Science.gov

Sample records for artificial hip joint

  1. Biotribology of artificial hip joints

    PubMed Central

    Di Puccio, Francesca; Mattei, Lorenza

    2015-01-01

    Hip arthroplasty can be considered one of the major successes of orthopedic surgery, with more than 350000 replacements performed every year in the United States with a constantly increasing rate. The main limitations to the lifespan of these devices are due to tribological aspects, in particular the wear of mating surfaces, which implies a loss of matter and modification of surface geometry. However, wear is a complex phenomenon, also involving lubrication and friction. The present paper deals with the tribological performance of hip implants and is organized in to three main sections. Firstly, the basic elements of tribology are presented, from contact mechanics of ball-in-socket joints to ultra high molecular weight polyethylene wear laws. Some fundamental equations are also reported, with the aim of providing the reader with some simple tools for tribological investigations. In the second section, the focus moves to artificial hip joints, defining materials and geometrical properties and discussing their friction, lubrication and wear characteristics. In particular, the features of different couplings, from metal-on-plastic to metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic, are discussed as well as the role of the head radius and clearance. How friction, lubrication and wear are interconnected and most of all how they are specific for each loading and kinematic condition is highlighted. Thus, the significant differences in patients and their lifestyles account for the high dispersion of clinical data. Furthermore, such consideration has raised a new discussion on the most suitable in vitro tests for hip implants as simplified gait cycles can be too far from effective implant working conditions. In the third section, the trends of hip implants in the years from 2003 to 2012 provided by the National Joint Registry of England, Wales and Northern Ireland are summarized and commented on in a discussion. PMID:25621213

  2. Considerations upon applying tripodic coupling in artificial hip joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaci, S.; Ciornei, M. C.; Filote, C.; Ciornei, F. C.; Gradinariu, M. C.

    2016-08-01

    The employment of tripodic joint allows creation of homokinetical transmissions and thus it is expected that at the use of such a transmission for a dynamical system with smooth enough inputs, the outputs should maintain the same characteristics. The present paper presents a comparison between the effect of using a spherical joint in spatial mechanisms - the classical solution for hip joint implant, and the effect of replacing such prosthesis with a tripodic coupling.

  3. Christiansen's artificial hip joints--what went wrong?

    PubMed

    Sudmann, Einar; Ramstad, Knut Rasmus; Engesæter, Lars Birger

    2013-12-10

    Modern arthroplasty is undoubtedly the greatest contribution that orthopaedic surgery has ever made to medical science. The honour for the good results achieved with total hip replacement surgery goes chiefly to the Briton John Charnley (1911-1982). However, the Norwegian Tor Aas Christiansen (1917-1981) has also earned a place in this history. He wanted to improve the operative treatment of dislocated, medial fractures of the femoral neck, and in the 1960s he constructed a hemiprosthesis. Later, he also made a total prosthesis for the hip joint. Over time, the prostheses proved to be less than successful. Nevertheless, approximately 6,500 Christiansen prostheses were fitted in Norway before a prospective Charnley vs. Christiansen study at the Coastal Hospital in Hagavik finally put an end to his prostheses in 1983. Indirectly, the study led to the establishment of a national register of hip prostheses, now the National Arthroplasty Register, at Haukeland University Hospital. Based on our personal cooperation with Christiansen, as well as original drawings and correspondence from the Polaris factory in Sandnes, we will tell the story of Christiansen's hemi- and total prostheses. These are a key element in the history of hip arthroplasty in Norway.

  4. [Therapeutic effect of artificial total hip arthroplasty on flexion regidity of hip joint in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Song, Liming; Yu, Jianhua; Zhang, Tieliang

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the operative methods, clinical outcomes and complications of total hip arthroplasty (THA) in the treatment of patient with hip joint flexion rigidity due to ankylosing spondylitis (AS). From May 1992 to July 2004, 56 patients (32 left hips and 39 right hips) with AS received THA through a modified anterolateral approach, including 52 males (67 hips) and 4 females (4 hips) aged 17-48 years with an average of 35.5 years. All the hips were ankylosed in (43.1 +/- 7.2) degrees of flexion and 15 patients had bilaterally ankylosed hips. Preoperatively, Harris hip score was (42.6 +/- 5.3) points and all the hips were classified as stage IV according to the standard of American College of Rheumatology (ACR). And the course of disease was 3-11 years. Intraoperatively, 1 patient suffering from proximal femur fracture due to severe osteoporosis was treated with titanium wire fixation, and the fracture was healed 6 weeks later. All the patients were followed up for 3-15 years (average 5.3 years). Postoperatively, 1 patient (1 hip) got subcutaneous soft tissue infection at 8 days, 1 patient (1 hip) got wound disunion at 11 days, 2 patients (2 hips) got infection at 11 months and 3 years, respectively. All the infections were healed after symptomatic treatment. The wounds of the rest 52 patients were healed by first intention without joint infections. The postoperative X-rays demonstrated that 4 hips (5.6%) had loose acetabulum prosthesis, 3 hips (4.2%) had loose femoral prosthesis and 5 hips had loose acetabulum and femoral prosthesis (7.0%), and the total loosening rate was 16.8%. Among which, 8 hips received revision resulting in satisfactory therapeutic effects, and the rest 4 hips had no further treatment. Fifteen hips (21.1%) had heterotopic ossification, which was relieved after taking nonsteroidal anti-inflamatory drugs. Harris hip score at final follow-up was (82.7 +/- 4.1) points, indicating there was a significant difference between before and after

  5. The impact of surface and geometry on coefficient of friction of artificial hip joints.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Dipankar; Vrbka, Martin; Mamat, Azuddin Bin; Stavness, Ian; Roy, Chanchal K; Mootanah, Rajshree; Krupka, Ivan

    2017-08-01

    Coefficient of friction (COF) tests were conducted on 28-mm and 36-mm-diameter hip joint prostheses for four different material combinations, with or without the presence of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) particles using a novel pendulum hip simulator. The effects of three micro dimpled arrays on femoral head against a polyethylene and a metallic cup were also investigated. Clearance played a vital role in the COF of ceramic on polyethylene and ceramic on ceramic artificial hip joints. Micro dimpled metallic femoral heads yielded higher COF against a polyethylene cup; however, with metal on metal prostheses the dimpled arrays significantly reduced the COF. In situ images revealed evidence that the dimple arrays enhanced film formation, which was the main mechanism that contributed to reduced friction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Tribological measurements on a Charnley-type artificial hip joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A total hip simulator was used to determine the friction and wear properties of Charnley-type (316L stainless steel balls and sterile ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene cups) hip prostheses. Three different sets of specimens were tested to 395,000, 101,500 and 233,000 walking cycles, respectively. All tests were run unlubricated, at ambient conditions (22 to 26 C, 30 to 50 percent relative humidity), at 30 walking cycles per minute, under a dynamic load simulating walking. Polyethylene cup wear rates ranged from 1.4 to 39 ten billions cu m which corresponds to dimensional losses of 4.0 to 11 microns per year. Although these wear rates are lower than those obtained from other hip simulators and from in vivo X-ray measurements, they are comparable when taking run-in and plastic deformation into account. Maximum tangential friction forces ranged from 93 to 129 N under variable load (267 to 3090 N range) and from 93 to 143 N under a static load of 3090 N. A portion of one test 250,000 walking cycles) run under dry air ( 1 percent relative humidity) yielded a wear rate almost 6 times greater than that obtained under wet air ( 70 percent relative humidity) conditions.

  7. Analysis of fluid film lubrication in artificial hip joint replacements with surfaces of high elastic modulus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z M; Dowson, D; Fisher, J

    1997-01-01

    Lubrication mechanisms and contact mechanics have been analysed for total hip joint replacements made from hard bearing surfaces such as metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic. A similar analysis for ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) against a hard bearing surface has also been carried out and used as a reference. The most important factor influencing the predicted lubrication film thickness has been found to be the radial clearance between the ball and the socket. Full fluid film lubrication may be achieved in these hard/hard bearings provided that the surface finish of the bearing surface and the radial clearance are chosen correctly and maintained. Furthermore, there is a close relation between the predicted contact half width and the predicted lubrication film thickness. Therefore, it is important to analyse the contact mechanics in artificial hip joint replacements. Practical considerations of manufacturing these bearing surfaces have also been discussed.

  8. Alumina-alumina artificial hip joints. Part II: characterisation of the wear debris from in vitro hip joint simulations.

    PubMed

    Tipper, J L; Hatton, A; Nevelos, J E; Ingham, E; Doyle, C; Streicher, R; Nevelos, A B; Fisher, J

    2002-08-01

    Until recently it was not possible to reproduce clinically relevant wear rates and wear patterns in in vitro hip joint simulators for alumina ceramic-on-ceramic hip prostheses. The introduction of microseparation of the prosthesis components into in vitro wear simulations produced clinically relevant wear rates and wear patterns for the first time. The aim of this study was to characterise the wear particles generated from standard simulator testing and microseparation simulator testing of hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) and non-HIPed alumina ceramic-on-ceramic hip prostheses, and compare these particles to those generated in vivo. Standard simulation conditions produced wear rates of approximately 0.1 mm3 per million cycles for both material types. No change in surface roughness was detected and very few wear features were observed. In contrast, when microseparation was introduced into the wear simulation, wear rates of between 1.24 (HIPed) and 1.74 mm3 per million cycles (non-HIPed) were produced. Surface roughness increased and a wear stripe often observed clinically on retrieved femoral heads was also reproduced. Under standard simulation conditions only nanometre-sized wear particles (2-27.5 nm) were observed by TEM, and it was thought likely that these particles resulted from relief polishing of the alumina ceramic. However, when microseparation of the prosthesis components was introduced into the simulation, a bi-modal distribution of particle sizes was observed. The nanometre-sized particles produced by relief polishing were present (1-35nm). however, larger micrometre-sized particles were also observed by both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) (0.021 microm) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) (0.05-->10 microm). These larger particles were thought to originate from the wear stripe and were produced by trans-granular fracture of the alumina ceramic. In Part I of this study, alumina ceramic wear particles were isolated from the periprosthetic

  9. Wear Debris Characterization and Corresponding Biological Response: Artificial Hip and Knee Joints

    PubMed Central

    Nine, Md J.; Choudhury, Dipankar; Hee, Ay Ching; Mootanah, Rajshree; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2014-01-01

    Wear debris, of deferent sizes, shapes and quantities, generated in artificial hip and knees is largely confined to the bone and joint interface. This debris interacts with periprosthetic tissue and may cause aseptic loosening. The purpose of this review is to summarize and collate findings of the recent demonstrations on debris characterization and their biological response that influences the occurrence in implant migration. A systematic review of peer-reviewed literature is performed, based on inclusion and exclusion criteria addressing mainly debris isolation, characterization, and biologic responses. Results show that debris characterization largely depends on their appropriate and accurate isolation protocol. The particles are found to be non-uniform in size and non-homogeneously distributed into the periprosthetic tissues. In addition, the sizes, shapes, and volumes of the particles are influenced by the types of joints, bearing geometry, material combination, and lubricant. Phagocytosis of wear debris is size dependent; high doses of submicron-sized particles induce significant level of secretion of bone resorbing factors. However, articles on wear debris from engineered surfaces (patterned and coated) are lacking. The findings suggest considering debris morphology as an important parameter to evaluate joint simulator and newly developed implant materials. PMID:28788496

  10. Hip joint injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007633.htm Hip joint injection To use the sharing features on this ... injection is a shot of medicine into the hip joint. The medicine helps relieve pain and inflammation. It ...

  11. Grafting of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) on polyethylene liner in artificial hip joints reduces production of wear particles.

    PubMed

    Moro, Toru; Kyomoto, Masayuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Saiga, Kenichi; Hashimoto, Masami; Tanaka, Sakae; Ito, Hideya; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Oshima, Hirofumi; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Takatori, Yoshio

    2014-03-01

    Despite improvements in the techniques, materials, and fixation of total hip arthroplasty, periprosthetic osteolysis, a complication that arises from this clinical procedure and causes aseptic loosening, is considered to be a major clinical problem associated with total hip arthroplasty. With the objective of reducing the production of wear particles and eliminating periprosthetic osteolysis, we prepared a novel hip polyethylene (PE) liner whose surface graft was made of a biocompatible phospholipid polymer-poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)). This study investigated the wear resistance of the poly(MPC)-grafted cross-linked PE (CLPE; MPC-CLPE) liner during 15×10(6) cycles of loading in a hip joint simulator. The gravimetric analysis showed that the wear of the acetabular liner was dramatically suppressed in the MPC-CLPE liner, as compared to that in the non-treated CLPE liner. Analyses of the MPC-CLPE liner surface revealed that it suffered from no or very little wear even after the simulator test, whereas the CLPE liners suffered from substantial wears. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis of the wear particles isolated from the lubricants showed that poly(MPC) grafting dramatically decreased the total number, area, and volume of the wear particles. However, there was no significant difference in the particle size distributions, and, in particular, from the SEM image, it was observed that particles with diameters less than 0.50μm were present in the range of the highest frequency. In addition, there were no significant differences in the particle size descriptors and particle shape descriptors. The results obtained in this study show that poly(MPC) grafting markedly reduces the production of wear particles from CLPE liners, without affecting the size of the particles. These results suggest that poly(MPC) grafting is a promising technique for increasing the longevity of artificial hip joints.

  12. Coupling of dynamics and contact mechanics of artificial hip joints in a pendulum model.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Ellison, P J; Xu, H; Jin, Z

    2010-01-01

    To date, fully coupled dynamics and contact mechanics analysis is still limited by expensive computational cost and long computing time and has not been addressed comprehensively, particularly in the hip joint. To understand the influence of different parameters on the biomechanics of the total hip replacement (THR) and improve its design, two numerical approaches were developed and implemented in finite element models to investigate the coupling between the dynamics response and the contact mechanics for three different THR configurations, metal-on-polyethylene (MOP), metal-on-metal (MOM), and ceramic-on-ceramic (COC). The dynamic force and the contact pressure distribution at the bearing surfaces from the two methods were predicted and compared. The influences of various parameters (motion angle, load applied in the pendulum, friction coefficient, geometry, and material properties) were subsequently investigated. From the comparisons, the decoupled method, based on the rigid-body dynamics and the quasi-static elastic contact mechanics, was adequate to predict the performance of the THRs efficiently. The load had the greatest influence on the dynamics/contact mechanics among other factors.

  13. Generation of physiological parameter sets for hip joint motions and loads during daily life activities for application in wear simulators of the artificial hip joint.

    PubMed

    Fabry, Christian; Herrmann, Sven; Kaehler, Michael; Klinkenberg, Ernst-Dieter; Woernle, Christoph; Bader, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    At present, wear investigations of total hip replacements are performed in accordance with the ISO standard 14242, which is based on simplified kinematic and force data of the gait cycle. The aim of this analytical study was to generate parameter sets of daily life activities in order to replicate more realistic joint load situations in wear testing. Hence, published in vivo motion and force data of daily life activities were evaluated and adjusted using analytical techniques. The created kinematically and dynamically consistent parameter sets comprised time trajectories of three Cardan angles to describe the motion of the femur with respect to the pelvis and time trajectories of three force components, representing the hip joint contact force. The parameter sets include the activities of walking, knee bending, stair climbing and a combined load case of sitting down and standing up. Additionally, a motion sequence following the frequency of daily life activities was presented. Differences of the evaluated angular motions and joint contact forces in comparison to the ISO standard 14242-1 were pointed out. The results of this study offer the possibility to extend the kinematics and dynamics of the ISO standard test protocol and to support the loading conditions of hip wear simulators with a comprehensive set of motions and loads close to reality. Copyright © 2012 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Tribological behavior of artificial hip joint under the effects of magnetic field in dry and lubricated sliding.

    PubMed

    Zaki, M; Aljinaidi, A; Hamed, M

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, there is an increasing utilization and demand to use magnetic fields in bioengineering applications due to its beneficial effects. Although in the last decade more attention has been given by tribologists to the electromagnetic processes taking place between sliding surfaces, which influence the tribological behaviors, but no attention has been concern with the sliding surfaces of the artificial implant joints. Therefore, the present work aims to elucidate the tribological behavior of an artificial joint implant under the effect of magnetic fields. Experimental investigation was carried out on a specially designed and constructed hip simulator on which the variations in the coefficients of friction and wear rates of the sliding surfaces were evaluated under the influence of a medium strength magnetic field suitable to apply in the human body. A realistic Ti-alloy implanted stem was used with an inserted head made from surgical grade stainless steel. This head was allowed to rub against UHMWPE sockets. The utilized type of prosthesis was "The JRI Modular Muller Standard-Total Hip Design". The performed experimental tests were conducted under both dry and lubricated sliding conditions using physiological saline solution. The designed simulator allows the coefficients of friction and the wear rates to be evaluated under realistic physiological loading and motion cycles encountered during normal walking of the human body. Comparative results are presented between the artificial joint performance in the presence and absence of the applied magnetic field. The experimental results have indicated that the presence of a medium strength magnetic field of 270 Gauss strength between rubbing surfaces resulted in high beneficial reductions in friction and wear rate of UHMWPE sliding on stainless steel either under dry or saline lubricating conditions. Therefore recommendation was forward to subject artificial implants made of stainless steel/UHMWPE combination

  15. Wear rate evaluation of a novel polycarbonate-urethane cushion form bearing for artificial hip joints.

    PubMed

    Elsner, Jonathan J; Mezape, Yoav; Hakshur, Keren; Shemesh, Maoz; Linder-Ganz, Eran; Shterling, Avi; Eliaz, Noam

    2010-12-01

    There is growing interest in the use of compliant materials as an alternative to hard bearing materials such as polyethylene, metal and ceramics in artificial joints. Cushion form bearings based on polycarbonate-urethane (PCU) mimic the natural synovial joint more closely by promoting fluid-film lubrication. In the current study, we used a physiological simulator to evaluate the wear characteristics of a compliant PCU acetabular buffer, coupled against a cobalt-chrome femoral head. The wear rate was evaluated over 8 million cycles gravimetrically, as well as by wear particle isolation using filtration and bio-ferrography (BF). The gravimetric and BF methods showed a wear rate of 9.9-12.5mg per million cycles, whereas filtration resulted in a lower wear rate of 5.8mg per million cycles. Bio-ferrography was proven to be an effective method for the determination of wear characteristics of the PCU acetabular buffer. Specifically, it was found to be more sensitive towards the detection of wear particles compared to the conventional filtration method, and less prone to environmental fluctuations than the gravimetric method. PCU demonstrated a low particle generation rate (1-5×10⁶ particles per million cycles), with the majority (96.6%) of wear particle mass lying above the biologically active range, 0.2-10μm. Thus, PCU offers a substantial advantage over traditional bearing materials, not only in its low wear rate, but also in its osteolytic potential.

  16. Life Estimation of Hip Joint Prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, C.; Hirani, H.; Chawla, A.

    2014-11-01

    Hip joint is one of the largest weight-bearing structures in the human body. In the event of a failure of the natural hip joint, it is replaced with an artificial hip joint, known as hip joint prosthesis. The design of hip joint prosthesis must be such so as to resist fatigue failure of hip joint stem as well as bone cement, and minimize wear caused by sliding present between its head and socket. In the present paper an attempt is made to consider both fatigue and wear effects simultaneously in estimating functional-life of the hip joint prosthesis. The finite element modeling of hip joint prosthesis using HyperMesh™ (version 9) has been reported. The static analysis (load due to the dead weight of the body) and dynamic analysis (load due to walking cycle) have been described. Fatigue life is estimated by using the S-N curve of individual materials. To account for progressive wear of hip joint prosthesis, Archard's wear law, modifications in socket geometry and dynamic analysis have been used in a sequential manner. Using such sequential programming reduction in peak stress has been observed with increase in wear. Finally life is estimated on the basis of socket wear.

  17. In vitro assessment of Function Graded (FG) artificial Hip joint stem in terms of bone/cement stresses: 3D Finite Element (FE) study.

    PubMed

    Al-Jassir, Fawzi F; Fouad, H; Alothman, Othaman Y

    2013-01-16

    Stress shielding in the cemented hip prosthesis occurs due to the mismatching in the mechanical properties of metallic stem and bone. This mismatching in properties is considered as one of the main reasons for implant loosening. Therefore, a new stem material in orthopedic surgery is still required. In the present study, 3D finite element modeling is used for evaluating the artificial hip joint stem that is made of Function Graded (FG) material in terms of joint stress distributions and stem length. 3D finite element models of different stems made of two types of FG materials and traditional stems made of Cobalt Chromium alloy (CoCrMo) and Titanium alloy (Ti) were developed using the ANSYS Code. The effects on the total artificial hip joint stresses (Shear stress and Von Mises stresses at bone cement, Von Mises stresses at bone and stem) due to using the proposed FG materials stems were investigated. The effects on the total artificial hip joint system stresses due to using different stem lengths were investigated. Using FG stem (with low stiffness at stem distal end and high stiffness at its proximal end) resulted in a significant reduction in shear stress at the bone cement/stem interface. Also, the Von Mises stresses at the bone cement and stem decrease significantly when using FG material instead of CoCrMo and Ti alloy. The stresses' distribution along the bone cement length when using FG material was found to be more uniform along the whole bone cement compared with other stem materials. These more uniform stresses will help in the reduction of the artificial hip joint loosening rate and improve its short and long term performance. FE results showed that using FG stem increases the resultant stresses at the femur bone (reduces stress shielding) compared to metallic stem. The results showed that the stem length has significant effects on the resultant shear and Von Mises stresses at bone, stem and bone cement for all types of stem materials.

  18. Wear resistance of artificial hip joints with poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) grafted polyethylene: comparisons with the effect of polyethylene cross-linking and ceramic femoral heads.

    PubMed

    Moro, Toru; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Kyomoto, Masayuki; Karita, Tatsuro; Ito, Hideya; Nakamura, Kozo; Takatori, Yoshio

    2009-06-01

    Aseptic loosening of artificial hip joints induced by wear particles from the polyethylene (PE) liner remains the ruinous problem limiting their longevity. We reported here that grafting with a polymer, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)) (PMPC), on the PE liner surface dramatically decreased the wear production under a hip joint simulator condition. We examined that the effect of properties of both PE by cross-linking and femoral head by changing the materials on wearing properties of PE. The PMPC grafting on the liners increased hydrophilicity and decreased friction torque, regardless of the cross-linking of the PE liner or the difference in the femoral head materials. During the hip joint simulator experiments (5 x 10(6) cycles of loading), cross-linking caused a decrease of wear amount and a reduction of the particle size, while the femoral head materials did not affect it. The PMPC grafting abrogated the wear production, confirmed by almost no wear of the liner surface, independently of the liner cross-linking or the femoral head material. We concluded that the PMPC grafting on the PE liner surpasses the liner cross-linking or the change of femoral head materials for extending longevity of artificial hip joints.

  19. In vitro assessment of Function Graded (FG) artificial Hip joint stem in terms of bone/cement stresses: 3D Finite Element (FE) study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stress shielding in the cemented hip prosthesis occurs due to the mismatching in the mechanical properties of metallic stem and bone. This mismatching in properties is considered as one of the main reasons for implant loosening. Therefore, a new stem material in orthopedic surgery is still required. In the present study, 3D finite element modeling is used for evaluating the artificial hip joint stem that is made of Function Graded (FG) material in terms of joint stress distributions and stem length. Method 3D finite element models of different stems made of two types of FG materials and traditional stems made of Cobalt Chromium alloy (CoCrMo) and Titanium alloy (Ti) were developed using the ANSYS Code. The effects on the total artificial hip joint stresses (Shear stress and Von Mises stresses at bone cement, Von Mises stresses at bone and stem) due to using the proposed FG materials stems were investigated. The effects on the total artificial hip joint system stresses due to using different stem lengths were investigated. Results Using FG stem (with low stiffness at stem distal end and high stiffness at its proximal end) resulted in a significant reduction in shear stress at the bone cement/stem interface. Also, the Von Mises stresses at the bone cement and stem decrease significantly when using FG material instead of CoCrMo and Ti alloy. The stresses’ distribution along the bone cement length when using FG material was found to be more uniform along the whole bone cement compared with other stem materials. These more uniform stresses will help in the reduction of the artificial hip joint loosening rate and improve its short and long term performance. Conclusion FE results showed that using FG stem increases the resultant stresses at the femur bone (reduces stress shielding) compared to metallic stem. The results showed that the stem length has significant effects on the resultant shear and Von Mises stresses at bone, stem and bone cement for all types

  20. Comparative study of the wear of UHMWPE with zirconia ceramic and stainless steel femoral heads in artificial hip joints.

    PubMed

    Derbyshire, B; Fisher, J; Dowson, D; Hardaker, C; Brummitt, K

    1994-05-01

    The wear of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) when sliding against zirconia ceramic and stainless steel counterfaces has been compared in a pin-on-plate reciprocator and in a hip joint simulator. A lower wear factor was found for the UHMWPE when sliding on the zirconia ceramic counterfaces in the pin-on-plate tests. In the hip joint simulator test, the acetabular cups articulating on zirconia heads showed consistently lower volume changes than the cups articulating on stainless steel heads. The higher volume changes found with the stainless steel heads were associated with an increased roughness of the femoral heads during the tests. This roughening was caused by the adherence of a rough polymer transfer film.

  1. Hip joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... A socket, which is usually made of strong metal. A liner, which fits inside the socket. It ... are now trying other materials, like ceramic or metal. The liner allows the hip to move smoothly. ...

  2. Biological response to wear debris generated in carbon based composites as potential bearing surfaces for artificial hip joints.

    PubMed

    Howling, G I; Sakoda, H; Antonarulrajah, A; Marrs, H; Stewart, T D; Appleyard, S; Rand, B; Fisher, J; Ingham, E

    2003-11-15

    UHMWPE wear particles have been implicated in osteolysis, implant loosening, and long-term failure of total hip arthroplasties in vivo. This study examined four carbon-based composite materials as alternatives for UHMWPE in joint bearings. These materials were HMU-CVD, SMS-CVD, P25-CVD, and CFR-PEEK. New bearing materials should satisfy certain criteria: they should have good wear properties that at least match UHMWPE, and produce wear particles with low levels of biological activity. Of the four materials tested in multidirectional pin-on-plate tribological tests, SMS-CVD, P25-CVD, and CFR-PEEK showed lower volumetric wear factors than UHMWPE. P25-CVD had the lowest wear factor of 0.54 +/- 0.34 x 10(-7) mm(3)/Nm. Analysis of P25-CVD wear particles by transmission electron microscopy showed that the debris was very small, with the vast majority of particles being under 100 nm in size, which was similar in size to metal wear particles. The P25-CVD particles were isolated and cultured with L929 fibroblasts and U937 monocytic cells to assess their effect on cell viability. P25-CVD particles were significantly less cytotoxic (p < 0.01, ANOVA) to both cell types than CoCr metal wear particles. This work suggests that carbon-carbon composite materials may have potential for use in total hip replacement bearings. Of the materials tested P25-CVD had the lowest wear factor, and produced very small wear debris that had minimal cytotoxic effect on L929 and U937 cells in vitro. Therefore carbon-carbon composites, such as P25-CVD, may be important in the development of next-generation implants with lower wear rates and reduced cytotoxic potential. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Fabrication of dense α-alumina layer on Ti-6Al-4V alloy hybrid for bearing surfaces of artificial hip joint.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Rohit; Kokubo, Tadashi; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Takadama, Hiroaki

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in hip replacements are focused towards producing reliable bearing surfaces to enhance their longevity. In this perspective, progressive attempts have been made to improve the wear resistance of polyethylene to eliminate osteolysis and mechanical reliability of brittle alumina ceramics, but in vain. It is proposed that both high wear resistance and mechanical reliability can be retained if a thin layer of dense alumina is formed onto high toughness Ti-6Al-4V alloy. For this purpose, we devised a unique methodology in which a layer of Al metal was deposited onto the Ti alloy substrate by cold spraying (CS), followed by a heat treatment to form Al3Ti reaction layer at their interface to improve adhesion and subsequent micro-arc oxidation (MAO) treatment to transform Al to alumina layer. An optimal MAO treatment of cold sprayed Al formed an adherent and dense α-alumina layer with high Vickers hardness matching with that of sintered alumina used as a femoral head. Structure-phase-property relationships in dense α-alumina layer have been revealed and discussed in the light of our research findings. The designed alumina/Ti alloy hybrid might be a potential candidate for reliable bearing surfaces of artificial hip joint.

  4. [Arthroscopy of the hip joint].

    PubMed

    Pasa, L; Hart, R; Kocis, J; Muzík, V; Veselý, R

    2005-01-01

    Arthroscopic examination of joints has recently gained wide application. Due to hip joint shape and a difficult approach to it, hip arthroscopy has long remained outside the attention and abilities of arthroscopists. The authors present their first experience with operative hip arthroscopy that offers new options for the treatment of intra-articular pathology of the hip joint. In the years 2001-2003, 24 hip arthroscopies were performed. The following pathological conditions were diagnosed and treated: loose bodies, chondral lesions of the femoral head and acetabulum, ruptures of the labrum acetabuli and ligamentum teres, impingement syndrome of the labrum acetabuli, and coxitis. No post-operative neurologic symptoms or vascular complications were observed. All procedures were carried out on patients in a supine position, with the treated joint in traction. A standard 30 degrees device and common instruments for arthroscopic surgery were used. The instruments were inserted in the articular fissure with the use of an X-ray intensifier. Movement in the hip joint during surgery is very limited due to traction, joint shape and the length of working canals. After traction is released, it is possible to examine also the intra-articular part of the femoral neck. The pre-operative complaints (clunking, painful joint) were relieved up to 4 to 6 weeks after surgery in 23 patients. In one patient primarily diagnosed with coxitis, infection was not eradicated after lavage and debridement and, because inflammation deeply affected the femoral head, the hip was eventually treated by Girdlestone arthroplasty. The results were evaluated clinically and on the basis of the Merle d'Aubigne and Postel questionnaire assessing pain and walking abilities by both the patients and the surgeon. All 24 patients reported poor or average conditions before surgery and, after surgery, 23 experienced improvement to a very good or average condition. One patient's state failed to improve and was

  5. Confocal Raman spectroscopic analysis of cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene for application in artificial hip joints.

    PubMed

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Kumakura, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Kiyotaka; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Puppulin, Leonardo; Zhu, Wenliang; Yamamoto, Kengo

    2007-01-01

    Confocal spectroscopic techniques are applied to selected Raman bands to study the microscopic features of acetabular cups made of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) before and after implantation in vivo. The micrometric lateral resolution of a laser beam focused on the polymeric surface (or subsurface) enables a highly resolved visualization of 2-D conformational population patterns, including crystalline, amorphous, orthorhombic phase fractions, and oxidation index. An optimized confocal probe configuration, aided by a computational deconvolution of the optical probe, allows minimization of the probe size along the in-depth direction and a nondestructive evaluation of microstructural properties along the material subsurface. Computational deconvolution is also attempted, based on an experimental assessment of the probe response function of the polyethylene Raman spectrum, according to a defocusing technique. A statistical set of high-resolution microstructural data are collected on a fully 3-D level on gamma-ray irradiated UHMWPE acetabular cups both as-received from the maker and after retrieval from a human body. Microstructural properties reveal significant gradients along the immediate material subsurface and distinct differences are found due to the loading history in vivo, which cannot be revealed by conventional optical spectroscopy. The applicability of the confocal spectroscopic technique is valid beyond the particular retrieval cases examined in this study, and can be easily extended to evaluate in-vitro tested components or to quality control of new polyethylene brands. Confocal Raman spectroscopy may also contribute to rationalize the complex effects of gamma-ray irradiation on the surface of medical grade UHMWPE for total joint replacement and, ultimately, to predict their actual lifetime in vivo.

  6. Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... replacement is an operation in which a damaged hip joint is removed and replaced with an artificial joint. ... are many medical conditions that can damage the hip joint. (Watch the video to learn about what goes ...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  11. [Bilateral Asymmetric Traumatic Dislocation of Hip Joints].

    PubMed

    Paša, L; Veselý, R; Kelbl, M

    2017-01-01

    The authors present a rare case of bilateral asymmetric traumatic dislocation of hip joints, where the left joint was treated conservatively after the reduction, while the right joint, with an acetabular fragment interposition, was treated surgically - by arthroscopically assisted reduction and fixation of an osteochondral fragment of posterior wall of the acetabulum. The female patient healed with no complications, showing an excellent clinical outcome with no signs of instability or limited mobility of hip joints, and also with no signs of para-articular calcification or necrosis of the hip at 1 year after the injury and treatment. Bilateral asymmetric dislocation of hip joint is a rare injury with the total incidence of 150 cases as reported by the literature. Recently, its incidence is higher due to the increased traffic and the associated accident rate. A precise and prompt reduction of the injured hip joint is always necessary, if possible under general anesthesia. Also, it is always necessary to carry out a complete examination of the patient since this type of injury is always caused by a strong force and is often accompanied by injuries of other parts of the body. Key words: bilateral asymmetric dislocation of hip joints, hip arthroscopy, acetabular fracture.

  12. Hip joint replacement - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip socket. The socket is usually made of metal. A liner that fits inside the socket. It ... usually plastic, but some surgeons use ceramic and metal. The liner allows the hip to move smoothly. ...

  13. Status of surface modification techniques for artificial hip implants

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Subir; Abanteriba, Sylvester

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Surface modification techniques have been developed significantly in the last couple of decades for enhanced tribological performance of artificial hip implants. Surface modification techniques improve biological, chemical and mechanical properties of implant surfaces. Some of the most effective techniques, namely surface texturing, surface coating, and surface grafting, are applied to reduce the friction and wear of artificial implants. This article reviews the status of the developments of surface modification techniques and their effects on commonly used artificial joint implants. This study focused only on artificial hip joint prostheses research of the last 10 years. A total of 27 articles were critically reviewed and categorized according to surface modification technique. The literature reveals that modified surfaces exhibit reduced friction and enhanced wear resistance of the contact surfaces. However, the wear rates are still noticeable in case of surface texturing and surface coating. The associated vortex flow aids to release entrapped wear debris and thus increase the wear particles generation in case of textured surfaces. The earlier delamination of coating materials due to poor adhesion and graphitization transformation has limited the use of coating techniques. Moreover, the produced wear debris has adverse effects on biological fluid. Conversely, the surface grafting technique provides phospholipid like layer that exhibited lower friction and almost zero wear rates even after a longer period of friction and wear test. The findings suggest that further investigations are required to identify the role of surface grafting on film formation and heat resistance ability under physiological hip joint conditions for improved performance and longevity of hip implants. PMID:28228866

  14. Status of surface modification techniques for artificial hip implants.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subir; Abanteriba, Sylvester

    2016-01-01

    Surface modification techniques have been developed significantly in the last couple of decades for enhanced tribological performance of artificial hip implants. Surface modification techniques improve biological, chemical and mechanical properties of implant surfaces. Some of the most effective techniques, namely surface texturing, surface coating, and surface grafting, are applied to reduce the friction and wear of artificial implants. This article reviews the status of the developments of surface modification techniques and their effects on commonly used artificial joint implants. This study focused only on artificial hip joint prostheses research of the last 10 years. A total of 27 articles were critically reviewed and categorized according to surface modification technique. The literature reveals that modified surfaces exhibit reduced friction and enhanced wear resistance of the contact surfaces. However, the wear rates are still noticeable in case of surface texturing and surface coating. The associated vortex flow aids to release entrapped wear debris and thus increase the wear particles generation in case of textured surfaces. The earlier delamination of coating materials due to poor adhesion and graphitization transformation has limited the use of coating techniques. Moreover, the produced wear debris has adverse effects on biological fluid. Conversely, the surface grafting technique provides phospholipid like layer that exhibited lower friction and almost zero wear rates even after a longer period of friction and wear test. The findings suggest that further investigations are required to identify the role of surface grafting on film formation and heat resistance ability under physiological hip joint conditions for improved performance and longevity of hip implants.

  15. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a portion of the hip...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  1. Dynamic hip joint stiffness in individuals with total hip arthroplasty: relationships between hip impairments and dynamics of the other joints.

    PubMed

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Tsukagoshi, Rui; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Oda, Shingo; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2011-07-01

    Little is known about hip joint stiffness during walking (dynamic joint stiffness) and the effect of hip impairments on biomechanical alterations of other joints in patients with total hip arthroplasty. Twenty-four patients (mean age 61.7 years) who underwent unilateral (n=12) or bilateral total hip arthroplasty (n=12) and healthy subjects (n=12) were recruited. In addition to kinematic and kinetic variables, dynamic hip joint stiffness which was calculated as an angular coefficient of linear regression of the plot of the hip flexion moment vs. hip extension angle during the late stance of gait, was measured. Group differences were compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test, and relationships between primary hip impairments and secondary gait impairments were found using partial correlation coefficients adjusted for gait speed and stride length. Dynamic hip joint stiffness was 47% higher on the side with the more pronounced limp in patients with bilateral arthroplasty than in healthy controls. In the same patients, increased dynamic hip joint stiffness was significantly associated especially with increased ankle plantarflexion moment on the ipsilateral side. In patients with unilateral arthroplasty, decreased hip power was significantly related to increased ankle plantarflexor power, only on the non-operated side. We found that dynamic hip joint stiffness was an important factor in assessing relationships between hip impairments and dynamics in other joints, especially in patients with bilateral total hip arthroplasty. The effects of altering hip joint stiffness on gait biomechanics need to be explored. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [The hip joint in neuromuscular disorders].

    PubMed

    Strobl, W M

    2009-07-01

    Physiologic motor and biomechanical parameters are prerequisites for normal hip development and hip function. Disorders of muscle activity and lack of weight bearing due to neuromuscular diseases may cause clinical symptoms such as an unstable hip or reduced range of motion. Disability and handicap because of pain, hip dislocation, osteoarthritis, gait disorders, or problems in seating and positioning are dependent on the severity of the disease, the time of occurrence, and the means of prevention and treatment. Preservation of pain-free and stable hip joints should be gained by balancing muscular forces and by preventing progressive dislocation. Most important is the exact indication of therapeutic options such as movement and standing therapy as well as drugs and surgery.

  3. Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis

    ScienceCinema

    Koval, Carl; Lee, Kenny; Houle, Frances; Lewis, Nate

    2016-07-12

    The Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) is the nation's largest research program dedicated to the development of an artificial solar-fuel generation technology. Established in 2010 as a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Innovation Hub, JCAP aims to find a cost-effective method to produce fuels using only sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide as inputs. JCAP brings together more than 140 top scientists and researchers from the California Institute of Technology and its lead partner, Berkeley Lab, along with collaborators from the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, and the University of California campuses at Irvine and San Diego.

  4. Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Koval, Carl; Lee, Kenny; Houle, Frances; Lewis, Nate

    2013-12-10

    The Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) is the nation's largest research program dedicated to the development of an artificial solar-fuel generation technology. Established in 2010 as a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Innovation Hub, JCAP aims to find a cost-effective method to produce fuels using only sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide as inputs. JCAP brings together more than 140 top scientists and researchers from the California Institute of Technology and its lead partner, Berkeley Lab, along with collaborators from the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, and the University of California campuses at Irvine and San Diego.

  5. Hip replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery to replace all or part of your hip joint with an artificial joint called a prosthesis. This ... You're in the Hospital You had a hip joint replacement surgery to replace all or part of ...

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of hip joint cartilage and labrum

    PubMed Central

    Zilkens, Christoph; Miese, Falk; Jäger, Marcus; Bittersohl, Bernd; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2011-01-01

    Hip joint instability and impingement are the most common biomechanical risk factors that put the hip joint at risk to develop premature osteoarthritis. Several surgical procedures like periacetabular osteotomy for hip dysplasia or hip arthroscopy or safe surgical hip dislocation for femoroacetabular impingement aim at restoring the hip anatomy. However, the success of joint preserving surgical procedures is limited by the amount of pre-existing cartilage damage. Biochemically sensitive MRI techniques like delayed Gadolinium Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) might help to monitor the effect of surgical or non-surgical procedures in the effort to halt or even reverse joint damage. PMID:22053256

  7. [An endoapparatus for restoration of hip joint].

    PubMed

    Lapinskaia, V S; Gatiatulin, R R; Trubnikov, V I; Velichko, M V; Froliakin, T V; Kovalenko, A E; Froliakina, L A

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of prolonging the anatomic and functional longevity of joints in young patients with coxarthrosis deformans under conditions of long-term unloading using a submersible distraction device is considered. A submersible endoapparatus for restoration of hip joint is described. Its functional capabilities as an unloading device were corroborated by experimental testing. Clinical examples illustrated with X-ray photographs demonstrate the possibility of long-term unloading of the injured joint and postponement of endoprosthesis replacement in young patients by 20-25 years. It is suggested to use the developed method for organ-sparing surgery in young working-age patients.

  8. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a two...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a two...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a...

  13. Capsulotomy Size Affects Hip Joint Kinematic Stability.

    PubMed

    Wuerz, Thomas H; Song, Sang H; Grzybowski, Jeffrey S; Martin, Hal D; Mather, Richard C; Salata, Michael J; Espinoza Orías, Alejandro A; Nho, Shane J

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of capsulotomy size and subsequent repair on the biomechanical stability of hip joint kinematics through external rotation of a cadaveric hip in neutral flexion. Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric hip specimens were used in this study. Each hip was tested under torsional loads of 6 N·m applied by a servohydraulic frame and transmitted by a pulley system. The test conditions were (1) neutral flexion with the capsule intact, (2) neutral flexion with a 4-cm interportal capsulotomy, (3) neutral flexion with a 6-cm capsulotomy, and (4) neutral flexion with capsulotomy repair. Soft tissue was retained during all interventions. Measures indicating joint kinematics (range of motion [ROM], hysteresis area [HA], and neutral zone [NZ]) were obtained for each condition. For all hip specimens, the average ROM, HA, and NZ were calculated relative to the intact capsular state (100%) and expressed in terms of percentage (± SD). The findings for ROM were as follows: intact, 100%; 4 cm, 107.42% ± 5.69%; 6 cm, 113.40% ± 7.92%; and repair, 99.78% ± 3.77%. The findings for HA were as follows: intact, 100%; 4 cm, 108.30% ± 9.30%; 6 cm, 115.30% ± 13.92%; and repair, 99.47% ± 4.12%. The findings for NZ were as follows: intact, 100%; 4 cm, 139.61% ± 62.35%; 6 cm, 169.25% ± 78.19%; and repair, 132.03% ± 64.38%. Statistically significant differences in ROM existed between the intact and 4-cm conditions (P = .039), the intact and 6-cm conditions (P < .0001), the 4-cm and repair conditions (P = .033), and the 6-cm and repair conditions (P < .0001). There was no statistically significant difference between the intact and repair conditions (P > .99) or between the 4- and 6-cm conditions (P = .126). Under laboratory-based conditions, larger-sized capsulotomies were accompanied by increases in all 3 measures of joint mobility: ROM, HA, and NZ at time zero. Complete capsular closure effectively restored these measures when compared with the intact condition

  14. Tribology of total artificial joints.

    PubMed

    Fisher, J; Dowson, D

    1991-01-01

    The tribology of total artificial replacement joints is reviewed. The majority of prosthesis currently implanted comprise a hard metallic component which articulates on ultra high molecular weight polyethylene surface. These relatively hard bearing surfaces operate with a mixed or boundary lubrication regime, which results in wear and wear debris from the ultra high molecular weight polyethylene surface. This debris can contribute to loosening and ultimate failure of the prostheses. The tribological performance of these joints has been considered and a number of factors which may contribute to increased wear rates have been identified. Cushion bearing surfaces consisting of low elastic modulus materials which can articulate with full fluid film lubrication are also described. These bearing surfaces have shown the potential for greatly reducing wear debris.

  15. Cystic lesion around the hip joint

    PubMed Central

    Yukata, Kiminori; Nakai, Sho; Goto, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Yuichi; Shimaoka, Yasunori; Yamanaka, Issei; Sairyo, Koichi; Hamawaki, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a narrative review of cystic lesions around the hip and primarily consists of 5 sections: Radiological examination, prevalence, pathogenesis, symptoms, and treatment. Cystic lesions around the hip are usually asymptomatic but may be observed incidentally on imaging examinations, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Some cysts may enlarge because of various pathological factors, such as trauma, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or total hip arthroplasty (THA), and may become symptomatic because of compression of surrounding structures, including the femoral, obturator, or sciatic nerves, external iliac or common femoral artery, femoral or external iliac vein, sigmoid colon, cecum, small bowel, ureters, and bladder. Treatment for symptomatic cystic lesions around the hip joint includes rest, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug administration, needle aspiration, and surgical excision. Furthermore, when these cysts are associated with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and THA, primary or revision THA surgery will be necessary concurrent with cyst excision. Knowledge of the characteristic clinical appearance of cystic masses around the hip will be useful for determining specific diagnoses and treatments. PMID:26495246

  16. Pathogenic organisms in hip joint infections

    PubMed Central

    Geipel, Udo

    2009-01-01

    Infections of the hip joint are usually of bacterial etiology. Only rarely, an infectious arthritis is caused in this localization by viruses or fungi. Native joint infections of the hip are less common than infections after implantation of prosthetic devices. Difficulties in prosthetic joint infections are, (I) a higher age of patients, and, thus an associated presence of other medical risk factors, (II) often long courses of treatment regimes depending on the bacterium and its antibiotic resistance, (III) an increased mortality, and (IV) a high economic burden for removal and reimplantation of an infected prosthetic device. The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for articular infections are well studied only for some bacteria, e.g. Staphylococcus aureus, while others are only partially understood. Important known bacterial properties and microbiological characteristics of infection are the bacterial adhesion on the native joint or prosthetic material, the bacterial biofilm formation, the development of small colony variants (SCV) as sessile bacterial types and the increasing resistance to antibiotics. PMID:19834588

  17. Management of Periprosthetic Hip Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Dong; Prashant, Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Total hip joint replacement offers dramatic improvement in the quality of life but periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is the most devastating complication of this procedure. The infection threatens the function of the joint, the preservation of the limb, and occasionally even the life of the patient due to long term hospitalization and high cost. For the surgeon it is a disastrous burden, which requires repeated, complicated procedures to eradicate infection and to provide a mobile joint without pain. Yet in the absence of a true gold standard, the diagnosis of PJI can be elusive. Synovial fluid aspiration, diagnostic imaging, traditional culture, peripheral serum inflammatory markers, and intraoperative frozen sections each have their limitations but continue to be the mainstay for diagnosis of PJI. Treatment options mainly include thorough irrigation and debridement with prosthesis retention, or a two-stage prosthesis exchange with intervening placement of an antibiotic-loaded spacer. Success in treating PJI depends on extensive surgical debridement and adequate and effective antibiotic therapy. Treatment in two stages using a spacer is recommended for most chronic PJI. Debridement, antibiotics and implant retention is the obvious choice for treatment of acute PJI, with good success rates in selected patients. This article presents an overview of recent management concepts for PJI of the hip emphasizing diagnosis and the clinical approach, and also share own experience at our institution. PMID:27536605

  18. Biofluid lubrication for artificial joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendleton, Alice Mae

    This research investigated biofluid lubrication related to artificial joints using tribological and rheological approaches. Biofluids studied here represent two categories of fluids, base fluids and nanostructured biofluids. Base fluids were studied through comparison of synthetic fluids (simulated body fluid and hyaluronic acid) as well as natural biofluids (from dogs, horses, and humans) in terms of viscosity and fluid shear stress. The nano-structured biofluids were formed using molecules having well-defined shapes. Understanding nano-structured biofluids leads to new ways of design and synthesis of biofluids that are beneficial for artificial joint performance. Experimental approaches were utilized in the present research. This includes basic analysis of biofluids' property, such as viscosity, fluid shear stress, and shear rate using rheological experiments. Tribological investigation and surface characterization were conducted in order to understand effects of molecular and nanostructures on fluid lubrication. Workpiece surface structure and wear mechanisms were investigated using a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope. The surface topography was examined using a profilometer. The results demonstrated that with the adding of solid additives, such as crown ether or fullerene acted as rough as the other solids in the 3-body wear systems. In addition, the fullerene supplied low friction and low wear, which designates the lubrication purpose of this particular particle system. This dissertation is constructed of six chapters. The first chapter is an introduction to body fluids, as mentioned earlier. After Chapter II, it examines the motivation and approach of the present research, Chapter III discusses the experimental approaches, including materials, experimental setup, and conditions. In Chapter IV, lubrication properties of various fluids are discussed. The tribological properties and performance nanostructured biofluids are

  19. Iliacus pyomyositis mimicking septic arthritis of the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Chen W-S; Wan Y-L

    1996-01-01

    The iliacus muscle is closely associated with the psoas muscle, femoral nerve, hip joint, pelvic and intraabdominal structures; thus, its disorders may present as lower abdominal pain, hip pain, or femoral neuropathy. Iliacus pyomyositis, a primary bacterial infection of the skeletal muscle not secondary to a contiguous skin, bone, or soft-tissue infection, presenting as hip pain, femoral neuropathy, and sympathetic effusion of the hip joint in an 8-year-old boy mimicked septic arthritis of the hip joint. Computed tomography was helpful in delineating the accurate location of the lesion. Surgical drainage and appropriate antibiotic therapy led to complete resolution and full functional recovery.

  20. Using a scale-bridging technique to determine the effect of elastic properties on stress distribution around the femoral stem of an artificial hip joint with a simplified geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, C. U.; Lee, S.-C.; Rhee, H. N.; Park, K. S.; Choi, S.-H.

    2014-07-01

    A scale-bridging technique was used to investigate the effect of the elastic properties of β-Ti alloys on the stress distribution around the femoral stem of an artificial hip joint with a simplified geometry when under an external loading. The anisotropic elastic constants of single-crystalline β-Ti alloys (TN1: Ti-18.75 at% Nb, TN2: Ti-37.5 at% Nb, and TN3: Ti-43.75 at% Nb) were calculated using an ab-initio technique that was based on density functional theory calculation. The single-crystalline elastic constants calculated via the ab-initio technique were used to calculate the elastic constants of polycrystal β-Ti alloys using an elastic selfconsistent scheme. Finite element analysis based on the elastic constants of polycrystalline β-Ti alloys for a femoral stem was conducted to calculate the above-mentioned stress distribution. The model system consisting of a TN1 alloy exhibited a relatively high level of von Mises stress on the surface of cancellous and cortical bones compared to model systems consisting of TN2, TN3 alloys and commercial biomaterials (Ti-6Al-4V alloy and 316STS). The thickness of the cancellous bone between the femoral stem and the cortical bone affected the stress concentration on the surface of the cortical bone.

  1. Artificial Hip Simulator with Crystal Models

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-06-21

    Robert Johnson, top, sets the lubricant flow while Donald Buckley adjusts the bearing specimen on an artificial hip simulator at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center. The simulator was supplemented by large crystal lattice models to demonstrate the composition of different bearing alloys. This this image by NASA photographer Paul Riedel was used for the cover of the August 15, 1966 edition of McGraw-Hill Product Engineering. Johnson was chief of Lubrication Branch and Buckley head of the Space Environment Lubrication Section in the Fluid System Components Division. In 1962 they began studying the molecular structure of metals. Their friction and wear testing revealed that the optimal structure for metal bearings was a hexagonal crystal structure with proper molecular space. Bearing manufacturers traditionally preferred cubic structures over hexagonal arrangements. Buckley and Johnson found that even though the hexagonal structural was not as inherently strong as its cubic counterpart, it was less likely to cause a catastrophic failure. The Lewis researchers concentrated their efforts on cobalt-molybdenum and titanium alloys for high temperatures applications. The alloys had a number of possible uses, included prosthetics. The alloys were similar in composition to the commercial alloys used for prosthetics, but employed the longer lasting hexagonal structure.

  2. Factors associated with hip joint rotation in former elite athletes

    PubMed Central

    Kettunen, J.; Kujala, U.; Raty, H.; Videman, T.; Sarna, S.; Impivaara, O.; Koskinen, S.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives—To study factors associated with passive hip rotation range of motion (ROM) in former elite male athletes. Methods—Athletes were interviewed about hip pain, disability, lifetime occupational loading, and athletic training. The passive hip rotation was measured with a Myrin inclinometer in 117 former elite male long distance runners, soccer players, weight lifters, and shooters aged 45–68 years. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to detect hip osteoarthritis. Results—There were no differences in passive hip rotation ROM between the four athlete groups nor between diverging lifetime loading patterns associated with occupational or athletic activities. Among the subjects without hip osteoarthritis, hip pain, and hip disability according to a stepwise linear regression analysis, the only factor that was associated with the passive hip rotation ROM was body mass index (BMI), explaining about 21% of its variation. Subjects with high BMI had lower passive hip rotation ROM than those with low BMI. There was no right-left difference in the mean passive hip rotation ROM in subjects either with or without hip osteoarthritis as determined by magnetic resonance imaging. Nevertheless, hip rotation ROM was clearly reduced in a few hips with severe caput deformity. Conclusions—Long term loading appears to have no association with passive hip rotation ROM. On the other hand, the hip rotation value was lower in subjects with high BMI than in those with low BMI. A clear right-left difference in hip rotation was found only in those subjects who, according to our magnetic resonance imaging criteria, had severe hip osteoarthritis. These findings should be taken into account when hip rotation ROM is used in the clinical assessment of hip joints. Key Words: hip joint rotation; range of motion; osteoarthritis; athletic training; body mass index PMID:10690450

  3. [Nerve distribution and density in the canine hip joint capsule. Comparison of healthy and dysplastic hip joints].

    PubMed

    Giebels, Felix; Prescher, Andreas; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Bücker, Arno; Kinzel, Sylvia

    2017-04-19

    The hip-joint capsule is exposed to increased tension forces during canine hip dysplasia, resulting in inflammation of the capsular tissue. It has been postulated that inflammation is associated with an increased nerve-distribution density. Therefore, it could be supposed that the nerve-distribution density in the hip-joint capsule is higher in dogs with dysplastic hip compared to healthy dogs. In 16 Labrador Retriever dogs that had been euthanised due to unrelated reasons, the hip joints were classified as normoplastic (group 1, n = 18) or dysplastic (group 2, n = 14) based on radiography. Following staining of the capsular nerve fibres by the Sihler method, histological specimens of the hip-joint capsules were scanned. By subdividing each specimen into 10 quadrants numbered from dorsomedial (Q01) to craniodorsolateral (Q10), the ratio of black to white pixels was calculated digitally for each specimen and each quadrant by using a semiautomatic image analysis. Statistical analysis was performed using an independent t-test. Comparison of the mean values of each quadrant showed a significantly higher (p < 0.03) nerve distribution density for the craniodorsolateral quadrant (Q10) in group 2 when compared to group 1. Mean nerve-distribution density for all quadrants combined was not significantly different between the two groups. The increase in nerve-distribution density of the craniodorsal region of the hip-joint capsule in dogs with dysplastic hip could be the result of increased tension forces on this area following hip-joint dysplasia. The craniodorsal region of the hip-joint capsule is an important origin of pain and coxarthrosis in canine hip dysplasia. The results provide the pathophysiological basis for the efficacy of hip-joint denervation. Denervation of the cranial region of the acetabular rim is essential to reduce capsular inflammation and joint-related pain in canine hip dysplasia.

  4. Subject-specific hip geometry and hip joint centre location affects calculated contact forces at the hip during gait.

    PubMed

    Lenaerts, G; Bartels, W; Gelaude, F; Mulier, M; Spaepen, A; Van der Perre, G; Jonkers, I

    2009-06-19

    Hip loading affects the development of hip osteoarthritis, bone remodelling and osseointegration of implants. In this study, we analyzed the effect of subject-specific modelling of hip geometry and hip joint centre (HJC) location on the quantification of hip joint moments, muscle moments and hip contact forces during gait, using musculoskeletal modelling, inverse dynamic analysis and static optimization. For 10 subjects, hip joint moments, muscle moments and hip loading in terms of magnitude and orientation were quantified using three different model types, each including a different amount of subject-specific detail: (1) a generic scaled musculoskeletal model, (2) a generic scaled musculoskeletal model with subject-specific hip geometry (femoral anteversion, neck-length and neck-shaft angle) and (3) a generic scaled musculoskeletal model with subject-specific hip geometry including HJC location. Subject-specific geometry and HJC location were derived from CT. Significant differences were found between the three model types in HJC location, hip flexion-extension moment and inclination angle of the total contact force in the frontal plane. No model agreement was found between the three model types for the calculation of contact forces in terms of magnitude and orientations, and muscle moments. Therefore, we suggest that personalized models with individualized hip joint geometry and HJC location should be used for the quantification of hip loading. For biomechanical analyses aiming to understand modified hip joint loading, and planning hip surgery in patients with osteoarthritis, the amount of subject-specific detail, related to bone geometry and joint centre location in the musculoskeletal models used, needs to be considered.

  5. Metal-on-metal hip joint tribology.

    PubMed

    Dowson, D; Jin, Z M

    2006-02-01

    The basic tribological features of metal-on-metal total hip replacements have been reviewed to facilitate an understanding of the engineering science underpinning the renaissance of these hard-on-hard joints. Metal-on-polymer hip replacements operate in the boundary lubrication regime, thus leading to the design guidance to reduce the femoral head diameter as much as is feasible to minimize frictional torque and volumetric wear. This explains why the gold-standard implant of this form from the past half-century had a diameter of only 22.225 mm (7/8 in). Metal-on-metal implants can operate in the mild mixed lubrication regime in which much of the applied load is supported by elastohydrodynamic films. Correct tribological design leads to remarkably low steady state wear rates. Promotion of the most effective elastohydrodynamic films calls for the largest possible head diameters and the smallest clearances that can reasonably be adopted, consistent with fine surface finishes, good sphericity and minimal structural elastic deformation of the cup on its foundations. This guidance, which is opposite in form to that developed for metal-on-polymer joints, is equally valid for solid (monolithic) metallic heads on metallic femoral stems and surface replacement femoral shells. Laboratory measurements of friction and wear in metal-on-metal joints have confirmed their potential to achieve a very mild form of mixed lubrication. The key lies in the generation of effective elastohydrodynamic lubricating films of adequate thickness compared with the composite roughness of the head and cup. The calculation of the film thickness is by no means easy, but the full procedure is outlined and the use of an empirical formula that displays good agreement with calculations based upon the full numerical solutions is explained. The representation of the lambda ratio, lambda, embracing both film thickness and composite roughness, is described.

  6. Associations among exercise duration, lameness severity, and hip joint range of motion in Labrador Retrievers with hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Greene, Laura M; Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate factors associated with lameness severity and hip joint range of motion in dogs with hip dysplasia and to assess the association between hip joint range of motion and degree of lameness. Prospective case series. 60 client-owned Labrador Retrievers with hip dysplasia. Owners completed a questionnaire regarding their dogs' daily exercise duration and type (i.e., low impact vs high impact) and lifestyle. Range of motion of affected hip joints was measured with a transparent plastic goniometer. The presence of subluxation or luxation of hip joints as a consequence of hip dysplasia and the size of the largest osteophytes or enthesophytes of hip joints on ventrodorsal radiographic images of the pelvis were recorded. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify factors associated with lameness, loss of hip joint flexion, and loss of hip joint extension and to identify factors associated with the presence of large osteophytes. Exercise was associated with a decrease in the severity of lameness in dogs with hip dysplasia. The strength of this inverse relationship increased with longer exercise duration. Lameness was more severe in dogs with hip joint luxation than in dogs without luxation. Hip joint extension was 1° lower for each year of age, and osteophyte or enthesophyte size was 1 mm larger with each 3-year increase in age. Longer daily exercise duration was associated with lower lameness scores in dogs with hip dysplasia. Dogs with hip joint luxation secondary to hip dysplasia had higher lameness scores than did dogs without hip joint luxation.

  7. Taking care of your new hip joint

    MedlinePlus

    ... arthroplasty - precautions; Hip replacement - precautions; Osteoarthritis - hip; Osteoarthritis - knee ... NOT cross your legs. Keep your feet and knees pointed straight ahead, not turned in or out. ...

  8. Radiographic identification of loose bodies in the traumatized hip joint

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, R.A.; Schobert, W.E.; Pais, M.J.; Ahmed, M.; Wilson, W.J.; Farjalla, G.L.; Imray, T.J.

    1982-12-01

    Acrylic spacers and cubes of cortical bone of known dimensions were placed in predetermined locations in cadaver hip joints, which were then studied with plain radiography and linear, hypocycloidal, and computed tomography (CT). Joint space widening was not measurable on plain radiographs of the pelvis when 2-mm spacers were placed anywhere within the hip joint. When 4-mm spacers were used, widening measured 2 mm in the axis of measurement corresponding to the location of the spacer. Linear tomography did not permit identification of the 2-mm cubes; however, hypocycloidal tomography and CT consistently showed them anywhere within the hip joint. Radiation dose and clinical recommendations are discussed.

  9. The prevalence of predisposing deformity in osteoarthritic hip joints.

    PubMed

    Klit, Jakob; Gosvig, Kasper; Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Troelsen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that hip joint deformities may be major contributors to the development of osteoarthritis, and the term 'idiopathic osteoarthritis' may be inappropriate in many cases. Our study cohort was derived from the Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Sub-study, a cross sectional population-based database of 4151 individuals, all of whom had a standard anteroposterior weight-bearing pelvic radiograph taken. Hip joints were classified according to type and degree of deformity. We defined hip osteoarthritis by a minimum joint space width of < or = 2 mm. This cut-off has a significant relationship in both sexes with the clinical presentation. The study cohort which fulfilled these inclusion criteria consisted of 322 females (149 right hips and 173 left hips) and 162 males (77 right hips and 85 left hips) with osteoarthritis. We found an overall prevalence of predisposing hip deformities in females of 62.4% and in males of 78.9%. Minor and major deformities showed the same prevalence. Both sexes had a comparable prevalence of minor and major hip joint deformity, except for pistol grip deformity, which was more prevalent in men. We concluded that 'idiopathic osteoarthritis' is uncommon, and that even minor predisposing deformities are associated with hip osteoarthritis.

  10. Alumina-alumina artificial hip joints. Part I: a histological analysis and characterisation of wear debris by laser capture microdissection of tissues retrieved at revision.

