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Sample records for artificial immune system

  1. Artificial Immune System Approaches for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    KrishnaKumar, Kalmanje; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Artificial Immune Systems (AIS) combine a priori knowledge with the adapting capabilities of biological immune system to provide a powerful alternative to currently available techniques for pattern recognition, modeling, design, and control. Immunology is the science of built-in defense mechanisms that are present in all living beings to protect against external attacks. A biological immune system can be thought of as a robust, adaptive system that is capable of dealing with an enormous variety of disturbances and uncertainties. Biological immune systems use a finite number of discrete "building blocks" to achieve this adaptiveness. These building blocks can be thought of as pieces of a puzzle which must be put together in a specific way-to neutralize, remove, or destroy each unique disturbance the system encounters. In this paper, we outline AIS models that are immediately applicable to aerospace problems and identify application areas that need further investigation.

  2. Artificial Immune System for Recognizing Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, Terrance

    2005-01-01

    A method of recognizing or classifying patterns is based on an artificial immune system (AIS), which includes an algorithm and a computational model of nonlinear dynamics inspired by the behavior of a biological immune system. The method has been proposed as the theoretical basis of the computational portion of a star-tracking system aboard a spacecraft. In that system, a newly acquired star image would be treated as an antigen that would be matched by an appropriate antibody (an entry in a star catalog). The method would enable rapid convergence, would afford robustness in the face of noise in the star sensors, would enable recognition of star images acquired in any sensor or spacecraft orientation, and would not make an excessive demand on the computational resources of a typical spacecraft. Going beyond the star-tracking application, the AIS-based pattern-recognition method is potentially applicable to pattern- recognition and -classification processes for diverse purposes -- for example, reconnaissance, detecting intruders, and mining data.

  3. Clonal Selection Based Artificial Immune System for Generalized Pattern Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, Terry

    2011-01-01

    The last two decades has seen a rapid increase in the application of AIS (Artificial Immune Systems) modeled after the human immune system to a wide range of areas including network intrusion detection, job shop scheduling, classification, pattern recognition, and robot control. JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) has developed an integrated pattern recognition/classification system called AISLE (Artificial Immune System for Learning and Exploration) based on biologically inspired models of B-cell dynamics in the immune system. When used for unsupervised or supervised classification, the method scales linearly with the number of dimensions, has performance that is relatively independent of the total size of the dataset, and has been shown to perform as well as traditional clustering methods. When used for pattern recognition, the method efficiently isolates the appropriate matches in the data set. The paper presents the underlying structure of AISLE and the results from a number of experimental studies.

  4. Network intrusion detection by the coevolutionary immune algorithm of artificial immune systems with clonal selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamatova, T.; Zhukov, V.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents the application of the artificial immune systems apparatus as a heuristic method of network intrusion detection for algorithmic provision of intrusion detection systems. The coevolutionary immune algorithm of artificial immune systems with clonal selection was elaborated. In testing different datasets the empirical results of evaluation of the algorithm effectiveness were achieved. To identify the degree of efficiency the algorithm was compared with analogs. The fundamental rules based of solutions generated by this algorithm are described in the article.

  5. Artificial immune system approach for air combat maneuvering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneshige, John; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje

    2007-04-01

    Since future air combat missions will involve both manned and unmanned aircraft, the primary motivation for this research is to enable unmanned aircraft with intelligent maneuvering capabilities. During air combat maneuvering, pilots use their knowledge and experience of maneuvering strategies and tactics to determine the best course of action. As a result, we try to capture these aspects using an artificial immune system approach. The biological immune system protects the body against intruders by recognizing and destroying harmful cells or molecules. It can be thought of as a robust adaptive system that is capable of dealing with an enormous variety of disturbances and uncertainties. However, another critical aspect of the immune system is that it can remember how previous encounters were successfully defeated. As a result, it can respond faster to similar encounters in the future. This paper describes how an artificial immune system is used to select and construct air combat maneuvers. These maneuvers are composed of autopilot mode and target commands, which represent the low-level building blocks of the parameterized system. The resulting command sequences are sent to a tactical autopilot system, which has been enhanced with additional modes and an aggressiveness factor for enabling high performance maneuvers. Just as vaccinations train the biological immune system how to combat intruders, training sets are used to teach the maneuvering system how to respond to different enemy aircraft situations. Simulation results are presented, which demonstrate the potential of using immunized maneuver selection for the purposes of air combat maneuvering.

  6. Vaccine-enhanced artificial immune system for multimodal function optimization.

    PubMed

    Woldemariam, Kumlachew M; Yen, Gary G

    2010-02-01

    This paper emulates a biological notion in vaccines to promote exploration in the search space for solving multimodal function optimization problems using artificial immune systems (AISs). In this method, we first divide the decision space into equal subspaces. The vaccine is then randomly extracted from each subspace. A few of these vaccines, in the form of weakened antigens, are then injected into the algorithm to enhance the exploration of global and local optima. The goal of this process is to lead the antibodies to unexplored areas. Using this biologically motivated notion, we design the vaccine-enhanced AIS for multimodal function optimization, achieving promising performance.

  7. Simulation of HIV infection in artificial immune systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieburg, Hans B.; McCutchan, J. Allen; Clay, Oliver K.; Cabalerro, Lisa; Ostlund, James J.

    1990-09-01

    Infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes a multi-faceted disease process which ultimately leads to severe degenerative conditions in the immune and nervous systems. The complexity of the virus/host-system interaction has brought into sharp focus the need for alternative efforts by which to overcome the limitations of available animal models. This article reports on the dynamics of HIV infection in an artificial immune system (AIS), a novel in silico tool for bio-medical research. Using a method of graphical programming, the HIV/AIS interactions are described at the cellular level and then transferred into the setting of an asynchronous cellular automaton simulation. A specific problem in HIV pathogenesis is addressed: To determine the extent by which the physiological connectivity of a normal B-cell, T-cell, macrophage immune system supports persistence of infection and disease progression to AIDS. Several observations are discussed which will be presented in four categories: (a) the major known manifestations of HIV infection and AIDS; (b) the predictability of latency and sudden progression to disease; (c) the predictability of HIV-dependent alterations of cytokine secretion patterns, and (d) secondary infections, which are found to be a critical element in establishing and maintaining a progressive disease dynamics. The effects of exogenously applied cytokine Interleukin 2 are considered. All results are summarized in a phase-graph model of the global HIV/AIS dynamical system.

  8. Evolution of immune systems from self/not self to danger to artificial immune systems (AIS).

    PubMed

    Cooper, Edwin L

    2010-03-01

    self/not self model. The review will end with certain perspectives on artificial immune systems new on the scene and the product of computational immunologists. The tentative view is to question if the immune systems of invertebrates might be amenable to such an analysis? This would offer more credence to the innate system, often pushed aside thus favoring the adaptive responses.

  9. Evolution of immune systems from self/not self to danger to artificial immune systems (AIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Edwin L.

    2010-03-01

    self/not self model. The review will end with certain perspectives on artificial immune systems new on the scene and the product of computational immunologists. The tentative view is to question if the immune systems of invertebrates might be amenable to such an analysis? This would offer more credence to the innate system, often pushed aside thus favoring the adaptive responses.

  10. A Survey of Artificial Immune System Based Intrusion Detection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Hu, Xinlei; Wang, Feng; Zou, Yang

    2014-01-01

    In the area of computer security, Intrusion Detection (ID) is a mechanism that attempts to discover abnormal access to computers by analyzing various interactions. There is a lot of literature about ID, but this study only surveys the approaches based on Artificial Immune System (AIS). The use of AIS in ID is an appealing concept in current techniques. This paper summarizes AIS based ID methods from a new view point; moreover, a framework is proposed for the design of AIS based ID Systems (IDSs). This framework is analyzed and discussed based on three core aspects: antibody/antigen encoding, generation algorithm, and evolution mode. Then we collate the commonly used algorithms, their implementation characteristics, and the development of IDSs into this framework. Finally, some of the future challenges in this area are also highlighted. PMID:24790549

  11. Security framework for networked storage system based on artificial immune system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianzhong; Xie, Changsheng; Zhang, Chengfeng; Zhan, Ling

    2007-11-01

    This paper proposed a theoretical framework for the networked storage system addressing the storage security. The immune system is an adaptive learning system, which can recognize, classify and eliminate 'non-self' such as foreign pathogens. Thus, we introduced the artificial immune technique to the storage security research, and proposed a full theoretical framework for storage security system. Under this framework, it is possible to carry out the quantitative evaluation for the storage security system using modeling language of artificial immune system (AIS), and the evaluation can offer security consideration for the deployment of networked storage system. Meanwhile, it is potential to obtain the active defense technique suitable for networked storage system via exploring the principle of AIS and achieve a highly secure storage system with immune characteristic.

  12. Artificial Immune System for Flight Envelope Estimation and Protection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-31

    consists of two equally important components: the innate system and the adaptive system1. The former is an inherited system that functions as the... innate immune system is always active and responds immediately to any class of pathogen without distinction. On the other hand, the adaptive immune...are macrophages (MΦs), dendritic cells (DCs), T-cells, and B-cells. The MΦ and DC populations form what is known as phagocytes (part of the innate

  13. An automated diagnosis system of liver disease using artificial immune and genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chunlin; Peng, Lingxi

    2013-04-01

    The rise of health care cost is one of the world's most important problems. Disease prediction is also a vibrant research area. Researchers have approached this problem using various techniques such as support vector machine, artificial neural network, etc. This study typically exploits the immune system's characteristics of learning and memory to solve the problem of liver disease diagnosis. The proposed system applies a combination of two methods of artificial immune and genetic algorithm to diagnose the liver disease. The system architecture is based on artificial immune system. The learning procedure of system adopts genetic algorithm to interfere the evolution of antibody population. The experiments use two benchmark datasets in our study, which are acquired from the famous UCI machine learning repository. The obtained diagnosis accuracies are very promising with regard to the other diagnosis system in the literatures. These results suggest that this system may be a useful automatic diagnosis tool for liver disease.

  14. Reinforcement learning based artificial immune classifier.

    PubMed

    Karakose, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    One of the widely used methods for classification that is a decision-making process is artificial immune systems. Artificial immune systems based on natural immunity system can be successfully applied for classification, optimization, recognition, and learning in real-world problems. In this study, a reinforcement learning based artificial immune classifier is proposed as a new approach. This approach uses reinforcement learning to find better antibody with immune operators. The proposed new approach has many contributions according to other methods in the literature such as effectiveness, less memory cell, high accuracy, speed, and data adaptability. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated by simulation and experimental results using real data in Matlab and FPGA. Some benchmark data and remote image data are used for experimental results. The comparative results with supervised/unsupervised based artificial immune system, negative selection classifier, and resource limited artificial immune classifier are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed new method.

  15. Reinforcement Learning Based Artificial Immune Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Karakose, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    One of the widely used methods for classification that is a decision-making process is artificial immune systems. Artificial immune systems based on natural immunity system can be successfully applied for classification, optimization, recognition, and learning in real-world problems. In this study, a reinforcement learning based artificial immune classifier is proposed as a new approach. This approach uses reinforcement learning to find better antibody with immune operators. The proposed new approach has many contributions according to other methods in the literature such as effectiveness, less memory cell, high accuracy, speed, and data adaptability. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated by simulation and experimental results using real data in Matlab and FPGA. Some benchmark data and remote image data are used for experimental results. The comparative results with supervised/unsupervised based artificial immune system, negative selection classifier, and resource limited artificial immune classifier are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed new method. PMID:23935424

  16. Geometric Distribution-Based Readers Scheduling Optimization Algorithm Using Artificial Immune System.

    PubMed

    Duan, Litian; Wang, Zizhong John; Duan, Fu

    2016-11-16

    In the multiple-reader environment (MRE) of radio frequency identification (RFID) system, multiple readers are often scheduled to interrogate the randomized tags via operating at different time slots or frequency channels to decrease the signal interferences. Based on this, a Geometric Distribution-based Multiple-reader Scheduling Optimization Algorithm using Artificial Immune System (GD-MRSOA-AIS) is proposed to fairly and optimally schedule the readers operating from the viewpoint of resource allocations. GD-MRSOA-AIS is composed of two parts, where a geometric distribution function combined with the fairness consideration is first introduced to generate the feasible scheduling schemes for reader operation. After that, artificial immune system (including immune clone, immune mutation and immune suppression) quickly optimize these feasible ones as the optimal scheduling scheme to ensure that readers are fairly operating with larger effective interrogation range and lower interferences. Compared with the state-of-the-art algorithm, the simulation results indicate that GD-MRSOA-AIS could efficiently schedules the multiple readers operating with a fairer resource allocation scheme, performing in larger effective interrogation range.

  17. Geometric Distribution-Based Readers Scheduling Optimization Algorithm Using Artificial Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Litian; Wang, Zizhong John; Duan, Fu

    2016-01-01

    In the multiple-reader environment (MRE) of radio frequency identification (RFID) system, multiple readers are often scheduled to interrogate the randomized tags via operating at different time slots or frequency channels to decrease the signal interferences. Based on this, a Geometric Distribution-based Multiple-reader Scheduling Optimization Algorithm using Artificial Immune System (GD-MRSOA-AIS) is proposed to fairly and optimally schedule the readers operating from the viewpoint of resource allocations. GD-MRSOA-AIS is composed of two parts, where a geometric distribution function combined with the fairness consideration is first introduced to generate the feasible scheduling schemes for reader operation. After that, artificial immune system (including immune clone, immune mutation and immune suppression) quickly optimize these feasible ones as the optimal scheduling scheme to ensure that readers are fairly operating with larger effective interrogation range and lower interferences. Compared with the state-of-the-art algorithm, the simulation results indicate that GD-MRSOA-AIS could efficiently schedules the multiple readers operating with a fairer resource allocation scheme, performing in larger effective interrogation range. PMID:27854342

  18. Artificial Immune System Approach for Airborne Vehicle Maneuvering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneshige, John T. (Inventor); Krishnakumar, Kalmanje S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method and system for control of a first aircraft relative to a second aircraft. A desired location and desired orientation are estimated for the first aircraft, relative to the second aircraft, at a subsequent time, t=t2, subsequent to the present time, t=t1, where the second aircraft continues its present velocity during a subsequent time interval, t1.ltoreq.t.ltoreq.t2, or takes evasive action. Action command sequences are examined, and an optimal sequence is chosen to bring the first aircraft to the desired location and desired orientation relative to the second aircraft at time t=t2. The method applies to control of combat aircraft and/or of aircraft in a congested airspace.

  19. Learning ensembles of neural networks by means of a Bayesian artificial immune system.

    PubMed

    Castro, Pablo A Dalbem; Von Zuben, Fernando José

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, we apply an immune-inspired approach to design ensembles of heterogeneous neural networks for classification problems. Our proposal, called Bayesian artificial immune system, is an estimation of distribution algorithm that replaces the traditional mutation and cloning operators with a probabilistic model, more specifically a Bayesian network, representing the joint distribution of promising solutions. Among the additional attributes provided by the Bayesian framework inserted into an immune-inspired search algorithm are the automatic control of the population size along the search and the inherent ability to promote and preserve diversity among the candidate solutions. Both are attributes generally absent from alternative estimation of distribution algorithms, and both were shown to be useful attributes when implementing the generation and selection of components of the ensemble, thus leading to high-performance classifiers. Several aspects of the design are illustrated in practical applications, including a comparative analysis with other attempts to synthesize ensembles.

  20. Artificial immune system via Euclidean Distance Minimization for anomaly detection in bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montechiesi, L.; Cocconcelli, M.; Rubini, R.

    2016-08-01

    In recent years new diagnostics methodologies have emerged, with particular interest into machinery operating in non-stationary conditions. In fact continuous speed changes and variable loads make non-trivial the spectrum analysis. A variable speed means a variable characteristic fault frequency related to the damage that is no more recognizable in the spectrum. To overcome this problem the scientific community proposed different approaches listed in two main categories: model-based approaches and expert systems. In this context the paper aims to present a simple expert system derived from the mechanisms of the immune system called Euclidean Distance Minimization, and its application in a real case of bearing faults recognition. The proposed method is a simplification of the original process, adapted by the class of Artificial Immune Systems, which proved to be useful and promising in different application fields. Comparative results are provided, with a complete explanation of the algorithm and its functioning aspects.

  1. AITSO: A Tool for Spatial Optimization Based on Artificial Immune Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiang; Liu, Yaolin; Liu, Dianfeng; Ma, Xiaoya

    2015-01-01

    A great challenge facing geocomputation and spatial analysis is spatial optimization, given that it involves various high-dimensional, nonlinear, and complicated relationships. Many efforts have been made with regard to this specific issue, and the strong ability of artificial immune system algorithms has been proven in previous studies. However, user-friendly professional software is still unavailable, which is a great impediment to the popularity of artificial immune systems. This paper describes a free, universal tool, named AITSO, which is capable of solving various optimization problems. It provides a series of standard application programming interfaces (APIs) which can (1) assist researchers in the development of their own problem-specific application plugins to solve practical problems and (2) allow the implementation of some advanced immune operators into the platform to improve the performance of an algorithm. As an integrated, flexible, and convenient tool, AITSO contributes to knowledge sharing and practical problem solving. It is therefore believed that it will advance the development and popularity of spatial optimization in geocomputation and spatial analysis. PMID:25678911

  2. Monitoring Immune System Function and Reactivation of Latent Viruses in the Artificial Gravity Pilot Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Satish K.; Crucian, Brian; Pierson, Duane L.; Sams, Clarence; Stowe, Raymond P.

    2007-01-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that dysregulation of the immune system occurs during or after spaceflight. Using 21 day -6 degrees head-down tilt bed rest as a spaceflight analog, this study describes the effects of artificial gravity (AG) as a daily countermeasure on immunity, stress and reactivation of clinically important latent herpes viruses. The specific aims were to evaluate psychological and physiological stress, to determine the status of the immune system, and to quantify reactivation of latent herpes viruses. Blood, saliva, and urine samples were collected from each participating subject at different times throughout the study. An immune assessment was performed on all treatment and control subjects that consisted of a comprehensive peripheral immunophenotype analysis, intracellular cytokine profiles and a measurement of T cell function. The treatment group displayed no differences throughout the course of the study with regards to peripheral leukocyte distribution, cytokine production or T cell function. Shedding of Epstein barr virus (EBV), Cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Varicella zoster virus (VZV) was quantified by real time PCR in saliva and urine samples, respectively. There was no significant difference in CMV DNA in the treatment group as compared to the control group. EBV and VZV on the other hand showed a mild reactivation during the study. There were no significant differences in cortisol between the control and treatment groups. In addition, no significant differences between antiviral antibody titers (EBV-VCA, -EA, -EBNA, CMV) or tetramer-positive (EBV, CMV) were found between the two groups. EBV DNA copies in blood were typically undetectable but never exceeded 1,500 copies per 106 PBMCs. Overall, these data indicate that the artificial gravity countermeasure and the 21 day head-down tilt bed rest regimen had no observable adverse effect on immune function.

  3. Monitoring Immune System Function and Reactivation of Latent Viruses in the Artificial Gravity Pilot Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Satish; Crusian, Brian; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarence; Stowe, Raymond

    2007-01-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that dysregulation of the immune system occurs during or after spaceflight. Using 21 day -6 deg. head-down tilt bed rest as a spaceflight analog, this study describes the effects of artificial gravity as a daily countermeasure on immunity, stress and reactivation of clinically important latent herpes viruses. The specific aims were to evaluate psychological and physiological stress, to determine the status of the immune system and to quantify reactivation of latent herpes viruses. Blood, saliva, and urine samples were collected from each participating subject at different times throughout the study. An immune assessment was performed on all treatment and control subjects that consisted of a comprehensive peripheral immunophenotype analysis, intracellular cytokine profiles and a measurement of T cell function. The treatment group displayed no differences throughout the course of the study with regards to peripheral leukocyte distribution, cytokine production or T cell function. Shedding of EBV and CMV was quantified by real time PCR in saliva and urine samples, respectively. There was no significant difference in CMV DNA in the treatment group as compared to the control group. EBV and VZV on the other hand showed a mild reactivation during the study. There were no significant differences in plasma cortisol between the control and treatment groups. In addition, no significant differences between antiviral antibody titers (EBV-VCA, -EA, -EBNA, CMV) or tetramer-positive (EBV, CMV) were found between the two groups. EBV DNA copies in blood were typically undetectable but never exceeded 1,500 copies per 10(exp 6) PBMCs. These data indicate that the artificial gravity countermeasure and the 21 day head-down tilt bed rest regimen had no observable adverse effect on immune function.

  4. Optimal Solution for an Engineering Applications Using Modified Artificial Immune System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, S.; Chandrasekaran, M.; Ganesan, S.; patan, Mahamed Naveed Khan; Navakanth, Polina

    2017-03-01

    An Engineering optimization leads a essential role in several engineering application areas like process design, product design, re-engineering and new product development, etc. In engineering, an awfully best answer is achieved by comparison to some completely different solutions by utilization previous downside information. An optimization algorithms provide systematic associate degreed economical ways that within which of constructing and comparison new design solutions so on understand at best vogue, thus on best solution efficiency and acquire the foremost wonderful design impact. In this paper, a new evolutionary based Modified Artificial Immune System (MAIS) algorithm used to optimize an engineering application of gear drive design. The results are compared with existing design.

  5. Artificial Immunity Based Cooperative Sustainment Framework for Multi-Agent Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, R. C. M.; Lau, H. Y. K.

    Many studies show that the modelling concept of multi-agent systems (MAS) can be very useful for many industries, such as automated production systems, modern distribution centres and warehouses, port container terminals and transportation systems, etc. However, when applying them to real life where unpredictable factors exists that lead to agent failures, they will not be able to perform as expected or even failed completely. A MAS that can withstand and recover from unpredictable failures is much welcomed by many industries that adopt automation as an integral part of their businesses. Therefore, we propose a cooperative sustainment framework to help MAS to recover the failed agent nodes and extend the system life using artificial immunity inspired design. To verify the usefulness of the design, we carry out some experiments and the result is encouraging.

  6. Fault diagnosis using noise modeling and a new artificial immune system based algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Farshid; Mojtahedi, Alireza; Ettefagh, Mir Mohammad

    2015-12-01

    A new fault classification/diagnosis method based on artificial immune system (AIS) algorithms for the structural systems is proposed. In order to improve the accuracy of the proposed method, i.e., higher success rate, Gaussian and non-Gaussian noise generating models are applied to simulate environmental noise. The identification of noise model, known as training process, is based on the estimation of the noise model parameters by genetic algorithms (GA) utilizing real experimental features. The proposed fault classification/diagnosis algorithm is applied to the noise contaminated features. Then, the results are compared to that obtained without noise modeling. The performance of the proposed method is examined using three laboratory case studies in two healthy and damaged conditions. Finally three different types of noise models are studied and it is shown experimentally that the proposed algorithm with non-Gaussian noise modeling leads to more accurate clustering of memory cells as the major part of the fault classification procedure.

  7. An application of artificial immune recognition system for prediction of diabetes following gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hung-Chun; Su, Chao-Ton; Wang, Pa-Chun

    2011-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a disease prevalent in population and is not easily perceived in its initial stage but may sway a patient very seriously in later stage. In accordance with the estimation of World Health Organization (WHO), there will be 370 million diabetics which are 5.4% of the global people in 2030, so it becomes more and more important to predict whether a pregnant woman has or is likely to acquire diabetes. This study is conducted with the use of the machine learning-Artificial Immune Recognition System (AIRS)-to assist doctors in predicting pregnant women who have premonition of type 2 diabetes. AIRS is proposed by Andrew Watkins in 2001 and it makes use of the metaphor of the vertebrate immune system to recognize antigens, select clone, and memorize cells. Additionally, AIRS includes a mechanism, limited resource, to restrain the number of memory cells from increasing uncontrollably. It has also showed positive results on problems in which it was applied. The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility in using AIRS to predict gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) subsequent DM. The dataset of diabetes has imbalanced data, but the overall classification recall could still reach 62.8%, which is better than the traditional method, logistic regression, and the technique which is thought as one of the powerful classification approaches, support vector machines (SVM).

  8. Use of kernel functions in artificial immune systems for the nonlinear classification problems.

    PubMed

    Ozşen, Seral; Güneş, Salih; Kara, Sadik; Latifoğlu, Fatma

    2009-07-01

    Due to the fact that there exist only a small number of complex systems in artificial immune systems (AISs) that solve nonlinear problems, there is a need to develop nonlinear AIS approaches that would be among the well-known solution methods. In this study, we developed a kernel-based AIS to compensate for this deficiency by providing a nonlinear structure via transformation of distance calculations in the clonal selection models of classical AIS to kernel space. Applications of the developed system were conducted on Statlog heart disease dataset, which was taken from the University of California, Irvine Machine-Learning Repository, and on Doppler sonograms to diagnose atherosclerosis disease. The system obtained a classification accuracy of 85.93% for the Statlog heart disease dataset, while it achieved a 99.09% classification success for the Doppler dataset. With these results, our system seems to be a potential solution method, and it may be considered as a suitable method for hard nonlinear classification problems.

  9. Immune System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Immune System KidsHealth > For Teens > Immune System A A A ... could put us out of commission. What the Immune System Does The immune (pronounced: ih-MYOON) system, which ...

  10. Web-based e-learning and virtual lab of human-artificial immune system.

    PubMed

    Gong, Tao; Ding, Yongsheng; Xiong, Qin

    2014-05-01

    Human immune system is as important in keeping the body healthy as the brain in supporting the intelligence. However, the traditional models of the human immune system are built on the mathematics equations, which are not easy for students to understand. To help the students to understand the immune systems, a web-based e-learning approach with virtual lab is designed for the intelligent system control course by using new intelligent educational technology. Comparing the traditional graduate educational model within the classroom, the web-based e-learning with the virtual lab shows the higher inspiration in guiding the graduate students to think independently and innovatively, as the students said. It has been found that this web-based immune e-learning system with the online virtual lab is useful for teaching the graduate students to understand the immune systems in an easier way and design their simulations more creatively and cooperatively. The teaching practice shows that the optimum web-based e-learning system can be used to increase the learning effectiveness of the students.

  11. A radial basis function neural network based on artificial immune systems for remote sensing image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qin; Zhong, Yanfei

    2008-12-01

    The radial basis function (RBF) neural network is a powerful method for remote sensing image classification. It has a simple architecture and the learning algorithm corresponds to the solution of a linear regression problem, resulting in a fast training process. The main drawback of this strategy is the requirement of an efficient algorithm to determine the number, position, and dispersion of the RBF. Traditional methods to determine the centers are: randomly choose input vectors from the training data set; vectors obtained from unsupervised clustering algorithms, such as k-means, applied to the input data. These conduce that traditional RBF neural network is sensitive to the center initialization. In this paper, the artificial immune network (aiNet) model, a new computational intelligence based on artificial immune networks (AIN), is applied to obtain appropriate centers for remote sensing image classification. In the aiNet-RBF algorihtm, each input pattern corresonds to an antigenic stimulus, while each RBF candidate center is considered to be an element, or cell, of the immune network model. The steps are as follows: A set of candidate centers is initialized at random, where the initial number of candidates and their positions is not crucial to the performance. Then, the clonal selection principle will control which candidates will be selected and how they will be upadated. Note that the clonal selection principle will be responsible for how the centers will represent the training data set. Finally, the immune network will identify and eliminate or suppress self-recognizing individuals to control the number of candidate centers. After the above learning phase, the aiNet network centers represent internal images of the inuput patterns presented to it. The algorithm output is taken to be the matrix of memory cells' coordinates that represent the final centers to be adopted by the RBF network. The stopping criterion of the proposed algorithm is given by a pre

  12. Diagnosis of diabetes diseases using an Artificial Immune Recognition System2 (AIRS2) with fuzzy K-nearest neighbor.

    PubMed

    Chikh, Mohamed Amine; Saidi, Meryem; Settouti, Nesma

    2012-10-01

    The use of expert systems and artificial intelligence techniques in disease diagnosis has been increasing gradually. Artificial Immune Recognition System (AIRS) is one of the methods used in medical classification problems. AIRS2 is a more efficient version of the AIRS algorithm. In this paper, we used a modified AIRS2 called MAIRS2 where we replace the K- nearest neighbors algorithm with the fuzzy K-nearest neighbors to improve the diagnostic accuracy of diabetes diseases. The diabetes disease dataset used in our work is retrieved from UCI machine learning repository. The performances of the AIRS2 and MAIRS2 are evaluated regarding classification accuracy, sensitivity and specificity values. The highest classification accuracy obtained when applying the AIRS2 and MAIRS2 using 10-fold cross-validation was, respectively 82.69% and 89.10%.

  13. The in vitro effects of artificial and natural sweeteners on the immune system using whole blood culture assays.

    PubMed

    Rahiman, F; Pool, E J

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the effects of commercially available artificial (aspartame, saccharin, sucralose) and natural sweeteners (brown sugar, white sugar, molasses) on the immune system. Human whole blood cultures were incubated with various sweeteners and stimulated in vitro with either phytohemagglutinin or endotoxin. Harvested supernatants were screened for cytotoxicity and cytokine release. Results showed that none of the artificial or natural sweeteners proved to be cytotoxic, indicating that no cell death was induced in vitro. The natural sweetener, sugar cane molasses (10 ug/mL), enhanced levels of the inflammatory biomarker IL-6 while all artificial sweeteners (10 ug/mL) revealed a suppressive effect on IL-6 secretion (P < 0.001). Exposure of blood cells to sucralose-containing sweeteners under stimulatory conditions reduced levels of the biomarker of humoral immunity, Interleukin-10 (P < 0.001). The cumulative suppression of Interleukin-6 and Interleukin-10 levels induced by sucralose may contribute to the inability in mounting an effective humoral response when posed with an exogenous threat.

  14. Artificial immune system based on adaptive clonal selection for feature selection and parameters optimisation of support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadat Hashemipour, Maryam; Soleimani, Seyed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Artificial immune system (AIS) algorithm based on clonal selection method can be defined as a soft computing method inspired by theoretical immune system in order to solve science and engineering problems. Support vector machine (SVM) is a popular pattern classification method with many diverse applications. Kernel parameter setting in the SVM training procedure along with the feature selection significantly impacts on the classification accuracy rate. In this study, AIS based on Adaptive Clonal Selection (AISACS) algorithm has been used to optimise the SVM parameters and feature subset selection without degrading the SVM classification accuracy. Several public datasets of University of California Irvine machine learning (UCI) repository are employed to calculate the classification accuracy rate in order to evaluate the AISACS approach then it was compared with grid search algorithm and Genetic Algorithm (GA) approach. The experimental results show that the feature reduction rate and running time of the AISACS approach are better than the GA approach.

  15. Application of tissue engineering to the immune system: development of artificial lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Cupedo, Tom; Stroock, Abraham; Coles, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The goal of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is to develop synthetic versions of human organs for transplantation, in vitro toxicology testing and to understand basic mechanisms of organ function. A variety of different approaches have been utilized to replicate the microenvironments found in lymph nodes including the use of a variety of different bio-materials, culture systems, and the application of different cell types to replicate stromal networks found in vivo. Although no system engineered so far can fully replicate lymph node function, progress has been made in the development of microenvironments that can promote the initiation of protective immune responses. In this review we will explore the different approaches utilized to recreate lymph node microenvironments and the technical challenges required to recreate a fully functional immune system in vitro. PMID:23162557

  16. Improvement in magnetic field immunity of externally-coupled transcutaneous energy transmission system for a totally implantable artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takahiko; Koshiji, Kohji; Homma, Akihiko; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    Transcutaneous energy transmission (TET) that uses electromagnetic induction between the external and internal coils of a transformer is the most promising method to supply driving energy to a totally implantable artificial heart without invasion. Induction-heating (IH) cookers generate magnetic flux, and if a cooker is operated near a transcutaneous transformer, the magnetic flux generated will link with the external and internal coils of the transcutaneous transformer. This will affect the performance of the TET and the artificial heart system. Hence, it is necessary to improve the magnetic field immunity of the TET system. During operation of the system, if the transcutaneous transformer is in close proximity to an IH cooker, the electric power generated by the cooker and coupled to the transformer can drive the artificial heart system. To prevent this coupling, the external coil was shielded with a conductive shield that had a slit in it. This reduces the coupling between the transformer and the magnetic field generated by the induction cooker. However, the temperature of the shield increased due to heating by eddy currents. The temperature of the shield can be reduced by separating the IH cooker and the shield.

  17. Immune System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  18. An efficient two-objective automatic SAR image segmentation framework using artificial immune system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dongdong; Niu, Ruican; Fei, Rong; Jiang, Qiaoyong; Li, Hongye; Cao, Zijian

    2015-12-01

    Here, an efficient multi-objective automatic segmentation framework (MASF) is formulated and applied to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image unsupervised classification. In the framework, three important issues are presented: 1) two reasonable image preprocessing techniques, including spatial filtering and watershed operator, are discussed at the initial stage of the framework; 2)then, an efficient immune multi-objective optimization algorithm with uniform clone, adaptive selection by online nondominated solutions, and dynamic deletion in diversity maintenance is proposed; 3 two very simple, but very efficient conflicting clustering validity indices are incorporated into the framework and simultaneously optimized. Two simulated SAR data and two complicated real images are used to quantitatively validate its effectiveness. In addition, four other state-of-the-art image segmentation methods are employed for comparison.

  19. Integrating Artificial Immune, Neural and Endrocine Systems in Autonomous Sailing Robots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-24

    system - Development of an adaptive hormone system capable of changing operation and control of the neural network depending on changing enviromental ...and control of the neural network depending on changing enviromental conditions • First basic design of the MOOP and a simple neural-endocrine based

  20. Immune System (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Immune System KidsHealth > For Parents > Immune System A A A ... can lead to illness and infection. About the Immune System The immune system is the body's defense against ...

  1. Artificial immune algorithm for multi-depot vehicle scheduling problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhongyi; Wang, Donggen; Xia, Linyuan; Chen, Xiaoling

    2008-10-01

    In the fast-developing logistics and supply chain management fields, one of the key problems in the decision support system is that how to arrange, for a lot of customers and suppliers, the supplier-to-customer assignment and produce a detailed supply schedule under a set of constraints. Solutions to the multi-depot vehicle scheduling problems (MDVRP) help in solving this problem in case of transportation applications. The objective of the MDVSP is to minimize the total distance covered by all vehicles, which can be considered as delivery costs or time consumption. The MDVSP is one of nondeterministic polynomial-time hard (NP-hard) problem which cannot be solved to optimality within polynomial bounded computational time. Many different approaches have been developed to tackle MDVSP, such as exact algorithm (EA), one-stage approach (OSA), two-phase heuristic method (TPHM), tabu search algorithm (TSA), genetic algorithm (GA) and hierarchical multiplex structure (HIMS). Most of the methods mentioned above are time consuming and have high risk to result in local optimum. In this paper, a new search algorithm is proposed to solve MDVSP based on Artificial Immune Systems (AIS), which are inspirited by vertebrate immune systems. The proposed AIS algorithm is tested with 30 customers and 6 vehicles located in 3 depots. Experimental results show that the artificial immune system algorithm is an effective and efficient method for solving MDVSP problems.

  2. Immune System Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth > For Kids > Quiz: Immune System A A A How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! About KidsHealth ...

  3. RAIRS2 a new expert system for diagnosing tuberculosis with real-world tournament selection mechanism inside artificial immune recognition system.

    PubMed

    Saybani, Mahmoud Reza; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Golzari, Shahram; Wah, Teh Ying; Saeed, Aghabozorgi; Mat Kiah, Miss Laiha; Balas, Valentina Emilia

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis is a major global health problem that has been ranked as the second leading cause of death from an infectious disease worldwide, after the human immunodeficiency virus. Diagnosis based on cultured specimens is the reference standard; however, results take weeks to obtain. Slow and insensitive diagnostic methods hampered the global control of tuberculosis, and scientists are looking for early detection strategies, which remain the foundation of tuberculosis control. Consequently, there is a need to develop an expert system that helps medical professionals to accurately diagnose the disease. The objective of this study is to diagnose tuberculosis using a machine learning method. Artificial immune recognition system (AIRS) has been used successfully for diagnosing various diseases. However, little effort has been undertaken to improve its classification accuracy. In order to increase the classification accuracy, this study introduces a new hybrid system that incorporates real tournament selection mechanism into the AIRS. This mechanism is used to control the population size of the model and to overcome the existing selection pressure. Patient epacris reports obtained from the Pasteur laboratory in northern Iran were used as the benchmark data set. The sample consisted of 175 records, from which 114 (65 %) were positive for TB, and the remaining 61 (35 %) were negative. The classification performance was measured through tenfold cross-validation, root-mean-square error, sensitivity, and specificity. With an accuracy of 100 %, RMSE of 0, sensitivity of 100 %, and specificity of 100 %, the proposed method was able to successfully classify tuberculosis cases. In addition, the proposed method is comparable with top classifiers used in this research.

  4. Diagnostic Accuracy Comparison of Artificial Immune Algorithms for Primary Headaches

    PubMed Central

    Çelik, Ufuk; Yurtay, Nilüfer; Koç, Emine Rabia; Tepe, Nermin; Güllüoğlu, Halil; Ertaş, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of immune system algorithms with the aim of classifying the primary types of headache that are not related to any organic etiology. They are divided into four types: migraine, tension, cluster, and other primary headaches. After we took this main objective into consideration, three different neurologists were required to fill in the medical records of 850 patients into our web-based expert system hosted on our project web site. In the evaluation process, Artificial Immune Systems (AIS) were used as the classification algorithms. The AIS are classification algorithms that are inspired by the biological immune system mechanism that involves significant and distinct capabilities. These algorithms simulate the specialties of the immune system such as discrimination, learning, and the memorizing process in order to be used for classification, optimization, or pattern recognition. According to the results, the accuracy level of the classifier used in this study reached a success continuum ranging from 95% to 99%, except for the inconvenient one that yielded 71% accuracy. PMID:26075014

  5. Null steering of adaptive beamforming using linear constraint minimum variance assisted by particle swarm optimization, dynamic mutated artificial immune system, and gravitational search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Darzi, Soodabeh; Kiong, Tiong Sieh; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Ismail, Mahamod; Kibria, Salehin; Salem, Balasem

    2014-01-01

    Linear constraint minimum variance (LCMV) is one of the adaptive beamforming techniques that is commonly applied to cancel interfering signals and steer or produce a strong beam to the desired signal through its computed weight vectors. However, weights computed by LCMV usually are not able to form the radiation beam towards the target user precisely and not good enough to reduce the interference by placing null at the interference sources. It is difficult to improve and optimize the LCMV beamforming technique through conventional empirical approach. To provide a solution to this problem, artificial intelligence (AI) technique is explored in order to enhance the LCMV beamforming ability. In this paper, particle swarm optimization (PSO), dynamic mutated artificial immune system (DM-AIS), and gravitational search algorithm (GSA) are incorporated into the existing LCMV technique in order to improve the weights of LCMV. The simulation result demonstrates that received signal to interference and noise ratio (SINR) of target user can be significantly improved by the integration of PSO, DM-AIS, and GSA in LCMV through the suppression of interference in undesired direction. Furthermore, the proposed GSA can be applied as a more effective technique in LCMV beamforming optimization as compared to the PSO technique. The algorithms were implemented using Matlab program.

  6. How simple autonomous decisions evolve into robust behaviours? A review from neurorobotics, cognitive, self-organized and artificial immune systems fields.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Leon, Jose A; Acosta, Gerardo G; Rozenfeld, Alejandro

    2014-10-01

    Researchers in diverse fields, such as in neuroscience, systems biology and autonomous robotics, have been intrigued by the origin and mechanisms for biological robustness. Darwinian evolution, in general, has suggested that adaptive mechanisms as a way of reaching robustness, could evolve by natural selection acting successively on numerous heritable variations. However, is this understanding enough for realizing how biological systems remain robust during their interactions with the surroundings? Here, we describe selected studies of bio-inspired systems that show behavioral robustness. From neurorobotics, cognitive, self-organizing and artificial immune system perspectives, our discussions focus mainly on how robust behaviors evolve or emerge in these systems, having the capacity of interacting with their surroundings. These descriptions are twofold. Initially, we introduce examples from autonomous robotics to illustrate how the process of designing robust control can be idealized in complex environments for autonomous navigation in terrain and underwater vehicles. We also include descriptions of bio-inspired self-organizing systems. Then, we introduce other studies that contextualize experimental evolution with simulated organisms and physical robots to exemplify how the process of natural selection can lead to the evolution of robustness by means of adaptive behaviors.

  7. Medical diagnosis of atherosclerosis from Carotid Artery Doppler Signals using principal component analysis (PCA), k-NN based weighting pre-processing and Artificial Immune Recognition System (AIRS).

    PubMed

    Latifoğlu, Fatma; Polat, Kemal; Kara, Sadik; Güneş, Salih

    2008-02-01

    In this study, we proposed a new medical diagnosis system based on principal component analysis (PCA), k-NN based weighting pre-processing, and Artificial Immune Recognition System (AIRS) for diagnosis of atherosclerosis from Carotid Artery Doppler Signals. The suggested system consists of four stages. First, in the feature extraction stage, we have obtained the features related with atherosclerosis disease using Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) modeling and by calculating of maximum frequency envelope of sonograms. Second, in the dimensionality reduction stage, the 61 features of atherosclerosis disease have been reduced to 4 features using PCA. Third, in the pre-processing stage, we have weighted these 4 features using different values of k in a new weighting scheme based on k-NN based weighting pre-processing. Finally, in the classification stage, AIRS classifier has been used to classify subjects as healthy or having atherosclerosis. Hundred percent of classification accuracy has been obtained by the proposed system using 10-fold cross validation. This success shows that the proposed system is a robust and effective system in diagnosis of atherosclerosis disease.

  8. Immune System and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend against germs. It ... t, to find and destroy them. If your immune system cannot do its job, the results can be ...

  9. Immune System Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth > For Kids > Quiz: Immune System Print A A A How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! About KidsHealth ...

  10. [Immune system and tumors].

    PubMed

    Terme, Magali; Tanchot, Corinne

    2017-02-01

    Despite having been much debated, it is now well established that the immune system plays an essential role in the fight against cancer. In this article, we will highlight the implication of the immune system in the control of tumor growth and describe the major components of the immune system involved in the antitumoral immune response. The immune system, while exerting pressure on tumor cells, also will play a pro-tumoral role by sculpting the immunogenicity of tumors cells as they develop. Finally, we will illustrate the numerous mechanisms of immune suppression that take place within the tumoral microenvironment which allow tumor cells to escape control from the immune system. The increasingly precise knowledge of the brakes to an effective antitumor immune response allows the development of immunotherapy strategies more and more innovating and promising of hope.

  11. International Conference on Artificial Immune Systems (1st) ICARIS 2002, held on 9, 10, and 11 September 2002

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-07

    Tempesti, and C. Teuscher. BioWatch: A Giant Electronic Bio-Inspired Watch. The 3rd NASA/DoD Workshop on Evolvable Hardware. Pages 185-192. 2001. P...protects the body from external damages, if it does so, to build good protective system for computers. The Panda antiviral system that by computer has

  12. The Immune System Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Work, Kirsten A.; Gibbs, Melissa A.; Friedman, Erich J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a card game that helps introductory biology students understand the basics of the immune response to pathogens. Students simulate the steps of the immune response with cards that represent the pathogens and the cells and molecules mobilized by the immune system. In the process, they learn the similarities and differences between the…

  13. Human immune system variation

    PubMed Central

    Brodin, Petter; Davis, Mark M.

    2017-01-01

    The human immune system is highly variable between individuals but relatively stable over time within a given person. Recent conceptual and technological advances have enabled systems immunology analyses, which reveal the composition of immune cells and proteins in populations of healthy individuals. The range of variation and some specific influences that shape an individual’s immune system is now becoming clearer. Human immune systems vary as a consequence of heritable and non-heritable influences, but symbiotic and pathogenic microbes and other non-heritable influences explain most of this variation. Understanding when and how such influences shape the human immune system is key for defining metrics of immunological health and understanding the risk of immune-mediated and infectious diseases. PMID:27916977

  14. Swine immune system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Probably no area of veterinary medicine has seen a greater explosion in knowledge then the immune system and its implications in disease and vaccination. In this chapter on the Swine Immune System for the 10th Edition of Diseases of Swine we expand on the information provided in past editions by in...

  15. Immune System 101

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infectious Diseases - The Immune System Related Topics on AIDS.gov CD4 Count Viral Load Cancer Opportunistic Infections ... Immune Response (video) Last revised: 08/22/2011 AIDS.gov HIV/AIDS Basics • Federal Resources • Using New ...

  16. Immune System (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... teens. Environmental allergies (to dust mites, for example), seasonal allergies (such as hay fever), drug allergies (reactions to ... For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Definition: ... Allergies Activity: Immune System Word! Autoimmunity HIV and AIDS ...

  17. The immune system

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    All organisms are connected in a complex web of relationships. Although many of these are benign, not all are, and everything alive devotes significant resources to identifying and neutralizing threats from other species. From bacteria through to primates, the presence of some kind of effective immune system has gone hand in hand with evolutionary success. This article focuses on mammalian immunity, the challenges that it faces, the mechanisms by which these are addressed, and the consequences that arise when it malfunctions. PMID:27784777

  18. Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawlor, Joseph

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is the field of scientific inquiry concerned with designing machine systems that can simulate human mental processes. The field draws upon theoretical constructs from a wide variety of disciplines, including mathematics, psychology, linguistics, neurophysiology, computer science, and electronic engineering. Some of the…

  19. Interactions between Artificial Gravity, the Affected Physiological Systems, and Nutrition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heer, Martina; Baecker, Nathalie; Zwart, Sara; Smith, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Malnutrition, either by insufficient supply of some nutrients or by overfeeding, has a profound effect on the health of an organism. Therefore, optimal nutrition is a necessity in normal gravity on Earth, in microgravity, and when applying artificial gravity to the human system. Reduced physical activity, such as observed in microgravity or bed rest, has an effect on many physiological systems, such as the cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, immune, and body fluids regulation systems. There is currently no countermeasure that is effective to counteract both the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning when applied for a short duration (see Chapter 1). Artificial gravity therefore seems the simplest physiological approach to keep these systems intact. The application of intermittent daily dose of artificial gravity by means of centrifugation has often been proposed as a potential countermeasure against the physiological deconditioning induced by spaceflight. However, neither the optimal gravity level, nor its optimal duration of exposure have been enough studied to recommend a validated, effective, and efficient artificial gravity application. As discussed in previous chapters, artificial gravity has a very high potential to counteract any changes caused by reduced physical activity. The nutrient supply, which ideally should match the actual needs, will interact with these changes and therefore has also to be taken into account. This chapter reviews the potential interactions between these nutrients (energy intake, vitamins, minerals) and the other physiological systems affected by artificial gravity generated by an on-board short-radius centrifuge.

  20. [Current progress of the artificial accommodation system].

    PubMed

    Bretthauer, G; Gengenbach, U; Nagel, J A; Beck, C; Fliedner, J; Koker, L; Krug, M; Martin, T; Stachs, O; Guthoff, R F

    2014-12-01

    In case of presbyopia or cataract the "artificial accommodation system" represents one future possibility to durably restore the ability to accommodate. The work presented describes recent progress in the development of the artificial accommodation system. Major advances were achieved in the fields of the actuator system for the active optics, the pupil near reflex sensor, the communication system, the power supply system as well as in system integration. Beside the technical advances, first trials were performed to implant the artificial accommodation system into animals. These trials showed that the new lens shaped design and the C-shaped haptics are beneficial for implantation and secure fixation of the implant inside the capsular bag.

  1. Artificial Intelligence and Spacecraft Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugel-Whitehead, Norma R.

    1997-01-01

    This talk will present the work which has been done at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center involving the use of Artificial Intelligence to control the power system in a spacecraft. The presentation will include a brief history of power system automation, and some basic definitions of the types of artificial intelligence which have been investigated at MSFC for power system automation. A video tape of one of our autonomous power systems using co-operating expert systems, and advanced hardware will be presented.

  2. Learning in Artificial Neural Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matheus, Christopher J.; Hohensee, William E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents an overview and analysis of learning in Artificial Neural Systems (ANS's). It begins with a general introduction to neural networks and connectionist approaches to information processing. The basis for learning in ANS's is then described, and compared with classical Machine learning. While similar in some ways, ANS learning deviates from tradition in its dependence on the modification of individual weights to bring about changes in a knowledge representation distributed across connections in a network. This unique form of learning is analyzed from two aspects: the selection of an appropriate network architecture for representing the problem, and the choice of a suitable learning rule capable of reproducing the desired function within the given network. The various network architectures are classified, and then identified with explicit restrictions on the types of functions they are capable of representing. The learning rules, i.e., algorithms that specify how the network weights are modified, are similarly taxonomized, and where possible, the limitations inherent to specific classes of rules are outlined.

  3. Dynamics of immune system vulnerabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromberg, Sean P.

    The adaptive immune system can be viewed as a complex system, which adapts, over time, to reflect the history of infections experienced by the organism. Understanding its operation requires viewing it in terms of tradeoffs under constraints and evolutionary history. It typically displays "robust, yet fragile" behavior, meaning common tasks are robust to small changes but novel threats or changes in environment can have dire consequences. In this dissertation we use mechanistic models to study several biological processes: the immune response, the homeostasis of cells in the lymphatic system, and the process that normally prevents autoreactive cells from entering the lymphatic system. Using these models we then study the effects of these processes interacting. We show that the mechanisms that regulate the numbers of cells in the immune system, in conjunction with the immune response, can act to suppress autoreactive cells from proliferating, thus showing quantitatively how pathogenic infections can suppress autoimmune disease. We also show that over long periods of time this same effect can thin the repertoire of cells that defend against novel threats, leading to an age correlated vulnerability. This vulnerability is shown to be a consequence of system dynamics, not due to degradation of immune system components with age. Finally, modeling a specific tolerance mechanism that normally prevents autoimmune disease, in conjunction with models of the immune response and homeostasis we look at the consequences of the immune system mistakenly incorporating pathogenic molecules into its tolerizing mechanisms. The signature of this dynamic matches closely that of the dengue virus system.

  4. Oral immune therapy: targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Ilan, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an altered systemic immune response leading to inflammation-mediated damage to the gut and other organs. Oral immune therapy is a method of systemic immune modulation via alteration of the gut immune system. It uses the inherit ability of the innate system of the gut to redirect the systemic innate and adaptive immune responses. Oral immune therapy is an attractive clinical approach to treat autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. It can induce immune modulation without immune suppression, has minimal toxicity and is easily administered. Targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system can serve as an attractive novel therapeutic method for IBD. This review summarizes the current data and discusses several examples of oral immune therapeutic methods for using the gut immune system to generate signals to reset systemic immunity as a treatment for IBD. PMID:26900473

  5. Oral immune therapy: targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Ilan, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an altered systemic immune response leading to inflammation-mediated damage to the gut and other organs. Oral immune therapy is a method of systemic immune modulation via alteration of the gut immune system. It uses the inherit ability of the innate system of the gut to redirect the systemic innate and adaptive immune responses. Oral immune therapy is an attractive clinical approach to treat autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. It can induce immune modulation without immune suppression, has minimal toxicity and is easily administered. Targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system can serve as an attractive novel therapeutic method for IBD. This review summarizes the current data and discusses several examples of oral immune therapeutic methods for using the gut immune system to generate signals to reset systemic immunity as a treatment for IBD.

  6. A Novel Artificial Immune Algorithm for Spatial Clustering with Obstacle Constraint and Its Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liping; Luo, Yonglong; Ding, Xintao; Zhang, Ji

    2014-01-01

    An important component of a spatial clustering algorithm is the distance measure between sample points in object space. In this paper, the traditional Euclidean distance measure is replaced with innovative obstacle distance measure for spatial clustering under obstacle constraints. Firstly, we present a path searching algorithm to approximate the obstacle distance between two points for dealing with obstacles and facilitators. Taking obstacle distance as similarity metric, we subsequently propose the artificial immune clustering with obstacle entity (AICOE) algorithm for clustering spatial point data in the presence of obstacles and facilitators. Finally, the paper presents a comparative analysis of AICOE algorithm and the classical clustering algorithms. Our clustering model based on artificial immune system is also applied to the case of public facility location problem in order to establish the practical applicability of our approach. By using the clone selection principle and updating the cluster centers based on the elite antibodies, the AICOE algorithm is able to achieve the global optimum and better clustering effect. PMID:25435862

  7. A novel artificial immune algorithm for spatial clustering with obstacle constraint and its applications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liping; Luo, Yonglong; Ding, Xintao; Zhang, Ji

    2014-01-01

    An important component of a spatial clustering algorithm is the distance measure between sample points in object space. In this paper, the traditional Euclidean distance measure is replaced with innovative obstacle distance measure for spatial clustering under obstacle constraints. Firstly, we present a path searching algorithm to approximate the obstacle distance between two points for dealing with obstacles and facilitators. Taking obstacle distance as similarity metric, we subsequently propose the artificial immune clustering with obstacle entity (AICOE) algorithm for clustering spatial point data in the presence of obstacles and facilitators. Finally, the paper presents a comparative analysis of AICOE algorithm and the classical clustering algorithms. Our clustering model based on artificial immune system is also applied to the case of public facility location problem in order to establish the practical applicability of our approach. By using the clone selection principle and updating the cluster centers based on the elite antibodies, the AICOE algorithm is able to achieve the global optimum and better clustering effect.

  8. Overview of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Medina, Kay L

    2016-01-01

    The immune system is designed to execute rapid, specific, and protective responses against foreign pathogens. To protect against the potentially harmful effects of autoreactive escapees that might arise during the course of the immune response, multiple tolerance checkpoints exist in both the primary and secondary lymphoid organs. Regardless, autoantibodies targeting neural antigens exist in multiple neurologic diseases. The goal of this introductory chapter is to provide a foundation of the major principles and components of the immune system as a framework to understanding autoimmunity and autoimmune neurologic disorders. A broad overview of: (1) innate mechanisms of immunity and their contribution in demyelinating diseases; (2) B and T lymphocytes as effector arms of the adaptive immune response and their contribution to the pathophysiology of neurologic diseases; and (3) emerging therapeutic modalities for treatment of autoimmune disease is provided.

  9. Enhancing Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm with Self-Adaptive Searching Strategy and Artificial Immune Network Operators for Global Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tinggui; Xiao, Renbin

    2014-01-01

    Artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm, inspired by the intelligent foraging behavior of honey bees, was proposed by Karaboga. It has been shown to be superior to some conventional intelligent algorithms such as genetic algorithm (GA), artificial colony optimization (ACO), and particle swarm optimization (PSO). However, the ABC still has some limitations. For example, ABC can easily get trapped in the local optimum when handing in functions that have a narrow curving valley, a high eccentric ellipse, or complex multimodal functions. As a result, we proposed an enhanced ABC algorithm called EABC by introducing self-adaptive searching strategy and artificial immune network operators to improve the exploitation and exploration. The simulation results tested on a suite of unimodal or multimodal benchmark functions illustrate that the EABC algorithm outperforms ACO, PSO, and the basic ABC in most of the experiments. PMID:24772023

  10. The immune system and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Singh, Madhu V; Chapleau, Mark W; Harwani, Sailesh C; Abboud, Francois M

    2014-08-01

    A powerful interaction between the autonomic and the immune systems plays a prominent role in the initiation and maintenance of hypertension and significantly contributes to cardiovascular pathology, end-organ damage and mortality. Studies have shown consistent association between hypertension, proinflammatory cytokines and the cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. The sympathetic nervous system, a major determinant of hypertension, innervates the bone marrow, spleen and peripheral lymphatic system and is proinflammatory, whereas the parasympathetic nerve activity dampens the inflammatory response through α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The neuro-immune synapse is bidirectional as cytokines may enhance the sympathetic activity through their central nervous system action that in turn increases the mobilization, migration and infiltration of immune cells in the end organs. Kidneys may be infiltrated by immune cells and mesangial cells that may originate in the bone marrow and release inflammatory cytokines that cause renal damage. Hypertension is also accompanied by infiltration of the adventitia and perivascular adipose tissue by inflammatory immune cells including macrophages. Increased cytokine production induces myogenic and structural changes in the resistance vessels, causing elevated blood pressure. Cardiac hypertrophy in hypertension may result from the mechanical afterload and the inflammatory response to resident or migratory immune cells. Toll-like receptors on innate immune cells function as sterile injury detectors and initiate the inflammatory pathway. Finally, abnormalities of innate immune cells and the molecular determinants of their activation that include toll-like receptor, adrenergic, cholinergic and AT1 receptors can define the severity of inflammation in hypertension. These receptors are putative therapeutic targets.

  11. Portable Immune-Assessment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond P.; Mishra, Saroj K.

    1995-01-01

    Portable immune-assessment system developed for use in rapidly identifying infections or contaminated environment. System combines few specific fluorescent reagents for identifying immune-cell dysfunction, toxic substances, buildup of microbial antigens or microbial growth, and potential identification of pathogenic microorganisms using fluorescent microplate reader linked to laptop computer. By using few specific dyes for cell metabolism, DNA/RNA conjugation, specific enzyme activity, or cell constituents, one makes immediate, onsite determination of person's health or of contamination of environment.

