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Sample records for artificial ionospheric layers

  1. Artificial ionospheric layers during pump frequency stepping near the 4th gyroharmonic at HAARP.

    PubMed

    Sergeev, E; Grach, S; Shindin, A; Mishin, E; Bernhardt, P; Briczinski, S; Isham, B; Broughton, M; LaBelle, J; Watkins, B

    2013-02-01

    We report on artificial descending plasma layers created in the ionosphere F region by high-power high-frequency (HF) radio waves from High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program at frequencies f(0) near the fourth electron gyroharmonic 4f(ce). The data come from concurrent measurements of the secondary escaping radiation from the HF-pumped ionosphere, also known as stimulated electromagnetic emission, reflected probing signals at f(0), and plasma line radar echoes. The artificial layers appeared only for injections along the magnetic field and f(0)>4f(ce) at the nominal HF interaction altitude in the background ionosphere. Their average downward speed ~0.5 km/s holds until the terminal altitude where the local fourth gyroharmonic matches f(0). The total descent increases with the nominal offset f(0)-4f(ce). PMID:23432261

  2. Artificial Ionospheric Layers during Pump Frequency Stepping Near the 4th Gyroharmonic at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, E.; Grach, S.; Shindin, A.; Mishin, E.; Bernhardt, P.; Briczinski, S.; Isham, B.; Broughton, M.; LaBelle, J.; Watkins, B.

    2013-02-01

    We report on artificial descending plasma layers created in the ionosphere F region by high-power high-frequency (HF) radio waves from High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program at frequencies f0 near the fourth electron gyroharmonic 4fce. The data come from concurrent measurements of the secondary escaping radiation from the HF-pumped ionosphere, also known as stimulated electromagnetic emission, reflected probing signals at f0, and plasma line radar echoes. The artificial layers appeared only for injections along the magnetic field and f0>4fce at the nominal HF interaction altitude in the background ionosphere. Their average downward speed ˜0.5km/s holds until the terminal altitude where the local fourth gyroharmonic matches f0. The total descent increases with the nominal offset f0-4fce.

  3. Numerical modeling of artificial ionospheric layers driven by high-power HF-heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milikh, G. M.; Eliasson, B.; Shao, X.; Mishin, E. V.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2012-12-01

    We present a multi-scale dynamic model for the creation and propagation of artificial plasma layers in the ionosphere observed during high-power high frequency heating experiments at HAARP. Ordinary mode electromagnetic waves excite parametric instabilities and strong Langmuir turbulence near the reflection point. The coupling between high frequency electromagnetic and Langmuir waves and low-frequency ion acoustic waves is numerically simulated using a generalized Zakharov equation. The acceleration of plasma electrons is described by a Fokker-Planck model with an effective diffusion coefficient constructed using the simulated Langmuir wave spectrum. The propagation of the accelerated electrons through the non-uniform ionosphere is simulated by a kinetic model accounting for elastic and inelastic collisions with neutrals. The resulting ionization of neutral gas increases the plasma density below the acceleration region, so that the pump wave is reflected at a lower altitude. This leads to a new turbulent layer at the lower altitude, resulting in a descending artificial ionized layer, that moves from near 230 km to about 150 km. At the terminal altitude, ionization, recombination, and ambipolar diffusion reach equilibrium, so the descent stops. The modeling results reproduce artificial ionospheric layers produced for similar sets of parameters during the high-power HF experiments at HAARP.

  4. Artificial ionospheric layers driven by high-frequency radiowaves: An assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, Evgeny; Watkins, Brenton; Lehtinen, Nikolai; Eliasson, Bengt; Pedersen, Todd; Grach, Savely

    2016-04-01

    High-power ordinary mode radio waves produce artificial ionization in the F region ionosphere at the European Incoherent Scatter (Tromsø, Norway) and High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (Gakona, Alaska, USA) facilities. We have summarized the features of the excited plasma turbulence and descending layers of freshly ionized ("artificial") plasma. The concept of an ionizing wavefront created by accelerated suprathermal electrons appears to be in accordance with the data. The strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) regime is revealed by the specific spectral features of incoherent radar backscatter and stimulated electromagnetic emissions. Theory predicts that the SLT acceleration is facilitated in the presence of photoelectrons. This agrees with the intensified artificial plasma production and the greater speeds of descent but weaker incoherent radar backscatter in the sunlit ionosphere. Numerical investigation of propagation of O-mode waves and the development of SLT and descending layers have been performed. The greater extent of the SLT region at the magnetic zenith than that at vertical appears to make magnetic zenith injections more efficient for electron acceleration and descending layers. At high powers, anomalous absorption is suppressed, leading to the Langmuir and upper hybrid processes during the whole heater on period. The data suggest that parametric upper hybrid interactions mitigate anomalous absorption at heating frequencies far from electron gyroharmonics and also generate SLT in the upper hybrid layer. The persistence of artificial plasma at the terminal altitude depends on how close the heating frequency is to the local gyroharmonic.

  5. Artificial periodic irregularities in the lower ionosphere, atmospheric waves and sporadic E-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhmetieva, Nataliya V.; Egerev, M. N.; Tolmacheva, A. V.; Vyakhirev, V. D.

    2010-05-01

    The long-term researches have shown that artificial periodic irregularities (API) created in the ionosphere plasma are a good means for the ionosphere diagnostics. In the report we present the new applications of the API technique for experimental studies of the lower ionosphere, atmospheric waves and sporadic E-layers. The applications are based on the new so-called two-frequency method of the API creation for the ionosphere diagnostic. The main results of the ionosphere studies carried out in 2006-2009 by the API technique using SURA heating facility are presented. API are formed in the field of a powerful standing radio wave produced by interference of the incident wave and reflected one by the ionosphere (Belikovich et al., Ionospheric Research by Means of Artificial Periodic Irregularities- Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany. 2002. Copernicus GmbH. ISBN 3-936586-03-9). The spatial period of the irregular structure is equal to the standing wavelength or the one-half the power wavelength λ/2. Ionosphere diagnostic is carried out in the API relaxation stage by their sounding of probing radio pulses. The two frequency method bases upon the API creation and the scattering of the probe waves from API at two different frequencies that is having different spatial periods of the quasi periodic structure. In the E-region of the ionosphere API are formed as a result of the diffusion redistribution of the ionosphere plasma. Relaxation of the periodic structure is specified by the ambipolar diffusion process. The API relaxation time depends on the power wavelength and the ambipolar diffusion rate. It means that API having different spatial scales destroys with different time scales ?. The API spatial scale depends on the refractive index n that is determined by the electron density N. It is shown the ratio of API relaxation times ? at two frequencies f1 and f2, measured at the same heights, is connected with the frequencies ratio and the refractive index ratio. The measurement of

  6. Geometric Aspects of Artificial Ionospheric Layers Driven by High-Power HF-Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milikh, G. M.; Eliasson, B.; Shao, X.; Djordjevic, B.; Mishin, E. V.; Zawdie, K.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2013-12-01

    We have generalized earlier developed multi-scale dynamic model for the creation and propagation of artificial plasma layers in the ionosphere [Eliasson et al, 2012] by including two dimensional effects in the horizontal direction. Such layers were observed during high-power high frequency HF heating experiments at HAARP [Pedersen et al., 2010]. We have numerically investigated the importance of different angles of incidence of ordinary mode waves on the Langmuir turbulence and the resulting electron acceleration that leads to the formation of artificial ionospheric layers. It was shown that the most efficient electron acceleration and subsequent ionization is obtained at angles between magnetic zenith and the vertical, where strong Langmuir turbulence dominates over weak turbulence. A role played by the heating wave propagation near caustics was also investigated. Eliasson, B. et al. (2012), J. Geophys. Res. 117, A10321, doi:10.1029/2012JA018105. Pedersen, T., et al. (2010), Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L02106, doi:10.1029/2009GL041895.

  7. Forecasting of the critical frequency of the ionosphere F2 layer by the method of artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkhatov, N. A.; Revunov, S. E.; Uryadov, V. P.

    2004-12-01

    An algorithm of forecasting of the ionosphere F2 layer critical frequency for time intervals: 1, 2, 3, 12, and 24 hours was developed on the basis of the technology of artificial neural networks (ANN). The experimental search for a valid training array and architecture of ANN was performed. The solar wind parameters, interplanetary magnetic field, and geomagnetic disturbance indexes were additionally used in the forecasting. This made it possible to improve its effectiveness. The practical importance of the performed work is in the application of its results for efficient correction of the ionosphere model for an improvement of the ionosphere shortwave radio communication.

  8. Artificial ionosphere layers for pumping-wave frequencies near the fourth electron gyroharmonic in experiments at the HAARP facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grach, S. M.; Sergeev, E. N.; Shindin, A. V.; Mishin, E. V.; Watkins, B.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we consider the action (in the magnetic-zenith direction) of powerful high frequency (HF) radiation of ordinary polarization on the ionosphere F region. We deal with frequencies f 0 > 4 f ce ( f ce is the electron cyclotron frequency) of 1.7 GW equivalent radiated power. This action results in the appearance in the ionosphere of an artificial ionization layer. The layer descends with respect to the basic (unperturbed) layer at a rate of ˜500 m s-1 down to the altitude, where f 0 ≈ 4 f ce .

  9. Incidence angle dependence of Langmuir turbulence and artificial ionospheric layers driven by high-power HF-heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, B.; Milikh, G.; Shao, X.; Mishin, E. V.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2015-04-01

    We have numerically investigated the development of strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and associated electron acceleration at different angles of incidence of ordinary (O) mode pump waves. For angles of incidence within the Spitze cone, the turbulence initially develops within the first maximum of the Airy pattern near the plasma resonance altitude. After a few milliseconds, the turbulent layer shifts downwards by about 1 km. For injections outside the Spitze region, the turning point of the pump wave is at lower altitudes. Yet, an Airy-like pattern forms here, and the turbulence development is quite similar to that for injections within the Spitze. SLT leads to the acceleration of 10-20 eV electrons that ionize the neutral gas thereby creating artificial ionospheric layers. Our numerical modeling shows that most efficient electron acceleration and ionization occur at angles between the magnetic and geographic zenith, where SLT dominates over weak turbulence. Possible effects of the focusing of the electromagnetic beam on magnetic field-aligned density irregularities and the finite heating beam width at the magnetic zenith are also discussed. The results have relevance to ionospheric heating experiments using ground-based, high-power radio transmitters to heat the overhead plasma, where recent observations of artificial ionization layers have been made.

  10. Regional application of multi-layer artificial neural networks in 3-D ionosphere tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari Razin, Mir Reza; Voosoghi, Behzad

    2016-08-01

    Tomography is a very cost-effective method to study physical properties of the ionosphere. In this paper, residual minimization training neural network (RMTNN) is used in voxel-based tomography to reconstruct of 3-D ionosphere electron density with high spatial resolution. For numerical experiments, observations collected at 37 GPS stations from Iranian permanent GPS network (IPGN) are used. A smoothed TEC approach was used for absolute STEC recovery. To improve the vertical resolution, empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) obtained from international reference ionosphere 2012 (IRI-2012) used as object function in training neural network. Ionosonde observations is used for validate reliability of the proposed method. Minimum relative error for RMTNN is 1.64% and maximum relative error is 15.61%. Also root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.17 × 1011 (electrons/m3) is computed for RMTNN which is less than RMSE of IRI2012. The results show that RMTNN has higher accuracy and compiles speed than other ionosphere reconstruction methods.

  11. Foreshortened short-wave scattering on artificial ionospheric inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, V. Y.; Yerkhimov, L. M.; Maksimenko, O. I.; Mityakova, E. Y.; Mityakov, N. A.; Voguta, N. M.; Nekrasov, B. Y.; Uryadov, V. P.; Shirochkov, A. V.; Shumilov, I. A.

    1985-03-01

    Synchronous slant soundings of the ionosphere were performed in April, May and September of 1982 in the morning and evening hours. Reflections observed on the diagrams as a mode with a delay relative to the 1F2 mode were recorded only on the Murmansk-Kiev path, not the Leningrad-Kiev, Moscow-Kiev or Kheys island-Kiev paths. The observations of the foreshortening mode indicate that it develops when the heating frequency is 81 to 88% of the critical frequency of the F2 layer at the heated point. It is found that the slant sounding equipment is effective for the study of foreshortening scattering of radio waves on artificial ionospheric inhomogeneities created by powerful shortwave transmitters. Foreshortening modes are observed with a mean probability of 34.8% over the Murmansk-Kiev path at frequencies of 0.5-6 MHz.

  12. Artificially created holes in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendillo, M.; Forbes, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The artificial creation of ionospheric holes by the release of highly reactive molecules into the F region is investigated. Through ion-atom interchange or charge transfer reactions, H2 or H2O reacts with O(+) to form OH(+) or H2O(+), respectively, which subsequently dissociatively recombines with electrons at a very rapid rate. The diffusion of H2 is also modified by chemical loss to the ambient atomic oxygen atmosphere. The limited spatial and temporal extent of the hole-making process allows several approximations to be made which permit three-dimensional analytic solutions of the continuity equations for the released particles, the O(+) and e(-) densities, and the intermediary molecular ions. A versatile formalism is developed whereby the hole-making capability of virtually any spatial-temporal configuration of released particles can be determined by convolving a set of destruction operators which can be viewed as Green's functions for the problem. As a specific application of the techniques developed, the modification of a winter nighttime ionosphere is described by simulating the release of 1000 kg of water vapor near a height of 300 km.

  13. HF Radio Wave Production of Artificial Ionospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Herbert

    In 1993 it was predicted that artificial ionospheres would be produced by high power HF radio waves, once HF transmitters approached a GWatt ERP. When that threshold was very recently achieved, such production was indeed detected and published at two high latitude high power HF facilities. Here we review: the first-principles logic behind that prediction, which aspects of such production are critically dependent on magnetic latitude, and which aspects of such production depend only on physical parameters independent of latitude. These distinctions follow directly from decomposition of the problem of ionization production into its components of: radio-wave propagation, wave-particle interactions, electron transport, and quantitative elastic/inelastic cross-sections. We outline this analysis to show that, within the context of early observations, the production of ionization is inevitable, and only a question of competing instability thresholds, and scale of ionization production. This illustrates complimentary aeronomy and plasma physics to advance understanding of both.

  14. Investigations of the ionospheric using radio signals from artificial satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titheridge, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The occurrence and characteristics of ionospheric irregularities in medium latitudes and in polar regions were measured using radio signals from artificial satellites. Ionospheric changes during quiet and disturbed conditions were also measured. Electron density, elevation angle, and amplitude and frequency of these high frequency signals were determined as well as the direction of their arrival.

  15. Automatic ionospheric layers detection: Algorithms analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, María G.; Zuccheretti, Enrico; Cabrera, Miguel A.; Bianchi, Cesidio; Sciacca, Umberto; Baskaradas, James

    2016-03-01

    Vertical sounding is a widely used technique to obtain ionosphere measurements, such as an estimation of virtual height versus frequency scanning. It is performed by high frequency radar for geophysical applications called "ionospheric sounder" (or "ionosonde"). Radar detection depends mainly on targets characteristics. While several targets behavior and correspondent echo detection algorithms have been studied, a survey to address a suitable algorithm for ionospheric sounder has to be carried out. This paper is focused on automatic echo detection algorithms implemented in particular for an ionospheric sounder, target specific characteristics were studied as well. Adaptive threshold detection algorithms are proposed, compared to the current implemented algorithm, and tested using actual data obtained from the Advanced Ionospheric Sounder (AIS-INGV) at Rome Ionospheric Observatory. Different cases of study have been selected according typical ionospheric and detection conditions.

  16. Artificial plasma jet in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, G.; Sagdeev, R. Z.

    The dynamics of an artificially injected plasma beam in the near-earth space are analyzed in terms of the beam structure, its propagation across the magnetic field, and the resulting wave phenomena (Porcupine Project, flight 4, March 31, 1979). Out of the four ejectable canisters attached to the main payload, two were instrumented by the U.S., one by the USSR (the Xenon plasma beam experiment), and one by West Germany (carrying a barium ion jet experiment). The propagation of the plasma seems to occur in three stages, with high-frequency broad-band oscillations mainly localized in the 'core' of the jet, while low-frequency oscillations were spatially separated from it. The generation region of LF oscillations was found to be much wider than the jet core. As a result of the interaction between the plasma beam and the ambient medium a heating of electrons, up to energies of about 20 eV, associated with LF noise was observed. The behavior of high-energy ions and the observed HF wave phenomena need further analysis.

  17. Ionospheric Turbulence and the Evolution of Artificial Irregularities Excited by RF Interactions at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Rayyan, N.; Watkins, B. J.; Bristow, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The HAARP phased-array HF transmitter at Gakona, AK delivers up to 3.6 GW (ERP) of HF power in the range of 2.8 - 10 MHz to the ionosphere with millisecond pointing, power modulation, and frequency agility. HAARP's unique features have enabled the conduct of a number of nonlinear plasma experiments in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma including stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE), artificial aurora, artificial ionization layers, VLF wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and suprathermal electron acceleration. Diagnostics include the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, spacecraft radio beacons, HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE) and telescopes and cameras for optical emissions. We report on short timescale ponderomotive overshoot effects, artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI), the aspect angle dependence of the intensity of the plasma line, and suprathermal electrons. For a narrow range of HF pointing between Spitze and magnetic zenith, a reduced threshold for AFAI is observed. Applications are made to the study of irregularities relevant to spacecraft communication and navigation systems.

  18. Electrostatic and Electromagnetic Fluctuation in the Boundary Layer of Laboratory-Created Ionospheric Depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Cao, J.; Xu, L.; Zhang, X.

    2014-12-01

    Ionospheric depletions have been frequently artificially-created in the past decades from releasing attachment chemicals[Mendillo and Forbes, 1978]. In the early phase of the ionospheric depletion, a boundary layer of width of electric scale length emerged and separated the ionosphere into two regions, the ambient plasmas and the negative ion plasmas. In the localized boundary layer, there exists sharp electron gradients and strong sheared flows, which have a pronounced effect on the nonlinear evolution of many plasma systems. Therefore, it reflects essential research significance to study the boundary layer processes in an ionospheric depletion. However, until now, few experiments have specially designed and conducted to characterize and study those boundary layer processes[ Liu et al., 2014]. In the work, We studied the evolution of boundary layer in laboratory-created ionospheric depletions. These experiments were performed in plasma conditions with key dimensionless parameters scaled to those of the ionosphere. These electrons depletions were produced by releasing attachment chemicals into pre-existing plasmas. These plasmas were separated into two regions by a boundary layer of width of electric scale length. In the modeling ionospheric hole, localized boundary layer, those fluctuations of the electron density , floating potential, and magnetic field were investigated varying with the plasma pressure and the partial pressure of released chemicals. These fluctuations were recorded by Langmuir probes and magnetic probes. We analyzed the fluctuation using digital spectral analysis techniques, and electrostatic and electromagnetic fluctuations in the lower hybrid range were observed. These modes may be electron-ion hybrid(EIH) and whistler mode, respectively. The possibility will be discussed in more detail during the presentation. Reference Liu, Y., J. Cao, L. Xu, X. Zhang, P. Wang, J. Wang, Y. Du, and Z. Zheng (2014a), Coherent structure generated in the

  19. A Coupled Ionosphere-Raytrace Model for Artificial HF Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawdie, K.; Huba, J. D.; Drob, D. P.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The first self-consistent 3D model of artificial HF ionospheric heating has been developed. The model combines the first principles ionosphere model SAMI3/ESF and the ray trace code MoJo-15. The location of HF heating is calculated by simulating the ray path through the ionosphere and determining the average heating location. This new model has been used to successfully simulate the snapback effect discovered in a Arecibo HF heating experiment described by Bernhardt et al. [1988]. The simulations provide new insight into the physical mechanism for snapback. As Bernhardt et al. [1988] hypothesized, the heater wave is refracted by the density cavity, thus causing the location of heating to drift in longitude. The cause of snapback, however, is not that the ray snaps back to its original configuration once the density cavity has convected out of range. Instead, the density cavity convects into the path of the refracted ray such that only a small portion of the ray near the original heating location is above the threshold for HF heating. The heating location thus suddenly snaps back to the original location but the ray itself is still refracted in longitude.

  20. Lightning-induced intensification of the ionospheric sporadic E layer.

    PubMed

    Davis, C J; Johnson, C G

    2005-06-01

    A connection between thunderstorms and the ionosphere has been hypothesized since the mid-1920s. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this connection, and evidence from modelling as well as various types of measurements demonstrate that lightning can interact with the lower ionosphere. It has been proposed, on the basis of a few observed events, that the ionospheric 'sporadic E' layer--transient, localized patches of relatively high electron density in the mid-ionosphere E layer, which significantly affect radio-wave propagation--can be modulated by thunderstorms, but a more formal statistical analysis is still needed. Here we identify a statistically significant intensification and descent in altitude of the mid-latitude sporadic E layer directly above thunderstorms. Because no ionospheric response to low-pressure systems without lightning is detected, we conclude that this localized intensification of the sporadic E layer can be attributed to lightning. We suggest that the co-location of lightning and ionospheric enhancement can be explained by either vertically propagating gravity waves that transfer energy from the site of lightning into the ionosphere, or vertical electrical discharge, or by a combination of these two mechanisms. PMID:15944700

  1. Artificial quasi-periodic plasma inhomogeneities in the lower ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikovich, V. V.; Benediktov, E. A.; Dmitriev, S. A.; Terina, G. I.

    Experimental results are presented on artificial quasi-periodic plasma inhomogeneities in a standing wave field of high-power shortwave radio transmission, at ionospheric altitudes of 75 to 115 km. A transmitter of an equivalent power of 20 MW periodically emitted for 10 to 20 sec an extraordinary component at frequencies of 5.5-5.75 MHz. Backward-scattered signals, at amplitudes of 40-70 dB below the specular channel level, were observed, and relaxation time fluctuation was noted to be within the range of from tenths of seconds to several seconds. The scattering height of the regular component of the sounding waves decreased as the sounding wave frequency approached the extraordinary component frequency of the disturbing radio emission, in accordance with the spatial synchronism condition (Belikovich et al., 1978). The feasibility of using the method for measurements at lower altitudes was shown.

  2. Quasi-Stationary Global Auroral Ionospheric Model: E-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, Vera; Gordeev, Evgeny; Kotikov, Andrey; Makarova, Ludmila; Shirochkov, Aleksander

    2014-05-01

    E-layer Auroral Ionospheric Model (E-AIM) is developed to provide temporal and spatial density distribution of the main ionosphere neutral species (NO, N(4S),N(2D)), and ions (N2+, NO+,O2+,O+) in the altitude range from 90 to 150 km. NRLMSISE-00 model [Picone et al., JGR 2003] is used for neutral atmosphere content and temperature determination, that is the input for the E-AIM model. The E-AIM model based on chemical equilibrium state in E-layer that reaches in chemical reactions between ionospheric species considering solar radiation ionization source, superposed with sporadic precipitation of magnetospheric electrons. The chemical equilibrium state in each location under specific solar and geomagnetic activity conditions reaches during numerical solution of the continuity equations for the neutrals and ions using the high-performance Gear method [Gear, 1971] for ordinary differential equation (ODE) systems. Applying the Gear method for solving stiff ODE system strongly reduce the computation time and machine resources comparing to widely used methods and provide an opportunity to calculate the global spatial E-layer ion content distribution. In contrast to the mid-latitude ionosphere, structure and dynamics of the auroral zone ionosphere (φ ≡ 60-75° MLat) associated not only with shortwave solar radiation. Precipitating magnetospheric particle flux is the most important ionization source and is the main cause of E-layer disturbances. Precipitated electrons with initial energies of 1 - 30 keV influence the auroral ionosphere E-layer. E-AIM model can estimate ionization rate corresponds to auroral electron precipitation in two different ways: 1. with direct electron flux satellite data; 2. with differential energy spectrum reconstructed from OVATION-Prime empirical model [Newell, JGR 2009] average values, that allows to estimate ionosphere ion content for any time and location in the auroral zone. Comparison of E-AIM results with direct ionospheric observations

  3. A sporadic third layer in the ionosphere of Mars.

    PubMed

    Pätzold, M; Tellmann, S; Häusler, B; Hinson, D; Schaa, R; Tyler, G L

    2005-11-01

    The daytime martian ionosphere has been observed as a two-layer structure with electron densities that peak at altitudes between about 110 and 130 kilometers. The Mars Express Orbiter Radio Science Experiment on the European Mars Express spacecraft observed, in 10 out of 120 electron density profiles, a third ionospheric layer at altitude ranges of 65 to 110 kilometers, where electron densities, on average, peaked at 0.8 x 10(10) per cubic meter. Such a layer has been predicted to be permanent and continuous. Its origin has been attributed to ablation of meteors and charge exchange of magnesium and iron. Our observations imply that this layer is present sporadically and locally.

  4. Radiotomography and HF ray tracing of the artificially disturbed ionosphere above the Sura heating facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, E. S.; Frolov, V. L.; Kunitsyn, V. E.; Kryukovskii, A. S.; Lukin, D. S.; Nazarenko, M. O.; Padokhin, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    We present the results of the radiotomographic imaging of the artificial ionospheric disturbances obtained in the recent experiments on the modification of the midlatitude ionosphere by powerful HF radiowaves carried out at the Sura heater. Radio transmissions from low orbital PARUS beacon satellites recorded at the specially installed network of three receiving sites were used for the remote sensing of the heated ionosphere. We discuss the possibility to generate acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) with special regimes of ionospheric heating (with the square wave modulation of the effective radiated power at the frequency lower than or of the order of the Brunt-Vaisala frequency of the neutral atmosphere at ionospheric heights during several hours) and present radiotomographic images of the spatial structure of the disturbed volume of the ionosphere corresponding to the directivity pattern of the heater, as well as the spatial structure of the wave-like disturbances, which are possibly heating-induced AGWs, diverging from the heated area of the ionosphere. We also studied the HF propagation of the pumping wave through the reconstructed disturbed ionosphere above the Sura heater, showing the presence of heater-created, field-aligned irregularities that effectively serve as "artificial radio windows."

  5. Quasi-periodic variations in the Doppler shift of HF signals scattered by artificial ionospheric turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Belenov, A.F.; Ponomarenko, P.V.; Sinitsyn, V.G.; Yampol`skii, Yu.M.

    1994-06-01

    The results of an experimental study of quasi-periodic variations of the Doppler shift (DS) of decimeter-wave signals scattered by artificial ionospheric turbulence are presented. It is suggested that ionospheric MHD waves of natural origin are a possible cause of such variations. The amplitude of the magnetic component of such waves that leads to observable values of DS variations is estimated to be 1{gamma}.

  6. Artificial electron beams in the magnetosphere and ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckler, John R.

    1990-01-01

    The Plasma Diagnostics Payload of the Echo 7 satellite carried TV cameras and photometers by means of which the luminosity around an electron beam in the polar ionosphere could be studied. It was found that, while the beam Larmor spiral could be clearly seen near 100 km, above this only a column due to suprathermal electrons was observable. At high altitudes, the emission of neutral gas both generated powerful luminosity and substantially reduced accelerator potentials. An analysis of conjugate echoes indicates that inferred magnetospheric electric fields do not map well into the ionosphere, as well as the presence of strong pitch-angle scattering.

  7. Coupling of magnetopause-boundary layer to the polar ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, C.Q.; Lee, L.C. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors develop a model which seeks to explain ultraviolet auroral images from the Viking satellite which show periodic bright regions which resemble [open quotes]beads[close quotes] or [open quotes]pearls[close quotes] aligned along the postnoon auroral oval. ULF geomagnetic pulsations observed in the cusp region are also addressed by this model. The model addresses plasma dynamics in the low-latitude boundary layer and interactions with the polar ionosphere by means of field-aligned current. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability can develop in the presence of driven plasma flow, which can lead to the formation and growth of plasma vortices in the boundary layer. The finite conductivity of the earth ionosphere causes these vortices to decay. However regions of enhanced field-aligned power density in the postnoon auroral oval can be associated with field-aligned current filaments and boundary layer vortices. These structures may explain the observed bright spots. The authors also discuss the frequency spectrum and the polarization state of the pulsations.

  8. Airborne studies of equatorial F layer ionospheric irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, E.J.; Buchau, J.; Moore, J.G.

    1980-09-01

    Radio wave and optical experiments were conducted onboard a U.S. Air Force research aircraft in March 1977 and March 1978 at low magnetic latitudes to investigate the effects of F region electron density amplitude. Scintillation measurements were used to monitor the development and motion of F region 6300-A O I airglow depletions, spread F, and scintillation producing irregularities that are all associated with low-density bubbles in the postsunset equatorial ionosphere. The 6300-A airglow depletions are the bottomside signature of low plasma density within the bubbles. Examples of multiple airglow depletions and their relation to variations in the F layer virtual height (h'F) and to the occurrence of amplitude scintillations on 250-MHz satellite signals are described. Estimates of the average bottomside electron density, from simultaneous ionosonde measurements and 6300-A airglow intensities, show electron density decreases of approx.66% within the bubbles. These decreases are approximately the same for bubbles observed at the magnetic equator and near Ascension Island (18 /sup 0/S magnetic latitude). The measurements at Ascension Island show that airglow depletions extend away from the magnetic equator into the southern 6300-A intertropical arc. Variations in the maximum poleward extent of airglow depletions and of associated ionospheric irregularities that give rise to amplitude scintillations were observed. These latitudinal variations are interpreted, using field line mapping considerations, as variations in the maximum altitude of plasma bubbles over the magnetic equator. A north-south flight confirms that the overall pattern of airglow depletions and associated ionospheric irregularities extends continuously across the magnetic equator to +-15/sup 0/ magnetic latitude.

  9. Modeling the variations of reflection coefficient of Earth's lower ionosphere using very low frequency radio wave data by artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Keyvan; Khakian Ghomi, Mehdi; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Marbouti, Marjan; Tan, Le Minh

    2016-08-01

    The ionized atmosphere lying from 50 to 600 km above surface, known as ionosphere, contains high amount of electrons and ions. Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio waves with frequencies between 3 and 30 kHz are reflected from the lower ionosphere specifically D-region. A lot of applications in long range communications and navigation systems have been inspired by this characteristic of ionosphere. There are several factors which affect the ionization rate in this region, such as: time of day (presence of sun in the sky), solar zenith angle (seasons) and solar activities. Due to nonlinear response of ionospheric reflection coefficient to these factors, finding an accurate relation between these parameters and reflection coefficient is an arduous task. In order to model these kinds of nonlinear functionalities, some numerical methods are employed. One of these methods is artificial neural network (ANN). In this paper, the VLF radio wave data of 4 sudden ionospheric disturbance (SID) stations are given to a multi-layer perceptron ANN in order to simulate the variations of reflection coefficient of D region ionosphere. After training, validation and testing the ANN, outputs of ANN and observed values are plotted together for 2 random cases of each station. By evaluating the results using 2 parameters of pearson correlation coefficient and root mean square error, a satisfying agreement was found between ANN outputs and real observed data.

  10. Artificial modification of the ionosphere by launches of rockets which insert space vehicles into orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagorskii, P. M.; Tarashchuk, Yu. E.

    1993-10-01

    Results are presented from vertical (ionogram) and inclined (frequency and signal strength variations of reference shortwave stations) probing of artificial ionospheric disturbances (AIDs) formed by powerful rockets during the active portion of their flight. Experimental data obtained over the course of several dozen rocket launches are generalized. The processes of evolution of an AID initiated by shock-acoustic waves are studied theoretically and experimentally, together with questions of shortwave radio scattering on such disturbances.

  11. HF Propagation Effects Caused by an Artificial Plasma Cloud in the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, D. R.; Groves, K. M.; McNeil, W. J.; Caton, R. G.; Parris, R. T.; Pedersen, T. R.; Cannon, P. S.; Angling, M. J.; Jackson-Booth, N. K.

    2014-12-01

    In a campaign carried out by the NASA sounding rocket team, the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) launched two sounding rockets in the Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands, in May 2013 known as the Metal Oxide Space Cloud (MOSC) experiment to study the interactions of artificial ionization and the background plasma and measure the effects on high frequency (HF) radio wave propagation. The rockets released samarium metal vapor in the lower F-region of the ionosphere that ionized forming a plasma cloud that persisted for tens of minutes to hours in the post-sunset period. Data from the experiments has been analyzed to understand the impacts of the artificial ionization on HF radio wave propagation. Swept frequency HF links transiting the artificial ionization region were employed to produce oblique ionograms that clearly showed the effects of the samarium cloud. Ray tracing has been used to successfully model the effects of the ionized cloud. Comparisons between observations and modeled results will be presented, including model output using the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI), the Parameterized Ionospheric Model (PIM) and PIM constrained by electron density profiles measured with the ALTAIR radar at Kwajalein. Observations and modeling confirm that the cloud acted as a divergent lens refracting energy away from direct propagation paths and scattering energy at large angles relative to the initial propagation direction. The results confirm that even small amounts of ionized material injected in the upper atmosphere can result in significant changes to the natural propagation environment.

  12. Comparison of dayside current layers in Venus' ionosphere and earth's equatorial electrojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Keith D.

    1993-01-01

    The major physical aspects of the equatorial electrojet of Earth and the dayside ionospheric current layers of Venus are compared, viz., the electric current intensity and total current, roles of electric field, pressure and gravity, diffusion time scales, and the Bernouille effect. The largest potential differences, of the order of 10 volts, horizontally across the dayside ionosphere of Venus, have important implications for possible dynamo action in the Venus ionosphere and the application of an electric field from the lower atmosphere or from the solar wind. An upper limit to the horizontal scale of vertical magnetic fields in the Venus ionosphere is estimated thereby for the first time. New upper limits on the velocity in, and thickness of, a possible S layer at Venus are presented. If an S layer exists, it is only for extreme conditions of the solar wind. A mechanism for formation of magnetic ropes in the Venus ionosphere is also proposed.

  13. Modeling of self-consistent artificial radiowave ionospheric turbulence pumping and damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochetov, Andrey

    2011-10-01

    The numerical simulations of the action of self-consistent powerful radiowave absorption arising in the regions of artificial plasma turbulence excitation at formation, saturation and relaxation stages of the turbulence structures (Kochetov, A.V., Mironov, V.A., et. al., Physica D, Nonlinear phenomena, 2001, 152-153, 723) to refection index dynamics are carried out. The nonlinear Schrödinger equation in inhomogeneous plasma layer with incident electromagnetic wave pumping and backscattered radiation damping (Kochetov, et al, Adv. Space Res., 2002, 29, 1369 and 2006, 38, 2490) is extended with the imaginary part of plasma dielectric constant, which results the energy transformation from electromagnetic wave to plasma one at resonance interaction (D.V. Shapiro, V.I. Shevchenko, in Handbook of Plasma Physics 2, eds. A.A Galeev, R.N. Sudan. Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1984). The modeling reproduces the basic energy transformation peculiarities: hard excitation, non-linearity, hysteresis (A.V. Kochetov, E. Mjølhus, Proc. of IV Intern. Workshop ``SMP,'' Ed. A.G. Litvak, Vol.2, N. Novgorod, 2000, 491) and demonstrates that the calculated reflection and absorption index dynamics at the beginning of the saturation stage agrees qualitatively to the experimental results for ionosphere plasma modification study. (Thide B., E.N. Sergeev, S.M. Grach, et. al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2005, 95, 255002). The numerical simulations of the action of self-consistent powerful radiowave absorption arising in the regions of artificial plasma turbulence excitation at formation, saturation and relaxation stages of the turbulence structures (Kochetov, A.V., Mironov, V.A., et. al., Physica D, Nonlinear phenomena, 2001, 152-153, 723) to refection index dynamics are carried out. The nonlinear Schrödinger equation in inhomogeneous plasma layer with incident electromagnetic wave pumping and backscattered radiation damping (Kochetov, et al, Adv. Space Res., 2002, 29, 1369 and 2006, 38, 2490) is extended

  14. Simulation of Self-consistent Radio Wave Artificial Ionospheric Turbulence Pumping and Damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochetov, Andrey

    The numerical simulations of the action of self-consistent incident powerful electromagnetic wave absorption arising in the regions of artificial plasma turbulence excitation at formation, saturation and relaxation stages of turbulent structures (Kochetov, A.V., Mironov, V.A., Te-rina, G.I., Bubukina V. N, Physica D, Nonlinear phenomena, 2001, 152-153, 723) to reflection index dynamics are carried out. The nonlinear Schrüdinger equation in inhomogeneous plasma layer with incident electromagnetic wave pumping and backscattered radiation damping (Ko-chetov, et al, Adv. Space Res., 2002, 29, 1369 and 2006, 38, 2490) is extended with the imagi-nary part of plasma dielectric constant (volume damping), which is should be taken into account in strong electromagnetic field plasma regions and results the energy transformation from elec-tromagnetic waves to plasma ones at resonance interaction (D.V. Shapiro, V.I. Shevchenko, in Handbook of Plasma Physics 2, eds. A.A Galeev, R.N. Sudan. Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1984). The volume damping reproduces the basic energy transformation peculiarities: hard excitation, nonlinearity, hysteresis (A.V. Kochetov, E. Mjoelhus, Proc. of IV Intern. Workshop "SMP", Ed. A.G. Litvak, Vol.2, N. Novgorod, 2000, 491). Computer modeling demonstrates that the amplitude and period of reflection index oscillations at the formation stage slowly depend on damping parameters of turbulent plasma regions. The transformation from complicated: quasi-periodic and chaotic dynamics, to quasi-stationary regimes is shown at the saturation stage. Transient processes time becomes longer if the incident wave amplitude and nonlinear plasma response increase, but damping decreases. It is obtained that the calculated reflection and absorption index dynamics at the beginning of the saturation stage agrees qualitatively to the experimental results for ionosphere plasma modification study (Thide B., E.N. Sergeev, S.M. Grach, et. al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2005, 95, 255002). The

  15. Compact way of the ionosphere layers critical frequency detection using A-map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusupov, Kamil; Akchurin, Adel

    2016-07-01

    The critical frequency of the ionosphere layer characterizes the electron density of the ionosphere layers and it is an important parameter for ionosphere observation. So, it has long been established that the critical frequencies have correlation with the solar activity, the geomagnetic activity, the neutral atmosphere and others. Based on the analysis of the critical frequency of the ionosphere the empirical models was based (e.g. IRI). Critical frequencies detection is complex due to the inhomogeneous properties of the ionosphere, which leads to the nonlinearity of reflection traces in ionogram at vertical sounding. This paper describes ionogram processing algorithm using the A-maps [Akchurin, 2011; Yusupov, 2014] for ionosphere layers critical frequency detection. For A-map construction, the reflected signal amplitude is allocated. Our ionosonde has not magnetoionic modes polarization separation; therefore, A-map has signal amplitude failures (due to interference). Also, ionosphere traces have amplitude failures associated with the signal focusing as a result of the effects of the TID and others. An important is the noise presence from the other HF radio system. To decrease the influence of these effects in critical frequency detection it is used several filtering stages that smooth A-map amplitude oscillation. Next is searching amplitude threshold, which mark the boundary of the critical frequency. The resulting F-plot easily compared with A-map, which have high precision visually noticeable critical frequency. This algorithm is well suited for the E- and F-regions critical frequency detection.

  16. Observations of radiation from an electron beam artificially injected into the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, D. G.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    This paper reports the observations of waves generated by a controlled beam of particles artificially injected into the ionosphere and magnetosphere. The measurements were made during the Electron Echo 1 experiment, in which an electron accelerator was carried to a height of 350 km in the ionosphere from Wallops Island, Virginia, on an Aerobee 350 sounding rocket. It injected into the earth's magnetic field over 3000 16-ms pulses of electrons with 40-keV energy and a current of 70 mA at pitch angles between 70 and 110 deg. The ejected fiber glass nose cone carried antennas and receivers to measure the electric field of waves generated by the beam. Associated with the electron beam was radiation detected at frequencies near the electron plasma frequency of the background ionosphere, near twice the electron cyclotron frequency in the whistler mode, and near zero frequency. Associated with the operation of an argon plasma generator used to keep the accelerator neutralized were continuous emissions detected at frequencies near the lower-hybrid resonance (LHR).

  17. Thermal response of the F region ionosphere in artificial modification experiments by HF radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantas, G. P.; Lahoz, C. H.; Carlson, H. C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The thermal response of the nighttime F region ionosphere to local heating by HF radio waves has been observed with the incoherent scatter radar at Arecibo, Puerto Rico. The observations consist of high-resolution space and time variation of the electron temperature as a high-power HF transmitter is switched on and off with a period 240 s. As soon as the HF transmitter is turned on, the electron temperature begins to rise rapidly in a narrow altitude region near 300 km, below the F2 layer peak. The electron temperature perturbation subsequently spreads over a broader altitude region. The observations are compared with the anticipated thermal response of the ionosphere based on numerical solutions of the coupled time-dependent heat conduction equations for the electron and composite ion gases and are found to be in good agreement over the entire altitude region covered by the observations.

  18. Sporadic E ionization layers observed with radar imaging and ionospheric modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysell, D. L.; Munk, J.; McCarrick, M.

    2014-10-01

    Sporadic E ionization layers have been observed in the daytime subauroral ionospheric E layer by a 30 MHz radar in Alaska. The radar detects coherent backscatter from meter-scale field-aligned plasma density irregularities. The irregularities were generated by ionospheric modification—by the emission of strong HF electromagnetic waves directly beneath the layers—making the layers visible to the radar. Aperture-synthesis methods are used to generate imagery of the layers from the radar data. The layers are patchy, with patches organized along fronts spaced by tens of kilometers and propagating slowly toward the southwest. Similar, naturally occurring layers are commonly observed at middle latitudes at night in the absence of ionospheric modification. That the patchy layers can be found at high magnetic latitudes during the day argues that they are most likely produced through the interaction of the ionospheric layer with neutral atmospheric waves and instabilities. Attenuation of the radar echoes when the HF emission frequency exceeded the third harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency was observed and is discussed.

  19. The main layers of the ionosphere of Venus as seen by Pioneer Venus Orbiter radio occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, Jacob; Withers, Paul; Vogt, Marissa F.

    2016-10-01

    Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) performed numerous atmospheric experiments from 1978 to 1992. Radio occultation measurements were used to create vertical ionospheric electron density profiles extending as low as 100 km altitude; yielding data coverage across the V1 and V2 layers of the Venusian ionosphere, 125 and 140 km respectively. The PVO data give us a unique look at the ionosphere during solar maximum compared to later Venus missions. However, none of these ionospheric profiles were archived at the PDS nor have been available for comparison to Venus Express observations. We have extracted 120 PVO radio occultation profiles from published papers using a program to digitally read data from graphical images. Additionally, the NSSDC had 94 profiles, 63 of which were added to our dataset. The data from both sources were used in conjunction to analyze trends between solar activity and the characteristics of the V1 and V2 layers. The V1 layer, created by soft x-rays, should react more to changes in solar activity than the EUV created V2 layer. We intend to archive this data at the PDS so that the community can easily access digital measurements of the Venusian ionosphere at solar maximum.

  20. Evening and nighttime features of equatorial ionospheric F2 layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyekola, Oyedemi S.

    2016-07-01

    We have used ionosonde observations recorded at Ibadan (7.4 degree North, 3.9 degree East) during the International Geophysical year (1957-58) to investigate evening and nighttime characteristic features of equatorial ionosphere during high solar flux and quiet magnetic conditions. We have also used International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI-2012) data. Our results show that the base of the ionosphere descends at a rate of -27.5 km/hr between 2000 LT and 0400 LT, whereas the observed bottomside peak of the ionosphere move down at a rate of -29.3 km/hr between 1900 and 0500 LT, while IRI2012 bottomside peak show -29.8 km/hr between 2000 LT and 0500 LT. The downward flow rate of plasma concentration between 1900 LT and 0500 LT and between 1800 LT and 0400 LT is approximately 0.040 electron per cubic metre per hour and 0.081 electron per cubic metre per hour, respectively for observed and for modeled NmF2. Month-by-month averaged altitudes (h'F, hmF2, and modeled hmF2) indicate significant local time variation. In addition, the month-by month variation indicates nighttime double crest of averaged peak height (hmF2) in the ionosonde measurements and in the IRI-2012 empirical model with a trough in June-August for data and In July for model. The monthly mean downward vertical drift velocities derived from local time variation of h'F and hmF2 together with global drift model essential demonstrate much fluctuations. We found a "domed shape" in modeled drift velocity, indicating equatorward plasma between April and September.

  1. Application of Artificial Bee Colony algorithm in TEC seismo-ionospheric anomalies detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhoondzadeh, M.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the efficiency of Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm is investigated to detect the TEC (Total Electron Content) seismo-ionospheric anomalies around the time of some strong earthquakes including Chile (27 February 2010; 01 April 2014), Varzeghan (11 August 2012), Saravan (16 April 2013) and Papua New Guinea (29 March 2015). In comparison with other anomaly detection algorithms, ABC has a number of advantages which can be numerated as (1) detection of discord patterns in a large non linear data during a short time, (2) simplicity, (3) having less control parameters and (4) efficiently for solving multimodal and multidimensional optimization problems. Also the results of this study acknowledge the TEC time-series as a robust earthquake precursor.

  2. Remote sensing of ELF/VLF radiation induced in experiments on artificial modification of the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, B. G.; Zetser, Yu. I.; Ryakhovskii, I. A.; Poklad, Yu. V.; Ermak, V. M.

    2015-07-01

    In 2012, remote measurements of electromagnetic signals in the ELF/VLF band were taken at different points in Russia during experiments on artificial ionospheric modification with the powerful HF wave at the EISCAT heating facility (Tromsø, Norway). The use of the new, highly sensitive magnetometric equipment allowed signals with an amplitude of a few femtoteslas to be recorded at a distance of up to 2000 km from the source. Analysis of the measurement results discovered substantial differences in the amplitude-phase characteristics of the signals, which were caused by a change in helio-geophysical conditions in the region of heating and along the signal passage route, and features of signal propagation, which are related to their mode of guided propagation, the directivity of the source, and angles of reception.

  3. Why the Viking descent probes found only one ionospheric layer at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayyasi, Majd; Mendillo, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Radio wave transmissions from satellites revealed that Mars had two relatively distinct layers of ionization: a maximum electron density near 130 km, and a secondary layer near 110 km. When the Viking descent probes—with their in situ observing capabilities—passed through the ionosphere, the peak electron density was found, with no indication of a secondary layer below. Here we use an ionospheric model to show that profiles of electron density versus height have shapes that favor the detection of two layers at local times near dawn and dusk (where many thousands of radio occultation observations have been made), but that the two layers essentially merge into one during midday hours (when Viking measurements were made). The profile shapes are attributed to ionizing geometry of solar photons and to chemical processes that affect the profile shapes in a way that favors secondary peak formation near sunrise and sunset.

  4. Characterization of propagation and communication properties of the natural and artificially disturbed ionosphere. Final report, September 1990-December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Reinisch, B.W.; Sales, G.S.; Brent, R.; Ostergaard, J.; Huang, Y.

    1995-05-01

    This basic research project, conducted during the period starting 12 September 1990 and ending 12 December 1994, studied the effects of natural and artificial ionospheric disturbances on HF and VHF propagation and communication. This project was reasonably divided into two parts where each stood by itself; VHF meteor scatter investigation and HF ionospheric modification studies. In addition to these two studies, a third study was later added to the project to include a Joint Electromagnetic Warfare Center (JEWC) electromagnetic wave propagation and signal loss study. Each of these studies are addressed independently within this final report.

  5. Study of Ionospheric Perturbations in D-Layer Using VLF Receiver at Tashkent IHY Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmedov, Bobomurat

    2016-07-01

    Tashkent International Heliophysical Year (IHY) station is a member of Atmospheric Weather Electromagnetic System for Observation, Modeling and Education (AWESOME) network being operated globally to study the ionosphere and the magnetosphere with the help of electromagnetic waves in Very Low Frequency (VLF) band. Regular monitoring of the D- and F-layers of ionosphere over Central Asia territory is being performed on the permanent basis starting year 2008 when one VLF receiver and two SuperSID receivers were provided to Uzbekistan IHY cite by Stanford University. The results obtained at Tashkent IHY station are applied to earthquake electromagnetic precursors, lightning, and Solar flares and to ionospheric disturbances originating from gamma ray flares of Soft Gamma-Ray Repeaters connected with evolution of strongly magnetized neutron stars believed as magnetars. Regular monitoring of the D-layer of ionosphere over Central Asia territory has been performed on the permanent basis. Several Solar events are observed and the analysis has shown that there is simultaneous correlation between the times of change of amplitude of the waves and the Solar flares. Features of the lightning discharge generated by radio atmospherics are studied and its effectiveness in D-region ionosphere diagnostics is examined.

  6. Electromagnetic internal gravity waves in the Earth's ionospheric E-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaladze, T. D.; Tsamalashvili, L. V.; Kaladze, D. T.

    2011-12-01

    In the Earth's ionospheric E-layer existence of the new waves connecting with the electromagnetic nature of internal gravity waves is shown. They represent the mixture of the ordinary internal gravity waves and the new type of dispersive Alfven waves.

  7. Electron density modification in ionospheric E layer by inserting fine dust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Shikha; Mishra, S. K.

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we have developed the kinetics of E-region ionospheric plasma comprising of fine dust grains and shown that the electron density in E-layer can purposely be reduced/enhanced up to desired level by inserting fine dust particles of appropriate physical/material properties; this may certainly be promising for preferred rf-signal processing through these layers. The analytical formulation is based on average charge theory and includes the number and energy balance of the plasma constituents along with charge balance over dust particles. The effect of varying number density, work function, and photo-efficiency of dust particles on ionospheric plasma density at different altitude in E-layer has been critically examined and presented graphically.

  8. Electron density modification in ionospheric E layer by inserting fine dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Shikha; Mishra, S. K.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we have developed the kinetics of E-region ionospheric plasma comprising of fine dust grains and shown that the electron density in E-layer can purposely be reduced/enhanced up to desired level by inserting fine dust particles of appropriate physical/material properties; this may certainly be promising for preferred rf-signal processing through these layers. The analytical formulation is based on average charge theory and includes the number and energy balance of the plasma constituents along with charge balance over dust particles. The effect of varying number density, work function, and photo-efficiency of dust particles on ionospheric plasma density at different altitude in E-layer has been critically examined and presented graphically.

  9. Online Chapmann Layer Calculator for Simulating the Ionosphere with Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, N. A.; Withers, P.; Sojka, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Chapman Layer Model is a "textbook" model of the ionosphere (for example, "Theory of Planetary Atmospheres" by Chamberlain and Hunten, Academic Press (1978)). The model use fundamental assumptions about the neutral atmosphere, the flux of ionizing radiation, and the recombination rate to calculation the ionization rate, and ion/electron density for a single species atmosphere. We have developed a "Chapman Layer Calculator" application that is deployed on the web using Java. It allows the user to see how various parameters control ion density, peak height, and profile of the ionospheric layer. Users can adjust parameters relevant to thermosphere scale height (temperature, gravitational acceleration, molecular weight, neutral atmosphere density) and to Extreme Ultraviolet solar flux (reference EUV, distance from the Sun, and solar Zenith Angle) and then see how the layer changes. This allows the user to simulate the ionosphere on other planets, by adjusting to the appropriate parameters. This simulation has been used as an exploratory activity for the NASA/LWS - Heliophysics Summer School 2014 and has an accompanying activity guide.

  10. Comparing different assimilation techniques for the ionospheric F2 layer reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerzen, Tatjana; Minkwitz, David; Schlueter, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    From the applications perspective the electron density is the major determining parameter of the ionosphere due to its strong impact on the radio signal propagation. As the most ionized ionospheric region, the F2 layer has the most pronounced effect on transionospheric radio wave propagation. The maximum electron density of the F2 layer, NmF2, and its height, hmF2, are of particular interest for radio communication applications as well as for characterizing the ionosphere. Since these ionospheric key parameters decisively shape the vertical electron density profiles, the precise calculation of them is of crucial importance for an accurate 3-D electron density reconstruction. The vertical sounding by ionosondes provides the most reliable source of F2 peak measurements. Within this paper, we compare the following data assimilation methods incorporating ionosonde measurements into a background model: Optimal Interpolation (OI), OI with time forecast (OI FC), the Successive Correction Method (SCM), and a modified SCM (MSCM) working with a daytime-dependent measurement error variance. These approaches are validated with the measurements of nine ionosonde stations for two periods covering quiet and disturbed ionospheric conditions. In particular, for the quiet period, we show that MSCM outperforms the other assimilation methods and allows an accuracy gain up to 75% for NmF2 and 37% for hmF2 compared to the background model. For the disturbed period, OI FC reveals the most promising results with improvements up to 79% for NmF2 and 50% for hmF2 compared to the background and up to 42% for NmF2 and 16% for hmF2 compared to OI.

  11. On diurnal dependence and spatial scales of seismo-ionospheric effects in the E-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liperovskaya, E. V.; Meister, C.-V.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Silina, A. S.

    In the present work, disturbances of the fbEs -frequency of the sporadic E-layer of the ionosphere are investigated in connection with earthquakes. The fbEs -frequency is proportional to the square root of the maximum ionisation density of the sporadic E-layer. In this work, it is shown that two days before a seismic shock with magnitude M > 5.5 , and during the shock, an increase of the fbEs -frequency is obtained around midnight at distances from the epicentre R < expM + 100 km in the case that the focus of the shock was situated at depths smaller than 60 km. Data obtained by the three ionospheric sounding stations "Kokubunji", "Akita" and "Yamagawa" are analysed, which were recorded during a total time of 42 years. The superimposed epoches method is applied for a few tens of earthquakes.

  12. In-situ observations of intermediate layers in the night time ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, J.; Swenson, C. M.; Humphries, S.; Fish, C.; Carlson, C.; Barjatya, A.

    2005-12-01

    Night time ionospheric electron density profiles have been obtained using impedance and Langmuir probe techniques showing the presence of intermediate layers. Four sounding rockets were launched in July of 2003 at Wallops Island, VA and two more were launched in August of 2004 from Kwajalein atoll, Marshall Islands. Although these rocket campaigns were conducted at different latitudes they both indicated a patchy spatial structure. All six flights used essentially the same plasma impedance probe but the later campaign included a sweeping Langmuir probe. More emphasis is given to the data from the later campaign, "Scattering Layer in the Bottomside Equatorial F-region Ionosphere" investigation, which was a part of the NASA EQUIS II campaign. Electron density from this data set is analyzed using Balmain's theory for a short antenna in a cold magnetoplasma and compared with data from the sweeping Langmuir probe.

  13. Daytime dependence of disturbances of ionospheric Es-layers connected to earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liperovskaya, E. V.; Liperovsky, A. V.; Meister, C.-V.; Silina, A. S.

    2012-04-01

    In the present work variations of the semi-transparency of the sporadic E-layer of the ionosphere due to seismic activities are studied. The semi-transparency Q is determined by the blanketing frequency fbEs and the characteristic frequency foEs, Q = (foEs - fbEs)/fbEs. At low values of the blanketing frequency fbEs, the critical frequency foEs does not describe the maximum ionisation density of the Es-layer, as the critical frequencies of regular ionospheric layers (e.g. foF2) do, but it describes the occurrence of small-scall (tenths of meters) inhomogeneities of the ionisation density along the vertical in the layer. The maximum ionisation density of the sporadic layer is proportional to the square of fbEs. In the case of vertical ionospheric sounding, the sporadic layer becomes transparent for signals with frequencies larger than fbEs. Investigations showed that about three days before an earthquake an increase of the semi-transparency interval is observed during sunset and sunrise. In the present work, analogous results are found for data of the vertical sounding stations "Tokyo" and "Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky". Using the method of superposition of epoches, more than 50 earthquakes with magnitudes M > 5, depths h < 40 km, and distances between the station and the epicenter R < 300 km are considered in case of the vertical sounding station "Tokyo". More than 20 earthquakes with such parameters were analysed in case of the station "Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky". Days with strong geomagnetic activity were excluded from the analysis. According to the station "Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky" about 1-3 days before earthquakes, an increase of Es-spread is observed a few hours before midnight. This increase is a sign of large-scale inhomogeneities in the sporadic layers.