    PubMed

    Hatton, A; Nevelos, J E; Nevelos, A A; Banks, R E; Fisher, J; Ingham, E

    2002-08-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the tissues from uncemented Mittelmeier alumina ceramic-on-ceramic total hip replacements using histological methods and to isolate and characterise the ceramic wear debris using laser capture microdissection and electron microscopy. Tissues from around 10 non-cemented Mittelmeier alumina ceramic on ceramic THRs were obtained from patients undergoing revision surgery. Tissues were also obtained from six patients who were undergoing revisions for aseptic loosening of Charnley, metal-on-polyethylene prostheses. Tissue sections were analysed using light microscopy to determine histological reactions and also the location and content of alumina ceramic wear debris. Tissue samples were extracted from sections using laser capture microdissection and the characteristics of the particles subsequently analysed by TEM and SEM. The tissues from around the ceramic-on-ceramic prostheses all demonstrated the presence of particles, which could be seen as agglomerates inside cells or in distinct channels in the tissues. The tissues from the ceramic-on-ceramic retrievals had a mixed pathology with areas that had no obvious pathology, areas that were relatively rich in macrophages and over half of the tissues had in the region of 60% necrosis/necrobiosis. In comparison, the Charnley tissues showed a granulomatous cellular reaction involving a dense macrophage infiltrate and the presence of giant cells and < 30% necrosis/necrobiosis. The tissues from the ceramic prostheses also showed the presence of neutrophils and lymphocytes, which were not evident in the tissues from the Charnley retrievals. There were significantly more macrophages (p < 0.05), and giant cells (p < 0.01) in the Charnley tissues and significantly more neutrophils (p < 0.01) in the ceramic-on-ceramic tissues. TEM of the laser captured tissue revealed the presence of very small alumina wear debris in the size range 5-90 nm, mean size + SD of 24 +/- 19nm whereas SEM (lower

  11. Effects of hip posture on the frontal impact tolerance of the human hip joint.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Jonathan D; Reed, Matthew P; Jeffreys, Thomas A; Schneider, Lawrence W

    2003-10-01

    The pattern of left- and right-side hip injuries to front-seat occupants involved in offset and angled frontal crashes suggests that hip posture (i.e., the orientation of the femur relative to the pelvis) affects the fracture/dislocation tolerance of the hip joint to forces transmitted along the femur during knee-to-knee-bolster loading in frontal impacts. To investigate this hypothesis, dynamic hip tolerance tests were conducted on the left and right hips of 22 unembalmed cadavers. In these tests, the knee was dynamically loaded in the direction of the long axis of the femur and the pelvis was fixed to minimize inertial effects. Thirty-five successful hip tolerance tests were conducted. Twenty-five of these tests were performed with the hip oriented in a typical posture for a seated driver, or neutral posture, to provide a baseline measure of hip tolerance. The effects of hip posture on hip tolerance were quantified using a paired-comparison experimental design. In six pairs of tests, one side of each cadaver was tested with the hip joint oriented in the neutral posture and the contralateral hip from the same cadaver was tested with the hip joint adducted 10 degrees from the neutral posture. In four pairs of tests, the hip was tested in neutral and 30 degrees flexed postures. The average fracture tolerance of the hip in the neutral posture was 6.1-/+1.5 kN. Hip tolerance decreased by an average of 34-/+4% with 30 degrees of flexion from the neutral posture (p<0.0001) and by 18-/+8% with 10 degrees of adduction from the neutral posture (p=0.008).

  12. Tribological performance of the biological components of synovial fluid in artificial joint implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subir; Choudhury, Dipankar; Roy, Taposh; Moradi, Ali; Masjuki, H. H.; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda

    2015-08-01

    The concentration of biological components of synovial fluid (such as albumin, globulin, hyaluronic acid, and lubricin) varies between healthy persons and osteoarthritis (OA) patients. The aim of the present study is to compare the effects of such variation on tribological performance in a simulated hip joint model. The study was carried out experimentally by utilizing a pin-on-disk simulator on ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) and ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP) hip joint implants. The experimental results show that both friction and wear of artificial joints fluctuate with the concentration level of biological components. Moreover, the performance also varies between material combinations. Wear debris sizes and shapes produced by ceramic and polyethylene were diverse. We conclude that the biological components of synovial fluid and their concentrations should be considered in order to select an artificial hip joint to best suit that patient.

  13. Tribological performance of the biological components of synovial fluid in artificial joint implants.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subir; Choudhury, Dipankar; Roy, Taposh; Moradi, Ali; Masjuki, H H; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda

    2015-08-01

    The concentration of biological components of synovial fluid (such as albumin, globulin, hyaluronic acid, and lubricin) varies between healthy persons and osteoarthritis (OA) patients. The aim of the present study is to compare the effects of such variation on tribological performance in a simulated hip joint model. The study was carried out experimentally by utilizing a pin-on-disk simulator on ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) and ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP) hip joint implants. The experimental results show that both friction and wear of artificial joints fluctuate with the concentration level of biological components. Moreover, the performance also varies between material combinations. Wear debris sizes and shapes produced by ceramic and polyethylene were diverse. We conclude that the biological components of synovial fluid and their concentrations should be considered in order to select an artificial hip joint to best suit that patient.

  14. Tribological performance of the biological components of synovial fluid in artificial joint implants

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Subir; Choudhury, Dipankar; Roy, Taposh; Moradi, Ali; Masjuki, H H; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda

    2015-01-01

    The concentration of biological components of synovial fluid (such as albumin, globulin, hyaluronic acid, and lubricin) varies between healthy persons and osteoarthritis (OA) patients. The aim of the present study is to compare the effects of such variation on tribological performance in a simulated hip joint model. The study was carried out experimentally by utilizing a pin-on-disk simulator on ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) and ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP) hip joint implants. The experimental results show that both friction and wear of artificial joints fluctuate with the concentration level of biological components. Moreover, the performance also varies between material combinations. Wear debris sizes and shapes produced by ceramic and polyethylene were diverse. We conclude that the biological components of synovial fluid and their concentrations should be considered in order to select an artificial hip joint to best suit that patient. PMID:27877822

  15. Actuator device for artificial leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An actuator device is described for moving an artificial leg of a person having a prosthesis replacing an entire leg and hip joint. The device includes a first articulated hip joint assembly carried by the natural leg and a second articulated hip joint assembly carried by the prosthesis whereby energy from the movement of the natural leg is transferred by a compressible fluid from the first hip joint assembly to the second hip joint assembly for moving the artificial leg.

  16. The influence of resting periods on friction in the artificial hip.

    PubMed

    Nassutt, Roman; Wimmer, Markus A; Schneider, Erich; Morlock, Michael M

    2003-02-01

    Insufficient tribologic performance of total joint components is a major cause of prostheses failure. Wear has been studied intensively using testing machines that apply continuous motions. Human locomotion, however, is not well represented by continuous motions alone. Singular events and resting periods are a substantial part of daily activities. Resting does influence adhesion in the artificial joint with possible effects on friction, wear, and loosening. The current study evaluated the effects of resting on the frictional properties of hip prosthesis components. The activity measurements of 32 patients with artificial hip replacements were analyzed for resting durations of the hip. A pin-on-ball screening device was used to determine friction after characteristic resting periods and during continuous oscillating motion. All common articulation pairings were investigated. Prolonged and frequent resting periods of the hip were found for the patients. Initial friction increased with increasing resting duration for all tested materials (between 41% and 191%). The metal-on-metal articulations showed the highest friction level (0.098 for sliding) and the highest increase (191%) in friction with resting duration (0.285 after resting periods of 60 seconds). A high static frictional moment after resting periods might present a risk for aseptic implant loosening. Therefore, large head diameters of metal-on-metal joints should be used with caution, especially when additional unfavorable risk factors such as obesity, weak bone-implant interface, or high activity level are present.

  17. Artificial impaction in hip fracture. By F. J. Cotton, 1911.

    PubMed

    Cotton, F J

    1987-12-01

    Frederic Jay Cotton (Fig. 1) was born in Prescott, Wisconsin, and educated at Harvard. After postgraduate study in New York and in Europe, he returned to Boston where he had an association with most of the important hospitals. In addition to great surgical talent, he also was an able administrator and medical politician. He is remembered primarily for his work on fractures, which is summarized in his book, Dislocations and Joint Fractures. The two editions of this book were illustrated by many of the author's own drawings. Cotton was a founder of the American College of Surgeons and served as Regent of the College as well as on the Committee on Fractures. He served in both the Spanish American War and World War I. In the summer of 1918, he was the Chief of Surgery at Walter Reed Army Hospital in Washington, D.C. This article on "Artificial Impaction in Hip Fracture" is an example of the application of a clinical observation to the development of an improvement in the care of patients. It had been known for a long time that impacted fractures of the neck of the femur healed, while displaced fractures did not. Cotton was the first to suggest that impaction, after reduction of the fracture, would be of value. Cotton published three additional papers on the use of impaction in the treatment of hip fractures, the last in 1938, the year of his death. Impaction of fractures of the neck of the femur after reduction of the displacement was rapidly incorporated into all of the procedures for internal fixation of such injuries.

  18. Subject-specific hip geometry affects predicted hip joint contact forces during gait.

    PubMed

    Lenaerts, G; De Groote, F; Demeulenaere, B; Mulier, M; Van der Perre, G; Spaepen, A; Jonkers, I

    2008-01-01

    Hip loading affects bone remodeling and implant fixation. In this study, we have analyzed the effect of subject-specific modeling of hip geometry on muscle activation patterns and hip contact forces during gait, using musculoskeletal modeling, inverse dynamic analysis and static optimization. We first used sensitivity analysis to analyze the effect of isolated changes in femoral neck-length (NL) and neck-shaft angle (NSA) on calculated muscle activations and hip contact force during the stance phase of gait. A deformable generic musculoskeletal model was adjusted incrementally to adopt a physiological range of NL and NSA. In a second similar analysis, we adjusted hip geometry to the measurements from digitized radiographs of 20 subjects with primary hip osteoarthrosis. Finally, we studied the effect of hip abductor weakness on muscle activation patterns and hip contact force. This analysis showed that differences in NL (41-74 mm) and NSA (113-140 degrees ) affect the muscle activation of the hip abductors during stance phase and hence hip contact force by up to three times body weight. In conclusion, the results from both the sensitivity and subject-specific analysis showed that at the moment of peak contact force, altered NSA has only a minor effect on the loading configuration of the hip. Increased NL, however, results in an increase of the three hip contact-force components and a reduced vertical loading. The results of these analyses are essential to understand modified hip joint loading, and for planning hip surgery for patients with osteoarthrosis.

  19. Hip joint pain in spastic dislocation: aetiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Masłoń, Adrian; Jóźwiak, Marek; Pawlak, Maciej; Modrzewski, Tadeusz; Grzegorzewski, Andrzej

    2011-11-01

    Children with severe forms of cerebral palsy (CP) are at high risk of hip joint displacement. Various studies have found that the pain from affected joints occurs in 40 to 84% of studied individuals. The purpose of this study was to establish a correlation between the density of nociceptors localized in selected areas of the spastic dislocated hip joint and clinical evidence of hip joint pain in children with CP. Nineteen samples of articular capsule and 19 samples of teres ligaments, collected during open hip joint reduction from 19 non-ambulatory children with spastic CP (Gross Motor Function Classification System level V; mean age 9y 6mo; 10 males, nine females), were studied. Pain was assessed using the numeric rating scale completed by caregivers. The density of nociceptive fibres was compared between the children with painful and children with painless hip joints, using S-100 and substance P monoclonal antibodies. The presence of S-100 protein and substance P were significantly increased (p=0.024 and p=0.02 respectively) in the children with painful hip joints. There were significantly positive correlations between the intensity of pain and the density of nerve fibres with S-100 protein (teres ligament, p=0.001; joint capsule, p=0.032) as well as substance P (teres ligament, p=0.001). Direct and indirect inflammatory factors, present in dislocated hip joints with cartilage damage in children with spastic CP, lead to hip joint sensitization. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2011 Mac Keith Press.

  20. Computational Modelling and Movement Analysis of Hip Joint with Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siswanto, W. A.; Yoon, C. C.; Salleh, S. Md.; Ngali, M. Z.; Yusup, Eliza M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the model of hip joint and the main muscles are modelled by finite elements. The parts included in the model are hip joint, hemi pelvis, gluteus maximus, quadratus femoris and gamellus inferior. The materials that used in these model are isotropic elastic, Mooney Rivlin and Neo-hookean. The hip resultant force of the normal gait and stair climbing are applied on the model of hip joint. The responses of displacement, stress and strain of the muscles are then recorded. FEBio non-linear solver for biomechanics is employed to conduct the simulation of the model of hip joint with muscles. The contact interfaces that used in this model are sliding contact and tied contact. From the analysis results, the gluteus maximus has the maximum displacement, stress and strain in the stair climbing. Quadratus femoris and gamellus inferior has the maximum displacement and strain in the normal gait however the maximum stress in the stair climbing. Besides that, the computational model of hip joint with muscles is produced for research and investigation platform. The model can be used as a visualization platform of hip joint.

  1. Influence of Different Hip Joint Centre Locations on Hip and Knee Joint Kinetics and Kinematics During the Squat

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Atkins, Stephen; Vincent, Hayley

    2014-01-01

    Identification of the hip joint centre (HJC) is important in the biomechanical examination of human movement. However, there is yet to be any published information regarding the influence of different HJC locations on hip and knee joint kinetics during functional tasks. This study aimed to examine the influence of four different HJC techniques on 3-D hip and knee joint kinetics/kinematics during the squat. Hip and knee joint kinetics/kinematics of the squat were obtained from fifteen male participants using an eight camera motion capture system. The 3-D kinetics/kinematics of the squat were quantified using four hip joint centre estimation techniques. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to compare the discrete parameters as a function of each HJC location. The results show that significant differences in joint angles and moment parameters were evident at both the hip and knee joint in the coronal and transverse planes. These observations indicate that when calculating non-sagittal joint kinetics/kinematics during the squat, researchers should carefully consider their HJC method as it may significantly affect the interpretation of their data. PMID:25713661

  2. 21 CFR 888.3340 - Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal... hip joint. The device limits translation and rotation in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3340 - Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal... hip joint. The device limits translation and rotation in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3340 - Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal... hip joint. The device limits translation and rotation in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3340 - Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal... hip joint. The device limits translation and rotation in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  6. Paraplegic flexion contracture of hip joints: An unsolvable problem

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sailendra

    2016-01-01

    Paraplegic flexion contracture of hip joints beyond 90° is a difficult condition to treat for any orthopedic surgeon. There is no fixed protocol of treatment described, by and large it is individualized. A 20 year old female presented with paraplegia for last 15 years due to irrecoverable spinal cord disease with complete sensory and motor loss of both lower extremities and was admitted with acute flexion contracture of both hip joints with trunk resting on thighs. She underwent bilateral proximal femoral resection. Both hip joints were straight immediately after surgery and patient could lie on her back. In a course of time, she started sitting on her buttocks, led a comfortable wheelchair life with a sitting balance. Proximal femoral resection is an effective method to treat long standing irrecoverable paraplegic acute flexion deformity of the hip joint. PMID:27904226

  7. Paraplegic flexion contracture of hip joints: An unsolvable problem.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sailendra

    2016-01-01

    Paraplegic flexion contracture of hip joints beyond 90° is a difficult condition to treat for any orthopedic surgeon. There is no fixed protocol of treatment described, by and large it is individualized. A 20 year old female presented with paraplegia for last 15 years due to irrecoverable spinal cord disease with complete sensory and motor loss of both lower extremities and was admitted with acute flexion contracture of both hip joints with trunk resting on thighs. She underwent bilateral proximal femoral resection. Both hip joints were straight immediately after surgery and patient could lie on her back. In a course of time, she started sitting on her buttocks, led a comfortable wheelchair life with a sitting balance. Proximal femoral resection is an effective method to treat long standing irrecoverable paraplegic acute flexion deformity of the hip joint.

  8. [Juvenile rheumatoid diseases: Endoprosthetic care of destroyed hip joints].

    PubMed

    Rehart, S; Henniger, M

    2015-07-01

    Patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) often suffer from involvement of the hip joints, with joint destruction and related functional limitations, making hip replacement necessary. To discover what special features are to be expected in patients with JIA and hip arthroplasty and what impact they have on surgical indication, choice of implant, and technique. Selective literature review and evaluation of our patient population. Compared with osteoarthritis patients, JIA patients are on average much younger at the time of hip replacement. Owing to the onset of the disease in childhood or adolescence and the frequent glucocorticoid therapy, growth disorders or abnormal anatomical findings are common in these patients. Bone density is often reduced at an early age. The perioperative management of medication has to be planned. Special implants for patients with rheumatic diseases do not exist, but the above peculiarities of this group of patients should be considered for surgical procedure and choice of implant and material. Overall, the results of hip arthroplasty in juvenile rheumatic diseases, in terms of pain relief and functional improvement, are good. The limited life of the arthroplasty is problematic. By relieving pain, improvement of the range of motion and activity level very high patient satisfaction is usually achieved by hip arthroplasty in JIA patients. In the case of involvement of the contralateral hip or the ipsilateral knee joint it may be useful to perform a simultaneous, single-stage joint replacement of both joints.

  9. Femoral neck erosions: sign of hip joint synovial disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, R.P.; Weissman, B.N.; Naimark, A.

    1983-07-01

    Pathologic synovial processes in the hip joint can cause characteristic extrinsic erosions of the femoral neck, which in extreme cases produce an ''apple core'' appearance. Nine such cases of synovial diseases, including synovial osteochondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and amyloidosis, that demonstrate this radiographic finding are presented. The anatomic relations of the hip joint that result in theis appearance, differential diagnosis, and radiographic techniques useful in diagnosis are discussed.

  10. No evidence hip joint angle modulates intrinsically produced stretch reflex in human hopping.

    PubMed

    Gibson, W; Campbell, A; Allison, G

    2013-09-01

    Motor output in activities such as walking and hopping is suggested to be mediated neurally by purported stretch reflex augmentation of muscle output. Reflex EMG activity during these tasks has been frequently investigated in the soleus muscle; with alterations in reflex amplitude being associated with changes in hip joint angle/phase of the gait cycle. Previous work has focussed on reflex activity induced by an artificial perturbation or by induction of H-reflexes. As such, it is currently unknown if stretch reflex activity induced intrinsically (as part of the task) is modulated by changes in hip joint angle. This study investigated whether hip joint angle modulated reflex EMG 'burst' activity during a hopping task performed on a custom-built partially reclined sleigh. Ten subjects participated; EMG and kinematic data (VICON motor capture system) was collected for each hop cycle. Participants completed 5 sets of 30s of self-paced hopping in (1) hip neutral and (2) hip 60° flexion conditions. There was no difference in EMG 'burst' activity or in sagittal plane kinematics (knee/ankle) in the hopping task between the two conditions. The results indicate that during a functional task such as hopping, changes in hip angle do not alter the stretch reflex-like activity associated with landing.

  11. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. 888.3360 Section 888.3360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... designs which are intended to be fixed to the bone with bone cement (§ 888.3027) as well as designs...

  12. [Squatting cast for biomechanical treatment of decentred hip joints].

    PubMed

    Mühlbacher, E; Lick-Schiffer, W; Lojpur, M; Baumgartner, F; Spieß, T; Tschauner, C

    2014-12-01

    The so-called "congenital" luxation of the hip joint is endemic in Central Europe and occurs in about 1% of all newborn infants. By the means of ultrasonographic diagnosis according to the Graf method an early detection instantly after birth has become a good clinical routine in the German-speaking countries. Sonography-based conservative treatment has become the gold standard. The cast in squatting ("human") position is a standard procedure in order to retain the originally decentred or unstable hip joints in the reduced position: 100° flexion and 50° abduction are necessary to fix the hip joint in the reduced position without the risk of avascular necrosis. After the fixation in a squatting-cast, a period of functional bracing in flexed position enhances bony maturation. This two-phase functional conservative treatment can avoid later osteotomies or even early total hip replacement.

  13. [Themistocles Gluck. 100 years artificial joint replacement].

    PubMed

    Wessinghage, D

    1991-01-01

    One hundred years ago Themistocles Gluck reported for the first time about artificial joint replacements and the fixation by cement in a most important publication. Extirpation even of internal organs and differentiated possibilities of their replacement were standing in the center of the scientific work of this genius but first of all controversial discussed German doctor.

  14. [Real-time sonography of the infant hip joint in the early diagnosis of congenital hip dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Casser, H R; Forst, R

    1985-01-01

    The ultrasonic examination of infant hip joint means a great advantage in early diagnosis of congenital hip dysplasia. The sonographic type classification by Graf enables the experienced examiner to make up a differentiated diagnostic-therapeutic concept as early as possible. Therapeutic omissions just as well as exaggerated therapeutic measures can be avoided. Consequently the prognosis of hip joint dysplasia is considerably improved by ultrasonic examination of new-born hip joints.

  15. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  16. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  17. Effect of increased pushoff during gait on hip joint forces

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Cara L.; Garibay, Erin J.

    2014-01-01

    Anterior acetabular labral tears and anterior hip pain may result from high anteriorly directed forces from the femur on the acetabulum. While providing more pushoff is known to decrease sagittal plane hip moments, it is unknown if this gait modification also decreases hip joint forces. The purpose of this study was to determine if increasing pushoff decreases hip joint forces. Nine healthy subjects walked on an instrumented force treadmill at 1.25 m/s under two walking conditions. For the natural condition, subjects were instructed to walk as they normally would. For the increased pushoff condition, subjects were instructed to “push more with your foot when you walk”. We collected motion data of markers placed on the subjects’ trunk and lower extremities to capture trunk and leg kinematics and ground reaction force data to determine joint moments. Data were processed in Visual 3D to produce the inverse kinematics and model scaling files. In OpenSim, the generic gait model (Gait2392) was scaled to the subject, and hip joint forces were calculated for the femur on the acetabulum after computing the muscle activations necessary to reproduce the experimental data. The instruction to “push more with your foot when you walk” reduced the maximum hip flexion and extension moment compared to the natural condition. The average reduction in the hip joint forces was 12.5%, 3.2% and 9.6% in the anterior, superior and medial directions respectively and 2.3% for the net resultant force. Increasing pushoff may be an effective gait modification for people with anterior hip pain. PMID:25468661

  18. Effect of increased pushoff during gait on hip joint forces.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Cara L; Garibay, Erin J

    2015-01-02

    Anterior acetabular labral tears and anterior hip pain may result from high anteriorly directed forces from the femur on the acetabulum. While providing more pushoff is known to decrease sagittal plane hip moments, it is unknown if this gait modification also decreases hip joint forces. The purpose of this study was to determine if increasing pushoff decreases hip joint forces. Nine healthy subjects walked on an instrumented force treadmill at 1.25 m/s under two walking conditions. For the natural condition, subjects were instructed to walk as they normally would. For the increased pushoff condition, subjects were instructed to "push more with your foot when you walk". We collected motion data of markers placed on the subjects' trunk and lower extremities to capture trunk and leg kinematics and ground reaction force data to determine joint moments. Data were processed in Visual3D to produce the inverse kinematics and model scaling files. In OpenSim, the generic gait model (Gait2392) was scaled to the subject, and hip joint forces were calculated for the femur on the acetabulum after computing the muscle activations necessary to reproduce the experimental data. The instruction to "push more with your foot when you walk" reduced the maximum hip flexion and extension moment compared to the natural condition. The average reduction in the hip joint forces were 12.5%, 3.2% and 9.6% in the anterior, superior and medial directions respectively and 2.3% for the net resultant force. Increasing pushoff may be an effective gait modification for people with anterior hip pain.

  19. Hip reconstruction osteotomy by Ilizarov method as a salvage option for abnormal hip joints.

    PubMed

    Umer, Masood; Rashid, Haroon; Umer, Hafiz Muhammad; Raza, Hasnain

    2014-01-01

    Hip joint instability can be secondary to congenital hip pathologies like developmental dysplasia (DDH) or acquired such as sequel of infective or neoplastic process. An unstable hip is usually associated with loss of bone from the proximal femur, proximal migration of the femur, lower-extremity length discrepancy, abnormal gait, and pain. In this case series of 37 patients coming to our institution between May 2005 and December 2011, we report our results in treatment of unstable hip joint by hip reconstruction osteotomy using the Ilizarov method and apparatus. This includes an acute valgus and extension osteotomy of the proximal femur combined with gradual varus and distraction (if required) for realignment and lengthening at a second, more distal, femoral osteotomy. 18 males and 19 females participated in the study. There were 17 patients with DDH, 12 with sequelae of septic arthritis, 2 with tuberculous arthritis, 4 with posttraumatic arthritis, and 2 with focal proximal femoral deficiency. Outcomes were evaluated by using Harris Hip Scoring system. At the mean follow-up of 37 months, Harris Hip Score had significantly improved in all patients. To conclude, illizarov hip reconstruction can successfully improve Trendelenburg's gait. It supports the pelvis and simultaneously restores knee alignment and corrects lower-extremity length discrepancy (LLD).

  20. Management of acute calcific tendinitis around the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Min; Baek, Ji-Hoon; Ko, Young-Bong; Lee, Han-Jun; Park, Ki Jeong; Ha, Yong-Chan

    2014-11-01

    Although the natural history of calcific tendinitis within the rotator cuff of the shoulder is established, the natural history of calcific tendinitis around the hip joint remains unknown. To examine the duration of symptoms including pain, the location of calcific tendinitis around the hip joint, the radiologic course of calcium phosphate crystals, and the proportion of patients who required surgical treatment. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Thirty hips (29 patients) with acute calcific tendinitis were treated between January 2010 and December 2012. Level of subjective hip pain using the visual analog scale pain score, radiologic type, and the location and size of calcium deposits were measured during a follow-up period of 12 to 32 months. The 29 patients included 7 men (24%) and 22 women (76%) with a mean age of 51.5 years (range, 28-78 years). All visual analog scale pain scores significantly improved from a mean of 7.1 to 0.8 at the latest follow-up (P < .001). The most common site of calcium deposition was the tendon of the gluteus medius. During follow-up, calcium deposition completely resolved in 5 of 20 hips. Symptoms in 23 patients (24 hips) responded to nonoperative treatment. Two patients (2 hips) were treated with ultrasound-guided local anesthetic and steroid injection. Four patients (4 hips) with long duration (>3 months) of severe pain, solid type, and large size (range, 96-416 mm(2)) were treated with arthroscopic excision. Nonoperative treatment in patients with acute calcific tendinitis of the hip joint might be successful in most patients. Surgical treatment is of value for patients experiencing prolonged severe pain, solid type, and large size. © 2014 The Author(s).

  1. Dynamic radiostereometric analysis for evaluation of hip joint pathomechanics.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lars; de Raedt, Sepp; Jørgensen, Peter Bo; Mygind-Klavsen, Bjarne; Kaptein, Bart; Stilling, Maiken

    2017-12-01

    Dynamic RSA (dRSA) enables non-invasive 3D motion-tracking of bones and may be used to evaluate in-vivo hip joint kinematics including hip pathomechanics such as femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and the biomechanical effects of arthroscopic cheilectomy and -rim trimming (ACH). The study aim was to evaluate the kinematic changes in the hip joint after ACH. Seven non-FAI affected human cadaveric hips were CT-scanned and CT-bone models were created. dRSA recordings of the hip joints were acquired at five frames/s during passive flexion, adduction to stop, and internal rotation to stop (FADIR). ACH was performed and dRSA was repeated. dRSA images were analyzed using model-based RSA. Hip joint kinematics before and after ACH were compared pairwise. The volume of removed bone was quantified and compared to the postoperative range of motion (ROM). Mean hip internal rotation increased from 19.1 to 21.9° (p = 0.04, Δ2.8°, SD 2.7) after ACH surgery. Mean adduction of 3.9° before and 2.7° after ACH surgery was unchanged (p = 0.48, Δ-1.2°; SD 4.3). Mean flexion angles during dRSA tests were 82.4° before and 80.8° after ACH surgery, which were similar (p = 0.18, Δ-1.6°, SD = 2.7). No correlation between volume of removed bone and ROM was observed. A small increase in internal rotation, but not in adduction, was observed after arthroscopic cheilectomy and -rim trimming in cadaver hips. The hip flexion angle of the FADIR test was reproducible. dRSA kinematic analysis is a new and clinically applicable method with good potential to evaluate hip joint kinematics and to test FAI pathomechanics and other surgical corrections of the hip.

  2. Problems With Large Joints: Hip Conditions.

    PubMed

    Goerl, Kyle

    2016-07-01

    Common overuse injuries of the hip include greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) and coxa saltans (ie, snapping hip). GTPS, previously called trochanteric bursitis, is a regional chronic pain syndrome. Etiologies include gluteal tendinitis or tendinosis, gluteal muscle or tendon tears, bursitis, meralgia paresthetica, iliotibial band disorders, and referred osteoarthritis pain. Treatment typically consists of activity modification and physical therapy (PT). Snapping hip can have multiple etiologies. Extra-articular etiologies include iliotibial band syndrome and iliopsoas snapping. Patients typically are treated with activity modification and PT. Intra-articular snapping usually is the result of chondral or acetabular labral injuries, and may require surgical intervention. Femoroacetabular impingement is an emerging etiology of hip pain. Patients commonly report anterior hip or groin pain with insidious onset. It results from cam-type impingement from an irregular shape of the femoral head-neck junction, pincer-type impingement from the acetabulum, or mixed-type impingement resulting from a combination of abnormalities. This atypical morphology can lead to labral tears or chondral injuries, which may manifest as painful clicking or popping. Treatments range from conservative, including activity modification, anti-inflammatory drugs, and PT, to surgical correction of the atypical morphology and addressing labral or chondral damage when present.

  3. Immediate Effect of Grade IV Inferior Hip Joint Mobilization on Hip Abductor Torque: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Makofsky, Howard; Panicker, Siji; Abbruzzese, Jeanine; Aridas, Cynthia; Camp, Michael; Drakes, Jonelle; Franco, Caroline; Sileo, Ray

    2007-01-01

    Joint mobilization and manipulation stimulate mechanoreceptors, which may influence the joint and surrounding muscles. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the effect of grade IV inferior hip joint mobilization on hip abductor torque. Thirty healthy subjects were randomly assigned to a control group (grade I inferior hip joint mobilization) or an experimental group (grade IV inferior hip joint mobilization). Subjects performed a pre- and post-intervention test of five isometric repetitions on the Cybex Normö dynamometer; the average torque was determined for both pre- and post-intervention measurements. These data were analyzed using the independent samples t-test with the significance level set at P<0.05. The results showed a statistically significant difference between the two groups for an increase in hip abductor torque in the experimental group (P=0.03). The experimental group demonstrated a 17.35% increase in average torque whereas the control group demonstrated a 3.68% decrease in average torque. These findings are consistent with other studies demonstrating that the use of grade IV non-thrust mobilization improves strength immediately post-intervention in healthy individuals. The results of this pilot study provide physical therapists with further support for the utilization of manual therapy in conjunction with therapeutic exercise to enhance muscle strength. PMID:19066650

  4. Hip joint contact forces in normal subjects and subjects with total hip prostheses: walking and stair and ramp negotiation.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, B W; Nicol, A C

    2002-02-01

    To calculate the hip joint contact force in normal subjects and subjects with total hip replacements. An observational study of age matched normal subjects and subjects with hip joint replacements. Hip joint contact forces have been calculated using musculo-skeletal models and measured in vivo using instrumented hip prostheses. There are few examples of studies performed on subjects in the 40-60 year age range. This study characterises the forces in both normal subjects and subjects with hip joint replacements for these 'young' subjects. Motion analysis and force plate data were used as input to a three-dimensional model of the leg. Five male and six female normal subjects and five male subjects with hip prostheses were studied. Each subject was observed walking and negotiating stairs and a ramp. Hip joint contact forces in both thigh and pelvic-based co-ordinate systems are presented. Subjects cadence, speed and stride length are given. In general subjects with hip replacements exhibited lower hip joint contact forces than age matched normal subjects. It is suggested that this was the results of the lower speeds, stride lengths and cadences adopted by the subjects with hip replacements. The characterisation of hip joint contact forces provides essential information for prosthetic joint design and testing. The comparison of hip joint contact forces in normal subjects with those in subjects with prosthetic joints provides evidence of, not only actual use of joints, but also of possible levels of force that might be applied to hip prostheses if subjects returned to normal use.

  5. Hip joint load and muscular activation during rising exercises.

    PubMed

    Németh, G; Ekholm, J; Arborelius, U P; Schüldt, K; Harms-Ringdahl, K

    1984-01-01

    The load on the hip joint and activation of the gluteus maximus, hamstrings, adductor magnus and rectus femoris muscles during rising exercises including different adaptive adjustments were investigated in nine healthy subjects. The joint load was calculated from forces recorded with a force-measuring platform and pictures on cine-film. Levels of muscular activity were recorded with rectified, low-pass filtered, time-averaged and normalized EMGs. The loading moment about the hip joint was about 45 Nm during the initial part of the rising exercise, decreasing with smaller hip angle. Increase of the backward inclination of the trunk increased the load moment, which was maintained at about the same level during the rising exercise. Two adaptive adjustments lowered the joint load: foot position further backward and reduced resistance from the device. Foot position further forward increased the joint load. The levels of muscular activity in the hip extensors were low to medium and were slightly increased by posterior foot position and increased resistance from the device. Increased backward trunk inclination increased the activity in the final part of the rising exercise.

  6. [The development of research in tribology of artificial joints].

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhendong; Gong, Juanqing

    2006-06-01

    Aseptic loosening of the prosthesis is a major form for the failure of artificial joints, which results in the conglomeration of wear particles at the bone-implant interface. This paper briefly reviews the recent development of tribology of artificial joints preserving good lubrication, enhancing the wear resistance of materials for the joints, reducing the generation of sensitive-size particles and depressing the debris-tissue reactions. Suggestion for improvement in the design of artificial joints is presented.

  7. Optical measurement system for preparation and after-OP-check of a hip joint endoprothetic implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maschke, R.; Lempe, B.; Taudt, Ch.; Rudek, F.; Baselt, T.; Basan, F.; Grunert, R.; Hartmann, P.

    2014-02-01

    With 332,000 operations carried out every year, the implantation of an artificial hip joint is one of the most common surgical operations performed in the US. According to prognosis which takes the demographical change into account, the number of these operations will increase in the coming years. One of the essential requirements is the perfect reconstruction of the biomechanical functions, especially the knowledge about the center of the hip rotation and the length of the leg. Based on this information it is possible to ensure the right position of the newly set leg during surgery. The aim of this work is to present and evaluate an optical measurement method in order to gather information about the center of the hip joint and the leg length. An appropriate laboratory setup has been designed and implemented in order to evaluate two different approaches: a structured light-method consisting of a DLP-Beamer or a laser source which projects defined patterns onto the patient and a marker-based system. Together with this both methods are combined with custom software to determine the hip joint center and the leg length with an accuracy of around +/- 0.2 inches. The clinical use of the tested approaches would give the surgeon the opportunity to reset the implant-parameters in the course of the surgery. In this way subsequent illnesses such as scoliotic pelvis can be prevented.

  8. Total Hip Joint Replacement Biotelemetry System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreham, J. F.; Postal, R. B.; Luntz, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a biotelemetry system that is hermetically sealed within a total hip replacement implant is reported. The telemetry system transmits six channels of stress data to reconstruct the major forces acting on the neck of the prosthesis and uses an induction power coupling technique to eliminate the need for internal batteries. The activities associated with the telemetry microminiaturization, data recovery console, hardware fabrications, power induction systems, electrical and mechanical testing and hermetic sealing test results are discussed.

  9. Bioceramics for Hip Joints: The Physical Chemistry Viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2014-06-11

    Which intrinsic biomaterial parameter governs and, if quantitatively monitored, could reveal to us the actual lifetime potential of advanced hip joint bearing materials? An answer to this crucial question is searched for in this paper, which identifies ceramic bearings as the most innovative biomaterials in hip arthroplasty. It is shown that, if in vivo exposures comparable to human lifetimes are actually searched for, then fundamental issues should lie in the physical chemistry aspects of biomaterial surfaces. Besides searching for improvements in the phenomenological response of biomaterials to engineering protocols, hip joint components should also be designed to satisfy precise stability requirements in the stoichiometric behavior of their surfaces when exposed to extreme chemical and micromechanical conditions. New spectroscopic protocols have enabled us to visualize surface stoichiometry at the molecular scale, which is shown to be the key for assessing bioceramics with elongated lifetimes with respect to the primitive alumina biomaterials used in the past.

  10. Bioceramics for Hip Joints: The Physical Chemistry Viewpoint

    PubMed Central

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Which intrinsic biomaterial parameter governs and, if quantitatively monitored, could reveal to us the actual lifetime potential of advanced hip joint bearing materials? An answer to this crucial question is searched for in this paper, which identifies ceramic bearings as the most innovative biomaterials in hip arthroplasty. It is shown that, if in vivo exposures comparable to human lifetimes are actually searched for, then fundamental issues should lie in the physical chemistry aspects of biomaterial surfaces. Besides searching for improvements in the phenomenological response of biomaterials to engineering protocols, hip joint components should also be designed to satisfy precise stability requirements in the stoichiometric behavior of their surfaces when exposed to extreme chemical and micromechanical conditions. New spectroscopic protocols have enabled us to visualize surface stoichiometry at the molecular scale, which is shown to be the key for assessing bioceramics with elongated lifetimes with respect to the primitive alumina biomaterials used in the past. PMID:28788682

  11. Hip-spine syndrome: A cadaveric analysis between osteoarthritis of the lumbar spine and hip joints.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, D S; Gebhart, J J; Liu, R W

    2017-09-01

    Authors have recently proposed the concept of "hip-spine syndrome", however there exists limited evidence available to differentiate whether these concomitant arthritides are due to anatomic/structural causes, or systemic/metabolic effects. Exploring this relationship has important implications during the evaluation and treatment of both spine and hip disorders-a common clinical presentation of many patients. The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the individual contribution of hip arthritis towards the development of spine arthritis, with knee arthritis also being analyzed as a negative (systemic) control. Hip and spine arthritis are caused by both metabolic and anatomic causes. A large, well-organized osteological database was queried, and osteoarthritis of the spine, hip, and knee joints was quantified using a validated scoring criteria. Six hundred and twenty-five specimens were chosen for analysis. Multivariate linear regression models were created to quantify the independent contributions of age, gender, race, height, and arthritis of the spine and hip joints. Age was the strongest predictor of arthritis at each site (standardized betas>0.281, P<0.001 for all). Hip arthritis was a stronger predictor of spine arthritis than was knee arthritis (standardized betas 0.215 and 0.155, respectively, P<0.001 for both). Spine arthritis was also a stronger predictor of hip arthritis than was knee arthritis (standardized betas 0.232 and 0.173, P<0.001 for both). Anatomic/structural influences about the lumbosacral-pelvic junction contribute towards the development of arthritis that is separate from any systemic/metabolic effects. Surgeons performing total hip arthroplasty should remain aware of these relationships, although future research is necessary regarding optimal surgical treatment of these patients. N/A (cadaveric study). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiological Assessment of the Sacrofemoral Angle: A Novel Method to Measure the Range of Hip Joint Flexion.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xian-Zhao; Xu, Xi-Ming; Wang, Fei; Li, Ming; Wang, Zi-Min

    2015-09-05

    A quantitative and accurate measurement of the range of hip joint flexion (RHF) is necessarily required in the evaluation of disordered or artificial hip joint function. This study aimed to assess a novel method to measure RHF more accurately and objectively. Lateral radiographs were taken of 31 supine men with hip joints extended or flexed. Relevant angles were measured directly from the radiographs. The change in the sacrofemoral angle (SFA) (the angle formed between the axis of the femur and the line tangent to the upper endplate of S1) from hip joint extension to hip joint flexion, was proposed as the RHF. The validity of this method was assessed via concomitant measurements of changes in the femur-horizontal angle (between the axis of the femur and the horizontal line) and the sacrum-horizontal angle (SHA) (between the line tangent to the upper endplate of S1 and the horizontal line), the difference of which should equal the change in the SFA. The mean change in the SFA was 112.5 ± 7.4°, and was independent of participant age, height, weight, or body mass index. The mean changes in the femur-horizontal and SHAs were 123.0 ± 6.4° and 11.4 ± 3.0°, respectively. This confirmed that the change of SFA between hip joint extension and hip joint flexion was equal to the difference between the changes in the femur-horizontal and SHAs. Using the SFA, to evaluate RHF could prevent compromised measurements due to the movements of pelvis and lumbar spine during hip flexion, and is, therefore, a more accurate and objective method with reasonable reliability and validity.

  13. Radiological Assessment of the Sacrofemoral Angle: A Novel Method to Measure the Range of Hip Joint Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xian-Zhao; Xu, Xi-Ming; Wang, Fei; Li, Ming; Wang, Zi-Min

    2015-01-01

    Background: A quantitative and accurate measurement of the range of hip joint flexion (RHF) is necessarily required in the evaluation of disordered or artificial hip joint function. This study aimed to assess a novel method to measure RHF more accurately and objectively. Methods: Lateral radiographs were taken of 31 supine men with hip joints extended or flexed. Relevant angles were measured directly from the radiographs. The change in the sacrofemoral angle (SFA) (the angle formed between the axis of the femur and the line tangent to the upper endplate of S1) from hip joint extension to hip joint flexion, was proposed as the RHF. The validity of this method was assessed via concomitant measurements of changes in the femur-horizontal angle (between the axis of the femur and the horizontal line) and the sacrum-horizontal angle (SHA) (between the line tangent to the upper endplate of S1 and the horizontal line), the difference of which should equal the change in the SFA. Results: The mean change in the SFA was 112.5 ± 7.4°, and was independent of participant age, height, weight, or body mass index. The mean changes in the femur-horizontal and SHAs were 123.0 ± 6.4° and 11.4 ± 3.0°, respectively. This confirmed that the change of SFA between hip joint extension and hip joint flexion was equal to the difference between the changes in the femur-horizontal and SHAs. Conclusions: Using the SFA, to evaluate RHF could prevent compromised measurements due to the movements of pelvis and lumbar spine during hip flexion, and is, therefore, a more accurate and objective method with reasonable reliability and validity. PMID:26315079

  14. 21 CFR 888.3350 - Hip joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3350 Hip joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer semi...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3350 - Hip joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3350 Hip joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer semi...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3350 - Hip joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3350 Hip joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer semi...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3310 - Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or... Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3310 - Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or... Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3300 - Hip joint metal constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint metal constrained cemented or uncemented... metal constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal constrained... Administration on or before December 26, 1996 for any hip joint metal constrained cemented or...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3340 - Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. 888.3340 Section 888.3340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3300 - Hip joint metal constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint metal constrained cemented or uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3300 Hip joint metal constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3300 - Hip joint metal constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal constrained cemented or uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3300 Hip joint metal constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3300 - Hip joint metal constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint metal constrained cemented or uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3300 Hip joint metal constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3300 - Hip joint metal constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint metal constrained cemented or uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3300 Hip joint metal constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal...

  5. Hip pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain involves any pain in or around the hip joint. You may not feel pain from your hip ... 2012:chap 48. Read More Hip fracture surgery Hip joint replacement Patient Instructions Hip fracture - discharge Hip or ...

  6. Total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Siopack, J S; Jergesen, H E

    1995-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty, or surgical replacement of the hip joint with an artificial prosthesis, is a reconstructive procedure that has improved the management of those diseases of the hip joint that have responded poorly to conventional medical therapy. In this review we briefly summarize the evolution of total hip arthroplasty, the design and development of prosthetic hip components, and the current clinical indications for this procedure. The possible complications of total hip arthroplasty, its clinical performance over time, and future directions in hip replacement surgery are also discussed. Images PMID:7725707

  7. The effects of taping, stretching, and joint exercise on hip joint flexibility and range of motion.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Kyung-Tae; An, Ho-Jung; Choi, Wan-Suk; Koo, Ja-Pung; Kim, Jae-Ic; Kim, Nyeon-Jun

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of joint exercise, taping, and stretching on hip joint flexion, flexibility, and range of motion. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five college students in their 20s were randomly assigned and equally divided into three groups, as follows: a stretching group, a taping and exercise group, and an exercise group. Changes in trunk range of motion and hip joint flexibility of the three groups were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] Comparison between flexibility before and after the intervention revealed statistically significant changes in all three groups. Moreover, the evaluation of joint range of motion after the intervention showed that there were statistically significant changes in all three groups. [Conclusion] Taping, stretching, and joint exercise are considered effective for the increase in flexibility and joint range of motion.

  8. The effects of taping, stretching, and joint exercise on hip joint flexibility and range of motion

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Kyung-Tae; An, Ho-Jung; Choi, Wan-Suk; Koo, Ja-Pung; Kim, Jae-Ic; Kim, Nyeon-Jun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of joint exercise, taping, and stretching on hip joint flexion, flexibility, and range of motion. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five college students in their 20s were randomly assigned and equally divided into three groups, as follows: a stretching group, a taping and exercise group, and an exercise group. Changes in trunk range of motion and hip joint flexibility of the three groups were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] Comparison between flexibility before and after the intervention revealed statistically significant changes in all three groups. Moreover, the evaluation of joint range of motion after the intervention showed that there were statistically significant changes in all three groups. [Conclusion] Taping, stretching, and joint exercise are considered effective for the increase in flexibility and joint range of motion. PMID:27313394

  9. Hip arthroscopy without traction: In vivo anatomy of the peripheral hip joint cavity.

    PubMed

    Dienst, M; Gödde, S; Seil, R; Hammer, D; Kohn, D

    2001-01-01

    To describe the in vivo anatomy of the peripheral compartment of the hip joint using a systematic sequence of examination without traction. Case series. We performed 35 hip arthroscopies without traction from an anterolateral portal in the supine position. Free draping and a good range of movement of the hip joint were used to relax parts of the capsule and increase the intra-articular volume of the area that was inspected. Each procedure was documented on a standard protocol including detailed information on technical features and normal and pathologic intra-articular findings. A comprehensive inspection of the peripheral compartment was obtained from the anterolateral portal. A systematic sequence of examination was developed separating the periphery of the hip joint into 7 areas: anterior neck area, medial neck area, medial head area, anterior head area, lateral head area, lateral neck area, and posterior area. The arthroscopic in vivo anatomy of each area is described. In 3 patients, 1 to 3 loose bodies were removed. In 1 patient with a synovial chondromatosis, 40 chondromas were retrieved. In osteoarthritis, impinging osteophytes were trimmed in 3 cases and partial synovectomy was performed in 10 patients. The following complications were observed: a temporary sensory deficit of the lateral femoral cutaneus nerve in 1 patient, scuffing of the anterior surface of the femoral head in 3 patients, detaching of an osteophyte in 1 patient, and partial tears of the anterior synovial fold in 10 patients. Arthroscopy without traction allows for a complete evaluation of hip anatomy without the loaded articular surfaces, the acetabular fossa, and the ligamentum teres. For a complete overview of both the central and peripheral part of the hip, traction is necessary for the central part.

  10. Revision for prosthetic joint infection following hip arthroplasty: Evidence from the National Joint Registry.

    PubMed

    Lenguerrand, E; Whitehouse, M R; Beswick, A D; Jones, S A; Porter, M L; Blom, A W

    2017-06-01

    We used the National Joint Registry for England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man (NJR) to investigate the risk of revision due to prosthetic joint infection (PJI) for patients undergoing primary and revision hip arthroplasty, the changes in risk over time, and the overall burden created by PJI. We analysed revision total hip arthroplasties (THAs) performed due to a diagnosis of PJI and the linked index procedures recorded in the NJR between 2003 and 2014. The cohort analysed consisted of 623 253 index primary hip arthroplasties, 63 222 index revision hip arthroplasties and 7585 revision THAs performed due to a diagnosis of PJI. The prevalence, cumulative incidence functions and the burden of PJI (total procedures) were calculated. Overall linear trends were investigated with log-linear regression. We demonstrated a prevalence of revision THA due to prosthetic joint infection of 0.4/100 procedures following primary and 1.6/100 procedures following revision hip arthroplasty. The prevalence of revision due to PJI in the three months following primary hip arthroplasty has risen 2.3-fold (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3 to 4.1) between 2005 and 2013, and 3.0-fold (95% CI 1.1 to 8.5) following revision hip arthroplasty. Over 1000 procedures are performed annually as a consequence of hip PJI, an increase of 2.6-fold between 2005 and 2013. Although the risk of revision due to PJI following hip arthroplasty is low, it is rising and, coupled with the established and further predicted increased incidence of both primary and revision hip arthroplasty, this represents a growing and substantial treatment burden.Cite this article: E. Lenguerrand, M. R. Whitehouse, A. D. Beswick, S. A. Jones, M. L. Porter, A. W. Blom. Revision for prosthetic joint infection following hip arthroplasty: Evidence from the National Joint Registry. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:391-398. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.66.BJR-2017-0003.R1. © 2017 Lenguerrand et al.

  11. Stress shielding effects of two prosthetic groups after total hip joint simulation replacement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective The study aims to compare the stress shielding effects of implantable anatomical and traditional prostheses after in vitro total hip joint replacement simulation. The study serves as a biomechanical basis for novel artificial prostheses and for clinical hip joint replacements. Methods Sixteen femoral specimens from adult male corpses were randomly divided into two groups: the traditional prosthesis group implanted into femur specimens using simulated total hip joint replacement (n = 8) and the femoral neck-preserved anatomical prosthesis implantation group that used a collum femoris preserving stem/trabeculae oriented pattern (CFP/TOP) acetabular cup (n = 8). The strain values in the two groups before and after prosthesis implantation were measured at different test points using electric resistance strain gauges. The stress shielding rate was calculated according to the related formula. Results The results showed that the rates of proximal femoral stress shielding were significantly higher at test points 1–10 in the traditional femoral prosthesis transplantation group than in the anatomical prosthesis group (p < 0.05). Conclusions There were different effects of stress shielding between the anatomical and traditional prostheses. Retained femoral anatomical implants should reduce stress shielding and increase the stability of anatomical prosthesis implants. PMID:25174846

  12. The Arterial Folding Point During Flexion of the Hip Joint

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung Il; Won, Je Hwan Kim, Byung Moon; Kim, Jae Keun; Lee, Do Yun

    2005-04-15

    Purpose: Endovascular stents placed in periarticular vessels may be at a greater risk of neointimal hyperplasia and eventual occlusion than those placed in non-periarticular vessels. The purpose of this study was to investigate the location of maximal conformational change along the iliac and femoral artery, the folding point, during flexion of the hip joint and its location relative to the hip joint and the inguinal ligament. Methods: Seventy patients undergoing femoral artery catheterization were evaluated. The patients were 47 men and 23 women and ranged in age from 26 to 75 years (mean 54 years). The arteries (right:left = 34:36) were measured using a marked catheter for sizing vessels. Fluoroscopic images were obtained in anteroposterior and lateral projections in neutral position, and in the lateral projection in flexed position of the hip joint. The folding point was determined by comparing the lateral projection images in the neutral and flexed positions. The distance from the acetabular roof to the folding point and the distance from the inguinal ligament to the folding point was evaluated. Results: : The folding point was located 42.8 {+-} 28.6 mm cranial to the acetabular roof and 35.1 {+-} 30.1 mm cranial to the inguinal ligament. As the patient's age increased, the folding point was located more cranially (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The folding point during flexion of the hip joint was located 42.8 {+-} 28.6 mm cranial to the acetabular roof and 35.1 {+-} 30.1 mm cranial to the inguinal ligament. As the patient's age increased, the folding point was located more cranially. When a stent is inserted over this region, more attention may be needed during follow-up to monitor possible occlusion and stent failure.

  13. [Hip fractures in the elderly : Osteosynthesis versus joint replacement].

    PubMed

    Knobe, M; Siebert, C H

    2014-04-01

    Osteoporotic fractures of the femoral neck and trochanteric region pose an ever-expanding existential problem both for the individual and for society. Despite numerous innovations and advances regarding implant design, mortality and the systemic and mechanical complication rates remain high. Depiction of treatment options for femoral neck fractures and trochanteric femur fractures in the elderly comparing joint replacement and osteosynthesis. A search of the Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases was carried out focusing on hip fracture treatment. Randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses and reviews comparing joint replacement or fixation implants in the elderly were included. Displaced fractures of the femoral neck often require total joint arthroplasty whereas trochanteric fractures are amenable to internal fixation. Cemented total hip replacement as opposed to cementless techniques is recommended in the elderly and yields good functional results in active patients. Hemiarthroplasty is the treatment of choice in infirm patients with multiple comorbidities and cognitive impairment. Trochanteric fractures (AO/OTA types A1 and A2) can be successfully treated with intramedullary or extramedullary fixation. Adequate reduction and stable fixation are prerequisites for uneventful healing. A meticulous operative technique can prevent iatrogenic complications. In summary, there are many parameters affecting the outcome in the treatment of fragility and hip fractures. Technical features as well as surgeon characteristics play an important role and the ultimate solution has yet to be developed. Even though fracture morphology may indicate a specific treatment option, patient characteristics play an important role in decision-making. The development of centers of fragility fracture care in Germany could help to lower the complication rate and increase quality of life in hip fracture patients in the future.

  14. Bilateral Hip Joint Hylan G-F 20 Granulomatous Synovitis due to Viscosupplementation Injections.

    PubMed

    Weinrauch, Patrick; Trigger, Robert; Tsikleas, George

    2014-01-01

    We present the diagnosis of bilateral granulomatous inflammation of the hip joints associated with Hylan G-F 20 viscosupplementation injections. Clinicians recommending therapeutic Hylan injections for the management of hip arthritis should maintain clinical awareness regarding this potential complication.

  15. An in vitro simulation method for the tribological assessment of complete natural hip joints.

    PubMed

    Groves, Dawn; Fisher, John; Williams, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    The use of hip joint simulators to evaluate the tribological performance of total hip replacements is widely reported in the literature, however, in vitro simulation studies investigating the tribology of the natural hip joint are limited with heterogeneous methodologies reported. An in vitro simulation system for the complete natural hip joint, enabling the acetabulum and femoral head to be positioned with different orientations whilst maintaining the correct joint centre of rotation, was successfully developed for this study. The efficacy of the simulation system was assessed by testing complete, matched natural porcine hip joints and porcine hip hemiarthroplasty joints in a pendulum friction simulator. The results showed evidence of biphasic lubrication, with a non-linear increase in friction being observed in both groups. Lower overall mean friction factor values in the complete natural joint group that increased at a lower rate over time, suggest that the exudation of fluid and transition to solid phase lubrication occurred more slowly in the complete natural hip joint compared to the hip hemiarthroplasty joint. It is envisaged that this methodology will be used to investigate morphological risk factors for developing hip osteoarthritis, as well as the effectiveness of early interventional treatments for degenerative hip disease.

  16. An in vitro simulation method for the tribological assessment of complete natural hip joints

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, John; Williams, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    The use of hip joint simulators to evaluate the tribological performance of total hip replacements is widely reported in the literature, however, in vitro simulation studies investigating the tribology of the natural hip joint are limited with heterogeneous methodologies reported. An in vitro simulation system for the complete natural hip joint, enabling the acetabulum and femoral head to be positioned with different orientations whilst maintaining the correct joint centre of rotation, was successfully developed for this study. The efficacy of the simulation system was assessed by testing complete, matched natural porcine hip joints and porcine hip hemiarthroplasty joints in a pendulum friction simulator. The results showed evidence of biphasic lubrication, with a non-linear increase in friction being observed in both groups. Lower overall mean friction factor values in the complete natural joint group that increased at a lower rate over time, suggest that the exudation of fluid and transition to solid phase lubrication occurred more slowly in the complete natural hip joint compared to the hip hemiarthroplasty joint. It is envisaged that this methodology will be used to investigate morphological risk factors for developing hip osteoarthritis, as well as the effectiveness of early interventional treatments for degenerative hip disease. PMID:28886084

  17. Improvement of the reliability of ceramic hip joint implants.

    PubMed

    Weisse, Bernhard; Zahner, Marcel; Weber, W; Rieger, W

    2003-11-01

    The aim of this article is to present the optimization of a proof test procedure of ceramic hip joint ball heads. The proof test rejects defective samples in the production line before being implanted into human body. Thereby on every ceramic ball head a static load is applied, which is somewhat higher than the maximum physiological load. The magnitude of the applied load should not damage the samples which are free of flaws in the high stress area. The configuration of the proof test influences the stress distribution in the ball head, which should be similar to the physiological case. To determine the stress distribution, a non-linear finite element (FE) analysis was performed and the results were validated by measurements. With an iterative approach based on FE calculations the proof test configuration was optimized in such a way that the stress distribution in the ball head is similar to the stress distribution in vivo. In this study all ball heads showed very high fatigue resistance after being proof tested and fulfilled the requirements of the FDA (Food and Drug Administration, USA) described in the Guidance Document for the Preparation of Premarket Notifications for Ceramic Ball Hip System. The probability of a fracture of an implanted ceramic ball head can be decreased by the presented optimized proof test procedure. Latter can thus improve the reliability of ceramic hip joint ball heads. The study was supported by the KTI (Commission for Technology and Innovation, Switzerland).

  18. Granulicatella adiacens prosthetic hip joint infection after dental treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sundararajan, Sabapathy; Teferi, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Granulicatella adiacens is a Gram-positive bacteria and a normal component of oral flora. It is also found in dental plaques, endodontic abscesses and can rarely cause more serious infections. Case presentation: We describe a prosthetic hip joint infection in an 81-year-old fit and healthy man due to Granulicatella adiacens who underwent a prolonged dental intervention two days earlier without antibiotic prophylaxis. The infection was successfully treated with surgical intervention and a combination of antibiotics. The patient eventually succumbed to severe community-acquired pneumonia two months later. Conclusion: Current guidelines recommend avoidance of antibiotic prophylaxis prior to dental treatment in patients who have no co-morbidities and no prior operation on the index prosthetic joint. This case report indicates that infections of prosthetic joints may be associated with dental procedures even in fit and healthy patients without the recognized risk factors. PMID:28348763

  19. Bone scintigraphy of hip joint effusions in children

    SciTech Connect

    Kloiber, R.; Pavlosky, W.; Portner, O.; Gartke, K.

    1983-05-01

    Thirty-eight children with hip pain of acute onset were studied by bone scintigraphy. Nine patients had diminished radiotracer deposition involving the entire proximal femoral ossification center. This could be related to infarction or compression of blood supply by a tense joint effusion. Eight of these patients had joint aspiration confirming the presence of an effusion. Five patients had follow-up studies after aspiration, and femoral-head uptake reverted to normal in all but one which subsequently proved to be infarcted. A photopenic zone was seen on blood pool images in 10 patients, many of whom were also aspirated of fluid. Bone scintigraphy is useful in the diagnosis of joint effusions and can give information as to the state of perfusion of the femoral head. Follow-up studies after aspiration can differentiate infarction from reversible ischemia.

  20. Comparison of mechanoreceptor quantities in hip joints of developmental dysplasia of the hip patients with normal hips.

    PubMed

    Desteli, Engin Eren; Gülman, Ali Birol; Imren, Yunus; Kaymaz, Figen

    2014-01-01

    Joint mechanoreceptors are afferent neural elements involved in pain sensation and tactile sense. We aimed to detect the free nerve endings (FNE) and other types of mechanoreceptors and to compare their quantities in human hip joint capsule (HJC) and ligamentum capitis femoris (LCF) of babies with developmantal dysplasia of hip (DDH) and intrauterine ex foetuses (control group) to find out whether there is an increase in the amount of mechanoreceptors in hip joint due to the occured anatomical chages. We took 15 LCF and HJC biopsies from 15 patients undergoing hip surgery for DDH, and 15 HJC and LCFs from intrauterine ex fetuses. Total of 60 specimens were investigated. The mean age of the babies was 10.3 months (6-18 months) at the time of surgery. Full thickness 1 × 1 cm HJC and LCF portions were taken as biopsy specimens. An immunohistochemical technique was performed for neurogenic protein S-100 and examined under light microscopy. FNEs were detected in all four different tissues (type IVa). Other types of mechanoreceptors (Type I-II and III) were not detected in any of the specimens. The positive rates of FNE staining in the control group were % 2.60 ± 1.24 for the LCF and % 2.67 ± 1.11 for the HJC respectively and FNE staining in the DDH group were found to be % 2.67 ± 1.11 for the LCF and % 2.73 ± 1.16 for the HJC. We did not find a statistically significant difference in number of FNEs between the specimens of the DDH group and the control group (p>0.05), also there was no statistically significant difference in number of FNEs between the HJC and LCF within each group (p>0.05). Our results suggest that the number of FNEs does not increase in HJC and LCF of DDH patients even though LCF hypertrophy and capsular elongation occurs.

  1. Hind limb kinematics during therapeutic exercises in dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joints.

    PubMed

    Bockstahler, Barbara A; Prickler, Bettina; Lewy, Elisabeth; Holler, Peter J; Vobornik, Angela; Peham, Christian

    2012-09-01

    To assess joint kinematics in dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joints during walking up an incline or down a decline and over low obstacles and to compare findings with data for nonlame dogs. 10 dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joints (mean ± SD age, 6.95 ± 3.17 years; mean body weight, 34.33 ± 13.58 kg) and 8 nonlame dogs (3.4 ± 2.0 years; 23.6 ± 4.6 kg). Reflective markers located on the limbs and high-speed cameras were used to record joint kinematics during walking up an incline or down a decline and over low obstacles. Maximal flexion, extension, and range of motion of the hip joints were calculated. Osteoarthritis of the hip joints reduced extension of both hip joints and flexion of the contralateral hind limb, compared with flexion of the lame hind limb, during walking down a decline. Walking up an incline resulted in decreased extension of the stifle joint in both hind limbs of osteoarthritic dogs; extension was significantly decreased for the lame hind limb. During walking over low obstacles, maximal flexion of the stifle joint was increased significantly for the contralateral hind limb. Maximal flexion was increased in both tarsal joints. Osteoarthritis of the hip joints led to complex changes in the gait of dogs, which involved more joints than the affected hip joint alone. Each exercise had specific effects on joint kinematics that must be considered when planning a rehabilitation program.

  2. [Minimally invasive approaches to hip and knee joints for total joint replacement].

    PubMed

    Rittmeister, M; König, D P; Eysel, P; Kerschbaumer, F

    2004-11-01

    The manuscript features the different minimally invasive approaches to the hip for joint replacement. These include medial, anterior, anterolateral, and posterior approaches. The concept of minimally invasive hip arthroplasty makes sense if it is an integral part of a larger concept to lower postoperative morbidity. Besides minimal soft tissue trauma, this concept involves preoperative patient education, preemptive analgesia, and postoperative physiotherapy. It is our belief that minimal incision techniques for the hip are not suited for all patients and all surgeons. The different minimally invasive approaches to the knee joint for implantation of a knee arthroplasty are described and discussed. There have been no studies published yet that fulfill EBM criteria. The data so far show that minimally invasive approaches and implantation techniques for total knee replacements lead to quicker rehabilitation of patients.

  3. FACTS: Fully Automatic CT Segmentation of a Hip Joint.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chengwen; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Li; Zheng, Guoyan

    2015-05-01

    Extraction of surface models of a hip joint from CT data is a pre-requisite step for computer assisted diagnosis and planning (CADP) of periacetabular osteotomy (PAO). Most of existing CADP systems are based on manual segmentation, which is time-consuming and hard to achieve reproducible results. In this paper, we present a Fully Automatic CT Segmentation (FACTS) approach to simultaneously extract both pelvic and femoral models. Our approach works by combining fast random forest (RF) regression based landmark detection, multi-atlas based segmentation, with articulated statistical shape model (aSSM) based fitting. The two fundamental contributions of our approach are: (1) an improved fast Gaussian transform (IFGT) is used within the RF regression framework for a fast and accurate landmark detection, which then allows for a fully automatic initialization of the multi-atlas based segmentation; and (2) aSSM based fitting is used to preserve hip joint structure and to avoid penetration between the pelvic and femoral models. Taking manual segmentation as the ground truth, we evaluated the present approach on 30 hip CT images (60 hips) with a 6-fold cross validation. When the present approach was compared to manual segmentation, a mean segmentation accuracy of 0.40, 0.36, and 0.36 mm was found for the pelvis, the left proximal femur, and the right proximal femur, respectively. When the models derived from both segmentations were used to compute the PAO diagnosis parameters, a difference of 2.0 ± 1.5°, 2.1 ± 1.6°, and 3.5 ± 2.3% were found for anteversion, inclination, and acetabular coverage, respectively. The achieved accuracy is regarded as clinically accurate enough for our target applications.

  4. [Rolling friction: a desing of artificial knee joint].