  12. Cystatins in Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Magister, Špela; Kos, Janko

    2013-01-01

    Cystatins comprise a large superfamily of related proteins with diverse biological activities. They were initially characterised as inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases, however, in recent years some alternative functions for cystatins have been proposed. Cystatins possessing inhibitory function are members of three families, family I (stefins), family II (cystatins) and family III (kininogens). Stefin A is often linked to neoplastic changes in epithelium while another family I cystatin, stefin B is supposed to have a specific role in neuredegenerative diseases. Cystatin C, a typical type II cystatin, is expressed in a variety of human tissues and cells. On the other hand, expression of other type II cystatins is more specific. Cystatin F is an endo/lysosome targeted protease inhibitor, selectively expressed in immune cells, suggesting its role in processes related to immune response. Our recent work points on its role in regulation of dendritic cell maturation and in natural killer cells functional inactivation that may enhance tumor survival. Cystatin E/M expression is mainly restricted to the epithelia of the skin which emphasizes its prominent role in cutaneous biology. Here, we review the current knowledge on type I (stefins A and B) and type II cystatins (cystatins C, F and E/M) in pathologies, with particular emphasis on their suppressive vs. promotional function in the tumorigenesis and metastasis. We proposed that an imbalance between cathepsins and cystatins may attenuate immune cell functions and facilitate tumor cell invasion. PMID:23386904

  13. Melatonin: Buffering the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Vico, Antonio; Lardone, Patricia J.; Álvarez-Sánchez, Nuria; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Ana; Guerrero, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin modulates a wide range of physiological functions with pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Despite the large number of reports implicating melatonin as an immunomodulatory compound, it still remains unclear how melatonin regulates immunity. While some authors argue that melatonin is an immunostimulant, many studies have also described anti-inflammatory properties. The data reviewed in this paper support the idea of melatonin as an immune buffer, acting as a stimulant under basal or immunosuppressive conditions or as an anti-inflammatory compound in the presence of exacerbated immune responses, such as acute inflammation. The clinical relevance of the multiple functions of melatonin under different immune conditions, such as infection, autoimmunity, vaccination and immunosenescence, is also reviewed. PMID:23609496

  14. 14 CFR 23.691 - Artificial stall barrier system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Artificial stall barrier system. 23.691... Construction Control Systems § 23.691 Artificial stall barrier system. If the function of an artificial stall... pitching motion. (d) Each system must be designed so that the artificial stall barrier can be quickly...

  15. 14 CFR 23.691 - Artificial stall barrier system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Artificial stall barrier system. 23.691... Construction Control Systems § 23.691 Artificial stall barrier system. If the function of an artificial stall... pitching motion. (d) Each system must be designed so that the artificial stall barrier can be quickly...

  16. 14 CFR 23.691 - Artificial stall barrier system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Artificial stall barrier system. 23.691... Construction Control Systems § 23.691 Artificial stall barrier system. If the function of an artificial stall... pitching motion. (d) Each system must be designed so that the artificial stall barrier can be quickly...

  17. 14 CFR 23.691 - Artificial stall barrier system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Artificial stall barrier system. 23.691... Construction Control Systems § 23.691 Artificial stall barrier system. If the function of an artificial stall... pitching motion. (d) Each system must be designed so that the artificial stall barrier can be quickly...

  18. 14 CFR 23.691 - Artificial stall barrier system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Artificial stall barrier system. 23.691... Construction Control Systems § 23.691 Artificial stall barrier system. If the function of an artificial stall... pitching motion. (d) Each system must be designed so that the artificial stall barrier can be quickly...

  19. The immune system in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Trott, Daniel W; Harrison, David G

    2014-03-01

    While hypertension has predominantly been attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, kidney, and central nervous system, research for almost 50 yr has shown that the immune system also contributes to this disease. Inflammatory cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension and likely contribute to end-organ damage. We and others have shown that mice lacking adaptive immune cells, including recombinase-activating gene-deficient mice and rats and mice with severe combined immunodeficiency have blunted hypertension to stimuli such as ANG II, high salt, and norepinephrine. Adoptive transfer of T cells restores the blood pressure response to these stimuli. Agonistic antibodies to the ANG II receptor, produced by B cells, contribute to hypertension in experimental models of preeclampsia. The central nervous system seems important in immune cell activation, because lesions in the anteroventral third ventricle block hypertension and T cell activation in response to ANG II. Likewise, genetic manipulation of reactive oxygen species in the subfornical organ modulates both hypertension and immune cell activation. Current evidence indicates that the production of cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-17, and interleukin-6, contribute to hypertension, likely via effects on both the kidney and vasculature. In addition, the innate immune system also appears to contribute to hypertension. We propose a working hypothesis linking the sympathetic nervous system, immune cells, production of cytokines, and, ultimately, vascular and renal dysfunction, leading to the augmentation of hypertension. Studies of immune cell activation will clearly be useful in understanding this common yet complex disease.

  20. Counseling, Artificial Intelligence, and Expert Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illovsky, Michael E.

    1994-01-01

    Considers the use of artificial intelligence and expert systems in counseling. Limitations are explored; candidates for counseling versus those for expert systems are discussed; programming considerations are reviewed; and techniques for dealing with rational, nonrational, and irrational thoughts and feelings are described. (Contains 46…

  1. The Immune System in Hypertension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trott, Daniel W.; Harrison, David G.

    2014-01-01

    While hypertension has predominantly been attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, kidney, and central nervous system, research for almost 50 yr has shown that the immune system also contributes to this disease. Inflammatory cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension and likely…

  2. Pneumonia - weakened immune system

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatments to remove fluid and mucus from the respiratory system are often needed. Outlook (Prognosis) Factors that may ... immunocompromised host Images Pneumococci organism Lungs The lungs Respiratory system References Donnelly JP, Blijlevens NMA, van der Velden ...

  3. miRNA-124 in Immune System and Immune Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhen; Wang, Peng-Yuan; Su, Ding-Feng; Liu, Xia

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, miR-124 has emerged as a critical modulator of immunity and inflammation. Here, we summarize studies on the function and mechanism of miR-124 in the immune system and immunity-related diseases. They indicated that miR-124 exerts a crucial role in the development of immune system, regulation of immune responses, and inflammatory disorders. It is evident that miR-124 may serve as an informative diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target in the future. PMID:27757114

  4. Gel-Trapped Lymphorganogenic Chemokines Trigger Artificial Tertiary Lymphoid Organs and Mount Adaptive Immune Responses In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    We previously generated artificial lymph node-like tertiary lymphoid organs (artTLOs) in mice using lymphotoxin α-expressing stromal cells. Here, we show the construction of transplantable and functional artTLOs by applying soluble factors trapped in slow-releasing gels in the absence of lymphoid tissue organizer stromal cells. The resultant artTLOs were easily removable, transplantable, and were capable of attracting memory B and T cells. Importantly, artTLOs induced a powerful antigen-specific secondary immune response, which was particularly pronounced in immune-compromised hosts. Synthesis of functionally stable immune tissues/organs like those described here may be a first step to eventually develop immune system-based therapeutics. Although much needs to be learned from the precise mechanisms of action, they may offer ways in the future to reestablish immune functions to overcome hitherto untreatable diseases, including severe infection, cancer, autoimmune diseases, and various forms of immune deficiencies, including immune-senescence during aging.

  5. Adaptation in the innate immune system and heterologous innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stefan F

    2014-11-01

    The innate immune system recognizes deviation from homeostasis caused by infectious or non-infectious assaults. The threshold for its activation seems to be established by a calibration process that includes sensing of microbial molecular patterns from commensal bacteria and of endogenous signals. It is becoming increasingly clear that adaptive features, a hallmark of the adaptive immune system, can also be identified in the innate immune system. Such adaptations can result in the manifestation of a primed state of immune and tissue cells with a decreased activation threshold. This keeps the system poised to react quickly. Moreover, the fact that the innate immune system recognizes a wide variety of danger signals via pattern recognition receptors that often activate the same signaling pathways allows for heterologous innate immune stimulation. This implies that, for example, the innate immune response to an infection can be modified by co-infections or other innate stimuli. This "design feature" of the innate immune system has many implications for our understanding of individual susceptibility to diseases or responsiveness to therapies and vaccinations. In this article, adaptive features of the innate immune system as well as heterologous innate immunity and their implications are discussed.

  6. Control of adaptive immunity by the innate immune system

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Akiko; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2015-01-01

    Microbial infections are recognized by the innate immune system both to elicit immediate defense and to generate long-lasting adaptive immunity. To detect and respond to vastly different groups of pathogens, the innate immune system uses several recognition systems that rely on sensing common structural and functional features associated with different classes of microorganisms. These recognition systems determine microbial location, viability, replication and pathogenicity. Detection of these features by recognition pathways of the innate immune system is translated into different classes of effector responses though specialized populations of dendritic cells. Multiple mechanisms for the induction of immune responses are variations on a common design principle wherein the cells that sense infections produce one set of cytokines to induce lymphocytes to produce another set of cytokines, which in turn activate effector responses. Here we discuss these emerging principles of innate control of adaptive immunity. PMID:25789684

  7. Autonomic nervous system and immune system interactions.

    PubMed

    Kenney, M J; Ganta, C K

    2014-07-01

    The present review assesses the current state of literature defining integrative autonomic-immune physiological processing, focusing on studies that have employed electrophysiological, pharmacological, molecular biological, and central nervous system experimental approaches. Central autonomic neural networks are informed of peripheral immune status via numerous communicating pathways, including neural and non-neural. Cytokines and other immune factors affect the level of activity and responsivity of discharges in sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves innervating diverse targets. Multiple levels of the neuraxis contribute to cytokine-induced changes in efferent parasympathetic and sympathetic nerve outflows, leading to modulation of peripheral immune responses. The functionality of local sympathoimmune interactions depends on the microenvironment created by diverse signaling mechanisms involving integration between sympathetic nervous system neurotransmitters and neuromodulators; specific adrenergic receptors; and the presence or absence of immune cells, cytokines, and bacteria. Functional mechanisms contributing to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway likely involve novel cholinergic-adrenergic interactions at peripheral sites, including autonomic ganglion and lymphoid targets. Immune cells express adrenergic and nicotinic receptors. Neurotransmitters released by sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve endings bind to their respective receptors located on the surface of immune cells and initiate immune-modulatory responses. Both sympathetic and parasympathetic arms of the autonomic nervous system are instrumental in orchestrating neuroimmune processes, although additional studies are required to understand dynamic and complex adrenergic-cholinergic interactions. Further understanding of regulatory mechanisms linking the sympathetic nervous, parasympathetic nervous, and immune systems is critical for understanding relationships between chronic disease

  8. An integrated multivariable artificial pancreas control system.

    PubMed

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Quinn, Lauretta T; Littlejohn, Elizabeth; Cinar, Ali

    2014-05-01

    The objective was to develop a closed-loop (CL) artificial pancreas (AP) control system that uses continuous measurements of glucose concentration and physiological variables, integrated with a hypoglycemia early alarm module to regulate glucose concentration and prevent hypoglycemia. Eleven open-loop (OL) and 9 CL experiments were performed. A multivariable adaptive artificial pancreas (MAAP) system was used for the first 6 CL experiments. An integrated multivariable adaptive artificial pancreas (IMAAP) system consisting of MAAP augmented with a hypoglycemia early alarm system was used during the last 3 CL experiments. Glucose values and physical activity information were measured and transferred to the controller every 10 minutes and insulin suggestions were entered to the pump manually. All experiments were designed to be close to real-life conditions. Severe hypoglycemic episodes were seen several times during the OL experiments. With the MAAP system, the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia was decreased significantly (P < .01). No hypoglycemia was seen with the IMAAP system. There was also a significant difference (P < .01) between OL and CL experiments with regard to percentage of glucose concentration (54% vs 58%) that remained within target range (70-180 mg/dl). Integration of an adaptive control and hypoglycemia early alarm system was able to keep glucose concentration values in target range in patients with type 1 diabetes. Postprandial hypoglycemia and exercise-induced hypoglycemia did not occur when this system was used. Physical activity information improved estimation of the blood glucose concentration and effectiveness of the control system.

  9. Artificial Neural Network Analysis System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Target detection, multi-target tracking and threat identification of ICBM and its warheads by sensor fusion and data fusion of sensors in a fuzzy neural network system based on the compound eye of a fly.

  10. Energetics and the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Reiches, Meredith W.; Prentice, Andrew M.; Moore, Sophie E.; Ellison, Peter T.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background and objectives: The human immune system is an ever-changing composition of innumerable cells and proteins, continually ready to respond to pathogens or insults. The cost of maintaining this state of immunological readiness is rarely considered. In this paper we aim to discern a cost to non-acute immune function by investigating how low levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) relate to other energetic demands and resources in adolescent Gambian girls. Methodology: Data from a longitudinal study of 66 adolescent girls was used to test hypotheses around investment in immune function. Non-acute (under 2 mg/L) CRP was used as an index of immune function. Predictor variables include linear height velocity, adiposity, leptin, and measures of energy balance. Results: Non-acute log CRP was positively associated with adiposity (β = 0.16, P < 0.001, R2 = 0.17) and levels of the adipokine leptin (β = 1.17, P = 0.006, R2 = 0.09). CRP was also negatively associated with increased investment in growth, as measured by height velocity (β = −0.58, P < 0.001, R2 = 0.13) and lean mass deposition β = −0.42, P = 0.005, R2 = 0.08). Relationships between adiposity and growth explained some, but not all, of this association. We do not find that CRP was related to energy balance. Conclusions and implications: These data support a hypothesis that investment in non-acute immune function is facultative, and sensitive to energetic resources and demands. We also find support for an adaptive association between the immune system and adipose tissue. PMID:28003312

  11. Immunity-Based Aircraft Fault Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, D.; KrishnaKumar, K.; Wong, D.; Berry, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the study reported in this paper, we have developed and applied an Artificial Immune System (AIS) algorithm for aircraft fault detection, as an extension to a previous work on intelligent flight control (IFC). Though the prior studies had established the benefits of IFC, one area of weakness that needed to be strengthened was the control dead band induced by commanding a failed surface. Since the IFC approach uses fault accommodation with no detection, the dead band, although it reduces over time due to learning, is present and causes degradation in handling qualities. If the failure can be identified, this dead band can be further A ed to ensure rapid fault accommodation and better handling qualities. The paper describes the application of an immunity-based approach that can detect a broad spectrum of known and unforeseen failures. The approach incorporates the knowledge of the normal operational behavior of the aircraft from sensory data, and probabilistically generates a set of pattern detectors that can detect any abnormalities (including faults) in the behavior pattern indicating unsafe in-flight operation. We developed a tool called MILD (Multi-level Immune Learning Detection) based on a real-valued negative selection algorithm that can generate a small number of specialized detectors (as signatures of known failure conditions) and a larger set of generalized detectors for unknown (or possible) fault conditions. Once the fault is detected and identified, an adaptive control system would use this detection information to stabilize the aircraft by utilizing available resources (control surfaces). We experimented with data sets collected under normal and various simulated failure conditions using a piloted motion-base simulation facility. The reported results are from a collection of test cases that reflect the performance of the proposed immunity-based fault detection algorithm.

  12. Priming in Systemic Plant Immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Wang, Lin; Glazebrook, Jane; Greenberg, Jean T.

    2009-01-01

    Upon local infection, plants possess inducible systemic defense responses against their natural enemies. Bacterial infection results in the accumulation to high levels of the mobile metabolite C9-dicarboxylic acid azelaic acid in the vascular sap of Arabidopsis. Azelaic acid confers local and systemic resistance against Pseudomonas syringae. The compound primes plants to strongly accumulate salicylic acid (SA), a known defense signal, upon infection. Mutation of a gene induced by azelaic acid (AZI1) results in the specific loss in plants of systemic immunity triggered by pathogen or azelaic acid and of the priming of SA induction. AZI1, a predicted secreted protein, is also important for generating vascular sap that confers disease resistance. Thus, azelaic acid and AZI1 comprise novel components of plant systemic immunity involved in priming defenses.

  13. Missileborne artificial vision system (MAVIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andes, David K.; Witham, James C.; Miles, Michael D.

    1994-03-01

    The Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake has developed a real time, hardware and software system designed to implement and evaluate biologically inspired retinal and cortical models. The hardware is based on the Adaptive Solutions Inc. massively parallel CNAPS system COHO boards. Each COHO board is a standard size 6U VME card featuring 256 fixed point, RISC processors running at 20 MHz in a SIMD configuration. Each COHO board has a Companion board built to support a real time VSB interface to an imaging seeker, a NTSC camera and to other COHO boards. The system is designed to have multiple SIMD machines each performing different Corticomorphic functions. The system level software has been developed which allows a high level description of Corticomorphic structures to be translated into the native microcode of the CNAPS chips. Corticomorphic structures are those neural structures with a form similar to that of the retina, the lateral geniculate nucleus or the visual cortex. This real time hardware system is designed to be shrunk into a volume compatible with air launched tactical missiles. Initial versions of the software and hardware have been completed and are in the early stages of integration with a missile seeker.

  14. Missileborne Artificial Vision System (MAVIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andes, David K.; Witham, James C.; Miles, Michael D.

    1994-01-01

    Several years ago when INTEL and China Lake designed the ETANN chip, analog VLSI appeared to be the only way to do high density neural computing. In the last five years, however, digital parallel processing chips capable of performing neural computation functions have evolved to the point of rough equality with analog chips in system level computational density. The Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, has developed a real time, hardware and software system designed to implement and evaluate biologically inspired retinal and cortical models. The hardware is based on the Adaptive Solutions Inc. massively parallel CNAPS system COHO boards. Each COHO board is a standard size 6U VME card featuring 256 fixed point, RISC processors running at 20 MHz in a SIMD configuration. Each COHO board has a companion board built to support a real time VSB interface to an imaging seeker, a NTSC camera, and to other COHO boards. The system is designed to have multiple SIMD machines each performing different corticomorphic functions. The system level software has been developed which allows a high level description of corticomorphic structures to be translated into the native microcode of the CNAPS chips. Corticomorphic structures are those neural structures with a form similar to that of the retina, the lateral geniculate nucleus, or the visual cortex. This real time hardware system is designed to be shrunk into a volume compatible with air launched tactical missiles. Initial versions of the software and hardware have been completed and are in the early stages of integration with a missile seeker.

  15. A completely implantable total artificial heart system.

    PubMed

    Snyder, A; Rosenberg, G; Weiss, W; Pierce, W; Pae, W; Marlotte, J; Nazarian, R; Ford, S

    1991-01-01

    The authors developed, built, and tested in vivo a completely implanted total artificial heart (TAH) system. The system used a reduced size version of a roller screw energy converter and mating sac blood pumps. The motor drive, pumps, and a compliance chamber were implanted intrathoracically. A canister containing controlling electronics and an emergency battery was implanted in the abdomen. The secondary coil of an inductive energy transmission and telemetry system was placed over the ribs. The system was implanted in three calves, that survived 0.5-13 days with the system. The system maintained safe left atrial pressures and adequate cardiac outputs during each animal's entire course.

  16. Induction of mucosal immunity through systemic immunization: Phantom or reality?

    PubMed Central

    Su, Fei; Patel, Girishchandra B.; Hu, Songhua; Chen, Wangxue

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Generation of protective immunity at mucosal surfaces can greatly assist the host defense against pathogens which either cause disease at the mucosal epithelial barriers or enter the host through these surfaces. Although mucosal routes of immunization, such as intranasal and oral, are being intensely explored and appear promising for eliciting protective mucosal immunity in mammals, their application in clinical practice has been limited due to technical and safety related challenges. Most of the currently approved human vaccines are administered via systemic (such as intramuscular and subcutaneous) routes. Whereas these routes are acknowledged as being capable to elicit antigen-specific systemic humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, they are generally perceived as incapable of generating IgA responses or protective mucosal immunity. Nevertheless, currently licensed systemic vaccines do provide effective protection against mucosal pathogens such as influenza viruses and Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, whether systemic immunization induces protective mucosal immunity remains a controversial topic. Here we reviewed the current literature and discussed the potential of systemic routes of immunization for the induction of mucosal immunity. PMID:26752023

  17. From Artificial Chemistries to Systems Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleta, Christoph

    Artificial Chemistries abstract from real-world chemistries by reducing them to systems of interacting and reacting molecules. They have been used to study phenomena in a wide array of fields like social and ecological modelling, evolution or chemical computing. Artificial Chemistries are inherently difficult to study and, thus, methods have been proposed to analyze their complexity. This chapter outlines how the concept of chemical organization and software dedicated at their analysis can help to ease this task. The chemical organizations of a reaction network correspond to sets of molecules that can coexist over long periods of (simulation-) time. Thus, they can be used to study the full dynamic behavior a system can exhibit without the need to simulate it in every detail. Due to this appealing property, Chemical Organization Theory has been used in the study of a wide array of systems ranging from Artificial Chemistries to real-world chemistries and biological systems. Especially the analysis of biological systems motivated an integration of the tools dedicated to the study of chemical organizations into an application framework from Systems Biology. The benefit of this integration is that tools from Systems Biology can be used without much effort along with the tools for the computation of chemical organizations and vice versa. Thus, software for the analysis of chemical organizations seamlessly integrates into a framework covering almost any aspect of network design and analysis.

  18. Tailoring superradiance to design artificial quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Longo, Paolo; Keitel, Christoph H; Evers, Jörg

    2016-03-24

    Cooperative phenomena arising due to the coupling of individual atoms via the radiation field are a cornerstone of modern quantum and optical physics. Recent experiments on x-ray quantum optics added a new twist to this line of research by exploiting superradiance in order to construct artificial quantum systems. However, so far, systematic approaches to deliberately design superradiance properties are lacking, impeding the desired implementation of more advanced quantum optical schemes. Here, we develop an analytical framework for the engineering of single-photon superradiance in extended media applicable across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, and show how it can be used to tailor the properties of an artificial quantum system. This "reverse engineering" of superradiance not only provides an avenue towards non-linear and quantum mechanical phenomena at x-ray energies, but also leads to a unified view on and a better understanding of superradiance across different physical systems.

  19. Tailoring superradiance to design artificial quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Paolo; Keitel, Christoph H.; Evers, Jörg

    2016-03-01

    Cooperative phenomena arising due to the coupling of individual atoms via the radiation field are a cornerstone of modern quantum and optical physics. Recent experiments on x-ray quantum optics added a new twist to this line of research by exploiting superradiance in order to construct artificial quantum systems. However, so far, systematic approaches to deliberately design superradiance properties are lacking, impeding the desired implementation of more advanced quantum optical schemes. Here, we develop an analytical framework for the engineering of single-photon superradiance in extended media applicable across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, and show how it can be used to tailor the properties of an artificial quantum system. This “reverse engineering” of superradiance not only provides an avenue towards non-linear and quantum mechanical phenomena at x-ray energies, but also leads to a unified view on and a better understanding of superradiance across different physical systems.

  20. Immune System as a Sensory System

    PubMed Central

    Dozmorov, Igor M.; Dresser, D.

    2010-01-01

    As suggested by the well-known gestalt concept the immune system can be regarded as an integrated complex system, the functioning of which cannot be fully characterized by the behavior of its constituent elements. Similar approaches to the immune system in particular and sensory systems in general allows one to discern similarities and differences in the process of distinguishing informative patterns in an otherwise random background, thus initiating an appropriate and adequate response. This may lead to a new interpretation of difficulties in the comprehension of some immunological phenomena. PMID:21686066

  1. Artificial intelligence and space power systems automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, David J.

    1987-01-01

    Various applications of artificial intelligence to space electrical power systems are discussed. An overview is given of completed, on-going, and planned knowledge-based system activities. These applications include the Nickel-Cadmium Battery Expert System (NICBES) (the expert system interfaced with the Hubble Space Telescope electrical power system test bed); the early work with the Space Station Experiment Scheduler (SSES); the three expert systems under development in the space station advanced development effort in the core module power management and distribution system test bed; planned cooperation of expert systems in the Core Module Power Management and Distribution (CM/PMAD) system breadboard with expert systems for the space station at other research centers; and the intelligent data reduction expert system under development.

  2. Agency in natural and artificial systems.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Alvaro; Etxeberria, Arantza

    2005-01-01

    We analyze the conditions for agency in natural and artificial systems. In the case of basic (natural) autonomous systems, self-construction and activity in the environment are two aspects of the same organization, the distinction between which is entirely conceptual: their sensorimotor activities are metabolic, realized according to the same principles and through the same material transformations as those typical of internal processes (such as energy transduction). The two aspects begin to be distinguishable in a particular evolutionary trend, related to the size increase of some groups of organisms whose adaptive abilities depend on motility. Here a specialized system develops, which, in the sensorimotor aspect, is decoupled from the metabolic basis, although it remains dependent on it in the self-constructive aspect. This decoupling reveals a complexification of the organization. In the last section of the article this approach to natural agency is used to analyze artificial systems by posing two problems: whether it is possible to artificially build an organization similar to the natural, and whether this notion of agency can be grounded on different organizing principles.

  3. A Dynamic Health Assessment Approach for Shearer Based on Artificial Immune Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongbin; Xu, Xihua; Si, Lei; Ji, Rui; Liu, Xinhua; Tan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    In order to accurately identify the dynamic health of shearer, reducing operating trouble and production accident of shearer and improving coal production efficiency further, a dynamic health assessment approach for shearer based on artificial immune algorithm was proposed. The key technologies such as system framework, selecting the indicators for shearer dynamic health assessment, and health assessment model were provided, and the flowchart of the proposed approach was designed. A simulation example, with an accuracy of 96%, based on the collected data from industrial production scene was provided. Furthermore, the comparison demonstrated that the proposed method exhibited higher classification accuracy than the classifiers based on back propagation-neural network (BP-NN) and support vector machine (SVM) methods. Finally, the proposed approach was applied in an engineering problem of shearer dynamic health assessment. The industrial application results showed that the paper research achievements could be used combining with shearer automation control system in fully mechanized coal face. The simulation and the application results indicated that the proposed method was feasible and outperforming others. PMID:27123002

  4. Hypo-gravity and immune system effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Paul D.; Barnes, Frank

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies on the effects of hypo-gravity on astronauts have shown depressed response of the immune system component cells (e.g. T-lymphocytes activity) and associated bone-mass loss due to demineralization. The widespread use of various electrical stimulation techniques in fracture repair and bone growth make use of the inherent piezoelectric and streaming potentials in Ca(2++) depositation. In-vitro and in-vivo experiments were designed to determine if these potentials, absent or greatly reduced in space, could be artificially enhanced to advantageously effect the bone marrow and, consequently, immune system cells. The bone marrow plays an extremely important role in the development and maturation of all blood cells and, specifically, T- and B-lymphocytes. It is our belief that simulated E-fields will enhance this development when 'ambient' physiological fields are absent during spaceflight or extended bedrest. Our investigation began with a look at the component immune system cells and their growth patterns in vitro. The first chamber will induce E-fields by current densities produced from an agar-bridge electrode arrangement. The cells are immersed in a nutrient agar and isolated from the electrodes by an agar bridge to prevent electrolytic contamination. The second chamber induces current densities by mutual induction from a magnetic field produced by a solenoid coil. Cells are isolated in a small radial area to reduce (1/r) effects and for accurate field calculations. We anticipate inducing currents in the nano- and microampere range as indicated by our calculations of physiological fields.

  5. Immune System Toxicity and Immunotoxicity Hazard Identification

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to chemicals may alter immune system health, increasing the risk of infections, allergy and autoimmune diseases. The chapter provides a concise overview of the immune system, host factors that affect immune system heal, and the effects that xenobiotic exposure may have ...

  6. Immune Evasion, Immunopathology and the Regulation of the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Sorci, Gabriele; Cornet, Stéphane; Faivre, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Costs and benefits of the immune response have attracted considerable attention in the last years among evolutionary biologists. Given the cost of parasitism, natural selection should favor individuals with the most effective immune defenses. Nevertheless, there exists huge variation in the expression of immune effectors among individuals. To explain this apparent paradox, it has been suggested that an over-reactive immune system might be too costly, both in terms of metabolic resources and risks of immune-mediated diseases, setting a limit to the investment into immune defenses. Here, we argue that this view neglects one important aspect of the interaction: the role played by evolving pathogens. We suggest that taking into account the co-evolutionary interactions between the host immune system and the parasitic strategies to overcome the immune response might provide a better picture of the selective pressures that shape the evolution of immune functioning. Integrating parasitic strategies of host exploitation can also contribute to understand the seemingly contradictory results that infection can enhance, but also protect from, autoimmune diseases. In the last decades, the incidence of autoimmune disorders has dramatically increased in wealthy countries of the northern hemisphere with a concomitant decrease of most parasitic infections. Experimental work on model organisms has shown that this pattern may be due to the protective role of certain parasites (i.e., helminths) that rely on the immunosuppression of hosts for their persistence. Interestingly, although parasite-induced immunosuppression can protect against autoimmunity, it can obviously favor the spread of other infections. Therefore, we need to think about the evolution of the immune system using a multidimensional trade-off involving immunoprotection, immunopathology and the parasitic strategies to escape the immune response. PMID:25436882

  7. Visual computing model for immune system and medical system.

    PubMed

    Gong, Tao; Cao, Xinxue; Xiong, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Natural immune system is an intelligent self-organizing and adaptive system, which has a variety of immune cells with different types of immune mechanisms. The mutual cooperation between the immune cells shows the intelligence of this immune system, and modeling this immune system has an important significance in medical science and engineering. In order to build a comprehensible model of this immune system for better understanding with the visualization method than the traditional mathematic model, a visual computing model of this immune system was proposed and also used to design a medical system with the immune system, in this paper. Some visual simulations of the immune system were made to test the visual effect. The experimental results of the simulations show that the visual modeling approach can provide a more effective way for analyzing this immune system than only the traditional mathematic equations.

  8. The immune system in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Harrison, David G

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is generally attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, the kidney, and the central nervous system. During the past several years, it has become apparent that cells of the innate and adaptive immune system also contribute to this disease. Macrophages and T cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension, and likely contribute to end-organ damage. We have shown that mice lacking lymphocytes, such as recombinase-activating gene-deficient (RAG-1(-/-)) mice, have blunted hypertension in response to angiotensin II, increased salt levels, and norepinephrine. Adoptive transfer of T cells restores the blood pressure response to these stimuli. Others have shown that mice with severe combined immunodeficiency have blunted hypertension in response to angiotensin II. Deletion of the RAG gene in Dahl salt-sensitive rats reduces the hypertensive response to salt feeding. The central nervous system seems to orchestrate immune cell activation. We produced lesions of the anteroventral third ventricle and showed that these block T cell activation in response to angiotensin II. Likewise, we showed that genetic manipulation of reactive oxygen species in the subfornical organ modulates both hypertension and T cell activation. Current evidence indicates that production of cytokines including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 17, and interleukin 6 contribute to hypertension, likely by promoting vasoconstriction, production of reactive oxygen species, and sodium reabsorption in the kidney. We propose a working hypothesis linking the sympathetic nervous system, immune cells, the production of cytokines, and ultimately vascular and renal dysfunction, leading to augmentation of hypertension.

  9. Immunological memory within the innate immune system

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Joseph C; Ugolini, Sophie; Vivier, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Immune memory has traditionally been the domain of the adaptive immune system, present only in antigen-specific T and B cells. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence for immunological memory in lower organisms (which are not thought to possess adaptive immunity) and within specific cell subsets of the innate immune system. A special focus will be given to recent findings in both mouse and humans for specificity and memory in natural killer (NK) cells, which have resided under the umbrella of innate immunity for decades. The surprising longevity and enhanced responses of previously primed NK cells will be discussed in the context of several immunization settings. PMID:24674969

  10. Genomics and the immune system.

    PubMed

    Pipkin, Matthew E; Monticelli, Silvia

    2008-05-01

    While the hereditary information encoded in the Watson-Crick base pairing of genomes is largely static within a given individual, access to this information is controlled by dynamic mechanisms. The human genome is pervasively transcribed, but the roles played by the majority of the non-protein-coding genome sequences are still largely unknown. In this review we focus on insights to gene transcriptional regulation by placing special emphasis on genome-wide approaches, and on how non-coding RNAs, which derive from global transcription of the genome, in turn control gene expression. We review recent progress in the field with highlights on the immune system.

  11. Artificial immune-network based autonomous mobile robots navigation and coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Q. J.; Wang, R. X.

    2005-12-01

    Based on the analogies between multi autonomous robots system (MARS) and immune system, a synthesized immune network is proposed, and used to solve the navigation and coordination problem on MARS. Individual robot was regarded as small-scaled immune networks (SN). Task was regarded as antigen, and behavior tactics were deemed to the antibodies respectively. Behavior tactic to a robot sensor was taken as B cell. Navigation and coordination problem is transformed into the interaction mechanism among antibody, antigen and small-scaled immune networks. The pursuit problem was used to validate the hypothesis. Simulation results suggest that the proposal is promising.

  12. A brief outline of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Namrata; De, Rajat K

    2014-01-01

    The various cells and proteins responsible for immunity constitute the immune system, and their orchestrated response to defend foreign/non-self substances (antigen) is known as the immune response. When an antigen attacks the host system, two distinct, yet interrelated, branches of the immune system are active-the nonspecific/innate and specific/adaptive immune response. Both of these systems have certain physiological mechanisms, which enable the host to recognize foreign materials to itself and to neutralize, eliminate, or metabolize them. Innate immunity represents the earliest development of protection against antigens. Adaptive immunity has again two branches-humoral and cell mediated. It should be noted that both innate and adaptive immunities do not work independently. Moreover, most of the immune responses involve the activity and interplay of both the humoral and the cell-mediated immune branches of the immune system. We have described these branches in detail along with the mechanism of antigen recognition. This chapter also describes the disorders of immune system in brief.

  13. Proactive learning for artificial cognitive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soo-Young

    2010-04-01

    The Artificial Cognitive Systems (ACS) will be developed for human-like functions such as vision, auditory, inference, and behavior. Especially, computational models and artificial HW/SW systems will be devised for Proactive Learning (PL) and Self-Identity (SI). The PL model provides bilateral interactions between robot and unknown environment (people, other robots, cyberspace). For the situation awareness in unknown environment it is required to receive audiovisual signals and to accumulate knowledge. If the knowledge is not enough, the PL should improve by itself though internet and others. For human-oriented decision making it is also required for the robot to have self-identify and emotion. Finally, the developed models and system will be mounted on a robot for the human-robot co-existing society. The developed ACS will be tested against the new Turing Test for the situation awareness. The Test problems will consist of several video clips, and the performance of the ACSs will be compared against those of human with several levels of cognitive ability.

  14. Overview of the Immune System

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the bone marrow is the precursor to innate immune cells—neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils, mast cells, monocytes, ... common lymphoid progenitor and share features of both innate and adaptive immune cells, as they provide immediate ...

  15. Learning and Memory... and the Immune System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin, Ioana; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The nervous system and the immune system are two main regulators of homeostasis in the body. Communication between them ensures normal functioning of the organism. Immune cells and molecules are required for sculpting the circuitry and determining the activity of the nervous system. Within the parenchyma of the central nervous system (CNS),…

  16. An Artificial Ising System with Phononic Excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, Hamed; Griffith, W. Ashley; Benson, Philip; Nasseri, M. H. B.; Young, R. Paul

    Many intractable systems and problems can be reduced to a system of interacting spins. Here, we report mapping collective phononic excitations from different sources of crystal vibrations to spin systems. The phononic excitations in our experiments are due to micro and nano cracking (yielding crackling noises due to lattice distortion). We develop real time mapping of the multi-array senores to a network-space and then mapping the excitation- networks to spin-like systems. We show that new mapped system satisfies the quench (impulsive) characteristics of the Ising model in 2D classical spin systems. In particular, we show that our artificial Ising system transits between two ground states and approaching the critical point accompanies with a very short time frozen regime, inducing formation of domains separated by kinks. For a cubic-test under a true triaxial test (3D case), we map the system to a 6-spin ring under a transversal-driving field where using functional multiplex networks, the vector components of the spin are inferred (i.e., XY model). By visualization of spin patterns of the ring per each event, we demonstrate that ``kinks'' (as defects) proliferate when system approach from above to its critical point. We support our observations with employing recorded acoustic excitations during distortion of crystal lattices in nano-indentation tests on different crystals (silicon and graphite), triaxial loading test on rock (poly-crystal) samples and a true 3D triaxial test.

  17. Primary and secondary immune responses to keyhole limpet hemocyanin in rats after infusion of hemoglobin vesicle, an artificial oxygen carrier.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Mitsuhiro; Takahashi, Daisuke; Abe, Hideki; Sakai, Hiromi; Horinouchi, Hirohisa; Kobayashi, Koichi; Ikeda, Hisami; Azuma, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Hemoglobin vesicles (HbVs), artificial oxygen carriers encapsulating concentrated Hb solution on phospholipid vesicles (liposomes), are promising candidates for clinically useful transfusion. Although HbV infusion transiently suppressed the proliferative response of rat splenic T-cells to concanavalin A or keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), a T-cell-dependent antigen, in ex vivo culture conditions, HbV infusion did not affect the primary IgG antibody response. We extended our assessment of the effects of HbV infusion on the systemic immune response using primary and secondary responses to KLH in rats. We observed that the generation of primary anti-KLH IgM antibody in HbV-infused rats was not suppressed but was instead higher than those in saline-infused rats. Furthermore, HbV infusion did not suppress the increase of IgG subclass of KLH antibody in secondary response. The T cell response to KLH of bulk spleen cells, as derived from 2-3 months after secondary KLH immunization, was unaffected by infusion of HbV, suggesting that HbV loading has no suppressive effect on homeostatic survival of memory T-cells against KLH. These results indicate that HbV is highly biocompatible in systemic immune responses in rats.

  18. Avian biological clock - Immune system relationship.

    PubMed

    Markowska, Magdalena; Majewski, Paweł M; Skwarło-Sońta, Krystyna

    2017-01-01

    Biological rhythms in birds are driven by the master clock, which includes the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the pineal gland and the retina. Light/dark cycles are the cues that synchronize the rhythmic changes in physiological processes, including immunity. This review summarizes our investigations on the bidirectional relationships between the chicken pineal gland and the immune system. We demonstrated that, in the chicken, the main pineal hormone, melatonin, regulates innate immunity, maintains the rhythmicity of immune reactions and is involved in the seasonal changes in immunity. Using thioglycollate-induced peritonitis as a model, we showed that the activated immune system regulates the pineal gland by inhibition of melatonin production at the level of the key enzyme in its biosynthetic pathway, arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AANAT). Interleukin 6 and interleukin 18 seem to be the immune mediators influencing the pineal gland, directly inhibiting Aanat gene transcription and modulating expression of the clock genes Bmal1 and Per3, which in turn regulate Aanat.

  19. Artificial immune algorithm implementation for optimized multi-axis sculptured surface CNC machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountas, N. A.; Kechagias, J. D.; Vaxevanidis, N. M.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the results obtained by the implementation of an artificial immune algorithm to optimize standard multi-axis tool-paths applied to machine free-form surfaces. The investigation for its applicability was based on a full factorial experimental design addressing the two additional axes for tool inclination as independent variables whilst a multi-objective response was formulated by taking into consideration surface deviation and tool path time; objectives assessed directly from computer-aided manufacturing environment A standard sculptured part was developed by scratch considering its benchmark specifications and a cutting-edge surface machining tool-path was applied to study the effects of the pattern formulated when dynamically inclining a toroidal end-mill and guiding it towards the feed direction under fixed lead and tilt inclination angles. The results obtained form the series of the experiments were used for the fitness function creation the algorithm was about to sequentially evaluate. It was found that the artificial immune algorithm employed has the ability of attaining optimal values for inclination angles facilitating thus the complexity of such manufacturing process and ensuring full potentials in multi-axis machining modelling operations for producing enhanced CNC manufacturing programs. Results suggested that the proposed algorithm implementation may reduce the mean experimental objective value to 51.5%

  20. The Microbiome, Systemic Immune Function, and Allotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Nellore, Anoma; Fishman, Jay A

    2016-01-01

    Diverse effects of the microbiome on solid organ transplantation are beginning to be recognized. In allograft recipients, microbial networks are disrupted by immunosuppression, nosocomial and community-based infectious exposures, antimicrobial therapies, surgery, and immune processes. Shifting microbial patterns, including acute infectious exposures, have dynamic and reciprocal interactions with local and systemic immune systems. Both individual microbial species and microbial networks have central roles in the induction and control of innate and adaptive immune responses, in graft rejection, and in ischemia-reperfusion injury. Understanding the diverse interactions between the microbiome and the immune system of allograft recipients may facilitate clinical management in the future.

  1. The Microbiome, Systemic Immune Function, and Allotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nellore, Anoma

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Diverse effects of the microbiome on solid organ transplantation are beginning to be recognized. In allograft recipients, microbial networks are disrupted by immunosuppression, nosocomial and community-based infectious exposures, antimicrobial therapies, surgery, and immune processes. Shifting microbial patterns, including acute infectious exposures, have dynamic and reciprocal interactions with local and systemic immune systems. Both individual microbial species and microbial networks have central roles in the induction and control of innate and adaptive immune responses, in graft rejection, and in ischemia-reperfusion injury. Understanding the diverse interactions between the microbiome and the immune system of allograft recipients may facilitate clinical management in the future. PMID:26656674

  2. Artificial Intelligence for VHSIC Systems Design (AIVD) User Reference Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    AD-A259 518 C;ý I RESEARCH TRIANGLE INSTITUTE ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE FOR IVHSIC SYSTEMS DESIGN (AIVD) DTIC USER REFERENCE MANUAL * ScELECTE fl2...Report 14. SUBJECT TERMS IS. MUMBER OF PAGES VHSIC, Software/hardware codesign, Artificial Intelligence graph transformation, ADAS 14. PRICE CODE 17... ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE FOR I VHSIC SYSTEMS DESIGN (AIVD) USER REFERENCE MANUAL December 1988 I Department of the Army ,,’ U.S. Army Electronics Research

  3. Conceptual Spaces of the Immune System.

    PubMed

    Fierz, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The immune system can be looked at as a cognitive system. This is often done in analogy to the neuro-psychological system. Here, it is demonstrated that the cognitive functions of the immune system can be properly described within a new theory of cognitive science. Gärdenfors' geometrical framework of conceptual spaces is applied to immune cognition. Basic notions, like quality dimensions, natural properties and concepts, similarities, prototypes, saliences, etc., are related to cognitive phenomena of the immune system. Constraints derived from treating the immune system within a cognitive theory, like Gärdenfors' conceptual spaces, might well prove to be instrumental for the design of vaccines, immunological diagnostic tests, and immunotherapy.

  4. Conceptual Spaces of the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Fierz, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The immune system can be looked at as a cognitive system. This is often done in analogy to the neuro-psychological system. Here, it is demonstrated that the cognitive functions of the immune system can be properly described within a new theory of cognitive science. Gärdenfors’ geometrical framework of conceptual spaces is applied to immune cognition. Basic notions, like quality dimensions, natural properties and concepts, similarities, prototypes, saliences, etc., are related to cognitive phenomena of the immune system. Constraints derived from treating the immune system within a cognitive theory, like Gärdenfors’ conceptual spaces, might well prove to be instrumental for the design of vaccines, immunological diagnostic tests, and immunotherapy. PMID:28018339

  5. [Immune System Reaction against Environmental Pollutants].

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Tsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Natsu; Okuda, Masayuki; Ishimaru, Yasutaka; Takahashi, Hidekazu

    2015-01-01

    Environmental pollutants (such as diesel exhaust particles and silica) cause disorders ranging from bronchial asthma to malignant tumors. In recent years, it has been reported that some of the signaling pathways in which environmental contaminants act in vivo are associated with innate immunity. Innate immunity recognizes ligands and induces inflammation. Those ligands are pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs: e.g., lipopolysaccharide) and danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs: e.g., cholesterol crystallization or uric acid crystal). Activation of innate immunity stimulates the acquired immunity system. Therefore, innate immunity regulates the strength of the general immune system. Furthermore, crystal silica, which is an environmental pollutant, activates innate immunity as a ligand. Innate immunity involves the membrane-bound Toll-like receptors (TLR) and cytoplasm-localized nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLR). We reported the innate immunity-system-related diseases such as Crohn's disease, Blau syndrome, myelogenous leukemia, and sarcoidosis. An inflammasome complex containing NLR has attracted attention owing to its correlation with the onset of several diseases. It is reported that the inflammasome activation is related to the development of lifestyle-related diseases such as myocardial infarction and fatty liver. It is also reported that the mechanism by which crystal silica and asbestos cause inflammation involves the inflammasome activation. Analyzing the genes of innate immunity contributes to the clarification of the mechanism of disease onset caused by environmental pollutants.

  6. [Immune proteasomes in the development of rat immune system].

    PubMed

    Karpova, Ia D; Lyupina, Iu V; Astakhova, T M; Stepanova, A A; Erokhov, P A; Abramova, E B; Sharova, N P

    2013-01-01

    their plunge by P5 may be related to the loss of liver function of a primary lymphoid organ of the immune system by this stage and disappearance of B-lymphocytes enriched by immune proteasomes in it. In the spleen and liver, MHC class I molecules were revealed at the periods of the raise of proteasome immune subunits level. On E21 , the liver was enriched by neuronal NO-synthase, its level decreased after birth and enhanced to P18. This fact indicates the possibility of the induction of the immune subunits LMP7 [character: see text] LMP2 expression in hepatocytes in signal way with neuronal NO-synthase participation. The results obtained prove that T-cell immune response with spleen participation as regards rat liver cells is possible starting with P19-P21 stage. First, at this period, white pulp T-area is formed in the spleen. Second, enhanced immune proteasomes and MHC class I molecules levels in hepatocytes can procure antigenic epitopes formation from foreign proteins and their delivery to cell surface for their subsequent presentation for cytotoxic T-lymphocytes.

  7. Vehicle detection system using artificial retina chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, Koichi; Tamura, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Ken-ichi; Kyuma, Kazuo

    2001-05-01

    The AR chip is a versatile CMOS image sensor, functions are not only normal image acquisition but also on-chip image processing. Such features can accelerate algorithms of image processing and the controls of proper image. We have developed the low-cost and compact vehicle detection system using he AR chips. The system is composed of a processing module and an AR camera module. The AR Camera module has dual artificial retina chips to cover the wide dynamic range of the outdoor brightness environment. The ND filter is coated on the lens of one of the chips, each AR chip covers different range of the brightness. The control algorithm of image acquisition is designed to select an adequate chip based on the image quality. The images of the selected chip are processed by on-chip functions for pre-processing and they are transferred to the processing module. Finally the processing module judges the existence of vehicles and detects several kinds of attributive information of the detected vehicle such as moving direction. In our paper, we describe details of the system and the algorithm and we show several result data through field experiments under the real road environment.

  8. Feeding Our Immune System: Impact on Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wolowczuk, Isabelle; Verwaerde, Claudie; Viltart, Odile; Delanoye, Anne; Delacre, Myriam; Pot, Bruno; Grangette, Corinne

    2008-01-01

    Endogenous intestinal microflora and environmental factors, such as diet, play a central role in immune homeostasis and reactivity. In addition, microflora and diet both influence body weight and insulin-resistance, notably through an action on adipose cells. Moreover, it is known since a long time that any disturbance in metabolism, like obesity, is associated with immune alteration, for example, inflammation. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on how nutrients-derived factors (mostly focusing on fatty acids and glucose) impact the innate and acquired immune systems, including the gut immune system and its associated bacterial flora. We will try to show the reader how the highly energy-demanding immune cells use glucose as a main source of fuel in a way similar to that of insulin-responsive adipose tissue and how Toll-like receptors (TLRs) of the innate immune system, which are found on immune cells, intestinal cells, and adipocytes, are presently viewed as essential actors in the complex balance ensuring bodily immune and metabolic health. Understanding more about these links will surely help to study and understand in a more fundamental way the common observation that eating healthy will keep you and your immune system healthy. PMID:18350123

  9. Recent Advances in Aptamers Targeting Immune System.

    PubMed

    Hu, Piao-Ping

    2017-02-01

    The immune system plays important role in protecting the organism by recognizing non-self molecules from pathogen such as bacteria, parasitic worms, and viruses. When the balance of the host defense system is disturbed, immunodeficiency, autoimmunity, and inflammation occur. Nucleic acid aptamers are short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) or RNA ligands that interact with complementary molecules with high specificity and affinity. Aptamers that target the molecules involved in immune system to modulate their function have great potential to be explored as new diagnostic and therapeutic agents for immune disorders. This review summarizes recent advances in the development of aptamers targeting immune system. The selection of aptamers with superior chemical and biological characteristics will facilitate their application in the diagnosis and treatment of immune disorders.

  10. Physical Theory of the Immune System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deem, Michael

    2012-10-01

    I will discuss to theories of the immune system and describe a theory of the immune response to vaccines. I will illustrate this theory by application to design of the annual influenza vaccine. I will use this theory to explain limitations in the vaccine for dengue fever and to suggest a transport-inspired amelioration of these limitations.

  11. The Molecules of the Immune System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonegawa, Susumu

    1985-01-01

    The immune system includes the most diverse proteins known because they are encoded by hundreds of scattered gene fragments which can be combined in millions or billions of ways. Events of immune response, binding of antigens, antibody structure, T-cell receptors, and other immunologically-oriented topics are discussed. (DH)

  12. [Olive oil, immune system and infection].

    PubMed

    Puertollano, M A; Puertollano, E; Alvarez de Cienfuegos, G; de Pablo Martínez, Manuel Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids contribute to the suppression of immune system functions. For this reason, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been applied in the resolution of inflammatory disorders. Although the inhibition of several immune functions promotes beneficial effects on the human health, this state may lead to a significant reduction of immune protection against infectious microorganisms (viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites). Nevertheless, less attention has been paid to the action of olive oil in immunonutrition. Olive oil, a main constituent of the Mediterranean diet, is capable of modulating several immune functions, but it does not reduce host immune resistance to infectious microorganisms. Based on these criteria, we corroborate that olive oil administration may exert beneficial effects on the human health and especially on immune system, because it contributes to the reduction of typical inflammatory activity observed in patients suffering from autoimmune disorders, but without exacerbating the susceptibility to pathogen agents. The administration of olive oil in lipid emulsions may exert beneficial effects on the health and particularly on the immune system of immunocompromised patients. Therefore, this fact acquires a crucial importance in clinical nutrition. This review contributes to clarify the interaction between the administration of diets containing olive oil and immune system, as well as to determine the effect promoted by this essential component of Mediterranean diet in the immunomodulation against an infectious agent.

  13. How phototherapy affects the immune system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyson, Mary

    2008-03-01

    The immune system is a complex group of cells, tissues and organs that recognize and attack foreign substances, pathogenic organisms and cancer cells. It also responds to injury by producing inflammation. The immune system has peripheral components that include skin-associated lymphoid tissues (SALT) and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT), located where pathogens and other harmful substances gain access to the body. Phototherapy, delivered at appropriate treatment parameters, exerts direct actions on the cellular elements of the peripheral part of the immune system since it is readily accessible to photons.

  14. [Regulation of allergy by innate immune system].

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Yutaro; Akira, Shizuo

    2009-11-01

    Allergy is an immune disease including asthma. Activation of Th2 response, such as production of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 from CD4+ T cells and IgG1 or IgE from B cells is responsible for allergy. Activation of acquired immune system requires preceding activation of innate immunity, therefore innate immunity may control Th2 response and allergy. Recent studies revealed that dendritic cells, epithelial cells, and basophils play central roles in the initiation of Th2 response. In this review, we will summarize the current understanding on the control of Th2 and allergic responses by innate immune system, and discuss recent findings on house dust mite-induced allergic response based on these understandings.

  15. A brief journey through the immune system.

    PubMed

    Yatim, Karim M; Lakkis, Fadi G

    2015-07-07

    This review serves as an introduction to an Immunology Series for the Nephrologist published in CJASN. It provides a brief overview of the immune system, how it works, and why it matters to kidneys. This review describes in broad terms the main divisions of the immune system (innate and adaptive), their cellular and tissue components, and the ways by which they function and are regulated. The story is told through the prism of evolution in order to relay to the reader why the immune system does what it does and why imperfections in the system can lead to renal disease. Detailed descriptions of cell types, molecules, and other immunologic curiosities are avoided as much as possible in an effort to not detract from the importance of the broader concepts that define the immune system and its relationship to the kidney.

  16. A Brief Journey through the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Yatim, Karim M.

    2015-01-01

    This review serves as an introduction to an Immunology Series for the Nephrologist published in CJASN. It provides a brief overview of the immune system, how it works, and why it matters to kidneys. This review describes in broad terms the main divisions of the immune system (innate and adaptive), their cellular and tissue components, and the ways by which they function and are regulated. The story is told through the prism of evolution in order to relay to the reader why the immune system does what it does and why imperfections in the system can lead to renal disease. Detailed descriptions of cell types, molecules, and other immunologic curiosities are avoided as much as possible in an effort to not detract from the importance of the broader concepts that define the immune system and its relationship to the kidney. PMID:25845377

  17. Systemic tolerance and secretory immunity after oral immunization

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Diminished systemic immune reaction after ingestion of antigen has been reported in several animal models. Conversely, it has been reported recently that oral immunization may lead to the production of secretory antibodies. To determine whether these events could occur concurrently, CBA/J mice were immunized intragastrically with varying doses of ovalbumin (OVA) and Streptococcus mutans. After 7 d, the animals were challenged systemically with antigen in complete adjuvant and 8 d later serum and saliva taken, and the draining lymph nodes assayed for a proliferative response. Intragastric doses of 1 mg OVA or 10(9) S. mutans led to significant suppression of the proliferative response, and intragastric doses of 10 mg OVA or 2.5 X 10(9) S. mutans led to the production of detectable salivary antibodies using hemagglutination. Serum antibodies were not detected after intragastric administration of OVA or S. mutans. Suppression of the proliferative response could be detected from 2-60 d after intragastric administration of OVA, and 2-21 d after S. mutans. Prior intragastric immunization with heterologous antigens did not suppress the response to OVA or S. mutans. Transfer of 40 X 10(6) mesenteric lymph node cells from mice given 20 mg OVA or 10(9) S. mutans led to suppression of the proliferative response in syngeneic recipients. Salivary antibodies wer removed by absorption with anti-IgA, but not anti-IgG or IgM, indicating that they were of the IgA class. It appears that intragastric administration of soluble or particulate antigens in mice may lead to the concurrent induction of salivary antibodies and systemic suppression. PMID:7452148

  18. The innate immune system in demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Lior; Quintana, Francisco J; Weiner, Howard L

    2012-07-01

    Demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis are chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases with a heterogeneous clinical presentation and course. Both the adaptive and the innate immune systems have been suggested to contribute to their pathogenesis and recovery. In this review, we discuss the role of the innate immune system in mediating demyelinating diseases. In particular, we provide an overview of the anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory functions of dendritic cells, mast cells, natural killer (NK) cells, NK-T cells, γδ T cells, microglial cells, and astrocytes. We emphasize the interaction of astroctyes with the immune system and how this interaction relates to the demyelinating pathologies. Given the pivotal role of the innate immune system, it is possible that targeting these cells may provide an effective therapeutic approach for demyelinating diseases.

  19. Weakened Immune System and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Healthcare Professionals Weakened Immune System and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... up to age 26 years Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  20. Immunoendocrinology: faulty hormonal imprinting in the immune system.

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2014-06-01

    Hormonal imprinting is an epigenetic process which is taking place perinatally at the first encounter between the developing hormone receptors and their target hormones. The hormonal imprinting influences the binding capacity of receptors, the hormone synthesis of the cells, and other hormonally regulated functions, as sexual behavior, aggressivity, empathy, etc. However, during the critical period, when the window for imprinting is open, molecules similar to the physiological imprinters as synthetic hormone analogs, other members of the hormone families, environmental pollutants, etc. can cause faulty imprinting with life-long consequences. The developing immune system, the cells of which also have receptors for hormones, is very sensitive to faulty imprinting, which causes alterations in the antibody and cytokine production, in the ratio of immune cells, in the defense against bacterial and viral infections as well as against malignant tumors. Immune cells (lymphocytes, monocytes, granulocytes and mast cells) are also producing hormones which are secreted into the blood circulation as well as are transported locally (packed transport). This process is also disturbed by faulty imprinting. As immune cells are differentiating during the whole life, faulty imprinting could develop any time, however, the most decisive is the perinatal imprinting. The faulty imprinting is inherited to the progenies in general and especially in the case of immune system. In our modern world the number and amount of artificial imprinters (e.g. endocrine disruptors and drugs) are enormously increasing. The effects of the faulty imprinters most dangerous to the immune system are shown in the paper. The present and future consequences of the flood of faulty imprintings are unpredictable however, it is discussed.

  1. From natural to bioassisted and biomimetic artificial water channel systems.

    PubMed

    Barboiu, Mihail; Gilles, Arnaud

    2013-12-17

    Within biological systems, natural channels and pores transport metabolites across the cell membranes. Researchers have explored artificial ion-channel architectures as potential mimics of natural ionic conduction. All these synthetic systems have produced an impressive collection of alternative artificial ion-channels. Amazingly, researchers have made far less progress in the area of synthetic water channels. The development of synthetic biomimetic water channels and pores could contribute to a better understanding of the natural function of protein channels and could offer new strategies to generate highly selective, advanced water purification systems. Despite the imaginative work by synthetic chemists to produce sophisticated architectures that confine water clusters, most synthetic water channels have used natural proteins channels as the selectivity components, embedded in the diverse arrays of bioassisted artificial systems. These systems combine natural proteins that present high water conductance states under natural conditions with artificial lipidic or polymeric matrixes. Experimental results have demonstrated that natural biomolecules can be used as bioassisted building blocks for the construction of highly selective water transport through artificial membranes. A next step to further the potential of these systems was the design and construction of simpler compounds that maintain the high conduction activity obtained with natural compounds leading to fully synthetic artificial biomimetic systems. Such studies aim to use constitutional selective artificial superstructures for water/proton transport to select functions similar to the natural structures. Moving to simpler water channel systems offers a chance to better understand mechanistic and structural behaviors and to uncover novel interactive water-channels that might parallel those in biomolecular systems. This Account discusses the incipient development of the first artificial water channels

  2. Building Artificial Vision Systems with Machine Learning

    SciTech Connect

    LeCun, Yann

    2011-02-23

    Three questions pose the next challenge for Artificial Intelligence (AI), robotics, and neuroscience. How do we learn perception (e.g. vision)? How do we learn representations of the perceptual world? How do we learn visual categories from just a few examples?

  3. [Biotherapy targeting the immune system].

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The use of monoclonal antibody targeted therapy has changed the management of several diseases, including in hematology and immunology. The panel of the present available biotherapies allows a specific action at various stages of the immune response. Indeed, some of these molecules can target the naive T cell at the immunological synapse or the way of TH1, TH17 and regulatory T cell. Others may be more specific for the B cell and immunoglobulin. Some will even be active on both B and T cells.