  14. Gyroharmonic Features of Generation of Artificial Irregularities Hf-Induced in the Ionospheric F_2 Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Vladimir; Akchurin, Adel; Bolotin, Ilya; Zykov, Evgeniy; Vertogradov, Gennadiy

    In the report, basing on experimental data obtained at the SURA heating facility [1-4], we consider gyroharmonic features of generation of artificial irregularities HF-induced in the ionospheric F _{2} region. In [5] it was revealed that, when the pump wave frequency (f _{PW}) is slightly above the 4th electron gyro harmonic frequency (4f_{ce}) in the ionosphere disturbed volume, spectra of signals field-aligned scattered from irregularities with l_⊥ ≃ 10 - 20 m had widths up to DeltaF ≃ 10 Hz in comparison with DeltaF ≃ 0.5 Hz, when the f _{PW} was below 4f_{ce}. Obtained in our experiments data have shown that the scattering from decameter irregularities consists of two components (narrow- and wideband) distinguished by their spectral characteristics, relaxation times, and dependence on f _{PW}. The narrowband component is related to scattered signals when f _{PW} is outside the gyro harmonic frequency range. The wideband component is observed at deltaf = f_{PW} - 4f_{ce} ≃ 0 - 150 kHz and shows well-pronounced gyro features; it has the maximum width (up to 10 Hz) at deltaf_{m} ≃ 20 - 60 kHz, where the BUM component in SEE spectra has the greatest intensity. A typical growth time for the wideband component is of the same order of magnitude as the growth time of decameter irregularities (0.3 - 0.5 s); its typical decay time is of about 0.4 - 0.9 s, which is much shorter of the decay time for decameter irregularities. It is significant that at the decay stage the fast narrowing of the wideband component spectra is observed. In [4] it was observed short-term decreases in TEC of about 0.03 - 0.05 TECU when a sounding wave crossed the magnetic zenith region in the ionosphere disturbed volume. According to [6] such TEC variations can be produced by generation of super small-scale striations with l_⊥ ≃ 10 - 20 sm. Basing on obtained experimental data it may be concluded that not only the generation of small-scale irregularities with l_⊥ < 50 m, but the

  15. Observations of filamentary field-aligned current coupling between the magnetospheric boundary layer and the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. R.; Mchenry, M. A.; Friis-Christensen, E.

    1990-01-01

    A distinct class of dayside high-latitude magnetic pulsations can be identified from the spatial characteristics of the disturbance field. These pulsations exhibit traveling radial patterns such as would result from moving filaments of field-aligned current interacting with the ionosphere to produce cells of Hall current and vortexlike plasma flow. Time intervals containing a series of continuous multiple vortices are investigated here. The vortices occur on the boundary between sunward and antisunward ionospheric plasma convection. Low altitude DMSP satellite particle measurements indicate that the vortices are on magnetic field lines which map to the inner edge of the magnetospheric low latitude boundary layer. No repetitive solar wind disturbance (e.g., pressure variations) appears to be associated with the events, suggesting that the vortices are related to a local magnetospheric instability. No strong correlation between interplanetary field conditions and the detection of vortices is found.

  16. Observations of Metal Ions in the Meteoroid Layer of the Ionosphere of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benna, Mehdi; Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Mahaffy, Paul

    2016-10-01

    We report the results of the observations of metal ions in the ionosphere of Mars by the Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS). These observations were conducted during the five "deep dip" campaigns of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution mission (MAVEN), during which the periapsis altitude of the spacecraft altitude is lowered from its nominal 150 km to ~125 km. The observations revealed the presence of Na+, Mg+, and Fe+ in the ionosphere with peak abundance ranging from 1 to 10 ions/cm3 at the periapsis altitude. While, the relative abundance of these metals ions varies from a deep dip campaigns to another, their altitude profile exhibit correlated structures with the neutral atmosphere. These structure may be indicative of the transport processes that carry the metals upward from the main ablation layer to the spacecraft's altitude.

  17. Rocket/Radar Investigation of Lower Ionospheric Electrodynamics Associated with Intense Midlatitude Sporadic-E Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heelis, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    Sporadic layers, which appear in the region from 100 km to 120 km are thought to be formed by convergent Pedersen drifts induced by altitude gradients in the zonal neutral wind. In this altitude region NO+ and 02+ are the major ions produced by photoionization and charge exchange of atmospheric and ionospheric species. The relative composition of atmospheric ions and meteoric ions in sporadic layers is important in determining their persistence, the time scales for formation, and the electrical conductivity of the layers. This rocket investigation will include a diagnosis of the neutral wind field and the electric field distribution. Coupled with ion composition measurements we will be able to expose the relevant formation mechanisms and the electrodynamic consequences of their existence. A rocket trajectory has been chosen to provide substantial horizontal sampling of the layer properties and knowledge of the horizontal gradients in composition and density are essential to determine the polarization electric fields that may be associated with ionospheric layers. The University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) is responsible for designing, building, and operating the ion mass spectrometers included on these rockets. The following provides a summary of the UTD accomplishments in the second year of the project as well as a description of the plans for the third year's activities. The UTD mass spectrometer acronym has been coined as PRIMS for Puerto Rico Ion Mass Spectrometer.

  18. Investigations of natural and artificial disturbances in the Earth-ionosphere cavity via VLF radio links for the time span 2009-2015 (sunspot cycle 24)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, Hans; Schwingenschuh, Konrad; Besser, B. P.; Prattes, Gustav; Aydogar; Wolbang, Daniel; Rozhnoi, Alexander; Solovieva, Maria; Biagi, Pier Francesco; Boudjada, Mohammed

    2016-07-01

    We focus on natural disturbances of the sub-ionospheric VLF waveguide in the time span 2009 to 2015 (sunspot cycle 24), i.e. variations in amplitude and phase measurements of the radio paths are considered. In particular we're investigating numerous solar flares (up to X-class), geomagnetic storms and substorms, therefore discuss how to discriminate natural from artificial variations between different transmitters and receivers. Meteorological effects could be important [1] and we estimate the possibility to detect the influence of lithospheric sources in the VLF radio links. As part of the VLF multistation network we're using the single receiver mid-latitude station in Graz, Austria. This facility receives up to 12 transmitter simultaneously (frequency range 10-50 kHz), has 20 sec temporal resolution, and is running continuously since 2009 [2]. We obtain the statistics relating VLF amplitude and phase fluctuations with C/M/X-class solar flares, and characterise night time fluctuations in connection with enhanced particle precipitation in the northern latitude path (Iceland transmitter). The statistics is important to improve the quality of seismo-electromagnetic studies. We conclude that for ionospheric perturbations (D-layer), e.g. solar flares, a reliable real time monitoring service can be established. Atmospheric and lithospheric variations are generally difficult to characterise, it's harder to distinguish between natural and man made signals, therefore - as a future outlook - complementary ground and satellite based measurements can deliver valuable additional information for environmental monitoring. References: [1] A. Rozhnoi et al.: Meteorological effects in the lower ionosphere as based on VLF/LF signal observations, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 14, 2671-2679, 2014. [2] K. Schwingenschuh et al.: The Graz seismo-electromagnetic VLF facility, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 1121-1127, 2011.

  19. Plasma Cavern Structure in the Ionosphere F Layer at the Geomagnetic Equator according to the Kosmos 900 Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gdalevich, G. L.; Izhovkina, N. I.; Ozerov, V. D.

    2003-11-01

    The observational data on the plasma density and electron component temperature in the region of the geomagnetic equator in the ionosphere F layer are presented. The measurements have been conducted by scientific equipment onboard the Kosmos 900 satellite (on August 7, 1979). A plasma cavern was observed in this region. It is shown that the formation of the cavern may be related to the attenuation of the electrostatic plasma instability and plasma vortices in the upper ionosphere at the geomagnetic equator.

  20. Anomalous Behavior of D-Layer Preparation Time of the Ionosphere Due to Earthquakes as observed from Malda (India)

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Achintya K.; Nandy, Nilmadhab; Bari, Md. Washimul; Choudhury, Asit K.

    2010-10-20

    The anomalous behavior of D-layer preparation time of the ionosphere are observed only before, during and after the earthquakes, which took place in the neighbouring region by monitoring the Very Low Frequency (VLF) signal using Gyrator II loop antenna. The anomalies were also observed in the sunrise terminator times during seismically active days. These anomalous behavior may be due to the Lithosphere-Ionosphere coupling. These anomalies may be a precursor of earthquake.

  1. [Characteristics of soil moisture in artificial impermeable layers].

    PubMed

    Suo, Gai-Di; Xie, Yong-Sheng; Tian, Fei; Chuai, Jun-Feng; Jing, Min-Xiao

    2014-09-01

    For the problem of low water and fertilizer use efficiency caused by nitrate nitrogen lea- ching into deep soil layer and soil desiccation in dryland apple orchard, characteristics of soil moisture were investigated by means of hand tamping in order to find a new approach in improving the water and fertilizer use efficiency in the apple orchard. Two artificial impermeable layers of red clay and dark loessial soil were built in soil, with a thickness of 3 or 5 cm. Results showed that artificial impermeable layers with the two different thicknesses were effective in reducing or blocking water infiltration into soil and had higher seepage controlling efficiency. Seepage controlling efficiency for the red clay impermeable layer was better than that for the dark loessial soil impermeable layer. Among all the treatments, the red clay impermeable layer of 5 cm thickness had the highest bulk density, the lowest initial infiltration rate (0.033 mm · min(-1)) and stable infiltration rate (0.018 mm · min(-1)) among all treatments. After dry-wet alternation in summer and freezing-thawing cycle in winter, its physiochemical properties changed little. Increase in years did not affect stable infiltration rate of soil water. The red clay impermeable layer of 5 cm thickness could effectively increase soil moisture content in upper soil layer which was conducive to raise the water and nutrient use efficiency. The approach could be applied to the apple production of dryland orchard.

  2. Shear flow driven Rossby-Khantadze electromagnetic planetary vortices in the ionospheric E-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaladze, T. D.; Kahlon, L. Z.; Horton, W.; Pokhotelov, O.; Onishchenko, O.

    2014-04-01

    A system of equations describing the nonlinear interaction of coupled Rossby-Khantadze electromagnetic waves with a sheared zonal flow in the Earth's ionospheric E-layer is obtained. For the linear regime the corresponding region of phase velocities is analyzed and the appropriate stability condition of zonal flow is deduced. It is shown that the sheared zonal flow may excite solitary vortical structures in the form of a row of counter-rotating vortices whose amplitudes decrease with the increase of the zonal flow parameter. This conclusion is consistent with the stabilizing idea of a sheared zonal flow. The possibility of an intense magnetic-field generation is shown.

  3. Field-aligned and field-perpendicular velocities in the ionospheric F2-layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rishbeth, H.; Ganguly, S.; Walker, J. C. G.

    1978-01-01

    The correlation between variations in the components of the ionospheric F2-layer parallel and perpendicular to the geomagnetic field is theoretically examined. The servo model of Rishbath (1967) is used as a basis for further calculations. The equations involved are presented in full and results are given for various assumed conditions. The response of the model to both steplike and periodic perturbations of the perpendicular component is considered along with the effects of winds and the Coriolis force. Arecibo and Malvern data are reviewed on the basis of theoretically predicted behavior.

  4. Influence of the turbulence on the processes formation and relaxation of periodical artificial irregularities in the lower ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terina, Galina

    2016-07-01

    The periodic artificial irregularities (PAI) are formed in the standing wave field of powerful radio emission. The study the scattering of probing radio pulses on PAI allowed to create a method diagnostics of the ionospheric plasma parameters - the resonance scattering method (RSM) of radio waves on the periodic artificial irregularities. The different mechanisms of PAI formation in D and E ranges of the lower ionosphere were investigated (G.I. Terina, J.Atm.Terr.Phys., 1996, 58, 645). However the height range 75-90 km where there is turbulent diffusion, remained unstudied. In present paper the study results the processes formation and relaxation of periodic artificial irregularities in this height range are considered. For the analysis the processes of the formation and the relaxation of PAI one can use quasi-hydrodynamic equation for the homogeneous isotropic ionospheric plasma. Under the small disturbances, quasi-neutral plasma and some assumptions can to obtain the differential equations for regular and fluctuation PAI parts, which take account: the ambipolar diffusion, the temperature dependence of the coefficient of electrons recombination, the temperature dependence of the coefficient of the electrons attachment to the neutral molecules and also the turbulent diffusion and caused by it small-scale irregularities of the electron density. The solutions of the inhomogeneous and homogeneous equations present the processes of the formation and relaxation of PAI accordingly. The numerical estimations of obtained solutions showed that the main reasons of PAI formation in considered range of heights are the small-scale irregularities of the electron concentration and the turbulence diffusion. The obtained results qualitatively agree with results of experimental investigations. The experiments were carried out at the heating facilities "Zimenki" and "Sura". The heater transmitter periodically was switched on for several seconds and off for the same duration. The

  5. Generation of zonal flow and magnetic field in the ionospheric E-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahlon, L. Z.; Kaladze, T. D.

    2015-10-01

    > We review the generation of zonal flow and magnetic field by coupled electromagnetic ultra-low-frequency waves in the Earth's ionospheric E-layer. It is shown that, under typical ionospheric E-layer conditions, different planetary low-frequency waves can couple with each other. Propagation of coupled internal-gravity-Alfvén, coupled Rossby-Khantadze and coupled Rossby-Alfvén-Khantadze waves is revealed and studied. A set of appropriate equations describing the nonlinear interaction of such waves with sheared zonal flow is derived. The conclusion on the instability of short-wavelength turbulence of such coupled waves with respect to the excitation of low-frequency and large-scale perturbation of the sheared zonal flow and sheared magnetic field is deduced. The nonlinear mechanism of the instability is based on the parametric triple interaction of finite-amplitude coupled waves leading to the inverse energy cascade towards longer wavelength. The possibility of generation of an intense mean magnetic field is shown. Obtained growth rates are discussed for each case of the considered coupled waves.

  6. Observations of the artificially injected Porcupine xenon ion beam in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haeusler, B.; Treumann, R. A.; Bauer, O. H.; Haerendel, G.; Bush, R.

    1986-01-01

    Results are given of ion beam injection experiments performed in the auroral ionosphere in connection with the German Sounding Rocket Project Porcupine. A heavy (xenon) ion beam was injected into the collisionless ionospheric plasma approximately perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field at altitudes from 190 km to about 450 km. The beam propagates nearly undistorted across the plasma because it is essentially depolarized; at the same time the beam is not current neutralized. This unexpected behavior poses the interconnected problems of how the beam manages to become charge neutralized, how current closure is maintained, and what is the mechanism of depolarization.

  7. Features of the F3 layer in the low-latitude ionosphere at sunset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Biqiang; Wan, Weixing; Reinisch, Bodo; Yue, Xinan; Le, Huijun; Liu, Jing; Xiong, Bo

    2011-01-01

    The F3 layer is a common feature within ±10° of the magnetic equatorial ionosphere in the daytime. According to Balan et al. (1998) the F3 layer occurs mainly during the morning-noon period due to the combined effect of the upward E × B drift and the neutral wind that provides upward plasma drifts at and above the F2 layer. The F3 layer occurrence rate is higher in summer and decreases with increasing solar activity. In this study, the characteristic of the sunset F3 layer is first investigated using a solar cycle of ionosonde data (1995-2010) from the magnetic equatorial station at Jicamarca, and compared with the features derived from the four subtropical stations at Sao Luis, Fortaleza, Kwajalein, and Vanimo. Evidence shows that the local time distribution of the occurrence of the F3 layer can extend to the postsunset time (1800-2100 local time). The sunset F3 layer has a strong seasonal dependence occurring mainly during the summertime. Unlike the daytime F3 layer, the occurrence of the sunset F3 layer clearly increases and the virtual height of the bottom side of the F3 layer statistically increases from 620 to 1000 km with increasing solar activity. In addition, the occurrence of the sunset F3 layer at the other stations is much less than that at Jicamarca. These features of the dependence on the season, solar activity, and latitude are clearly related to the geomagnetic control of the evening prereversal enhancement of the equatorial zonal electric field and geomagnetic configuration.

  8. Limits on the validity of the thin-layer model of the ionosphere for radio interferometric calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Poppy L.; Bray, Justin D.; Scaife, Anna M. M.

    2016-07-01

    For a ground-based radio interferometer observing at low frequencies, the ionosphere causes propagation delays and refraction of cosmic radio waves which result in phase errors in the received signal. These phase errors can be corrected using a calibration method that assumes a two-dimensional phase screen at a fixed altitude above the surface of the Earth, known as the thin-layer model. Here, we investigate the validity of the thin-layer model and provide a simple equation with which users can check when this approximation can be applied to observations for varying time of day, zenith angle, interferometer latitude, baseline length, ionospheric electron content and observing frequency.

  9. Ionospheric F2 layer responses to total solar eclipses at low and mid-latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adekoya, B. J.; Chukwuma, V. U.

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we presented ionospheric F2 responses to total solar eclipses on the basis of the data obtained from five (5) equatorial/low-latitude and twenty-seven (27) mid-latitude ionosonde stations, which are within the obscuration percentage of 50-100% of the path of the total solar eclipses progression. Statistically, the diurnal changes in the F2 layer peak height hmF2 and electron density NmF2, as well as the latitudinal and hemispheric dependence and the contribution of both magnetic and solar activities during the eclipse window were investigated. The estimation of the solar ionizing radiation that remains unmasked during the eclipse window was as well carried out. Plasma diffusion processes dominate the F2 region plasma, and determine the height at which the F2 peak formed at mid-latitude. The electron density decreased during the eclipse window, closely following the variation in the local solar radiation at the mid-latitude. However, at equatorial/low-latitude, the plasma distribution during total solar eclipse depends on combine effect of solar radiation and the background nighttime ionospheric irregularities mechanism. The uncertainty level of the estimated solar ionizing radiation was <±0.3 at mid-latitude and greater±0.3 at equatorial/low-latitude. Their correlation ranges from (0.42-0.99). The ionospheric F2 layer eclipse effect is latitudinal and hemispheric dependent. The effect is largest at mid-latitude and relatively small at equatorial/low-latitudes. It is more pronounced at the equator, and decreases toward the equatorial ionospheric anomaly (EIA) region. The better correlation of 0.5840 and 0.6435 between geographic latitude and E(t) and electron density justifies the latitudinal relationship. The increase in percentage deviation of electron density increases with latitude and delay time (∆T) in the northern hemisphere of the mid-latitude. Conversely, in the southern hemisphere the percentage deviation decreases with an increase in

  10. Thermo-sensitive spin valve based on layered artificial ferrimagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svalov, A. V.; Kurlyandskaya, G. V.; Vas'kovskiy, V. O.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the temperature and magnetic field dependences of magnetic and magnetoresistive properties of Gd-Co/Co/Cu/Co spin valves were comparatively analyzed. It was observed that the Gd-Co/Co bilayer structure exhibited macroscopic ferrimagnetic behavior. It was shown that the temperature dependence of magnetization of Gd-Co/Co layered artificial ferrimagnet could be the basis for the creation of a thermo-sensitive spin valve.

  11. Characteristics of layers, waves and turbulence in the atmosphere and ionosphere as estimated by GPS space radio-holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelyev, Alexander; Gubenko, Vladimir; Matyugov, Stanislav; Pavelyev, Alexey

    The spatial, seasonal and geographical distrubutions of the intensity of layers, turbulence and internal waves at different altitudes in the atmosphere and ionosphere of the Earth are presented. The results have been obtained on the base of locality principle using a new phase acceleration-intensity method for analysis of the GPS radio occultation signals. This methodology has been applied to mesearements of the inclination and altitude of ionospheric layers. Obtained information has been used for estimation of the front orientation, internal frequency and phase speed of the internal waves in the ionosphere and neutral atmosphere. A new index of the ionospheric activity as measured from the phase of radio waves passed through the ionosphere is introduced and its high correlation with S4 scintillation index is established. This correlation indicates the significant influence of ionospheric layers on variations of characteristics of radio waves in transionospheric communication links. Specially for the troposphere the geographical distribution of the weak total absorption (about of 1-2 db) of the radio waves at GPS frequencies in the Earth atmosphere corresponding to influence of the oxygen and water vapor in the troposphere is measured with accuracy better than 0.1 db. Obtained results expanded the applicable domain of the GPS space radio-holography for global investigation of the natural processes in the atmosphere and ionosphere as function of solar activity and space weather effects. The new phase acceleration-intensity method is also a basic tool which can be applied for data analysis of future planetary radio occultation missions

  12. (Workshop on artificially ionized layers in the atmosphere)

    SciTech Connect

    Tunnell, T.W.

    1989-10-30

    I presented our report which described our technique of inferring electron temperature in a microwave induced plasma. The primary purpose of my trip to Kiev was to present a paper entitled Analysis of Nitrogen Light Emission from Artificially Ionized Layers (AIL) Breakdown'' at the AIL workshop. The AIL concept is to produce an ionized layer in the atmosphere from which radio frequency waves can be reflected. The workshop provided for the transfer of unclassified technology between the US and the USSR, who are reportedly years, if not decades, ahead of the US in this area of research.

  13. Excitation of the lower oblique resonance by an artificial plasma jet in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, J.; Storey, L. R. O.; Bauer, O. H.; Jones, D.

    1984-04-01

    Aboard the Porcupine rockets, bursts of noise were detected in the electron whistler range during the operation of a xenon plasma gun on a package ejected from the main payload. These observations can be interpreted in terms of excitation of the lower oblique resonance by instabilities associated with the motion of the xenon ion beam through the ionospheric plasma.

  14. Global morphology of ionospheric F-layer scintillations using FS3/COSMIC GPS radio occultation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Lung-Chih; Su, Shin-Yi

    2016-07-01

    The FormoSat-3/ Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (FS3/COSMIC) has been proven a successful mission on profiling and modeling of ionospheric electron density by the radio occultation (RO) technique. In this study we report FS3/COSMIC limb-viewing observations of the GPS L-band scintillation since mid 2006 and propose to study F-layer irregularity morphology. Generally the FS3/COSMIC has performed >1000 ionospheric RO observations per day. Most of these observations can provide limb-viewing profiles of S4 scintillation index at dual L-band frequencies. There are a few percentage of FS3/COSMIC RO observations having >0.08 S4 values on average. However, seven identified areas at Central Pacific Area (-20∘~ 20∘dip latitude, 160∘E~130∘W), South American Area (-20∘~ 20∘dip latitude, 100∘W~30∘W), African Area (-20∘~ 20∘dip latitude, 30∘W~50∘E), European Area (30∘~55∘N, 0∘~55∘E), Japan See Area (35∘~55∘N, 120∘~150∘E), Arctic Area (> 65∘dip latitude), and Antarctic Area (< -65∘dip latitude) have been designated to have much higher percentage of strong L-band RO scintillation. During these years in most of the last sunspot cycle from mid 2006 to end 2014 the climatology of scintillations, namely, its variations with each identified area, season, local time, magnetic activity and solar activity have been documented.

  15. Design and construction of Keda Space Plasma Experiment (KSPEX) for the investigation of the boundary layer processes of ionospheric depletions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Zhongkai; Lei, Jiuhou; Cao, Jinxiang; Yu, Pengcheng; Zhang, Xiao; Xu, Liang; Zhao, Yaodong

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the design and construction of the Keda Space Plasma EXperiment (KSPEX), which aims to study the boundary layer processes of ionospheric depletions, are described in detail. The device is composed of three stainless-steel sections: two source chambers at both ends and an experimental chamber in the center. KSPEX is a steady state experimental device, in which hot filament arrays are used to produce plasmas in the two sources. A Macor-mesh design is adopted to adjust the plasma density and potential difference between the two plasmas, which creates a boundary layer with a controllable electron density gradient and inhomogeneous radial electric field. In addition, attachment chemicals can be released into the plasmas through a tailor-made needle valve which leads to the generation of negative ions plasmas. Ionospheric depletions can be modeled and simulated using KSPEX, and many micro-physical processes of the formation and evolution of an ionospheric depletion can be experimentally studied.

  16. E-layer dominated ionosphere observed by EISCAT/ESR radars during solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hongtao; Li, Fei; Shen, Ge; Zhan, Weijia; Zhou, Kangjun; McCrea, Ian W.; Ma, Shuying

    2014-05-01

    E-layer dominated ionosphere (ELDI) is referred to vertical profiles having peak density at E-layer altitudes (Mayer and Jakowski, 2009). In this paper, characteristics of ELDI were investigated with the help of field-aligned measurements of EISCAT/ESR radars during 2009-2011. ELDI events were identified with simple but reasonable criterions, in which a minimal duration was required to exclude possible 'fake' events induced by random errors in measurements. It was found that ELDI were observed more often in winter than other seasons. In winter, occurrence of ELDI peaks around mid-night at auroral latitude, while it reaches its maximum around geomagnetic local noon at ESR latitude. Our results imply that ELDI looks like a sporadic rather than a regular phenomenon, being contrary to previous results inferred from radio occultation measurements. Discrepancy in duration of ELDI events observed by the two radars is remarkable, being 30 minutes at TromsØ on average and about a half of it at Svalbard. During the presence of ELDI, average thickness of E-layer exhibits undetectable variations at the two sites, as well as HmE and the ratio of NmE/NmF. Case studies reveal that either extra E-layer ionization possible induced by auroral precipitation or density depletion in F-layer caused by plasma convection alone could lead to the presence of ELDI. We suggest that both them play an important role in ELDI formation.

  17. Modelling of the equatorial ionospheric E-layer based on cos ξ index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazeem, A. K.; Adeniyi, J. O.; Adediji, A. T.

    2014-06-01

    Daytime hourly values of the critical frequency of the ionospheric E-layer, f oE, obtained at Ouagadougou Ionospheric Observatory (12.4°N, 1.5°W) in Burkina Faso, West Africa, an equatorial station, during the solar cycle 22 (1985-1995) have been used to develop a model based on solar zenith angle through cos ξ index factor using the relation f oE = a (cos ξ)n, The average value of the diurnal cos ξ index, n, at Ouagadougou was found to be 0.30 for both low and high solar activity. The model was tested with f oE data from Korhogo (9.3°N, 5.4°W) in Cote-d'Ivoire, another equatorial station, and there is good agreement between the model and observations. The validity of the f oE model was also compared with predicted values by IRI-2012 model and good agreement has been observed. The percentage difference, when f oE observed compared with IRI-2012 model, was found to be within f ±10% for both equinoxes and solstices for the two levels of solar activity.

  18. Peculiar Features of Ionospheric F3-Layer during Prolonged Solar Minimum (2007-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, C.; Yadav, V.; Kakad, B. A.; Sripathi, S.; Emperumal, K.; Pant, T. K.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Jin, S.

    2014-12-01

    Seasonal and local time occurrence of ionospheric F3-layer over Tirunelveli (geo. lon. 77.8° E, geo. lat. 8.7° N, dip 0.7°) during extremely low and prolonged solar activity period (2007-2009) has been presented in this paper. Almost three times increase in the occurence of the F3-layer has been observed 2009 (~ 48%) as compared to that during 2007(~ 16%). The increase of this order just within low solar activity period is unusual. In earlier studies similar increase in F3 occurrence has been reported when solar activity changes from high (F10.7=182) to low (F10.7=72). Another important feature of this study, is the presence of post-noon F3 layers that are observed predominantly during the summer solstice of 2009. Such occurrence of post-noon F3 layers was nearly absent during summer solstice of previous solar minimum (1996) over nearby dip equatorial station Trivandrum. Using the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) as a proxy for eastward electric field, we found that the EEJ strength and the maximum rate of change of EEJ are higher for F3-days as compared to that during non-F3 days. It was also observed that the peak occurrence of pre-noon F3-layer closely coincides with the time of maximum rate of change of EEJ. The present study reveals that the rate of change of eastward electric field (dE/dt) as well plays an important role in the formation of F3-layer.

  19. Evidence for lightning-associated enhancement of the ionospheric sporadic E layer dependent on lightning stroke energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bingkun; Xue, Xianghui; Lu, Gaopeng; Ma, Ming; Dou, Xiankang; Qie, Xiushu; Ning, Baiqi; Hu, Lianhuan; Wu, Jianfei; Chi, Yutian

    2015-10-01

    In this study we analyze the lightning data obtained by the World-Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) and hourly ionospheric data observed by ionosondes located at Sanya and Beijing, to examine the changes in ionospheric electron density in response to the underlying thunderstorms and to investigate the possible connection between lightning discharges and the enhancement of the ionospheric sporadic E(Es) layer. We identify a statistically significant enhancement and a decrease in altitude of the Es layer at Sanya station, in agreement with the results found at Chilton, UK. However, the lightning-associated modification of the Es layer investigated using the same approach is not evident at Beijing station. Furthermore, we compare the responses to weak and strong lightning strokes using WWLLN-determined energies at Sanya in 2012. The lightning-associated enhancement of the Es layer is predominantly attributed to powerful strokes with high stroke energy. A statistically significant intensification of the Es layer with higher-energy strokes at Sanya, along with the statistical dependence of lightning-associated enhancement of the Es layer on stroke energy, leads us to conclude that the magnitude of the enhancement is likely associated with lightning stroke energy.

  20. Gas dynamic and aeronomic phenomena in the ionosphere caused by artificial cloud releases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovsky, Yu. A.; Tcema, A.

    In a series of active experiments, carried out on the rockets MR-12 and MR-20 the features of the upper atmosphere and the ionosphere disturbances caused by gas dynamic and aeronomic processes after releases of pyrotechnic and explosive heterophase (gas-plasma-particle) mixtures (HM) from the rockets at heights of 120-200 km, were investigated. The data on changes of the neutral and ion composition and densities due to gas dynamic and aeronomic processes after the HM releases are presented and discussed.

  1. Numerical study of the generation and propagation of ultralow-frequency waves by artificial ionospheric F region modulation at different latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Zhou, Chen; Shi, Run; Ni, Binbin; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Yuannong

    2016-09-01

    Powerful high-frequency (HF) radio waves can be used to efficiently modify the upper-ionospheric plasmas of the F region. The pressure gradient induced by modulated electron heating at ultralow-frequency (ULF) drives a local oscillating diamagnetic ring current source perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, which can act as an antenna radiating ULF waves. In this paper, utilizing the HF heating model and the model of ULF wave generation and propagation, we investigate the effects of both the background ionospheric profiles at different latitudes in the daytime and nighttime ionosphere and the modulation frequency on the process of the HF modulated heating and the subsequent generation and propagation of artificial ULF waves. Firstly, based on a relation among the radiation efficiency of the ring current source, the size of the spatial distribution of the modulated electron temperature and the wavelength of ULF waves, we discuss the possibility of the effects of the background ionospheric parameters and the modulation frequency. Then the numerical simulations with both models are performed to demonstrate the prediction. Six different background parameters are used in the simulation, and they are from the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-2012) model and the neutral atmosphere model (NRLMSISE-00), including the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP; 62.39° N, 145.15° W), Wuhan (30.52° N, 114.32° E) and Jicamarca (11.95° S, 76.87° W) at 02:00 and 14:00 LT. A modulation frequency sweep is also used in the simulation. Finally, by analyzing the numerical results, we come to the following conclusions: in the nighttime ionosphere, the size of the spatial distribution of the modulated electron temperature and the ground magnitude of the magnetic field of ULF wave are larger, while the propagation loss due to Joule heating is smaller compared to the daytime ionosphere; the amplitude of the electron temperature oscillation decreases with

  2. Modeling the Arecibo nighttime F{sub 2} layer 2. Ionospheric gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Melendez-Alvira, D.J.; Burnside, R.G.; Walker, J.C.G.

    1994-12-01

    The servo model is extended and used to fit horizontal gradients in the F{sub 2} layer height and density and to estimate the zonal Pedersen current and its zonal and meridional gradient. Horizontal gradients were measured from the Arecibo Observatory during the following five nights: August 16-17 and 17-18, 1982; and October 4-5, 5-6, and 9-10, 1983. The model gradients are driven by nonzero current gradients, which are applied as needed to fit the measured gradients in the F{sub 2} peak. The gradient is calculated self-consistently in the model. The divergence of the Pedersen current can be deduced when the current flows zonally and is found to differ from zero. This is a consequence of zonal divergence of the model zonal current. Expressions are derived for the divergence of the Hall current and for the curl of the current in the presence of ionospheric gradients. The vertical vorticity of the F region current is determined from the radar and optical measurements and the mass spectrometer/incoherent scatter (MSIS) neutral densities. Both neutral and plasma motions generate current vorticity equally as expected from the F region dynamo. The measured velocity gradients produce more current gradients and vorticity than the measured conductance gradients. The nighttime current may be irrotational or have constant vorticity. Large current gradients occur in conjunction with observed descents of the F{sub 2} peak height. The gradients are interpreted as due to the midnight pressure bulge at low latitudes. Short-period gravity waves of meteorological origin are ruled out as they were not observed and are limited in their ability to reach ionospheric heights. The harmonic analysis used to obtain horizontal wind gradients is largely unaffected by spatially uniform wind accelerations. Therefore the deduced spatial variations in the measured winds are unlikely to be due to temporal variations. 49 refs., 13 figs.

  3. A New Grid based Ionosphere Algorithm for GAGAN using Data Fusion Technique (ISRO GIVE Model-Multi Layer Data Fusion)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Nirmala; Ganeshan, A. S.; Mishra, Saumyaketu

    2012-07-01

    A New Grid based Ionosphere Algorithm for GAGAN using Data Fusion Technique (ISRO GIVE Model-Multi Layer Data Fusion) Saumyaketu Mishra, Nirmala S, A S Ganeshan ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore and Timothy Schempp, Gregory Um, Hans Habereder Raytheon Company Development of a region-specific ionosphere model is the key element in providing precision approach services for civil aviation with GAGAN (GPS Aided GEO Augmented Navigation). GAGAN is an Indian SBAS (Space Based Augmentation System) comprising of three segments; space segment (GEO and GPS), ground segment (15 Indian reference stations (INRES), 2 master control centers and 3 ground uplink stations) and user segment. The GAGAN system is intended to provide air navigation services for APV 1/1.5 precision approach over the Indian land mass and RNP 0.1 navigation service over Indian Flight Information Region (FIR), conforming to the standards of GNSS ICAO-SARPS. Ionosphere being largest source of error is of prime concern for a SBAS. India is a low latitude country, posing challenges for grid based ionosphere algorithm development; large spatial and temporal gradients, Equatorial anomaly, Depletions (bubbles), Scintillations etc. To meet the required GAGAN performance, it is necessary to develop and implement a best suitable ionosphere model, applicable for the Indian region as thin shell models like planar does not meet the requirement. ISRO GIVE Model - Multi Layer Data Fusion (IGM-MLDF) employs an innovative approach for computing the ionosphere corrections and confidences at pre-defined grid points at 350 Km shell height. Ionosphere variations over the Geo-magnetic equatorial regions shows peak electron density shell height variations from 200 km to 500 km, so single thin shell assumption at 350 km is not valid over Indian region. Hence IGM-MLDF employs innovative scheme of modeling at two shell heights. Through empirical analysis the shell heights of 250 km and 450 km are chosen. The ionosphere measurement

  4. The variations of ionosphere critical frequency of E layer over the equatorial geomagnetic region in Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenpankho, Prasert; Ishii, Mamoru; Supnithi, Pornchai

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the values of the critical frequency of the ionospheric E layer, foE, obtained at Chumphon ionospheric observatory station, Thailand. For a declining phase of the solar cycle 23 during the year 2005-2008 and an inclining phase of the solar cycle 24 during the year 2009-2013, the foE data have been used to investigate the foE variations over the equatorial geomagnetic region in Southeast Asia. A comparison between the observation data and International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) 2012 model has also been investigated and studied. The results show that the foE obtained from IRI 2012 model underestimates foE from Chumphon station especially during the period of 7-11 am and after 6 pm for each day and all seasons. As the results combining with the previous investigations, we suggest that the underestimation of ionospheric foE by IRI 2012 model is helpful for the correction and improvement of IRI model in an equatorial Asia region.

  5. Meteoric ion layers in the ionospheres of venus and mars: Early observations and consideration of the role of meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, Paul; Christou, A. A.; Vaubaillon, J.

    2013-10-01

    Layers of metal ions produced by meteoroid ablation have been known in Earth's ionosphere for decades, but have only recently been discovered at Venus and Mars. Here we report the results of a search for meteoric layers in earlier datasets from Venus and Mars. We find 13 candidates at Venus in Mariner 10, Venera 9/10, and Pioneer Venus Orbiter data that augment the 18 previously identified in Venus Express data. We find 8 candidates at Mars in Mariner 7 and Mariner 9 data that augment the 71 and 10 previously identified in Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Express data, respectively. These new findings extend the ranges of conditions under which meteoric layers have been observed, support studies of the temporal variability of meteoric layers, and (for Venus) independently confirm the existence of meteoric layers. One of the proposed causes of temporal variations in the occurrence rate of meteoric layers is meteor showers. This possibility is controversial, since meteor showers have minimal observed effect on meteoric layers in Earth's ionosphere. In order to aid progress towards a resolution of this issue, we present a series of tests for this hypothesis.

  6. Propagation of Rossby-Khantadze Electromagnetic Planetary Waves in the Ionospheric E-Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futatani, S.; Kaladze, T.; Horton, W.; Benkadda, S.

    2013-10-01

    Nonlinear vortex propagation of electromagnetic coupled Rossby and Khantadze planetary waves in the weakly ionized E-layer of the ionosphere are investigated with numerical simulations. For each k-vector the linear dispersion relation has two eigenmodes corresponding to the slow magnetized Rossby wave and the fast magnetic Khantadze wave. Both waves propagate westward with speeds of order 10-20 m/s for the slow wave and of order 500-1000 km/s for the fast wave. We show that for finite amplitudes there are dipole solitary vortex structures emitted from general initial conditions. These structures are the neutrally stable, nonlinear states that avoid radiating waves by propagating faster than the corresponding linear wave speeds. The condition for these coherent structures to occur is that their amplitudes be such that the nonlinear convection around the core of the disturbance is faster that the linear wave speed for the corresponding dominant Fourier components of the initial disturbance. The presence of the solitary vortex states are indicative of an initial strong disturbance such that arising from a solar storm, a tectonic plate movements or volcanic eruptions. Supported by NSF Grant 0964692 to the University of Texas at Austin; PIIM/CNRS at Aix-Marseille University, and by IMeRA Grant for Advanced Research.

  7. Nonlinear propagation of Rossby-Khantadze electromagnetic planetary waves in the ionospheric E-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futatani, S.; Horton, W.; Kaladze, T. D.

    2013-10-01

    Nonlinear vortex propagation of electromagnetic coupled Rossby and Khantadze planetary waves in the weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer is investigated with numerical simulations. Large scale, finite amplitude vortex structures are launched as initial conditions at low, mid, and high latitudes. For each k-vector the linear dispersion relation has two eigenmodes corresponding to the slow magnetized Rossby wave and the fast magnetic Khantadze wave. Both waves propagate westward with local speeds of the order of 10-20 m/s for the slow wave and of the order of 500-1000 km/s for the fast wave. We show that for finite amplitudes there are dipole solitary structures emitted from the initial conditions. These structures are neutrally stable, nonlinear states that avoid radiating waves by propagating faster than the corresponding linear wave speeds. The condition for these coherent structures to occur is that their amplitudes are such that the nonlinear convection around the core of the disturbance is faster than the linear wave speed for the corresponding dominant Fourier components of the initial disturbance. The presence of the solitary vortex states is indicative of an initial strong disturbance such as that from a solar storm or a tectonic plate movement. We show that for generic, large amplitude initial disturbances both slow and fast vortex structures propagate out of the initial structure.

  8. Nonlinear propagation of Rossby-Khantadze electromagnetic planetary waves in the ionospheric E-layer

    SciTech Connect

    Futatani, S.; Horton, W.; Kaladze, T. D.

    2013-10-15

    Nonlinear vortex propagation of electromagnetic coupled Rossby and Khantadze planetary waves in the weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer is investigated with numerical simulations. Large scale, finite amplitude vortex structures are launched as initial conditions at low, mid, and high latitudes. For each k-vector the linear dispersion relation has two eigenmodes corresponding to the slow magnetized Rossby wave and the fast magnetic Khantadze wave. Both waves propagate westward with local speeds of the order of 10–20 m/s for the slow wave and of the order of 500–1000 km/s for the fast wave. We show that for finite amplitudes there are dipole solitary structures emitted from the initial conditions. These structures are neutrally stable, nonlinear states that avoid radiating waves by propagating faster than the corresponding linear wave speeds. The condition for these coherent structures to occur is that their amplitudes are such that the nonlinear convection around the core of the disturbance is faster than the linear wave speed for the corresponding dominant Fourier components of the initial disturbance. The presence of the solitary vortex states is indicative of an initial strong disturbance such as that from a solar storm or a tectonic plate movement. We show that for generic, large amplitude initial disturbances both slow and fast vortex structures propagate out of the initial structure.

  9. Spaced sensor measurements of artificial airglow emission at 630 nm of ionosphere caused by ``Sura'' facility radiation in November 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasyrov, Igor; Grach, Savely; Gumerov, Rustam; Shindin, Alexey; Kogogin, Denis; Dementiev, Vladislav

    Some first results on simultaneous observation artificial airglow emission at 630 nm during HF pumping of the ionosphere by “Sura” facility from two spatial situated experimental sites are reported. The measurements of artificial airglow are usually conducted in red and green lines of atomic oxygen (the radiation of levels O((1) D) and O((1) S) under their excitation by electronic impact) with wave lengths of 630 and 557.7 nm and excitation energy of 1.96 and 4.17 eV accordingly. An enhancement of airglow intensity in the red line is related at present to the electron heating by powerful radio waves. The idea of the experiment was to estimate the heated volume three-dimensional structure and drift motion one. The experiment was carried out in November 2013 at the “Sura” radio facility, situated near Nizhny Novgorod, Russia (geographical coordinates 56.13(o) N, 46.10(o) E, geomagnetic field declination and inclination are ˜ 10.0(o) east and ˜ 71.5(o) , respectively). Conditions of ionosphere were checked by means of "Cady" ionosonde during “Sura” runs. According to the ionospheric conditions, on the 7(th) of November the “Sura” facility operated at frequency 4.540 MHz. At this frequency the effective radiated power was about 120MW. The HF beam width at the “Sura” facility is ˜ 12(o) . A square wave pump modulation of 5 min on, 5 min off, was used. Measurements were carried out in the period from 14:40 to 17:30 UTC. Optical imaging was performed on two spatial experimental sites: “Vasilsursk” (situated about 500 m from antenna system of “Sura” facility); “Raifa” (situated about 170 km from “Sura” facility at the Magnetic Observatory of Kazan Federal University, geographical coordinates 55.93(o) N, 48.75(o) E). They both were fitted out Peltier-cooled front-illuminated bare CCD cameras with 16-bit slow-scan read-out (S1C3). On “Vasilsursk” site the images were binned down to 256× 256 pixels in addition to cooling, in order

  10. Ionospheric electron number densities from CUTLASS dual-frequency velocity measurements using artificial backscatter over EISCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarno-Smith, Lois K.; Kosch, Michael J.; Yeoman, Timothy; Rietveld, Michael; Nel, Amore'; Liemohn, Michael W.

    2016-08-01

    Using quasi-simultaneous line-of-sight velocity measurements at multiple frequencies from the Hankasalmi Cooperative UK Twin Auroral Sounding System (CUTLASS) on the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN), we calculate electron number densities using a derivation outlined in Gillies et al. (2010, 2012). Backscatter targets were generated using the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) ionospheric modification facility at Tromsø, Norway. We use two methods on two case studies. The first approach is to use the dual-frequency capability on CUTLASS and compare line-of-sight velocities between frequencies with a MHz or greater difference. The other method used the kHz frequency shifts automatically made by the SuperDARN radar during routine operations. Using ray tracing to obtain the approximate altitude of the backscatter, we demonstrate that for both methods, SuperDARN significantly overestimates Ne compared to those obtained from the EISCAT incoherent scatter radar over the same time period. The discrepancy between the Ne measurements of both radars may be largely due to SuperDARN sensitivity to backscatter produced by localized density irregularities which obscure the background levels.

  11. Results of Experimental and Theoretical Studies of the Atmospheric Turbulence, Internal Gravity Waves and Sporadic-E Layers by Resonant Scattering of Radio Waves on Artificial Periodic Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhmetieva, Nataliya V.; Grigoriev; Tolmacheva, Ariadna V.

    Artificial periodic irregularities (API) formed by the powerful standing radio waves in the ionospheric plasma give the good chance for the lower ionosphere comprehensive studies. In this paper we present some applications of the API technique for experimental studies of sporadic E-layers (E _{s}), internal gravity waves and turbulent events in the lower ionosphere. API are formed in the field of the standing radio wave produced by interference of the incident wave and reflected one from the ionosphere (in more details about the API technique one can see in the book Belikovich et al., Ionospheric Research by Means of Artificial Periodic Irregularities - Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany. 2002. Copernicus GmbH. ISBN 3-936586-03-9). The spatial period of the irregular structure is equal to the standing wavelength Lambda or one-half the powerful wavelength lambda/2. API diagnostics are carried out at the API relaxation or decay stage by their sounding of probing radio pulses. Based on the measurement of an amplitude and a phase of the API scattered signal their relaxation time and regular vertical plasma velocity are measured. In the E-region of the ionosphere API are formed as a result of the diffusion redistribution of the non-uniformly heated plasma. The relaxation of the periodic structure is specified by the ambipolar diffusion process. The diffusion time is tau=(K (2) D _{a}) (-1) where K=2pi/Lambda and D _{a} is the ambipolar diffusion rate. The atmospheric turbulence causes reduction of the API relaxation time in comparison the diffusion time. Determination of the turbulent velocity is based on this fact. The vertical plasma velocity is determined by measuring the phase of the scattered signal. Atmospheric waves having the periods from 5-10 minutes to 5-6 hours give the contribution to temporal variations of the velocity. Parameters and effects of atmospheric waves and the turbulence on the API relaxation process are presented. Determination of the masses of the

  12. Revealing the classes of ionospheric disturbances on the basis of multiyear data on the critical frequency of the F2 layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkhatov, N. A.; Barkhatova, O. M.

    2012-07-01

    The bases of the classification method of ionospheric disturbances caused by solar-geomagnetic activity on the basis of the critical frequency of the F2 layer are developed. Data for the total solar activity cycle from 1975 to 1986 were used for studying variations in the critical frequency of the ionospheric F2 layer. The critical frequency was measured at the Moscow ionospheric observatory (55°45'N, 37°37'E) at an interval of 1 h. The gaps in the critical frequency values were filled in by the cubic interpolation method. The solar activity level was estimated using the F10.7 index. The geomagnetic disturbance was determined using the Kp · 10, Dst, and AE indices. According to the developed classification, an index of ionospheric activity is introduced. An analysis of the obtained values of the index for years of solar activity minimum and maximum shows that an increase in the absolute values of the index as a rule occurs at an increase in global geomagnetic and/or auroral disturbances. This fact indicates the sufficient information content of the developed index for characterizing ionospheric activity in any season. Moreover, using the sign of the index, one can form an opinion regarding an increase or decrease in the concentration of the ionospheric F2 layer, because the values of the considered index correspond to real oscillations in the critical frequency of the midlatitude ionosphere.

  13. Model Simulation of Ionosphere Electron Density with Dynamic Transportation and Mechanism of Sporadic E Layers in Lower Part of Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. C.; Chu, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    There are many physical theories responsible for explanation the generation mechanism of sporadic E (Es) plasma irregularities. In middle latitude, it's generally believed that sporadic E layers occur in vertical ion convergent areas driven by horizontal neutral wind shear. The sporadic E layers appear characteristic of abundant metallic ion species (i.e., Fe+, Mg+, Na+), that lifetime are longer than molecular ions by a factor of several orders, have been demonstrated by rocket-borne mass spectrometric measurements. On the basic of the GPS Radio Occultation (RO), using the scintillations of the GPS signal-to-noise ratio and intense fluctuation of excess phase, the global and seasonal sporadic E layers occurrence rates could be retrieved. In our previous study we found there is averaged 10 kilometers shift in height between the COSMIC-retrieved sporadic E layer occurrence rate and the sporadic E occurrence rate modeled from considering the convergence/divergence of Fe+ vertical flux. There are many reasons that maybe result in the altitude differences, e.g., tidal wind with phase shift, electric field driven force, iron species distributions. In this research, the quantitative analyses for electric field drives Es layers translations in vertical direction are presented. The tidal wind driven sporadic E layers have been simulating by modeling several nonmetallic ions (O+(4S), O+(2D), O+(2p), N+, N2+, O2+, NO+) and metallic ions (Fe+, FeO2+, FeN2+, FeO+) with wind shear transportation. The simulation result shows the Fe+ particles accumulate at zonal wind shear convergent regions and form the thin sporadic E layers. With the electric field taking into account, the whole shape of sporadic E layers vertical shift 2~5 km that depending on what magnitude and direction of electric field is added.

  14. Ionospheric physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sojka, J.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Advances in all areas of ionospheric research are reviewed for the 1987-1990 time period. Consideration is given to the equatorial ionosphere, the midlatitude ionosphere and plasmasphere, the auroral ionosphere, the polar ionosphere and polar wind, ionospheric electrodynamic inputs, plasma waves and irregularities, active experiments, ionospheric forecasting, and coupling the ionosphere with other regions.

  15. Signature of 3-4 day planetary waves in the equatorial ionospheric F layer height and medium frequency radar winds over Tirunelveli (8.7oN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararaman, Sathishkumar

    Signature of 3-4 day planetary waves in the equatorial ionospheric F layer height and medium frequency radar winds over Tirunelveli (8.7oN) S. Sathishkumar1, R. Dhanya1, K. Emperumal1, D. Tiwari2, S. Gurubaran1 and A. Bhattacharyya2 1. Equatorial Geophysical Research Laboratory, Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Tirunelveli, India 2. Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai, India Email: sathishmaths@gmail.com Abstract The equatorial atmosphere-ionosphere system has been studied theoretically and observationally in the past. In the equatorial atmosphere, oscillations with periods of 3-4 days are often observed in the medium frequency (MF) radar over Tirunelveli (8.7oN, 77.8oE, 1.34oN geomag. lat.). Earlier observations show the clear evidence that these waves can propagate from the stratosphere to ionosphere. A digital ionosonde has been providing useful information on several ionospheric parameters from the same site. Simultaneous observations of mesospheric winds using medium frequency radar and F-layer height (h'F) from ionosonde reveal that the 3-4 day wave was evident in both the component during the 01 June 2007 and 31 July 2007. The 3-4 day wave could have an important role in the day to day variability of the equatorial ionosphere evening uplift. Results from an extensive analysis that is being carried out in the direction of 3-4 day wave present in the ionosphere will be presented.

  16. Low-frequency waves and ion heating associated with double layers in the downward current region of the auroral ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Naresh

    2009-06-01

    Recent observations by satellites in the auroral ionosphere have established the presence of strong narrowly localized electric fields parallel to the ambient magnetic field. Physically these fields are formed by two layers of opposite charges in close proximity existing self-consistently in the plasma; this is known as a double layer (DL). The DL field accelerates plasma particles to form beams which excite wave modes and saturate to form electron phase-space holes (EHs). Intense perpendicular heating of ions is concurrently observed, leading to speculations regarding the heating mechanism(s). In this thesis, we address this issue via numerical simulations and analysis. We have performed electrostatic kinetic simulations using the Vlasov-Poisson system of equations for conditions prevalent in the downward current region (DCR) of the auroral ionosphere. The simulations display low-frequency waves, EHs and ion heating, consistent with observations. We determine the relative importance of two proposed mechanisms for ion heating: stochastic heating due to EHs and due to wave-particle interactions at identifiable wave modes. Stochastic heating of ions via EH-ion scattering is estimated to account for approximately 10-15% of the observed increase in ion temperature in regions of intense wave activity. Spectral analysis shows that the energy exchange between waves and ions is concentrated at frequencies and wave numbers associated with nearly perpendicular magnetized ion wave modes and not EHs. We conclude that, in the vicinity of DLs in the DCR of the auroral ionosphere where both intense waves and EHs are present, wave-particle interactions are the principal mechanism of ion heating, with stochastic heating by electron phase-space holes playing a minor role.

  17. Generation of zonal flow and magnetic field by finite-amplitude waves in the ionospheric E-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahlon, Laila; Kaladze, Tamaz

    2016-07-01

    We review the generation of zonal flow and magnetic field by coupled electromagnetic (EM) ULF waves in the Earth's ionospheric E layer. It is shown that under the typical ionospheric E-layer conditions different planetary low-frequency waves can couple with each other. Propagation of coupled internal-gravity-Alfvén (CIGA), coupled Rossby-Khantadze (CRK) and coupled Rossby-Alfvén-Khantadze (CRAK) waves is revealed and studied. A set of appropriate equations describing the nonlinear interaction of such waves with sheared zonal flow is derived. The conclusion on the instability of short wavelength turbulence of such coupled waves with respect to the excitation of low-frequency and large-scale perturbation of the sheared zonal flow and sheared magnetic field is deduced. The nonlinear mechanism of the instability is based on the parametric triple interaction of finite amplitude coupled waves leading to the inverse energy cascade toward the longer wavelength. The possibility of generation of the intense mean magnetic field is shown. Obtained growth rates are discussed for each case of the considered coupled waves.

  18. Response of some ionospheric parameters to geomagnetic disturbances at heights below the F2-layer maximum in September and April 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushnarenko, G. P.; Kuznetsova, G. M.; Ratovskii, K. G.; Kolpakova, O. E.

    2012-05-01

    An analysis of ionospheric data obtained during geomagnetic disturbances in April and September 2005 is performed in order to obtain information on the behavior of some ionospheric parameters at heights of the F1 layer. The results of measurements by an Irkutsk digisonde at hourly and 5- and 15-min time intervals were used. It is shown that in September all parameters very actively responded to geomagnetic disturbances in short measurement time intervals. It is also shown that the electron concentration behaves more stable at lower heights of the F1 layer both during strong and moderate disturbances.

  19. Crystallographic structure and superconductive properties of Nb-Ti films with an artificially layered structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, N. )

    1990-06-15

    Artificially layered niobium-titanium (Nb-Ti) films with various thickness ratios (3/1--1/3) and periodicities (2--100 A) are made in an argon or in a mixed argon/nitrogen atmosphere by a dc magnetron sputtering method. Films with small periodicities (less than 30 A) have an artificial superlattice structure (ASL) with crystallographic coherence between constituent layers, where Nb and Ti grow epitaxially on the closest planes. The crystallographic structures of films are bcc with the (110) plane parallel to the film for films with the same or a thicker Nb layer than a Ti layer, and hcp with the (001) plane parallel to the film for films with a thinner Nb layer than a Ti layer. Films with large periodicities have an artificial superstructure (ASS) with only periodic stacking of constituent layers. Films deposited in the Ar/N atmosphere also have the artificially layered structures of ASL or ASS. The artificially layered structure is thermally stable at temperatures up to 500 {degree}C. The superconducting properties of the films depend strongly on the periodicity and thickness ratio of Nb and Ti layers. The dependence of the transition temperature on the periodicity and thickness ratio is qualitatively explained by a proximity effect with a three-region model. Films with periodicities less than 20 A, composed of the same or a thicker Nb layer than a Ti layer, show high transition temperatures (above 9.3 K). The highest {ital T}{sub {ital c}} of about 13.6 K is obtained in the film composed of monatomic layers of constituents deposited in an Ar atmosphere including 30 vol % N.

  20. Wave reflection from randomly inhomogeneous ionospheric layer: 1. The method of describing the wavefield in a reflecting layer with random irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinin, Mikhail

    2016-08-01

    It has been previously proposed to describe wave propagation in inhomogeneous media in a small-angle approximation with the aid of a double weighted Fourier transform (DWFT) method. This method agrees with the methods of geometrical optics, smooth perturbations, and phase screen in domains of their applicability; therefore, it can be employed to solve direct and inverse problems of radio wave propagation in multiscale inhomogeneous ionospheric plasma. In this paper, for the DWFT wide-angle generalization a wave equation is preliminary reduced using the Fock proper-time method to a parabolic equation that then is solved by the DWFT method. The resulting solution is analyzed for the case of wave reflection and scattering by a layer with random irregularities and linear profile of average permittivity. We show the transformation of this solution into strict results in the absence of irregularities and in the single-scatter approximation, including backscattering, during weak phase fluctuations. Under certain conditions, the solution takes the form of the small-angle DWFT with respect to refraction in the layer and backscatter effects. Spatial processing in source and observer coordinates brings a beam of received waves into one wave without amplitude fluctuations, which allows an increase in resolution of vertical ionospheric sounding systems.

  1. Regional spherical modeling of 2-D functions: The case of the critical frequency of the F2 ionospheric layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Santis, A.; De Franceschi, G.; Kerridge, D. J.