    PubMed

    He, Yujue; Yu, Zhongjia; Chen, Ming; Wang, Chengtao

    2005-08-01

    Resorption and osteolysis of periimplant bones resulting from the wear debris of artificial joint will cause long-term loosening. A new type of rolling knee artificial joint without UHMWPE based on the mechanics of rolling friction is designed for alleviating this problem. Because of low friction force, the resistance of extension and flexion is reduced strikingly and the stress on the interface between prosthesis and bone is reduced evidently. In addition, the bio-toxicity caused by the wear debris of UHMWPE will not occur absolutely. In consequence, the rolling artificial joint can prevent the trend of long-term loosening of the prosthesis efficiently.

  5. An open source lower limb model: Hip joint validation.

    PubMed

    Modenese, L; Phillips, A T M; Bull, A M J

    2011-08-11

    Musculoskeletal lower limb models have been shown to be able to predict hip contact forces (HCFs) that are comparable to in vivo measurements obtained from instrumented prostheses. However, the muscle recruitment predicted by these models does not necessarily compare well to measured electromyographic (EMG) signals. In order to verify if it is possible to accurately estimate HCFs from muscle force patterns consistent with EMG measurements, a lower limb model based on a published anatomical dataset (Klein Horsman et al., 2007. Clinical Biomechanics. 22, 239-247) has been implemented in the open source software OpenSim. A cycle-to-cycle hip joint validation was conducted against HCFs recorded during gait and stair climbing trials of four arthroplasty patients (Bergmann et al., 2001. Journal of Biomechanics. 34, 859-871). Hip joint muscle tensions were estimated by minimizing a polynomial function of the muscle forces. The resulting muscle activation patterns obtained by assessing multiple powers of the objective function were compared against EMG profiles from the literature. Calculated HCFs denoted a tendency to monotonically increase their magnitude when raising the power of the objective function; the best estimation obtained from muscle forces consistent with experimental EMG profiles was found when a quadratic objective function was minimized (average overestimation at experimental peak frame: 10.1% for walking, 7.8% for stair climbing). The lower limb model can produce appropriate balanced sets of muscle forces and joint contact forces that can be used in a range of applications requiring accurate quantification of both. The developed model is available at the website https://simtk.org/home/low_limb_london. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Contributions of individual muscles to hip joint contact force in normal walking.

    PubMed

    Correa, Tomas A; Crossley, Kay M; Kim, Hyung J; Pandy, Marcus G

    2010-05-28

    The human hip joint withstands high contact forces during daily activity and is therefore susceptible to injury and structural deterioration over time. Knowledge of muscle-force contributions to hip joint loading may assist in the development of strategies to prevent and manage conditions such as osteoarthritis, femoro-acetabular impingement and fracture. The main aim of this study was to determine the contributions of individual muscles to hip contact force in normal walking. Muscle contributions to hip contact force were calculated based on a previously published dynamic optimization solution for normal walking, which provided the time histories of joint motion, ground reaction forces, and muscle forces during the stance and swing phases of gait. The force developed by each muscle plus its contribution to the ground reaction force were used to determine the muscle's contribution to hip contact force. Muscles were the major contributors to hip contact force, with gravitational and centrifugal forces combined contributing less than 5% of the total contact force. Four muscles that span the hip - gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, iliopsoas, and hamstrings - contributed most significantly to the three components of the hip contact force and hip contact impulse (integral of hip contact force over time). Three muscles that do not span the hip - vasti, soleus, and gastrocnemius - also contributed substantially to hip joint loading. These results provide additional insight into lower-limb muscle function during walking and may also be relevant to studies of cartilage degeneration and bone remodelling at the hip.

  7. Hip joint center localisation: A biomechanical application to hip arthroplasty population

    PubMed Central

    Bouffard, Vicky; Begon, Mickael; Champagne, Annick; Farhadnia, Payam; Vendittoli, Pascal-André; Lavigne, Martin; Prince, François

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine hip joint center (HJC) location on hip arthroplasty population comparing predictive and functional approaches with radiographic measurements. METHODS: The distance between the HJC and the mid-pelvis was calculated and compared between the three approaches. The localisation error between the predictive and functional approach was compared using the radiographic measurements as the reference. The operated leg was compared to the non-operated leg. RESULTS: A significant difference was found for the distance between the HJC and the mid-pelvis when comparing the predictive and functional method. The functional method leads to fewer errors. A statistical difference was found for the localization error between the predictive and functional method. The functional method is twice more precise. CONCLUSION: Although being more individualized, the functional method improves HJC localization and should be used in three-dimensional gait analysis. PMID:22919569

  8. [Surgical access routes to the hip joint in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Nogler, M; Thaler, M

    2017-01-01

    There are a large number of different approaches to the hip joint. Several conventional and minimally invasive portals exist and numerous technical variations with different instrument sets are available. All approaches can be regarded as standard and can be utilized lege artis. The main differences between approaches are their potential to preserve muscles and avoid damage which would slow down rehabilitation and mobilization. In the elderly the preservation of abductor function is, in the authors' opinion, of utmost importance. A well-functioning gluteal system provides a limp-free gait, supports joint stability and reduces the probability of dislocations. The direct anterior approach has some advantages; however, minimally invasive approaches should be used with care. Surgical experience, experience with a specific approach and the availability of specialized instruments as well as sufficient training are mandatory for a successful performance. A surgeon should always choose the approach with which he has most experience.

  9. Reduction of hip joint reaction force via medio-lateral foot center of pressure manipulation in bilateral hip osteoarthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Solomonow-Avnon, Deborah; Haim, Amir; Levin, Daniel; Elboim-Gabyzon, Michal; Rozen, Nimrod; Peled, Eli; Wolf, Alon

    2016-10-01

    Loading/excessive loading of the hip joint has been linked to onset and progression of hip osteoarthritis. Footwear-generated biomechanical manipulation in the frontal plane has been previously shown in a cohort of healthy subjects to cause a specific gait adaption when the foot center of pressure trajectory was shifted medially, which thereby significantly reduced hip joint reaction force. The objective of the present study was to validate these results in a cohort of female bilateral hip osteoarthritis patients. Sixteen patients underwent gait analysis while using a footworn biomechanical device, allowing controlled foot center of pressure manipulation, in three para-sagittal configurations: medial, lateral, and neutral. Hip osteoarthritis patients exhibited similar results to those observed in healthy subjects in that a medial center of pressure led to an increase in inter-maleolar distance while step width (i.e., distance between right and left foot center of pressure) remained constant. This adaptation, which we speculate subjects adopt to maintain base of support, was associated with significantly greater hip abduction, significantly decreased hip adduction moment, and significantly reduced joint reaction force compared to the neutral and lateral configurations. Recommendations for treatment of hip osteoarthritis emphasize reduction of loads on the pathological joint(s) during daily activities and especially in gait. Our results show that a medially deviated center of pressure causes a reduction in hip joint reaction force. The present study does not prove, but rather suggests, clinical significance, and further investigation is required to assess clinical implications. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1762-1771, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Hip joint centre localisation with an unscented Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    De Momi, Elena; Beretta, Elisa; Ferrigno, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    The accurate estimation of the hip joint centre (HJC) in gait analysis and in computer assisted orthopaedic procedures is a basic requirement. Functional methods, based on rigid body localisation, assessing the kinematics of the femur during circumduction movements (pivoting) have been used for estimating the HJC. Localising the femoral segment only, as it is usually done in total knee replacement procedure, can give rise to estimation errors, since the pelvis, during the passive pivoting manoeuvre, might undergo spatial displacements. This paper presents the design and test of an unscented Kalman filter that allows the estimation of the HJC by observing the pose of the femur and the 3D coordinates of a single marker attached to the pelvis. This new approach was validated using a hip joint mechanical simulator, mimicking both hard and soft tissues. The algorithm performances were compared with the literature standards and proved to have better performances in case of pelvis translation greater than 8 mm, thus satisfying the clinical requirements of the application.

  11. Hard-on-hard lubrication in the artificial hip under dynamic loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Sonntag, Robert; Reinders, Jörn; Rieger, Johannes S; Heitzmann, Daniel W W; Kretzer, J Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The tribological performance of an artificial hip joint has a particularly strong influence on its success. The principle causes for failure are adverse short- and long-term reactions to wear debris and high frictional torque in the case of poor lubrication that may cause loosening of the implant. Therefore, using experimental and theoretical approaches models have been developed to evaluate lubrication under standardized conditions. A steady-state numerical model has been extended with dynamic experimental data for hard-on-hard bearings used in total hip replacements to verify the tribological relevance of the ISO 14242-1 gait cycle in comparison to experimental data from the Orthoload database and instrumented gait analysis for three additional loading conditions: normal walking, climbing stairs and descending stairs. Ceramic-on-ceramic bearing partners show superior lubrication potential compared to hard-on-hard bearings that work with at least one articulating metal component. Lubrication regimes during the investigated activities are shown to strongly depend on the kinematics and loading conditions. The outcome from the ISO gait is not fully confirmed by the normal walking data and more challenging conditions show evidence of inferior lubrication. These findings may help to explain the differences between the in vitro predictions using the ISO gait cycle and the clinical outcome of some hard-on-hard bearings, e.g., using metal-on-metal.

  12. Hard-on-Hard Lubrication in the Artificial Hip under Dynamic Loading Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sonntag, Robert; Reinders, Jörn; Rieger, Johannes S.; Heitzmann, Daniel W. W.; Kretzer, J. Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The tribological performance of an artificial hip joint has a particularly strong influence on its success. The principle causes for failure are adverse short- and long-term reactions to wear debris and high frictional torque in the case of poor lubrication that may cause loosening of the implant. Therefore, using experimental and theoretical approaches models have been developed to evaluate lubrication under standardized conditions. A steady-state numerical model has been extended with dynamic experimental data for hard-on-hard bearings used in total hip replacements to verify the tribological relevance of the ISO 14242-1 gait cycle in comparison to experimental data from the Orthoload database and instrumented gait analysis for three additional loading conditions: normal walking, climbing stairs and descending stairs. Ceramic-on-ceramic bearing partners show superior lubrication potential compared to hard-on-hard bearings that work with at least one articulating metal component. Lubrication regimes during the investigated activities are shown to strongly depend on the kinematics and loading conditions. The outcome from the ISO gait is not fully confirmed by the normal walking data and more challenging conditions show evidence of inferior lubrication. These findings may help to explain the differences between the in vitro predictions using the ISO gait cycle and the clinical outcome of some hard-on-hard bearings, e.g., using metal-on-metal. PMID:23940772

  13. A frictional study of total hip joint replacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholes, S. C.; Unsworth, A.; Goldsmith, A. A. J.

    2000-12-01

    Polymeric wear debris produced by articulation of the femoral head against the ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene socket of a total hip replacement has been implicated as the main cause of osteolysis and subsequent failure of these implants. Potential solutions to this problem are to employ hard bearing surface combinations such as metal-on-metal or ceramic-on-ceramic prostheses. The aim of this study was to investigate the difference in lubrication modes and friction of a range of material combinations using synthetic and biological fluids as the lubricants. The experimental results were compared with theoretical predictions of film thicknesses and lubrication modes. A strong correlation was observed between experiment and theory when employing carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC) fluids as the lubricant. Under these conditions the ceramic-on-ceramic joints showed full fluid film lubrication while the metal-on-metal, metal-on-plastic, diamond-like carbon-coated stainless steel (DLC)-on-plastic and ceramic-on-plastic prostheses operated under a mixed lubrication regime. With bovine serum as the lubricant in the all ceramic joints, however, the full fluid film lubrication was inhibited due to adsorbed proteins. In the metal-on-metal joints this adsorbed protein layer acted to reduce the friction while in the ceramic coupling the friction was increased. The use of bovine serum as the lubricant also significantly increased the friction in both the metal-on-plastic and ceramic-on-plastic joints. The friction produced by the DLC-on-plastic joints depended on the quality of the coating. Those joints with a less consistent coating and therefore a higher surface roughness gave significantly higher friction than the smoother, more consistently coated heads.

  14. Wear and deformation of ceramic-on-polyethylene total hip replacements with joint laxity and swing phase microseparation.

    PubMed

    Williams, S; Butterfield, M; Stewart, T; Ingham, E; Stone, M; Fisher, J

    2003-01-01

    Wear of polyethylene and the resulting wear debris-induced osteolysis remains a major cause of long-term failure in artificial hip joints. There is interest in understanding engineering and clinical conditions that influence wear rates. Fluoroscopic studies have shown separation of the head and the cup during the swing phase of walking due to joint laxity. In ceramic-on-ceramic hips, joint laxity and microseparation, which leads to contact of the head on the superior rim of the cup, has led to localized damage and increased wear in vivo and in vitro. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of joint laxity and microseparation on the wear of ceramic on polyethylene artificial hip joints in an in vitro simulator. Microseparation during the swing phase of the walking cycle produced contact of the ceramic head on the rim of the polyethylene acetabular cup that deformed the softer polyethylene cup. No damage to the alumina ceramic femoral head was found. Under standard simulator conditions the volume change of the moderately crosslinked polyethylene cups was 25.6 +/- 5.3 mm3/million cycles and this reduced to 5.6 +/- 4.2 mm3/million cycles under microseparation conditions. Testing under microseparation conditions caused the rim of the polyethylene cup to deform locally, possibly due to creep, and the volume change of the polyethylene cup when the head relocated was substantially reduced, possibly due to improved lubrication. Joint laxity may be caused by poor soft tissue tension or migration and subsidence of components. In ceramic-on-polyethylene acetabular cups wear was decreased with a small degree of joint laxity, while in contrast in hard-on-hard alumina bearings, microseparation accelerated wear. These findings may have significant implications for the choice of fixation systems to be used for different types of bearing couples.

  15. In vivo hip joint loads and pedal forces during ergometer cycling.

    PubMed

    Damm, P; Dymke, J; Bender, A; Duda, G; Bergmann, G

    2017-07-26

    The rising prevalence of osteoarthritis and an increase in total hip replacements calls for attention to potential therapeutic activities. Cycling is considered as a low impact exercise for the hip joint and hence recommended. However, there are limited data about hip joint loading to support this claim. The aim of this study was to measure synchronously the in vivo hip joint loads and pedal forces during cycling. The in vivo hip joint loads were measured in 5 patients with instrumented hip implants. Data were collected at several combinations of power and cadence, at two saddle heights. Joint loads and pedal forces showed strong linear correlation with power. So the relationship between the external pedal forces and internal joint forces was shown. While cycling at different cadences the minimum joint loads were acquired at 60RPM. The lower saddle height configuration results in an approximately 15% increase compared to normal saddle height. The results offered new insights into the actual effects of cycling on the hip joint and can serve as useful tools while developing an optimum cycling regimen for individuals with coxarthrosis or following total hip arthroplasty. Due to the relatively low contact forces, cycling at a moderate power level of 90W at a normal saddle height is suitable for patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii reaches a new frontier: prosthetic hip joint infection.

    PubMed

    Hischebeth, G T R; Wimmer, M D; Molitor, E; Seifert, H; Gravius, S; Bekeredjian-Ding, I

    2015-02-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen primarily in countries with a high prevalence of multidrug resistance. Here we report the detection of a bla OXA23 carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii strain in a German patient with prosthetic hip joint infection following several hip joint surgeries but no history of foreign travel.

  17. 21 CFR 888.3350 - Hip joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. 888.3350 Section 888.3350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer semi...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3350 - Hip joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. 888.3350 Section 888.3350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer...

  19. A model of flexion-extension movement in hip joint using polynomial interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth-Taşcǎu, Mirela; Pater, Flavius; Stoia, Dan Ioan

    2013-10-01

    The study proposes a mathematical model of flexion-extension movement in hip joint based on Lagrange polynomial interpolation. In order to develop and validate the proposed model the angle of flexion-extension (F-E) in hip joint was analyzed. The two main reasons of this option rely on the importance of the hip joint in human locomotion and the fact that flexion-extension movement is developed in most of the human joints. The mathematical model of joint movement allows developing a more detailed kinematic analysis of the joint movements. The raw data representing the variation of the flexion-extension angle in hip joint was achieved by experimental kinematic analysis of a lot of ten young healthy subjects.

  20. The effects of proteins on the friction and lubrication of artificial joints.

    PubMed

    Scholes, S C; Unsworth, A

    2006-08-01

    The tribological testing of artificial hip and knee joints in the laboratory has been ongoing for several decades. This work has been carried out in an attempt to simulate the loading and motion conditions applied in vivo and, therefore, the potential for the success of the joint. However, several different lubricants have been used in these tests. The work documented in this paper compares results obtained using different lubricants and makes suggestions for future work. Hip joints and knee joints of different material combinations were tested in a friction simulator to determine their friction and lubrication properties. Both carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) fluids and bovine serum (with CMC fluids added) were used as the lubricants. These were prepared to various viscosities to produce the Stribeck plots. Human synovial fluid, of just one viscosity, was used as the lubricant with some of the joints to give a true comparison with physiological lubricants. The results showed that, in most cases, the lubricant had a significant effect on the friction developed between the joint surfaces. This is thought to be due to the proteins that are present within the bovine serum adsorbing to the bearing surfaces, creating 'solid-like' films which rub together, protecting the surfaces from solid-to-solid contact. This would be beneficial in terms of wear but can either increase or decrease the friction between the contacting surfaces. It is important to simulate the conditions in vivo as closely as possible when testing these joints to try to obtain a better comparison between the joints and to simulate more accurately the way that these joints will operate in the body. In an attempt to simulate synovial fluid, bovine serum seems to be the most popular lubricant used at present. It would be beneficial, however, to develop a new synthetic lubricant that more closely matches synovial fluid. This would allow us to predict more accurately how these joints would operate long-term in

  1. Coordination and timing of spine and hip joints during full body reaching tasks

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, James S; Gibson, Gary E.

    2007-01-01

    Coupling of spine and hip joints during full body reaching tasks was investigated in sixteen participants (8 male & 8 female) who performed reaching tasks at comfortable and fast-paced movement speeds to three targets located in a para-sagittal plane. The participants paused at target contact for 500 ms and then returned to an upright posture. Three dimensional joint motions of the spine and hip were recorded using an electromagnetic tracking device. We found an effect of movement phase (i.e. reach and return) on the onset timing of the spine and hip joints. For most target locations and movement speeds, spine motion onset preceded hip motion onset during the reaching phase of the movement task. In the reach phase, when averaged across all movement conditions, spine joint motion preceded hip joint motion by an average of 48.9 ms. In contrast, in the return phase, hip joint motion preceded spine joint motion by an average of 63.0 ms. Additionally, when subjects were instructed to use either a knee flexion or knee extension strategy to perform the reaching tasks there was no effect of movement strategy on timing of the spine and hip. There was also no effect of target height on the spine hip ratio, but as movement speed increased, the spine/hip ratio decreased for all target locations due primarily to an increase in hip joint excursion. The findings indicate clear differences in onset timing of the spine and hip joints during reaching tasks that necessitate some forward bending of the trunk and that onset timing is reversed for the return to an upright posture. PMID:17055098

  2. Three-dimensional morphology and bony range of movement in hip joints in patients with hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, I; Takao, M; Sakai, T; Miki, H; Nishii, T; Sugano, N

    2014-05-01

    To confirm whether developmental dysplasia of the hip has a risk of hip impingement, we analysed maximum ranges of movement to the point of bony impingement, and impingement location using three-dimensional (3D) surface models of the pelvis and femur in combination with 3D morphology of the hip joint using computer-assisted methods. Results of computed tomography were examined for 52 hip joints with DDH and 73 normal healthy hip joints. DDH shows larger maximum extension (p = 0.001) and internal rotation at 90° flexion (p < 0.001). Similar maximum flexion (p = 0.835) and external rotation (p = 0.713) were observed between groups, while high rates of extra-articular impingement were noticed in these directions in DDH (p < 0.001). Smaller cranial acetabular anteversion (p = 0.048), centre-edge angles (p < 0.001), a circumferentially shallower acetabulum, larger femoral neck anteversion (p < 0.001), and larger alpha angle were identified in DDH. Risk of anterior impingement in retroverted DDH hips is similar to that in retroverted normal hips in excessive adduction but minimal in less adduction. These findings might be borne in mind when considering the possibility of extra-articular posterior impingement in DDH being a source of pain, particularly for patients with a highly anteverted femoral neck.

  3. Shoulder and hip joint for hard space suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    Shoulder and hip joints for hard space suits are disclosed which are comprised of three serially connected truncated spherical sections, the ends of which converge. Ball bearings between the sections permit relative rotation. The proximal end of the first section is connected to the torso covering by a ball bearing and the distal end of the outermost section is connected to the elbow or thigh covering by a ball bearing. The sections are equi-angular and this alleviates lockup, the condition where the distal end of the joint leaves the plane in which the user is attempting to flex. The axes of rotation of the bearings and the bearing mid planes are arranged to intersect in a particular manner that provides the joint with a minimum envelope. In one embodiment, the races of the bearing between the innermost section and the second section is partially within the inner race of the bearing between the torso and the innermost spherical section further to reduce bulk.

  4. A case report of severely damaged hip joint caused by SAPHO syndrome treated with 2-stage total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Ingwon; Cha, Hoon-Suk; Yoon, Young Cheol; Park, Youn-Soo; Lim, Seung-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome is an increasingly recognized entity. The hip joint is known as a less frequently affected site in SAPHO syndrome, and there has been limited reports about hip joint diseases caused by SAPHO syndrome, and as such adequate treatment for this disease spectrum is still not fully elucidated. Case: We describe the case of a 52-year-old man admitted for SAPHO syndrome who went on to be diagnosed with advanced secondary hip arthritis associated with disabling right hip pain. The diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome was delayed; the patient was given a clinical diagnosis of osteomyelitis and treated with prolonged courses of antibiotics and open surgical debridement at previous tertiary health facility. The patient underwent 2-stage joint replacement surgery in our hospital. At 1 year after the surgery, he is well, with minimal right hip pain and the prosthesis is functioning well. Conclusion: This case shows the safety and effectiveness of the 2-stage joint replacement in treating destructive hip disease caused by SAPHO syndrome mimicking infectious arthritis. PMID:27399138

  5. Nonvascularized Bone Grafting Defers Joint Arthroplasty in Hip Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Seyler, Thorsten M.; Marker, David R.; Ulrich, Slif D.; Fatscher, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    A variety of nonvascularized bone grafting techniques have been proposed with varying degrees of success as treatment alternatives for osteonecrosis of the femoral head. The success of these procedures may be enhanced using ancillary growth and differentiation factors. We retrospectively reviewed 33 patients (39 hips) with osteonecrosis of the hip who had nonvascularized bone grafting procedures with supplemental OP-1. We compared the outcomes in this cohort to similar patients treated nonoperatively or with other nonvascularized bone grafting procedures. We used a trapdoor to make a window at the head-neck junction to remove necrotic bone and packed the excavated area with autogenous cancellous bone graft, marrow, and OP-1. The minimum followup was 24 months (mean, 36 months; range, 24–50 months). We performed no further surgery in 25 of 30 small- and medium-sized lesions (80%) but did in two of nine large lesions. Hips with Ficat Stage II disease were not reoperated in 18 of 22 cases during the followup periods. Our short-term results compare similarly to nonoperative treatment and other reports of nonvascularized bone grafting. With the addition of ancillary growth factors, these procedures effectively reduce donor site morbidity and may defer joint arthroplasty in selected patients. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11999-008-0211-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18351424

  6. 21 CFR 888.3410 - Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semiconstrained resurfacing cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer... Devices § 888.3410 Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semiconstrained resurfacing cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semi-constrained resurfacing...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3410 - Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semiconstrained resurfacing cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer... Devices § 888.3410 Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semiconstrained resurfacing cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semi-constrained resurfacing...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3410 - Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semiconstrained resurfacing cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer... Devices § 888.3410 Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semiconstrained resurfacing cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semi-constrained resurfacing...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3410 - Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semiconstrained resurfacing cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer... Devices § 888.3410 Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semiconstrained resurfacing cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semi-constrained...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3410 - Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semiconstrained resurfacing cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer... Devices § 888.3410 Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semiconstrained resurfacing cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semi-constrained...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3353 - Hip joint metal/ceramic/polymer semi-constrained cemented or nonporous uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/ceramic/polymer semi-constrained... Devices § 888.3353 Hip joint metal/ceramic/polymer semi-constrained cemented or nonporous uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/ceramic/polymer semi-constrained cemented or...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3358 - Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained... Devices § 888.3358 Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3358 - Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained... Devices § 888.3358 Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3320 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a... Devices § 888.3320 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3330 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an... Devices § 888.3330 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3330 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an... Devices § 888.3330 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3320 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a... Devices § 888.3320 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3320 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a... Devices § 888.3320 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3320 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a... Devices § 888.3320 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3330 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an... Devices § 888.3330 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3330 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an... Devices § 888.3330 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3330 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an... Devices § 888.3330 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3320 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a... Devices § 888.3320 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3353 - Hip joint metal/ceramic/polymer semi-constrained cemented or nonporous uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint metal/ceramic/polymer semi-constrained... Devices § 888.3353 Hip joint metal/ceramic/polymer semi-constrained cemented or nonporous uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/ceramic/polymer semi-constrained cemented or...

  5. Increased expression of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) in osteoarthritis of human knee joint compared to hip joint.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, John H; Rai, Vikrant; Dilisio, Matthew F; Sekundiak, Todd D; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2017-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease characterized by the destruction of cartilage. The greatest risk factors for the development of OA include age and obesity. Recent studies suggest the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of OA. The two most common locations for OA to occur are in the knee and hip joints. The knee joint experiences more mechanical stress, cartilage degeneration, and inflammation than the hip joint. This could contribute to the increased incidence of OA in the knee joint. Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), including high-mobility group box-1, receptor for advanced glycation end products, and alarmins (S100A8 and S100A9), are released in the joint in response to stress-mediated chondrocyte and cartilage damage. This facilitates increased cartilage degradation and inflammation in the joint. Studies have documented the role of DAMPs in the pathogenesis of OA; however, the comparison of DAMPs and its influence on OA has not been discussed. In this study, we compared the DAMPs between OA knee and hip joints and found a significant difference in the levels of DAMPs expressed in the knee joint compared to the hip joint. The increased levels of DAMPs suggest a difference in the underlying pathogenesis of OA in the knee and the hip and highlights DAMPs as potential therapeutic targets for OA in the future.

  6. Muscle Strength Imbalance in the Hip Joint Caused by Fast Movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontaga, I.

    2003-07-01

    Eleven male sportsmen at the age of 24.3 ± 4.5 were examined. Their hip joint flexors and extensors were tested by an "REV-9000" Technogym dynamometer system during isokinetic movements at angular velocities of 100 (low) and 200 (high) °/s. The range of hip joint movements was from 30 (in flexion) to 130° (in extension). Torque values and their ratios for hip flexors and extensors at different angular positions were obtained and compared. It is shown that, at high speeds, the flexion movement significantly raises ( p < 0.001) the torque ratios of flexors and extensors in flexion positions of the hip (50 and 60°). These ratios approximately twofold exceed their values at moderate velocities. The weakness of hip joint extensors in extreme flexion positions of the hip may cause injury of this group of muscles at fast movements.

  7. Modern Radiological Imaging of Osteoarthritis of The Hip Joint With Consideration of Predisposing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Weber, M-A; Merle, C; Rehnitz, C; Gotterbarm, T

    2016-07-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common disease of the hip joint in adults and has a high socioeconomic impact. This review article discusses the value of three imaging modalities in the diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the hip joint: projection radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Besides established imaging diagnostics of osteoarthritis, this review also outlines new MRI techniques that enable the biochemical analysis of hip joint cartilage and discusses predisposing deformities of the hip joint including femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) with labral pathologies, hip joint dysplasia, malrotation, and, finally, femoral head necrosis, for which early detection and an exact description of the extent and localization of the necrotic area are extremely important. Conventional X-rays remain indispensable for the diagnosis of osteoarthritis, while MRI is able to depict additional early symptoms and signs of activity of the disease. With the increasing number of joint-preserving interventions such as surgical hip luxation and hip joint arthroscopy for treating FAI, high-resolution imaging is gaining further importance for both pre- and postoperative diagnostics because it can accurately recognize early stages of joint damage. With high-resolution MR sequences and MR arthrography, the detailed depiction of the thin cartilaginous coating of the hip joint has become quite possible. • Projection radiography is the method of choice for the diagnostic work-up of osteoarthritis of the hip joint.• Using computed tomography, the amount of acetabular bone stock prior to total hip arthroplasty is assessed in selected patients.• Magnetic resonance imaging can substantiate the indication of surgery in case of discrepancy between clinical symptoms and radiological findings of the hip joint.• If distinct and left untreated, predisposing conditions (such as femoroacetabular impingement) may lead to early development of osteoarthritis of the

  8. [Development of the normal infantile hip joints assessed by MRI].

    PubMed

    Wierusz-Kozłowska, M; Ziemiański, A; Kruczyński, J; Borkowski, W

    2000-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the time of appearance of the secondary ossification centers and closure of the growth plates of the acetabulum and proximal epiphysis of the femur: the triradiate cartilage, the acetabular roof growth cartilage, the subcapital growth cartilage, the growth cartilage of the major trochanter, the growth cartilage of the minor trochanter. The study is based upon 62 MRI scans of healthy hips in 45 patients aged 3-21. The examined hips showed no pathologic traits--neither in the MRI scan nor in X-ray investigation. In Spin Echo and Turbo Spin Echo sequential imaging all obtained slices were used, on GRADIENT ECHO: FISP 3D, FLASH 2D, and FLASH 3D FAT SAT only chosen slices were included in the study. This way the following results were obtained: the ossification center of the major trochanter appears at the age of 3 in girls and at the age of 6 in boys, while the ossification center of the minor trochanter appears at the age of 6 in both sexes. The times of complete ossification of following growth cartilages were observed: for the triradiate cartilage ossification was observed at age 12-15 in girls and 15-16 in boys; for the cartilage of the acetabular roof ossification was noted at age 12-15 in girls and 15-18 in boys; ossification in the subcapital growth cartilage occurred at age 15-17 in girls and 16-18 in boys; the major trochanter growth cartilage ossifies at age 15-16 in girls and 16-18 in boys; for the minor trochanter ossification of the growth cartilage occurs at age 14-16 in girls and at age 16-18 in boys. The secondary ossification center of the pubic bone appears at age 9-11 in girls and 13-16 in boys and the secondary ossification center of the acetabular roof appears at age 13-17 in girls and boys. This study expand our knowledge on the development of the hip joint and facilitate the assessment of hip pathology.

  9. Modeling effects of sagittal-plane hip joint stiffness on reciprocating gait orthosis-assisted gait.

    PubMed

    Johnson, William Brett; Fatone, Stefania; Gard, Steven A

    2013-01-01

    Upright ambulation is believed to improve quality of life for persons with lower-limb paralysis (LLP). However, ambulatory orthoses for persons with LLP, like reciprocating gait orthoses (RGOs), result in a slow, exhausting gait. Increasing the hip joint stiffness of these devices may improve the efficiency of RGO-assisted gait. The small, diverse population of RGO users makes subject recruitment challenging for clinical investigations. Therefore, we developed a lower-limb paralysis simulator (LLPS) that enabled nondisabled persons to exhibit characteristics of RGO-assisted gait, thereby serving as surrogate models for research. For this study, tests were conducted to determine the effects of increased hip joint stiffness on gait of nondisabled persons walking with the LLPS. A motion capture system, force plates, and spirometer were used to measure the hip flexion, crutch ground reaction forces (GRFs), and oxygen consumption of subjects as they walked with four different hip joint stiffness settings. Increasing the hip joint stiffness decreased hip flexion during ambulation but did not appear to affect the crutch GRFs. Walking speed was observed to initially increase with increases in hip joint stiffness, and then decrease. These findings suggest that increasing hip joint stiffness may increase walking speed for RGO users.

  10. Differences in hip-knee joint coupling during gait after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Gribbin, Timothy C; Slater, Lindsay V; Herb, C Collin; Hart, Joseph M; Chapman, Ryan M; Hertel, Jay; Kuenze, Christopher M

    2016-02-01

    After anterior cruciate ligament injury, patients have increased risk for developing degenerative osteoarthritis, potentially due to the kinematic changes that persist after surgical reconstruction. Current research only describes single joint kinematic differences rather than the way in which two joints behave concurrently, termed joint coupling. The purpose of this study was to compare knee motion relative to hip motion in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed and healthy limbs during walking and jogging. Thirty-seven recreationally active volunteers (22 reconstructed, 15 healthy) walked and jogged at 4.83 km/h and 9.66 km/h respectively. Vector coding methods were used to calculate stride-to-stride variability, magnitude, and vector angle of 6 joint couples during walking and jogging: hip frontal-knee frontal planes, hip frontal-knee sagittal, hip frontal-knee transverse, hip sagittal-knee frontal, hip sagittal-knee transverse, and hip transverse-knee frontal planes. The hip sagittal-knee frontal and hip sagittal-knee transverse joint couples had decreased variability during mid-stance, and all other couples had increased variability during the stance phase in the reconstructed group. The reconstructed group had decreased magnitude of joint excursion in the hip frontal-knee sagittal couple during all phases of gait during walking. Vector angles of the hip frontal-knee transverse couple increased in the reconstructed group during the loading, middle, and terminal stance phases, and swing phase of gait during walking. The increased variability and decreased magnitude of joint excursion indicate that movement patterns were less consistent during walking gait despite employing a more constrained system during movement in the reconstructed limb compared to healthy controls. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Nordic walking on pelvis motion and muscle activities around the hip joints of adults with hip osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Daisuke; Jigami, Hirofumi; Sato, Naritoshi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Increased compensatory pelvic movement is remarkable in limping patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA). However, a method of improving limping has not been established. The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of two types of Nordic walking by analyzing the pelvic movement and muscle activities of adults with hip OA. [Subjects and Methods] Ten patients with OA of the hip performed Japanese-style Nordic walking (JS NW), European-style Nordic walking (ES NW), and Ordinary walking (OW), and the muscle activities around the hip joint and pelvic movements were analyzed. [Results] The pelvic rotation angle was significantly larger in ES NW than in JS NW. In the stance phase, hip abductor muscle activity was significantly decreased in JS NW compared to both OW and ES NW. In the swing phase, rectus abdominis muscle activity was significantly increased in both JS NW and ES NW compared to OW and lumbar erector spinae activity was significantly lower in JS NW than in OW. [Conclusion] JS NW style may reduce the compensatory pelvic rotation in patients with hip OA. JS NW might be better for joint protection and prevention of secondary disorders of the hip in OA patients. PMID:27190455

  12. Joint awareness in osteoarthritis of the hip and knee evaluated with the 'Forgotten Joint' Score before and after joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Thienpont, E; Vanden Berghe, A; Schwab, P E; Forthomme, J P; Cornu, O

    2016-10-01

    To utilize the 'Forgotten Joint' Score (FJS), a 12-item questionnaire analysing the ability to forget the joint, for comparing preoperative status in osteoarthritic patients scheduled for total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Higher scores represent a better result with a maximum of 100. The hypothesis of this study was that a preoperative difference in favour of hip arthritis could eventually explain why THA is cited more often as a forgotten joint than TKA. A prospective cohort study was conducted in 150 patients with either tricompartmental knee (n = 75) or hip osteoarthritis (n = 75). Patients completed FJS-12 scores preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively. A similar preoperative FJS-12 was observed for hip (22 (15)) and knee osteoarthritis (24 (17)) (n.s.). The postoperative FJS-12 score was significantly higher for THA (80 (24)) than for TKA (70 (27)) (p < 0.05). High reliability after 6 weeks was observed for the preoperative FJS-12 test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.87) in TKA. A preoperative floor effect of 15 % in THA and 0 % in TKA was found as well as a postoperative ceiling effect of 33 % in THA and 9 % in TKA. The clinical relevance of utilizing the FJS-12 as an instrument to evaluate outcome is strongly proposed for knee arthroplasty. In general, one is not aware of a healthy joint during the ADL, and it can therefore be regarded as 'forgotten'. The preoperative FJS-12 Score is a powerful tool to provide patients with clearer insights into their positive evolution after surgery. The use of the FJS-12 in THA is a topic for further research, as this study found that floor and ceiling effects limit its usefulness in studies evaluating clinical outcome in this area. II.

  13. A novel modelling and simulation method of hip joint surface contact stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Monan; Wang, Lei; Li, Pengcheng; Fu, Yili

    2017-01-02

    Understanding the hip joint surface contact stress distribution characteristics is helpful to determine hip joint biomechanical features and abnormal pathological behavior. Firstly, a 3-dimensional static hip joint biomechanical model is built using analytical method of model in order to study biomechanical properties including bearing area, stress distribution and the peak value of the contact stress of the femoral head, which reveals the relationship between the biomechanical properties and its geometric parameters. Secondly, based on the finite element analysis of the hip joint model, the contact stress distribution on the surface of femoral head is acquired under the condition of the different joint force and the acetabulum coverage rate. Finally, according to the evaluation of the femoral head surface stress and contact stress peak under different load distribution, accuracy and universality of the biomechanical model is verified.

  14. Clarification on Mechanical Characteristic in State of Stress of Osteoarthritis of the Hip Joint Using Stress Freezing Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maezaki, Nobutaka; Ezumi, Tsutomu; Hachiya, Masashi

    In this research, the Osteoarthritis of Hip Joint was pick up, the 3-dimensional stress freezing method of photoelastic method was applied, and the state of the stress in the normality hip joint and the transformable hip joint was examined. The direction and the singular point of principal stress and stress distribution were experimentally examined. At result, The Osteoarthritis of Hip Joint touches by 2 points, Osteoarthritis of Hip Joint occurrence of the new singular point with flat of the femoral head, They change the direction of the principal stress line in an existing singular point is cause.

  15. Note: Application of a novel 2(3HUS+S) parallel manipulator for simulation of hip joint motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, X. L.; Cheng, G.; Liu, X. Z.

    2016-07-01

    In the paper, a novel 2(3HUS+S) parallel manipulator, which has two moving platforms, is proposed. The parallel manipulator is adopted to simulate hip joint motion and can conduct an experiment for two hip joints simultaneously. Motion experiments are conducted in the paper, and the recommended hip joint motion curves from ISO14242 and actual hip joint motions during jogging and walking are selected as the simulated motions. The experimental results indicate that the 2(3HUS+S) parallel manipulator can realize the simulation of many kinds of hip joint motions without changing the structure size.

  16. Hip joint geometry effects on cartilage contact stresses during a gait cycle.

    PubMed

    Hui-Hui Wu; Dong Wang; An-Bang Ma; Dong-Yun Gu

    2016-08-01

    The cartilage surface geometry of natural human hip joint is commonly regarded as sphere. It has been widely applied in computational simulation and hip joint prosthesis design. Some new geometry models have been developed and the sphere assumption has been questioned recently. The objective of this study was to analyze joint geometry effects on cartilage contact stress distribution and investigate contact patterns during a whole gait cycle. Hip surface was reconstructed from CT data of a healthy volunteer. Three finite element (FE) models of hip joint were developed from different cartilage geometries: natural geometry, sphere and rotational ellipsoid. Loads at ten instants of gait cycle were applied to these models based on published in-vivo data. FE predictions of peak contact pressure during gait of natural hip were compared with sphere and rotational ellipsoid replaced hip joint. Contact occurs mainly in upper anterior region of both acetabulum and femur distributing along sagittal plane of human body. It moves towards inferolateral aspect as the resultant joint reaction force changes during walking for natural hip. Peak pressures at the instant with maximum contact force were 7.48 MPa, 14.97 MPa and 13.12 MPa for models with natural hip surface, sphere replaced and rotational ellipsoid replaced surface respectively. During the whole gait cycle, contact pressure of natural hip ranked lowest in most of the instants, followed by rotational ellipsoid replaced and sphere replaced hip. The results indicate that rotational ellipsoid is more consistent with natural hip cartilage geometry than sphere during normal walking. This means rotational ellipsoid prosthesis could give a better description of physiological structure compared with standard sphere prosthesis. Therefore, rotational ellipsoid would be a better choice for prosthesis design.

  17. Nondestructive inspection of phase transformation in zirconia-containing hip joints by confocal Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenliang; Sugano, Nobuhiko; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2013-12-01

    Environmental metastability of zirconia (ZrO2) ceramic in the human body [represented by a tetragonal-to-monoclinic (t→m) phase transformation] takes place on the surface of the artificial joint and proceeds with time toward its interior. Its quantitative characterization is mandatory for the safety of joint implants and consists of the assessment of the in-depth monoclinic profile fraction as compared to that of the initially untransformed material. We attempt to fully establish a characterization protocol and present two different nondestructive approaches for resolving highly graded phase-transformation profiles along the hip-joint subsurface by confocal Raman microprobe technique. A series of partially transformed tetragonal zirconia polycrystal and zirconia-toughened alumina ceramics are used as screening samples. Probe biases could be eliminated and the real transformation profiles retrieved through a deconvolution procedure of Raman experimental data collected as a function of pinhole aperture and focal depth, respectively. Confirmation of the confocal assessments was made by a destructive cross-sectional inspection by both laser optical microscope and Raman spectral line scans. This study unveils for the first time the real quantitative amount of surface phase-transformation fractions and the related subsurface profiles in zirconia-based retrieved medical samples.

  18. Acetabular cartilage defects cause altered hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait

    PubMed Central

    Samaan, Michael A.; Teng, Hsiang-Ling; Kumar, Deepak; Lee, Sonia; Link, Thomas; Majumdar, Sharmila; Souza, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with acetabular cartilage defects reported increased pain and disability compared to those without acetabular cartilage defects. The specific effects of acetabular cartilage defects on lower extremity coordination patterns are unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait in those with and without acetabular cartilage defects. Methods A combined approach, consisting of a semi-quantitative MRI-based quantification method and vector coding, was used to assess hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait in those with and without acetabular cartilage lesions. Findings The coordination variability of the hip flexion-extension/knee rotation, hip abduction-adduction/knee rotation and hip rotation/knee rotation joint couplings were reduced in the acetabular lesion group compared to the control group during loading response of the gait cycle. The lesion group demonstrated increased variability in the hip flexion-extension/knee rotation and hip abduction-adduction/knee rotation joint couplings, compared to the control group, during the terminal stance/pre-swing phase of gait. Interpretation Reduced variability during loading response in the lesion group may suggest reduced movement strategies and a possible compensation mechanism for lower extremity instability during this phase of the gait cycle. During terminal stance/pre-swing, a larger variability in the lesion group may suggest increased movement strategies and represent a compensation or pain avoidance mechanism caused by the load applied to the hip joint. PMID:26298706

  19. Acetabular cartilage defects cause altered hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait.

    PubMed

    Samaan, Michael A; Teng, Hsiang-Ling; Kumar, Deepak; Lee, Sonia; Link, Thomas M; Majumdar, Sharmila; Souza, Richard B

    2015-12-01

    Patients with acetabular cartilage defects reported increased pain and disability compared to those without acetabular cartilage defects. The specific effects of acetabular cartilage defects on lower extremity coordination patterns are unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait in those with and without acetabular cartilage defects. A combined approach, consisting of a semi-quantitative MRI-based quantification method and vector coding, was used to assess hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait in those with and without acetabular cartilage lesions. The coordination variability of the hip flexion-extension/knee rotation, hip abduction-adduction/knee rotation, and hip rotation/knee rotation joint couplings were reduced in the acetabular lesion group compared to the control group during loading response of the gait cycle. The lesion group demonstrated increased variability in the hip flexion-extension/knee rotation and hip abduction-adduction/knee rotation joint couplings, compared to the control group, during the terminal stance/pre-swing phase of gait. Reduced variability during loading response in the lesion group may suggest reduced movement strategies and a possible compensation mechanism for lower extremity instability during this phase of the gait cycle. During terminal stance/pre-swing, a larger variability in the lesion group may suggest increased movement strategies and represent a compensation or pain avoidance mechanism caused by the load applied to the hip joint. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. In vivo baseline measurements of hip joint range of motion in suspensory and nonsuspensory anthropoids.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Ashley S

    2014-03-01

    Hominoids and atelines are known to use suspensory behaviors and are assumed to possess greater hip joint mobility than nonsuspensory monkeys, particularly for range of abduction. This assumption has greatly influenced how extant and fossil primate hip joint morphology has been interpreted, despite the fact that there are no data available on hip mobility in hominoids or Ateles. This study uses in vivo measurements to test the hypothesis that suspensory anthropoids have significantly greater ranges of hip joint mobility than nonsuspensory anthropoids. Passive hip joint mobility was measured on a large sample of anesthetized captive anthropoids (nonhuman hominids = 43, hylobatids = 6, cercopithecids = 43, Ateles = 6, and Cebus = 6). Angular and linear data were collected using goniometers and tape measures. Range of motion (ROM) data were analyzed for significant differences by locomotor group using ANOVA and phylogenetic regression. The data demonstrate that suspensory anthropoids are capable of significantly greater hip abduction and external rotation. Degree of flexion and internal rotation were not larger in the suspensory primates, indicating that suspension is not associated with a global increase in hip mobility. Future work should consider the role of external rotation in abduction ability, how the physical position of the distal limb segments are influenced by differences in ROM proximally, as well as focus on bony and soft tissue differences that enable or restrict abduction and external rotation at the anthropoid hip joint.

  1. [Viscosity determination of synovial fluids from the canine hip and elbow joint as well as the human knee joint].

    PubMed

    Helms, Gabriele; Rittmann, Pia; Wefstaedt, Patrick; Windhagen, Henning; Pressel, Thomas; Behrens, Bernd-Arno; Nolte, Ingo

    2008-01-01

    The development of pathological changes in both human and canine hip joints is mainly caused by a lack of synovial fluid lubrication. This results in an increased joint abrasion. Even after implantation of joint prosthesis, inadequate lubrication can lead to abrasion in the tribological pair. This can finally result in aseptic loosening of the prosthesis. In spite of the enormous number of studies that have been performed on human, only little knowledge about the tribological properties of the joints in dogs is available in the literature. For this reason the viscosities of synovial fluid, derived from physiological and pathologically changed canine elbow joints were measured. The viscosities were determined by the use of a cone-plate viscometer at different temperatures and shear rates. The obtained values were compared with the viscosity values of pathologically changed synovial fluids from human knee joints as well as with pathological samples from the canine hip joint. The results show that the viscosity values vary within a series of measurements and are inversely proportional to the temperature of the sample and the shear rate. The differences between the average viscosities of canine and human synovial fluids taken from pathologically changed joints are below 4% (22.5 s(-1) at theta1 = 25 degrees C). The findings of this study are being implemented in a FE-Model for the computation of actual forces in the hip joint during different movements. This would represent a contribution to an improved prosthetic treatment of canine and human hips.

  2. Evaluation of the magnitude of hip joint deformation in subjects with avascular necrosis of the hip joint during walking with and without Scottish Rite orthosis.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mohammad Taghi; Mohammadi, Ali; Ebrahimi, Mohammad Hossein; McGarry, Anthony

    2017-02-01

    The femoral head in subjects with leg calve perthes disease (LCPD) is generally considerably deformed. It is debatable whether this deformation is due to an increase in applied loads, a decrease in bone mineral density or a change in containment of articular surfaces. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of these factors on deformation of the femoral head. Two subjects with LCPD participated in this study. Subject motion and the forces applied on the affected leg were recorded using a motion analysis system (Qualsis(TM)) and a Kistler force plate. OpenSim software was used to determine joint contact force of the hip joint whilst walking with and without a Scottish Rite orthosis. 3D Models of hip joints of both subjects were produced by Mimics software. The deformation of femoral bone was determined by Abaqus. Mean values of the force applied on the leg increased while walking with the orthosis. There was no difference between bone mineral density (BMD) of the femoral bone of normal and LCPD sides (p-value>0.05) and no difference between hip joint contact force of normal and LCPD sides. Hip joint containment appeared to decrease follow the use of the orthosis. It can be concluded that the deformation of femoral head in LCPD may not be due to change in BMD or applied load. Although the Scottish Rite orthosis is used mostly to increase hip joint containment, it appears to reduce hip joint contact area. It is recommended that a similar study is conducted using a higher number of subjects.

  3. Inter-joint coordination between hips and trunk during downswings: Effects on the clubhead speed.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ahnryul; Lee, In-Kwang; Choi, Mun-Taek; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2016-10-01

    Understanding of the inter-joint coordination between rotational movement of each hip and trunk in golf would provide basic knowledge regarding how the neuromuscular system organises the related joints to perform a successful swing motion. In this study, we evaluated the inter-joint coordination characteristics between rotational movement of the hips and trunk during golf downswings. Twenty-one right-handed male professional golfers were recruited for this study. Infrared cameras were installed to capture the swing motion. The axial rotation angle, angular velocity and inter-joint coordination were calculated by the Euler angle, numerical difference method and continuous relative phase, respectively. A more typical inter-joint coordination demonstrated in the leading hip/trunk than trailing hip/trunk. Three coordination characteristics of the leading hip/trunk reported a significant relationship with clubhead speed at impact (r < -0.5) in male professional golfers. The increased rotation difference between the leading hip and trunk in the overall downswing phase as well as the faster rotation of the leading hip compared to that of the trunk in the early downswing play important roles in increasing clubhead speed. These novel inter-joint coordination strategies have the great potential to use a biomechanical guideline to improve the golf swing performance of unskilled golfers.

  4. Hip joint contact loads in older adults during recovery from forward loss of balance by stepping.

    PubMed

    Graham, David F; Modenese, Luca; Trewartha, Grant; Carty, Christopher P; Constantinou, Maria; Lloyd, David G; Barrett, Rod S

    2016-09-06

    Hip joint contact loads during activities of daily living are not generally considered high enough to cause acute bone or joint injury. However there is some evidence that hip joint loads may be higher in stumble recovery from loss of balance. A common laboratory method used to evaluate balance recovery performance involves suddenly releasing participants from various static forward lean magnitudes (perturbation intensities). Prior studies have shown that when released from the same perturbation intensity, some older adults are able to recover with a single step, whereas others require multiple steps. The main purpose of this study was to use a musculoskeletal model to determine the effect of three balance perturbation intensities and the use of single versus multiple recovery steps on hip joint contact loads during recovery from forward loss of balance in community dwelling older adults (n=76). We also evaluated the association of peak hip contact loads with perturbation intensity, step length and trunk flexion angle at foot contact at each participant׳s maximum recoverable lean angle (MRLA). Peak hip joint contact loads were computed using muscle force estimates obtained using Static Optimisation and increased as lean magnitude was increased and were on average 32% higher for Single Steppers compared to Multiple Steppers. At the MRLA, peak hip contact loads ranged from 4.3 to 12.7 body weights and multiple linear stepwise regression further revealed that initial lean angle, step length and trunk angle at foot contact together explained 27% of the total variance in hip joint contact load. Overall findings indicated that older adults experience peak hip joint contact loads during maximal balance recovery by stepping that in some cases exceeded loads reported to cause mechanical failure of cadaver femurs. While step length and trunk flexion angle are strong predictors of step recovery performance they are at best moderate predictors of peak hip joint loading

  5. [Short- and medium-term effectivenesses of stemless hip arthroplasty for treating hip joint disease in young and middle-aged patients].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingzhen; Liu, Wuyang; Gao, Hui; Shi, Mingxiang; Lian, Yucai

    2014-09-01

    To summarize the short- and medium-term effectivenesses of stemless hip arthroplasty for treating hip joint disease in young and middle-aged patients. Between June 2005 and December 2010, 25 cases (27 hips) of hip joint disease were treated with stemless hip arthroplasty. There were 17 males (19 hips) and 8 females (8 hips) with an average age of 45.6 years (range, 30-57 years), including 13 left hips, 10 right hips, and 2 bilateral hips. The causes included avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) secondary to femoral neck fracture in 5 cases (5 hips), ANFH in 15 cases (16 hips), osteoarthritis of the hip joint caused by ankylosing spondylitis in 2 cases (3 hips), osteoarthritis of the hip joint caused by dysplasia of acetabular in 2 cases (2 hips), and rheumatoid arthritis in 1 case (1 hip). The disease duration was 1-17 years (mean, 6.1 years). Before operation, the Harris score was 47.6 ± 14.2. The incision healed by first intention in all patients, and no complications occurred, such as infection, periprosthetic fracture, and deep vein thrombosis of lower extremity. Twenty-five patients (27 hips) were followed up 36-96 months (mean, 51 months). One case (1 hip) had sciatic nerve injury after operation, which was relieved by symptomatic treatment. One case (1 hip) had prosthesis loosening, which was relieved after revision. The survival rate of prosthesis was 96.3% (26/27). At last follow-up, the Harris score was 92.1 ± 3.6, which was significantly better than preoperative score (t = 18.241, P = 0.000). The excellent and good rate was 88.9% (excellent in 19 hips, good in 5 hips, fair in 2 hips, and poor in 1 hip). The X-ray films showed good location of prosthesis, and no evidence of dislocation, bone resorption, osteolysis, and heterotopic ossification. Because of reserving femoral neck, biomechanics conduction and distribute of the proximal femur achieve natural biomechanics state of the human body. The short- and medium-term effectivenesses of

  6. [Geometry of the hip joint: methodology and guidelines].

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Drago; Crnković, Tomislav

    2013-03-01

    An hip fracture is an significant personal, family and health issue of people older than 65 years. In the first year of the fracture up to 30% of the injured die and about 50% of them never regain their formal degree of independence in fulfilling day-to-day activities. Estimations are that throughout 30 years in the world there will be around 6 million hip fractures per year which is about four times the todays amount. Todays predictions of hip fractures based on the hip geometry have shown us that the hip geometry is an independent variable of the bone mineral density. The hip geometry is more resistant to the effect of various factors than the bone mineral density and the changes throu life are a lot slower. The uniqueness and the sensitivity of the hip geometry in predicting a fracture is high and acceptable in research results of most authors. In this review we present the previous relevant knowledge about the measures and factors which determines the hip geometry and the accepted amount of pictorial methods of hip display. We have compared the methodology and the patients of eleven randomly picked writings on predicting hip fracture based on the hip geometry. We highlight the need of further refinement of the methodology and the more balanced selection of patients for a greater conformity in future writings. The hip geometry has shown it self as an useful diagnostical instrument but there is still more room for its improvement.

  7. Kinematic relationship between rotation of lumbar spine and hip joints during golf swing in professional golfers.

    PubMed

    Mun, Frederick; Suh, Seung Woo; Park, Hyun-Joon; Choi, Ahnryul

    2015-05-14

    Understanding the kinematics of the lumbar spine and hip joints during a golf swing is a basic step for identifying swing-specific factors associated with low back pain. The objective of this study was to examine the kinematic relationship between rotational movement of the lumbar spine and hip joints during a golf swing. Fifteen professional golfers participated in this study with employment of six infrared cameras to record their golf swings. Anatomical reference system of the upper torso, pelvis and thigh segments, and the location of each hip and knee joint were defined by the protocols of the kinematic model of previous studies. Lumbar spine and hip joint rotational angle was calculated utilizing the Euler angle method. Cross-correlation and angle-angle plot was used to examine the degree of kinematic relationship between joints. A fairly strong coupling relationship was shown between the lumbar spine and hip rotational movements with an average correlation of 0.81. Leading hip contribution to overall rotation was markedly high in the early stage of the downswing, while the lumbar spine contributed greater towards the end of the downswing; however, the relative contributions of the trailing hip and lumbar spine were nearly equal during the entire downswing. Most of the professional golfers participated in this study used a similar coordination strategy when moving their hips and lumbar spine during golf swings. The rotation of hips was observed to be more efficient in producing the overall rotation during the downswing when compared to the backswing. These results provide quantitative information to better understand the lumbar spine and hip joint kinematic characteristics of professional golfers. This study will have great potential to be used as a normal control data for the comparison with kinematic information among golfers with low back pain and for further investigation of golf swing-specific factors associated with injury.

  8. The influence of artificially increased hip and trunk stiffness on balance control in man.

    PubMed

    Grüneberg, C; Bloem, B R; Honegger, F; Allum, J H J

    2004-08-01

    Lightweight corsets were used to produce mid-body stiffening, rendering the hip and trunk joints practically inflexible. To examine the effect of this artificially increased stiffness on balance control, we perturbed the upright stance of young subjects (20-34 years of age) while they wore one of two types of corset or no corset at all. One type, the "half-corset", only increased hip stiffness, and the other, the "full-corset", increased stiffness of the hips and trunk. The perturbations consisted of combined roll and pitch rotations of the support surface (7.5 deg, 60 deg/s) in one of six different directions. Outcome measures were biomechanical responses of the legs, trunk, arms and head, and electromyographic (EMG) responses from leg, trunk, and upper arm muscles. With the full-corset, a decrease in forward stabilising trunk pitch rotation compared to the no-corset condition occurred for backward pitch tilts of the support surface. In contrast, the half-corset condition yielded increased forward trunk motion. Trunk backward pitch motion after forwards support-surface perturbations was the same for all corset conditions. Ankle torques and lower leg angle changes in the pitch direction were decreased for both corset conditions for forward pitch tilts of the support-surface but unaltered for backward tilts. Changes in trunk roll motion with increased stiffness were profound. After onset of a roll support-surface perturbation, the trunk rolled in the opposite direction to the support-surface tilt for the no-corset and half-corset conditions, but in the same direction as the tilt for the full-corset condition. Initial head roll angular accelerations (at 100 ms) were larger for the full-corset condition but in the same direction (opposite platform tilt) for all conditions. Arm roll movements were initially in the same direction as trunk movements, and were followed by large compensatory arm movements only for the full-corset condition. Leg muscle (soleus, peroneus

  9. Bilateral Hip Joint Hylan G-F 20 Granulomatous Synovitis due to Viscosupplementation Injections

    PubMed Central

    Trigger, Robert; Tsikleas, George

    2014-01-01

    We present the diagnosis of bilateral granulomatous inflammation of the hip joints associated with Hylan G-F 20 viscosupplementation injections. Clinicians recommending therapeutic Hylan injections for the management of hip arthritis should maintain clinical awareness regarding this potential complication. PMID:25210640

  10. Group C streptococcal septic arthritis of a prosthetic hip joint following dental treatment.

    PubMed

    Al-Himdani, Sarah; Woodnutt, David

    2015-10-22

    We report a case of a prosthetic joint infection occurring secondary to group C Streptococcus following dental treatment in a 66-year-old woman. This patient presented 11 years following a right hip resurfacing procedure with increasing pain and difficulty mobilising the right hip. An ultrasound and MRI scan identified a collection in the right hip joint, which was subsequently aspirated. Cultures revealed a group C Streptococcus. Extensive washout and surgical debridement of the hip joint was undertaken and the patient was treated with a protracted course of antibiotics. At 1 year follow-up, the patient demonstrated no evidence of recurrent infection. We discuss the evidence underlying prophylactic antibiotic usage regarding dental procedures in the prevention of septic arthritis in patients with prosthetic joints. We also review the spectrum of diseases caused by this organism.

  11. Properties of copper?stainless steel HIP joints before and after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tähtinen, S.; Laukkanen, A.; Singh, B. N.; Toft, P.

    2002-12-01

    The tensile and fracture behaviour of CuCrZr and CuAl25 IG0 alloys joint to 316L(N) stainless steel by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) have been determined in unirradiated and neutron-irradiated conditions. The tensile and fracture behaviour of copper alloy HIP joint specimens are dominated by the properties of the copper alloys, and particularly, by the strength mismatch and mismatch in strain hardening capacities between copper alloys and stainless steel. The test temperature, neutron irradiation and thermal cycles primarily affect the copper alloy HIP joint properties through changing the strength mismatch between the base alloys. Changes in the loading conditions i.e. tensile, bend ( JI) and mixed-mode bend ( JI/ JII) lead to different fracture modes in the copper alloy HIP joint specimens.

  12. Acute bursitis calcarea trochanterica in an infant, with perforation into the hip joint demonstrated by arthrogram.

    PubMed

    Stenström, R; Gripenberg, L

    1978-04-10

    A case of bursitis calcarea trochanterica acuta is reported in a boy aged four months. The calcification was amorphous, and arthrography revealed extension into the hip joint. The lesion was treated surgically.

  13. Advanced hip joint degeneration associated with femoroacetabular impingement in a retired chiropractor

    PubMed Central

    Emary, Peter C.; Taylor, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement is a relatively new clinical entity only recently described in the orthopedic literature. In this report, we document a severe case of hip joint osteoarthritis associated with cam-type impingement in a retired chiropractor. PMID:27713583

  14. Effects of normal and abnormal loading conditions on morphogenesis of the prenatal hip joint: application to hip dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Giorgi, Mario; Carriero, Alessandra; Shefelbine, Sandra J.; Nowlan, Niamh C.

    2015-01-01

    Joint morphogenesis is an important phase of prenatal joint development during which the opposing cartilaginous rudiments acquire their reciprocal and interlocking shapes. At an early stage of development, the prenatal hip joint is formed of a deep acetabular cavity that almost totally encloses the head. By the time of birth, the acetabulum has become shallower and the femoral head has lost substantial sphericity, reducing joint coverage and stability. In this study, we use a dynamic mechanobiological simulation to explore the effects of normal (symmetric), reduced and abnormal (asymmetric) prenatal movements on hip joint shape, to understand their importance for postnatal skeletal malformations such as developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). We successfully predict the physiological trends of decreasing sphericity and acetabular coverage of the femoral head during fetal development. We show that a full range of symmetric movements helps to maintain some of the acetabular depth and femoral head sphericity, while reduced or absent movements can lead to decreased sphericity and acetabular coverage of the femoral head. When an abnormal movement pattern was applied, a deformed joint shape was predicted, with an opened asymmetric acetabulum and the onset of a malformed femoral head. This study provides evidence for the importance of fetal movements in the prevention and manifestation of congenital musculoskeletal disorders such as DDH. PMID:26163754

  15. Effects of normal and abnormal loading conditions on morphogenesis of the prenatal hip joint: application to hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Mario; Carriero, Alessandra; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Nowlan, Niamh C

    2015-09-18

    Joint morphogenesis is an important phase of prenatal joint development during which the opposing cartilaginous rudiments acquire their reciprocal and interlocking shapes. At an early stage of development, the prenatal hip joint is formed of a deep acetabular cavity that almost totally encloses the head. By the time of birth, the acetabulum has become shallower and the femoral head has lost substantial sphericity, reducing joint coverage and stability. In this study, we use a dynamic mechanobiological simulation to explore the effects of normal (symmetric), reduced and abnormal (asymmetric) prenatal movements on hip joint shape, to understand their importance for postnatal skeletal malformations such as developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). We successfully predict the physiological trends of decreasing sphericity and acetabular coverage of the femoral head during fetal development. We show that a full range of symmetric movements helps to maintain some of the acetabular depth and femoral head sphericity, while reduced or absent movements can lead to decreased sphericity and acetabular coverage of the femoral head. When an abnormal movement pattern was applied, a deformed joint shape was predicted, with an opened asymmetric acetabulum and the onset of a malformed femoral head. This study provides evidence for the importance of fetal movements in the prevention and manifestation of congenital musculoskeletal disorders such as DDH.

  16. Reverse engineering of pelvic bone for hip joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Popov, I; Onuh, S O

    2009-01-01

    Research into fabrication of hip joint replacements combines knowledge from distinct domains, such as engineering, materials and medical fields. Recent computer assisted technologies have played an important role in the medical field. Unlike the modelling of most of the human bones, the creation of an accurate 3D model of a pelvic bone has been a challenging task. The main source of difficulties in this case has proven to be the complexity of the structure of the pelvis, having basically a free-form shape with a hole in the middle constituting some over-shadowed areas (undercuts), various cavities, areas with high form curvature, variable wall thickness with some very thin sections and inside layers with different mechanical properties. In this research work, a pelvic bone is generated using reverse engineering, rapid prototyping and rapid tooling techniques. The geometric data obtained from reverse engineering through laser scanning are used and manipulated to create accurate 3D CAD representations of these devices. These CAD models can be used for various virtual tests and simulations, as well as for reproduction through rapid manufacturing processes and then used as prototypes in tooling, physical tests and planning of surgical operations.