  4. The immune system in space and microgravity.

    PubMed

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2002-12-01

    Space flight and models that created conditions similar to those that occur during space flight have been shown to affect a variety of immunological responses. These have primarily been cell-mediated immune responses including leukocyte proliferation, cytokine production, and leukocyte subset distribution. The mechanisms and biomedical consequences of these changes remain to be established. Among the possible causes of space flight-induced alterations in immune responses are exposure to microgravity, exposure to stress, exposure to radiation, and many more as yet undetermined causes. This review chronicles the known effects of space flight on the immune system and explores the possible role of stress in contributing to these changes.

  5. The immune system in space and microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2002-01-01

    Space flight and models that created conditions similar to those that occur during space flight have been shown to affect a variety of immunological responses. These have primarily been cell-mediated immune responses including leukocyte proliferation, cytokine production, and leukocyte subset distribution. The mechanisms and biomedical consequences of these changes remain to be established. Among the possible causes of space flight-induced alterations in immune responses are exposure to microgravity, exposure to stress, exposure to radiation, and many more as yet undetermined causes. This review chronicles the known effects of space flight on the immune system and explores the possible role of stress in contributing to these changes.

  6. The immune system--multiple sites but one system.

    PubMed

    Harleman, Johannes H

    2006-07-01

    Recently several guidelines were published on immunotoxicity. Validation studies have shown that detailed extended examination of the immune system is able to flag immunotoxic compounds. Parameters of the examination are presented. In the final examination it is important that the whole immune system is evaluated as one functional system--multiple sites but one system.

  7. The immune system and aging: a review.

    PubMed

    Castelo-Branco, Camil; Soveral, Iris

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The concept of immunosenescence reflects age-related changes in immune responses, both cellular and serological, affecting the process of generating specific responses to foreign and self-antigens. The decline of the immune system with age is reflected in the increased susceptibility to infectious diseases, poorer response to vaccination, increased prevalence of cancer, autoimmune and other chronic diseases. Both innate and adaptive immune responses are affected by the aging process; however, the adaptive response seems to be more affected by the age-related changes in the immune system. Additionally, aged individuals tend to present a chronic low-grade inflammatory state that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many age-related diseases (atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, osteoporosis and diabetes). However, some individuals arrive to advanced ages without any major health problems, referred to as healthy aging. The immune system dysfunction seems to be somehow mitigated in this population, probably due to genetic and environmental factors yet to be described. In this review, an attempt is made to summarize the current knowledge on how the immune system is affected by the aging process.

  8. The innate immune system and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Conrad A; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W; Sacks, Steven H

    2013-10-01

    The sensitive and broadly reactive character of the innate immune system makes it liable to activation by stress factors other than infection. Thermal and metabolic stresses experienced during the transplantation procedure are sufficient to trigger the innate immune response and also augment adaptive immunity in the presence of foreign antigen on the donor organ. The resulting inflammatory and immune reactions combine to form a potent effector response that can lead to graft rejection. Here we examine the evidence that the complement and toll-like receptor systems are central to these pathways of injury and present a formidable barrier to transplantation. We review extensive information about the effector mechanisms that are mediated by these pathways, and bring together what is known about the damage-associated molecular patterns that initiate this sequence of events. Finally, we refer to two ongoing therapeutic trials that are evaluating the validity of these concepts in man.

  9. Adenovirus sensing by the immune system.

    PubMed

    Atasheva, Svetlana; Shayakhmetov, Dmitry M

    2016-12-01

    The host immune system developed multiple ways for recognition of viral pathogens. Upon disseminated adenovirus infection, the immune system senses adenovirus invasion from the moment it enters the bloodstream. The soluble blood factors, FX, antibodies, and complement, can bind and activate plethora of host-protective immune responses. Adenovirus binding to the cellular β3 integrin and endosomal membrane rupture trigger activation of IL-1α/IL-1R1 proinflammatory cascade leading to attraction of cytotoxic immune cells to the site of infection. Upon cell entry, adenovirus exposes its DNA genome in the cytoplasm and triggers DNA sensors signaling. Even when inside the nucleus, the specialized cellular machinery that recognizes the double-strand DNA breaks become activated and triggers viral DNA replication arrest. Thus, the host employs very diverse mechanisms to prevent viral dissemination.

  10. Circadian Clocks in the Immune System.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, Nathalie; Cermakian, Nicolas

    2015-08-01

    The immune system is a complex set of physiological mechanisms whose general aim is to defend the organism against non-self-bodies, such as pathogens (bacteria, viruses, parasites), as well as cancer cells. Circadian rhythms are endogenous 24-h variations found in virtually all physiological processes. These circadian rhythms are generated by circadian clocks, located in most cell types, including cells of the immune system. This review presents an overview of the clocks in the immune system and of the circadian regulation of the function of immune cells. Most immune cells express circadian clock genes and present a wide array of genes expressed with a 24-h rhythm. This has profound impacts on cellular functions, including a daily rhythm in the synthesis and release of cytokines, chemokines and cytolytic factors, the daily gating of the response occurring through pattern recognition receptors, circadian rhythms of cellular functions such as phagocytosis, migration to inflamed or infected tissue, cytolytic activity, and proliferative response to antigens. Consequently, alterations of circadian rhythms (e.g., clock gene mutation in mice or environmental disruption similar to shift work) lead to disturbed immune responses. We discuss the implications of these data for human health and the areas that future research should aim to address.

  11. Lung cancer: the immune system and radiation.

    PubMed

    Mendes, F; Antunes, C; Abrantes, A M; Gonçalves, A C; Nobre-Gois, I; Sarmento, A B; Botelho, M F; Rosa, M S

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer has a known relationship with smoking and is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Although the number of studies discussing lung cancer is vast, treatment efficacy is still suboptimal due to the wide range of factors that affect patient outcome. This review aims to collect information on lung cancer treatment, specially focused on radiation therapy. It also compiles information regarding the influence of radiotherapy on the immune system and its response to tumour cells. It evaluates how immune cells react after radiation exposure and the influence of their cytokines in the tumour microenvironment. The literature analysis points out that the immune system is a very promising field of investigation regarding prognosis, mostly because the stromal microenvironment in the tumour can provide some information about what can succeed in the future concerning treatment choices and perspectives. T cells (CD4+ and CD8+), interleukin-8, vascular endothelial growth factor and transforming growth factor-β seem to have a key role in the immune response after radiation exposure. The lack of large scale studies means there is no common consensus in the scientific community about the role of the immune system in lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Clarification of the mechanism behind the immune response after radiation can lead to better treatments and better quality life for patients.

  12. Immune system stimulation by probiotic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Rabia; Shah, Nagendra P

    2014-01-01

    Probiotic organisms are claimed to offer several functional properties including stimulation of immune system. This review is presented to provide detailed informations about how probiotics stimulate our immune system. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus casei Shirota, Bifidobacterium animalis Bb-12, Lactobacillus johnsonii La1, Bifidobacterium lactis DR10, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae boulardii are the most investigated probiotic cultures for their immunomodulation properties. Probiotics can enhance nonspecific cellular immune response characterized by activation of macrophages, natural killer (NK) cells, antigen-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes, and the release of various cytokines in strain-specific and dose-dependent manner. Mixture and type (gram-positive and gram-negative) of probiotic organisms may induce different cytokine responses. Supplementation of probiotic organisms in infancy could help prevent immune-mediated diseases in childhood, whereas their intervention in pregnancy could affect fetal immune parameters, such as cord blood interferon (IFN)-γ levels, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 levels, and breast milk immunoglobulin (Ig)A. Probiotics that can be delivered via fermented milk or yogurt could improve the gut mucosal immune system by increasing the number of IgA(+) cells and cytokine-producing cells in the effector site of the intestine.

  13. [A method of hyperspectral quantificational identification of minerals based on infrared spectral artificial immune calculation].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing-Jie; Jing, Lin-Hai; Li, Xin-Wu; Bi, Jian-Tao; Wang, Meng-Fei; Lin, Qi-Zhong

    2013-04-01

    Rapid identification of minerals based on near infrared (NIR) and shortwave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectra is vital to remote sensing mine exploration, remote sensing minerals mapping and field geological documentation of drill core, and have leaded to many identification methods including spectral angle mapping (SAM), spectral distance mapping (SDM), spectral feature fitting(SFF), linear spectral mixture model (LSMM), mathematical combination feature spectral linear inversion model(CFSLIM) etc. However, limitations of these methods affect their actual applications. The present paper firstly gives a unified minerals components spectral inversion (MCSI) model based on target sample spectrum and standard endmember spectral library evaluated by spectral similarity indexes. Then taking LSMM and SAM evaluation index for example, a specific formulation of unified MCSI model is presented in the form of a kind of combinatorial optimization. And then, an artificial immune colonial selection algorithm is used for solving minerals feature spectral linear inversion model optimization problem, which is named ICSFSLIM. Finally, an experiment was performed to use ICSFSLIM and CFSLIM to identify the contained minerals of 22 rock samples selected in Baogutu in Xinjiang China. The mean value of correctness and validness identification of ICSFSLIM are 34.22% and 54.08% respectively, which is better than that of CFSLIM 31.97% and 37.38%; the correctness and validness variance of ICSFSLIM are 0.11 and 0.13 smaller than that of CFSLIM, 0.15 and 0.25, indicating better identification stability.

  14. Securing Mobile Ad Hoc Networks Using Danger Theory-Based Artificial Immune Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A mobile ad hoc network (MANET) is a set of mobile, decentralized, and self-organizing nodes that are used in special cases, such as in the military. MANET properties render the environment of this network vulnerable to different types of attacks, including black hole, wormhole and flooding-based attacks. Flooding-based attacks are one of the most dangerous attacks that aim to consume all network resources and thus paralyze the functionality of the whole network. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to investigate the capability of a danger theory-based artificial immune algorithm called the mobile dendritic cell algorithm (MDCA) to detect flooding-based attacks in MANETs. The MDCA applies the dendritic cell algorithm (DCA) to secure the MANET with additional improvements. The MDCA is tested and validated using Qualnet v7.1 simulation tool. This work also introduces a new simulation module for a flooding attack called the resource consumption attack (RCA) using Qualnet v7.1. The results highlight the high efficiency of the MDCA in detecting RCAs in MANETs. PMID:25946001

  15. Neural Control of the Immune System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundman, Eva; Olofsson, Peder S.

    2014-01-01

    Neural reflexes support homeostasis by modulating the function of organ systems. Recent advances in neuroscience and immunology have revealed that neural reflexes also regulate the immune system. Activation of the vagus nerve modulates leukocyte cytokine production and alleviates experimental shock and autoimmune disease, and recent data have…

  16. Effects of microgravity on the immune system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Taylor, Gerald R.

    1991-01-01

    Changes in resistance to bacterial and viral infections in Apollo crew members has stimulated interest in the study of immunity and space flight. Results of studies from several laboratories in both humans and rodents have indicated alterations after space flight that include the following immunological parameters: thymus size, lymphocyte blastogenesis, interferon and interleukin production, natural killer cell activity, cytotoxic T-cell activity, leukocyte subset population distribution, response of bone marrow cells to colony stimulating factors, and delayed hypersensitivity skin test reactivity. The interactions of the immune system with other physiological systems, including muscle, bone, and the nervous system, may play a major role in the development of these immunological parameters during and after flight. There may also be direct effects of space flight on immune responses.

  17. Nutritional components regulate the gut immune system and its association with intestinal immune disease development.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Aayam; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Kunisawa, Jun

    2013-12-01

    The gut is equipped with a unique immune system for maintaining immunological homeostasis, and its functional immune disruption can result in the development of immune diseases such as food allergy and intestinal inflammation. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that nutritional components play an important role in the regulation of gut immune responses and also in the development of intestinal immune diseases. In this review, we focus on the immunological functions of lipids, vitamins, and nucleotides in the regulation of the intestinal immune system and as potential targets for the control of intestinal immune diseases.

  18. Network representations of immune system complexity

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Naeha; Torabi-Parizi, Parizad; Gottschalk, Rachel A.; Germain, Ronald N.; Dutta, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian immune system is a dynamic multi-scale system composed of a hierarchically organized set of molecular, cellular and organismal networks that act in concert to promote effective host defense. These networks range from those involving gene regulatory and protein-protein interactions underlying intracellular signaling pathways and single cell responses to increasingly complex networks of in vivo cellular interaction, positioning and migration that determine the overall immune response of an organism. Immunity is thus not the product of simple signaling events but rather non-linear behaviors arising from dynamic, feedback-regulated interactions among many components. One of the major goals of systems immunology is to quantitatively measure these complex multi-scale spatial and temporal interactions, permitting development of computational models that can be used to predict responses to perturbation. Recent technological advances permit collection of comprehensive datasets at multiple molecular and cellular levels while advances in network biology support representation of the relationships of components at each level as physical or functional interaction networks. The latter facilitate effective visualization of patterns and recognition of emergent properties arising from the many interactions of genes, molecules, and cells of the immune system. We illustrate the power of integrating ‘omics’ and network modeling approaches for unbiased reconstruction of signaling and transcriptional networks with a focus on applications involving the innate immune system. We further discuss future possibilities for reconstruction of increasingly complex cellular and organism-level networks and development of sophisticated computational tools for prediction of emergent immune behavior arising from the concerted action of these networks. PMID:25625853

  19. The innate immune system in human systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Weidenbusch, Marc; Kulkarni, Onkar P; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-04-25

    Although the role of adaptive immune mechanisms, e.g. autoantibody formation and abnormal T-cell activation, has been long noted in the pathogenesis of human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the role of innate immunity has been less well characterized. An intricate interplay between both innate and adaptive immune elements exists in protective anti-infective immunity as well as in detrimental autoimmunity. More recently, it has become clear that the innate immune system in this regard not only starts inflammation cascades in SLE leading to disease flares, but also continues to fuel adaptive immune responses throughout the course of the disease. This is why targeting the innate immune system offers an additional means of treating SLE. First trials assessing the efficacy of anti-type I interferon (IFN) therapy or modulators of pattern recognition receptor (PRR) signalling have been attempted. In this review, we summarize the available evidence on the role of several distinct innate immune elements, especially neutrophils and dendritic cells as well as the IFN system, as well as specific innate PRRs along with their signalling pathways. Finally, we highlight recent clinical trials in SLE addressing one or more of the aforementioned components of the innate immune system.

  20. Artificial cells: building bioinspired systems using small-scale biology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Ruder, Warren C; LeDuc, Philip R

    2008-01-01

    Artificial cells have generated much interest since the concept was introduced by Aleksandr Oparin in the 1920s, and they have had an impact on the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry in various areas, including potential therapeutic applications. Here, we discuss the development of small-scale, bio-inspired artificial cell components that recreate the function of key cellular and physiological systems. We describe artificial cells, selected current applications and how small-scale biology could be used to provide what might be a next-generation approach in this area. We believe that this type of work is in its infancy and that exploiting small-scale biological inspiration in the field of artificial cells has great potential for successes in the future.

  1. Innate immune system cells in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Espinosa-Luna, Jose E; Chávez-Rueda, Karina; Legorreta-Haquet, María V; Montoya-Díaz, Eduardo; Blanco-Favela, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall characterized by innate and adaptive immune system involvement. A key component of atherosclerotic plaque inflammation is the persistence of different innate immune cell types including mast cells, neutrophils, natural killer cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells. Several endogenous signals such as oxidized low-density lipoproteins, and exogenous signals such as lipopolysaccharides, trigger the activation of these cells. In particular, these signals orchestrate the early and late inflammatory responses through the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and contribute to plaque evolution through the formation of foam cells, among other events. In this review we discuss how innate immune system cells affect atherosclerosis pathogenesis.

  2. Immune system alterations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hovden, H; Frederiksen, J L; Pedersen, S W

    2013-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a disease of which the underlying cause and pathogenesis are unknown. Cumulatative data clearly indicates an active participation by the immune system in the disease. An increasingly recognized theory suggests a non-cell autonomous mechanism, meaning that multiple cells working together are necessary for the pathogenesis of the disease. Observed immune system alterations could indicate an active participation in this mechanism. Damaged motor neurons are able to activate microglia, astrocytes and the complement system, which further can influence each other and contribute to neurodegeneration. Infiltrating peripheral immune cells appears to correlate with disease progression, but their significance and composition is unclear. The deleterious effects of this collaborating system of cells appear to outweigh the protective aspects, and revealing this interplay might give more insight into the disease. Markers from the classical complement pathway are elevated where its initiator C1q appears to derive primarily from motor neurons. Activated microglia and astrocytes are found in close proximity to dying motor neurons. Their activation status and proliferation seemingly increases with disease progression. Infiltrating monocytes, macrophages and T cells are associated with these areas, although with mixed reports regarding T cell composition. This literature review will provide evidence supporting the immune system as an important part of ALS disease mechanism and present a hypothesis to direct the way for further studies.

  3. Structural colors: from natural to artificial systems.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yulan; Tippets, Cary A; Donev, Eugenii U; Lopez, Rene

    2016-09-01

    Structural coloration has attracted great interest from scientists and engineers in recent years, owing to fascination with various brilliant examples displayed in nature as well as to promising applications of bio-inspired functional photonic structures and materials. Much research has been done to reveal and emulate the physical mechanisms that underlie the structural colors found in nature. In this article, we review the fundamental physics of many natural structural colors displayed by living organisms as well as their bio-inspired artificial counterparts, with emphasis on their connections, tunability strategies, and proposed applications, which aim to maximize the technological benefits one could derive from these photonic nanostructures. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:758-775. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1396 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  4. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... remembers" the germ and can fight it again. Vaccines contain germs that have been killed or weakened. When given to a healthy person, the vaccine triggers the immune system to respond and thus ...

  5. Prion Disease and the Innate Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Barry M.; Mabbott, Neil A.

    2012-01-01

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are a unique category of infectious protein-misfolding neurodegenerative disorders. Hypothesized to be caused by misfolding of the cellular prion protein these disorders possess an infectious quality that thrives in immune-competent hosts. While much has been discovered about the routing and critical components involved in the peripheral pathogenesis of these agents there are still many aspects to be discovered. Research into this area has been extensive as it represents a major target for therapeutic intervention within this group of diseases. The main focus of pathological damage in these diseases occurs within the central nervous system. Cells of the innate immune system have been proven to be critical players in the initial pathogenesis of prion disease, and may have a role in the pathological progression of disease. Understanding how prions interact with the host innate immune system may provide us with natural pathways and mechanisms to combat these diseases prior to their neuroinvasive stage. We present here a review of the current knowledge regarding the role of the innate immune system in prion pathogenesis. PMID:23342365

  6. Obesity, inflammation and the immune system.

    PubMed

    de Heredia, Fátima Pérez; Gómez-Martínez, Sonia; Marcos, Ascensión

    2012-05-01

    Obesity shares with most chronic diseases the presence of an inflammatory component, which accounts for the development of metabolic disease and other associated health alterations. This inflammatory state is reflected in increased circulating levels of pro-inflammatory proteins, and it occurs not only in adults but also in adolescents and children. The chronic inflammatory response has its origin in the links existing between the adipose tissue and the immune system. Obesity, like other states of malnutrition, is known to impair the immune function, altering leucocyte counts as well as cell-mediated immune responses. In addition, evidence has arisen that an altered immune function contributes to the pathogenesis of obesity. This review attempts to briefly comment on the various plausible explanations that have been proposed for the phenomenon: (1) the obesity-associated increase in the production of leptin (pro-inflammatory) and the reduction in adiponectin (anti-inflammatory) seem to affect the activation of immune cells; (2) NEFA can induce inflammation through various mechanisms (such as modulation of adipokine production or activation of Toll-like receptors); (3) nutrient excess and adipocyte expansion trigger endoplasmic reticulum stress; and (4) hypoxia occurring in hypertrophied adipose tissue stimulates the expression of inflammatory genes and activates immune cells. Interestingly, data suggest a greater impact of visceral adipose tissue and central obesity, rather than total body fat, on the inflammatory process. In summary, there is a positive feedback loop between local inflammation in adipose tissue and altered immune response in obesity, both contributing to the development of related metabolic complications.

  7. [The liver and the immune system].

    PubMed

    Jakab, Lajos

    2015-07-26

    The liver is known to be the metabolic centre of the organism and is under the control of the central nervous system. It has a peculiar tissue structure and its anatomic localisation defines it as part of the immune system having an individual role in the defence of the organism. The determinant of its particular tissue build-up is the sinusoid system. In addition to hepatocytes, one cell row "endothelium", stellate cells close to the external surface, Kupffer cells tightly to its inner surface, as well as dendritic cells and other cell types (T and B lymphocytes, natural killer and natural killer T-cells, mast cells, granulocytes) are present. The multitudes and variety of cells make it possible to carry out the tasks according to the assignment of the organism. The liver is a member of the immune system having immune cells largely in an activated state. Its principal tasks are the assurance of the peripheral immune tolerance of the organism with the help of the haemopoetic cells and transforming growth factor-β. The liver takes part in the determination of the manner of the non-specific immune response of the organism. In addition to acute phase reaction of the organism, the liver has a role in the adaptive/specific immune response. These functions include retardation of the T and B lymphocytes and the defence against harmful pathogens. With the collaboration of transforming growth factor-β, immunoglobulins and their subclasses are inhibited just as the response of the T lymphocytes. The only exception is the undisturbed immunoglobulin A production. Particularly important is the intensive participation of the liver in the acute phase reaction of the organism, which is organised and guided by the coordinated functions of the cortico-hypothalamo-hypophysis-adrenal axis. Beside cellular elements, hormones, adhesion molecules, chemokines and cytokines are also involved in the cooperation with the organs. Acute phase reactants play a central role in these processes

  8. Reactions of the immune system in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    COJOCARU, Inimioara Mihaela; COJOCARU, Manole

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epilepsy may present as a symptom of many neurological disorders and often an etiological explanation cannot be identified. There is growing evidence that autoimmune mechanisms might have a role in some patients. The evidence for immunological mechanisms in epilepsy can be examined within the following three main areas: the childhood epilepsy syndromes, epilepsy associated with other immunologically mediated diseases, and the more common unselected groups of patients with epilepsy. Autoimmunity was recently suspected to be involved in the pathology of certain human epilepsies. This includes numerous reports of the detection of theoretically relevant serum autoantibodies, experimental data showing that antibodies can be epileptogenic, and a response of some epilepsy syndromes to immunomodulation. The high prevalence of epilepsies in specific immune diseases suggests that immune system may play a role in the pathogenesis of epilepsy or might be associated with it. There is some evidence that immune mechanisms play a role in the pathogenesis of some epilepsy syndromes. PMID:21977153

  9. The humoral immune system of anadromous fish.

    PubMed

    Zwollo, Patty

    2017-01-03

    The immune system of anadromous fish is extremely complex, a direct consequence of their diadromous nature. Hormone levels fluctuate widely throughout their life cycle, as fish move between fresh and salt water. This poses major challenges to the physiology of anadromous fish, including adaptation to very different saline environments, distinct pathogen fingerprints, and different environmental stressors. Elevated cortisol and sex hormone levels inhibit B lymphopoiesis and IgM(+) antibody responses, while catecholamines, growth hormones and thyroid hormones are generally stimulatory and enhance the humoral immune response. Immunological memory in the form of long-lived plasma cells likely plays important roles in health and survival during the life cycle of anadromous fishes. This review discusses some of the complex immune-endocrine pathways in anadromous fish, focusing on essential roles for B lineage cells in the successful completion of their life cycle. A discussion is included on potential differences in immuno-competence between wild and hatchery-raised fish.

  10. Systems in Science: Modeling Using Three Artificial Intelligence Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunal, Cynthia Szymanski; Karr, Charles L.; Smith, Coralee; Sunal, Dennis W.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary course focusing on modeling scientific systems. Investigates elementary education majors' applications of three artificial intelligence concepts used in modeling scientific systems before and after the course. Reveals a great increase in understanding of concepts presented but inconsistent application. (Author/KHR)

  11. From network-to-antibody robustness in a bio-inspired immune system.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Leon, Jose A; Acosta, Gerardo G; Mayosky, Miguel A

    2011-01-01

    Behavioural robustness at antibody and immune network level is discussed. The robustness of the immune response that drives an autonomous mobile robot is examined with two computational experiments in the autonomous mobile robots trajectory generation context in unknown environments. The immune response is met based on the immune network metaphor for different low-level behaviours coordination. These behaviours are activated when a robot sense the appropriate conditions in the environment in relation to the network current state. Results are obtained over a case study in computer simulation as well as in laboratory experiments with a Khepera II microrobot. In this work, we develop a set of tests where such an immune response is externally perturbed at network or low-level behavioural modules to analyse the robust capacity of the system to unexpected perturbations. Emergence of robust behaviour and high-level immune response relates to the coupling between behavioural modules that are selectively engaged with the environment based on immune response. Experimental evidence leads discussions on a dynamical systems perspective of behavioural robustness in artificial immune systems that goes beyond the isolated immune network response.

  12. The immune system and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sherry H; Bordeaux, Jeremy S; Baron, Elma D

    2014-01-01

    Carcinogenesis involves multiple mechanisms that disturb genomic integrity and encourage abnormal proliferation. The immune system plays an integral role in maintaining homeostasis and these mechanisms may arrest or enhance dysplasia. There exists a large body of evidence from organ transplantation literature supporting the significance of the immune suppression in the development of skin cancer. Nonmelanoma skin cancers are the most frequent neoplasms after organ transplantation, with organ transplant recipients having a 65-fold increase in squamous cell carcinoma incidence and 10-fold increase in basal cell carcinoma incidence. Similarly, UV-radiation (UVR) induced immunosuppression is correlated with the development of cutaneous malignancies in a dose-dependent manner. This was first shown several decades ago by Margaret Kripke, when transplanted tumors were rejected in mice with competent immune systems, but grew unchecked in immunosuppressed specimens. After UV exposure, chromophores initiate a cascade that leads to immunosuppression via derangement of Langerhans cells' antigen-presenting capacity. UV-irradiated Langerhans cells present antigens to Th2 cells, but fail to stimulate Th1 cells. A subset of T regulatory cells, specific for the antigen encountered after UVR, is also stimulated to proliferate. In general UV irradiation leads to a greater number of T regulatory cells and fewer effector T cells in the skin, shiftingthe balance from T-cell-mediated immunity to immunosuppression. These regulatory cells have the phenotype CD4+, CD25+, Foxp3+, CTLA-4+. These and many other changes in local immunity lead to a suppressed immune state, which allow for skin cancer development.

  13. Multivariable adaptive identification and control for artificial pancreas systems.

    PubMed

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Quinn, Laurie; Littlejohn, Elizabeth; Cinar, Ali

    2014-03-01

    A constrained weighted recursive least squares method is proposed to provide recursive models with guaranteed stability and better performance than models based on regular identification methods in predicting the variations of blood glucose concentration in patients with Type 1 Diabetes. Use of physiological information from a sports armband improves glucose concentration prediction and enables earlier recognition of the effects of physical activity on glucose concentration. Generalized predictive controllers (GPC) based on these recursive models are developed. The performance of GPC for artificial pancreas systems is illustrated by simulations with UVa-Padova simulator and clinical studies. The controllers developed are good candidates for artificial pancreas systems with no announcements from patients.

  14. Lighting system combining daylight concentrators and an artificial source

    DOEpatents

    Bornstein, Jonathan G.; Friedman, Peter S.

    1985-01-01

    A combined lighting system for a building interior includes a stack of luminescent solar concentrators (LSC), an optical conduit made of preferably optical fibers for transmitting daylight from the LSC stack, a collimating lens set at an angle, a fixture for receiving the daylight at one end and for distributing the daylight as illumination inside the building, an artificial light source at the other end of the fixture for directing artifical light into the fixture for distribution as illumination inside the building, an automatic dimmer/brightener for the artificial light source, and a daylight sensor positioned near to the LSC stack for controlling the automatic dimmer/brightener in response to the daylight sensed. The system also has a reflector positioned behind the artificial light source and a fan for exhausting heated air out of the fixture during summer and for forcing heated air into the fixture for passage into the building interior during winter.

  15. The Mucosal Immune System of Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Teleost fish possess an adaptive immune system associated with each of their mucosal body surfaces. Evidence obtained from mucosal vaccination and mucosal infection studies reveal that adaptive immune responses take place at the different mucosal surfaces of teleost. The main mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) of teleosts are the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), the gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT) and the recently discovered nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). Teleost MALT includes diffuse B cells and T cells with specific phenotypes different from their systemic counterparts that have co-evolved to defend the microbe-rich mucosal environment. Both B and T cells respond to mucosal infection or vaccination. Specific antibody responses can be measured in the gills, gut and skin mucosal secretions of teleost fish following mucosal infection or vaccination. Rainbow trout studies have shown that IgT antibodies and IgT+ B cells are the predominant B cell subset in all MALT and respond in a compartmentalized manner to mucosal infection. Our current knowledge on adaptive immunity in teleosts is limited compared to the mammalian literature. New research tools and in vivo models are currently being developed in order to help reveal the great intricacy of teleost mucosal adaptive immunity and help improve mucosal vaccination protocols for use in aquaculture. PMID:26274978

  16. Sympathetic neural modulation of the immune system

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    One route by which the central nervous system communicates with lymphoid organs in the periphery is through the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). To study SNS regulation of immune activity in vivo, selective removal of peripheral noradrenergic nerve fibers was achieved by administration of the neurotoxic drug, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), to adult mice. To assess SNS influence on lymphocyte proliferation in vitro, uptake of {sup 125}iododeoxyuridine ({sup 125}IUdR), a DNA precursor, was measured following 6-OHDA treatment. Sympathectomy prior to epicutaneous immunization with TNCB did not alter draining lymph nodes (LN) cell proliferation, whereas 6-OHDA treatment before footpad immunization with KLH reduced DNA synthesis in popliteal LN by 50%. In mice which were not deliberately immunized, sympathectomy stimulated {sup 125}IUdR uptake inguinal and axillary LN, spleen, and bone marrow. In vitro, these LN and spleen cells exhibited decreased proliferation responses to the T cell mitogen, concanavalin A (Con A), whereas lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated IgG secretion was enhanced. Studies examining {sup 51}Cr-labeled lymphocyte trafficking to LN suggested that altered cell migration may play a part in sympathectomy-induced changes in LN cell function.

  17. An Immunized Aircraft Maneuver Selection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Charles L.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this project, as stated in the original proposal, was to develop an immunized aircraft maneuver selection (IAMS) system. The IAMS system was to be composed of computational and informational building blocks that resemble structures in natural immune systems. The ultimate goal of the project was to develop a software package that could be flight tested on aircraft models. This report describes the work performed in the first year of what was to have been a two year project. This report also describes efforts that would have been made in the final year to have completed the project, had it been continued for the final year. After introductory material is provided in Section 2, the end-of-year-one status of the effort is discussed in Section 3. The remainder of the report provides an accounting of first year efforts. Section 4 provides background information on natural immune systems while Section 5 describes a generic ar&itecture developed for use in the IAMS. Section 6 describes the application of the architecture to a system identification problem. Finally, Section 7 describes steps necessary for completing the project.

  18. Leptin as immune mediator: Interaction between neuroendocrine and immune system.

    PubMed

    Procaccini, Claudio; La Rocca, Claudia; Carbone, Fortunata; De Rosa, Veronica; Galgani, Mario; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone/cytokine that links nutritional status with neuroendocrine and immune functions. Initially described as an anti-obesity hormone, leptin has subsequently been shown to exert pleiotropic effects, being also able to influence haematopoiesis, thermogenesis, reproduction, angiogenesis, and more importantly immune homeostasis. As a cytokine, leptin can affect both innate and adaptive immunity, by inducing a pro-inflammatory response and thus playing a key role in the regulation of the pathogenesis of several autoimmune/inflammatory diseases. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances on the role of leptin as immune-modulator in mammals and we also provide an overview on its main functions in non-mammalian vertebrates.

  19. Glucose Synthesis in a Protein-Based Artificial Photosynthesis System.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hao; Yuan, Wenqiao; Zhou, Jack; Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to understand glucose synthesis of a protein-based artificial photosynthesis system affected by operating conditions, including the concentrations of reactants, reaction temperature, and illumination. Results from non-vesicle-based glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) and glucose synthesis showed that the initial concentrations of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), lighting source, and temperature significantly affected glucose synthesis. Higher initial concentrations of RuBP and ATP significantly enhanced GAP synthesis, which was linearly correlated to glucose synthesis, confirming the proper functions of all catalyzing enzymes in the system. White fluorescent light inhibited artificial photosynthesis and reduced glucose synthesis by 79.2 % compared to in the dark. The reaction temperature of 40 °C was optimum, whereas lower or higher temperature reduced glucose synthesis. Glucose synthesis in the vesicle-based artificial photosynthesis system reconstituted with bacteriorhodopsin, F 0 F 1 ATP synthase, and polydimethylsiloxane-methyloxazoline-polydimethylsiloxane triblock copolymer was successfully demonstrated. This system efficiently utilized light-induced ATP to drive glucose synthesis, and 5.2 μg ml(-1) glucose was synthesized in 0.78-ml reaction buffer in 7 h. Light-dependent reactions were found to be the bottleneck of the studied artificial photosynthesis system.

  20. Artificial Cochlea Design Using Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-21

    of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) in the design of an artificial cochlea is investigated in depth. Interdigitated finger (comb), cantilever... INTERDIGITATED FINGER (COMB) RESONATOR DESIGN .............................................. 3-9 3.2.1 Calculating Comb Resonance...frequency. 1.4.1.4 MEMS Description Cantilever, bridge, interdigitated finger (comb), and mirror type resonators are considered for the MEMS devices

  1. Artificial intelligence technologies for power system operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Talukdar, S.N.; Cardozo, E.

    1986-01-01

    Researchers in this study examined the potential of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies for improving problem-solving strategies in 16 power system operations. To demonstrate the use of AI in the area they considered most promising, contingency selection-security assessment, they also developed two programs - one to simulate network protection schemes, the other to diagnose faults.

  2. Integrated Photobioelectrochemical Systems: A Paradigm Shift in Artificial Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Pavel; Pant, Deepak; Patra, Snehangshu

    2017-04-01

    Recent breakthroughs have reinvigorated the century-old research domain of artificial photosynthesis. Here, we highlight CO2-reducing and O2-liberating integrated photobioelectrochemical systems that contain novel enzymatic cathodes and photoanodes. These devices, which are completely self-driven by solar energy with unprecedented efficiency and stability, have important implications for biotechnological research communities.

  3. An Artificial Intelligence-Based Distance Education System: Artimat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabiyev, Vasif; Karal, Hasan; Arslan, Selahattin; Erumit, Ali Kursat; Cebi, Ayca

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the artificial intelligence-based distance education system called ARTIMAT, which has been prepared in order to improve mathematical problem solving skills of the students, in terms of conceptual proficiency and ease of use with the opinions of teachers and students. The implementation has been performed…

  4. An overview of expert systems. [artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gevarter, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    An expert system is defined and its basic structure is discussed. The knowledge base, the inference engine, and uses of expert systems are discussed. Architecture is considered, including choice of solution direction, reasoning in the presence of uncertainty, searching small and large search spaces, handling large search spaces by transforming them and by developing alternative or additional spaces, and dealing with time. Existing expert systems are reviewed. Tools for building such systems, construction, and knowledge acquisition and learning are discussed. Centers of research and funding sources are listed. The state-of-the-art, current problems, required research, and future trends are summarized.

  5. Artificial synapse network on inorganic proton conductor for neuromorphic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Li Qiang; Wan, Chang Jin; Guo, Li Qiang; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2014-01-01

    The basic units in our brain are neurons, and each neuron has more than 1,000 synapse connections. Synapse is the basic structure for information transfer in an ever-changing manner, and short-term plasticity allows synapses to perform critical computational functions in neural circuits. Therefore, the major challenge for the hardware implementation of neuromorphic computation is to develop artificial synapse network. Here in-plane lateral-coupled oxide-based artificial synapse network coupled by proton neurotransmitters are self-assembled on glass substrates at room-temperature. A strong lateral modulation is observed due to the proton-related electrical-double-layer effect. Short-term plasticity behaviours, including paired-pulse facilitation, dynamic filtering and spatiotemporally correlated signal processing are mimicked. Such laterally coupled oxide-based protonic/electronic hybrid artificial synapse network proposed here is interesting for building future neuromorphic systems.

  6. Artificial synapse network on inorganic proton conductor for neuromorphic systems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li Qiang; Wan, Chang Jin; Guo, Li Qiang; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2014-01-01

    The basic units in our brain are neurons, and each neuron has more than 1,000 synapse connections. Synapse is the basic structure for information transfer in an ever-changing manner, and short-term plasticity allows synapses to perform critical computational functions in neural circuits. Therefore, the major challenge for the hardware implementation of neuromorphic computation is to develop artificial synapse network. Here in-plane lateral-coupled oxide-based artificial synapse network coupled by proton neurotransmitters are self-assembled on glass substrates at room-temperature. A strong lateral modulation is observed due to the proton-related electrical-double-layer effect. Short-term plasticity behaviours, including paired-pulse facilitation, dynamic filtering and spatiotemporally correlated signal processing are mimicked. Such laterally coupled oxide-based protonic/electronic hybrid artificial synapse network proposed here is interesting for building future neuromorphic systems.

  7. Immune response and performance of growing Santa Ines lambs to artificial Trichostrongylus colubriformis infections.

    PubMed

    Cardia, D F F; Rocha-Oliveira, R A; Tsunemi, M H; Amarante, A F T

    2011-12-15

    This study was carried out to evaluate the immune response and the impact of Trichostrongylus colubriformis infections on the performance of growing Santa Ines lambs. Thirty male lambs, 3-4 months of age, were maintained in individual pens and restrictively randomised by weight into 3 treatment groups: (1) infected group, artificially infected with 2500 T. colubriformis larvae, three times a week, for 13 weeks, and fed ad libitum; (2) Pair-Fed Group, non-infected and fed with the same amount of food consumed by the infected animal of the same class on the previous day; and (3) control group, non-infected and fed ad libitum. Refused feed was weighed daily to assess the food intake of each lamb. Animals were weighed weekly and blood and fecal samples were collected. At the end of the trial, all lambs were euthanized to determine worm burden and collect intestinal tissues and mucus samples for histological and immunological analysis. The infected group presented eosinophilia, increased number of inflammatory cells in the mucosa, in addition to an increased production of specific immunoglobulins against T. colubriformis, which partially prevented the establishment of infective larvae. As a consequence of parasitism, the infected lambs presented reduced serum albumin concentrations and demonstrated severe small intestine lesions, such as villous atrophy and epithelial erosion, which impaired the digestion and absorption of nutrients, causing a significant loss in performance. The infected group presented a 37% reduction in daily weight gain (107.26 ± 10.8 g/day), when compared with the control group (171.07 ± 7.15 g/day). The infected lambs also demonstrated the worst food conversion, i.e., each animal needed to consume on average 10.05 ± 0.52 kg of food to gain 1 kg live weight. The voluntary hay intake depression in infected animals was small, and statistical difference (P<0.01) was seen only on two occasions (ninth and 12th weeks), in comparison with the control

  8. Expert Systems: Artificial Intelligence for Professional Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoech, Dick; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes expert systems which are computer programs which use inference schemes to apply generalized human expertise to the facts of a specific case. Basic concepts, potentials and implications are presented along with the issues involved in their development and use. A simple expert system, written in BASIC, is included to illustrate the…

  9. Did the molecules of adaptive immunity evolve from the innate immune system?

    PubMed

    Bartl, Simona; Baish, Meredith; Weissman, Irving L; Diaz, Marilyn

    2003-04-01

    The antigen receptors on cells of innate immune systems recognize broadly expressed markers on non-host cells while the receptors on lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system display a higher level of specificity. Adaptive immunity, with its exquisite specificity and immunological memory, has only been found in the jawed vertebrates, which also display innate immunity. Jawless fishes and invertebrates only have innate immunity. In the adaptive immune response, T and B-lymphocytes detect foreign agents or antigens using T cell receptors (TCR) or immunoglobulins (Ig), respectively. While Ig can bind free intact antigens, TCR only binds processed antigenic fragments that are presented on molecules encoded in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). MHC molecules display variation through allelic polymorphism. A diverse repertoire of Ig and TCR molecules is generated by gene rearrangement and junctional diversity, processes carried out by the recombinase activating gene (RAG) products and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT). Thus, the molecules that define adaptive immunity are TCR, Ig, MHC molecules, RAG products and TdT. No direct predecessors of these molecules have been found in the jawless fishes or invertebrates. In contrast, the complement cascade can be activated by either adaptive or innate immune systems and contains examples of molecules that gradually evolved from non-immune functions to being part of the innate and then adaptive immune system. In this paper we examine the molecules of the adaptive immune system and speculate on the existence of direct predecessors that were part of innate immunity.

  10. Exploring the Homeostatic and Sensory Roles of the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Rafael Elias; Marques, Pedro Elias; Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Teixeira, Mauro Martins

    2016-01-01

    Immunology developed under the notion of the immune system exists to fight pathogens. Recently, the discovery of interactions with commensal microbiota that are essential to human health initiated a change in this old paradigm. Here, we argue that the immune system has major physiological roles extending far beyond defending the host. Immune and inflammatory responses share the core property of sensing, defining the immune system also as a sensory system. The inference with the immune system collects, interprets, and stores information, while creating an identity of self, places it in close relationship to the nervous system, which suggests that these systems may have a profound evolutionary connection. PMID:27065209

  11. Exploring the Homeostatic and Sensory Roles of the Immune System.

    PubMed

    Marques, Rafael Elias; Marques, Pedro Elias; Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Teixeira, Mauro Martins

    2016-01-01

    Immunology developed under the notion of the immune system exists to fight pathogens. Recently, the discovery of interactions with commensal microbiota that are essential to human health initiated a change in this old paradigm. Here, we argue that the immune system has major physiological roles extending far beyond defending the host. Immune and inflammatory responses share the core property of sensing, defining the immune system also as a sensory system. The inference with the immune system collects, interprets, and stores information, while creating an identity of self, places it in close relationship to the nervous system, which suggests that these systems may have a profound evolutionary connection.

  12. Central nervous system-immune system interactions: psychoneuroendocrinology of stress and its immune consequences.

    PubMed Central

    Black, P H

    1994-01-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology is a relatively new discipline which deals with CNS-immune system interactions. The evidence for such interactions was reviewed, as was the neuroendocrinologic response to stress. Recent evidence indicates that the behavioral, nervous system, and neuroendocrine responses to stress are mediated by hypothalamic CRF, which acts on both the sympathetic nervous system and the HPA axis, resulting in increased levels of corticosteroids, catecholamines, and certain opiates, substances which are generally immunosuppressive. Concentrations of growth hormone and prolactin, which are immunoenhancing, are elevated early during the response to stress but are later suppressed. Although several other neuromediators may also be released with stress, the net effect of a variety of acute stressors is down regulation of the immune system function. In the following minireview, I consider whether stress alters the resistance of the host to infection as well as the immunomodulatory effects of released immune system mediators on the brain. PMID:8141561

  13. Integration of the immune system: a complex adaptive supersystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisman, Mark V.

    2001-10-01

    Immunity to pathogenic organisms is a complex process involving interacting factors within the immune system including circulating cells, tissues and soluble chemical mediators. Both the efficiency and adaptive responses of the immune system in a dynamic, often hostile, environment are essential for maintaining our health and homeostasis. This paper will present a brief review of one of nature's most elegant, complex adaptive systems.

  14. Systemic activation of the immune system in HIV infection: The role of the immune complexes (hypothesis).

    PubMed

    Korolevskaya, Larisa B; Shmagel, Konstantin V; Shmagel, Nadezhda G; Saidakova, Evgeniya V

    2016-03-01

    Currently, immune activation is proven to be the basis for the HIV infection pathogenesis and a strong predictor of the disease progression. Among the causes of systemic immune activation the virus and its products, related infectious agents, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and regulatory CD4+ T cells' decrease are considered. Recently microbial translocation (bacterial products yield into the bloodstream as a result of the gastrointestinal tract mucosal barrier integrity damage) became the most popular hypothesis. Previously, we have found an association between immune complexes present in the bloodstream of HIV infected patients and the T cell activation. On this basis, we propose a significantly modified hypothesis of immune activation in HIV infection. It is based on the immune complexes' participation in the immunocompetent cells' activation. Immune complexes are continuously formed in the chronic phase of the infection. Together with TLR-ligands (viral antigens, bacterial products coming from the damaged gut) present in the bloodstream they interact with macrophages. As a result macrophages are transformed into the type II activated forms. These macrophages block IL-12 production and start synthesizing IL-10. High level of this cytokine slows down the development of the full-scale Th1-response. The anti-viral reactions are shifted towards the serogenesis. Newly synthesized antibodies' binding to viral antigens leads to continuous formation of the immune complexes capable of interacting with antigen-presenting cells.

  15. Detector Design Considerations in High-Dimensional Artificial Immune Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-22

    a method known as randomized RNS [15]. In this approach, Monte Carlo integration is used to determine the size of self and non-self within the given...feature space, then a number of randomly placed detectors are chosen according to Monte Carlo integration calculations. Simulated annealing is then...18] Harris, J. W. and H. Stocker. Segment of a Circle 3.8.6, 92–93. Springer-Verlag, 1998. [19] Heidemann, John and Cristos Papadopoulos. “Uses and

  16. Educational Game Systems in Artificial Intelligence Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chubarkova, Elena V.; Sadchikov, Ilya A.; Suslova, Irina A.; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrey ?.; Milova, Larisa N.

    2016-01-01

    Article actuality based on fact that existing knowledge system aimed at future professional life of students: a skillful use game activity in educational process will teach students to look for alternative ways solving of real problems. The purpose of article lies in theoretical substantiation, development and testing of criteria, which must be…

  17. Performance Evaluation of Artificial Intelligence Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-17

    difficulty Veit and Callero (1981) have Aq developed an evaluation technique called the Subjective Transfer Function (STF) ’-~ ~approach. In the STF...Information Retrieval, Montreal, Canada. Veit, C.T., M. Callero . (1981) Subjective Transfer Function Approach to Complex System " 4Analysis. Rand Corp

  18. An integrated artificial photosynthesis system based on peptide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Bin; Li, Ying; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Chunfeng; Qin, Meng; Cao, Yi; Wang, Wei

    2014-06-01

    A peptide nanotube platform that integrates both light-harvesting and catalytic units was successfully engineered for artificial photosynthesis. Peptide nanotubes not only serve as a hub for physically combining both units, but also work as mediators that transfer the energy from photo-excited chromophores to catalytic centers. The direct conversion of NAD+ to NADH upon light illumination was demonstrated. This represents a promising step towards efficient and fully integrated artificial photosynthesis systems.A peptide nanotube platform that integrates both light-harvesting and catalytic units was successfully engineered for artificial photosynthesis. Peptide nanotubes not only serve as a hub for physically combining both units, but also work as mediators that transfer the energy from photo-excited chromophores to catalytic centers. The direct conversion of NAD+ to NADH upon light illumination was demonstrated. This represents a promising step towards efficient and fully integrated artificial photosynthesis systems. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures and supporting figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00295d

  19. An artificial neural network controller for intelligent transportation systems applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vitela, J.E.; Hanebutte, U.R.; Reifman, J.

    1996-04-01

    An Autonomous Intelligent Cruise Control (AICC) has been designed using a feedforward artificial neural network, as an example for utilizing artificial neural networks for nonlinear control problems arising in intelligent transportation systems applications. The AICC is based on a simple nonlinear model of the vehicle dynamics. A Neural Network Controller (NNC) code developed at Argonne National Laboratory to control discrete dynamical systems was used for this purpose. In order to test the NNC, an AICC-simulator containing graphical displays was developed for a system of two vehicles driving in a single lane. Two simulation cases are shown, one involving a lead vehicle with constant velocity and the other a lead vehicle with varying acceleration. More realistic vehicle dynamic models will be considered in future work.

  20. Chronic infection and the origin of adaptive immune system.

    PubMed

    Usharauli, David

    2010-08-01

    It has been speculated that the rise of the adaptive immune system in jawed vertebrates some 400 million years ago gave them a superior protection to detect and defend against pathogens that became more elusive and/or virulent to the host that had only innate immune system. First, this line of thought implies that adaptive immune system was a new, more sophisticated layer of host defense that operated independently of the innate immune system. Second, the natural consequence of this scenario would be that pathogens would have exercised so strong an evolutionary pressure that eventually no host could have afforded not to have an adaptive immune system. Neither of these arguments is supported by the facts. First, new experimental evidence has firmly established that operation of adaptive immune system is critically dependent on the ability of the innate immune system to detect invader-pathogens and second, the absolute majority of animal kingdom survives just fine with only an innate immune system. Thus, these data raise the dilemma: If innate immune system was sufficient to detect and protect against pathogens, why then did adaptive immune system develop in the first place? In contrast to the innate immune system, the adaptive immune system has one important advantage, precision. By precision I mean the ability of the defense system to detect and remove the target, for example, infected cells, without causing unwanted bystander damage of surrounding tissue. While the target precision per se is not important for short-term immune response, it becomes a critical factor when the immune response is long-lasting, as during chronic infection. In this paper I would like to propose new, "toxic index" hypothesis where I argue that the need to reduce the collateral damage to the tissue during chronic infection(s) was the evolutionary pressure that led to the development of the adaptive immune system.

  1. Home care artificial heart monitoring system via internet.

    PubMed

    Chung, J; Lee, J H; Choi, J; Lee, J; Kim, W G; Sun, K; Min, B G

    2004-10-01

    The availability of a remote management system, which provides both physiological-related information about the patient and device-related information about the implanted device, would be helpful during in vivo experiments or clinical trials involving artificial heart implantation. In order to be able to monitor the course of the in vivo experiment continuously regardless of the patient's location, an internet-based remote monitoring system was developed, which can monitor physiological-related information such as pressure (AoP, LAP, RAP, PAP) and flow data, as well as device-related information such as current, direction and pump operating conditions. The home care artificial heart monitoring system which we developed consists of four main components, which are the transcutaneous information transmission system (TITS), local monitoring station (LMS), data server station (DSS), and client monitoring station (CMS). The device-related information and physiological-related information can be transmitted in real time from a patient in a remote non-clinical environment to the specialist situated in a clinic depending on the current capabilities and availability of the internet. The local monitoring station situated at the remote site is composed of a data acquisition and preprocessing unit connected to a computer via its RS-232 port, and which communicate using a Java-based client-server architecture. The remote monitoring system so developed was used during an in vivo experiment of the artificial heart implantation for 2 months and performed successfully according to design specifications.

  2. Effects of chromium on the immune system.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Richa; Upreti, R K; Seth, P K; Chaturvedi, U C

    2002-09-06

    Chromium is a naturally occurring heavy metal found commonly in the environment in trivalent, Cr(III), and hexavalent, Cr(VI), forms. Cr(VI) compounds have been declared as a potent occupational carcinogen among workers in chrome plating, stainless steel, and pigment industries. The reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) results in the formation of reactive intermediates that together with oxidative stress oxidative tissue damage and a cascade of cellular events including modulation of apoptosis regulatory gene p53, contribute to the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of Cr(VI)-containing compounds. On the other hand, chromium is an essential nutrient required to promote the action of insulin in body tissues so that the body can use sugars, proteins and fats. Chromium is of significant importance in altering the immune response by immunostimulatory or immunosuppressive processes as shown by its effects on T and B lymphocytes, macrophages, cytokine production and the immune response that may induce hypersensitivity reactions. This review gives an overview of the effects of chromium on the immune system of the body.

  3. Complement System Part II: Role in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Nicolas S.; Noe, Remi; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been considered for a long time as a simple lytic cascade, aimed to kill bacteria infecting the host organism. Nowadays, this vision has changed and it is well accepted that complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in host homeostasis, inflammation, and in the defense against pathogens. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the role of complement in physiology and pathology. It starts with a description of complement contribution to the normal physiology (homeostasis) of a healthy organism, including the silent clearance of apoptotic cells and maintenance of cell survival. In pathology, complement can be a friend or a foe. It acts as a friend in the defense against pathogens, by inducing opsonization and a direct killing by C5b–9 membrane attack complex and by triggering inflammatory responses with the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Opsonization plays also a major role in the mounting of an adaptive immune response, involving antigen presenting cells, T-, and B-lymphocytes. Nevertheless, it can be also an enemy, when pathogens hijack complement regulators to protect themselves from the immune system. Inadequate complement activation becomes a disease cause, as in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, C3 glomerulopathies, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Age-related macular degeneration and cancer will be described as examples showing that complement contributes to a large variety of conditions, far exceeding the classical examples of diseases associated with complement deficiencies. Finally, we discuss complement as a therapeutic target. PMID:26074922

  4. Effects of artificial gravity on the cardiovascular system: Computational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Artiles, Ana; Heldt, Thomas; Young, Laurence R.

    2016-09-01

    Artificial gravity has been suggested as a multisystem countermeasure against the negative effects of weightlessness. However, many questions regarding the appropriate configuration are still unanswered, including optimal g-level, angular velocity, gravity gradient, and exercise protocol. Mathematical models can provide unique insight into these questions, particularly when experimental data is very expensive or difficult to obtain. In this research effort, a cardiovascular lumped-parameter model is developed to simulate the short-term transient hemodynamic response to artificial gravity exposure combined with ergometer exercise, using a bicycle mounted on a short-radius centrifuge. The model is thoroughly described and preliminary simulations are conducted to show the model capabilities and potential applications. The model consists of 21 compartments (including systemic circulation, pulmonary circulation, and a cardiac model), and it also includes the rapid cardiovascular control systems (arterial baroreflex and cardiopulmonary reflex). In addition, the pressure gradient resulting from short-radius centrifugation is captured in the model using hydrostatic pressure sources located at each compartment. The model also includes the cardiovascular effects resulting from exercise such as the muscle pump effect. An initial set of artificial gravity simulations were implemented using the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Compact-Radius Centrifuge (CRC) configuration. Three centripetal acceleration (artificial gravity) levels were chosen: 1 g, 1.2 g, and 1.4 g, referenced to the subject's feet. Each simulation lasted 15.5 minutes and included a baseline period, the spin-up process, the ergometer exercise period (5 minutes of ergometer exercise at 30 W with a simulated pedal cadence of 60 RPM), and the spin-down process. Results showed that the cardiovascular model is able to predict the cardiovascular dynamics during gravity changes, as well as the expected

  5. IMMUNE SYSTEM MATURITY AND SENSITIVITY TO CHEMICAL EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is well established that human diseases associated with abnormal immune function, including some common infectious diseases and asthma, are considerably more prevalent at younger ages. The immune system continues to mature after birth, and functional immaturity accounts for m...

  6. Present and future of the artificial heart driving system.

    PubMed

    Shumakov, V I; Itkin, G P; Sumin, A V; Mordashov, V M; Kiselev, U M; Zimin, N K; Drobyshev, A A

    1991-10-01

    The totally artificial heart (TAH) is now in development in two trends. First, there is the development of a bridge system for temporary support of cardiac function. The TAH with the extracorporeal pneumatic driving system Sinus-IS is more efficient and safer. Parallel with this, a portable pneumatic driving system has been developed. That can be considered a stage in the development of the second trend: a totally implantable TAH. This article reviews problems of building of the Micron energy system to be used in implantable TAH designs.

  7. Immuno-epidemiology of a population structured by immune status: a mathematical study of waning immunity and immune system boosting.

    PubMed

    Barbarossa, M V; Röst, G

    2015-12-01

    When the body gets infected by a pathogen the immune system develops pathogen-specific immunity. Induced immunity decays in time and years after recovery the host might become susceptible again. Exposure to the pathogen in the environment boosts the immune system thus prolonging the time in which a recovered individual is immune. Such an interplay of within host processes and population dynamics poses significant challenges in rigorous mathematical modeling of immuno-epidemiology. We propose a framework to model SIRS dynamics, monitoring the immune status of individuals and including both waning immunity and immune system boosting. Our model is formulated as a system of two ordinary differential equations (ODEs) coupled with a PDE. After showing existence and uniqueness of a classical solution, we investigate the local and the global asymptotic stability of the unique disease-free stationary solution. Under particular assumptions on the general model, we can recover known examples such as large systems of ODEs for SIRWS dynamics, as well as SIRS with constant delay.

  8. Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and the Developing Immune System.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Theresa W

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from research in humans and animals suggest that ingesting alcohol during pregnancy can disrupt the fetal immune system and result in an increased risk of infections and disease in newborns that may persist throughout life. Alcohol may have indirect effects on the immune system by increasing the risk of premature birth, which itself is a risk factor for immune-related problems. Animal studies suggest that alcohol exposure directly disrupts the developing immune system. A comprehensive knowledge of the mechanisms underlying alcohol's effects on the developing immune system only will become clear once researchers establish improved methods for identifying newborns exposed to alcohol in utero.

  9. Ginseng, the 'Immunity Boost': The Effects of Panax ginseng on Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Soowon; Min, Hyeyoung

    2012-01-01

    Thousands of literatures have described the diverse role of ginseng in physiological processes such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, insulin resistance, and hypertension. In particular, ginseng has been extensively reported to maintain homeostasis of the immune system and to enhance resistance to illness or microbial attacks through the regulation of immune system. Immune system comprises of different types of cells fulfilling their own specialized functions, and each type of the immune cells is differentially influenced and may be simultaneously controlled by ginseng treatment. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the effects of ginseng on immune system. We discuss how ginseng regulates each type of immune cells including macrophages, natural killer cells, dendritic cells, T cells, and B cells. We also describe how ginseng exhibits beneficial effects on controlling inflammatory diseases and microbial infections. PMID:23717137

  10. Measuring the immune system: a comprehensive approach for the analysis of immune functions in humans.

    PubMed

    Claus, Maren; Dychus, Nicole; Ebel, Melanie; Damaschke, Jürgen; Maydych, Viktoriya; Wolf, Oliver T; Kleinsorge, Thomas; Watzl, Carsten

    2016-10-01

    The immune system is essential to provide protection from infections and cancer. Disturbances in immune function can therefore directly affect the health of the affected individual. Many extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as exposure to chemicals, stress, nutrition and age have been reported to influence the immune system. These influences can affect various components of the immune system, and we are just beginning to understand the causalities of these changes. To investigate such disturbances, it is therefore essential to analyze the different components of the immune system in a comprehensive fashion. Here, we demonstrate such an approach which provides information about total number of leukocytes, detailed quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of lymphocyte subsets, cytokine levels in serum and functional properties of T cells, NK cells and monocytes. Using samples from a cohort of 24 healthy volunteers, we demonstrate the feasibility of our approach to detect changes in immune functions.