    1994-06-01

    In this paper it is shown that Adjusted Spherical Harmonic Analysis (ASHA), previously used for modeling the three-dimensional (3-D) geomagnetic field in a restricted area can be adapted to model general bidimensional (2-D) spherical functions, f(γ, θ). As an example of application the case of the critical frequency of the F2 ionospheric layer, f0F2 is described. By assuming that, at a fixed epoch, the monthly median value of f0F2 is a function only of the geographic longitude γ and colatitude θ, that is f0F2 = f( γ, θ), ASHA has been applied to modeling and mapping this ionospheric parameter over Europe. Here, the FORTRAN-77 computer programs and subprograms are presented enabling the practical and easy use of the ASHA technique to obtain, as a final output, either a grid (2 × 2 degrees) of the computed monthly medians of f0F2 in the European area and the calculated value of the parameter at one point, in the region of interest, as a function of time. The same codes can be adapted easily to be used for modeling any bidimensional function defined over a spherical portion of the Earth.

  2. Perspective ground-based method for diagnostics of the lower ionosphere and the neutral atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhmetieva, N. V.; Grigoriev, G. I.; Tolmacheva, A. V.

    We present a new perspective ground-based method for diagnostics of the ionosphere and atmosphere parameters. The method uses one of the numerous physical phenomena observed in the ionosphere illuminated by high-power radio waves. It is a generation of the artificial periodic irregularities (APIs) in the ionospheric plasma. The APIs were found while studying the effects of ionospheric high-power HF modification. It was established that the APIs are formed by a standing wave that occurs due to interference between the upwardly radiated radio wave and its reflection off the ionosphere. The API studies are based upon observation of the Bragg backscatter of the pulsed probe radio wave from the artificial periodic structure. Bragg backscatter occurs if the spatial period of the irregularities is equal to half a wavelength of the probe signal. The API techniques makes it possible to obtain the following information: the profiles of electron density from the lower D-region up to the maximum of the F-layer; the irregular structure of the ionosphere including split of the regular E-layer, the sporadic layers; the vertical velocities in the D- and E-regions of the ionosphere; the turbulent velocities, turbulent diffusion coefficients and the turbopause altitude; the neutral temperatures and densities at the E-region altitudes; the parameters of the internal gravity waves and their spectral characteristics; the relative concentration of negative oxygen ions in the D-region. Some new results obtained by the API technique are discussed .

  3. Rossby-Khantadze electromagnetic planetary waves driven by sheared zonal winds in the E-layer ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Futatani, S.; Horton, W.; Kahlon, L. Z.; Kaladze, T. D.

    2015-01-15

    Nonlinear simulations of electromagnetic Rossby and Khantadze planetary waves in the presence of a shearless and sheared zonal flows in the weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer are carried out. The simulations show that the nonlinear action of the vortex structures keeps the solitary character in the presence of shearless zonal winds as well as the ideal solutions of solitary vortex in the absence of zonal winds. In the presence of sheared zonal winds, the zonal flows result in breaking into separate multiple smaller pieces. A passively convected scalar field is shown to clarify the transport associated with the vortices. The work shows that the zonal shear flows provide an energy source into the vortex structure according to the shear rate of the zonal winds.

  4. Excitation of zonal flow and magnetic field by Rossby-Khantadze electromagnetic planetary waves in the ionospheric E-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaladze, T. D.; Kahlon, L. Z.; Tsamalashvili, L. V.

    2012-02-01

    Nonlinear dynamics of Rossby-Khantadze electromagnetic planetary waves in the weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer is investigated. Along with the prevalent effect of Hall conductivity for these waves, the latitudinal inhomogeneity of both the Earth's angular velocity and the geomagnetic field becomes essential. It is shown that such short wavelength turbulence of Rossby-Khantadze waves is unstable with respect to the excitation of low-frequency and large-scale perturbations of the zonal flow and magnetic field. The nonlinear mechanism of the instability is driven by the advection of vorticity, leading to the inverse energy cascade toward the longer wavelength. The growth rate of the corresponding instability is found. It is shown that the generation of the intense mean magnetic field is caused by the latitudinal gradient of the geomagnetic field.

  5. Rossby-Khantadze Electromagnetic Planetary Waves Driven by Sheared Zonal Winds in the E-Layer Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futatani, S.; Horton, W.; Kahlon, L. Z.; Kaladze, T.

    2014-10-01

    Nonlinear simulations are carried out for planetary scale [ >1000 km] electromagnetic Rossby and Khantadze planetary waves in the presence of a sheared zonal flow in the weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer. A variety of sheared flow profiles are studied. We shown that the nonlinear dynamics with the sheared zonal flows provides an energy source into the vortex structures. The energy transfer through the Reynolds stress tensor produces growth of the stable vortices under a variety of conditions. The energy accumulation breaks the vortex structure into multiple species according to the non-uniformity of profile of the external zonal shear flows. S. Futatani, W. Horton, T. D. Kaladze, Phys. Plasmas 20, 102903 (2013). T. D. Kaladze, L. Z. Kahlon, W. Horton. O Pokhotelov, and O. Onishenchenko, EPL 106, A05302 (2014).

  6. Rossby-Khantadze electromagnetic planetary waves driven by sheared zonal winds in the E-layer ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futatani, S.; Horton, W.; Kahlon, L. Z.; Kaladze, T. D.

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear simulations of electromagnetic Rossby and Khantadze planetary waves in the presence of a shearless and sheared zonal flows in the weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer are carried out. The simulations show that the nonlinear action of the vortex structures keeps the solitary character in the presence of shearless zonal winds as well as the ideal solutions of solitary vortex in the absence of zonal winds. In the presence of sheared zonal winds, the zonal flows result in breaking into separate multiple smaller pieces. A passively convected scalar field is shown to clarify the transport associated with the vortices. The work shows that the zonal shear flows provide an energy source into the vortex structure according to the shear rate of the zonal winds.

  7. Remote sensing of the ionospheric F layer by use of O I 6300-A and O I 1356-A observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, S.; Reed, E. I.; Meier, R. R.; Opal, C. B.; Hicks, G. T.

    1975-01-01

    The possibility of using airglow techniques for estimating the electron density and height of the F layer is studied on the basis of a simple relationship between the height of the F2 peak and the column emission rates of the O I 6300 A and O I 1356 A lines. The feasibility of this approach is confirmed by a numerical calculation of F2 peak heights and electron densities from simultaneous measurements of O I 6300 A and O I 1356 A obtained with earth-facing photometers carried by the Ogo 4 satellite. Good agreement is established with the F2 peak heights estimates from top-side and bottom-side ionospheric sounding.

  8. Rossby-Khantadze electromagnetic planetary vortical motions in the ionospheric E-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaladze, T. D.; Tsamalashvili, L. V.; Kahlon, L. Z.

    2011-12-01

    It is shown that in the earth's conductive ionospheric E-region, large-scale ultra low-frequency Rossby and Khantadze electromagnetic waves can propagate. Along with the prevalent effect of Hall conductivity for these waves, the latitudinal inhomogeneity of both the earth's angular velocity and the geomagnetic field becomes essential. Action of these effects leads to the coupled propagation of electromagnetic Rossby and Khantadze modes. Linear propagation properties of these waves are given in detail. It is shown that the waves lose the dispersing property for large values of wave numbers. Corresponding nonlinear solitary vortical structures are constructed. Conditions for such self-organization are given. It is shown that nonlinear large-scale vortices generate the stronger pulses of the geomagnetic field than the corresponding linear waves. Previous investigations are revised.

  9. Simulations of ionospheric turbulence produced by HF heating near the upper hybrid layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmi, A.; Eliasson, B.; Shao, X.; Milikh, G. M.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2016-06-01

    Heating of the ionosphere by high-frequency (HF), ordinary (O) mode electromagnetic waves can excite magnetic field-aligned density striations, associated with upper and lower hybrid turbulence and electron heating. We have used Vlasov simulations in one spatial and two velocity dimensions to study the induced turbulence in the presence of striations when the O-mode pump is mode converted to large-amplitude upper hybrid oscillations trapped in a striation. Parametric processes give rise to upper and lower hybrid turbulence, as well as to large amplitude, short wavelength electron Bernstein waves. The latter excite stochastic electron heating when their amplitudes exceed a threshold for stochasticity, leading to a rapid increase of the electron temperature by several thousands of kelvin. The results have relevance for high-latitude heating experiments.

  10. Recent Advances in Ionospheric Anomalies detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Anton; Vyacheslav, Khattatov

    2016-07-01

    The variability of the parameters of the ionosphere and ionospheric anomalies are the subject of intensive research. It is widely known and studied in the literature ionospheric disturbances caused by solar activity, the passage of the terminator, artificial heating of high-latitude ionosphere, as well as seismic events. Each of the above types of anomalies is the subject of study and analysis. Analysis of these anomalies will provide an opportunity to improve our understanding of the mechanisms of ionospheric disturbances. To solve this problem are encouraged to develop a method of modeling the ionosphere, based on the assimilation of large amounts of observational data.

  11. Excitation of guided ELF-VLF waves through modification of the F{sub 2} ionospheric layer by high-power radio waves

    SciTech Connect

    Markov, G. A.; Belov, A. S.; Komrakov, G. P.; Parrot, M.

    2012-03-15

    The possibility of controlled excitation of ELF-VLF electromagnetic waves through modification of the F{sub 2} ionospheric layer by high-power high-frequency emission is demonstrated in a natural experiment by using the Sura midlatitude heating facility. The excited low-frequency waves can be used to explore the near-Earth space and stimulate the excitation of a magnetospheric maser.

  12. Artificial Excitation of Schumann Resonance with HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, A. V.; Chang, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    We report results from the experiment aimed at the artificial excitation of extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic waves with frequencies corresponding to the frequency of Schumann resonance (typically, 7.5 - 8.0 Hz frequency range). Electromagnetic waves with these frequencies can form a standing pattern inside the spherical cavity formed by the surface of the earth and the ionosphere. In the experiment the ELF waves were excited by heating the ionosphere with X-mode HF electromagnetic waves generated by the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska. The experiment demonstrates that heating of the ionosphere can excite relatively large-amplitude electromagnetic waves with frequencies in the range of the Schumann resonance, when the ionosphere has a strong F-layer and an electric field greater than 5 mV/m is present in the E-region.

  13. Artificial excitation of ELF waves with frequency of Schumann resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, A. V.; Guido, T.; Tulegenov, B.; Labenski, J.; Chang, C.-L.

    2014-11-01

    We report results from the experiment aimed at the artificial excitation of extremely low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic waves with frequencies corresponding to the frequency of Schumann resonance. Electromagnetic waves with these frequencies can form a standing pattern inside the spherical cavity formed by the surface of the Earth and the ionosphere. In the experiment the ELF waves were excited by heating the ionosphere with X-mode HF electromagnetic waves generated at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska. The experiment demonstrates that heating of the ionosphere can excite relatively large-amplitude electromagnetic waves with frequencies in the range 7.8-8.0 Hz when the ionosphere has a strong F layer, the frequency of the HF radiation is in the range 3.20-4.57 MHz, and the electric field greater than 5 mV/m is present in the ionosphere.

  14. Upper Hybrid Effects in Artificial Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, K.; Eliasson, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    A most fascinating result of recent ionospheric experiments has been the discovery of artificial ionization by Pedersen et al. (GRL, 37, L02106, 2010). The Artificial Ionospheric Layers (AIL) were the result of F-region O-mode HF irradiation using the HAARP ionospheric heater operating at 3.6 MW power. As demonstrated by Eliasson et al. (JGR, 117, A10321, 2012) the physics controlling the observed phenomenon and its threshold can be summarized as: " Collisional ionization due to high energy (~ 20 eV) electron tails generated by the interaction of strong Langmuir turbulence with plasma heated at the upper hybrid resonance and transported at the reflection height". The objective of the current presentation is to explore the role of the upper hybrid heating in the formation of AIL and its implications to future experiments involving HF heaters operating in middle and equatorial latitudes.

  15. Instantaneous space-weighted ionospheric regional model for instantaneous mapping of the critical frequency of the F2 layer in the European region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrella, Marco; Perrone, Loredana

    2005-02-01

    An instantaneous space-weighted ionospheric regional model (ISWIRM) for the regional now-casting of the critical frequency of the F2 layer (foF2) has been developed. The geographical area of applicability of the model is ranged between 35°N-70°N and 5°W-40°E. Inside this region the hourly values of foF2 are obtained, correcting the monthly medians values of foF2 predicted by the space-weighted ionospheric local model (SWILM) on the basis of hourly observations of foF2 coming from four reference stations (Rome, Chilton, Lycksele, and Loparskaya (or Sodankyla)). The performance of the model, evaluated at four testing stations (Tortosa, Juliusruh, Uppsala, and Kiruna) during some periods characterized by strong solar and geomagnetic activity, can be considered satisfactory, given that the hourly values of the residuals are almost always below 1 MHz. A comparison between ISWIRM's performance using manually validated and autoscaled data of foF2 and SWILM's performance was made for two disturbed periods. One example of instantaneous ionospheric mapping of foF2 relative to the selected disturbed periods is also shown.

  16. Creating a two-layered augmented artificial immune system for application to computer network intrusion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, Matthew G.; Lamont, Gary B.

    2009-05-01

    Computer network security has become a very serious concern of commercial, industrial, and military organizations due to the increasing number of network threats such as outsider intrusions and insider covert activities. An important security element of course is network intrusion detection which is a difficult real world problem that has been addressed through many different solution attempts. Using an artificial immune system has been shown to be one of the most promising results. By enhancing jREMISA, a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm inspired artificial immune system, with a secondary defense layer; we produce improved accuracy of intrusion classification and a flexibility in responsiveness. This responsiveness can be leveraged to provide a much more powerful and accurate system, through the use of increased processing time and dedicated hardware which has the flexibility of being located out of band.

  17. Manifestation of planetary wave-type oscillations in variations in the critical frequencies of the ionospheric F2 layer in the Asian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergasova, G. V.; Kazimirovskii, E. S.; Polekh, N. M.; Xiong, J.; Liu, L.

    2011-12-01

    Results of studies of the wave structure of the critical frequencies of the ionospheric F2 layer with periods of planetary waves for two Asian stations—Irkutsk and Wuhan (China)—are presented. Estimates of the appearance frequency, amplitudes, and the lifetime of oscillations with periods typical of planetary waves (2-25 days) are obtained. It is shown that these characteristics depend on the season and place of observation. The appearance of joint periodicities in the critical frequencies at both stations, as well as in the planetary index of geomagnetic activity Ap, is noted.

  18. Feasibility of generating an artificial burst in a turbulent boundary layer, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gad-El-hak, Mohamed

    1989-01-01

    Various drag accounts for about half of the total drag on commercial aircraft at subsonic cruise conditions. Two avenues are available to achieve drag reduction: either laminar flow control or turbulence manipulation. The present research deals with the latter approach. The primary objective of Phase 2 research was to investigate experimentally the feasibility of substantially reducing the skin-friction drag in a turbulent boundary layer. The method combines the beneficial effects of suction and a longitudinally ribbed surface. At a sufficiently large spanwise separation, the streamwise grooves act as a nucleation site causing a focusing of low-speed streaks over the peaks. Suction is then applied intermittently through longitudinal slots located at selected locations along those peaks to obliterate the low-speed regions and to prevent bursting. Phase 2 research was divided into two tasks. In the first, selective suction from a single streamwise slot was used to eliminate either a single burst-like event or a periodic train of artificially generated bursts in laminar and turbulent boundary layers that develop on a flat plate towed in a water channel. The results indicate that equivalent values of the suction coefficient as low as 0.0006 were sufficient to eliminate the artificially generated bursts in a laminar boundary layer.

  19. On the Formation Mechanisms of Artificially Generated High Reynolds Number Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-López, Eduardo; Bruce, Paul J. K.; Buxton, Oliver R. H.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the evolution of an artificially thick turbulent boundary layer generated by two families of small obstacles (divided into uniform and non-uniform wall normal distributions of blockage). One- and two-point velocity measurements using constant temperature anemometry show that the canonical behaviour of a boundary layer is recovered after an adaptation region downstream of the trips presenting 150~% higher momentum thickness (or equivalently, Reynolds number) than the natural case for the same downstream distance (x≈ 3 m). The effect of the degree of immersion of the trips for h/δ ≳ 1 is shown to play a secondary role. The one-point diagnostic quantities used to assess the degree of recovery of the canonical properties are the friction coefficient (representative of the inner motions), the shape factor and wake parameter (representative of the wake regions); they provide a severe test to be applied to artificially generated boundary layers. Simultaneous two-point velocity measurements of both spanwise and wall-normal correlations and the modulation of inner velocity by the outer structures show that there are two different formation mechanisms for the boundary layer. The trips with high aspect ratio and uniform distributed blockage leave the inner motions of the boundary layer relatively undisturbed, which subsequently drive the mixing of the obstacles' wake with the wall-bounded flow (wall-driven). In contrast, the low aspect-ratio trips with non-uniform blockage destroy the inner structures, which are then re-formed further downstream under the influence of the wake of the trips (wake-driven).

  20. Feasibility of generating an artificial burst in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gad-El-hak, M.

    1986-01-01

    Artificial bursts were generated in laminar and turbulent boundary layers. The burst-like events were produced by withdrawing near-wall fluid from two minute holes separated in the spanwise direction or by pitching a miniature delta wing that was flush-mounted to the wall. Either of these actions generated streamwise vorticity and a low-speed streak that resembled a naturally occurring one. The resulting sequence of events occurred at a given location and at controlled times, allowing detailed examination and comparison with natural, random bursts by means of flow visualization and fast-response probe measurement techniques.

  1. A Wind-Tunnel Artificially-Thickened Simulated Weakly Unstable Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, P. E.; Zhang, S.; Hayden, P.

    2013-12-01

    A wind-tunnel simulation of an atmospheric boundary layer, artificially thickened as is often used in neutral flow wind-loading studies, has been investigated for weakly unstable stratification, including the effect of an overlying inversion. Rather than using a uniform inlet temperature profile, the inlet profile was adjusted iteratively by using measured downstream profiles. It was found that three cycles are sufficient for there to be no significant further change in profiles of temperature and other quantities. Development to nearly horizontally-homogeneous flow took a longer distance than in the neutral case because the simulated layer was deeper and therefore the length scales larger. Comparisons show first-order and second-order moments quantities are substantially larger than given by `standard forms' in the mixed layer but are close in the surface layer. Modified functions, obtained by matching one to the other, are suggested that amount to an interpolation in the mixed layer between the strongly unstable and the weakly unstable cases.

  2. Global median model of the F2-layer peak height based on ionospheric radio-occultation and ground-based Digisonde observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubin, V. N.

    2015-09-01

    In this article, we present a global median model of the ionospheric F2-layer peak height (hmF2), which we named Satellite and Digisonde Model of the F2 layer (SDMF2). This model is based on the radio-occultation data of the satellite missions CHAMP (2001-2008), GRACE (2007-2011), COSMIC (2006-2012) as well as the ionospheric sounding data from the 62 Earth-based Digisonde sounders (1987-2012). As the input parameters, the model uses the year, month and time UT as well as the geographic coordinates and F10.7 index averaged over the 3 Sun rotations (F10.7A). The SDMF2 model is based on the spherical functions decomposition with the 12 harmonics for the longitude and the 8 ones for the modified dip latitude (MODIP). For the diurnal variations, we used the 3 Fourier harmonics. We assumed that the dependency of hmF2 on F10.7A index is logarithmic. The model accurately reproduces both the spatial and temporal behavior of the monthly hmF2 median. The root-mean-square (RMS) and the mean relative deviations (MRD) from the original data are MRD ∼ 3.7%, RMS ∼ 14.3 km and MRD ∼ 5.4%, RMS ∼ 23.4 km for the periods of low and high solar activity, respectively. The large initial dataset allows achieving the higher accuracy than International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI), and this is confirmed by comparing the SDMF2 model with independent data.

  3. A study on ionospheric TEC forecast using genetic algorithm and neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhi; Yuan, Hong

    Back propagation artificial neural network (ANN) augmented by genetic algorithm (GA) is introduced to forecast ionospheric TEC with the dual-frequency GPS measurements from the low and high solar activity years in this paper due to ionosphere space characterizing by the highly nonlinear and time-varying with random variations. First, with different number of neurons in the hidden layer, different transfer function and training function, the training performance of network model is analyzed and then optimized network structure is determined. The ionospheric TEC values one hour in advance are forecasted and further the prediction performance of the developed network model is evaluated at the given criterions. The results show that predicted TEC using BP neural network improved by genetic algorithm has good agreement with observed data. In addition, the prediction errors are smaller in middle and high latitudes than in low latitudes, smaller in low solar activity than in high solar activity. Compared with BP Network with three layers structure, Prediction precision of network model optimized by genetic algorithm is further improved. The resolution quality indicate that the proposed algorithm can offer a powerful and reliable alternative to the design of ionospheric TEC forecast technologies, and provide advice for the regional ionospheric TEC maps. Key words: Neural network, Genetic algorithm, Ionospheric TEC, Forecast,

  4. Formation and properties of novel artificially-layered cuprate superconductors using pulsed-laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, D.P.; Chakoumakos, B.C.; Budai, J.D.

    1996-03-01

    Pulsed-laser deposition and epitaxial stabilization have been effectively used to engineer artificially-layered thin-film materials. Novel cuprate compounds have been synthesized using the constraint of epitaxy to stabilize (Ca,Sr)CuO{sub 2}/(Ba,Ca,Sr)CuO{sub 2} superconducting superlattices in the infinite layer structure. Superlattice chemical modulation can be observed from the x-ray diffraction patterns for structures with SrCuO{sub 2} and (Ca, Sr)CuO{sub 2} layers as thin as a single unit cell ({approximately}3. 4 {angstrom}). X-ray diffraction intensity oscillations, due to the finite thickness of the film, indicate that (Ca,Sr)CuO{sub 2} films grown by pulsed-laser deposition are extremely flat with a thickness variation of only {approximately}20 {angstrom} over a length scale of several thousand angstroms. This enables the unit-cell control of (Ca, Sr)CuO{sub 2} film growth in an oxygen pressure regime in which in situ surface analysis using electron diffraction is not possible. With the incorporation of BaCuO{sub 2} layers, superlattice structures have been synthesized which superconduct at temperatures as high as 70 K. Dc transport measurements indicate that (Ca, Sr)CuO{sub 2}/BaCuO{sub 2} superlattices are two dimensional superconductors with the superconducting transition primarily associated with the BaCuO{sub 2} layers. Superconductivity is observed only for structures with BaCuO{sub 2} layers at least two unit cells thick with {Tc} decreasing as the (Ca,Sr)CuO{sub 2} layer thickness increases. Normalized resistance in the superconducting region collapse to the Ginzburg-Landau Coulomb gas universal resistance curve consistent with the two-dimensional vortex fluctuation model.

  5. Nano-sized layered Mn oxides as promising and biomimetic water oxidizing catalysts for water splitting in artificial photosynthetic systems.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Heidari, Sima; Amini, Emad; Khatamian, Masoumeh; Carpentier, Robert; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-04-01

    One challenge in artificial photosynthetic systems is the development of artificial model compounds to oxidize water. The water-oxidizing complex of Photosystem II which is responsible for biological water oxidation contains a cluster of four Mn ions bridged by five oxygen atoms. Layered Mn oxides as efficient, stable, low cost, environmentally friendly and easy to use, synthesize, and manufacture compounds could be considered as functional and structural models for the site. Because of the related structure of these Mn oxides and the catalytic centre of the active site of the water oxidizing complex of Photosystem II, the study of layered Mn oxides may also help to understand more about the mechanism of water oxidation by the natural site. This review provides an overview of the current status of layered Mn oxides in artificial photosynthesis and discuss the sophisticated design strategies for Mn oxides as water oxidizing catalysts.

  6. Tunable ferroelectricity in artificial tri-layer superlattices comprised of non-ferroic components.

    PubMed

    Rogdakis, K; Seo, J W; Viskadourakis, Z; Wang, Y; Qune, L F N Ah; Choi, E; Burton, J D; Tsymbal, E Y; Lee, J; Panagopoulos, C

    2012-01-01

    Heterostructured material systems devoid of ferroic components are presumed not to display ordering associated with ferroelectricity. In heterostructures composed of transition metal oxides, however, the disruption introduced by an interface can affect the balance of the competing interactions among electronic spins, charges and orbitals. This has led to the emergence of properties absent in the original building blocks of a heterostructure, including metallicity, magnetism and superconductivity. Here we report the discovery of ferroelectricity in artificial tri-layer superlattices consisting solely of non-ferroelectric NdMnO(3)/SrMnO(3)/LaMnO(3) layers. Ferroelectricity was observed below 40 K exhibiting strong tunability by superlattice periodicity. Furthermore, magnetoelectric coupling resulted in 150% magnetic modulation of the polarization. Density functional calculations indicate that broken space inversion symmetry and mixed valency, because of cationic asymmetry and interfacial polar discontinuity, respectively, give rise to the observed behaviour. Our results demonstrate the engineering of asymmetric layered structures with emergent ferroelectric and magnetic field tunable functions distinct from that of normal devices, for which the components are typically ferroelectrics. PMID:22990860

  7. An Undergraduate Student Instrumentation Project (USIP) to Develop New Instrument Technology to Study the Auroral Ionosphere and Stratospheric Ozone Layer Using Ultralight Balloon Payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamblin, R.; Marrero, E.; Bering, E. A., III; Leffer, B.; Dunbar, B.; Ahmad, H.; Canales, D.; Bias, C.; Cao, J.; Pina, M.; Ehteshami, A.; Hermosillo, D.; Siddiqui, A.; Guala, D.

    2014-12-01

    This project is currently engaging tweleve undergraduate students in the process of developing new technology and instrumentation for use in balloon borne geospace investigations in the auroral zone. Motivation stems from advances in microelectronics and consumer electronic technology. Given the technological inovations over the past 20 years it now possible to develop new instrumentation to study the auroral ionosphere and stratospheric ozone layer using ultralight balloon payloads for less than 6lbs and $3K per payload. The UH USIP undergraduate team is currently in the process of build ten such payloads for launch using1500 gm latex weather balloons to be deployed in Houston and Fairbanks, AK as well as zero pressure balloons launched from northern Sweden. The latex balloon project will collect vertical profiles of wind speed, wind direction, temperature, electrical conductivity, ozone and odd nitrogen. This instrument payload will also profiles of pressure, electric field, and air-earth electric current. The zero pressure balloons will obtain a suite of geophysical measurements including: DC electric field, electric field and magnetic flux, optical imaging, total electron content of ionosphere via dual-channel GPS, X-ray detection, and infrared/UV spectroscopy. Students will fly payloads with different combinations of these instruments to determine which packages are successful. Data collected by these instruments will be useful in understanding the nature of electrodynamic coupling in the upper atmosphere and how the global earth system is changing. Results and best practices learned from lab tests and initial Houston test flights will be discussed.

  8. Pregnancy rates after artificial insemination with cooled stallion spermatozoa either with or without single layer centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Morrell, J M; Richter, J; Martinsson, G; Stuhtmann, G; Hoogewijs, M; Roels, K; Dalin, A-M

    2014-11-01

    A successful outcome after artificial insemination with cooled semen is dependent on many factors, the sperm quality of the ejaculate being one. Previous studies have shown that spermatozoa with good motility, normal morphology, and good chromatin integrity can be selected by means of colloid centrifugation, particularly single layer centrifugation (SLC) using species-specific colloids. The purpose of the present study was to conduct an insemination trial with spermatozoa from "normal" ejaculates, i.e., from stallions with no known fertility problem, to determine whether the improvements in sperm quality seen in SLC-selected sperm samples compared with uncentrifuged controls in laboratory tests are reflected in an increased pregnancy rate after artificial insemination. In a multicentre study, SLC-selected sperm samples and uncentrifuged controls from eight stallions were inseminated into approximately 10 mares per treatment per stallion. Ultrasound examination was carried out approximately 16 days after insemination to detect an embryonic vesicle. The pregnancy rates per cycle were 45% for controls and 69% for SLC-selected sperm samples, which is statistically significant (P < 0.0018). Thus, the improvement in sperm quality reported previously for SLC-selected sperm samples is associated with an increase in pregnancy rate, even for ejaculates from stallions with no known fertility problem.

  9. `Earth-ionosphere' mode controlled source electromagnetic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Diquan; Di, Qingyun; Wang, Miaoyue; Nobes, David

    2015-09-01

    In traditional artificial-source electromagnetic exploration, the effects of the ionosphere and displacement current (DC) in the air were neglected, and only the geoelectrical structure of the earth's crust and upper mantle was considered, such as for controlled source audio-frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT). By employing a transmitter (less than 30 kW) to generate source fields, the CSAMT method overcomes the problems associated with weak natural electromagnetic (EM) fields used in magnetotellurics. However, the transmitter is moved and the source-receiver offset is approximately less than 20 km, because of the limitation of emission energy. We put forward a new idea, that is, a fixed artificial source (greater than 200 kW) is used and the source location selected at a high resistivity region (to ensure a high emission efficiency), so there may be a possibility that as long as the source strength magnitude is strong enough, the artificial EM signal can be easily observed within a distance of several thousand kilometres. Previous studies have provided the evidence to support this idea; they used the `earth-ionosphere' mode in modeling the EM fields with the offset up to a thousand kilometres. Such EM fields still have a signal/noise ratio over 10-20 dB; this means that a new EM method with fixed source is feasible. However, in their calculations, the DC which plays a very important role for large offsets was neglected. This paper pays much attention to derive the formulae of the `earth-ionosphere' mode with a horizontal electric dipole source, and the DC is not neglected. We present some three layers modeling results to illustrate the basic EM field characteristics under the `earth-ionosphere' mode. As the offset increases, the contribution of the conduction current decreases, DC and ionosphere were taken into account, and the EM field attenuation decreases. We also quantitatively compare the predicted and observed data. The comparison of these results with the

  10. Comparison of electron concentrations in the ionospheric E-layer maximum in spring conditions obtained by calculations and Moscow ionosonde measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. V.; Pavlova, N. M.

    2015-03-01

    The electron concentrations in the ionospheric E-layer maximum NmE, as measured by the Moscow ionosonde, are compared with the results of theoretical calculations of NmE for geomagnetically quiet conditions at low solar activity on April 1, 1986, and April 6, 1996, moderate solar activity on April 9, 1978, and April 6, 1998, and high solar activity on April 20, 1980, and April 15, 1991. On the basis of this comparison, a correction of the model flux of solar X-ray radiation is proposed. The discovered variability of the correction factors manifests the influence of solar X-ray radiation flux variations on NmE variability. The dependence of the influence of the neutral constituents ionization by photoelectrons on NmE on the solar activity level is studied.

  11. Generation of zonal flow and magnetic field by coupled internal-gravity and alfvén waves in the ionospheric E-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaladze, Tamaz; Kahlon, Laila

    Nonlinear dynamics of coupled internal-gravity (IG) and alfven electromagnetic planetary waves in the weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer is investigated. Under such coupling new type of alfven waves is revealed. It is shown that such short wavelength turbulence of IG and alfvén waves is unstable with respect to the excitation of low-frequency and large-scale perturbations of the zonal flow and magnetic field. A set of coupled equations describing the nonlinear interaction of coupled IG and alfven waves with zonal flows is derived. The nonlinear mechanism of the instability is driven by the advection of vorticity and is based on the parametric excitation of convective cells by finite-amplitude coupled IG and alfven waves leading to the inverse energy cascade toward the longer wavelength. The growth rates of the corresponding instability and the conditions for driving them are determined. The possibility of generation of the intense mean magnetic field is shown.

  12. Zonal flows and magnetic fields driven by large-amplitude Rossby-Alfvén-Khantadze waves in the E-layer ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaladze, T. D.; Horton, W.; Kahlon, L. Z.; Pokhotelov, O.; Onishchenko, O.

    2013-12-01

    waves and vortices in the weakly ionized ionospheric E layer are dominated by the Hall conductivity that couples the Rossby and Alfvén dynamics giving rise to what are called Rossby-Alfvén-Khantadze electromagnetic structures. At finite amplitudes we show that the nonlinearities in the dynamics generate sheared zonal-flow velocities and zonal magnetic field fluctuations. The zonal-flow mechanism is based on the parametric excitation of the zonal variations through three-wave mode coupling in the planetary-scale waves. The coupled dynamics of the nonlinear 3-D incompressible flows and the magnetic field fluctuations are derived and used to derive the structure and growth rates for the zonal flows and zonal magnetic fields. Large-amplitude planetary waves are shown to drive up magnetic fluctuations up to 100 nT.

  13. Nonlinear Plasma Effects in Natural and Artificial Aurora

    SciTech Connect

    Mishin, E. V.

    2011-01-04

    This report describes common features of natural ('Enhanced') aurora and 'artificial aurora'(AA) created by electron beams injected from sounding rockets. These features cannot be explained solely by col-lisional degradation of energetic electrons, thereby pointing to collisionless plasma effects. The fundamental role in electron beam-ionosphere interactions belongs to Langmuir turbulence. Its development in the (weakly-ionized) ionosphere is significantly affected by electron-neutral collisions, so that the heating and acceleration of plasma electrons proceed more efficiently than in collisionless plasmas. As a result, a narrow layer of enhanced auroral glow/ionization is formed above the standard collisional peak.

  14. Effects of sporadic E-layer characteristics on spread-F generation in the nighttime ionosphere near a northern equatorial anomaly crest during solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. C.; Chen, W. S.

    2015-06-01

    This study is to know how the characteristics of sporadic E-layer (Es-layer) affect the generation of spread-F in the nighttime ionosphere near the crest of equatorial ionization anomaly during solar minimum. The data of Es-layer parameters and spread-F are obtained from the Chungli ionograms of 1996. The Es-layer parameters include foEs (critical frequency of Es-layer), fbEs (blanketing frequency of Es-layer), and Δf (≡foEs-fbEs). Results show that the nighttime variations of foEs and fbEs medians (Δf medians) are different from (similar to) that of the occurrence probabilities of spread-F. Because the total number of Es-layer events is greater than that of spread-F events, the comparison between the medians of Es-layer parameters and the occurrence probabilities of spread-F might have a shortfall. Further, we categorize the Es-layer and spread-F events into each frequency interval of Es-layer parameters. For the occurrence probabilities of spread-F versus foEs, an increasing trend is found in post-midnight of all three seasons. The increasing trend also exists in pre-midnight of the J-months and in post-midnight of all seasons, for the occurrence probabilities of spread-F versus Δf. These demonstrate that the spread-F occurrence increases with increasing foEs and/or Δf. Moreover, the increasing trends indicate that polarization electric fields generated in Es-layer assist to produce spread-F, through the electrodynamical coupling of Es-layer and F-region. Regarding the occurrence probabilities of spread-F versus fbEs, the significant trend only appears in post-midnight of the E-months. This implies that fbEs might not be a major factor for the spread-F formation.

  15. Effects of artificial sea film slick upon the atmospheric boundary layer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repina, Irina; Artamonov, Arseniy; Malinovsky, Vladimir; Chechin, Dmitriy

    2010-05-01

    Organic surface-active compounds accumulate at the ocean-atmosphere boundary, influencing several air-sea interaction processes. In coastal areas with high biological activity this accumulation frequently becomes visible as mirrorlike patches ("slicks") on the sea surface. The artificial surface films of oleyl alcohol and vegetable oil were produced in the Black Sea coastal zone (one site was located near Gelendjik and another was near Crimea coast) to investigate its influence on energy and gas exchange between atmosphere and sea surface under different meteorological conditions. The atmospheric turbulence measurements during the passage of an artificial sea slick are compared with similar measurements without a sea slick. The effects of the slick are modifications of roughness length z0, and a possible increase in mean wind speed. In the mean, during the passage of the slick, the roughness length decreased while the mean wind speed appeared to increase. For the spectral comparison we compared the wind field over the sea during the time the film slick was in the vicinity of the measurement site with the wind field observed after the slick had passed. The cross-spectral density was computed between horizontal velocity and vertical velocity (Reynolds stress) and between atmospheric temperature and vertical velocity (heat flux). The introduction of the sea film slick, with its damping and suppression of capillary waves, appears to completely destroy the atmospheric turbulence generation. When a slick is present, the U-W phase angle and Reynolds stress spectrum for the atmosphere appear to be completely unaffected by undulating sea surface directly below the sensors. Spectral and wavelet analysis of the atmospheric surface layer characteristics showed a significant correlation between the processes on the sea surface and the atmospheric boundary layer. An intensification of change processes in the vicinity of the windward slick boundary are detected. It may be

  16. Ionospheric modifications in high frequency heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-01-15

    Featured observations in high-frequency (HF) heating experiments conducted at Arecibo, EISCAT, and high frequency active auroral research program are discussed. These phenomena appearing in the F region of the ionosphere include high-frequency heater enhanced plasma lines, airglow enhancement, energetic electron flux, artificial ionization layers, artificial spread-F, ionization enhancement, artificial cusp, wideband absorption, short-scale (meters) density irregularities, and stimulated electromagnetic emissions, which were observed when the O-mode HF heater waves with frequencies below foF2 were applied. The implication and associated physical mechanism of each observation are discussed and explained. It is shown that these phenomena caused by the HF heating are all ascribed directly or indirectly to the excitation of parametric instabilities which instigate anomalous heating. Formulation and analysis of parametric instabilities are presented. The results show that oscillating two stream instability and parametric decay instability can be excited by the O-mode HF heater waves, transmitted from all three heating facilities, in the regions near the HF reflection height and near the upper hybrid resonance layer. The excited Langmuir waves, upper hybrid waves, ion acoustic waves, lower hybrid waves, and field-aligned density irregularities set off subsequent wave-wave and wave-electron interactions, giving rise to the observed phenomena.

  17. HF-induced airglow structure as a proxy for ionospheric irregularity detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) heating facility allows scientists to test current theories of plasma physics to gain a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms at work in the lower ionosphere. One powerful technique for diagnosing radio frequency interactions in the ionosphere is to use ground-based optical instrumentation. High-frequency (HF), heater-induced artificial airglow observations can be used to diagnose electron energies and distributions in the heated region, illuminate natural and/or artificially induced ionospheric irregularities, determine ExB plasma drifts, and measure quenching rates by neutral species. Artificial airglow is caused by HF-accelerated electrons colliding with various atmospheric constituents, which in turn emit a photon. The most common emissions are 630.0 nm O(1D), 557.7 nm O(1S), and 427.8 nm N2+(1NG). Because more photons will be emitted in regions of higher electron energization, it may be possible to use airglow imaging to map artificial field-aligned irregularities at a particular altitude range in the ionosphere. Since fairly wide field-of-view imagers are typically deployed in airglow campaigns, it is not well-known what meter-scale features exist in the artificial airglow emissions. Rocket data show that heater-induced electron density variations, or irregularities, consist of bundles of ~10-m-wide magnetic field-aligned filaments with a mean depletion depth of 6% [Kelley et al., 1995]. These bundles themselves constitute small-scale structures with widths of 1.5 to 6 km. Telescopic imaging provides high resolution spatial coverage of ionospheric irregularities and goes hand in hand with other observing techniques such as GPS scintillation, radar, and ionosonde. Since airglow observations can presumably image ionospheric irregularities (electron density variations), they can be used to determine the spatial scale variation, the fill factor, and the lifetime characteristics of

  18. An Undergraduate Student Instrumentation Project (USIP) to Develop New Instrument Technology to Study the Auroral Ionosphere and Stratospheric Ozone Layer Using Ultralight Balloon Payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowling, M.; Ahmad, H.; Gamblin, R.; Guala, D.; Hermosillo, D.; Pina, M.; Marrero, E.; Canales, D. R. J.; Cao, J.; Ehteshami, A.; Bering, E. A., III; Lefer, B. L.; Dunbar, B.; Bias, C.; Shahid, S.

    2015-12-01

    This project is currently engaging twelve undergraduate students in the process of developing new technology and instrumentation for use in balloon borne geospace investigations in the auroral zone. Motivation stems from advances in microelectronics and consumer electronic technology. Given the technological innovations over the past 20 years it now possible to develop new instrumentation to study the auroral ionosphere and stratospheric ozone layer using ultralight balloon payloads for less than 6lbs and $3K per payload. The University of Houston Undergraduate Student Instrumentation Project (USIP) team has built ten such payloads for launch using 1500 gm latex weather balloons deployed in Houston, TX, Fairbanks, AK, and as well as zero pressure balloons launched from northern Sweden. The latex balloon project will collect vertical profiles of wind velocity, temperature, electrical conductivity, ozone, and odd nitrogen. This instrument payload will also produce profiles of pressure, electric field, and air-earth electric current. The zero pressure balloons will obtain a suite of geophysical measurements including: DC electric field, electric field and magnetic flux, optical imaging, total electron content of ionosphere via dual-channel GPS, X-ray detection, and infrared/UV spectroscopy. Students flew payloads with different combinations of these instruments to determine which packages are successful. Data collected by these instruments will be useful in understanding the nature of electrodynamic coupling in the upper atmosphere and how the global earth system is changing. Twelve out of the launched fifteen payloads were successfully launched and recovered. Results and best practices learned from lab tests and initial Houston test flights will be discussed.

  19. Creation of an artificial ionized layer in the atmosphere by microwave nanosecond radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vikharev, A.L.; Ivanov, O.A.; Litvak, A.G.

    1995-12-31

    The paper reviews recent results of IAP microwave discharge group in investigation of a pulse-periodical nanosecond microwave discharges in converging wave beams. Performed experiments are the laboratory modeling of plasma chemical kinetics in an artificial ionized layer (AIL) created in the atmosphere by microwave beams using a ground-based transmitters. The interest to the AIL is explained by the variety of tasks which can be solved with its help. At present there are suggestions to use AIL for: distant radio- and television communication, generation of ozone, diagnostics of atmosphere, clearing of atmosphere from pollution. For the first time the possibility of using a nanosecond microwave discharge in wave beams to replenish the ozone decrease in the region of local ``ozone holes`` has been demonstrated experimentally. The regimes of effective ozone generation with low expenditure of energy have been defined. The efficiency of chlorofluorocarbons (freon) destruction has been defined with the help of AIL in troposphere at the heights of 10--20 km on the basis of laboratory measurements of plasma decay rate of a nanosecond microwave discharge. It has been experimentally shown that if the concentration of the atmosphere freon surpasses the threshold value then it is destroyed quickly in the processes of dissociative attachment of electrons.

  20. Compliant layer bearings in artificial joints. Part 2: simulator and fatigue testing to assess the durability of the interface between an elastomeric layer and a rigid substrate.

    PubMed

    Jones, E; Scholes, S C; Burgess, I C; Ash, H E; Unsworth, A

    2009-01-01

    Artificial joints have been much improved since their introduction but they still have a limited lifetime. In an attempt to increase their life by improving the lubrication acting within these prostheses, compliant layered polyurethane (PU) joints have been devised. These joints mimic the natural synovial joint more closely by promoting fluid film lubrication. In this study, tests were performed on compliant layer joints to determine their ability to function under a range of conditions. Both static and dynamic compression tests were undertaken on compliant artificial hip joints of two different radial clearances. Friction tests were also performed before and after static loading. In addition to this, knee wear tests were conducted to determine the suitability of a compliant layer in these applications. In the knee tests, variations in experimental testing conditions were investigated using both active and passive rotation and severe malalignment of the tibial inserts. The static compression tests together with the friction studies suggest that a small radial clearance is likely to result in 'grabbing' contact between the head and cup. The larger radial clearance (0.33 microm) did not exhibit these problems. The importance of the design of the compliant layer joints was highlighted with delamination occurring on the lateral bearings during the knee wear studies. The bearings with a layer 2 mm thick performed better than the bearings with a layer 3 mm thick. Tests conducted on flat PU bearings resulted in no delamination; therefore, it was concluded that the layer separation was caused by design issues rather than by material issues. It was found that, with careful material choice, consideration of design, and effective manufacturing techniques, the compliant layer joint functioned well and demonstrated durability of the union between the hard and soft layers. These results give encouragement for the suitability of these joints for clinical use.

  1. Accuracy of theoretical calculations of the main parameters of the F2-layer of the daytime ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. V.; Sitnov, Iu. S.

    1985-10-01

    Pavlov's (1984) method is used to determine the relative errors (due to errors in measuring the input parameters of the model) in theoretical calculations of the main parameters of the daytime F2-layer under quiet conditions. The parameters calculated are the height of the F2-layer maximum and the electron density.

  2. Ionospheric disturbance dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, M.; Richmond, A.D.

    1980-04-01

    A numerical simulation study of the thermospheric winds produced by auroral heating during magnetic storms, and of their global dynamo effects, establishes the main features of the ionospheric disturbanc dynamo. Driven by auroral heating, a Hadley cell is created with equatorward winds blowing above about 120 km at mid-latitudes. The transport of angular momentum by these winds produces a subrotation of the midlatitude thermosphere, or westward motion with respect to the earth. The westward winds in turn drive equatorward Pedersen currents which accumulate charge toward the equator, resulting in the generation of a poleward electric field, a westward E x B drift, and an eastward current. When realistic local time conductivity variations are simulated, the eastward mid-latitude current is found to close partly via lower latitudes, resulting in an 'anti-Sq' type of current vortex. Both electric field and current at low latitudes thus vary in opposition to their normal quiet-day behavior. This total pattern of distrubance winds, electric fields, and currents is superimposed upon the background quiet-day pattern. When the neutral winds are artificially confined on the nightside, the basic pattern of predominantly westward E x B plasma drifts still prevails on the nightside but no longer extends into the dayside. Considerable observational evidence exists, suggesting that the ionospheric disturbance dynamo has an appreciable influence on storm-time ionospheric electric fields at middle and low latitudes.

  3. Ionospheric Change and Solar EUV Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, J. J.; David, M.; Jensen, J. B.; Schunk, R. W.

    2011-12-01

    The ionosphere has been quantitatively monitored for the past six solar cycles. The past few years of observations are showing trends that differ from the prior cycles! Our good statistical relationships between the solar radio flux index at 10.7 cm, the solar EUV Irradiance, and the ionospheric F-layer peak density are showing indications of divergence! Present day discussion of the Sun-Earth entering a Dalton Minimum would suggest change is occurring in the Sun, as the driver, followed by the Earth, as the receptor. The dayside ionosphere is driven by the solar EUV Irradiance. But different components of this spectrum affect the ionospheric layers differently. For a first time the continuous high cadence EUV spectra from the SDO EVE instrument enable ionospheric scientists the opportunity to evaluate solar EUV variability as a driver of ionospheric variability. A definitive understanding of which spectral components are responsible for the E- and F-layers of the ionosphere will enable assessments of how over 50 years of ionospheric observations, the solar EUV Irradiance has changed. If indeed the evidence suggesting the Sun-Earth system is entering a Dalton Minimum periods is correct, then the comprehensive EVE solar EUV Irradiance data base combined with the ongoing ionospheric data bases will provide a most fortuitous fiduciary reference baseline for Sun-Earth dependencies. Using the EVE EUV Irradiances, a physics based ionospheric model (TDIM), and 50 plus years of ionospheric observation from Wallops Island (Virginia) the above Sun-Earth ionospheric relationship will be reported on.

  4. Comparison of Observations of Sporadic-E Layers in the Nighttime and Daytime Mid-Latitude Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Rowland, D.; Klenzing, J.; Clemmons, J.; Larsen, M.; Kudeki, E.; Franke, S.; Urbina, J.; Bullett, T.

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of numerous rocket experiments to investigate mid-latitude sporadic-E layers is presented. Electric field and plasma density data gathered on sounding rockets launched in the presence of sporadic-E layers and QP radar echoes reveal a complex electrodynamics including both DC parameters and plasma waves detected over a large range of scales. We show both DC and wave electric fields and discuss their relationship to intense sporadic-E layers in both nighttime and daytime conditions. Where available, neutral wind observations provide the complete electrodynamic picture revealing an essential source of free energy that both sets up the layers and drives them unstable. Electric field data from the nighttime experiments reveal the presence of km-scale waves as well as well-defined packets of broadband (10's of meters to meters) irregularities. What is surprising is that in both the nighttime and daytime experiments, neither the large scale nor short scale waves appear to be distinctly organized by the sporadic-E density layer itself. The observations are discussed in the context of current theories regarding sporadic-E layer generation and quasi-periodic echoes.

  5. Photoluminescence quenching and charge transfer in artificial heterostacks of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides and few-layer black phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jiangtan; Najmaei, Sina; Zhang, Zhuhua; Zhang, Jing; Lei, Sidong; M Ajayan, Pulickel; Yakobson, Boris I; Lou, Jun

    2015-01-27

    Transition metal dichalcogenides monolayers and black phosphorus thin crystals are emerging two-dimensional materials that demonstrated extraordinary optoelectronic properties. Exotic properties and physics may arise when atomic layers of different materials are stacked together to form van der Waals solids. Understanding the important interlayer couplings in such heterostructures could provide avenues for control and creation of characteristics in these artificial stacks. Here we systematically investigate the optical and optoelectronic properties of artificial stacks of molybdenum disulfide, tungsten disulfide, and black phosphorus atomic layers. An anomalous photoluminescence quenching was observed in tungsten disulfide-molybdenum disulfide stacks. This was attributed to a direct to indirect band gap transition of tungsten disulfide in such stacks while molybdenum disulfide maintains its monolayer properties by first-principles calculations. On the other hand, due to the strong build-in electric fields in tungsten disulfide-black phosphorus or molybdenum disulfide-black phosphorus stacks, the excitons can be efficiently splitted despite both the component layers having a direct band gap in these stacks. We further examine optoelectronic properties of tungsten disulfide-molybdenum disulfide artificial stacks and demonstrate their great potentials in future optoelectronic applications.

  6. Generation of zonal flow and magnetic field by coupled internal-gravity and alfvén waves in the ionospheric E-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaladze, T. D.; Kahlon, L. Z.; Tsamalashvili, L. V.; Kaladze, D. T.

    2012-11-01

    Nonlinear dynamics of coupled internal-gravity (IG) and alfvén electromagnetic planetary waves in the weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer is investigated. Under such coupling new type of alfvén waves is revealed. It is shown that such short wavelength turbulence of IG and alfvén waves is unstable with respect to the excitation of low-frequency and large-scale perturbations of the zonal flow and magnetic field. A set of coupled equations describing the nonlinear interaction of coupled IG and alfvén waves with zonal flows is derived. The nonlinear mechanism of the instability is driven by the advection of vorticity and is based on the parametric excitation of convective cells by finite-amplitude coupled IG and alfvén waves leading to the inverse energy cascade toward the longer wavelength. The growth rates of the corresponding instability and the conditions for driving them are determined. The possibility of generation of the intense mean magnetic field is shown.

  7. Generation of zonal flow and magnetic field by coupled Rossby-Alfvén-Khantadze waves in the Earth's ionospheric E-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaladze, T. D.; Horton, W.; Kahlon, L. Z.; Pokhotelov, O.; Onishchenko, O.

    2013-12-01

    It is shown that in the Earth's weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer with the dominant Hall conductivity, a new type of coupled Rossby-Alfvén-Khantadze (CRAK) electromagnetic (EM) planetary waves, attributable by the latitudinal inhomogeneity of both the Earth's Coriolis parameter and the geomagnetic field, can exist. Under such coupling, a new type of dispersive Alfvén waves is revealed. The generation of a sheared zonal flow and a magnetic field by CRAK EM planetary waves is investigated. The nonlinear mechanism of the instability is based on the parametric excitation of a zonal flow by interacting four waves, leading to the inverse energy cascade in the direction of a longer wavelength. A three-dimensional (3D) set of coupled equations describing the nonlinear interaction of pumping CRAK waves and zonal flow is derived. The growth rate of the corresponding instability and the conditions for driving them are determined. It is found that the growth rate is mainly stipulated by Rossby waves but the generation of the intense mean magnetic field is caused by Alfvén waves.

  8. "Twisted Beam" SEE Observations of Ionospheric Heating from HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briczinski, S. J.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Siefring, C. L.; Han, S.-M.; Pedersen, T. R.; Scales, W. A.

    2015-10-01

    Nonlinear interactions of high power HF radio waves in the ionosphere provide aeronomers with a unique space-based laboratory capability. The High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) in Gakona, Alaska is the world's largest heating facility, yielding effective radiated powers in the gigawatt range. New results are present from HAARP experiments using a "twisted beam" excitation mode. Analysis of twisted beam heating shows that the SEE results obtained are identical to more traditional patterns. One difference in the twisted beam mode is the heating region produced is in the shape of a ring as opposed to the more traditional "solid spot" region from a pencil beam. The ring heating pattern may be more conducive to the creation of stable artificial airglow layers because of the horizontal structure of the ring. The results of these runs include artificial layer creation and evolution as pertaining to the twisted beam pattern. The SEE measurements aid the interpretation of the twisted beam interactions in the ionosphere.

  9. The Ionospheric Focused Heating experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Siefring, C. L.; Rodriguez, P.; Haas, D. G.; Baumback, M. M.; Romero, H. A.; Solin, D. A.; Djuth, F. T.; Duncan, L. M.; Hunton, D. E.; Pollock, C. J.; Sulzer, M. P.; Tepley, C. A.; Wagner, L. S.; Goldstein, J. A.

    1995-09-01

    The Ionospheric Focused Heating rocket was launched on May 30, 1992. The sounding rocket carried an instrument and chemical payload along a trajectory that crossed the intersection of the beams from the 430-MHz incoherent scatter radar and the 5.1-MHz high-power radio wave facility near Arecibo. The release of 30 kg of CF3Br into the F region at 285 km altitude produced an ionospheric hole that acted like a convergent lens to focus the HF transmissions. The power density inside the radio beam was raised by 12 dB immediately after the release. A wide range of new processes were recorded by in situ and ground-based instruments. Measurements by instruments flying through the modified ionosphere show small-scale microcavities (<1 m) and downshifted electron plasma (Langmuir) waves inside the artificial cavity, electron density spikes at the edge of the cavity, and Langmuir waves coincident with ion gyroradius (4 m) cavities near the radio wave reflection altitude. The Arecibo incoherent scatter radar showed 20 dB or greater enhancements in ion acoustic and Langmuir wave turbulence after the 5.1-MHz radio beam was focused by the artificial lens. Enhancements in airglow from chemical reactions and, possibly, electron acceleration were recorded with optical instruments. The Ionospheric Focused Heating experiment verified some of the preflight predictions and demonstrated the value of active experiments that combine high-power radio waves with chemical releases.

  10. Comparison of peak characteristics of the F2 ionospheric layer obtained from the Cyprus Digisonde and IRI-2012 model during low and high solar activity period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haralambous, Haris; Oikonomou, Christina

    2015-11-01

    We investigate first the climatology expressed by diurnal and seasonal variations of the critical frequency (foF2) and the peak height (hmF2) of the F2-layer derived from digital ionosonde measurements at the low-middle latitude European station in Nicosia, Cyprus (geographical coordinates: 35°N, 33°E, geomagnetic lat. 29.38°N, I = 51.7°). Monthly median hourly values of the F2-layer peak characteristics are obtained using manually scaled data during the 5-year period 2009-2013. The observational results are then compared with the International Reference Ionospheric Model (IRI-2012) predictions using both URSI and CCIR coefficients. It is shown that the semi-annual pattern of daytime foF2 characterized by higher values at equinoxes than either solstices as well as the winter anomaly phenomenon demonstrate strong solar activity dependence. An annual pattern of night-time foF2 is also detected with lower values in winter and higher in summer. The seasonal variation of daytime hmF2 is evident and peaks of hmF2 at pre-sunrise and post-sunset hours are identified during December. The IRI-2012 model is capable to capture the main diurnal and seasonal patterns of foF2 and hmF2. The highest overestimation of daytime foF2 is noted at equinoxes and solstices except from March, October, December of 2011, and June of 2013. Significant foF2 underestimation is observed at evening and after midnight during February and March of 2009. Large positive discrepancies between the modeled and observed hmF2 values are noticed during the deep solar minimum year 2009. Overall, IRI-model estimates are more accurate for hmF2 than foF2 over Cyprus and for the examined period.

  11. Ionosphere/thermosphere heating determined from dynamic magnetosphere-ionosphere/thermosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jiannan; Song, Paul; Vasyliūnas, Vytenis M.

    2011-09-01

    Ionosphere/thermosphere heating driven by magnetospheric convection is investigated through a three-fluid inductive (including Faraday's law) approach to describing magnetosphere-ionosphere/thermosphere coupling, for a 1-D stratified ionosphere/thermosphere in this initial study. It is shown that the response of the ionosphere/thermosphere and thus the heating is dynamic and height-dependent. The heating is essentially frictional in nature rather than Joule heating as commonly assumed. The heating rate reaches a quasi-steady state after about 25 Alfvén travel times. During the dynamic period, the heating can be enhanced and displays peaks at multiple times due to wave reflections. The dynamic heating rate can be more than twice greater than the quasi-steady state value. The heating is strongest in the E-layer but the heating rate per unit mass is concentrated around the F-layer peak height. This implies a potential mechanism of driving O+ upflow from O+ rich F-layer. It is shown that the ionosphere/thermosphere heating caused by the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling can be simply evaluated through the relative velocity between the plasma and neutrals without invoking field-aligned currents, ionospheric conductance, and electric field. The present study provides understanding of the dynamic magnetosphere-ionosphere/thermosphere coupling from the ionospheric/thermospheric view in addition to magnetospheric perspectives.