  17. Computed tomography assessment of hip joints in asymptomatic individuals in relation to femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Kang, Alan C L; Gooding, Andrew J; Coates, Mark H; Goh, Tony D; Armour, Paul; Rietveld, John

    2010-06-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement has become a well-recognized entity predisposing to acetabular labral tears and chondral damage, and subsequently development of osteoarthritis of the hip joint. In the authors' experience, it is common to see bony abnormalities predisposing to femoroacetabular impingement in the contralateral asymptomatic hips in patients with unilateral femoroacetabular impingement. This study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of bony abnormalities predisposing to femoroacetabular impingement in asymptomatic individuals without exposing study participants to unnecessary radiation. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 4. Fifty individuals (100 hip joints), ranging from 15 to 40 years of age, who were seen at a local hospital between March and August 2008 with abdominal trauma or nonspecific abdominal pain in whom abdominal computed tomography was performed to aid diagnosis were prospectively studied. These patients were not known to have any history of hip-related problems. Raw data from the abdominal computed tomography scan, performed on a 64-slice multidetector computed tomography scanner, were reformatted using bone algorithm into several different planes. Several measurements and observations of the hip joints were made in relation to femoroacetabular impingement. The 100 hip joints from 50 patients with no history of hip problems demonstrated that 39% of the joints (31% of female, 48% of male joints) have at least 1 morphologic aspect predisposing to femoroacetabular impingement. The majority (66% to 100% ) of the findings were bilateral; 33% of female and 52% of male asymptomatic participants in our study had at least 1 predisposing factor for femoroacetabular impingement in 1 or both of their hip joints. Based on the data collected from this study, the acetabular crossover sign had a 71% sensitivity and 88% specificity for detecting acetabular retroversion. Nonquantitative assessment of the femoral head at the anterior

  18. Effects of imbalanced muscle loading on hip joint development and maturation.

    PubMed

    Ford, Caleb A; Nowlan, Niamh C; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Killian, Megan L

    2017-05-01

    The mechanical loading environment influences the development and maturation of joints. In this study, the influence of imbalanced muscular loading on joint development was studied using localized chemical denervation of hip stabilizing muscle groups in neonatal mice. It was hypothesized that imbalanced muscle loading, targeting either gluteal muscles or quadriceps muscles, would lead to bilateral hip joint asymmetry, as measured by acetabular coverage, femoral head volume and bone morphometry, and femoral-acetabular shape. The contralateral hip joints as well as age-matched, uninjected mice were used as controls. Altered bone development was analyzed using micro-computed tomography, histology, and image registration techniques at postnatal days (P) 28, 56, and 120. This study found that unilateral muscle unloading led to reduced acetabular coverage of the femoral head, lower total volume, lower bone volume ratio, and lower mineral density, at all three time points. Histologically, the femoral head was smaller in unloaded hips, with thinner triradiate cartilage at P28 and thinner cortical bone at P120 compared to contralateral hips. Morphological shape changes were evident in unloaded hips at P56. Unloaded hips had lower trabecular thickness and increased trabecular spacing of the femoral head compared to contralateral hips. The present study suggests that decreased muscle loading of the hip leads to altered bone and joint shape and growth during postnatal maturation. Statement of Clinical Significance: Adaptations from altered muscle loading during postnatal growth investigated in this study have implications on developmental hip disorders that result from asymmetric loading, such as patients with limb-length inequality or dysplasia. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1128-1136, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Medial Translation of the Hip Joint Center Associated with the Bernese Periacetabular Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Clohisy, John C; Barrett, Susan E; Gordon, J Eric; Delgado, Eliana D; Schoenecker, Perry L

    2004-01-01

    This study assessed medial translation of the hip joint achieved by the Bernese periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) in correcting residual acetabular dysplasia deformities. 86 hips in 75 patients with an average age of 25 years (range, 12-50) were treated for symptomatic acetabular dysplasia with a periacetabular osteotomy. Radiographic analysis was performed to assess correction of the acetabular deformity with specific attention to the horizontal position of the hip joint center. All hips were followed until bony union of the iliac osteotomy and the average follow-up was 28 months. The lateral center edge angle improved an average 31.6° (-0.4° preoperative, 31.2° at follow-up). Anterior center edge angle improved 39.3° (-4.5° to 34.8°). The acetabular roof obliquity improved an average 21.8° (25.1° to 3.3°). Preoperatively, the average distance from the medial aspect of the femoral head to the ilioischial line was 17.6 mm. This distance was decreased to an average 7.8 mm postoperatively. This change resulted in an average medial translation of the hip joint center of 9.8 mm, (range -6 to 31mm). Overall, some degree of medial translation of the hip joint center was obtained in 79 (92%) of the hips. 4 (5%) were maintained in the same horizontal position, and 3 (3%) had slight lateral repositioning. For the hips translated medially, the average change was 10.0 mm, and 72% of all hips had an optimal correction with the distance between the medial aspect of the femoral head and the ilioischial line being between 0 and 10 mm. This study demonstrates that in addition to optimizing femoral head coverage, a major and distinct advantage of the periacetabular osteotomy is reproducible and consistent medial translation of the hip joint center. PMID:15296205

  20. Lower-limb joint mechanics after total hip arthroplasty during sitting and standing tasks.

    PubMed

    Lamontagne, Mario; Beaulieu, Mélanie L; Varin, Daniel; Beaulé, Paul E

    2012-10-01

    While the effect of total hip arthroplasty on the operated limb mechanics is well documented, little is known on its effect on the contralateral limb. The purpose of this study was to measure the joint mechanics of both lower limbs during the tasks of sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit. Twenty total hip arthroplasty patients and 20 control participants performed three trials of each task from which 3D lower-limb joint kinematics and kinetics were obtained. Total hip arthroplasty patients exhibited lower operated-hip joint flexion, extension moments, and power, occurring most frequently near seat-on and seat-off. Despite these reduced kinetic variables in the operated hip, the joints of the non-operated limb generated similar joint kinetics as the matched control participants. These results indicated the patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty could adopt a strategy that allowed them to reduce moments and power generated at the operated lower-limb joints without overcompensating with the non-operated leg. Although such a strategy may be desirable given that higher loads can increase friction and accelerate wear of the prosthesis, reduced loading may be an indication of inadequate muscle strength that needs to be addressed.

  1. Articular cartilage friction increases in hip joints after the removal of acetabular labrum.

    PubMed

    Song, Yongnam; Ito, Hiroshi; Kourtis, Lampros; Safran, Marc R; Carter, Dennis R; Giori, Nicholas J

    2012-02-02

    The acetabular labrum is believed to have a sealing function. However, a torn labrum may not effectively prevent joint fluid from escaping a compressed joint, resulting in impaired lubrication. We aimed to understand the role of the acetabular labrum in maintaining a low friction environment in the hip joint. We did this by measuring the resistance to rotation (RTR) of the hip, which reflects the friction of the articular cartilage surface, following focal and complete labrectomy. Five cadaveric hips without evidence of osteoarthritis and impingement were tested. We measured resistance to rotation of the hip joint during 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 times body weight (BW) cyclic loading in the intact hip, and after focal and complete labrectomy. Resistance to rotation, which reflects articular cartilage friction in an intact hip was significantly increased following focal labrectomy at 1-3 BW loading, and following complete labrectomy at all load levels. The acetabular labrum appears to maintain a low friction environment, possibly by sealing the joint from fluid exudation. Even focal labrectomy may result in increased joint friction, a condition that may be detrimental to articular cartilage and lead to osteoarthritis.

  2. The Hip-Spine Effect: A Biomechanical Study of Ischiofemoral Impingement Effect on Lumbar Facet Joints.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hoyos, Juan; Khoury, Anthony; Schröder, Ricardo; Johnson, Eric; Palmer, Ian J; Martin, Hal D

    2017-01-01

    To assess the relation between ischiofemoral impingement (IFI) and lumbar facet joint load during hip extension in cadavers. Twelve hips in 6 fresh T1-to-toes cadaveric specimens were tested. A complete pretesting imaging evaluation was performed using computed tomography scan. Cadavers were positioned in lateral decubitus and fixed to a dissection table. Both legs were placed on a frame in a simulated walking position. Through a posterior lumbar spine approach L3-4 and L4-5 facet joints were dissected bilaterally. In addition, through a posterolateral approach to the hip, the space between the ischium and the lesser trochanter was dissected and measured. Ultrasensitive, and previously validated, piezoresistive force sensors were placed in lumbar facet joints of L3-4 and L4-5. Lumbar facet loads during hip extension were measured in native hip conditions and after simulating IFI by performing lesser trochanter osteotomy and lengthening. Four paired t-tests were performed comparing normal and simulated IFI on the L3-L4 and L4-L5 facet joint loads. After simulating IFI, mean absolute differences of facet joint load were 10.8 N (standard error of the mean [SEM] ±4.53, P = .036) for L3-4 at 10° of hip extension, 13.71 N (SEM ±4.53, P = .012) for L3-4 at 20° of hip extension, 11.49 N (SEM ±4.33, P = .024) for L4-5 at 10° of hip extension, and 6.67 N (SEM ±5.43, P = .245) for L4-5 at 20° of hip extension. A statistically significant increase in L3-4 and L4-5 lumbar facet joint loads of 30.81% was found in the IFI state as compared with the native state during terminal hip extension. Limited terminal hip extension due to simulated IFI significantly increases L3-4 and L4-5 lumbar facet joint load when compared with non-IFI native hips. This biomechanical study directly links IFI to increased lumbar facet loads and supports the clinical findings of IFI causing lumbar pathology. Assessing and treating (open or endoscopic) hip disorders that limit extension

  3. Efficacy of using an air arthrogram for EUA and injection of the hip joint in adults.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Mohammad; Shyamsundar, Srinivasan; Bali, Navi; McBryde, Callum; O'Hara, John; Bache, Edward

    2014-09-01

    Hip arthrography usually requires the injection of iodine based dyes which can cause complications. We wanted to determine the accuracy of using air for hip arthrography. A prospective study was undertaken including all adults who had a hip arthrogram. We initially did an air arthrogram and subsequently injected iohexol to see if we were still in the joint. Forty injections were done. Mean age 32 years. There was a 100% success rate with obtaining a positive air arthrogram. Air arthrogram of the hip offers a safe, cost free and accurate alternative to iodine based arthrograms.

  4. Inflammatory pain-related traits of sensory DRG neurons innervating the hip joints.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Takayuki; Ohtori, Seiji; Nakamura, Junichi; Suzuki, Takane; Aoki, Yasuchika; Watanabe, Atsuya; Takazawa, Makoto; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2017-03-01

    Hip pain is transmitted to the dorsal horn of the spinal cord via the dorsal root ganglion (DRG), which contains two types of neurons with differential sensitivity to neurotrophic factors. If either type predominantly innervates the hip joint, it may represent a good target for hip joint pain treatment. Inflammation was induced in the left hip joint of rats (n = 10) by using complete Freund's adjuvant. Fluoro-Gold (FG) was applied to the hip joint after 7 days, and T12-L6 DRGs were double-stained for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and isolection-IB4 1 week later. FG-labeled neurons in the control group were distributed throughout the left DRG from T13 to L5, primarily in L2 to L4, and CGRP-positive neurons were significantly more frequent than IB4-binding neurons. In the inflammatory group, FG-labeled neurons were similarly distributed, primarily at L3 and L4, and CGRP-positive neurons were significantly more frequent than IB4-binding neurons. The percentage of CGRP-positive neurons was significantly greater in the inflammatory group (P < 0.05). Most small neurons innervating the hip joint express CGRP. Furthermore, hip joint inflammation caused an increase in CGRP-positive neurons, but not in IB4-binding neurons. Our results suggest that CGRP-expressing nerve growth factor-dependent neurons are primarily responsible for hip joint pain and may represent therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Current knowledge and importance of dGEMRIC techniques in diagnosis of hip joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Zilkens, Christoph; Tiderius, Carl Johann; Krauspe, Rüdiger; Bittersohl, Bernd

    2015-08-01

    Accurate assessment of early hip joint cartilage alterations may help optimize patient selection and follow-up of hip joint preservation surgery. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is sensitive to the glycosaminoglycan content in cartilage that is lost early in the development of osteoarthritis (OA). Hence, the dGEMRIC technique holds promise for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. However, because of the location of the hip joint deep within the body and due to the fairly thin cartilage layers that require high spatial resolution, the diagnosis of early hip joint cartilage alterations may be problematic. The purpose of this review is to outline the current status of dGEMRIC in the assessment of hip joint cartilage. A literature search was performed with PubMed, using the terms "cartilage, osteoarthritis, hip joint, MRI, and dGEMRIC", considering all levels of studies. This review revealed that dGEMRIC can be reliably used in the evaluation of early stage cartilage pathology in various hip joint disorders. Modifications in the technique, such as the operation of three-dimensional imaging and dGEMRIC after intra-articular contrast medium administration, have expanded the range of application. Notably, the studies differ considerably in patient selection and technical prerequisites. Furthermore, there is a need for multicenter prospective studies with the required technical conditions in place to establish outcome based dGEMRIC data to obtain, in conjunction with clinical data, reliable threshold values for normal and abnormal cartilage, and for hips that may benefit from conservative or surgical treatment.

  6. Subluxation of the hip joint after internal fixation of a trochanteric fracture.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kazuo; Murotani, Rentaroh; Mogami, Atsuhiko; Okahara, Hitoshi; Ohbayashi, Osamu; Iwase, Hideaki; Fujita, Hidemine; Kurosawa, Hisashi

    2004-02-01

    The authors report an unusual case of hip subluxation after internal fixation without associated sepsis. We report one recently treated case in which a 75-year-old female experienced subluxation of her hip joint after open reduction and internal fixation for a trochanteric fracture. In this paper, we describe a case of progressive, spontaneous subluxation of the hip joint over several weeks. Most previously reported cases are associated with cerebral palsy. This entity has not been reported previously. Our patient was treated by hemi-arthroplasty and repair of the disrupted capsule, and achieved a good long-term functional result. The cause of this particular condition is discussed.

  7. Repair of radiographic hip joint in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with etanercept plus methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Remy, Anouck; Combe, Bernard

    2014-10-01

    For patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), structural damage, i.e. bone erosion and joint space narrowing, is a major factor leading to functional disability. Negative radiographic progression has been shown in joints, especially in RA patients treated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) inhibitors in combination with methotrexate. Bone erosion repair in small joints have been observed but only one study selected large weight-bearing joints. We reported 2 cases of patients with severe seropositive juvenile RA who shown improvement of joint space narrowing and subchondral erosion in hip joint when treated with etanercept in combination with methotrexate for at least 1year. Two Japanese cases were also published but with different TNF inhibitors. The mechanisms of bone erosion or joint space narrowing repair are unclear. One study investigated whether bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis patients show evidence of repair in metacarpophalangeal joints when treated with TNF inhibitors and MTX. These results suggested that repair in RA emerged from the bone marrow and the endosteal lining rather than the periosteal compartment. No study investigated joint space narrowing repair in hip joint in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Larger studies needed to confirm joint space narrowing improvement in hip joint in patients treated with TNF inhibitors and to explain the mechanisms of repair.

  8. Characterisation and classification of the neural anatomy in the human hip joint.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Michael; Johnson, Keith; Atkinson, Roscoe; Snow, Brian; Shaw, Colin; Brown, Ashley; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy remains a useful surgical intervention for labral injuries. The literature has predominantly focused on structural and vascular considerations of the hip joint, with few studies examining the neurohistology of the surrounding periarticular tissues. We mapped and identified the periarticular neural anatomy, to identify the presence of sensory nerve fibres and mechanoreceptors within the hip joint. Eight human cadaveric hips were dissected into a total of ten specimens per hip. Histological staining was used to identify neural structures taken from the superolateral, anterior, inferior, and posterior positions of the hip joint. The frozen sections were analyzed by light microscopy to calculate relative concentrations of mean neural fibres per high power field (mnf/hpf). Neural end organs were found in the hip capsule, acetabular labrum, ligamentum teres and transverse acetabular ligament. The highest levels of mechanoreceptors were found in the superolateral aspect of the hip capsule (9.6 mnf/hpf). The labrum showed highest levels of sensory fibres (3.4 mnf/hpf) and mechanoreceptors (4.3mnf/hpf) within the anterior zone. Sensory fibres and mechanoreceptors densely populate the acetabular labrum, capsule and transverse acetabular ligament. The anterior zone of the labrum contained the highest relative concentration of sensory fibres, specifically Ruffini corpuscles.

  9. Nerve Palsy after Total Hip Arthroplasty without Subtrochanteric Femoral Shortening Osteotomy for a Completely Dislocated Hip Joint

    PubMed Central

    Sonohata, Motoki; Kitajima, Masaru; Kawano, Shunsuke; Mawatari, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neurological injuries are a rare but devastating complication after total hip arthroplasty (THA). The purpose of this study was to retrospectively determine the frequency of nerve palsy after THA without subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy in patients with a completely dislocated hip joint without pseudo-articulation between the femoral head and iliac bone. Methods: Between October 1999 and September 2001, nine primary THAs were performed for patients with a completely dislocated hip joint. The limb lengths, neurological abnormalities, and the extent of their neurological recovery were evaluated. Three THAs were combined with subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy, and six THAs were combined without subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy. Results: The mean length of the operation was 4.8 cm (range, 3.0-6.5 cm). Sciatic nerve palsy developed in four of the nine patients after THA. None of the cases with sciatic nerve palsy were combined with subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy. Three of four patients did not completely recover from sciatic nerve palsy. Conclusions: THA for patients with a completely dislocated hip was associated with a high risk of nerve palsy due to excessive limb lengthening; the potential for recovery from nerve palsy was observed to be poor. Subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy should be used in combination with THA in patients with a completely dislocated hip. PMID:28217204

  10. Knee and hip joint biomechanics are gender-specific in runners with high running mileage.

    PubMed

    Gehring, D; Mornieux, G; Fleischmann, J; Gollhofer, A

    2014-02-01

    Female runners are reported to be more prone to develop specific knee joint injuries than males. It has been suggested that increased frontal plane joint loading might be related to the incidence of these knee injuries in running. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if frontal plane knee and hip joint kinematics and kinetics are gender-specific in runners with high mileage. 3D-kinematics and kinetics were recorded from 16 female and 16 male runners at a speed of 3 m/s, 4 m/s, and 5 m/s. Frontal plane joint angles and joint moments were ascertained and compared between genders among speed conditions. Across all speed conditions, females showed increased hip adduction and reduced knee adduction angles compared to males (p < 0.003). The initial peak in the hip adduction moment was enhanced in females (p = 0.003). Additionally, the hip adduction impulse showed a trend towards an increase in females at slow running speed (p = 0.07). Hip and knee frontal plane joint kinematics are gender-specific. In addition, there are indications that frontal plane joint loading is increased in female runners. Future research should focus on the relationship of these observations regarding overuse running injuries.

  11. Coupling motion between rearfoot and hip and knee joints during walking and single-leg landing.

    PubMed

    Koshino, Yuta; Yamanaka, Masanori; Ezawa, Yuya; Okunuki, Takumi; Ishida, Tomoya; Samukawa, Mina; Tohyama, Harukazu

    2017-09-22

    The objective of the current study was to investigate the kinematic relationships between the rearfoot and hip/knee joint during walking and single-leg landing. Kinematics of the rearfoot relative to the shank, knee and hip joints during walking and single-leg landing were analyzed in 22 healthy university students. Kinematic relationships between two types of angular data were assessed by zero-lag cross-correlation coefficients and coupling angles, and were compared between joints and between tasks. During walking, rearfoot eversion/inversion and external/internal rotation were strongly correlated with hip adduction/abduction (R=0.69 and R=0.84), whereas correlations with knee kinematics were not strong (R≤0.51) and varied between subjects. The correlations with hip adduction/abduction were stronger than those with knee kinematics (P<0.001). Most coefficients during single-leg landing were strong (R≥0.70), and greater than those during walking (P<0.001). Coupling angles indicated that hip motion relative to rearfoot motion was greater than knee motion relative to rearfoot motion during both tasks (P<0.001). Interventions to control rearfoot kinematics may affect hip kinematics during dynamic tasks. The coupling motion between the rearfoot and hip/knee joints, especially in the knee, should be considered individually. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Asymmetrical lumbosacral transitional vertebrae in dogs may promote asymmetrical hip joint development.

    PubMed

    Flückiger, Mark A; Steffen, Frank; Hässig, Michael; Morgan, Joseph P

    2017-03-20

    This study examines the relationship between the morphology of the lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LTV) and asymmetrical development of the hip joints in dogs. A total of 4000 dogs which had been consecutively scored for canine hip dysplasia were checked for the presence of a LTV. A LTV was noted in 138 dogs and classified depending on the morphology of the transverse processes and the degree of contact with the ilium. In dogs with an asymmetrical LTV, the hip joint was significantly more predisposed to subluxation and malformation on the side of the intermediate or sacral-like transverse process (p <0.01), on the side of the elevated pelvis (p <0.01), or when an asymmetrical LTV resulted in pelvic rotation on its long axis (p <0.01), whereas hip joint conformation was less affected on the side featuring a free transverse process (p <0.01). The results support our hypothesis that an asymmetrical LTV favours pelvic rotation over its long axis, resulting in inadequate femoral head coverage by the acetabulum on one side. Inadequate coverage of the femoral head favours subluxation, malformation of the hip joint, and secondary osteoarthritis. Asymmetrical hip conformation may therefore be the sequela of a LTV and mask or aggravate genetically induced canine hip dysplasia.

  13. The effect of resistance exercise direction for hip joint stabilization on lateral abdominal muscle thickness

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ju-Hyeon; Lee, Sang-Yeol

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of resistance direction in hip joint stabilization exercise on change in lateral abdominal muscle thickness in healthy adults. Twenty-six healthy adults were randomly allocated to either a hip stabilization exercise by hip straight resistance group (n=12) or a hip diagonal resistance group (n=14). The outcome measures included contraction thickness ratio in transversus abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO) and external oblique, and TrA lateral slide were assessed during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver by b-mode ultrasound. The researcher measured the abdominal muscle thickness of each participant before the therapist began the intervention and at the moment intervention was applied. There was a significant difference in lateral abdominal muscle thickness between the straight resistance exercise of hip joint group and the diagonal resistance exercise of hip joint group. Significant differences were found between the two groups in the percentage of change of muscle thickness of the TrA (P=0.018) and in the thickness ratio of the TrA (P=0.018). Stability exercise accompanied by diagonal resistance on the hip joint that was applied in this study can induce automatic contraction of the IO and TrA, which provides stability to the lumbar spine. PMID:27807520

  14. Bilateral prosthetic hip joint infections associated with a Psoas abscess. A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gunaratne, G D Rajitha; Khan, Riaz J K; Tan, Cynthia; Golledge, Clayton

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Psoas abscess is a recognized but under-diagnosed complication of prosthetic hip joint infections. Case report: We report a case of a 68-year-old man with right and left hip arthroplasties performed 22 and 14 years ago, respectively, who presented with non-specific symptoms and was subsequently diagnosed with left psoas abscess on CT scan. Drainage of the psoas abscess was complicated by the formation of a discharging sinus connected to the left hip. He then developed an infected right thigh haematoma, which also formed a discharging sinus connecting to the right hip post-drainage. He was treated with bilateral two-stage revision total hip arthroplasties and multiple courses of prolonged antibacterial therapy. Both abscesses and hip joints cultured the same species of multi-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. The causal link between the psoas abscess and the prosthetic hip infections is discussed, as well as the investigation and management. Conclusion: We recommend routine exploration of the iliopsoas bursa when revision of an infected total hip arthroplasty is performed to rule out intrapelvic spread of the infection [3]. There should be high index of suspicion of prosthetic hip infection in patients presenting with Psoas abscess and vice versa. A CT scan might be warranted to rule out concomitant infection in both these patients. PMID:28116254

  15. Establishing percentile charts for hip joint capsule and synovial cavity thickness in apparently healthy children.

    PubMed

    Żuber, Zbigniew; Owczarek, Aleksander; Sobczyk, Małgorzata; Migas-Majoch, Agata; Turowska-Heydel, Dorota; Sternal, Agnieszka; Michalczak, Justyna; Chudek, Jerzy

    2017-01-31

    The usefulness of musculoskeletal ultrasonography (MSUS) in paediatric population is limited by lack of reference values. One of such parameters is hip joint capsule thickness, postulated as an early measure for synovitis. However, the joint capsule is hardly a distinguished structure from slit synovial cavity in patients with little or no fluid collection. Therefore, in patients without effusion, it is more convenient to measure hip joint capsule thickness together with synovial cavity. The aim of the study was to establish percentile chart for hip joint capsule and synovial cavity thickness (HJC&SCT) in apparently healthy children. The analysis included 816 US of hip joint in 408 children without musculoskeletal disorders, distributed equally throughout the whole developmental period in 18 one-year subgroups. Hip joints US was performed according to standard protocol including measurement of HJC&SCT in a single rheumatology centre by three investigators. The 3rd, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 97th HJC&SCT percentile curves were depicted in the age and height charts for the combined group of girls and boys. The median HJC&SCT values were increasing with age from 3.7 (C10 - C90: 3.3 - 4.2) mm in the first year of life up to 6.7 (5.8 - 7.3) in 16 years old, and above. In a similar way the increase was seen with height from 3.9 (3.5 - 4.7) mm in shorter than 95 cm to 6.9 (6.2 - 7.4) mm in taller than 169 cm subjects. Intra-observer and inter-observer mean precision was less than 1.8 and 12.5%, respectively. The developed centile chart for hip joint capsule and synovial cavity thickness in the paediatric population is expected to improve detection of hip joint capsule disorders, including synovitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  16. Grading and quantification of hip osteoarthritis severity by analyzing the spectral energy distribution of radiographic hip joint space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boniatis, I.; Costaridou, L.; Panagiotopoulos, E.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2009-08-01

    An image analysis system is proposed for the assessment of hip osteoarthritis (OA) severity. Sixty four hips (18 normal, 46 osteoarthritic), corresponding to 32 patients of unilateral or bilateral hip OA were studied. Employing custom developed software, 64 Region Of Interest (ROI) images of Hip Joint Spaces (HJSs) were delineated on patients' digitized radiographs. The Fourier spectrum of each HJS-ROI was computed and expressed in polar coordinates. Spectral signatures, quantifying the radial and angular distribution of HJS spectral energy were formed. Signature descriptors were generated and utilized in the design of a two-level hierarchical decision tree, used for the grading of the severity of the disease. Accordingly, at Level 1, implemented by a multiple classifier system, the discrimination between normal and osteoarthritic hips was performed. At Level 2, the hips that had been successfully characterized as osteoarthritic at Level 1, were further characterized as of ``Mild / Moderate'' or ``Severe'' OA, by the Bayes classifier. A signature descriptors based regression model was designed, so as to quantify OA-severity. The system graded OA reliably, given that the accomplished classification accuracies for Level 1 and Level 2 were 98.4% and 100%, respectively. OA-severity values, expressed by HJS-narrowing, correlated highly (r = 0.9, p < 0.001) with values predicted by the model. The system may contribute to OA-patient management.

  17. On hip and lumbar biomechanics. A study of joint load and muscular activity.

    PubMed

    Németh, G

    1984-01-01

    Loading moment of force about the hip and lumbo-sacral joints during straight and flexed knee lifting was calculated at regular intervals during the lifts, using a computerized sagittal plane model. Lift with flexed knees and burden moved close to the body was found to induce lower load. Important parameters influencing the induced joint load are discussed. EMG levels from three trunk and seven hip muscles were recorded with surface electrodes and normalized, i.e. expressed as a percentage of the recorded level of each muscle during an isometric voluntary contraction. The erector spinae, gluteus maximus and adductor magnus muscles were more activated initially in the flexed knee lifts than in the straight knee lift, while the hamstrings were more and earlier activated in the flexed knee lifts. In order to estimate what proportion of the maximum hip extensor muscle moment was used to counteract the induced load moments about the hip, assessments of maximum hip extensor muscle moments were made: the highest extensor muscle moment was exerted at 90 degrees hip flexion, decreasing with decreasing hip angle. The knee angle did not significantly influence the muscle moments exerted by the hip extensor muscles. To calculate the magnitude and direction of the hip compressive load from known load moments, the length of the moment arms of three hip extensors was determined at every fifth degree of flexion at hip flexion angles between 0 degrees and 90 degrees by combining data from autopsy specimens and patients, the latter examined by computed tomography. There were significant differences in moment arm length between men and women but there was low correlation between subject's height and length of muscular moment arms. The calculated compressive force during the lifts was about three times body weight and the direction of the compressive force passed through the area described by others as having the most severe osteoarthrotic lesions on the femoral head. Hip joint load

  18. Can hip abduction and external rotation discriminate sacroiliac joint pain?

    PubMed

    Adhia, Divya Bharatkumar; Tumilty, Steve; Mani, Ramakrishnan; Milosavljevic, Stephan; Bussey, Melanie D

    2016-02-01

    The primary aim of the study is to determine if Hip Abduction and External Rotation (HABER) test is capable of reproducing familiar pain in individuals with low back pain (LBP) of sacroiliac joint (SIJ) origin (SIJ-positive) when compared with LBP of Non-SIJ origin (SIJ-negative). If so, the secondary aim is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of HABER test against the reference standard of pain provocation tests, and to determine which increments of the HABER test has highest sensitivity and specificity for identifying SIJ-positive individuals. Single-blinded diagnostic accuracy study. Participants [n(122)] between ages of 18-50 y, suffering from chronic non-specific LBP (≥3 months) volunteered in the study. An experienced musculoskeletal physiotherapist evaluated and classified participants into either SIJ-positive [n(45)] or SIJ-negative [n(77)], based on reference standard of pain provocation tests [≥3 positive tests = SIJ-positive]. Another musculoskeletal physiotherapist, blinded to clinical groups, evaluated participants for reproduction of familiar pain during each increment (10°, 20°, 30°, 40°, and 50°) of HABER test. The HABER test reproduced familiar pain in SIJ-positive individuals when compared with SIJ-negative individuals [p (0.001), R(2) (0.38), Exp(β) (5.95-10.32)], and demonstrated moderate level of sensitivity (67%-78%) and specificity (71%-72%) for identifying SIJ-positive individuals. Receiver operator curve analysis demonstrated that the HABER increments of ≥30° have the highest sensitivity (83%-100%) and specificity (52%-64%). The HABER test is capable of reproducing familiar pain in SIJ-positive LBP individuals and has moderate levels of sensitivity and specificity for identifying SIJ-positive LBP individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Surface grafting of artificial joints with a biocompatible polymer for preventing periprosthetic osteolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, Toru; Takatori, Yoshio; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Konno, Tomohiro; Takigawa, Yorinobu; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Chung, Ung-Il; Nakamura, Kozo; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi

    2004-11-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis-bone loss in the vicinity of a prosthesis-is the most serious problem limiting the longevity of artificial joints. It is caused by bone-resorptive responses to wear particles originating from the articulating surface. This study investigated the effects of graft polymerization of our original biocompatible phospholipid polymer 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) onto the polyethylene surface. Mechanical studies using a hip-joint simulator revealed that the MPC grafting markedly decreased the friction and the amount of wear. Osteoclastic bone resorption induced by subperiosteal injection of particles onto mouse calvariae was abolished by the MPC grafting on particles. MPC-grafted particles were shown to be biologically inert by culture systems with respect to phagocytosis and resorptive cytokine secretion by macrophages, subsequent expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand in osteoblasts, and osteoclastogenesis from bone marrow cells. From the mechanical and biological advantages, we believe that our approach will make a major improvement in artificial joints by preventing periprosthetic osteolysis.

  20. Validity of summing painful joint sites to assess joint-pain comorbidity in hip or knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Siemons, Liseth; ten Klooster, Peter M; van de Laar, Mart A F J; van den Ende, Cornelia H M; Hoogeboom, Thomas J

    2013-08-09

    Previous studies in patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) have advocated the relevance of assessing the number of painful joint sites, other than the primary affected joint, in both research and clinical practice. However, it is unclear whether joint-pain comorbidities can simply be summed up. A total of 401 patients with hip or knee OA completed questionnaires on demographic variables and joint-pain comorbidities. Rasch analysis was performed to evaluate whether a sum score of joint-pain comorbidities can be calculated. Self-reported joint-pain comorbidities showed a good fit to the Rasch model and were not biased by gender, age, disease duration, BMI, or patient group. As a group, joint-pain comorbidities covered a reasonable range of severity levels, although the sum score had rather low reliability levels suggesting it cannot discriminate well among patients. Joint-pain comorbidities, in other than the primary affected joints, can be summed into a joint pain comorbidity score. Nevertheless, its use is discouraged for individual decision making purposes since its lacks discriminative power in patients with minimal or extreme joint pain.

  1. Effect of Ti interlayer on the bonding quality of W and steel HIP joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji-Chao; Wang, Wanjing; Wei, Ran; Wang, Xingli; Sun, Zhaoxuan; Xie, Chunyi; Li, Qiang; Luo, Guang-Nan

    2017-03-01

    Tungsten (W) and steel bonding is one of the key technologies for blanket First Wall (FW) manufacture in thermal fusion reactor. The W/Steel joints are prone to fail without interlayer for the different thermo physical properties. To study the effect of titanium (Ti) interlayer on the bonding quality of W and steel joints, W/Steel Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) experiments with Ti interlayer were conducted under 930 °C, 100 MPa for 2 h. Intermetallics caused by atom interdiffusion would affect the bonding quality of W/Ti/Steel HIP joints, the bonding quality was evaluated by microstructure analysis and mechanical tests. All the HIP joints were well bonded and results showed no intermetallics occurred between W/Ti interfaces, meanwhile multiply phases were found between Ti/Steel interfaces. Shear tests indicated when Ti thickness was 100-500 μm, the maximum shear strength of W/Ti/Steel HIP joints would be up to around 151 MPa. Charpy impact tests showed the W/Ti/Steel HIP joints all broke in a brittle manner and the maximum Charpy impact energy was ∼0.192 J. Nano-indentation tests demonstrated W/Ti interfaces could be enhanced by solid solution hardening and formation of brittle phases has conducted high hardness across the Ti/Steel interfaces.

  2. [Evaluation of treatment outcomes in tuberculosis of knee and hip joints in 2005-2012].

    PubMed

    Chocholáč, D; Kala, B; Gallo, J; Netval, M; Chaloupka, R

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in a joint region presents high risk of damage to the joint. Consequences of a late diagnosis and inadequate therapy may be serious particularly in the large joints of lower extremities. Tuberculosis of knee and hip joints accounts for about 25% to 35% of osteoarticular tuberculosis (OAT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the objective and subjective results of tuberculosis treatment in knee and hip joints. Of 258 OAT patients treated at the Specialised Treatment Centre Jevíčko between January 2005 and September 2012, tuberculosis of the hip joint was diagnosed in 31 patients in whom three hips were treated by incision and drainage and 10 by total hip replacement; 18 patients had tuberculosis of the knee joint with the following treatment: puncture in seven knees, incision and drainage in eight, excochleation of a tuberculous focus in the proximal tibia in two, removal of a bursa in one, arthrodesis in four and total knee replacement in four patients. The patients continued to be followed up at the Jevíčko Centre. The scale of 1 to 5 (best to worst) was established for evaluation of objective and subjective results of the treatment. The data were analysed using the basic statistical characteristics and compared. The objective evaluation was better for the hip joint; the sums of relative frequencies of marks 1 to 3 were 72.22% in the knee and 80.65% in the hip. In the knee more than 50% of the cases fell in the interval <1.304; 4.252>, in the hip this was <1.296; 3.672>. The hip joint was better subjectively evaluated, it had a higher sum of relative frequencies of marks 1 to 3, i.e., 96.77% as compared with 88.89% for the knee. In the knee more than 50% of the cases had marks in the interval <0.767; 3.122>; in the hip this was <0.869; 2.680>. The hip joint was better evaluated both objectively and subjectively. An early diagnosis allows for the treatment of synovitis, which has a better prognosis than an arthritic disease. The subjective

  3. Hip Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... clues about the underlying cause. Problems within the hip joint itself tend to result in pain on the ... tendons and other soft tissues that surround your hip joint. Hip pain can sometimes be caused by diseases ...

  4. Tribological performance of some alternative bearing materials for artificial joints.

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, B.; Ajayi, O. O.; Fenske, G.; Erdemir, A.; Liang, H.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Alaska

    2003-08-01

    In current artificial joints consisting of metal or ceramic and polyethylene (ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene, UHMWPE) bearing surfaces, the wear debris of polyethylene is the main cause for shortening implant's life. In order to enhance the durability of human artificial joints, alternative bearing surfaces may be needed. In the present study, the tribological performance of several candidate implant materials, including the diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin film coating on stainless steel were investigated. A pin-on-flat contact configuration in reciprocating sliding was used for preliminary materials evaluation and friction and wear testing. Test pairs were lubricated with bovine blood serum. The DLC coating sliding against uncoated stainless steel showed the lowest friction coefficient and very little, if any, wear. Wear mechanisms in tests of ceramics and steel pairs were primarily abrasive.

  5. Reciprocal angular acceleration of the ankle and hip joints during quiet standing in humans.

    PubMed

    Aramaki, Y; Nozaki, D; Masani, K; Sato, T; Nakazawa, K; Yano, H

    2001-02-01

    Human quiet standing is often modeled as a single inverted pendulum rotating around the ankle joint, under the assumption that movement around the hip joint is quite small. However, several recent studies have shown that movement around the hip joint can play a significant role in the efficient maintenance of the center of body mass (COM) above the support area. The aim of this study was to investigate how coordination between the hip and ankle joints is controlled during human quiet standing. Subjects stood quietly for 30 s with their eyes either opened (EO) or closed (EC), and we measured subtle angular displacements around the ankle (thetaa) and hip (thetah) joints using three highly sensitive CCD laser displacement sensors. Reliable data were obtained for both angular displacement and angular velocity (the first derivative of the angular displacement). Further, measurement error was not predominant, even among the angular acceleration data, which were obtained by taking the second derivative of the angular displacement. The angular displacement, velocity, and acceleration of the hip were found to be significantly greater (P<0.001) than those of the ankle, confirming that hip-joint motion cannot be ignored, even during quiet standing. We also found that a consistent reciprocal relationship exists between the angular accelerations of the hip and ankle joints, namely positive or negative angular acceleration of ankle joint is compensated for by oppositely directed angular acceleration of the hip joint. Principal component analysis revealed that this relationship can be expressed as: thetah=gammathetaa with gamma=-3.15+/-1.24 and gamma=-3.12+/-1.46 (mean +/-SD) for EO and EC, respectively, where theta is the angular acceleration. There was no significant difference in the values of y for EO and EC, and these values were in agreement with the theoretical value calculated assuming the acceleration of COM was zero. On the other hand, such a consistent relationship was

  6. Measurement of pelvic motion is a prerequisite for accurate estimation of hip joint work in maximum height squat jumping.

    PubMed

    Blache, Yoann; Bobbert, Maarten; Argaud, Sebastien; Pairot de Fontenay, Benoit; Monteil, Karine M

    2013-08-01

    In experiments investigating vertical squat jumping, the HAT segment is typically defined as a line drawn from the hip to some point proximally on the upper body (eg, the neck, the acromion), and the hip joint as the angle between this line and the upper legs (θUL-HAT). In reality, the hip joint is the angle between the pelvis and the upper legs (θUL-pelvis). This study aimed to estimate to what extent hip joint definition affects hip joint work in maximal squat jumping. Moreover, the initial pelvic tilt was manipulated to maximize the difference in hip joint work as a function of hip joint definition. Twenty-two male athletes performed maximum effort squat jumps in three different initial pelvic tilt conditions: backward (pelvisB), neutral (pelvisN), and forward (pelvisF). Hip joint work was calculated by integrating the hip net joint torque with respect to θUL-HAT (WUL-HAT) or with respect to θUL-pelvis (WUL-pelvis). θUL-HAT was greater than θUL-pelvis in all conditions. WUL-HAT overestimated WULpelvis by 33%, 39%, and 49% in conditions pelvisF, pelvisN, and pelvisB, respectively. It was concluded that θUL-pelvis should be measured when the mechanical output of hip extensor muscles is estimated.

  7. Computer-aided grading and quantification of hip osteoarthritis severity employing shape descriptors of radiographic hip joint space.

    PubMed

    Boniatis, Ioannis; Cavouras, Dionisis; Costaridou, Lena; Kalatzis, Ioannis; Panagiotopoulos, Elias; Panayiotakis, George

    2007-12-01

    A computer-based system was designed for the grading and quantification of hip osteoarthritis (OA) severity. Employing an active-contours segmentation model, 64 hip joint space (HJS) images (18 normal, 46 osteoarthritic) were obtained from the digitized radiographs of 32 unilateral and bilateral OA-patients. Shape features, generated from the HJS-images, and a hierarchical decision tree structure was used for the grading of OA. A shape features based regression model quantified the OA-severity. The system accomplished high accuracies in characterizing hips as "Normal" (100%), of "mild/moderate"-OA (93.8%) or "severe"-OA (96.7%). OA-severity values, as expressed by HJS-narrowing, correlated highly (r=0.9,p<0.001) with the values predicted by the regression model. The system may contribute to OA-patient management.

  8. Efficacy of Debridement for Early Periprosthetic Joint Infection after Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Hoon; Chun, Sung Kwang; Yoon, Yong Cheol; Lakhotia, Devendra

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In early prosthetic joint infection after hip arthroplasty, debridement with prosthesis retention may be performed for implant salvage, but the reported success rates are highly variable. Hence we reviewed the outcome of radical debridement and retention of prosthesis using established diagnostic criteria and surgical procedures in relation to significant variables including clinical characteristics, pathogenicity, and antibiotic treatment. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 20 patients (11 men and 9 women) with early prosthetic joint infection after unilateral hip arthroplasty, treated by radical debridement with retention of prosthesis from January 2000 to May 2011. Average follow-up period was 55 months (12-178 months). The outcome was evaluated and analyzed based on recurrence of infection and clinical (Harris hip score) and radiological criteria. Results Pathogens were isolated from 11 hips (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [MRSA] in three, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis [MRSE] in two, methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus [MSSA] in one, Acinetobacter baumannii in two, Enterococcus faecalis in two patients, and Enterococcus, Citrobacter species in one). The mean duration of antibiotic administration was 43.5 days. Recurrence of infection was not observed in any case. Average Harris hip score was 91 points at the last follow-up. Revision surgery was not required for any reason including implant failure. Dislocation occurred in two hips after debridement and was treated conservatively. Conclusion Radical debridement with prosthesis retention is an effective procedure for early prosthetic joint infection after hip arthroplasty in carefully selected patients and with early diagnosis. PMID:27536586

  9. "In vivo" determination of hip joint separation and the forces generated due to impact loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Dennis, D A; Komistek, R D; Northcut, E J; Ochoa, J A; Ritchie, A

    2001-05-01

    Numerous supporting structures assist in the retention of the femoral head within the acetabulum of the normal hip joint including the capsule, labrum, and ligament of the femoral head (LHF). During total hip arthroplasty (THA), the LHF is often disrupted or degenerative and is surgically removed. In addition, a portion of the remaining supporting structures is transected or resected to facilitate surgical exposure. The present study analyzes the effects of LHF absence and surgical dissection in THA patients. Twenty subjects (5 normal hip joints, 10 nonconstrained THA, and 5 constrained THA) were evaluated using fluoroscopy while performing active hip abduction. All THA subjects were considered clinically successful. Fluoroscopic videos of the normal hips were analyzed using digitization, while those with THA were assessed using a computerized interactive model-fitting technique. The distance between the femoral head and acetabulum was measured to determine if femoral head separation occurred. Error analysis revealed measurements to be accurate within 0.75mm. No separation was observed in normal hips or those subjects implanted with constrained THA, while all 10 (100%) with unconstrained THA demonstrated femoral head separation, averaging 3.3mm (range 1.9-5.2mm). This study has shown that separation of the prosthetic femoral head from the acetabular component can occur. The normal hip joint has surrounding capsuloligamentous structures and a ligament attaching the femoral head to the acetabulum. We hypothesize that these soft tissue supports create a passive, resistant force at the hip, preventing femoral head separation. The absence of these supporting structures after THA may allow increased hip joint forces, which may play a role in premature polyethylene wear or prosthetic loosening.

  10. In vivo ultrasound measurement of posterior femoral glide during hip joint mobilization in healthy college students.

    PubMed

    Loubert, Peter V; Zipple, J Tim; Klobucher, Michael J; Marquardt, Eric D; Opolka, Matthew J

    2013-08-01

    Descriptive study. To measure femoral translational glide in vivo during posterior hip joint mobilization and to interpret data in the context of the normal arthrokinematic glide necessary for hip flexion. Joint play, or translational glide available at a joint, is largely influenced by the geometry of the articular surfaces. The high degree of congruence between the articular surfaces at the hip and the substantial arc of concavity of the acetabulum suggests that the amount of translational glide available at the hip should be very small. Twenty subjects received manual posteriorly directed hip mobilization at a force equal to 50% of their body weight, while concurrent ultrasound imaging of the joint was performed. Images were captured before and during application of the target mobilization force. Femoroacetabular distance for each image was measured, and the average of the 3 greatest differences between corresponding before/during mobilization values represented the translational glide produced. The amplitude of arthrokinematic glide (tangential glide) was calculated using the measured femoral head radius and hip flexion passive range of motion for each subject. The average posterior femoral translational glide was 2.0 mm (range, 0.8-4.2 mm). The average calculated tangential glide required for hip flexion passive range of motion was 53.8 mm (range, 43.2-64.8 mm). The average translational glide as a percentage of tangential glide was 3.8% (range, 1.5%-7.9%). Translational glides at the hip are small, particularly in the context of the amplitude of glide necessary for normal hip flexion range of motion.

  11. Finite element analysis of mechanical behavior of human dysplastic hip joints: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vafaeian, B; Zonoobi, D; Mabee, M; Hareendranathan, A R; El-Rich, M; Adeeb, S; Jaremko, J L

    2017-04-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a common condition predisposing to osteoarthritis (OA). Especially since DDH is best identified and treated in infancy before bones ossify, there is surprisingly a near-complete absence of literature examining mechanical behavior of infant dysplastic hips. We sought to identify current practice in finite element modeling (FEM) of DDH, to inform future modeling of infant dysplastic hips. We performed multi-database systematic review using PRISMA criteria. Abstracts (n = 126) fulfilling inclusion criteria were screened for methodological quality, and results were analyzed and summarized for eligible articles (n = 12). The majority of the studies modeled human adult dysplastic hips. Two studies focused on etiology of DDH through simulating mechanobiological growth of prenatal hips; we found no FEM-based studies in infants or children. Finite element models used either patient-specific geometry or idealized average geometry. Diversities in choice of material properties, boundary conditions, and loading scenarios were found in the finite-element models. FEM of adult dysplastic hips demonstrated generally smaller cartilage contact area in dysplastic hips than in normal joints. Contact pressure (CP) may be higher or lower in dysplastic hips depending on joint geometry and mechanical contribution of labrum (Lb). FEM of mechanobiological growth of prenatal hip joints revealed evidence for effects of the joint mechanical environment on formation of coxa valga, asymmetrically shallow acetabulum and malformed femoral head associated with DDH. Future modeling informed by the results of this review may yield valuable insights into optimal treatment of DDH, and into how and why OA develops early in DDH.

  12. The sex specificity of hip-joint muscles offers an explanation for better results in men after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Preininger, Bernd; Schmorl, Kathrin; von Roth, Philipp; Winkler, Tobias; Matziolis, Georg; Perka, Carsten; Tohtz, Stephan

    2012-06-01

    Choosing a surgical approach for total hip arthroplasty (THA) has a patient-specific impact on peri-operative muscle damage as well as postoperative functional outcome. Women and aged patients increasingly benefit from minimally invasive surgical procedures. For this reason, and due to the distinctly different bony anatomy of men and women, the hypothesis of this study is that muscle distribution around the hip joint is dependent on sex and age. The goal of this study was to analyse hip musculature in men and women and to correlate total muscle volume distribution. From 93 computed tomography (CT) scans of the pelvis (45 men, 48 women) volumes of gluteus medius (GMV), gluteus maximus (GXV) and tensor faciae latae (TFL) muscles were measured on both sides of the pelvis. The distribution of muscle volumes was normalised to patient weight and then correlated with sex and age. The measured muscle volumes featured no major differences between the left and the right side. The absolute total volume of the hip-encompassing muscular system (TMV) is bigger in men than in women. Correlations between TMV and collected data were observed in both sexes in relation to body weight and size (men p < .00001; women p 0.001). With increased body weight, the TMV of the male patients increased progressively (women 11.2 cm TMV/kg KG vs. men 17.4 cm TMV/kg KG) (p 0.04). The relative distribution of each muscle volume (GMV, GXV, TFL) around the hip joint showed no major differences with respect to sex and/or age (p 0.986 and 0.996, respectively). The equal relative muscle distribution in men and women around the hip joint reflects neither sex-related differences observed in clinical outcomes after THA nor bony anatomy. Yet men exhibited more muscle reserves (muscle volume; absolute and in relation to body mass) , which could explain the better outcome in men after THA. Furthermore, this suggests the extraordinary importance of muscle-sparing surgical approaches in women. The results

  13. Is there a difference in hip joint position sense between young and older groups?

    PubMed

    Pickard, Christine M; Sullivan, Patricia E; Allison, Garry T; Singer, Kevin P

    2003-07-01

    Joint position sense (JPS) in the knee has been shown by many authors to decline with age. It has been speculated that this decrease contributes to abnormal joint mechanics during load-bearing activities and putatively results in joint degeneration. Surprisingly little research has been conducted on the human hip to determine benchmarks for normal JPS. Fifty-nine community dwelling subjects, 30 young (mean age 21.7 years) and 29 older (mean age 75 years), were recruited to determine normal reference ranges for the effect of age on hip JPS. Active and passive repositioning tasks were performed in inner and outer ranges of the hip abduction plane of movement. An electromagnetic tracking system was used to obtain accurate error measurements of the angular displacement. Results indicated no difference in hip JPS between the young and older subjects (F(1,57) = 0.011, p = .917). However, it was found that for both age groups, accurate reproduction of position at the hip joint occurred in the inner range (F(1,57) = 13.760, p < .001). For both groups, active repositioning was more accurate than passive (F(1,57) = 9.265, p = .004). In this study, no difference in hip JPS was found between young and older subjects. Accuracy was greater in the inner range, with active repositioning demonstrating higher precision compared to passive repositioning of the limb.

  14. Associations between Alpha Angle and Herniation Pit on MRI Revisited in 185 Asymptomatic Hip Joints.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunchae; Choi, Jung-Ah

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the association between alpha angle and herniation pit on MRI in asymptomatic hip joints and their associations with demographic variables. Hip MRI of 185 asymptomatic hip joints of 105 adults (age 18 to 80 years) from September 2011 through December 2012 were retrospectively studied. Alpha angles were measured on oblique axial MR images by 2 observers. Herniation pit was determined by 1 observer. Size measures, prevalence, and statistical analyses were conducted regarding its association with age, gender, laterality (right or left hip). Intra- and inter-observer agreements were determined by intra-class correlation coefficient. The prevalence of herniation pit in asymptomatic hips was 21.6%. The range of alpha angle was 27.6-65.0 degrees. Seventeen and 16 out of 185 (9.1% and 8.6%) hip joints showed alpha angle of ≥ 55 degrees in first and second measurement sessions, respectively. There was no association between alpha angle ≥ 55 and presence of herniation pit. There was no association between alpha angle ≥ 55 and the size of herniation pit. Inter-observer agreement of alpha angle was 0.485 between first measurements of first vs. second observer, respectively. Intra-observer agreement of alpha angle was 0.654, respectively. Forty (21.6%) of 185 hip joints (35 of 105 patients, 33.3%) had herniation pit, with no difference according to age, gender, or laterality of hip joint. There is no association between alpha angle ≥ 55 degrees and presence of herniation pit or demographic variables.

  15. Which method of hip joint centre localisation should be used in gait analysis?

    PubMed

    Sangeux, Morgan; Pillet, Hélène; Skalli, Wafa

    2014-01-01

    Accurate localisation of the hip joint centre is required to obtain accurate kinematics, kinetics and musculoskeletal modelling results. Literature data showed that conclusions drawn from synthetic data, adult normal subjects and cerebral palsy children may vary markedly. This study investigated the localisation accuracy of the hip joint centre against EOS. The EOS system allowed us to register the hip joint centres with respect to the skin markers on standing subjects. A comprehensive set of predictive and functional calibration techniques were tested. For the functional calibration techniques, our results showed that algorithm, range of motion and self-performance of the movement were factors significantly affecting the results. Best results were obtained for comfortable range and self-performance of the movement. The best method in this scenario was the functional geometrical sphere fitting method which localised the hips 1.1cm from the EOS reference in average and 100% of the time within 3 cm. Worst results for functional calibration methods occurred when the movement was assisted with a reduced range of movement. The best method in this scenario was the Harrington et al. regression equations since it does not rely on a functional calibration movement. Harrington et al. equations put the hips 1.7 cm from the EOS reference in average and 97% of the time within 3 cm. We conclude that accurate localisation of the hip joint centre is possible in gait analysis providing that method to localise the hip joint centres are adapted to the population studied: functional geometrical sphere fitting when hip calibration movements are not a problem and Harrington et al. predictive equations otherwise.

  16. Ultrasonographic Features of Hip Joints in Mucopolysaccharidoses Type I and II.

    PubMed

    Żuber, Zbigniew; Jurecka, Agnieszka; Różdżyńska-Świątkowska, Agnieszka; Migas-Majoch, Agata; Lembas, Agnieszka; Kieć-Wilk, Beata; Tylki-Szymańska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess the ultrasonographic features of hip joints in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type I and II in comparison with healthy population. The secondary aims were to correlate these features with clinical measures and to evaluate the utility of ultrasound in the diagnosis of MPS disease. Sixteen MPS I (n = 3) and II (n = 13) patients were enrolled in the present study and underwent clinical and radiological evaluation, and bilateral high-resolution ultrasonography (US) of hip joints. The distance from the femoral neck to joint capsule (synovial joint space, SJS), joint effusion, synovial hyperthrophy, and local pathological vascularization were evaluated. The results were compared to the healthy population and correlated with clinical and radiological measures. 1. There was a difference in US SJS between children with MPS disease and the normative value for healthy population (7mm). Mean values of SJS were 15.81 ± 4.08 cm (right hip joints) and 15.69 ± 4.19 cm (left joints). 2. No inflammatory joint abnormalities were detected in MPS patients. 3. There was a clear correlation between US SJS and patients' age and height, while no clear correlation was observed between SJS and disease severity. 1. Patients with MPS I and II present specific features in hip joint ultrasonography. 2. The data suggests that ultrasonography might be effective in the evaluation of hip joint involvement in patients with MPS and might present a valuable tool in facilitating the diagnosis and follow up of the disease.

  17. Ultrasonographic Features of Hip Joints in Mucopolysaccharidoses Type I and II

    PubMed Central

    Żuber, Zbigniew; Jurecka, Agnieszka; Różdżyńska-Świątkowska, Agnieszka; Migas-Majoch, Agata; Lembas, Agnieszka; Kieć-Wilk, Beata; Tylki-Szymańska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The primary aim of this study was to assess the ultrasonographic features of hip joints in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type I and II in comparison with healthy population. The secondary aims were to correlate these features with clinical measures and to evaluate the utility of ultrasound in the diagnosis of MPS disease. Materials and Methods Sixteen MPS I (n = 3) and II (n = 13) patients were enrolled in the present study and underwent clinical and radiological evaluation, and bilateral high-resolution ultrasonography (US) of hip joints. The distance from the femoral neck to joint capsule (synovial joint space, SJS), joint effusion, synovial hyperthrophy, and local pathological vascularization were evaluated. The results were compared to the healthy population and correlated with clinical and radiological measures. Results 1. There was a difference in US SJS between children with MPS disease and the normative value for healthy population (7mm). Mean values of SJS were 15.81 ± 4.08 cm (right hip joints) and 15.69 ± 4.19 cm (left joints). 2. No inflammatory joint abnormalities were detected in MPS patients. 3. There was a clear correlation between US SJS and patients’ age and height, while no clear correlation was observed between SJS and disease severity. Conclusions 1. Patients with MPS I and II present specific features in hip joint ultrasonography. 2. The data suggests that ultrasonography might be effective in the evaluation of hip joint involvement in patients with MPS and might present a valuable tool in facilitating the diagnosis and follow up of the disease. PMID:25922936

  18. Protrusion of an artificial femoral head: a rare complication of chronic dislocation of the prosthetic hip.

    PubMed

    Kadar, Assaf; Gigi, Roy; Chechik, Ofir

    2013-02-01

    Chronic dislocation is considered a rare complication after total hip arthroplasty. We have treated a patient with a complication related to chronic dislocation-protrusion of the prosthetic femoral head through the skin. This 86-year-old bedridden patient with a known dislocated total hip arthroplasty presented with fever and protrusion of an artificial femoral head after 2 months of a nonhealing pressure sore. The care of this patient was partial removal of the prosthetic components and intravenous antibiotics. Chronic dislocation is rarely reported, yet it may cause severe complications in debilitated and demented patients. Special attention should be warranted to these patients as they might benefit from earlier surgical treatment.

  19. Effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties of Cu/SS joints after single and multiple HIP cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tähtinen, S.; Singh, B. N.; Toft, P.

    2000-12-01

    The present design of the ITER plasma facing components consists of a copper alloy heat sink layer between plasma facing materials and stainless steel structure. The main option for manufacturing these components is hot isostatic pressing (HIP) method and several HIP thermal cycles are foreseen for manufacturing of the complete blanket module. Mechanical characterisation of HIP joints between dissimilar metals is a complicated issue, where information on mechanical properties of base alloys, metallurgy of the HIP joints and mechanical testing methods will be required. The tensile and three point bend tests produced different fracture modes, depending on test temperature, applied HIP thermal cycles and neutron irradiation. The fracture mode was either ductile fracture of copper alloy or joint interface fracture. The mechanical properties of the HIP joint specimens were dominated by strength mismatch of the base alloys which was affected by HIP thermal cycles and neutron irradiation.

  20. The effect of angle and moment of the hip and knee joint on iliotibial band hardness.

    PubMed

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Shiratori, Sakiko; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2015-02-01

    Although several studies have described kinematic deviations such as excessive hip adduction in patients with iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome, the factors contributing to increased ITB hardness remains undetermined, owing to lack of direct in vivo measurement. The purpose of this study was to clarify the factors contributing to an increase in ITB hardness by comparing the ITB hardness between the conditions in which the angle, moment, and muscle activity of the hip and knee joint are changed. Sixteen healthy individuals performed the one-leg standing under five conditions in which the pelvic and trunk inclination were changed in the frontal plane. The shear elastic modulus in the ITB was measured as an indicator of the ITB hardness using shear wave elastography. The three-dimensional joint angle and external joint moment in the hip and knee joints, and muscle activities of the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, tensor fasciae latae, and vastus lateralis, which anatomically connect to the ITB, were also measured. ITB hardness was significantly increased in the posture with pelvic and trunk inclination toward the contralateral side of the standing leg compared with that in all other conditions (increase of approximately 32% compared with that during normal one-leg standing). This posture increased both the hip adduction angle and external adduction moment at the hip and knee joint, although muscle activities were not increased. Our findings suggest that coexistence of an increased adduction moment at the hip and knee joints with an excessive hip adduction angle lead to an increase in ITB hardness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of unloading bracing on knee and hip joints for patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Toriyama, Minoru; Deie, Masataka; Shimada, Noboru; Otani, Takuya; Shidahara, Hiroe; Maejima, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Hideki; Shibuya, Hayatoshi; Okuhara, Atsushi; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2011-06-01

    Osteoarthritis affects the whole body, thus biomechanical effects on other joints should be considered. Unloading knee braces could be effective for knee osteoarthritis, but their effects on the contralateral knee and bilateral hip joints remain unknown. This study investigated the effects of bracing on the kinematics and kinetics of involved and contralateral joints during gait. Nineteen patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis were analysed. Kinematics and kinetics of the knee and hip joints in frontal and sagittal planes were measured during walking without and with bracing on the more symptomatic knee. The ipsilateral hip in the braced condition showed a lower adduction angle by an average of 2.58° (range, 1.05°-4.16°) during 1%-49% of the stance phase, and a lower abduction moment at the second peak during the stance phase than the hip in the unbraced condition (P<0.05 and P<0.005, respectively). With bracing, the contralateral hip showed a more marked peak extension moment and lower abduction moment at the first peak (P<0.05), and the contralateral knee adduction angle increased by an average of 0.32° (range, 0.21°-0.45°) during 46%-55% of the stance phase (P<0.05), compared to no bracing. Unloading bracing modified the contralateral knee adduction angle pattern at a specific time point during gait. It also affected the frontal plane on the ipsilateral hip and the frontal and sagittal planes on the contralateral hip joint. Consideration should be provided to other joints when treating knee osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Exercise therapy for the management of osteoarthritis of the hip joint: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    McNair, Peter J; Simmonds, Marion A; Boocock, Mark G; Larmer, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Recent guidelines pertaining to exercise for individuals with osteoarthritis have been released. These guidelines have been based primarily on studies of knee-joint osteoarthritis. The current study was focused on the hip joint, which has different biomechanical features and risk factors for osteoarthritis and has received much less attention in the literature. The purpose was to conduct a systematic review of the literature to evaluate the exercise programs used in intervention studies focused solely on hip-joint osteoarthritis, to decide whether their exercise regimens met the new guidelines, and to determine the level of support for exercise-therapy interventions in the management of hip-joint osteoarthritis. Methods A systematic literature search of 14 electronic databases was undertaken to identify interventions that used exercise therapy as a treatment modality for hip osteoarthritis. The quality of each article was critically appraised and graded according to standardized methodologic approaches. A 'pattern-of-evidence' approach was used to determine the overall level of evidence in support of exercise-therapy interventions for treating hip osteoarthritis. Results More than 4,000 articles were identified, of which 338 were considered suitable for abstract review. Of these, only 6 intervention studies met the inclusion criteria. Few well-designed studies specifically investigated the use of exercise-therapy management on hip-joint osteoarthritis. Insufficient evidence was found to suggest that exercise therapy can be an effective short-term management approach for reducing pain levels, improving joint function and the quality of life. Conclusions Limited information was available on which conclusions regarding the efficacy of exercise could be clearly based. No studies met the level of exercise recommended for individuals with osteoarthritis. High-quality trials are needed, and further consideration should be given to establishing the optimal

  3. A patterned microtexture to reduce friction and increase longevity of prosthetic hip joints

    PubMed Central

    Chyr, Anthony; Qiu, Mingfeng; Speltz, Jared; Jacobsen, Ronald L.; Sanders, Anthony P.; Raeymaekers, Bart

    2014-01-01

    More than 285,000 total hip replacement surgeries are performed in the US each year. Most prosthetic hip joints consist of a cobalt-chromium (CoCr) femoral head that articulates with a polyethylene acetabular component, lubricated with synovial fluid. The statistical survivorship of these metal-on-polyethylene prosthetic hip joints declines significantly after 10 to 15 years of use, primarily as a result of polyethylene wear and wear debris incited disease. The current engineering paradigm to increase the longevity of prosthetic hip joints is to improve the mechanical properties of the polyethylene component, and to manufacture ultra-smooth articulating surfaces. In contrast, we show that adding a patterned microtexture to the ultra-smooth CoCr femoral head reduces friction when articulating with the polyethylene acetabular liner. The microtexture increases the load-carrying capacity and the thickness of the joint lubricant film, which reduces contact between the articulating surfaces. As a result, friction and wear is reduced. We have used a lubrication model to design the geometry of the patterned microtexture, and experimentally demonstrate reduced friction for the microtextured compared to conventional smooth surrogate prosthetic hip joints. PMID:25013240

  4. Hip joint kinetics in the table tennis topspin forehand: relationship to racket velocity.

    PubMed

    Iino, Yoichi

    2017-06-23

    The purpose of this study was to determine hip joint kinetics during a table tennis topspin forehand, and to investigate the relationship between the relevant kinematic and kinetic variables and the racket horizontal and vertical velocities at ball impact. Eighteen male advanced table tennis players hit cross-court topspin forehands against backspin balls. The hip joint torque and force components around the pelvis coordinate system were determined using inverse dynamics. Furthermore, the work done on the pelvis by these components was also determined. The peak pelvis axial rotation velocity and the work done by the playing side hip pelvis axial rotation torque were positively related to the racket horizontal velocity at impact. The sum of the work done on the pelvis by the backward tilt torques and the upward joint forces was positively related to the racket vertical velocity at impact. The results suggest that the playing side hip pelvis axial rotation torque exertion is important for acquiring a high racket horizontal velocity at impact. The pelvis backward tilt torques and upward joint forces at both hip joints collectively contribute to the generation of the racket vertical velocity, and the mechanism for acquiring the vertical velocity may vary among players.