  11. Artificial intelligence, expert systems, computer vision, and natural language processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gevarter, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of artificial intelligence (AI), its core ingredients, and its applications is presented. The knowledge representation, logic, problem solving approaches, languages, and computers pertaining to AI are examined, and the state of the art in AI is reviewed. The use of AI in expert systems, computer vision, natural language processing, speech recognition and understanding, speech synthesis, problem solving, and planning is examined. Basic AI topics, including automation, search-oriented problem solving, knowledge representation, and computational logic, are discussed.

  12. Approaches Mediating Oxytocin Regulation of the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Wang, Ping; Wang, Stephani C.; Wang, Yu-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The hypothalamic neuroendocrine system is mainly composed of the neural structures regulating hormone secretion from the pituitary gland and has been considered as the higher regulatory center of the immune system. Recently, the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system (HNS) emerged as an important component of neuroendocrine–immune network, wherein the oxytocin (OT)-secreting system (OSS) plays an essential role. The OSS, consisting of OT neurons in the supraoptic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, their several accessory nuclei and associated structures, can integrate neural, endocrine, metabolic, and immune information and plays a pivotal role in the development and functions of the immune system. The OSS can promote the development of thymus and bone marrow, perform immune surveillance, strengthen immune defense, and maintain immune homeostasis. Correspondingly, OT can inhibit inflammation, exert antibiotic-like effect, promote wound healing and regeneration, and suppress stress-associated immune disorders. In this process, the OSS can release OT to act on immune system directly by activating OT receptors or through modulating activities of other hypothalamic–pituitary–immune axes and autonomic nervous system indirectly. However, our understandings of the role of the OSS in neuroendocrine regulation of immune system are largely incomplete, particularly its relationship with other hypothalamic–pituitary–immune axes and the vasopressin-secreting system that coexists with the OSS in the HNS. In addition, it remains unclear about the relationship between the OSS and peripherally produced OT in immune regulation, particularly intrathymic OT that is known to elicit central immunological self-tolerance of T-cells to hypophysial hormones. In this work, we provide a brief review of current knowledge of the features of OSS regulation of the immune system and of potential approaches that mediate OSS coordination of the activities of entire neuroendocrine–immune

  13. Approaches Mediating Oxytocin Regulation of the Immune System.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Wang, Ping; Wang, Stephani C; Wang, Yu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamic neuroendocrine system is mainly composed of the neural structures regulating hormone secretion from the pituitary gland and has been considered as the higher regulatory center of the immune system. Recently, the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system (HNS) emerged as an important component of neuroendocrine-immune network, wherein the oxytocin (OT)-secreting system (OSS) plays an essential role. The OSS, consisting of OT neurons in the supraoptic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, their several accessory nuclei and associated structures, can integrate neural, endocrine, metabolic, and immune information and plays a pivotal role in the development and functions of the immune system. The OSS can promote the development of thymus and bone marrow, perform immune surveillance, strengthen immune defense, and maintain immune homeostasis. Correspondingly, OT can inhibit inflammation, exert antibiotic-like effect, promote wound healing and regeneration, and suppress stress-associated immune disorders. In this process, the OSS can release OT to act on immune system directly by activating OT receptors or through modulating activities of other hypothalamic-pituitary-immune axes and autonomic nervous system indirectly. However, our understandings of the role of the OSS in neuroendocrine regulation of immune system are largely incomplete, particularly its relationship with other hypothalamic-pituitary-immune axes and the vasopressin-secreting system that coexists with the OSS in the HNS. In addition, it remains unclear about the relationship between the OSS and peripherally produced OT in immune regulation, particularly intrathymic OT that is known to elicit central immunological self-tolerance of T-cells to hypophysial hormones. In this work, we provide a brief review of current knowledge of the features of OSS regulation of the immune system and of potential approaches that mediate OSS coordination of the activities of entire neuroendocrine-immune network.

  14. Cancer immune cycle: a video introduction to the interaction between cancer and the immune system.

    PubMed

    Preusser, Matthias; Berghoff, Anna S; Thallinger, Christiane; Zielinski, Christoph C

    2016-01-01

    This educational video discusses and visualises the key steps of the complex interaction between cancer and the immune system. Essential steps of the cancer immune cycle take place in the tumour itself and in regional lymph nodes, with immune cells travelling between these distinct sites. Antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells migrate into the tumour microenvironment and take up tumour antigens. Antigen-presenting cells travel to regional lymph nodes, where they present the tumour antigens to naïve T cells in order to initiate a tumour-specific T cell response. Activated tumour-specific T cells multiply by clonal expansion and enter the blood flow and travel from the regional lymph node to the tumour site. As soon as activated T cells arrive at the tumor site they start a tumour-specific immune response. Co-inhibitory receptors modulate the immune response and may be exploited by tumour cells to escape immunological destruction. In summary, the cancer immune cycle involves several pivotal steps that are essential for generation of a successful specific antitumour immune response. Importantly, dysfunction of a single step may interrupt the entire cycle, thus impairing the immune-mediated control of tumour growth. Immune modulatory therapies such as vaccines or immune checkpoint modulators target specific steps of the cancer immune cycle with the ultimate aim of facilitating an antitumour immune response.

  15. Communications and control for electric power systems: Power system stability applications of artificial neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, N.; Kirkham, Harold

    1994-01-01

    This report investigates the application of artificial neural networks to the problem of power system stability. The field of artificial intelligence, expert systems, and neural networks is reviewed. Power system operation is discussed with emphasis on stability considerations. Real-time system control has only recently been considered as applicable to stability, using conventional control methods. The report considers the use of artificial neural networks to improve the stability of the power system. The networks are considered as adjuncts and as replacements for existing controllers. The optimal kind of network to use as an adjunct to a generator exciter is discussed.

  16. Validation of artificial skin equivalents as in vitro testing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Robert; Marx, Ulrich; Walles, Heike; Schober, Lena

    2011-03-01

    With the increasing complexity of the chemical composition of pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and everyday substances, the awareness of potential health issues and long term damages for humanoid organs is shifting into focus. Artificial in vitro testing systems play an important role in providing reliable test conditions and replacing precarious animal testing. Especially artificial skin equivalents ASEs are used for a broad spectrum of studies like penetration, irritation and corrosion of substances. One major challenge in tissue engineering is the qualification of each individual ASE as in vitro testing system. Due to biological fluctuations, the stratum corneum hornified layer of some ASEs may not fully develop or other defects might occur. For monitoring these effects we developed an fully automated Optical Coherence Tomography device. Here, we present different methods to characterize and evaluate the quality of the ASEs based on image and data processing of OCT B-scans. By analysing the surface structure, defects, like cuts or tears, are detectable. A further indicator for the quality of the ASE is the morphology of the tissue. This allows to determine if the skin model has reached the final growth state. We found, that OCT is a well suited technology for automatically characterizing artificial skin equivalents and validating the application as testing system.

  17. [The role of the innate immune system in atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Volz, T; Kaesler, S; Skabytska, Y; Biedermann, T

    2015-02-01

    The mechanisms how the innate immune system detects microbes and mounts a rapid immune response have been more and more elucidated in the past years. Subsequently it has been shown that innate immunity also shapes adaptive immune responses and determines their quality that can be either inflammatory or tolerogenic. As atopic dermatitis is characterized by disturbances of innate and adaptive immune responses, colonization with pathogens and defects in skin barrier function, insight into mechanisms of innate immunity has helped to understand the vicious circle of ongoing skin inflammation seen in atopic dermatitis patients. Elucidating general mechanisms of the innate immune system and its functions in atopic dermatitis paves the way for developing new therapies. Especially the novel insights into the human microbiome and potential functional consequences make the innate immune system a very fundamental and promising target. As a result atopic dermatitis manifestations can be attenuated or even resolved. These currently developed strategies will be introduced in the current review.

  18. Opioid System Modulates the Immune Function: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xuan; Liu, Renyu; Chen, Chunhua; Ji, Fang; Li, Tianzuo

    2016-01-01

    Opioid receptors and their ligands produce powerful analgesia that is effective in perioperative period and chronic pain managements accompanied with various side effects including respiratory depression, constipation and addiction etc. Opioids can also interfere with the immune system, not only participating in the function of the immune cells, but also modulating innate and acquired immune responses. The traditional notion of opioids is immunosuppressive. Recent studies indicate that the role of opioid receptors on immune function is complicated, working through various different mechanisms. Different opioids or opioids administrations show various effects on the immune system: immunosuppressive, immunostimulatory, or dual effect. It is important to elucidate the relationship between opioids and immune function, since immune system plays critical role in various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including the inflammation, tumor growth and metastasis, drug abuse, and so on. This review article tends to have an overview of the recent work and perspectives on opioids and the immune function. PMID:26985446

  19. Opioid System Modulates the Immune Function: A Review.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xuan; Liu, Renyu; Chen, Chunhua; Ji, Fang; Li, Tianzuo

    Opioid receptors and their ligands produce powerful analgesia that is effective in perioperative period and chronic pain managements accompanied with various side effects including respiratory depression, constipation and addiction etc. Opioids can also interfere with the immune system, not only participating in the function of the immune cells, but also modulating innate and acquired immune responses. The traditional notion of opioids is immunosuppressive. Recent studies indicate that the role of opioid receptors on immune function is complicated, working through various different mechanisms. Different opioids or opioids administrations show various effects on the immune system: immunosuppressive, immunostimulatory, or dual effect. It is important to elucidate the relationship between opioids and immune function, since immune system plays critical role in various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including the inflammation, tumor growth and metastasis, drug abuse, and so on. This review article tends to have an overview of the recent work and perspectives on opioids and the immune function.

  20. The Immune System in Cancer Prevention, Development and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Candeias, Serge M; Gaipl, Udo S

    2016-01-01

    The immune system plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of the integrity of an organism. Besides the protection against pathogens, it is strongly involved in cancer prevention, development and defense. This review focuses on how the immune system protects against infections and trauma and on its role in cancer development and disease. Focus is set on the interactions of the innate and adaptive immune system and tumors. The role of IFN-γ as a pleiotropic cytokine that plays a very important role at the interface of innate and adaptive immune systems in tumor development and induction of anti-tumor immune responses is outlined. Further, immune cells as prognostic and predictive markers of cancer will be discussed. Data are provided that even the brain as immune privileged organ is subjected to immune surveillance and consequently also brain tumors. Immune therapeutic approaches for glioblastoma multiforme, the most frequent and malignant brain tumor, based on vaccination with dendritic cells are outlined and application of hyperthermia in form of magnetic nanoparticles is discussed. We conclude that the immune system and developing tumors are intimately intertwined. Anti-tumor immune responses can be prominently boosted by multimodal therapies aiming on the one hand to induce immunogenic tumor cell death forms and on the other hand to actively counteract the immune suppressive microenvironment based on the tumor itself.

  1. Cross-talk between probiotic lactobacilli and host immune system.

    PubMed

    Kemgang, T S; Kapila, S; Shanmugam, V P; Kapila, R

    2014-08-01

    The mechanism by which probiotic lactobacilli affect the immune system is strain specific. As the immune system is a multicompartmental system, each strain has its way to interact with it and induce a visible and quantifiable effect. This review summarizes the interplay existing between the host immune system and probiotic lactobacilli, that is, with emphasis on lactobacilli as a prototype probiotic genus. Several aspects including the bacterial-host cross-talk with the mucosal and systemic immune system are presented, as well as short sections on the competing effect towards pathogenic bacteria and their uses as delivery vehicle for antigens.

  2. Extracellular Adenosine Mediates a Systemic Metabolic Switch during Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Bajgar, Adam; Kucerova, Katerina; Jonatova, Lucie; Tomcala, Ales; Schneedorferova, Ivana; Okrouhlik, Jan; Dolezal, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Immune defense is energetically costly, and thus an effective response requires metabolic adaptation of the organism to reallocate energy from storage, growth, and development towards the immune system. We employ the natural infection of Drosophila with a parasitoid wasp to study energy regulation during immune response. To combat the invasion, the host must produce specialized immune cells (lamellocytes) that destroy the parasitoid egg. We show that a significant portion of nutrients are allocated to differentiating lamellocytes when they would otherwise be used for development. This systemic metabolic switch is mediated by extracellular adenosine released from immune cells. The switch is crucial for an effective immune response. Preventing adenosine transport from immune cells or blocking adenosine receptor precludes the metabolic switch and the deceleration of development, dramatically reducing host resistance. Adenosine thus serves as a signal that the “selfish” immune cells send during infection to secure more energy at the expense of other tissues. PMID:25915062

  3. Reciprocal Interactions of the Intestinal Microbiota and Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Craig L.; Elson, Charles O.; Hatton, Robin D.; Weaver, Casey T.

    2013-01-01

    Preface Emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates set the stage for evolution of an advanced symbiotic relationship with the intestinal microbiota. The defining features of specificity and memory that characterize adaptive immunity have afforded vertebrates mechanisms for efficiently tailoring immune responses to diverse types of microbes, whether to promote mutualism or host defense. These same attributes carry risk for immune-mediated diseases that are increasingly linked to the intestinal microbiota. Understanding how the adaptive immune system copes with the remarkable number and diversity of microbes that colonize the digestive tract, and how it integrates with more primitive innate immune mechanisms to maintain immune homeostasis, holds considerable promise for new approaches to modulate immune networks in order to treat and prevent disease. PMID:22972296

  4. Identification of SPAM messages using an approach inspired on the immune system.

    PubMed

    Guzella, T S; Mota-Santos, T A; Uchôa, J Q; Caminhas, W M

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, an immune-inspired model, named innate and adaptive artificial immune system (IA-AIS) is proposed and applied to the problem of identification of unsolicited bulk e-mail messages (SPAM). It integrates entities analogous to macrophages, B and T lymphocytes, modeling both the innate and the adaptive immune systems. An implementation of the algorithm was capable of identifying more than 99% of legitimate or SPAM messages in particular parameter configurations. It was compared to an optimized version of the naive Bayes classifier, which has been attained extremely high correct classification rates. It has been concluded that IA-AIS has a greater ability to identify SPAM messages, although the identification of legitimate messages is not as high as that of the implemented naive Bayes classifier.

  5. Multiple-Valued Immune Network with Apoptosis System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Takayuki; Tang, Zheng

    In this paper, we describe a new model of immune network based on biological immune response network. We propose an immunity like multiple-valued network with apoptosis mechanism. The model is based on the interaction between B cells and T cells and the biological apoptosis mechanism in human body. With the mechanism, a naturally immune system can be reproduced. The model is also applied to pattern recognition. It gets possible with a conventional model to restricting categories increase of memory patterns.

  6. Artificial intelligence and expert systems in-flight software testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demasie, M. P.; Muratore, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    The authors discuss the introduction of advanced information systems technologies such as artificial intelligence, expert systems, and advanced human-computer interfaces directly into Space Shuttle software engineering. The reconfiguration automation project (RAP) was initiated to coordinate this move towards 1990s software technology. The idea behind RAP is to automate several phases of the flight software testing procedure and to introduce AI and ES into space shuttle flight software testing. In the first phase of RAP, conventional tools to automate regression testing have already been developed or acquired. There are currently three tools in use.

  7. Intercellular Communication in the Adaptive Immune System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Arup

    2004-03-01

    Higher organisms, like humans, have an adaptive immune system that can respond to pathogens that have not been encountered before. T lymphocytes (T cells) are the orchestrators of the adaptive immune response. They interact with cells, called antigen presenting cells (APC), that display molecular signatures of pathogens. Recently, video microscopy experiments have revealed that when T cells detect antigen on APC surfaces, a spatially patterned supramolecular assembly of different types of molecules forms in the junction between cell membranes. This recognition motif is implicated in information transfer between APC and T cells, and so, is labeled the immunological synapse. The observation of synapse formation sparked two broad questions: How does the synapse form? Why does the synapse form? I will describe progress made in answering these fundamental questions in biology by synergistic use of statistical mechanical theory/computation, chemical engineering principles, and genetic and biochemical experiments. The talk will also touch upon mechanisms that may underlie the extreme sensitivity with which T cells discriminate between self and non-self.

  8. Artificial endocrine controller for power management in robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Sauzé, Colin; Neal, Mark

    2013-12-01

    The robots that operate autonomously for extended periods in remote environments are often limited to gather only small amounts of power through photovoltaic solar panels. Such limited power budgets make power management critical to the success of the robot's mission. Artificial endocrine controllers, inspired by the mammalian endocrine system, have shown potential as a method for managing competing demands, gradually switching between behaviors, synchronizing behavior with external events, and maintaining a stable internal state of the robot. This paper reports the results obtained using these methods to manage power in an autonomous sailing robot. Artificial neural networks are used for sail and rudder control, while an artificial endocrine controller modulates the magnitude of actuator movements in response to battery or sunlight levels. Experiments are performed both in simulation and using a real robot. In simulation a 13-fold reduction in median power consumption is achieved; in the robot this is reduced to a twofold reduction because of the limitations of the simulation model. Additional simulations of a long term mission demonstrate the controller's ability to make gradual behavioral transitions and to synchronize behaviors with diurnal and seasonal changes in sunlight levels.

  9. Development of a Safeguard System Using an Episomal Mammalian Artificial Chromosome for Gene and Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Narumi; Uno, Katsuhiro; Komoto, Shinya; Suzuki, Teruhiko; Hiratsuka, Masaharu; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    The development of a safeguard system to remove tumorigenic cells would allow safer clinical applications of stem cells for the treatment of patients with an intractable disease including genetic disorders. Such safeguard systems should not disrupt the host genome and should have long-term stability. Here, we attempted to develop a tumor-suppressing mammalian artificial chromosome containing a safeguard system that uses the immune rejection system against allogeneic tissue from the host. For proof-of-concept of the safeguard system, B16F10 mouse melanoma cells expressing the introduced H2-K(d) major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I)-allogenic haplotype were transplanted into recipient C57BL/6J mice expressing MHC H2-K(b). Subcutaneous implantation of B16F10 cells into C57BL/6J mice resulted in high tumorigenicity. The volume of tumors derived from B16F10 cells expressing allogenic MHC H2-K(d) was decreased significantly (P < 0.01). Suppression of MHC H2-K(d)-expressing tumors in C57BL/6J mice was enhanced by immunization with MHC H2-K(d)-expressing splenocytes (P < 0.01). These results suggest that the safeguard system is capable of suppressing tumor formation by the transplanted cells. PMID:26670279

  10. Diffuse endocrine system, neuroendocrine tumors and immunity: what's new?

    PubMed

    Ameri, Pietro; Ferone, Diego

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, research into the modulation of immunity by the neuroendocrine system has flourished, unravelling significant effects of several neuropeptides, including somatostatin (SRIH), and especially cortistatin (CST), on immune cells. Scientists have learnt that the diffuse neuroendocrine system can regulate the immune system at all its levels: innate immunity, adaptive immunity, and maintenance of immune tolerance. Compelling studies with animal models have demonstrated that some neuropeptides may be effective in treating inflammatory disorders, such as sepsis, and T helper 1-driven autoimmune diseases, like Crohn's disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Here, the latest findings concerning the neuroendocrine control of the immune system are discussed, with emphasis on SRIH and CST. The second part of the review deals with the immune response to neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). The anti-NET immune response has been described in the last years and it is still being characterized, similarly to what is happening for several other types of cancer. In parallel with investigations addressing the mechanisms by which the immune system contrasts NET growth and spreading, ground-breaking clinical trials of dendritic cell vaccination as immunotherapy for metastatic NETs have shown in principle that the immune reaction to NETs can be exploited for treatment.

  11. Pathway to artificial pancreas systems revisited: moving downstream.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Aaron

    2015-06-01

    Artificial pancreas (AP) systems, a long-sought quest to replicate mechanically islet physiology that is lost in diabetes, are reaching the clinic, and the potential of automating insulin delivery is about to be realized. Significant progress has been made, and the safety and feasibility of AP systems have been demonstrated in the clinical research center and more recently in outpatient "real-world" environments. An iterative road map to AP system development has guided AP research since 2009, but progress in the field indicates that it needs updating. While it is now clear that AP systems are technically feasible, it remains much less certain that they will be widely adopted by clinicians and patients. Ultimately, the true success of AP systems will be defined by successful integration into the diabetes health care system and by the ultimate metric: improved diabetes outcomes.

  12. An artificial compound eye system for large field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Shi, Lifang; Shi, Ruiying; Dong, Xiaochun; Deng, Qiling; Du, Chunlei

    2012-11-01

    With the rapid development of science and technology, optical imaging system has been widely used, and the performance requirements are getting higher and higher such as lighter weight, smaller size, larger field of view and more sensitive to the moving targets. With the advantages of large field of view, high agility and multi-channels, compound eye is more and more concerned by academia and industry. In this work, an artificial spherical compound eye imaging system is proposed, which is formed by several mini cameras to get a large field of view. By analyzing the relationship of the view field between every single camera and the whole system, the geometric arrangement of cameras is studied and the compound eye structure is designed. By using the precision machining technology, the system can be manufactured. To verify the performance of this system, experiments were carried out, where the compound eye was formed by seven mini cameras which were placed centripetally along a spherical surface so that each camera points in a different direction. Pictures taken by these cameras were mosaiced into a complete image with large field of view. The results of the experiments prove the validity of the design method and the fabrication technology. By increasing the number of the cameras, larger view field even panoramic imaging can be realized by using this artificial compound eye.

  13. Alcohol consumption and antitumor immunity: dynamic changes from activation to accelerated deterioration of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhu, Zhaohui; Zhang, Faya; Meadows, Gary G

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of how alcohol and its metabolites induce cancer have been studied extensively. However, the mechanisms whereby chronic alcohol consumption affects antitumor immunity and host survival have largely been unexplored. We studied the effects of chronic alcohol consumption on the immune system and antitumor immunity in mice inoculated with B16BL6 melanoma and found that alcohol consumption activates the immune system leading to an increase in the proportion of IFN-γ-producing NK, NKT, and T cells in mice not injected with tumors. One outcome associated with enhanced IFN-γ activation is inhibition of melanoma lung metastasis. However, the anti-metastatic effects do not translate into increased survival of mice bearing subcutaneous tumors. Continued growth of the subcutaneous tumors and alcohol consumption accelerates the deterioration of the immune system, which is reflected in the following: (1) inhibition in the expansion of memory CD8+ T cells, (2) accelerated decay of Th1 cytokine-producing cells, (3) increased myeloid-derived suppressor cells, (4) compromised circulation of B cells and T cells, and (5) increased NKT cells that exhibit an IL-4 dominant cytokine profile, which is inhibitory to antitumor immunity. Taken together, the dynamic effects of alcohol consumption on antitumor immunity are in two opposing phases: the first phase associated with immune stimulation is tumor inhibitory and the second phase resulting from the interaction between the effects of alcohol and the tumor leads to immune inhibition and resultant tumor progression.

  14. Generation of Individual Diversity: A Too Neglected Fundamental Property of Adaptive Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Muraille, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The fitness gains resulting from development of the adaptive immune system (AIS) during evolution are still the subject of hot debate. A large random repertoire of antigenic receptors is costly to develop and could be the source of autoimmune reactions. And yet, despite their drawbacks, AIS-like systems seem to have been independently acquired in several phyla of metazoans with very different anatomies, longevities, and lifestyles. This article is a speculative attempt to explore the selective pressures, which favored this striking convergent evolution. It is well known that the AIS enables an organism to produce a specific immune response against all natural or artificial antigenic structures. However, it is frequently neglected that this response is highly variable among individuals. In practice, each individual possesses a “private” adaptive immune repertoire. This individualization of immune defenses implies that invasion and escape immune mechanisms developed by pathogens will certainly not always be successful as the specific targets and organization of the immune response are somewhat unpredictable. In a population, where individuals display heterogeneous immune responses to infection, the probability that a pathogen is able to infect all individuals could be reduced compared to a homogeneous population. This suggests that the individual diversity of the immune repertoire is not a by-product of the AIS but of its fundamental properties and could be in part responsible for repeated selection and conservation of the AIS during metazoan evolution. The capacity of the AIS to improve the management of cooperative or parasitic symbiotic relationships at the individual level could be a secondary development due to its progressive integration into the innate immune system. This hypothesis constitutes a new scenario for AIS emergence and explains the selection of MHC restriction and MHC diversification. PMID:24860570

  15. Generation of individual diversity: a too neglected fundamental property of adaptive immune system.

    PubMed

    Muraille, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The fitness gains resulting from development of the adaptive immune system (AIS) during evolution are still the subject of hot debate. A large random repertoire of antigenic receptors is costly to develop and could be the source of autoimmune reactions. And yet, despite their drawbacks, AIS-like systems seem to have been independently acquired in several phyla of metazoans with very different anatomies, longevities, and lifestyles. This article is a speculative attempt to explore the selective pressures, which favored this striking convergent evolution. It is well known that the AIS enables an organism to produce a specific immune response against all natural or artificial antigenic structures. However, it is frequently neglected that this response is highly variable among individuals. In practice, each individual possesses a "private" adaptive immune repertoire. This individualization of immune defenses implies that invasion and escape immune mechanisms developed by pathogens will certainly not always be successful as the specific targets and organization of the immune response are somewhat unpredictable. In a population, where individuals display heterogeneous immune responses to infection, the probability that a pathogen is able to infect all individuals could be reduced compared to a homogeneous population. This suggests that the individual diversity of the immune repertoire is not a by-product of the AIS but of its fundamental properties and could be in part responsible for repeated selection and conservation of the AIS during metazoan evolution. The capacity of the AIS to improve the management of cooperative or parasitic symbiotic relationships at the individual level could be a secondary development due to its progressive integration into the innate immune system. This hypothesis constitutes a new scenario for AIS emergence and explains the selection of MHC restriction and MHC diversification.

  16. Neuroendocrine and Immune System Responses with Spaceflights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, Charles M.; Greenleaf, John E.; Jackson, Catherine G. R.

    1996-01-01

    Despite the fact that the first human was in space during 1961 and individuals have existed in a microgravity environment for more than a year, there are limited spaceflight data available on the responses of the neuroendocrine and immune systems. Because of mutual interactions between these respective integrative systems, it is inappropriate to assume that the responses of one have no impact on functions of the other. Blood and plasma volume consistently decrease with spaceflight; hence, blood endocrine and immune constituents will be modified by both gravitational and measurement influences. The majority of the in-flight data relates to endocrine responses that influence fluids and electrolytes during the first month in space. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), aldo-sterone. and anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) appear to be elevated with little change in the atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP). Flight results longer than 60 d show increased ADH variability with elevations in angiotensin and cortisol. Although post-flight results are influenced by reentry and recovery events, ACTH and ADH appear to be consistently elevated with variable results being reported for the other hormones. Limited in-flight data on insulin and growth hormone levels suggest they are not elevated to counteract the loss in muscle mass. Post-flight results from short- and long-term flights indicate that thyroxine and insulin are increased while growth hormone exhibits minimal change. In-flight parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels are variable for several weeks after which they remain elevated. Post-flight PTH was increased on missions that lasted either 7 or 237 d, whereas calcitonin concentrations were increased after 1 wk but decreased after longer flights. Leukocytes are elevated in flights of various durations because of an increase in neutrophils. The majority of post-flight data indicates immunoglobulin concentrations are not significantly changed from pre-flight measurements. However, the numbers of T

  17. [Understanding of immune system by visualization of spatiotemporal regulation of immune cells in the entire body].

    PubMed

    Tomura, Michio

    2013-01-01

    Immune system is high-dimensional integrated system distributed in the whole body. Many kinds of, total 10(11) of immune cells are regulated by receiving appropriate signals in appropriate places. We have been attempting to understand immune system by revealing spatiotemporal regulation of immune cells at the whole body level by "Visualization of immune response in vivo". Photoconvertible protein, "Kaede"-Tg mice allowed us to monitor cell-replacement and cell-movement in the whole body by marking cells with color of Kaede from green to red with exposure to violet light. It is applicable to small cell number populations in both lymphoid organs and also peripheral tissues under both normal and pathophysiological conditions. By using this system, we have demonstrated novel findings that "Naive CD4(+) T cell recirculation is an active process that they recirculate through lymphoid organs to seek limited niche for interacting with endogenous antigens and upregulate their function." and "Activated regulatory T cells emigrating from cutaneous immune response is responsible for termination of immune reponse." I will introduce these new tools of us and would like to discuss what is needed to understand immune system in the entire body.

  18. Network Intrusion Detection Based on a General Regression Neural Network Optimized by an Improved Artificial Immune Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianfa; Peng, Dahao; Li, Zhuping; Zhao, Li; Ling, Huanzhang

    2015-01-01

    To effectively and accurately detect and classify network intrusion data, this paper introduces a general regression neural network (GRNN) based on the artificial immune algorithm with elitist strategies (AIAE). The elitist archive and elitist crossover were combined with the artificial immune algorithm (AIA) to produce the AIAE-GRNN algorithm, with the aim of improving its adaptivity and accuracy. In this paper, the mean square errors (MSEs) were considered the affinity function. The AIAE was used to optimize the smooth factors of the GRNN; then, the optimal smooth factor was solved and substituted into the trained GRNN. Thus, the intrusive data were classified. The paper selected a GRNN that was separately optimized using a genetic algorithm (GA), particle swarm optimization (PSO), and fuzzy C-mean clustering (FCM) to enable a comparison of these approaches. As shown in the results, the AIAE-GRNN achieves a higher classification accuracy than PSO-GRNN, but the running time of AIAE-GRNN is long, which was proved first. FCM and GA-GRNN were eliminated because of their deficiencies in terms of accuracy and convergence. To improve the running speed, the paper adopted principal component analysis (PCA) to reduce the dimensions of the intrusive data. With the reduction in dimensionality, the PCA-AIAE-GRNN decreases in accuracy less and has better convergence than the PCA-PSO-GRNN, and the running speed of the PCA-AIAE-GRNN was relatively improved. The experimental results show that the AIAE-GRNN has a higher robustness and accuracy than the other algorithms considered and can thus be used to classify the intrusive data. PMID:25807466

  19. Network intrusion detection based on a general regression neural network optimized by an improved artificial immune algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianfa; Peng, Dahao; Li, Zhuping; Zhao, Li; Ling, Huanzhang

    2015-01-01

    To effectively and accurately detect and classify network intrusion data, this paper introduces a general regression neural network (GRNN) based on the artificial immune algorithm with elitist strategies (AIAE). The elitist archive and elitist crossover were combined with the artificial immune algorithm (AIA) to produce the AIAE-GRNN algorithm, with the aim of improving its adaptivity and accuracy. In this paper, the mean square errors (MSEs) were considered the affinity function. The AIAE was used to optimize the smooth factors of the GRNN; then, the optimal smooth factor was solved and substituted into the trained GRNN. Thus, the intrusive data were classified. The paper selected a GRNN that was separately optimized using a genetic algorithm (GA), particle swarm optimization (PSO), and fuzzy C-mean clustering (FCM) to enable a comparison of these approaches. As shown in the results, the AIAE-GRNN achieves a higher classification accuracy than PSO-GRNN, but the running time of AIAE-GRNN is long, which was proved first. FCM and GA-GRNN were eliminated because of their deficiencies in terms of accuracy and convergence. To improve the running speed, the paper adopted principal component analysis (PCA) to reduce the dimensions of the intrusive data. With the reduction in dimensionality, the PCA-AIAE-GRNN decreases in accuracy less and has better convergence than the PCA-PSO-GRNN, and the running speed of the PCA-AIAE-GRNN was relatively improved. The experimental results show that the AIAE-GRNN has a higher robustness and accuracy than the other algorithms considered and can thus be used to classify the intrusive data.

  20. Trauma equals danger--damage control by the immune system.

    PubMed

    Stoecklein, Veit M; Osuka, Akinori; Lederer, James A

    2012-09-01

    Traumatic injuries induce a complex host response that disrupts immune system homeostasis and predisposes patients to opportunistic infections and inflammatory complications. The response to injuries varies considerably by type and severity, as well as by individual variables, such as age, sex, and genetics. These variables make studying the impact of trauma on the immune system challenging. Nevertheless, advances have been made in understanding how injuries influence immune system function as well as the immune cells and pathways involved in regulating the response to injuries. This review provides an overview of current knowledge about how traumatic injuries affect immune system phenotype and function. We discuss the current ideas that traumatic injuries induce a unique type of a response that may be triggered by a combination of endogenous danger signals, including alarmins, DAMPs, self-antigens, and cytokines. Additionally, we review and propose strategies for redirecting injury responses to help restore immune system homeostasis.

  1. Reversal of hepatitis B virus-induced systemic immune tolerance by intrinsic innate immune stimulation.

    PubMed

    Han, Qiuju; Lan, Peixiang; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Cai; Tian, Zhigang

    2013-08-01

    Systemic immune tolerance induced by chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a significant question, but the mechanism of which remains unclear. In this mini-review, we summarize the impaired innate and adaptive immune responses involved in immune tolerance in chronic HBV infection. Furthermore, we delineate a novel dual functional small RNA to inhibit HBV replication and stimulate innate immunity against HBV, which proposed a promising immunotherapeutic intervention to interrupt HBV-induced immunotolerance. A mouse model of HBV persistence was established and used to observe the immune tolerant to HBV vaccination, the cell-intrinsic immune tolerance of which might be reversed by chemically synthesized dual functional small RNA (3p-hepatitis B Virus X gene [HBx]-small interfering RNA) in vitro experiments and by biologically constructed dual functional vector (single-stranded RNA-HBx- short hairpin RNA) in vivo experiment using HBV-carrier mice.

  2. Artificial vision support system (AVS(2)) for improved prosthetic vision.

    PubMed

    Fink, Wolfgang; Tarbell, Mark A

    2014-11-01

    State-of-the-art and upcoming camera-driven, implanted artificial vision systems provide only tens to hundreds of electrodes, affording only limited visual perception for blind subjects. Therefore, real time image processing is crucial to enhance and optimize this limited perception. Since tens or hundreds of pixels/electrodes allow only for a very crude approximation of the typically megapixel optical resolution of the external camera image feed, the preservation and enhancement of contrast differences and transitions, such as edges, are especially important compared to picture details such as object texture. An Artificial Vision Support System (AVS(2)) is devised that displays the captured video stream in a pixelation conforming to the dimension of the epi-retinal implant electrode array. AVS(2), using efficient image processing modules, modifies the captured video stream in real time, enhancing 'present but hidden' objects to overcome inadequacies or extremes in the camera imagery. As a result, visual prosthesis carriers may now be able to discern such objects in their 'field-of-view', thus enabling mobility in environments that would otherwise be too hazardous to navigate. The image processing modules can be engaged repeatedly in a user-defined order, which is a unique capability. AVS(2) is directly applicable to any artificial vision system that is based on an imaging modality (video, infrared, sound, ultrasound, microwave, radar, etc.) as the first step in the stimulation/processing cascade, such as: retinal implants (i.e. epi-retinal, sub-retinal, suprachoroidal), optic nerve implants, cortical implants, electric tongue stimulators, or tactile stimulators.

  3. Mass Cytometry of the Human Mucosal Immune System Identifies Tissue- and Disease-Associated Immune Subsets.

    PubMed

    van Unen, Vincent; Li, Na; Molendijk, Ilse; Temurhan, Mine; Höllt, Thomas; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Verspaget, Hein W; Mearin, M Luisa; Mulder, Chris J; van Bergen, Jeroen; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; Koning, Frits

    2016-05-17

    Inflammatory intestinal diseases are characterized by abnormal immune responses and affect distinct locations of the gastrointestinal tract. Although the role of several immune subsets in driving intestinal pathology has been studied, a system-wide approach that simultaneously interrogates all major lineages on a single-cell basis is lacking. We used high-dimensional mass cytometry to generate a system-wide view of the human mucosal immune system in health and disease. We distinguished 142 immune subsets and through computational applications found distinct immune subsets in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and intestinal biopsies that distinguished patients from controls. In addition, mucosal lymphoid malignancies were readily detected as well as precursors from which these likely derived. These findings indicate that an integrated high-dimensional analysis of the entire immune system can identify immune subsets associated with the pathogenesis of complex intestinal disorders. This might have implications for diagnostic procedures, immune-monitoring, and treatment of intestinal diseases and mucosal malignancies.

  4. Reactive oxygen species in the immune system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuhui; Bazhin, Alexandr V; Werner, Jens; Karakhanova, Svetlana

    2013-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a group of highly reactive chemicals containing oxygen produced either exogenously or endogenously. ROS are related to a wide variety of human disorders, such as chronic inflammation, age-related diseases and cancers. Besides, ROS are also essential for various biological functions, including cell survival, cell growth, proliferation and differentiation, and immune response. At present there are a number of excellent publications including some reviews about functions of these molecules either in normal cell biology or in pathophysiology. In this work, we reviewed available information and recent advances about ROS in the main immune cell types and gave summary about functions of these highly reactive molecules both in innate immunity as conservative defense mechanisms and in essential immune cells involved in adaptive immunity, and particularly in immune suppression.

  5. Adaptive conventional power system stabilizer based on artificial neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, M.L.; Segal, R.; Ghodki, B.K.

    1995-12-31

    This paper deals with an artificial neural network (ANN) based adaptive conventional power system stabilizer (PSS). The ANN comprises an input layer, a hidden layer and an output layer. The input vector to the ANN comprises real power (P) and reactive power (Q), while the output vector comprises optimum PSS parameters. A systematic approach for generating training set covering wide range of operating conditions, is presented. The ANN has been trained using back-propagation training algorithm. Investigations reveal that the dynamic performance of ANN based adaptive conventional PSS is quite insensitive to wide variations in loading conditions.

  6. Design Considerations for Artificial Lifting of Enhanced Geothermal System Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Xina Xie; K. K. Bloomfield; G. L. Mines; G. M. Shook

    2005-07-01

    This work evaluates the effect of production well pumping requirements on power generation. The amount of work that can be extracted from a geothermal fluid and the rate at which this work is converted to power increase as the reservoir temperature increases. Artificial lifting is an important issue in this process. The results presented are based on a configuration comprising one production well and one injection well, representing an enhanced geothermal system. The effects of the hydraulic conductivity of the geothermal reservoir, the flow rate, and the size of the production casing are considered in the study. Besides submersible pumps, the possibility of using lineshaft pumps is also discussed.

  7. The application of artificial intelligence technology to aeronautical system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouchard, E. E.; Kidwell, G. H.; Rogan, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the automation of one class of aeronautical design activity using artificial intelligence and advanced software techniques. Its purpose is to suggest concepts, terminology, and approaches that may be useful in enhancing design automation. By understanding the basic concepts and tasks in design, and the technologies that are available, it will be possible to produce, in the future, systems whose capabilities far exceed those of today's methods. Some of the tasks that will be discussed have already been automated and are in production use, resulting in significant productivity benefits. The concepts and techniques discussed are applicable to all design activity, though aeronautical applications are specifically presented.

  8. The role of artificial intelligence techniques in scheduling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geoffroy, Amy L.; Britt, Daniel L.; Gohring, John R.

    1990-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques provide good solutions for many of the problems which are characteristic of scheduling applications. However, scheduling is a large, complex heterogeneous problem. Different applications will require different solutions. Any individual application will require the use of a variety of techniques, including both AI and conventional software methods. The operational context of the scheduling system will also play a large role in design considerations. The key is to identify those places where a specific AI technique is in fact the preferable solution, and to integrate that technique into the overall architecture.

  9. How the Innate Immune System Senses Trouble and Causes Trouble.

    PubMed

    Hato, Takashi; Dagher, Pierre C

    2015-08-07

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense in response to nonself and danger signals from microbial invasion or tissue injury. It is increasingly recognized that each organ uses unique sets of cells and molecules that orchestrate regional innate immunity. The cells that execute the task of innate immunity are many and consist of not only "professional" immune cells but also nonimmune cells, such as renal epithelial cells. Despite a high level of sophistication, deregulated innate immunity is common and contributes to a wide range of renal diseases, such as sepsis-induced kidney injury, GN, and allograft dysfunction. This review discusses how the innate immune system recognizes and responds to nonself and danger signals. In particular, the roles of renal epithelial cells that make them an integral part of the innate immune apparatus of the kidney are highlighted.

  10. [Psychoneuroimmunology--regulation of immunity at the systemic level].

    PubMed

    Boranić, Milivoj; Sabioncello, Ante; Gabrilovac, Jelka

    2008-01-01

    Innate and acquired immune reactions are controlled by their intrinsic regulatory mechanisms, ie. by an array of cytokines that mediate communication among cells of the immune system itself and with other cells and tissues, e. g. in areas of inflammation. In addition, the immune system is also subjected to systemic regulation by the vegetative and endocrine systems since immune cells express receptors for neurotransmitters and hormones. Neuroendocrine signals may enhance or suppress the immune reaction, accelerate or slow it, but do not affect specificity. Various stressful factors, including the psychosocial ones, affect immunity. In turn, cytokines generated by the immune system influence hormonal secretion and central nervous system, producing specific behavioral changes (the "sickness behavior") accompanying infectious and inflammatory diseases. That includes somnolence, loss of apetite, depression or anxiety and decrease of cognitive abilities, attention and memory. Local immune systems in skin and mucosa are also subjected to systemic neuroendocrine regulation and possess intrinsic neuroregulatory networks as well. These mechanisms render skin and respiratory and digestive tracts responsive to various forms of stress. Examples are neurodermitis, asthma and ulcerative colitis. In children, the immune and the neuroendocrine systems are still developing, particularly in fetal, neonatal and early infant periods, and exposure to stressful experiences at that time may result in late consequences in the form of deficient immunity or greater risks for allergic or autoimmune reactions. Recognition of the participation of neuroendocrine mechanisms in regulation of immunity helps us understand alterations and disturbances of immune reactions under the influence of stressful factors but so far has not produced reliable therapeutic implications. Psychosocial interventions involving the child and its family may be useful.

  11. The immune system and cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G.

    2008-01-01

    role of the immune system in cardiac repair is necessary in order to design optimal strategies for cardiac regeneration. PMID:18620057

  12. Evaluation of articulation simulation system using artificial maxillectomy models.

    PubMed

    Elbashti, M E; Hattori, M; Sumita, Y I; Taniguchi, H

    2015-09-01

    Acoustic evaluation is valuable for guiding the treatment of maxillofacial defects and determining the effectiveness of rehabilitation with an obturator prosthesis. Model simulations are important in terms of pre-surgical planning and pre- and post-operative speech function. This study aimed to evaluate the acoustic characteristics of voice generated by an articulation simulation system using a vocal tract model with or without artificial maxillectomy defects. More specifically, we aimed to establish a speech simulation system for maxillectomy defect models that both surgeons and maxillofacial prosthodontists can use in guiding treatment planning. Artificially simulated maxillectomy defects were prepared according to Aramany's classification (Classes I-VI) in a three-dimensional vocal tract plaster model of a subject uttering the vowel /a/. Formant and nasalance acoustic data were analysed using Computerized Speech Lab and the Nasometer, respectively. Formants and nasalance of simulated /a/ sounds were successfully detected and analysed. Values of Formants 1 and 2 for the non-defect model were 675.43 and 976.64 Hz, respectively. Median values of Formants 1 and 2 for the defect models were 634.36 and 1026.84 Hz, respectively. Nasalance was 11% in the non-defect model, whereas median nasalance was 28% in the defect models. The results suggest that an articulation simulation system can be used to help surgeons and maxillofacial prosthodontists to plan post-surgical defects that will be facilitate maxillofacial rehabilitation.

  13. Monitoring induced denitrification in an artificial aquifer recharge system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grau-Martinez, Alba; Torrentó, Clara; Folch, Albert; Domènech, Cristina; Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert

    2014-05-01

    literature ɛN values of -4o and -22o respectively (Aravena and Robertson, 1998; Pauwels et al., 2000). Ongoing denitrification batch experiments will allow us to determine the specific nitrogen and oxygen isotopic fractionation induced by the organic reactive layer, in order to estimate more precisely the extent of denitrification during artificial aquifer recharge. These results confirmed that the reactive layer induces denitrification in the recharge ponds area, proving the usefulness of an isotopic approach to characterize water quality improvement occurring during artificial aquifer recharge. References 1. Aravena, R., Robertson, W.D., 1998. Use of multiple isotope tracers to evaluate denitrification in ground water: Study of nitrate from a large-flux septic system plume. Ground Water, 36(6): 975-982. 2. Pauwels, H., J.C., Kloppmann, W., 2000. Denitrification and mixing in a schist aquifer: Influence on water chemistry and isotopes. Chemical Geology, 168(3-4): 307-324. Acknowledgment This study was supported by the projects CGL2011-29975-C04-01 from the Spanish Government, 2009SGR-00103 from the Catalan Government and ENPI/2011/280-008 from the European Commission. Please fill in your abstract text.

  14. Resident viruses and their interactions with the immune system.

    PubMed

    Duerkop, Breck A; Hooper, Lora V

    2013-07-01

    The human body is colonized with a diverse resident microflora that includes viruses. Recent studies of metagenomes have begun to characterize the composition of the human 'virobiota' and its associated genes (the 'virome'), and have fostered the emerging field of host-virobiota interactions. In this Perspective, we explore how resident viruses interact with the immune system. We review recent findings that highlight the role of the immune system in shaping the composition of the virobiota and consider how resident viruses may impact host immunity. Finally, we discuss the implications of virobiota-immune system interactions for human health.

  15. Promoting tissue regeneration by modulating the immune system.

    PubMed

    Julier, Ziad; Park, Anthony J; Briquez, Priscilla S; Martino, Mikaël M

    2017-01-22

    The immune system plays a central role in tissue repair and regeneration. Indeed, the immune response to tissue injury is crucial in determining the speed and the outcome of the healing process, including the extent of scarring and the restoration of organ function. Therefore, controlling immune components via biomaterials and drug delivery systems is becoming an attractive approach in regenerative medicine, since therapies based on stem cells and growth factors have not yet proven to be broadly effective in the clinic. To integrate the immune system into regenerative strategies, one of the first challenges is to understand the precise functions of the different immune components during the tissue healing process. While remarkable progress has been made, the immune mechanisms involved are still elusive, and there is indication for both negative and positive roles depending on the tissue type or organ and life stage. It is well recognized that the innate immune response comprising danger signals, neutrophils and macrophages modulates tissue healing. In addition, it is becoming evident that the adaptive immune response, in particular T cell subset activities, plays a critical role. In this review, we first present an overview of the basic immune mechanisms involved in tissue repair and regeneration. Then, we highlight various approaches based on biomaterials and drug delivery systems that aim at modulating these mechanisms to limit fibrosis and promote regeneration. We propose that the next generation of regenerative therapies may evolve from typical biomaterial-, stem cell-, or growth factor-centric approaches to an immune-centric approach.

  16. Invited essay: Cognitive influences on the psychological immune system.

    PubMed

    Rachman, S J

    2016-12-01

    The construct of the psychological immune system is described and analysed. The direct and indirect cognitive influences on the system are discussed, and the implications of adding a cognitive construal to the influential model of a behavioural immune system are considered. The psychological immune system has two main properties: defensive and healing. It encompasses a good amount of health-related phenomena that is outside the scope of the behavioural model or the biological immune system. Evidence pertaining to the psychological immune system includes meta-analyses of the associations between psychological variables such as positive affect/wellbeing and diseases and mortality, and associations between wellbeing and positive health. The results of long-term prospective studies are consistent with the conclusions drawn from the meta-analyses. Laboratory investigations of the effects of psychological variables on the biological immune system show that negative affect can slow wound-healing, and positive affect can enhance resistance to infections, for example in experiments involving the introduction of the rhinovirus and the influenza A virus. A number of problems concerning the assessment of the functioning of the psychological immune system are considered, and the need to develop techniques for determining when the system is active or not, is emphasized. This problem is particularly challenging when trying to assess the effects of the psychological immune system during a prolonged psychological intervention, such as a course of resilience training.

  17. Immune reconstitution and strategies for rebuilding the immune system after haploidentical stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Oevermann, Lena; Lang, Peter; Feuchtinger, Tobias; Schumm, Michael; Teltschik, Heiko-Manuel; Schlegel, Patrick; Handgretinger, Rupert

    2012-08-01

    Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a curative alternative option for patients without an otherwise suitable stem cell donor. In order to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), different in vitro and in vivo T cell-depletion strategies have been developed. A delayed immune reconstitution is common to all these strategies, and an impaired immune function after haploidentical transplantation with subsequent infections is a major cause of deaths in these patients. In addition to in vitro and in vivo T cell-depletion methods, posttransplant strategies to rapidly rebuild the immune system have been introduced in order to improve the outcome. Advances in in vitro and in vivo T cell-depletion methods, and adoptive transfer of immune cells of the innate and specific immune system, will contribute to reduce the risk of GvHD, lethal infections, and the risk of relapse of the underlying malignant disease.

  18. ANUBIS: artificial neuromodulation using a Bayesian inference system.

    PubMed

    Smith, Benjamin J H; Saaj, Chakravarthini M; Allouis, Elie

    2013-01-01

    Gain tuning is a crucial part of controller design and depends not only on an accurate understanding of the system in question, but also on the designer's ability to predict what disturbances and other perturbations the system will encounter throughout its operation. This letter presents ANUBIS (artificial neuromodulation using a Bayesian inference system), a novel biologically inspired technique for automatically tuning controller parameters in real time. ANUBIS is based on the Bayesian brain concept and modifies it by incorporating a model of the neuromodulatory system comprising four artificial neuromodulators. It has been applied to the controller of EchinoBot, a prototype walking rover for Martian exploration. ANUBIS has been implemented at three levels of the controller; gait generation, foot trajectory planning using Bézier curves, and foot trajectory tracking using a terminal sliding mode controller. We compare the results to a similar system that has been tuned using a multilayer perceptron. The use of Bayesian inference means that the system retains mathematical interpretability, unlike other intelligent tuning techniques, which use neural networks, fuzzy logic, or evolutionary algorithms. The simulation results show that ANUBIS provides significant improvements in efficiency and adaptability of the three controller components; it allows the robot to react to obstacles and uncertainties faster than the system tuned with the MLP, while maintaining stability and accuracy. As well as advancing rover autonomy, ANUBIS could also be applied to other situations where operating conditions are likely to change or cannot be accurately modeled in advance, such as process control. In addition, it demonstrates one way in which neuromodulation could fit into the Bayesian brain framework.

  19. Current topics in glycemic control by wearable artificial pancreas or bedside artificial pancreas with closed-loop system.

    PubMed

    Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Munekage, Masaya; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Munekage, Eri; Shiga, Mai; Maeda, Hiromichi; Namikawa, Tsutomu

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of diabetes is increasing at an unprecedented pace and has become a serious health concern worldwide during the last two decades. Despite this, adequate glycemic control using an artificial pancreas has not been established, although the 21st century has seen rapid developments in this area. Herein, we review current topics in glycemic control for both the wearable artificial pancreas for type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients and the bedside artificial pancreas for surgical diabetic patients. In type 1 diabetic patients, nocturnal hypoglycemia associated with insulin therapy remains a serious problem that could be addressed by the recent development of a wearable artificial pancreas. This smart phone-like device, comprising a real-time, continuous glucose monitoring system and insulin pump system, could potentially significantly reduce nocturnal hypoglycemia compared with conventional glycemic control. Of particular interest in this space are the recent inventions of a low-glucose suspend feature in the portable systems that automatically stops insulin delivery 2 h following a glucose sensor value <70 mg/dL and a bio-hormonal pump system consisting of insulin and glucagon pumps. Perioperative tight glycemic control using a bedside artificial pancreas with the closed-loop system has also proved safe and effective for not only avoiding hypoglycemia, but also for reducing blood glucose level variability resulting in good surgical outcomes. We hope that a more sophisticated artificial pancreas with closed-loop system will now be taken up for routine use worldwide, providing enormous relief for patients suffering from uncontrolled hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and/or variability in blood glucose concentrations.

  20. Role of the immune system in pancreatic cancer progression and immune modulating treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Sideras, K; Braat, H; Kwekkeboom, J; van Eijck, C H; Peppelenbosch, M P; Sleijfer, S; Bruno, M

    2014-05-01

    Traditional chemotherapeutics have largely failed to date to produce significant improvements in pancreatic cancer survival. One of the reasons for the resilience of pancreatic cancer towards intensive treatment is that the cancer is capable of high jacking the immune system: during disease progression the immune system is converted from a system that attacks tumor cells into a support structure for the cancer, exerting trophic actions on the cancer cells. This turn-around of immune system action is achieved through mobilization and activation of regulatory T cells, myeloid derived suppressor cells, tumor-associated macrophages and fibroblasts, all of which suppress CD8 T cells and NK cells. This immune suppression occurs both through the expression of tolerance-inducing cell surface molecules, such as PD-L1, as well as through the production of "tolerogenic" cytokines, such as IL-10 and TGF-β. Based on the accumulating insight into the importance of the immune system for the outcome of pancreatic cancer patients multiple new immunotherapeutic approaches against pancreatic cancer are being currently tested in clinical trials. In this review we give an overview of both the immune escaping mechanisms of pancreatic cancer as well as the new immune related therapeutic strategies currently being tested in pancreatic cancer clinical trials.

  1. Incomplete fuzzy data processing systems using artificial neural network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patyra, Marek J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the implementation of a fuzzy data processing system using an artificial neural network (ANN) is discussed. The binary representation of fuzzy data is assumed, where the universe of discourse is decartelized into n equal intervals. The value of a membership function is represented by a binary number. It is proposed that incomplete fuzzy data processing be performed in two stages. The first stage performs the 'retrieval' of incomplete fuzzy data, and the second stage performs the desired operation on the retrieval data. The method of incomplete fuzzy data retrieval is proposed based on the linear approximation of missing values of the membership function. The ANN implementation of the proposed system is presented. The system was computationally verified and showed a relatively small total error.

  2. Ultrathin Alvarez lens system actuated by artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Petsch, S; Grewe, A; Köbele, L; Sinzinger, S; Zappe, H

    2016-04-01

    A key feature of Alvarez lenses is that they may be tuned in focal length using lateral rather than axial translation, thus reducing the overall length of a focus-tunable optical system. Nevertheless the bulk of classical microsystems actuators limits further miniaturization. We present here a new, ultrathin focus-tunable Alvarez lens fabricated using molding techniques and actuated using liquid crystal elastomer (LCE) artificial muscle actuators. The large deformation generated by the LCE actuators permits the integration of the actuators in-plane with the mechanical and optical system and thus reduces the device thickness to only 1.6 mm. Movement of the Alvarez lens pair of 178 μm results in a focal length change of 3.3 mm, based on an initial focal length of 28.4 mm. This design is of considerable interest for realization of ultraflat focus-tunable and zoom systems.

  3. Neutrophils: Cinderella of innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Sharma, A

    2010-11-01

    Neutrophils are the first line of innate immune defense against infectious diseases. However, since their discovery by Elie Metchnikoff, they have always been considered tissue-destructive cells responsible for inflammatory tissue damage occurring during acute infections. Now, extensive research in the field of neutrophil cell biology and their role skewing the immune response in various infections or inflammatory disorders revealed their importance in the regulation of immune response. Along with releasing various antimicrobial molecules, neutrophils also release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) for the containment of infection and inflammation. Activated neutrophils provide signals for the activation and maturation of macrophages as well as dendritic cells. Neutrophils are also involved in the regulation of T-cell immune response against various pathogens and tumor antigens. Thus, the present review is intended to highlight the emerging role of neutrophils in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immunity during acute infectious or inflammatory conditions.

  4. Psychoneuroimmunology--cross-talk between the immune and nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Ziemssen, Tjalf; Kern, Simone

    2007-05-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology is a relatively new field of study that investigates interactions between behaviour and the immune system, mediated by the endocrine and nervous systems. The immune and central nervous system (CNS) maintain extensive communication. On the one hand, the brain modulates the immune system by hardwiring sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves (autonomic nervous system) to lymphoid organs. On the other hand, neuroendocrine hormones such as corticotrophin-releasing hormone or substance P regulate cytokine balance. Vice versa, the immune system modulates brain activity including sleep and body temperature. Based on a close functional and anatomical link, the immune and nervous systems act in a highly reciprocal manner. From fever to stress, the influence of one system on the other has evolved in an intricate manner to help sense danger and to mount an appropriate adaptive response. Over recent decades, reasonable evidence has emerged that these brain-to-immune interactions are highly modulated by psychological factors which influence immunity and immune system-mediated disease.

  5. Mapping the effects of drugs on the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Brian A; Wroblewska, Aleksandra; Boland, Mary R; Agudo, Judith; Merad, Miriam; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Brown, Brian D; Dudley, Joel T

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how drugs affect the immune system has consequences for treating disease and minimizing unwanted side effects. Here we present an integrative computational approach for predicting interactions between drugs and immune cells in a system-wide manner. The approach matches gene sets between transcriptional signatures to determine their similarity. We apply the method to model the interactions between 1,309 drugs and 221 immune cell types and predict 69,995 known and novel interactions. The resulting immune-cell pharmacology map is used to predict how 5 drugs influence 4 immune cell types in humans and mice. To validate the predictions, we analyzed patient records and examined cell population changes from in vivo experiments. Our method offers a tool for screening thousands of interactions to identify relationships between drugs and the immune system. PMID:26619012

  6. Mapping the effects of drugs on the immune system.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Brian A; Wroblewska, Aleksandra; Boland, Mary R; Agudo, Judith; Merad, Miriam; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Brown, Brian D; Dudley, Joel T

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how drugs affect the immune system has consequences for treating disease and minimizing unwanted side effects. Here we present an integrative computational approach for predicting interactions between drugs and immune cells in a system-wide manner. The approach matches gene sets between transcriptional signatures to determine their similarity. We apply the method to model the interactions between 1,309 drugs and 221 immune cell types and predict 69,995 interactions. The resulting immune-cell pharmacology map is used to predict how five drugs influence four immune cell types in humans and mice. To validate the predictions, we analyzed patient records and examined cell population changes from in vivo experiments. Our method offers a tool for screening thousands of interactions to identify relationships between drugs and the immune system.