  12. "Twisted Beam" SEE Observations of Ionospheric Heating from HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briczinski, S. J.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Pedersen, T. R.; Rodriguez, S.; SanAntonio, G.

    2012-12-01

    High power HF radio waves exciting the ionosphere provide aeronomers with a unique space-based laboratory capability. The High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) in Gakona, Alaksa is the world's largest heating facility, providing effective radiated powers in the gigawatt range. Experiments performed at HAARP have allowed researchers to study many non-linear effects of wave-plasma interactions. Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE) is of interest to the ionospheric community for its diagnostic purposes. Typical SEE experiments at HAARP have focused on characterizing the parametric decay of the electromagnetic pump wave into several different wave modes such as upper and lower hybrid, ion acoustic, ion-Bernstein and electron-Bernstein. These production modes have been extensively studied at HAARP using traditional beam heating patterns and SEE detection. New results are present from HAARP experiments using a "twisted beam" excitation mode. Unlike traditional heating beams used at HAARP or other heating facilities, the twisted beam attempts to impart orbital angular momentum (OAM) into the heating region. Analysis of twisted beam heating shows that the SEE results obtained are nearly identical to the modes without OAM. One difference in the twisted beam mode is the heating region produced is in the shape of a ring as opposed to the more traditional "solid spot" region. The ring heating pattern may be more conducive to the creation of artificial airglow layers. The results of these runs include artificial layer creation and evolution as pertaining to the twisted beam pattern. The SEE measurements aid the interpretation of the twisted beam interactions in the ionosphere.

  13. Tsunamis warning from space :Ionosphere seismology

    SciTech Connect

    Larmat, Carene

    2012-09-04

    Ionosphere is the layer of the atmosphere from about 85 to 600km containing electrons and electrically charged atoms that are produced by solar radiation. Perturbations - layering affected by day and night, X-rays and high-energy protons from the solar flares, geomagnetic storms, lightning, drivers-from-below. Strategic for radio-wave transmission. This project discusses the inversion of ionosphere signals, tsunami wave amplitude and coupling parameters, which improves tsunami warning systems.

  14. Simultaneous middle and upper atmosphere radar and ionospheric sounder observations of midlatitude E region irregularities and sporadic E layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, T.; Takahashi, O.; Otsuka, Y.; Nozaki, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Kita, K.

    2002-10-01

    We made middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar observations of midlatitude E region field-aligned irregularities (FAIs) in the summer of 1999 and 2000. Sporadic E (Es) layer was monitored with a routine ionosonde, and its altitude was measured with an FM-CW sounder (FCS). In this paper we draw attention to two findings. First, we show that quasiperiodic (QP) radar echoes appearing before 0200 LT are more enhanced with increasing foEs - fbEs, which means that the FAI generation is closely related to localized density gradients within Es, and extend from 100 to 130 km in altitude, while Es altitudes determined from the FCS soundings are between 100 and 110 km. The latter fact suggests that existing models for the QP echo generation, which require a deep modulation of Es altitude, are not applicable to our observational results. We propose a new working model for generating QP echoes in which polarization electric fields originated from high-density plasma clouds within Es are mapped upward along the geomagnetic field to produce relatively weak irregularities above the Es layer. Second, we show new findings obtained from the current observations, namely, two types of QP echoes that occur below 100 km in the morning: one is the morning QP (MQP) echoes with periods of 4-8 min, and the other is the QP echoes with periods of ˜1 min. The latter type can be categorized as low-altitude QP echoes that were found from previous nighttime MU radar observations. Until now the MU radar QP echoes have been believed to occur above 100 km for the period from sunset to midnight. Although we do not know the generation mechanisms of the low-altitude MQP echoes, we suppose that these echoes might be caused by a weak Es that exists below 100 km.

  15. Using an artificial neural network approach to estimate surface-layer optical turbulence at Mauna Loa, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Basu, Sukanta

    2016-05-15

    In this Letter, an artificial neural network (ANN) approach is proposed for the estimation of optical turbulence (Cn2) in the atmospheric surface layer. Five routinely available meteorological variables are used as the inputs. Observed Cn2 data near the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii are utilized for validation. The proposed approach has demonstrated its prowess by capturing the temporal evolution of Cn2 remarkably well. More interestingly, this ANN approach is found to outperform a widely used similarity theory-based conventional formulation for all the prevalent atmospheric conditions (including strongly stratified conditions).

  16. Using an artificial neural network approach to estimate surface-layer optical turbulence at Mauna Loa, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Basu, Sukanta

    2016-05-15

    In this Letter, an artificial neural network (ANN) approach is proposed for the estimation of optical turbulence (Cn2) in the atmospheric surface layer. Five routinely available meteorological variables are used as the inputs. Observed Cn2 data near the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii are utilized for validation. The proposed approach has demonstrated its prowess by capturing the temporal evolution of Cn2 remarkably well. More interestingly, this ANN approach is found to outperform a widely used similarity theory-based conventional formulation for all the prevalent atmospheric conditions (including strongly stratified conditions). PMID:27176996

  17. Ionospheric research for space weather service support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislawska, Iwona; Gulyaeva, Tamara; Dziak-Jankowska, Beata

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of the behavior of the ionosphere is very important for space weather services. A wide variety of ground based and satellite existing and future systems (communications, radar, surveillance, intelligence gathering, satellite operation, etc) is affected by the ionosphere. There are the needs for reliable and efficient support for such systems against natural hazard and minimalization of the risk failure. The joint research Project on the 'Ionospheric Weather' of IZMIRAN and SRC PAS is aimed to provide on-line the ionospheric parameters characterizing the space weather in the ionosphere. It is devoted to science, techniques and to more application oriented areas of ionospheric investigation in order to support space weather services. The studies based on data mining philosophy increasing the knowledge of ionospheric physical properties, modelling capabilities and gain applications of various procedures in ionospheric monitoring and forecasting were concerned. In the framework of the joint Project the novel techniques for data analysis, the original system of the ionospheric disturbance indices and their implementation for the ionosphere and the ionospheric radio wave propagation are developed since 1997. Data of ionosonde measurements and results of their forecasting for the ionospheric observatories network, the regional maps and global ionospheric maps of total electron content from the navigational satellite system (GNSS) observations, the global maps of the F2 layer peak parameters (foF2, hmF2) and W-index of the ionospheric variability are provided at the web pages of SRC PAS and IZMIRAN. The data processing systems include analysis and forecast of geomagnetic indices ap and kp and new eta index applied for the ionosphere forecasting. For the first time in the world the new products of the W-index maps analysis are provided in Catalogues of the ionospheric storms and sub-storms and their association with the global geomagnetic Dst storms is

  18. Radio Tomography and Imaging of Ionospheric Disturbances Caused by Active Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunitsyn, Viacheslav; Padokhin, Artem; Andreeva, Elena; Tereshchenko, Evgeny; Nesterov, Ivan; Vladimir Frolov, S.

    We present the results of the radiotomographic imaging of the artificial ionospheric disturbances obtained in the experiments on the modification of the midlatitude ionosphere by powerful HF radiowaves carried out during last decade at the Sura heating facility. The experiments were conducted using both O- and X- mode radiowaves at frequencies lower than critical frequency of the ionospheric F2 layer both in daytime and nighttime ionosphere. Various schemes of the radiation of the heating wave were used including square wave modulation of the effective radiated power (ERP) at various frequencies and power stepping. Radio transmissions of the low- (Parus/Tsikada) and high-orbital (GPS/GLONASS) navigational satellites received at the mobile network of receiving sites were used for the remote sensing of the heated area of the ionosphere. We study the variations in TEC caused by HF heating showing that the GNSS TEC spectra often contain frequency components corresponding to the modulation periods of the ERP of the heating wave. The manifestations of the heating-induced variations in TEC are most prominent in the area of magnetic zenith of the pumping wave. In this work we also present the radiotomographic reconstructions of the spatial structure of the disturbed area of the ionosphere corresponding to the directivity pattern of the heater as well as the spatial structure of the wave-like disturbances, which are possibly AGWs, diverging from the heated area of the ionosphere. We also compare the effects obsereved during artificial heating experiments with those obsereved during rocket launches and powerful industiral explosions. The possibility of generation of electromagnetic waves by moving wave-like structures in ionosphere (like AGWs induced by HF-heating observed in our experiments) is also addressed in this work. The authors acknowledge the support of the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grants № 13-05-01122, 14-05-31445, 14-05-00855, 14-05-10069), grants

  19. Ionospheric Stimulation By High Power Radio Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, S.; Nishino, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Sato, S.; Tanikawa, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Wong, A. Y.

    1999-01-01

    We have performed an experiment to artificially stimulate the ionosphere using higher power radio waves at the HIPAS (High Power Auroral Stimulation) facility in Alaska. A radio transmission of 2.85 MHz was made at 80 MW (ERP). Diagnostics were made at the other site located 35 km from the transmission site. The results of cross-correlating the excited HF wave and observed with an 8 channel, 30 MHz scanning cosmic radio noise absorption records revealed the excited height of 90 km. Also atmospheric pressure waves observed on the ground show evident propagation of pressure waves which are generated in the ionosphere by the high-power HF wave. The results determine the excitation height of 90 km in the ionosphere and show evidence of the pressure wave coupling between the ionosphere and the lower atmosphere for periods of 10 min

  20. Artificial Synaptic Devices Based on Natural Chicken Albumen Coupled Electric-Double-Layer Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guodong; Feng, Ping; Wan, Xiang; Zhu, Liqiang; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in using biomaterials to fabricate functional electronics has got growing attention for the new generation of environmentally friendly and biocompatible electronic devices. As a kind of biological material with rich source, proteins are essential natural component of all organisms. At the same time, artificial synaptic devices are of great significance for neuromorphic systems because they can emulate the signal process and memory behaviors of biological synapses. In this report, natural chicken albumen with high proton conductivity was used as the coupling electrolyte film for organic/inorganic hybrid synaptic devices fabrication. Some important synaptic functions including paired-pulse facilitation, dynamic filtering, short-term to long-term memory transition and spatial summation and shunting inhibition were successfully mimicked. Our results are very interesting for biological friendly artificial neuron networks and neuromorphic systems. PMID:27008981

  1. Artificial Synaptic Devices Based on Natural Chicken Albumen Coupled Electric-Double-Layer Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guodong; Feng, Ping; Wan, Xiang; Zhu, Liqiang; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2016-03-01

    Recent progress in using biomaterials to fabricate functional electronics has got growing attention for the new generation of environmentally friendly and biocompatible electronic devices. As a kind of biological material with rich source, proteins are essential natural component of all organisms. At the same time, artificial synaptic devices are of great significance for neuromorphic systems because they can emulate the signal process and memory behaviors of biological synapses. In this report, natural chicken albumen with high proton conductivity was used as the coupling electrolyte film for organic/inorganic hybrid synaptic devices fabrication. Some important synaptic functions including paired-pulse facilitation, dynamic filtering, short-term to long-term memory transition and spatial summation and shunting inhibition were successfully mimicked. Our results are very interesting for biological friendly artificial neuron networks and neuromorphic systems.

  2. 25th anniversary article: Artificial carbonate nanocrystals and layered structural nanocomposites inspired by nacre: synthesis, fabrication and applications.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong-Bin; Ge, Jin; Mao, Li-Bo; Yan, You-Xian; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Rigid biological systems are increasingly becoming a source of inspiration for the fabrication of next generation advanced functional materials due to their diverse hierarchical structures and remarkable engineering properties. Among these rigid biomaterials, nacre, as the main constituent of the armor system of seashells, exhibiting a well-defined 'brick-and-mortar' architecture, excellent mechanical properties, and interesting iridescence, has become one of the most attractive models for novel artificial materials design. In this review, recent advances in nacre-inspired artificial carbonate nanocrystals and layered structural nanocomposites are presented. To clearly illustrate the inspiration of nacre, the basic principles relating to plate-like aragonite single-crystal growth and the contribution of hierarchical structure to outstanding properties in nacre are discussed. The inspiration of nacre for the synthesis of carbonate nanocrystals and the fabrication of layered structural nanocomposites is also discussed. Furthermore, the broad applications of these nacre inspired materials are emphasized. Finally, a brief summary of present nacre-inspired materials and challenges for the next generation of nacre-inspired materials is given. PMID:24338814

  3. The Artificial Bee Colony algorithm in layer optimization for the maximum fundamental frequency of symmetrical laminated composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemal Apalak, M.; Karaboga, Dervis; Akay, Bahriye

    2014-03-01

    In this study the layer optimization was carried out for maximizing the lowest (first) fundamental frequency of symmetrical laminated composite plates subjected to any combination of the three classical boundary conditions, and the applicability of the Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm to the layer optimization was investigated. The finite element method was used for calculating the first natural frequencies of the laminated composite plates with various stacking sequences. The ABC algorithm maximizes the first natural frequency of the laminated composite plate defined as an objective function. The optimal stacking sequences were determined for two layer numbers, twenty boundary conditions and two plate length/width ratios. The outer layers of the composite plate had a stiffness increasing effect, and as the number of clamped plate edges was increased both he stiffness and natural frequency of the plate increased. The optimal stacking sequences were in good agreement with those determined by the Ritz-based layerwise optimization method (Narita 2003: J. Sound Vibration 263 (5), 1005-1016) as well as by the genetic algorithm method combined with the finite element method.

  4. Three-layered scaffolds for artificial esophagus using poly(ɛ-caprolactone) nanofibers and silk fibroin: An experimental study in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Chung, Eun-Jae; Ju, Hyung Woo; Park, Hyun Jung; Park, Chan Hum

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of an artificial esophagus using a three-layered poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)-silk fibroin (SF) scaffold in a rat model. The artificial esophagus was a three-layered, hybrid-type prosthesis composed of an outer and inner layer of PCL with a middle layer of SF. After depositing the inner layer of the PCL scaffold by electrospinning, the lyophilized middle SF layer was created. The outer layer of PCL was produced following the same procedure used to make the inner PCL layer. Eleven rats were anesthetized using inhaled anesthesia. Circumferential defects of the cervical esophagus (n=11) were created and reconstructed. Groups of rats were sacrificed after the 1st and 2nd weeks. Three rats died of an esophageal fistula and wound infection. No gross evidence of a fistula, perforation, abscess formation, seroma accumulation, or surrounding soft-tissue necrosis was observed in the other rats sacrificed after the 1st and 2nd weeks. The artificial esophagus constructs produced complete healing of the circumferential defects by the 2nd week. The composition of the three-layered artificial esophagus was confirmed histologically to have an outer and inner layer of PCL and a middle layer of SF. The fusion of the PCL-SF scaffold and the regenerative tissue remained intact. Our study proposes a more practical experimental model for studying a three-layered PCL-SF scaffold in the esophagus. However, further studies on circumferential defect reconstruction in a rat model are still required.

  5. Physics of planetary atmospheres and ionospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, S. J.

    1981-01-01

    The traditional atmospheric regions, the distinction between homosphere and heterosphere, and changing atmospheric composition are discussed. The validity of the barometric law based on a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, for the major part of a planetary atmosphere and its breakdown in the exosphere due to escape of atmospheric particles is considered. The formation and maintenance of photochemical and diffusion-controlled ionospheric layers are treated. Their applicability to planetary ionospheres is dealt with. The spatial extent of magnetic and nonmagnetic planet ionospheres is investigated. Thermal and nonthermal processes responsible for the mass loss of planetary atmospheres are surveyed.

  6. HAARP-Induced Ionospheric Ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Milikh, Gennady; Vartanyan, Aram

    2011-01-04

    It is well known that strong electron heating by a powerful HF-facility can lead to the formation of electron and ion density perturbations that stretch along the magnetic field line. Those density perturbations can serve as ducts for ELF waves, both of natural and artificial origin. This paper presents observations of the plasma density perturbations caused by the HF-heating of the ionosphere by the HAARP facility. The low orbit satellite DEMETER was used as a diagnostic tool to measure the electron and ion temperature and density along the satellite orbit overflying close to the magnetic zenith of the HF-heater. Those observations will be then checked against the theoretical model of duct formation due to HF-heating of the ionosphere. The model is based on the modified SAMI2 code, and is validated by comparison with well documented experiments.

  7. Characterizing redox conditions and monitoring attenuation of selected pharmaceuticals during artificial recharge through a reactive layer.

    PubMed

    Valhondo, Cristina; Carrera, Jesús; Ayora, Carlos; Tubau, Isabel; Martinez-Landa, Lurdes; Nödler, Karsten; Licha, Tobias

    2015-04-15

    A permeable reactive layer was installed at the floor of an infiltration basin. The reactive layer comprised 1) vegetable compost to provide a sorption surface for neutral organic compounds and to release easily degradable organic matter, thus generating a sequence of redox states, and 2) minor amounts of clay and iron oxide to increase sorption of cationic and anionic species, respectively. Field application of this design was successful in generating denitrification, and manganese-, and iron-reducing conditions beneath the basin. This, together with the increase in types of sorption sites, may explain the improved removal of three of the four selected pharmaceuticals compared with their behavior prior to installation of the layer. After installation of the reactive layer, atenolol concentrations were below the detection limits in the vadose zone. Moreover, concentrations of gemfibrozil and cetirizine were reduced to 20% and 40% of their initial concentrations, respectively, after 200 h of residence time. In contrast, prior to installation of the reactive layer, the concentrations of these three pharmaceuticals in both the vadose zone and the aquifer were more than 60% of the initial concentration. Carbamazepine exhibited recalcitrant behavior both prior to and after the reactive barrier installation. PMID:25625636

  8. Characterizing redox conditions and monitoring attenuation of selected pharmaceuticals during artificial recharge through a reactive layer.

    PubMed

    Valhondo, Cristina; Carrera, Jesús; Ayora, Carlos; Tubau, Isabel; Martinez-Landa, Lurdes; Nödler, Karsten; Licha, Tobias

    2015-04-15

    A permeable reactive layer was installed at the floor of an infiltration basin. The reactive layer comprised 1) vegetable compost to provide a sorption surface for neutral organic compounds and to release easily degradable organic matter, thus generating a sequence of redox states, and 2) minor amounts of clay and iron oxide to increase sorption of cationic and anionic species, respectively. Field application of this design was successful in generating denitrification, and manganese-, and iron-reducing conditions beneath the basin. This, together with the increase in types of sorption sites, may explain the improved removal of three of the four selected pharmaceuticals compared with their behavior prior to installation of the layer. After installation of the reactive layer, atenolol concentrations were below the detection limits in the vadose zone. Moreover, concentrations of gemfibrozil and cetirizine were reduced to 20% and 40% of their initial concentrations, respectively, after 200 h of residence time. In contrast, prior to installation of the reactive layer, the concentrations of these three pharmaceuticals in both the vadose zone and the aquifer were more than 60% of the initial concentration. Carbamazepine exhibited recalcitrant behavior both prior to and after the reactive barrier installation.

  9. An Artificial Olfaction System Formed by a Massive Sensors Array Dispersed in a Diffusion Media and an Automatically Formed Glomeruli Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Natale, Corrado; Martinelli, Eugenio; Paolesse, Roberto; D'Amico, Arnaldo; Filippini, Daniel; Lundström, Ingemar

    2009-05-01

    Optical imaging is a read-out technique for sensors that can easily provide advances in artificial olfaction implementing features such as the large number of receptors and the glomeruli layer. In this paper an artificial olfaction system based on the imaging of a continuous layer of chemical indicators is illustrated. The system results in an array of thousands of sensors, corresponding to the pixels of the image. The choice of Computer Screen Photoassisted Technology as a platform for optical interrogation of the sensing layer allows for the definition of a strategy for an automatic definition of the glomeruli layer based on the classification of the optical fingerprints of the image pixels. Chemical indicators are dissolved into a polymeric matrix mimicking the functions of the olfactory mucosa. The system is here illustrated with a simple experiment. Data are treated applying a lateral inhibition to the glomeruli layer resulting in a dynamic pattern resembling that observed in natural olfaction.

  10. A general elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of artificial hip joints employing a compliant layered socket under steady state rotation.

    PubMed

    Wang, F C; Liu, F; Jin, Z M

    2004-01-01

    A general numerical methodology was developed in the present study to analyse the elastohydrodynamic lubrication problem of a compliant layered socket against a rigid ball under steady state rotation representing flexion and extension during walking, with particular reference to artificial hip joint replacements. The general numerical methodology consisted of using the Newton-Raphson method to solve the Reynolds equation, simultaneously with the full elasticity equation using the finite element method in combination with the fast Fourier transform technique. Two specific types of acetabular cup were considered, one with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene used in current total hip joint replacements, and one with polyurethane proposed for compliant layered 'cushion form bearings' for future developments. The film thickness and the pressure distribution for both cups were obtained under a wide range of operating conditions. The predicted central or average film thicknesses within the contact conjunction were compared with those estimated from various simplified theories available in the literature. A simple analytical methodology was consequently established to estimate the lubricating film thickness in a compliant layered socket, based on the corresponding ball-on-plane model and the consideration of the curvature effect.

  11. Contrasting suspended covers reveal the impact of an artificial monolayer on heat transfer processes at the interfacial boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Pittaway, P; Martínez-Alvarez, V; Hancock, N

    2015-01-01

    The highly variable performance of artificial monolayers in reducing evaporation from water storages has been attributed to wind speed and wave turbulence. Other factors operating at the interfacial boundary layer have seldom been considered. In this paper, two physical shade covers differing in porosity and reflectivity were suspended over 10 m diameter water tanks to attenuate wind and wave turbulence. The monolayer octadecanol was applied to one of the covered tanks, and micrometeorological conditions above and below the covers were monitored to characterise diurnal variation in the energy balance. A high downward (air-to-water) convective heat flux developed under the black cover during the day, whereas diurnal variation in the heat flux under the more reflective, wind-permeable white cover was much less. Hourly air and water temperature profiles under the covers over 3 days when forced convection was minimal (low wind speed) were selected for analysis. Monolayer application reduced temperature gain in surface water under a downward convective heat flux, and conversely reduced temperature loss under an upward convective heat flux. This 'dual property' may explain why repeat application of an artificial monolayer to retard evaporative loss (reducing latent heat loss) does not inevitably increase water temperature. PMID:26524454

  12. Contrasting suspended covers reveal the impact of an artificial monolayer on heat transfer processes at the interfacial boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Pittaway, P; Martínez-Alvarez, V; Hancock, N

    2015-01-01

    The highly variable performance of artificial monolayers in reducing evaporation from water storages has been attributed to wind speed and wave turbulence. Other factors operating at the interfacial boundary layer have seldom been considered. In this paper, two physical shade covers differing in porosity and reflectivity were suspended over 10 m diameter water tanks to attenuate wind and wave turbulence. The monolayer octadecanol was applied to one of the covered tanks, and micrometeorological conditions above and below the covers were monitored to characterise diurnal variation in the energy balance. A high downward (air-to-water) convective heat flux developed under the black cover during the day, whereas diurnal variation in the heat flux under the more reflective, wind-permeable white cover was much less. Hourly air and water temperature profiles under the covers over 3 days when forced convection was minimal (low wind speed) were selected for analysis. Monolayer application reduced temperature gain in surface water under a downward convective heat flux, and conversely reduced temperature loss under an upward convective heat flux. This 'dual property' may explain why repeat application of an artificial monolayer to retard evaporative loss (reducing latent heat loss) does not inevitably increase water temperature.

  13. Artificially MoO3 graded ITO anodes for acidic buffer layer free organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hye-Min; Kim, Seok-Soon; Kim, Han-Ki

    2016-02-01

    We report characteristics of MoO3 graded ITO anodes prepared by a RF/DC graded sputtering for acidic poly(3,4-ethylene dioxylene thiophene):poly(styrene sulfonic acid) (PEDOT:PSS)-free organic solar cells (OSCs). Graded sputtering of the MoO3 buffer layer on top of the ITO layer produced MoO3 graded ITO anodes with a sheet resistance of 12.67 Ω/square, a resistivity of 2.54 × 10-4 Ω cm, and an optical transmittance of 86.78%, all of which were comparable to a conventional ITO anode. In addition, the MoO3 graded ITO electrode showed a greater work function of 4.92 eV than that (4.6 eV) of an ITO anode, which is beneficial for hole extraction from an organic active layer. Due to the high work function of MoO3 graded ITO electrodes, the acidic PEDOT:PSS-free OSCs fabricated on the MoO3 graded ITO electrode exhibited a power conversion efficiency 3.60% greater than that of a PEDOT:PSS-free OSC on the conventional ITO anode. The successful operation of PEDOT:PSS-free OSCs indicates simpler fabrication steps for cost-effective OSCs and elimination of interfacial reactions caused by the acidic PEDOT:PSS layer for reliable OSCs.

  14. Physics of planetary ionospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    The fundamental physical and chemical processes in an idealized planetary ionosphere are considered as a general abstraction, with actual planetary ionospheres representing special cases. After describing the structure of the neutral atmospheres (the barosphere, the thermosphere, and the exosphere) and noting the principal ionizing radiations responsible for the formation of planetary ionospheres, a detailed study is made of the thermal structure of these ionospheres and of the chemical processes and plasma-transport processes occurring in them. The features of equilibrium and realistic models of planetary ionospheres are discussed, and an attempt is made to determine the extent of these ionospheres. Considering the ionosphere as a plasma, a plasma kinetic approach is developed for determining the effects of interactions between individual particles and waves in this plasma. The use of remote-sensing radio techniques and direct measurement or in situ techniques is discussed. Finally, the observed properties of the ionospheres of the Earth, Mars, Venus, and Jupiter are reviewed.

  15. Experimental and theoretical study of artificial plasma layers produced by two intersecting beams in a chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Zhang, Y. S.

    1989-01-01

    The work done on the Bragg scattering of electromagnetic waves by microwave produced plasma layers is reported. Also summarized is the work accomplished on the propagation of high power microwave pulses in an air breakdown environment. Ongoing work on the theoretical model and numerical results of pulse propagation in air is also presented as are the results of studying the decay of plasma density and temperature.

  16. Investigation of Tsunami-Ionospheric Coupling Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, D. J.; Grawe, M.; Makela, J. J.; Coisson, P.; Rolland, L.; Rakoto, V.; Lognonne, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that coupling exists between ocean tsunamis and the upper atmosphere, opening up the possibility of tsunami monitoring through observing the ionosphere. Several measurement techniques have demonstrated the effects of this coupling in the ionosphere. Here, we present data from two techniques that allow for deducing properties of a tsunami from the ionosphere (e.g., wavelength, orientation, and velocity), namely total electron content (TEC) measurements from dual-frequency GPS receivers and ionospheric imaging through monitoring the airglow layers surrounding the earth. However, a quantitative relationship between the wave amplitudes observed in the ionosphere and the height of the tsunami remains elusive. Ionospheric signatures from two tsunamis in the Pacific Ocean, caused by the 2011 Tohoku and 2012 Haida Gwaii earthquakes, have been observed in airglow imaging systems and a network of dual-frequency GPS receivers located in Hawaii. These two events provide excellent test cases for the study of tsunami-ionospheric coupling efficiency, most notably the effects of the relative orientation between the tsunami-induced gravity waves and the Earth's magnetic field. We present a quantitative comparison of the TEC and airglow intensity variation from these events, including results from tsunami normal mode summation modeling.

  17. Photochemistry of planetary ionospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, Andrew F.

    1987-01-01

    The dominant photochemical reactions taking place in the ionospheres of Venus, Saturn, and Comet P/Halley are presented. It is shown that the differences in the ionospheres of these celestial bodies result from the different chemistry, energetics, and dynamics of the respective atmospheres. The role of photochemistry in the formation of the individual ionospheres is discussed.

  18. Reactivity surveillance in a nuclear reactor by using a layered artificial neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Arul, A.J. . Reactor Physics Div.)

    1994-07-01

    Layered neural networks, which are a class of models based on neuronal computation in biological systems, are applied to the task of reactivity monitoring in a nuclear reactor to improve the safety and the reliability of the operating plant. Training is done with a maximum likelihood method, which is suitable for on-line training. Operational data from the Fast Breeder Test Reactor are used to study its performance. The adaptability of the network to slow variations in the system parameters and its ability to learn in a noisy environment are studied.

  19. Interaction of an Artificially Thickened Boundary Layer with a Vertically Mounted Pitching Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohman, Tristen; Smits, Alexander; Martinelli, Luigi

    2011-11-01

    Wind energy represents a large portion of the growing market in alternative energy technologies and the current landscape has been dominated by the more prevalent horizontal axis wind turbine. However, there are several advantages to the vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) or Darrieus type design and yet there is much to be understood about how the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) affects their performance. In this study the ABL was simulated in a wind tunnel through the use of elliptical shaped vortex generators, a castellated wall, and floor roughness elements as described in the method of Counihan (1967) and then verified its validity by hot wire measurement of the mean velocity profile as well as the turbulence intensity. The motion of an blade element around a vertical axis is approximated through the use of a pitching airfoil. The wake of the airfoil is investigated through hot wire anemometry in both uniform flow and in the simulated boundary layer both at Re = 1 . 37 ×105 based on the chord of the airfoil. Sponsored by Hopewell Wind Power (Hong Kong) Limited.

  20. Infrasonic troposphere-ionosphere coupling in Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garces, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    The propagation of infrasonic waves in the ionospheric layers has been considered since the 1960's. It is known that space weather can alter infrasonic propagation below the E layer (~120 km altitude), but it was thought that acoustic attenuation was too severe above this layer to sustain long-range propagation. Although volcanoes, earthquakes and tsunamis (all surface sources) appear to routinely excite perturbations in the ionospheric F layer by the propagation of acoustic and acoustic-gravity waves through the atmosphere, there are few reports of the inverse pathway. This paper discusses some of the routine ground-based infrasonic array observations of ionospheric returns from surface sources. These thermospheric returns generally point back towards the source, with an azimuth deviation that can be corrected using the wind velocity profiles in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. However, the seismic excitation in the North Pacific by the Tohoku earthquake ensonified the coupled lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere waveguide in the 0.01 - 0.1 Hz frequency band, producing anomalous signals observed by infrasound arrays in Hawaii. These infrasonic signals propagated at curiously high velocities, suggesting that some assumptions on ionospheric sound generation and propagation could be revisited.

  1. Artificial vision by multi-layered neural networks: neocognitron and its advances.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kunihiko

    2013-01-01

    The neocognitron is a neural network model proposed by Fukushima (1980). Its architecture was suggested by neurophysiological findings on the visual systems of mammals. It is a hierarchical multi-layered network. It acquires the ability to robustly recognize visual patterns through learning. Although the neocognitron has a long history, modifications of the network to improve its performance are still going on. For example, a recent neocognitron uses a new learning rule, named add-if-silent, which makes the learning process much simpler and more stable. Nevertheless, a high recognition rate can be kept with a smaller scale of the network. Referring to the history of the neocognitron, this paper discusses recent advances in the neocognitron. We also show that various new functions can be realized by, for example, introducing top-down connections to the neocognitron: mechanism of selective attention, recognition and completion of partly occluded patterns, restoring occluded contours, and so on.

  2. Physical mechanisms associated with long-range propagation of the signals from ionospheric heating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabotin, Nikolay A.; Zavorotny, Valery U.; Rietveld, Michael T.

    2014-10-01

    Long-range propagation of heater-produced signals has been studied in experiments with the European Incoherent Scatter Scientific Association ionospheric heating facility and with several globally distributed receiving sites by Zalizovski et al. [2009]. Two distinctive components were present in the signals' spectra, and these can be attributed to two modes of propagation of the signals. One of the components is narrowband and stable; it obviously can be associated with the multihop ionospheric propagation of HF waves radiated by the side lobes of the heater's antenna array. Prominent features of the second component are its wider spectral band (up to few tens of hertz) and strong variations in the average Doppler frequency shift and in the power, which in many cases were synchronous at the different receiving sites. These effects are most likely produced by the ionospheric scattering and dynamics within the heater's main beam. The tricky part is to explain how a portion of the HF energy contained in the relatively narrow main beam of the heater is redirected toward the remote receiving locations. We suggest a robust mechanism explaining the long-range propagation of the wideband component of the heater-generated signal based on the theory of scattering from rough surfaces. This mechanism preserves all the observed properties of the remote signals. We show that mountain relief in the vicinity of the heater plays the role of the rough surface causing almost isotropic scattering of the heater's main beam after it is reflected by the ionosphere. Multiple scattering by natural and artificial field-aligned irregularities in the ionospheric layer may be related to the ground-scattered remote signals through its role in spatial redistribution of the heater's radiation.

  3. Ionospheric Modelling using GPS to Calibrate the MWA. II: Regional Ionospheric Modelling using GPS and GLONASS to Estimate Ionospheric Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, B. S.; Morgan, J.; Ord, S. M.; Tingay, S. J.; Bell, M.; Callingham, J. R.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, B.-Q.; Hancock, P.; Hindson, L.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; Lenc, E.; McKinley, B.; Offringa, A. R.; Procopio, P.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Wayth, R. B.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.

    2016-07-01

    We estimate spatial gradients in the ionosphere using the Global Positioning System and GLONASS (Russian global navigation system) observations, utilising data from multiple Global Positioning System stations in the vicinity of Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory. In previous work, the ionosphere was characterised using a single-station to model the ionosphere as a single layer of fixed height and this was compared with ionospheric data derived from radio astronomy observations obtained from the Murchison Widefield Array. Having made improvements to our data quality (via cycle slip detection and repair) and incorporating data from the GLONASS system, we now present a multi-station approach. These two developments significantly improve our modelling of the ionosphere. We also explore the effects of a variable-height model. We conclude that modelling the small-scale features in the ionosphere that have been observed with the MWA will require a much denser network of Global Navigation Satellite System stations than is currently available at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory.

  4. Active experiments in the ionosphere and geomagnetic field variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivokon, V. P.; Cherneva, N. V.; Khomutov, S. Y.; Serovetnikov, A. S.

    2014-11-01

    Variations of ionospheric-magnetospheric relation energy, as one of the possible outer climatology factors, may be traced on the basis of analysis of natural geophysical phenomena such as ionosphere artificial radio radiation and magnetic storms. Experiments on active impact on the ionosphere have been carried out for quite a long time in Russia as well. The most modern heating stand is located in Alaska; it has been used within the HAARP Program. The possibility of this stand to affect geophysical fields, in particular, the geomagnetic field is of interest.

  5. Yakov Alpert: Sputnik-1 and the first satellite ionospheric experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. D.; Sinelnikov, V. M.; Alpert, S. N.

    2015-06-01

    The world first scientific space experiment was carried out in 1957 during the flight of the First Artificial Earth Satellite (AES) - Sputnik-1. It was an ionospheric experiment performed at IZMIRAN under the direction of Prof. Ya.L. Alpert (1911-2010). The sunrise and sunset variations in the AES radio signal were recorded to determine the distribution of electron density in the topside ionosphere (above the maximum). The experiment demonstrated the capabilities of the satellite radio beacon method, which is now very important and widely used for studying the ionosphere. The paper describes the history and results of that experiment as well as the contribution of Ya.L. Alpert to ionospheric research. Ya.L. Alpert was one of the most famous and influential radiophysicists, the author of many fundamental studies and a number of classic books on the theory of propagation of electromagnetic waves, interaction of artificial bodies with ionospheric plasma, ionospheric radio scattering, and the use of satellite radio beacon methods for studying the ionosphere. We give in the paper some extracts from Ya.L. Alpert's research notes. They include the history of the publication of the results from recordings of the Sputnik-1 transmitter signals, and described the method of data analysis. The first scientific publication based on Sputnik-1 data is given in the abbreviated summary. At the end of the paper there is an outline of Ya.L. Alpert's scientific biography.

  6. Sputnik 1 and the First Satellite Ionospheric Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinelnikov, Vyacheslav; Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Alpert, Svetlana

    The world's first scientific space experiment was carried out in 1957 during the flight of the first Artificial Earth Satellite (AES) - Sputnik 1. It was an ionospheric experiment performed at IZMIRAN under the direction of Prof. Ya.L.Alpert (1911-2010). The sunrise and sunset variations in the AES radio signal were recorded in order to determine the distribution of electron density in the topside ionosphere (above the maximum). The experiment demonstrated the capabilities of the satellite radio beacon method, which is now very important and widely used for studying the ionosphere. Our report submitted to the COSPAR General Assembly in Russia describes the history and results of that experiment, as well as some other contributions by Ya.L.Alpert to ionospheric research. Yakov L.Alpert was one of the most famous and influential radiophysicists of his time, the author of many fundamental studies and of a number of classic books on the theory of propagation of electromagnetic waves, interaction of artificial bodies with ionospheric plasmas, ionospheric radio scattering, and the use of satellite radio beacon methods for studying the ionosphere.

  7. Electron cyclotron harmonic resonances in high-frequency heating of the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2013-09-15

    Electron acceleration by upper hybrid waves under cyclotron harmonic resonance interaction is studied. Theory is formulated; the analytical solutions in the second and fourth harmonic cyclotron resonance cases are obtained, and in the third harmonic case, a first order differential equation governing the evolution of the electron energy is derived. The theory is applied for explaining the generation of artificial ionization layers observed in high-frequency (HF) ionospheric heating experiments. The upper hybrid waves are assumed to be excited parametrically by the O-mode HF heating wave. As the decay mode is the lower hybrid wave, the excited upper hybrid waves have wavelengths ranging from 0.25 to 0.5 m, which are short enough to effectively incorporate the finite Larmour radius effect for the harmonic cyclotron resonance interactions as well as have a frequency bandwidth of about 20 kHz, which provides an altitude region of about 10 km for continuous harmonic cyclotron resonance interaction between electrons and descending waves in the slightly inhomogeneous geomagnetic field. The numerical results on electron acceleration show that electron fluxes with energies larger than 14 eV are generated in the three harmonic cases. These energetic electrons cause impact ionizations, which are descending to form artificial ionization layers at the bottom of the ionospheric F region.

  8. Wave-like perturbations in the ionospheric F2-layer observed after the M s8.1 Samoa earthquake of September 29, 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegai, V. V.; Legen'ka, A. D.; Kim, V. P.; Georgieva, K.

    2011-06-01

    A study of the critical frequency foF2 variations after the large earthquake (M s = 8.1) which occurred on 29 September, 2009 in the region of Samoa Islands in the Pacific Ocean is carried out using data of the ionospheric station of Kwajalein. The epicenter of the earthquake was located at about 184 km southwest from Apia (the capital of West Samoa). It was found that wave-like perturbations of foF2 were observed for ˜3 h above the station (located approximately 3560 km northwest from the epicenter). The amplitude of the disturbance was as large as ˜20% of the average magnetic quiet day foF2 values. A comparison of the observed perturbations of foF2 with the ones detected at Stanford ionospheric station after the Alaska earthquake of 28 March 1964 (M s = 8.4) showed a close similarity of the wave-like perturbations of foF2 in both cases.

  9. Ionospheric research opportunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickel, Dwight

    1985-05-01

    Ground-based explosions have been exploited successfully in the past as a relatively controlled source for producing ionospheric disturbances. On June 25, the Defense Nuclear Agency will conduct a high explosives test on the northern section of the White Sands Missile Range. Approximately 4,800 tons of ammonium nitrate and fuel oil (ANFO) will be detonated at ground level, producing an acoustic shock wave with a surface pressure change of approximately 20 mbar at a 6 km range. This shock front will have sufficient strength to propagate into the ionosphere with at least a 10% change in the ambient pressure across the disturbance front in the lower F region. Such an ionospheric perturbation will give ionospheric researchers an excellent opportunity to investigate acoustic propagation at ionospheric heights, shock dissipation effect, the ion-neutral coupling process, acoustic-gravity wave (traveling ionospheric disturbance) generation mechanisms, and associated RF phenomena.

  10. ULF Generation by Modulated Ionospheric Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Labenski, J.; Wallace, T.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2013-12-01

    Modulated ionospheric heating experiments designed to generate ULF waves using the HAARP heater have been conducted since 2007. Artificial ULF waves in the Pc1 frequency range were observed from space and by ground induction magnetometers located in the vicinity of the heater as well as at long distances. Two distinct generation mechanisms of artificial ULF waves were identified. The first was electroject modulation under geomagnetically disturbed conditions. The second was pressure modulation in the E and F regions of the ionosphere under quiet conditions. Ground detections of ULF waves near the heater included both Shear Alfven waves and Magnetosonic waves generated by electrojet and/or pressure modulations. Distant ULF detections involved Magnetosonic wave propagation in the Alfvenic duct with pressure modulation as the most likely source. Summary of our observations and theoretical interpretations will be presented at the meeting. We would like to acknowledge the support provided by the staff at the HAARP facility during our ULF experiments.

  11. Novel artificial hip joint: A layer of alumina on Ti-6Al-4V alloy formed by micro-arc oxidation.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Rohit; Kokubo, Tadashi; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Nomura, Yuuji; Nose, Norihiro; Oomori, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Takuya; Wakita, Koichi; Takadama, Hiroaki

    2015-10-01

    In many hip replacement surgeries, monolithic alumina is used as a femoral head due to its high wear resistance. However, it is liable to fracture under load bearing operations in artificial joints. We propose a promising way to overcome this limitation by forming a dense alumina layer onto a relatively tough substrate such as Ti-6Al-4V alloy to obtain high wear resistance on a material that can sustain relatively high toughness. For this purpose, Al metal powders were deposited onto Ti-6Al-4V alloy by cold spraying in N2 atmosphere. Interfacial adhesion between Al and the Ti alloy was improved by the formation of a reaction layer of Al3Ti between them by heating at 640 °C for 1h in air. Subsequently, micro-arc oxidation treatment was performed to oxidize Al. The oxidized layer was composed of an outer porous layer of γ-alumina and inner-most dense layer of α-alumina. The α-alumina layer was almost fully densified and exhibited high Vickers hardness almost equal to that of alumina ceramics used as the femoral head. Thus, the newly developed dense alumina/Ti alloy can be potentially used to produce the reliable bearing surfaces of artificial hip joint. PMID:26117770

  12. The ionosphere and upper atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, S.

    1975-01-01

    A summary is presented of current understanding of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Venus and its interaction with the solar wind, based on data from the Mariner 5 and Mariner 10 fly-bys and on far UV spectra obtained in rocket experiments. The major constituent of the upper atmosphere is CO2. Minor constituents include H, He, O, C, and CO and probably N2, Cl, and S. Although the thermal escape rate is only about 10,000/sq cm/sec, the H content in the exosphere appears to be highly variable. A prominent peak in the ionosphere profile near 140 km, appearing both on the day and nightside, is identified as an F(1) layer. An E layer and possibly an F(2) layer are present at 125 and 170 km, respectively. The dayside ionosphere may be explained in terms of the absorption of solar radiation by CO2, O, and He. The transport of ions from day to nightside may be important in the formation of the nightside ionosphere; an additional source may be needed to explain the nightside E layer. There is observational evidence that the solar wind interacts directly with the Venusian atmosphere, resulting in the formation of a bow shock. This may in part be explained by a balance at the ionopause between the solar wind ram pressure and the planetary plasma pressure.

  13. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of a functionally graded layered bearing surface, with particular reference to 'cushion form bearings' for artificial knee joints.

    PubMed

    Virdee, S S; Wang, F C; Xu, H; Jin, Z M

    2003-01-01

    Elastohydrodynamic lubrication of a functionally graded layered (FGL) bearing surface, whose elastic modulus increases with depth from the bearing surface, was investigated in this study. The finite difference method was employed to solve the Reynolds equation, simultaneously with the elasticity equation of the bearing surface, under circular point contacts. The finite element method was adopted to solve the elasticity equation for the FGL bearing surface. The displacement coefficients thus obtained were used to calculate the elastic deformation of the bearing surface, required for the elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis. Good agreement of the predicted film thickness and pressure distribution was obtained, between the present method and a previous study for a single layered bearing surface with a uniform elastic modulus. The general numerical methodology was then applied to an FGL bearing surface with both linear and exponential variations in elastic modulus, with particular reference to the 'cushion form bearing' for artificial knee joints. The predicted film thickness and pressure distribution were shown to be quite close to those obtained for a single layer under typical operating conditions representative of artificial knee joints, provided that the elastic modulus of the single layer was chosen to be the average elastic modulus of the graded layer.

  14. International reference ionosphere 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza, Dieter; Rawer, K.; Bossy, L.; Kutiev, I.; Oyama, K.-I.; Leitinger, R.; Kazimirovsky, E.

    1990-01-01

    The International Reference Ionosphere 1990 (IRI-90) is described. IRI described monthly averages of the electron density, electron temperature, ion temperature, and ion composition in the altitude range from 50 to 1000 km for magnetically quiet conditions in the non-auroral ionosphere. The most important improvements and new developments are summarized.

  15. Atmospheric waves and the ionosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, T.

    1972-01-01

    A review of evidence supporting the existence of atmospheric waves is presented, and a simple, theoretical approach for describing them is shown. Suggestions for gravity wave sources include equatorial and auroral electrojet, auroral and polar substorm heating, atmospheric jet streams, and large oceanic tides. There are reviewed previous studies dealing with the interaction between ionization and atmospheric waves believed to exist at ionospheric heights. These waves include acoustic waves, evanescent waves, and internal atmospheric gravity waves. It is explained that mode analysis, often employed when an increased number of layers is used for a more complete profile, is inapplicable for waves very close to a source.

  16. Convergent instability in the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Ponyatov, A.A.

    1994-04-01

    A linear theory of the convergent instability (CI) of ionospheric plasma associated with the nonuniform nature of its regular motion is examined. The conditions under which CI appears in the E- and F-layers for vertical ion motion caused by various physical factors are analyzed. The possibility of small-scale strongly geomagnetic-field-aligned nonuniformities of electron concentration (l{sub min} {approximately} 10-30 m) is demonstrated. The altitude dependence of collision frequency is shown to play a large role in CI.

  17. An Initial Investigation of Ionospheric Gradients for Detection of Ionospheric Disturbances over Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroglu, Meltem; Arikan, Feza; Koroglu, Ozan

    2015-04-01

    Ionosphere is an ionized layer of earth's atmosphere which affect the propagation of radio signals due to highly varying electron density structure. Total Electron Content (TEC) and Slant Total Electron Content (STEC) are convenient measures of total electron density along a ray path. STEC model is given by the line integral of the electron density between the receiver and GPS satellite. TEC and STEC can be estimated by observing the difference between the two GPS signal time delays that have different frequencies L1 (1575 MHz) and L2 (1227 MHz). During extreme ionospheric storms ionospheric gradients becomes larger than those of quiet days since time delays of the radio signals becomes anomalous. Ionosphere gradients can be modeled as a linear semi-infinite wave front with constant propagation speed. One way of computing the ionospheric gradients is to compare the STEC values estimated between two neighbouring GPS stations. In this so-called station-pair method, ionospheric gradients are defined by dividing the difference of the time delays of two receivers, that see the same satellite at the same time period. In this study, ionospheric gradients over Turkey are computed using the Turkish National Permanent GPS Network (TNPGN-Active) between May 2009 and September 2012. The GPS receivers are paired in east-west and north-south directions with distances less than 150 km. GPS-STEC for each station are calculated using IONOLAB-TEC and IONOLAB-BIAS softwares (www.ionolab.org). Ionospheric delays are calculated for each paired station for both L1 and L2 frequencies and for each satellite in view with 30 s time resolution. During the investigation period, different types of geomagnetic storms, Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances (TID), Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances (SID) and various earthquakes with magnitudes between 3 to 7.4 have occured. Significant variations in the structure of station-pair gradients have been observed depending on location of station-pairs, the

  18. HF wave propagation and induced ionospheric turbulence in the magnetic equatorial region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, B.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2016-03-01

    The propagation and excitation of artificial ionospheric turbulence in the magnetic equatorial region by high-frequency electromagnetic (EM) waves injected into the overhead ionospheric layer is examined. EM waves with ordinary (O) mode polarization reach the critical layer only if their incidence angle is within the Spitze cone. Near the critical layer the wave electric field is linearly polarized and directed parallel to the magnetic field lines. For large enough amplitudes, the O mode becomes unstable to the four-wave oscillating two-stream instability and the three-wave parametric decay instability driving large-amplitude Langmuir and ion acoustic waves. The interaction between the induced Langmuir turbulence and electrons located within the 50-100 km wide transmitter heating cone at an altitude of 230 km can potentially accelerate the electrons along the magnetic field to several tens to a few hundreds of eV, far beyond the thresholds for optical emissions and ionization of the neutral gas. It could furthermore result in generation of shear Alfvén waves such as those recently observed in laboratory experiments at the University of California, Los Angeles Large Plasma Device.

  19. Incredibly distant ionospheric responses to earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusupov, Kamil; Akchurin, Adel

    2015-04-01

    Attempts to observe ionospheric responses to the earthquake has been going on for decades. In recent years, the greatest progress in the study of this question have GPS-measurements with simultaneous HF-measurements. The use of a dense network of GPS-receivers and getting with it sufficiently detailed two-dimensional maps of the total electron content (TEC) greatly clarified the nature of the ionospheric response to strong earthquakes. For ionospheric responses observation, that are remote more than 1000 km from the strong earthquakes epicentres, it is necessary to applying more sensitive methods than GPS. The most experience in the observation of the ionospheric responses to earthquakes accumulated with Doppler sounding. Using these measurements, ionospheric disturbances characteristic features (signature) have been allocated, which associated with the passage of Rayleigh waves on the surface. Particular, this Rayleigh wave signatures allocation is implemented in the Nostradamus coherent backscatter radar. The authors of this method suggest using radar techniques like a sensitive "ionospheric seismometer." The most productive allocation and studying of the vertical structure ionospheric responses could be ionosonde observations. However, their typical 15 minute sounding rate is quite sufficient for observing the regular ionosphere, but it is not enough for studying the ionospheric responses to earthquakes, because ionospheric responses is often seen only in one ionogram and it is absent in adjacent. The decisive factor in establishing the striking ionospheric response to the earthquake was the Tohoku earthquake in 2011, when there was three ionosondes distant at 870-2000 km from the epicentre. These ionosondes simultaneously showed distortion of the F1-layer traces as its multiple stratification (multiple-cusp signature - MCS), which generated by Rayleigh wave. Note that there was another fourth Japanese ionosonde. It is located a little further near boundaries

  20. Rocket studies of the lower ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowhill, Sidney A.

    1990-01-01

    The earth's ionosphere in the altitude range of 50 to 200 km was investigated by rocket-borne sensors, supplemented by ground-based measurement. The rocket payloads included mass spectrometers, energetic particle detectors, Langmuir probes and radio propagation experiments. Where possible, rocket flights were included in studies of specific phenomena, and the availability of data from other experiments greatly increased the significance of the results. The principal ionospheric phenomena studied were: winter anomaly in radiowave absorption, ozone and molecular oxygen densities, mid-latitude sporadic-E layers, energetic particle precipitation at middle and low latitudes, ionospheric instabilities and turbulence, and solar eclipse effects in the D and E regions. This document lists personnel who worked on the project, and provides a bibliography of resultant publications.

  1. Biophysical investigations of the structure and function of the tear fluid lipid layers and the effect of ectoine. Part B: artificial lipid films.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Mridula; Brinkkötter, Marc; Harishchandra, Rakesh Kumar; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2014-10-01

    The tear fluid lipid layer is present at the outermost part of the tear film which lines the ocular surface and functions to maintain the corneal surface moist by retarding evaporation. Instability in the structure of the tear fluid lipid layer can cause an increased rate of evaporation and thus dry eye syndrome. Ectoine has been previously shown to fluidize lipid monolayers and alter the phase behavior. In the current study we have investigated the effect of ectoine on the artificial tear fluid lipid layer composed of binary and ternary lipid mixtures of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), cholesteryl esters and tri-acyl-glycerols. The focus of our study was mainly the structural and the biophysical aspects of the artificial tear fluid lipid layer using surface activity studies and topology analysis. The presence of ectoine consistently causes an expansion of the pressure-area isotherm indicating increased intermolecular spacing. The topology studies showed the formation of droplet-like structures due to the addition of ectoine only when tri-acyl-glycerol is present in the mixture of DPPC and chol-palmitate, similar to the natural meibomian lipids. Consequently, the hypothesis of an exclusion of tri/di-acyl-glycerol from the meibomian lipid film in the presence of ectoine in the subphase is confirmed. A model describing the effect of ectoine on meibomian lipid films is further presented which may have an application for the use of ectoines in eye drops as a treatment for the dry eye syndrome.

  2. Anomalies in the Ionosphere around the Southern faults of Haiti near the 2010 Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornely, P.; Daniell, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    In the last few decades, research on earthquake prediction has resulted in the recognition that there may exist many earthquake precursors in the lithosphere, atmosphere and ionosphere. The ionosphere is naturally perturbed by solar and geomagnetic disturbances and it is difficult to extract the variations connected with earthquakes particularly for the equatorial and high latitude ionosphere. Several researchers have contending theories on the mechanisms associated with pre-earthquake signals. The basic premise is that a thin layer of particles created before earthquakes due to ions originating from the earth's crust travel to the earth's surface and begin radiating from the earth's surface due to strong electric fields Namgaladze et al., [2009]. The ions can then travel from above earth's surface to the ionosphere where they can create ionospheric disturbances. When solar and geomagnetic disturbances can be ruled out, the effects of pre-seismic activities in the ionosphere can be assessed using fluctuations in the ionospheric electron density in the vicinity of fault lines. The Parameterized Ionospheric Model (PIM) is a fast global ionospheric model which produces electron density profiles (EDPs) between 90 and 25000 km altitude, which corresponds to critical altitudes of the ionosphere Daniell et al., [1995]. Since PIM only simulates a statistical mean ionosphere, sudden variations in ionospheric electron density will not be represented in the models, which make PIM ideal for background electron density predictions. The background predictions can then removed from the actual electron density data which could provide means for identifying pre-seismic electron density perturbations.

  3. Ionospheric irregularity physics modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Ossakow, S.L.; Keskinen, M.J.; Zalesak, S.T.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical simulation techniques have been employed to study ionospheric F region plasma cloud striation phenomena, equatorial spread F phenomena, and high latitude diffuse auroral F region irregularity phenomena. Each of these phenomena can cause scintillation effects. The results and ideas from these studies are state-of-the-art, agree well with experimental observations, and have induced experimentalists to look for theoretically predicted results. One conclusion that can be drawn from these studies is that ionospheric irregularity phenomena can be modelled from a first principles physics point of view. Theoretical and numerical simulation results from the aforementioned ionospheric irregularity areas will be presented.

  4. Observations of aspect sensitive RF-enhanced incoherent backscatter in the polar cap ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhillon, Ranvir; Robinson, T. R.; Yeoman, Timothy K.

    RF-induced plasma instabilities give rise to characteristic spectral enhancements in incoherent scatter spectra. The aspect sensitivity of these enhancements provides valuable information regarding the physical processes that occur within the RF-affected ionospheric patch. These direction-dependent signatures exhibit significant variability and help shed light on possible coupling between artificial field-aligned irregularities generated at the upper-hybrid height and RF-induced instabilities excited near the reflection height for O-mode-polarized radio waves. This directional dependence of RF-enhanced incoherent radar backscatter has been shown using data from the high-latitude ionosphere, and the significant features included consistent field-aligned signatures that may be related to the presence of artificial field-aligned irregularities. These earlier high-latitude results provided motivation for repeating the investigation in the different geophysical conditions that obtain in the polar cap ionosphere. The Space Plasma Exploration by Active Radar (SPEAR) facility is located within the polar cap and has provided observations of RF-enhanced ion and plasma line spectra recorded by the EISCAT Svalbard UHF incoherent scatter radar system (ESR), which is collocated with SPEAR. We present observations of aspect sensitive E-and F-region SPEAR-induced ion and plasma line enhance-ments from several directions in the magnetic meridian plane, centred on field-aligned. These enhancements indicate excitation of both the purely growing mode and the parametric decay instability, together with sporadic E-layer results that may indicate the presence of cavitons. We note consistent enhancements from field-aligned, vertical and also from 5 degrees south of field-aligned. We attribute the prevalence of vertical scatter to the importance of the Spitze region, and of that from field-aligned to possible wave/irregularity coupling.