  5. [Dynamics of hip joint biomechanics in patients with coxarthrosis at the time of hippotherapy].

    PubMed

    Nareklishvili, T M

    2008-02-01

    The problems of degenerative-dystrophic abnormalities stimulate the development of new skills and methods of treatment and rehabilitation of the diseases. The goal of the study was to determine the efficacy of hippotherapy in patients with coxarthrosis, according to functional and biomechanical parameters. Hippotherapy involves the utilization of horseback riding to stimulate the patient's normal reactions and locomotion; to improve the balance and coordination of movement, normalize muscle tension, and eliminate pathological reflexes. The advantage of the hippotherapy is in the specific posture, which is adopted by hip joint at the time of riding and in movement, which is accomplished by rider, at different paces of the horse. 10 female patients from 14 to 32 years old with coxarthrosis were under the observation. The rehabilitation of the patients was carried out by means of hippotherapy, which consisted of three months riding three times a week. To evaluate the efficacy of treatment, a new method of biomechanical registration of hip joint movement during hippotherapy on pacing horse was developed. The dynamics of biomechanical curves before and after the treatment, as well as the clinical and functional parameters of the patients allowed the authors to conclude: hippotherapy improves a hip joint functional state in patients with coxarthrosis; improves the muscle-tendineous component of hip joint movement. Hippotherapy may be considered as the pathogenetic method of treatment of coxarthrosis. Drawing the biomechanical curve of hip joint movement at the time of riding is the objective method of studying its function.

  6. A patterned microtexture to reduce friction and increase longevity of prosthetic hip joints.

    PubMed

    Chyr, Anthony; Qiu, Mingfeng; Speltz, Jared; Jacobsen, Ronald L; Sanders, Anthony P; Raeymaekers, Bart

    2014-07-15

    More than 285,000 total hip replacement surgeries are performed in the US each year. Most prosthetic hip joints consist of a cobalt-chromium (CoCr) femoral head that articulates with a polyethylene acetabular component, lubricated with synovial fluid. The statistical survivorship of these metal-on-polyethylene prosthetic hip joints declines significantly after 10 to 15 years of use, primarily as a result of polyethylene wear and wear debris incited disease. The current engineering paradigm to increase the longevity of prosthetic hip joints is to improve the mechanical properties of the polyethylene component, and to manufacture ultra-smooth articulating surfaces. In contrast, we show that adding a patterned microtexture to the ultra-smooth CoCr femoral head reduces friction when articulating with the polyethylene acetabular liner. The microtexture increases the load-carrying capacity and the thickness of the joint lubricant film, which reduces contact between the articulating surfaces. As a result, friction and wear is reduced. We have used a lubrication model to design the geometry of the patterned microtexture, and experimentally demonstrate reduced friction for the microtextured compared to conventional smooth surrogate prosthetic hip joints.

  7. Evaluation of Silicone as an Artificial Lubricant in Osteoarthrotic Joints

    PubMed Central

    Wright, V.; Haslock, D. I.; Dowson, D.; Seller, P. C.; Reeves, B.

    1971-01-01

    Silicone 300 has been evaluated as an artificial lubricant in osteoarthrotic joints by means of a pilot study in five inpatients and a control trial of 25 outpatients with 40 osteoarthrotic knees. Sequential analysis showed a significant benefit from saline compared with silicone at one week follow-up and no significant difference at one month. Measurement of stiffness with a knee arthrograph showed no difference in reduction of stiffness between the two substances. In a study of 18 rabbits there was no evidence that silicone was retained in the joint cavity for longer than 48 hours. There was a failure of clearance of iodinated serum albumin for as long as three to four days after the injection of silicone, suggesting some obstruction to lymphatic outflow. Experimentally produced cartilaginous defects did not heal quicker with the injection of silicone into the joint. PMID:5575973

  8. A computer-based image analysis method for assessing the severity of hip joint osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boniatis, Ioannis; Costaridou, Lena; Cavouras, Dionisis; Panagiotopoulos, Elias; Panayiotakis, George

    2006-12-01

    A computer-based image analysis method was developed for assessing the severity of hip osteoarthritis (OA). Eighteen pelvic radiographs of patients with verified unilateral hip OA, were digitized and enhanced employing custom developed software. Two ROIs corresponding to osteoarthritic and contralateral-physiological radiographic Hip Joint Spaces (HJSs) were determined on each radiograph. Textural features were extracted from the HJS-ROIs utilizing the run-length matrices and Laws textural measures. A k-Nearest Neighbour based hierarchical tree structure was designed for classifying hips into three OA severity categories labeled as "Normal", "Mild/Moderate", and "Severe". Employing the run-length features, the overall classification accuracy of the hierarchical tree structure was 86.1%. The utilization of Laws' textural measures improved the system classification performance, providing an overall classification accuracy of 94.4%. The proposed method maybe of value to physicians in assessing the severity of hip OA.

  9. Normal radiological unossified hip joint space and femoral head size development during growth in 675 children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Veronika; Jorysz, Gabriele; Arnoldi, Andreas; Utzschneider, Sandra; Wegener, Bernd; Jansson, Volkmar; Heimkes, Bernhard

    2017-03-01

    Evaluation of hip joint space width during child growth is important to aid in the early diagnosis of hip pathology in children. We established reference values for hip joint space and femoral head size for each age. Hip joint space development during growth was retrospectively investigated medial and cranial in 1350 hip joints of children using standard anteroposterior supine plain pelvic radiographs. Maximum capital femoral epiphysis diameter and femoral radii were further more investigated. Hip joint space values show a slow decline during growth. Joint space was statistically significantly (p < 0.006) larger in boys than girls. Our hip joint space measurements on supine subjects seem slightly larger than those reported by Hughes on standing subjects. Evaluation of the femoral head diameter and the radii showed a size curve quite parallel to the known body growth charts. Radii medial and perpendicular to the physis are not statistically significantly different. We recommend to compare measurements of hip joint space at two locations to age dependent charts using the same imaging technique. During growth, a divergence in femoral head size from the expected values or loss of the spherical shape should raise the question of hip disorder. Clin. Anat. 30:267-275, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. In-situ electrochemical study of interaction of tribology and corrosion in artificial hip prosthesis simulators.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yu; Dowson, Duncan; Neville, Anne

    2013-02-01

    The second generation Metal-on-Metal (MoM) hip replacements have been considered as an alternative to commonly used Polyethylene-on-Metal (PoM) joint prostheses due to polyethylene wear debris induced osteolysis. However, the role of corrosion and the biofilm formed under tribological contact are still not fully understood. Enhanced metal ion concentrations have been reported widely from hair, blood and urine samples of patients who received metal hip replacements and in isolated cases when abnormally high levels have caused adverse local tissue reactions. An understanding of the origin of metal ions is really important in order to design alloys for reduced ion release. Reciprocating pin-on-plate wear tester is a standard instrument to assess the interaction of corrosion and wear. However, more realistic hip simulator can provide a better understanding of tribocorrosion process for hip implants. It is very important to instrument the conventional hip simulator to enable electrochemical measurements. In this study, simple reciprocating pin-on-plate wear tests and hip simulator tests were compared. It was found that metal ions originated from two sources: (a) a depassivation of the contacting surfaces due to tribology (rubbing) and (b) corrosion of nano-sized wear particles generated from the contacting surfaces.

  11. Ankle, knee, and hip joint contribution to body support during gait

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Tsutomu; Ueda, Yasuhisa; Kamijo, Fumiko

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Support moment was defined as the sum of ankle plantar flexion, knee and hip extension moments. There are some mechanical relationships among the 3 joints. If these relationships were understood, it might be possible to determine which joint should be strengthened to improve gait. The aims of this study were to examine the mutual relationship among kinetic variables of the 3 joints during different phases. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five healthy subjects volunteered for this study. They were asked to walk on a platform at a self-selected speed. Correlation coefficients between support moment and vertical ground reaction force were calculated for each subject. Pearson correlation analysis was performed among the 3 joint moments and between each joint moment and vertical ground reaction force. [Results] Knee and hip extension moments showed negative correlation throughout the stance. Ankle moment had a positive with hip but a negative correlation with knee moment except in the initial contact and pre-swing. Hip moment in the initial contact, knee moment in the loading response, and ankle moment from the terminal stance to pre-swing had a high correlation with vertical ground reaction force. [Conclusion] The results may indicate which joint should be strengthened to improve gait pattern. PMID:27821945

  12. Biotribological properties of UHMWPE grafted with AA under lubrication as artificial joint.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yaling; Xiong, Dangsheng; Wang, Kun

    2013-09-01

    Osteolysis caused by wear particles from polyethylene in the artificial hip joints is a serious issue. In order to endow the low friction and wear of the bearing surface of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) artificial joint for a longer term, hydrophilic acrylic acid (AA) was grafted on UHMWPE powders with the method of ultraviolet irradiation and then the modified powders were hot pressed. The tribological properties of modified UHMWPE sliding against CoCrMo metallic plate on reciprocating tribometer under calf serum, saline and distilled water lubrication during a long-term friction were investigated. The measurement of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy indicates that AA is successfully grafted on the surface of UHMWPE powders by photo-induced graft polymerization. Contact angles of UHMWPE are decreased from 83° to 35° by grafting and the surface wettability is effectively improved. The tensile strength of modified sample decreases. The friction coefficient and wear rate of UHMWPE-g-PAA under calf serum, saline and distilled water lubrication are lower than that of untreated UHMWPE. With the increase of grafting ratio, the wear rate of UHMWPE-g-PAA decreases firstly and then increases. The modified UHMWPE with grafting ratio of 3.5 % has the lowest wear rate, which is just quarter of the untreated UHMWPE. The hydrated PAA polymer brushes enclosed in the UHMWPE bulk material provide continuous lubrication during long term sliding.

  13. Iranian Joint Registry (Iranian National Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Hamidreza; Nourbakhsh, Seyed Taghi; Lahiji, Farivar A.; Heydarian, Keykavoos; Jabalameli, Mahmood; Ghazavi, Mohammad Taghi; Tahmasebi, Mohammad Naghi; Fayyaz, Mahmoud Reza; Sazegari, Mohammad Ali; Mohaddes, Maziar; Rajabpour, Mojtaba; Emami, Mohammad; Jazayeri, Seyyed Mohammad; Madadi, Firooz; Farahini, Hossein; Mirzatoloee, Fardin; Gharahdaghi, Mohammad; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimian, Mohammadreza; Mirvakili, Hossein; Bashti, Kaveh; Almasizadeh, Mohtasham; Abolghasemian, Mansour; Taheriazam, Afshin; Motififard, Mehdi; Yazdi, Hamidreza; Mobarakeh, Mahmood Karimi; Shayestehazar, Masoud; Moghtadae, Mehdi; Siavashi, Babak; Sajjadi, Mohammadreza M.; Rasi, Alireza Manafi; Chabok, Seyyed Kazem; Zafarani, Zohreh; Salehi, Shahin; Ahmadi, Monireh; Mohammadi, Amin; Shahsavand, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Periodic evaluation and monitoring the health and economic outcome of joint replacement surgery is a common and popular process under the territory of joint registries in many countries. In this article we introduce the methodology used for the foundation of the National Iranian Joint Registry (IJR) with a joint collaboration of the Social Security Organization (SSO) and academic research departments considering the requirements of the Iran’s Ministry of Health and Education. PMID:27200403

  14. Iranian Joint Registry (Iranian National Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Registry).

    PubMed

    Aslani, Hamidreza; Nourbakhsh, Seyed Taghi; Lahiji, Farivar A; Heydarian, Keykavoos; Jabalameli, Mahmood; Ghazavi, Mohammad Taghi; Tahmasebi, Mohammad Naghi; Fayyaz, Mahmoud Reza; Sazegari, Mohammad Ali; Mohaddes, Maziar; Rajabpour, Mojtaba; Emami, Mohammad; Jazayeri, Seyyed Mohammad; Madadi, Firooz; Farahini, Hossein; Mirzatoloee, Fardin; Gharahdaghi, Mohammad; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimian, Mohammadreza; Mirvakili, Hossein; Bashti, Kaveh; Almasizadeh, Mohtasham; Abolghasemian, Mansour; Taheriazam, Afshin; Motififard, Mehdi; Yazdi, Hamidreza; Mobarakeh, Mahmood Karimi; Shayestehazar, Masoud; Moghtadae, Mehdi; Siavashi, Babak; Sajjadi, Mohammadreza M; Rasi, Alireza Manafi; Chabok, Seyyed Kazem; Zafarani, Zohreh; Salehi, Shahin; Ahmadi, Monireh; Mohammadi, Amin; Shahsavand, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2016-04-01

    Periodic evaluation and monitoring the health and economic outcome of joint replacement surgery is a common and popular process under the territory of joint registries in many countries. In this article we introduce the methodology used for the foundation of the National Iranian Joint Registry (IJR) with a joint collaboration of the Social Security Organization (SSO) and academic research departments considering the requirements of the Iran's Ministry of Health and Education.

  15. Articular soft tissue anatomy of the archosaur hip joint: Structural homology and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Henry P; Holliday, Casey M

    2015-06-01

    Archosaurs evolved a wide diversity of locomotor postures, body sizes, and hip joint morphologies. The two extant archosaurs clades (birds and crocodylians) possess highly divergent hip joint morphologies, and the homologies and functions of their articular soft tissues, such as ligaments, cartilage, and tendons, are poorly understood. Reconstructing joint anatomy and function of extinct vertebrates is critical to understanding their posture, locomotor behavior, ecology, and evolution. However, the lack of soft tissues in fossil taxa makes accurate inferences of joint function difficult. Here, we describe the soft tissue anatomies and their osteological correlates in the hip joint of archosaurs and their sauropsid outgroups, and infer structural homology across the extant taxa. A comparative sample of 35 species of birds, crocodylians, lepidosaurs, and turtles ranging from hatchling to skeletally mature adult were studied using dissection, imaging, and histology. Birds and crocodylians possess topologically and histologically consistent articular soft tissues in their hip joints. Epiphyseal cartilages, fibrocartilages, and ligaments leave consistent osteological correlates. The archosaur acetabulum possesses distinct labrum and antitrochanter structures on the supraacetabulum. The ligamentum capitis femoris consists of distinct pubic- and ischial attachments, and is homologous with the ventral capsular ligament of lepidosaurs. The proximal femur has a hyaline cartilage core attached to the metaphysis via a fibrocartilaginous sleeve. This study provides new insight into soft tissue structures and their osteological correlates (e.g., the antitrochanter, the fovea capitis, and the metaphyseal collar) in the archosaur hip joint. The topological arrangement of fibro- and hyaline cartilage may provide mechanical support for the chondroepiphysis. The osteological correlates identified here will inform systematic and functional analyses of archosaur hindlimb evolution and

  16. Joint kinematics and kinetics during walking and running in 32 patients with hip dysplasia 1 year after periacetabular osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Julie S; Nielsen, Dennis B; Sørensen, Henrik; Søballe, Kjeld; Mechlenburg, Inger

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose — Hip dysplasia can be treated with periacetabular osteotomy (PAO). We compared joint angles and joint moments during walking and running in young adults with hip dysplasia prior to and 6 and 12 months after PAO with those in healthy controls. Patients and methods — Joint kinematics and kinetics were recorded using a 3-D motion capture system. The pre- and postoperative gait characteristics quantified as the peak hip extension angle and the peak joint moment of hip flexion were compared in 23 patients with hip dysplasia (18–53 years old). Similarly, the gait patterns of the patients were compared with those of 32 controls (18–54 years old). Results — During walking, the peak hip extension angle and the peak hip flexion moment were significantly smaller at baseline in the patients than in the healthy controls. The peak hip flexion moment increased 6 and 12 months after PAO relative to baseline during walking, and 6 months after PAO relative to baseline during running. For running, the improvement did not reach statistical significance at 12 months. In addition, the peak hip extension angle during walking increased 12 months after PAO, though not statistically significantly. There were no statistically significant differences in peak hip extension angle and peak hip flexion moment between the patients and the healthy controls after 12 months. Interpretation — Walking and running characteristics improved after PAO in patients with symptomatic hip dysplasia, although gait modifications were still present 12 months postoperatively. PMID:25191933

  17. Consideration of equilibrium equations at the hip joint alongside those at the knee and ankle joints has mixed effects on knee joint response during gait.

    PubMed

    Adouni, M; Shirazi-Adl, A

    2013-02-01

    Accurate estimation of muscle forces during daily activities such as walking is critical for a reliable evaluation of loads on the knee joint. To evaluate knee joint muscle forces, the importance of the inclusion of the hip joint alongside the knee and ankle joints when treating the equilibrium equations remains yet unknown. An iterative kinematics-driven finite element model of the knee joint that accounts for the synergy between passive structures and active musculature is employed. The knee joint muscle forces and biomechanical response are predicted and compared with our earlier results that did not account for moment equilibrium equations at the hip joint. This study indicates that inclusion of the hip joint in the optimization along the knee and ankle joints only slightly (<10%) influences total forces in quadriceps, lateral hamstrings and medial hamstrings. As a consequence, even smaller differences are found in predicted ligament forces, contact forces/areas, and cartilage stresses/strains during the stance phase of gait. The distribution of total forces between the uni- and bi-articular muscle components in quadriceps and in lateral hamstrings; however, substantially alter at different stance phases.

  18. Identification of the contribution of the ankle and hip joints to multi-segmental balance control

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human stance involves multiple segments, including the legs and trunk, and requires coordinated actions of both. A novel method was developed that reliably estimates the contribution of the left and right leg (i.e., the ankle and hip joints) to the balance control of individual subjects. Methods The method was evaluated using simulations of a double-inverted pendulum model and the applicability was demonstrated with an experiment with seven healthy and one Parkinsonian participant. Model simulations indicated that two perturbations are required to reliably estimate the dynamics of a double-inverted pendulum balance control system. In the experiment, two multisine perturbation signals were applied simultaneously. The balance control system dynamic behaviour of the participants was estimated by Frequency Response Functions (FRFs), which relate ankle and hip joint angles to joint torques, using a multivariate closed-loop system identification technique. Results In the model simulations, the FRFs were reliably estimated, also in the presence of realistic levels of noise. In the experiment, the participants responded consistently to the perturbations, indicated by low noise-to-signal ratios of the ankle angle (0.24), hip angle (0.28), ankle torque (0.07), and hip torque (0.33). The developed method could detect that the Parkinson patient controlled his balance asymmetrically, that is, the right ankle and hip joints produced more corrective torque. Conclusion The method allows for a reliable estimate of the multisegmental feedback mechanism that stabilizes stance, of individual participants and of separate legs. PMID:23433148

  19. Bone bruise, lipohemarthrosis, and joint effusion in CT of non-displaced hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Geijer, Mats; Dunker, Dennis; Collin, David; Göthlin, Jan H

    2012-03-01

    A suspected occult hip fracture after normal radiography is not uncommon in an elderly person after a fall. Despite a lack of robust validation in the literature, computed tomography (CT) is often used as secondary imaging. To assess the frequency and clinical utility of non-cortical skeletal and soft tissue lesions as ancillary fracture signs in CT diagnosis of occult hip fractures. All fracture signs (cortical and trabecular fractures, bone bruise, joint effusion, and lipohemarthrosis) were recorded in 231 hip low-energy trauma cases with CT performed after normal or equivocal radiography in two trauma centers. There were no fracture signs in 110 patients. Twelve of these had a joint effusion. In 121 patients with 46 cervical hip fractures and 75 trochanteric fractures one or more fracture signs were present. Cortical fractures were found in 115 patients. Bone bruise was found in 119 patients, joint effusion in 35, and lipohemarthrosis in 20 patients. Ancillary signs such as bone bruise and lipohemarthrosis can strengthen and sometimes indicate the diagnosis in CT of occult hip fractures. Joint effusion is a non-specific sign.

  20. Knee vs hip single-joint intra-articular hyaluronic acid injection in patients with both hip and knee osteoarthritis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Diraçoğlu, Demirhan; Alptekin, Kerem; Teksöz, Bahar; Yağci, Ilker; Ozçakar, Levent; Aksoy, Cihan

    2009-09-01

    This paper aims to compare the results of single-joint knee vs hip hyaluronic acid (HA) injections in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) involving both the knee and hip joints. Thirty-eight patients who were diagnosed to have both hip and knee OA were enrolled. Patients were divided into two groups to receive HA injection three times at 1-week intervals either to the hip or knee joints. Pain level during activities and rest was measured by using visual analog scale (VAS). Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC 5-point Likert 3.0) was also used prior to the injections and 1 month after the 3rd injection. In the knee injection group, the intragroup analysis revealed significant improvements in VAS activity pain, VAS rest pain, and WOMAC pain values following injection when compared with preinjection values, while no significant difference was detected in WOMAC stiffness, WOMAC physical function, and WOMAC total values. In the hip injection group, VAS activity pain, VAS rest pain, WOMAC pain, WOMAC stiffness, WOMAC physical function, and WOMAC total values showed significant improvement after the injection when compared with preinjection values. Although statistically not significant (p > 0.05), the comparison of the differences (preinjection-postinjection) between the groups demonstrated higher values in the hip injection group. We imply that intra-articular single-joint HA injections either to the knee or hip joints in OA patients with involvement of both of these joints are effective with regard to pain and functional status.

  1. [Long-term results of endoprosthesis of the hip joint with Plus-Endoprosthetic prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Neverov, V A; Kurbanov, S Kh; Serb, S K

    2011-01-01

    An experience and results with using endoprosthesis of the hip joint with Plus-Endoprosthetic prosthesis in 937 (1018 operations) patients were analyzed. The period of follow-up observations was 12 years. Distinctive characteristics of the endoprosthesis are described. Specific behavior of this construction in patients with diseases and damages of the hip joint are shown. Results and complications of the endoprosthesis operations are analyzed. In whole, excellent and good results were obtained in 99.42% of cases, satisfactory - in 0.47%, unsatisfactory - in 0.11%.

  2. Direct hip joint distraction during acetabular fracture surgery using the AO universal manipulator.

    PubMed

    Calafi, L Afshin; Routt, M L Chip

    2010-02-01

    Certain acetabular fractures may necessitate distraction of the hip joint for removal of intra-articular debris and assessment of reduction. Distraction can be accomplished by manual traction, using a traction table or an AO universal manipulator (UM). The UM is a relatively simple and an inexpensive device that can provide focal distraction in a controlled manner without the risks associated with the use of a traction table. We describe a technique using the UM for hip joint distraction during acetabular fracture surgery through a Kocher-Langenbeck surgical exposure.

  3. [Hybrid replacement of the hip joint of the poldi-cech system.].

    PubMed

    Cech, O; Beznoska, S; Krbec, M

    1992-01-01

    The authors present cementless endoprothesis of the hip joint from the new series of hybrid endoprothesis of the hip joint being developed. The endoprothesis has a conic shaft allowing - with a precise reaming of the medullary canal by means of pneumatic reamer - good primary stability which provides the prerequisites for the remodellation of the bone bed. Endoprothesis is produced from the titanium alloy Ti-5 AI-2,5 Fe. The replacement is indicated for biologically young patients with a solid skeleton. Key words: hybrid endoprothesis, titanium alloy Ti-5 AI-2,5 Fe, cementless endoprothesis.

  4. Relative Changes in Ankle and Hip Control during Bilateral Joint Movements in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Matthew C.; Hyngstrom, Allison S.; Ng, Alexander V.; Schmit, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to quantify hip and ankle impairments contributing to movement dysfunction in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods Volitional phasing of bilateral hip and ankle torques was assessed using a load-cell-instrumented servomotor drive system in 10 participants with MS and 10 age-matched healthy participants. The hips and ankles were separately bilaterally oscillated 180° out of phase (40° range of motion) at a frequency of 0.75 Hz while the other joints were held stationary. Participants were instructed to assist in the same direction as the robot-imposed movement. The hip and ankle torques were measured and work was calculated for each movement. Results Total negative work at the ankle was significantly different between groups (p=0.040). The participants with MS produced larger negative work during hip flexion (p=0.042) and ankle flexion (p=0.037). Negative work at the hip was significantly correlated with the Berg Balance Scores and Timed 25 Feet Walk Test, and trends demonstrated increasing negative work with increasing clinical impairment in MS. Conclusions These results suggest an increased importance of the hip in functional balance and gait in MS. Significance Rehabilitation strategies targeting ankle recovery or compensation using the hip might improve movement function in MS. PMID:24315810

  5. Relative changes in ankle and hip control during bilateral joint movements in persons with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chua, Matthew C; Hyngstrom, Allison S; Ng, Alexander V; Schmit, Brian D

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify hip and ankle impairments contributing to movement dysfunction in multiple sclerosis (MS). Volitional phasing of bilateral hip and ankle torques was assessed using a load-cell-instrumented servomotor drive system in ten participants with MS and 10 age-matched healthy participants. The hips and ankles were separately bilaterally oscillated 180° out of phase (40° range of motion) at a frequency of 0.75 Hz while the other joints were held stationary. Participants were instructed to assist in the same direction as the robot-imposed movement. The hip and ankle torques were measured and work was calculated for each movement. Total negative work at the ankle was significantly different between groups (p=0.040). The participants with MS produced larger negative work during hip flexion (p=0.042) and ankle flexion (p=0.037). Negative work at the hip was significantly correlated with the Berg Balance Scores and Timed 25 Feet Walk Test, and trends demonstrated increasing negative work with increasing clinical impairment in MS. These results suggest an increased importance of the hip in functional balance and gait in MS. Rehabilitation strategies targeting ankle recovery or compensation using the hip might improve movement function in MS. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of hip joint center location and femoral offset on abductor muscle strength after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Taro; Inaba, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Naomi; Ike, Hiroyuki; Kubota, So; Kawamura, Masaki; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2015-07-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to examine the changes in the hip joint center (HJC) position and the femoral offset (FO) after total hip arthroplasty (THA) and 2) to investigate the effects of the HJC and FO on isometric abductor muscle strength. We evaluated 51 patients who underwent unilateral primary THA. The FO, and horizontal and vertical distances from the HJC to the tip of the teardrop were measured and isometric hip abductor muscle strength was measured. The HJC of the affected side moved medially postoperatively compared with that of the unaffected side (p < 0.05), and the FO was reconstructed similarly to the unaffected side. There were significant negative correlations between the changes in the horizontal distance from the HJC and FO to the tip of the teardrop. An increase in the FO and infero-medial cup position optimized hip abductor muscle strength. The HJC was reconstructed medially and superiorly, and the change in the FO after THA was influenced by the change in the horizontal distance of the HJC. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the medial and inferior HJC and increase in the FO constitute an effective procedure for restoring abductor strength.

  7. What happens at the adjacent knee joint after total hip arthroplasty of Crowe type III and IV dysplastic hips?

    PubMed

    Kilicarslan, Kasim; Yalcin, Nadir; Cicek, Hakan; Cila, Erdal; Yildirim, Hasan

    2012-02-01

    We prospectively evaluated 30 hips of 22 patients who had normal knees with a mean age of 53.4 years (range, 38-72 years). In the early postoperative period, genu valgum deformity was observed in all knees. Of 22 patients, 17 complained of severe pain owing to strain in the medial collateral ligament and iliotibial tract. Postoperatively, the ipsilateral extremities of the patients were extended by a mean of 16.5 mm (8-25 mm). Q angles of the patients increased by a mean of 4.4° ± 2.5° (P < .001). Although the Harris hip scores were improved (40.7-87.8 points), postoperative Lysholm-Gillquist knee scores were significantly reduced (92-76 points, P < .001). Reduction of displaced hips into the anatomical hip center and lengthening the extremity despite shortening procedure may lead to strain at the knee joint iatrogenically, particularly with the mechanical effect of tensor fascia lata, which results with changes in the knee biomechanics.

  8. Textured bearing surface in artificial joints to reduce macrophage activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Yoshitaka; Nishi, Naoki; Chikaura, Hiroto; Nakashima, Yuta; Miura, Hiromasa; Higaki, Hidehiko; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Fujiwara, Yukio; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Takeya, Motohiro

    2015-12-01

    Micro slurry-jet erosion has been proposed as a precision machining technique for the bearing surfaces of artificial joints in order to reduce the total amount of polyethylene wear and to enlarge the size of the wear debris. The micro slurry-jet erosion method is a wet blasting technique which uses alumina particles as the abrasive medium along with compressed air and water to create an ideal surface. Pin-on-disc wear tests with multidirectional sliding motion on the textured surface of a \\text{Co}-\\text{Cr}-\\text{Mo} alloy counterface for polyethylene resulted in both a reduction of wear as well as enlargement of the polyethylene debris size. In this study, primary human peripheral blood mononuclear phagocytes were incubated with the debris, and it was elucidated that the wear debris generated on the textured surface regulated secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, indicating a reduction in the induced tissue reaction and joint loosening.

  9. Effects of idealized joint geometry on finite element predictions of cartilage contact stresses in the hip.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Andrew E; Ellis, Benjamin J; Maas, Steve A; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2010-05-07

    Computational models may have the ability to quantify the relationship between hip morphology, cartilage mechanics and osteoarthritis. Most models have assumed the hip joint to be a perfect ball and socket joint and have neglected deformation at the bone-cartilage interface. The objective of this study was to analyze finite element (FE) models of hip cartilage mechanics with varying degrees of simplified geometry and a model with a rigid bone material assumption to elucidate the effects on predictions of cartilage stress. A previously validated subject-specific FE model of a cadaveric hip joint was used as the basis for the models. Geometry for the bone-cartilage interface was either: (1) subject-specific (i.e. irregular), (2) spherical, or (3) a rotational conchoid. Cartilage was assigned either a varying (irregular) or constant thickness (smoothed). Loading conditions simulated walking, stair-climbing and descending stairs. FE predictions of contact stress for the simplified models were compared with predictions from the subject-specific model. Both spheres and conchoids provided a good approximation of native hip joint geometry (average fitting error approximately 0.5mm). However, models with spherical/conchoid bone geometry and smoothed articulating cartilage surfaces grossly underestimated peak and average contact pressures (50% and 25% lower, respectively) and overestimated contact area when compared to the subject-specific FE model. Models incorporating subject-specific bone geometry with smoothed articulating cartilage also underestimated pressures and predicted evenly distributed patterns of contact. The model with rigid bones predicted much higher pressures than the subject-specific model with deformable bones. The results demonstrate that simplifications to the geometry of the bone-cartilage interface, cartilage surface and bone material properties can have a dramatic effect on the predicted magnitude and distribution of cartilage contact pressures in

  10. The effect of tranexamic acid on artificial joint materials: a biomechanical study (the bioTRANX study).

    PubMed

    Alshryda, Sattar; Mason, James M; Sarda, Praveen; Lou, T; Stanley, Martin; Wu, Junjie; Unsworth, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Tranexamic acid (TXA) has been successfully used to reduce bleeding in joint replacement. Recently local TXA has been advocated to reduce blood loss in total knee or hip replacement; however, this raised concerns about potential adverse effects of TXA upon the artificial joint replacement. In this biomechanical study we compared the effects of TXA and saline upon the following biomechanical properties of artificial joint materials-(1) tensile properties (ultimate strength, stiffness and Young's modulus), (2) the wear rate using a multi-directional pin-on-plate machine, and (3) the surface topography of pins and plates before and after wear rate testing. There were no significant differences in tensile strength, wear rates or surface topography of either ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene pins or cobalt chromium molybdenum metal plates between specimens soaked in TXA and specimens soaked in saline. Biomechanical testing shows that there are no biomechanical adverse affects on the properties of common artificial joint materials from using topical TXA. V.

  11. Agreement between weight bearing and non-weight bearing joint position replication tasks at the knee and hip.

    PubMed

    Foch, Eric; Milner, Clare E

    2013-01-01

    Peak joint angles assumed during the stance phase of running may indicate a runner's ability to sense limb position in space. Joint position sense can be assessed through weight bearing and non-weight bearing tasks. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if weight bearing and non-weight bearing knee and hip joint replication tasks elicited similar joint position sense test results. Absolute replication error was measured during sagittal plane knee and frontal plane hip conditions on 23 healthy runners. Three-dimensional kinematics was recorded during running. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) determined agreement between the two measures of joint position sense. Pearson's correlation coefficients measured the relationship between hip and knee absolute error and peak joint angles during running. Despite similar mean absolute error, ICCs indicated low agreement between weight bearing and non-weight bearing conditions at each joint. The results indicate the tests are not interchangeable. Absolute error for non-weight bearing hip replication was correlated with peak stance hip adduction during running. Weight bearing and non-weight bearing joint position sense tasks within the knee and hip joints measure joint position sense differently. Therefore, a task that is relevant to the activity of interest should be selected to measure joint position sense.

  12. Joint pain undergoes a transition in accordance with signal changes of bones detected by MRI in hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Mikio; Nakamura, Yukio; Ikegami, Shota; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate whether joint pain is derived from cartilage or bone alterations. We reviewed 23 hip joints of 21 patients with primary hip osteoarthritis (OA), which were classified into Kellgren-Laurence (KL) grading I to IV. Plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were obtained from all of the 23 joints. Two of the 21 patients had bilateral hip OA. Pain was assessed based on the pain scale of Denis. A Welch t test was performed for age, height, weight, body mass index, bone mineral density, and a Mann-Whitney U test was performed for KL grading. Four of 8 hip joints with pain and OA showed broad signal changes detected by MRI. Fourteen hip joints without pain, but with OA did not show broad signal changes by MRI. Collectively, MRI analyses showed that broad signal changes in OA cases without joint pain or with a slight degree of joint pain were not observed, while broad signal changes were observed in OA cases with deteriorated joint pain. Our findings suggest that hip joint pain might be associated with bone signal alterations in the hips of OA patients.

  13. Prevalence of knee and hip osteoarthritis and the appropriateness of joint replacement in an older population.

    PubMed

    Quintana, José M; Arostegui, Inmaculada; Escobar, Antonio; Azkarate, Jesus; Goenaga, J Ignacio; Lafuente, Iratxe

    2008-07-28

    Relatively little is known about the prevalence of knee and hip osteoarthritis in the general population. To estimate the prevalence of knee and hip osteoarthritis and the appropriateness of joint replacement in a general population of older individuals, the validated Knee and Hip OsteoArthritis Screening Questionnaire (KHOA-SQ) was sent to a random sample of individuals aged 60 to 90 years, stratified by age and sex, living in a single province in Spain. Respondents positive for knee or hip osteoarthritis on the KHOA-SQ were invited to be examined by an orthopedic surgeon. Diagnosis of knee or hip osteoarthritis was based on clinical and radiographic data. For respondents judged as having osteoarthritis, the appropriateness of knee or hip replacement was evaluated using published explicit criteria. Of 11 002 individuals contacted, 7577 completed the KHOA-SQ. The derived prevalence of hip osteoarthritis was approximately 7.4%. It was slightly higher in women (8.0%) than in men (6.7%) and tended to increase with age. The estimated appropriateness rate for hip replacement was 37.7% in men and 52.7% in women with osteoarthritis. The derived prevalence of knee osteoarthritis was 12.2%; it was significantly higher in women (14.9%) than in men (8.7%) and tended to increase with age. The estimated appropriateness rate for knee replacement was 11.8% in men and 17.9% in women with osteoarthritis. Knee and hip osteoarthritis are highly prevalent diseases in the older population. The estimation of appropriateness for hip replacement seems to be significantly higher than that for knee replacement.

  14. Associations between early radiographic and computed tomographic measures and canine hip joint osteoarthritis at maturity.

    PubMed

    Andronescu, Anemone A; Kelly, Laura; Kearney, Michael T; Lopez, Mandi J

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate associations of measures assessed by radiography, 2-D CT, and 3-D CT of the hip joints of immature dogs with osteoarthritis in the same joints at maturity. 46 hound-type dogs from a colony predisposed to osteoarthritis. Images of hip joints (1/dog) were obtained at 16, 32, and 104 weeks of age. Radiographic measures included Norberg angle, distraction index, and osteoarthritis score. Two-dimensional CT measures included acetabular index, percentage of femoral head coverage, and center edge, horizontal toit externe, acetabular anteversion, and ventral, dorsal, and horizontal acetabular sector angles. Three-dimensional CT measures were femoral head and neck volume, femoral neck angle, and femoral head and neck radius. Differences among measures at 16 and 32 weeks in dogs with different osteoarthritis scores at later time points, relationships among variables at each time point, and relationships of single and combined measures with the presence of osteoarthritis at 104 weeks were evaluated. The 16- and 32-week distraction index, center edge angle, dorsal acetabular sector angle, horizontal acetabular sector angle, percentage of femoral head coverage, acetabular index, and Norberg angle and the 32-week femoral neck angle varied significantly with osteoarthritis severity at 104 weeks. Presence of osteoarthritis in mature dogs was most strongly associated with 16-week combined measures of distraction index and center edge angle and 32-week combined measures of dorsal acetabular sector angle and Norberg angle. Changes in hip joint morphology associated with radiographic signs of osteoarthritis were detectable as early as 16 weeks of age and varied with osteoarthritis severity in adult dogs. The use of combined hip joint measures may improve early identification of dogs predisposed to hip joint osteoarthritis.

  15. Hip reconstruction surgery is successful in restoring joint congruity in patients with cerebral palsy: long-term outcome.

    PubMed

    Braatz, Frank; Eidemüller, Annette; Klotz, Matthias C; Beckmann, Nicholas A; Wolf, Sebastian I; Dreher, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Neurogenic hip dislocation is frequently observed in patients with cerebral palsy (CP). If the hip is not centred but not dislocated, the hip joint can be recentered with minor operative effort. Reconstructive procedures are indicated if the femoral head is subluxated or dislocated. There are no data as to when destruction of the femoral head requires a salvage procedure or whether hip reconstruction surgery is successful in restoring joint congruity in patients with CP. Our aim was to investigate femoral head plasticity after hip reconstruction surgery in a long-term outcome study. We studied a large cohort of patients with CP and high hip dislocation (Tönnis grade IV) before surgery. Sixty-eight patients were assessed, of whom 23 presented with bilateral high hip dislocation, and 91 complex hip reconstructions were conducted. Standardised radiographic examination was performed before and directly after surgery and at the long-term follow-up examination. Pain was the most frequent reason for complex hip-joint reconstruction (49 patients, 72%). An impressive improvement in pain was demonstrated postoperatively. Forty-five hip joints presented aspheric incongruity postoperatively, which improved on average 7.7 years after surgery and 59 hip joints showed congruency. Only 15% of patients experienced pain at the time of final follow-up, and that was of low intensity. Early conservative treatment for hip dislocation is helpful, and operative reconstruction should also be scheduled early. Continued surveillance is necessary, and Reimers index is useful for monitoring the development of hip centering. In case of hip pain and femoral head deformity, our long-term study indicates that hip reconstruction surgery as a part of multilevel surgery improves pain and function in patients with CP and Tönnis IV hip dislocation, even if the hip joint is incongruent after operation. This incongruity improves over the long-term. If possible, a reconstruction procedure should be

  16. [Asymmetric bilateral traumatic dislocation of the hip joint: a case report].

    PubMed

    Azar, Nikola; Yalçinkaya, Merter; Akman, Yunus Emre; Uzümcügil, Onat; Kabukçuoğlu, Yavuz S

    2010-08-01

    Bilateral traumatic dislocation of the hip is a rare condition. Simultaneous asymmetric traumatic dislocation of the hip, one hip anterior and the other posterior, is even more unusual. This article reports a 21-year-old male patient with asymmetric bilateral dislocation of the hip joint, injured due to a landslide during a canal excavation. The patient was treated conservatively and evaluated according to Thompson and Epstein clinical and radiographic criteria after a follow-up period of 10 years and six months. The clinical result was perfect and radiographical result was good. We determined that our case had occurred as a result of a mechanism that has not been previously published in the literature and evaluated it from this point of view.

  17. Hip and knee joint kinematics during a diagonal jump landing in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed females.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, Eamonn; Prendiville, Anna; Sweeney, Lauren; Chawke, Mark; Kelleher, Judy; Patterson, Matt; Murphy, Katie

    2012-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a common injury encountered by sport medicine clinicians. Surgical reconstruction is the recommended treatment of choice for those athletes wishing to return to full-contact sports participation and for sports requiring multi-directional movement patterns. The aim of ACL reconstruction is to restore knee joint mechanical stability such that the athlete can return to sporting participation. However, knowledge regarding the extent to which lower limb kinematic profiles are restored following ACL reconstruction is limited. In the present study the hip and knee joint kinematic profiles of 13 ACL reconstructed (ACL-R) and 16 non-injured control subjects were investigated during the performance of a diagonal jump landing task. The ACL-R group exhibited significantly less peak knee joint flexion (P=0.01). Significant between group differences were noted for time averaged hip joint sagittal plane (P<0.05) and transverse plane (P<0.05) kinematic profiles, as well as knee joint frontal plane (P<0.05) and sagittal plane (P<0.05) kinematic profiles. These results suggest that aberrant hip and knee joint kinematic profiles are present following ACL reconstruction, which could influence future injury risk.

  18. Arthrosonography of hip and knee joints in the follow up of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Frosch, M; Foell, D; Ganser, G; Roth, J

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Twenty eight patients with JRA with active disease at entry in 15 hips and 38 knee joints were followed up three times in intervals of 4–6 weeks. Sonographic, clinical, and laboratory findings were documented at the same time in clinically active and inactive disease. As controls of the sonographic variables 10 children without a history of arthritis were examined by ultrasound. Results: In active arthritis of the hip joint 19/31 (61%) examinations showed a pathological widening of the synovial joint space. There was no significant correlation between sonographic and clinical measures of disease activity in coxitis. Marked effusion within the suprapatellar pouch was seen in 87% and thickening of the synovial membrane in 92% of cases of active gonarthritis in patients with JRA. There was a significant difference in the number of patients with joint effusion and in the mean joint effusion between patients with clinically active gonarthritis at entry and inactive arthritis at follow up (p<0.001). In contrast, synovial thickening persisted in about 80% after induction of clinical remission. Conclusion: The data confirm the high sensitivity of arthrosonography in imaging changes in hip and knee joints of patients with JRA. Sonographic effusion of the knee provided the highest correlation with measures of clinical disease activity. Further prospective studies should evaluate whether persistent thickening of the synovial membrane detected by ultrasound in clinically inactive arthritis indicates residual inflammatory activity and an increased risk of relapse. PMID:12594110

  19. Bone mineral density in patients with destructive arthrosis of the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Okano, Kunihiko; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Enomoto, Hiroshi; Osaki, Makoto; Chiba, Ko; Yamaguchi, Kazumasa

    2014-05-01

    Recent reports have shown the existence of subchondral insufficiency fracture in rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip joint (RDA), and the findings suggest that osteopenia is related to the pathogenesis of the rapid progression of this disease. Therefore, we measured bone mineral density (BMD) in RDA patients. We measured BMD of the lumbar spine, radius, and calcaneus using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 19 patients with RDA and 75 with osteoarthritis of the hip (OA) and compared BMD at different skeletal sites between RDA and OA patients. No significant differences were observed in BMD of the lumbar spine, ultradistal radius, mid-radius, and calcaneous between the RDA and OA groups. Our data suggest that RDA is not accompanied by generalized osteoporosis. Factors other than generalized bone status, for example, BMD around the affected hip joint before destruction, need to be analyzed to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanism of RDA.

  20. Evaluation of range of motion restriction within the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Turley, Glen A; Williams, Mark A; Wellings, Richard M; Griffin, Damian R

    2013-04-01

    In total hip arthroplasty, determining the impingement free range of motion requirement is a complex task. This is because in the native hip, motion is restricted by both impingement as well as soft tissue restraint. The aim of this study is to determine a range of motion benchmark which can identify motions which are at risk from impingement and those which are constrained due to soft tissue. Two experimental methodologies were used to determine motions which were limited by impingement and those motions which were limited by both impingement and soft tissue restraint. By comparing these two experimental results, motions which were limited by impingement were able to be separated from those motions which were limited by soft tissue restraint. The results show motions in extension as well as flexion combined with adduction are limited by soft tissue restraint. Motions in flexion, flexion combined with abduction and adduction are at risk from osseous impingement. Consequently, these motions represent where the maximum likely damage will occur in femoroacetabular impingement or at most risk of prosthetic impingement in total hip arthroplasty.

  1. MR imaging of transient osteoporosis of the hip: an update on 155 hip joints.

    PubMed

    Klontzas, Michail E; Vassalou, Evangelia E; Zibis, Aristeidis H; Bintoudi, Antonia S; Karantanas, Apostolos H

    2015-03-01

    Transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH) presents with acute onset pain and bone marrow edema (BMe) on MR imaging. The purpose of this study is to revise the MR imaging characteristics of TOH by analyzing the data derived from 155 hip examinations. We also sought to explore the relationship between the duration of symptoms and the presence of sparing and subchondral fractures. MR images of 155 hips (141 TOH patients) were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of insufficiency fractures and the morphology of BMe. Sparing of the medial bone marrow of the femoral head was recorded together with demographic and clinical data. Progression to regional migratory osteoporosis (RMO) and postpartum cases were also recorded. Our population consisted of 76.4% male and 23.6% female patients. RMO progression was recorded in 19.4% and 4 postpartum cases displayed bilateral disease. Sparing of the medial bone marrow was present at 87.7% of patients and disappeared as the disease progressed (P=0.005). BMe was restricted within the femoral head in 11.0%, extended to the femoral neck in 40% and to the femoral shaft in 49% of the cases studied. Subchondral fractures were present at 48.7% of the hips. This study describes TOH patient characteristics, the MR imaging findings (BMe pattern, microfractures), their association with symptom duration and the chance of progressing to RMO. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Single nucleotide polymorphisms refine QTL intervals for hip joint laxity in dogs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, L; Zhang, Z; Feng, F; Schweitzer, P; Phavaphutanon, J; Vernier-Singer, M; Corey, E; Friedenberg, S; Mateescu, R; Williams, A; Lust, G; Acland, G; Todhunter, R

    2008-04-01

    Hip laxity is one characteristic of canine hip dysplasia (CHD), an inheritable disease that leads to hip osteoarthritis. Using a genome-wide screen with 250 microsatellites in a crossbreed pedigree of 159 dysplastic Labrador retrievers and unaffected greyhounds, we previously identified putative (P < 0.01) QTL on canine chromosomes 11 and 29 (CFA11 and CFA29). To refine these QTL locations, we have genotyped 257 dogs including 105 Labrador retrievers, seven greyhounds, four generations of their crossbreed offspring and three German shepherds for 111 and 171 SNPs on CFA11 and CFA29 respectively. The distraction index (DI, a measure of maximum hip laxity) was used as an intermediate phenotype that predicts whether a hip joint will or will not develop osteoarthritis. Using a multipoint linkage analysis, significant evidence (95% posterior probability) was found for QTL contributing to hip laxity in the 16.2-21 cM region on CFA11 that explained 15-18% of the total variance in DI. Evidence for an independent QTL on CFA29 was weaker than that on CFA11. Identification of the causative mutation(s) will lead to better understanding of biochemical pathways in both dogs and humans with hip laxity and dysplasia.

  3. Loss of range of motion of the hip joint: a hypothesis for etiology of sports hernia

    PubMed Central

    Rambani, Rohit; Hackney, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background: sports hernia is a well-recognized cause of groin pain in athletes involved in sports, especially football and rugby. Loss of range of motion of the hip joint is a possible contributory factor to stress across the symphysis pubis leading to the instability. Methods: twenty-five athletes presenting with sports hernia were matched to age, sex, physical/sports activity and co-morbidities with twenty-five athletes without sports hernia. The range of movement of both the hips was compared in athletes of both the groups. Results: there was marked restriction of internal rotation with the hip flexed to 90 degrees (average 17 degrees) and external rotation (average 26 degrees) in sports hernia group compared to the control group. Other movements of the hip were comparable in both the groups. Conclusion: the study highlights observation of limitation of hip rotation with the hip flexed to 90 degrees as a possible factor in the aetiology of sports hernia. There may be an association with other pathologies of the hip such as impingement that requires further investigation. Though this study has its limitation in being a small number and a case control study, it does helps in understanding the possible mechanism of development of this condition. PMID:25878984

  4. Does aquatic exercise reduce hip and knee joint loading? In vivo load measurements with instrumented implants

    PubMed Central

    Kutzner, Ines; Dymke, Jörn; Damm, Philipp; Duda, Georg N.; Günzl, Reiner; Bergmann, Georg

    2017-01-01

    Aquatic exercises are widely used for rehabilitation or preventive therapies in order to enable mobilization and muscle strengthening while minimizing joint loading of the lower limb. The load reducing effect of water due to buoyancy is a main advantage compared to exercises on land. However, also drag forces have to be considered that act opposite to the relative motion of the body segments and require higher muscle activity. Due to these opposing effects on joint loading, the load-reducing effect during aquatic exercises remains unknown. The aim of this study was to quantify the joint loads during various aquatic exercises and to determine the load reducing effect of water. Instrumented knee and hip implants with telemetric data transfer were used to measure the resultant joint contact forces in 12 elderly subjects (6x hip, 6x knee) in vivo. Different dynamic, weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing activities were performed by the subjects on land and in chest-high water. Non-weight-bearing hip and knee flexion/extension was performed at different velocities and with additional Aquafins. Joint forces during aquatic exercises ranged between 32 and 396% body weight (BW). Highest forces occurred during dynamic activities, followed by weight-bearing and slow non-weight-bearing activities. Compared to the same activities on land, joint forces were reduced by 36–55% in water with absolute reductions being greater than 100%BW during weight-bearing and dynamic activities. During non-weight-bearing activities, high movement velocities and additional Aquafins increased the joint forces by up to 59% and resulted in joint forces of up to 301%BW. This study confirms the load reducing effect of water during weight-bearing and dynamic exercises. Nevertheless, high drag forces result in increased joint contact forces and indicate greater muscle activity. By the choice of activity, movement velocity and additional resistive devices joint forces can be modulated individually in

  5. Does aquatic exercise reduce hip and knee joint loading? In vivo load measurements with instrumented implants.

    PubMed

    Kutzner, Ines; Richter, Anja; Gordt, Katharina; Dymke, Jörn; Damm, Philipp; Duda, Georg N; Günzl, Reiner; Bergmann, Georg

    2017-01-01

    Aquatic exercises are widely used for rehabilitation or preventive therapies in order to enable mobilization and muscle strengthening while minimizing joint loading of the lower limb. The load reducing effect of water due to buoyancy is a main advantage compared to exercises on land. However, also drag forces have to be considered that act opposite to the relative motion of the body segments and require higher muscle activity. Due to these opposing effects on joint loading, the load-reducing effect during aquatic exercises remains unknown. The aim of this study was to quantify the joint loads during various aquatic exercises and to determine the load reducing effect of water. Instrumented knee and hip implants with telemetric data transfer were used to measure the resultant joint contact forces in 12 elderly subjects (6x hip, 6x knee) in vivo. Different dynamic, weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing activities were performed by the subjects on land and in chest-high water. Non-weight-bearing hip and knee flexion/extension was performed at different velocities and with additional Aquafins. Joint forces during aquatic exercises ranged between 32 and 396% body weight (BW). Highest forces occurred during dynamic activities, followed by weight-bearing and slow non-weight-bearing activities. Compared to the same activities on land, joint forces were reduced by 36-55% in water with absolute reductions being greater than 100%BW during weight-bearing and dynamic activities. During non-weight-bearing activities, high movement velocities and additional Aquafins increased the joint forces by up to 59% and resulted in joint forces of up to 301%BW. This study confirms the load reducing effect of water during weight-bearing and dynamic exercises. Nevertheless, high drag forces result in increased joint contact forces and indicate greater muscle activity. By the choice of activity, movement velocity and additional resistive devices joint forces can be modulated individually in the

  6. [Adhesive (retractile) capsulitis of the hip joint in diabetes mellitus. An x-ray histomorphological synopsis].

    PubMed

    Dihlmann, W; Höpker, W W

    1992-09-01

    Adhesive (retractile) capsulitis of the hip joint is a rare complication (association) of (juvenile) diabetes mellitus. The clinical features, plain radiographic and CT findings and histomorphological appearances of this condition are described and attention is drawn to changes in the elastic tissue in the fibrosed capsule. Three diagnostic radiological features have been defined; in their presence, arthrography or diagnostic arthroscopy need not be performed.

  7. Bilateral rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip joint resulting from subchondral fracture with superimposed secondary osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takuaki; Schneider, Robert; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Bullough, Peter G

    2010-02-01

    A 57-year-old woman suffered rapid destruction of both hip joints over a 10 months period. At the first visit, her radiographs demonstrated slight joint space narrowing and acetabular cyst formation in both hips. Five months later, joint space narrowing had further progressed, and intra-articular injection of steroid was given in both hips. However, the hip pain gradually became worse. Five months later, both joint spaces had totally disappeared and both femoral heads had undergone massive collapse. At gross examination, both resected femoral heads showed extensive opaque yellow areas consistent with osteonecrosis. Microscopic examination of these areas revealed evidence of both extensive fracture and callus formation, as well as necrosis throughout, indicating that the osteonecrosis observed in this case was a secondary phenomenon superimposed on pre-existing osteoarthritis and subchondral fracture. There were many pseudogranulomatous lesions in the marrow space and necrotic area, where tiny fragments of bone and articular cartilage, surrounded by histiocytes and giant cells, were embedded, such as are typically seen in rapidly destructive arthrosis. No radiologic or morphologic evidence of primary osteonecrosis was noted. This case indicates that at least some cases of rapidly destructive arthritis are the result of subchondral fracture with superimposed secondary osteonecrosis.

  8. Radiographic study of the hip joint to determine anthropometric parameters for Indian population.

    PubMed

    Bagaria, Vaibhav; Deshpande, Shirish; Kuthe, Abhay; Rasalkar, Darshana D; Paunipagar, Bhawan K; Madhugiri, Tanushree Subhash

    2012-02-01

    Hip replacement surgeries are on the rise in India. However, for these surgeries, most of the implants used are imported and manufactured entirely to suit the geometrical considerations of the western population. Studies in the past have shown that there are anatomical variations in the hip joint for different ethnic backgrounds and geographical locations. There is paucity of anthropometric hip joint data related to Indian population and anthropometric variations in skeletal geometry between Asian and Western counterparts have not yet been thoroughly reviewed and considered for implant manufacturing. The purpose of this anthropometric study is to determine any anatomical variations in the normal hip joint among the Indian population and to statistically compare the mean values with the existing data on western population. 422 Hip radiographs of 211 individuals (141 males and 70 females) with normal and healthy hip joints were evaluated to obtain the horizontal offset, vertical offset and neck shaft angle. For males, mean neck shaft angle was 127.68° (SD = 3.94), horizontal offset was 34.60mm (SD=6.55) and vertical offset was 39.17 mm (SD = 5.86). For females, mean neck shaft angle was 125.92° (SD = 4.75), horizontal offset was 32.96 mm (SD = 7.04) and vertical offset was 36.38 mm (SD = 6.28). When these parameters were compared to the data available from western world, there were significant anatomical variations and it was evident that there is a need to evaluate existing implants in relation to this data and possibly design the implants suited and relevant to Indian population.

  9. Surrogate Modeling of Deformable Joint Contact using Artificial Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Eskinazi, Ilan; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Deformable joint contact models can be used to estimate loading conditions for cartilage-cartilage, implant-implant, human-orthotic, and foot-ground interactions. However, contact evaluations are often so expensive computationally that they can be prohibitive for simulations or optimizations requiring thousands or even millions of contact evaluations. To overcome this limitation, we developed a novel surrogate contact modeling method based on artificial neural networks (ANNs). The method uses special sampling techniques to gather input-output data points from an original (slow) contact model in multiple domains of input space, where each domain represents a different physical situation likely to be encountered. For each contact force and torque output by the original contact model, a multi-layer feed-forward ANN is defined, trained, and incorporated into a surrogate contact model. As an evaluation problem, we created an ANN-based surrogate contact model of an artificial tibiofemoral joint using over 75,000 evaluations of a fine-grid elastic foundation (EF) contact model. The surrogate contact model computed contact forces and torques about 1000 times faster than a less accurate coarse grid EF contact model. Furthermore, the surrogate contact model was seven times more accurate than the coarse grid EF contact model within the input domain of a walking motion. For larger input domains, the surrogate contact model showed the expected trend of increasing error with increasing domain size. In addition, the surrogate contact model was able to identify out-of-contact situations with high accuracy. Computational contact models created using our proposed ANN approach may remove an important computational bottleneck from musculoskeletal simulations or optimizations incorporating deformable joint contact models. PMID:26220591

  10. Surrogate modeling of deformable joint contact using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Eskinazi, Ilan; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2015-09-01

    Deformable joint contact models can be used to estimate loading conditions for cartilage-cartilage, implant-implant, human-orthotic, and foot-ground interactions. However, contact evaluations are often so expensive computationally that they can be prohibitive for simulations or optimizations requiring thousands or even millions of contact evaluations. To overcome this limitation, we developed a novel surrogate contact modeling method based on artificial neural networks (ANNs). The method uses special sampling techniques to gather input-output data points from an original (slow) contact model in multiple domains of input space, where each domain represents a different physical situation likely to be encountered. For each contact force and torque output by the original contact model, a multi-layer feed-forward ANN is defined, trained, and incorporated into a surrogate contact model. As an evaluation problem, we created an ANN-based surrogate contact model of an artificial tibiofemoral joint using over 75,000 evaluations of a fine-grid elastic foundation (EF) contact model. The surrogate contact model computed contact forces and torques about 1000 times faster than a less accurate coarse grid EF contact model. Furthermore, the surrogate contact model was seven times more accurate than the coarse grid EF contact model within the input domain of a walking motion. For larger input domains, the surrogate contact model showed the expected trend of increasing error with increasing domain size. In addition, the surrogate contact model was able to identify out-of-contact situations with high accuracy. Computational contact models created using our proposed ANN approach may remove an important computational bottleneck from musculoskeletal simulations or optimizations incorporating deformable joint contact models.

  11. Is closed suction drainage effective in early recovery of hip joint function? Comparative evaluation in one-stage bilateral total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Koyano, Gaku; Jinno, Tetsuya; Koga, Daisuke; Hoshino, Chisato; Muneta, Takeshi; Okawa, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    One-stage primary bilateral cementless total hip arthroplasty with unilateral closed suction drainage (CSD) was prospectively performed for 51 patients (102 hips), and local effects of CSD were quantitatively evaluated. Postoperatively, pain scores evaluated by visual analog scale and periwound temperatures measured by thermography were lower in the CSD side than the non-CSD side. CT measurements also showed that postoperative cross-sectional area of the thigh was smaller in the CSD side. Active straight leg raising and weight bearing were more accelerated in the CSD side., showing earlier recovery of hip joint function. CSD for hip arthroplasty has an advantage in reducing postoperative local inflammation and be recommended from the viewpoint of postoperative pain relief and early recovery of hip joint function.

  12. Access to the hip joint from standard arthroscopic portals: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Thorey, Fritz; Ezechieli, Marco; Ettinger, Max; Albrecht, Urs-Vito; Budde, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Our purpose was to study and describe the areas of the hip joint that can be safely visualized and operated on using a variety of portals for the central and peripheral compartments. Twelve hip joints in 6 human cadavers were examined through 9 different central and peripheral arthroscopic portals. Markings of the accessible areas within the joint were made through an arthroscope. Dissection of the cadavers was carried out for final evaluation of the visible areas and those accessible for instruments. During dissection, anatomic proximity of the portals to relevant neurovascular structures was measured. The central compartment was sufficiently accessible using the anterior, anterolateral, and posterolateral portals, with slight limitations in the posteromedial corner. A more medial portal did not offer substantial advantages regarding accessibility but decreased the safety distance to the femoral nerve. With regard to the peripheral compartment, the combination of the anterolateral and posterolateral portals allowed visualization of most of the joint. It was observed that the structure at highest risk of injury for the central anterior and the peripheral anterolateral portals was the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. In hip arthroscopy, the use of the standard anterior, anterolateral, and posterolateral portals allows proper accessibility of the central compartment, with slight limitations in the posteromedial corner. A more medial portal is not recommended with regard to its risk-benefit ratio. The peripheral compartment of the hip joint is sufficiently visible using the anterolateral and posterolateral portals. For treatment of specific pathologic conditions, a variation of these portals improves surgical accessibility. The anatomic structure at highest risk of injury during hip arthroscopy is the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. The general objectives of this study were to prepare surgeons to develop appropriate concepts of surgery and to facilitate preoperative

  13. Unilateral hip osteoarthritis: The effect of compensation strategies and anatomic measurements on frontal plane joint loading.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, André; Meurer, Andrea; Lenarz, Katharina; Vogt, Lutz; Froemel, Dara; Lutz, Frederick; Barker, John; Stief, Felix

    2017-08-01

    In order to reduce pain caused by the affected hip joint, unilateral hip osteoarthritis patients (HOAP) adopt characteristic gait patterns. However, it is unknown if the knee and hip joint loading in the non-affected (limbnon-affected ) and the affected (limbaffected ) limb differ from healthy controls (HC) and which gait parameters correlate with potential abnormal joint loading. Instrumented 3D-gait analysis was performed on 18 HOAP and 18 sex, age, and height matched HC. The limbnon-affected showed greater first and second peak external hip adduction moments (first HAM: +15%, p = 0.014; second HAM: +15%, p = 0.021, respectively), than seen in HC. In contrast, the second peak external knee adduction moment (KAM) in the limbaffected is reduced by about 23% and 30% compared to the limbnon-affected and HC, respectively. Furthermore, our patients showed characteristic gait compensation strategies including reduced peak vertical forces (pvF), a greater foot progression angle (FPA), and reduced knee range of motion (ROM) in the limbaffected . The limbaffected was 5.6 ± 3.8 mm shorter than the limbnon-affected . Results of stepwise regression analyses showed that increased first pvF explain 16% of first HAM alterations, whereas knee ROM and FPA explain 39% of second KAM alterations. We therefore expect an increased rate of progression of OA in the hip joint of the limbnon-affected and suggest that the shift in the medial-to-lateral knee joint load distribution may impact the rate of progression of OA in the limbaffected . The level of evidence is III. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1764-1773, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Quantifying the association of radiographic osteoarthritis in knee or hip joints with other knees or hips: the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project.