  7. Development of an Electrohydraulic Total Artificial Heart System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma, Akihiko; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Mizuno, Toshihide; Shioya, Kyoko; Lee, Hwan Sung; Tsukiya, Tomonori; Kakuta, Yukihide; Katagiri, Nobumasa; Nishinaka, Tomohiro; Koshiji, Kohji

    An electrohydraulic total artificial heart (EHTAH) system has been developed. The EHTAH system consists of diaphragm-type blood pumps, an electrohydraulic actuator, an internal control unit, a transcutaneous energy transfer system (TETS), a transcutaneous optical telemetry system (TOTS), and an internal battery. The reciprocating rotation of the impeller generates oil pressure which drives the blood pumps at alternating intervals. The blood pumps and the actuator were successfully integrated into the pump unit without oil conduits. As a result of miniaturizing the blood pumps and the actuator, the displacement volume and weight of the EHTAH system decreased to 872 ml and 2492g, respectively. Furthermore, the maximum flow rate and efficiency increased up to 12 L/min and 15.4%. The pump units and the EHTAH systems were successfully implanted in 36 calves weighing from 55 to 87kg. In the longest case, the ca1f with the pump unit survived for 87 days and the calf with the EHTAH system survived for 70 days. The EHTAH system was powered by the TETS, and was powered everyday by the internal battery for 40 minutes. These results indicate that the EHTAH system has the potential to become a fully implantable cardiac replacement system.

  8. The Immune System in the Pathogenesis of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charbonneau, Bridget; Goode, Ellen L.; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Knutson, Keith L.; DeRycke, Melissa S.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical outcomes in ovarian cancer are heterogeneous even when considering common features such as stage, response to therapy, and grade. This disparity in outcomes warrants further exploration into tumor and host characteristics. One compelling host characteristic is the immune response to ovarian cancer. While several studies have confirmed a prominent role for the immune system in modifying the clinical course of the disease, recent genetic and protein analyses also suggest a role in disease incidence. Recent studies also show that anti-tumor immunity is often negated by immune suppressive cells present in the tumor microenvironment. These suppressive immune cells also directly enhance the pathogenesis through the release of various cytokines and chemokines, which together form an integrated pathologic network. Thus, future research into immunotherapy targeting ovarian cancer will likely become increasingly focused on combination approaches that simultaneously augment immunity while preventing local immune suppression or by disrupting critical cytokine networks. PMID:23582060

  9. Interactions between Artificial Gravity, Affected Physiological Systems, and Nutrition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heer, Martina; Baecker, Natalie; Zwart, Sara; Smith, Scott M.

    2007-01-01

    Malnutrition, either by insufficient supply of some nutrients or by overfeeding has a profound effect on the health of an organism. Therefore, optimal nutrition is mandatory on Earth (1 g), in microgravity and also when applying artificial gravity to the human system. Immobilization like in microgravity or bed rest also has a profound effect on different physiological systems, like body fluid regulation, the cardiovascular, the musculoskeletal, the immunological system and others. Up to now there is no countermeasure available which is effective to counteract cardiovascular deconditioning (rf. Chapter 5) together with maintenance of the musculoskeletal system in a rather short period of time. Gravity seems therefore to be one of the main stimuli to keep these systems and application of certain duration of artificial gravity per day by centrifugation has often been proposed as a very potential countermeasure against the weakening of the physiological systems. Up to now, neither optimal intensity nor optimal length of application of artificial gravity has been studied sufficiently to recommend a certain, effective and efficient protocol. However, as shown in chapter 5 on cardiovascular system, in chapter 6 on the neuromuscular system and chapter 7 (bone and connective system) artificial gravity has a very high potential to counteract any degradation caused by immobilization. But, nutrient supply -which ideally should match the actual needs- will interact with these changes and therefore has also to be taken into account. It is well known that astronauts beside the Skylab missions- were and are still not optimally nourished during their stay in space (Bourland et al. 2000;Heer et al. 1995;Heer et al. 2000b;Smith et al. 1997;Smith & Lane 1999;Smith et al. 2001;Smith et al. 2005). It has also been described anecdotally that astronauts have lower appetites. One possible explanation could be altered taste and smell sensations during space flight, although in some early

  10. Continuous Dual Resetting of the Immune Repertoire as a Basic Principle of the Immune System Function

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic chronic inflammatory conditions (ICIC) such as allergy, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and various autoimmune conditions are a worldwide health problem. Understanding the pathogenesis of ICIC is essential for their successful therapy and prevention. However, efforts are hindered by the lack of comprehensive understanding of the human immune system function. In line with those efforts, described here is a concept of stochastic continuous dual resetting (CDR) of the immune repertoire as a basic principle that governs the function of immunity. The CDR functions as a consequence of system's thermodynamically determined intrinsic tendency to acquire new states of inner equilibrium and equilibrium against the environment. Consequently, immune repertoire undergoes continuous dual (two-way) resetting: against the physiologic continuous changes of self and against the continuously changing environment. The CDR-based dynamic concept of immunity describes mechanisms of self-regulation, tolerance, and immunosenescence, and emphasizes the significance of immune system's compartmentalization in the pathogenesis of ICIC. The CDR concept's relative simplicity and concomitantly documented congruency with empirical, clinical, and experimental data suggest it may represent a plausible theoretical framework to better understand the human immune system function. PMID:28246613

  11. Continuous Dual Resetting of the Immune Repertoire as a Basic Principle of the Immune System Function.

    PubMed

    Balzar, Silvana

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic chronic inflammatory conditions (ICIC) such as allergy, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and various autoimmune conditions are a worldwide health problem. Understanding the pathogenesis of ICIC is essential for their successful therapy and prevention. However, efforts are hindered by the lack of comprehensive understanding of the human immune system function. In line with those efforts, described here is a concept of stochastic continuous dual resetting (CDR) of the immune repertoire as a basic principle that governs the function of immunity. The CDR functions as a consequence of system's thermodynamically determined intrinsic tendency to acquire new states of inner equilibrium and equilibrium against the environment. Consequently, immune repertoire undergoes continuous dual (two-way) resetting: against the physiologic continuous changes of self and against the continuously changing environment. The CDR-based dynamic concept of immunity describes mechanisms of self-regulation, tolerance, and immunosenescence, and emphasizes the significance of immune system's compartmentalization in the pathogenesis of ICIC. The CDR concept's relative simplicity and concomitantly documented congruency with empirical, clinical, and experimental data suggest it may represent a plausible theoretical framework to better understand the human immune system function.

  12. Natural evolution, disease, and localization in the immune system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deem, Michael

    2004-03-01

    Adaptive vertebrate immune system is a wonder of modern evolution. Under most circumstances, the dynamics of the immune system is well-matched to the dynamics of pathogen growth during a typical infection. Some pathogens, however, have evolved escape mechanisms that interact in subtle ways with the immune system dynamics. In addition, negative interactions the immune system, which has evolved over 400 000 000 years, and vaccination,which has been practiced for only 200 years, are possible. For example,vaccination against the flu can actually increase susceptibility to the flu in the next year. As another example, vaccination against one of the four strains of dengue fever typically increases susceptibility against the other three strains. Immunodominance also arises in the immune system control of nascent tumors--the immune system recognizes only a small subset of the tumor specific antigens, and the rest are free to grow and cause tumor growth. In this talk, I present a physical theory of original antigenic sin and immunodominance. How localization in the immune system leads to the observed phenomena is discussed. 1) M. W. Deem and H. Y. Lee, ``Sequence Space Localization in the Immune System Response to Vaccination and Disease,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 068101

  13. The University Immune System: Overcoming Resistance to Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilley, Ann; Godek, Marisha; Gilley, Jerry W.

    2009-01-01

    A university, similar to any other organization, has an immune system that erects a powerful barrier against change. This article discusses the university immune system and what can be done to counteract its negative effects and thereby allow change to occur.

  14. Overview of fish immune system and infectious diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A brief overview of the fish immune system and the emerging or re-emerging bacterial, viral, parasitic and fungal diseases considered to currently have a negative impact on aquaculture is presented. The fish immune system has evolved with both innate (natural resistance) and adaptive (acquired) immu...

  15. Using isotopes for design and monitoring of artificial recharge systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Contributors: Hendriksson, N.; Kulongoski, J.T.; Massmann, G.; Newman, B.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past years, the IAEA has provided support to a number of Member States engaged in the implementation of hydrological projects dealing with the design and monitoring of artificial recharge ( A R ) systems, primarily situated in arid and semiarid regions. AR is defined as any engineered system designed to introduce water to, and store water in, underlying aquifers. Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is a specific type of AR used with the purpose of increasing groundwater resources. Different water management strategies have been tested under various geographical, hydrological and climatic regimes. However, the success of such schemes cannot easily be predicted, since many variables need to be taken into account in the early stages of every AR project.

  16. A Bio-Inspired Electromechanical System: Artificial Hair Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kang-Hun

    Inspired by recent biophysical study on the auditory sensory organs, we study electromechanical system which functions similar to the hair cell of the ear. One of the important mechanisms of hair cells, adaptation, is mimicked by an electromechanical feedback loop. The proposed artificial hair cell functions similar to a living sensory organ in the sense that it senses input force signal in spite of the relatively strong noise. Numerical simulation of the proposed system shows otoacoustic sound emission, which was observed in the experiments on the hair cells of the bullfrog. This spontaneous motion is noise-induced periodic motion which is controlled by the time scale of adaptation process and the mechanical damping.

  17. Aging of immune system: Immune signature from peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in 1068 healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ling; Jing, Xie; Qiu, Zhifeng; Cao, Wei; Jiao, Yang; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Li, Taisheng

    2016-01-01

    Aging is a major risk factor for several conditions including neurodegenerative, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Functional impairments in cellular pathways controlling genomic stability, and immune control have been identified. Biomarker of immune senescence is needed to improve vaccine response and to develop therapy to improve immune control. To identify phenotypic signature of circulating immune cells with aging, we enrolled 1068 Chinese healthy volunteers ranging from 18 to 80 years old. The decreased naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, increased memory CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, loss of CD28 expression on T cells and reverse trend of CD38 and HLA-DR, were significant for aging of immune system. Conversely, the absolute counts and percentage of NK cells and CD19+B cells maintained stable in aging individuals. The Chinese reference ranges of absolute counts and percentage of peripheral lymphocyte in this study might be useful for future clinical evaluation. PMID:26886066

  18. Aging of immune system: Immune signature from peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in 1068 healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ling; Jing, Xie; Qiu, Zhifeng; Cao, Wei; Jiao, Yang; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Li, Taisheng

    2016-05-01

    Aging is a major risk factor for several conditions including neurodegenerative, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Functional impairments in cellular pathways controlling genomic stability, and immune control have been identified. Biomarker of immune senescence is needed to improve vaccine response and to develop therapy to improve immune control. To identify phenotypic signature of circulating immune cells with aging, we enrolled 1068 Chinese healthy volunteers ranging from 18 to 80 years old. The decreased naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, increased memory CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, loss of CD28 expression on T cells and reverse trend of CD38 and HLA-DR, were significant for aging of immune system. Conversely, the absolute counts and percentage of NK cells and CD19+B cells maintained stable in aging individuals. The Chinese reference ranges of absolute counts and percentage of peripheral lymphocyte in this study might be useful for future clinical evaluation.

  19. Artificial Neural Network-Based System for PET Volume Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mhd Saeed; Abbod, Maysam; Amira, Abbes; Zaidi, Habib

    2010-01-01

    Tumour detection, classification, and quantification in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging at early stage of disease are important issues for clinical diagnosis, assessment of response to treatment, and radiotherapy planning. Many techniques have been proposed for segmenting medical imaging data; however, some of the approaches have poor performance, large inaccuracy, and require substantial computation time for analysing large medical volumes. Artificial intelligence (AI) approaches can provide improved accuracy and save decent amount of time. Artificial neural networks (ANNs), as one of the best AI techniques, have the capability to classify and quantify precisely lesions and model the clinical evaluation for a specific problem. This paper presents a novel application of ANNs in the wavelet domain for PET volume segmentation. ANN performance evaluation using different training algorithms in both spatial and wavelet domains with a different number of neurons in the hidden layer is also presented. The best number of neurons in the hidden layer is determined according to the experimental results, which is also stated Levenberg-Marquardt backpropagation training algorithm as the best training approach for the proposed application. The proposed intelligent system results are compared with those obtained using conventional techniques including thresholding and clustering based approaches. Experimental and Monte Carlo simulated PET phantom data sets and clinical PET volumes of nonsmall cell lung cancer patients were utilised to validate the proposed algorithm which has demonstrated promising results. PMID:20936152

  20. Does cold activate the Drosophila melanogaster immune system?

    PubMed

    Salehipour-Shirazi, Golnaz; Ferguson, Laura V; Sinclair, Brent J

    2017-01-01

    Cold exposure appears to activate aspects of the insect immune system; however, the functional significance of the relationship between cold and immunity is unclear. Insect success at low temperatures is shaped in part by interactions with biotic stressors, such as pathogens, thus it is important to understand how and why immunity might be activated by cold. Here we explore which components of the immune system are activated, and whether those components differ among different kinds of cold exposure. We exposed Drosophila melanogaster to both acute (2h, -2°C) and sustained (10h, -0.5°C) cold, and measured potential (antimicrobial peptide expression, phenoloxidase activity, haemocyte counts) and realised (survival of fungal infection, wound-induced melanisation, bacterial clearance) immunity following recovery. Acute cold increased circulating haemocyte concentration and the expression of Turandot-A and diptericin, but elicited a short-term decrease in the clearance of gram-positive bacteria. Sustained cold increased the expression of Turandot-A, with no effect on other measures of potential or realised immunity. We show that measures of potential immunity were up-regulated by cold, whereas realised immunity was either unaffected or down-regulated. Thus, we hypothesize that cold-activation of potential immunity in Drosophila may be a compensatory mechanism to maintain stable immune function during or after low temperature exposure.

  1. Suppressive effects of androgens on the immune system.

    PubMed

    Trigunaite, Abhishek; Dimo, Joana; Jørgensen, Trine N

    2015-04-01

    Sex-based disparities in immune responses are well known phenomena. The two most important factors accounting for the sex-bias in immunity are genetics and sex hormones. Effects of female sex hormones, estrogen and progesterone are well established, however the role of testosterone is not completely understood. Evidence from unrelated studies points to an immunosuppressive role of testosterone on different components of the immune system, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remains unknown. In this review we evaluate the effect of testosterone on key cellular components of innate and adaptive immunity. Specifically, we highlight the importance of testosterone in down-regulating the systemic immune response by cell type specific effects in the context of immunological disorders. Further studies are required to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of testosterone-induced immunosuppression, leading the way to the identification of novel therapeutic targets for immune disorders.

  2. Evidence for a common mucosal immune system in the pig.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Heather L; Obradovic, Milan R

    2015-07-01

    The majority of lymphocytes activated at mucosal sites receive instructions to home back to the local mucosa, but a portion also seed distal mucosa sites. By seeding distal sites with antigen-specific effector or memory lymphocytes, the foundation is laid for the animal's mucosal immune system to respond with a secondary response should to this antigen be encountered at this site in the future. The common mucosal immune system has been studied quite extensively in rodent models but less so in large animal models such as the pig. Reasons for this paucity of reported induction of the common mucosal immune system in this species may be that distal mucosal sites were examined but no induction was observed and therefore it was not reported. However, we suspect that the majority of investigators simply did not sample distal mucosal sites and therefore there is little evidence of immune response induction in the literature. It is our hope that more pig immunologists and infectious disease experts who perform mucosal immunizations or inoculations on pigs will sample distal mucosal sites and report their findings, whether results are positive or negative. In this review, we highlight papers that show that immunization/inoculation using one route triggers mucosal immune system induction locally, systemically, and within at least one distal mucosal site. Only by understanding whether immunizations at one site triggers immunity throughout the common mucosal immune system can we rationally develop vaccines for the pig, and through these works we can gather evidence about the mucosal immune system that may be extrapolated to other livestock species or humans.

  3. Cancer immunoediting by the innate immune system in the absence of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Timothy; Saddawi-Konefka, Robert; Vermi, William; Koebel, Catherine M; Arthur, Cora; White, J Michael; Uppaluri, Ravi; Andrews, Daniel M; Ngiow, Shin Foong; Teng, Michele W L; Smyth, Mark J; Schreiber, Robert D; Bui, Jack D

    2012-09-24

    Cancer immunoediting is the process whereby immune cells protect against cancer formation by sculpting the immunogenicity of developing tumors. Although the full process depends on innate and adaptive immunity, it remains unclear whether innate immunity alone is capable of immunoediting. To determine whether the innate immune system can edit tumor cells in the absence of adaptive immunity, we compared the incidence and immunogenicity of 3'methylcholanthrene-induced sarcomas in syngeneic wild-type, RAG2(-/-), and RAG2(-/-)x γc(-/-) mice. We found that innate immune cells could manifest cancer immunoediting activity in the absence of adaptive immunity. This activity required natural killer (NK) cells and interferon γ (IFN-γ), which mediated the induction of M1 macrophages. M1 macrophages could be elicited by administration of CD40 agonists, thereby restoring editing activity in RAG2(-/-)x γc(-/-) mice. Our results suggest that in the absence of adaptive immunity, NK cell production of IFN-γ induces M1 macrophages, which act as important effectors during cancer immunoediting.

  4. Interactions between mesenchymal stem cells and the immune system.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Hua, Jinlian

    2017-02-18

    In addition to being multi-potent, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess immunomodulatory functions that have been investigated as potential treatments in various immune disorders. MSCs can robustly interact with cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems, either through direct cell-cell contact or through their secretome. In this review, we discuss current findings regarding the interplay between MSCs and different immune cell subsets. We also draw attention to the mechanisms involved.

  5. Autopolyreactivity Confers a Holistic Role in the Immune System.

    PubMed

    Avrameas, S

    2016-04-01

    In this review, we summarize and discuss some key findings from the study of naturally occurring autoantibodies. The B-cell compartment of the immune system appears to recognize almost all endogenous and environmental antigens. This ability is accomplished principally through autopolyreactive humoral and cellular immune receptors. This extended autopolyreactivity (1) along immunoglobulin gene recombination contributes to the immune system's ability to recognize a very large number of self and non-self constituents; and (2) generates a vast immune network that creates communication channels between the organism's interior and exterior. Thus, the immune system continuously evolves depending on the internal and external stimuli it encounters. Furthermore, this far-reaching network's existence implies activities resembling those of classical biological factors or activities that modulate the function of other classical biological factors. A few such antibodies have already been found. Another important concept is that natural autoantibodies are highly dependent on the presence or absence of commensal microbes in the organism. These results are in line with past and recent findings showing the fundamental influence of the microbiota on proper immune system development, and necessitate the existence of a host-microbe homeostasis. This homeostasis requires that the participating humoral and cellular receptors are able to recognize self-antigens and commensal microbes without damaging them. Autopolyreactive immune receptors expressing low affinity for both types of antigens fulfil this role. The immune system appears to play a holistic role similar to that of the nervous system.

  6. The immune system and developmental programming of brain and behavior.

    PubMed

    Bilbo, Staci D; Schwarz, Jaclyn M

    2012-08-01

    The brain, endocrine, and immune systems are inextricably linked. Immune molecules have a powerful impact on neuroendocrine function, including hormone-behavior interactions, during health as well as sickness. Similarly, alterations in hormones, such as during stress, can powerfully impact immune function or reactivity. These functional shifts are evolved, adaptive responses that organize changes in behavior and mobilize immune resources, but can also lead to pathology or exacerbate disease if prolonged or exaggerated. The developing brain in particular is exquisitely sensitive to both endogenous and exogenous signals, and increasing evidence suggests the immune system has a critical role in brain development and associated behavioral outcomes for the life of the individual. Indeed, there are associations between many neuropsychiatric disorders and immune dysfunction, with a distinct etiology in neurodevelopment. The goal of this review is to describe the important role of the immune system during brain development, and to discuss some of the many ways in which immune activation during early brain development can affect the later-life outcomes of neural function, immune function, mood and cognition.

  7. The Immune System and Developmental Programming of Brain and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Bilbo, Staci D.; Schwarz, Jaclyn M.

    2012-01-01

    The brain, endocrine, and immune systems are inextricably linked. Immune molecules have a powerful impact on neuroendocrine function, including hormone-behavior interactions, during health as well as sickness. Similarly, alterations in hormones, such as during stress, can powerfully impact immune function or reactivity. These functional shifts are evolved, adaptive responses that organize changes in behavior and mobilize immune resources, but can also lead to pathology or exacerbate disease if prolonged or exaggerated. The developing brain in particular is exquisitely sensitive to both endogenous and exogenous signals, and increasing evidence suggests the immune system has a critical role in brain development and associated behavioral outcomes for the life of the individual. Indeed, there are associations between many neuropsychiatric disorders and immune dysfunction, with a distinct etiology in neurodevelopment. The goal of this review is to describe the important role of the immune system during brain development, and to discuss some of the many ways in which immune activation during early brain development can affect the later-life outcomes of neural function, immune function, mood and cognition. PMID:22982535

  8. Taenia solium: immune response against oral or systemic immunization with purified recombinant calreticulin in mice.

    PubMed

    Fonseca-Coronado, Salvador; Ruiz-Tovar, Karina; Pérez-Tapia, Mayra; Mendlovic, Fela; Flisser, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant functional Taenia solium calreticulin (rTsCRT) confers different degrees of protection in the experimental model of intestinal taeniosis in hamsters. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immune response induced after oral or systemic immunization with an electroeluted rTsCRT in BALB/c mice. Oral immunization elicited high fecal IgA and the production of IL-4 and IL-5 by mesenteric lymph node cells after in vitro stimulation with rTSCRT, indicating a Th2 response. Mice subcutaneously immunized produced high amounts of serum IgG, being IgG1 (Th2-related) the predominant isotype, while in vitro stimulated spleen cells synthesized IL-4, IL-5 and also IFN-γ, indicating a mixed Th1/Th2 cellular response after systemic immunization. Our data show that purified rTsCRT induces polarized Th2 responses after oral immunization of mice, a common characteristic of protective immunity against helminths and, consequently, a desirable hallmark in the search for a vaccine.

  9. Multi-System Effects of Daily Artificial Gravity Exposures in Humans Deconditioned by Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, William H.

    2007-01-01

    We have begun to explore the utility of intermittent artificial gravity (AG) as a multi-system countermeasure to the untoward health and performance effects of adaptation to decreased gravity during prolonged space flight. The first study in this exploration was jointly designed by an international, multi-disciplinary team of scientists interested in standardizing an approach so that comparable data could be obtained from follow-on studies performed in multiple international locations. Fifteen rigorously screened male volunteers participated in the study after providing written informed consent. All were subjected to 21 days of 6deg head-down-tilt (HDT) bed rest. Eight were treated with daily 1hr AG exposures (2.5g at the feet decreasing to 1.0g at the heart) aboard a short radius (3m) centrifuge, while the other seven served as controls. Multiple observations were made of dependent measures in the bone, muscle, cardiovascular, sensory-motor, immune, and behavioral systems during a 10 day acclimatization period prior to HDT bed rest and again during an 8 day recovery period after the bed rest period. Comparisons between the treatment and control subjects demonstrated salutary effects of the AG exposure on aspects of the muscle and cardiovascular systems, with no untoward effects on the vestibular system, the immune system, or cognitive function. Bone deconditioning was similar between the treatment and control groups, suggesting that the loading provided by this specific AG paradigm was insufficient to protect that system from deconditioning. Future work will be devoted to varying the loading duty cycle and/or coupling the AG loading with exercise to provide maximum physiological protection across all systems. Testing will also be extended to female subjects. The results of this study suggest that intermittent AG could be an effective multi-system countermeasure.

  10. VWPS: A Ventilator Weaning Prediction System with Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Austin H.; Chen, Guan-Ting

    How to wean patients efficiently off mechanical ventilation continues to be a challenge for medical professionals. In this paper we have described a novel approach to the study of a ventilator weaning prediction system (VWPS). Firstly, we have developed and written three Artificial Neural Network (ANN) algorithms to predict a weaning successful rate based on the clinical data. Secondly, we have implemented two user-friendly weaning success rate prediction systems; the VWPS system and the BWAP system. Both systems could be used to help doctors objectively and effectively predict whether weaning is appropriate for patients based on the patients' clinical data. Our system utilizes the powerful processing abilities of MatLab. Thirdly, we have calculated the performance through measures such as sensitivity and accuracy for these three algorithms. The results show a very high sensitivity (around 80%) and accuracy (around 70%). To our knowledge, this is the first design approach of its kind to be used in the study of ventilator weaning success rate prediction.

  11. Transport, hysteresis and avalanches in artificial spin ice systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia J; Libal, A

    2010-01-01

    We examine the hopping dynamics of an artificial spin ice system constructed from colloids on a kagome optical trap array where each trap has two possible states. By applying an external drive from an electric field which is analogous to a biasing applied magnetic field for real spin systems, we can create polarized states that obey the spin-ice rules of two spins in and one spin out at each vertex. We demonstrate that when we sweep the external drive and measure the fraction of the system that has been polarized, we can generate a hysteresis loop analogous to the hysteretic magnetization versus external magnetic field curves for real spin systems. The disorder in our system can be readily controlled by changing the barrier that must be overcome before a colloid can hop from one side of a trap to the other. For systems with no disorder, the effective spins all flip simultaneously as the biasing field is changed, while for strong disorder the hysteresis curves show a series of discontinuous jumps or avalanches similar to Barkhausen noise.

  12. Possible roles of magnesium on the immune system.

    PubMed

    Tam, M; Gómez, S; González-Gross, M; Marcos, A

    2003-10-01

    During the last few years, magnesium (Mg) has been subject of research due to its functionality in the organism. It is one of the most important micronutrients, and therefore its role in biological systems has been extensively investigated. Particularly, Mg has a strong relation with the immune system, in both nonspecific and specific immune response, also known as innate and acquired immune response. The aim of this paper is to review the state of the art about the interactions between Mg and the immune system. We discuss the link between dietary Mg and inflammation, apoptosis and alterations in number and function of innate immune cell populations, described in animal models. Furthermore, the immune system can be compromised in human populations under certain circumstances, including athletes and elderly people. The importance of a balanced Mg homeostasis and its interaction with the immune system in these groups has also been reviewed. Although emerging data support the relevant role of Mg in the immune response, further research is needed; and special efforts should be made to establish the most adequate dose in nutritional supplements to reach beneficial effects on health.

  13. The immune system as a biomonitor: explorations in innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Niclas; Heather, James; Pollara, Gabriel; Simpson, Nandi; Matjeka, Theres; Shawe-Taylor, John; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Chain, Benjamin

    2013-04-06

    The human immune system has a highly complex, multi-layered structure which has evolved to detect and respond to changes in the internal microenvironment of the body. Recognition occurs at the molecular or submolecular scale, via classical reversible receptor-ligand interactions, and can lead to a response with great sensitivity and speed. Remarkably, recognition is coupled to memory, such that responses are modulated by events which occurred years or even decades before. Although the immune system in general responds differently and more vigorously to stimuli entering the body from the outside (e.g. infections), this is an emergent property of the system: many of the recognition molecules themselves have no inherent bias towards external stimuli (non-self) but also bind targets found within the body (self). It is quite clear that the immune response registers pathophysiological changes in general. Cancer, wounding and chronic tissue injury are some obvious examples. Against this background, the immune system 'state' tracks the internal processes of the body, and is likely to encode information regarding both current and past disease processes. Moreover, the distributed nature of most immune responses (e.g. typically involving lymphoid tissue, non-lymphoid tissue, bone marrow, blood, extracellular interstitial spaces, etc.) means that many of the changes associated with immune responses are manifested systemically, and specifically can be detected in blood. This provides a very convenient route to sampling immune cells. We consider two different and complementary ways of querying the human immune 'state' using high-dimensional genomic screening methodologies, and discuss the potentials of these approaches and some of the technological and computational challenges to be overcome.

  14. New insights into innate immune control of systemic candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Lionakis, Michail S

    2014-08-01

    Systemic infection caused by Candida species is the fourth leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infection in modern hospitals and carries high morbidity and mortality despite antifungal therapy. A recent surge of immunological studies in the mouse models of systemic candidiasis and the parallel discovery and phenotypic characterization of inherited genetic disorders in antifungal immune factors that are associated with enhanced susceptibility or resistance to the infection have provided new insights into the cellular and molecular basis of protective innate immune responses against Candida. In this review, the new developments in our understanding of how the mammalian immune system responds to systemic Candida challenge are synthesized and important future research directions are highlighted.

  15. Development of a linear induction motor based artificial muscle system.

    PubMed

    Gruber, A; Arguello, E; Silva, R

    2013-01-01

    We present the design of a linear induction motor based on electromagnetic interactions. The engine is capable of producing a linear movement from electricity. The design consists of stators arranged in parallel, which produce a magnetic field sufficient to displace a plunger along its axial axis. Furthermore, the winding has a shell and cap of ferromagnetic material that amplifies the magnetic field. This produces a force along the length of the motor that is similar to that of skeletal muscle. In principle, the objective is to use the engine in the development of an artificial muscle system for prosthetic applications, but it could have multiple applications, not only in the medical field, but in other industries.

  16. Visual system based on artificial retina for motion detection.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Francisco; Díaz, Javier; Ros, Eduardo; del Pino, Begoña

    2009-06-01

    We present a bioinspired model for detecting spatiotemporal features based on artificial retina response models. Event-driven processing is implemented using four kinds of cells encoding image contrast and temporal information. We have evaluated how the accuracy of motion processing depends on local contrast by using a multiscale and rank-order coding scheme to select the most important cues from retinal inputs. We have also developed some alternatives by integrating temporal feature results and obtained a new improved bioinspired matching algorithm with high stability, low error and low cost. Finally, we define a dynamic and versatile multimodal attention operator with which the system is driven to focus on different target features such as motion, colors, and textures.

  17. IPMC cilia system for artificial muscle applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Taeseon; Palmre, Viljar; Stalbaum, Tyler P.; Shen, Qi; Trabia, Sarah; Kim, Kwang Jin

    2016-04-01

    Artificial muscle (AM) technology is an excellent candidate for creating cilia-based structures for bio-inspired locomotion, maneuvering, and acoustic systems. We developed an AM based cilia fiber which are soft, flexible, easily shaped and low power consumption. The developed cilium has a diameter of around 200 µm and prepared through polymer injection technique. Nafion was used for base polymer for cilia and fabricated IPMCs via platinum electroless plating process. The prepared cilia were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetric analysis. The 2 point probe was conducted to measure electrode surface resistance of prepared IPMCs. We further characterized the cross-sectional morphology and studied the electromechanical performances (displacement and blocking force) of the prepared IPMC actuators. Also we created prototype mm-sized AM fiber cilia array (3x20) and tested the actuation of AM cilia fiber under external electric field.

  18. Artificial carrier for oxygen supply in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Dey, E S; Norrlöw, O; Liu, Y

    2004-04-01

    Several poly (dimethylsiloxanes) (PDMS) copolymers of dimethylsiloxane (DMS) with ethylene or propylene oxide were tested as artificial carriers for the delivery of oxygen to biological systems. Copolymers with a DMS content of 33% or lower enhanced glucose oxidation by 200% in contrast to the 25% increase produced by the same concentration of perfluorodecalin. When 0.05% of the copolymer with 18% DMS was included in the growth media of Bacillus thuriginensis, the biomass (growth rate) increased 1.5-fold. With 0.1% of this copolymer, actinorhodin production by Streptomyces coelicolor A3 (2) occurred in half the normal time and with an increased yield. In conclusion, these PDMS copolymers are a good alternative to perfluorodecalin as oxygen carriers in biotechnological processes.

  19. Beta-glucan recognition by the innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Goodridge, Helen S; Wolf, Andrea J; Underhill, David M

    2009-07-01

    Beta-glucans are recognized by the innate immune system. This recognition plays important roles in host defense and presents specific opportunities for clinical modulation of the host immune response. Neutrophils, macrophages, and dendritic cells among others express several receptors capable of recognizing beta-glucan in its various forms. This review explores what is currently known about beta-glucan recognition and how this recognition stimulates immune responses. Special emphasis is placed on Dectin-1, as we know the most about how this key beta-glucan receptor translates recognition into intracellular signaling, stimulates cellular responses, and participates in orchestrating the adaptive immune response.

  20. Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Get Weight Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A What's in this article? Why Are Vaccinations Important? Why Do I Need Shots? Which Vaccinations Do ...

  1. Nociception and role of immune system in pain.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Ahmed, Ahad S

    2015-09-01

    Both pain and inflammation are protective responses. However, these self-limiting conditions (with well-established negative feedback loops) become pathological if left uncontrolled. Both pain and inflammation can interact with each other in a multi-dimensional manner. These interactions are known to create an array of 'difficult to manage' pathologies. This review explains in detail the role of immune system and the related cells in peripheral sensitization and neurogenic inflammation. Various neuro-immune interactions are analyzed at peripheral, sensory and central nervous system levels. Innate immunity plays a critical role in central sensitization and in establishing acute pain as chronic condition. Moreover, inflammatory mediators also exhibit psychological effects, thus contributing towards the emotional elements associated with pain. However, there is also a considerable anti-inflammatory and analgesic role of immune system. This review also attempts to enlist various novel pharmacological approaches that exhibit their actions through modification of neuro-immune interface.

  2. Automatic Emboli Detection System for the Artificial Heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steifer, T.; Lewandowski, M.; Karwat, P.; Gawlikowski, M.

    In spite of the progress in material engineering and ventricular assist devices construction, thromboembolism remains the most crucial problem in mechanical heart supporting systems. Therefore, the ability to monitor the patient's blood for clot formation should be considered an important factor in development of heart supporting systems. The well-known methods for automatic embolus detection are based on the monitoring of the ultrasound Doppler signal. A working system utilizing ultrasound Doppler is being developed for the purpose of flow estimation and emboli detection in the clinical artificial heart ReligaHeart EXT. Thesystem will be based on the existing dual channel multi-gate Doppler device with RF digital processing. A specially developed clamp-on cannula probe, equipped with 2 - 4 MHz piezoceramic transducers, enables easy system setup. We present the issuesrelated to the development of automatic emboli detection via Doppler measurements. We consider several algorithms for the flow estimation and emboli detection. We discuss their efficiency and confront them with the requirements of our experimental setup. Theoretical considerations are then met with preliminary experimental findings from a) flow studies with blood mimicking fluid and b) in-vitro flow studies with animal blood. Finally, we discuss some more methodological issues - we consider several possible approaches to the problem of verification of the accuracy of the detection system.

  3. The immune system and cancer evasion strategies: therapeutic concepts.

    PubMed

    Muenst, S; Läubli, H; Soysal, S D; Zippelius, A; Tzankov, A; Hoeller, S

    2016-06-01

    The complicated interplay between cancer and the host immune system has been studied for decades. New insights into the human immune system as well as the mechanisms by which tumours evade immune control have led to the new and innovative therapeutic strategies that are considered amongst the medical breakthroughs of the last few years. Here, we will review the current understanding of cancer immunology in general, including immune surveillance and immunoediting, with a detailed look at immune cells (T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, macrophages and dendritic cells), immune checkpoints and regulators, sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) and other mechanisms. We will also present examples of new immune therapies able to reverse immune evasion strategies of tumour cells. Finally, we will focus on therapies that are already used in daily oncological practice such as the blockade of immune checkpoints cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death-1 (PD-1) in patients with metastatic melanoma or advanced lung cancer, or therapies currently being tested in clinical trials such as adoptive T-cell transfer.

  4. A cognitive computational model inspired by the immune system response.

    PubMed

    Abdo Abd Al-Hady, Mohamed; Badr, Amr Ahmed; Mostafa, Mostafa Abd Al-Azim

    2014-01-01

    The immune system has a cognitive ability to differentiate between healthy and unhealthy cells. The immune system response (ISR) is stimulated by a disorder in the temporary fuzzy state that is oscillating between the healthy and unhealthy states. However, modeling the immune system is an enormous challenge; the paper introduces an extensive summary of how the immune system response functions, as an overview of a complex topic, to present the immune system as a cognitive intelligent agent. The homogeneity and perfection of the natural immune system have been always standing out as the sought-after model we attempted to imitate while building our proposed model of cognitive architecture. The paper divides the ISR into four logical phases: setting a computational architectural diagram for each phase, proceeding from functional perspectives (input, process, and output), and their consequences. The proposed architecture components are defined by matching biological operations with computational functions and hence with the framework of the paper. On the other hand, the architecture focuses on the interoperability of main theoretical immunological perspectives (classic, cognitive, and danger theory), as related to computer science terminologies. The paper presents a descriptive model of immune system, to figure out the nature of response, deemed to be intrinsic for building a hybrid computational model based on a cognitive intelligent agent perspective and inspired by the natural biology. To that end, this paper highlights the ISR phases as applied to a case study on hepatitis C virus, meanwhile illustrating our proposed architecture perspective.

  5. Ion-exchange polymer artificial muscle and actuating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, Dominique; Tondu, Bertrand; Lopez, Pierre; Aurelle, Yves; Ricard, Alain

    1996-04-01

    Chemomechanical transformations are used to produce a mechanical force from a reversible chemical reaction in order to generate artificial muscular contraction, on the model of the biological muscle. The design and experimentation of an original artificial muscle using an ion-exchange polymer which reacts inside a soft envelope, derived from research on pneumatic artificial McKibben muscle, is presented. Then a chemomechanical actuator constituted of two artificial muscles has been conceived: first results are shown on position control in open-loop mode.

  6. Inorganic nanoparticles and the immune system: detection, selective activation and tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastús, Neus G.; Sánchez-Tilló, Ester; Pujals, Silvia; Comenge, Joan; Giralt, Ernest; Celada, Antonio; Lloberas, Jorge; Puntes, Victor F.

    2012-03-01

    The immune system is the responsible for body integrity and prevention of external invasion. On one side, nanoparticles are no triggers that the immune system is prepared to detect, on the other side it is known that foreign bodies, not only bacteria, viruses and parasites, but also inorganic matter, can cause various pathologies such as silicosis, asbestosis or inflammatory reactions. Therefore, nanoparticles entering the body, after interaction with proteins, will be either recognized as self-agents or detected by the immune system, encompassing immunostimulation or immunosuppression responses. The nature of these interactions seems to be dictated not specially by the composition of the material but by modifications of NP coating (composition, surface charge and structure). Herein, we explore the use of gold nanoparticles as substrates to carry multifunctional ligands to manipulate the immune system in a controlled manner, from undetection to immunostimulation. Murine bone marrow macrophages can be activated with artificial nanometric objects consisting of a gold nanoparticle functionalized with peptides. In the presence of some conjugates, macrophage proliferation was stopped and pro-inflammatory cytokines were induced. The biochemical type of response depended on the type of conjugated peptide and was correlated with the degree of ordering in the peptide coating. These findings help to illustrate the basic requirements involved in medical NP conjugate design to either activate the immune system or hide from it, in order to reach their targets before being removed by phagocytes. Additionally, it opens up the possibility to modulate the immune response in order to suppress unwanted responses resulting from autoimmunity, or allergy or to stimulate protective responses against pathogens.

  7. CNS Remyelination and the Innate Immune System

    PubMed Central

    McMurran, Christopher E.; Jones, Clare A.; Fitzgerald, Denise C.; Franklin, Robin J. M.

    2016-01-01

    A misguided inflammatory response is frequently implicated in myelin damage. Particularly prominent among myelin diseases, multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune condition, with immune–mediated damage central to its etiology. Nevertheless, a robust inflammatory response is also essential for the efficient regeneration of myelin sheaths after such injury. Here, we discuss the functions of inflammation that promote remyelination, and how these have been experimentally disentangled from the pathological facets of the immune response. We focus on the contributions that resident microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages make to remyelination and compare the roles of these two populations of innate immune cells. Finally, the current literature is framed in the context of developing therapies that manipulate the innate immune response to promote remyelination in clinical myelin disease. PMID:27200350

  8. Unbalanced Immune System: Immunodeficiencies and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Giardino, Giuliana; Gallo, Vera; Prencipe, Rosaria; Gaudino, Giovanni; Romano, Roberta; De Cataldis, Marco; Lorello, Paola; Palamaro, Loredana; Di Giacomo, Chiara; Capalbo, Donatella; Cirillo, Emilia; D’Assante, Roberta; Pignata, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Increased risk of developing autoimmune manifestations has been identified in different primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). In such conditions, autoimmunity and immune deficiency represent intertwined phenomena that reflect inadequate immune function. Autoimmunity in PIDs may be caused by different mechanisms, including defects of tolerance to self-antigens and persistent stimulation as a result of the inability to eradicate antigens. This general immune dysregulation leads to compensatory and exaggerated chronic inflammatory responses that lead to tissue damage and autoimmunity. Each PID may be characterized by distinct, peculiar autoimmune manifestations. Moreover, different pathogenetic mechanisms may underlie autoimmunity in PID. In this review, the main autoimmune manifestations observed in different PID, including humoral immunodeficiencies, combined immunodeficiencies, and syndromes with immunodeficiencies, are summarized. When possible, the pathogenetic mechanism underlying autoimmunity in a specific PID has been explained. PMID:27766253

  9. Evolution of innate and adaptive immune systems in jawless vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kasamatsu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Because jawless vertebrates are the most primitive vertebrates, they have been studied to gain understanding of the evolutionary processes that gave rise to the innate and adaptive immune systems in vertebrates. Jawless vertebrates have developed lymphocyte-like cells that morphologically resemble the T and B cells of jawed vertebrates, but they express variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) instead of the T and B cell receptors that specifically recognize antigens in jawed vertebrates. These VLRs act as antigen receptors, diversity being generated in their antigen-binding sites by assembly of highly diverse leucine-rich repeat modules. Therefore, jawless vertebrates have developed adaptive immune systems based on the VLRs. Although pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and Rig-like receptors (RLRs), and their adaptor genes are conserved in jawless vertebrates, some transcription factor and inflammatory cytokine genes in the TLR and RLR pathways are not present. However, like jawed vertebrates, the initiation of adaptive immune responses in jawless vertebrates appears to require prior activation of the innate immune system. These observations imply that the innate immune systems of jawless vertebrates have a unique molecular basis that is distinct from that of jawed vertebrates. Altogether, although the molecular details of the innate and adaptive immune systems differ between jawless and jawed vertebrates, jawless vertebrates have developed versions of these immune systems that are similar to those of jawed vertebrates.

  10. Adaptive control of artificial pancreas systems - a review.

    PubMed

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Cinar, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Artificial pancreas (AP) systems offer an important improvement in regulating blood glucose concentration for patients with type 1 diabetes, compared to current approaches. AP consists of sensors, control algorithms and an insulin pump. Different AP control algorithms such as proportional-integral-derivative, model-predictive control, adaptive control, and fuzzy logic control have been investigated in simulation and clinical studies in the past three decades. The variability over time and complexity of the dynamics of blood glucose concentration, unsteady disturbances such as meals, time-varying delays on measurements and insulin infusion, and noisy data from sensors create a challenging system to AP. Adaptive control is a powerful control technique that can deal with such challenges. In this paper, a review of adaptive control techniques for blood glucose regulation with an AP system is presented. The investigations and advances in technology produced impressive results, but there is still a need for a reliable AP system that is both commercially viable and appealing to patients with type 1 diabetes.

  11. Artificial intelligence in the service of system administrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haen, C.; Barra, V.; Bonaccorsi, E.; Neufeld, N.

    2012-12-01

    The LHCb online system relies on a large and heterogeneous IT infrastructure made from thousands of servers on which many different applications are running. They run a great variety of tasks: critical ones such as data taking and secondary ones like web servers. The administration of such a system and making sure it is working properly represents a very important workload for the small expert-operator team. Research has been performed to try to automatize (some) system administration tasks, starting in 2001 when IBM defined the so-called “self objectives” supposed to lead to “autonomic computing”. In this context, we present a framework that makes use of artificial intelligence and machine learning to monitor and diagnose at a low level and in a non intrusive way Linux-based systems and their interaction with software. Moreover, the multi agent approach we use, coupled with an “object oriented paradigm” architecture should increase our learning speed a lot and highlight relations between problems.

  12. [Defects in immune system response by our organisms].

    PubMed

    Español, Teresa

    2005-09-01

    When some of the mechanisms in our immune response system fail, this can be due to external problems such as infections or transplants or due to congenital errors, known as Primary Immunologic Deficiencies. Dr. Español briefly reviews the most important characteristics of our immune response system, and then continues with an analysis of the defects of this system, especially those defects which are classified as Primary Immunologic Deficiencies.

  13. Autophagy as a Stress Response Pathway in the Immune System.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Abhisek; Eissa, N Tony

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy, hereafter, referred to as autophagy, has long been regarded as a housekeeping pathway involved in intracellular degradation and energy recycling. These housekeeping and homeostatic functions are especially important during cellular stress, such as periods of nutrient deprivation. However, importance of autophagy extends far beyond its degradative functions. Recent evidence shows that autophagy plays an essential role in development, organization and functions of the immune system, and defects in autophagy lead to several diseases, including cancer and autoimmunity. In the immune system, autophagy is important in regulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses. This review focuses on the roles of autophagy in the adaptive immune system. We first introduce the autophagy pathway and provide a brief description of the major molecular players involved in autophagy. We then discuss the importance of autophagy as a stress integrator mechanism and provide relevant examples of this role of autophagy in adaptive immune cells. Then we proceed to describe how autophagy regulates development, activation and functions of different adaptive immune cells. In these contexts, we mention both degradative and non-degradative roles of autophagy, and illustrate their importance. We also discuss role of autophagy in antigen presenting cells, which play critical roles in the activation of adaptive immune cells. Further, we describe how autophagy regulates functions of different adaptive immune cells during infection, inflammation and autoimmunity.

  14. Understanding the vertebrate immune system: insights from the reptilian perspective.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, L M; Vogel, L A; Bowden, R M

    2010-03-01

    Reptiles are ectothermic amniotes, providing the key link between ectothermic anamniotic fishes and amphibians, and endothermic amniotic birds and mammals. A greater understanding of reptilian immunity will provide important insights into the evolutionary history of vertebrate immunity as well as the growing field of eco-immunology. Like mammals, reptile immunity is complex and involves innate, cell-mediated and humoral compartments but, overall, there is considerably less known about immune function in reptiles. We review the current literature on each branch of the reptilian immune system, placing this information in context to other vertebrates. Further, we identify key areas that are prime for research as well as areas that are lagging because of lack of reagents in non-model systems.

  15. Recognition of Streptococcus pneumoniae by the innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Koppe, Uwe; Suttorp, Norbert; Opitz, Bastian

    2012-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is both a frequent colonizer of the upper respiratory tract and a leading cause of life-threatening infections such as pneumonia, meningitis and sepsis. The innate immune system is critical for the control of colonization and for defence during invasive disease. Initially, pneumococci are recognized by different sensors of the innate immune system called pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which control most subsequent host defence pathways. These PRRs include the transmembrane Toll-like receptors (TLRs) as well as the cytosolic NOD-like receptors (NLRs) and DNA sensors. Recognition of S. pneumoniae by members of these PRR families regulates the production of inflammatory mediators that orchestrate the following immune response of infected as well as neighbouring non-infected cells, stimulates the recruitment of immune cells such as neutrophils and macrophages, and shapes the adaptive immunity. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the function of different PRRs in S. pneumoniae infection.

  16. Single-cell technologies to study the immune system.

    PubMed

    Proserpio, Valentina; Mahata, Bidesh

    2016-02-01

    The immune system is composed of a variety of cells that act in a coordinated fashion to protect the organism against a multitude of different pathogens. The great variability of existing pathogens corresponds to a similar high heterogeneity of the immune cells. The study of individual immune cells, the fundamental unit of immunity, has recently transformed from a qualitative microscopic imaging to a nearly complete quantitative transcriptomic analysis. This shift has been driven by the rapid development of multiple single-cell technologies. These new advances are expected to boost the detection of less frequent cell types and transient or intermediate cell states. They will highlight the individuality of each single cell and greatly expand the resolution of current available classifications and differentiation trajectories. In this review we discuss the recent advancement and application of single-cell technologies, their limitations and future applications to study the immune system.

  17. Modeling cancer evolution: evolutionary escape under immune system control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobeinikov, Andrei; Starkov, Konstantin E.; Valle, Paul A.

    2017-02-01

    It can be expected that adequate immune response should be able to annihilate cancer at a very early stage of its appearance. However, in some cases cancer is able to persist avoiding immune response. One can conject that cancer is able to avoid immune response control due to a succession of mutations leading to the development of immune-resistant cells. In order to illustrate this possibility, in this paper we present a 2n–dimensional mathematical model that describes interaction of n subtypes of tumor cells with corresponding genotype-specific immune response. The model postulates that there is a probability for tumor cells of each of n subtype to produce offsprings of other types. Each of the subtypes activates the genotype-specific immune response with a possibility of suppressing cancer cells of other genotypes (the cross-immunity). Numerical simulations show that if cancer cells are able to mutate comparatively fast and if immune response is not strong enough, then, despite immune system pressure, cancer is able to persist.

  18. Ageing and the immune system: focus on macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Linehan, E.

    2015-01-01

    A fully functioning immune system is essential in order to maintain good health. However, the immune system deteriorates with advancing age, and this contributes to increased susceptibility to infection, autoimmunity, and cancer in the older population. Progress has been made in identifying age-related defects in the adaptive immune system. In contrast, relatively little research has been carried out on the impact of ageing on the innate immune response. This area requires further research as the innate immune system plays a crucial role in protection against infection and represents a first line of defence. Macrophages are central effector cells of the innate immune system and have many diverse functions. As a result, age-related impairments in macrophage function are likely to have important consequences for the health of the older population. It has been reported that ageing in macrophages impacts on many processes including toll-like receptor signalling, polarisation, phagocytosis, and wound repair. A detailed understanding of the impact of ageing on macrophages is required in order to develop therapeutics that will boost immune responses in the older population. PMID:25883791

  19. Ageing and the immune system: focus on macrophages.

    PubMed

    Linehan, E; Fitzgerald, D C

    2015-03-01

    A fully functioning immune system is essential in order to maintain good health. However, the immune system deteriorates with advancing age, and this contributes to increased susceptibility to infection, autoimmunity, and cancer in the older population. Progress has been made in identifying age-related defects in the adaptive immune system. In contrast, relatively little research has been carried out on the impact of ageing on the innate immune response. This area requires further research as the innate immune system plays a crucial role in protection against infection and represents a first line of defence. Macrophages are central effector cells of the innate immune system and have many diverse functions. As a result, age-related impairments in macrophage function are likely to have important consequences for the health of the older population. It has been reported that ageing in macrophages impacts on many processes including toll-like receptor signalling, polarisation, phagocytosis, and wound repair. A detailed understanding of the impact of ageing on macrophages is required in order to develop therapeutics that will boost immune responses in the older population.

  20. The immune self: a selectionist theory of recognition, learning, and remembering within the immune system.

    PubMed

    Kradin, R L

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, I have briefly explored metaphors shared by the immune and nervous systems and shown that this exercise can lead to the elucidation of common principles of organization, as well as to predictions concerning how the immune system functions. Metaphor itself undoubtedly reflects the way in which we categorize and retrieve information 44], so it is not surprising that the deep processes of language tend to sample information from related data categories. Although the nervous and immune systems are obviously not the same and metaphors are indeed just that, my primary goal has been to suggest that by virtue of their having evolved in parallel over millions of years, the nervous and immune systems currently use the same archetypal principles and strategies to address related challenges in information processing and retrieval. Ultimately, nature is conservative. One need only look at a tree, a river, the airways, or the vascular bed in order to see how a fractal pattern of repetitive dichotomous branching has been used by each, in order to optimize the transport of fluids over large distances [45]. While each system has had to adopt different materials in order to solve the problem, the shape of their solutions is remarkably alike. In the immune and nervous systems, the elements used to produce optimal functional responses are also quite different, but again the solutions have been achieved by comparable strategies. I am certain that these two great systems of information processing, each responding with vastly different kinetics, will prove to be far more integrally interdependent than has been previously recognized. For example, should a swift response by the immune system be required in an overwhelming invasion by microbial pathogens, the immune system may be able to cooperate with the rapidly reacting nervous system to rid the host of the invaders. In this regard, we have shown that the beta-adrenergic hormone epinephrine rapidly increases the traffic of

  1. [Current status of the use of the artificial heart and ventricular assist systems].

    PubMed

    Urbaszek, W; Schmitz, K P; Emmrich, K; Klinkmann, H

    1989-11-01

    The state of the technical development of the mechanical assist systems and the artificial heart, respectively, guarantees a sufficient support of the circulatory system up to the improvement of the own heart function or to the possible heart transplantation. There is the necessity for the temporarily limited support of the heart, but also for the long-term one. Independent of the underlying etiology in acute conditions of cardiac failure in many cases the external supporting system may be sufficiently helpful. The antithrombotic therapy and the prophylaxis of infections demands particular carefulness. There is still no representable release for the long-term use of the hitherto available cardiovascular supporting systems. The question is controversial, whether then an experiment on patients or an already accepted therapeutic intervention is still taken into consideration. Essential prerequisites for the long-term use would be a full implantability of the systems in transcutaneous energy transmission, a further biologization of the blood-contacting materials, a clarification of the immune phenomena, a possibly automatic mode of action adapted to the need as well as a reliable strategy of antithrombotic therapy. The increased risk of infection should be taken into consideration.

  2. Dengue and soluble mediators of the innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Espada-Murao, Lyre Anni; Morita, Kouichi

    2011-12-01

    Huge emphasis has been placed on the role of the adaptive immune system in dengue pathogenesis. Yet there is increasing evidence for the importance of the innate immune system in regulating dengue infection and possibly influencing the disease. This review focuses on the interplay between the innate immune system and dengue and highlights the role of soluble immunological mediators. Type I and type II interferons of the innate immune system demonstrate non-overlapping roles in dengue infection. Furthermore, while some IFN responses to dengue are protective, others may exert disease-related effects on the host. But aside from interferons, a number of cytokines have also been implicated in dengue pathogenesis. Our expanding knowledge of cytokines indicates that these soluble mediators act upon a complicated network of events to provoke the disease. This cytokine storm is generally attributed to massive T cell activation as an outcome of secondary infection. However, there is reason to believe that innate immune response-derived cytokines also have contributory effects, especially in the context of severe cases of primary dengue infection. Another less popular but interesting perspective on dengue pathogenesis is the effect of mosquito feeding on host immune responses and viral infection. Various studies have shown that soluble factors from vector saliva have the capacity to alter immune reactions and thereby influence pathogen transmission and establishment. Hence, modulation of the innate immune system at various levels of infection is a critical component of dengue disease. In the absence of an approved drug or vaccine for dengue, soluble mediators of the innate immune system could be a strategic foothold for developing anti-viral therapeutics and improving clinical management.

  3. The mucosal immune system: From dentistry to vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Kiyono, Hiroshi; Azegami, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is the beginning of the aero-digestive tract, which is covered by mucosal epithelium continuously under the threat of invasion of pathogens, it is thus protected by the mucosal immune system. In the early phase of our scientific efforts for the demonstration of mucosal immune system, dental science was one of major driving forces due to their foreseeability to use oral immunity for the control of oral diseases. The mucosal immune system is divided functionally into, but interconnected inductive and effector sites. Intestinal Peyer's patches (PPs) are an inductive site containing antigen-sampling M cells and immunocompetent cells required to initiate antigen-specific immune responses. At effector sites, PP-originated antigen-specific IgA B cells become plasma cells to produce polymeric IgA and form secretory IgA by binding to poly-Ig receptor expressed on epithelial cells for protective immunity. The development of new-generation mucosal vaccines, including the rice-based oral vaccine MucoRice, on the basis of the coordinated mucosal immune system is a promising strategy for the control of mucosal infectious diseases.

  4. The mucosal immune system: From dentistry to vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    KIYONO, Hiroshi; AZEGAMI, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is the beginning of the aero-digestive tract, which is covered by mucosal epithelium continuously under the threat of invasion of pathogens, it is thus protected by the mucosal immune system. In the early phase of our scientific efforts for the demonstration of mucosal immune system, dental science was one of major driving forces due to their foreseeability to use oral immunity for the control of oral diseases. The mucosal immune system is divided functionally into, but interconnected inductive and effector sites. Intestinal Peyer’s patches (PPs) are an inductive site containing antigen-sampling M cells and immunocompetent cells required to initiate antigen-specific immune responses. At effector sites, PP-originated antigen-specific IgA B cells become plasma cells to produce polymeric IgA and form secretory IgA by binding to poly-Ig receptor expressed on epithelial cells for protective immunity. The development of new-generation mucosal vaccines, including the rice-based oral vaccine MucoRice, on the basis of the coordinated mucosal immune system is a promising strategy for the control of mucosal infectious diseases. PMID:26460320

  5. ALLERGIC ASTHMA AND THE DEVELOPING IMMUNE SYSTEM: A PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: The predisposition towards atopic disease begins early in life, and that the risk of developing asthma is heightened following prenatal exposure to some compounds. Nonetheless, the effect of gestational aeroallergen exposure on the developing immune system is unclear....

  6. ISS Update: Space Flight and the Immune System

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries interviews Brian Crucian, NASA immunologist, about the issues with space flight and the immune system. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson and inc...