  5. Studies of the eddy structure in the lower ionosphere by the API technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhmetieva, Nataliya V.; Grigoriev, Gennadii I.; Lapin, Victor G.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new application of the API technique to study of turbulent phenomena in the lower ionosphere. The main objective of these studies is experimental diagnostics of natural ordered eddy structures at the altitudes of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere, such as those that occur when internal gravity waves propagate in stratified flows in the atmospheric boundary layer. To this end, we considered the impact of eddy motions in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere on the relaxation time and the frequency of the signal scattered by periodic irregularities. Theoretical study of eddy structures base on experiments using SURA heating facility (56,14 N; 44,1 W). It is known, artificial periodic irregularities (APIs) are formed in the field of the powerful standing wave as a result of the interference of the incident wave and reflected from the ionosphere (Belikovich et al., Ionospheric Research by Means of Artificial Periodic Irregularities - 2002. Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany. Copernicus GmbH. 160 p.). The relaxation or decay of the periodic structure is specified by the ambipolar diffusion process. The atmospheric turbulence causes reduction of the amplitude and decay time of the API scattered signal in comparison with the diffusion time. We found a relation between the eddy period and the characteristic decay time of scattered signal, for which the synchronism of the waves scattered by a periodic structure is broken. Besides, it is shown, when the eddy structure moves by a horizontal wind exists at these heights, the frequency of the radio wave scattered by API structure will periodically increase and decrease compared with the frequency of the radiated diagnostic (probing) radio-wave. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation under grant No 14-12-00556.

  6. Fabrication of dense α-alumina layer on Ti-6Al-4V alloy hybrid for bearing surfaces of artificial hip joint.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Rohit; Kokubo, Tadashi; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Takadama, Hiroaki

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in hip replacements are focused towards producing reliable bearing surfaces to enhance their longevity. In this perspective, progressive attempts have been made to improve the wear resistance of polyethylene to eliminate osteolysis and mechanical reliability of brittle alumina ceramics, but in vain. It is proposed that both high wear resistance and mechanical reliability can be retained if a thin layer of dense alumina is formed onto high toughness Ti-6Al-4V alloy. For this purpose, we devised a unique methodology in which a layer of Al metal was deposited onto the Ti alloy substrate by cold spraying (CS), followed by a heat treatment to form Al3Ti reaction layer at their interface to improve adhesion and subsequent micro-arc oxidation (MAO) treatment to transform Al to alumina layer. An optimal MAO treatment of cold sprayed Al formed an adherent and dense α-alumina layer with high Vickers hardness matching with that of sintered alumina used as a femoral head. Structure-phase-property relationships in dense α-alumina layer have been revealed and discussed in the light of our research findings. The designed alumina/Ti alloy hybrid might be a potential candidate for reliable bearing surfaces of artificial hip joint. PMID:27612821

  7. Modeling Ionospheric Electrodynamics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huba, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    We present modeling results of ionospheric electrodynamics using the 3D NRL ionosphere model SAMI3. Recently, SAMI3 has been upgraded to solve the potential equation that determines the electrostatic potential from the ionospheric conductances (Pedersen and Hall) and drivers: neutral wind, gravity, and parallel current systems. We present results showing the impact of different neutral wind models (e.g., HWM93, HWM07, TIMEGCM) on the dynamics of the low- to mid-latitude ionosphere, as well as the Region 1 and 2 current systems. We point out issues and concerns with obtaining an accurate specification of the global electric field within the context of existing models.(with J. Krall, G. Joyce, S. Slinker, and G. Crowley). Research supported by NASA and ONR

  8. Dayside Ionospheric Superfountain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Verkhoglyadova, Olga P.; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The Dayside Ionospheric Super-fountain modified SAMI2 code predicts the uplift, given storm-time electric fields, of the dayside near-equatorial ionosphere to heights of over 800 kilometers during magnetic storm intervals. This software is a simple 2D code developed over many years at the Naval Research Laboratory, and has importance relating to accuracy of GPS positioning, and for satellite drag.

  9. Ionospheric response to the High Speed Solar Streams during last solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosna, Zbysek; Koucka Knizova, Petra; Georgieva, Katya

    Ionosphere is a highly variable system. Response of ionospheric plasma to the High Speed Solar Streams (HSS) by means of critical frequencies fof2, heights of maximum electron concentration hmf2 and the occurrence of sporadic E-layer during last prolonged solar minimum is presented and we compare it to previous studies. State of the ionosphere depends on the daytime, season, phase of solar cycle etc. The extent of ionospheric response to the solar event (HSS, CME etc.) is a subject of mentioned conditions and strength of solar event itself but it also significantly depends on the actual geomagnetic and ionospheric situation and the memory of the system, e.g. length of the preceding quiet or disturbed period. Ionospheric storms have been relatively widely studied. However, last solar minimum gives us an exceptional possibility to study ionospheric processes under conditions of unusually long time of low solar activity.

  10. Ionospheric disturbances at the equatorial anomaly crest region during the March 1989 magnetic storms

    SciTech Connect

    Yinn-Nien Huang; Kang, Cheng )

    1991-08-01

    On March 6, 1989, the largest sunspot group since 1982 came into view as it moved out of the eastern limb of the Sun. It was highly active during March8-18, and a great many transient ionospheric and geomagnetic variations were triggered by this sunspot group. The intensive ionospheric observations at Lunping Observatory and Chungli Ionosphere Station during this period recorded 30 solar flares manifested as shortwave fade-outs, sudden frequency deviations, and solar flare effects and three storm sudden commencement (SSC)-tupe geomagnetic storms, among which the March 13 SSC-type geomagnetic storm triggered an unusually severe ionospheric disturbance. The ionospheric total electron content, the critical frequency of the F{sub 2} layer, f{sub o}F{sub 2}, and the virtual heights at given frequencies all show wavelike up-and-down oscillations of the ionosphere. This oscillatory ionospheric motion is explained as due to the compression and expansion of the plasmasphere.

  11. Ionospheric disturbances at the equatorial anomaly crest region during the March 1989 magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-08-01

    On March 6, 1989, the largest sunspot group since 1982 came into view as it moved out of the eastern limb of the Sun. It was highly active during March 8-18, and a great many transient ionospheric and geomagnetic variations were triggered by this sunspot group. The intensive ionospheric observations at Lunping Observatory and Chungli Ionosphere Station during this period recorded 30 solar flares manifested as shortwave fade-outs, sudden frequency deviations, and solar flare effects and three storm sudden commencement (SSC)-type geomagnetic storms, among which the March 13 SSC-type geomagnetic storm triggered an unusually severe ionospheric disturbance. The ionospheric total electron content, the critical frequency of the F2 layer, f0F2, and the virtual heights at given frequencies all show wavelike up-and-down oscillations of the ionosphere. This oscillatory ionospheric motion is explained as due to the compression and expansion of the plasmasphere.

  12. Long-term monthly statistics of the mid-latitude ionospheric E-layer peak electron density in the Northern geographic hemisphere during geomagnetically quiet and steadily low solar activity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Anatoli; Pavlova, Nadezhda

    2016-07-01

    Long-term hourly values of the ionospheric E-layer peak electron density, NmE, measured during the time period of 1957-2014 by 4 mid-latitude ionosondes (Wallops Island, Boulder, de l'Ebre, and Rome) in the Northern geographic hemisphere were processed to select periods of geomagnetically quiet and low solar activity conditions to calculate several descriptive statistics of NmE close to noon for each month in a year, including the mathematical expectation of NmE, the standard deviations of NmE from the mathematically expected NmE, and the NmE variation coefficient. The month-to-month variability of these descriptors allowed us to identify months of a year when they reach their extremes (maxima, minima). We found that the most probable NmE cannot be considered as the best statistical parameter among the most probable NmE and the mathematically expected NmE in statistical studies of month-to-month variations of NmE. Depending on a choice of an ionosonde and a month, the calculated NmE variation coefficient changes from 5 to 12 %.

  13. Tsunami Ionospheric warning and Ionospheric seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lognonne, Philippe; Rolland, Lucie; Rakoto, Virgile; Coisson, Pierdavide; Occhipinti, Giovanni; Larmat, Carene; Walwer, Damien; Astafyeva, Elvira; Hebert, Helene; Okal, Emile; Makela, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    The last decade demonstrated that seismic waves and tsunamis are coupled to the ionosphere. Observations of Total Electron Content (TEC) and airglow perturbations of unique quality and amplitude were made during the Tohoku, 2011 giant Japan quake, and observations of much lower tsunamis down to a few cm in sea uplift are now routinely done, including for the Kuril 2006, Samoa 2009, Chili 2010, Haida Gwai 2012 tsunamis. This new branch of seismology is now mature enough to tackle the new challenge associated to the inversion of these data, with either the goal to provide from these data maps or profile of the earth surface vertical displacement (and therefore crucial information for tsunami warning system) or inversion, with ground and ionospheric data set, of the various parameters (atmospheric sound speed, viscosity, collision frequencies) controlling the coupling between the surface, lower atmosphere and the ionosphere. We first present the state of the art in the modeling of the tsunami-atmospheric coupling, including in terms of slight perturbation in the tsunami phase and group velocity and dependance of the coupling strength with local time, ocean depth and season. We then show the confrontation of modelled signals with observations. For tsunami, this is made with the different type of measurement having proven ionospheric tsunami detection over the last 5 years (ground and space GPS, Airglow), while we focus on GPS and GOCE observation for seismic waves. These observation systems allowed to track the propagation of the signal from the ground (with GPS and seismometers) to the neutral atmosphere (with infrasound sensors and GOCE drag measurement) to the ionosphere (with GPS TEC and airglow among other ionospheric sounding techniques). Modelling with different techniques (normal modes, spectral element methods, finite differences) are used and shown. While the fits of the waveform are generally very good, we analyse the differences and draw direction of future

  14. Investigation of the D and E regions of the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, R. N.; Engelman, A.; Tobey, A. F.

    1973-01-01

    Details of an experimental program that investigates the ionosphere using sounding rockets are presented. The investigation is part of a continuing program to gather data on the D and E regions of the ionosphere during periods of recurring natural phenomena that influence these regions. To achieve these ends, four vehicles were launched during the eclipse of the sun on March 7, 1970. Other vehicles totalling 10 in all were launched to investigate transient phenomena such as the sporadic E layer.

  15. Changes in the ionosphere prior to weak earthquakes in the Irkutsk region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsunova, L. P.; Chistuakova, L. V.; Khegai, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    Data from 15-minute measurements at the vertical ionospheric sounding station in Irkutsk during the summer months of 2008-2011 are analyzed in order to detect in the ionosphere effects of preparation of weak earthquakes of the K = 10-12 energy class. The method of revealing disturbances in ionospheric parameters by simultaneous observations of the sporadic E layer and regular F2 layer, which was previously applied by the authors in the case of stronger earthquakes, was used. The efficiency of using this method to detect ionospheric disturbances preceding earthquakes also in the case of weak earthquakes is demonstrated. Possible ionospheric precursors of the selected series of earthquakes are identified. For them, an empirical dependence relating the time of advance of the shock moment by the probable ionospheric precursor on the energy class of the earthquake and the epicenter distance to the observation point is found.

  16. Electromagnetic inertio-gravity waves in the Earth's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaladze, T. D.; Tsamalashvili, L. V.; Kahlon, L. Z.

    2011-05-01

    Propagation of electromagnetic inertio-gravity (IG) waves in the partially ionized ionospheric E- and F-layers is considered in the shallow water approximation. Accounting of the field-aligned current is the main novelty of the investigation. Existence of two new eigen-frequencies for fast and slow electromagnetic waves is revealed in the ionospheric E-layer. It is shown that in F-layer slowly damping new type of inertial-fast magnetosonic waves can propagate. Slowly damping low-frequency oscillations connected with the field-aligned conductivity are found. Broad spectrum of oscillations is investigated.

  17. Using DORIS measurements for ionosphere modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmering, Denise; Schmidt, Michael; Limberger, Marco

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays, most of the ionosphere models used in geodesy are based on terrestrial GNSS measurements and describe the Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) depending on longitude, latitude, and time. Since modeling the height distribution of the electrons is difficult due to the measurement geometry, the VTEC maps are based on the the assumption of a single-layer ionosphere. Moreover, the accuracy of the VTEC maps is different for different regions of the Earth, because the GNSS stations are unevenly distributed over the globe and some regions (especially the ocean areas) are not very well covered by observations. To overcome the unsatisfying measurement geometry of the terrestrial GNSS measurements and to take advantage of the different sensitivities of other space-geodetic observation techniques, we work on the development of multi-dimensional models of the ionosphere from the combination of modern space-geodetic satellite techniques. Our approach consists of a given background model and an unknown correction part expanded in terms of B-spline functions. Different space-geodetic measurements are used to estimate the unknown model coefficients. In order to take into account the different accuracy levels of the observations, a Variance Component Estimation (VCE) is applied. We already have proven the usefulness of radio occultation data from space-borne GPS receivers and of two-frequency altimetry data. Currently, we test the capability of DORIS observations to derive ionospheric parameters such as VTEC. Although DORIS was primarily designed for precise orbit computation of satellites, it can be used as a tool to study the Earth's ionosphere. The DORIS ground beacons are almost globally distributed and the system is on board of various Low Earth Orbiters (LEO) with different orbit heights, such as Jason-2, Cryosat-2, and HY-2. The last generation of DORIS receivers directly provides phase measurements on two frequencies. In this contribution, we test the DORIS

  18. Ionospheric precursors for crustal earthquakes in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, L.; Korsunova, L. P.; Mikhailov, A. V.

    2010-04-01

    Crustal earthquakes with magnitude 6.0>M≥5.5 observed in Italy for the period 1979-2009 including the last one at L'Aquila on 6 April 2009 were considered to check if the earlier obtained relationships for ionospheric precursors for strong Japanese earthquakes are valid for the Italian moderate earthquakes. The ionospheric precursors are based on the observed variations of the sporadic E-layer parameters (h'Es, fbEs) and foF2 at the ionospheric station Rome. Empirical dependencies for the seismo-ionospheric disturbances relating the earthquake magnitude and the epicenter distance are obtained and they have been shown to be similar to those obtained earlier for Japanese earthquakes. The dependences indicate the process of spreading the disturbance from the epicenter towards periphery during the earthquake preparation process. Large lead times for the precursor occurrence (up to 34 days for M=5.8-5.9) tells about a prolong preparation period. A possibility of using the obtained relationships for the earthquakes prediction is discussed.

  19. Ionosphere-thermosphere space weather issues.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1996-10-01

    Weather disturbances in the ionosphere-thermosphere system can have a detrimental effect on both ground-based and space-based systems. Because of this impact and because this field has matured, it is now appropriate to develop specification and forecast models, with the aim of eventually predicting the occurrence, duration, and intensity of weather effects. As part of the new National Space Weather Program, the CEDAR community will focus on science issues concerning space weather, and this tutorial/review is an expanded version of a tutorial presentation given at the recent CEDAR annual meeting. The tutorial/review provides a brief discussion of weather disturbances and features, the causes of weather, and the status of weather modeling. The features and disturbances discussed include plasma patches, boundary and auroral blobs, Sun-aligned polar cap arcs, the effects of traveling convection vortices and SAID events, the lifetime of density structures, sporadic-E and intermediate layers, spread F and equatorial plasma bubbles, geomagnetic storms and substorms, traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs), and the effects of tides and gravity waves propagating from the lower atmosphere. The tutorial/review is only intended to provide an overview of some of the important scientific issues concerning ionospheric-thermospheric weather, with the emphasis on the ionosphere. Tutorials on thermospheric and magnetospheric weather issues are given in companion papers.

  20. Ionospheric storms on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, E.; Fraenz, M.; Woch, J.; Duru, F.; Gurnett, D.; Modolo, R.; Barabash, S.; Lundin, R.

    2009-04-01

    Measurements made by the ASPERA-3 and MARSIS experiments on Mars Express have shown that space weather effects related to the impact of a dense and high pressure solar wind on Mars cause strong perturbations in the martian induced magnetosphere and ionosphere. The magnetic barrier formed by pile-up of the draped interplanetary magnetic field ceases to be a shield for the incoming solar wind. Large blobs of solar wind plasma penetrate to the magnetosphere and sweep out dense plasma from the ionosphere. The topside martian ionosphere becomes very fragmented consisting of intermittent cold/low energy and energized plasmas. The scavenging effect caused by the intrusions of solar wind plasma clouds enhances significantly the losses of volatile material from Mars.

  1. Characterizing Extreme Ionospheric Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, L.; Komjathy, A.; Altshuler, E.

    2011-12-01

    Ionospheric storms consist of disturbances of the upper atmosphere that generate regions of enhanced electron density typically lasting several hours. Depending upon the storm magnitude, gradients in electron density can sometimes become large and highly localized. The existence of such localized, dense irregularities is a major source of positioning error for users of the Global Positioning System (GPS). Consequently, satellite-based augmentation systems have been implemented to improve the accuracy and to ensure the integrity of user position estimates derived from GPS measurements. Large-scale irregularities generally do not pose a serious threat to estimate integrity as they can be readily detected by such systems. Of greater concern, however, are highly localized irregularities that interfere with the propagation of a signal detected by a user measurement but are poorly sampled by the receivers in the system network. The most challenging conditions have been found to arise following disturbances of large magnitude that occur only rarely over the course of a solar cycle. These extremely disturbed conditions exhibit behavior distinct from moderately disturbed conditions and, hence, have been designated "extreme storms". In this paper we examine and compare the behavior of the extreme ionospheric storms of solar cycle 23 (or, more precisely, extreme storms occurring between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2008), as represented in maps of vertical total electron content. To identify these storms, we present a robust means of quantifying the regional magnitude of an ionospheric storm. Ionospheric storms are observed frequently to occur in conjunction with magnetic storms, i.e., periods of geophysical activity as measured by magnetometers. While various geomagnetic indices, such as the disturbance storm time (Dst) and the planetary Kp index, have long been used to rank the magnitudes of distinct magnetic storms, no comparable, generally recognized index exists for

  2. Intercepted signals for ionospheric science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, F. D.; Erickson, P. J.; Coster, A. J.; Foster, J. C.; Marchese, J. R.; Berkowitz, Z.; Sahr, J. D.

    2013-05-01

    The ISIS array (Intercepted Signals for Ionospheric Science) is a distributed, coherent software radio array designed for the study of geospace phenomena by observing the scatter of ambient radio frequency (RF) signals. ISIS data acquisition and analysis is performed using the MIDAS-M platform (Millstone Data Acquisition System - Mobile). Observations of RF signals can be performed between HF and L-band using the Array nodes and appropriate antennas. The deployment of the Array focuses on observations of the plasmasphere boundary layer. We discuss the concept of the coherent software radio array, describe the ISIS hardware, and give examples of data from the system for selected applications. In particular, we include the first observations of E region irregularities using the Array. We also present single-site passive radar observations of both meteor trails and E region irregularities using adaptive filtering techniques.

  3. Proactive control of the metal-ceramic interface behavior of thermal barrier coatings using an artificial alpha-Al2O 3 layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yi-Feng

    The reliability and life of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) used in the hottest sections of advanced aircraft engines and power generation systems are largely dictated by: (1) the ability of a metallic bond coating to form an adherent thermally grown oxide (TGO) at the metal-ceramic interface and (2) the rate at which the TGO grows upon oxidation. It is postulated that a thin alpha-Al2O3 layer, if it could be directly deposited on a Ni-based alloy, will guide the alloy surface to form a TGO that is more tenacious and slower growing than what is attainable with state-of-the-art bond coatings. A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process was used to directly deposit an alpha-Al2O3 layer on the surface of a single crystal Ni-bases superalloy. The layer was 150 nm thick, and consisted of small columnar grains (˜100 to 200 nm) with alpha-Al2O 3 as the major phase with a minute amount of theta-Al2O 3. Within 0.5 h of oxidation at 1150°C, the resulting TGO formed on the alloy surface underwent significant lateral grain growth. Consequently, within this time scale, the columnar nature of the TGO became well established. After 50 h, a network of ridges was clearly observed on the TGO surface instead of equiaxed grains typically observed on uncoated alloy surface. Comparison of the TGO morphologies observed with and without the CVD-Al2O 3 layer suggested that the transient oxidation of the alloy surface was considerably reduced. The alloy coated with the CVD-Al2O 3 layer also produced a much more adherent and slow growing TGO in comparison to that formed on the uncoated alloy surface. The CVD-Al2O 3 layer also improved its spallation resistance. Without the CVD-Al 2O3 layer, more than 50% of the TGO spalled off the alloy surface after 500 h in oxidation with significant wrinkling of the TGO that remained on the alloy surface. In contrast, the TGO remained intact with the CVD-Al2O3 layer after the 500 h exposure. Furthermore, the CVD layer significantly reduced the degree of

  4. Space weather disturbances in the ionosphere-thermosphere-electrodynamics system at middle and low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunk, Robert

    2012-07-01

    It has been clearly established that the ionosphere-thermosphere-electrodynamics system can vary significantly from hour to hour and from day to day. The hour-to-hour variations are associated with weather disturbances, which can produce mesoscale (100-1000 km) structures and plasma irregularities. For the ionosphere, these weather disturbances include Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs), sporadic E layers, He ^{+} layers in the topside ionosphere, descending intermediate layers, ridges of enhanced ionization (Storm Enhanced Densities), a 4-wave signature, spread-F, and equatorial plasma bubbles. For the thermosphere, the weather disturbances include upward propagating waves from the lower atmosphere (planetary, tidal and gravity waves), Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances (TADs) generated at high latitudes, storm-time O/N _{2} depletions, and neutral gas perturbations both at the terminator and in the regions containing equatorial plasma bubbles. The current state of our knowledge of weather disturbances in the middle and low latitude ionosphere-thermosphere-electrodynamics system will be reviewed.

  5. In situ transmission electron microscopy probing of native oxide and artificial layers on silicon nanoparticles for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    He, Yang; Piper, Daniela Molina; Gu, Meng; Travis, Jonathan J; George, Steven M; Lee, Se-Hee; Genc, Arda; Pullan, Lee; Liu, Jun; Mao, Scott X; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Ban, Chunmei; Wang, Chongmin

    2014-11-25

    Surface modification of silicon nanoparticles via molecular layer deposition (MLD) has been recently proved to be an effective way for dramatically enhancing the cyclic performance in lithium ion batteries. However, the fundamental mechanism of how this thin layer of coating functions is not known, which is complicated by the inevitable presence of native oxide of several nanometers on the silicon nanoparticle. Using in situ TEM, we probed in detail the structural and chemical evolution of both uncoated and coated silicon particles upon cyclic lithiation/delithation. We discovered that upon initial lithiation, the native oxide layer converts to crystalline Li2O islands, which essentially increases the impedance on the particle, resulting in ineffective lithiation/delithiation and therefore low Coulombic efficiency. In contrast, the alucone MLD-coated particles show extremely fast, thorough, and highly reversible lithiation behaviors, which are clarified to be associated with the mechanical flexibility and fast Li(+)/e(-) conductivity of the alucone coating. Surprisingly, the alucone MLD coating process chemically changes the silicon surface, essentially removing the native oxide layer, and therefore mitigates side reactions and detrimental effects of the native oxide. This study provides a vivid picture of how the MLD coating works to enhance the Coulombic efficiency, preserves capacity, and clarifies the role of the native oxide on silicon nanoparticles during cyclic lithiation and delithiation. More broadly, this work also demonstrates that the effect of the subtle chemical modification of the surface during the coating process may be of equal importance to the coating layer itself.

  6. In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Probing of Native Oxide and Artificial Layers on Silicon Nanoparticles for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yang; Piper, Daniela M.; Gu, Meng; Travis, Jonathan J.; George, Steven M.; Lee, Se-Hee; Genc, Arda; Pullan, Lee; Liu, Jun; Mao, Scott X.; Zhang, Jiguang; Ban, Chunmei; Wang, Chong M.

    2014-11-25

    Surface modification of silicon nanoparticle via molecular layer deposition (MLD) has been recently proved to be an effective way for dramatically enhancing the cyclic performance in lithium ion batteries. However, the fundamental mechanism as how this thin layer of coating function is not known, which is even complicated by the inevitable presence of native oxide of several nanometers on the silicon nanoparticle. Using in-situ TEM, we probed in detail the structural and chemical evolution of both uncoated and coated silicon particles upon cyclic lithiation/delithation. We discovered that upon initial lithiation, the native oxide layer converts to crystalline Li2O islands, which essentially increases the impedance on the particle, resulting in ineffective lithiation/delithiation, and therefore low coulombic efficiency. In contrast, the alucone MLD coated particles show extremely fast, thorough and highly reversible lithiation behaviors, which are clarified to be associated with the mechanical flexibility and fast Li+/e- conductivity of the alucone coating. Surprisingly, the alucone MLD coating process chemically changes the silicon surface, essentially removing the native oxide layer and therefore mitigates side reaction and detrimental effects of the native oxide. This study provides a vivid picture of how the MLD coating works to enhance the coulombic efficiency and preserve capacity and clarifies the role of the native oxide on silicon nanoparticles during cyclic lithiation and delithiation. More broadly, this work also demonstrated that the effect of the subtle chemical modification of the surface during the coating process may be of equal importance as the coating layer itself.

  7. Electrical responses of artificial DNA nanostructures on solution-processed In-Ga-Zn-O thin-film transistors with multistacked active layers.

    PubMed

    Jung, Joohye; Kim, Si Joon; Yoon, Doo Hyun; Kim, Byeonghoon; Park, Sung Ha; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2013-01-01

    We propose solution-processed In-Ga-Zn-O (IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) with multistacked active layers for detecting artificial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Enhanced sensing ability and stable electrical performance of TFTs were achieved through use of multistacked active layers. Our IGZO TFT had a turn-on voltage (V(on)) of -0.8 V and a subthreshold swing (SS) value of 0.48 V/decade. A dry-wet method was adopted to immobilize double-crossover DNA on the IGZO surface, after which an anomalous hump effect accompanying a significant decrease in V(on) (-13.6 V) and degradation of SS (1.29 V/decade) was observed. This sensing behavior was attributed to the middle interfaces of the multistacked active layers and the negatively charged phosphate groups on the DNA backbone, which generated a parasitic path in the TFT device. These results compared favorably with those reported for conventional field-effect transistor-based DNA sensors with remarkable sensitivity and stability. PMID:23211212

  8. The Geomagnetic Control Concept of The Ionospheric Long- Term Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, A. V.

    The geomagnetic control concept has been developed to explain long-term trends of the electron concentration in the F2 and E ionospheric regions. Periods with negative and positive foF2, hmF2 and foE trends correspond to the periods of increasing or decreasing geomagnetic activity with the turning points around the end of 1950s, 1960s, and 1980s where trends change their signs. Strong latitudinal and diurnal variations revealed for the foF2 and hmF2 trends can be explained by neutral composition, temperature and thermospheric wind changes. Particle precipitation is important in the auroral zone. The newly proposed concept proceeds from a natural origin of the F2-layer trends rather than an artificial one related to the greenhouse effect. Using the proposed method a very long-term foF2 and foE trends related with general increase of geomagnetic activity in the 20th century has been revealed for the first time. The firstly revealed relationship of the foE trends with geomagnetic activity is due to nitric oxide variations at the E-region heights. This "natural" relationship of the foE trends with geomagnetic activity breaks down around 1970 on many stations presumably due to chemical polution of the upper atmosphere. The increasing rate of rocket and satellite launchings in the late 1960s is considered as a reason.

  9. Generation of Acoustic-Gravity Waves in Ionospheric HF Heating Experiments: Simulating Large-Scale Natural Heat Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradipta, Rezy

    In this thesis, we investigate the potential role played by large-scale anomalous heat sources (e.g. prolonged heat wave events) in generating acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) that might trigger widespread plasma turbulence in the ionospheric layer. The main hypothesis is that, the thermal gradients associated with the heat wave fronts could act as a source of powerful AGW capable of triggering ionospheric plasma turbulence over extensive areas. In our investigations, first we are going to examine a case study of the summer 2006 North American heat wave event. Our examination of GPS-derived total electron content (TEC) data over the North American sector reveals a quite noticeable increase in the level of daily plasma density fluctuations during the summer 2006 heat wave period. Comparison with the summer 2005 and summer 2007 data further confirms that the observed increase of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) during the summer 2006 heat wave period was not simply a regular seasonal phenomenon. Furthermore, a series of field experiments had been carried out at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in order to physically simulate the process of AGW/TID generation by large-scale thermal gradients in the ionosphere. In these ionospheric HF heating experiments, we create some time-varying artificial thermal gradients at an altitude of 200--300 km above the Earth's surface using vertically-transmitted amplitude-modulated 0-mode HF heater waves. For our experiments, a number of radio diagnostic instruments had been utilized to detect the characteristic signatures of heater-generated AGW/TID. So far, we have been able to obtain several affirmative indications that some artificial AGW/TID are indeed being radiated out from the heated plasma volume during the HAARP-AGW experiments. Based on the experimental evidence, we may conclude that it is certainly quite plausible for large-scale thermal gradients associated with severe heat wave

  10. Saturn's ionosphere and plasmasphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Luke Edward

    2008-01-01

    A number of puzzling phenomena were revealed when the Voyager spacecraft flew past Saturn in 1981 to measure the ionized portions (ionosphere) of its upper atmosphere (thermosphere). Most of these issues have remained unexplained in the intervening 25 years due to a lack of conclusive observational data. With the arrival of Cassini at Saturn in July 2004, however, a new era of observations began, providing the promise of fresh evidence and demanding the development of a contemporary theoretical framework in order to re-examine old mysteries and understand new discoveries. This dissertation presents studies of Saturn's ionosphere and inner plasmasphere based on new time-dependent photochemical and diffusive transport models that solve the ion equations of continuity in one dimension. Calculations are conducted within the overall framework of a self-consistent, three-dimensional general circulation model (GCM) of Saturn's thermosphere, and the results of these studies are combined with GCM results to provide the building blocks of a new comprehensive model, the Saturn-Thermosphere- Ionosphere-Model (STIM). The one-dimensional model calculations are used to constrain and investigate a number of unresolved issues and to make testable predictions based on those investigations. Five primary topics are addressed: (1) the additional loss processes required to bring predicted electron densities into agreement with observations, (2) the discrepancy between theory and observations regarding the diurnal variation of peak electron density, (3) the effects of shadowing by Saturn's rings on its ionosphere, (4) the yet unknown electron and ion temperatures at Saturn, and (5) the ionospheric contribution to Saturn's plasmasphere. The models show that a steady influx of water into Saturn's atmosphere--from its rings or icy satellites--is required to explain observed electron densities. Additionally, the time-variability of the water source may be the cause of frequently observed

  11. Ionospheric Scintillation Explorer (ISX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuliano, J.; Bahcivan, H.

    2015-12-01

    NSF has recently selected Ionospheric Scintillation Explorer (ISX), a 3U Cubesat mission to explore the three-dimensional structure of scintillation-scale ionospheric irregularities associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF). ISX is a collaborative effort between SRI International and Cal Poly. This project addresses the science question: To what distance along a flux tube does an irregularity of certain transverse-scale extend? It has been difficult to measure the magnetic field-alignment of scintillation-scale turbulent structures because of the difficulty of sampling a flux tube at multiple locations within a short time. This measurement is now possible due to the worldwide transition to DTV, which presents unique signals of opportunity for remote sensing of ionospheric irregularities from numerous vantage points. DTV spectra, in various formats, contain phase-stable, narrowband pilot carrier components that are transmitted simultaneously. A 4-channel radar receiver will simultaneously record up to 4 spatially separated transmissions from the ground. Correlations of amplitude and phase scintillation patterns corresponding to multiple points on the same flux tube will be a measure of the spatial extent of the structures along the magnetic field. A subset of geometries where two or more transmitters are aligned with the orbital path will be used to infer the temporal development of the structures. ISX has the following broad impact. Scintillation of space-based radio signals is a space weather problem that is intensively studied. ISX is a step toward a CubeSat constellation to monitor worldwide TEC variations and radio wave distortions on thousands of ionospheric paths. Furthermore, the rapid sampling along spacecraft orbits provides a unique dataset to deterministically reconstruct ionospheric irregularities at scintillation-scale resolution using diffraction radio tomography, a technique that enables prediction of scintillations at other radio frequencies, and

  12. Ionospheric manifestations of acoustic-gravity waves under quiet and disturbed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, Vladimir; Chernogor, Leonid; Panasenko, Sergii; Domnin, Igor

    2014-05-01

    We present the observation results of wave disturbances in the ionosphere, which are known to be manifestations of atmospheric acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs). The observations have been conducted under quiet and naturally or artificially disturbed conditions by ionosonde and incoherent scatter radar located near Kharkiv, Ukraine. Wave disturbance parameters under quiet conditions were obtained and analysed during geophysical periods including vernal and autumn equinoxes as well as summer and winter solstices. The prevailing oscillation in ionospheric F2- layer had the period of 140 - 200 min and relative amplitude of 0.1 - 0.2. The duration of this oscillation changed from 5 - 7 to 24 hours, depending on a season. The amplitude of fluctuations with other periods was noticeably smaller. The time intervals at which the intensity of incoherent scatter signals varied quasi-periodically in the altitude range from 150 to 300 km were detected. The parameters of these variations were estimated using statistical analysis and bandpass filtering. The periods of wave processes were shown to be of 30 - 120 min, there durations did not exceed of 2 - 6 periods and relative amplitudes usually ranged from 0.03 to 0.15. The phase of oscillations was detected to propagate downwards. The vertical phase velocity of travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) was estimated to be in the range from 50 to 200 m/s and increased with altitude. The observations of the partial solar eclipse on January, 4, 2011 near Kharkiv were used to study the ionospheric parameters in naturally disturbed conditions. The F2-layer critical frequency dropped by a factor of 2.1. The time delay of these variations with respect to the main magnitude of the solar disk obscuration was equal to about 16 minutes. The virtual height of signal reflection near the maximum of the F2-layer ionization increased by 70 km, and the height of the model parabolic layer increased by 10 km. Some decrease in electron density and

  13. Martian ionosphere response to solar wind variability during solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Cano, Beatriz; Lester, Mark; Witasse, Olivier; Mays, M. Leila; Hall, Benjamin E. S.; Milan, Stephen E.; Cartacci, Marco; Blelly, Pierre-Louis; Andrews, David; Opgenoorth, Hermann; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2016-04-01

    Solar cycle variations in solar radiation create notable density changes in the Martian ionosphere. In addition to this long-term variability, there are numerous short-term and non-recurrent solar events that hit Mars which need to be considered, such as Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs), Co-Rotation Interaction Regions (CIRs), solar flares, or solar wind high speed streams. The response of the Martian plasma system to each of these events is often unusual, especially during the long period of extreme low solar activity in 2008 and 2009. This work shows the long-term solar cycle impact on the ionosphere of Mars using data from The Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS), and The Analyzer of Space Plasma and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA-3), and with empirical and numerical models on Mars Express. Particular attention is given to the different ionospheric responses observed during the last, extended solar minimum. Mars' ionospheric response followed a similar pattern to the response observed in the Earth's ionosphere, despite the large differences related to the inner-origin of the magnetic field of both planets. The ionospheric temperature was cooler, the topside scale height was smaller and almost constant with altitude, the secondary ionospheric layer practically disappeared and the whole atmospheric total electron content (TEC) suffered an extreme reduction of about 30-40%, not predicted before by models. Moreover, there is a larger probability for the induced magnetic field to be present in the ionosphere, than in other phases of the solar cycle. The short-term variability is also addressed with the study of an ICME followed by a fast stream that hit Mars in March 2008, where solar wind data are provided by ACE and STEREO-B and supported by simulations using the WSA-ENLIL Model. The solar wind conditions lead to the formation of a CIR centred on the interface of the fast and the slow solar wind streams. Mars' system reacted to

  14. Proposed experimental studies for assessing ionospheric perturbations on SPS uplinking pilot beam signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, S.; Basu, S.

    1980-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the occurrence of natural irregularities at midlatitude based on scintillation measurements by the use of VHF and GHz transmission from geostationary satellites, and from satellite in-situ measurements. An effort to determine the phase and intensity scintillation effects during ionospheric heating is described along with proposed measurements related to the detection, lifetimes, and drift of artificial irregularities generated by ionospheric heating in the underdense mode.

  15. Comparative Aeronomy: Molecular Ionospheres at Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendillo, Michael; Trovato, Jeffrey; Narvaez, Clara; Mayyasi, Majd A.; Moore, Luke; Vogt, Marissa F.; Fallows, Kathryn J.; Withers, Paul; Martinis, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    The ionospheres in our solar system vary not only in their electron densities, but also in the dominance of atomic versus molecular ions at their altitudes of peak plasma density. With the exception of Earth's F-layer composed of atomic oxygen ions and electrons, all other planets have their peak ionospheric layers composed of molecular ions and electrons embedded in a dense neutral atmosphere. At Mars, both of its ionospheric layers have molecular ions, with the M1-layer at a lower altitude than the more robust M2-layer above it. The terrestrial ionosphere has a prominent region of molecular ions (the E-layer) below the dominant F-layer. In this paper, we explore the production and loss of molecular ion layers observed under the same solar irradiance conditions at Mars and Earth. We compare observations of M1 and M2 electron densities with terrestrial ionosonde data for the peak densities of the E- and F-layers during low, moderate and high solar flux conditions. The sub-solar peak densities of molecular ion layers have high correlations at each planet, as well as between planets, even though they are produced by separate portions of the solar spectrum. We use photo-chemical-equilibrium theory for layers produced by soft X-rays (M1 and E) versus the M2-layer produced by extreme ultraviolet (EUV) to identify the key parameters that cause similarities and differences. The yield of our comparative study points to the roles of secondary ionization and temperature dependent plasma recombination rates as areas most in need of further study at each planet.

  16. Remote sensing of ionosphere by using ultraviolet and visible emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, C.I.; Huffman, R.E.; Skrivanek, R.A.; Strickland, D.J.; Daniell, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The ability to remotely sense ionospheric conditions for improved operation of communications and radar systems has been a long term goal of some DOD programs. This capability now appears to be possible through improvements in computer models of the ionosphere and in UV remote-sensing methods. The approach is to use passive ultraviolet optical measurements and in-situ ion-density measurements as inputs to a comprehensive ionospheric model, which will calculate the electron-density measurements as inputs to a comprehensive ionospheric model which will calculate the electron-density profile. A novel feature of this approach is the use of naturally occurring airglow and auroral ultraviolet radiation. This method can be used for the mid-latitude day ionosphere (90 to 800 km) and the night auroral E layer. Eventually, extensions of the technique will cover the night mid-latitude as well. The remote-sensing measurement can also be used to locate regions of ionospheric irregularity, and hence probable phase scintillation, in both equatorial and polar-cap regions and to locate the real-time position of the auroral-oval particle precipitation.

  17. Wet model of Saturn's ionosphere: Water from the rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Waite, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Current theoretical models of Saturn's ionosphere are difficult to reconcile with the ionospheric electron density profiles obtained from the Pioneer and Voyager radio occultation observations and the large diurnal variation of maximum ionospheric electron density deduced from studies of Saturn lightning discharges. A model of Saturn's ionosphere is proposed in which water plays a major role as a minor constituent present by virtue of downward diffusion from an external source. This model of the Saturn ionosphere is a classical 'F2' type layer resulting from the photodissociative production of H(+) from H2 and rapid chemical loss due to a series of charge exchange reactions with water. A planet-wide influx of about 4x10 to the 7th power molecules/sec/sq cm of water from the rings is consistent with the observed ionospheric electron densities and estimates of influx due to micrometeoride bombardment of the rings. An enhanced influx of water occurs at latitudes (-38 deg, +44 deg) magnetically connected to the inner edge of Saturn's B ring which results from an electromagnetic erosion process contributing substantially to the (local) upper atmosphere water content. Present day influx at these latitudes is possibly as large as 2x10 to the 9th power molecules/sec/sq cm.

  18. Wet model of Saturn's ionosphere: water from the rings

    SciTech Connect

    Connerney, J.E.P.; Waite, J.H.

    1984-06-01

    Current theoretical models of Saturn's ionosphere are difficult to reconcile with the ionospheric electron density profiles obtained from the Pioneer and Voyager radio occultation observations and the large diurnal variation of maximum ionospheric electron density deduced from studies of Saturn lightning discharges. A model of Saturn's ionosphere is proposed in which water plays a major role as a minor constituent present by virtue of downward diffusion from an external source. This model of the Saturn ionosphere is a classical F2 type layer resulting from the photodissociative production of H(+) from H2 and rapid chemical loss due to a series of charge exchange reactions with water. A planet-wide influx of about 4x10 to the 7th power molecules/sec/sq cm of water from the rings is consistent with the observed ionospheric electron densities and estimates of influx due to micrometeoride bombardment of the rings. An enhanced influx of water occurs at latitudes (-38 deg, +44 deg) magnetically connected to the inner edge of Saturn's B ring which results from an electromagnetic erosion process contributing substantially to the (local) upper atmosphere water content. Present day influx at these latitudes is possibly as large as 2x10 to the 9th power molecules/sec/sq cm.

  19. Chemistry in the Thermosphere and Ionosphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roble, Raymond G.

    1986-01-01

    An informative review which summarizes information about chemical reactions in the thermosphere and ionosphere. Topics include thermal structure, ultraviolet radiation, ionospheric photochemistry, thermospheric photochemistry, chemical heating, thermospheric circulation, auroral processes and ionospheric interactions. Provides suggested followup…

  20. Statistical Features of Nighttime Enhancements in the Electron Concentration in the F2 Layer Maximum of the Midlatitude Ionosphere in the 23 and 24th cycles of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhumabayev, Beibit; Yakovets, Artur; Gordienko, Galina; Litvinov, Yuriy

    2016-04-01

    On the basis of the vertical sounding of the ionosphere in Alma-Ata (76 deg 55'E, 43 deg 15'N) during 2000-2014, the analysis of the occurrence probability of the nighttime electron concentration enhancements in the maximum of the F2-layer (NmF2) was performed. A comparison of parameters of very large enhancements observed in Irkutsk and Alma-Ata simultaneously was conducted. During the period considered overall 2272 observation sessions were carried out, and in 1430 sessions, enhancements of NmF2 were observed. The entire data (2000-2014) were divided into two subarrays. The first one (2000-2003 and 2011-2014) corresponded to high solar activity, when the annual average Wolf numbers exceeded 50 (W> 50). The second subarray (2004-2010) corresponded to the low solar activity, when the annual average Wolf numbers were less than 50 (W <50). Statistics of enhancement parameters was submitted for individual months and seasons: winter (December, January, February), spring (March, April, May), summer (June, July, August) and autumn (September, October, November). There is a distinct seasonal dependence of the occurrence probability of enhancement appearance. The same features of the distributions for the high and low solar activity are the high occurrence probability near to 90% in January, February and November, December. In addition, a rapid decrease in the probability occurs from February to March, and a gradual increase from September to December. An evident maximum of the occurrence probability in the summer months takes place for high solar activity, while for the low activity the summer months are characterized by the minimum occurrence. It is shown that the distribution of enhancement durations regardless of the level of solar activity have the same features. In winter and autumn, duration distributed over a wide range, with most of the enhancements lies in the range of 1 to 5 hours. For spring and summer months (April-August) the duration of the main part of the

  1. Modelling ionospheric density structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Large-scale density structures are a common feature in the high-latitude ionsphere. The structures were observed in the dayside cusp, polar cap, and nocturnal auroral region over a range of altitudes, including the E-region, F-region and topside ionosphere. The origins, lifetimes and transport characteristics of large-scale density structures were studied with the aid of a three-dimensional, time-dependent ionospheric model. Blob creation due to particle precipitation, the effect that structured electric fields have on the ionosphere, and the lifetimes and transport characteristics of density structures for different seasonal, solar cycle, and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions were studied. The main conclusions drawn are: (1) the observed precipitation energy fluxes are sufficient for blob creation if the plasma is exposed to the precipitation for 5 to 10 minutes; (2) structured electric fields produce structured electron densities, ion temperatures, and ion composition; (3) the lifetime of an F-region density structure depends on several factors, including the initial location where it was formed, the magnitude of the perturbation, season, solar cycle and IMF; and (4) depending on the IMF, horizontal plasma convection can cause an initial structure to break up into multiple structures of various sizes, remain as a single distorted structure, or become stretched into elongated segments.

  2. Ionospheric variability over Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezquer, R. G.; Mosert, M.; Corbella, R.; Erazu, M.; de La Zerda, L.

    The understanding of ionospheric variability is important for the user of ionospheric models. A satellite designer or operator needs to know not only monthly average conditions but also the expected deviations from these mean values. In order to contribute to the studies on ionospheric variability, in this paper values of critical frequencies of F2, F1 and E regions and M(3000)F2 factor measured at 4 Japanese stations are used. Data correspond to equinoxes, solstices, high and low solar activity. Quartiles and median values are used to specify variability, because they have the advantage of being less affected by large deviations that can occur during magnetic storms. The results are similar for the considered stations and show that the highest variability correspond to foF2. For March high solar activity the variability of fof2 decreases during hours of maximum ionisation. The M3000F2 factor, in general, shown low variability. Akita (39.72° N, 140.13° E) showed the highest variability for the three frequencies. Moreover, it can be seen that quartiles are not equidistant from the median value.

  3. Meteoric Ions in Planetary Ionospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, W. D.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Solar system debris, in the form of meteoroids, impacts every planet. The flux, relative composition and speed of the debris at each planet depends on the planet's size and location in the solar system. Ablation in the atmosphere evaporates the meteoric material and leaves behind metal atoms. During the ablation process metallic ions are formed by impact ionization. For small inner solar system planets, including Earth, this source of ionization is typically small compared to either photoionization or charge exchange with ambient molecular ions. For Earth, the atmosphere above the main deposition region absorbs the spectral lines capable of ionizing the major metallic atoms (Fe and Mg) so that charge exchange with ambient ions is the dominant source. Within the carbon dioxide atmosphere of Mars (and possibly Venus), photoionization is important in determining the ion density. For a heavy planet like Jupiter, far from the sun, impact ionization of ablated neutral atoms by impacts with molecules becomes a prominent source of ionization due to the gravitational acceleration to high incident speeds. We will describe the processes and location and extent of metal ion layers for Mars, Earth and Jupiter, concentrating on flagging the uncertainties in the models at the present time. This is an important problem, because low altitude ionosphere layers for the planets, particularly at night, probably consist predominantly of metallic ions. Comparisons with Earth will be used to illustrate the differing processes in the three planetary atmospheres.

  4. Study of the mid-latitude ionospheric response to geomagnetic storms in the European region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berényi, Kitti Alexandra; Barta, Veronika; Kis, Arpad

    2016-07-01

    Geomagnetic storms affect the ionospheric regions of the terrestrial upper atmosphere through different physical and atmospheric processes. The phenomena that can be regarded as a result of these processes, generally is named as "ionospheric storm". The processes depend on altitude, segment of the day, the geomagnetic latitude and longitude, strength of solar activity and the type of the geomagnetic storm. We examine the data of ground-based radio wave ionosphere sounding measurements of European ionospheric stations (mainly the data of Nagycenk Geophysical Observatory) in order to determine how and to what extent a geomagnetic disturbance of a certain strength affects the mid-latitude ionospheric regions in winter and in summer. For our analysis we used disturbed time periods between November 2012 and June 2015. Our results show significant changing of the ionospheric F2 layer parameters on strongly disturbed days compared to quiet ones. We show that the critical frequencies (foF2) increase compared to their quiet day value when the ionospheric storm was positive. On the other hand, the critical frequencies become lower, when the storm was negative. In our analysis we determined the magnitude of these changes on the chosen days. For a more complete analysis we compare also the evolution of the F2 layer parameters of the European ionosonde stations on a North-South geographic longitude during a full storm duration. The results present the evolution of an ionospheric storm over a geographic meridian. Furthermore, we compared the two type of geomagnetic storms, namely the CME caused geomagnetic storm - the so-called Sudden impulse (Si) storms- and the HSS (High Speed Solar Wind Streams) caused geomagnetic storms -the so-called Gradual storms (Gs)- impact on the ionospheric F2-layer (foF2 parameter). The results show a significant difference between the effect of Si and of the Gs storms on the ionospheric F2-layer.

  5. The ionospheric response to the Saint Patrick storm over South East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spogli, L.; Alfonsi, L.; Di Mauro, D.; Pezzopane, M.; Cesaroni, C.; Povero, G., Sr.; Pini, M., Sr.; Dovis, F., Sr.; Romero, R.; Linty, N.; Abadi, P.; Nuraeni, F.; Husin, A.; Huy Le, M.; La The, V.; Pillat, V. G.; Floury, N.

    2015-12-01

    ERICA, a project funded by the European Space Agency, aims at characterizing the ionospheric variability of the Equatorial Ionospheric Anomaly in the South East Asia. In particular, ERICA focuses on the variation of the plasma electron density in the southern and northern crests of the anomaly and over the dip equator identified by the Equatorial Ionospheric Trough. To achieve this goal, an ad hoc measurements campaign is on-going with ground-based instruments located in the footprints of the Equatorial Ionospheric Anomaly and of the Equatorial Ionospheric Trough in Vietnam and Indonesia.The campaign started on the 1st of March 2015, timing to monitor the Saint Patrick storm effects on the ionosphere by means of ionosondes, double frequency hardware and software defined radio GNSS receivers, ground based and spaceborne magnetometers and Langmuir probe. Such multi-instrumental and multi-parametric observations of the region enables an in-depth investigation of the ionospheric response to the largest geomagnetic storm of the current solar cycle. The observations record positive and negative ionospheric storms, sporadic E layer and spread F conditions, scintillations enhancement and inhibition, TEC gradients. The ancillary information on the local magnetic field allows to highlight the variety of ionospheric perturbations happened during the main and the long recovery phase of the storm.The paper presents the outcomes of the investigation evidencing the peculiarities of a region not yet extensively reported in the open literature.

  6. The cause of small scale disturbances in the lower ionosphere of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Kerstin Susanne; Pätzold, Martin; González-Galindo, Francisco; Molina-Cuberos, Gregorio; Lillis, Robert J.; Dunn, Patrick A.; Witasse, Olivier; Tellmann, Silvia; Häusler, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    The radio-science experiment MaRS (Mars Express Radio Science) on the Mars Express spacecraft sounds the neutral atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars since 2004. Approximately 800 vertical profiles of the ionospheric electron density have been acquired until today. A subset of these MaRS dayside observations contains small scale disturbances in the lower part of the ionosphere. Those electron density profiles show unusual small scale features in the M1 altitude range which appear either merged with or completely detached from the M1 layer. Possible explanations for this additional ionospheric electron density may be ionospheric NO+, enhanced solar X-ray fluxes, solar energetic particle events (SEPs) or meteoroid influx. A 1D photo-chemical model of the Mars dayside ionosphere (IonA-2) is used to investigate the behavior of planetary NO+ in the lower dayside ionosphere. The influence of variable solar X-ray on the ionospheric electron density is estimated with IonA-2 and the influence of SEPs is discussed. A possible correlation between the meteoroid influx in the Mars atmosphere and the small scale disturbances is investigated based on a model of the ablation/chemical reactions of meteoroids with the atmosphere/ionosphere (MSDM) and on MAVEN IUVS magnesium ion observations.

  7. Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, K. J.; Jeong, T. S.; Youn, C. J.

    2014-09-01

    The temperature-dependent photoresponse characteristics of MnAl2S4 layers have been investigated, for the first time, by use of photocurrent (PC) spectroscopy. Three peaks were observed at all temperatures. The electronic origin of these peaks was associated with band-to-band transitions from the valence-band states Γ4( z), Γ5( x), and Γ5( y) to the conduction-band state Γ1( s). On the basis of the relationship between PC-peak energy and temperature, the optical band gap could be well expressed by the expression E g( T) = E g(0) - 2.80 × 10-4 T 2/(287 + T), where E g(0) was estimated to be 3.7920 eV, 3.7955 eV, and 3.8354 eV for the valence-band states Γ4( z), Γ5( x), and Γ5( y), respectively. Results from PC spectroscopy revealed the crystal-field and spin-orbit splitting were 3.5 meV and 39.9 meV. The gradual decrease of PC intensity with decreasing temperature can be explained on the basis of trapping centers associated with native defects in the MnAl2S4 layers. Plots of log J ph, the PC current density, against 1/ T, revealed a dominant trap level in the high-temperature region. By comparing PC and the Hall effect results, we confirmed that this trap level is a shallow donor 18.9 meV below the conduction band.

  8. The use of layer by layer self-assembled coatings of hyaluronic acid and cationized gelatin to improve the biocompatibility of poly(ethylene terephthalate) artificial ligaments for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Shurong; Jiang, Jia; Tao, Hongyue; Xu, Jialing; Sun, Jianguo; Zhong, Wei; Chen, Shiyi

    2012-11-01

    In this study layer by layer (LBL) self-assembled coatings of hyaluronic acid (HA) and cationized gelatin (CG) were used to modify polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligament grafts. Changes in the surface properties were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and contact angle and biomechanical measurements. The cell compatibility of this HA-CG coating was investigated in vitro on PET films seeded with human foreskin dermal fibroblasts over 7days. The results of our in vitro studies demonstrated that the HA-CG coating significantly enhanced cell adhesion, facilitated cell growth, and suppressed the expression of inflammation-related genes relative to a pure PET graft. Furthermore, rabbit and porcine anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction models were used to evaluate the effect of this LBL coating in vivo. The animal experiment results proved that this LBL coating significantly inhibited inflammatory cell infiltration and promoted new ligament tissue regeneration among the graft fibers. In addition, the formation of type I collagen in the HA-CG coating group was much higher than in the control group. Based on these results we conclude that PET grafts coated with HA-CG have considerable potential as substitutes for ligament reconstruction.

  9. Solar cycle modulation of Titan's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edberg, N. J. T.; Andrews, D. J.; Shebanits, O.; Ågren, K.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Opgenoorth, H. J.; Cravens, T. E.; Girazian, Z.

    2013-08-01

    During the six Cassini Titan flybys T83-T88 (May 2012 to November 2012) the electron density in the ionospheric peak region, as measured by the radio and plasma wave science instrument/Langmuir probe, has increased significantly, by 15-30%, compared to previous average. These measurements suggest that a long‒term change has occurred in the ionosphere of Titan, likely caused by the rise to the new solar maximum with increased EUV fluxes. We compare measurements from TA, TB, and T5, from the declining phase of solar cycle 23 to the recent T83-T88 measurements during cycle 24, since the solar irradiances from those two intervals are comparable. The peak electron densities normalized to a common solar zenith angle Nnorm from those two groups of flybys are comparable but increased compared to the solar minimum flybys (T16-T71). The integrated solar irradiance over the wavelengths 1-80nm, i.e., the solar energy flux, Fe, correlates well with the observed ionospheric peak density values. Chapman layer theory predicts that Nnorm∝Fek, with k=0.5. We find observationally that the exponent k=0.54±0.18. Hence, the observations are in good agreement with theory despite the fact that many assumptions in Chapman theory are violated. This is also in good agreement with a similar study by Girazian and Withers (2013) on the ionosphere of Mars. We use this power law to estimate the peak electron density at the subsolar point of Titan during solar maximum conditions and find it to be about 6500cm-3, i.e., 85-160% more than has been measured during the entire Cassini mission.

  10. Introducing a disturbance ionosphere index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakowski, N.; Borries, C.; Wilken, V.

    2012-01-01

    Although ionospheric perturbations such as traveling ionospheric disturbances have a strong impact on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and other space-based radio systems, the description of individual perturbations is difficult. To overcome this problem, it is suggested to use a disturbance ionosphere index (DIX) that describes the perturbation degree of the ionosphere in a less specific form as a proxy. Although such an index does not describe the exact propagation conditions at the measurement site, the estimated index number indicates the probability of a potential impact on radio systems used in communication, navigation, and remote sensing. The definition of such a DIX must take into account the following major requirements: relevance to practical needs, objective measure of ionospheric conditions, easy and reproducible computation, and availability of a reliable database. Since the total electron content has been shown in many publications to act as an outstanding parameter for quantifying the range error and also the strength of ionospheric perturbations, we propose a DIX that is based on GNSS measurements. To illustrate the use of the index, recent storms monitored in 2011 and the Halloween storm are discussed. The proposed index is a robust and objective measure of the ionospheric state, applicable to radio systems which are impacted by a highly variable perturbed ionosphere.