    PubMed

    Sayre, Eric C; Jordan, Joanne M; Cibere, Jolanda; Murphy, Louise; Schwartz, Todd A; Helmick, Charles G; Renner, Jordan B; Rahman, M Mushfiqur; Aghajanian, Jaafar; Kang, Weiqun; Badley, Elizabeth M; Kopec, Jacek A

    2010-06-01

    To quantify the association of radiographic osteoarthritis (ROA) in one knee or hip joint with other knee or hip joints. We analyzed baseline data from the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project (n = 3068). We fit 4 models for left/right knee/hip. The Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) radiographic grade severity scale was KL 0/1 (no/questionable ROA), 2 (mild ROA), or 3/4 (moderate/severe ROA). We estimated associations between KL grade in contralateral joints and other joint sites (e.g., worst hip in knee models), adjusting for sex, race/ethnicity (African American/white), age, and measured body mass index, using cumulative odds logistic regression models. Interactions were investigated: race/ethnicity by sex; race/ethnicity and sex by the 2 explanatory variables. Contralateral joint KL grade was strongly associated with KL grade, with OR ranging from 9.2 (95% CI 7.1, 11.9) to 225.0 (95% CI 83.6, 605.7). In the left knee model, the contralateral joint association was stronger among African Americans than whites, but for the other models the associations by race/ethnicity were identical. Models examining other joint sites showed weaker but mostly statistically significant associations (OR 1.4 to 1.8). We found a strong multivariable-adjusted association between KL grades in contralateral knees and hips, and a modest association with the other joint site (e.g., knees vs hips). These results suggest that diagnosis of ROA in 1 large joint may be a marker for risk of multijoint ROA, and warrant interventions to reduce the incidence or severity of ROA at these other joints.

  15. [Update on metal-on-metal hip joints].

    PubMed

    Günther, K-P; Lützner, J; Hannemann, F; Schmitt, J; Kirschner, S; Goronzy, J; Stiehler, M; Lohmann, C; Hartmann, A

    2013-05-01

    Increasing data are available describing risk factors for the development of local and systemic adverse events following operations using metal-on-metal (MoM) hip implants. The prevalence and clinical relevance of metal-associated problems are, however, still under debate. They can be influenced by type and position of implant as well as patient-specific factors. Patients with small MoM heads (maximum diameter 32 mm) and subgroups of resurfacing arthroplasty can achieve good long-term survival. The use of large head MoM implants (diameters greater than 36 mm), however, is currently not advised due to the unsatisfactory results.

  16. [Study on design method for the individual anatomical hip joint endoprosthesis].

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiansheng; Kang, Liyun; Wang, Jian

    2008-02-01

    To solve the problem of aseptic loosening of hip joint prosthesis after THR (total hip replacement) and to meet the requirement of individual endoprosthesis for rapid automatic design and manufacture, a new method is presented. According to the anatomical shape of the patient's femoral marrow cavity and the replacement requirement, the hip joint prosthesis is designed via the combination of medical CT technique, computer aided design and finite element analysis. During analysis of the endoprosthesis, the 3-D finite element model of the femur is structured by finite element software ANSYS, the near true femoral material parameters are gained, the quantitative description of femoral material's anisotropy and inhomogeneity is realized by self-developed specific software in the 3-D finite element model of femur. Contact analyses of the customized hip endoprosthesis--femur system are simulated by ANSYS, stress, strain and their distribution are analyzed and contrasted before and after-operation under the action of physiological load in the system. It is feasible to checkout the rationality of the design by comparing the stress distribution in the femur with the situation before replacement, the extent of stress-shielding caused by the replacement is determined quantificationally. The results reveal that the method is more reasonable and reliable and can provide basic means for optimizing the design of custom-made hip prostheses and for evaluating the long-term stability of endoprosthesis after operation.

  17. [Diagnosis and treatment of prosthetic hip and knee joint infections].

    PubMed

    Huotari, Kaisa; Leskinen, Jarkko

    2016-01-01

    Successful replacement arthroplasty enhances the patient's functional capacity, alleviates pain and improves the quality of life. Prosthetic joint infection is one of the most dangerous complications following replacement arthroplasty. In cases of suspected prosthetic joint infection it is essential to consult with the prosthetic joint unit and abstain from starting antibiotics before the appropriate microbiological samples. The diagnosis is made on the basis of history, clinical picture, levels of inflammatory markers, synovial fluid cells and microbiological findings. The most common options of surgical treatment are early debridement and replacement of loose parts, and replacement of the prosthesis. Antimicrobial drug therapy will be planned according to the surgical mode of treatment and the causative bacterium.

  18. Hip Joint Replacement Using Monofilament Polypropylene Surgical Mesh: An Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Białecki, Jacek; Klimowicz-Bodys, Małgorzata Dorota; Wierzchoś, Edward; Kołomecki, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Hip joint dysplasia is a deformation of the articular elements (pelvic acetabulum, head of the femur, and/or ligament of the head of the femur) leading to laxity of the hip components and dislocation of the femoral head from the pelvic acetabulum. Diagnosis is based on symptoms observed during clinical and radiological examinations. There are two treatment options: conservative and surgical. The classic surgical procedures are juvenile pubic symphysiodesis (JPS), triple pelvic osteotomy (TPO), total hip replacement (THR), and femoral head and neck resection (FHNE). The aim of this experiment was to present an original technique of filling the acetabulum with a polypropylene implant, resting the femoral neck directly on the mesh. The experiment was performed on eight sheep. The clinical value of the new surgical technique was evaluated using clinical, radiological, and histological methods. This technique helps decrease the loss of limb length by supporting the femoral neck on the mesh equivalent to the femoral head. It also reduces joint pain and leads to the formation of stable and mobile pseudarthrosis. The mesh manifested osteoprotective properties and enabled the formation of a stiff-elastic connection within the hip joint. The method is very cost-effective and the technique itself is simple to perform. PMID:24987672

  19. Hip Joint Contact Force in the Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) during Normal Level Walking

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Jessica E.; Derrick, Timothy R.; Pedersen, Douglas R.; Robinson, Duane A.; Conzemius, Michael G.; Baer, Thomas E.; Brown, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    The emu is a large, (bipedal) flightless bird that potentially can be used to study various orthopaedic disorders in which load protection of the experimental limb is a limitation of quadrupedal models. An anatomy-based analysis of normal emu walking gait was undertaken to determine hip contact forces for comparison with human data. Kinematic and kinetic data captured for two laboratory-habituated emus were used to drive the model. Muscle attachment data were obtained by dissection, and bony geometries were obtained by CT scan. Inverse dynamics calculations at all major lower-limb joints were used in conjunction with optimization of muscle forces to determine hip contact forces. Like human walking gait, emu ground reaction forces showed a bimodal distribution over the course of the stance phase. Two-bird averaged maximum hip contact force was approximately 5.5 times body weight, directed nominally axially along the femur. This value is only modestly larger than optimization-based hip contact forces reported in literature for humans. The interspecies similarity in hip contact forces makes the emu a biomechanically attractive animal in which to model loading-dependent human orthopaedic hip disorders. PMID:18206892

  20. Influence of electrical stimulation on hip joint adductor muscle activity during maximum effort

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Sota; Wada, Chikamune

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated whether hip adductor activity was influenced by electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata muscle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 16 nondisabled males. Each subject was asked to adduct the hip joint with maximum effort. The electromyogram of the adductor longus was recorded under two experimental conditions, with and without electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata. [Results] In the presence of electrical stimulation, muscle activity decreased to 72.9% (57.8–89.3%) of that without stimulation. [Conclusion] These results suggested that inactivation of the adductor group was promoted by electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata. PMID:27313387

  1. Influence of electrical stimulation on hip joint adductor muscle activity during maximum effort.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Sota; Wada, Chikamune

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated whether hip adductor activity was influenced by electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata muscle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 16 nondisabled males. Each subject was asked to adduct the hip joint with maximum effort. The electromyogram of the adductor longus was recorded under two experimental conditions, with and without electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata. [Results] In the presence of electrical stimulation, muscle activity decreased to 72.9% (57.8-89.3%) of that without stimulation. [Conclusion] These results suggested that inactivation of the adductor group was promoted by electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata.

  2. Analysis of mixed lubrication mechanism in metal-on-metal hip joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z M

    2002-01-01

    A simple mixed lubrication model has been developed to predict the asperity contact and wear for the metal-on-metal bearing couple for total hip joint replacements. It has been shown that the femoral head radius has a large effect on the predicted asperity contact and wear depending on the lubrication regime. An increase in the femoral head radius can lead to an increase in wear under a predominantly boundary lubrication regime, but this trend can be reversed under a mixed lubrication regime towards fluid film lubrication. These observations are consistent with the recent experimental findings from hip simulator studies by Smith and co-workers.

  3. Tribology considerations for hip joint articulations in relation to the "new orthopaedic patient".

    PubMed

    Rieker, C B

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine alternative bearings used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and discuss the specific tribologic needs of the "New Orthopaedic Patient". As orthopaedic patients today are younger and more active, there is a clear need for hip joint implants and articulations minimising the amount of wear and guarantying better stability. Recent modern developments in tribology with highly cross-linked polyethylenes and hard-on-hard bearings allow the safe and effective use of larger diameter articulations in THA.

  4. Hip rotation angle is associated with frontal plane knee joint mechanics during running.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Masanori; Shimizu, Norifumi; Yanai, Toshimasa; Stefanyshyn, Darren J; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2015-02-01

    Inability to control lower extremity segments in the frontal and transverse planes resulting in large knee abduction angle and increased internal knee abduction impulse has been associated with patellofemoral pain (PFP). However, the influence of hip rotation angles on frontal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to explore how hip rotation angles are related to frontal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics during running. Seventy runners participated in this study. Three-dimensional marker positions and ground reaction forces were recorded with an 8-camera motion analysis system and a force plate while subjects ran along a 25-m runway at a speed of 4m/s. Knee abduction, hip rotation and toe-out angles, frontal plane lever arm at the knee, internal knee abduction moment and impulse, ground reaction forces and the medio-lateral distance from the ankle joint center to the center of pressure (AJC-CoP) were quantified. The findings of this study indicate that greater hip external rotation angles were associated with greater toe-out angles, longer AJC-CoP distances, smaller internal knee abduction impulses with shorter frontal plane lever arms and greater knee abduction angles. Thus, there appears to exist a conflict between kinematic and kinetic risk factors of PFP, and hip external rotation angle may be a key factor to control frontal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics. These results may help provide an appropriate manipulation and/or intervention on running style to reduce the risk of PFP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Difficulty of diagnosing the origin of lower leg pain in patients with both lumbar spinal stenosis and hip joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Junya; Ohtori, Seiji; Kishida, Shunji; Nakamura, Junichi; Takeshita, Munenori; Shigemura, Tomonori; Takazawa, Makoto; Eguchi, Yawara; Inoue, Gen; Orita, Sumihisa; Takaso, Masashi; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Arai, Gen; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Gou; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2012-12-01

    Case series. To present the difficulty of diagnosing the origin of lower leg pain in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and hip joint arthritis. Pain arising from a degenerated hip joint is sometimes localized to the lower leg. Patients with lumbar spinal disease may also show radicular pain corresponding to the lower leg area. If patients present with both conditions and only pain at the lower leg, it is difficult to determine the origin of the pain. We reviewed 420 patients who had leg pain with lumbar spinal stenosis diagnosed by myelography, computed tomography after myelography, or magnetic resonance imaging. Pain only at the ipsilateral lateral aspect of the lower leg but slight low back pain or pain around the hip joint was shown in 4 patients who had lumbar spinal stenosis and hip osteoarthritis. The symptoms resolved after L5 spinal nerve block, but remained after lidocaine infiltration into the hip joint. We performed decompression and posterolateral fusion surgery for these 4 patients. Leg pain did not resolve after lumbar surgery in all patients. Conservative treatment was not effective from 6 to 12 months, so ultimately we performed ipsilateral total hip replacement for all patients and they became symptom-free. It is difficult to determine the origin of lower leg pain by spinal nerve block and hip joint block in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and hip osteoarthritis. We take this into consideration before surgery.

  6. In vivo baseline measurements of hip joint range of motion in suspensory and non-suspensory anthropoids

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Ashley S.

    2014-01-01

    Hominoids and atelines are known to use suspensory behaviors and are assumed to possess greater hip joint mobility than non-suspensory monkeys, particularly for range of abduction. This assumption has greatly influenced how extant and fossil primate hip joint morphology has been interpreted, despite the fact that there are no data available on hip mobility in hominoids or Ateles. This study uses in vivo measurements to test the hypothesis that suspensory anthropoids have significantly greater ranges of hip joint mobility than non-suspensory anthropoids. Passive hip joint mobility was measured on a large sample of anesthetized captive anthropoids (non-human hominids=43, hylobatids=6, cercopithecids=43, Ateles=6, Cebus=6). Angular and linear data were collected using goniometers and tape measures. Range of motion data were analyzed for significant differences by locomotor group using ANOVA and phylogenetic regression. The data demonstrate that suspensory anthropoids are capable of significantly greater hip abduction and external rotation. Degree of flexion and internal rotation were not larger in the suspensory primates, indicating that suspension is not associated with a global increase in hip mobility. Future work should consider the role of external rotation in abduction ability, how the physical position of the distal limb segments are influenced by differences in range of motion proximally, as well as focus on bony and soft tissue differences that enable or restrict abduction and external rotation at the anthropoid hip joint. PMID:24288178

  7. Hip joint biomechanics during gait in people with and without symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Laura E; Wrigley, Tim V; Bennell, Kim L; Hinman, Rana S; O'Donnell, John; Hodges, Paul W

    2016-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a morphological hip condition that can cause hip/groin pain and impaired function in younger active adults, and may lead to stiffness, muscle weakness, structural damage, and hip osteoarthritis. Understanding the impairments associated with FAI is crucial to guide treatment and rehabilitation strategies. Evidence is limited and conflicting about whether hip biomechanics are impaired during walking in people with symptomatic FAI. The objective of this study was to determine whether kinematics and kinetics during gait differ between people with symptomatic FAI and control participants. Fifteen participants diagnosed with symptomatic cam-type or combined (cam plus pincer) FAI who were scheduled for arthroscopic surgery and 14 age-, and sex-matched disease-free controls underwent three-dimensional gait analysis. Tri-planar hip kinematics and kinetics were compared between the two groups. There were limited significant between-group differences with respect to spatiotemporal variables. Participants with FAI walked with less range of motion in the sagittal plane during a gait cycle, but did not exhibit any significant kinematic differences in the frontal or transverse planes. There were no systematic differences in kinetics between the groups in any plane. Findings suggest that individuals with symptomatic FAI have minimal impairments in gait biomechanics. Although these individuals demonstrate reduced hip joint motion in the sagittal plane, the size of the difference is small and its significance for symptoms and function is unclear. More pronounced deficits in hip kinetics and kinematics may be evident during functional tasks that challenge the hip towards the position of impingement.

  8. Explant analysis of the Biomet Magnum/ReCap metal-on-metal hip joint

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, B. J.; Richardson, V. M.; Langton, D. J.; Smith, E.; Joyce, T. J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The high revision rates of the DePuy Articular Surface Replacement (ASR) and the DePuy ASR XL (the total hip arthroplasty (THA) version) have led to questions over the viability of metal-on-metal (MoM) hip joints. Some designs of MoM hip joint do, however, have reasonable mid-term performance when implanted in appropriate patients. Investigations into the reasons for implant failure are important to offer help with the choice of implants and direction for future implant designs. One way to assess the performance of explanted hip prostheses is to measure the wear (in terms of material loss) on the joint surfaces. Methods In this study, a coordinate measuring machine (CMM) was used to measure the wear on five failed cementless Biomet Magnum/ReCap/ Taperloc large head MoM THAs, along with one Biomet ReCap resurfacing joint. Surface roughness measurements were also taken. The reason for revision of these implants was pain and/or adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD) and/or elevated blood metal ion levels. Results The mean wear rate of the articulating surfaces of the heads and acetabular components of all six joints tested was found to be 6.1 mm3/year (4.1 to 7.6). The mean wear rate of the femoral head tapers of the five THAs was 0.054 mm3/year (0.021 to 0.128) with a mean maximum wear depth of 5.7 µm (4.3 to 8.5). Conclusion Although the taper wear was relatively low, the wear from the articulating surfaces was sufficient to provide concern and was potentially large enough to have been the cause of failure of these joints. The authors believe that patients implanted with the ReCap system, whether the resurfacing prosthesis or the THA, should be closely monitored. Cite this article: S. C. Scholes, B. J. Hunt, V. M. Richardson, D. J. Langton, E. Smith, T. J. Joyce. Explant analysis of the Biomet Magnum/ReCap metal-on-metal hip joint. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:113–122. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.62.BJR-2016-0130.R2. PMID:28246095

  9. Explant analysis of the Biomet Magnum/ReCap metal-on-metal hip joint.

    PubMed

    Scholes, S C; Hunt, B J; Richardson, V M; Langton, D J; Smith, E; Joyce, T J

    2017-02-01

    The high revision rates of the DePuy Articular Surface Replacement (ASR) and the DePuy ASR XL (the total hip arthroplasty (THA) version) have led to questions over the viability of metal-on-metal (MoM) hip joints. Some designs of MoM hip joint do, however, have reasonable mid-term performance when implanted in appropriate patients. Investigations into the reasons for implant failure are important to offer help with the choice of implants and direction for future implant designs. One way to assess the performance of explanted hip prostheses is to measure the wear (in terms of material loss) on the joint surfaces. In this study, a coordinate measuring machine (CMM) was used to measure the wear on five failed cementless Biomet Magnum/ReCap/ Taperloc large head MoM THAs, along with one Biomet ReCap resurfacing joint. Surface roughness measurements were also taken. The reason for revision of these implants was pain and/or adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD) and/or elevated blood metal ion levels. The mean wear rate of the articulating surfaces of the heads and acetabular components of all six joints tested was found to be 6.1 mm(3)/year (4.1 to 7.6). The mean wear rate of the femoral head tapers of the five THAs was 0.054 mm(3)/year (0.021 to 0.128) with a mean maximum wear depth of 5.7 µm (4.3 to 8.5). Although the taper wear was relatively low, the wear from the articulating surfaces was sufficient to provide concern and was potentially large enough to have been the cause of failure of these joints. The authors believe that patients implanted with the ReCap system, whether the resurfacing prosthesis or the THA, should be closely monitored.Cite this article: S. C. Scholes, B. J. Hunt, V. M. Richardson, D. J. Langton, E. Smith, T. J. Joyce. Explant analysis of the Biomet Magnum/ReCap metal-on-metal hip joint. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:113-122. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.62.BJR-2016-0130.R2. © 2017 Scholes et al.

  10. Validity and responsiveness of radiographic joint space width metric measurement in hip osteoarthritis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lin, D. Chu Miow; Reichmann, W.M.; Gossec, L.; Losina, E.; Conaghan, P.G.; Maillefert, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Aim To perform a systematic review of the literature on the concurrent validity, predictive validity and responsiveness of radiographic metric measurement of femoro-acetabular joint space width (JSW) in hip osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Eligibility criteria: studies reporting any data on (1) JSW on X-rays in hip OA patients and (2) concurrent validity (correlations with clinical symptoms), predictive validity (correlations with future symptomatic state, joint space loss or joint replacement), and/or responsiveness (JSW change over time evaluated using the standardized response mean (SRM)). Search strategy: Medline PUBMED and Embase databases. Statistical analysis: Random-effects models were constructed to obtain pooled SRMs. Results Of 448 articles, 79 met the abstract inclusion criteria and were read for further screening. Of these, 15 reported measures of validity and 11 reported measures of responsiveness. Concurrent validity: Five studies suggested an association between JSW and symptoms in the general population. Two evaluated the correlations between JSW and symptoms in hip OA patients, with conflicting results. Five demonstrated that JSW is predictive of future hip joint replacement. Responsiveness was moderate (SRM = 0.66; 95% confidential interval (95%CI): 0.41, 0.91), but tended to be lower in randomized clinical trials than in cohort studies (0.35 vs 0.83), using an intention to treat rather than a completer analysis (0.30 vs 0.80), and using manual rather than computer-based measurement (0.47 vs 1.12). Conclusion There is evidence of a weak association between JSW and symptoms, of predictive validity for subsequent joint replacement, and of moderate responsiveness of metric measurement of JSW. PMID:21396472

  11. A comparison of effectiveness of fascial relaxation and classic model of patients rehabilitation after hip joint endoprosthetics.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Beata; Jabłoński, Mirosław; Gębala, Edyta; Drelich, Małgorzata

    2012-01-01

    Degenerative joint disease usually leads to functional failure and pain in the affected parts of the musculoskeletal system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of fascial relaxation for tense muscles in the affected hip joint by comparing this method and classic physiotherapeutic rehabilitation in patients after hip arthroplasty with regard to the range of motion, presence of pain and quality of life. The study involved 35 females qualified for hip arthroplasty. A control group consisted of 10 patients aged 47 to 77 years who received classic kinesiotherapy, including antithrombotic prophylaxis and isometric muscle exercises for the operated lower limb followed by active exercises for supported flexion in the hip and knee joints, active decompression exercises, assuming the upright position, and gait training. The experimental group consisted of 25 women aged 45 to 75 years who, along with conventional therapeutic exercises, were treated by fascial relaxation of the affected hip joint. The arthroplasty procedure was carried out from a posterior approach in all patients, in accordance with the technique recommended by Swanson. The results indicate that the group of patients who additionally received fascial relaxation demonstrated a significantly increased range of motion in the operated hip joint. The experimental group also reported considerable pain reduction and improved daily activity in comparison to the control group. The techniques of fascial relaxation significantly reduced recovery time and liminated muscle tensing in the operated hip joint, thus contributing to improving the range of motion.

  12. Update on Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Genitourinary Procedures in Patients with Artificial Joint Replacement and Artificial Heart Valves.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Daniel J; Fuchs, Daniel J; Abicht, Travis O; Peabody, Terrance D

    2015-11-01

    Infection of artificial joint replacements and heart valves is an uncommon but serious complication encountered anytime after the implantation of these prostheses. It is known that bacteremia can lead to infection of a prosthetic device. However, there is no strong evidence to correlate urologic procedures with the development of periprosthetic joint infection or prosthetic valve endocarditis. Therefore, antibiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of endocarditis is not recommended in patients undergoing urologic procedures. However, guidelines regarding prophylaxis to prevent infection of an artificial joint in the setting of a genitourinary procedure are more varied. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevalence of radiological femoroacetabular impingement in Japanese hip joints: detailed investigation with computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Taku; Itakura, Shin; Hirata, Tomohiro; Fuzikawa, Hitomi; Mori, Kanji; Imai, Shinji

    2015-07-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) has been highlighted as a new etiology for osteoarthritis of the hip, and its prevalence has been reported in the past decade. In the present study, we performed a detailed investigation of the anatomical parameters related to FAI and calculated the prevalence of FAI-related findings in asymptomatic Japanese hip joints using computed tomography. We evaluated high-resolution reconstructed multislice computed tomography images in patients who had undergone computed tomography imaging in our institution for conditions unrelated to hip disorders. The examined parameters were as follows: center-edge (CE) angle; acetabular index; acetabular anteversion (five slices in the axial plane); and asphericity angle of the femoral head (AAFH) (six slices in multiple radial planes). The AAFH in the oblique axial slice through the center of the femoral neck is the so-called α-angle. We then examined the accurate prevalence of FAI-related findings in Japan. We investigated a total of 103 hips. The mean age of the subjects was 59.4 years. The mean CE angle was 31.1° and the mean acetabular index was 7.0°. The mean acetabular anteversion was 20.3° at the level of the hip center, and decreased as the slice level neared the superior margin of the femoral head. The mean AAFH ranged from 40.6° to 49.2° in the radial planes. The AAFH was largest at 60° rotated slice from the oblique axial slice through the center of the femoral neck. The prevalence of FAI-related findings in these Japanese hip joints was assessed as follows. An AAFH of >50° in any slice was detected in 51.5 % of the hips, and acetabular anteversion was negative for all images in 16.5 % of the hips, meaning that a total of 56.3 % of the images met the criteria for radiological FAI. With consideration of our results, we emphasize that "anatomical or radiological FAI" is not uncommon in Japanese hips. Therefore, the diagnosis of FAI should be performed with the clinical findings

  14. Improved detection methods for infected hip joint prostheses.

    PubMed

    Høgdall, Dan; Hvolris, Jørgen Jesper; Christensen, Lise

    2010-11-01

    Awareness of the role of bacterial biofilm in the pathogenesis of low-grade or chronic infections diagnosed in hip arthroplasty has been on the rise in recent years. The importance of bacterial biofilm for the development of prosthesis failure is probably underestimated, and terms like aseptic loosening, sterile pus and aseptic necrosis are up for revision. The diagnosis of biofilm has been, and still is, difficult, but new molecular biological techniques, alone or in combination with older established ones, have further helped us to uncover lesions, where biofilm is part of the pathology. This article based on a literature search and own observations is primarily focused on newer methods that help us identify the pathology behind infection-based prosthesis failure. We suggest that the fluorescence in situ hybridization technique on carefully selected biopsy material is used in the future to identify live as well as dead bacteria within their environment. The method is quick and sensitive and provides a reliable result with optimal detection rate.

  15. [A shock-absorber-damper endoprosthesis for the hip joint].

    PubMed

    Sherepo, K M

    1995-01-01

    The paper deals with the construction of an implant for complete thigh joint removal. The implant works on a new principle, i.e. division of the major parts of the prosthesis into load-carrying and bearing parts which are isolated all the way with damping silicone gaskets. The implant has a fundamentally new construction. It is accessible for commercial production by advanced technologies and readily applicable in clinical practice. The estimated results of its application are positive as when used, the implant brings a considerably less pressure to bear on the bone than do the well-known Russian and foreign implant models.

  16. Anthropometric analysis of the hip joint in South Indian population using computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sengodan, Vetrivel Chezian; Sinmayanantham, Elangovan; Kumar, J Saravana

    2017-01-01

    Background: Proximal femur has a significant functional modification on erect bipedal posture. Various proximal femoral parameters were analyzed in Western literature. This information was utilized in prosthetic designing. Implants designed for Western people are used in Indian patients undergoing hip surgeries such as internal fixation and replacement arthroplasty. Materials and Methods: The study was done among 200 individuals (400 hips) with a normal hip joint after ethical committee clearance. Computed tomography scanning of proximal femur was done. Neck-shaft angle (NSA), neck width (NW), head diameter (HD), acetabular angle (AA) of sharp, horizontal offset (HO), vertical offset (VO), medullary canal diameter at the level of lesser trochanter (MDLT), and acetabular version (AV) were measured. These parameters were tabulated and compared with various populations and statistically analyzed. Results: The mean values were NSA 135°, NW 27 mm, femoral HD (HD) 42.5 mm, AA of sharp 35.5°, HO 37 mm, VO 46 mm, MDLT20 mm, and AV 18.64°. The values differ when compared with Western population. This study results differed when compared with other Indian studies done in Northern and Northeast Indian population. Significant differences noted in the parameters between sexes and between the sides of the hip joint. Conclusion: This study indicates that there are significant differences in anthropometric parameters of proximal femur among the South Indian population compared with Western population. Even within the Indian population, the anthropometric parameters vary region to region.

  17. Stochastic impulsive pressure calculations for time dependent human hip joint lubrication.

    PubMed

    Wierzcholski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with the calculation of the stochastic unsteady, impulsive pressure distributions and load carrying capacities in human hip joint for unsteady stochastic conditions, various standard deviations and Gaussian probability density function. The total changes of hydrodynamic pressure caused by viscoelastic synovial fluid properties are completely estimated. Calculations are performed in a super thin layer of biological synovial fluid inside the slide hip joint gap limited by a spherical bone head. Using a new unified operator of summation (UOS) method, the numerical topology of pressure calculation for a difference method is applied. From numerical standpoint the proposed method of solving modified hydrodynamic equations reduces this problem to resolving the partial recurrence non-homogeneous equation of second order with variable coefficients.

  18. Time dependent human hip joint lubrication for periodic motion with stochastic asymmetric density function.

    PubMed

    Wierzcholski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with the calculation of the human hip joint parameters for periodic, stochastic unsteady, motion with asymmetric probability density function for gap height. The asymmetric density function indicates that the stochastic probabilities of gap height decreasing are different in comparison with the probabilities of the gap height increasing. The models of asymmetric density functions are considered on the grounds of experimental observations. Some methods are proposed for calculation of pressure distributions and load carrying capacities for unsteady stochastic conditions in a super thin layer of biological synovial fluid inside the slide biobearing gap limited by a spherical bone acetabulum. Numerical calculations are performed in Mathcad 12 Professional Program, by using the method of finite differences. This method assures stability of numerical solutions of partial differential equations and gives proper values of pressure and load carrying capacity forces occurring in human hip joints.

  19. Autosomal dominant (Beukes) premature degenerative osteoarthropathy of the hip joint unlinked to COL2A1

    SciTech Connect

    Beighton, P.; Ramesar, R.; Cilliers, H.J.

    1994-12-01

    Molecular investigations have been undertaken in several separate large South African families with autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasias in which premature degenerative osteoarthropathy of the hip joint was the major manifestation. There are sometimes additional minor changes in the spine and these conditions fall into the general spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) nosological category. In some kindreds, linkage between phenotype and the type II collagen gene (COL2A1) has been established, while in others there is no linkage. We have now completed molecular linkage investigations in an Afrikaner family named Beukes, in which 47 members in 6 generations have premature osteoarthropathy of the hip joint. A LOD score of minus infinity indicates that this condition is not the result of a defect of the COL2A1 gene. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Influence of trunk flexion on hip and knee joint kinematics during a controlled drop landing.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, J Troy; Padua, Darin A

    2008-03-01

    An erect posture and greater knee valgus during landing have been implicated as anterior cruciate ligament injury risk factors. While previous research suggests coupling of knee and hip kinematics, the influence of trunk positioning on lower extremity kinematics has yet to be determined. We hypothesized that greater trunk flexion during landing would result in greater knee and hip flexion and lesser knee valgus. Identification of a modifiable factor (e.g. trunk flexion) which positively influences kinematics of multiple lower extremity joints would be invaluable for anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention efforts. Forty healthy individuals completed two drop landing tasks while knee, hip, and trunk kinematics were sampled. The first task constituted the natural/preferred landing strategy (Preferred), while in the second task, subjects actively flexed the trunk upon landing (Flexed). Peak trunk flexion angle was 47 degrees greater for Flexed compared to Preferred (P<0.001), and was associated with increases in peak hip flexion angle of 31 degrees (P<0.001) and peak knee flexion angle of 22 degrees (P<0.001). Active trunk flexion during landing produces concomitant increases in knee and hip flexion angles. A more flexed/less erect posture during landing is associated with a reduced anterior cruciate ligament injury risk. As such, incorporating greater trunk flexion as an integral component of anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention programs may be warranted.

  1. Subsequent Total Joint Arthroplasty After Primary Total Knee or Hip Arthroplasty: A 40-Year Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Thomas L; Maradit Kremers, Hilal; Schleck, Cathy D; Larson, Dirk R; Berry, Daniel J

    2017-03-01

    Despite the large increase in total hip arthroplasties and total knee arthroplasties, the incidence and prevalence of additional contralateral or ipsilateral joint arthroplasty are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of additional joint arthroplasty after a primary total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty. This historical cohort study identified population-based cohorts of patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty (n = 1,933) or total knee arthroplasty (n = 2,139) between 1969 and 2008. Patients underwent passive follow-up through their medical records beginning with the primary total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty. We assessed the likelihood of undergoing a subsequent total joint arthroplasty, including simultaneous and staged bilateral procedures. Age, sex, and calendar year were evaluated as potential predictors of subsequent arthroplasty. During a mean follow-up of 12 years after an initial total hip arthroplasty, we observed 422 contralateral total hip arthroplasties (29% at 20 years), 76 contralateral total knee arthroplasties (6% at 10 years), and 32 ipsilateral total knee arthroplasties (2% at 20 years). Younger age was a significant predictor of contralateral total hip arthroplasty (p < 0.0001), but not a predictor of the subsequent risk of total knee arthroplasty. During a mean follow-up of 11 years after an initial total knee arthroplasty, we observed 809 contralateral total knee arthroplasties (45% at 20 years), 31 contralateral total hip arthroplasties (3% at 20 years), and 29 ipsilateral total hip arthroplasties (2% at 20 years). Older age was a significant predictor of ipsilateral or contralateral total hip arthroplasty (p < 0.001). Patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty can be informed of a 30% to 45% chance of a surgical procedure in a contralateral cognate joint and about a 5% chance of a surgical procedure in noncognate joints within 20 years of

  2. The tribological behaviour of different clearance MOM hip joints with lubricants of physiological viscosities.

    PubMed

    Hu, X Q; Wood, R J K; Taylor, A; Tuke, M A

    2011-11-01

    Clearance is one of the most influential parameters on the tribological performance of metal-on-metal (MOM) hip joints and its selection is a subject of considerable debate. The objective of this paper is to study the lubrication behaviour of different clearances for MOM hip joints within the range of human physiological and pathological fluid viscosities. The frictional torques developed by MOM hip joints with a 50 mm diameter were measured for both virgin surfaces and during a wear simulator test. Joints were manufactured with three different diametral clearances: 20, 100, and 200 microm. The fluid used for the friction measurements which contained different ratios of 25 percent newborn calf serum and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) with the obtained viscosities values ranging from 0.001 to 0.71 Pa s. The obtained results indicate that the frictional torque for the 20 microm clearance joint remains high over the whole range of the viscosity values. The frictional torque of the 100 microm clearance joint was low for the very low viscosity (0.001 Pa s) lubricant, but increased with increasing viscosity value. The frictional torque of the 200 microm clearance joint was high at very low viscosity levels, however, it reduced with increasing viscosity. It is concluded that a smaller clearance level can enhance the formation of an elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) film, but this is at the cost of preventing fluid recovery between the bearing surfaces during the unloaded phase of walking. Larger clearance bearings allow a better recovery of lubricant during the unloaded phase, which is necessary for higher viscosity lubricants. The selection of the clearance value should therefore consider both the formation of the EHL film and the fluid recovery as a function of the physiological viscosity in order to get an optimal tribological performance for MOM hip joints. The application of either 25 per cent bovine serum or water in existing in vitro tribological study should

  3. Knee joint changes in patients with neglected developmental hip dysplasia: a prospective case-control study.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiwei; Kadhim, Muayad; Zhang, Lijun; Cheng, Xiangjun; Zhao, Qun; Li, Lianyong

    2014-12-01

    Few reports are available describing knee changes in neglected developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). The purpose of this study was to assess the radiographic morphology of knee joints in adults with neglected DDH. Thirty-seven patients (35 females and two males) with neglected DDH were prospectively recruited with an average age of 32.6 years. Twenty-three patients had unilateral and 14 patients had bilateral neglected DDH. Thirty-seven healthy individuals were recruited to form a matched control group. Three groups of knee joints were examined: affected knees (on the same side of the neglected DDH), unaffected knees (contralateral to the neglected DDH in patients with unilateral involvement), and control knees. A series of radiographic parameters of the knee joint were measured in the coronal and sagittal plane, and they were compared between patients and normal controls. In the coronal plane, the affected knees had increased valgus angulation related to increased height of the medial femoral condyle, decreased height of the lateral femoral condyle and decreased lateral distal femoral angle compared to control knees. In the sagittal plane, both distal femoral and proximal tibial joints of the affected knees developed a decrease in posterior angles. Additionally, the unaffected knees also developed radiographic changes compared to control knees. Patients with neglected DDH may develop changes in both knee joints. These changes should be considered during surgery to the hip, femur and knee to prevent potential complications. Level 2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanics of the muscles crossing the hip joint during sprint running.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Yasuharu; Higashihara, Ayako; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to demonstrate the changes over time in the lengths and forces of the muscles crossing the hip joint during overground sprinting and investigate the relationships between muscle lengths and muscle-tendon unit forces - particularly peak biceps femoris force. We obtained three-dimensional kinematics during 1 running cycle from 8 healthy sprinters sprinting at maximum speed. Muscle lengths and muscle-tendon unit forces were calculated for the iliacus, rectus femoris, gluteus maximus, and biceps femoris muscles of the target leg as well as the contralateral iliacus and rectus femoris. Our results showed that during sprinting, the muscles crossing the hip joint demonstrate a stretch-shortening cycle and 1 or 2 peak forces. The timing of peak biceps femoris force, expressed as a percentage of the running cycle (mean [SD], 80.5 [2.9]%), was synchronous with those of the maximum biceps femoris length (82.8 [1.9]%) and peak forces of the gluteus maximus (83.8 [9.1]%), iliacus (81.1 [5.2]%), and contralateral iliacus (78.5 [5.8]%) and also that of the peak pelvic anterior tilt. The force of the biceps femoris appeared to be influenced by the actions of the muscles crossing the hip joint as well as by the pelvic anterior tilt.

  5. [Hip joint infections - Results of a questionnaire among 28 university orthopedic departments].

    PubMed

    Anagnostakos, K; Kohn, D

    2011-09-01

    Despite numerous prophylactic measures infections still remain a hazardous complication in orthopedic surgery. A questionnaire about hip joint infections was sent to all university orthopedic departments in Germany and Austria. The questionnaire included 33 questions with respect to demographic data, causative organisms, diagnostic measures, treatment options for early and late infections, antibiotic therapy and prosthesis reimplantation. The participation rate was 70%. The most frequent primary surgical indication was primary total hip replacement and Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis were the most common pathogens identified. All departments performed a joint aspiration for diagnosis confirmation but for other diagnostic measures a great discrepancy could be observed. In the treatment of early infections removable components were always exchanged, whereas a local antibiotic therapy was not always employed. With regard to late infections a two-stage protocol was more frequently used than a one-stage treatment, whereby the implantation of a cement spacer was more commonly performed than a resection arthroplasty. The time between stages varied between 6 and 12 weeks and systemic antibiotics were administered for a mean time of 6 weeks. For prosthesis reimplantion cementless components were mostly used but no clear tendency could be determined for systemic antibiotic therapy. Treatment of hip joint infections among German and Austrian university orthopedic departments is only partly carried out in a similar manner.

  6. Effect of compensatory trunk movements on knee and hip joint loading during gait in children with different orthopedic pathologies.

    PubMed

    Stief, Felix; Böhm, Harald; Ebert, Carsten; Döderlein, Leonhard; Meurer, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    Ipsilateral trunk lean toward the affected stance limb has been identified as a compensatory mechanism to unload the hip joint. However, this altered gait pattern increases the lever arm around the knee joint by shifting the ground reaction vector more lateral to the knee joint center, which could be sufficient to deform the lateral compartment of the knee. The purpose of the present study was to show the effect of ipsilateral trunk lean on hip and knee joint moments in the frontal plane in 132 young patients with different orthopedic diagnosis. Linear correlations between ipsilateral trunk lean and the external knee and/or hip adduction moment were detected for patients with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD), arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, myelomeningocele, and unilateral cerebral palsy (CP). In contrast, children with bilateral CP did not show such a relationship due to an increased internal foot placement. In comparison to the hip joint, the effect of ipsilateral trunk lean in patients with LCPD is obviously more pronounced in the knee joint. The valgus thrust of the knee could initiate degenerative changes by placing altered loads on regions of the articular cartilage that were previously conditioned for different load levels. The results suggest that the ipsilateral trunk lean should not be considered and recommended as unloading mechanism for the hip joint on its own but also as a potential increased joint loading of the lateral knee compartment. Therefore, an acceptable therapy concept for limping patients should aim for an inconspicuous gait pattern with a reduced trunk movement.

  7. Assessment of cartilage contact pressure and loading in the hip joint during split posture.

    PubMed

    Assassi, Lazhari; Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia

    2016-05-01

    Given the crucial role of the mechanical behavior in the degenerative process of the hip joint, analyzing the contact mechanics in the articular layers during physical activities could contribute to understanding the pathology. Indeed, the development process of hip osteoarthritis generally evolves over a long time period, and therefore analyzing the mechanical behavior of the hip joint during extreme repetitive movements will be helpful to analyze degeneration causes. The aim of the study was to investigate the link between the excessive movements and the development of hip osteoarthritis. To individualize the analysis, we used a subject-specific and noninvasive approach based on finite element analysis and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. The contact pressure distribution and loading conditions on the acetabular cartilage were assessed on eleven professional dancer subjects performing a split movement. This movement is frequently practiced (repetitive) by dancers during their daily exercises. Moreover, split postures are mostly characterized by high anatomical angles with subluxation (excessive). To ensure the motion accuracy, MRI data of the subjects were acquired in neutral and split positions performed inside the MRI scanner. Based on the reconstructed bone models from the MRI data, a motion tracking approach was used to compute the transformation between the two poses. To evaluate the contact during the split movement and to quantify the role of the labrum in the hip joint mechanics, additional simulations of two daily activities (walking and stand-up) were performed. Finally, a clinical study based on morphological and radiological analysis of the subjects was performed and validated by orthopedic surgeons and radiological experts to evaluate the proposed approach. The reconstructed split movement was characterized by high anatomical angles with a subluxation on the left hip. Consequently, strong deformations and pressures were observed during the

  8. Adductor squeeze test values and hip joint range of motion in Gaelic football athletes with longstanding groin pain.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Fiona; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2014-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate whether differences exist in adductor squeeze test values and hip joint range of motion between athletes with longstanding groin pain and injury-free controls. Observational study with a case control design. Eighteen Gaelic football players with current longstanding groin pain and 18 matched injury-free controls were assessed on their performance of the adductor squeeze test. Adductor squeeze test values were quantified using a sphygmomanometer. A fluid-filled inclinometer was used to assess hip joint internal and external rotation range of motion. A bent knee fall-out test was also utilised to examine hip joint range of motion. A significant difference in adductor squeeze test values was observed between the control group (269 ± 25 mmHg) and longstanding groin pain group (202 ± 36 mmHg; p<0.01). Furthermore the longstanding groin pain group had a decreased bent knee fall-out (p<0.01) bilaterally, as well as decreased hip joint internal rotation (p<0.05) and hip joint external rotation (p<0.05) range of motion bilaterally when compared to the control group. Gaelic football players with longstanding groin pain exhibit decreased adductor squeeze test values and hip joint range of motion when compared to non-injured players. These findings have implications for assessment and rehabilitation practices, as well as return to play criteria. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Relationship between proximal femoral and acetabular alignment in normal hip joints using 3-dimensional computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Buller, Leonard T; Rosneck, James; Monaco, Feno M; Butler, Robert; Smith, Travis; Barsoum, Wael K

    2012-02-01

    The bony architecture of the hip depends upon functional adaptation to mechanical usage via the dynamic interaction between the acetabulum and femoral head. Acetabular retroversion is thought to be a contributing factor of pincer-type femoroacetabular impingement. Studies of pathological hip joints suggest proximal femoral anatomy compensates for acetabular retroversion. HYPOTHESIS/ PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine if a predictable relationship exists between proximal femoral and acetabular angles, age, and gender in normal hip joints. We hypothesized that, through functional adaptation to mechanical loading, a complementary developmental relationship exists between the acetabulum and proximal femur. Descriptive laboratory study. The femoral neck version, femoral neck shaft angle, acetabular version, acetabular inclination, and center edge angle were measured in 230 normal hip joints in 115 adults using 3-dimensional reconstruction software. Correlations between the angles, age, and gender were examined using the methods of stepwise regression and backward elimination. Regarding side-to-side comparison and variability, there was no statistically significant difference between the left and right sides in the average value of each angle measurement. The correlations specifically between angles, age, and gender were similar on the left and right sides for all pairs except femoral version and acetabular inclination. Regarding significant findings of the study, a positive correlation (P < .05) was found between femoral version and acetabular version (0.38° to 1°). A positive correlation was found between femoral neck shaft angle and acetabular version (0.21° to 1°). A negative correlation was found between femoral neck shaft angle and age (-0.17° to 1°). A positive correlation was found between acetabular version and female gender (2.6° to 1°). A positive correlation was found between center edge angle and female gender (2.8° to 1°). A

  10. Partial hemi-resurfacing of the hip joint--a new approach to treat local osteochondral defects?

    PubMed

    Jäger, Marcus; Begg, Malcom J W; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2006-12-01

    There is currently renewed interest in articular resurfacing for the treatment of damaged hip-joint cartilage. In contrast to these implants, which involve endoprosthetic replacement of both articulating surfaces, we present a new joint-preserving technique that allows treatment of local osteochondral defects of the femoral head by partial hemi-resurfacing. In this study we describe the operative and technical aspects and problems for partial hemi-resurfacing of the hip joint and critically discuss indications for this procedure in one case. To guarantee an adequate view of the situs, we recommend a surgical approach involving trochanter flip osteotomy, followed by surgical dislocation of the hip joint. Besides partial hemi-resurfacing of the osteochondral defect, this approach allows treatment of associated labral tears and cartilage defects of the hip joint at the same time. For adequate implant fixation, good bone quality is required. Furthermore, osteochondral defects of limited extent and excellent patient compliance are essential for clinical success. In particular, prominence of the implant has to be avoided, which can lead to an irregular joint surface and may induce further cartilage destruction. Long-term studies on statistical populations will show if partial articular hemi-resurfacing is a bone-preserving and useful therapeutic alternative to hemi-resurfacing caps in the treatment of osteochondral hip-joint defects, especially in young patients.

  11. Determining the shear fracture properties of HIP joints of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel by a torsion test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Takashi; Noh, Sanghoon; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2012-08-01

    Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is a key technology used to fabricate a first wall with cooling channels for the fusion blanket system utilizing a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel. To qualify the HIPped components, small specimen test techniques are beneficial not only to evaluate the thin-wall cooling channels containing the HIP joint but also to use in neutron irradiation studies. This study aims to develop the torsion test method with special emphasis on providing a reasonable and comprehensive method to determine interfacial shear properties of HIP joints during the torsional fracture process. Torsion test results identified that the torsion process shows yield of the base metal followed by non-elastic deformation due to work hardening of the base metal. By considering this work hardening issue, we propose a reasonable and realistic solution to determine the torsional yield shear stress and the ultimate torsional shear strength of the HIPped interface. Finally, a representative torsion fracture process was identified.

  12. Regional variations in MR relaxation of hip joint cartilage in subjects with and without femoralacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Subburaj, Karupppasamy; Valentinitsch, Alexander; Dillon, Alexander B; Joseph, Gabby B; Li, Xiaojuan; Link, Thomas M; Vail, Thomas P; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze regional variations of magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation times (T1ρ and T2) in hip joint cartilage of healthy volunteers and subjects with femoral acetabular impingement (FAI). Morphological and quantitative images of the hip joints of 12 healthy volunteers and 9 FAI patients were obtained using a 3T MR scanner. Both femoral and acetabular cartilage layers in each joint were semi-automatically segmented on sagittal 3D high-resolution spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) images. These segmented regions of interest (ROIs) were automatically divided radially into twelve equal sub-regions (30(0) intervals) based on the fitted center of the femur head. The mean value of T1ρ/T2 was calculated in each sub-region after superimposing the divided cartilage contours on the MR relaxation (T1ρ/T2) maps to quantify the relaxation times. T1ρ and T2 relaxation times of the femoral cartilage were significantly higher in FAI subjects compared to healthy controls (39.9±3.3 msec in FAI vs. 35.4±2.3msec in controls for T1ρ (P=0.0020); 33.9±3.1 msec in FAI vs. 31.1±1.7 msec in controls for T2 (P=0.0160)). Sub-regional analysis showed significantly different T1ρ and T2 relaxation times in the anterior-superior region (R9) of the hip joint cartilage between subjects with FAI and healthy subjects, suggesting possible regional differences in cartilage matrix composition between these two groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis showed that sub-regional analysis in femoral cartilage was more sensitive in discriminating FAI joint cartilage from that of healthy joints than global analysis of the whole region (T1ρ: area under the curve (AUC)=0.981, P=0.0001 for R9 sub-region; AUC=0.901, P=0.002 for whole region; T2: AUC=0.976, P=0.0005 for R9 sub-region; AUC=0.808, P=0.0124 for whole region). The results of this study demonstrated regional variations in hip cartilage composition using MR relaxation times (T1ρ and T2) and suggested

  13. Assessment of congruence and impingement of the hip joint in professional ballet dancers: a motion capture study.

    PubMed

    Charbonnier, Caecilia; Kolo, Frank C; Duthon, Victoria B; Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia; Becker, Christoph D; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Menetrey, Jacques

    2011-03-01

    Early hip osteoarthritis in dancers could be explained by femoroacetabular impingements. However, there is a lack of validated noninvasive methods and dynamic studies to ascertain impingement during motion. Moreover, it is unknown whether the femoral head and acetabulum are congruent in typical dancing positions. The practice of some dancing movements could cause a loss of hip joint congruence and recurrent impingements, which could lead to early osteoarthritis. Descriptive laboratory study. Eleven pairs of female dancer's hips were motion captured with an optical tracking system while performing 6 different dancing movements. The resulting computed motions were applied to patient-specific hip joint 3-dimensional models based on magnetic resonance images. While visualizing the dancer's hip in motion, the authors detected impingements using computer-assisted techniques. The range of motion and congruence of the hip joint were also quantified in those 6 recorded dancing movements. The frequency of impingement and subluxation varied with the type of movement. Four dancing movements (développé à la seconde, grand écart facial, grand écart latéral, and grand plié) seem to induce significant stress in the hip joint, according to the observed high frequency of impingement and amount of subluxation. The femoroacetabular translations were high (range, 0.93 to 6.35 mm). For almost all movements, the computed zones of impingement were mainly located in the superior or posterosuperior quadrant of the acetabulum, which was relevant with respect to radiologically diagnosed damaged zones in the labrum. All dancers' hips were morphologically normal. Impingements and subluxations are frequently observed in typical ballet movements, causing cartilage hypercompression. These movements should be limited in frequency. The present study indicates that some dancing movements could damage the hip joint, which could lead to early osteoarthritis.

  14. Imaging of the hip joint. Computed tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, P.; Genant, H. K.; Jergesen, H. E.; Murray, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    The authors reviewed the applications and limitations of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of the most common hip disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive technique in detecting osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Magnetic resonance reflects the histologic changes associated with osteonecrosis very well, which may ultimately help to improve staging. Computed tomography can more accurately identify subchondral fractures than MR imaging and thus remains important for staging. In congenital dysplasia of the hip, the position of the nonossified femoral head in children less than six months of age can only be inferred by indirect signs on CT. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates the cartilaginous femoral head directly without ionizing radiation. Computed tomography remains the imaging modality of choice for evaluating fractures of the hip joint. In some patients, MR imaging demonstrates the fracture even when it is not apparent on radiography. In neoplasm, CT provides better assessment of calcification, ossification, and periosteal reaction than MR imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging, however, represents the most accurate imaging modality for evaluating intramedullary and soft-tissue extent of the tumor and identifying involvement of neurovascular bundles. Magnetic resonance imaging can also be used to monitor response to chemotherapy. In osteoarthrosis and rheumatoid arthritis of the hip, both CT and MR provide more detailed assessment of the severity of disease than conventional radiography because of their tomographic nature. Magnetic resonance imaging is unique in evaluating cartilage degeneration and loss, and in demonstrating soft-tissue alterations such as inflammatory synovial proliferation.

  15. Human hip joint cartilage: MRI quantitative thickness and volume measurements discriminating acetabulum and femoral head.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Abram, François; Beaudoin, Gilles; Berthiaume, Marie-Josée; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne

    2008-12-01

    This paper aims at developing a quantitative system for measuring human hip cartilage thickness and volume using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A new MRI-acquisition technique, named axial rotation, where the acquisition planes are organized around a virtual axis, was used. The MRI protocol consists of a 2-D multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC) using water excitation. Inner and outer interface contours of acetabulum and femoral head cartilage are obtained using a semiautomated 3-D segmentation method and combined to form 3-D surfaces. A local spherical coordinate system computed from the original contours enables cartilage thickness and volume computation. An anatomical labeling is performed automatically for thickness and volume measurements in predefined subregions: inferior, anterior, superior, and posterior. A registration module is introduced allowing the assessment of cartilage changes over time. Validation of the system was conducted with three protocols each involving data obtained from nine subjects: 1) registration process accuracy; 2) intrareader reproducibility; and 3) intervisit coefficient of variation. Data showed excellent correlation coefficients for either the intrareader (r>or=0.0942, p<0.0001 ) or intervisit (r>or=0.0837, p<0.005) protocols. This noninvasive system, which enables the quantification of cartilage thickness and volume in the human hip joint using MRI, is the first to discriminate the acetabular and femoral head cartilage throughout the entire hip without the use of an external device, and to implement hip registration for follow-up studies on the same subject.

  16. Use of dimensionality reduction for structural mapping of hip joint osteoarthritis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theoharatos, C.; Boniatis, I.; Panagiotopoulos, E.; Panayiotakis, G.; Fotopoulos, S.

    2009-10-01

    A visualization-based, computer-oriented, classification scheme is proposed for assessing the severity of hip osteoarthritis (OA) using dimensionality reduction techniques. The introduced methodology tries to cope with the confined ability of physicians to structurally organize the entire available set of medical data into semantically similar categories and provide the capability to make visual observations among the ensemble of data using low-dimensional biplots. In this work, 18 pelvic radiographs of patients with verified unilateral hip OA are evaluated by experienced physicians and assessed into Normal, Mild and Severe following the Kellgren and Lawrence scale. Two regions of interest corresponding to radiographic hip joint spaces are determined and representative features are extracted using a typical texture analysis technique. The structural organization of all hip OA data is accomplished using distance and topology preservation-based dimensionality reduction techniques. The resulting map is a low-dimensional biplot that reflects the intrinsic organization of the ensemble of available data and which can be directly accessed by the physician. The conceivable visualization scheme can potentially reveal critical data similarities and help the operator to visually estimate their initial diagnosis. In addition, it can be used to detect putative clustering tendencies, examine the presence of data similarities and indicate the existence of possible false alarms in the initial perceptual evaluation.

  17. Imaging of the hip joint. Computed tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, P.; Genant, H. K.; Jergesen, H. E.; Murray, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    The authors reviewed the applications and limitations of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of the most common hip disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive technique in detecting osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Magnetic resonance reflects the histologic changes associated with osteonecrosis very well, which may ultimately help to improve staging. Computed tomography can more accurately identify subchondral fractures than MR imaging and thus remains important for staging. In congenital dysplasia of the hip, the position of the nonossified femoral head in children less than six months of age can only be inferred by indirect signs on CT. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates the cartilaginous femoral head directly without ionizing radiation. Computed tomography remains the imaging modality of choice for evaluating fractures of the hip joint. In some patients, MR imaging demonstrates the fracture even when it is not apparent on radiography. In neoplasm, CT provides better assessment of calcification, ossification, and periosteal reaction than MR imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging, however, represents the most accurate imaging modality for evaluating intramedullary and soft-tissue extent of the tumor and identifying involvement of neurovascular bundles. Magnetic resonance imaging can also be used to monitor response to chemotherapy. In osteoarthrosis and rheumatoid arthritis of the hip, both CT and MR provide more detailed assessment of the severity of disease than conventional radiography because of their tomographic nature. Magnetic resonance imaging is unique in evaluating cartilage degeneration and loss, and in demonstrating soft-tissue alterations such as inflammatory synovial proliferation.

  18. Tribolayer Formation in a Metal-on-Metal (MoM) Hip Joint: An Electrochemical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, MT; Nagelli, C; Pourzal, R; Fischer, A; Laurent, MP; Jacobs, JJ; Wimmer, MA

    2013-01-01

    The demand for total hip replacement (THR) surgery is increasing in the younger population due to faster rehabilitation and more complete restoration of function. Up to 2009, metal-on-metal (MoM) hip joint bearings were a popular choice due to their design flexibility, post-operative stability and relatively low wear rates. The main wear mechanisms that occur along the bearing surface of MoM joints are tribochemical reactions that deposit a mixture of wear debris, metal ions and organic matrix of decomposed proteins known as a tribolayer. No in-depth electrochemical studies have been reported on the structure and characteristics of this tribolayer or about the parameters involved in its formation. In this study, we conducted an electrochemical investigation of different surfaces (bulk-like: control, nano-crystalline: new implant and tribolayer surface: retrieved implant) made out of two commonly used hip CoCrMo alloys (high-carbon and low-carbon). As per ASTM standard, cyclic polarization tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests were conducted. The results obtained from electrochemical parameters for different surfaces clearly indicated a reduction in corrosion for the tribolayer surface (Icorr: 0.76 μA/cm2). Further, polarization resistance (Rp:2.39±0.60MΩ/cm2) and capacitance (Cdl:15.20±0.75 μF/cm2) indicated variation in corrosion kinetics for the tribolayer surface, that attributed to its structure and stability in a simulated body environment. PMID:24099949

  19. One-stage Exchange Arthroplasty for Periprosthetic Hip and Knee Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Manny; Sukeik, Mohamed; Zahar, Akos; Nizam, Ikram; Haddad, Fares Sami

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a devastating complication of joint replacement surgery. In an aging population of the developed world, the increasing numbers of hip and knee replacements will inevitably lead to increasing incidence of PJI, carrying with (it) significant patient morbidity and cost to the health care system. Two-stage exchange arthroplasty is currently the gold standard but it is associated with multiple operations, prolonged hospitalization and impaired functionality. One-stage exchange arthroplasty is similar to the two-stage procedure but the interval between removal of the prosthesis and reimplantation of a new one is only a few minutes. It has the theoretical benefits of a single anesthetic, shorter hospitalization, less cost and improved function. Methods: We reviewed the current literature regarding the outcomes of one-stage exchange arthroplasties focusing on re-infection rates and functional outcomes. Results: Current themes around the one-stage exchange procedure include the indications for the procedure, definition of re-infection, surgical techniques used to provide fixation and differences in approach for hip and knee replacements. Conclusion: The current literature on one-stage exchange procedure is promising, with comparable results to two-stage revisions for hips and knees in selected patients. However, there is a great need for a large multi-centred randomized control trial, focusing on re-infection rates and functional scores postoperatively, to provide concrete guidelines in managing this complex condition. PMID:28144374

  20. A biomechanical modelof the arthrosis of the hip joint - biomed 2011.

    PubMed

    Pascolo, Paolo B; Rossi, Rubens

    2011-01-01

    The hip joint has been investigated in depth, but causes of algic (pain) phenomena, especially those apparently located at the knee (referred pain), still remain unclear. Using a bi-dimensional multi-body model we investigated the effect of arthrosis on the kinematic of the hip joint and its relationship to pain. The bone was modeled as a rigid structure whereas the capsule and cartilage were assumed to be deformable. The effects of arthrosis were simulated as reduction of the thickness of the deformable tissues and increased friction. The extension velocity of the rectus femori and the trajectory of the instantaneous center of rotation (ICR) were examined for both physiological conditions and advanced degrees of arthrosis.In physiological conditions, results show that the extension velocity of the muscle has slight irregularities but is nevertheless continuous. The presence of arthrosis leads to a localized increase in friction and the model shows a migration of the location of the ICR toward the acetabulum. Changes in the ICR due to irregular surface friction, cartilage erosion as well as lack of synovial fluid, which in normal conditions ensures boundary film lubrication, induce discontinuities in the extension velocity of the muscle which are detected by the proprioceptive system (e.g. Golgi tendon organ) generating algic phenomena.The results of the model confirmed these findings and how hip arthrosis, in producing changes in the extension velocity of the muscle and in the kinematic of the movement, results in muscle and tendon pain around the knee.

  1. Tribology and total hip joint replacement: current concepts in mechanical simulation.

    PubMed

    Affatato, S; Spinelli, M; Zavalloni, M; Mazzega-Fabbro, C; Viceconti, M

    2008-12-01

    Interest in the rheology and effects of interacting surfaces is as ancient as man. This subject can be represented by a recently coined word: tribology. This term is derived from the Greek word "tribos" and means the "science of rubbing". Friction, lubrication, and wear mechanism in the common English language means the precise field of interest of tribology. Wear of total hip prosthesis is a significant clinical problem that involves, nowadays, a too high a number of patients. In order to acquire further knowledge on the tribological phenomena that involve hip prosthesis wear tests are conducted on employed materials to extend lifetime of orthopaedic implants. The most basic type of test device is the material wear machine, however, a more advanced one may more accurately reproduce some of the in vivo conditions. Typically, these apparatus are called simulators, and, while there is no absolute definition of a joint simulator, its description as a mechanical rig used to test a joint replacement, under conditions approximating those occurring in the human body, is acceptable. Simulator tests, moreover, can be used to conduct accelerated protocols that replicate/simulate particularly extreme conditions, thus establishing the limits of performance for the material. Simulators vary in their level of sophistication and the international literature reveals many interpretations of the design of machines used for joint replacement testing. This paper aims to review the current state of the art of the hip joint simulators worldwide. This is specified through a schematic overview by describing, in particular, constructive solutions adopted to reproduce in vivo conditions. An exhaustive commentary on the evolution and actually existing simulation standards is proposed by the authors. The need of a shared protocol among research laboratories all over the world could lead to a consensus conference.

  2. Radiographic measurements of the hip joint and their associations with hip pain in Japanese men and women: the Research on Osteoarthritis/osteoporosis Against Disability (ROAD) study.

    PubMed

    Iidaka, T; Muraki, S; Oka, H; Kodama, R; Tanaka, S; Kawaguchi, H; Nakamura, K; Akune, T; Yoshimura, N

    2017-08-24

    To investigate radiographic measurements of the hip joint and their associations with hip pain, and the prevalence of acetabular dysplasia defined by radiographic measurements of the hip joint in Japanese men and women using the large-scale population-based cohort of the Research on Osteoarthritis/osteoporosis Against Disability (ROAD) study. From the baseline survey of the ROAD study (cross-sectional study), 2963 participants (1040 men, 1923 women; mean age, 70.2 years) were analyzed. All participants underwent radiographic examinations of both hips using an anteroposterior view under weight-bearing. Minimum joint space width (mJSW), central-edge (CE) angle, acetabular depth-to-width ratio (ADR), and acetabular head index (AHI) were measured. Associations between these radiographic measurements and hip pain were assessed by calculating odds ratios (ORs) using multivariable logistic-regression analysis. Acetabular dysplasia was defined as a CE angle <20°. Mean radiographic measurements of the hip joint for men were: mJSW, 3.8 mm; CE angle, 30.6°; ADR, 262.1 per 1000; and AHI, 81.4%. For women, these values were: mJSW, 3.4 mm; CE angle, 29.9°; ADR, 262.7 per 1000; and AHI, 81.2%. Associations were seen between hip pain and each of mJSW, CE angle, ADR, and AHI (OR 4.52, 95% confidence interval 3.45-5.97; 1.14, 1.11-1.18; 1.31, 1.24-1.40; and 1.15, 1.12-1.18, respectively). Acetabular dysplasia showed an overall prevalence of 13.9%, and was significantly more prevalent in women than in men (P = 0.012). The present study of radiographic measurements of the hip joint showed that mJSW, CE angle, ADR, and AHI were associated with hip pain. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of acetabular labrum tears on hip stability and labral strain in a joint compression model.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew V; Panchal, Hemang B; Ruberte Thiele, Ramon A; Sekiya, Jon K

    2011-07-01

    Acetabular labrum tears are now commonly diagnosed in young and active patients. Because the role of the acetabular labrum is incompletely understood, it is critical to determine how these tears affect native hip biomechanics. Radial and circumferential labral tears significantly decrease hip stability and significantly alter strain patterns in the anterior and anterior-superior acetabular labrum. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-two human cadaveric hips without evidence of degeneration or dysplasia were assigned to a circumferential tear (n = 11) and a radial tear (n = 11) group. The hips were tested in a neutral position with an average compressive force of 25 N. In the circumferential tear group, the labral states were intact; 1-, 2-, and 3-cm circumferential tears; a 3-cm partial labrectomy; and a full labrectomy. In the radial tear group, the labral states were intact; a radial tear; a 1-, 2-, and 3-cm partial labrectomy; and a full labrectomy. The effect of labral injury on the stability ratio (peak dislocation force/compressive loads) and labral strain in the anterior and anterior-superior labrum was analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance. There was no significant difference in stability ratio after circumferential tears 3 cm or less in size compared with the intact labral state. Strain in the anterior and anterior-superior labrum was either unchanged or increased after circumferential labral tear. There was no significant difference in stability ratio after a radial tear or a 1-cm partial labrectomy compared with the intact labral state. A 2-cm partial labrectomy significantly decreased the stability ratio. Anterior and anterior-superior labral strain significantly decreased after a radial tear. Under the influence of joint compression in a neutral hip position, the acetabular labrum continues to resist femoral head dislocation despite detachment from the acetabular rim. A radial tear in the acetabular labrum decreases adjacent labral

  4. Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... exercise can reduce stiffness and increase flexibility and muscle strength. People who have an artificial hip should talk ... and cross-country skiing. These exercises can increase muscle strength and cardiovascular fitness without injuring the new hip. ...