  7. The CRISPR-Cas immune system: biology, mechanisms and applications.

    PubMed

    Rath, Devashish; Amlinger, Lina; Rath, Archana; Lundgren, Magnus

    2015-10-01

    Viruses are a common threat to cellular life, not the least to bacteria and archaea who constitute the majority of life on Earth. Consequently, a variety of mechanisms to resist virus infection has evolved. A recent discovery is the adaptive immune system in prokaryotes, a type of system previously thought to be present only in vertebrates. The system, called CRISPR-Cas, provide sequence-specific adaptive immunity and fundamentally affect our understanding of virus-host interaction. CRISPR-based immunity acts by integrating short virus sequences in the cell's CRISPR locus, allowing the cell to remember, recognize and clear infections. There has been rapid advancement in our understanding of this immune system and its applications, but there are many aspects that await elucidation making the field an exciting area of research. This review provides an overview of the field and highlights unresolved issues.

  8. The Immune System, Cytokines, and Biomarkers in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Masi, Anne; Glozier, Nicholas; Dale, Russell; Guastella, Adam J

    2017-04-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental condition characterized by variable impairments in communication and social interaction as well as restricted interests and repetitive behaviors. Heterogeneity of presentation is a hallmark. Investigations of immune system problems in ASD, including aberrations in cytokine profiles and signaling, have been increasing in recent times and are the subject of ongoing interest. With the aim of establishing whether cytokines have utility as potential biomarkers that may define a subgroup of ASD, or function as an objective measure of response to treatment, this review summarizes the role of the immune system, discusses the relationship between the immune system, the brain, and behavior, and presents previously-identified immune system abnormalities in ASD, specifically addressing the role of cytokines in these aberrations. The roles and identification of biomarkers are also addressed, particularly with respect to cytokine profiles in ASD.

  9. How (and why) the immune system makes us sleep

    PubMed Central

    Imeri, Luca; Opp, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Good sleep is necessary for physical and mental health. For example, sleep loss impairs immune function, and sleep is altered during infection. Immune signalling molecules are present in the healthy brain, where they interact with neurochemical systems to contribute to the regulation of normal sleep. Animal studies have shown that interactions between immune signalling molecules (such as the cytokine interleukin 1) and brain neurochemical systems (such as the serotonin system) are amplified during infection, indicating that these interactions might underlie the changes in sleep that occur during infection. Why should the immune system cause us to sleep differently when we are sick? We propose that the alterations in sleep architecture during infection are exquisitely tailored to support the generation of fever, which in turn imparts survival value. PMID:19209176

  10. The Twin Bikes System for artificial gravity in space.

    PubMed

    di Prampero, P E

    1994-05-01

    Exposure to microgravity (microgravity < or = 10(-4) g), beside affecting the neurovestibular and respiratory systems, greatly alters the dynamics of the circulation and leads to bone demineralization and muscle atrophy (Grigoriev and Egorov, 1991; Nicogossian, 1989a). When taken together, circulatory deconditioning and muscle atrophy lead to a reduced exercise capacity and tolerance. It is generally believed that the above modifications are completely reversible upon reentry to normal 1 g conditions, even if it is still a matter of debate whether this is really the case after very long space flights. In any case, appropriate countermeasures appear necessary for long term space flights (Nicogossian, 1989b). These countermeasures are generally based on: i) exercise training programmes, ii) appropriate suits maintaining the lower part of the body at a pressure below cabin level, thus partially reversing the headward fluid shift and iii) elastic cords pulling the subject's body towards the floor of the cabin to simulate Earth gravity. In addition, iv) artificial gravity obtained by rotation of the spacecraft, or parts thereof, was proposed since the beginning of the space era to prevent cardiovascular deconditioning and bone and muscle loss. This paper describes the Twin Bikes System and studies testing its usefulness as a tool for maintaining astronauts' physical fitness during microgravity.

  11. Phosphorus fate, management, and modeling in artificially drained systems.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, Peter J A; Smith, Douglas R; Bolster, Carl H; Easton, Zachary M

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorus (P) losses in agricultural drainage waters, both surface and subsurface, are among the most difficult form of nonpoint source pollution to mitigate. This special collection of papers on P in drainage waters documents the range of field conditions leading to P loss in drainage water, the potential for drainage and nutrient management practices to control drainage losses of P, and the ability of models to represent P loss to drainage systems. A review of P in tile drainage and case studies from North America, Europe, and New Zealand highlight the potential for artificial drainage to exacerbate watershed loads of dissolved and particulate P via rapid, bypass flow and shorter flow path distances. Trade-offs are identified in association with drainage intensification, tillage, cover crops, and manure management. While P in drainage waters tends to be tied to surface sources of P (soil, amendments or vegetation) that are in highest concentration, legacy sources of P may occur at deeper depths or other points along drainage flow paths. Most startling, none of the major fate-and-transport models used to predict management impacts on watershed P losses simulate the dominant processes of P loss to drainage waters. Because P losses to drainage waters can be so difficult to manage and to model, major investment are needed (i) in systems that can provide necessary drainage for agronomic production while detaining peak flows and promoting P retention and (ii) in models that can adequately describe P loss to drainage waters.

  12. Knowledge Based Simulation: An Artificial Intelligence Approach to System Modeling and Automating the Simulation Life Cycle.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-13

    Simulation: An Artificial Intelligence Approach to System Modeling and Automating the Simulation Life Cycle Mark S. Fox, Nizwer Husain, Malcolm...years of research in the application of Artificial Intelligence to Simulation. Our focus has been in two areas: the use of Al knowledge representation...this problem by using Artificial Intelligence (Al) knowledge representation techniques, such as frames, to represent the objects and their

  13. Human immune system mice immunized with Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein induce protective human humoral immunity against malaria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Li, Xiangming; Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G A; Zhang, Min; Mitchell, Robert; Nogueira, Raquel Tayar; Tsao, Tiffany; Noe, Amy R; Ayala, Ramses; Sahi, Vincent; Gutierrez, Gabriel M; Nussenzweig, Victor; Wilson, James M; Nardin, Elizabeth H; Nussenzweig, Ruth S; Tsuji, Moriya

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we developed human immune system (HIS) mice that possess functional human CD4+ T cells and B cells, named HIS-CD4/B mice. HIS-CD4/B mice were generated by first introducing HLA class II genes, including DR1 and DR4, along with genes encoding various human cytokines and human B cell activation factor (BAFF) to NSG mice by adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vectors, followed by engrafting human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HIS-CD4/B mice, in which the reconstitution of human CD4+ T and B cells resembles to that of humans, produced a significant level of human IgG against Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite (PfCS) protein upon immunization. CD4+ T cells in HIS-CD4/B mice, which possess central and effector memory phenotypes like those in humans, are functional, since PfCS protein-specific human CD4+ T cells secreting IFN-γ and IL-2 were detected in immunized HIS-CD4/B mice. Lastly, PfCS protein-immunized HIS-CD4/B mice were protected from in vivo challenge with transgenic P. berghei sporozoites expressing the PfCS protein. The immune sera collected from protected HIS-CD4/B mice reacted against transgenic P. berghei sporozoites expressing the PfCS protein and also inhibited the parasite invasion into hepatocytes in vitro. Taken together, these studies show that our HIS-CD4/B mice could mount protective human anti-malaria immunity, consisting of human IgG and human CD4+ T cell responses both specific for a human malaria antigen.

  14. Roles of Zinc Signaling in the Immune System.

    PubMed

    Hojyo, Shintaro; Fukada, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential micronutrient for basic cell activities such as cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Zn deficiency depresses both innate and adaptive immune responses. However, the precise physiological mechanisms of the Zn-mediated regulation of the immune system have been largely unclear. Zn homeostasis is tightly controlled by the coordinated activity of Zn transporters and metallothioneins, which regulate the transport, distribution, and storage of Zn. There is growing evidence that Zn behaves like a signaling molecule, facilitating the transduction of a variety of signaling cascades in response to extracellular stimuli. In this review, we highlight the emerging functional roles of Zn and Zn transporters in immunity, focusing on how crosstalk between Zn and immune-related signaling guides the normal development and function of immune cells.

  15. Roles of Zinc Signaling in the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential micronutrient for basic cell activities such as cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Zn deficiency depresses both innate and adaptive immune responses. However, the precise physiological mechanisms of the Zn-mediated regulation of the immune system have been largely unclear. Zn homeostasis is tightly controlled by the coordinated activity of Zn transporters and metallothioneins, which regulate the transport, distribution, and storage of Zn. There is growing evidence that Zn behaves like a signaling molecule, facilitating the transduction of a variety of signaling cascades in response to extracellular stimuli. In this review, we highlight the emerging functional roles of Zn and Zn transporters in immunity, focusing on how crosstalk between Zn and immune-related signaling guides the normal development and function of immune cells. PMID:27872866

  16. The immune system and its modulation mechanism in scallop.

    PubMed

    Song, Linsheng; Wang, Lingling; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Mengqiang

    2015-09-01

    Scallops are a cosmopolitan family of bivalves, and some of them are highly prized as dominant aquaculture species. In the past decades, there have been increasing studies on the basic biology and immunology of scallops, and this review summarizes the research progresses of immune system and its modulation mechanism in scallop. As invertebrate, scallops lack adaptive immunity and they have evolved an array of sophisticated strategies to recognize and eliminate various invaders by employing a set of molecules and cells. It is evident that basic immune reactions such as immune recognition, signal transduction, and effector synthesis involved in immune response are accomplished in a variety of ways. They rely upon an extensive repertoire of phagocytosis, apoptosis and encapsulation of the circulating hemocytes for eliminating invasive pathogens, as well as the production of immune effectors that are active against a large range of pathogens or sensitive for the environmental stress. Furthermore, the molecular constitutions, metabolic pathways and immunomodulation mechanisms of the primitive catecholaminergic, cholinergic, enkephalinergic system and NO system in scallop are also discussed, which can be taken as an entrance to better understand the origin and evolution of the neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in lower invertebrates.

  17. Metabolites: messengers between the microbiota and the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Maayan; Thaiss, Christoph A.; Elinav, Eran

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian intestine harbors one of the largest microbial densities on Earth, necessitating the implementation of control mechanisms by which the host evaluates the state of microbial colonization and reacts to deviations from homeostasis. While microbial recognition by the innate immune system has been firmly established as an efficient means by which the host evaluates microbial presence, recent work has uncovered a central role for bacterial metabolites in the orchestration of the host immune response. In this review, we highlight examples of how microbiota-modulated metabolites control the development, differentiation, and activity of the immune system and classify them into functional categories that illustrate the spectrum of ways by which microbial metabolites influence host physiology. A comprehensive understanding of how microbiota-derived metabolites shape the human immune system is critical for the rational design of therapies for microbiota-driven diseases. PMID:27474437

  18. The immune system in human milk and the developing infant.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Armond S

    2007-12-01

    The concept of the immune system in human milk emerged in the 1970s from clinical and laboratory observations made between the late 18th through the mid-20th centuries. The discovery of living leukocytes in human milk in 1970 was the final link to the chain of evidence that culminated in the concept. The concept was later expanded to include not only antimicrobial but also anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory agents. These agents evolved to compensate for developmental delays in the immune system during infancy. Indeed, that explains the defense by human milk against common infectious diseases in infancy, necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants, and immune-mediated disorders such as Crohn's disease in later childhood. These diverse evolutionary outcomes underscore the superiority of human milk for the nutrition of human infants. Finally, other components of the immune system in human milk and their fate and functions in the developing infant may well be discovered in the near future.

  19. Artificial sweetener sucralose in U.S. drinking water systems.

    PubMed

    Mawhinney, Douglas B; Young, Robert B; Vanderford, Brett J; Borch, Thomas; Snyder, Shane A

    2011-10-15

    The artificial sweetener sucralose has recently been shown to be a widespread of contaminant of wastewater, surface water, and groundwater. In order to understand its occurrence in drinking water systems, water samples from 19 United States (U.S.) drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) serving more than 28 million people were analyzed for sucralose using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Sucralose was found to be present in source water of 15 out of 19 DWTPs (47-2900 ng/L), finished water of 13 out of 17 DWTPs (49-2400 ng/L) and distribution system water of 8 out of the 12 DWTPs (48-2400 ng/L) tested. Sucralose was only found to be present in source waters with known wastewater influence and/or recreational usage, and displayed low removal (12% average) in the DWTPs where finished water was sampled. Further, in the subset of DWTPs with distribution system water sampled, the compound was found to persist regardless of the presence of residual chlorine or chloramines. In order to understand intra-DWTP consistency, sucralose was monitored at one drinking water treatment plant over an 11 month period from March 2010 through January 2011, and averaged 440 ng/L in the source water and 350 ng/L in the finished water. The results of this study confirm that sucralose will function well as an indicator compound for anthropogenic influence on source, finished drinking and distribution system (i.e., tap) water, as well as an indicator compound for the presence of other recalcitrant compounds in finished drinking water in the U.S.

  20. The Mucosal Immune System and Its Regulation by Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Kabat, Agnieszka M.; Pott, Johanna; Maloy, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract presents a unique challenge to the mucosal immune system, which has to constantly monitor the vast surface for the presence of pathogens, while at the same time maintaining tolerance to beneficial or innocuous antigens. In the intestinal mucosa, specialized innate and adaptive immune components participate in directing appropriate immune responses toward these diverse challenges. Recent studies provide compelling evidence that the process of autophagy influences several aspects of mucosal immune responses. Initially described as a “self-eating” survival pathway that enables nutrient recycling during starvation, autophagy has now been connected to multiple cellular responses, including several aspects of immunity. Initial links between autophagy and host immunity came from the observations that autophagy can target intracellular bacteria for degradation. However, subsequent studies indicated that autophagy plays a much broader role in immune responses, as it can impact antigen processing, thymic selection, lymphocyte homeostasis, and the regulation of immunoglobulin and cytokine secretion. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of mucosal immune cells and discuss how autophagy influences many aspects of their physiology and function. We focus on cell type-specific roles of autophagy in the gut, with a particular emphasis on the effects of autophagy on the intestinal T cell compartment. We also provide a perspective on how manipulation of autophagy may potentially be used to treat mucosal inflammatory disorders. PMID:27446072

  1. Direct and Electronic Health Record Access to the Clinical Decision Support for Immunizations in the Minnesota Immunization Information System

    PubMed Central

    Rajamani, Sripriya; Bieringer, Aaron; Wallerius, Stephanie; Jensen, Daniel; Winden, Tamara; Muscoplat, Miriam Halstead

    2016-01-01

    Immunization information systems (IIS) are population-based and confidential computerized systems maintained by public health agencies containing individual data on immunizations from participating health care providers. IIS hold comprehensive vaccination histories given across providers and over time. An important aspect to IIS is the clinical decision support for immunizations (CDSi), consisting of vaccine forecasting algorithms to determine needed immunizations. The study objective was to analyze the CDSi presentation by IIS in Minnesota (Minnesota Immunization Information Connection [MIIC]) through direct access by IIS interface and by access through electronic health records (EHRs) to outline similarities and differences. The immunization data presented were similar across the three systems examined, but with varying ability to integrate data across MIIC and EHR, which impacts immunization data reconciliation. Study findings will lead to better understanding of immunization data display, clinical decision support, and user functionalities with the ultimate goal of promoting IIS CDSi to improve vaccination rates. PMID:28050128

  2. Aircraft Abnormal Conditions Detection, Identification, and Evaluation Using Innate and Adaptive Immune Systems Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Azzawi, Dia

    Abnormal flight conditions play a major role in aircraft accidents frequently causing loss of control. To ensure aircraft operation safety in all situations, intelligent system monitoring and adaptation must rely on accurately detecting the presence of abnormal conditions as soon as they take place, identifying their root cause(s), estimating their nature and severity, and predicting their impact on the flight envelope. Due to the complexity and multidimensionality of the aircraft system under abnormal conditions, these requirements are extremely difficult to satisfy using existing analytical and/or statistical approaches. Moreover, current methodologies have addressed only isolated classes of abnormal conditions and a reduced number of aircraft dynamic parameters within a limited region of the flight envelope. This research effort aims at developing an integrated and comprehensive framework for the aircraft abnormal conditions detection, identification, and evaluation based on the artificial immune systems paradigm, which has the capability to address the complexity and multidimensionality issues related to aircraft systems. Within the proposed framework, a novel algorithm was developed for the abnormal conditions detection problem and extended to the abnormal conditions identification and evaluation. The algorithm and its extensions were inspired from the functionality of the biological dendritic cells (an important part of the innate immune system) and their interaction with the different components of the adaptive immune system. Immunity-based methodologies for re-assessing the flight envelope at post-failure and predicting the impact of the abnormal conditions on the performance and handling qualities are also proposed and investigated in this study. The generality of the approach makes it applicable to any system. Data for artificial immune system development were collected from flight tests of a supersonic research aircraft within a motion-based flight

  3. Aging of the Immune System. Mechanisms and Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Weyand, Cornelia M; Goronzy, Jörg J

    2016-12-01

    Beginning with the sixth decade of life, the human immune system undergoes dramatic aging-related changes, which continuously progress to a state of immunosenescence. The aging immune system loses the ability to protect against infections and cancer and fails to support appropriate wound healing. Vaccine responses are typically impaired in older individuals. Conversely, inflammatory responses mediated by the innate immune system gain in intensity and duration, rendering older individuals susceptible to tissue-damaging immunity and inflammatory disease. Immune system aging functions as an accelerator for other age-related pathologies. It occurs prematurely in some clinical conditions, most prominently in patients with the autoimmune syndrome rheumatoid arthritis (RA); and such patients serve as an informative model system to study molecular mechanisms of immune aging. T cells from patients with RA are prone to differentiate into proinflammatory effector cells, sustaining chronic-persistent inflammatory lesions in the joints and many other organ systems. RA T cells have several hallmarks of cellular aging; most importantly, they accumulate damaged DNA. Because of deficiency of the DNA repair kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated, RA T cells carry a higher burden of DNA double-strand breaks, triggering cell-indigenous stress signals that shift the cell's survival potential and differentiation pattern. Immune aging in RA T cells is also associated with metabolic reprogramming; specifically, with reduced glycolytic flux and diminished ATP production. Chronic energy stress affects the longevity and the functional differentiation of older T cells. Altered metabolic patterns provide opportunities to therapeutically target the immune aging process through metabolic interference.

  4. Energy conversion at liquid/liquid interfaces: artificial photosynthetic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkov, A. G.; Gugeshashvili, M. I.; Deamer, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    This chapter focuses on multielectron reactions in organized assemblies of molecules at the liquid/liquid interface. We describe the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of such reactions, including the structure of the reaction centers, charge movement along the electron transfer pathways, and the role of electric double layers in artificial photosynthesis. Some examples of artificial photosynthesis at the oil/water interface are considered, including water photooxidation to the molecular oxygen, oxygen photoreduction, photosynthesis of amphiphilic compounds and proton evolution by photochemical processes.

  5. Honey characterization using computer vision system and artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Shafiee, Sahameh; Minaei, Saeid; Moghaddam-Charkari, Nasrollah; Barzegar, Mohsen

    2014-09-15

    This paper reports the development of a computer vision system (CVS) for non-destructive characterization of honey based on colour and its correlated chemical attributes including ash content (AC), antioxidant activity (AA), and total phenolic content (TPC). Artificial neural network (ANN) models were applied to transform RGB values of images to CIE L*a*b* colourimetric measurements and to predict AC, TPC and AA from colour features of images. The developed ANN models were able to convert RGB values to CIE L*a*b* colourimetric parameters with low generalization error of 1.01±0.99. In addition, the developed models for prediction of AC, TPC and AA showed high performance based on colour parameters of honey images, as the R(2) values for prediction were 0.99, 0.98, and 0.87, for AC, AA and TPC, respectively. The experimental results show the effectiveness and possibility of applying CVS for non-destructive honey characterization by the industry.

  6. Artificial intelligence approach for spot application project system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, M. J.; Fisse, G.; Martin, E.; de Boissezon, H.; Galaup, M.

    1993-11-01

    Over the past four years, CNES has been engaged in a major programme focusing on the development of SPOT Operational Application Projects. With a total of sixty projects now complete, we can draw a number of meaningful conclusions and identify a number of objectives to be satisfied by advanced remote sensing methodology. One of the main conclusions points to the importance of human vision in studies on natural complex space imagery. This being so, visual recognition must be one of the main phases of the ``Pilot Project for the Application of Remote Sensing to Agricultural Statistics'': only human experts have the ability to make a meaningful analysis of Spot TM imagery. Non-expert operators will not be able to manage the subsequent rational production phase alone. The first part of this paper describes an approach to the formalization and modelling of expert know-how based on the use of artificial intelligence. The second part puts forward a cooperative operator/computer system based on a cognitive structure. Our proposal comprises 1) a specific knowledge base, 2) an ergonomic interface associated with functional software that is based on automatic image enhancement coupled with perception support functions.

  7. Optimal secondary coil design for inductive powering of the Artificial Accommodation System.

    PubMed

    Nagel, J A; Krug, M; Gengenbach, U; Guth, H; Bretthauer, G; Guthoff, R F

    2011-01-01

    Age-related ailments like presbyopia and cataract are increasing concerns in the aging society. Both go along with a loss of ability to accommodate. A new approach to restore the patients' ability to accommodate is the Artificial Accommodation System. This micro mechatronic system will be implanted into the capsular bag to replace the human crystalline lens. Depending on the patients' actual need for accommodation, the Artificial Accommodation System autonomously adapts the refractive power of its integrated optical element in a way that the projection on the patients' retina results in a sharp image. As the Artificial Accommodation System is an active implant, its subsystems have to be supplied with electrical energy. Evolving technologies, like energy harvesting, which can potentially be used to power an implant like the Artificial Accommodation System are at the current state of art not sufficient to power the Artificial Accommodation System autonomously [1]. In the near future, therefore an inductive power supply system will be developed which includes an energy storage to power the Artificial Accommodation System autonomously over a period of 24 h and can be recharged wirelessly. This Paper describes a new possibility to optimize the secondary coil design in a solely analytical way, based on a new figure of merit. Within this paper the developed figure of merit is applied to optimize the secondary coil design for the Artificial Accommodation System.

  8. Modeling Systems-Level Regulation of Host Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Thakar, Juilee; Pilione, Mylisa; Kirimanjeswara, Girish; Harvill, Eric T; Albert, Réka

    2007-01-01

    Many pathogens are able to manipulate the signaling pathways responsible for the generation of host immune responses. Here we examine and model a respiratory infection system in which disruption of host immune functions or of bacterial factors changes the dynamics of the infection. We synthesize the network of interactions between host immune components and two closely related bacteria in the genus Bordetellae. We incorporate existing experimental information on the timing of immune regulatory events into a discrete dynamic model, and verify the model by comparing the effects of simulated disruptions to the experimental outcome of knockout mutations. Our model indicates that the infection time course of both Bordetellae can be separated into three distinct phases based on the most active immune processes. We compare and discuss the effect of the species-specific virulence factors on disrupting the immune response during their infection of naive, antibody-treated, diseased, or convalescent hosts. Our model offers predictions regarding cytokine regulation, key immune components, and clearance of secondary infections; we experimentally validate two of these predictions. This type of modeling provides new insights into the virulence, pathogenesis, and host adaptation of disease-causing microorganisms and allows systems-level analysis that is not always possible using traditional methods. PMID:17559300

  9. The immune system: role in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2013-05-01

    Over the past 20 years it has become recognized that low-grade inflammation plays a role in cardiovascular disease. More recently, participation of the innate and the adaptive immune response in mechanisms that contribute to inflammation in cardiovascular disease has been reported in atherosclerosis and hypertension. Different subsets of lymphocytes and their cytokines are involved in vascular remodelling and hypertensive renal disease as well as heart disease. Effector T cells including T-helper (Th) 1 (interferon-γ-producing) and Th2 lymphocytes (interleukin-4 producing), as well as Th17 (which produce interleukin-17), and T suppressor lymphocytes such as T regulatory cells, which express the transcription factor forkhead box P3, participate respectively as pro- and anti-inflammatory cells, and mediate effects of angiotensin II and mineralocorticoids. Involvement of immune mechanisms in cardiac, vascular, and renal changes in hypertension has been demonstrated in many experimental models, an example being the Dahl-salt sensitive rat and the spontaneously hypertensive rat. How activation of immunity is triggered remains unknown, but neoantigens could be generated by elevated blood pressure through damage-associated molecular pattern receptors or other mechanisms. When activated, Th1 may contribute to blood pressure elevation by affecting the kidney, vascular remodelling of blood vessels directly via effects of the cytokines produced, or through their effects on perivascular fat. T regulatory cells protect from blood pressure elevation acting on similar targets. These novel findings may open the way for new therapeutic approaches to improve outcomes in hypertension and cardiovascular disease in humans.

  10. Embodied artificial evolution: Artificial evolutionary systems in the 21st Century.

    PubMed

    Eiben, A E; Kernbach, S; Haasdijk, Evert

    2012-12-01

    Evolution is one of the major omnipresent powers in the universe that has been studied for about two centuries. Recent scientific and technical developments make it possible to make the transition from passively understanding to actively using evolutionary processes. Today this is possible in Evolutionary Computing, where human experimenters can design and manipulate all components of evolutionary processes in digital spaces. We argue that in the near future it will be possible to implement artificial evolutionary processes outside such imaginary spaces and make them physically embodied. In other words, we envision the "Evolution of Things", rather than just the evolution of digital objects, leading to a new field of Embodied Artificial Evolution (EAE). The main objective of this paper is to present a unifying vision in order to aid the development of this high potential research area. To this end, we introduce the notion of EAE, discuss a few examples and applications, and elaborate on the expected benefits as well as the grand challenges this developing field will have to address.

  11. Melanoma: oncogenic drivers and the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Karachaliou, Niki; Pilotto, Sara; Teixidó, Cristina; Viteri, Santiago; González-Cao, María; Riso, Aldo; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Molina, Miguel Angel; Chaib, Imane; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Richardet, Eduardo; Bria, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Advances and in-depth understanding of the biology of melanoma over the past 30 years have contributed to a change in the consideration of melanoma as one of the most therapy-resistant malignancies. The finding that oncogenic BRAF mutations drive tumor growth in up to 50% of melanomas led to a molecular therapy revolution for unresectable and metastatic disease. Moving beyond BRAF, inactivation of immune regulatory checkpoints that limit T cell responses to melanoma has provided targets for cancer immunotherapy. In this review, we discuss the molecular biology of melanoma and we focus on the recent advances of molecularly targeted and immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:26605311

  12. The immunization data quality audit: verifying the quality and consistency of immunization monitoring systems.

    PubMed Central

    Ronveaux, O.; Rickert, D.; Hadler, S.; Groom, H.; Lloyd, J.; Bchir, A.; Birmingham, M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the consistency and quality of immunization monitoring systems in 27 countries during 2002-03 using standardized data quality audits (DQAs) that had been launched within the framework of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization. METHODS: The consistency of reporting systems was estimated by determining the proportion of third doses of diphtheria-tetanuspertussis (DTP-3) vaccine reported as being administered that could be verified by written documentation at health facilities and districts. The quality of monitoring systems was measured using quality indices for different components of the monitoring systems. These indices were applied to each level of the health service (health unit, district and national). FINDINGS: The proportion of verified DTP-3 doses was lower than 85% in 16 countries. Difficulties in verifying the doses administered often arose at the peripheral level of the health service, usually as the result of discrepancies in information between health units and their corresponding districts or because completed recording forms were not available from health units. All countries had weaknesses in their monitoring systems; these included the inconsistent use of monitoring charts; inadequate monitoring of vaccine stocks, injection supplies and adverse events; unsafe computer practices; and poor monitoring of completeness and timeliness of reporting. CONCLUSION: Inconsistencies in immunization data occur in many countries, hampering their ability to manage their immunization programmes. Countries should use these findings to strengthen monitoring systems so that data can reliably guide programme activities. The DQA is an innovative tool that provides a way to independently assess the quality of immunization monitoring systems at all levels of a health service and serves as a point of entry to make improvements. It provides a useful example for other global health initiatives. PMID:16175824

  13. A Modular Artificial Intelligence Inference Engine System (MAIS) for support of on orbit experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, Thomas M., III

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a Modular Artificial Intelligence Inference Engine System (MAIS) support tool that would provide health and status monitoring, cognitive replanning, analysis and support of on-orbit Space Station, Spacelab experiments and systems.

  14. Multifunctional astronomical self-organizing system of autonomous navigation and orientation for artificial Earth satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. I.; Danilova, T. V.

    2017-03-01

    We describe the methods and algorithms of a multifunctional astronomical system of the autonomous navigation and orientation for artificial Earth satellites based on the automatization of the system approach to the design and programming problems of the subject area.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Aging and Immune System Regulation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Eleftherianos, Ioannis; Castillo, Julio Cesar

    2012-01-01

    Aging is a complex process that involves the accumulation of deleterious changes resulting in overall decline in several vital functions, leading to the progressive deterioration in physiological condition of the organism and eventually causing disease and death. The immune system is the most important host-defense mechanism in humans and is also highly conserved in insects. Extensive research in vertebrates has concluded that aging of the immune function results in increased susceptibility to infectious disease and chronic inflammation. Over the years, interest has grown in studying the molecular interaction between aging and the immune response to pathogenic infections. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent model system for dissecting the genetic and genomic basis of important biological processes, such as aging and the innate immune system, and deciphering parallel mechanisms in vertebrate animals. Here, we review the recent advances in the identification of key players modulating the relationship between molecular aging networks and immune signal transduction pathways in the fly. Understanding the details of the molecular events involved in aging and immune system regulation will potentially lead to the development of strategies for decreasing the impact of age-related diseases, thus improving human health and life span. PMID:22949833

  16. Countermeasure for space flight effects on immune system: nutritional nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, A D; Yamauchi, K; Sundaresan, A; Ramesh, G T; Pellis, N R

    2005-06-01

    Microgravity and its environment have adverse effects on the immune system. Abnormal immune responses observed in microgravity may pose serious consequences, especially for the recent directions of NASA for long-term space missions to Moon, Mars and deep Space exploration. The study of space flight immunology is limited due to relative inaccessibility, difficulty of performing experiments in space, and inadequate provisions in this area in the United States and Russian space programs (Taylor 1993). Microgravity and stress experienced during space flights results in immune system aberration (Taylor 1993). In ground-based mouse models for some of the microgravity effects on the human body, hindlimb unloading (HU) has been reported to cause abnormal cell proliferation and cytokine production (Armstrong et al., 1993, Chapes et al. 1993). In this report, we document that a nutritional nucleotide supplementation as studied in ground-based microgravity analogs, has potential to serve as a countermeasure for the immune dysfunction observed in space travel.

  17. CRISPR-Cas systems: Prokaryotes upgrade to adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2014-04-24

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), and associated proteins (Cas) comprise the CRISPR-Cas system, which confers adaptive immunity against exogenic elements in many bacteria and most archaea. CRISPR-mediated immunization occurs through the uptake of DNA from invasive genetic elements such as plasmids and viruses, followed by its integration into CRISPR loci. These loci are subsequently transcribed and processed into small interfering RNAs that guide nucleases for specific cleavage of complementary sequences. Conceptually, CRISPR-Cas shares functional features with the mammalian adaptive immune system, while also exhibiting characteristics of Lamarckian evolution. Because immune markers spliced from exogenous agents are integrated iteratively in CRISPR loci, they constitute a genetic record of vaccination events and reflect environmental conditions and changes over time. Cas endonucleases, which can be reprogrammed by small guide RNAs have shown unprecedented potential and flexibility for genome editing and can be repurposed for numerous DNA targeting applications including transcriptional control.

  18. Countermeasure for space flight effects on immune system: nutritional nucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, A. D.; Yamauchi, K.; Sundaresan, A.; Ramesh, G. T.; Pellis, N. R.

    2005-01-01

    Microgravity and its environment have adverse effects on the immune system. Abnormal immune responses observed in microgravity may pose serious consequences, especially for the recent directions of NASA for long-term space missions to Moon, Mars and deep Space exploration. The study of space flight immunology is limited due to relative inaccessibility, difficulty of performing experiments in space, and inadequate provisions in this area in the United States and Russian space programs (Taylor 1993). Microgravity and stress experienced during space flights results in immune system aberration (Taylor 1993). In ground-based mouse models for some of the microgravity effects on the human body, hindlimb unloading (HU) has been reported to cause abnormal cell proliferation and cytokine production (Armstrong et al., 1993, Chapes et al. 1993). In this report, we document that a nutritional nucleotide supplementation as studied in ground-based microgravity analogs, has potential to serve as a countermeasure for the immune dysfunction observed in space travel.

  19. Comparative and Developmental Study of the Immune System in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Jacques; Ohta, Yuko

    2010-01-01

    Xenopus laevis is the model of choice for evolutionary, comparative, and developmental studies of immunity, and invaluable research tools including MHC-defined clones, inbred strains, cell lines, and monoclonal antibodies are available for these studies. Recent efforts to use Silurana (Xenopus) tropicalis for genetic analyses have led to the sequencing of the whole genome. Ongoing genome mapping and mutagenesis studies will provide a new dimension to the study of immunity. Here we review what is known about the immune system of X. laevis integrated with available genomic information from S. tropicalis. This review provides compelling evidence for the high degree of similarity and evolutionary conservation between Xenopus and mammalian immune systems. We propose to build a powerful and innovative comparative biomedical model based on modern genetic technologies that takes take advantage of X. laevis and S. tropicalis, as well as the whole Xenopus genus. PMID:19253402

  20. Blood feeding of Ornithodoros turicata larvae using an artificial membrane system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An artificial membrane system was adapted to feed Ornithodoros turicata larvae from a laboratory colony using defibrinated swine blood. Aspects related to larval feeding and molting to the 1st nymphal instar were evaluated. Fifty-five percent of all larvae exposed to the artificial membrane in two e...

  1. Implications of Human Pattern Processing for the Design of Artificial Knowledge Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes-Roth, Barbara

    This paper presents evidence that four design principles commonly embodied in artificial knowledge systems are inconsistent with human cognitive capabilities. Because these principles are widely accepted as characteristics of human knowledge processing, common theoretical properties related to cognitive psychology and artificial intelligence which…

  2. Effects of gastrointestinal nematode infection on the ruminant immune system.

    PubMed

    Gasbarre, L C

    1997-11-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes of ruminants evoke a wide variety of immune responses in their hosts. In terms of specific immune responses directed against parasite antigens, the resulting immune responses may vary from those that give strong protection from reinfection after a relatively light exposure (e.g. Oesophagostomum radiatum) to responses that are very weak and delayed in their onset (e.g. Ostertagia ostertagi). The nature of these protective immune responses has been covered in another section of the workshop and the purpose of this section will be to explore the nature of changes that occur in the immune system of infected animals and to discuss the effect of GI nematode infections upon the overall immunoresponsiveness of the host. The discussion will focus primarily on Ostertagia ostertagi because this parasite has received the most attention in published studies. The interaction of Ostertagia and the host immune system presents what appears to be an interesting contradiction. Protective immunity directed against the parasite is slow to arise and when compared to some of the other GI nematodes, is relatively weak. Although responses that reduce egg output in the feces or increase the number of larvae undergoing inhibition may occur after a relatively brief exposure (3-4 months), immune responses which reduce the number of parasites that can establish in the host are not evident until the animal's second year. Additionally, even older animals that have spent several seasons on infected pastures will have low numbers of Ostertagia in their abomasa, indicating that sterilizing immune responses against the parasite are uncommon. In spite of this apparent lack of specific protective immune responses, infections with Ostertagia induce profound changes in the host immune system. These changes include a tremendous expansion of both the number of lymphocytes in the local lymph nodes and the number of lymphoid cells in the mucosa of the abomasum. This expansion

  3. Regulation of the Immune System by Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-14

    mechanisms of lymphokine induction. @• Depletion of macrophages from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) caused a marked decrease in...Harbour- McMenamin , D.V., E.M. Smith and J.E. Blalock. 1985. Endotoxin induction of leukocyte-derived proopiomelanocortin related peptides. Infect. immun...48:813-817. 3. Blalock, J.E., D.V. McMenamin , and E.M. Smith. 1985. Peptide hormones shared by the neuroendocrine and immune systems. J Immunol. 135

  4. Localization and Glassy Dynamics in the Immune System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jun; Earl, David J.; Deem, Michael W.

    We discuss use of the generalized NK model to examine evolutionary dynamics within the immune system. We describe how randomness and diversity play key roles in the immune response and how their effects are captured by this hierarchical spin glass model. We discuss analytical aspects of the model as well as practical applications to design of the annual influenza vaccine. We discuss the subtle role that the glassy evolutionary dynamics plays in suppressing autoimmune disease.

  5. The Immune System of HIV-Exposed Uninfected Infants

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Raya, Bahaa; Kollmann, Tobias R.; Marchant, Arnaud; MacGillivray, Duncan M.

    2016-01-01

    Infants born to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected women are HIV-exposed but the majority remains uninfected [i.e., HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU)]. HEU infants suffer greater morbidity and mortality from infections compared to HIV-unexposed (HU) peers. The reason(s) for these worse outcomes are uncertain, but could be related to an altered immune system state. This review comprehensively summarizes the current literature investigating the adaptive and innate immune system of HEU infants. HEU infants have altered cell-mediated immunity, including impaired T-cell maturation with documented hypo- as well as hyper-responsiveness to T-cell activation. And although prevaccination vaccine-specific antibody levels are often lower in HEU than HU, most HEU infants mount adequate humoral immune response following primary vaccination with diphtheria toxoid, haemophilus influenzae type b, whole cell pertussis, measles, hepatitis B, tetanus toxoid, and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. However, HEU infants are often found to have lower absolute neutrophil counts as compared to HU infants. On the other hand, an increase of innate immune cytokine production and expression of co-stimulatory markers has been noted in HEU infants, but this increase appears to be restricted to the first few weeks of life. The immune system of HEU children beyond infancy remains largely unexplored. PMID:27733852

  6. Dying autologous cells as instructors of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Munoz, L E; Herrmann, M; Berens, C

    2015-01-01

    In an organism, cell death occurs at many different sites and in many different forms. It is frequently part of normal development or serves to maintain cell homeostasis. In other cases, cell death not only occurs due to injury, disease or infection, but also as a consequence of various therapeutic interventions. However, in all of these scenarios, the immune system has to react to the dying and dead cells and decide whether to mount an immune response, to remain quiet or to initiate healing and repopulation. This is essential for the organism, testified by many diseases that are associated with malfunctioning in the cell death process, the corpse removal, or the ensuing immune responsiveness. Therefore, dying cells generally have to be considered as instructors of the immune system. How this happens and which signals and pathways contribute to modulate or shape the immune response is still elusive in many conditions. The articles presented in this Special Issue address such open questions. They highlight that the context in which cell death occurs will not only influence the cell death process itself, but also affect the surrounding cellular milieu, how the generation and presence of 'eat me' signals can have an impact on cell clearance, and that the exact nature of the residual 'debris' and how it is processed are fundamental to determining the immunological consequences. Hopefully, these articles initiate new approaches and new experiments to complete our understanding of how cell death and the immune system interact with each other.

  7. The Immune System of HIV-Exposed Uninfected Infants.

    PubMed

    Abu-Raya, Bahaa; Kollmann, Tobias R; Marchant, Arnaud; MacGillivray, Duncan M

    2016-01-01

    Infants born to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected women are HIV-exposed but the majority remains uninfected [i.e., HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU)]. HEU infants suffer greater morbidity and mortality from infections compared to HIV-unexposed (HU) peers. The reason(s) for these worse outcomes are uncertain, but could be related to an altered immune system state. This review comprehensively summarizes the current literature investigating the adaptive and innate immune system of HEU infants. HEU infants have altered cell-mediated immunity, including impaired T-cell maturation with documented hypo- as well as hyper-responsiveness to T-cell activation. And although prevaccination vaccine-specific antibody levels are often lower in HEU than HU, most HEU infants mount adequate humoral immune response following primary vaccination with diphtheria toxoid, haemophilus influenzae type b, whole cell pertussis, measles, hepatitis B, tetanus toxoid, and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. However, HEU infants are often found to have lower absolute neutrophil counts as compared to HU infants. On the other hand, an increase of innate immune cytokine production and expression of co-stimulatory markers has been noted in HEU infants, but this increase appears to be restricted to the first few weeks of life. The immune system of HEU children beyond infancy remains largely unexplored.

  8. The immune system and overtraining in athletes: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Hackney, Anthony C; Koltun, Kristen J

    2012-12-01

    The primary objective of this review is to provide an overview of how overtraining and the overtraining syndrome (OTS) affect the immune system of athletes. A secondary objective is to provide sports medicine clinicians with guidance as to how best to prevent and/or treat some of the health consequences of overtraining and the OTS as related to the development of a compromised immune system associated with exercise training. The OTS is a physically debilitating condition that results in athletes being totally compromised in their capacity to perform and compete. Many physiological systems are affected by the process of overtraining and the OTS; but one system in particular, the immune, is highly susceptible to degradation resulting in a reduction in overall health and performance. Monitoring of an athlete's exercise training load and other life stresses is critical to the determination of when their training regimen may be excessive, thereby increasing the risk of OTS developing. Taking steps to mitigate prolonged exposure to extreme stress (training + life or otherwise) in athletes as well as promoting a healthy immune system can significantly aid in the advancement of an athlete's training regimen progression and ultimate physical performance and overall health. In this light, this review provides approaches to aid sports medicine clinicians in promoting a healthy immune system in athletes.

  9. Inhibitory Receptors of the Immune System: Functions and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Xiao, Xiang; Liu, Wentao; Demirci, Gulcin; Li, Xian C

    2009-01-01

    The immune system has a remarkable ability to respond to seemingly endless antigens. In essence, a productive immune response takes place along a well defined but treacherous line, that is to effectively eradicate pathogens, and at the same time avoid causing damage to self organs. This type of response is fine-tuned, at least in part, by a complex array of pathways that either promote or inhibit the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells. Much effort has been focused on pathways that can support immune activation. In this article, we review specifically pathways that can inhibit immune responses and maintain immune homeostasis, highlighting our recent understanding on the role of inhibitory receptors that selectively engage the self MHC class I molecules and the B7 superfamily members, we also discuss the inhibitory Fc receptors and inhibitory cytokines and how such pathways, either individually or collectively, regulate innate and adaptive immune responses. Finally, we summarize new emerging approaches on how such negative pathways can be therapeutically modulated in various disease settings. PMID:20003816

  10. Space flight and the immune system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogoli, A.

    1993-01-01

    Depression of lymphocyte response to mitogens in cosmonauts after space flight was reported for the first time in the early 1970s by Soviet immunologists. Today we know that depression of lymphocyte function affects at least 50% of space crew members. Investigations on the ground on subjects undergoing physical and psychological stress indicate that stress is a major factor in immune depression of astronauts. This is despite the fact that weightlessness per se has a strong inhibitory effect on lymphocyte activation in vitro. Although the changes observed never harmed the health of astronauts, immunological changes must be seriously investigated and understood in view of long-duration flight on space stations in an Earth orbit, to other planets such as Mars and to the Moon.

  11. Nutritionally mediated programming of the developing immune system.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Amanda C

    2011-09-01

    A growing body of evidence highlights the importance of a mother's nutrition from preconception through lactation in programming the emerging organ systems and homeostatic pathways of her offspring. The developing immune system may be particularly vulnerable. Indeed, examples of nutrition-mediated immune programming can be found in the literature on intra-uterine growth retardation, maternal micronutrient deficiencies, and infant feeding. Current models of immune ontogeny depict a "layered" expansion of increasingly complex defenses, which may be permanently altered by maternal malnutrition. One programming mechanism involves activation of the maternal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to nutritional stress. Fetal or neonatal exposure to elevated stress hormones is linked in animal studies to permanent changes in neuroendocrine-immune interactions, with diverse manifestations such as an attenuated inflammatory response or reduced resistance to tumor colonization. Maternal malnutrition may also have a direct influence, as evidenced by nutrient-driven epigenetic changes to developing T regulatory cells and subsequent risk of allergy or asthma. A 3rd programming pathway involves placental or breast milk transfer of maternal immune factors with immunomodulatory functions (e.g. cytokines). Maternal malnutrition can directly affect transfer mechanisms or influence the quality or quantity of transferred factors. The public health implications of nutrition-mediated immune programming are of particular importance in the developing world, where prevalent maternal undernutrition is coupled with persistent infectious challenges. However, early alterations to the immune system, resulting from either nutritional deficiencies or excesses, have broad relevance for immune-mediated diseases, such as asthma, and chronic inflammatory conditions like cardiovascular disease.

  12. The application of artificial intelligence in the optimal design of mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poteralski, A.; Szczepanik, M.

    2016-11-01

    The paper is devoted to new computational techniques in mechanical optimization where one tries to study, model, analyze and optimize very complex phenomena, for which more precise scientific tools of the past were incapable of giving low cost and complete solution. Soft computing methods differ from conventional (hard) computing in that, unlike hard computing, they are tolerant of imprecision, uncertainty, partial truth and approximation. The paper deals with an application of the bio-inspired methods, like the evolutionary algorithms (EA), the artificial immune systems (AIS) and the particle swarm optimizers (PSO) to optimization problems. Structures considered in this work are analyzed by the finite element method (FEM), the boundary element method (BEM) and by the method of fundamental solutions (MFS). The bio-inspired methods are applied to optimize shape, topology and material properties of 2D, 3D and coupled 2D/3D structures, to optimize the termomechanical structures, to optimize parameters of composites structures modeled by the FEM, to optimize the elastic vibrating systems to identify the material constants for piezoelectric materials modeled by the BEM and to identify parameters in acoustics problem modeled by the MFS.

  13. Artificial Gravity as a Multi-System Countermeasure for Exploration Class Space Flight Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, William H.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's vision for space exploration includes missions of unprecedented distance and duration. However, during 30 years of human space flight experience, including numerous long-duration missions, research has not produced any single countermeasure or combination of countermeasures that is completely effective. Current countermeasures do not fully protect crews in low-Earth orbit, and certainly will not be appropriate for crews journeying to Mars and back over a three-year period. The urgency for exploration-class countermeasures is compounded by continued technical and scientific successes that make exploration class missions increasingly attractive. The critical and possibly fatal problems of bone loss, cardiovascular deconditioning, muscle weakening, neurovestibular disturbance, space anemia, and immune compromise may be alleviated by the appropriate application of artificial gravity (AG). However, despite a manifest need for new countermeasure approaches, concepts for applying AG as a countermeasure have not developed apace. To explore the utility of AG as a multi-system countermeasure during long-duration, exploration-class space flight, eighty-three members of the international space life science and space flight community met earlier this year. They concluded unanimously that the potential of AG as a multi-system countermeasure is indeed worth pursuing, and that the requisite AG research needs to be supported more systematically by NASA. This presentation will review the issues discussed and recommendations made.

  14. Book Review: Rediscovering the Immune System as an Integrated Organ.

    PubMed

    Corthay, A

    2016-07-01

    The immune system may seem incredibly complex. Researchers in immunology are amassing enormous amounts of detailed information without gaining proportional insights. Why might this be? So asks Peter Bretscher near the start of his book Rediscovering the Immune System as an Integrated Organ. He argues that contemporary immunology fails to provide understanding at the level of the system because it is dominated by molecular and cellular considerations. He reminds us of a famous quotation: Not everything that counts can be counted and not everything that can be counted counts, before stating the ambitious aim of his book: to make plausible an integrated and readily accessible view of how the immune system functions. By Peter Bretscher. FriesenPress, 2016. 288 pp. ISBN: 978-1-4602-7406-4.

  15. “Health system approach” for improving immunization program performance

    PubMed Central

    Lahariya, Chandrakant

    2015-01-01

    Immunization programs are one of the most well-recognized and successful public health programs across the world. The immunization programs have achieved significant successes in a number of countries; however, the coverage with available vaccines remains sub-optimal in many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). This article, based upon extensive review of literature and using universal immunization program (UIP) in India as a case study, summarizes the latest developments and initiatives in the area of vaccination and immunization in the last few years. The article analyzes initiatives under UIP in India from the “health system approach” and argues that it is possible to increase coverage with available vaccines and overall program performance by focused attention on various functions of health systems. It also discusses the emerging evidence that health systems could be strengthened prior to the introduction of new interventions (vaccines included) and the introduction of new interventions (including vaccines) could be planned in a way to strengthen the health systems. It concludes that immunization programs could be one of the entry points for strengthening health systems in the countries and lessons from vaccine introduction could pave pathway for scaling up other health interventions and therefore, could contribute to advancing Universal Health Coverage (UHC). PMID:26985404

  16. Thermodynamics as the driving principle behind the immune system.

    PubMed

    Finger, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 120 years, few things contributed more to our understanding of immune system than the study of its behavior in the host/parasite relationship. Despite the advances though, a few questions remain, such as what drives the immune system? What are its guiding principles? If we ask these questions randomly, most will immediately answer "defend the body from external threats," but what exactly do we defend ourselves from? How do these threats harm us? What criteria define what constitutes a threat? On the other hand, if the immune system evolved to defend us against external threats, how does its action against "internal" processes, such as neoplasms, qualify? Why do we die from cancer? Or from infection? Or even, why do we die at all? These apparently obvious questions are nor simple neither trivial, and the difficulty answering them reveals the complex reality that the immune system handles. The objective of this article is to articulate for the reader something that he instinctively already knows: that the decisions of the immune system are thermodynamically driven. Additionally, we will discuss how this apparent change in paradigm alters concepts such as health, disease, and therapeutics.

  17. Effects of prebiotics on immune system and cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Shokryazdan, Parisa; Faseleh Jahromi, Mohammad; Navidshad, Bahman; Liang, Juan Boo

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, use of prebiotics as feed and food additives has received increasing interest because of the beneficial effects of prebiotics on the health of animals and humans. One of the beneficial effects of prebiotics is stimulation of immune system, which can be direct or indirect through increasing population of beneficial microbes or probiotics, especially lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria, in the gut. An important mechanism of action of probiotics and prebiotics, by which they can affect the immune system, is changing the expression of cytokines. The present review tried to summarize the findings of studies that investigated the effects of prebiotics on immune system with focusing on their effects on cytokine expression. Generally, most of reviewed studies indicated beneficial effects for prebiotics in terms of improving immune system, by increasing the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines, while reducing the expressions of proinflammatory cytokines. However, most of studies mainly considered the indirect effects of prebiotics on the immune system (through changing the composition and population of gut microbiota), and their direct effects still need to be further studied using prebiotics with different degree of polymerization in different hosts.

  18. Products of an Artificially Induced Hydrothermal System at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    S. Levy

    2000-08-07

    Studies of mineral deposition in the recent geologic past at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, address competing hypotheses of hydrothermal alteration and deposition from percolating groundwater. The secondary minerals being studied are calcite-opal deposits in fractures and lithophysal cavities of ash-flow tuffs exposed in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), a 7.7-km tunnel excavated by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project within Yucca Mountain. An underground field test in the ESF provided information about the minerals deposited by a short-lived artificial hydrothermal system and an opportunity for comparison of test products with the natural secondary minerals. The heating phase lasted nine months, followed by a nine-month cooling period. Natural pore fluids were the only source of water during the thermal test. Condensation and reflux of water driven away from the heater produced fluid flow in certain fractures and intersecting boreholes. The mineralogic products of the thermal test are calcite-gypsum aggregates of less than 4-micrometer crystals and amorphous silica as glassy scale less than 0.2 mm thick and as mounds of tubules with diameters less than 0.7 micrometers. The minute crystal sizes of calcite and gypsum from the field test are very different from the predominantly coarser calcite crystals (up to cm scale) in natural secondary-mineral deposits at the site. The complex micrometer-scale textures of the amorphous silica differ from the simple forms of opal spherules and coatings in the natural deposits, even though some natural spherules are as small as 1 micrometer. These differences suggest that the natural minerals, especially if they were of hydrothermal origin, may have developed coarser or simpler forms during subsequent episodes of dissolution and redeposition. The presence of gypsum among the test products and its absence from the natural secondary-mineral assemblage may indicate a higher degree of evaporation during the test than

  19. In vitro selection with artificial expanded genetic information systems.

    PubMed

    Sefah, Kwame; Yang, Zunyi; Bradley, Kevin M; Hoshika, Shuichi; Jiménez, Elizabeth; Zhang, Liqin; Zhu, Guizhi; Shanker, Savita; Yu, Fahong; Turek, Diane; Tan, Weihong; Benner, Steven A

    2014-01-28

    Artificially expanded genetic information systems (AEGISs) are unnatural forms of DNA that increase the number of independently replicating nucleotide building blocks. To do this, AEGIS pairs are joined by different arrangements of hydrogen bond donor and acceptor groups, all while retaining their Watson-Crick geometries. We report here a unique case where AEGIS DNA has been used to execute a systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) experiment. This AEGIS-SELEX was designed to create AEGIS oligonucleotides that bind to a line of breast cancer cells. AEGIS-SELEX delivered an AEGIS aptamer (ZAP-2012) built from six different kinds of nucleotides (the standard G, A, C, and T, and the AEGIS nonstandard P and Z nucleotides, the last having a nitro functionality not found in standard DNA). ZAP-2012 has a dissociation constant of 30 nM against these cells. The affinity is diminished or lost when Z or P (or both) is replaced by standard nucleotides and compares well with affinities of standard GACT aptamers selected against cell lines using standard SELEX. The success of AEGIS-SELEX relies on various innovations, including (i) the ability to synthesize GACTZP libraries, (ii) polymerases that PCR amplify GACTZP DNA with little loss of the AEGIS nonstandard nucleotides, and (iii) technologies to deep sequence GACTZP DNA survivors. These results take the next step toward expanding the power and utility of SELEX and offer an AEGIS-SELEX that could possibly generate receptors, ligands, and catalysts having sequence diversities nearer to that displayed by proteins.

  20. The interplay between the gut microbiota and the immune system.

    PubMed

    Geuking, Markus B; Köller, Yasmin; Rupp, Sandra; McCoy, Kathy D

    2014-01-01

    The impact of the gut microbiota on immune homeostasis within the gut and, importantly, also at systemic sites has gained tremendous research interest over the last few years. The intestinal microbiota is an integral component of a fascinating ecosystem that interacts with and benefits its host on several complex levels to achieve a mutualistic relationship. Host-microbial homeostasis involves appropriate immune regulation within the gut mucosa to maintain a healthy gut while preventing uncontrolled immune responses against the beneficial commensal microbiota potentially leading to chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Furthermore, recent studies suggest that the microbiota composition might impact on the susceptibility to immune-mediated disorders such as autoimmunity and allergy. Understanding how the microbiota modulates susceptibility to these diseases is an important step toward better prevention or treatment options for such diseases.

  1. Programmed cell death in the plant immune system.

    PubMed

    Coll, N S; Epple, P; Dangl, J L

    2011-08-01

    Cell death has a central role in innate immune responses in both plants and animals. Besides sharing striking convergences and similarities in the overall evolutionary organization of their innate immune systems, both plants and animals can respond to infection and pathogen recognition with programmed cell death. The fact that plant and animal pathogens have evolved strategies to subvert specific cell death modalities emphasizes the essential role of cell death during immune responses. The hypersensitive response (HR) cell death in plants displays morphological features, molecular architectures and mechanisms reminiscent of different inflammatory cell death types in animals (pyroptosis and necroptosis). In this review, we describe the molecular pathways leading to cell death during innate immune responses. Additionally, we present recently discovered caspase and caspase-like networks regulating cell death that have revealed fascinating analogies between cell death control across both kingdoms.

  2. Arginase: an emerging key player in the mammalian immune system

    PubMed Central

    Munder, Markus

    2009-01-01

    The enzyme arginase metabolizes L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea. Besides its fundamental role in the hepatic urea cycle, arginase is also expressed the immune system of mice and man. While significant interspecies differences exist regarding expression, subcellular localization and regulation of immune cell arginase, associated pathways of immunopathology are comparable between species. Arginase is induced in murine myeloid cells mainly by Th2 cytokines and inflammatory agents and participates in a variety of inflammatory diseases by down-regulation of nitric oxide synthesis, induction of fibrosis and tissue regeneration. In humans, arginase I is constitutively expressed in polymorphonuclear neutrophils and is liberated during inflammation. Myeloid cell arginase-mediated L-arginine depletion profoundly suppresses T cell immune responses and this has emerged as a fundamental mechanism of inflammation-associated immunosuppression. Pharmacological interference with L-arginine metabolism is a novel promising strategy in the treatment of cancer, autoimmunity or unwanted immune deviation. PMID:19764983

  3. Development of built-in type and noninvasive sensor systems for smart artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Hiromasa; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Yamane, Takashi; Jikuya, Tomoaki; Tsutsui, Tatsuo

    2003-01-01

    It is very important to grasp the artificial heart condition and the physiologic conditions for the implantable artificial heart. In our laboratory, a smart artificial heart (SAH) has been proposed and developed. An SAH is an artificial heart with a noninvasive sensor; it is a sensorized and intelligent artificial heart for safe and effective treatment. In this study, the following sensor systems for SAH are described: noninvasive blood temperature sensor system, noninvasive blood pressure sensor system, and noninvasive small blood flow sensor system. These noninvasive sensor systems are integrated and included around the artificial heart to evaluate these sensor systems for SAH by the mockup experiments and the animal experiments. The blood temperature could be measured stably by the temperature sensor system. Aortic pressure was estimated, and sucking condition was detected by the pressure sensor system. The blood flow was measured by the flow meter system within 10% error. As a result of these experiments, we confirmed the effectiveness of the sensor systems for SAH.