  11. Vertical characteristics of midlatitude E and F region ionospheric drifts during disturbed conditions..

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boska, Josef; Kouba, Daniel; Koucka Knizova, Petra; Potuznikova, Katerina

    2015-04-01

    Modern HF digisonde DPS-4 D (Digisonde Portable Sounder), which is in operation at the Pruhonice observatory of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Prague (IAP) from 2004, enables us to carry out standard ionospheric sounding and ionospheric drifts measurements. Using standard mode of automatic drift (autodrift mode) measurements the velocity of the F region drifts is usually determined in the vicinity of the peak of the electron density profile (N(h) profile). Since 2005 we are also measuring ionospheric drifts at the heights of the ionospheric E region. This new experimental arrangement makes possible to study vertical changes and profiles of the ionospheric drift velocity in two different ionospheric regions. From E region within the altitudinal interval of 90-150 km to F region in altitudes from 150 km up to height of the maximum electron density profile N(h). This paper present the results of the analysis of the plasma drifts velocity in two different ionospheric regions observed under quiet geomagnetic and ionospheric conditions and especially during ionospheric spread F conditions. These spread F conditions are often observed in the ionosphere as effect of travelling ionopheric disturbances TIDs. The presence of this TIDS can be detected from the F layer isoelectrondensity contours. The spread F conditions are often present also under moderate-to-intense ionospheric and geomagnetic storm conditions. Our results shows, that behavior of Es layer drifts can be different than drifts in E-layer. During winter geomagnetic storm -more dramatic increasing of all drift velocities components was observed (50 - 100 m/s vertical drift component). Different behaviour ionospheric drifts at the heights intervals 90 - 110 km and 110 - 130 km was observed during winter storm. Significant height changes of the drift velocity height profile in the interval of heights 90 - 130 km during winter event was observed. Our results shows that behavior of Es layer drifts can be

  12. Radio Wave Reflections from Magnetized Plasma Bulges in the Martian Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Nielsen, E.; Xiao, L.; Liang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we propose a quantitative explanation of a special type of radio wave reflection phenomena observed by MARSIS (Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding), in light of the cold plasma theory. The phenomena in question appear as a type of traces in the AIS (Active Ionosphere Sounding) ionograms. The traces show the following characteristics: (1) They may appear only when the spacecraft is near to a magnetic cusp region (around 300km altitude) on dayside; (2) They are "C"-shaped curves, with their open ends pointing to the increasing frequency direction. Obviously, these traces represent 'reflection pairs' (two echoes corresponding to one transmission from the antenna). The two echoes of a 'pair' have approximately the same time delay at the lowest propagating frequency, and have increasing time delay separation with increasing wave frequency; (3) Their positions and sizes in ionograms (i.e., their frequency ranges and time delay ranges) change regularly with spacecraft motion; (4) They represent quite rare events, since they are clearly observed only in a few orbit segments among thousands of orbits of Mars Express. In order to investigate the origin of these features, we employ a 2D spatial configuration model of the magnetized plasma bulge to simulate the behavior of the AIS radio waves. In the model the magnetic field is assumed to be a deformed vertical cylinder (corresponding to the patched crustal field of Mars), with its transverse size expanding upward. Magnetic flux density decreases upward and sideward continuously into a low background field value (while the total flux is conserved). Electron density is positively related to the field flux density, meanwhile decreases upward in an exponential manner. Equilibrium between magnetic pressure and plasma pressure is assumed to hold the density bulge. A ray tracing method based on the cold plasma dispersion relation is used to produce artificial ionograms. We find that under some

  13. Ionospheric disturbances during November 30-December 1, 1988. III - Some features of ionospheric disturbances observed through the Digisonde 256 system and routine ionosondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igi, Seiji; Minakoshi, Hisamitsu; Nagayama, Mikitoshi; Kato, Hisao; Takeuchi, Tetsuo

    1992-07-01

    The ionospheric structure at Kokubunji was investigated using ionograms observed during the period of ionospheric disturbances between November 30 and December 1, 1988 using the Digisonde 256 system and routine ionosondes. A noteworthy finding during this period was the observation of satellite traces, which began to be observed from about 1303UT and abruptly disappeared at about 1703UT. A sequential plot of virtual height clarifies that the observation of the satellite traces indicates the existence of TIDs (traveling ionospheric disturbances). Remarkable electron density increases at night were observed up to the latitude of Akita station. Sporadic E-layers were often observed, which is unusual during winter.

  14. Ionospheric Transmission Losses Associated with Mars-orbiting Radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.

    2005-01-01

    There are a number of obstacles to radar sounding of the deep Martian subsurface from orbit, including signal losses from the medium conductivity, layer reflective losses, and ground clutter. Another adverse process is signal loss as radio waves propagate through the ionospheric plasma medium. The ionosphere is a plasma consisting of free electrons, ions and neutrals that can effectively damp/attenuate radar signals via electrodneutral collisions. The effect is most severe for transmissions at lower frequencies, which, unfortunately, are also favorable transmissions for deep penetration into the subsurface.

  15. Oblique sounding of the ionosphere by powerful wave beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotkov, I. A.; Atamaniuk, B.

    2011-04-01

    The article is devoted to modeling the impact on the ionosphere powerful obliquely incident wave beam. The basis of this analysis will be orbital variational principle for the intense wave beams-generalization of Fermat's principle to the case of a nonlinear medium (Molotkov and Vakulenko, 1988a,b; Molotkov, 2003, 2005). Under the influence of a powerful wave beam appears manageable the additional stratification of the ionospheric layer F2. Explicit expressions show how the properties of the test beam, with a shifted frequency, released in the same direction as the beam depend on the intensity of a powerful beam and the frequency shift.

  16. Frequency modulation ionospheric pumping at EISCAT: New results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosch, Michael; Pedersen, Todd; Rietveld, Michael; Senior, Andrew; Bryers, Carl; Wu, Jun; Xu, Bin

    2012-07-01

    In November 2011 a new capability of the EISCAT HF ionospheric pump facility was deployed, namely, frequency modulation. The pump frequency was ramped linearly over 300 kHz in 18 minutes. Experiments were performed at a variety of frequency ranges, including the 4th and 5th electron gyro-harmonics in the F-layer ionosphere. The EISCAT UHF radar observed pump frequency-dependent electron temperature enhancements, minimising on the electron gyro-harmonic frequency which are consistent with previous experiments. Novel results include pump frequency-dependent ion temperature enhancements as well as strong plasma density enhancements, which maximise for pump frequencies above the electron gyro-harmonics.

  17. QSAR analysis for nano-sized layered manganese-calcium oxide in water oxidation: An application of chemometric methods in artificial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Shahbazy, Mohammad; Kompany-Zareh, Mohsen; Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi

    2015-11-01

    Water oxidation is among the most important reactions in artificial photosynthesis, and nano-sized layered manganese-calcium oxides are efficient catalysts toward this reaction. Herein, a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model was constructed to predict the catalytic activities of twenty manganese-calcium oxides toward water oxidation using multiple linear regression (MLR) and genetic algorithm (GA) for multivariate calibration and feature selection, respectively. Although there are eight controlled parameters during synthesizing of the desired catalysts including ripening time, temperature, manganese content, calcium content, potassium content, the ratio of calcium:manganese, the average manganese oxidation state and the surface of catalyst, by using GA only three of them (potassium content, the ratio of calcium:manganese and the average manganese oxidation state) were selected as the most effective parameters on catalytic activities of these compounds. The model's accuracy criteria such as R(2)test and Q(2)test in order to predict catalytic rate for external test set experiments; were equal to 0.941 and 0.906, respectively. Therefore, model reveals acceptable capability to anticipate the catalytic activity.

  18. Qualitative and quantitative high performance thin layer chromatography analysis of Calendula officinalis using high resolution plate imaging and artificial neural network data modelling.

    PubMed

    Agatonovic-Kustrin, S; Loescher, Christine M

    2013-10-10

    Calendula officinalis, commonly known Marigold, has been traditionally used for its anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the capacity of an artificial neural network (ANN) to analyse thin layer chromatography (TLC) chromatograms as fingerprint patterns for quantitative estimation of chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and rutin in Calendula plant extracts. By applying samples with different weight ratios of marker compounds to the system, a database of chromatograms was constructed. A hundred and one signal intensities in each of the HPTLC chromatograms were correlated to the amounts of applied chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, and rutin using an ANN. The developed ANN correlation was used to quantify the amounts of 3 marker compounds in calendula plant extracts. The minimum quantifiable level (MQL) of 610, 190 and 940 ng and the limit of detection (LD) of 183, 57 and 282 ng were established for chlorogenic, caffeic acid and rutin, respectively. A novel method for quality control of herbal products, based on HPTLC separation, high resolution digital plate imaging and ANN data analysis has been developed. The proposed method can be adopted for routine evaluation of the phytochemical variability in calendula extracts.

  19. QSAR analysis for nano-sized layered manganese-calcium oxide in water oxidation: An application of chemometric methods in artificial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Shahbazy, Mohammad; Kompany-Zareh, Mohsen; Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi

    2015-11-01

    Water oxidation is among the most important reactions in artificial photosynthesis, and nano-sized layered manganese-calcium oxides are efficient catalysts toward this reaction. Herein, a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model was constructed to predict the catalytic activities of twenty manganese-calcium oxides toward water oxidation using multiple linear regression (MLR) and genetic algorithm (GA) for multivariate calibration and feature selection, respectively. Although there are eight controlled parameters during synthesizing of the desired catalysts including ripening time, temperature, manganese content, calcium content, potassium content, the ratio of calcium:manganese, the average manganese oxidation state and the surface of catalyst, by using GA only three of them (potassium content, the ratio of calcium:manganese and the average manganese oxidation state) were selected as the most effective parameters on catalytic activities of these compounds. The model's accuracy criteria such as R(2)test and Q(2)test in order to predict catalytic rate for external test set experiments; were equal to 0.941 and 0.906, respectively. Therefore, model reveals acceptable capability to anticipate the catalytic activity. PMID:25591399

  20. Ionospheric wave spectrum measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harker, K. J.; Ilic, D. B.; Crawford, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    The local spectrum S(k, omega) of either potential or electron-density fluctuations can be used to determine macroscopic-plasma characteristics such as the local density and temperature, transport coefficients, and drift current. This local spectrum can be determined by measuring the cross-power spectrum. The paper examines the practicality of using the cross-power spectrum analyzer on the Space Shuttle to measure ionospheric parameters. Particular attention is given to investigating the integration time required to measure the cross-power spectral density to a desired accuracy.

  1. Imaging meso-scale ionospheric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burston, Robert

    2012-06-01

    The accuracy and capacity to resolve meso-scale structures of a four dimensional ionospheric imaging algorithm in the circumstance of data from dense networks of permanent GNSS ground receiver stations were investigated. Simulation studies were conducted in order to be able to assess the performance of the algorithm over the entire imaged region. The Multi-instrument Data Assimilation Software (MIDAS) algorithm was used for this purpose. Simulated input data in Receiver Independent Exchange Format (RINEX) were produced by calculating slant Total Electron Content (sTEC) values for satellite to receiver raypaths through an artificially generated ionosphere. Modeling these signals including Differential Code Biases (DCBs) and noise had negligible impact on the output from the imaging algorithm when compared with modeled signals that included neither. Comparing the output from MIDAS using a range of grid definitions show that finer grids have improved capacity to resolve meso-scale structures in the input model but over all are less accurate than coarser grids. The greatest errors occur in low-data regions of the grid and where structures in the input have the greatest gradients in vertical Total Electron Content (vTEC). A good compromise between the conflicting needs of resolution and accuracy is given by a grid defined with 2° × 2° latitude by longitude local horizontal grid divisions.

  2. The Jovian ionospheric E region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. H.; Fox, J. L.

    1991-02-01

    A model of the Jovian ionosphere was constructed, that includes direct photoionization of hydrocarbon molecules. A high-resolution solar spectrum was synthesized from Hinteregger's solar maximum spectrum (F79050N), and high-resolution cross sections for photoabsorption by H2 bands in the range 842 to 1116 A were constructed. Two strong solar lines and about 30 percent of the continuum flux between 912 and 1116 A penetrate below the methane homopause despite strong absorption by CH4 and H2. It is found that hydrocarbons (mainly C2H2 are ionized at a maximum rate of 55/cu cm per sec at 320 km above the ammonia cloud tops. The hydrocarbon ions produced are quickly converted to more complex hydrocarbon ions through reactions with CH4, C2H2, C2H6, and C2H4. It is found that a hydrocarbon ion layer is formed near 320 km that is about 50 km wide with a peak density in excess of 10,000/cu cm.

  3. On spread-F in the ionosphere before earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liperovskaya, E. V.; Liperovsky, V. A.; Silina, A. S.; Parrot, M.

    2006-01-01

    Occurrence probability of the ionospheric spread-F in connection with earthquakes is analyzed. The F-layer is not close to the Earth (˜400 km), but in situ data could be obtained either by ionospheric sounders or by satellites. Data from the two Japanese ionospheric stations Kokubunji and Akita have been analyzed to find out long-term (a few weeks) variations of spread-F before and after earthquakes. Earthquakes with magnitudes M>5 were taken into account. Only time intervals where geomagnetic variations are weak have been analyzed. It is shown that the probability of spread-F observations starts to decrease approximately 40 days before earthquakes, presents a minimum about 10 days before and then takes 1 month to recover the background level (therefore this increase lasts about 3 weeks after earthquakes). This effect exists if the distance between epicenters and the sounding station is less than 500 km.

  4. Ionospheric and magnetospheric plasmapauses'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Hoffman, J. H.; Maynard, N. C.

    1977-01-01

    During August 1972, Explorer 45 orbiting near the equatorial plane with an apogee of about 5.2 R sub e traversed magnetic field lines in close proximity to those simultaneously traversed by the topside ionospheric satellite ISIS 2 near dusk in the L range 2-5.4. The locations of the Explorer 45 plasmapause crossings during this month were compared to the latitudinal decreases of the H(+) density observed on ISIS 2 near the same magnetic field lines. The equatorially determined plasmapause field lines typically passed through or poleward of the minimum of the ionospheric light ion trough, with coincident satellite passes occurring for which the L separation between the plasmapause and trough field lines was between 1 and 2. Vertical flows of the H(+) ions in the light ion trough as detected by the magnetic ion mass spectrometer on ISIS were directed upward with velocities between 1 and 2 kilometers/sec near dusk on these passes. These velocities decreased to lower values on the low latitude side of the H(+) trough but did not show any noticeable change across the field lines corresponding to the magnetospheric plasmapause.

  5. A coupled ionosphere-raytrace model for high-power HF heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawdie, K. A.; Huba, J. D.; Drob, D. P.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2015-11-01

    The first 3-D model of artificial HF ionospheric heating to self-consistently calculate the modification in heating location due to evolving ionospheric gradients has been developed. The model combines the ionosphere model SAMI3/ESF and the HF propagation code MoJo-15. At each time step, the simulated path of the HF wave through the ionosphere is used to determine the HF heating location. These calculations have been used to explain the physical mechanism responsible for the snapback effect observed in an Arecibo HF heating experiment described by Bernhardt et al. (1988). The heater wave is refracted by the density cavity, which causes the heating location to drift in longitude. Eventually, the density cavity convects into the path of the refracted ray, such that only a small portion of the ray is above the threshold for HF heating and the heating location snaps back even though the ray itself is still refracted in longitude.

  6. Results of the international ionospheric Doppler sounder network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lastovicka, Jan; Chum, Jaroslav

    2016-07-01

    This paper summarizes main recent results reached by the Czech-lead international network of ionospheric Doppler sounders. The network consists of Doppler sounders in the western half of Czechia (5 measuring paths, 3 frequencies with central receivers in Prague), northern Taiwan (3 transmitters, two separated receivers, 1 frequency), and three similar systems (3 measuring paths with 1 receiver and 1 frequency) in Tucuman (north-western Argentina), Hermanus (the southernmost South Africa) and Luisville (northern South Africa). Three main areas of research have been (1) statistical properties of gravity waves, (2) ionospheric effects of earthquakes, and (3) low latitude/equatorial phenomena. Some results: (1) the theoretically expected dominance of gravity wave propagation against wind has been confirmed; (2) impact of the Tohoku 2001 M9.0 earthquake was registered in the ionosphere over the Czech Republic as long-period infrasound on the distance of about 9000 km from epicenter; analysis of ionospheric infrasound excited by the Nepal 2015 M7.8 earthquake observed by the Czech and Taiwan Doppler sounders showed that the intensity of ionospheric signal is significantly height dependent and that the Doppler shift depends not only on the advection (up and down motion) of the reflecting layer but also on the compression/rarefaction of the electron gas; (3) spread F structures observed by Doppler sounders in Tucuman and Taiwan (both under the crest of equatorial ionization anomaly) provide results consistent with S4 scintillation data and with previous optical, GPS and satellite measurements.

  7. Diffusion of rotating inhomogeneities in ionospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erukhimov, L. M.; Myasnikov, E. N.

    1998-02-01

    We consider the problem of generation of small-scale quasistatic electric fields that can lead to establishment of the bipolar regime of inhomogeneity relaxation observed in experimental studies of the properties of an artificial turbulence excited in the upper ionosphere by high-power shortwave radio emission [1 8], which is slower than the regime of unipolar diffusion of quasineutral fluctuations of density in a homogeneous strongly magnetized plasma [9 11]. We show that necessary conditions for the existence of this mode are disruption of the symmetry of the initial disturbance in the plasma density with respect to the direction of the field ěc B_0 and its differential rotation with the drift frequency in the plane orthogonal to ěc B_0 . Assuming that the initial disturbance of the plasma has the form of a plane wave whose wave vector ěc k makes an angle θ = k_allel /k_ bot ≪ 1 with the normal to ěc B_0 , we obtain an expression for the drift frequency and study the relations between the fluctuational electric and magnetic fields and the drift velocity of the disturbed plasma in, the linear approximation. We discuss the properties of the nonlinear solution, which, in particular, can describe generation of small-scale plasma inhomogeneities that have a helical structure in the plane orthogonal to ěc B_0 . The phenomenon of frequency broadening of the Doppler spectra of signals of field-aligned SW and USW scattering observed in the case of field-aligned scattering of short and ultrashort radio waves by artificial ionospheric inhomogeneities [4 7] is interpreted.

  8. On the effect of BUM generation enhancement revealed using the scheme of additional heating of ionospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V. L.; Erukhimov, L. M.; Komrakov, G. P.; Sergeev, E. N.; Thidé, B.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Wagner, L. S.; Goldstein, J. A.; Selcher, G.

    1997-05-01

    We present measured characteristics of the artificial ionospheric radio emission (AIRE), which were obtained experimentally using additional heating of the ionospheric F-region by O-polarized waves. It is shown that the observed enhancement of intensity of the broad upshifted maximum (BUM) of the AIRE can result from the influence of electrons accelerated in the plasma: esonance region on its generation. An empirical model of the phenomenon observed is developed. It is concluded from experimental results that the BUM has a complex structure and only one of its components produces the above emission enhancement. We show the possibility of using the AIRE in additional heating of ionospheric plasma for diagnostics of artificial ionospheric turbulence and investigation of the features of perturbation propagation along the geomagnetic field lines.

  9. Onion artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Chun; Shih, Wen-Pin; Chang, Pei-Zen; Lai, Hsi-Mei; Chang, Shing-Yun; Huang, Pin-Chun; Jeng, Huai-An

    2015-05-01

    Artificial muscles are soft actuators with the capability of either bending or contraction/elongation subjected to external stimulation. However, there are currently no artificial muscles that can accomplish these actions simultaneously. We found that the single layered, latticed microstructure of onion epidermal cells after acid treatment became elastic and could simultaneously stretch and bend when an electric field was applied. By modulating the magnitude of the voltage, the artificial muscle made of onion epidermal cells would deflect in opposing directions while either contracting or elongating. At voltages of 0-50 V, the artificial muscle elongated and had a maximum deflection of -30 μm; at voltages of 50-1000 V, the artificial muscle contracted and deflected 1.0 mm. The maximum force response is 20 μN at 1000 V.

  10. Cubesat-Based Dtv Receiver Constellation for Ionospheric Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcivan, H.; Leveque, K.; Doe, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    sort the frequencies and de-trend the phase variations due to spacecraft motion. For a single channel and a spacecraft-DTV transmitter path scan, TEC can be determined from the incremental phase variations for each channel. Determination of the absolute TEC requires knowledge of the absolute phase, i.e., including the number of 2π cycles. The absolute TEC can be determined in the case of multi-channel transmissions from a single tower (most towers house multiple television stations). A CubeSat constellation using DTV transmissions as signals of opportunity is a composite instrument for frontier ionospheric research. It is a novel application of CubeSats to understand the ionospheric response to solar, magnetospheric and upper atmospheric forcing. Combined tomographic measurements of ionospheric density can be used to study the global-scale ionospheric circulation and small-scale ionospheric structures that cause scintillation of trans-ionospheric signals. The data can support a wide range of studies, including Sub-auroral Polarization Streams (SAPS), low latitude plasma instabilities and the generation of equatorial spread F bubbles, and the role of atmospheric waves and layers and sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) events in traveling ionospheric disturbances (TID).

  11. A post-Pioneer Venus reassessment of the Martian dayside ionosphere as observed by radio occultation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, M. H. G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Kliore, A. J.; Kim, J.

    1990-01-01

    Global characteristics of the dayside ionosphere of Mars were investigated by reanalyzing the electron-density dayside altitude profiles obtained by Mariners 4, 6, 7, and 9 and the Viking 1 and 2. The properties of both the electron density peaks and the topside profiles with the behavior expected for a Chapman layer in the Mars ionosphere were compared with those observed at Venus with the Pioneer Venus. The results yield an improved picture of the solar zenith angle dependences of both the peaks and the scale heights of the ionosphere of Mars, and their comparison with Venus at solar minimum. It is shown that, under similar conditions where the incident solar wind dynamic pressure exceeds the peak ionospheric thermal pressure, the Martian dayside ionosphere peaks at higher altitudes in the flanks and has a greater scale height. Thus, Martian and Venusian ionospheres would present different obstacles to solar wind.

  12. The origin of small scale disturbances in the lower ionosphere of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Kerstin; Pätzold, Martin; Molina-Cuberos, Gregorio; Witasse, Olivier; Tellmann, Silvia; Häusler, Bernd; Bird, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The radio-science experiment MaRS (Mars Express Radio Science) on the Mars Express spacecraft (MEX) sounds the atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars since 2004. Approximately 800 vertical profiles of the ionospheric electron density have been acquired until today. A subset of the MaRS dayside observations contains small scale disturbances in the lower ionosphere. Those electron density profiles display unusual small scale features in the M1 altitude range, which appear either merged with or completely detached from the M1 layer. Possible explanations for this additional ionospheric electron density may be ionospheric NO+, meteoroid influx, solar energetic particle events or atmospheric waves. A 1D photo-chemical model of the Mars dayside ionosphere (IonA-2) coupled with a model of the ablation/chemical reactions of meteoroids with the atmosphere/ionosphere (MSDM) is used in combination with derived environmental parameters to investigate the origins of the small scale disturbances in the lower ionosphere of Mars.

  13. Regional model-based computerized ionospheric tomography using GPS measurements: IONOLAB-CIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuna, Hakan; Arikan, Orhan; Arikan, Feza

    2015-10-01

    Three-dimensional imaging of the electron density distribution in the ionosphere is a crucial task for investigating the ionospheric effects. Dual-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite signals can be used to estimate the slant total electron content (STEC) along the propagation path between a GPS satellite and ground-based receiver station. However, the estimated GPS-STEC is very sparse and highly nonuniformly distributed for obtaining reliable 3-D electron density distributions derived from the measurements alone. Standard tomographic reconstruction techniques are not accurate or reliable enough to represent the full complexity of variable ionosphere. On the other hand, model-based electron density distributions are produced according to the general trends of ionosphere, and these distributions do not agree with measurements, especially for geomagnetically active hours. In this study, a regional 3-D electron density distribution reconstruction method, namely, IONOLAB-CIT, is proposed to assimilate GPS-STEC into physical ionospheric models. The proposed method is based on an iterative optimization framework that tracks the deviations from the ionospheric model in terms of F2 layer critical frequency and maximum ionization height resulting from the comparison of International Reference Ionosphere extended to Plasmasphere (IRI-Plas) model-generated STEC and GPS-STEC. The suggested tomography algorithm is applied successfully for the reconstruction of electron density profiles over Turkey, during quiet and disturbed hours of ionosphere using Turkish National Permanent GPS Network.

  14. Seasonal and Solar Cycle Variation of the Martian Ionosphere from Nine Years of MARSIS Active Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, David D.; Withers, Paul; Gurnett, Donald; Nemec, Frantisek

    This past June, we celebrated nine years of continuous operation by MARSIS, the radar sounder on the Mars Express spacecraft, in orbit around Mars since Christmas of 2003. The copious data from this instrument in its Active Ionospheric Sounding mode has been used in numerous scientific endeavors to generate empirical models of the Martian ionosphere. The full ionospheric profiles gleaned from analysis of these data are ideal for this kind of effort. Out of more than 170,000 traces collected, we have selected only about 10%, deemed to be of the best quality, and that can be fit to a Chapman layer function. We now have nine years, or 4-3/4 Mars years, worth of ionospheric traces. In addition to sampling nearly five years of seasonal variation, these nine years of data also represent 80% of a normal solar cycle. Therefore, in this work we shall analyze ionospheric traces with the objective of determining variation of atmospheric and ionospheric parameters such as the neutral atmospheric scale height, ionospheric peak altitude, and ionospheric peak density as they vary with the solar cycle and the change in season.

  15. Ionospheric scintillation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rino, C. L.; Freemouw, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    The diffracted field of a monochromatic plane wave was characterized by two complex correlation functions. For a Gaussian complex field, these quantities suffice to completely define the statistics of the field. Thus, one can in principle calculate the statistics of any measurable quantity in terms of the model parameters. The best data fits were achieved for intensity statistics derived under the Gaussian statistics hypothesis. The signal structure that achieved the best fit was nearly invariant with scintillation level and irregularity source (ionosphere or solar wind). It was characterized by the fact that more than 80% of the scattered signal power is in phase quadrature with the undeviated or coherent signal component. Thus, the Gaussian-statistics hypothesis is both convenient and accurate for channel modeling work.

  16. Models of Titan's Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, I. P.; Cravens, T. E.; Waite, J. H.; Wahlund, J.; Yelle, R. V.; Vuitton, V.; Coates, A.; Magee, B.; Gell, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    During the TA and T18 encounters with Titan, in situ measurements were made of Titan's atmosphere and ionosphere by several instruments on board the Cassini Orbiter, including the Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS), the Langmuir probe on the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Experiment (RPWS), and the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer Subsystem (CAPS). Both of these encounters were on the day as well as the night side of Titan. The model uses neutral densities measured by the INMS instrument and the electron temperature was measured by the RPWS instrument. The model also includes energetic electron fluxes measured by the CAPS instrument, which act as an important source of ionization on the night side. The modeled ion densities are compared with densities measured by INMS in its Open Source mode.

  17. Stability of a cometary ionosphere/ionopause determined by ion-neutral friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ershkovich, A. I.; McKenzie, J. F.; Axford, W. I.

    1989-09-01

    The linear MHD stability of the magnetic field structure discovered in the ionosphere of Comet Halley during the Giotto mission encounter is analyzed in terms of the hydromagnetic counterpart of the bounce frequency for a stratified atmosphere. The structure resulting from the balance between the Lorentz body force and the ion-neutral friction, as suggested by Cravens (1986) and by Ip and Axford (1982) turns out to be unstable. If, however, effects of the mass-loading (due to photoionization) and dissociative recombination are taken into account, the ionosphere becomes stabilized except for the Halley ionopause and adjacent ionosphere layer (of thickness 100 km) which remain unstable.

  18. Phenomena associated with complex (dusty) plasmas in the ionosphere during high-speed meteor showers

    SciTech Connect

    Kopnin, S. I.; Popel, S. I.; Yu, M. Y.

    2009-06-15

    Formation of dusty plasmas in the Earth's ionosphere at 80-120 km altitudes during high-speed meteor showers and its detectable manifestations are discussed. Emphasis is given to ground-based observations such as detection of low-frequency (<50 Hz) ionospheric radio noise, ground-based observations of infrasonic waves, and amplification of the intensity of green radiation at 557.7 nm from a layer at the 110-120 km altitude in the lower ionosphere. The physical processes responsible for these manifestations are considered.

  19. Determination of Ionospheric Total Electron Content Derived from Gnss Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inyurt, S.; Mekik, C.; Yildirim, O.

    2014-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) has been used in numerous fields especially related to satellite- based radio navigation system for a long time. Ionosphere, one of the upper atmosphere layers ranges from 60 km to 1500 km, is a dispersive medium and it includes a number of free electrons and ions. The ionization is mainly subject to the sun and its activity. Ionospheric activity depends also on seasonal, diurnal variations and geographical location. Total Electron Content (TEC), which is also called Slant Total Electron Content (STEC), is a parameter that changes according to ionospheric conditions and has highly variable structure. Furthermore, Vertical TEC (VTEC) can be explained as TEC value in the direction of zenith. Thanks to VTEC, TEC values can be modelled. TEC is measured in units of TECU and 1TECU= 1016 electrons/m2. Ionospheric modelling has a great importance for improving the accuracies of positioning and understanding the ionosphere. Thus, various models have been developed to detect TEC value in the last years. Single Layer Model (SLM) which provides determining TEC value and GPS positioning in the ionosphere accurately is one of the most commonly used models. SLM assumes that all free electrons are concentrated in a shell of infinitesimal thickness. In this paper SLM model was used to derive TEC values by means of Bernese 5.0 program developed by the University of Bern, Sweden. In this study, we have used regional ionosphere model to derive TEC value. First of all, GPS data have been collected from 10 stations in Turkey and 13 IGS stations for 7 days from 06.03.2010 to 12.03.2010. Then, Regional Ionosphere Model (RIM) is created with the reference of the GPS data. At the end of the process, the result files are stored as IONEX format. TEC results for those days are obtained with two hours interval. TEC variation related to the research area ranges from nearly 6 TECU to approximately 20 TECU. The obtained results show that TEC values start

  20. Joint ionospheric and target state estimation for multipath OTHR track fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, Mark G.; Percival, D. John

    2001-11-01

    Over-the-horizon Radar (OTHR) uses the ionosphere as a propagation medium to detect targets beyond the line-of-sight horizon. The layered structure of the ionosphere can support several signal propagation paths between the radar site and detected targets, often giving rise to multiple radar tracks for a single target. A multi-hypothesis multipath track fusion (MPTF) algorithm for OTHR has been developed and reported in earlier publications. In this paper, the MPTF formalism is developed from first principles to explicitly explore sources of track dependence which arise in OTHR track fusion. In particular, a solution is proposed which accounts for track-to-track dependencies arising from common target ionospheric dynamic processes. The algorithm is applied to the simplest nontrivial case, where the ionosphere is modeled as two spherically-symmetric reflecting layers, and two radar tracks are observed.

  1. The worldwide ionospheric data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza, Dieter

    1989-01-01

    The worldwide ionospheric data base is scattered over the entire globe. Different data sets are held at different institutions in the U.S., U.S.S.R., Australia, Europe, and Asia. The World Data Centers on the different continents archive and distribute part of the huge data base; the scope and cross section of the individual data holdings depend on the regional and special interest of the center. An attempt is made to pull together all the strings that point toward different ionospheric data holdings. Requesters are provided with the information about what is available and where to get it. An attempt is also made to evaluate the reliability and compatibility of the different data sets based on the consensus in the ionospheric research community. The status and accuracy of the standard ionospheric models are also discussed because they may facilitate first order assessment of ionospheric effects. This is a first step toward an ionospheric data directory within the framework of NSSDC's master directory.

  2. Methods for Creation and Detection of Ultra-Strong Artificial Ionization in the Upper Atmosphere (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Siefring, C. L.; Briczinski, S. J.; Kendall, E. A.; Watkins, B. J.; Bristow, W. A.; Michell, R.

    2013-12-01

    The High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) transmitter in Alaska has been used to produce localized regions of artificial ionization at altitudes between 150 and 250 km. High power radio waves tuned near harmonics of the electron gyro frequency were discovered by Todd Pederson of the Air Force Research Laboratory to produce ionosonde traces that looked like artificial ionization layers below the natural F-region. The initial regions of artificial ionization (AI) were not stable but had moved down in altitude over a period of 15 minutes. Recently, artificial ionization has been produced by the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 6th harmonics transmissions by the HAARP. In march 2013, the artificial ionization clouds were sustained for more the 5 hours using HAARP tuned to the 4 fce at the full power of 3.6 Mega-Watts with a twisted-beam antenna pattern. Frequency selection with narrow-band sweeps and antenna pattern shaping has been employed for optimal generation of AI. Recent research at HAARP has produced the longest lived and denser artificial ionization clouds using HF transmissions at the harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency and ring-shaped radio beams tailored to prevent the descent of the clouds. Detection of artificial ionization employs (1) ionosonde echoes, (2) coherent backscatter from the Kodiak SuperDARN radar, (3) enhanced ion and plasma line echoes from the HAARP MUIR radar at 400 MHz, (4) high resolution optical image from ground sites, and (5) unique stimulated electromagnetic emissions, and (6) strong UHF and L-Band scintillation induced into trans-ionospheric signals from satellite radio beacons. Future HAARP experiments will determine the uses of long-sustained AI for enhanced HF communications.

  3. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltz, David L.

    1982-01-01

    Describes kinds of results achieved by computer programs in artificial intelligence. Topics discussed include heuristic searches, artificial intelligence/psychology, planning program, backward chaining, learning (focusing on Winograd's blocks to explore learning strategies), concept learning, constraint propagation, language understanding…

  4. Artificial Limbs

    MedlinePlus

    ... you are missing an arm or leg, an artificial limb can sometimes replace it. The device, which is ... activities such as walking, eating, or dressing. Some artificial limbs let you function nearly as well as before.

  5. Viscous Magnus Force for the Rotating Venus Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-de-Tejada, H.

    2008-03-01

    The Magnus force applicable to the Venus ionosphere is calculated for the high-altitude transterminator flow that streams around the low-altitude ionospheric plasma that is subject to rotating motion. The Magnus force can account for the observed dawn-dusk (east-west) asymmetry of the Venus nightside ionosphere and is suitable to describe conditions in astrophysical problems in which the plasma of a rotating body interacts with a directional plasma flow. The Magnus force equation is derived including the viscous force term in the momentum equation of the transterminator flow in the Venus upper ionosphere and is examined by comparing the expected dawnward-directed displacement of that flow with the Pioneer Venus Orbiter measurements. Values of the coefficient of the Magnus force equation suitable for the dawnward deflection of the transterminator flow are comparable to those of a rotating sphere subject to a streaming flow in fluid dynamics problems and imply Re ~ 200-300 values of the Reynolds number for that flow using the ~600 km width of the region where it is measured. Such values of the Reynolds number are 1 order of magnitude larger than those inferred from the viscous transport of solar wind momentum to the Venus upper ionosphere that is implied by the velocity boundary layer observed along the flanks of the Venus ionosheath. With values of the coefficient of the Magnus force equation for the Venus ionosphere that are similar to those applicable to ordinary fluid dynamic problems it is possible to suggest a common quality in the response of rotating obstacles subject to a streaming flow in fluid dynamics and in astrophysical problems.

  6. Ionospheric Effects from the superbolid exploded over the Chelyabinsk area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzhin, Yuri; Smirnov, Vladimir; Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Smirnova, Elena

    The Chelyabinsk meteorite fall is undoubtedly the most documented in history. Its passage through the atmosphere was recorded by video and photographers, visual observers, infrasonic microphones, seismographs on the ground, and by satellites in orbit. The data of transionospheric sounding by signals from the GPS cluster satellites carried out in the zone of explosion of the Chelyabinsk meteoroid have been analyzed. The analysis has shown that the explosion had a very weak effect on the ionosphere. The observed ionospheric disturbances were asymmetric with respect to the explosion epicenter. The signals obtained were compared both in shape and in amplitude with the known surface explosions for which the diagnostics of the ionospheric effects had been made by radio techniques. Ionospheric effects in the form of acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) produced by 500-600 tons TNT explosions on the ground are detected with confidence both by vertical sounding and by GPS techniques. This allows us to suggest that the reported equivalent of the meteoroid explosion was obviously overestimated. The experiments on the injection of barium vapor (3.3 kg) carried out under similar conditions in the terminator zone revealed the response of the ionosphere in variations of the critical frequencies of the layer at a distance of 1500-2000 km (AGW with a period of 5-10 min). The absence of such ionospheric effects in the remote zone at 1500-1700 km from the epicenter of the bolide explosion in the case under discussion also makes us feel doubtful about the estimated explosion equivalent.

  7. The study of the midlatitude ionospheric response to geomagnetic activity at Nagycenk Geophysical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berényi, Kitti; Kis, Árpád; Barta, Veronika; Novák, Attila

    2016-04-01

    Geomagnetic storms affect the ionospheric regions of the terrestrial upper atmosphere, causing several physical and chemical atmospheric processes. The changes and phenomena, which can be seen as a result of these processes, generally called ionospheric storm. These processes depend on altitude, term of the day, and the strength of solar activity, the geomagnetic latitude and longitude. The differences between ionospheric regions mostly come from the variations of altitude dependent neutral and ionized atmospheric components, and from the physical parameters of solar radiation. We examined the data of the ground-based radio wave ionosphere sounding instruments of the European ionospheric stations (mainly the data of Nagycenk Geophysical Observatory), called ionosonde, to determine how and what extent a given strength of a geomagnetic disturbance affect the middle latitude ionospheric regions in winter. We chose the storm for the research from November 2012 and March 2015. As the main result of our research, we can show significant differences between the each ionospheric (F1 and F2) layer parameters on quiet and strong stormy days. When we saw, that the critical frequencies (foF2) increase from their quiet day value, then the effect of the ionospheric storm was positive, otherwise, if they drop, they were negative. With our analysis, the magnitude of these changes could be determined. Furthermore we demonstrated, how a full strong geomagnetic storm affects the ionospheric foF2 parameter during different storm phases. It has been showed, how a positive or negative ionospheric storm develop during a geomagnetic storm. For a more completed analysis, we compared also the evolution of the F2 layer parameters of the European ionosonde stations on a North-South geographic longitude during a full storm duration. Therefore we determined, that the data of the ionosonde at Nagycenk Geophysical Observatory are appropriate, it detects the same state of ionosphere like the

  8. Comparative statistical and spectral studies of seismic and non-seismic sub-ionospheric VLF anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolbang, Daniel; Biernat, Helfried; Schwingenschuh, Konrad; Eichelberger, Hans; Prattes, Gustav; Besser, Bruno; Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Rozhnoi, Alexander; Solovieva, Maria; Biagi, Pier Francesco; Friedrich, Martin

    2013-04-01

    We present a comparative study of seismic and non-seismic sub-ionospheric VLF anomalies. Our method is based on parameter variations of the sub-ionospheric VLF waveguide formed by the surface and the lower ionosphere. The used radio links working in the frequency range between 10 and 50 kHz, the receivers are part of the European and Russian networks. Various authors investigated the lithopsheric-atmospheric-ionospheric coupling and predicted the lowering of the ionosphere over earthquake preparation zones [1]. The received nighttime signal of a sub-ionospheric waveguide depends strongly on the height of the ionospheric E-layer, typically 80 to 85 km. This height is characterized by a typical gradient of the electron density near the atmospheric-ionospheric boundary [2]. In the last years it has been turned out that one of the major issues of sub-ionospheric seismo-electromagnetic VLF studies are the non-seismic influences on the links, which have to be carefully characterized. Among others this could be traveling ionospheric disturbances, geomagnetic storms as well as electron precipitation. Our emphasis is on the analysis of daily, monthly and annual variations of the VLF amplitude. To improve the statistics we investigate the behavior and typical variations of the VLF amplitude and phase over a period of more than 2 years. One important parameter considered is the rate how often the fluctuations are falling below a significant level derived from a mean value. The temporal variations and the amplitudes of these depressions are studied for several years for sub-ionospheric VLF radio links with the receivers in Graz and Kamchatka. In order to study the difference between seismic and non-seismic turbulences in the lower ionosphere a power spectrum analysis of the received signal is performed too. We are especially interested in variations T>6 min which are typical for atmospheric gravity waves causing the lithospheric-atmospheric-ionospheric coupling [3]. All

  9. Modification of ionospheric electron density by dust suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Sweta; Mishra, Rashmi; Singh Sodha, Mahendra

    2016-05-01

    On the basis of a dynamic analysis the effectiveness of dust suspension for the reduction and enhancement of electron density in the E-layer of the ionosphere has been investigated in this paper. The analysis is based on the modelling of the E-layer as the Chapman α layer (validated earlier); the electron/ion production function, arrived at by Chapman and effective electron temperature-dependent electron–ion recombination coefficients in agreement with observations have been used. The balance of the charge on the particles and the number/energy balance of the constituents have been taken into account. The following is the physics of the change in electron density in the ionosphere by the suspension of dust. First, the dust provides a source (emission) and sink (accretion) of electrons. Second, the dust emits photoelectrons with energies much higher than those of ambient electrons, which enhances the electron temperature, leading to a reduced electron–ion recombination coefficient, and thus to a higher electron density. An interplay of these processes and the natural processes of electron production/annihilation determines the electron density and temperature in the dust suspension in the ionosphere. The numerical results, corresponding to suspension of dust of silicate (high work function) and Cs coated bronze (low work function) in the E-layer at 105 \\text{km} are presented and discussed.

  10. Modification of ionospheric electron density by dust suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Sweta; Mishra, Rashmi; Singh Sodha, Mahendra

    2016-05-01

    On the basis of a dynamic analysis the effectiveness of dust suspension for the reduction and enhancement of electron density in the E-layer of the ionosphere has been investigated in this paper. The analysis is based on the modelling of the E-layer as the Chapman α layer (validated earlier); the electron/ion production function, arrived at by Chapman and effective electron temperature-dependent electron-ion recombination coefficients in agreement with observations have been used. The balance of the charge on the particles and the number/energy balance of the constituents have been taken into account. The following is the physics of the change in electron density in the ionosphere by the suspension of dust. First, the dust provides a source (emission) and sink (accretion) of electrons. Second, the dust emits photoelectrons with energies much higher than those of ambient electrons, which enhances the electron temperature, leading to a reduced electron-ion recombination coefficient, and thus to a higher electron density. An interplay of these processes and the natural processes of electron production/annihilation determines the electron density and temperature in the dust suspension in the ionosphere. The numerical results, corresponding to suspension of dust of silicate (high work function) and Cs coated bronze (low work function) in the E-layer at 105 \\text{km} are presented and discussed.

  11. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Technology Quarterly, 1985

    1985-01-01

    This issue of "Information Technology Quarterly" is devoted to the theme of "Artificial Intelligence." It contains two major articles: (1) Artificial Intelligence and Law" (D. Peter O'Neill and George D. Wood); (2) "Artificial Intelligence: A Long and Winding Road" (John J. Simon, Jr.). In addition, it contains two sidebars: (1) "Calculating and…

  12. Comparison of ionospheric parameters calculated with UAM and measured at Voeykovo observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakov, M. V.; Namgaladze, A. A.; Karpov, M. I.

    2016-09-01

    The measurements of the critical frequencies of the ionospheric F2 layer based on vertical radiosounding, which was performed with a CADI digital ionosonde at the Voeykovo magnetic-ionospheric observatory in February 2013, have been considered. The observations have been compared with the upper atmosphere numerical model (UAM) data for three days that differ in the amplitude and the character of solar and magnetic activity and correspond to quiet and moderately disturbed states of the ionosphere. The work was performed in order to improve the methods for determining the ionospheric state by vertical sounding ionograms. The time variations in the F2 layer critical frequency, electric field vector zonal component, and thermospheric wind velocity meridional component have been analyzed. Calculations were performed with three UAM variants. The UAM version providing the best agreement with the CADI ionosonde data was the version in which the neutral temperature, neutral composition, and pressure gradients are calculated according to the MSIS empirical model and the horizontal neutral wind velocity is determined by the equation of motion with pressure gradients from MSIS. The calculated values corresponded to the measurements, except those for the evening, because the electron density at the ionospheric F2 layer maximum depends more strongly on electric fields and thermospheric wind velocities during this period. Thus, the indicated UAM version with the above limitations can be used to determine the state of the subauroral ionosphere.

  13. Weather disturbances in the ionosphere-thermosphere system at middle and low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunk, Robert

    It has been clearly established that the ionosphere-thermosphere system exhibits both a back-ground state (climatology) and a disturbed state (weather). At mid-latitudes, the background ionospheric state is characterized by an electron density distribution that tends to be uniform, with a gradual transition from high electron densities on the dayside to low electron densities on the nightside. At low latitudes, the main characteristic feature is the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA), which corresponds to ionization peaks that are located on both sides of the magnetic equator. The background thermospheric state at mid-and low-latitudes tends to be uniform, with gentle winds blowing around the globe from the sub-solar point. However, su-perimposed on these background states are storm-time disturbances, mesoscale (100-1000 km) structures, and plasma irregularities. For the ionosphere, these include traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs), sporadic E layers, He+ layers in the topside ionosphere, descending inter-mediate layers, ridges of enhanced ionization (Storm Enhanced Densities), a 4-wave signature, spread-F, and equatorial plasma bubbles. For the thermosphere, the weather disturbances include upward propagating waves from the lower atmosphere (planetary, tidal and gravity waves), Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances (TADs) generated at high latitudes, storm-time O/N2 depletions, and neutral gas perturbations at the terminator and in the regions contain-ing equatorial plasma bubbles. These and other weather disturbances in the middle and low latitude ionosphere-thermosphere system will be discussed.

  14. Ionospheric parameter analysis techniques and anomaly identification in periods of ionospheric perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandrikova, Oksana; Polozov, Yury; Fetisova Glushkova, Nadejda; Shevtsov, Boris

    In the present paper we suggest intellectual techniques intended for the analysis of ionospheric parameters. These techniques are directed at studying dynamic processes in the "magnetosphere-ionosphere" system during perturbations. Using the combination of the wavelet transform and neural networks, the authors have developed a technique of approximating the time variation of ionospheric parameters. This technique allows us to make data predictions and detect anomalies in the ionosphere. Multiscale component approximations of the critical frequency of the ionosphere layer F2 were constructed. These approximations can be presented in the following form: begin{center} c_{l,k+m} (t) = varphi_m(3) Bigl (sum_i omega(3_{mi}) varphi_i(2) Bigl (sum_j omega(2_{ij}) varphi_j(1) Bigl (sum_k omega(1_{jk}) c_{l,k} (t) Bigr ) Bigr ) Bigr ) , where c_{l,k} = bigl < f , Psi_{l,k} bigr > ; Psi_{l,k} (t) = 2(l/2) Psi (2(l) t - k) is the wavelet basis; omega(1_{jk}) are the weighting coefficients of the neuron j of the network input layer; omega(2_{ij}) are the weighting coefficients of the neuron i of the network hidden layer; omega(3_{mi}) are the weighting coefficients of the neuron m of the network output layer; varphi(1_j) (z) = varphi(2_i) (z) = (1)/(1+exp(-z))) ; varphi(3_m) (z) = x*z+y . The coefficients c_{l,k} can be found as a result of transforming the original function f into the space with the scale l . In order to obtain the approximations of the time variation of data, neural networks can be united in groups. In the paper we have suggested a multicomponent time variation model of ionospheric parameters, which makes it possible to perform the analysis of the ionospheric dynamic mode, receive predictions about parameter variations, and detect anomalies in periods of perturbations. The multicomponent model also allows us to fill missing values in critical frequency data taking into account diurnal and seasonal variations. Identification of the model is based on combining

  15. Diagnostics of the ionospheric turbulence by wide band radio signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Evgeny; Shindin, Alexey; Grach, Savely

    Results of the investigations of the time-space structure of the HF-pumped ionospheric volume above the SURA heating facility are presented. The method of investigations is based on mea-surements of the amplitude and phase of pulsed (pulse duration < 200µs and interpulse period 20-200 ms), wide band (˜ 300 kHz) and powerful (Effective Radiated Power ˜ 20-150 MW) radio signals radiated by three SURA transmitter and used for multifrequency sounding of the ionospheric plasma in frequency band up to ˜ 1 MHz. For simultaneous modification of the ionosphere and its diagnostics, technical capabilities of SURA transmitter-receiver system, specially elaborated time-frequency modes of transmitter operation, space diversity three point reception, wide band signal recording, digital filtering, spectral and correlation analysis of the short radio pulses reflected from ionosphere were used. As a result of numerically solved in-verse problem of vertical sounding of the HF-perturbed ionosphere, dynamic behavior of the electron plasma density variations was obtained in the regions close to plasma resonance and upper hybrid resonance of the pump wave. In our experiments the pumping usually leaded to plasma expulsion from the resonance regions. A magnitude of artificial plasma density pertur-bations achieved 0.8% from the background density for pump power about P 60 MW ERP. The methods of a similarity and full correlation analysis were used for pulse signal amplitude processing, which were obtained by diversity three point reception with the receiving aerial separation of 84 m. As a result, novel data on fine structure of the space field of the vertical and horizontal velocities of plasma in the perturbed ionosphere volume with high time (up to 20 ms) and frequency (˜ 1 kHz) resolution are obtained. This frequency resolution can be translated into altitude resolution (˜ 50-100 m) in the ionosphere. The work was supported by RFBR grants 10-02-00642, 09-02-01150 and Federal

  16. The International Reference Ionosphere: Model Update 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilitza, Dieter; Altadill, David; Reinisch, Bodo; Galkin, Ivan; Shubin, Valentin; Truhlik, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) is recognized as the official standard for the ionosphere (COSPAR, URSI, ISO) and is widely used for a multitude of different applications as evidenced by the many papers in science and engineering journals that acknowledge the use of IRI (e.g., about 11% of all Radio Science papers each year). One of the shortcomings of the model has been the dependence of the F2 peak height modeling on the propagation factor M(3000)F2. With the 2016 version of IRI, two new models will be introduced for hmF2 that were developed directly based on hmF2 measurements by ionosondes [Altadill et al., 2013] and by COSMIC radio occultation [Shubin, 2015], respectively. In addition IRI-2016 will include an improved representation of the ionosphere during the very low solar activities that were reached during the last solar minimum in 2008/2009. This presentation will review these and other improvements that are being implemented with the 2016 version of the IRI model. We will also discuss recent IRI workshops and their findings and results. One of the most exciting new projects is the development of the Real-Time IRI [Galkin et al., 2012]. We will discuss the current status and plans for the future. Altadill, D., S. Magdaleno, J.M. Torta, E. Blanch (2013), Global empirical models of the density peak height and of the equivalent scale height for quiet conditions, Advances in Space Research 52, 1756-1769, doi:10.1016/j.asr.2012.11.018. Galkin, I.A., B.W. Reinisch, X. Huang, and D. Bilitza (2012), Assimilation of GIRO Data into a Real-Time IRI, Radio Science, 47, RS0L07, doi:10.1029/2011RS004952. Shubin V.N. (2015), Global median model of the F2-layer peak height based on ionospheric radio-occultation and ground-based Digisonde observations, Advances in Space Research 56, 916-928, doi:10.1016/j.asr.2015.05.029.

  17. Ionosphere Transient Response To Solar Flares: Hf Radio Monitoring Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, J.-P.; Telljohann, U.; Witasse, O.; Sanderson, T. R.

    We use a simple and low cost method to monitor the ionospheric reflection of commer- cial HF radio transmissions. It only requires a standard HF radio receiver with Single Side Band capability, a computer with a sound card, and appropriate audio signal spectral analysis software. We tune the radio receiver such that the carrier frequency of the transmission appears as a ~ 1kHz tone at the output of the radio receiver. The output signal of the radio receiver is processed with appropriate software that allows real time recording of high frequency resolution dynamic spectrograms of the audio spectrum in the 0-5 kHz range. Voice modulation is also present in the audio spectrum and appears as both upper and lower side bands but it is not considered in this study. HF radio signals reach the receiving station after being reflected by ionospheric layers. Any change in the ionospheric layers that affects HF wave reflection is detectable. In this paper, we particularly discuss our observations related to the transient response of the ionosphere to solar flare ionizing radiation. Enhanced ionization due to EUV and soft X-rays may produce a transient perturbation of the ionosphere which lasts typically one to few minutes. The signature of the transient response depends upon local time, solar flare intensity and the rise time of the solar flare ionizing radiation. We discuss both a few typical examples and a preliminary analysis of our 1-year sta- tistical analysis of observed events at 17.640 MHz. The method is easily accessible to amateur scientists. Possible use of the method for spaceweather-related research and outreach and educational activities is discussed.

  18. Modeling the ionospheric response to traveling atmospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauske, R.; Prölss, G. W.

    1997-07-01

    Anomalous increases of the ionization density at middle latitudes (positive ionospheric storms) are often a prominent feature of upper atmospheric storms. One of their possible causes are traveling atmospheric disturbances (TADs) which propagate from polar to equatorial latitudes, carrying along equatorward-directed meridional winds. At middle latitudes, these winds cause an increase in the height of the F2 layer which in turn will lead to an enhancement of the ionization density. Using a simple description of a TAD and an ionospheric model, we are able to reproduce the basic properties of such perturbations. We also attempt to simulate an actually observed storm period. Rough agreement is obtained when the wind speed is derived from the height of the F2-layer peak. A more detailed simulation of the initial phase of the storm requires a more refined TAD model with time-dependent height gradients in the wind field.

  19. Earthquake-Ionosphere Coupling Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamogawa, Masashi

    After a giant earthquake (EQ), acoustic and gravity waves are excited by the displacement of land and sea surface, propagate through atmosphere, and then reach thermosphere, which causes ionospheric disturbances. This phenomenon was detected first by ionosonde and by HF Doppler sounderin the 1964 M9.2 Great Alaskan EQ. Developing Global Positioning System (GPS), seismogenic ionospheric disturbance detected by total electron content (TEC) measurement has been reported. A value of TEC is estimated by the phase difference between two different carrier frequencies through the propagation in the dispersive ionospheric plasma. The variation of TEC is mostly similar to that of F-region plasma. Acoustic-gravity waves triggered by an earthquake [Heki and Ping, EPSL, 2005; Liu et al., JGR, 2010] and a tsunami [Artu et al., GJI, 2005; Liu et al., JGR, 2006; Rolland, GRL, 2010] disturb the ionosphere and travel in the ionosphere. Besides the traveling ionospheric disturbances, ionospheric disturbances excited by Rayleigh waves [Ducic et al, GRL, 2003; Liu et al., GRL, 2006] as well as post-seismic 4-minute monoperiodic atmospheric resonances [Choosakul et al., JGR, 2009] have been observed after the large earthquakes. Since GPS Earth Observation Network System (GEONET) with more than 1200 GPS receiving points in Japan is a dense GPS network, seismogenic ionospheric disturbance is spatially observed. In particular, the seismogenic ionospheric disturbance caused by the M9.0 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku EQ (henceforth the Tohoku EQ) on 11 March 2011 was clearly observed. Approximately 9 minutes after the mainshock, acoustic waves which propagated radially emitted from the tsunami source area were observed through the TEC measurement (e. g., Liu et al. [JGR, 2011]). Moreover, there was a depression of TEC lasting for several tens of minutes after a huge earthquake, which was a large-scale phenomenon extending to a radius of a few hundred kilometers. This TEC depression may be

  20. Ionospheric observations in southern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjørsvik, N.; Øvstedal, O.; Pettersen, B. R.; Svendsen, J. G. G.

    2003-04-01

    A permanent GPS reference receiver is established in station AK06 at the campus of NLH, Norway. The monumentation, hardware, software and network connection is according to IGS practice. In this poster the first application of dual frequency GPS observations from this station is presented. Carrier phase and pseudorange observations at 1 Hz are used to monitor ionospheric TEC values. The processing is carried out in near real time. Observation files containing one hour of observations are added to moving observation files containing 24 hours of data. Differential Code Biases (DCB) in the satellites are taken from the IONEX (IONosphere Exchange format) computed by the ionosphere working group of the International GPS Services. The IGS estimate daily Global Ionospheric Models with DCBs and ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) parameters. Daily estimates for the receiver DCB are estimated using dual frequency pseudorange observations and satellite DCBs and TEC values from IGS. Final TEC values are estimated using undifferenced carrier phase observations leveled to pseudorange. Hourly snap shots as well as animations are presented on a web-page. GPS-observations from other stations will be added in order to extend the area of coverage.

  1. The International Reference Ionosphere - Climatological Standard for the Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) a joint project of URSI and COSPAR is the defacto standard for a climatological specification of ionospheric parameters. IRI is based on a wide range of ground and space data and has been steadily improved since its inception in 1969 with the ever-increasing volume of ionospheric data and with better mathematical descriptions of the observed global and temporal variation patterns. The IRI model has been validated with a large amount of data including data from the most recent ionospheric satellites (KOMPSAT, ROCSAT and TIMED) and data from global network of ionosondes. Several IRI teams are working on specific aspects of the IRI modeling effort including an improved representation of the topside ionosphere with a seamless transition to the plasmasphere, a new effort to represent the global variation of F2 peak parameters using the Neural Network (NN) technique, and the inclusion of several additional parameters in IRI, e.g., spread-F probability and ionospheric variability. Annual IRI workshops are the forum for discussions of these efforts and for all science activities related to IRI as well as applications of the IRI model in engineering and education. In this paper I will present a status report about the IRI effort with special emphasis on the presentations and results from the most recent IRI Workshops (Paris, 2004; Tortosa, 2005) and on the most important ongoing IRI activities. I will discuss the latest version of the IRI model, IRI-2006, highlighting the most recent changes and additions. Finally, the talk will review some of the applications of the IRI model with special emphasis on the use for radiowave propagation studies and communication purposes.