  5. Rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip joint in a young adult with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yongseung; Motomura, Goro; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Ohishi, Masanobu; Hamai, Satoshi; Iura, Kunio; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2015-10-01

    A 37-year-old female had been treated with corticosteroids for systemic lupus erythematosus clinically diagnosed at age 10. She suddenly had right hip pain without any antecedent trauma. Four months after the onset of pain, she visited her primary care physician. On magnetic resonance imaging, joint space narrowing at the weight-bearing area was already seen with bone marrow edematous lesions in both the femoral head and acetabulum. She was treated non-operatively; however, her pain continued to worsen in severity. Thirteen months after the onset of pain, she was referred to our hospital. A plain radiograph showed subluxation of the collapsed femoral head accompanied by destruction of the acetabular rim. Because of her severe intractable pain, she underwent total hip arthroplasty 1 month after her first visit. Histological examination of the resected femoral head revealed pseudogranulomatous lesions along with prominent callus formation, suggesting rapid destruction of the femoral head.

  6. Cement spacer loaded with antibiotics for infected implants of the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kengo; Miyagawa, Naoki; Masaoka, Toshinori; Katori, Youichi; Shishido, Takaaki; Imakiire, Atsuhiro

    2009-01-01

    It is difficult to treat infected implants of the hip joints. Such treatment involves immeasurable physical and psychological suffering of the patients. We used antibiotic-impregnated cement spacers in 17 cases of infection after total hip arthroplasty and bipolar arthroplasty with good clinical results. We thoroughly removed any foreign material and formed an antibiotic-impregnated cement spacer into a similar shape as that of the implants. A cement spacer enables high-concentration antibiotics to act on infected sites. Also, it can prevent leg length discrepancy and atrophy of bones or muscles. Although cement spacers have been reported to have problems regarding shape and strength, we achieved good results with a cement spacer mold in the present study. No recurring infection has been found at a mean follow-up period of 3 years and 2 months.

  7. Gender differences in hip and ankle joint kinematics on knee abduction during running.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Masanori; Ogawa, Haruna; Shimizu, Norifumi; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Yanai, Toshimasa; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    The knee is the most common site of running injuries, particularly prevalent in females. The purpose of this study was to clarify gender differences in the lower extremity kinematics during running, with a specific emphasis on the relationships between the distal and proximal factors and the knee joint kinematics. Eleven female and 11 male runners participated in this study. Three-dimensional marker positions were recorded with a motion analysis system while the subjects ran along a 25 m runway at a speed of 3.5 m/s. Kinematic variables were analyzed for the stance phase of the right leg. Female runners demonstrated significantly greater peak knee abduction (P<0.05), hip adduction (P<0.01) and internal rotation (P<0.05), whereas male runners demonstrated significantly greater peak rearfoot eversion (P<0.01). The knee abduction angles were positively correlated with hip adduction angles (r=0.49, P<0.05) and negatively correlated with rearfoot eversion (r= -0.69, P<0.001). There was no significant difference in normalised step width between genders (P>0.05). Smaller rearfoot eversion and greater hip adduction related closely to the greater knee abduction as the distal and proximal factors, respectively. These relationships are thought to be the compensatory joint motions in the frontal plane, because there was no significant difference in the normalised step width between females and males. The current results suggest that if the step width is identical, the subjects with greater knee abduction had smaller rearfoot eversion to compensate for greater hip adduction, which were more apparent in females. This explains greater knee abduction found in female runners, which can be linked to a high risk of knee injury.

  8. Depression and the Overall Burden of Painful Joints: An Examination among Individuals Undergoing Hip and Knee Replacement for Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Rajiv; Zywiel, Michael G.; Mahomed, Nizar N.; Perruccio, Anthony V.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) report one or more symptomatic joints apart from the one targeted for surgical care. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between the burden of multiple symptomatic joints and self-reported depression in patients awaiting joint replacement for OA. Four hundred and seventy-five patients at a single centre were evaluated. Patients self-reported joints that were painful and/or symptomatic most days of the previous month on a homunculus, with nearly one-third of the sample reporting 6 or more painful joints. The prevalence of depression was 12.2% (58/475). When adjusted for age, sex, education level, hip or knee OA, body mass index, chronic condition count, and joint-specific WOMAC scores, each additional symptomatic joint was associated with a 19% increased odds (odds ratio: 1.19 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.31, P < 0.01)) of self-reported depression. Individuals reporting 6 or more painful joints had 2.5-fold or greater odds of depression when compared to those patients whose symptoms were limited to the surgical joint. A focus on the surgical joint alone is likely to miss a potentially important determinant of postsurgical patient-reported outcomes in patients undergoing hip or knee replacement. PMID:25861476

  9. Depression and the Overall Burden of Painful Joints: An Examination among Individuals Undergoing Hip and Knee Replacement for Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Rajiv; Zywiel, Michael G; Mahomed, Nizar N; Perruccio, Anthony V

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) report one or more symptomatic joints apart from the one targeted for surgical care. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between the burden of multiple symptomatic joints and self-reported depression in patients awaiting joint replacement for OA. Four hundred and seventy-five patients at a single centre were evaluated. Patients self-reported joints that were painful and/or symptomatic most days of the previous month on a homunculus, with nearly one-third of the sample reporting 6 or more painful joints. The prevalence of depression was 12.2% (58/475). When adjusted for age, sex, education level, hip or knee OA, body mass index, chronic condition count, and joint-specific WOMAC scores, each additional symptomatic joint was associated with a 19% increased odds (odds ratio: 1.19 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.31, P < 0.01)) of self-reported depression. Individuals reporting 6 or more painful joints had 2.5-fold or greater odds of depression when compared to those patients whose symptoms were limited to the surgical joint. A focus on the surgical joint alone is likely to miss a potentially important determinant of postsurgical patient-reported outcomes in patients undergoing hip or knee replacement.

  10. Comparison of gluteus medius muscle activity during functional tasks in individuals with and without osteoarthritis of the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Maureen K; Stafford, Kelly; Mattacola, Carl G; Uhl, Timothy L; Giordani, Mauro

    2013-08-01

    Neuromuscular alterations have been reported for patients with osteoarthritis of the hip joint; however, the underlying cause associated with altered gluteus medius muscle function has not been examined. This study assessed electromyographic amplitudes of the gluteus medius muscles during function in patients with unilateral end-stage osteoarthritis of the hip joint compared to controls. Patients with unilateral end-stage hip joint osteoarthritis (n=13) and asymptomatic control participants (n=17) participated. Average root-mean squared muscle amplitudes represented as a percent of maximum voluntary isometric contraction for both the involved and uninvolved limb gluteus medius muscles were analyzed during step up, step down, and gait. The association between muscle activation and impact forces during stepping tasks was assessed. Patients with hip osteoarthritis exhibited increased gluteus medius muscle electromyographic amplitudes bilaterally during stair ascent, stair descent, and gait compared to controls, regardless of which limb they led. Involved limb muscle activity was inversely related to impact force during step down onto the ipsilateral limb. Patients with hip osteoarthritis demonstrated increased gluteus medius muscle activation levels during stepping tasks and gait when compared to controls. The increased activation is most likely a compensatory response to muscle weakness. Therefore, application of strengthening exercises which target the gluteal muscles should assist in neuromuscular control and result in improved strength for patients with hip joint osteoarthritis. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of American Society of Biomechanics. All rights reserved.

  11. Prediction of hip joint load and translation using musculoskeletal modelling with force-dependent kinematics and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Chen, Zhenxian; Wang, Ling; Yang, Wenjian; Li, Dichen; Jin, Zhongmin

    2015-07-01

    Musculoskeletal lower limb models are widely used to predict the resultant contact force in the hip joint as a non-invasive alternative to instrumented implants. Previous musculoskeletal models based on rigid body assumptions treated the hip joint as an ideal sphere with only three rotational degrees of freedom. An musculoskeletal model that considered force-dependent kinematics with three additional translational degrees of freedom was developed and validated in this study by comparing it with a previous experimental measurement. A 32-mm femoral head against a polyethylene cup was considered in the musculoskeletal model for calculating the contact forces. The changes in the main modelling parameters were found to have little influence on the hip joint forces (relative deviation of peak value < 10 BW%, mean trial deviation < 20 BW%). The centre of the hip joint translation was more sensitive to the changes in the main modelling parameters, especially muscle recruitment type (relative deviation of peak value < 20%, mean trial deviation < 0.02 mm). The predicted hip contact forces showed consistent profiles, compared with the experimental measurements, except in the lateral-medial direction. The ratio-average analysis, based on the Bland-Altman's plots, showed better limits of agreement in climbing stairs (mean limits of agreement: -2.0 to 6.3 in walking, mean limits of agreement: -0.5 to 3.1 in climbing stairs). Better agreement of the predicted hip contact forces was also found during the stance phase. The force-dependent kinematics approach underestimated the maximum hip contact force by a mean value of 6.68 ± 1.75% BW compared with the experimental measurements. The predicted maximum translations of the hip joint centres were 0.125 ± 0.03 mm in level walking and 0.123 ± 0.005 mm in climbing stairs.

  12. Effects of acetabular rim trimming on hip joint contact pressures: how much is too much?

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Sanjeev; Lee, Simon; Shewman, Elizabeth; Mather, Richard C; Salata, Michael J; Bush-Joseph, Charles A; Nho, Shane J

    2015-09-01

    In patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), acetabular rim trimming removes the offending area of the acetabular deformity in patients with pincer-type and mixed-type FAI to improve hip joint kinematics. Although the rationale for arthroscopic acetabular rim trimming in patients with FAI is well established, the amount of rim resection has not been quantified, and the threshold at which excessive rim resection results in abnormal hip contact pressures has not been described. To investigate the changes in contact areas, contact pressures, and peak forces within the hip joint with sequential acetabular rim trimming. Controlled laboratory study. Six fresh-frozen, nondysplastic, human cadaveric hemipelvises were analyzed utilizing thin-film piezoresistive load sensors to measure the contact area, contact pressure, and peak force after anterosuperior acetabular rim trimming at depths of 0 mm (intact), 2 mm, 4 mm, 6 mm, and 8 mm. Each specimen was examined at 20° of extension and 60° of flexion. Analysis was performed on 2 regions of interest: the acetabular rim and the acetabular base (deep part of the acetabulum). After each experimental condition, the acetabulum was normalized with respect to the intact state to account for specimen variability. Statistical analysis was conducted through 1-way analysis of variance with post hoc Games-Howell tests. At the acetabular base, there were significant increases in the contact area after 4-mm resection (60°: 169.12% ± 30.64%; P = .0138), contact pressure after 6-mm resection (60°: 292.76% ± 79.07%; P = .009), and peak force after 6-mm resection (60°: 166.00% ± 34.40%; P = .027). At the acetabular rim, there were significant decreases in the contact area after 6-mm resection (60°: 66.32% ± 18.80%; P = .0354) (20°: 65.47% ± 15.87%; P = .0127), contact pressure after 6-mm resection (60°: 50.77% ± 11.49%; P < .001) (20°: 58.01% ± 23.10%; P = .0335), and peak force after 6-mm resection (60°: 60.67% ± 9

  13. Responsiveness and ceiling effects of the Forgotten Joint Score-12 following total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, D F; Giesinger, J M; MacDonald, D J; Simpson, A H R W; Howie, C R; Giesinger, K

    2016-03-01

    To assess the responsiveness and ceiling/floor effects of the Forgotten Joint Score -12 and to compare these with that of the more widely used Oxford Hip Score (OHS) in patients six and 12 months after primary total hip arthroplasty. We prospectively collected data at six and 12 months following total hip arthroplasty from 193 patients undergoing surgery at a single centre. Ceiling effects are outlined with frequencies for patients obtaining the lowest or highest possible score. Change over time from six months to 12 months post-surgery is reported as effect size (Cohen's d). The mean OHS improved from 40.3 (sd 7.9) at six months to 41.9 (sd 7.2) at 12 months. The mean FJS-12 improved from 56.8 (sd 30.1) at six months to 62.1 (sd 29.0) at 12 months. At six months, 15.5% of patients reached the best possible score (48 points) on the OHS and 8.3% obtained the best score (100 points) on the FJS-12. At 12 months, this percentage increased to 20.8% for the OHS and to 10.4% for the FJS-12. In terms of the effect size (Cohen's d), the change was d = 0.10 for the OHS and d = 0.17 for the FJS-12. The FJS-12 is more responsive to change between six and 12 months following total hip arthroplasty than is the OHS, with the measured ceiling effect for the OHS twice that of the FJS-12. The difference in effect size of change results in substantial differences in required sample size if aiming to detect change between these two time points. This has important implications for powering clinical trials with patient-reported measures as the primary outcome.Cite this article: Dr D. F. Hamilton. Responsiveness and ceiling effects of the Forgotten Joint Score-12 following total hip arthroplasty. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:87-91. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.53.2000480. © 2016 Hamilton et al.

  14. Responsiveness and ceiling effects of the Forgotten Joint Score-12 following total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Giesinger, J. M.; MacDonald, D. J.; Simpson, A. H. R. W.; Howie, C. R.; Giesinger, K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the responsiveness and ceiling/floor effects of the Forgotten Joint Score -12 and to compare these with that of the more widely used Oxford Hip Score (OHS) in patients six and 12 months after primary total hip arthroplasty. Methods We prospectively collected data at six and 12 months following total hip arthroplasty from 193 patients undergoing surgery at a single centre. Ceiling effects are outlined with frequencies for patients obtaining the lowest or highest possible score. Change over time from six months to 12 months post-surgery is reported as effect size (Cohen’s d). Results The mean OHS improved from 40.3 (sd 7.9) at six months to 41.9 (sd 7.2) at 12 months. The mean FJS-12 improved from 56.8 (sd 30.1) at six months to 62.1 (sd 29.0) at 12 months. At six months, 15.5% of patients reached the best possible score (48 points) on the OHS and 8.3% obtained the best score (100 points) on the FJS-12. At 12 months, this percentage increased to 20.8% for the OHS and to 10.4% for the FJS-12. In terms of the effect size (Cohen’s d), the change was d = 0.10 for the OHS and d = 0.17 for the FJS-12. Conclusions The FJS-12 is more responsive to change between six and 12 months following total hip arthroplasty than is the OHS, with the measured ceiling effect for the OHS twice that of the FJS-12. The difference in effect size of change results in substantial differences in required sample size if aiming to detect change between these two time points. This has important implications for powering clinical trials with patient-reported measures as the primary outcome. Cite this article: Dr D. F. Hamilton. Responsiveness and ceiling effects of the Forgotten Joint Score-12 following total hip arthroplasty. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:87–91. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.53.2000480. PMID:26965167

  15. ANATOMICAL AND CLINICAL ORBSERVATIONS ON STRUCTURAL CHANGES OF THE HIP JOINT.

    PubMed

    Macovei, Luana-Andreea; Rezus, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The hip, the second largest joint of the human body, with its primary contribution to locomotion, is exposed to numerous traumatic or non-traumatic risks. Regardless of the initial pathology, there is always almost the same result: diminution of range of motion, onset of pain and functional impotence, as well as change of biomechanics of walking. Through its high frequency, morpho-functional imbalance (clinically expressed both imagistic and biologically, in one or several joints), osteoarthritis is a disease with a multifactorial etiology and a complex pathogeny. The study included 244 patients aged between 18-85 years, clinically and paraclinically investigated, especially for the osteoarthritis of the hip, admitted to Rheumatology Clinic I, Rehabilitation Hospital in Iasi, from January 2012 to December 2014. The high prevalence of degenerative diseases of the joints in old age is analyzed in accordance with the results of the estimations, which showed that, in fact, most of the patients remain undetected, undiagnosed and untreated. Main symptoms are pain in the coxofemoral joint, radiating or not on the lateral or anterior face of the thigh down to the knee, morning stiffness after a long rest, limping or walking with small steps, and muscle atrophy of the group of muscles that are responsible for the stability of the joint. A strict discipline is needed from the patient's side, in order to keep and apply the doctor's indications in a chronic disease that requires a long therapy, on one hand; on the other hand, a close cooperation between various experts is needed, in order to customize and apply the most effective program, at the right time.

  16. The Influence of Shearing Velocity on Shear Behavior of Artificial Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atapour, Hadi; Moosavi, Mahdi

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the effects of shear velocity on the shearing behavior of artificial joints have been studied at different normal stress levels. Here, artificial joints with planar and rough surfaces were prepared with the plaster (simulating soft rock joints) and concrete (medium-hard rock joints) materials. The rough joints had triangular shaped asperities with 10° and 20° inclination angles. Direct shear tests were performed on these joints under various shear velocities in the range of 0.3-30 mm/min. The planar plaster-plaster and planer concrete-concrete joints were sheared at three levels of normal stress under constant normal load boundary condition. Also, the rough plaster-plaster and concrete-concrete joints were sheared at one level of normal stress under constant normal stiffness boundary condition. The results of the shear tests show that the shearing parameters of joints, such as shear strength, shear stiffness and friction angle, are related to the shear velocity. Shear strength of planar and rough plaster-plaster joints were decreased when the shear velocity was increased. Shear strength of concrete joints, except for rough joints with 10° inclination, increased with increasing shear velocity. Regardless of the normal stress level, shear stiffness of both planar plaster-plaster and concrete-concrete joints were decreased when the shear velocity was increased.

  17. Post-mortem study of the hip joint. III. Correlations between observations.

    PubMed Central

    Byers, P D; Contepomi, C A; Farkas, T A

    1976-01-01

    Correlations between alterations in hip joints, described in a post-mortem study, have established the independence of limited and progressive alterations, and in addition have shown that there is a weak association between limited alterations and osteophytes and a strong one between progressive alterations and osteophytes. Nevertheless limited alterations may rarely undergo progressive damage. Cysts relate strongly to osteophytes but only moderately with progressive alterations. Limited alterations of both head and acetabulum can be subdivided. Some implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:942267

  18. Amyloid Arthropathy of the Hip Joint Associated with Multiple Myeloma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Young Soo; Rhyu, Kee Hyung; Park, Yong Koo; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Park, Ji Seon; Liang, Huo; Jung, Gwang Young; Shin, Won Ju

    2016-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a disease characterized by the deposition of non-soluble fibrous protein in multiple tissues with a number of possible causes. This protein deposition can occur in any tissue, yet is most commonly seen in kidneys, heart, and gastrointestinal tracts. However, invasion to bone tissues is not often reported. The deposition of amyloid proteins in bone tissues may result in joint pain and pathological fractures; it is important to elucidate the causes and detect early to determine prognosis and treat optimally. In the present case report, with relevant literature review, the authors report a case of total hip arthroplasty in an amyloidosis patient. PMID:27536655

  19. Hip2Norm: an object-oriented cross-platform program for 3D analysis of hip joint morphology using 2D pelvic radiographs.

    PubMed

    Zheng, G; Tannast, M; Anderegg, C; Siebenrock, K A; Langlotz, F

    2007-07-01

    We developed an object-oriented cross-platform program to perform three-dimensional (3D) analysis of hip joint morphology using two-dimensional (2D) anteroposterior (AP) pelvic radiographs. Landmarks extracted from 2D AP pelvic radiographs and optionally an additional lateral pelvic X-ray were combined with a cone beam projection model to reconstruct 3D hip joints. Since individual pelvic orientation can vary considerably, a method for standardizing pelvic orientation was implemented to determine the absolute tilt/rotation. The evaluation of anatomically morphologic differences was achieved by reconstructing the projected acetabular rim and the measured hip parameters as if obtained in a standardized neutral orientation. The program had been successfully used to interactively objectify acetabular version in hips with femoro-acetabular impingement or developmental dysplasia. Hip(2)Norm is written in object-oriented programming language C++ using cross-platform software Qt (TrollTech, Oslo, Norway) for graphical user interface (GUI) and is transportable to any platform.

  20. The Fate of DDH Hips Showing Cartilaginous or Fibrous Tissue-filled Joint Spaces Following Primary Reduction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hui Taek; Lee, Tae Hoon; Ahn, Tae Young; Jang, Jae Hoon

    Because the use of magnetic resonance imaging is still not universal for the patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip patients, orthopaedists do not generally distinguish widened joint spaces which are "empty" after primary treatment (and therefore still reducible), from those which are filled and much more difficult to treat. To date no studies have focused on the latter hips. We treated and observed the outcomes for 19 hips which showed filled joint spaces after primary treatment. We retrospectively reviewed 19 cases of developmental dysplasia of the hip: (1) who showed a widened joint space on radiographs after primary treatment; and (2) whose magnetic resonance imaging showed that the widened joint space was accompanied by acetabular cartilage hypertrophy and/or was filled with fibrous tissues. All patients were over 1 year old at the time of primary reduction (reduction was closed in 4 patients, open in 6, and open with pelvic osteotomy in 9). Thirteen patients received at least 1 secondary treatment. Final results were classified using a modified Severin classification. Final outcomes were satisfactory in 10 (52.6%) and unsatisfactory in 9 (47.4%). The widened joint spaces gradually filled with bone, resulting in a shallow acetabulum in the patients with unsatisfactory results. Of 9 patients who underwent combined pelvic osteotomy at the time of primary reduction, results were satisfactory in 6 (66.7%), whereas all patients who had only closed or open primary reduction had unsatisfactory results. Combined pelvic osteotomy at the time of primary reduction is advisable in hips with widened joint spaces. However, hips with filled joint spaces after primary treatment often have unsatisfactory results even after additional pelvic and/or femoral osteotomy. Level IV-prognostic study.

  1. Methods for determining hip and lumbosacral joint centers in a seated position from external anatomical landmarks.

    PubMed

    Peng, Junfeng; Panda, Jules; Van Sint Jan, Serge; Wang, Xuguang

    2015-01-21

    A global coordinate system (GCS) method is proposed to estimate hip and lumbosacral joint centers (HJC and LSJC) from at least three distances between joint center of interest and target anatomic landmarks (ALs). The distances from HJC and LSJC to relevant pelvis and femur ALs were analyzed with respect to usual pelvis and femur scaling dimensions. Forty six pelves and related pairs of femurs from a same sample of adult specimens were examined. The corresponding regression equations were obtained. These equations can be used to estimate HJC and LSJC in conditions where a very limited number of ALs are available: for example, during seated posture analysis as performed in the automotive industry. Compared to currently existing HJC and LSJC methods from ALs, the proposed method showed better results with an average error less than 11 mm.

  2. [Rehabilitation of patients after total endoprosthesis replacement of hip joint by the method of functional electrostimulation].

    PubMed

    Oskanian, T L; Solopova, I A; Grishin, A A; Sidorov, V D

    2008-01-01

    Patients after total endoprosthesis replacement of hip joint underwent method of functional electrostimulation (FES) with the purpose to recovery correct walking stereotype, to increase leisured muscle strength, to prevent secondary coxarthrosis development via stimulation or relaxation of muscles, and for analgesia of joints and pain zones at walking. Results of treatment of 143 patients received rehabilitation course of FES (15 procedures of 30 minutes) were compared with results of treatment of 54 patients received traditional methods. It is shown that FES is effective method of rehabilitation because it makes possible to improve muscle strength significantly, to eliminate or reduce motor deficit, to decrease pain syndrome, to form correct walking stereotype, and to perform early prophylaxis of secondary coxarthrosis on contralateral side. The main advantage of proposed method of nonmedicamental influence is better clinic-biomechanical result without use of drugs.

  3. [The causes of arthrosis of the hip-joint. A radiologic study (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Mutter, K; Schlegel, K F

    1975-06-01

    It is often possible to establish the origin of an arthosis of the hip joint radiologically. Only in 17 out of 445 patients were we unable to arrive at a classification because the arthrosis was already too advanced. Data relating to the history are of limited value -- only 21% of our patients knew of earlier disorders of the joint --, so definition of causes an radiographs is important. The high percentage of arthroses the origin of which is known, makes it likely that the concept of "primary arthrosis" is unnecessary, since behind it there hide those cases of apparently ill-defined arhtroses which -- as shown in our results -- can be further differentiated. This radiologically based classification will serve to increase the possibilities of progressing from symptomatic to prophylactic treatment.

  4. [Monitoring of IL-6 levels in patients after total hip joint replacement].

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Waldemar; Wierusz-Kozłowska, Małgorzata; Markuszewski, Jacek; Leśniewska, Kinga; Wiktorowicz, Krzysztof

    2004-01-01

    Total hip replacement became a method of choice in treatment of the severe osteoarthritis. Despite the progress in constructing the implants and also the surgical technique, the number of complications rises together with the number of arthroplasties performed. The periprosthetic osteolysis and its consequence--the loosening is the one of the greatest problems of today's joint replacement. It creates the main obstacle for the long-term efficiency of the total hip arthroplasty. It was proved by the numerous research, wear debris of the implant induce the chronic periprosthetic inflammatory process. Many studies emphasize the influence of the proinflammatory cytokines on the bone metabolism. The aim of the study was the evaluation of the inflammatory process in patients with the severe osteoarthritis before the surgery and in subsequent periods after total hip replacements and also in patients with the aseptic loosening of the endoprosthesis, by the monitoring the levels of IL-6 in serum of the peripheral blood. The results suggest, that in patients following THA with the elevated level of IL-6, the inflammatory process was present. This inflammation may lead in future to the aseptic loosening of the implant.

  5. Intra- and retroperitoneal irrigation liquid after arthroscopy of the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Haupt, Ulrich; Völkle, Daniela; Waldherr, Christian; Beck, Martin

    2008-08-01

    The case of intra- and retroperitoneal irrigation solution after hip arthroscopy of a 15-year-old girl is presented. She underwent hip arthroscopy for intra-articular adhesiolysis after previous surgical dislocation of the hip for the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement. Arthroscopy was performed in the lateral decubitus position without traction to debride the peripheral joint compartment. The irrigation pressure was set at 40 mm Hg. There were no intraoperative complications. By the end of surgery, the anesthesiologist reported a drop in the patient's body temperature from 36.3 degrees to 34.5 degrees C. Postoperatively, she complained about abdominal swelling and discomfort. Abdominal sonography revealed approximately 2 to 3 L of intra- and retroperitoneal liquid, which was considered to be irrigation fluid. The irrigation fluid was absorbed within 16 hours without further treatment. The only possible way the irrigation fluid could have flown was a retroperitoneal course along the iliopsoas muscle and the iliac vessels with intraperitoneal perforation along their course. We observed at arthroscopies that irrigation pressure incidentally can rise to 140 mm Hg when leaking of fluid through the portals occurs. Intra-abdominal fluid is a potentially devastating complication. A sudden drop of body temperature has to raise suspicion for intra-abdominal leaking of irrigation fluid.

  6. In vivo measured joint friction in hip implants during walking after a short rest.

    PubMed

    Damm, Philipp; Bender, Alwina; Duda, Georg; Bergmann, Georg

    2017-01-01

    It has been suspected that friction in hip implants is higher when walking is initiated after a resting period than during continuous movement. It cannot be excluded that such increased initial moments endanger the cup fixation in the acetabulum, overstress the taper connections in the implant or increase wear. To assess these risks, the contact forces, friction moments and friction coefficients in the joint were measured in vivo in ten subjects. Instrumented hip joint implants with telemetric data transmission were used to access the contact loads between the cup and head during the first steps of walking after a short rest. The analysis demonstrated that the contact force is not increased during the first step. The friction moment in the joint, however, is much higher during the first step than during continuous walking. The moment increases throughout the gait cycle were 32% to 143% on average and up to 621% individually. The high initial moments will probably not increase wear by much in the joint. However, comparisons with literature data on the fixation resistance of the cup against moments made clear that the stability can be endangered. This risk is highest during the first postoperative months for cementless cups with insufficient under-reaming. The high moments after a break can also put taper connections between the head and neck and neck and shaft at a higher risk. During continuous walking, the friction moments individually were extremely varied by factors of 4 to 10. Much of this difference is presumably caused by the varying lubrication properties of the synovia. These large moment variations can possibly lead to friction-induced temperature increases during walking, which are higher than the 43.1°C which have previously been observed in a group of only five subjects.

  7. Friction in Total Hip Joint Prosthesis Measured In Vivo during Walking

    PubMed Central

    Damm, Philipp; Dymke, Joern; Ackermann, Robert; Bender, Alwina; Graichen, Friedmar; Halder, Andreas; Beier, Alexander; Bergmann, Georg

    2013-01-01

    Friction-induced moments and subsequent cup loosening can be the reason for total hip joint replacement failure. The aim of this study was to measure the in vivo contact forces and friction moments during walking. Instrumented hip implants with Al2O3 ceramic head and an XPE inlay were used. In vivo measurements were taken 3 months post operatively in 8 subjects. The coefficient of friction was calculated in 3D throughout the whole gait cycle, and average values of the friction-induced power dissipation in the joint were determined. On average, peak contact forces of 248% of the bodyweight and peak friction moments of 0.26% bodyweight times meter were determined. However, contact forces and friction moments varied greatly between individuals. The friction moment increased during the extension phase of the joint. The average coefficient of friction also increased during this period, from 0.04 (0.03 to 0.06) at contralateral toe off to 0.06 (0.04 to 0.08) at contralateral heel strike. During the flexion phase, the coefficient of friction increased further to 0.14 (0.09 to 0.23) at toe off. The average friction-induced power throughout the whole gait cycle was 2.3 W (1.4 W to 3.8 W). Although more parameters than only the synovia determine the friction, the wide ranges of friction coefficients and power dissipation indicate that the lubricating properties of synovia are individually very different. However, such differences may also exist in natural joints and may influence the progression of arthrosis. Furthermore, subjects with very high power dissipation may be at risk of thermally induced implant loosening. The large increase of the friction coefficient during each step could be caused by the synovia being squeezed out under load. PMID:24260114

  8. Friction in total hip joint prosthesis measured in vivo during walking.

    PubMed

    Damm, Philipp; Dymke, Joern; Ackermann, Robert; Bender, Alwina; Graichen, Friedmar; Halder, Andreas; Beier, Alexander; Bergmann, Georg

    2013-01-01

    Friction-induced moments and subsequent cup loosening can be the reason for total hip joint replacement failure. The aim of this study was to measure the in vivo contact forces and friction moments during walking. Instrumented hip implants with Al2O3 ceramic head and an XPE inlay were used. In vivo measurements were taken 3 months post operatively in 8 subjects. The coefficient of friction was calculated in 3D throughout the whole gait cycle, and average values of the friction-induced power dissipation in the joint were determined. On average, peak contact forces of 248% of the bodyweight and peak friction moments of 0.26% bodyweight times meter were determined. However, contact forces and friction moments varied greatly between individuals. The friction moment increased during the extension phase of the joint. The average coefficient of friction also increased during this period, from 0.04 (0.03 to 0.06) at contralateral toe off to 0.06 (0.04 to 0.08) at contralateral heel strike. During the flexion phase, the coefficient of friction increased further to 0.14 (0.09 to 0.23) at toe off. The average friction-induced power throughout the whole gait cycle was 2.3 W (1.4 W to 3.8 W). Although more parameters than only the synovia determine the friction, the wide ranges of friction coefficients and power dissipation indicate that the lubricating properties of synovia are individually very different. However, such differences may also exist in natural joints and may influence the progression of arthrosis. Furthermore, subjects with very high power dissipation may be at risk of thermally induced implant loosening. The large increase of the friction coefficient during each step could be caused by the synovia being squeezed out under load.

  9. In vivo measured joint friction in hip implants during walking after a short rest

    PubMed Central

    Damm, Philipp; Bender, Alwina; Duda, Georg; Bergmann, Georg

    2017-01-01

    Introduction It has been suspected that friction in hip implants is higher when walking is initiated after a resting period than during continuous movement. It cannot be excluded that such increased initial moments endanger the cup fixation in the acetabulum, overstress the taper connections in the implant or increase wear. To assess these risks, the contact forces, friction moments and friction coefficients in the joint were measured in vivo in ten subjects. Instrumented hip joint implants with telemetric data transmission were used to access the contact loads between the cup and head during the first steps of walking after a short rest. Results The analysis demonstrated that the contact force is not increased during the first step. The friction moment in the joint, however, is much higher during the first step than during continuous walking. The moment increases throughout the gait cycle were 32% to 143% on average and up to 621% individually. The high initial moments will probably not increase wear by much in the joint. However, comparisons with literature data on the fixation resistance of the cup against moments made clear that the stability can be endangered. This risk is highest during the first postoperative months for cementless cups with insufficient under-reaming. The high moments after a break can also put taper connections between the head and neck and neck and shaft at a higher risk. Discussion During continuous walking, the friction moments individually were extremely varied by factors of 4 to 10. Much of this difference is presumably caused by the varying lubrication properties of the synovia. These large moment variations can possibly lead to friction-induced temperature increases during walking, which are higher than the 43.1°C which have previously been observed in a group of only five subjects. PMID:28350858

  10. The hip joint: the fibrillar collagens associated with development and ageing in the rabbit

    PubMed Central

    BLAND, YVETTE S.; ASHHURST, DOREEN E.

    2001-01-01

    The fibrillar collagens associated with the articular cartilages, joint capsule and ligamentum teres of the rabbit hip joint were characterised from the 17 d fetus to the 2-y-old adult by immunohistochemical methods. Initially the putative articular cartilage contains types I, III and V collagens, but when cavitation is complete in the 25 d fetus, type II collagen appears. In the 17 d fetus, the cells of the chondrogenous layers express type I collagen mRNA, but not that of type II collagen. Types III and V collagens are present throughout life, particularly pericellularly. Type I collagen is lost. In all respects, the articular cartilage of the hip joint is similar to that of the knee. The joint capsule contains types I, III and V collagens. In the fetus the ligamentum teres contains types I and V collagens and the cells express type I collagen mRNA; type III collagen is confined mainly to its surface and insertions. After birth, the same distribution remains, but there is more type III collagen in the ligament, proper. The attachment to the cartilage of the head of the femur is marked only by fibres of type I collagen traversing the cartilage; the attachment cannot be distinguished in preparations localising types III and V collagens. The attachment to the bone at the lip of the acetabulum is via fibres of types I and V collagens and little type III is present. The ligament is covered by a sheath of types III and V collagens. Type II collagen was not located in any part of the ligamentum teres. The distribution of collagens in the ligamentum teres is similar to that in the collateral ligaments of the knee. Its insertions are unusual because no fibrocartilage was detected. PMID:11215763

  11. Periprosthetic Joint Infection in Hip Arthroplasty: Is There an Association Between Infection and Bearing Surface Type?

    PubMed

    Pitto, Rocco P; Sedel, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    Preliminary studies have raised the question of whether certain prosthetic biomaterials used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) bearings are associated with increased risk of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). For example, some observational data suggest the risk of PJI is higher with metal-on-metal bearings. However, it is not known whether other bearings-including ceramic bearings or metal-on-polyethylene bearings-may be associated with a higher or lower risk of PJI. The objective of this study was to use a national arthroplasty registry to assess whether the choice of bearings-metal-on-polyethylene (MoP), ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP), ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC), or metal-on-metal (MoM)-is associated with differences in the risk of revision for deep infection, either (1) within 6 months or (2) over the entire period of observation, which spanned 15 years. Data from primary THAs were extracted from the New Zealand Joint Registry over a 15-year period. A total of 97,889 hips were available for analysis. Inclusion criterion was degenerative joint disease; exclusion criteria were previous surgery, trauma, and any other diagnosis (12,566 hips). We also excluded a small group of ceramic-on-metal THAs (429) with short followup. The median observation period of the selected group of hips (84,894) was 9 years (range, 1-15 years). The mean age of patients was 68 years (SD ± 11 years), and 52% were women. There were 54,409 (64%) MoP, 16,503 (19%) CoP, 9051 (11%) CoC, and 4931 (6%) MoM hip arthroplasties. Four hundred one hips were revised for deep infection. A multivariate assessment was carried out including the following risks factors available for analysis: age, sex, operating room type, use of body exhaust suits, THA fixation mode, and surgeon volume. Because of late introduction of data collection in the Registry, we were unable to include body mass index (BMI, recording started 2010) and medical comorbidities according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists

  12. Meat consumption and risk of primary hip and knee joint replacement due to osteoarthritis: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is emerging evidence for a beneficial effect of meat consumption on the musculoskeletal system. However, whether it affects the risk of knee and hip osteoarthritis is unknown. We performed a prospective cohort study to examine the relationship between meat consumption and risk of primary hip and knee replacement for osteoarthritis. Methods Eligible 35,331 participants were selected from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study recruited during 1990-1994. Consumption of fresh red meat, processed meat, chicken, and fish was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. Primary hip and knee replacement for osteoarthritis during 2001-2005 was determined by linking the cohort records to the Australian National Joint Replacement Registry. Results There was a negative dose-response relationship between fresh red meat consumption and the risk of hip replacement (hazard ratio (HR) 0.94 per increase in intake of one time/week, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89-0.98). In contrast, there was no association with knee replacement risk (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.94-1.02). Consumption of processed meat, chicken and fish were not associated with risk of hip or knee replacement. Conclusion A high level consumption of fresh red meat was associated with a decreased risk of hip, but not knee, joint replacement for osteoarthritis. One possible mechanism to explain these differential associations may be via an effect of meat intake on bone strength and hip shape. Further confirmatory studies are warranted. PMID:21235820

  13. Influence of the contralateral hip state after total hip arthroplasty on patient-reported outcomes measured with the Forgotten Joint Score-12.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Mikio; Baba, Tomonori; Ochi, Hironori; Ozaki, Yu; Watari, Taiji; Homma, Yasuhiro; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2017-04-25

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of the contralateral hip state on postoperative assessment using the Forgotten Joint Score-12 (FJS-12) in comparison with the McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Hip Disease Evaluation Questionnaire (JHEQ). One hundred and thirty-four hips underwent total hip arthroplasty (THA) between 2014 and 2015. Of these, the subjects were 106 hips with degenerative hip arthrosis as a primary disease for whom initial THA was performed on the affected side. The WOMAC and JHEQ were investigated before surgery and 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year after surgery. The FJS-12 was examined 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year after surgery. We divided the subjects into three groups based on the state of the contralateral hip, which was not surgically treated in this study: healthy (n = 43), THA (n = 31), and OA (n = 31) groups. One year after surgery, the mean FJS-12 scores in the healthy, THA, and OA groups were 69.1, 52.8, and 68.0 points, respectively. In the THA group, the score was significantly lower than in the healthy and OA group. There were no significant differences in WOMAC and JHEQ scores among the three groups. The FJS-12 score in the presence of an arthroplasty on the contralateral side was more markedly influenced by the contralateral hip state compared with that in the presence of contralateral painful OA. This result suggests that it is necessary to understand the characteristics of PROs and utilize them for post-THA assessment.

  14. A cement spacer for two-stage revision of infected implants of the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Leunig, M; Chosa, E; Speck, M; Ganz, R

    1998-01-01

    We report the technical details and clinical results of twelve patients who had deep infections of implants in the hip joint and were treated by two-stage revision, using a gentamicin-loaded, hand-moulded cement spacer inserted for the period between resection and reimplantation arthroplasty. During management with the spacer, usually for 4 months, patients were almost free of pain and mobile with good leg control, spending 2/3 of the treatment period at home. Six of twelve spacers failed locally due to dislocation [5] or cement fracture [1], and more than two further episodes of surgery were required in 3 patients. Problems with dislocation of the spacer were significantly higher when the head to neck offset was lacking (P < 0.05) or when anchorage in the femoral shaft was poor. Nevertheless, infection after reimplantation arthroplasty did not occur by the time of follow-up (2.2 years). Based on these data, we consider that the use of the cement spacer is a promising approach to the treatment of complicated infections of the hip joint.

  15. The High performance of nanocrystalline CVD diamond coated hip joints in wear simulator test.

    PubMed

    Maru, M M; Amaral, M; Rodrigues, S P; Santos, R; Gouvea, C P; Archanjo, B S; Trommer, R M; Oliveira, F J; Silva, R F; Achete, C A

    2015-09-01

    The superior biotribological performance of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings grown by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was already shown to demonstrate high wear resistance in ball on plate experiments under physiological liquid lubrication. However, tests with a close-to-real approach were missing and this constitutes the aim of the present work. Hip joint wear simulator tests were performed with cups and heads made of silicon nitride coated with NCD of ~10 μm in thickness. Five million testing cycles (Mc) were run, which represent nearly five years of hip joint implant activity in a patient. For the wear analysis, gravimetry, profilometry, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy techniques were used. After 0.5 Mc of wear test, truncation of the protruded regions of the NCD film happened as a result of a fine-scale abrasive wear mechanism, evolving to extensive plateau regions and highly polished surface condition (Ra<10nm). Such surface modification took place without any catastrophic features as cracking, grain pullouts or delamination of the coatings. A steady state volumetric wear rate of 0.02 mm(3)/Mc, equivalent to a linear wear of 0.27 μm/Mc favorably compares with the best performance reported in the literature for the fourth generation alumina ceramic (0.05 mm(3)/Mc). Also, squeaking, quite common phenomenon in hard-on-hard systems, was absent in the present all-NCD system.

  16. Response of hip joint afferent fibers to pressure and vibration in the cat.

    PubMed

    Aloisi, A M; Carli, G; Rossi, A

    1988-07-19

    Mechanical properties of 33 slowly adapting and 8 quickly adapting capsule receptors of the hip joint were investigated. All the slowly adapting receptors identified were of a limited range, discharging only when the femur was rotated to its limit of movement. They behaved as single-spot high-threshold pressure receptors as shown by the von Frey's hairs. In addition they showed a low sensitivity to vibratory stimuli applied perpendicularly to their receptive field. Only 14 out of 33 units were found to discharge following vibration; 11 could be driven 1:1 at different frequencies. There was a general trend to be entrained at lower amplitudes for higher frequencies of vibration. A positive correlation between the pressure threshold and both activation angle and vibration threshold was found. The mechanical properties of all the quickly adapting capsule receptors were found to be similar to those described in other tissues. Finally, unlike joint receptors, slowly adapting muscle afferents travelling in the same hip articular nerve were highly sensitive to pressure and vibratory stimuli.

  17. Focused shape models for hip joint segmentation in 3D magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Shekhar S; Xia, Ying; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart; Schwarz, Raphael; Fripp, Jurgen

    2014-04-01

    Deformable models incorporating shape priors have proved to be a successful approach in segmenting anatomical regions and specific structures in medical images. This paper introduces weighted shape priors for deformable models in the context of 3D magnetic resonance (MR) image segmentation of the bony elements of the human hip joint. The fully automated approach allows the focusing of the shape model energy to a priori selected anatomical structures or regions of clinical interest by preferentially ordering the shape representation (or eigen-modes) within this type of model to the highly weighted areas. This focused shape model improves accuracy of the shape constraints in those regions compared to standard approaches. The proposed method achieved femoral head and acetabular bone segmentation mean absolute surface distance errors of 0.55±0.18mm and 0.75±0.20mm respectively in 35 3D unilateral MR datasets from 25 subjects acquired at 3T with different limited field of views for individual bony components of the hip joint.

  18. Tribolayer formation in a metal-on-metal (MoM) hip joint: an electrochemical investigation.

    PubMed

    Mathew, M T; Nagelli, C; Pourzal, R; Fischer, A; Laurent, M P; Jacobs, J J; Wimmer, M A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for total hip replacement (THR) surgery is increasing in the younger population due to faster rehabilitation and more complete restoration of function. Up to 2009, metal-on-metal (MoM) hip joint bearings were a popular choice due to their design flexibility, post-operative stability and relatively low wear rates. The main wear mechanisms that occur along the bearing surface of MoM joints are tribochemical reactions that deposit a mixture of wear debris, metal ions and organic matrix of decomposed proteins known as a tribolayer. No in-depth electrochemical studies have been reported on the structure and characteristics of this tribolayer or about the parameters involved in its formation. In this study, we conducted an electrochemical investigation of different surfaces (bulk-like: control, nano-crystalline: new implant and tribolayer surface: retrieved implant) made out of two commonly used hip CoCrMo alloys (high-carbon and low-carbon). As per ASTM standard, cyclic polarization tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests were conducted. The results obtained from electrochemical parameters for different surfaces clearly indicated a reduction in corrosion for the tribolayer surface (Icorr: 0.76μA/cm(2)). Further, polarization resistance (Rp:2.39±0.60MΩ/cm(2)) and capacitance (Cdl:15.20±0.75μF/cm(2)) indicated variation in corrosion kinetics for the tribolayer surface, that attributed to its structure and stability in a simulated body environment. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Preoperative Joint Space Width Predicts Patient-Reported Outcomes After Total Hip Arthroplasty in Young Patients.

    PubMed

    Stambough, Jeffrey B; Xiong, Ao; Baca, Geneva R; Wu, Ningying; Callaghan, John J; Clohisy, John C

    2016-02-01

    In a new health care economy, there is an emerging need to understand and quantify predictors of total hip arthroplasty (THA) outcomes. We investigated the association between preoperative radiographic disease (as measured quantitatively by joint space width [JSW]) and patient-reported function, activity, pain, and quality of life after THA. We retrospectively analyzed 146 patients (146 hips) 55 years or younger with a diagnosis of osteoarthritis who underwent cementless THA between January 2009 and December 2010. Preoperative pelvic radiographs were measured by 1 author blinded to clinical outcomes to establish JSW, defined as the shortest distance between the femoral head margin and the superolateral weight-bearing portion of the acetabulum. The JSW value was treated as a continuous variable when applied to statistical modeling. The relationship between the JSW and the improvement of clinical outcome was examined via a general linear modeling approach with adjustments for patients' age, body mass index, and sex. We identified an inverse relationship between preoperative JSW and improvements in functional, activity, pain, and quality of life. We found that, as JSW decreased by 1 mm, the outcome measure improvements were modified Harris Hip Score of 6.3 (p<0.001); SF-12 physical: 2.1 (p=0.027); WOMAC-pain: 4.8 (p=0.01); and UCLA Activity: 0.44 (p=0.02). Our results demonstrate that patients with greater preoperative joint space have less predictable improvement in terms of function, pain relief, and activity. These findings suggest that THA in young patients with a JSW less than 1.5 to 2 mm provides more predictable improvements in pain and functional outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Diagnostic utility of joint fluid metal ion measurement for histopathological findings in metal-on-metal hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Reito, Aleksi; Parkkinen, Jyrki; Puolakka, Timo; Pajamäki, Jorma; Eskelinen, Antti

    2015-12-22

    In vivo assessment of inflammatory responses in the synovia of patients with MoM hip replacements would be useful in the determination of the prognosis of the hip replacement. Aims of the study was to investigate the correlation between cobalt and chrome levels in joint fluid with histopathological findings and the predictive ability of metal ion levels for these findings. In 163 revision surgeries (141 ASR THAs and 22 ASR hip resurfacings) joint fluid chrome and cobalt levels were assessed and histological analysis of synovial tissues was performed. Histological analysis included assessment of histiocytes, particle load, surface necrosis, lymphocyte cuffs and ALVAL-score. Surface necrosis correlated positively with cobalt levels both in both groups. Neither chrome nor cobalt level had even fair discriminative ability to predict the presence or severity of any histological finding in the THA group. In the hip resurfacing group, cobalt level had good discriminative ability to predict the presence of perivascular lymphocytes and ALVAL-score of ≥ 7 whereas chrome had good discriminative ability to predict surface necrosis, metal particle load and ALVAL-score of ≥ 7. Measurement of metal ion levels following joint fluid aspirate offers no relevant information with regard to histopathological findings in patients with large-diameter MoM THAs. Limited information may be gained from assessment of joint fluid metal ion levels in patients with hip resurfacings, but disadvantages of an aspirate must be carefully reviewed.

  1. Segment-embedded frame definition affects the hip joint centre precision during walking.

    PubMed

    Roosen, Andy; Pain, Matthew T G; Thouzé, Arsène; Monnet, Tony; Begon, Mickaël

    2013-08-01

    Due to marker-specific soft tissue artefacts, the choice of the markers defining the segment-embedded frame affects the functional joint centre location, with subsequent error propagation to joint kinematics and kinetics in gait analysis. Our aim was to assess the effect of the number and placement of markers on the precision of the hip joint centre (HJC) location during walking. Twelve markers (2x6) were attached to the pelvis and left thigh of 15 young male subjects. Set-up movements were collected to locate an optimised functional HJC. For all permutations of three from six markers, a HJC was located and subsequently reconstructed in a static trial and during walking. Precision measures with two different definitions of the origin, namely a single maker or their mean-point, and using three, four, five and six were calculated. Finally, marker triads that reduced the variability of the HJC location were determined. Both the number of markers and method for defining the origin significantly affected the HJC precision during static and walking trials. For walking, precision of 39 mm using three markers improved to 5mm using redundant markers and the mean marker position as the segment origin. Markers placed close to the joint gave more consistent results.

  2. Friction moments of large metal-on-metal hip joint bearings and other modern designs.

    PubMed

    Bishop, N E; Waldow, F; Morlock, M M

    2008-10-01

    Modern hip joint replacements are designed to minimise wear problems. The most popular metal-on-polyethylene components are being updated by harder metal and ceramic combinations. However, this has also been shown to influence the friction moments, which could overload the interface between the implant and the body. In this study custom test apparatus was used to measure the joint moments in various modern bearings under simulated physiological joint conditions. The largest moments in serum were measured for large diameter metal-metal bearings (<8 Nm for standard bearings), followed by metal-polyethylene, and the lowest moments were for small diameter ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal combinations. Water as a lubricant was found to double the moments in comparison with serum. In metal-metal bearings moments were reduced by increasing loading frequency. Swing phase load and a rest period between load cycles had little effect. The moment magnitudes are within the turn-out capacity measured for press-fit cups and might become critical with higher joint loads.

  3. Validation of the greater trochanter method with radiographic measurements of frontal plane hip joint centers and knee mechanical axis angles and two other hip joint center methods.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Hunter J; Shen, Guangping; Weinhandl, Joshua T; Zhang, Songning

    2016-09-06

    Several motion capture methods exist for predicting hip joint centers (HJC). These methods include regression models, functional joints, and projections from greater trochanters. While regression and functional methods have been compared to imaging techniques, the TROCH method has not been previously validated. The purpose of this study was to compare frontal-plane HJCs and knee mechanical axis angles estimated using the greater trochanter method with a regression (Bell) and a functional method against those obtained using radiographs. Thirty-five participants underwent a long-standing anteroposterior radiograph, and performed static and functional motion capture trials. The Bell, functional, and trochanter HJCs were constructed to predict mechanical axes and compare HJC locations. One-way repeated measures ANOVAs were used to compare mechanical axes and HJC locations estimated by motion capture methods and measured using radiographs (p<0.05). All methods overestimated mechanical axes compared to radiographs (<2°), but were not different. Mediolateral HJC locations and inter-HJC widths were similar between methods; however, inter-HJC widths were underestimated (average 3.7%) compared to radiographs. The Bell HJC was more superior and anterior to both functional and trochanter methods. The trochanter HJC was more posterior to both methods. The Bell method outperformed the other methods in leg length predictions compared to radiographs. Although differences existed between methods, all frontal-plane HJC location differences were <1.7cm. This study validated the trochanter HJC prediction method mediolaterally and vertically (with small respective correction factors). Therefore, all HJC methods seem to be viable in predicting mechanical axes and frontal-plane HJC locations compared with radiographs.

  4. LOCATION-SPECIFIC HIP JOINT SPACE WIDTH FOR PROGRESSION OF HIP OSTEOARTHRITIS - DATA FROM THE OSTEOARTHRITIS INITIATIVE

    PubMed Central

    Ratzlaff, C.; Van Wyngaarden, C.; Duryea, J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish the performance of a location-specific computer-assisted quantitative measure of hip JSW, by measuring responsiveness at fixed locations in those with hip OA and pain and those without. Secondary purposes included investigating the most responsive location, comparison to mJSW and evaluating reading time. Methods Design: nested case-control Data: drawn from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI), a longitudinal cohort study of knee OA. All OAI participants had standardized standing AP pelvis radiographs at baseline and 48 months. Case definition (1): subjects with a total hip replacement (THR) after the 48 month visit with adequate baseline and 48 month radiographs (n=27) were selected and matched (1:1) on sex and age to subjects without a THR and no hip pain. Case definition (2): subjects with a THR at any point after baseline (n=79) were selected and the contralateral (CL) hip was designated the case hip, and subjects were matched (1:1) as above. Pain: the CL hip group were examined for the presence/absence of pain Measurements of superior hip JSW were made at three fixed locations relative to a landmark-based line, facilitated by software that delineated the femoral head and found the acetabular margin at the three points. The standardized response mean (SRM) was used to examine sensitivity to change from baseline to 48 months. Paired t-tests were used to compare cases and controls. Results Significant differences were observed between cases and controls and those with and without pain. The location-specific measure outperformed mJSW in all analyses, with SRM ranging from 0.53 (contralateral hip) to 1.06 (THR hip). The superior-medial location was the most responsive. Conclusion A new computer-assisted location-specific method of hip JSW is feasible and may provide a superior method to mJSW for radiographic OA progression. The superior-medial location was the most responsive. PMID:25278059

  5. An integrated system for 3D hip joint reconstruction from 2D X-rays: a preliminary validation study.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Steffen; Liu, Li; Tannast, Moritz; Bergmann, Mathias; Nolte, Lutz-P; Zheng, Guoyan

    2013-10-01

    The acquisition of conventional X-ray radiographs remains the standard imaging procedure for the diagnosis of hip-related problems. However, recent studies demonstrated the benefit of using three-dimensional (3D) surface models in the clinical routine. 3D surface models of the hip joint are useful for assessing the dynamic range of motion in order to identify possible pathologies such as femoroacetabular impingement. In this paper, we present an integrated system which consists of X-ray radiograph calibration and subsequent 2D/3D hip joint reconstruction for diagnosis and planning of hip-related problems. A mobile phantom with two different sizes of fiducials was developed for X-ray radiograph calibration, which can be robustly detected within the images. On the basis of the calibrated X-ray images, a 3D reconstruction method of the acetabulum was developed and applied together with existing techniques to reconstruct a 3D surface model of the hip joint. X-ray radiographs of dry cadaveric hip bones and one cadaveric specimen with soft tissue were used to prove the robustness of the developed fiducial detection algorithm. Computed tomography scans of the cadaveric bones were used to validate the accuracy of the integrated system. The fiducial detection sensitivity was in the same range for both sizes of fiducials. While the detection sensitivity was 97.96% for the large fiducials, it was 97.62% for the small fiducials. The acetabulum and the proximal femur were reconstructed with a mean surface distance error of 1.06 and 1.01 mm, respectively. The results for fiducial detection sensitivity and 3D surface reconstruction demonstrated the capability of the integrated system for 3D hip joint reconstruction from 2D calibrated X-ray radiographs.

  6. Surface Modifications for Improved Wear Performance in Artificial Joints: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Stacey J. L.; Topoleski, L. D. Timmie

    2015-11-01

    Artificial joint replacement is one of the most successful treatments for arthritis. Excellent wear and corrosion resistance, together with high strength and fracture toughness, are fundamental requirements for implant materials. Wear and/or corrosion of the materials used in artificial joints may lead to implant failure. Therefore, hard and wear-resistant materials, like cobalt-chromium-molybdenum and ceramic, are currently used as bearing surfaces. However, even using such hard materials, wear and/or corrosion related failure of artificial joints remains a central concern. One primary goal in orthopedic biomaterials research is to create more wear-resistant surfaces. Different technologies have been used to create new surfaces, or to modify existing surfaces, to prevent wear. It is the intent of this overview first to provide a summary of materials currently used as bearing surfaces in artificial joints, their functions, and their contributions to device longevity. Then, we will discuss advancements in modifying those bearing surfaces to produce more wear-resistant artificial joints.

  7. Higher medially-directed joint reaction forces are a characteristic of dysplastic hips: A comparative study using subject-specific musculoskeletal models.

    PubMed

    Harris, Michael D; MacWilliams, Bruce A; Bo Foreman, K; Peters, Christopher L; Weiss, Jeffrey A; Anderson, Andrew E

    2017-03-21

    Acetabular dysplasia is a known cause of hip osteoarthritis. In addition to abnormal anatomy, changes in kinematics, joint reaction forces (JRFs), and muscle forces could cause tissue damage to the cartilage and labrum, and may contribute to pain and fatigue. The objective of this study was to compare lower extremity joint angles, moments, hip JRFs and muscle forces during gait between patients with symptomatic acetabular dysplasia and healthy controls. Marker trajectories and ground reaction forces were measured in 10 dysplasia patients and 10 typically developing control subjects. A musculoskeletal model was scaled in OpenSim to each subject and subject-specific hip joint centers were determined using reconstructions from CT images. Joint kinematics and moments were calculated using inverse kinematics and inverse dynamics, respectively. Muscle forces and hip JRFs were estimated with static optimization. Inter-group differences were tested for statistical significance (p≤0.05) and large effect sizes (d≥0.8). Results demonstrated that dysplasia patients had higher medially directed JRFs. Joint angles and moments were mostly similar between the groups, but large inter-group effect sizes suggested some restriction in range of motion by patients at the hip and ankle. Higher medially-directed JRFs and inter-group differences in hip muscle forces likely stem from lateralization of the hip joint center in dysplastic patients. Joint force differences, combined with reductions in range of motion at the hip and ankle may also indicate compensatory strategies by patients with dysplasia to maintain joint stability.

  8. A new discrete element analysis method for predicting hip joint contact stresses.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Christine L; Maas, Steve A; Weiss, Jeffrey A; Ellis, Benjamin J; Peters, Christopher L; Anderson, Andrew E

    2013-04-05

    Quantifying cartilage contact stress is paramount to understanding hip osteoarthritis. Discrete element analysis (DEA) is a computationally efficient method to estimate cartilage contact stresses. Previous applications of DEA have underestimated cartilage stresses and yielded unrealistic contact patterns because they assumed constant cartilage thickness and/or concentric joint geometry. The study objectives were to: (1) develop a DEA model of the hip joint with subject-specific bone and cartilage geometry, (2) validate the DEA model by comparing DEA predictions to those of a validated finite element analysis (FEA) model, and (3) verify both the DEA and FEA models with a linear-elastic boundary value problem. Springs representing cartilage in the DEA model were given lengths equivalent to the sum of acetabular and femoral cartilage thickness and gap distance in the FEA model. Material properties and boundary/loading conditions were equivalent. Walking, descending, and ascending stairs were simulated. Solution times for DEA and FEA models were ~7 s and ~65 min, respectively. Irregular, complex contact patterns predicted by DEA were in excellent agreement with FEA. DEA contact areas were 7.5%, 9.7% and 3.7% less than FEA for walking, descending stairs, and ascending stairs, respectively. DEA models predicted higher peak contact stresses (9.8-13.6 MPa) and average contact stresses (3.0-3.7 MPa) than FEA (6.2-9.8 and 2.0-2.5 MPa, respectively). DEA overestimated stresses due to the absence of the Poisson's effect and a direct contact interface between cartilage layers. Nevertheless, DEA predicted realistic contact patterns when subject-specific bone geometry and cartilage thickness were used. This DEA method may have application as an alternative to FEA for pre-operative planning of joint-preserving surgery such as acetabular reorientation during peri-acetabular osteotomy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Automated bone segmentation from large field of view 3D MR images of the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ying; Fripp, Jurgen; Chandra, Shekhar S; Schwarz, Raphael; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart

    2013-10-21

    Accurate bone segmentation in the hip joint region from magnetic resonance (MR) images can provide quantitative data for examining pathoanatomical conditions such as femoroacetabular impingement through to varying stages of osteoarthritis to monitor bone and associated cartilage morphometry. We evaluate two state-of-the-art methods (multi-atlas and active shape model (ASM) approaches) on bilateral MR images for automatic 3D bone segmentation in the hip region (proximal femur and innominate bone). Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired at 3T from 30 volunteers. Image sequences included water-excitation dual echo stead state (FOV 38.6 × 24.1 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.61 mm) in all subjects and multi-echo data image combination (FOV 37.6 × 23.5 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.70 mm) for a subset of eight subjects. Following manual segmentation of femoral (head-neck, proximal-shaft) and innominate (ilium+ischium+pubis) bone, automated bone segmentation proceeded via two approaches: (1) multi-atlas segmentation incorporating non-rigid registration and (2) an advanced ASM-based scheme. Mean inter- and intra-rater reliability Dice's similarity coefficients (DSC) for manual segmentation of femoral and innominate bone were (0.970, 0.963) and (0.971, 0.965). Compared with manual data, mean DSC values for femoral and innominate bone volumes using automated multi-atlas and ASM-based methods were (0.950, 0.922) and (0.946, 0.917), respectively. Both approaches delivered accurate (high DSC values) segmentation results; notably, ASM data were generated in substantially less computational time (12 min versus 10 h). Both automated algorithms provided accurate 3D bone volumetric descriptions for MR-based measures in the hip region. The highly computational efficient ASM-based approach is more likely suitable for future clinical applications such as extracting bone-cartilage interfaces for potential cartilage segmentation.