  4. The Interplay between the Bone and the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Giorgio; D'Amelio, Patrizia; Faccio, Roberta; Brunetti, Giacomina

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades, numerous scientists have highlighted the interactions between bone and immune cells as well as their overlapping regulatory mechanisms. For example, osteoclasts, the bone-resorbing cells, are derived from the same myeloid precursor cells that give rise to macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells. On the other hand, osteoblasts, the bone-forming cells, regulate hematopoietic stem cell niches from which all blood and immune cells are derived. Furthermore, many of the soluble mediators of immune cells, including cytokines and growth factors, regulate the activities of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. This increased recognition of the complex interactions between the immune system and bone led to the development of the interdisciplinary osteoimmunology field. Research in this field has great potential to provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of several diseases affecting both the bone and immune systems, thus providing the molecular basis for novel therapeutic strategies. In these review, we reported the latest findings about the reciprocal regulation of bone and immune cells. PMID:23935650

  5. The Interplay between the bone and the immune system.

    PubMed

    Mori, Giorgio; D'Amelio, Patrizia; Faccio, Roberta; Brunetti, Giacomina

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades, numerous scientists have highlighted the interactions between bone and immune cells as well as their overlapping regulatory mechanisms. For example, osteoclasts, the bone-resorbing cells, are derived from the same myeloid precursor cells that give rise to macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells. On the other hand, osteoblasts, the bone-forming cells, regulate hematopoietic stem cell niches from which all blood and immune cells are derived. Furthermore, many of the soluble mediators of immune cells, including cytokines and growth factors, regulate the activities of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. This increased recognition of the complex interactions between the immune system and bone led to the development of the interdisciplinary osteoimmunology field. Research in this field has great potential to provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of several diseases affecting both the bone and immune systems, thus providing the molecular basis for novel therapeutic strategies. In these review, we reported the latest findings about the reciprocal regulation of bone and immune cells.

  6. Graphene and the immune system: Challenges and potentiality.

    PubMed

    Orecchioni, Marco; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Delogu, Lucia Gemma; Bianco, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    In the growing area of nanomedicine, graphene-based materials (GBMs) are some of the most recent explored nanomaterials. For the majority of GBM applications in nanomedicine, the immune system plays a fundamental role. It is necessary to well understand the complexity of the interactions between GBMs, the immune cells, and the immune components and how they could be of advantage for novel effective diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. In this review, we aimed at painting the current picture of GBMs in the background of the immune system. The picture we have drawn looks like a cubist image, a sort of Picasso-like portrait looking at the topic from all perspectives: the challenges (due to the potential toxicity) and the potentiality like the conjugation of GBMs to biomolecules to develop advanced nanomedicine tools. In this context, we have described and discussed i) the impact of graphene on immune cells, ii) graphene as immunobiosensor, and iii) antibodies conjugated to graphene for tumor targeting. Thanks to the huge advances on graphene research, it seems realistic to hypothesize in the near future that some graphene immunoconjugates, endowed of defined immune properties, can go through preclinical test and be successfully used in nanomedicine.

  7. Artificial Intelligence,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PATTERN RECOGNITION, * ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE , *TEXTBOOKS, COMPUTER PROGRAMMING, MATHEMATICAL LOGIC, ROBOTS, PROBLEM SOLVING, STATISTICAL ANALYSIS, GAME THEORY, NATURAL LANGUAGE, SELF ORGANIZING SYSTEMS.

  8. Role of the innate immune system in acute viral myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hua; Vallejo, Jesus G; Kollias, George; Mann, Douglas L

    2009-05-01

    Although the adaptive immune system is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of viral myocarditis, the role of the innate immune system has not been well defined. To address this deficiency, we employed a unique line of mice that harbor a genomic "knock in" of a mutated TNF gene lacking the AU rich element (TNF(ARE/ARE)) that is critical for TNF mRNA stability and translation, in order to examine the contribution of the innate immune system in encephalomyocarditis-induced myocarditis (EMCV). Heterozygous mice (TNF(ARE/+)) were infected with 500 plaque-forming units of EMCV. TNF(ARE/+)mice had a significantly higher 14-day mortality and myocardial inflammation when compared to littermate control mice. Virologic studies showed that the viral load at 14 days was significantly lower in the hearts of TNF(ARE/+) mice. TNF(ARE/+) mice had an exaggerated proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine response in the heart following EMCV infection. Modulation of the innate immune response in TNF(ARE/+) mice by the late administration of prednisolone resulted in a significant improvement in survival and decreased cardiac inflammation, whereas early administration of prednisolone resulted in a blunted innate response and increased mortality in littermate control mice. Viewed together, these data suggest that the duration and degree of activation of the innate immune system plays a critical role in determining host outcomes in experimental viral myocarditis.

  9. Effects of the space flight environment on the immune system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Butel, Janet S.; Shearer, William T.

    2003-01-01

    Space flight conditions have a dramatic effect on a variety of physiologic functions of mammals, including muscle, bone, and neurovestibular function. Among the physiological functions that are affected when humans or animals are exposed to space flight conditions is the immune response. The focus of this review is on the function of the immune system in space flight conditions during actual space flights, as well as in models of space flight conditions on the earth. The experiments were carried out in tissue culture systems, in animal models, and in human subjects. The results indicate that space flight conditions alter cell-mediated immune responses, including lymphocyte proliferation and subset distribution, and cytokine production. The mechanism(s) of space flight-induced alterations in immune system function remain(s) to be established. It is likely, however, that multiple factors, including microgravity, stress, neuroendocrine factors, sleep disruption, and nutritional factors, are involved in altering certain functions of the immune system. Such alterations could lead to compromised defenses against infections and tumors.

  10. Environmentally related disorders of the hematologic and immune systems

    SciTech Connect

    Luster, M.I.; Wierda, D.; Rosenthal, G.J. )

    1990-03-01

    From observations in rodents and, to a lesser extent, in humans inadvertently or occupationally exposed, it appears that a number of xenobiotics adversely affect immune homeostatic systems, either through acting as a hapten and resulting in hypersensitivity reactions or through altering hematopoietic or immune functions. At present, however, there is no evidence that the immune or hematopoietic systems of the general population have been compromised by xenobiotics via environmental exposure. Nonetheless, these examples and our current knowledge about the pathogenesis of disease support the possibility that chemical-induced damage to the immune system may be associated with potential pathological conditions, some of which may become detectable only after a long latency. Likewise, exposure to immunotoxic xenobiotics might represent additional risk to individuals with already fragile immune systems (e.g., in malnutrition, infancy, old age). However, it is important to be cautious when attempting to extrapolate meaningful conclusions from experimental data or isolated epidemiologic studies to risk assessment for low-level human exposure.65 references.

  11. ImmunoScenarios: A Game for the Immune System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Mark F.; Jackson, Sally W.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a board game, ImmunoScenarios, which was developed to reinforce the ideas about the immune system discussed in lecture classes. Emphasizes important characteristics of the body's specific defense system including specificity, cooperation among various cells, and memory. Includes directions for playing, student handouts, and scenarios.…

  12. Multiple sclerosis immunology: The healthy immune system vs the MS immune system.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Lloyd H; Shoemaker, Jennifer

    2010-01-05

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating autoimmune disease characterized by both inflammation and axonal degeneration. The resulting demyelination and subsequent degeneration of axons account for the disability of patients with MS. Early investigations indicated that disease progression was driven by CD4(+) effector T cells. However, clinical therapies specifically targeting these cells have, for the most part, not been effective. Therefore, new areas of research in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (the experimental model of MS) and human MS have identified previously unknown contributions to disease pathogenesis, including interleukin-17-producing T helper 17 cells, B cells, CD8(+) T cells, and both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-regulatory cells. Research into the respective mechanisms of action of these cells has identified novel therapeutic targets to combat this devastating disease. This article reviews the autoimmune response in patients with MS compared with individuals without MS and summarizes the fundamental differences in the immunologic response between people with and without MS. Investigations into these autoimmune differences and the disruption of the homeostatic balance of the immune system will help guide future research into MS therapeutics, with particular attention to the long-term management of this disease.

  13. Opposing Effects of Alcohol on the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Tasha; Helms, Christa; Grant, Kathleen; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have described a dose-dependent effect of alcohol on human health with light to moderate drinkers having a lower risk of all-cause mortality than abstainers, while heavy drinkers are at the highest risk. In the case of the immune system, moderate alcohol consumption is associated with reduced inflammation and improved responses to vaccination, while chronic heavy drinking is associated with a decreased frequency of lymphocytes and increased risk of both bacterial and viral infections. However, the mechanisms by which alcohol exerts a dose-dependent effect on the immune system remain poorly understood due to a lack of systematic studies that examine the effect of multiple doses and different time courses. This review will summarize our current understanding of the impact of moderate versus excessive alcohol consumption on the innate and adaptive branches of the immune system derived from both in vitro as well as in vivo studies carried out in humans and animal model studies. PMID:26375241

  14. Modeling molecular computing systems by an artificial chemistry - its expressive power and application.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Kazuto; Watanabe, Tooru; Kobayashi, Keiji; Nakamura, Masaki; Kishi, Koji; Kazuno, Mitsuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    Artificial chemistries are mainly used to construct virtual systems that are expected to show behavior similar to living systems. In this study, we explore possibilities of applying an artificial chemistry to modeling natural biochemical systems-or, to be specific, molecular computing systems-and show that it may be a useful modeling tool for molecular computation. We previously proposed an artificial chemistry based on string pattern matching and recombination. This article first demonstrates that this artificial chemistry is computationally universal if it has only rules that have one reactant or two reactants. We think this is a good property of an artificial chemistry that models molecular computing, because natural elementary chemical reactions, on which molecular computing is based, are mostly unimolecular or bimolecular. Then we give two illustrative example models for DNA computing in our artificial chemistry: one is for the type of computation called the Adleman-Lipton paradigm, and the other is for a DNA implementation of a finite automaton. Through the construction of these models we observe preferred properties of the artificial chemistry for modeling molecular computing, such as having no spatial structure and being flexible in choosing levels of abstraction.

  15. Removal of organic micropollutants in an artificial recharge system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valhondo, C.; Nödler, K.; Köck-Schulmeyer, M.; Hernandez, M.; Licha, T.; Ayora, C.; Carrera, J.

    2012-04-01

    Emerging contaminants including pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), personal care products (PCPs) and pesticides are increasingly being identified in the environment. Emerging pollutants and their transformation products show low concentration in the environment (ng/L), but the effects of the mixtures and lifelong exposure to humans are currently unknown. Many of these contaminants are removed under aerobic conditions in water treatment plants. However, several pharmaceuticals and metabolites present in wastewater are not eliminated by conventional treatment processes. Several lab studies, however, show that the behaviour of many of these micropollutants is affected by the dominant redox conditions. However, data from field experiments are limited and sometimes contradictory. Artificial recharge is a widespread technology to increase the groundwater resources. In this study we propose a design to enhance the natural remediation potential of the aquifer with the installation of a reactive layer at the bottom of the infiltration pond. This layer is a mixture of compost, aquifer material, clay and iron oxide. This layer is intended to provide an extra amount of DOC to the recharge water and to promote biodegradation by means of the development of different redox zones along the travel path through the unsaturated zone and within the aquifer. Moreover, compost, clay and iron oxide of the layer are assumed to increase sorption surfaces for neutral, cationic and anionic compounds, respectively. The infiltration system is sited in Sant Vicenç dels Horts (Barcelona, Spain). It consists of a decantation pond, receiving raw water from the Llobregat River (highly affected from treatment plant effluents), and an infiltration pond (5600 m2). The infiltration rate is around 1 m3/m2/day. The system is equipped with a network of piezometers, suction cups and tensiometers. Infiltration periods have been performed before and after the installation of the reactive layer

  16. Immunization information systems--progress on integration of school nurses: a multi-state roundtable.

    PubMed

    Galemore, Cynthia A

    2011-03-01

    The following is an article and roundtable discussion on school nurse integration into immunization information systems. The discussion participants were April Bailey, Deputy Director, Immunization Division, Indiana State Department of Health; Thomas Maerz, Manager, Wisconsin Immunization Registry; Erin Seward, Immunization Program Manager, Nevada State Health Division; and Debra Warren, Project Manager, KSWebIZ, Kansas Immunization Program.

  17. Comparative analysis of the Monochamus alternatus immune system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiao; Zhao, Li-Lin; Yu, Hai-Ying; Zhang, Wei; Ahmad, Faheem; Hu, Song-Nian; Zou, Zhen; Sun, Jiang-Hua

    2017-03-01

    The pine sawyer beetle, Monochamus alternatus, is regarded as a notorious forest pest in Asia, vectoring an invasive pathogenic nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, which is known to cause pine wilt disease. However, little sequence information is available for this vector beetle. This hampered the research on its immune system. Based on transcriptome of M. alternatus, we have identified and characterized 194 immunity-related genes in M. alternatus, and compared them with homologues molecules from other species known to exhibit immune responses against invading microbes. The lower number of putative immunity-related genes in M. alternatus were attributed to fewer C-type lectin, serine protease (SP) and anti-microbial peptide (AMP) genes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that M. alternatus had a unique recognition gene, galectin3, orthologues of which was not identified in Tribolium castaneum, Drosophila melanogastor, Anopheles gambiae, and Apis mellifera. This suggested a lineage-specific gene evolution for coleopteran insects. Our study provides the comprehensive sequence resources of the immunity-related genes of M. alternatus, presenting valuable information for better understanding of the molecular mechanism of innate immunity processes in M. alternatus against B. xylophilus. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Primitive immune systems: are your ways my ways?

    PubMed

    Rinkevich, Baruch

    2004-04-01

    Although vertebrate immune systems have been commonly conceived as exquisitely developed to combat pervasiveness by pathogens, they are not infallible. The enigmatic expression of histocompatibility in vertebrates, the manifestation of natural chimerism, autoimmunity, malignancy, and other puzzling outcomes hint that immunity did not arise in evolution to fight infections and that this capacity is a late evolutionary appendage, owing its appearance to the redeployment of a system developed for other reasons. Allorecognition in the colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri serves here as a platform for a contending paradigm, advocating that immunity has developed as a surveillance machinery against and for purging of nascent selfish cells (stemmed from a kin organism or from transformed cells within the organism of origin). Defense against pathogens (always representing xenogeneic aliens) appeared later, revealing the multiplicity of newly developed phenomena. Allorecognition events characteristic of the Botryllus primitive immune system, such as fusion versus rejection, the morphological resorption with its expressed hierarchy, and the somatic/germ-cell parasitic outcomes, provide clues to the evolutionary basis of allorecognition. Recent work on Botryllus immunity that highlights the cost of littering individuality by somatic variants/allogeneic cells is discussed.

  19. A role of the adaptive immune system in glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Bronsart, Laura L; Contag, Christopher H

    2016-01-01

    Objective The immune system, including the adaptive immune response, has recently been recognized as having a significant role in diet-induced insulin resistance. In this study, we aimed to determine if the adaptive immune system also functions in maintaining physiological glucose homeostasis in the absence of diet-induced disease. Research design and methods SCID mice and immunocompetent control animals were phenotypically assessed for variations in metabolic parameters and cytokine profiles. Additionally, the glucose tolerance of SCID and immunocompetent control animals was assessed following introduction of a high-fat diet. Results SCID mice on a normal chow diet were significantly insulin resistant relative to control animals despite having less fat mass. This was associated with a significant increase in the innate immunity-stimulating cytokines granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1), and MCP3. Additionally, the SCID mouse phenotype was exacerbated in response to a high-fat diet as evidenced by the further significant progression of glucose intolerance. Conclusions These results support the notion that the adaptive immune system plays a fundamental biological role in glucose homeostasis, and that the absence of functional B and T cells results in disruption in the concentrations of various cytokines associated with macrophage proliferation and recruitment. Additionally, the absence of functional B and T cells is not protective against diet-induced pathology. PMID:27026807

  20. Interactions of cnidarian toxins with the immune system.

    PubMed

    Suput, Dusan

    2011-10-01

    Cnidarians comprise four classes of toxic marine animals: Anthozoa, Cubozoa, Scyphozoa and Hydrozoa. They are the largest and probably the oldest phylum of toxic marine animals. Any contact with a cnidarian, especially the box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri), can be fatal, but most cnidarians do not possess sufficiently strong venomous apparatus to penetrate the human skin, whereas others rarely come into contact with human beings. Only a small, almost negligible percentage of the vast wealth of cnidarian toxins has been studied in detail. Many polypeptide cnidarian toxins are immunogenic, and cross-reactivity between several jellyfish venoms has been reported. Cnidarians also possess components of innate immunity, and some of those components have been preserved in evolution. On the other hand, cnidarian toxins have already been used for the design of immunotoxins to treat cancer, whereas other cnidarian toxins can modulate the immune system in mammals, including man. This review will focus on a short overview of cnidarian toxins, on the innate immunity of cnidarians, and on the mode of action of cnidarian toxins which can modulate the immune system in mammals. Emphasis is palced on those toxins which block voltage activated potassium channels in the cells of the immune system.

  1. Lymphatic system: an active pathway for immune protection.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shan; von der Weid, P Y

    2015-02-01

    Lymphatic vessels are well known to participate in the immune response by providing the structural and functional support for the delivery of antigens and antigen presenting cells to draining lymph nodes. Recent advances have improved our understanding of how the lymphatic system works and how it participates to the development of immune responses. New findings suggest that the lymphatic system may control the ultimate immune response through a number of ways which may include guiding antigen/dendritic cells (DC) entry into initial lymphatics at the periphery; promoting antigen/DC trafficking through afferent lymphatic vessels by actively facilitating lymph and cell movement; enabling antigen presentation in lymph nodes via a network of lymphatic endothelial cells and lymph node stroma cell and finally by direct lymphocytes exit from lymph nodes. The same mechanisms are likely also important to maintain peripheral tolerance. In this review we will discuss how the morphology and gene expression profile of the lymphatic endothelial cells in lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes provides a highly efficient pathway to initiate immune responses. The fundamental understanding of how lymphatic system participates in immune regulation will guide the research on lymphatic function in various diseases.

  2. The evolution of secondary organization in immune system gene libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Hightower, R.; Forrest, S.; Perelson, A.S.

    1993-02-01

    A binary model of the immune system is used to study the effects of evolution on the genetic encoding for antibody molecules. We report experiments which show that the evolution of immune system genes, simulated by the genetic algorithm, can induce a high degree of genetic organization even though that organization is not explicitly required by the fitness function. This secondary organization is related to the true fitness of an individual, in contrast to the sampled fitness which is the explicit fitness measure used to drive the process of evolution.

  3. Effect of simulated weightlessness on the immune system in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caren, L. D.; Mandel, A. D.; Nunes, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Rats suspended in a model system designed to simulate many aspects of weightlessness were immunized with sheep red blood cells. Parameters measured on these and control rats included titers of anti-sheep red blood cell antibodies, serum immunoglobulin levels, spleen and thymus weights, hematocrits, and leukocyte differential counts on peripheral blood. No significant differences were found between test and weight-bearing, harnessed controls; however, the thymuses of animals in both these groups were significantly smaller than untreated cage controls. The lack of an effect of simulated weightlessness on the immune system is an interesting result, and its significance is discussed.

  4. Effect of immunization route on mucosal and systemic immune response in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Valdenegro-Vega, Victoria A; Crosbie, Philip; Vincent, Benita; Cain, Kenneth D; Nowak, Barbara F

    2013-01-15

    This study aimed to assess systemic and mucosal immune responses of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) exposed to two protein-hapten antigens - dinitrophenol (DNP) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) each conjugated with keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) - administered using different delivery strategies. Fish were exposed to the antigens through different routes, and were given a booster 4 weeks post initial exposure. Both systemic and mucosal antibody responses were measured for a period of 12 weeks using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Only fish exposed to both antigens via intraperitoneal (IP) injection showed increased systemic antibody response starting 6 weeks post immunization. No treatment was able to produce a mucosal antibody response; however there was an increase in antibody levels in the tissue supernatant from skin explants obtained 12 weeks post immunization from fish injected with FITC. Western blots probed with serum and culture supernatant from skin explants showed a specific response against the antigens. In conclusion, IP injection of hapten-antigen in Atlantic salmon was the best delivery route for inducing an antibody response against these antigens in this species. Even though IP injection did not induce an increase in antibody levels in the skin mucus, there was an increased systemic antibody response and an apparent increase of antibody production in mucosal tissues as demonstrated by the increased level of specific antibody levels in supernatants from the tissue explants.

  5. The role of artificial intelligence and expert systems in increasing STS operations productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culbert, C.

    1985-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is discussed. A number of the computer technologies pioneered in the AI world can make significant contributions to increasing STS operations productivity. Application of expert systems, natural language, speech recognition, and other key technologies can reduce manpower while raising productivity. Many aspects of STS support lend themselves to this type of automation. The artificial intelligence section of the mission planning and analysis division has developed a number of functioning prototype systems which demonstrate the potential gains of applying AI technology.

  6. Effect of age and maternal antibodies on the systemic and mucosal immune response after neonatal immunization in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Bautista, Edgar R; Garcia-Ruiz, Carlos E; Gama-Espinosa, Alicia L; Ramirez-Estudillo, Carmen; Rojas-Gomez, Oscar I; Vega-Lopez, Marco A

    2014-01-01

    Newborn mammals are highly susceptible to respiratory infections. Although maternal antibodies (MatAb) offer them some protection, they may also interfere with their systemic immune response to vaccination. However, the impact of MatAb on the neonatal mucosal immune response remains incompletely described. This study was performed to determine the effect of ovalbumin (OVA)-specific MatAb on the anti-OVA antibody response in sera, nasal secretions and saliva from specific pathogen-free Vietnamese miniature piglets immunized at 7 or 14 days of age. Our results demonstrated that MatAb increased antigen-specific IgA and IgG responses in sera, and transiently enhanced an early secretory IgA response in nasal secretions of piglets immunized at 7 days of age. In contrast, we detected a lower mucosal (nasal secretion and saliva) anti-OVA IgG response in piglets with MatAb immunized at 14 days of age, compared with piglets with no MatAb, suggesting a modulatory effect of antigen-specific maternal factors on the isotype transfer to the mucosal immune exclusion system. In our porcine model, we demonstrated that passive maternal immunity positively modulated the systemic and nasal immune responses of animals immunized early in life. Our results, therefore, open the possibility of inducing systemic and respiratory mucosal immunity in the presence of MatAb through early vaccination. PMID:24754050

  7. Complement: a key system for immune surveillance and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ricklin, Daniel; Hajishengallis, George; Yang, Kun; Lambris, John D

    2010-09-01

    Nearly a century after the significance of the human complement system was recognized, we have come to realize that its functions extend far beyond the elimination of microbes. Complement acts as a rapid and efficient immune surveillance system that has distinct effects on healthy and altered host cells and foreign intruders. By eliminating cellular debris and infectious microbes, orchestrating immune responses and sending 'danger' signals, complement contributes substantially to homeostasis, but it can also take action against healthy cells if not properly controlled. This review describes our updated view of the function, structure and dynamics of the complement network, highlights its interconnection with immunity at large and with other endogenous pathways, and illustrates its multiple roles in homeostasis and disease.

  8. The immune system as a sensor of the metabolic state

    PubMed Central

    Odegaard, Justin I.; Chawla, Ajay

    2013-01-01

    Mammals possess a remarkable ability to maintain and defend a constant internal milieu against diverse environmental threats. Unsurprisingly, the two systems tasked with these duties, metabolism and immunity, have evolved to share a common modular architecture that allows extensive bidirectional communication and coordination. Indeed, recent observations have highlighted numerous, functionally critical immune regulatory modules located within diverse metabolic circuits. In this Review, we discuss the architectural commonality between immunity and metabolism, and highlight how these two primordially disparate systems leverage shared regulatory axes to coordinate metabolic physiology under conditions of normality and chronic overnutrition. Such an integrated perspective both advances our understanding of basic physiology and highlights potential opportunities for therapeutic intervention in metabolic dysfunction. PMID:23601683

  9. Quantifying Adaptive Evolution in the Drosophila Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Obbard, Darren J.; Welch, John J.; Kim, Kang-Wook; Jiggins, Francis M.

    2009-01-01

    It is estimated that a large proportion of amino acid substitutions in Drosophila have been fixed by natural selection, and as organisms are faced with an ever-changing array of pathogens and parasites to which they must adapt, we have investigated the role of parasite-mediated selection as a likely cause. To quantify the effect, and to identify which genes and pathways are most likely to be involved in the host–parasite arms race, we have re-sequenced population samples of 136 immunity and 287 position-matched non-immunity genes in two species of Drosophila. Using these data, and a new extension of the McDonald-Kreitman approach, we estimate that natural selection fixes advantageous amino acid changes in immunity genes at nearly double the rate of other genes. We find the rate of adaptive evolution in immunity genes is also more variable than other genes, with a small subset of immune genes evolving under intense selection. These genes, which are likely to represent hotspots of host–parasite coevolution, tend to share similar functions or belong to the same pathways, such as the antiviral RNAi pathway and the IMD signalling pathway. These patterns appear to be general features of immune system evolution in both species, as rates of adaptive evolution are correlated between the D. melanogaster and D. simulans lineages. In summary, our data provide quantitative estimates of the elevated rate of adaptive evolution in immune system genes relative to the rest of the genome, and they suggest that adaptation to parasites is an important force driving molecular evolution. PMID:19851448

  10. The Adaptive Immune System of Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Dyall-Smith, Mike; Marchfelder, Anita

    2015-02-16

    To fight off invading genetic elements, prokaryotes have developed an elaborate defence system that is both adaptable and heritable-the CRISPR-Cas system (CRISPR is short for: clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and Cas: CRISPR associated). Comprised of proteins and multiple small RNAs, this prokaryotic defence system is present in 90% of archaeal and 40% of bacterial species, and enables foreign intruders to be eliminated in a sequence-specific manner. There are three major types (I-III) and at least 14 subtypes of this system, with only some of the subtypes having been analysed in detail, and many aspects of the defence reaction remaining to be elucidated. Few archaeal examples have so far been analysed. Here we summarize the characteristics of the CRISPR-Cas system of Haloferax volcanii, an extremely halophilic archaeon originally isolated from the Dead Sea. It carries a single CRISPR-Cas system of type I-B, with a Cascade like complex composed of Cas proteins Cas5, Cas6b and Cas7. Cas6b is essential for CRISPR RNA (crRNA) maturation but is otherwise not required for the defence reaction. A systematic search revealed that six protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) sequences are recognised by the Haloferax defence system. For successful invader recognition, a non-contiguous seed sequence of 10 base-pairs between the crRNA and the invader is required.

  11. Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this double journal issue concern immunization and primary health care of children. The issue decribes vaccine storage and sterilization techniques, giving particular emphasis to the role of the cold chain, i.e., the maintenance of a specific temperature range to assure potency of vaccines as they are moved from a national storage…

  12. Molecular insights on the cerebral innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Rivest, Serge

    2003-02-01

    All species need an immediate reply to the microbial pathogens that is part of an effective immune response and is essential for the survival of most organisms. This reply is known as the innate immune response and is characterized by the de novo production of mediators that either kill the microbes directly or activate phagocytic cells to ingest and kill them. The innate immune response can be driven through specific recognition systems, the best example being an interaction between the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and its receptors CD14 and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). For a long time, the brain was considered to be a privileged organ from an immunological point of view, owing to its inability to mount an immune response and process antigens. Although this is partly true, the CNS shows a well-organized innate immune reaction in response to systemic bacterial infection and cerebral injury. The CD14 and TLR4 receptors are constitutively expressed in the circumventricular organs (CVOs), choroid plexus and leptomeninges. Circulating LPS is able to cause a rapid transcriptional activation of genes encoding CD14 and TLR2, as well as a wide variety of pro-inflammatory molecules in CVOs. A delayed response to LPS takes place in cells located at boundaries of the CVOs and in microglia across the CNS. Therefore, without having direct access to the brain parenchyma, pathogens have the ability to trigger an innate immune reaction throughout cerebral tissue. This review presents evidence supporting the existence of such a system in the brain, which is finely regulated at the transcription level. Transient activation of this system is not harmful toward neuronal elements.

  13. The Innate Immune System in Acute and Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Amanda S.; Mansbridge, Jonathan N.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: This review article provides an overview of the critical roles of the innate immune system to wound healing. It explores aspects of dysregulation of individual innate immune elements known to compromise wound repair and promote nonhealing wounds. Understanding the key mechanisms whereby wound healing fails will provide seed concepts for the development of new therapeutic approaches. Recent Advances: Our understanding of the complex interactions of the innate immune system in wound healing has significantly improved, particularly in our understanding of the role of antimicrobials and peptides and the nature of the switch from inflammatory to reparative processes. This takes place against an emerging understanding of the relationship between human cells and commensal bacteria in the skin. Critical Issues: It is well established and accepted that early local inflammatory mediators in the wound bed function as an immunological vehicle to facilitate immune cell infiltration and microbial clearance upon injury to the skin barrier. Both impaired and excessive innate immune responses can promote nonhealing wounds. It appears that the switch from the inflammatory to the proliferative phase is tightly regulated and mediated, at least in part, by a change in macrophages. Defining the factors that initiate the switch in such macrophage phenotypes and functions is the subject of multiple investigations. Future Directions: The review highlights processes that may be useful targets for further investigation, particularly the switch from M1 to M2 macrophages that appears to be critical as dysregulation of this switch occurs during defective wound healing. PMID:26862464

  14. The contribution of the immune system to parturition

    PubMed Central

    Jorens, Ph.; Student, I.; Heylen, R.

    1996-01-01

    The immune system plays a central role before and during parturition, including the main physiological processes of parturition: uterine contractions and cervical ripening. The immune system comprises white blood cells and their secretions. Polymorphonuclear cells and macrophages invade the cervical tissue and release compounds, such as oxygen radicals and enzymes, which break down the cervical matrix to allow softening and dilatation. During this inflammatory process, white blood cells undergo chemotaxis, adherence to endothelial cells, diapedesis, migration and activation. Factors that regulate white blood cell invasion and secretion include cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor and interleukins. Glucocorticoids, sex hormones and prostaglandins, affect cytokine synthesis. They also modulate the target cells, resulting in altered responses to cytokines. On the other hand, the immune system has profound effects on the hormonal system and prostaglandin synthesis. In animals, nitric oxide has marked effects on uterine quiescence during gestation. At the same time, it plays an important role in regulating the vascular tone of uterine arteries and has anti-adhesive effects on leukocytes. Cytokines are found in amniotic fluid, and in maternal and foetal serum at term and preterm. Several intrauterine cells have been shown to produce these cytoldnes. Since neither white blood cells, cytokines nor nitric oxide seem to be the ultimate intermediate for human parturition, the immune system is an additional but obligatory and underestimated component in the physiology of delivery. Scientists, obstetricians and anaesthesiologists must thus be aware of these processes. PMID:18475712

  15. Artificial intelligence (AI) systems for interpreting complex medical datasets.

    PubMed

    Altman, R B

    2017-02-09

    Advances in machine intelligence have created powerful capabilities in algorithms that find hidden patterns in data, classify objects based on their measured characteristics, and associate similar patients/diseases/drugs based on common features. However, artificial intelligence (AI) applications in medical data have several technical challenges: complex and heterogeneous datasets, noisy medical datasets, and explaining their output to users. There are also social challenges related to intellectual property, data provenance, regulatory issues, economics, and liability.

  16. Hybrid Shell Engineering of Animal Cells for Immune Protections and Regulation of Drug Delivery: Towards the Design of “Artificial Organs”

    PubMed Central

    Dandoy, Philippe; Meunier, Christophe F.; Michiels, Carine; Su, Bao-Lian

    2011-01-01

    Background With the progress in medicine, the average human life expectancy is continuously increasing. At the same time, the number of patients who require full organ transplantations is augmenting. Consequently, new strategies for cell transplantation are the subject of great interest. Methodology/Principal Findings This work reports the design, the synthesis and the characterisation of robust and biocompatible mineralised beads composed of two layers: an alginate-silica composite core and a Ca-alginate layer. The adequate choice of materials was achieved through cytotoxicity LDH release measurement and in vitro inflammatory assay (IL-8) to meet the biocompatibility requirements for medical purpose. The results obtained following this strategy provide a direct proof of the total innocuity of silica and alginate networks for human cells as underscored by the non-activation of immune defenders (THP-1 monocytes). The accessible pore size diameter of the mineralised beads synthesized was estimated between 22 and 30 nm, as required for efficient immuno-isolation without preventing the diffusion of nutrients and metabolites. The model human cells, HepG2, entrapped within these hybrid beads display a high survival rate over more than six weeks according to the measurements of intracellular enzymatic activity, respiration rate, as well as the “de novo” biosynthesis and secretion of albumin out of the beads. Conclusions/Significance The current study shows that active mammalian cells can be protected by a silica-alginate hybrid shell-like system. The functionality of the cell strain can be maintained. Consequently, cells coated with an artificial and a biocompatible mineral shell could respond physiologically within the human body in order to deliver therapeutic agents in a controlled fashion (i.e. insulin), substituting the declining organ functions of the patient. PMID:21731637

  17. Systems vaccinology: Probing humanity’s diverse immune systems with vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Pulendran, Bali

    2014-01-01

    Homo sapiens are genetically diverse, but dramatic demographic and socioeconomic changes during the past century have created further diversification with respect to age, nutritional status, and the incidence of associated chronic inflammatory disorders and chronic infections. These shifting demographics pose new challenges for vaccination, as emerging evidence suggests that age, the metabolic state, and chronic infections can exert major influences on the immune system. Thus, a key public health challenge is learning how to reprogram suboptimal immune systems to induce effective vaccine immunity. Recent advances have applied systems biological analysis to define molecular signatures induced early after vaccination that correlate with and predict the later adaptive immune responses in humans. Such “systems vaccinology” approaches offer an integrated picture of the molecular networks driving vaccine immunity, and are beginning to yield novel insights about the immune system. Here we discuss the promise of systems vaccinology in probing humanity’s diverse immune systems, and in delineating the impact of genes, the environment, and the microbiome on protective immunity induced by vaccination. Such insights will be critical in reengineering suboptimal immune systems in immunocompromised populations. PMID:25136102

  18. Materials to Engineer the Immune System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    tumor cell vac- cines in direct comparison and outperformed ex vivo DC vaccines re- ported in literature (1, 2, 4). This acellular biomaterial system...or Flt3-ligand. Cancer Res. 60, 3239–3246 (2000). 22. E. Daro, B. Pulendran, K. Brasel, M. Teepe, D. Pettit , D. H. Lynch, D. Vremec, L. Robb, K

  19. Biology of longevity: role of the innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Candore, Giuseppina; Colonna-Romano, Giuseppina; Balistreri, Carmela Rita; Di Carlo, Daniele; Grimaldi, Maria Paola; Listì, Florinda; Nuzzo, Domenico; Vasto, Sonya; Lio, Domenico; Caruso, Calogero

    2006-01-01

    Genetic factors play a relevant role in the attainment of longevity because they are involved in cell maintenance systems, including the immune system. In fact, longevity may be correlated with optimal functioning of clonotypic and natural immunity. The aging of the immune system, known as immunosenescence, is the consequence of the continuous attrition caused by chronic antigenic overload. The antigenic load results in the progressive generation of inflammatory responses involved in age-related diseases. Most of the parameters influencing immunosenescence appear to be under genetic control, and immunosenescence fits with the basic assumptions of evolutionary theories of aging, such as antagonistic pleiotropy. In fact, by neutralizing infectious agents the immune system plays a beneficial role until reproduction and parenting. However, by determining chronic inflammation, it can be detrimental later in life, a period largely unforeseen by evolution. In particular, the data coming from the long-lived male population under study show that genetic polymorphisms responsible for a low inflammatory response might result in an increased chance of long lifespan in an environment with a reduced pathogen burden. Such a modern and healthy environment also permits a lower grade of survivable atherogenic inflammatory response.

  20. Progress in immunization information systems - United States, 2008.

    PubMed

    2010-02-12

    Immunization information systems (IISs) are confidential, computerized information systems that collect and consolidate vaccination data from multiple health-care providers, generate reminder and recall notifications, and assess vaccination coverage within a defined geographic area. A CDC program goal for 2010 is to achieve >or=95% participation in an IIS (defined as having two or more recorded vaccinations) among children aged <6 years. To monitor progress toward this goal, CDC annually surveys immunization grantees in 50 states, five cities, and the District of Columbia, using the Immunization Information Systems Annual Report (IISAR). All 56 grantees were asked to complete the IISAR; 52 did so for 2008. This report highlights results from the 2008 IISAR, which indicated that 75% of all U.S. children aged <6 years (approximately 18 million children) participated in an IIS in 2008, an increase from 65% in 2006. The majority of grantees (82%) reported that their IIS had the capacity to track vaccinations for persons of all ages, compared with 70% in 2006. Data-quality measures of timeliness and completeness indicated that in 2008, 67% of IIS data were received and processed within 30 days of vaccine administration, and data were reported for six of 17 core data elements in >or=90% of IIS records (both measures are similar to 2006 results). Increased provider use of electronic health record systems can benefit IISs and their users by producing immunization records that are more timely and complete.

  1. TV synchronization system features stability and noise immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landauer, F. P.

    1967-01-01

    Horizontal jitter in the video presentation in television systems is prevented by using an additional sync level. This circuitry uses simultaneous signals at both sync and porch frequencies, providing a sync identification from which a coincidence circuit can generate pulses having the required stability and noise immunity.

  2. Studies of Cell-Mediated Immunity Against Immune Disorders Using Synthetic Peptides and Rotating Bioreactor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, Jagannadha K.

    1998-01-01

    We conducted a series of experiments using mouse immune-precursor cells, and observed that bioreactor culturing results in the loss of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) function. The reason for the abrogation of CTL function is microgravity conditions in the bioreactor, but not the antigen per se or its MHC restriction. Similarly, we observed that allostimulation of human PBMC in the bioreactor, but not in the T flask, resulted in the blunting of both allo-CTL function and the NK activity, indicating that the microgravity-associated functional defects are not unique to the mouse system. These results provide further confirmation to the microgravity-associated immune dysfunction, and constitute ground-based confirmatory data for those related to space-travel.

  3. Effects of activation of maternal immune system at early stages of pregnancy on antitumor immunity of the progeny.

    PubMed

    Obernikhin, S S

    2013-11-01

    The effects of maternal immune system on the formation and functioning of the fetus is an important problem. Single stimulation of immune system of female C57Bl/6 mice with concanavalin A at the early stages of pregnancy before the formation of fetal immune organs was followed by impairment of antitumor immunity in the progeny by the time of puberty. These changes manifested in the increased survival rate of B16 melanoma, high rate of death of tumor-bearing animals, and low cytotoxic activity of spleen cells on L-929 fibrosarcoma cells.

  4. A Framework for Intelligent Instructional Systems: An Artificial Intelligence Machine Learning Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Lee A.

    1987-01-01

    Presents and develops a general model of the nature of a learning system and a classification for learning systems. Highlights include the relationship between artificial intelligence and cognitive psychology; computer-based instructional systems; intelligent instructional systems; and the role of the learner's knowledge base in an intelligent…

  5. Effects of chalcone derivatives on players of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jian Sian; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas; Fauzi, Norsyahida Mohd

    2015-01-01

    The immune system is the defense mechanism in living organisms that protects against the invasion of foreign materials, microorganisms, and pathogens. It involves multiple organs and tissues in human body, such as lymph nodes, spleen, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues. However, the execution of immune activities depends on a number of specific cell types, such as B cells, T cells, macrophages, and granulocytes, which provide various immune responses against pathogens. In addition to normal physiological functions, abnormal proliferation, migration, and differentiation of these cells (in response to various chemical stimuli produced by invading pathogens) have been associated with several pathological disorders. The unwanted conditions related to these cells have made them prominent targets in the development of new therapeutic interventions against various pathological implications, such as atherosclerosis and autoimmune diseases. Chalcone derivatives exhibit a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities, such as immunomodulation, as well as anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiviral, and antimicrobial properties. Many studies have been conducted to determine their inhibitory or stimulatory activities in immune cells, and the findings are of significance to provide a new direction for subsequent research. This review highlights the effects of chalcone derivatives in different types of immune cells.

  6. Effects of chalcone derivatives on players of the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jian Sian; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas; Fauzi, Norsyahida Mohd

    2015-01-01

    The immune system is the defense mechanism in living organisms that protects against the invasion of foreign materials, microorganisms, and pathogens. It involves multiple organs and tissues in human body, such as lymph nodes, spleen, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues. However, the execution of immune activities depends on a number of specific cell types, such as B cells, T cells, macrophages, and granulocytes, which provide various immune responses against pathogens. In addition to normal physiological functions, abnormal proliferation, migration, and differentiation of these cells (in response to various chemical stimuli produced by invading pathogens) have been associated with several pathological disorders. The unwanted conditions related to these cells have made them prominent targets in the development of new therapeutic interventions against various pathological implications, such as atherosclerosis and autoimmune diseases. Chalcone derivatives exhibit a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities, such as immunomodulation, as well as anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiviral, and antimicrobial properties. Many studies have been conducted to determine their inhibitory or stimulatory activities in immune cells, and the findings are of significance to provide a new direction for subsequent research. This review highlights the effects of chalcone derivatives in different types of immune cells. PMID:26316713

  7. Influence of prebiotics on the human immune system (GALT).

    PubMed

    Bodera, Pawel

    2008-06-01

    Prebiotics have great potential to improve human health in specific intestinal disorders. The knowledge about the influence of prebiotics on the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) for the improvement of human health is still growing. This paper reviews the latest evidence for the immunity-enhancing effects of prebiotics. Prebiotics, include inulin, fructooligosaccharides, mannosoligosaccharides, and arabinogalactans, are a therapeutic nutritional preparation used for the gut function favoring growth of normal bacterial flora and impedes growth of pathogenic organisms. There is convincing preliminary data to suggest that the consumption of prebiotics can modulate immune parameters in GALT, secondary lymphoid tissues and peripheral circulation. There is increasing evidence that the newly described prebiotics and innovative means of administration can modulate various properties of the immune system, including those of the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT). Authors of recently published patents showed new mechanisms for immuno-modulation, and the ultimate impact on immunological health of prebiotics.

  8. Stochastic stage-structured modeling of the adaptive immune system

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, D. L.; Davenport, M. P.; Forrest, S.; Perelson, Alan S.,

    2003-01-01

    We have constructed a computer model of the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to antigen and the maintenance of immunological memory. Because immune responses often begin with small numbers of cells and there is great variation among individual immune systems, we have chosen to implement a stochastic model that captures the life cycle of T cells more faithfully than deterministic models. Past models of the immune response have been differential equation based, which do not capture stochastic effects, or agent-based, which are computationally expensive. We use a stochastic stage-structured approach that has many of the advantages of agent-based modeling but is more efficient. Our model can provide insights into the effect infections have on the CTL repertoire and the response to subsequent infections.

  9. Progress in immunization information systems - United States, 2010.

    PubMed

    2012-06-29

    Immunization information systems (IIS) are confidential, computerized, population-based systems that collect and consolidate vaccination data from vaccination providers and provide important tools for designing and sustaining effective immunization strategies at the provider and immunization program levels. These tools include clinical decision support, vaccination coverage reports, interoperability with electronic health record systems, vaccine inventory management, and the ability to generate reminder and recall messages. In 2010, based on strong evidence of effectiveness, the Task Force on Community Preventive Services recommended IIS use as a means of increasing vaccination rates. A Healthy People 2020 target (IID-18) is to increase to 95% the proportion of children aged <6 years whose immunization records are in fully operational, population-based IIS. To monitor progress toward program goals, CDC annually surveys 56 immunization program grantees (50 states, five cities, and the District of Columbia) using the IIS Annual Report (IISAR). Results from the 2010 IISAR (completed by 54 grantees) indicate that 82% (18.8 million) of U.S. children aged <6 years participated in IIS, as defined by having at least two recorded vaccinations, an increase from 78% (18.0 million) in 2009. Among 52 grantees who responded to questions about the Vaccine Tracking System (VTrckS), CDC's new national vaccine ordering and inventory management system for publicly purchased vaccine, 38 (73%) indicated their intention to use the IIS in their state or city to interface with VTrckS. Use of IIS to interface with VTrckS might provide additional incentive for vaccination providers to participate in IIS and enhance IIS utility by supporting efficient and effective methods for providers to order vaccine and track inventory and by promoting greater accountability of publicly purchased vaccine.

  10. Bacillus cereus var. toyoi enhanced systemic immune response in piglets.

    PubMed

    Schierack, Peter; Wieler, Lothar H; Taras, David; Herwig, Volker; Tachu, Babila; Hlinak, Andreas; Schmidt, Michael F G; Scharek, Lydia

    2007-07-15

    Probiotic bacteria have been suggested to stimulate the host immune system. In this study we evaluated the immunomodulatory effects of probiotic Bacillus cereus var. toyoi on the systemic immunity of piglets. A pool of 70 piglets was divided into a probiotic or control group. We determined the ratios of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) subsets and measured proliferative responses and cytokine production of PBMCs and effects on vaccination responses. Blood samples of probiotic-treated piglets showed a significantly lower frequency of CD8(high)/CD3+ T cells and CD8(low)/CD3+ T cells and a significant higher CD4+/CD8+ ratio. IL-4 and IFN-gamma production of polyclonally stimulated PBMCs was on average higher in the probiotic group. Specific proliferative responses of PBMCs to Influenza vaccination antigens were significantly higher and antibody titers against H3N2 Influenza and Mycoplasma vaccination antigens were on average higher in the probiotic group. In conclusion, B. cereus var. toyoi therefore alters the immune status of piglets as indicated by changes in the ratios as well as functionalities of systemic immune cell populations.

  11. Signal transduction in cells of the immune system in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Oliver; Huber, Kathrin; Lang, Kerstin

    2008-10-28

    Life on Earth developed in the presence and under the constant influence of gravity. Gravity has been present during the entire evolution, from the first organic molecule to mammals and humans. Modern research revealed clearly that gravity is important, probably indispensable for the function of living systems, from unicellular organisms to men. Thus, gravity research is no more or less a fundamental question about the conditions of life on Earth. Since the first space missions and supported thereafter by a multitude of space and ground-based experiments, it is well known that immune cell function is severely suppressed in microgravity, which renders the cells of the immune system an ideal model organism to investigate the influence of gravity on the cellular and molecular level. Here we review the current knowledge about the question, if and how cellular signal transduction depends on the existence of gravity, with special focus on cells of the immune system. Since immune cell function is fundamental to keep the organism under imnological surveillance during the defence against pathogens, to investigate the effects and possible molecular mechanisms of altered gravity is indispensable for long-term space flights to Earth Moon or Mars. Thus, understanding the impact of gravity on cellular functions on Earth will provide not only important informations about the development of life on Earth, but also for therapeutic and preventive strategies to cope successfully with medical problems during space exploration.

  12. A New Rule-Based System for the Construction and Structural Characterization of Artificial Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štambuk, Nikola; Konjevoda, Paško; Gotovac, Nikola

    In this paper, we present a new rule-based system for an artificial protein design incorporating ternary amino acid polarity (polar, nonpolar, and neutral). It may be used to design de novo α and β protein fold structures and mixed class proteins. The targeted molecules are artificial proteins with important industrial and biomedical applications, related to the development of diagnostic-therapeutic peptide pharmaceuticals, antibody mimetics, peptide vaccines, new nanobiomaterials and engineered protein scaffolds.

  13. Nasal immunity is an ancient arm of the mucosal immune system of vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Larragoite, Erin T.; Crossey, Kyle; Erhardt, Erik B.; Martin, Samuel A.M.; LaPatra, Scott E.; Salinas, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The mucosal surfaces of all vertebrates have been exposed to similar evolutionary pressures for millions of years. In terrestrial vertebrates such as birds and mammals, the nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) represents a first line of immune defence. Here we propose that NALT is an ancient arm of the mucosal immune system not restricted to terrestrial vertebrates. We find that NALT is present in rainbow trout and that it resembles other teleost mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues. Trout NALT consists of diffuse lymphoid cells and lacks tonsils and adenoids. The predominant B-cell subset found in trout NALT are IgT + B cells, similar to skin and gut. The trout olfactory organ is colonized by abundant symbiotic bacteria, which are coated by trout secretory immunoglobulin. Trout NALT is capable of mounting strong anti-viral immune responses following nasal delivery of a live attenuated viral vaccine. Our results open up a new tool for the control of aquatic infectious diseases via nasal vaccination. PMID:25335508

  14. Cortisol and corticosterone in the songbird immune and nervous systems: local vs. systemic levels during development.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kim L; Soma, Kiran K

    2008-07-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) have profound effects on the immune and nervous systems during development. However, circulating GC levels are low neonatally and show little response to stressors. This paradox could be resolved if immune and neural tissues locally synthesize GCs. Here, we measured baseline corticosterone and cortisol levels in plasma, immune organs, and brain regions of developing zebra finches. Steroids were extracted using solid phase-extraction and quantified using specific immunoassays. As expected, corticosterone was the predominant GC in plasma and increased with age. In contrast, cortisol was the predominant GC in immune tissues (bursa of Fabricius, thymus, spleen) and decreased with age. Cortisol levels in immune tissues were higher than cortisol levels in plasma. In the brain, corticosterone and cortisol levels were similarly low, providing little evidence for local synthesis of GCs in the brain. This is the first study to measure 1) cortisol in the plasma of songbirds, 2) corticosterone or cortisol in the brain of songbirds, and 3) corticosterone or cortisol in the immune system of any species. Despite the prevailing dogma that corticosterone is the primary GC in birds, these results indicate that cortisol is the predominant GC in the immune system of developing zebra finches. These results raise the hypothesis that cortisol is synthesized de novo from cholesterol in the immune system as an "immunosteroid," analogous to neurosteroids synthesized in the brain. Local production of GCs in immune tissues may allow GCs to regulate lymphocyte selection while avoiding the costs of high systemic GCs during development.

  15. Neuroendocrine mechanisms for immune system regulation during stress in fish.

    PubMed

    Nardocci, Gino; Navarro, Cristina; Cortés, Paula P; Imarai, Mónica; Montoya, Margarita; Valenzuela, Beatriz; Jara, Pablo; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Fernández, Ricardo

    2014-10-01

    In the last years, the aquaculture crops have experienced an explosive and intensive growth, because of the high demand for protein. This growth has increased fish susceptibility to diseases and subsequent death. The constant biotic and abiotic changes experienced by fish species in culture are challenges that induce physiological, endocrine and immunological responses. These changes mitigate stress effects at the cellular level to maintain homeostasis. The effects of stress on the immune system have been studied for many years. While acute stress can have beneficial effects, chronic stress inhibits the immune response in mammals and teleost fish. In response to stress, a signaling cascade is triggered by the activation of neural circuits in the central nervous system because the hypothalamus is the central modulator of stress. This leads to the production of catecholamines, corticosteroid-releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone and glucocorticoids, which are the essential neuroendocrine mediators for this activation. Because stress situations are energetically demanding, the neuroendocrine signals are involved in metabolic support and will suppress the "less important" immune function. Understanding the cellular mechanisms of the neuroendocrine regulation of immunity in fish will allow the development of new pharmaceutical strategies and therapeutics for the prevention and treatment of diseases triggered by stress at all stages of fish cultures for commercial production.

  16. Progress in immunization information systems--United States, 2011.

    PubMed

    2013-01-25

    Immunization information systems (IIS) are confidential, computerized, population-based systems that collect and consolidate vaccination data from vaccination providers and provide important tools for designing and sustaining effective immunization strategies. A Healthy People 2020 objective (IID-18) is to increase to 95% the proportion of children aged <6 years whose immunization records are in fully operational, population-based IIS. The National Vaccine Advisory Committee (NVAC) has published goals for IIS, including required and optional core data elements for which IIS should collect information. Two of the required core data elements are vaccine manufacturer and vaccine lot number. To monitor progress toward achieving these and other program goals, CDC annually surveys 56 immunization program grantees using the IIS Annual Report (IISAR). Results from the 2011 IISAR (completed by 54 grantees) indicate that 84% (19.2 million) of U.S. children aged <6 years participated in IIS, as defined by having at least two recorded vaccinations, an increase from 82% (18.8 million) in 2010. Grantees reported that an average of 63% of vaccination records for these children contained data in the field for vaccine manufacturer and 60% contained data in the field for lot number. A new project under way to capture vaccine product information, expiration date, and lot number on two-dimensional (2D) barcodes on vaccine vials might increase completeness, accuracy, and availability of these data elements in patient medical records and IIS, which in turn might enhance vaccine safety and support vaccine inventory management.

  17. HIV Immune Recovery Inflammatory Syndrome and Central Nervous System Paracoccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Sérgio Monteiro; Roza, Thiago Henrique

    2017-04-01

    The immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is a deregulated inflammatory response to invading microorganisms. It is manifested when there is an abrupt change in host immunity from an anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive state to a pro-inflammatory state as a result of rapid depletion or removal of factors that promote immune suppression or inhibition of inflammation. The aim of this paper is to discuss and re-interpret the possibility of association of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) with IRIS in the central nervous system (CNS) in a case from Brazil published by Silva-Vergara ML. et al. (Mycopathologia 177:137-141, 6). An AIDS patient who was not receiving medical care developed pulmonary PCM successfully treated with itraconazole. The patient developed central nervous system PCM (NPCM) after starting the ARV therapy with recovery of immunity and control of HIV viral load, although it was not interpreted as IRIS by the authors, it fulfills the criteria for CNS IRIS. This could be the first case of NPCM associated with IRIS described. Although not frequent, IRIS must be considered in PCM patients and HIV, from endemic areas or patients that traveled to endemic areas, receiving ARV treatment and with worsening symptoms.

  18. Controlling cytomegalovirus: helping the immune system take the lead.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Patrick J; Bollard, Catherine M

    2014-05-27

    Cytomegalovirus, of the Herpesviridae family, has evolved alongside humans for thousands of years with an intricate balance of latency, immune evasion, and transmission. While upwards of 70% of humans have evidence of CMV infection, the majority of healthy people show little to no clinical symptoms of primary infection and CMV disease is rarely observed during persistent infection in immunocompetent hosts. Despite the fact that the majority of infected individuals are asymptomatic, immunologically, CMV hijacks the immune system by infecting and remaining latent in antigen-presenting cells that occasionally reactivate subclinically and present antigen to T cells, eventually causing the inflation of CMV-specific T cells until they can compromise up to 10% of the entire T cell repertoire. Because of this impact on the immune system, as well as its importance in fields such as stem cell and organ transplant, the relationship between CMV and the immune response has been studied in depth. Here we provide a review of many of these studies and insights into how CMV-specific T cells are currently being used therapeutically.

  19. New Trends in Computing Anticipatory Systems : Emergence of Artificial Conscious Intelligence with Machine Learning Natural Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Daniel M.

    2008-10-01

    This paper deals with the challenge to create an Artificial Intelligence System with an Artificial Consciousness. For that, an introduction to computing anticipatory systems is presented, with the definitions of strong and weak anticipation. The quasi-anticipatory systems of Robert Rosen are linked to open-loop controllers. Then, some properties of the natural brain are presented in relation to the triune brain theory of Paul D. MacLean, and the mind time of Benjamin Libet, with his veto of the free will. The theory of the hyperincursive discrete anticipatory systems is recalled in view to introduce the concept of hyperincursive free will, which gives a similar veto mechanism: free will as unpredictable hyperincursive anticipation The concepts of endo-anticipation and exo-anticipation are then defined. Finally, some ideas about artificial conscious intelligence with natural language are presented, in relation to the Turing Machine, Formal Language, Intelligent Agents and Mutli-Agent System.

  20. The role of the adaptive immune system in regulation of gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Kato, Lucia M; Kawamoto, Shimpei; Maruya, Mikako; Fagarasan, Sidonia

    2014-07-01

    The gut nourishes rich bacterial communities that affect profoundly the functions of the immune system. The relationship between gut microbiota and the immune system is one of reciprocity. The microbiota contributes to nutrient processing and the development, maturation, and function of the immune system. Conversely, the immune system, particularly the adaptive immune system, plays a key role in shaping the repertoire of gut microbiota. The fitness of host immune system is reflected in the gut microbiota, and deficiencies in either innate or adaptive immunity impact on diversity and structures of bacterial communities in the gut. Here, we discuss the mechanisms that underlie this reciprocity and emphasize how the adaptive immune system via immunoglobulins (i.e. IgA) contributes to diversification and balance of gut microbiota required for immune homeostasis.

  1. The use of an immunization information system to establish baseline childhood immunization rates and measure contract objectives.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Stephanie L; Maerz, Thomas R; Hurie, Marjorie B; Gabor, Gerald W; Flynn, John M; Davis, Jeffrey P

    2009-01-01

    Measuring progress toward national immunization objectives at the local level, although difficult, is becoming more feasible owing to statewide immunization information systems. This article describes how a state immunization program expanded the scope of immunization service contracts with local health departments (LHDs) to address the immunization rates among children living within their jurisdictions using the Wisconsin Immunization Registry (WIR) to measure achievement of population-based objectives. By contract year (CY) 2008, 99 percent of Wisconsin LHDs selected population-based contract objectives. In late 2008, the Wisconsin Immunization Program assessed all children at 24 months of age for completeness of the 4:3:1:3:3:1 (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis/poliovirus/measles-containing vaccine/Haemophilus influenzae type b/hepatitis B/varicella) series by county for each of four CYs, using the WIR. From CY 2005 to CY 2008, LHDs in 61 (86%) of the 71 counties demonstrated increased series completeness rates for the series, and the overall statewide series completeness increased from 58 percent to 64 percent. However, the increases we observed cannot be attributed solely to LHDs' acceptance of population-based objectives because controlling for other factors known to influence immunization coverage levels was outside the scope of this case study. We found the WIR to be a powerful tool that can measure immunization coverage among local populations independent of the immunization provider, assess improvement toward contract objectives, and target resources toward pockets of need.

  2. Rearing environment affects development of the immune system in neonates.

    PubMed

    Inman, C F; Haverson, K; Konstantinov, S R; Jones, P H; Harris, C; Smidt, H; Miller, B; Bailey, M; Stokes, C

    2010-06-01

    Early-life exposure to appropriate microbial flora drives expansion and development of an efficient immune system. Aberrant development results in increased likelihood of allergic disease or increased susceptibility to infection. Thus, factors affecting microbial colonization may also affect the direction of immune responses in later life. There is a need for a manipulable animal model of environmental influences on the development of microbiota and the immune system during early life. We assessed the effects of rearing under low- (farm, sow) and high-hygiene (isolator, milk formula) conditions on intestinal microbiota and immune development in neonatal piglets, because they can be removed from the mother in the first 24 h for rearing under controlled conditions and, due to placental structure, neither antibody nor antigen is transferred in utero. Microbiota in both groups was similar between 2 and 5 days. However, by 12-28 days, piglets reared on the mother had more diverse flora than siblings reared in isolators. Dendritic cells accumulated in the intestinal mucosa in both groups, but more rapidly in isolator piglets. Importantly, the minority of 2-5-day-old farm piglets whose microbiota resembled that of an older (12-28-day-old) pig also accumulated dendritic cells earlier than the other farm-reared piglets. Consistent with dendritic cell control of T cell function, the effects on T cells occurred at later time-points, and mucosal T cells from high-hygiene, isolator pigs made less interleukin (IL)-4 while systemic T cells made more IL-2. Neonatal piglets may be a valuable model for studies of the effects of interaction between microbiota and immune development on allergy.