  2. Low-latitude ionospheric effects on SBAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenas, J.; Sardón, E.; Sainz, A.; Ochoa, B.; Magdaleno, S.

    2016-06-01

    Satellite-based augmentation systems (SBAS) provide augmentation to Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) users in three areas: (1) broadcasting accurate corrections to GNSS satellite ephemeris, (2) providing a real-time empirical ionospheric model in the service area, and (3) providing integrity information in the form of estimates of the confidence of the ephemeris corrections and ionospheric delays. Ionospheric effects on SBAS are twofold: (a) the input data used by the SBAS will be affected by ionospheric effects, and (b) the more perturbed the ionosphere is, the more difficult it will be to provide accurate and reliable ionospheric information to the users. The ionosphere at low latitudes presents larger variability and more intense phenomena than at midlatitudes. Therefore, SBAS providing service to low-latitude regions will be more affected than those at other latitudes. From the different low-latitude ionospheric effects, this paper will focus on those having the largest impact on SBAS, which are total electron content temporal and spatial gradients, ionospheric scintillations, and depletions. This paper will present the impact of these effects on EGNOS (European Global Navigation Overlay System), the European SBAS. Although EGNOS can be considered as a midlatitude SBAS, it has to provide coverage down to rather low latitudes, so sometimes low-latitude ionospheric effects are observed in the EGNOS data. It will be shown how EGNOS performs under nominal conditions and how its performance is degraded when low-latitude ionospheric phenomena occur. Real EGNOS data affected by low-latitude ionospheric phenomena will be used.

  3. Whistler propagation in ionospheric density ducts: Simulations and DEMETER observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodroffe, J. R.; Streltsov, A. V.; Vartanyan, A.; Milikh, G. M.

    2013-11-01

    On 16 October 2009, the Detection of Electromagnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) satellite observed VLF whistler wave activity coincident with an ionospheric heating experiment conducted at HAARP. At the same time, density measurements by DEMETER indicate the presence of multiple field-aligned enhancements. Using an electron MHD model, we show that the distribution of VLF power observed by DEMETER is consistent with the propagation of whistlers from the heating region inside the observed density enhancements. We also discuss other interesting features of this event, including coupling of the lower hybrid and whistler modes, whistler trapping in artificial density ducts, and the interference of whistlers waves from two adjacent ducts.

  4. Interplanetary Radio Transmission Through Serial Ionospheric and Material Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, David; Kennedy, Robert G; Roy, Kenneth I; Vacaliuc, Bogdan

    2013-01-01

    A usual first principle in planning radio astronomy observations from the earth is that monitoring must be carried out well above the ionospheric plasma cutoff frequency (~5 MHz). Before space probes existed, radio astronomy was almost entirely done above 6 MHz, and this value is considered a practical lower limit by most radio astronomers. Furthermore, daytime ionization (especially D-layer formation) places additional constraints on wave propagation, and waves of frequency below 10-20 MHz suffer significant attenuation. More careful calculations of wave propagation through the earth s ionosphere suggest that for certain conditions (primarily the presence of a magnetic field) there may be a transmission window well below this assumed limit. Indeed, for receiving extraterrestrial radiation below the ionospheric plasma cutoff frequency, a choice of VLF frequency appears optimal to minimize loss. The calculation, experimental validation, and conclusions are presented here. This work demonstrates the possibility of VLF transmission through the ionosphere and various subsequent material barriers. Implications include development of a new robust communications channel, communications with submerged or subterranean receivers / instruments on or offworld, and a new approach to SETI.

  5. Ionospheric slab thickness and its seasonal variations observed by GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shuanggen; Cho, Jung-Ho; Park, Jung-Uk

    2007-11-01

    The ionospheric slab thickness, the ratio of the total electron content (TEC) to the F2-layer peak electron density (NmF2), is closely related to the shape of the ionospheric electron density profile Ne (h) and the TEC. Therefore, the ionospheric slab thickness is a significant parameter representative of the ionosphere. In this paper, the continuous GPS observations in South Korea are firstly used to study the equivalent slab thickness (EST) and its seasonal variability. The averaged diurnal medians of December January February (DJF), March April May (MAM), June July August (JJA) and September October November (SON) in 2003 have been considered to represent the winter, spring, summer and autumn seasons, respectively. The results show that the systematic diurnal changes of TEC, NmF2 and EST significantly appeared in each season and the higher values of TEC and NmF2 are observed during the equinoxes (semiannual anomaly) as well as in the mid-daytime of each season. The EST is significantly smaller in winter than in summer, but with a consistent variation pattern. During 14 16 LT in daytime, the larger EST values are observed in spring and autumn, while the smaller ones are in summer and winter. The peaks of EST diurnal variation are around 10 18 LT which are probably caused by the action of the thermospheric wind and the plasmapheric flow into the F2-region.

  6. Very Low Frequency Remote Sensing of the Ionosphere and Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M.

    2013-05-01

    This review talk will explore the technique of Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) remote sensing of the ionosphere and magnetosphere, in which ground-based transmitter beacons (nominally for submarine communications) are used as a probe wave to study the D-region of the ionosphere (60-90 km), a layer is too low for satellites and too high for balloons. Guided efficiently by the Earth-ionosphere waveguide, VLF waves can be used on a global level, to sensitively quantify any ionospheric disturbance in the D-region. These include the impacts of solar flares, lightning heating (both the EMP and the quasi-static field changes), electron precipitation from lightning, and cosmic gamma-ray bursts. We will review many experimental and modeling efforts that have been made over the past several decades, including recent work on the transionospheric absorption of VLF waves from transmitters and lightning radio emissions. We will also review recent international efforts to build a global network of VLF receivers under the umbrella of the United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative.

  7. Whistler wave-induced ionospheric plasma turbulence: Source mechanisms and remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradipta, R.; Rooker, L. A.; Whitehurst, L. N.; Lee, M. C.; Ross, L. M.; Sulzer, M. P.; Gonzalez, S.; Tepley, C.; Aponte, N.; See, B. Z.; Hu, K. P.

    2013-10-01

    We report a series of experiments conducted at Arecibo Observatory in the past, aimed at the investigation of 40.75 kHz whistler wave interactions with ionospheric plasmas and the inner radiation belts at L=1.35. The whistler waves are launched from a Naval transmitter (code-named NAU) operating in Aguadilla, Puerto Rico at the frequency and power of 40.75 kHz and 100 kW, respectively. Arecibo radar, CADI, and optical instruments were used to monitor the background ionospheric conditions and detect the induced ionospheric plasma effects. Four-wave interaction processes produced by whistler waves in the ionosphere can excite lower hybrid waves, which can accelerate ionospheric electrons. Furthermore, whistler waves propagating into the magnetosphere can trigger precipitation of energetic electrons from the radiation belts. Radar and optical measurements can distinguish wave-wave and wave-particle interaction processes occurring at different altitudes. Electron acceleration by different mechanisms can be verified from the radar measurements of plasma lines. To facilitate the coupling of NAU-launched 40.75 kHz whistler waves into the ionosphere, we can rely on naturally occurring spread F irregularities to serve as ionospheric ducts. We can also use HF wave-created ducts/artificial waveguides, as demonstrated in our earlier Arecibo experiments and recent Gakona experiments at HAARP. The newly constructed Arecibo HF heater will be employed in our future experiments, which can extend the study of whistler wave interactions with the ionosphere and the magnetosphere/radiation belts as well as the whistler wave conjugate propagation between Arecibo and Puerto Madryn, Argentina.

  8. Multilayer Model: A New Regional Ionospheric Model For Near Real-Time Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnet, N.; Weber, R.

    2012-12-01

    The ionosphere is part of the upper atmosphere which affects electromagnetic waves by its ionization. The resulting propagation delay is frequency dependent, so it can be determined with dual frequency measurements. In case of single frequency users ionospheric models are used to correct the measurements. At the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics (Vienna University of Technology) a new ionospheric model, labeled Multilayer Model, is under development. It consists of nine horizontal equidistant electron layers within the height range of the F2 layer, where the maximum of the ionization can be found. The remaining ionospheric layers (e.g. the E-layers) are currently not considered. The electron content of each of the nine layers is obtained from a simple model with very few parameters, like the current maximum VTEC and weighting functions to account for the spherical distance between the coordinates of the electron maximum and the IPP-points of interest. All parameters are calculated with hourly time resolution from a combination of global (IGS-stations) and regional GNSS observation data. The Multilayer Model focuses on regional densification of global ionosphere models (e.g. IGS VTEC SH models) by means of a small and easy predictable set of parameters. The final ionospheric TEC grids provided by IGS (International GNSS Service) have a resolution of 2 hours x 5° Longitude x 2.5° Latitude. Daily files can be downloaded from the IGS web page (http://www.igs.org/). IRI (International Reference Ionosphere) is a joint project of the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) and the International Union of Radio Science (URSI). An empirical standard model of the ionosphere is provided which is based on a worldwide network of ionosondes, incoherent scatter radars and other data sources. In this presentation the VTEC values calculated with the regional Multilayer Model are compared to the results of the IGS global TEC grids and IRI. This comparison covers days with low

  9. Metrology and ionospheric observation standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panshin, Evgeniy; Minligareev, Vladimir; Pronin, Anton

    Accuracy and ionospheric observation validity are urgent trends nowadays. WMO, URSI and national metrological and standardisation services bring forward requirements and descriptions of the ionospheric observation means. Researches in the sphere of metrological and standardisation observation moved to the next level in the Russian Federation. Fedorov Institute of Applied Geophysics (IAG) is in charge of ionospheric observation in the Russian Federation and the National Technical Committee, TC-101 , which was set up on the base of IAG- of the standardisation in the sphere. TC-101 can be the platform for initiation of the core international committee in the network of ISO The new type of the ionosounde “Parus-A” is engineered, which is up to the national requirements. “Parus-A” calibration and test were conducted by National metrological Institute (NMI) -D.I. Mendeleyev Institute for Metrology (VNIIM), signed CIMP MRA in 1991. VNIIM is a basic NMI in the sphere of Space weather (including ionospheric observations), the founder of which was celebrated chemist and metrologist Dmitriy I. Mendeleyev. Tests and calibration were carried out for the 1st time throughout 50-year-history of ionosonde exploitation in Russia. The following metrological characteristics were tested: -measurement range of radiofrequency time delay 0.5-10 ms; -time measurement inaccuracy of radio- frequency pulse ±12mcs; -frequency range of radio impulse 1-20 MHz ; -measurement inaccuracy of radio impulse carrier frequency± 5KHz. For example, the sound impulse simulator that was built-in in the ionosounde was used for measurement range of radiofrequency time delay testing. The number of standards on different levels is developed. - “Ionospheric observation guidance”; - “The Earth ionosphere. Terms and definitions”.

  10. Artificial plasma cusp generated by upper hybrid instabilities in HF heating experiments at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Spencer; Snyder, Arnold

    2013-05-01

    High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program digisonde was operated in a fast mode to record ionospheric modifications by the HF heating wave. With the O mode heater of 3.2 MHz turned on for 2 min, significant virtual height spread was observed in the heater off ionograms, acquired beginning the moment the heater turned off. Moreover, there is a noticeable bump in the virtual height spread of the ionogram trace that appears next to the plasma frequency (~ 2.88 MHz) of the upper hybrid resonance layer of the HF heating wave. The enhanced spread and the bump disappear in the subsequent heater off ionograms recorded 1 min later. The height distribution of the ionosphere in the spread situation indicates that both electron density and temperature increases exceed 10% over a large altitude region (> 30 km) from below to above the upper hybrid resonance layer. This "mini cusp" (bump) is similar to the cusp occurring in daytime ionograms at the F1-F2 layer transition, indicating that there is a small ledge in the density profile reminiscent of F1-F2 layer transitions. Two parametric processes exciting upper hybrid waves as the sidebands by the HF heating waves are studied. Field-aligned purely growing mode and lower hybrid wave are the respective decay modes. The excited upper hybrid and lower hybrid waves introduce the anomalous electron heating which results in the ionization enhancement and localized density ledge. The large-scale density irregularities formed in the heat flow, together with the density irregularities formed through the parametric instability, give rise to the enhanced virtual height spread. The results of upper hybrid instability analysis are also applied to explain the descending feature in the development of the artificial ionization layers observed in electron cyclotron harmonic resonance heating experiments.

  11. Fine structure of artificial auroral rays

    SciTech Connect

    Mishin, E.V.; Ivchenko, V.N.; Milinevskii, G.P.

    1981-01-01

    Luminosity height profiles measured in the ray of artificial and natural auroras by highly sensitive television equipment with a super-orthicon are presented. It is noted that the photographic registration of the video monitor display image was made at a rate of 5 frames/sec and an exposition time of 0.17 sec. The artificial auroras were generated by electron beams with an energy of 7.2 keV injected into the ionosphere from a rocket. Seven photos are obtained showing a double-peak luminosity distribution.

  12. The Venus Ionosphere as seen by the Radio Science Experiment on Venera-15 and Venera-16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrik, Anatoly; Gavrik, Yury; Kopnina, Tatiana; Bondarenko, Michael

    This report presents reprocessed results of the radio occultation experiments in the Venus ionosphere carried out by Venera-15, -16 spacecraft in 1983-1984. High stability and coherence of two monochromatic signals (at 1 and 4 GHz) allowed for better precision in determining the influence of atmosphere and ionosphere on radio wave propagation. As a result the existence of the adiabatic invariant in radio occultation was observed experimentally and explained theoretically. The fact that the adiabatic invariant was maintained as the ray moved from plasma to neutral medium let us identify interdependent oscillations of both neutral and ionized medium in the stratified system of atmosphere/ionosphere. In the data provided by the Venera-15, -16 occultation experiments, periodic perturbations of medium density were discovered near the lower boundary of the day ionosphere on Venus, whose level exceeds random variations. Periodic oscillations in electron concentration on the vertical scale of 5-10 km at altitudes between 90 and 115 km were detected. Iterative solution of the forward occultation problem helped to determine electron concentration profiles in the lower ionosphere, describing its layered structure. This report shows that Venus Express occultation data provided by ESA confirms the existence of the adiabatic invariant, which offers means to extract information about the layered structure of the Venusian ionosphere. The work is partially supported by the RAS Presidium Program 22.

  13. Modulation of the ionosphere by Pc5 waves observed simultaneously by GPS/TEC and EISCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belakhovsky, V.; Pilipenko, V.; Murr, D.; Fedorov, E.; Kozlovsky, A.

    2016-06-01

    Earlier studies demonstrated that the monitoring of the ionospheric total electron content (TEC) by global satellite navigation systems is a powerful method to study the propagation of transient disturbances in the ionosphere, induced by internal gravity waves. This technique has turned out to be sensitive enough to detect ionospheric signatures of magnetohydrodynamic waves as well. However, the effect of TEC modulation by ULF waves is not well examined as a responsible mechanism has not been firmly identified. During periods with intense Pc5 waves distinct pulsations with the same periodicity were found in the TEC data from high-latitude GPS receivers in Scandinavia. We analyze jointly responses in TEC variations and EISCAT ionospheric parameters to global Pc5 pulsations during the recovery phase of the strong magnetic storms on October 31, 2003. Comparison of periodic fluctuations of the electron density at different altitudes from EISCAT data shows that main contribution into TEC pulsations is provided by the lower ionosphere, up to ~150 km, that is the E-layer and lower F-layer. This observational fact favors the TEC modulation mechanism by field-aligned plasma transport induced by Alfven wave. Analytical estimates and numerical modeling support the effectiveness of this mechanism. Though the proposed hypothesis is basically consistent with the analyzed event, the correspondence between magnetic and ionospheric oscillations is not always perfect, so further studies need to be conducted to understand fully the TEC modulations associated with Pc5 pulsations.

  14. Influence of meteorological storms on ionospheric parameters in Baltic region in 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, Ivan; Borchevkina, Olga; Dadashev, Ruslan; Ilminskaya, Aleksandra

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents observations of atmospheric and ionospheric parameters during strong meteorological disturbances (storms) in the Kaliningrad region. The critical frequency of the F2 layer (foF2) and the total electron content (TEC) were observed at the station Kaliningrad (20 °E, 54.20 °N). Atmospheric pressure and wind were taken to be the atmospheric parameters under study. The analysis of ionospheric observations has shown that during meteorological storms the amplitude of diurnal variations in TEC decreases to 50 %; and in foF2, to 15 % as compared to quiet days. The revealed changes in ionospheric conditions during meteorological storms are regularly registered and represent a characteristic feature of the meteorological effect on the ionosphere.

  15. ASPERA/Phobos measurements of the ion outflow from the Martian ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, R.; Borg, H.; Hultqvist, B. ); Zakharov, A.; Barabasj, S.W.; Dubinin, E.M.; Pissarenko, N. ); Pellinen, R.; Koskinen, H.; Liede, I. )

    1990-05-01

    This report reviews the first results on the ionospheric ion outflow in the Martian magnetosphere by the ion composition experiment ASPERA on Phobos-2. The measurements show that Mars is characterized by a strong loss of plasma from its topside ionosphere. This loss results from both ion pick-up due to mass-loading of the solar wind in the Martian boundary layer and an acceleration mechanism, quite similar to that observed above the Earth's auroral oval, providing intense ionospheric O{sup +} beams of energies up to several keV. A preliminary estimate of the ionospheric outflow from Mars indicates that the planet at present is losing oxygen at a rate of {approx} 3 {times} 10{sup 25} ions/s. This corresponds to an evacuation of its present total atmospheric oxygen content (contained in CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}) in less than 100 million years.

  16. The response of plasma density to breaking inertial gravity wave in the lower regions of ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wenbo Mahalov, Alex

    2014-04-15

    We present a three-dimensional numerical study for the E and lower F region ionosphere coupled with the neutral atmosphere dynamics. This model is developed based on a previous ionospheric model that examines the transport patterns of plasma density given a prescribed neutral atmospheric flow. Inclusion of neutral dynamics in the model allows us to examine the charge-neutral interactions over the full evolution cycle of an inertial gravity wave when the background flow spins up from rest, saturates and eventually breaks. Using Lagrangian analyses, we show the mixing patterns of the ionospheric responses and the formation of ionospheric layers. The corresponding plasma density in this flow develops complex wave structures and small-scale patches during the gravity wave breaking event.

  17. Characterizing GPS radio occultation loss of lock due to ionospheric weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xinan; Schreiner, William S.; Pedatella, Nicholas M.; Kuo, Ying-Hwa

    2016-04-01

    Transient loss of lock is one of the key space weather effects on the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). Based on the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) observations during 2007-2011, we have analyzed the signal cycle slip (CS) occurrence comprehensively and its correlation to the ionospheric weather phenomena such as sporadic E (Es), equatorial F region irregularity (EFI), and the ionospheric equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA). The high vertical resolution of RO observations enables us to distinguish the CS resulting from different ionospheric layers clearly on a global scale. In the E layer, the CS is dominated by the Es occurrence, while in the F layer, the CS is mainly related to the EIA and EFI at low and equatorial latitudes. In the polar region, the CS is primarily related to polar cap electron density gradients. The overall average CS (>6 cycles) occurrence is ~23% per occultation, with the E (50-150 km) and F (150-600 km) layers contributing ~8.3% and ~14.7%, respectively. Awareness of the effect of the ionospheric weather on the CS of the low Earth orbit (LEO)-based GNSS signal could be beneficial to a variety of applications, including the LEO-based GNSS data processing and the corresponding hardware/firmware design.

  18. Radar soundings of the ionosphere of Mars.

    PubMed

    Gurnett, D A; Kirchner, D L; Huff, R L; Morgan, D D; Persoon, A M; Averkamp, T F; Duru, F; Nielsen, E; Safaeinili, A; Plaut, J J; Picardi, G

    2005-12-23

    We report the first radar soundings of the ionosphere of Mars with the MARSIS (Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding) instrument on board the orbiting Mars Express spacecraft. Several types of ionospheric echoes are observed, ranging from vertical echoes caused by specular reflection from the horizontally stratified ionosphere to a wide variety of oblique and diffuse echoes. The oblique echoes are believed to arise mainly from ionospheric structures associated with the complex crustal magnetic fields of Mars. Echoes at the electron plasma frequency and the cyclotron period also provide measurements of the local electron density and magnetic field strength.

  19. Investigation of the Quality of a new Regional Model of the Ionospheric Electron Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnet, N.; Weber, R.

    2012-04-01

    The ionosphere is part of the upper atmosphere which affects electromagnetic waves by its ionization. The resulting propagation delay is frequency dependent, so it can be determined with dual frequency measurements. In case of single frequency users ionospheric models are used to correct the measurements. At the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics (Vienna University of Technology) a new ionospheric model, labeled Multilayer Model, is under development. It consists of nine horizontal equidistant electron layers within the height range of the F2 layer, where the maximum of the ionization can be found. The remaining ionospheric layers are currently not considered. The electron content of each of the nine layers is obtained from a simple model with very few parameters, like the current maximum VTEC and weighting functions to account for the spherical distance between coordinates of the sub-sun point and the points of interest. All parameters are calculated with hourly time resolution from global and regional GNSS observation data. The IRI (International Reference Ionosphere) is a joint project of the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) and the International Union of Radio Science (URSI). An empirical standard model of the ionosphere is provided which is based on a worldwide network of ionosondes, incoherent scatter radars and other data sources. The most recent available IRI model is version IRI2011. In this presentation slant TEC-values calculated with the Multilayer Model are compared to the results of IRI in order to evaluate the new model. The research is done within the project GIOMO (next Generation near real-time IOnospheric MOdels) which is funded by the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG).

  20. Using SDO-EVE Satellite Data to Model for the First Time how Large Solar Flares Influence the Earths Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Joseph; Sojka, Jan; Schunk, Robert; David, Michael; Woods, Tom; Eparvier, Frank

    2012-10-01

    The earth's ionosphere is very important in our everyday life. During large solar flares the ionosphere expands to the point of disrupting communications from GPS, military, and commercial communications satellites, and even radio blackouts can occur. The EVE instrument on the SDO satellite has given unprecedented spectral resolution for the Extreme Ultraviolet(EUV) spectrum with a time cadence of 10 seconds. This has made it possible to analyze flare spectra as never before. Using the Time Dependent Ionospheric Model (TDIM) we have input this new spectral data for large solar flares and analyzed the effect on the ionosphere. We take as a test case the X1.6 flare on March 9, 2011. Even this minor X-class provides insight into how the ionospheric layers respond differently to solar flares.

  1. Long-lived artificial ion clouds in the earth's ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Milinevsky, G.P. ); Kashirin, A.I. ); Romanovsky, Yu.A. ); Stenbaek-Nielson, H.C. ); Kelley, M.C. )

    1993-06-07

    The authors report on two observations made over the Caribbean during the summer of 1991 of barium ion cloud releases, ten hours after the clouds were released. One release was made in the morning twilight, and one in the evening twilight, and each was observed again in the following twilight period by a low light level TV imager and a TV spectrograph onboard a Russian research vessel. These observations were very surprising at the time, but the authors present arguments as to why in retrospect they may not be so unusual in practise. Such cloud releases may provide very sensitive tests of ionspheric convection models.

  2. Theory for modeling the equatorial evening ionosphere and the origin of the shear in the horizontal plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Haerendel, G.; Eccles, J.V.; Cakir, S. )

    1992-02-01

    Companion papers in this series present (1) the role of equatorial E region postsunset ionosphere, (2) the origin of horizontal plasma shear flow in the postsunset equatorial ionosphere (this paper), (3) the Colored Bubbles experiments results, and (4) computer simulations of artificial initiation of plasma density depletions (bubbles) in the equatorial ionosphere. Within this paper, equations describing the time evolution of the equatorial ionosphere are developed using flux tube integrated and flux tube weighted quantities which model the chemistry, dynamics, and electrodynamics of the equatorial ionosphere. The resulting two-dimensional set of equations can be used to investigate equatorial ionosphere. The resulting two-dimensional set of equations can be used to investigate equatorial electric fields neglecting small-scale phenomena ({lambda} < 1 km). An immediate result derived from the integrated current equations is an equation describing the physics of the shear in the horizontal flow of the equatorial plasma during the evening hours. The profile of the horizontal flow has three important contributing terms relating to the neutral wind dynamo, Hall conduction, and the equatorial electrojet current divergence. Using a one-dimensional model of the velocity shear equation and the integrated ionosphere transport equations, a time history of the development of the shear feature during postsunset hours is presented. The one-dimensional model results are compared to the velocity shear measurements from the Colored Bubbles experiments.

  3. Using Radio-Induced Aurora to Observe Ionospheric Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P.; Gondarenko, N.; Guzdar, P.; Huba, J.; Ossakow, S.; Djuth, F.; Tepley, C.; Sulzer, M.; Kagan, L.; Kelley, M.

    Two-dimensional images of F- and E- layers have been obtained using the technique called radio-induced aurora (RIA). This technique makes the plasma layers glow in the ionosphere glow when being stimulated by high power radio waves. Normally the irregularities in the ionosphere do not radiate strong enough visible emissions to be observed from the ground. Experiments at Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico and the SURA facility in Russia have shown that the plasma structures can be made to glow at 630.0 nm, 557.7 nm and other wavelengths by illuminating them by HF radio waves with effective radiated powers of 80 megawatts. The regions of the sporadic-E layers that have electron densities greater than the critical density for reflection of the radio waves emit electrons that collide with and excite atmospheric atomic oxygen and molecular nitrogen. A charge-coupled-device (CCD) imager located on the ground is used to capture images of the glowing E and F-region structures. The camera exposure- times were in the range of 15 to 45 seconds. The images obtained using this technique show a wide variety of both field-aligned and wind-aligned irregularities. Some layers cover the antenna pattern cone illuminated by the radio wave beam. Other layers show strong modulations by both plasma and neutral instabilities. Two-dimensional computer simulations of the coupling between neutral winds, electric fields and the ion layers simulate the structure in the images.

  4. Venera-9,-10 and Venera-15,-16 occultation data: proposals for updating a model of Venus ionosphere (VIRA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrik, Anatoly; Kopnina, Tatiana; Bondarenko, Michael; Gavrik, Yury

    This work aims at obtaining useful properties of Venusian ionosphere by re-examining dual-frequency occultation data from Venera-9,-10,-15, and -16 missions. High precision analysis of Venusian ionosphere was ensured by both high stability and coherence of radio signals with 32 cm and 8 cm wavelengths, and the fact that the 32 cm radio signal is highly sensitive to refraction on layered ionospheric structures. Occultation experiments in Venera-9, -10, -15, and -16 missions covered solar zenith angles between 10 and 90 degrees in daytime, and between 90 and 166 degrees at night. 189 electron density profiles were obtained from the data. These results demonstrate that ionosphere is highly susceptible to changes in solar zenith angles and solar activity levels. Daytime ionosphere is highly variable above 170 km in altitude. Electron density profiles frequently vary from a fully developed ionosphere which has ionopause at 1000 km to a compressed ionosphere with ionopause at 250 km. The main electron profile maximum usually lies within a few kilometres of the 142 km altitude point. The lower maximum is usually located approximately 13 km below. The lower boundary of daytime ionosphere can exist in the 80-100 km interval. We also detected interdependent oscillations of the neutral and ionized medium between 60 and 115 km. Nighttime ionosphere also varies strongly. Electron density profiles may frequently have 2 peaks. The altitude of the main maximum (142 km) is close to that of the daytime ionosphere; the lower peak lies in the 120-130 km interval. No ionization below 110 km was observed. The obtained results can serve to improve our understanding of the properties of Venusian ionosphere and atmosphere. This work is partially supported by Program 22 of the Presidium of RAS.

  5. Magnetospheric-ionospheric Poynting flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thayer, Jeffrey P.

    1994-01-01

    Over the past three years of funding SRI, in collaboration with the University of Texas at Dallas, has been involved in determining the total electromagnetic energy flux into the upper atmosphere from DE-B electric and magnetic field measurements and modeling the electromagnetic energy flux at high latitudes, taking into account the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system. This effort has been very successful in establishing the DC Poynting flux as a fundamental quantity in describing the coupling of electromagnetic energy between the magnetosphere and ionosphere. The DE-B satellite electric and magnetic field measurements were carefully scrutinized to provide, for the first time, a large data set of DC, field-aligned, Poynting flux measurement. Investigations describing the field-aligned Poynting flux observations from DE-B orbits under specific geomagnetic conditions and from many orbits were conducted to provide a statistical average of the Poynting flux distribution over the polar cap. The theoretical modeling effort has provided insight into the observations by formulating the connection between Poynting's theorem and the electromagnetic energy conversion processes that occur in the ionosphere. Modeling and evaluation of these processes has helped interpret the satellite observations of the DC Poynting flux and improved our understanding of the coupling between the ionosphere and magnetosphere.

  6. Thermospheric topside neutral density, ionospheric anomalous electric field and resistivity measurements by active experiment at EISCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosch, Michael; Ogawa, Yasunobu; Rietveld, Michael; Blagoveshchenskaya, Nataly; Yamazaki, Yosuke

    2016-07-01

    We have developed an active ground-based technique to estimate the topside thermospheric neutral density as well as topside ionospheric anomalous electric field and resistivity at EISCAT, combining the EISCAT UHF radar, HF heater and optics. When pumping the ionosphere the F-region electron temperature is significantly raised, increasing the upward plasma pressure gradient in the topside ionosphere, resulting in observed ion up-flow along the magnetic field line. Simultaneously, pump-induced suprathermal electrons produce artificial optical emissions. Using the modified ion-momentum equation, the thermospheric neutral density is estimated. Alternatively, using the MSIS model the field-aligned anomalous electric field is estimated. From the optical data the suprathermal electron flux is estimated, giving an estimate of the anomalous resistivity. Results from recent observations at EISCAT are presented.

  7. Observation and Modeling of Ionospheric Scintillation Associated with Irregularities in the Polar Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshi, S.; Zhang, Q. H.; Ma, Y. Z.; Wang, Y.; Zanyang, X.

    2015-12-01

    It is well understood that Ionospheric scintillation is a consequence of random electron density fluctuations present in the ionosphere. They appear at all local time of the polar regions therefore, it is essential to understand their evolution and dynamics. Using Madrigal database and South Pole Scintillation Receiver data an empirical model of ionospheric scintillation has been proposed for South Pole. Model has been validated and compared with the observations. We have investigated some interesting scintillation patterns associated with polar patches and structured flux of precipitated electrons. Our results illustrate well the irregularity structures causing ionospheric scintillation at the polar ionosphere. Limitations of our modeling approach is discussed. Keywords: Ionospheric irregularities, polar patches, scintillation.

  8. Experimental investigation of the ionospheric hysteresis effect on the threshold excitation level of the Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE) during heating at the second electron gyro-harmonic frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samimi, A.; Scales, W.; Cruz, M.; Isham, B.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    Recent experimental observations of the stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE) spectrum during heating at the second electron gyro-harmonic show structures ordered by ion gyro-frequency. The proposed generation mechanism considers parametric decay of a pump upper hybrid/electron Bernstein (UH/EB) wave into another UH/EB and a group of neutralized ion Bernstein waves. The presumption of the proposed mechanism is that the pump electromagnetic wave is converted into the UH/EB wave. This conversion process generates field aligned irregularity which exhibits hysteresis effect. The predicted ionospheric hysteresis effect is studied during the PARS 2012 at HAARP. The preliminary results are presented for the first time. Also, experimental study of the effects of 1) the transmitter beam angle and 2) the transmitter frequency offset relative to the second electron gyro-harmonic frequency on the ion gyro-harmonic structures in the SEE spectrum are provided. The aforementioned observations are compared to the predictions of the analytical model. Possible connection of the SEE spectral features and artificially generated ionospheric descending layer is also discussed

  9. A Campaign to Study Equatorial Ionospheric Phenomena over Guam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habash Krause, L.; Balthazor, R.; Dearborn, M.; Enloe, L.; Lawrence, T.; McHarg, M.; Petrash, D.; Reinisch, B. W.; Stuart, T.

    2007-05-01

    With the development of a series of ground-based and space-based experiments, the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) is in the process of planning a campaign to investigate the relationship between equatorial ionospheric plasma dynamics and a variety of space weather effects, including: 1) ionospheric plasma turbulence in the F region, and 2) scintillation of radio signals at low latitudes. A Digisonde Portable Sounder DPS-4 will operate from the island of Guam (with a magnetic latitude of 5.6° N) and will provide measurements of ionospheric total electron content (TEC), vertical drifts of the bulk ionospheric plasma, and electron density profiles. Additionally, a dual-frequency GPS TEC/scintillation monitor will be located along the Guam magnetic meridian at a magnetic latitude of approximately 15° N. In campaign mode, we will combine these ground-based observations with those collected from space during USAFA's FalconSAT-3 and FalconSAT-5 low-earth orbit satellite missions, the first of which is scheduled to be active over a period of several months beginning in the 2007 calendar year. The satellite experiments are designed to characterize in situ irregularities in plasma density, and include measurements of bulk ion density and temperature, minority-to- majority ion mixing ratios, small scale (10 cm to 1 m) plasma turbulence, and ion distribution spectra in energy with sufficient resolution for observations of non-thermalized distributions that may be associated with velocity- space instabilities. Specific targets of investigation include: a) a comparison of plasma turbulence observed on- orbit with spread F on ionograms as measured with the Digisonde, b) a correlation between the vertical lifting of the ionospheric layer over Guam and the onset of radio scintillation activity along the Guam meridian at 15° N magnetic latitude, and c) a correlation between on-orbit turbulence and ionospheric scintillation at 15° N magnetic latitude. These relationships

  10. Multiparametric study of polar ionosphere on both hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Giulia; Alfonsi, Lucilla; Spogli, Luca; Cesaroni, Claudio; Sgrigna, Vittorio

    2016-04-01

    The polar ionosphere is a complex system in which several actors concur to establish the observed medium. Indeed the coupling between the interplanetary magnetic field and the earth magnetic field determines a high degree of complexity of the polar ionosphere, which is directly exposed to the variations of the solar wind. This configuration results in a strong sensitivity of the polar ionosphere to the perturbation phenomena caused by solar events which may result in a wide variety of spatial and temporal dimensions of the plasma electron density irregularities. Polar ionospheric irregularities may seriously jeopardize performance and reliability level of the navigation and positioning technological systems, such as GPS or the nascent Galileo. Therefore, knowledge of the physical state of the upper atmosphere ionized layers becomes essential to predict and mitigate events that may affect the use of modern technology, causing economic damage and, in severe cases, even jeopardizing the safety of human beings. In this context, a careful and thorough investigation that covers a wide range of geospatial different disturbances, observed in circumterrestrial space and on the ground, can provide the necessary basis for a real advance of the current knowledge. In this frame, the aim of this work is to contribute to the study of the effects of perturbation induced by the Sun on the polar ionosphere of both the hemispheres, through the analysis and interpretation of the measures available before, during and after the occurrence of an event of disturbance. We propose a multiparametric approach, that combines the information derived from measurements acquired by ground-based and space-based stations, to have a broad spectrum of information necessary to characterize the ionospheric disturbances on different time scales (from milliseconds to days) and spatial scales (from millimetres to hundreds meters/kilometres). The period chosen for this study is the entire month of March

  11. Artificial intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Firschein, O.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on artificial intelligence. Topics considered include knowledge engineering, expert systems, applications of artificial intelligence to scientific reasoning, planning and problem solving, error recovery in robots through failure reason analysis, programming languages, natural language, speech recognition, map-guided interpretation of remotely-sensed imagery, and image understanding architectures.

  12. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornburg, David D.

    1986-01-01

    Overview of the artificial intelligence (AI) field provides a definition; discusses past research and areas of future research; describes the design, functions, and capabilities of expert systems and the "Turing Test" for machine intelligence; and lists additional sources for information on artificial intelligence. Languages of AI are also briefly…

  13. The energetics of Titan's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roboz, A.; Nagy, A. F.

    1994-02-01

    We have developed a comprehensive model to study the dynamics and energetics of the ionosphere of Titan. We solved the one-dimensional, time-dependent, coupled continuity and momentum equations for several ion species, together with single ion and electron energy equations, in order to calculate density, velocity, and temperature profiles. Calculations were carried out for several cases corresponding to different local times and configurations of the Titan-Saturn system. In our model the effects of horizontal magnetic fields were assumed to be negligible, except for their effect on reducing the electron and ion thermal conductivities and inhibiting vertical transport in the subram region. The ionospheric density peak was found to be at an altitude of about 1100 km, in accordance with earlier model calculations. The ionosphere is chemically controlled below an altitude of about 1500 km. Above this level, ion densities differ significantly from their chemical equilibrium values due to strong upward ion velocities. Heat is deposited in a narrow region around the ionospheric peak, resulting in temperature profiles increasing sharply and reaching nearly constant values of 800-1000 deg K for electrons and 300 deg K for ions in the topside, assuming conditions appropriate for the wake region. In the subram region magnetic correction factors make the electron heat conductivities negligible, resulting in electron temperatures increasing strongly with altitude and reaching values in the order of 5000 deg K at our upper boundary located at 2200 km. Ion chemical heating is found to play an important role in shaping the ion energy balance in Titan's ionosphere.

  14. Moment expansion for ionospheric range error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallinckrodt, A.; Reich, R.; Parker, H.; Berbert, J.

    1972-01-01

    On a plane earth, the ionospheric or tropospheric range error depends only on the total refractivity content or zeroth moment of the refracting layer and the elevation angle. On a spherical earth, however, the dependence is more complex; so for more accurate results it has been necessary to resort to complex ray-tracing calculations. A simple, high-accuracy alternative to the ray-tracing calculation is presented. By appropriate expansion of the angular dependence in the ray-tracing integral in a power series in height, an expression is obtained for the range error in terms of a simple function of elevation angle, E, at the expansion height and of the mth moment of the refractivity, N, distribution about the expansion height. The rapidity of convergence is heavily dependent on the choice of expansion height. For expansion heights in the neighborhood of the centroid of the layer (300-490 km), the expansion to N = 2 (three terms) gives results accurate to about 0.4% at E = 10 deg. As an analytic tool, the expansion affords some insight on the influence of layer shape on range errors in special problems.

  15. A refracting radio telescope. [using ionosphere as lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P.; Da Rosa, A. V.

    1977-01-01

    Observations of extraterrestrial radio sources at the lower end of the radio frequency spectrum are limited by reflection of waves from the topside ionosphere and by the large size of antenna apertures necessary for the realization of narrow beamwidths. The use of the ionosphere as a lens is considered. The lens is formed by the release of chemicals such as H2 and H2O at the F2-layer peak. These chemicals promote dissociative recombination of O(+) in the ionosphere resulting in a local reduction in plasma density. Gradients in electron density in the vicinity of the gas release tend to focus rays propagating through the depleted region. Preliminary calculations indicate that a lens capable of focusing cosmic radio waves in the 1 to 10 MHz frequency range may be produced by the release of 100 kg of H2 at the peak of the nighttime F layer. The beamwidth of a refracting radio telescope using this lens may be less than 1/5 degree.

  16. Observing system experiments with an ionospheric electrodynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durazo, J.; Kostelich, E.; Mahalov, A.; Tang, W.

    2016-04-01

    We assess the performance of an ensemble Kalman filter for data assimilation and forecasting of ion density in a model of the ionosphere given noisy observations of varying sparsity. The domain of the numerical model is a mid-latitude ionosphere between 80 and 440 km. This domain includes the D-E layers and the peak in the F layer in the ionosphere. The model simulates the time evolution of an ion density field and the coupled electrostatic potential as charge-neutral winds from gravity waves propagate up from the stratosphere. Forecasts are generated for an ensemble of initial conditions, and synthetic observations, which are generated at random locations in the model domain, are assimilated into the ensemble at time intervals corresponding to about a half-period of the gravity wave. The data assimilation scheme, called the local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF), incorporates observations within a fixed radius of each grid point to compute a unique linear combination of the forecast ensembles at each grid point. The collection of updated grid points forms the updated initial conditions (analysis ensemble) for the next forecast. Even when the observation density is spatially sparse, accurate analyses of the ion density still can be obtained, but the results depend on the size of the local region used. The LETKF is robust to large levels of Gaussian noise in the observations. Our results suggest that the LETKF merits consideration as a data assimilation scheme for space weather forecasting.

  17. Equatorial ionospheric irregularities produced by the Brazilian ionospheric modification experiment (BIME)

    SciTech Connect

    Klobuchar, J.A.; Abdu, M.A.

    1989-03-01

    On two separate evenings in September 1982, rockets were launched into the bottomside equatorial F2 region off the coast of Natal, Brazil, to inject chemicals, consisting of mainly H2O and CO2, to create a hole in ionization. The chemicals were injected near the height where the density gradient was steepest, and at a time when the F2 region was rising rapidly, to see whether plasma bubble irregularities could be generated from instabilities triggered by the ionization hole. The eastward drifts of these artificial depletions were observed by the time difference in the TEC features observed at various TEC monitoring stations, and from the changing range of oblique ionosonde echoes observed by an ionosonde located 300 km magnetically east of the chemical release point. Their subsequent evolution into plasma bubble irregularities was demonstrated from the observations of spread F echoes, strong-amplitude scintillation, and TEC depletion at distances of from 300 to 500 km eastward of the release points. The fact that similar behavior of the ionosphere was observed during the evenings of both rocket chemical releases, and on no other nights of the campaign, is strong evidence of successful artificial generation of bubble irregularities by chemical injection into the bottomside F2 region.

  18. Equatorial ionospheric irregularities produced by the Brazilian ionospheric modification experiment (BIME)

    SciTech Connect

    Klobuchar, J.A. ); Abdu, M.A. )

    1989-03-01

    On two separate evenings in September 1982, rockets were launched into the bottomside equatorial F{sub 2} region off the coast of Natal, Brazil, to inject chemicals, consisting of mainly H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}, to create a hole in ionization. The chemicals were injected near the height where the density gradient was steepest, and at a time when the F{sub 2} region was rising rapidly to see whether plasma bubble irregularities could be generated from instabilities triggered by the ionization hole. On both occasions, hole-induced depletions in total electron content (TEC) of more than 10{sup 16} el/m{sup 2} were observed over horizontal distances of at least 60 km from the chemical injection point. The eastward drifts of these artificial depletions were observed by the time difference in the TEC features observed at various TEC monitoring stations, and from the changing range of oblique ionosonde echoes observed by an ionosonde located 300 km magnetically east of the chemical release point. Their subsequent evolution into plasma bubble irregularities was demonstrated from the observations of spread F echoes, strong amplitude scintillation, and TEC depletion at distances of from 300 to 500 km eastward of the release points. The fact that similar behavior of the ionosphere was observed during the evenings of both rocket chemical releases, and on no other nights of the campaign, is strong evidence of successful artificial generation of bubble irregularities by chemical injection into the bottomside F{sub 2} region.

  19. The ionosphere disturbances observation on the Kharkiv incoherent scatter radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Iu.; Lysenko, V.

    2009-04-01

    he ionosphere plasma characteristics are responding on variations of solar and magnetic activity. The research of an ionosphere structure and dynamics is important as for understanding physics of processes and for radiophysical problems solution. The method incoherent scatter (IS) of radio waves allows determining experimentally both regular variations of the basic parameters ionosphere, and their behavior during perturbation. The equipment and measurement technique, developed by authors, are allows obtaining certain data about behavior of an ionosphere during various origin and intensity ionosphere perturbations. The Institute of Ionsphere IS radar located near Kharkiv, Ukraine (geographic coordinates: 49.6oN, 36.3oE, geomagnetic coordinates: 45.7oN, 117.8oE) was used to observe the processes in the ionosphere. The radar is operate with 100-m zenith parabolic antenna at 158 MHz with peak transmitted power of ~2.0 MW. The double-frequency measuring channel mode with compound sounding signal was employed for experiments. That provided ~ 20-km resolution in range ~100-400 km and ~100-km in range ~200-1100 km. Over a period of series of experiment are obtained data about variations of electron density simultaneous in the heights interval 100-1000 km, including three sun eclipses, two superstrong and a few moderate magnetic storms, as well as disturbance, is caused by powerful rockets starts. During strong geomagnetic storm on November 8-12, 2004 was observed night time increasing of electronic temperature up to 3000 Љ and ions temperature up to 2000K. Usually at this time temperature of ions is equal to temperature of electrons. During negative ionosphere storm was observed decreasing of electronic density at maximum F2 layer. The height of a F2 layer maximum was increased by 150 km and 70 km at daytime. The interesting phenomenon - high-power backscatter signal coherent backscatter was observed first time during geogeomagnetic storm 29-30 may 2003. A usually

  20. Regional Ionospheric Modelling for Single-Frequency Users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisits, Janina; Joldzic, Nina; Weber, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Ionospheric signal delays are a main error source in GNSS-based positioning. Thus, single-frequency receivers, which are frequently used nowadays, require additional ionospheric information to mitigate these effects. Within the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG) project Regiomontan (Regional Ionospheric Modelling for Single-Frequency Users) a new and as realistic as possible model is used to obtain precise GNSS ionospheric signal delays. These delays will be provided to single-frequency users to significantly increase positioning accuracy. The computational basis is the Thin-Shell Model. For regional modelling a thin electron layer of the underlying model is approximated by a Taylor series up to degree two. The network used includes 22 GNSS Reference Stations in Austria and nearby. First results were calculated from smoothed code observations by forming the geometry-free linear combination. Satellite and station DCBs were applied. In a least squares adjustment the model parameters, consisting of the VTEC0 at the origin of the investigated area, as well as the first and the second derivatives of the electron content in longitude and latitude, were obtained with a temporal resolution of 1 hour. The height of the layer was kept fixed. The formal errors of the model parameters suggest an accuracy of the VTEC slightly better than 1TECU for a user location within Austria. In a further step, the model parameters were derived from sole phase observations by using a levelling approach to mitigate common range biases. The formal errors of this model approach suggest an accuracy of about a few tenths of a TECU. For validation, the Regiomontan VTEC was compared to IGS TEC maps depicting a very good agreement. Further, a comparison of pseudoranges has been performed to calculate the 'true' error by forming the ionosphere-free linear combination on the one hand, and by applying the Regiomontan model to L1 pseudoranges on the other hand. The resulting differences are mostly

  1. Early MAVEN Deep Dip campaign reveals thermosphere and ionosphere variability.

    PubMed

    Bougher, S; Jakosky, B; Halekas, J; Grebowsky, J; Luhmann, J; Mahaffy, P; Connerney, J; Eparvier, F; Ergun, R; Larson, D; McFadden, J; Mitchell, D; Schneider, N; Zurek, R; Mazelle, C; Andersson, L; Andrews, D; Baird, D; Baker, D N; Bell, J M; Benna, M; Brain, D; Chaffin, M; Chamberlin, P; Chaufray, J-Y; Clarke, J; Collinson, G; Combi, M; Crary, F; Cravens, T; Crismani, M; Curry, S; Curtis, D; Deighan, J; Delory, G; Dewey, R; DiBraccio, G; Dong, C; Dong, Y; Dunn, P; Elrod, M; England, S; Eriksson, A; Espley, J; Evans, S; Fang, X; Fillingim, M; Fortier, K; Fowler, C M; Fox, J; Gröller, H; Guzewich, S; Hara, T; Harada, Y; Holsclaw, G; Jain, S K; Jolitz, R; Leblanc, F; Lee, C O; Lee, Y; Lefevre, F; Lillis, R; Livi, R; Lo, D; Ma, Y; Mayyasi, M; McClintock, W; McEnulty, T; Modolo, R; Montmessin, F; Morooka, M; Nagy, A; Olsen, K; Peterson, W; Rahmati, A; Ruhunusiri, S; Russell, C T; Sakai, S; Sauvaud, J-A; Seki, K; Steckiewicz, M; Stevens, M; Stewart, A I F; Stiepen, A; Stone, S; Tenishev, V; Thiemann, E; Tolson, R; Toublanc, D; Vogt, M; Weber, T; Withers, P; Woods, T; Yelle, R

    2015-11-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, during the second of its Deep Dip campaigns, made comprehensive measurements of martian thermosphere and ionosphere composition, structure, and variability at altitudes down to ~130 kilometers in the subsolar region. This altitude range contains the diffusively separated upper atmosphere just above the well-mixed atmosphere, the layer of peak extreme ultraviolet heating and primary reservoir for atmospheric escape. In situ measurements of the upper atmosphere reveal previously unmeasured populations of neutral and charged particles, the homopause altitude at approximately 130 kilometers, and an unexpected level of variability both on an orbit-to-orbit basis and within individual orbits. These observations help constrain volatile escape processes controlled by thermosphere and ionosphere structure and variability.

  2. Early MAVEN Deep Dip campaign reveals thermosphere and ionosphere variability.

    PubMed

    Bougher, S; Jakosky, B; Halekas, J; Grebowsky, J; Luhmann, J; Mahaffy, P; Connerney, J; Eparvier, F; Ergun, R; Larson, D; McFadden, J; Mitchell, D; Schneider, N; Zurek, R; Mazelle, C; Andersson, L; Andrews, D; Baird, D; Baker, D N; Bell, J M; Benna, M; Brain, D; Chaffin, M; Chamberlin, P; Chaufray, J-Y; Clarke, J; Collinson, G; Combi, M; Crary, F; Cravens, T; Crismani, M; Curry, S; Curtis, D; Deighan, J; Delory, G; Dewey, R; DiBraccio, G; Dong, C; Dong, Y; Dunn, P; Elrod, M; England, S; Eriksson, A; Espley, J; Evans, S; Fang, X; Fillingim, M; Fortier, K; Fowler, C M; Fox, J; Gröller, H; Guzewich, S; Hara, T; Harada, Y; Holsclaw, G; Jain, S K; Jolitz, R; Leblanc, F; Lee, C O; Lee, Y; Lefevre, F; Lillis, R; Livi, R; Lo, D; Ma, Y; Mayyasi, M; McClintock, W; McEnulty, T; Modolo, R; Montmessin, F; Morooka, M; Nagy, A; Olsen, K; Peterson, W; Rahmati, A; Ruhunusiri, S; Russell, C T; Sakai, S; Sauvaud, J-A; Seki, K; Steckiewicz, M; Stevens, M; Stewart, A I F; Stiepen, A; Stone, S; Tenishev, V; Thiemann, E; Tolson, R; Toublanc, D; Vogt, M; Weber, T; Withers, P; Woods, T; Yelle, R

    2015-11-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, during the second of its Deep Dip campaigns, made comprehensive measurements of martian thermosphere and ionosphere composition, structure, and variability at altitudes down to ~130 kilometers in the subsolar region. This altitude range contains the diffusively separated upper atmosphere just above the well-mixed atmosphere, the layer of peak extreme ultraviolet heating and primary reservoir for atmospheric escape. In situ measurements of the upper atmosphere reveal previously unmeasured populations of neutral and charged particles, the homopause altitude at approximately 130 kilometers, and an unexpected level of variability both on an orbit-to-orbit basis and within individual orbits. These observations help constrain volatile escape processes controlled by thermosphere and ionosphere structure and variability. PMID:26542579

  3. Doppler investigations of short-period ionospheric variations produced by magnetic disturbances.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, V.; Panchenko, V.; Polimatidi, V.; Ruzhin, Yu.

    In the report the results of experimental researches on excitation magnetospheric Alfven resonator by sudden magnetic disturbances and related with this an ionosphere effects are presented. The experiments were conducted with the help of the multifrequency Doppler installation of IZMIRAN since 1998. The research program consist in monitoring ionospheric disturbances related to solar activity. The measurements were conducted by a method of vertical radio sounding simultaneously on 4 frequencies. The set of selected frequencies would provide the signal reflection from Å, F1 and F2 layers of an ionosphere. The data processing consist in dynamic Doppler spectra calculation, which one allows receive the information on time responses of ionospheric disturbances. The effect, which one is discussed in the report, was watched already in the maiden experiments in April, 1998 at the moment of a substorm beginning in the polar ionosphere. It was revealed, that at the moment of a beginning of magnetic disturbance - which arrived from Tiksi Bay region (or substorm ignition area) - the Doppler displacements of sounding signal frequency (at Moscow) exhibit the synchronic variations (the observed period was about one minute duration) on all frequencies. During researches under the program HIRAC/SolarMax, which one was directed on analysis of influencing of solar activity on an ionosphere, it was possible to snap solar flare of April 26, 2001, which one has generated classic effects in an ionosphere -- sharp rise of an electron density and strong absorption of radio waves (black-out effect). The Doppler spectra on all active frequencies have shown in an instance of ignition considerable (more than 1 Hz) displacement of frequency. However most interesting events have begun after 2 day after a flash, when the magnetic disturbance began. At this time on Doppler spectra the quasiperiodic frequency drifts of radio echoes have appeared. Thus the quasiperiodic variations of Doppler

  4. Observing rapid quasi-wave ionospheric disturbance using amplitude charts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkin, Vladimir; Laryunin, Oleg; Podlesnyi, Alexey

    Data from vertical (quasi-vertical) sounding are traditionally used for determining a number of ionospheric parameters such as critical frequencies of E and F layers, peaks of these layers, and for reconstructing electron density profiles. In this respect, radio sounding is not used to its full capacity. Modern ionosondes provide additional information encoded in ionospheric echoes, including information on reflected-signal amplitude. The time dependence of the amplitude-frequency characteristic of reflected signal has been named "amplitude chart" (A-chart). Ionosondes used by the ISTP SB RAS Geophysical Observatory for constructing A-charts employ the frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) signal in a range 1.3-15 MHz. One-minute sounding interval allows a more detailed study of dynamic processes in the ionosphere. The ionosonde has a direct digital synthesizer and direct sampling receiver without automatic gain control (AGC). The absence of AGC and the high dynamic range enable determination of the relative field strength at a receiving point and registration of relative long-term variations in reflected-signal amplitude over the entire range of operating frequencies of the ionosonde. We have revealed that the passage of travelling ionospheric disturbances (TID) along with height-frequency distortion modulates amplitude characteristics of signal. The characteristic depth of the modulation reaches 40 dB. The pronounced alternate vertical stripes typical for A-charts are likely to be associated with focusing properties of TID. In order to examine the space-time structure of TID able to induce such a focusing of the radio waves, we performed ray tracing simulations. We used geometrical-optics approximation, took magneto-ionic effects into account and prescribed electron density to be a stratified electron density profile on which an undulating disturbance was superimposed. This work was supported by the RFBR grant №14-05-00259-а.

  5. Preface: International Reference Ionosphere - Progress in Ionospheric Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza Dieter; Reinisch, Bodo

    2010-01-01

    The international reference ionosphere (lRI) is the internationally recommended empirical model for the specification of ionospheric parameters supported by the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) and the International Union of Radio Science (URSI) and recognized by the International Standardization Organization (ISO). IRI is being continually improved by a team of international experts as new data become available and better models are being developed. This issue chronicles the latest phase of model updates as reported during two IRI-related meetings. The first was a special session during the Scientific Assembly of the Committee of Space Research (COSPAR) in Montreal, Canada in July 2008 and the second was an IRI Task Force Activity at the US Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs in May 2009. This work led to several improvements and additions of the model which will be included in the next version, IRI-201O. The issue is divided into three sections focusing on the improvements made in the topside ionosphere, the F-peak, and the lower ionosphere, respectively. This issue would not have been possible without the reviewing efforts of many individuals. Each paper was reviewed by two referees. We thankfully acknowledge the contribution to this issue made by the following reviewers: Jacob Adeniyi, David Altadill, Eduardo Araujo, Feza Arikan, Dieter Bilitza, Jilijana Cander, Bela Fejer, Tamara Gulyaeva, Manuel Hermindez-Pajares, Ivan Kutiev, John MacDougal, Leo McNamara, Bruno Nava, Olivier Obrou, Elijah Oyeyemi, Vadym Paznukhov, Bodo Reinisch, John Retterer, Phil Richards, Gary Sales, J.H. Sastri, Ludger Scherliess, Iwona Stanislavska, Stamir Stankov, Shin-Yi Su, Manlian Zhang, Y ongliang Zhang, and Irina Zakharenkova. We are grateful to Peggy Ann Shea for her final review and guidance as the editor-in-chief for special issues of Advances in Space Research. We thank the authors for their timely submission and their quick response to the reviewer comments and humbly

  6. Ionospheric response to the entry and explosion of the South Ural superbolide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzhin, Yu. Ya.; Kuznetsov, V. D.; Smirnov, V. M.