  10. Automated bone segmentation from large field of view 3D MR images of the hip joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ying; Fripp, Jurgen; Chandra, Shekhar S.; Schwarz, Raphael; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart

    2013-10-01

    Accurate bone segmentation in the hip joint region from magnetic resonance (MR) images can provide quantitative data for examining pathoanatomical conditions such as femoroacetabular impingement through to varying stages of osteoarthritis to monitor bone and associated cartilage morphometry. We evaluate two state-of-the-art methods (multi-atlas and active shape model (ASM) approaches) on bilateral MR images for automatic 3D bone segmentation in the hip region (proximal femur and innominate bone). Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired at 3T from 30 volunteers. Image sequences included water-excitation dual echo stead state (FOV 38.6 × 24.1 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.61 mm) in all subjects and multi-echo data image combination (FOV 37.6 × 23.5 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.70 mm) for a subset of eight subjects. Following manual segmentation of femoral (head-neck, proximal-shaft) and innominate (ilium+ischium+pubis) bone, automated bone segmentation proceeded via two approaches: (1) multi-atlas segmentation incorporating non-rigid registration and (2) an advanced ASM-based scheme. Mean inter- and intra-rater reliability Dice's similarity coefficients (DSC) for manual segmentation of femoral and innominate bone were (0.970, 0.963) and (0.971, 0.965). Compared with manual data, mean DSC values for femoral and innominate bone volumes using automated multi-atlas and ASM-based methods were (0.950, 0.922) and (0.946, 0.917), respectively. Both approaches delivered accurate (high DSC values) segmentation results; notably, ASM data were generated in substantially less computational time (12 min versus 10 h). Both automated algorithms provided accurate 3D bone volumetric descriptions for MR-based measures in the hip region. The highly computational efficient ASM-based approach is more likely suitable for future clinical applications such as extracting bone-cartilage interfaces for potential cartilage segmentation.

  11. Postoperative changes in in vivo measured friction in total hip joint prosthesis during walking.

    PubMed

    Damm, Philipp; Bender, Alwina; Bergmann, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Loosening of the artificial cup and inlay is the most common reasons for total hip replacement failures. Polyethylene wear and aseptic loosening are frequent reasons. Furthermore, over the past few decades, the population of patients receiving total hip replacements has become younger and more active. Hence, a higher level of activity may include an increased risk of implant loosening as a result of friction-induced wear. In this study, an instrumented hip implant was used to measure the contact forces and friction moments in vivo during walking. Subsequently, the three-dimensional coefficient of friction in vivo was calculated over the whole gait cycle. Measurements were collected from ten subjects at several time points between three and twelve months postoperative. No significant change in the average resultant contact force was observed between three and twelve months postoperative. In contrast, a significant decrease of up to 47% was observed in the friction moment. The coefficient of friction also decreased over postoperative time on average. These changes may be caused by 'running-in' effects of the gliding components or by the improved lubricating properties of the synovia. Because the walking velocity and contact forces were found to be nearly constant during the observed period, the decrease in friction moment suggests an increase in fluid viscosity. The peak values of the contact force individually varied by 32%-44%. The friction moment individually differed much more, by 110%-129% at three and up to 451% at twelve months postoperative. The maximum coefficient of friction showed the highest individual variability, about 100% at three and up to 914% at twelve months after surgery. These individual variations in the friction parameters were most likely due to different 'running-in' effects that were influenced by the individual activity levels and synovia properties.

  12. Postoperative Changes in In Vivo Measured Friction in Total Hip Joint Prosthesis during Walking

    PubMed Central

    Damm, Philipp; Bender, Alwina; Bergmann, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Loosening of the artificial cup and inlay is the most common reasons for total hip replacement failures. Polyethylene wear and aseptic loosening are frequent reasons. Furthermore, over the past few decades, the population of patients receiving total hip replacements has become younger and more active. Hence, a higher level of activity may include an increased risk of implant loosening as a result of friction-induced wear. In this study, an instrumented hip implant was used to measure the contact forces and friction moments in vivo during walking. Subsequently, the three-dimensional coefficient of friction in vivo was calculated over the whole gait cycle. Measurements were collected from ten subjects at several time points between three and twelve months postoperative. No significant change in the average resultant contact force was observed between three and twelve months postoperative. In contrast, a significant decrease of up to 47% was observed in the friction moment. The coefficient of friction also decreased over postoperative time on average. These changes may be caused by ‘running-in’ effects of the gliding components or by the improved lubricating properties of the synovia. Because the walking velocity and contact forces were found to be nearly constant during the observed period, the decrease in friction moment suggests an increase in fluid viscosity. The peak values of the contact force individually varied by 32%-44%. The friction moment individually differed much more, by 110%-129% at three and up to 451% at twelve months postoperative. The maximum coefficient of friction showed the highest individual variability, about 100% at three and up to 914% at twelve months after surgery. These individual variations in the friction parameters were most likely due to different ‘running-in’ effects that were influenced by the individual activity levels and synovia properties. PMID:25806805

  13. Knee and Hip Joint Kinematics Predict Quadriceps and Hamstrings Neuromuscular Activation Patterns in Drop Jump Landings

    PubMed Central

    Malfait, Bart; Dingenen, Bart; Smeets, Annemie; Staes, Filip; Pataky, Todd; Robinson, Mark A.; Vanrenterghem, Jos; Verschueren, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to assess if variation in sagittal plane landing kinematics is associated with variation in neuromuscular activation patterns of the quadriceps-hamstrings muscle groups during drop vertical jumps (DVJ). Methods Fifty female athletes performed three DVJ. The relationship between peak knee and hip flexion angles and the amplitude of four EMG vectors was investigated with trajectory-level canonical correlation analyses over the entire time period of the landing phase. EMG vectors consisted of the {vastus medialis(VM),vastus lateralis(VL)}, {vastus medialis(VM),hamstring medialis(HM)}, {hamstring medialis(HM),hamstring lateralis(HL)} and the {vastus lateralis(VL),hamstring lateralis(HL)}. To estimate the contribution of each individual muscle, linear regressions were also conducted using one-dimensional statistical parametric mapping. Results The peak knee flexion angle was significantly positively associated with the amplitudes of the {VM,HM} and {HM,HL} during the preparatory and initial contact phase and with the {VL,HL} vector during the peak loading phase (p<0.05). Small peak knee flexion angles were significantly associated with higher HM amplitudes during the preparatory and initial contact phase (p<0.001). The amplitudes of the {VM,VL} and {VL,HL} were significantly positively associated with the peak hip flexion angle during the peak loading phase (p<0.05). Small peak hip flexion angles were significantly associated with higher VL amplitudes during the peak loading phase (p = 0.001). Higher external knee abduction and flexion moments were found in participants landing with less flexed knee and hip joints (p<0.001). Conclusion This study demonstrated clear associations between neuromuscular activation patterns and landing kinematics in the sagittal plane during specific parts of the landing. These findings have indicated that an erect landing pattern, characterized by less hip and knee flexion, was significantly associated with an

  14. Stereometric Gait Evaluation For Control Of Hip And Knee Joint Surgery In Patients With Neurogenic Disorders Of Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Jurg U.

    1980-07-01

    Detailed knowledge on normal and pathological joint motion during physiological activities such as gait is necessary both for planning and evaluating of orthopaedic surgery in pyramidal-extrapyramidal disorders of movement. A methodology of stereometric gait evaluation using cinephotography in three planes combined with a pair of transparent force plates and electro-myographic recording is described. Resultats of a foot load study in 35 normal preschool children and long them follow-up evaluations on hip and knee joint operations in cerebral spastic patients are demonstrated. Problems of picture analysis are discussed. As a mean for improvement in surgical procedures for such patients, detailed information are obtainable by cinephotography is mandatory. In addition, three-dimensional motions in large joints such as hips, knees and talo-crural articulations must be measured quantitatively with a high degree of accuracy. Special polyhedral reflective targets were developed to permit semiautomatic and automatic image analysis for joint range measurement in the lower extremities.

  15. Is there a low-back cost to hip-centric exercise? Quantifying the lumbar spine joint compression and shear forces during movements used to overload the hips.

    PubMed

    Frost, David M; Beach, Tyson; Fenwick, Chad; Callaghan, Jack; McGill, Stuart

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify joint compression and shear forces at L4/L5 during exercises used to overload the hips. Nine men performed 36 "walking" trials using two modalities: (1) sled towing and (2) exercise bands placed around the ankles. Participants completed forward, backward, and lateral trials with bent and straight legs at three separate loads. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded bilaterally from eight torso and thigh sites, upper body and lumbar spine motion were quantified, and hand forces were measured. An EMG-driven musculoskeletal model was used to estimate the muscular contribution to joint compression and shear. Peak reaction, muscle and joint compression and shear forces, and peak gluteus medius and maximus activity were calculated. Significant differences were noted in each dependent measure; however, they were dependent on direction of travel, leg position, and load. The highest joint compression and shear forces for the sled and band conditions were 4378 N and 626 N, and 3306 N and 713 N, respectively. In general, increasing the band tension had little effect on all dependent measures, although a load-response was found during the sled conditions. Before using any exercise to improve hip function, the potential benefits should be weighed against "costs" to neighbouring joints.

  16. Treatment of the Bullet, Traversing Femoral Neck, Lodged in Hip Joint: Initial Arthroscopic Removal and Subsequent Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Çatma, Mehmet Faruk; Ünlü, Serhan; Ersan, Önder; Öztürk, Alper

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There have been several reports on arthroscopically assisted removal of the bullet imbedded in hip joint in the literature. Similarly, in this case, a bullet lodged in acetabulum was extracted with arthroscopic technique. What makes this case unique in the literature is that the bullet removed from the acetabulum traversed the femoral neck. Case Report: Male patient aged 32 years with a low-velocity gunshot wound was referred to the emergency room on August 28, 2012. The projectile was lodged in acetabular side of the hip joint transversing through the femoral neck. A hip arthroscopy was performed for bullet removal. Two years after surgery, the patient had groin pain and underwent a safe dislocation for femoral chondral injury. In the last follow-up in the second post-operative year, the patient had no clinical complaint. Conclusion: Hip arthroscopy is a minimally invasive and proper procedure for removal of foreign materials such as a bullet in the hip joint. Arthrotomy can be reserved for further complications such as chondral injury as in this case. PMID:28164046

  17. A quantitative assessment of the insertional footprints of the hip joint capsular ligaments and their spanning fibers for reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Telleria, Jessica J M; Lindsey, Derek P; Giori, Nicholas J; Safran, Marc R

    2014-04-01

    Quantitative descriptions of the hip joint capsular ligament insertional footprints have been reported. Using a three-dimensional digitizing system, and computer modeling, the area, and dimensions of the three main hip capsular ligaments and their insertional footprints were quantified in eight cadaveric hips. The iliofemoral ligament (ILFL) attaches proximally to the anterolateral supra-acetabular region (mean area = 4.2 cm(2)). The mean areas of the ILFL lateral and medial arm insertional footprints are 4.8 and 3.1 cm(2), respectively. The pubofemoral ligament (proximal footprint mean area = 1.4 cm(2)) blends with the medial ILFL anteriorly and the proximal ischiofemoral ligament (ISFL) distally without a distal bony insertion. The proximal and distal ISFL footprint mean areas are 6.4 and 1.2 cm(2), respectively. The hip joint capsular ligaments have consistent anatomic and insertional patterns. Quantification of the ligaments and their attachment sites may aid in improving anatomic repairs and reconstructions of the hip joint capsule using open and/or arthroscopic techniques.

  18. Two-stage Revision for Periprosthetic Hip and Knee Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kini, Sunil Gurpur; Gabr, Ayman; Das, Rishi; Sukeik, Mohamed; Haddad, Fares Sami

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) continues to be one of the leading causes of failure following hip and knee surgery. The diagnostic workflow of PJI includes detailed clinical examination, serum markers, imaging and aspiration/biopsy of the affected joint. The goals of treatment are eradication of the infection, alleviation of pain, and restoration of joint function. Surgical management of PJI consists of debridement, antibiotics and implant retention (DAIR) and single or two-stage revision procedures. Two-stage revision remains the gold standard for treatment of PJIs. We aim to discuss the two stage procedure in this article and report the outcomes. Methods: The first stage of the two stages consists of removal of all components and associated cement with aggressive debridement and placement of an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer. Patients are then treated with variable periods of parenteral antibiotics, followed by an antibiotic free period to help ensure the infection has been eradicated. If the clinical evaluation and serum inflammatory markers suggest infection control, then the second stage can be undertaken and this involves removal of the cement spacer, repeat debridement, and placement of a new prosthesis. Results: Common themes around the two-stage revision procedure include timing of the second stage, antibiotics used in the interim period, length of the interim period before consideration of reimplantation and close liaising with microbiologists. Conclusion: Successful eradication of infection and good functional outcome using the two stage procedure is dependent on a multidisciplinary approach and having a standard reproducible startegy. PMID:28144371

  19. Supramolecular Organization of Collagen Fibrils in Healthy and Osteoarthritic Human Knee and Hip Joint Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Gottardi, Riccardo; Hansen, Uwe; Raiteri, Roberto; Loparic, Marko; Düggelin, Marcel; Mathys, Daniel; Friederich, Niklaus F; Bruckner, Peter; Stolz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage matrix is a composite of discrete, but interacting suprastructures, i.e. cartilage fibers with microfibrillar or network-like aggregates and penetrating extrafibrillar proteoglycan matrix. The biomechanical function of the proteoglycan matrix and the collagen fibers are to absorb compressive and tensional loads, respectively. Here, we are focusing on the suprastructural organization of collagen fibrils and the degradation process of their hierarchical organized fiber architecture studied at high resolution at the authentic location within cartilage. We present electron micrographs of the collagenous cores of such fibers obtained by an improved protocol for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Articular cartilages are permeated by small prototypic fibrils with a homogeneous diameter of 18 ± 5 nm that can align in their D-periodic pattern and merge into larger fibers by lateral association. Interestingly, these fibers have tissue-specific organizations in cartilage. They are twisted ropes in superficial regions of knee joints or assemble into parallel aligned cable-like structures in deeper regions of knee joint- or throughout hip joints articular cartilage. These novel observations contribute to an improved understanding of collagen fiber biogenesis, function, and homeostasis in hyaline cartilage.

  20. Two-stage Revision for Periprosthetic Hip and Knee Joint Infections.

    PubMed

    Kini, Sunil Gurpur; Gabr, Ayman; Das, Rishi; Sukeik, Mohamed; Haddad, Fares Sami

    2016-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) continues to be one of the leading causes of failure following hip and knee surgery. The diagnostic workflow of PJI includes detailed clinical examination, serum markers, imaging and aspiration/biopsy of the affected joint. The goals of treatment are eradication of the infection, alleviation of pain, and restoration of joint function. Surgical management of PJI consists of debridement, antibiotics and implant retention (DAIR) and single or two-stage revision procedures. Two-stage revision remains the gold standard for treatment of PJIs. We aim to discuss the two stage procedure in this article and report the outcomes. The first stage of the two stages consists of removal of all components and associated cement with aggressive debridement and placement of an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer. Patients are then treated with variable periods of parenteral antibiotics, followed by an antibiotic free period to help ensure the infection has been eradicated. If the clinical evaluation and serum inflammatory markers suggest infection control, then the second stage can be undertaken and this involves removal of the cement spacer, repeat debridement, and placement of a new prosthesis. Common themes around the two-stage revision procedure include timing of the second stage, antibiotics used in the interim period, length of the interim period before consideration of reimplantation and close liaising with microbiologists. Successful eradication of infection and good functional outcome using the two stage procedure is dependent on a multidisciplinary approach and having a standard reproducible startegy.

  1. Supramolecular Organization of Collagen Fibrils in Healthy and Osteoarthritic Human Knee and Hip Joint Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Raiteri, Roberto; Loparic, Marko; Düggelin, Marcel; Mathys, Daniel; Friederich, Niklaus F.; Bruckner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage matrix is a composite of discrete, but interacting suprastructures, i.e. cartilage fibers with microfibrillar or network-like aggregates and penetrating extrafibrillar proteoglycan matrix. The biomechanical function of the proteoglycan matrix and the collagen fibers are to absorb compressive and tensional loads, respectively. Here, we are focusing on the suprastructural organization of collagen fibrils and the degradation process of their hierarchical organized fiber architecture studied at high resolution at the authentic location within cartilage. We present electron micrographs of the collagenous cores of such fibers obtained by an improved protocol for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Articular cartilages are permeated by small prototypic fibrils with a homogeneous diameter of 18 ± 5 nm that can align in their D-periodic pattern and merge into larger fibers by lateral association. Interestingly, these fibers have tissue-specific organizations in cartilage. They are twisted ropes in superficial regions of knee joints or assemble into parallel aligned cable-like structures in deeper regions of knee joint- or throughout hip joints articular cartilage. These novel observations contribute to an improved understanding of collagen fiber biogenesis, function, and homeostasis in hyaline cartilage. PMID:27780246

  2. Propionibacterium avidum as an Etiological Agent of Prosthetic Hip Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Brüggemann, Holger; Scholz, Christian F. P.; Leimbach, Andreas; Söderquist, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is well-established as a possible etiologic agent of prosthetic joint infections (PJIs). Other Propionibacterium spp. have occasionally been described as a cause of PJIs, but this has not previously been the case for P. avidum despite its capacity to form biofilm. We describe two patients with prosthetic hip joint infections caused by P. avidum. Both patients were primarily operated with an anteriorly curved skin incision close to the skin crease of the groin, and both were obese. Initial treatment was performed according to the DAIR procedure (debridement, antibiotics, and implant retention). In case 1, the outcome was successful, but in case 2, a loosening of the cup was present 18 months post debridement. The P. avidum isolate from case 1 and two isolates from case 2 (obtained 18 months apart) were selected for whole genome sequencing. The genome of P. avidum obtained from case 1 was approximately 60 kb larger than the genomes of the two isolates of case 2. These latter isolates were clonal with the exception of SNPs in the genome. All three strains possessed the gene cluster encoding exopolysaccharide synthesis. P. avidum has a pathogenic potential and the ability to cause clinically relevant infections, including abscess formation, in the presence of foreign bodies such as prosthetic joint components. Skin incision in close proximity to the groin or deep skin crease, such as the anteriorly curved skin incision approach, might pose a risk of PJIs by P. avidum, especially in obese patients. PMID:27355425

  3. Chondrogenic capability of osteoarthritic chondrocytes from the trapeziometacarpal and hip joints.

    PubMed

    Lovati, Arianna B; Colombini, Alessandra; Recordati, Camilla; Ceriani, Cristina; Zagra, Luigi; Berzero, Gianfranco; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common degenerative disease of joints like the hip and the trapeziometacarpal joint (rhizarthrosis). In this in vitro study, we compared the chondrogenesis of chondrocytes derived from the trapezium and the femoral head cartilage of osteoarthritic patients to have a deeper insight on trapezium chondrocyte behavior as autologous cell source for the repair of cartilage lesions in rhizarthrosis. Chondrocytes collected from trapezium and femoral head articular cartilage were cultured in pellets and analyzed for chondrogenic differentiation, cell proliferation, glycosaminoglycan production, gene expression of chondrogenic and fibrous markers, histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Our results showed a higher cartilaginous matrix deposition and a lower fibrocartilaginous phenotype of the femoral chondrocytes with respect to the trapezium chondrocytes assessed by a higher absolute glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen production, thus demonstrating a superior chondrogenic potential of the femoral with respect to the trapezium chondrocytes. The differences in chondrogenic potential between trapezium and femoral head chondrocytes confirmed a lower regenerative capability in the trapezium than in the femoral head cartilage due to the different environment and loading acting on these joints that affects the metabolism of the resident cells. This could represent a limitation to apply the cell therapy for rhizoarthrosis.

  4. Shoulder and hip joints for hard space suits and the like

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    For use in hard space suits and the like, a joint between the torso covering and the upper arm covering (i.e., shoulder) or between the torso covering and upper leg covering (i.e., hip) is disclosed. Each joint has an outer covering and a inner covering. The outer covering has plural perferably truncated toroidal sections decreasing in size proceeding outwardly. In one embodiment at each joint there are two bearings, the first larger than the second. The outer race of the larger bearing is attached to the outer edge of the smaller end of each section and the inner race of the larger bearing is attached to the end wall. The inner race of the smaller bearing is attached to the end wall. The outer race of the smaller bearing is attached to the larger end of the next section. Each bearing hask appropriate seals. Between each section is a rubber ring for the comfort of the wearer. Such rubber rings have radial flanges attached to the inner races of two adjacent bearings. Matching semicircular grooves are formed in the abutting overlapping surfaces. Bellows-like inner walls are also provided for each section fixed at one end to an inner cylindrical flange and, at the opposite end, to an end wall. Each outer section may rotate 360 deg relative to the next outer section, whereas the bellows sections do not rotate, but rather expand or contract locally as the rigid sections rotate relative to each other.

  5. Effects of denervation of the hip joint on results of clinical observations and instrumented gait analysis in dogs with sodium urate crystal-induced synovitis.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Elham A; Lambrechts, Nicolaas E; Weng, Hsin-Yi; Snyder, Paul W; Breur, Gert J

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of selective hip joint denervation on gait abnormalities and signs of hip joint pain in dogs. ANIMALS 6 healthy adult hound-type dogs. PROCEDURES Minimally invasive denervation was performed on the right hip joint of each dog. Two weeks later, sodium urate was injected into the right hip joint to induce synovitis. Dogs were evaluated clinically and by use of instrumented gait analysis before and 2 weeks after minimally invasive denervation and 4, 8, and 24 hours after induction of synovitis. Dogs were euthanized, and necropsy and histologic examination were performed. RESULTS No kinetic or kinematic gait modifications were detected 2 weeks after minimally invasive denervation. Denervation did not eliminate signs of pain and lameness associated with sodium urate-induced synovitis. Results of histologic examination confirmed that denervation was an effective method for transecting the innervation of the craniolateral and caudolateral aspects of the hip joint capsule. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, minimally invasive denervation did not result in gait modifications in dogs. Denervation did not abolish the signs of pain and lameness associated with generalized induced synovitis of the hip joint. Further studies are required before conclusions can be drawn regarding the clinical usefulness of hip joint denervation for dogs with hip dysplasia.

  6. The management of hip fracture in the older population. Joint position statement by Gruppo Italiano Ortogeriatria (GIOG).

    PubMed

    Pioli, Giulio; Barone, A; Mussi, C; Tafaro, L; Bellelli, G; Falaschi, P; Trabucchi, M; Paolisso, G

    2014-10-01

    This document is a Joint Position Statement by Gruppo Italiano di OrtoGeriatria (GIOG) supported by Società Italiana di Gerontologia e Geriatria (SIGG), and Associazione Italiana Psicogeriatria (AIP) on management of hip fracture older patients. Orthogeriatric care is at present the best model of care to improve results in older patients after hip fracture. The implementation of orthogeriatric model of care, based on the collaboration between orthopaedic surgeons and geriatricians, must take into account the local availability of resources and facilities and should be integrated into the local context. At the same time the programme must be based on the best available evidences and planned following accepted quality standards that ensure the efficacy of the intervention. The position paper focused on eight quality standards for the management of hip fracture older patients in orthogeriatric model of care. The GIOG promotes the development of a clinic database with the aim of obtaining a qualitative improvement in the management of hip fracture.

  7. The Possibilities to Decrease the Coefficient of Friciton Between Head and Socket of the Endoprosthesis of Hip Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haringová, Andrea; Stračár, Karol; Prikkel, Karol

    2014-12-01

    The article deals with the question of physical parameters that could positively influence the overall lifetime of hip joint endoprosthesis. As the important physical parameter it was selected the coefficient of friction. The contribution offers possibilities how to decrease the coefficient of friction and experimentally test these assumptions

  8. Muscle optimization techniques impact the magnitude of calculated hip joint contact forces.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Mariska; Derikx, Loes C; de Groote, Friedl; Bartels, Ward; Meyer, Christophe; Verdonschot, Nico; Jonkers, Ilse

    2015-03-01

    In musculoskeletal modelling, several optimization techniques are used to calculate muscle forces, which strongly influence resultant hip contact forces (HCF). The goal of this study was to calculate muscle forces using four different optimization techniques, i.e., two different static optimization techniques, computed muscle control (CMC) and the physiological inverse approach (PIA). We investigated their subsequent effects on HCFs during gait and sit to stand and found that at the first peak in gait at 15-20% of the gait cycle, CMC calculated the highest HCFs (median 3.9 times peak GRF (pGRF)). When comparing calculated HCFs to experimental HCFs reported in literature, the former were up to 238% larger. Both static optimization techniques produced lower HCFs (median 3.0 and 3.1 pGRF), while PIA included muscle dynamics without an excessive increase in HCF (median 3.2 pGRF). The increased HCFs in CMC were potentially caused by higher muscle forces resulting from co-contraction of agonists and antagonists around the hip. Alternatively, these higher HCFs may be caused by the slightly poorer tracking of the net joint moment by the muscle moments calculated by CMC. We conclude that the use of different optimization techniques affects calculated HCFs, and static optimization approached experimental values best.

  9. Evaluation of the bone mineral density of the subjects with avascular necrosis of hip joint

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Mohammad Taghi; Nodoshan, Seyed Mohammad Mousavi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The head of femur is deformed in subjects with Leg Calve Perthes Disease (LCPD). It may be due to an increase in loads applied on the hip, decrease in hip joint containment and decrease in bone mineral density (BMD) of femur. Unfortunately there is not enough evidence regarding BMD of femur in subjects with LCPD. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate BMD in subjects with Perthes disease. Method Two subjects with LCPD participated in this study. The BMD and Young modulus of elasticity (E) of different parts of femur of both Perthes and sound sides were evaluated by use of Mimics software. The difference between BMD of femur in both sides of each subject was compared by use of two sample t test. Results There was no difference between the BMD and E modulus of femur in Perthes and sound sides in both subjects (p-value>0.05). Conclusion As there is no difference between the BMD of femur in Perthes side, it can be concluded that the deformation of femur in these subjects may not be due to a change in BMD. PMID:27920812

  10. Effect of the high femoral osteotomy upon the vascularity and blood supply of the hip joint

    SciTech Connect

    Day, B.; Shim, S.S.; Leung, G.

    1984-05-01

    This investigation was done to study the effects of high femoral osteotomy upon the vascularity and blood supply of the hip and to further our knowledge of its physiologic basis. We have used established methods of study, including bone scans, microangiography, isotope clearance and perosseous venography, and based upon the results of these studies, we have reached certain conclusions. First, high femoral osteotomy increases the blood flow and vascularity in the hip joint, the femoral head and neck and the great trochanter. Second, bone scanning techniques using /sup 99m/Tc labeled diphosphonate have shown increased uptake in the femoral head and neck after high femoral osteotomy. The localization was done using a Digital Gamma III computer, and the activity on the osteotomy side at two weeks was 3.5 times as great as on the control side. By 16 weeks postoperatively, there was still two times as much activity on the osteotomy side. Third, microangiography showed increased vascularity both at the osteotomy site and in the femoral head and neck and the greater trochanter on that side. Such an increase in vascularity first became evident two weeks after osteotomy and persisted during the four month period studied. Fourth, the results of the /sup 99m/Tc diphosphonate clearance study showed a 25 per cent increase in femoral head blood flow on the operative side. Fifth, perosseous venography of the femoral head and neck showed a marked increase in venous drainage through the osteotomy site in the immediate postosteotomy stage.

  11. Contents and compositions of glycosaminoglycans in different sites of the human hip joint cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, K; Azuma, H

    1982-01-01

    The distribution of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in different functional regions (weight-bearing and nonweight-bearing portions) of the human hip joint cartilage was studied. The results obtained were as follows: (1) Weight-bearing cartilage contains larger amounts of GAGs than nonweight-bearing, cartilage. (2) Weight-bearing cartilage contains keratan sulphate in higher ratio to chondroitin sulphate than nonweight-bearing cartilage. (3) The differences in content and composition of GAGs between the weight-bearing and nonweight-bearing portions are more pronounced in the femoral head than in the acetabulum. The preliminary analyses showed that the chondroitin sulphate from the acetabular cartilage contained exclusively 6-sulphated disaccharide units and there was some heterogeneity in keratan sulphate. PMID:6812509

  12. Salvage Procedures for Management of Prosthetic Joint Infection After Hip and Knee Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Samer S.S.; Sukeik, Mohamed; Alazzawi, Sulaiman; Shaath, Mohammed; Sabri, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The increasing load placed by joint replacement surgery on health care systems makes infection, even with the lowest rates, a serious concern that needs to be thoroughly studied and addressed using all possible measures. Methods: A comprehensive review of the current literature on salvage procedures for recurrent PJIs using PubMed, EMBASE and CINAHL has been conducted. Results: Prolonged suppressive antibiotic therapy (PSAT), resection arthroplasty and arthrodesis were the most common procedures performed. Suppressive antibiotic therapy is based on the use of well tolerated long term antibiotics in controlling sensitive organisms. Resection arthroplasty which should be reserved as a last resort provided more predictable outcomes in the hip whereas arthrodesis was associated with better outcomes in the knee. Various methods for arthrodesis including internal and external fixation have been described. Conclusion: Despite good union and infection control rates, all methods were associated with complications occasionally requiring further surgical interventions. PMID:28144373

  13. Lower Urinary Tract Infection and Periprosthetic Joint Infection after Elective Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Ho; Lee, Young-Kyun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a grave complication. Urinary tract infection (UTI) as a source for PJI is controversial. Our purposes were, (1) to evaluate the incidence of PJI after elective primary THA and (2) to determine whether UTI was associated with a risk of PJI after elective primary THA. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 527 patients who underwent elective primary THA by using universal aseptic technique from May 2003 to October 2007. UTI group (13 patients) was defined as patients who underwent THA in status of having an UTI, and the remaining patients were defined as control group (514 patients). We compared the incidence of PJI in both groups. Results During the study period, the incidence of PJI was 0%, regardless of existence (or presence) of UTI. Conclusion There was no significant association between UTI and PJI, when cautiously performed THA. PMID:28316960

  14. Hip joint centre position estimation using a dual unscented Kalman filter for computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Beretta, Elisa; De Momi, Elena; Camomilla, Valentina; Cereatti, Andrea; Cappozzo, Aurelio; Ferrigno, Giancarlo

    2014-09-01

    In computer-assisted knee surgery, the accuracy of the localization of the femur centre of rotation relative to the hip-bone (hip joint centre) is affected by the unavoidable and untracked pelvic movements because only the femoral pose is acquired during passive pivoting manoeuvres. We present a dual unscented Kalman filter algorithm that allows the estimation of the hip joint centre also using as input the position of a pelvic reference point that can be acquired with a skin marker placed on the hip, without increasing the invasiveness of the surgical procedure. A comparative assessment of the algorithm was carried out using data provided by in vitro experiments mimicking in vivo surgical conditions. Soft tissue artefacts were simulated and superimposed onto the position of a pelvic landmark. Femoral pivoting made of a sequence of star-like quasi-planar movements followed by a circumduction was performed. The dual unscented Kalman filter method proved to be less sensitive to pelvic displacements, which were shown to be larger during the manoeuvres in which the femur was more adducted. Comparable accuracy between all the analysed methods resulted for hip joint centre displacements smaller than 1 mm (error: 2.2 ± [0.2; 0.3] mm, median ± [inter-quartile range 25%; inter-quartile range 75%]) and between 1 and 6 mm (error: 4.8 ± [0.5; 0.8] mm) during planar movements. When the hip joint centre displacement exceeded 6 mm, the dual unscented Kalman filter proved to be more accurate than the other methods by 30% during multi-planar movements (error: 5.2 ± [1.2; 1] mm). © IMechE 2014.

  15. Influence of hip joint simulator design and mechanics on the wear and creep of metal-on-polyethylene bearings.

    PubMed

    Ali, Murat; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Partridge, Susan; Williams, Sophie; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-05-01

    Hip joint simulators are used extensively for preclinical testing of hip replacements. The variation in simulator design and test conditions used worldwide can affect the tribological performance of polyethylene. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of simulator mechanics and design on the wear and creep of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene. In the first part of this study, an electromechanical simulator and pneumatic simulator were used to compare the wear and creep of metal-on-polyethylene components under the same standard gait conditions. In the second part of the study, the same electromechanical hip joint simulator was used to investigate the influence of kinematics on wear. Higher wear rates and penetration depths were observed from the electromechanical simulator compared with the pneumatic simulator. When adduction/abduction was introduced to the gait cycle, there was no significant difference in wear with that obtained under the gait cycle condition without adduction/abduction. This study confirmed the influence of hip simulator design and loading conditions on the wear of polyethylene, and therefore direct comparisons of absolute wear rates between different hip joint simulators should be avoided. This study also confirmed that the resulting wear path was the governing factor in obtaining clinically relevant wear rates, and this can be achieved with either two axes or three axes of rotations. However, three axes of rotation (with the inclusion of adduction/abduction) more closely replicate clinical conditions and should therefore be the design approach for newly developed hip joint simulators used for preclinical testing. © IMechE 2016.

  16. Influence of hip joint simulator design and mechanics on the wear and creep of metal-on-polyethylene bearings

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Murat; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Partridge, Susan; Williams, Sophie; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-01-01

    Hip joint simulators are used extensively for preclinical testing of hip replacements. The variation in simulator design and test conditions used worldwide can affect the tribological performance of polyethylene. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of simulator mechanics and design on the wear and creep of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene. In the first part of this study, an electromechanical simulator and pneumatic simulator were used to compare the wear and creep of metal-on-polyethylene components under the same standard gait conditions. In the second part of the study, the same electromechanical hip joint simulator was used to investigate the influence of kinematics on wear. Higher wear rates and penetration depths were observed from the electromechanical simulator compared with the pneumatic simulator. When adduction/abduction was introduced to the gait cycle, there was no significant difference in wear with that obtained under the gait cycle condition without adduction/abduction. This study confirmed the influence of hip simulator design and loading conditions on the wear of polyethylene, and therefore direct comparisons of absolute wear rates between different hip joint simulators should be avoided. This study also confirmed that the resulting wear path was the governing factor in obtaining clinically relevant wear rates, and this can be achieved with either two axes or three axes of rotations. However, three axes of rotation (with the inclusion of adduction/abduction) more closely replicate clinical conditions and should therefore be the design approach for newly developed hip joint simulators used for preclinical testing. PMID:27160559

  17. Sick leave in Sweden before and after total joint replacement in hip and knee osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Stigmar, Kjerstin; Dahlberg, Leif E; Zhou, Caddie; Jacobson Lidgren, Helena; Petersson, Ingemar F; Englund, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Little is know about patterns of sick leave in connection with total hip and knee joint replacement (THR and TKR) in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Patients and methods Using registers from southern Sweden, we identified hip and knee OA patients aged 40–59 years who had a THR or TKR in the period 2004–2012. Patients who died or started on disability pension were excluded. We included 1,307 patients with THR (46% women) and 996 patients with TKR (56% women). For the period 1 year before until 2 years after the surgery, we linked individual-level data on sick leave from the Swedish Social Insurance Agency. We created a matched reference cohort from the general population by age, birth year, and area of residence (THR: n = 4,604; TKR: n = 3,425). The mean number of days on sick leave and the proportion (%) on sick leave 12 and 24 months before and after surgery were calculated. Results The month after surgery, about 90% of patients in both cohorts were on sick leave. At the two-year follow-up, sick leave was lower for both cohorts than 1 year before surgery, except for men with THR, but about 9% of the THR patients and 12–17% of the TKR patients were still sick-listed. In the matched reference cohorts, sick leave was constant at around 4–7% during the entire study period. Interpretation A long period of sick leave is common after total joint replacement, especially after TKR. There is a need for better knowledge on how workplace adjustments and rehabilitation can facilitate the return to work and can postpone surgery. PMID:27996342

  18. THA following deformities due to congenital dislocation of the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Macheras, George A; Koutsostathis, Stefanos D; Lepetsos, Panagiotis; Anastasopoulos, Panagiotis P; Galanakos, Spyridon; Papadakis, Stamatios A

    2014-10-02

    Total hip replacement is the treatment of choice for the patient suffering from end-stage hip osteoarthritis. Excellent long-term results have been published. In the presence of deformities due to congenital hip dislocation, total hip replacement is, in most of the cases, a difficult task, since the technique of performing such an operation is demanding and the results could vary. This paper presents our experience and preferred strategies focusing on challenges and surgical techniques associated with reconstructing the dysplastic hip.

  19. Transcriptome-Wide High-Density Microarray Analysis Reveals Differential Gene Transcription in Periprosthetic Tissue From Hips With Chronic Periprosthetic Joint Infection vs Aseptic Loosening.

    PubMed

    Omar, Mohamed; Klawonn, Frank; Brand, Stephan; Stiesch, Meike; Krettek, Christian; Eberhard, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Differentiating between periprosthetic hip infection and aseptic hip prosthesis loosening can be challenging, especially in patients with chronic infections. This study used whole-genome microarray analysis to investigate the transcriptomes of periprosthetic hip tissues to identify genes that are differentially transcripted between chronic periprosthetic hip infection and aseptic hip prosthesis loosening. In this pilot study, a total of 24 patients with either chronic periprosthetic hip infection (n = 12) or aseptic hip prosthesis loosening (n = 12) were analyzed. Periprosthetic hip infection was diagnosed based on modified criteria of the Musculoskeletal Infection Society. To evaluate differences in gene transcription, whole-genome microarray analysis was performed on the mRNA of periprosthetic tissue. Microarray analysis revealed differential gene transcription in periprosthetic hip tissue affected by chronic hip infection vs aseptic hip prosthesis loosening. A total of 39 genes had area under the curve values greater than 0.9 for diagnosing chronic periprosthetic hip infection; 5 genes had annotations relevant to infection and metabolism. The 39 genes also included 7 genes that were differentially transcribed but that have no apparent connection to immune response processes plus 27 genes with unknown function. Differences in gene transcription profiles might represent novel diagnostic targets that can be used to differentiate between chronic periprosthetic hip infections and aseptic hip prosthesis loosening. Secondary metabolites of differentially transcripted genes might serve as easily accessible markers for detecting chronic periprosthetic joint infection in future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The effectiveness of massage in therapy for obturator nerve dysfunction as complication of hip joint alloplasty-case report.

    PubMed

    Kassolik, Krzysztof; Kurpas, Donata; Wilk, Iwona; Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Hyży, Jacek; Andrzejewski, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of our case presentation was to reveal effectiveness of medical massage in the therapy for obturator nerve dysfunction as a complication of hip joint alloplasty. Medical massage was carried out in a 58-year-old man after hip joint alloplasty. The aim was to normalize tension of muscle-ligament-fascia apparatus within pelvic girdle and reconstruct correct structural conditions in the course of obturator nerve. The methodology included correct positioning and medical massage with individually designed procedures. Full normalization of muscular tone and subsidence of pain complaints were obtained. Massage has a positive influence on subsidence of pain complaints; however, effectiveness of the procedure depends on an appropriate methodology. The presented massage procedure is an effective therapy in obturator nerve dysfunction as complication after alloplasty and it can be one of elements of complex improvement after surgical joint procedures within the scope of nursing rehabilitation. © 2013 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  1. Clinical experience with a new hip-knee-ankle-foot orthotic system using a medial single hip joint for paraplegic standing and walking.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, E; Suzuki, T; Sonoda, S; Fujitani, J; Tomita, Y; Chino, N

    1996-01-01

    The Walkabout is a new hip-knee-ankle-foot orthotic (HKAFO) system with a medial single hip joint (MSH-KAFO) invented by S. McKay in 1992. Compared with other HKAFO systems, the hip joint part is compact and removable, so it has distinguishable, real merits: ease in donning and doffing the device, compatibility with a wheelchair, and cosmesis. We clinically tested five patients, paraplegic because of spinal cord injury, using the MSH-KAFO system. All were males, aged 26-36 yr old. Their functional levels were L-1 (2 cases), T-10 (2 cases), and T-5 (1 case). All patients could stand stably without crutches and walk in parallel bars immediately the first time they wore the braces. After a few hours of crutch-walking exercises, all could walk independently with Lofstrand crutches. Their walking velocities ranged from 10 to 37.5 (mean, 19.9) m/min at the follow-up points (mean, 7.1 mo). With four cases, we measured oxygen uptake for predictions of energy consumption. At comfortable walking, predicted energy consumptions were from 1.31 to 3.89 (mean, 2.75) METs. Compared with the data in literature, these seemed to be at the same level with normal walking and lower than the KAFOs walking level. Our results suggest that MSH-KAFO is a very convenient standing and walking device for paraplegics and is compatible with wheelchair use.

  2. Evaluation of silicon nitride as a wear resistant and resorbable alternative for total hip joint replacement

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Johanna; Grehk, T. Mikael; Berlind, Torun; Persson, Cecilia; Jacobson, Staffan; Engqvist, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    Many of the failures of total joint replacements are related to tribology, i.e., wear of the cup, head and liner. Accumulation of wear particles at the implants can be linked to osteolysis which leads to bone loss and in the end aseptic implant loosening. Therefore it is highly desirable to reduce the generation of wear particles from the implant surfaces. Silicon nitride (Si3N4) has shown to be biocompatible and have a low wear rate when sliding against itself and is therefore a good candidate as a hip joint material. Furthermore, wear particles of Si3N4 are predicted to slowly dissolve in polar liquids and they therefore have the potential to be resorbed in vivo, potentially reducing the risk for aseptic loosening. In this study, it was shown that α-Si3N4-powder dissolves in PBS. Adsorption of blood plasma indicated a good acceptance of Si3N4 in the body with relatively low immune response. Si3N4 sliding against Si3N4 showed low wear rates both in bovine serum and PBS compared with the other tested wear couples. Tribofilms were built up on the Si3N4 surfaces both in PBS and in bovine serum, controlling the friction and wear characteristics. PMID:23507807

  3. Nuclear microbeam analysis of wear particles in tissue surrounding failed hip joint implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grime, G. W.; Triffitt, J. T.; Williamson, M. C.; Athanasou, N. A.

    1994-05-01

    Particulate wear debris from hip joint replacements is an important factor in determining the response of the surrounding tissue to the implants. Failed replacement joints are surrounded by a layer of fibrous tissue showing an inflammatory response to the wear debris. This reaction leads to bone resorption and the eventual failure of the prosthesis. In preliminary experiments the Oxford scanning proton microprobe has been used to study the composition of wear particles in the membranes surrounding failed implants constructed from Ti/V/Al alloy. The membranes were observed to contain 1-10 μm particles with major constituents from the alloy and also from the cement and polyethylene used in the fitting and construction of the implant. Histological staining shows that these particles are associated with areas of high macrophage activity. Individual PIXE analysis of the metal particles indicates that two populations (high Ti/low Al and low Ti/high Al) may be present. These observations will provide further information on the mechanisms of implant degradation.

  4. Movement-Pattern Training to Improve Function in People With Chronic Hip Joint Pain: A Feasibility Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Harris-Hayes, Marcie; Czuppon, Sylvia; Van Dillen, Linda R; Steger-May, Karen; Sahrmann, Shirley; Schootman, Mario; Salsich, Gretchen B; Clohisy, John C; Mueller, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Feasibility randomized clinical trial. Background Rehabilitation may be an appropriate treatment strategy for patients with chronic hip joint pain; however, the evidence related to the effectiveness of rehabilitation is limited. Objectives To assess feasibility of performing a randomized clinical trial to investigate the effectiveness of movement-pattern training (MPT) to improve function in people with chronic hip joint pain. Methods Thirty-five patients with chronic hip joint pain were randomized into a treatment (MPT) group or a control (wait-list) group. The MPT program included 6 one-hour supervised sessions and incorporated (1) task-specific training for basic functional tasks and symptom-provoking tasks, and (2) strengthening of hip musculature. The wait-list group received no treatment. Primary outcomes for feasibility were patient retention and adherence. Secondary outcomes to assess treatment effects were patient-reported function (Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score), lower extremity kinematics, and hip muscle strength. Results Retention rates did not differ between the MPT (89%) and wait-list groups (94%, P = 1.0). Sixteen of the 18 patients (89%) in the MPT group attended at least 80% of the treatment sessions. For the home exercise program, 89% of patients reported performing their home program at least once per day. Secondary outcomes support the rationale for conduct of a superiority randomized clinical trial. Conclusion Based on retention and adherence rates, a larger randomized clinical trial appears feasible and warranted to assess treatment effects more precisely. Data from this feasibility study will inform our future clinical trial. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 2b-. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(6):452-461. Epub 26 Apr 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6279.

  5. Treatment efficacy of etanercept and MTX combination therapy for ankylosing spondylitis hip joint lesion in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Lian, Fan; Yang, Xiuyan; Liang, Liuqin; Xu, Hanshi; Zhan, Zhongping; Qiu, Qian; Ye, Yujin

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the efficacy of etanercept and MTX (methotrexate) combination therapy in Chinese patients with ankylosing spondylitis hip joint lesion, the possible courses and maintenance protocol, altogether 97 ankylosing spondylitis patients fulfilling the modified New York criteria with hip joint lesion were enrolled in a 12-month trial treated with combined etanercept and MTX. All these patients were required to be poor responders to SSZ (Sulfasalazine) or MTX therapy for 6 consecutive months or the longer. Etanercept was administered subcutaneously twice a week at a fixed dosage of 25 mg for the first six months, followed by 25 mg once a week in patients with good control of both symptoms and radiological progression, or twice a week for another six months in patients with BASDAI > or = 4. Combined MTX was administered intravenously once a week at the dosage of 15 mg. Demographics, clinical and laboratory features, physical function and quality of life using the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Harris hip score, and radiological assessment using the BASRI-hip index were recorded. Most patients achieved pain release at the end point of assessment. Significant improvement in Bath AS Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) (P < 0.05), Bath AS Functional Activity Index (BASFI) (P < 0.05), and Harris hip score (P < 0.05) was demonstrated. Radiographic progression was recorded as no exacerbation or alleviated. Larger interval between two etanercept administrations would provide similar advantages to standard method and possibly less adverse events if MTX was combined. Etanercept and MTX combination therapy was beneficial to ankylosing spondylitis patients with hip joint lesion, and staged dosage deduction in the long term proved to be effective as well as adverse event preventing.

  6. Joint preservation after hip arthroscopy in patients with FAI. Prospective analysis with a minimum follow-up of seven years.

    PubMed

    Comba, Fernando; Yacuzzi, Carlos; Ali, Pablo J; Zanotti, Gerardo; Buttaro, Martin; Piccaluga, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical outcomes, radiological degenerative progression and the joint preservation rate in a series of patients with Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI) treated with hip arthroscopy at a minimum follow-up of 7 years. The predictive factors for total hip arthroplasty (THA) requirement were analyzed. Between February 2008 and February 2009, 42 consecutive patients treated with hip arthroscopy due to FAI syndrome were included. There were 15 women and 27 men with an average age of 38 years (range 23 to 56 years). The surgery involved joint damage stabilization (labral tears and/or chondrolabral injuries) and correction of associated bony deformities (cam and/or pincer lesions). A prospective clinical follow-up was made with no patient lost. We specifically addressed the need for THA. Predictive factors for THA were also analyzed. At final follow up, joint preservation rate was 83.33% (CI 95% 68,64%-93,03%). Probability of evolving to a THA in patients with radiographic preoperative Tonnis grades 0 and I was of 0% (CI 95%: 0-12.77). Probability of evolving to a THA in patients with preoperative Tonnis grades II and III was 46,67% (CI 95%21.27%-73,41%). A statistically significant difference was present between both groups (p= 0.002). Patients older than 45 years at the time of hip arthroscopy were at significant risk of evolving to a THA (p=0.0012). Excluding those patients who undergone a THA: modified HHS was 88.25 points (80-96) and radiographic analysis addressed a 14,29% (IC95% 4,81%-30,26%) of progressive degenerative changes without affecting clinical results. Hip arthroscopy for the treatment of patients with FAI syndrome showed favorable results regarding joint preservation. Patients with preoperative radiographic evidence of advanced-stage osteoarthritis and those older than 45 years at the time of surgery have higher risk of requiring THA. IV.

  7. Trends in revision hip and knee arthroplasty observations after implementation of a regional joint replacement registry

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jas; Politis, Angelos; Loucks, Lynda; Hedden, David R.; Bohm, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Background National joint replacement registries outside North America have been effective in reducing revision risk. However, there is little information on the role of smaller regional registries similar to those found in Canada or the United States. We sought to understand trends in total hip (THA) and knee (TKA) arthroplasty revision patterns after implementation of a regional registry. Methods We reviewed our regional joint replacement registry containing all 30 252 cases of primary and revision THA and TKA performed between Jan. 1, 2005, and Dec. 31, 2013. Each revision case was stratified into early (< 2 yr), mid (2–10 yr) or late (> 10 yr), and we determined the primary reason for revision. Results The early revision rate for TKA dropped from 3.0% in 2005 to 1.3% in 2011 (R2 = 0.84, p = 0.003). Similarly, the early revision rate for THA dropped from 4.2% to 2.1% (R2 = 0.78, p = 0.008). Despite primary TKA and THA volumes increasing by 35.5% and 39.5%, respectively, there was no concomitant rise in revision volumes. The leading reasons for TKA revision were infection, instability, aseptic loosening and stiffness. The leading reasons for THA revision were infection, instability, aseptic loosening and periprosthetic fracture. There were no discernible trends over time in reasons for early, mid-term or late revision for either TKA or THA. Conclusion After implementation of a regional joint replacement registry we observed a significant reduction in early revision rates. Further work investigating the mechanism by which registry reporting reduces early revision risk is warranted. PMID:27438053

  8. Design and simulation of a cable-pulley-based transmission for artificial ankle joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huaxin; Ceccarelli, Marco; Huang, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a mechanical transmission based on cable pulley is proposed for human-like actuation in the artificial ankle joints of human-scale. The anatomy articular characteristics of the human ankle is discussed for proper biomimetic inspiration in designing an accurate, efficient, and robust motion control of artificial ankle joint devices. The design procedure is presented through the inclusion of conceptual considerations and design details for an interactive solution of the transmission system. A mechanical design is elaborated for the ankle joint angular with pitch motion. A multi-body dynamic simulation model is elaborated accordingly and evaluated numerically in the ADAMS environment. Results of the numerical simulations are discussed to evaluate the dynamic performance of the proposed design solution and to investigate the feasibility of the proposed design in future applications for humanoid robots.

  9. Meaningful changes for the Oxford hip and knee scores after joint replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Beard, David J; Harris, Kristina; Dawson, Jill; Doll, Helen; Murray, David W; Carr, Andrew J; Price, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    To present estimates of clinically meaningful or minimal important changes for the Oxford Hip Score (OHS) and the Oxford Knee Score (OKS) after joint replacement surgery. Secondary data analysis of the NHS patient-reported outcome measures data set that included 82,415 patients listed for hip replacement surgery and 94,015 patients listed for knee replacement surgery was performed. Anchor-based methods revealed that meaningful change indices at the group level [minimal important change (MIC)], for example in cohort studies, were ∼ 11 points for the OHS and ∼ 9 points for the OKS. For assessment of individual patients, receiver operating characteristic analysis produced MICs of 8 and 7 points for OHS and OKS, respectively. Additionally, the between group minimal important difference (MID), which allows the estimation of a clinically relevant difference in change scores from baseline when comparing two groups, that is, for clinical trials, was estimated to be ∼ 5 points for both the OKS and the OHS. The distribution-based minimal detectable change (MDC90) estimates for the OKS and OHS were 4 and 5 points, respectively. This study has produced and discussed estimates of minimal important change/difference for the OKS/OHS. These estimates should be used in the power calculations and the interpretation of studies using the OKS and OHS. The MDC90 (∼ 4 points OKS and ∼ 5 points OHS) represents the smallest possible detectable change for each of these instruments, thus indicating that any lower value would fall within measurement error. Copyright © 2015 University of Oxford. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Meaningful changes for the Oxford hip and knee scores after joint replacement surgery

    PubMed Central

    Beard, David J.; Harris, Kristina; Dawson, Jill; Doll, Helen; Murray, David W.; Carr, Andrew J.; Price, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To present estimates of clinically meaningful or minimal important changes for the Oxford Hip Score (OHS) and the Oxford Knee Score (OKS) after joint replacement surgery. Study Design and Setting Secondary data analysis of the NHS patient-reported outcome measures data set that included 82,415 patients listed for hip replacement surgery and 94,015 patients listed for knee replacement surgery was performed. Results Anchor-based methods revealed that meaningful change indices at the group level [minimal important change (MIC)], for example in cohort studies, were ∼11 points for the OHS and ∼9 points for the OKS. For assessment of individual patients, receiver operating characteristic analysis produced MICs of 8 and 7 points for OHS and OKS, respectively. Additionally, the between group minimal important difference (MID), which allows the estimation of a clinically relevant difference in change scores from baseline when comparing two groups, that is, for clinical trials, was estimated to be ∼5 points for both the OKS and the OHS. The distribution-based minimal detectable change (MDC90) estimates for the OKS and OHS were 4 and 5 points, respectively. Conclusion This study has produced and discussed estimates of minimal important change/difference for the OKS/OHS. These estimates should be used in the power calculations and the interpretation of studies using the OKS and OHS. The MDC90 (∼4 points OKS and ∼5 points OHS) represents the smallest possible detectable change for each of these instruments, thus indicating that any lower value would fall within measurement error. PMID:25441700

  11. The biomaterials challenge: A comparison of polyethylene wear using a hip joint simulator.

    PubMed

    Affatato, Saverio; Freccero, Nadia; Taddei, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Although hip arthroplasty is an established procedure that relieves pain and improves functions, problems remain with wear and osteolysis. Highly cross-linked polyethylene and Vitamin-E-stabilized polyethylene were introduced in the last years to solve these problems. In this study we compared the in vitro wear behaviour of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) versus Vitamin-E diffused XLPE (XLPE_VE) versus conventional ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) acetabular cups. The test was performed using a hip joint simulator run for two millions cycles under bovine calf serum as lubricant. Mass loss was found to decrease along the series UHMWPE>XLPE_VE>XLPE, although statistically significant differences were found only between the mass losses of XLPE and UHMWPE at 1.2 and 2 million cycles. The mass loss data were explained in relation to the crystalline morphology of the control unworn cups, as investigated by non-destructive micro-Raman spectroscopy. This technique allowed to disclose a different wear behaviour of the three sets of cups. Wear testing produced a stress-induced crystallisation in UHMWPE, with increases in both amorphous (αa) and orthorhombic (αo) phases at the expense of the third phase (αb), which decreased upon wear. Moreover, the all-trans content decreased, while the ortho-trans content increased, contrarily to the trend observed for XLPE and XLPE_VE, for which no statistically significant changes in αo, αa and αb contents were detected. The XLPE_VE specimens underwent the least significant changes in the spectroscopic markers of micromorphology upon mechanical stress, probably due to their lower starting amorphous content.

  12. Isolation and Characterization of Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cell Derived from Hip Joints: A Comparative Analysis with a Matched Control Knee Group

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Akihisa; Utsunomiya, Hajime; Tsukamoto, Manabu; Nakashima, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Eiichiro; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Sekiya, Ichiro; Sakai, Akinori

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the characteristics of MSCs from hip and compare them to MSCs from knee. Methods. Synovial tissues were obtained from both the knee and the hip joints in 8 patients who underwent both hip and knee arthroscopies on the same day. MSCs were isolated from the knee and hip synovial samples. The capacities of MSCs were compared between both groups. Results. The number of cells per unit weight at passage 0 of synovium from the knee was significantly higher than that from the hip (P < 0.05). While it was possible to observe the growth of colonies in all the knee synovial fluid samples, it was impossible to culture cells from any of the hip samples. In adipogenesis experiments, the frequency of Oil Red-O-positive colonies and the gene expression of adipsin were significantly higher in knee than in hip. In osteogenesis experiments, the expression of COL1A1 and ALPP was significantly less in the knee synovium than in the hip synovium. Conclusions. MSCs obtained from hip joint have self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials. However, in matched donors, adipogenesis and osteogenesis potentials of MSCs from the knees are superior to those from the hips. Knee synovium may be a better source of MSC for potential use in hip diseases. PMID:28115945

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cell Derived from Hip Joints: A Comparative Analysis with a Matched Control Knee Group.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Akihisa; Uchida, Soshi; Utsunomiya, Hajime; Tsukamoto, Manabu; Nakashima, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Eiichiro; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Sekiya, Ichiro; Sakai, Akinori

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the characteristics of MSCs from hip and compare them to MSCs from knee. Methods. Synovial tissues were obtained from both the knee and the hip joints in 8 patients who underwent both hip and knee arthroscopies on the same day. MSCs were isolated from the knee and hip synovial samples. The capacities of MSCs were compared between both groups. Results. The number of cells per unit weight at passage 0 of synovium from the knee was significantly higher than that from the hip (P < 0.05). While it was possible to observe the growth of colonies in all the knee synovial fluid samples, it was impossible to culture cells from any of the hip samples. In adipogenesis experiments, the frequency of Oil Red-O-positive colonies and the gene expression of adipsin were significantly higher in knee than in hip. In osteogenesis experiments, the expression of COL1A1 and ALPP was significantly less in the knee synovium than in the hip synovium. Conclusions. MSCs obtained from hip joint have self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials. However, in matched donors, adipogenesis and osteogenesis potentials of MSCs from the knees are superior to those from the hips. Knee synovium may be a better source of MSC for potential use in hip diseases.

  14. Novel Highly Porous Metal Technology in Artificial Hip and Knee Replacement: Processing Methodologies and Clinical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muth, John; Poggie, Matthew; Kulesha, Gene; Michael Meneghini, R.

    2013-02-01

    Hip and knee replacement can dramatically improve a patient's quality of life through pain relief and restored function. Fixation of hip and knee replacement implants to bone is critical to the success of the procedure. A variety of roughened surfaces and three-dimensional porous surfaces have been used to enhance biological fixation on orthopedic implants. Recently, highly porous metals have emerged as versatile biomaterials that may enhance fixation to bone and are suitable to a number of applications in hip and knee replacement surgery. This article provides an overview of several processes used to create these implant surfaces.

  15. A computer-aided tracking and motion analysis with ultrasound (CAT & MAUS) system for the description of hip joint kinematics.

    PubMed

    Jia, Rui; Mellon, Stephen; Monk, Paul; Murray, David; Noble, J Alison

    2016-11-01

    Investigation of joint kinematics contributes to developing a better understanding of musculoskeletal conditions. However, the most commonly used optoelectronic motion analysis systems cannot determine the movements of underlying bone landmarks with high accuracy because of soft tissue artefacts. The aim of this paper was to present a computer-aided measurement system to track the underlying bone anatomy in a 3D global coordinate frame and describe hip joint kinematics of ten healthy volunteers during gait. We have developed a measurement tool with an image-based computer-aided post-processing pipeline for automatic bone segmentation in ultrasound (US) images and a globally optimal 3D surface-to-surface registration method to quantify hip joint movements. The segmentation algorithm exploits US intensity profiles, including information about the integrated backscattering, acoustic shadows, and local phase features. A global optimization method is applied based on the traditional iterative closest point registration algorithm, which is robust to initialization. The International Society of Biomechanics recommended joint kinematics descriptor has been adapted to calculate the joint kinematics. The developed system prototype has been validated with a ball-joint femoral phantom and tested in vivo with 10 volunteers. The maximum Euclidean distance error of the automatic bone segmentation is less than 2 pixels (approximately 0.2 mm). The maximum absolute rotation angle error is less than [Formula: see text]. This computer-aided tracking and motion analysis with ultrasound (CAT & MAUS) system shows the feasibility of describing hip joint kinematics for clinical investigation and diagnosis using an image-based solution.

  16. Periprosthetic bone loss in total hip arthroplasty. Polyethylene wear debris and the concept of the effective joint space.

    PubMed

    Schmalzried, T P; Jasty, M; Harris, W H

    1992-07-01

    Thirty-four hips in which there had been prosthetic replacement were selected for study because of the presence of linear (diffuse) or lytic (localized) areas of periprosthetic bone loss. In all hips, there was careful documentation of the anatomical location of the material that had been obtained for histological analysis, and the specific purpose of the removal of the tissue was for examination to determine the cause of the resorption of bone. Specimens from twenty-three hips were retrieved during an operation and from eleven hips, at autopsy. The area of bone loss was linear only in sixteen hips, lytic only in thirteen, and both linear and lytic in five. In all thirty-four hips, intracellular particulate debris was found in the macrophages that were present in the area of bone resorption. All thirty-four had intracellular particles of polyethylene, many of which were less than one micrometer in size. Thirty-one hips had extracellular particles of polyethylene as well. Twenty-two of the thirty-four hips had intracellular metallic debris; in ten, metallic debris was found extracellularly as well. Ten of the sixteen cemented specimens had intracellular and extracellular polymethylmethacrylate debris. In the mechanically stable prostheses--cemented and uncemented--polyethylene wear debris was identified in areas of bone resorption far from the articular surfaces. The number of macrophages in a microscopic field was directly related to the amount of particulate polyethylene debris that was visible by light microscopy. Although the gross radiographic appearances of linear bone loss and lytic bone loss were different, the histological appearance of the regions in which there was active bone resorption was similar. Regardless of the radiographic appearance and anatomical origin of the specimen, bone resorption was found to occur in association with macrophages that were laden with polyethylene debris. In general, the number of macrophages present had a direct

  17. Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a problem with the way a baby's hip joint forms before, during, or after birth — causing an unstable hip. In severe cases, the hip joint can dislocate or cause trouble walking. Mild cases ...

  18. Transient Synovitis of the Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation and swelling of the tissues around the hip joint. Usually only one hip is affected. This condition ... to reduce the swelling and inflammation around the hip joint.Your child's doctor will probably ask you to ...

  19. Serum levels of BMP-2, 4, 7 and AHSG in patients with degenerative joint disease requiring total arthroplasty of the hip and temporomandibular joints.

    PubMed

    Albilia, Jonathan B; Tenenbaum, Howard C; Clokie, Cameron M L; Walt, David R; Baker, Gerald I; Psutka, David J; Backstein, David; Peel, Sean A F

    2013-01-01

    To date, there is no objective or reliable means of assessing the severity of degenerative joint disease (DJD) and need for joint replacement surgery. Hence, it is difficult to know when an individual with DJD has reached a point where total arthroplasty is indicated. The purpose of the present study is to determine whether serum levels of Alpha-2 HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) as well as bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP-2, 4, 7) can be used to predict the presence of severe DJD of the hip and/or temporomandibular joint (TMJ) (specifically: joints that require replacement). A total of 30 patients scheduled for arthroplasty (diseased) (15 HIP, 15 TMJ) and 120 age-matched controls (healthy/non-diseased) were included. Blood samples were collected from all patients ≥8 weeks after the last arthroplasty. Concentrations of serum analytes were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and these were compared between the Diseased and Healthy groups, utilizing the Mann-Whitney U-test. Patients with disease had significantly higher levels of BMP-2 and BMP-4 and lower levels of AHSG in serum compared to non-diseased humans (p < 0.01). Higher levels of BMP-2, 4 and reduced levels of AHSG appear to characterize patients who have DJD that is severe enough to require total joint replacement. Perhaps measurements of these proteins can be used to make objective decisions regarding the need for total arthroplasty as opposed to the current subjective approaches.

  20. Hip and knee joints are more stabilized than driven during the stance phase of gait: an analysis of the 3D angle between joint moment and joint angular velocity.

    PubMed

    Dumas, R; Cheze, L

    2008-08-01

    Joint power is commonly used in orthopaedics, ergonomics or sports analysis but its clinical interpretation remains controversial. Some basic principles on muscle actions and energy transfer have been proposed in 2D. The decomposition of power on 3 axes, although questionable, allows the same analysis in 3D. However, these basic principles have been widely criticized, mainly because bi-articular muscles must be considered. This requires a more complex computation in order to determine how the individual muscle force contributes to drive the joint. Conversely, with simple 3D inverse dynamics, the analysis of both joint moment and angular velocity directions is essential to clarify when the joint moment can contribute or not to drive the joint. The present study evaluates the 3D angle between the joint moment and the joint angular velocity and investigates when the hip, knee and ankle joints are predominantly driven (angle close to 0 degrees and 180 degrees ) or stabilized (angle close to 90 degrees ) during gait. The 3D angle curves show that the three joints are never fully but only partially driven and that the hip and knee joints are mainly stabilized during the stance phase. The notion of stabilization should be further investigated, especially for subjects with motion disorders or prostheses.