  3. Artificial Gravity as a Multi-System Countermeasure to Bed Rest Deconditioning: Pilot Study Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, William H.; Young, L. R.

    2007-01-01

    Efficient, effective, multi-system countermeasures will likely be required to protect the health, safety, and performance of crews aboard planned exploration-class space flight missions to Mars and beyond. To that end, NASA, DLR, and IMBP initiated a multi-center international project to begin systematically exploring the utility of artificial gravity (AG) as a multi-system countermeasure in ground based venues using test subjects deconditioned by bed rest. The goal of this project is to explore the efficacy of short-radius, intermittent AG as a countermeasure to bone, muscle, cardiovascular, and sensory-motor adaptations to hypogravity. This session reports the results from a pilot study commissioned to validate a standardized protocol to be used by all centers involved in the project. Subject selection criteria, medical monitoring requirements, medical care procedures, experiment control procedures, and standardized dependent measures were established jointly. Testing was performed on 15 rigorously screened male volunteers subjected to 21 days of 6deg HDT bed rest. (All provided written consent to volunteer after the nature of the study and its hazards were clearly explained to them.) Eight were treated with daily 1hr AG exposures (2.5g at the feet decreasing to 1.0g at the heart) aboard a short radius (3m) centrifuge, while the other seven served as controls. Multiple tests of multiple dependent measures were made in each of the primary physiological systems of interest during a 10 day acclimatization period prior to HDT bed rest and again during an 8 day recovery period after the bed rest period was complete. Analyses of these data (presented in other papers in this session) suggest the AG prescription had salutary effects on aspects of the bone, muscle, and cardiovascular systems, with no untoward effects on the vestibular system, the immune system, or cognitive function. Furthermore, treatment subjects were able to tolerate 153/160 centrifuge sessions over

  4. Chasing the recipe for a pro-regenerative immune system.

    PubMed

    Godwin, James W; Pinto, Alexander R; Rosenthal, Nadia A

    2017-01-01

    Identification of the key ingredients and essential processes required to achieve perfect tissue regeneration in humans has so far remained elusive. Injury in vertebrates induces an obligatory wound response that will precede or overlap any regeneration specific program or scarring outcome. This process shapes the cellular and molecular landscape of the tissue, influencing the success of endogenous repair pathways or for potential clinical intervention. The involvement of immune cells is also required for aspects of development extending beyond the initial inflammatory phase of wounding. It has now become clear from amphibian, fish and mammalian models of tissue injury that the type of immune response and the profile of immune cells attending the site of injury can act as the gatekeepers that determine wound repair quality. The heterogeneity among innate and adaptive immune cell populations, along with the developmental origin of these cells, form key ingredients affecting the potential for downstream repair and the suppression of fibrosis. Cell-to-cell interactions between immune cells, such as macrophages and T cells, with stem cells and mesenchymal cells are critically important for shaping this process and these exchanges, are in turn influenced by the type of injury, tissue location and developmental stage of the organism. Developmentally, mouse cardiac regeneration is restricted to early stages of postnatal life where the balance of innate to adaptive immune cells may be poised towards regeneration. In the injured adult mouse liver, specific macrophage subsets improve repair while other bone marrow derived cells can exacerbate injury. Other studies using genetically diverse mice have shown enhanced regeneration in certain strains, restricted to specific tissues. This enhanced repair is linked with expression of genes such as Insulin-like Growth Factor- 1 (IGF-1) and activin (Act 1), that both play important roles in shaping the immune system. Immune cells are

  5. Chasing the recipe for a pro-regenerative immune system

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Alexander R.; Rosenthal, Nadia A.

    2017-01-01

    Identification of the key ingredients and essential processes required to achieve perfect tissue regeneration in humans has so far remained elusive. Injury in vertebrates induces an obligatory wound response that will precede or overlap any regeneration specific program or scarring outcome. This process shapes the cellular and molecular landscape of the tissue, influencing the success of endogenous repair pathways or for potential clinical intervention. The involvement of immune cells is also required for aspects of development extending beyond the initial inflammatory phase of wounding. It has now become clear from amphibian, fish and mammalian models of tissue injury that the type of immune response and the profile of immune cells attending the site of injury can act as the gatekeepers that determine wound repair quality. The heterogeneity among innate and adaptive immune cell populations, along with the developmental origin of these cells, form key ingredients affecting the potential for downstream repair and the suppression of fibrosis. Cell-to-cell interactions between immune cells, such as macrophages and T cells, with stem cells and mesenchymal cells are critically important for shaping this process and these exchanges, are in turn influenced by the type of injury, tissue location and developmental stage of the organism. Developmentally, mouse cardiac regeneration is restricted to early stages of postnatal life where the balance of innate to adaptive immune cells may be poised towards regeneration. In the injured adult mouse liver, specific macrophage subsets improve repair while other bone marrow derived cells can exacerbate injury. Other studies using genetically diverse mice have shown enhanced regeneration in certain strains, restricted to specific tissues. This enhanced repair is linked with expression of genes such as Insulin-like Growth Factor- 1 (IGF-1) and activin (Act 1), that both play important roles in shaping the immune system. Immune cells are

  6. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornburg, David D.

    1986-01-01

    Overview of the artificial intelligence (AI) field provides a definition; discusses past research and areas of future research; describes the design, functions, and capabilities of expert systems and the "Turing Test" for machine intelligence; and lists additional sources for information on artificial intelligence. Languages of AI are…

  7. A comparative study of artificial intelligent-based maximum power point tracking for photovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain Mutlag, Ammar; Mohamed, Azah; Shareef, Hussain

    2016-03-01

    Maximum power point tracking (MPPT) is normally required to improve the performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems. This paper presents artificial intelligent-based maximum power point tracking (AI-MPPT) by considering three artificial intelligent techniques, namely, artificial neural network (ANN), adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system with seven triangular fuzzy sets (7-tri), and adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system with seven gbell fuzzy sets. The AI-MPPT is designed for the 25 SolarTIFSTF-120P6 PV panels, with the capacity of 3 kW peak. A complete PV system is modelled using 300,000 data samples and simulated in the MATLAB/SIMULINK. The AI-MPPT has been tested under real environmental conditions for two days from 8 am to 18 pm. The results showed that the ANN based MPPT gives the most accurate performance and then followed by the 7-tri-based MPPT.

  8. How photons modulate wound healing via the immune system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyson, Mary

    2009-02-01

    The immune system is a diverse group of cells that recognize and attack foreign substances, pathogenic organisms and cancer cells. It also produces inflammation, an essential component of the wound healing process and, following the resolution of inflammation, plays a crucial role in the control of granulation tissue formation. Granulation tissue is the precursor of scar tissue. Injured skin and mucous membranes generally heal rapidly. However, some wounds are either slow to heal or fail to heal while in others overgrowth of scar tissue occurs, resulting in the production of either hypertophic or keloid scars. The modulation of wound healing in such conditions is clinically important and may even be vital. Evidence will be presented that phototherapy can modulate wound healing, and that changes induced in the immune system, in particular the secretion of soluble protein mediators including cytokines, may be involved in this modulation. The immune system has peripheral and deep components. The former, being located mainly in the skin and mucous membranes, are readily accessible to photons, which can affect them directly. The components of the immune system are linked by lymphatic vessels and blood vessels, which include many capillaries located in the sub-epithelial connective tissues of the skin and mucous membranes. The superficial location of these capillaries provides the immune cells and molecules in transit through them with ready access to photons. When these cells and molecules, some modified by exposure to photons, reach susceptible cells such as lymphocytes in the deeper parts of the immune system and cells of injured tissues, they can modify their activity. In addition to having direct effects on peripheral cells, photons can thus also produce indirect effects on cells too distant for the photons to reach them. For example, cytokines released from peripheral macrophages in response to the direct action of photons can be transported to and affect other

  9. Closed-Loop Artificial Pancreas Systems: Engineering the Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Huyett, Lauren M.; Lee, Joon Bok; Zisser, Howard C.; Dassau, Eyal

    2014-01-01

    In this two-part Bench to Clinic narrative, recent advances in both the preclinical and clinical aspects of artificial pancreas (AP) development are described. In the preceding Bench narrative, Kudva and colleagues provide an in-depth understanding of the modified glucoregulatory physiology of type 1 diabetes that will help refine future AP algorithms. In the Clinic narrative presented here, we compare and evaluate AP technology to gain further momentum toward outpatient trials and eventual approval for widespread use. We enumerate the design objectives, variables, and challenges involved in AP development, concluding with a discussion of recent clinical advancements. Thanks to the effective integration of engineering and medicine, the dream of automated glucose regulation is nearing reality. Consistent and methodical presentation of results will accelerate this success, allowing head-to-head comparisons that will facilitate adoption of the AP as a standard therapy for type 1 diabetes. PMID:24757226

  10. Emerging Roles for the Immune System in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Celia A.; Lukens, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects an ever-growing population of all ages with long-term consequences on health and cognition. Many of the issues that TBI patients face are thought to be mediated by the immune system. Primary brain damage that occurs at the time of injury can be exacerbated and prolonged for months or even years by chronic inflammatory processes, which can ultimately lead to secondary cell death, neurodegeneration, and long-lasting neurological impairment. Researchers have turned to rodent models of TBI in order to understand how inflammatory cells and immunological signaling regulate the post-injury response and recovery mechanisms. In addition, the development of numerous methods to manipulate genes involved in inflammation has recently expanded the possibilities of investigating the immune response in TBI models. As results from these studies accumulate, scientists have started to link cells and signaling pathways to pro- and anti-inflammatory processes that may contribute beneficial or detrimental effects to the injured brain. Moreover, emerging data suggest that targeting aspects of the immune response may offer promising strategies to treat TBI. This review will cover insights gained from studies that approach TBI research from an immunological perspective and will summarize our current understanding of the involvement of specific immune cell types and cytokines in TBI pathogenesis. PMID:27994591

  11. Harnessing the immune system to improve cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Nikos E.; Beniata, Ourania V.; Vitsos, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy uses the immune system and its components to mount an anti-tumor response. During the last decade, it has evolved from a promising therapy option to a robust clinical reality. Many immunotherapeutic modalities are already approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treating cancer patients and many others are in the pipeline for approval as standalone or combinatorial therapeutic interventions, several also combined with standard treatments in clinical studies. The two main axes of cancer immunotherapeutics refer to passive and active treatments. Prominent examples of passive immunotherapy include administration of monoclonal antibodies and cytokines and adoptive cell transfer of ex vivo “educated” immune cells. Active immunotherapy refers, among others, to anti-cancer vaccines [peptide, dendritic cell (DC)-based and allogeneic whole cell vaccines], immune checkpoint inhibitors and oncolytic viruses, whereas new approaches that can further enhance anti-cancer immune responses are also widely explored. Herein, we present the most popular cancer immunotherapy approaches and discuss their clinical relevance referring to data acquired from clinical trials. To date, clinical experience and efficacy suggest that combining more than one immunotherapy interventions, in conjunction with other treatment options like chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted or epigenetic therapy, should guide the way to cancer cure. PMID:27563648

  12. Terrestrial stress analogs for spaceflight associated immune system dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Crucian, Brian; Simpson, Richard J; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Chouker, Alexander; Hwang, Shen-An; Actor, Jeffrey K; Salam, Alex P; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarence

    2014-07-01

    Recent data indicates that dysregulation of the immune system occurs and persists during spaceflight. Impairment of immunity, especially in conjunction with elevated radiation exposure and limited clinical care, may increase certain health risks during exploration-class deep space missions (i.e. to an asteroid or Mars). Research must thoroughly characterize immune dysregulation in astronauts to enable development of a monitoring strategy and validate any necessary countermeasures. Although the International Space Station affords an excellent platform for on-orbit research, access may be constrained by technical, logistical vehicle or funding limitations. Therefore, terrestrial spaceflight analogs will continue to serve as lower cost, easier access platforms to enable basic human physiology studies. Analog work can triage potential in-flight experiments and thus result in more focused on-orbit studies, enhancing overall research efficiency. Terrestrial space analogs generally replicate some of the physiological or psychological stress responses associated with spaceflight. These include the use of human test subjects in a laboratory setting (i.e. exercise, bed rest, confinement, circadian misalignment) and human remote deployment analogs (Antarctica winterover, undersea, etc.) that incorporate confinement, isolation, extreme environment, physiological mission stress and disrupted circadian rhythms. While bed rest has been used to examine the effects of physical deconditioning, radiation and microgravity may only be simulated in animal or microgravity cell culture (clinorotation) analogs. This article will characterize the array of terrestrial analogs for spaceflight immune dysregulation, the current evidence base for each, and interpret the analog catalog in the context of acute and chronic stress.

  13. The immune system as a self-centered network of lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Santori, Fabio R

    2015-08-01

    This essay makes a brief historical and comparative review of selective and network theories of the immune system which is presented as a chemical sensory system with immune and non-immune functions. The ontogeny of immune networks is the result of both positive and negative selection of lymphocytes to self-epitopes that serve as a "template" for the recognition of foreign antigens. The development of immune networks progresses from single individual clones in early ontogeny into complex "information processing networks" in which lymphocytes are linked to inhibitory and stimulatory immune cells. The results of these regulatory interactions modulate immune responses and tolerance.

  14. The immune system as a self-centered network of lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Santori, Fabio R.

    2015-01-01

    This essay makes a brief historical and comparative review of selective and network theories of the immune system which is presented as a chemical sensory system with immune and non-immune functions. The ontogeny of immune networks is the result of both positive and negative selection of lymphocytes to self-epitopes that serve as a “template” for the recognition of foreign antigens. The development of immune networks progresses from single individual clones in early ontogeny into complex “information processing networks” in which lymphocytes are linked to inhibitory and stimulatory immune cells. The results of these regulatory interactions modulate immune responses and tolerance. PMID:26092524

  15. Hybrid artificial photosynthetic systems comprising semiconductors as light harvesters and biomimetic complexes as molecular cocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fuyu; Li, Can

    2013-11-19

    Solar fuel production through artificial photosynthesis may be a key to generating abundant and clean energy, thus addressing the high energy needs of the world's expanding population. As the crucial components of photosynthesis, the artificial photosynthetic system should be composed of a light harvester (e.g., semiconductor or molecular dye), a reduction cocatalyst (e.g., hydrogenase mimic, noble metal), and an oxidation cocatalyst (e.g., photosystem II mimic for oxygen evolution from water oxidation). Solar fuel production catalyzed by an artificial photosynthetic system starts from the absorption of sunlight by the light harvester, where charge separation takes place, followed by a charge transfer to the reduction and oxidation cocatalysts, where redox reaction processes occur. One of the most challenging problems is to develop an artificial photosynthetic solar fuel production system that is both highly efficient and stable. The assembly of cocatalysts on the semiconductor (light harvester) not only can facilitate the charge separation, but also can lower the activation energy or overpotential for the reactions. An efficient light harvester loaded with suitable reduction and oxidation cocatalysts is the key for high efficiency of artificial photosynthetic systems. In this Account, we describe our strategy of hybrid photocatalysts using semiconductors as light harvesters with biomimetic complexes as molecular cocatalysts to construct efficient and stable artificial photosynthetic systems. We chose semiconductor nanoparticles as light harvesters because of their broad spectral absorption and relatively robust properties compared with a natural photosynthesis system. Using biomimetic complexes as cocatalysts can significantly facilitate charge separation via fast charge transfer from the semiconductor to the molecular cocatalysts and also catalyze the chemical reactions of solar fuel production. The hybrid photocatalysts supply us with a platform to study the

  16. Postmenopausal osteoporosis: the role of immune system cells.

    PubMed

    Faienza, Maria Felicia; Ventura, Annamaria; Marzano, Flaviana; Cavallo, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    In the last years, new evidences of the relationship between immune system and bone have been accumulated both in animal models and in humans affected by bone disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis, bone metastasis, periodontitis, and osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue with a subsequent increase in bone fragility and susceptibility to fractures. The combined effects of estrogen deprivation and raising of FSH production occurring in menopause cause a marked stimulation of bone resorption and a rapid bone loss which is central for the onset of postmenopausal osteoporosis. This review focuses on the role of immune system in postmenopausal osteoporosis and on therapeutic strategies targeting osteoimmunology pathways.

  17. The role of immune system exhaustion on cancer cell escape and anti-tumor immune induction after irradiation.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Fernando; Domingues, Cátia; Rodrigues-Santos, Paulo; Abrantes, Ana Margarida; Gonçalves, Ana Cristina; Estrela, Jéssica; Encarnação, João; Pires, Ana Salomé; Laranjo, Mafalda; Alves, Vera; Teixo, Ricardo; Sarmento, Ana Bela; Botelho, Maria Filomena; Rosa, Manuel Santos

    2016-04-01

    Immune surveillance seems to represent an effective tumor suppressor mechanism. However, some cancer cells survive and become variants, being poorly immunogenic and able to enter a steady-state phase. These cells become functionally dormant or remain hidden clinically throughout. Neoplastic cells seem to be able to instruct immune cells to undergo changes promoting malignancy. Radiotherapy may act as a trigger of the immune response. After radiotherapy a sequence of reactions occurs, starting in the damage of oncogenic cells by multiple mechanisms, leading to the immune system positive feedback against the tumor. The link between radiotherapy and the immune system is evident. T cells, macrophages, Natural Killer cells and other immune cells seem to have a key role in controlling the tumor. T cells may be dysfunctional and remain in a state of T cell exhaustion, nonetheless, they often retain a high potential for successful defense against cancer, being able to be mobilized to become highly functional. The lack of clinical trials on a large scale makes data a little robust, in spite of promising information, there are still many variables in the studies relating to radiation and immune system. The clarification of the mechanisms underlying immune response to radiation exposure may contribute to treatment improvement, gain of life quality and span of patients.

  18. Design of a hydraulic analog of the circulatory system for evaluating artificial hearts.

    PubMed

    Donovan, F M

    1975-01-01

    A major problem in improving artificial heart designs is the absence of methods for accurate in vitro testing of artificial heart systems. A mock circulatory system has been constructed which hydraulically simulates the systemic and pulmonary circulations of the normal human. The device is constructed of 1/2 in. acrylic sheet and has overall dimensions of 24 in. wide, 16 in. tall, and 8 in. deep. The artificial heart to be tested is attached to the front of the device, and pumps fluid from the systemic venous chamber into the pulmonary arterial chamber and from the pulmonary venous chamber into the systemic arterial chamber. Each of the four chambers is hermetically sealed. The compliance of each chamber is determined by the volume of air trapped above the fluid in that chamber. The pulmonary and systemic resistances are set automatically by bellows-operated valves to simulate the barroreceptor response in the systemic arteries and the passive pulmonary resistance response in the pulmonary arteries. Cardiac output is measured by a turbine flowmeter in the systemic circulation. Results using the Kwan-Gett artificial heart show a good comparison between the mock circulatory system response and the calf response.

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... disease, which means the arthritis results from your immune system attacking your body's own tissues. The course of ...

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... In an autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system turns against parts of the body it is ... In an autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system turns against parts of the body it is ...

  1. A Paradigmatic Example of an Artificially Intelligent Instructional System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, John Seely; Burton, Richard R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the philosophy of intelligent instructional systems and presents an example of such a system, BLOCKS. The notion of BLOCKS as a paradigmatic system is explicated from both the system development and educational points of view. (Author/VT)

  2. Human nutrition, the gut microbiome and the immune system.

    PubMed

    Kau, Andrew L; Ahern, Philip P; Griffin, Nicholas W; Goodman, Andrew L; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2011-06-15

    Marked changes in socio-economic status, cultural traditions, population growth and agriculture are affecting diets worldwide. Understanding how our diet and nutritional status influence the composition and dynamic operations of our gut microbial communities, and the innate and adaptive arms of our immune system, represents an area of scientific need, opportunity and challenge. The insights gleaned should help to address several pressing global health problems.

  3. Investigation of man's immune system (M112), part B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritzmann, S. E.; Levin, W. C.

    1973-01-01

    Fifty-six days of residence in a Skylab-type environment produce essentially no change in the reactivity of the human immune system, as typified by the rate of RNA or DNA synthesis in small lymphocytes. The one point of divergence between the Skylab simulation crew and previous Apollo crews, a marked depression in synthesis rates on the fourteenth day after the chamber study, may be due to some technical difficulty in the experiment. Lymphocyte morphology changes paralleled functional changes.

  4. Dynamic immune intrusion detection system for IPv6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Li; Li, Zhi-tang; Hao, Tu

    2005-03-01

    We have set up a project aimed at developing a dynamical immune intrusion detection system for IPv6 and protecting the next generation Internet from intrusion. We focus on investigating immunelogical principles in designing a dynamic multi-agent system for intrusion detection in IPv6 environment, instead of attempting to describe all that is intrusion in the network try and describe what is normal use and define "non-self" as intrusion. The proposed intrusion detection system is designed as flexible, extendible, and adaptable in order to meet the needs and preferences of network administrators for IPv6 environment.

  5. Using systems biology to simplify complex disease: immune cartography.

    PubMed

    Polpitiya, Ashoka D; McDunn, Jonathan E; Burykin, Anton; Ghosh, Bijoy K; Cobb, J Perren

    2009-01-01

    What if there was a rapid, inexpensive, and accurate blood diagnostic that could determine which patients were infected, identify the organism(s) responsible, and identify patients who were not responding to therapy? We hypothesized that systems analysis of the transcriptional activity of circulating immune effector cells could be used to identify conserved elements in the host response to systemic inflammation, and furthermore, to discriminate between sterile and infectious etiologies. We review herein a validated, systems biology approach demonstrating that 1) abdominal and pulmonary sepsis diagnoses can be made in mouse models using microarray (RNA) data from circulating blood, 2) blood microarray data can be used to differentiate between the host response to Gram-negative and Gram-positive pneumonia, 3) the endotoxin response of normal human volunteers can be mapped at the level of gene expression, and 4) a similar strategy can be used in the critically ill to follow septic patients and quantitatively determine immune recovery. These findings provide the foundation of immune cartography and demonstrate the potential of this approach for rapidly diagnosing sepsis and identifying pathogens. Further, our data suggest a new approach to determine how specific pathogens perturb the physiology of circulating leukocytes in a cell-specific manner. Large, prospective clinical trails are needed to validate the clinical utility of leukocyte RNA diagnostics (e.g., the riboleukogram).

  6. Progress in immunization information systems - United States, 2012.

    PubMed

    2013-12-13

    Immunization information systems (IIS) are confidential, computerized, population-based systems that collect and consolidate vaccination data from vaccination providers that can be used in designing and sustaining effective immunization strategies. To monitor progress toward achieving IIS program goals, CDC annually surveys immunization program grantees using the IIS Annual Report (IISAR). Results from the 2012 IISAR, completed by 54 of 56 grantees, indicate that 86% (19.5 million) of U.S. children aged <6 years, and 25% (57.8 million) of U.S. adults participated in IIS. Eight of 12 minimum functional standards for IIS published by the National Vaccine Advisory Committee (NVAC) have been met by ≥90% of grantees. During 2011-2012, progress was also made in meeting three additional functional standards, including the presence of core data element fields, timeliness of vaccine records, and Health Level 7 (HL7) messaging, and will be monitored in new functional standards for IIS published in 2013. Several new and ongoing initiatives, including interoperability between IIS and electronic health records (i.e., ensuring systems can work together and exchange information), the use of IIS to support vaccine ordering and inventory management, the use of two-dimensional barcodes to record vaccination information, and collaboration with pharmacies, federal agencies, and other adult vaccination providers, will support further progress in meeting functional standards and enhance reporting of adult vaccinations to IIS.

  7. In vivo and in virto cellular responses to cytoplasmic and cell wall antigens of Histoplasma capsulatum in artificially immunized or infected guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Domer, J E

    1976-01-01

    Guinea pigs were infected with different doses of yeasts of Histoplasma capsulatum or artifically immunized with several concentrations of unextracted yeast cell walls, and then tested in vivo and in vitro for cell-mediated responses to various subcellular fractions of the fungus. Three types of cell-mediated responses were measured, viz., skin test activity, production of migration inhibition factor, and lymphocyte transformation. Positive cutaneous reactions were elicited in animals immunized with 100 or 1,000 mug of cell walls when such animals were skin-tested with cell wall glycoprotein of soluble cytoplasmic substances, whereas animals immunized with 2,000 mug of cell walls did not react significantly greater than unsensitized animals when skin-tested with the same antigens. Histoplasmin did not elicit cutaneous sensitivity in guinea pigs infected with the smallest inoculum, 6 X 10(5) yeast cells, or in animals immunized with cell walls, regardless of the concentration of cell walls used as immunogen. However, hypersensitivity to H. capsulatum could be detected with cytoplasmic substances in animals infected with 6X 10(5). In guinea pigs infected with larger doses, i.e., 10 X 10(7), 15 X10(7), or 20 X 10(7), hypersensitivity could be detected with histoplasmin, cell wall glycoprotein, a ribosome-rich fraction, and soluble cytoplasmic substances. Both cell wall glycoprotein and soluble cytoplasmic substances were functional in migration inhibition factor assays with peritoneal exudate cells from animals immunized with 100 or 1,000 mug of cell walls. The transformation of lymphocytes from infected and artificially immunized guinea pigs in the presence of cell wall glycoprotein and soluble cytoplasmic substances was variable and unpredictable, the lymphocytes from some animls within a given group transforming and those from other animals showing no evidence of stimulation. Moreover, the level of stimulation could not be correlated with the degree of dermal

  8. Monitoring of space station life support systems with miniature mass spectrometry and artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, Richard A.; Johnson, Jodie V.; Wong, Carla M.

    1987-01-01

    The combination of quadrupole ion trap tandem mass spectroscopy with artificial intelligence is a promising approach for monitoring the performance of the life support systems in the space station. Such an analytical system can provide the selectivity, sensitivity, speed, small size, and decision making intelligence to detect, identify, and quantify trace toxic compounds which may accumulate in the space station habitat.

  9. Artificial intelligence guides system's best practices, cutting costs and improving services.

    PubMed

    1999-06-01

    One for the history books. Clinical care improvement initiatives guided by a sophisticated artificial intelligence program have helped a major Virginia integrated health system make dramatic improvements in the cost and quality of its health care services. Find out how the technological innovation has earned Sentara Health System a place in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History.

  10. Implications of Artificial Intelligence for End User Use of Online Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Linda C.

    1980-01-01

    Reviewed are several studies which demonstrate how artificial intelligence techniques can be applied in the design of end user-oriented interfaces (which would eliminate the need for an intermediary) to existing online systems, as well as in the development of future generations of online systems intended for the end user. (Author/SW)

  11. Development of the CODER System: A Testbed for Artificial Intelligence Methods in Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Edward A.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the CODER system, which was developed to investigate the application of artificial intelligence methods to increase the effectiveness of information retrieval systems, particularly those involving heterogeneous documents. Highlights include the use of PROLOG programing, blackboard-based designs, knowledge engineering, lexicological…

  12. The use of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for estimation of the immune status of chickens artificially immunized against coccidiosis.

    PubMed

    Onaga, H; Togo, M; Kudo, Y; Motohashi, T; Ishii, T

    1989-10-01

    Nine thousand commercial breeder chicks (Chankee) reared in a floor pen were exposed to restricted numbers of Eimeria tenella and E. necatrix oocysts to confer immunity. Antibody induction in these chicks was examined by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with antigen prepared from E. tenella oocysts. The oocyst excretion pattern demonstrated recycled infections which continued in these chicks for greater than or equal to 22 days after exposure. Antibody levels in their sera, as determined by the mean absorbence values in ELISA, increased gradually up to 38 days post-inoculation. Mean absorbence values of sera from control chicks remained at a low level. When infected and control chicks were challenged with the two species of coccidia, the test chicks were protected against both species. The antibody level did not change for 8 days in the challenge groups, while in the control chicks, absorbence in ELISA rose significantly and the mean absorbence value was higher than that in immunized chicks. Some factors which influence the results of ELISA are considered and the applicability of this method to measuring immunity against coccidiosis in chickens is discussed.

  13. Light and immune systems: activation of immunological activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zheng; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.

    2006-02-01

    Light has been used to treat diseases for hundreds of years. Convenient and powerful light sources such as lasers make photomedicine a major branch in diseases treatment and detection. Originally, light was often used for local treatment, using photomechanical, photochemical, photothermal reactions and photomodulation as the major mechanisms. More and more investigators have become interested in the systemic effects of light, particularly in its effects on immune systems. Much work has been done to activate and/or enhance the host immune system to combat cancer, either using light as a direct tool or as an adjuvant method. Light has long been used for assisting disease detection and diagnosis. Advances in light technology have made photo-diagnostics ever more precise spatially and temporally. Many techniques facilitate observation of bio-molecule interactions and other biological processes at the cellular level, hence providing opportunities to detect and monitor immune activities. This manuscript will review recent photo-immunological research in treatment of cancer. The recent development of combination therapies involving lasers will be presented. Specifically, the results of cancer treatment using laser photothermal interaction, either with or without additional immunological stimulation will be discussed. The immunological effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT), and of its combination with immunotherapy in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Much interest has been recently concentrated in the immunological responses after laser treatment. Such responses at cellular and molecular levels will be discussed. The effect of these treatment modalities on the distant metastases also showed promise of light induced antitumor immunity. The combination therapy and induced immunological responses appear to be the key for long-term control of tumors.

  14. Teaching artificial neural systems to drive: Manual training techniques for autonomous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepanski, J. F.; Macy, S. A.

    1987-01-01

    A methodology was developed for manually training autonomous control systems based on artificial neural systems (ANS). In applications where the rule set governing an expert's decisions is difficult to formulate, ANS can be used to extract rules by associating the information an expert receives with the actions taken. Properly constructed networks imitate rules of behavior that permits them to function autonomously when they are trained on the spanning set of possible situations. This training can be provided manually, either under the direct supervision of a system trainer, or indirectly using a background mode where the networks assimilates training data as the expert performs its day-to-day tasks. To demonstrate these methods, an ANS network was trained to drive a vehicle through simulated freeway traffic.

  15. Coordinate actions of innate immune responses oppose those of the adaptive immune system during Salmonella infection of mice.

    PubMed

    Hotson, Andrew N; Gopinath, Smita; Nicolau, Monica; Khasanova, Anna; Finck, Rachel; Monack, Denise; Nolan, Garry P

    2016-01-12

    The immune system enacts a coordinated response when faced with complex environmental and pathogenic perturbations. We used the heterogeneous responses of mice to persistent Salmonella infection to model system-wide coordination of the immune response to bacterial burden. We hypothesized that the variability in outcomes of bacterial growth and immune response across genetically identical mice could be used to identify immune elements that serve as integrators enabling co-regulation and interconnectedness of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Correlation analysis of immune response variation to Salmonella infection linked bacterial load with at least four discrete, interacting functional immune response "cassettes." One of these, the innate cassette, in the chronically infected mice included features of the innate immune system, systemic neutrophilia, and high serum concentrations of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6. Compared with mice with a moderate bacterial load, mice with the highest bacterial burden exhibited high activity of this innate cassette, which was associated with a dampened activity of the adaptive T cell cassette-with fewer plasma cells and CD4(+) T helper 1 cells and increased numbers of regulatory T cells-and with a dampened activity of the cytokine signaling cassette. System-wide manipulation of neutrophil numbers revealed that neutrophils regulated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling in B cells during infection. Thus, a network-level approach demonstrated unappreciated interconnections that balanced innate and adaptive immune responses during the dynamic course of disease and identified signals associated with pathogen transmission status, as well as a regulatory role for neutrophils in cytokine signaling.

  16. Novel artificial anal sphincter system based on transcutaneous energy transmission system tested in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongbing; Liu, Hua; Xu, Qianqian; Yan, Guozheng

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes a novel artificial anal sphincter system (AASS) for severe fecal incontinence. The AASS is composed of an artificial anal sphincter (AAS), an external transcutaneous energy transmission system (TETS), and an external control device. The AAS is composed of a cuff, a micropump, a reservoir, and a remote control device. It is designed to be implanted into the body of the patient. The function of the AAS is to open and close the patient's natural anus. Patients suffering from loss of their natural sphincter lose rectal sensation and are thus unable to perceive imminent fecal incontinence. In order to restore rectal sensation, a pressure sensor in the AAS cuff is designed to detect pressure in the colon. The pressure reflects the present quantity of colon contents, allowing patients to control the AAS to open or close the anus according to the pressure. The TETS is designed to provide electrical energy to the implanted AAS without wire connections. The external control device is designed to receive the pressure information from the AAS and send the patient's command to the implanted device. This paper provides a thorough discussion of the design of the novel AASS and describes the performance of the AASS when tested in vivo on two Beagle dogs who were chosen to be the subjects for receiving the implant. The experimental results verified that the performance of the AASS met the functional requirements it was designed for; however, the trial also revealed some challenges to be further studied.

  17. How to build an information gathering and processing system: lessons from naturally and artificially intelligent systems.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Jackie; Demery, Zoe P; Arriola-Rios, Veronica; Sloman, Aaron

    2012-02-01

    Imagine a situation in which you had to design a physical agent that could collect information from its environment, then store and process that information to help it respond appropriately to novel situations. What kinds of information should it attend to? How should the information be represented so as to allow efficient use and re-use? What kinds of constraints and trade-offs would there be? There are no unique answers. In this paper, we discuss some of the ways in which the need to be able to address problems of varying kinds and complexity can be met by different information processing systems. We also discuss different ways in which relevant information can be obtained, and how different kinds of information can be processed and used, by both biological organisms and artificial agents. We analyse several constraints and design features, and show how they relate both to biological organisms, and to lessons that can be learned from building artificial systems. Our standpoint overlaps with Karmiloff-Smith (1992) in that we assume that a collection of mechanisms geared to learning and developing in biological environments are available in forms that constrain, but do not determine, what can or will be learnt by individuals.

  18. Signal processing using artificial neural network for BOTDA sensor system.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Wang, Liang; Guo, Nan; Tam, Hwa-Yaw; Lu, Chao

    2016-03-21

    We experimentally demonstrate the use of artificial neural network (ANN) to process sensing signals obtained from Brillouin optical time domain analyzer (BOTDA). The distributed temperature information is extracted directly from the local Brillouin gain spectra (BGSs) along the fiber under test without the process of determination of Brillouin frequency shift (BFS) and hence conversion from BFS to temperature. Unlike our previous work for short sensing distance where ANN is trained by measured BGSs, here we employ ideal BGSs with different linewidths to train the ANN in order to take the linewidth variation due to different conditions from the training and testing phases into account, making it feasible for long distance sensing. Moreover, the performance of ANN is compared with other two techniques, Lorentzian curve fitting and cross-correlation method, and our results show that ANN has higher accuracy and larger tolerance to measurement error, especially at large frequency scanning step. We also show that the temperature extraction from BOTDA measurements employing ANN is significantly faster than the other two approaches. Hence ANN can be an excellent alternative tool to process BGSs measured by BOTDA and obtain temperature distribution along the fiber, especially when large frequency scanning step is adopted to significantly reduce the measurement time but without sacrifice of sensing accuracy.

  19. Regenerative function of immune system: Modulation of muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Saini, Jasdeep; McPhee, Jamie S; Al-Dabbagh, Sarah; Stewart, Claire E; Al-Shanti, Nasser

    2016-05-01

    Ageing is characterised by progressive deterioration of physiological systems and the loss of skeletal muscle mass is one of the most recognisable, leading to muscle weakness and mobility impairments. This review highlights interactions between the immune system and skeletal muscle stem cells (widely termed satellite cells or myoblasts) to influence satellite cell behaviour during muscle regeneration after injury, and outlines deficits associated with ageing. Resident neutrophils and macrophages in skeletal muscle become activated when muscle fibres are damaged via stimuli (e.g. contusions, strains, avulsions, hyperextensions, ruptures) and release high concentrations of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors into the microenvironment. These localised responses serve to attract additional immune cells which can reach in excess of 1×10(5) immune cell/mm(3) of skeletal muscle in order to orchestrate the repair process. T-cells have a delayed response, reaching peak activation roughly 4 days after the initial damage. The cytokines and growth factors released by activated T-cells play a key role in muscle satellite cell proliferation and migration, although the precise mechanisms of these interactions remain unclear. T-cells in older people display limited ability to activate satellite cell proliferation and migration which is likely to contribute to insufficient muscle repair and, consequently, muscle wasting and weakness. If the factors released by T-cells to activate satellite cells can be identified, it may be possible to develop therapeutic agents to enhance muscle regeneration and reduce the impact of muscle wasting during ageing and disease.

  20. Interaction of the tick immune system with transmitted pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Hajdušek, Ondřej; Šíma, Radek; Ayllón, Nieves; Jalovecká, Marie; Perner, Jan; de la Fuente, José; Kopáček, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Ticks are hematophagous arachnids transmitting a wide variety of pathogens including viruses, bacteria, and protozoans to their vertebrate hosts. The tick vector competence has to be intimately linked to the ability of transmitted pathogens to evade tick defense mechanisms encountered on their route through the tick body comprising midgut, hemolymph, salivary glands or ovaries. Tick innate immunity is, like in other invertebrates, based on an orchestrated action of humoral and cellular immune responses. The direct antimicrobial defense in ticks is accomplished by a variety of small molecules such as defensins, lysozymes or by tick-specific antimicrobial compounds such as microplusin/hebraein or 5.3-kDa family proteins. Phagocytosis of the invading microbes by tick hemocytes is likely mediated by the primordial complement-like system composed of thioester-containing proteins, fibrinogen-related lectins and convertase-like factors. Moreover, an important role in survival of the ingested microbes seems to be played by host proteins and redox balance maintenance in the tick midgut. Here, we summarize recent knowledge about the major components of tick immune system and focus on their interaction with the relevant tick-transmitted pathogens, represented by spirochetes (Borrelia), rickettsiae (Anaplasma), and protozoans (Babesia). Availability of the tick genomic database and feasibility of functional genomics based on RNA interference greatly contribute to the understanding of molecular and cellular interplay at the tick-pathogen interface and may provide new targets for blocking the transmission of tick pathogens. PMID:23875177

  1. The scope of the crustacean immune system for disease control.

    PubMed

    Hauton, Chris

    2012-06-01

    The culture or wild capture of marine and freshwater shellfish, including crustaceans, is without doubt a key source of protein for a burgeoning world population. Historically the expansion of aquaculture has, however, been accompanied by the increased incidence of economically significant diseases, most notably of viral and bacterial origin. Since the late 1970s great progress has been made in our understanding of the generalized protostome innate immune system. Distinct pathways, pathogen receptor proteins and effector molecules have since been identified that are not ancestral or homologous to those of the deuterostomes, including vertebrates. Within the past decade progress has accelerated with the rapid characterisation of new classes of recognition proteins, immune effectors and regulatory pathways. This paper provides a broad overview of our current understanding of invertebrate immunology, taking the crustacean decapod immune system as its focus. Recent developments in the field are described briefly and their implications and potential considered. These advances offer fundamental new insights in our efforts to understand disease in cultured populations and also to develop knowledge of environmental effects on host/pathogen interactions within a fishery context. Of course, challenges do remain, including the lack of an immortal cell line and the limited publically-available genomic resources. These are considered in this review as priorities for future research effort. With the continued application of more insightful technologies, coupled with associated investment, it is expected that the speed at which some of these issues are resolved will accelerate.

  2. Joint Replacement Surgery and the Innate Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Stuart; Konttinen, Yrjö T.; Takagi, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Total joint replacement is a highly successful, cost-effective surgical procedure that relieves pain and improves function for patients with end-stage arthritis. The most commonly used materials for modern joint replacements include metal alloys such as cobalt chrome and titanium alloys, polymers including polymethylmethacrylate and polyethylene, and ceramics. Implantation of a joint prosthesis incites an acute inflammatory reaction that is regulated by the innate immune system, a preprogrammed non-antigen specific biological response composed of cells, proteins, and other factors. This “frontline” immune mechanism was originally designed to combat invading microorganisms, but now responds to both pathogen-associated molecular patterns or PAMPS (by-products from microorganisms), and damage associated molecular patterns or DAMPS (molecular by-products from cells), via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). In this way, potentially injurious stimuli that might disrupt the normal homeostatic regulatory mechanisms of the organism are efficiently dealt with, ensuring the survival of the host. Initial surgical implantation of the joint replacement, as well as ongoing generation of wear debris and byproducts during usage of the joint, activates the innate immune system. Understanding and potentially modulating these events may lead to improved function and increased longevity of joint replacements in the future. PMID:25747028

  3. Dysregulation of the immune system caused by silica and asbestos.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Megumi; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Kumagai, Naoko; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Hatayama, Tamayo; Katoh, Minako; Miyahara, Naomi; Yamamoto, Shoko; Hirastuka, Junichi; Otsuki, Takemi

    2010-01-01

    Silica and asbestos cause pneumoconioses known as silicosis and asbestosis, respectively, that are each characterized by progressive pulmonary fibrosis. While local effects of inhaled silica particles alter the function of alveolar macrophages and sequential cellular and molecular biological events, general systemic immunological effects may also evolve. One well-known health outcome associated with silica exposure/silicosis is an increase in the incidence of autoimmune disorders. In addition, while exposure to silica--in the crystalline form--has also been seen to be associated with the development of lung cancers, it remains unclear as to whether or not silicosis is a necessary condition for the elevation of silica-associated lung cancer risks. Since asbestos is a mineral silicate, it would be expected to also possess generalized immunotoxicological effects similar to those associated with silica particles. However, asbestos-exposed patients are far better known than silicotic patients for development of malignant diseases such as lung cancer and mesothelioma, and less so for the development of autoimmune disorders. With both asbestos and crystalline silica, one important dysregulatory outcome that needs to be considered is an alteration in tumor immunity that allows for silica- or asbestos- (or asbestos-associated agent)-induced tumors to survive and thrive in situ. In this review, the immunotoxicological effects of both silica and asbestos are presented and contrasted in terms of their abilities to induce immune system dysregulation that then are manifest by the onset of autoimmunity or by alterations in host-tumor immunity.

  4. Immune System Activation and Depression: Roles of Serotonin in the Central Nervous System and Periphery.

    PubMed

    Robson, Matthew J; Quinlan, Meagan A; Blakely, Randy D

    2017-04-03

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has long been recognized as a key contributor to the regulation of mood and anxiety and is strongly associated with the etiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Although more known for its roles within the central nervous system (CNS), 5-HT is recognized to modulate several key aspects of immune system function that may contribute to the development of MDD. Copious amounts of research have outlined a connection between alterations in immune system function, inflammation status, and MDD. Supporting this connection, peripheral immune activation results in changes in the function and/or expression of many components of 5-HT signaling that are associated with depressive-like phenotypes. How 5-HT is utilized by the immune system to effect CNS function and ultimately behaviors related to depression is still not well understood. This Review summarizes the evidence that immune system alterations related to depression affect CNS 5-HT signaling that can alter MDD-relevant behaviors and that 5-HT regulates immune system signaling within the CNS and periphery. We suggest that targeting the interrelationships between immune and 5-HT signaling may provide more effective treatments for subsets of those suffering from inflammation-associated MDD.

  5. Compartmentalized and systemic control of tissue immunity by commensals

    PubMed Central

    Belkaid, Yasmine; Naik, Shruti

    2013-01-01

    The body is composed of various tissue microenvironments with finely tuned local immunosurveillance systems, many of which are in close apposition with distinct commensal niches. Mammals have formed an evolutionary partnership with the microbiota that is critical for metabolism, tissue development and host defense. Despite our growing understanding of the impact of this host-microbe alliance on immunity in the gastrointestinal tract, the extent to which individual microenvironments are controlled by resident microbiota remains unclear. In this Perspective we discuss how resident commensals outside the gastrointestinal tract can control unique physiological niches and the potential implications of the dialog between these commensals and the host for the establishment of immune homeostasis, protective responses and tissue pathology. PMID:23778791

  6. Identification of transcriptional regulators in the mouse immune system.

    PubMed

    Jojic, Vladimir; Shay, Tal; Sylvia, Katelyn; Zuk, Or; Sun, Xin; Kang, Joonsoo; Regev, Aviv; Koller, Daphne; Best, Adam J; Knell, Jamie; Goldrath, Ananda; Joic, Vladimir; Koller, Daphne; Shay, Tal; Regev, Aviv; Cohen, Nadia; Brennan, Patrick; Brenner, Michael; Kim, Francis; Rao, Tata Nageswara; Wagers, Amy; Heng, Tracy; Ericson, Jeffrey; Rothamel, Katherine; Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe; Bezman, Natalie A; Sun, Joseph C; Min-Oo, Gundula; Kim, Charlie C; Lanier, Lewis L; Miller, Jennifer; Brown, Brian; Merad, Miriam; Gautier, Emmanuel L; Jakubzick, Claudia; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Monach, Paul; Blair, David A; Dustin, Michael L; Shinton, Susan A; Hardy, Richard R; Laidlaw, David; Collins, Jim; Gazit, Roi; Rossi, Derrick J; Malhotra, Nidhi; Sylvia, Katelyn; Kang, Joonsoo; Kreslavsky, Taras; Fletcher, Anne; Elpek, Kutlu; Bellemarte-Pelletier, Angelique; Malhotra, Deepali; Turley, Shannon

    2013-06-01

    The differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells into cells of the immune system has been studied extensively in mammals, but the transcriptional circuitry that controls it is still only partially understood. Here, the Immunological Genome Project gene-expression profiles across mouse immune lineages allowed us to systematically analyze these circuits. To analyze this data set we developed Ontogenet, an algorithm for reconstructing lineage-specific regulation from gene-expression profiles across lineages. Using Ontogenet, we found differentiation stage-specific regulators of mouse hematopoiesis and identified many known hematopoietic regulators and 175 previously unknown candidate regulators, as well as their target genes and the cell types in which they act. Among the previously unknown regulators, we emphasize the role of ETV5 in the differentiation of γδ T cells. As the transcriptional programs of human and mouse cells are highly conserved, it is likely that many lessons learned from the mouse model apply to humans.

  7. The Drosophila immune system detects bacteria through specific peptidoglycan recognition.

    PubMed

    Leulier, François; Parquet, Claudine; Pili-Floury, Sebastien; Ryu, Ji-Hwan; Caroff, Martine; Lee, Won-Jae; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Lemaitre, Bruno

    2003-05-01

    The Drosophila immune system discriminates between different classes of infectious microbes and responds with pathogen-specific defense reactions through selective activation of the Toll and the immune deficiency (Imd) signaling pathways. The Toll pathway mediates most defenses against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi, whereas the Imd pathway is required to resist infection by Gram-negative bacteria. The bacterial components recognized by these pathways remain to be defined. Here we report that Gram-negative diaminopimelic acid-type peptidoglycan is the most potent inducer of the Imd pathway and that the Toll pathway is predominantly activated by Gram-positive lysine-type peptidoglycan. Thus, the ability of Drosophila to discriminate between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria relies on the recognition of specific forms of peptidoglycan.

  8. A Paradigmatic Example of an Artificially Intelligent Instructional System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, John Seely; Burton, Richard R.

    This paper describes the philosophy of intelligent instructional systems and presents an example of one such system in the domain of manipulative mathematics--BLOCKS. The notion of BLOCKS as a paradigmatic system is explicated from both the system development and educational viewpoints. From a developmental point of view, the modular design of…

  9. Artificial feel system using magneto-rheological fluid on aircraft control stick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, Vignesh; Kim, Daewon

    2016-04-01

    The conventional feel system in aircraft occupies large space in the cockpit and has complicated designs. The primary objective of this research is to develop an artificial feel force system that can overcome some drawbacks of the current system. A novel feel system using magneto-rheological (MR) fluid is constructed to precisely control the shear stress under the magnetic field. To validate the functionality of the MR artificial feel system, the final system is fabricated and multiple tests are performed to acquire force-velocity characteristics that are compared to the mathematical model derived. In addition, the PID closed loop control algorithm is developed to simulate the dynamic system model. Both experimental and simulation results are compared to validate the derived system model. The system response time and sampling rates are evaluated and compared to the conventional system at the end. It is concluded that the developed artificial feel system can precisely control and acts as a fail proof system when incorporated with a modern fly-by-wire aircraft system.

  10. A multiuser detector based on artificial bee colony algorithm for DS-UWB systems.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhendong; Liu, Xiaohui; Wu, Zhilu

    2013-01-01

    Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm is an optimization algorithm based on the intelligent behavior of honey bee swarm. The ABC algorithm was developed to solve optimizing numerical problems and revealed premising results in processing time and solution quality. In ABC, a colony of artificial bees search for rich artificial food sources; the optimizing numerical problems are converted to the problem of finding the best parameter which minimizes an objective function. Then, the artificial bees randomly discover a population of initial solutions and then iteratively improve them by employing the behavior: moving towards better solutions by means of a neighbor search mechanism while abandoning poor solutions. In this paper, an efficient multiuser detector based on a suboptimal code mapping multiuser detector and artificial bee colony algorithm (SCM-ABC-MUD) is proposed and implemented in direct-sequence ultra-wideband (DS-UWB) systems under the additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel. The simulation results demonstrate that the BER and the near-far effect resistance performances of this proposed algorithm are quite close to those of the optimum multiuser detector (OMD) while its computational complexity is much lower than that of OMD. Furthermore, the BER performance of SCM-ABC-MUD is not sensitive to the number of active users and can obtain a large system capacity.

  11. Detection Technique for Artificially Illuminated Objects in the Outer Solar System and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Existing and planned optical telescopes and surveys can detect artificially illuminated objects, comparable in total brightness to a major terrestrial city, at the outskirts of the Solar System. Orbital parameters of Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) are routinely measured to exquisite precisions of<10−3. Here, we propose to measure the variation of the observed flux F from such objects as a function of their changing orbital distances D. Sunlight-illuminated objects will show a logarithmic slope α ≡ (d log F/d log D)=−4, whereas artificially illuminated objects should exhibit α=−2. The proposed Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and other planned surveys will provide superb data and allow measurement of α for thousands of KBOs. If objects with α=−2 are found, follow-up observations could measure their spectra to determine whether they are illuminated by artificial lighting. The search can be extended beyond the Solar System with future generations of telescopes on the ground and in space that would have the capacity to detect phase modulation due to very strong artificial illumination on the nightside of planets as they orbit their parent stars. Key Words: Astrobiology—SETI—Kuiper belt objects—Artificial illumination. Astrobiology 12, 290–294. PMID:22490065

  12. Development of a control system for artificially rehabilitated limbs: a review.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, M S H; Choudhury, I A; Dahari, M

    2015-04-01

    Development of an advanced control system for prostheses (artificial limbs) is necessary to provide functionality, effectiveness, and preferably the feeling of a sound living limb. The development of the control system has introduced varieties of control strategies depending on the application. This paper reviews some control systems used for prosthetics, orthotics, and exoskeletons. The advantages and limitations of different control systems for particular applications have been discussed and presented in a comparative manner to help in deciding the appropriate method for pertinent application.

  13. Progress in cybernetics and systems research. Vol. XI. Data base design. International Information Systems. Semiotic Systems. Artificial Intelligence. Cybernetics and Philosophy. Special aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Trappl, R.; Findler, N.V.; Horn, W.

    1982-01-01

    This book covers current research topics in six areas. These are data base design, international information systems, semiotic systems, artificial intelligence, cybernetics and philosophy, and special aspects of systems research. 1326 references.

  14. Hide-and-seek: the interplay between cancer stem cells and the immune system.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Mohammad; Coyle, Krysta Mila; Vidovic, Dejan; Thomas, Margaret Lois; Gujar, Shashi; Marcato, Paola

    2016-11-19

    The enhanced ability of cancer stem cells (CSCs) to give rise to new tumors suggests that these cells may also have an advantage in evading immune detection and elimination. This tumor-forming ability, combined with the known plasticity of the immune system, which can play both protumorigenic and antitumorigenic roles, has motivated investigations into the interaction between CSCs and the immune system. Herein, we review the interplay between host immunity and CSCs by examining the immune-related mechanisms that favor CSCs and the CSC-mediated expansion of protumorigenic immune cells. Furthermore, we discuss immune cells, such as natural killer cells, that preferentially target CSCs and the strategies used by CSCs to evade immune detection and destruction. An increased understanding of these interactions and the pathways that regulate them may allow us to harness immune system components to create new adjuvant therapies that eradicate CSCs and improve patient survival.

  15. Vein matching using artificial neural network in vein authentication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noori Hoshyar, Azadeh; Sulaiman, Riza

    2011-10-01

    Personal identification technology as security systems is developing rapidly. Traditional authentication modes like key; password; card are not safe enough because they could be stolen or easily forgotten. Biometric as developed technology has been applied to a wide range of systems. According to different researchers, vein biometric is a good candidate among other biometric traits such as fingerprint, hand geometry, voice, DNA and etc for authentication systems. Vein authentication systems can be designed by different methodologies. All the methodologies consist of matching stage which is too important for final verification of the system. Neural Network is an effective methodology for matching and recognizing individuals in authentication systems. Therefore, this paper explains and implements the Neural Network methodology for finger vein authentication system. Neural Network is trained in Matlab to match the vein features of authentication system. The Network simulation shows the quality of matching as 95% which is a good performance for authentication system matching.

  16. Utilization of artificial intelligence techniques for the Space Station power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evatt, Thomas C.; Gholdston, Edward W.

    1988-01-01

    Due to the complexity of the Space Station Electrical Power System (EPS) as currently envisioned, artificial intelligence/expert system techniques are being investigated to automate operations, maintenance, and diagnostic functions. A study was conducted to investigate this technology as it applies to failure detection, isolation, and reconfiguration (FDIR) and health monitoring of power system components and of the total system. Control system utilization of expert systems for load scheduling and shedding operations was also researched. A discussion of the utilization of artificial intelligence/expert systems for Initial Operating Capability (IOC) for the Space Station effort is presented along with future plans at Rocketdyne for the utilization of this technology for enhanced Space Station power capability.

  17. Human CD8+ T cells mediate protective immunity induced by a human malaria vaccine in human immune system mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangming; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Min; Funakoshi, Ryota; Sheetij, Dutta; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Crisanti, Andrea; Nussenzweig, Victor; Nussenzweig, Ruth S; Tsuji, Moriya

    2016-08-31

    A number of studies have shown that CD8+ T cells mediate protective anti-malaria immunity in a mouse model. However, whether human CD8+ T cells play a role in protection against malaria remains unknown. We recently established human immune system (HIS) mice harboring functional human CD8+ T cells (HIS-CD8 mice) by transduction with HLA-A∗0201 and certain human cytokines using recombinant adeno-associated virus-based gene transfer technologies. These HIS-CD8 mice mount a potent, antigen-specific HLA-A∗0201-restricted human CD8+ T-cell response upon immunization with a recombinant adenovirus expressing a human malaria antigen, the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP), termed AdPfCSP. In the present study, we challenged AdPfCSP-immunized HIS-CD8 mice with transgenic Plasmodium berghei sporozoites expressing full-length PfCSP and found that AdPfCSP-immunized (but not naïve) mice were protected against subsequent malaria challenge. The level of the HLA-A∗0201-restricted, PfCSP-specific human CD8+ T-cell response was closely correlated with the level of malaria protection. Furthermore, depletion of human CD8+ T cells from AdPfCSP-immunized HIS-CD8 mice almost completely abolished the anti-malaria immune response. Taken together, our data show that human CD8+ T cells mediate protective anti-malaria immunity in vivo.

  18. Methamphetamine: Effects on the brain, gut and immune system.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Monica D; Tangalakis, Kathy; Antonipillai, Juliana; Stojanovska, Lily; Nurgali, Kulmira; Apostolopoulos, Vasso

    2017-03-14

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a powerful central nervous system stimulant which elevates mood, alertness, energy levels and concentration in the short-term. However, chronic use and/or at higher doses METH use often results in psychosis, depression, delusions and violent behavior. METH was formerly used to treat conditions such as obesity and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, but now is primarily used recreationally. Its addictive nature has led to METH abuse becoming a global problem. At a cellular level, METH exerts a myriad of effects on the central and peripheral nervous systems, immune system and the gastrointestinal system. Here we present how these effects might be linked and their potential contribution to the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders. In the long term, this pathway could be targeted therapeutically to protect people from the ill effects of METH use. This model of METH use may also provide insight into how gut, nervous and immune systems might break down in other conditions that may also benefit from therapeutic intervention.

  19. [Plasticity of neuroendocrine and immune systems in early development].

    PubMed

    Zakharova, L A

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of our own and published data on the reciprocal morphogenetic influence of the neiuroendocriie and imnimune systems on their formation and function in mammals. It is substantiated that, in early ontogeny, neurohormones regulate the growth and differentiation of various tissues in the body, including the lymphoid tissue. Thymicpeptides, in turn, affect the development of the hypothalamic-pitiitary-adrenal and gonadal-systems. Various adverse factors and changes in the physiological concentrations of hormones in the critical periods of development of these systems change their functions, and the plasticity of physiological systems in early ontogeny allows the body to adapt to new conditions. Disturbances in the interaction of the neuroendocrineand immune systems in the perinatal period induce apredisposition to various diseases in progeny.

  20. Artificial Intelligence for Explosive Ordnance Disposal System (AI-EOD)

    SciTech Connect

    Madrid, R.; Williams, B.; Holland, J.

    1992-03-01

    Based on a dynamically configurable neural net that learns in a single pass of the training data, this paper describes a system used by the military in the identification of explosive ordnance. Allowing the technician to input incomplete, contradictory, and wrong information, this system combines expert systems and neural nets to provide a state-of-the-art search, retrieval, and image and text management system.