    2014-09-01

    The South Ural meteoroid (February 15, 2013; near the city of Chelyabinsk) is undoubtedly the best documented meteoroid in history. Its passage through the atmosphere has been recorded on videos and photographs, visually by observers, with ground-based infrasound microphones and seismographs, and by satellites in orbit. In this work, the results are presented of an analysis of the transionospheric GPS sounding data collected in the vicinity of the South Ural meteoroid site, which show a weak ionospheric effect. The ionospheric disturbances are found to be asymmetric about the explosion epicenter. The received signals are compared, both in shape and amplitude, with the reported ionospheric effects of ground level explosions with radio diagnostics. It is shown that the confident registration of ionospheric effects as acoustic gravity waves (AGWs) by means of vertical sounding and GPS technologies for ground explosions in the range of 0.26-0.6 kt casts doubt on the existing TNT equivalent estimates (up to 500 kt) for the Chelyabinsk event. The absence of effects in the magnetic field and in the ionosphere far zone at distances of 1500-2000 km from the superbolide explosion epicenter also raises a question about the possibility of an overestimated TNT equivalent. An alternative explanation is to consider the superposition of a cylindrical ballistic wave (due to the hypersonic motion of the meteoroid) with spherical shock waves caused by the multiple time points of fragmentation (multiple explosions) of the superbolide as a resulting source of the AGW impact on ionospheric layers.

  7. Low-latitude ionospheric effects of energetic electrons during a recurrent magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorova, A. V.; Huang, C.-M.; Matsumoto, H.; Dmitriev, A. V.; Kunitsyn, V. E.; Andreeva, E. S.; Nesterov, I. A.; Tsai, L.-C.

    2014-11-01

    We study a magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling at low latitudes during a moderate (corotating interaction regions/high-speed solar wind streams-driven) geomagnetic storm on 22 July 2009. Recently, it has been shown that during major (coronal mass ejection-driven) storms, quasi-trapped >30 keV electrons largely enhance below the radiation belt in the forbidden zone and produce an additional ionization in the topside ionosphere. In this work, we examine a case of the recurrent storm when the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling through the quasi-trapped electrons also may take place. Data from NOAA/Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite and Japanese Greenhouse gases Observing Satellite were used to identify the forbidden electron enhancement (FEE). We find a positive vertical gradient of the electron fluxes that indicates to the radiation belt as a source of FEE. Using global ionospheric maps, radiotomography reconstructions from beacon data and COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 radio occultation measurements, we have observed an unusually large area in the nighttime ionosphere with increased total electron content (TEC) and prominent elevation of the F layer at low latitudes that coincides with FEEs spatially and temporarily. Ionizing particles are considered as an addition source of ionization along with generally accepted mechanisms for storm time TEC increase (a positive ionospheric storm). We discuss relative contributions of the FEE and disturbance dynamo electric field in the TEC increases during the storm recovery phase.

  8. Extremely Low Ionospheric Peak Altitudes in the Polar-Hole Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.

    1999-01-01

    Vertical electron-density (N (sub e)) profiles, deduced from newly-available ISIS-II digital ionospheric topside-sounder data, are used to investigate the "polar-hole" region within the winter, nighttime polar cap ionosphere during solar minimum. The hole region is located around 0200 MLT near the poleward side of the auroral oval. Earlier investigations had revealed very low N (sub e) values in this region (down to 200/cu cm near 300 km). In the present study, such low N, values (approx. 100/cu cm) were only found near the ISIS (International Satellite for Ionospheric Study)-II altitude of 1400 km. The peak ionospheric concentration below the spacecraft remained fairly constant (approx. 10 (exp 5)/cu cm across the hole region but the altitude of the peak dropped dramatically. This peak dropped, surprisingly, to the vicinity of 100 km. These observations suggest that the earlier satellite in situ measurements, interpreted as deep holes in the ionospheric F-region concentration, could have been made during conditions of an extreme decrease in the altitude of the ionospheric N (sub e) peak. The observations, in combination with other data, indicate that the absence of an F-layer peak may be a frequent occurrence at high latitudes.

  9. Interaction of Titan's ionosphere with Saturn's magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Coates, Andrew J

    2009-02-28

    Titan is the only Moon in the Solar System with a significant permanent atmosphere. Within this nitrogen-methane atmosphere, an ionosphere forms. Titan has no significant magnetic dipole moment, and is usually located inside Saturn's magnetosphere. Atmospheric particles are ionized both by sunlight and by particles from Saturn's magnetosphere, mainly electrons, which reach the top of the atmosphere. So far, the Cassini spacecraft has made over 45 close flybys of Titan, allowing measurements in the ionosphere and the surrounding magnetosphere under different conditions. Here we review how Titan's ionosphere and Saturn's magnetosphere interact, using measurements from Cassini low-energy particle detectors. In particular, we discuss ionization processes and ionospheric photoelectrons, including their effect on ion escape from the ionosphere. We also discuss one of the unexpected discoveries in Titan's ionosphere, the existence of extremely heavy negative ions up to 10000amu at 950km altitude. PMID:19073464

  10. The dynamics of the Venus ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, K. L.

    1988-01-01

    Data from the Pioneer-Venus orbiter has demonstrated the importance of understanding ion dynamics in the Venus ionosphere. The analysis of the data has shown that during solar maximum the topside Venus ionosphere in the dark hemisphere is generated almost entirely on the dayside of the planet during solar maximum, and flows with supersonic velocities across the terminator into the nightside. The flow field in the ionosphere is mainly axially-symmetric about the sun-Venus axis, as are most measured ionospheric quantities. The primary data base used consisted of the ion velocity measurements made by the RPA during three years that periapsis of the orbiter was maintained in the Venus ionosphere. Examples of ion velocities were published and modeled. This research examined the planetary flow patterns measured in the Venus ionosphere, and the physical implications of departures from the mean flow.

  11. Interaction of Titan's ionosphere with Saturn's magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Coates, Andrew J

    2009-02-28

    Titan is the only Moon in the Solar System with a significant permanent atmosphere. Within this nitrogen-methane atmosphere, an ionosphere forms. Titan has no significant magnetic dipole moment, and is usually located inside Saturn's magnetosphere. Atmospheric particles are ionized both by sunlight and by particles from Saturn's magnetosphere, mainly electrons, which reach the top of the atmosphere. So far, the Cassini spacecraft has made over 45 close flybys of Titan, allowing measurements in the ionosphere and the surrounding magnetosphere under different conditions. Here we review how Titan's ionosphere and Saturn's magnetosphere interact, using measurements from Cassini low-energy particle detectors. In particular, we discuss ionization processes and ionospheric photoelectrons, including their effect on ion escape from the ionosphere. We also discuss one of the unexpected discoveries in Titan's ionosphere, the existence of extremely heavy negative ions up to 10000amu at 950km altitude.

  12. Mass spectrometers for studying the ionic and neutral composition of the upper layers of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shutov, M. D.

    1984-04-01

    The investigation of the ionic and neutral composition of the upper layers of the atmosphere and outer space which is of interest for solving theoretical and applied problems of astrophysics, geophysics, space biology, and other closely-tied areas of science is discussed. The upper layers of the atmosphere are of practical significance for launching rockets and artificial satellites, for which the nature of movement depends on the structure and composition of the atmosphere. The study of the chemical composition of the ionosphere, the degree of ionization of the upper layers of the atmosphere at different latitudes and different times of day, and the dependence of ionization on the action of ultraviolet and corpuscular radiation is necessary to study the processes of the propagation of radio waves, and to explain the chemical and photochemical reaction which cause the ionosphere to exist. The most modern methods of study the composition of the mass spectral method which is a direct method and is especially valuable at great altitudes to study the composition of the upper atmosphere is considered. The mass spectrometric method is the only one to analyze the composition of ionizing gases.

  13. The Ionospheric Model Adaptation to the Auroral Latitudes With UHF EISCAT Radar and Tromso Magnetometer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, Vera; Gordeev, Evgeny; Kotikov, Andrey

    E-layer Auroral Ionosphere Model (E-AIM) developed in Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute can provide temporal and spatial distribution of the main ionosphere parameters: ion and electron density distribution in the altitude range from 90 to 150 km. The statistical study of E-layer electron density dependence on substorm activity was made to improve model results in high latitudes. About fifty substorms were included to the data analysis. Particular attention was paid to the dynamics of magnetic disturbances and ionospheric parameters measured by the radar. Correlation of electron density values measured by the UHF EISCAT incoherent scattering radar with geomagnetic indices was determined. Applicability of geomagnetic indices as input parameters of the local E-AIM model was estimated.

  14. Effect of interplanetary magnetic field on ionosphere over the magnetic equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastogi, R. G.; Patel, V. L.

    1975-01-01

    Large and quick changes of the latitude of the interplanetary magnetic field from its southward to northward direction are shown to be associated with the disappearance of the Es-q layer (Knecht, 1959) at the equatorial ionosphere during the daytime or with the reversal of E region horizontal and F region vertical electron drifts during both night and day. This phenomenon is suggested as the imposition of an electric field in the ionosphere in a direction opposite to that of the Sq electric field. The resultant electrostatic field on the equatorial ionosphere would be decreased or even reversed from its normal direction, resulting in the reduction of electron drift velocity. When the normal Sq field is over-compensated by the magnetospheric electric field, the electron drifts are reversed and the irregularities in the E region due to the cross-field instabilities are inhibited, resulting in the sudden disappearance of the Es-q layers.

  15. Symmetry and asymmetry of ionospheric weather at magnetic conjugate points for two midlatitude observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaeva, T. L.; Arikan, F.; Stanislawska, I.; Poustovalova, L. V.

    2013-11-01

    Variations of the ionospheric weather W-index for two midlatitude observatories, namely, Grahamstown and Hermanus, and their conjugate counterpart locations in Africa are studied for a period from October 2010 to December 2011. The observatories are located in the longitude sector, which has consistent magnetic equator and geographic equator so that geomagnetic latitudes of the line of force are very close to the corresponding geographic latitudes providing opportunity to ignore the impact of the difference of the gravitational field and the geomagnetic field at the conjugate points on the ionosphere structure and dynamics. The ionosondes of Grahamstown and Hermanus provide data of the critical frequency (foF2), and Global Ionospheric Maps (GIM) provide the total electron content (TECgps) along the magnetic field line up to the conjugate point in the opposite hemisphere. The global model of the ionosphere, International Reference Ionosphere, extended to the plasmasphere altitude of 20,200 km (IRI-Plas) is used to deliver the F2 layer peak parameters from TECgps at the magnetic conjugate area. The evidence is obtained that the electron gas heated by day and cooled by night at the summer hemisphere as compared with the opposite features in the conjugate winter hemisphere testifies on a reversal of plasma fluxes along the magnetic field line by the solar terminator. The ionospheric weather W-index is derived from NmF2 (related with foF2) and TECgps data. It is found that symmetry of W-index behavior in the magnetic conjugate hemispheres is dominant for the equinoxes when plasma movement along the magnetic line of force is imposed on symmetrical background electron density and electron content. Asymmetry of the ionospheric storm effects is observed for solstices when the plasma diffuse down more slowly into the colder winter hemisphere than into the warmer summer hemisphere inducing either plasma increase (positive phase) or decrease (negative phase of W-index) in the

  16. Ionospheric co-seismic signatures at far and near distances from the earthquake epicenters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chum, Jaroslav; Liu, Jann-Yenq; Cabrera, Miguel; Zednik, Jan; Lastovicka, Jan; Fiser, Jiri; Mosna, Zbysek

    2016-04-01

    Ionospheric signatures of three recent large earthquakes observed by continuous Doppler sounding are presented. The co-seismic signatures of 11 March 2011 Tohoku M9.0 earthquake were observed ~9000 km away from the epicenter in the Czech Republic. The ionospheric responses to 25 April 2015 Nepal M7.8 earthquake were recorded in Taiwan (~3700 km from the epicenter) and in the Czech Republic (~ 6300 km from the epicenter). The ionospheric disturbances caused by the 16 September 2015 Chile M8.3 earthquake were measured over Tucumán, Argentina, about 800 km from the epicenter. It is shown that the ionospheric disturbances can be in all these cases associated with long period infrasound waves that were excited locally by vertical component of the ground surface motion and propagated nearly vertically to the ionosphere. The infrasound waves are heavily damped at the heights of F2 layer, so their amplitudes strongly depend on the altitudes of observations, which can be obtained from nearby ionosondes and/or simulations. Consequently, under specific conditions, the observed ionospheric response at larger distances from the epicenter can be comparable with the observed ionospheric response at shorter distances, although the amplitudes of causative seismic motions differ significantly. The wave packets observed in the ionosphere far outside the epicenter resemble the wave packets of vertical component of the local ground surface motion. The observed co-seismic wave packet near the epicenter (~800 km) however has different shape. It is shown that this shape cannot be explained by linear theory of infrasound propagation, including attenuation. It is documented that non-linear effects owing to large infrasound amplitudes in the upper atmosphere play an important role.

  17. High latitude artificial periodic irregularity observations with the upgraded EISCAT heating facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vierinen, Juha; Kero, Antti; Rietveld, Michael T.

    2013-12-01

    We present a recently developed ionospheric modification experiment that produces artificial periodic irregularities in the ionosphere and uses them to make observations of the spatiotemporal behaviour of the irregularities. In addition, the method can be used to measure Faraday rotation and vertical velocities. We also introduce a novel experiment that allows monitoring the formation of the irregularities during heating, in addition to observing their decay after heating. The first measurements indicate, contrary to existing theory, that the amplitude of the radar echoes from the periodic irregularities grows faster than they decay. We focus on the API effects in the D- and E-region of the ionosphere.

  18. Three-layer microfibrous peripheral nerve guide conduit composed of elastin-laminin mimetic artificial protein and poly(L-lactic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakinoki, Sachiro; Nakayama, Midori; Moritan, Toshiyuki; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2014-07-01

    We developed a microfibrous poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) nerve conduit with a three-layered structure to simultaneously enhance nerve regeneration and prevent adhesion of surrounding tissue. The inner layer was composed of PLLA microfiber containing 25% elastin-laminin mimetic protein (AG73-(VPGIG)30) that promotes neurite outgrowth. The thickest middle layer was constructed of pure PLLA microfibers that impart the large mechanical stremgth to the conduit. A 10% poly(ethylene glycol) was added to the outer layer to prevent the adhesion with the surrounding tissue. The AG73-(VPGIG)30 composisting of an elastin-like repetitive sequence (VPGIG)30 and a laminin-derived sequence (RKRLQVQLSIRT: AG73) was biosynthesized using Escherichia coli. The PLLA microfibrous conduits were fabricated using an electrospinning procedure. AG73-(VPGIG)30 was successfully mixed in the PLLA microfibers, and the PLLA/AG73-(VPGIG)30 microfibers were stable under physiological conditions. The PLLA/AG73-(VPGIG)30 microfibers enhanced adhesion and neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells. The electrospun microfibrous conduit with a three-layered structure was implanted for bridging a 2.0-cm gap in the tibial nerve of a rabbit. Two months after implantation, no adhesion of surrounding tissue was observed, and the action potential was slightly improved in the nerve conduit with the PLLA/AG73-(VPGIG)30 inner layer.

  19. Three-layer microfibrous peripheral nerve guide conduit composed of elastin-laminin mimetic artificial protein and poly(L-lactic acid)

    PubMed Central

    Kakinoki, Sachiro; Nakayama, Midori; Moritan, Toshiyuki; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2014-01-01

    We developed a microfibrous poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) nerve conduit with a three-layered structure to simultaneously enhance nerve regeneration and prevent adhesion of surrounding tissue. The inner layer was composed of PLLA microfiber containing 25% elastin-laminin mimetic protein (AG73-(VPGIG)30) that promotes neurite outgrowth. The thickest middle layer was constructed of pure PLLA microfibers that impart the large mechanical strength to the conduit. A 10% poly(ethylene glycol) was added to the outer layer to prevent the adhesion with the surrounding tissue. The AG73-(VPGIG)30 compositing of an elastin-like repetitive sequence (VPGIG)30 and a laminin-derived sequence (RKRLQVQLSIRT: AG73) was biosynthesized using Escherichia coli. The PLLA microfibrous conduits were fabricated using an electrospinning procedure. AG73-(VPGIG)30 was successfully mixed in the PLLA microfibers, and the PLLA/AG73-(VPGIG)30 microfibers were stable under physiological conditions. The PLLA/AG73-(VPGIG)30 microfibers enhanced adhesion and neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells. The electrospun microfibrous conduit with a three-layered structure was implanted for bridging a 2.0-cm gap in the tibial nerve of a rabbit. Two months after implantation, no adhesion of surrounding tissue was observed, and the action potential was slightly improved in the nerve conduit with the PLLA/AG73-(VPGIG)30 inner layer. PMID:25101261

  20. Midlatitude ionospheric dynamics and disturbances: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kintner, Paul M., Jr.; Coster, Anthea J.; Fuller-Rowell, Tim; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Mendillo, Michael; Heelis, Roderick

    Recent discoveries have demonstrated that the ionosphere responds over regions extending from the equator to the poles during geomagnetic storms and experiences the most extreme changes at midlatitudes. The midlatitude ionosphere was first studied during the "discovery era" of radio physics and space flight 50 or more years ago, but for the past three decades the polar and tropical ionosphere have dominated scientific activity, resulting in the false impression that the midlatitude ionosphere was an uninteresting region of known morphology and well-understood processes. During the past five years, however, the ability to image the ionosphere and thermosphere with large arrays of ground-based GPS receivers and satellite-borne UV imagers changed this viewpoint dramatically and led to the inception of the Chapman Conference on Mid-Latitude Ionospheric Dynamics and Disturbances (MIDD) and to this monograph. The most dramatic changes in ionospheric content occur at midlatitudes, not at high or equatorial latitudes. The most extreme examples of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) perturbations occur at midlatitudes during geomagnetic storms, where TEC can change by factors of three to ten over the duration of a magnetic storm. The ionosphere responds to magnetic storms over regions extending from the equator to the poles, where huge volumes of plasma are produced and transported polewards. Sharp gradients in ionospheric content, extending thousands of kilometers, are created by unknown factors. These gradients spawn irregularities that together impact users of RF signals, either transiting across or reflecting from the ionosphere. At higher altitudes, dramatic changes in the ionosphere are accompanied by movement and transport of the plasmasphere.

  1. Ionospheric redistribution during geomagnetic storms

    PubMed Central

    Immel, T J; Mannucci, A J

    2013-01-01

    [1]The abundance of plasma in the daytime ionosphere is often seen to grow greatly during geomagnetic storms. Recent reports suggest that the magnitude of the plasma density enhancement depends on the UT of storm onset. This possibility is investigated over a 7year period using global maps of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) produced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The analysis confirms that the American sector exhibits, on average, larger storm time enhancement in ionospheric plasma content, up to 50% in the afternoon middle-latitude region and 30% in the vicinity of the high-latitude auroral cusp, with largest effect in the Southern Hemisphere. We investigate whether this effect is related to the magnitude of the causative magnetic storms. Using the same advanced Dst index employed to sort the TEC maps into quiet and active (Dst<−100 nT) sets, we find variation in storm strength that corresponds closely to the TEC variation but follows it by 3–6h. For this and other reasons detailed in this report, we conclude that the UT-dependent peak in storm time TEC is likely not related to the magnitude of external storm time forcing but more likely attributable to phenomena such as the low magnetic field in the South American region. The large Dst variation suggests a possible system-level effect of the observed variation in ionospheric storm response on the measured strength of the terrestrial ring current, possibly connected through UT-dependent modulation of ion outflow. PMID:26167429

  2. Lithosphere - Atmosphere - Ionosphere Circuit Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kereselidze, Z.; Kachakhidze, N.; Kachakhidze, M.

    2012-04-01

    There are offered possibilities of original LAI circuit model. The problem concerns of existence of self-generated electromagnetic oscillations in the segment of LAI system, which are results of tectonic stress developing in the focus area of expected earthquake. By this model the main (lowest) frequency of these electromagnetic oscillations frequency spectrum is expressed analytically by following formula: ω = β c l where β(ω) is the coefficient depended on the frequency and geological characteristics of the medium and approximate to one, c-is the speed of light, and l- the length of the fault in the focus of the expected earthquake. On the base of relevant diagnosis of experimental data, the model gives us possibility to discuss the problem about location, time of occurrence and intensity of an expected earthquake with certain accuracy. In addition to it, considered model does not block the fall-unstable model of earthquake preparing and electromagnetic phenomena accompanied earthquake preparing process. On the contrary, the imagination of physical picture may be simplified in the separate stage of earthquakes preparing. Namely, it is possible to reliably separate series of foreshocks and aftershocks. By this point of view, the certain optimism about using of EM emission as earthquake precursor of full value may be expressed. The base of such optimism is developing of various phenomena connected to VLF emission many times fixed in the surroundings of epicentral area and cosmic space (changing of intensity of electro-telluric current, perturbations of geomagnetic field in forms of irregular pulsations or regular short-period pulsations, perturbations of atmospheric electric field, perturbations of ionosphere critical frequency and TEC, variations of height of lower ionosphere, parameters of ionospheric medium: changing of specific dielectric conductivity and spectrum of MGD waves in it, atmospheric-ionospheric discharging and etc.).

  3. Ionospheric very low frequency transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-02-15

    The theme of this paper is to establish a reliable ionospheric very low frequency (VLF) transmitter, which is also broad band. Two approaches are studied that generate VLF waves in the ionosphere. The first, classic approach employs a ground-based HF heater to directly modulate the high latitude ionospheric, or auroral electrojet. In the classic approach, the intensity-modulated HF heater induces an alternating current in the electrojet, which serves as a virtual antenna to transmit VLF waves. The spatial and temporal variations of the electrojet impact the reliability of the classic approach. The second, beat-wave approach also employs a ground-based HF heater; however, in this approach, the heater operates in a continuous wave mode at two HF frequencies separated by the desired VLF frequency. Theories for both approaches are formulated, calculations performed with numerical model simulations, and the calculations are compared to experimental results. Theory for the classic approach shows that an HF heater wave, intensity-modulated at VLF, modulates the electron temperature dependent electrical conductivity of the ionospheric electrojet, which, in turn, induces an ac electrojet current. Thus, the electrojet becomes a virtual VLF antenna. The numerical results show that the radiation intensity of the modulated electrojet decreases with an increase in VLF radiation frequency. Theory for the beat wave approach shows that the VLF radiation intensity depends upon the HF heater intensity rather than the electrojet strength, and yet this approach can also modulate the electrojet when present. HF heater experiments were conducted for both the intensity modulated and beat wave approaches. VLF radiations were generated and the experimental results confirm the numerical simulations. Theory and experimental results both show that in the absence of the electrojet, VLF radiation from the F-region is generated via the beat wave approach. Additionally, the beat wave approach

  4. The ionosphere under extremely prolonged low solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Libo; Chen, Yiding; Le, Huijun; Kurkin, Vladimir I.; Polekh, Nelya M.; Lee, Chien-Chih

    2011-04-01

    A critical question in ionospheric physics is the state of the ionosphere and relevant processes under extreme solar activities. The solar activity during 2007-2009 is extremely prolonged low, which offers us a unique opportunity to explore this issue. In this study, we collected the global ionosonde measurements of the F2 layer critical frequency (foF2), E layer critical frequency (foE), and F layer virtual height (h‧F) and the total electron content (TEC) maps produced by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which were retrieved from dual-frequency GPS receivers distributed worldwide, to investigate the ionospheric phenomena during solar minimum of cycle 23/24, particularly the difference in the ionosphere between solar minima of cycle 23/24 and the preceding cycles. The analysis indicates that the moving 1 year mean foF2 at most ionosonde stations and the global average TEC went to the lowest during cycle 23/24 minimum. The solar cycle differences in foF2 minima display local time dependence, being more negative during the daytime than at night. Furthermore, the cycle difference in daytime foF2 minima is about -0.5 MHz and even reaches to around -1.2 MHz. In contrast, a complex picture presents in global h‧F and foE. Evident reduction exists prevailingly in the moving 1 year mean h‧F at most stations, while no huge differences are detected at several stations. A compelling feature is the increase in foE at some stations, which requires independent data for further validation. Quantitative analysis indicates that record low foF2 and low TEC can be explained principally in terms of the decline in solar extreme ultraviolet irradiance recorded by SOHO/SEM, which suggests low solar EUV being the prevailing contributor to the unusual low electron density in the ionosphere during cycle 23/24 minimum. It also verifies that a quadratic fitting still reasonably captures the solar variability of foF2 and global average TEC at such low solar activity levels.

  5. Response of Ionosphere to the Tropospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, A. K.; Dube, A.; Singh, R.; Cohen, M.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present work is to find out response of the ionosphere to the various cases of tropical cyclones. The main process involved is suggested through Atmospheric Gravity waves (AGWs) originating from strong convective systems, propagating upward upto the ionospheric heights and perturbing ionospheric parameters (Bishop et al., 2006). We have used ground and satellite data to extract cyclone induced perturbations at different ionospheric heights along with the various parameters of AGWs during cyclones and associated thunderstorm. The initial results suggest that there is increase in total electron content of the ionosphere with wave like signatures in ionosphere. The satellite observation in optical band shows presence of concentric gravity wave pattern associated with troposphere disturbances with horizontal wavelength of ~50-200km and periods ranging from hours to days. The ground based Very Low Frequency (VLF) measurement shows fluctuations in VLF navigational transmitter signal passing over the region of disturbance. The lightning data from GLD360 lightning network shows intense activity associated with cyclones and increase in lightning peak current and energy during main phase of cyclones which seems to be sufficient enough to derive ionospheric disturbances in the ionosphere. This multi-instrument analysis provide detail information of the three dimensional structure of cyclone and their effect at different altitudes of the ionosphere in the Indian subcontinent.

  6. Ionospheric limitations to time transfer by satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, S. H.

    1983-01-01

    The ionosphere can contribute appreciable group delay and phase change to radio signals traversing it; this can constitute a fundamental limitation to the accuracy of time and frequency measurements using satellites. Because of the dispersive nature of the ionosphere, the amount of delay is strongly frequency-dependent. Ionospheric compensation is necessary for the most precise time transfer and frequency measurements, with a group delay accuracy better than 10 nanoseconds. A priori modeling is not accurate to better than 25%. The dual-frequency compensation method holds promise, but has not been rigorously experimentally tested. Irregularities in the ionosphere must be included in the compensation process.

  7. Observation of radio-wave-induced red hydroxyl emission at low altitude in the ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Kagan, L M; Nicolls, M J; Kelley, M C; Carlson, H C; Belikovich, V V; Bakhmet'eva, N V; Komrakov, G P; Trondsen, T S; Donovan, E

    2005-03-11

    We report the discovery of radio-wave-induced red emission of OH Meinel rotation-vibrational bands at 629.79 nm. These are the first measurements of artificial aurora below 100 km. We believe that the 629.79-nm OH emission was due to radio-wave focusing by sporadic ionization clouds near 80-85 km altitude, thus giving a technique to visualize the low-altitude sporadic ionization and providing insight into ionospheric interactions at these low altitudes.

  8. International Reference Ionosphere - Status 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilitza, D.; Reinisch, B.; Triskova, L.; Friedrich, M.

    The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) is the standard for ionospheric densities and temperatures as recommended by the International Union of Radio Science (URSI) and the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). A COSPAR/URSI Working Group is in charge of developing and improving the model. It currently consists of 43 members who work on different aspects of the modeling effort. By charter IRI is an empirical model that attempts to represent the combined ionospheric database of ground and space observations as accurately as possible. IRI provides monthly averages of the electron density, total electron content, electron temperature, ion temperature, ion composition (O+, H+, He+, N+, O2+, NO+, Cluster+) and vertical ion drift (at the equator). This paper reports about the most recent activities of the IRI Working Group and about the most recent updates of the IRI model. We review the presentations, discussions, and results of the 2003 IRI Workshop held in Grahamstown, South Africa. Special emphasis will be given to the improvements that are of importance for the IRI model now being proposed as ISO standard

  9. Mechanisms of Ionospheric Mass Escape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2010-01-01

    The dependence of ionospheric O+ escape flux on electromagnetic energy flux and electron precipitation into the ionosphere is derived for a hypothetical ambipolar pick-up process, powered the relative motion of plasmas and neutral upper atmosphere, and by electron precipitation, at heights where the ions are magnetized but influenced by photo-ionization, collisions with gas atoms, ambipolar and centrifugal acceleration. Ion pick-up by the convection electric field produces "ring-beam" or toroidal velocity distributions, as inferred from direct plasma measurements, from observations of the associated waves, and from the spectra of incoherent radar echoes. Ring-beams are unstable to plasma wave growth, resulting in rapid relaxation via transverse velocity diffusion, into transversely accelerated ion populations. Ion escape is substantially facilitated by the ambipolar potential, but is only weakly affected by centrifugal acceleration. If, as cited simulations suggest, ion ring beams relax into non-thermal velocity distributions with characteristic speed equal to the local ion-neutral flow speed, a generalized "Jeans escape" calculation shows that the escape flux of ionospheric O+ increases with Poynting flux and with precipitating electron density in rough agreement with observations.

  10. Large-Scale Ionospheric Effects Related to Electron-Gyro Harmonics: What We Have Learned from HAARP.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, B. J.; Fallen, C. T.; Secan, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The HAARP ionospheric modification facility has unique capabilities that enable a wide range of HF frequencies with transmit powers ranging from very low to very high values. We will review a range of experiment results that illustrate large-scale ionospheric effects when the HF frequencies used are close to electron gyro-harmoncs and we focus mainly on the 3rd and 4th harmonics. The data are primarily from the UHF diagnosticc radar and total electron content (TEC) observations through the heated topside ionosphere. Radar data for HF frequencies just above and just below gyro harmoncs show significant differences in radar scatter cross-section that suggest differing plasma processes, and this effect is HF power dependent with some effects only observable with full HF power. For the production of artificial ionization in the E-region when the HF frequency is near gyro-harmoncs the results differ significantly for relatively small (50 kHz) variations in the HF frequency. We show how slow FM scans in conjunction with gyro-harmonic effects are effective in producing artificial ionization in the lower ionosphere.In the topside ionosphere enhanced density and upward fluxes have been observed and these may act as effective ducts for the propagation of VLF waves upward into the magneosphere. Experimental techniques have been developed that may be used to continuously maintain these effects in the topside ionossphere.

  11. Ionospheric imaging of the southern crest of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly over Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muella, Marcio; De Paula, Eurico; Batista, Inez S.; Mitchell, Cathryn; Paes, Ricardo R.

    2012-07-01

    A four-dimensional time-dependent tomographic algorithm, named Multi Instrument Data Analysis System (MIDAS), is used to image the equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere over the central-eastern sides of the Brazilian territory. From differential phase data obtained by a chain of ground-based GPS receiver the total electron content (TEC) is estimated and then, together with a modeled ionosphere from International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model, the electron density distribution is reconstructed and the parameters of the F2-peak layer are accessed from the images. This paper presents the first study of ionospheric tomography using real dual-frequency data from the Brazilian Network for Continuous GPS Monitoring (RBMC). Ionospheric F2- peak electron density (NmF2) accessed from the images are compared to concurrent measurements from three ionosondes installed across Brazil. One year of data during the solar maximum period from March/2001 to February/2002 is used to analyze the seasonal and hourly variation of the F2-layer peak density. The accuracy with which MIDAS images the electron density during geomagnetic quiet periods is investigated through its correlation and deviation with the ionosonde and IRI model data, respectively. The main aspects of the reconstruction results at the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) region over Brazil are highlighted and discussed.

  12. Tomographic imaging of the equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere over central-eastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muella, Marcio T. A. H.; de Paula, Eurico R.; Mitchell, Cathryn N.; Kintner, Paul M.; Paes, Ricardo R.; Batista, Inez S.

    2011-02-01

    A four-dimensional time-dependent tomographic algorithm, named Multi Instrument Data Analysis System (MIDAS), is used to image the equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere over the central-eastern sides of the Brazilian territory. From differential phase data obtained by a chain of ground-based GPS receiver the total electron content (TEC) is estimated and then, together with a modeled ionosphere from International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model, the electron density distribution is reconstructed and the parameters of the F 2-peak layer are accessed from the images. This paper presents the first study of ionospheric tomography using real dual-frequency data from the Brazilian Network for Continuous GPS Monitoring (RBMC). Ionospheric F 2-peak electron density ( N m F 2) accessed from the images are compared to concurrent measurements from three ionosondes installed across Brazil. One year of data during the solar maximum period from March/2001 to February/2002 is used to analyze the seasonal and hourly variation of the F 2-layer peak density. The accuracy with which MIDAS images the electron density during geomagnetic quiet periods is investigated through its correlation and deviation with the ionosonde and IRI model data, respectively. The main aspects of the reconstruction results at the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) region over Brazil are highlighted and discussed.

  13. The Ionosphere and the Latin America Very Low Frequency Network Mexico (LAVNet-Mex)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgazzi, A.; Lara, A.; Santiago, A.

    2013-05-01

    The radiation emitted by the most energetic transient events in the solar system, solar flares, covers a wide range of wavelengths, from radio waves to gamma rays. When the transient excess of high energy radiation produced by solar flares reach the Earth environment, the upper layers of the Earth atmosphere are affected and highly disturbed. The dynamics (particularly the conductivity) of the ionosphere, is altered during solar explosive events. In order to detect and study the ionospheric response to the transient solar radiative input, we have constructed a VLF receiver station: the `Latin American Very low frequency Network at Mexico' (LAVNet-Mex), which extends to the northern hemisphere the South American VLF Network. LAVNet-Mex detects electromagnetic waves generated by strong transmitters located around the world. These waves travel inside the Earth-Ionosphere waveguide, along the Great Circle Path formed between the emitter and the observer. By observing changes in the phase and amplitude of these waves, it is possible to study the dynamics of the lower layer of the ionosphere during solar eruptive events. In this work we present preliminary results of the analysis of the effects of solar flares (class M and X) occurred in 2012 and that were observed by LAVNet-Mex. We explore the relationship between VLF signals coming from different paths during these solar burst to infer the degree of correlation that can exist between different sectors of the ionosphere.

  14. ULF wave modulation of the ionospheric parameters: Radar and magnetometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, V.; Belakhovsky, V.; Kozlovsky, A.; Fedorov, E.; Kauristie, K.

    2014-02-01

    The global Pc5 pulsations at the recovery phase of strong magnetic storm on October 31, 2003 are examined using the IMAGE magnetometer and EISCAT radar data from the tri-static Tromsø-Kiruna-Sodankylä system. This radar facility gives possibility to determine the vertical profile of basic ionospheric parameters and their variations with time cadence 30 s. The comparison of magnetometer data from Tromsø with the ionospheric parameters shows a significant (up to ~60%) modulation by Pc5 pulsations of the electron density in the E-layer, height-integrated ionospheric conductances, and ion temperature in the F-layer. This modulation has been observed in the absence of quasi-periodic electron precipitation as evidenced by riometer data. The mechanisms underlying the modulation effects, probably, comprise the Joule ion heating by ULF wave electric field, and feeding/depleting the ionospheric electron content by the wave field-aligned current. The impact of ULF waves on the ionosphere results in a non-linear distortion of ULF wave form, as revealed by the phase portrait method.

  15. The Dependence of the Strength and Thickness of Field-Aligned Currents on Solar Wind and Ionospheric Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jay R.; Wing, Simon

    2014-08-01

    Sheared plasma flows at the low-latitude boundary layer correlate well with early afternoon auroral arcs and eld-aligned currents [Sonnerup, 1980; Lundin and Evans, 1985]. We present a simple analytic model that relates solar wind and ionospheric parameters to the strength and thickness of field-aligned currents in a region of sheared velocity, such as the low latitude boundary layer. We compare the predictions of the model with DMSP observations and nd remarkably good scaling of the currents with solar wind and ionospheric parameters. The sheared boundary layer thickness is inferred to be around 3000km consistent with observational studies. The analytic model provides a simple way to organize data and to infer boundary layer structures from ionospheric data.

  16. Detection of ionospheric Alfvén resonator signatures in the equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões, Fernando; Klenzing, Jeffrey; Ivanov, Stoyan; Pfaff, Robert; Freudenreich, Henry; Bilitza, Dieter; Rowland, Douglas; Bromund, Kenneth; Liebrecht, Maria Carmen; Martin, Steven; Schuck, Peter; Uribe, Paulo; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro

    2012-11-01

    The ionosphere response resulting from minimum solar activity during cycle 23/24 was unusual and offered unique opportunities for investigating space weather in the near-Earth environment. We report ultra low frequency electric field signatures related to the ionospheric Alfvén resonator detected by the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite in the equatorial region. These signatures are used to constrain ionospheric empirical models and offer a new approach for monitoring ionosphere dynamics and space weather phenomena, namely aeronomy processes, Alfvén wave propagation, and troposphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling mechanisms.

  17. Comparison of ionospheric plasma drifts obtained by different techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouba, Daniel; Arikan, Feza; Arikan, Orhan; Toker, Cenk; Mosna, Zbysek; Gok, Gokhan; Rejfek, Lubos; Ari, Gizem

    2016-07-01

    Ionospheric observatory in Pruhonice (Czech Republic, 50N, 14.9E) provides regular ionospheric sounding using Digisonde DPS-4D. The paper is focused on F-region vertical drift data. Vertical component of the drift velocity vector can be estimated by several methods. Digisonde DPS-4D allows sounding in drift mode with direct output represented by drift velocity vector. The Digisonde located in Pruhonice provides direct drift measurement routinely once per 15 minutes. However, also other different techniques can be found in the literature, for example the indirect estimation based on the temporal evolution of measured ionospheric characteristics is often used for calculation of the vertical drift component. The vertical velocity is thus estimated according to the change of characteristics scaled from the classical quarter-hour ionograms. In present paper direct drift measurement is compared with technique based on measuring of the virtual height at fixed frequency from the F-layer trace on ionogram, technique based on variation of h`F and hmF. This comparison shows possibility of using different methods for calculating vertical drift velocity and their relationship to the direct measurement used by Digisonde. This study is supported by the Joint TUBITAK 114E092 and AS CR 14/001 projects.

  18. Ionospheric signatures of non-migrating tides and stratospheric warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lühr, Hermann; Stolle, Claudia; Häusler, Kathrin

    2010-05-01

    Observational data bases from recent years provided more and more evidence that climate and weather phenomena influence the dynamics of the high atmosphere. In the first part of this presentation we will address the dynamical interaction caused by non-migrating tides. Several of these tidal modes are generated in the lower atmosphere and are believed to propagate all the way up to the exosphere. Quantities that reflect the characteristics of the tides very well, are thermospheric temperature and wind. The dynamics of the neutrals is partly transferred to charged particles in the ionospheric E-layer. For that reason tidal signals are also present in the ionospheric E and F region. We show, as examples, the effect on the equatorial electrojet (EEJ), vertical plasma drift and F region electron density. Since the coupling conditions and strength between neutral and charged particles vary over the course of a day (a year, a solar cycle), the recovery of the complete ionospheric tidal signals is complex. We will present the amplitude and annual variation for the most prominent tidal components. A very recent topic of vertical coupling is the influence of sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) on the ionospheric electrodynamics. SSW has been shown to modify among others the diurnal variation of the vertical plasma drift and the electric field at equatorial latitudes. We will present global observations of the EEJ and its response to SSW events in 2002/2003. A typical feature is an enhancement of the EEJ intensity in the pre-noon hours and a reduction in the afternoon. Possible mechanisms causing these modifications will be discussed.

  19. GPS observation of the Travelling Ionospheric disturbances from Moscow megacity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. I.; Gorchakov, G. I.

    2016-07-01

    In our work we study the effect of the Moscow metropolis on the travelling disturbances, that appear and shown at ionospheric heights above the megacity in the abnormal conditions of the summer 2010. GPS- interferometry method is carried out for regional monitoring ionospheric disturbances by using GNSS-signals, received at Moscow region Navigational and geodetic support network and the International Geophysical Survay (IGS) network. We processed over 21000 hours of individual GPS observations in the period from June to August 2010. Detected traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs), which are distributed by the Moscow megacity and are grouped in the ring around it. Prolonged observations (˜100 days) provide us the opportunity to "accumulate signal" and reveal the influence of urban heat island from the megacity (such as Moscow) in the surface layer of the atmosphere. We suppose,that the changes in the urban heat island can lead to the appearance of the waves and the spread of disturbances in the atmosphere upto the ionosphere. We present the empirical distribution functions of the speed, observed duration and direction of the TIDs propagation. So, it was shown that the observed TIDs are acousto-gravity waves and, in particular, may be caused by effects of the megacity. Briefly summarizing the results, it can be argued that these studies illustrate the influence of the lower atmosphere on the processes in the upper. The methods of GPS- observations using special algorithms classification allocated wave structures allow to identify the ground source for this influence. This work, alongside with the general physical, has undoubtedly important ecological value, and the results may be useful for prognostic purposes. Work was partially supported by RFBR grant 15-45-03266.

  20. The INAF/IAPS Plasma Chamber for ionospheric simulation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego, Piero

    2016-04-01

    The plasma chamber is particularly suitable to perform studies for the following applications: - plasma compatibility and functional tests on payloads envisioned to operate in the ionosphere (e.g. sensors onboard satellites, exposed to the external plasma environment); - calibration/testing of plasma diagnostic sensors; - characterization and compatibility tests on components for space applications (e.g. optical elements, harness, satellite paints, photo-voltaic cells, etc.); - experiments on satellite charging in a space plasma environment; - tests on active experiments which use ion, electron or plasma sources (ion thrusters, hollow cathodes, field effect emitters, plasma contactors, etc.); - possible studies relevant to fundamental space plasma physics. The facility consists of a large volume vacuum tank (a cylinder of length 4.5 m and diameter 1.7 m) equipped with a Kaufman type plasma source, operating with Argon gas, capable to generate a plasma beam with parameters (i.e. density and electron temperature) close to the values encountered in the ionosphere at F layer altitudes. The plasma beam (A+ ions and electrons) is accelerated into the chamber at a velocity that reproduces the relative motion between an orbiting satellite and the ionosphere (≈ 8 km/s). This feature, in particular, allows laboratory simulations of the actual compression and depletion phenomena which take place in the ram and wake regions around satellites moving through the ionosphere. The reproduced plasma environment is monitored using Langmuir Probes (LP) and Retarding Potential Analyzers (RPA). These sensors can be automatically moved within the experimental space using a sled mechanism. Such a feature allows the acquisition of the plasma parameters all around the space payload installed into the chamber for testing. The facility is currently in use to test the payloads of CSES satellite (Chinese Seismic Electromagnetic Satellite) devoted to plasma parameters and electric field

  1. A Statistical Comparison of Coupled Thermosphere-Ionosphere Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzo, L. R.

    2014-12-01

    The thermosphere-ionosphere system is a highly dynamic, non-linearly coupled interaction that fluctuates on a daily basis. Many models exist to attempt to quantify the relationship between the two atmospheric layers, and each approaches the problem differently. Because these models differ in the implementation of the equations that govern the dynamics of the thermosphere-ionosphere system, it is important to understand under which conditions each model performs best, and under which conditions each model may have limitations in accuracy. With this in consideration, this study examines the ability of two of the leading coupled thermosphere-ionosphere models in the community, TIE-GCM and GITM, to reproduce thermospheric and ionospheric quantities observed by the CHAMP satellite during times of differing geomagnetic activity. Neutral and electron densities are studied for three geomagnetic activity levels, ranging form high to minimal activity. Metrics used to quantify differences between the two models include root-mean-square error and prediction efficiency, and qualitative differences between a model and observed data is also considered. The metrics are separated into the high- mid- and low-latitude region to depict any latitudinal dependencies of the models during the various events. Despite solving for the same parameters, the models are shown to be highly dependent on the amount of activity level that occurs and can be significantly different from each other. In addition, in comparing previous statistical studies that use the models, a clear improvement is observed in the evolution of each model as thermospheric and ionosphericconstituents during the differing levels of activity are solved.

  2. Recent Advances in Studies of Ionospheric Modification Using Rocket Exhaust (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.

    2009-12-01

    Rocket exhaust interacts with the ionosphere to produce a wide range of disturbances. A ten second burn of the Orbital Maneuver Subsystem (OMS) engines on the Space Shuttle deposits over 1 Giga Joule of energy into the upper atmosphere. The exhaust vapors travel at speeds between 4.7 and 10.7 km/s coupling momentum into the ions by both collisions and charge exchange. Long-lived plasma irregularities are formed by the artificial hypersonic “neutral wind” passing through the ionosphere. Charge exchange between the fast neutrals and the ambient ions yields high-speed ion beams that excite electro-static plasma waves. Ground based radar has been used to detect both field aligned irregularities and electrostatic turbulence driven by the Space Shuttle OMS exhaust. Molecular ions produced by the charge exchange with molecules in the rocket exhaust recombine with a time scale of 10 minutes leaving a residual plasma depression. This ionospheric “hole” fills in by ambipolar diffusion leaving a depleted magnetic flux tube. This large scale reduction in Pedersen conductivity can provide a seed for plasma interchange instabilities. For instance, a rocket firing on the bottom side of the ionosphere near the equator can trigger a Rayleigh-Taylor instability that is naturally seen as equatorial Spread-F. The Naval Research Laboratory has been exploring these phenomena with dedicated burns of the Space Shuttle OMS engines and exhaust releases from rockets. The Shuttle Ionospheric Modification with Pulsed Localized Exhaust (SIMPLEX) series of experiments uses ground radars to probe the ionosphere affected by dedicated burns of the Space Shuttle OMS engines. Radars located at Millstone Hill, Massachusetts; Arecibo, Puerto Rico; Jicamarca, Peru; Kwajalein, Marshall Island; and Alice Springs, Australia have participated in the SIMPLEX program. A companion program called Shuttle Exhaust Ionospheric Turbulence Experiment has or will use satellites to fly through the turbulence

  3. Investigations of the ionosphere by space techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowhill, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    Much of the impetus to ionosphere research since the International Geophysical Year has come from new types of measurement using space vehicles. The key developments are outlined, together with the contributions that they have made to the understanding of the ionosphere.

  4. Ionospheric modification by rocket effluents. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, P.A.; Price, K.M.; da Rosa, A.V.

    1980-06-01

    This report describes experimental and theoretical studies related to ionospheric disturbances produced by rocket exhaust vapors. The purpose of our research was to estimate the ionospheric effects of the rocket launches which will be required to place the Satellite Power System (SPS) in operation. During the past year, we have developed computational tools for numerical simulation of ionospheric changes produced by the injection of rocket exhaust vapors. The theoretical work has dealt with (1) the limitations imposed by condensation phenomena in rocket exhaust; (2) complete modeling of the ionospheric depletion process including neutral gas dynamics, plasma physics, chemistry and thermal processes; and (3) the influence of the modified ionosphere on radio wave propagation. We are also reporting on electron content measurements made during the launch of HEAO-C on Sept. 20, 1979. We conclude by suggesting future experiments and areas for future research.

  5. Plasma interactions in the Martian Nightside Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, L.; Fowler, C. M.; Ergun, R.; Weber, T. D.; Andrews, D. J.; Morooka, M. W.; Delory, G. T.; Eriksson, A. I.; Mitchell, D. L.; McFadden, J. P.; Connerney, J. E. P.

    2015-12-01

    Based on measurements from a number of missions at Mars the nightside ionosphere is patchy. The new mission MAVEN dedicated to observe the upper atmosphere and the plasma interactions provides the first comprehensive observations of the low altitude nightside ionosphere. Observations show that at density gradients the plasma is unstable and significant wave power, heated/accelerated electrons, and heated ions are co-located. Below 300 km, thermal electrons (>3 eV) are observed at the gradients to low density regions. The nightside ionosphere below 180 km is thought to be maintained by electron impact ionization and therefore these regions with thermal electrons may be the primary energy source for the low altitude ionosphere. Outside of the low density regions the plasma is cold. These observations suggest that the wave heating might be the primary process in the Matrian nightside ionosphere. The characteristics of these regions associated with density gradients will be presented and discussed in this presentation.

  6. The partially aligned gradient instability in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Ionization irregularities which are almost but not exactly aligned along the magnetic field may grow much more rapidly than purely aligned irregularities in the presence of a background gradient of ionization and current flow. The stability of these irregularities is considered, taking into account the finite thickness of the gradient and shear in the ion motion. It is shown in particular that the normal E region of the ionosphere is usually stable, whereas sporadic E is often unstable, and this may limit the compression of metallic ions to form such layers. The F region may sometimes be unstable. Temperate zone conditions are considered throughout.

  7. Charged particles in Titan's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Sachchida

    2010-05-01

    Charged particles in Titan's ionosphere Marykutty Michael1, Sachchida Nand Tripathi1,2,3, Pratima Arya1 1Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur 2Oak Ridge Associated Universities 3NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Observations by two instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft, Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and CAssini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS), revealed the existence of heavy hydrocarbon and nitrile species with masses of several thousand atomic mass units at altitudes of 950 - 1400 km in the atmosphere of Titan (Waite et al., 2007; Crary et al., 2009). Though these particles were believed to be molecules, they are most likely aerosols formed by the clumping of smaller molecules (Waite et al., 2009). These particles were estimated to have a density of 10-3 kg m-3 and a size of up to 256 nm. The existence of very heavy ions has also been observed by the CAPS components with a mass by charge ratio of up to 10000 (Coates et al., 2007, 2009; Sittler et al., 2009). The goal of this paper is to find out whether the so called heavy ions (or charged particles) are generated by the charge transfer of ions and electrons to the particles. The charging of these particles has been studied by using the charge balance equations that include positive ions, negative ions, electrons, neutral and charged particles. Information on the most abundant ion clusters are obtained from Vuitton et al., (2009) and Wilson and Atreya, (2004). Mass by charge ratio thus calculated will be compared with those observed by Coates et al. (2007). References: Coates AJ, et al., Discovery of heavy negative ions in Titan's ionosphere, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34:L22103, 2007. Coates AJ, et al., Heavy negative ions in titan's ionosphere: altitude and latitude dependence. Planet. Space Sci., doi:10.1016/j.pss.2009.05.009, 2009. Crary F.J., et al., Heavy ions, temperatures and winds in titan's ionosphere: Combined cassini caps and inms observations. Planet. Space Sci., doi:10.1016/j.pss.2009.09.006, 2009

  8. Comparison of ionospheric radio occultation CHAMP data with IRI 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakowski, N.; Wehrenpfennig, A.; Tsybulya, K.

    The GPS radio occultations measured on board low Earth orbiting satellites provide vertical electron density profiles of the ionosphere from satellite orbit heights down to the bottomside. No other profiling technique unifies profiling through the entire F2 layer with global coverage. First results of ionospheric radio occultation (IRO) measurements carried out onboard the German CHAMP satellite mission agree with vertical sounding based F2 layer height and electron density estimations within 13% and 17% RMS deviation. Methods and algorithms applied for retrieving the electron density profiles through the F2 layer are addressed. Although the validation of the CHAMP IRO data has still to be completed, we present a systematic comparison of more than 15000 IRO derived electron density profiles with corresponding IRI 2000 estimations. The results are discussed for quite different geophysical conditions, e.g. as a function of local time, season, geomagnetic/geographic latitude, level of geomagnetic activity. For a limited umber of events both types of electron density profiles are compared with independent electron density data obtained from vertical sounding stations on Earth and from the Langmuir probe onboard CHAMP.

  9. GPS Array as a Sensor of Lithosphere, Troposphere and Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heki, K.

    2011-12-01

    precipitable water vapor (PWV) of troposphere. After intense feasibility studies of GPS meteorology in 1990s, PWV information from GEONET has been routinely assimilated in the operational mesoscale model of the Japan Meteorological Agency since 2009. It is found useful in predicting localized heavy rainfalls that often attack Japan in summer. It is fairly easy to measure ionospheric total electron content (TEC) by using phase differences between L1 and L2 carriers from GPS satellites. Applications of GPS for upper atmospheric studies started for ionospheric disturbances of space weather origins. In 2003, clear coseismic ionospheric disturbances of the Tokachi-Oki earthquake were found, and the GPS-TEC technique has been extensively used to study ionospheric disturbances of solid earth origins, e.g. earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. There are also several recent examples of artificial ionospheric disturbances caused by rocket launches and passage of ballistic missiles from North Korea above NE Japan. In the last part of the lecture, I summarize what the GPS array saw before, during and after the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. The topic covers not only pre-, co- and postseismic crustal movements, but also results of high-rate sampling, and possible detection of precursory changes in ionospheric TEC immediately before the earthquake.

  10. Ionospheric data assimilation and forecasting during storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartier, Alex T.; Matsuo, Tomoko; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Collins, Nancy; Hoar, Timothy J.; Lu, Gang; Mitchell, Cathryn N.; Coster, Anthea J.; Paxton, Larry J.; Bust, Gary S.

    2016-01-01

    Ionospheric storms can have important effects on radio communications and navigation systems. Storm time ionospheric predictions have the potential to form part of effective mitigation strategies to these problems. Ionospheric storms are caused by strong forcing from the solar wind. Electron density enhancements are driven by penetration electric fields, as well as by thermosphere-ionosphere behavior including Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances and Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances and changes to the neutral composition. This study assesses the effect on 1 h predictions of specifying initial ionospheric and thermospheric conditions using total electron content (TEC) observations under a fixed set of solar and high-latitude drivers. Prediction performance is assessed against TEC observations, incoherent scatter radar, and in situ electron density observations. Corotated TEC data provide a benchmark of forecast accuracy. The primary case study is the storm of 10 September 2005, while the anomalous storm of 21 January 2005 provides a secondary comparison. The study uses an ensemble Kalman filter constructed with the Data Assimilation Research Testbed and the Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model. Maps of preprocessed, verticalized GPS TEC are assimilated, while high-latitude specifications from the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics and solar flux observations from the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Experiment are used to drive the model. The filter adjusts ionospheric and thermospheric parameters, making use of time-evolving covariance estimates. The approach is effective in correcting model biases but does not capture all the behavior of the storms. In particular, a ridge-like enhancement over the continental USA is not predicted, indicating the importance of predicting storm time electric field behavior to the problem of ionospheric forecasting.

  11. Artificial rearing.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Hector D; Thomas, Jennifer D

    2008-01-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure disrupts development, leading to a range of effects referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). FASDs include physical, central nervous system, and behavioral alterations. Animal model systems are used to study the relationship between alcohol-related central nervous system damage and behavioral alterations, risk factors for FASD, mechanisms of alcohol-induced damage, as well as treatments and interventions. When using a rodent model, it is important to recognize that the timing of brain development relative to birth differs between humans and rodents. Thus, to model alcohol exposure during the third trimester equivalent, rats must be exposed during early postnatal development (postnatal days 4-9). Artificial rearing is one experimental paradigm that is used to expose neonatal rats to alcohol during this period of brain development. Neonatal rat pups are housed in an artificial rearing environment and automatically fed a milk diet substitute via an intragastric cannula to ensure adequate growth during the treatment period. Alcohol is delivered in the milk diet. This chapter provides a description of the methods needed for this administrative technique, including preparation of the artificial rearing environment, gastrostomy surgery, and care of artificially reared rat pups.

  12. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wash, Darrel Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Making a machine seem intelligent is not easy. As a consequence, demand has been rising for computer professionals skilled in artificial intelligence and is likely to continue to go up. These workers develop expert systems and solve the mysteries of machine vision, natural language processing, and neural networks. (Editor)

  13. Aerosol growth in Titan's ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Lavvas, Panayotis; Yelle, Roger V; Koskinen, Tommi; Bazin, Axel; Vuitton, Véronique; Vigren, Erik; Galand, Marina; Wellbrock, Anne; Coates, Andrew J; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Crary, Frank J; Snowden, Darci

    2013-02-19

    Photochemically produced aerosols are common among the atmospheres of our solar system and beyond. Observations and models have shown that photochemical aerosols have direct consequences on atmospheric properties as well as important astrobiological ramifications, but the mechanisms involved in their formation remain unclear. Here we show that the formation of aerosols in Titan's upper atmosphere is directly related to ion processes, and we provide a complete interpretation of observed mass spectra by the Cassini instruments from small to large masses. Because all planetary atmospheres possess ionospheres, we anticipate that the mechanisms identified here will be efficient in other environments as well, modulated by the chemical complexity of each atmosphere. PMID:23382231

  14. Saturn: atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Gombosi, Tamas I; Ingersoll, Andrew P

    2010-03-19

    The Cassini spacecraft has been in orbit around Saturn since 30 June 2004, yielding a wealth of data about the Saturn system. This review focuses on the atmosphere and magnetosphere and briefly outlines the state of our knowledge after the Cassini prime mission. The mission has addressed a host of fundamental questions: What processes control the physics, chemistry, and dynamics of the atmosphere? Where does the magnetospheric plasma come from? What are the physical processes coupling the ionosphere and magnetosphere? And, what are the rotation rates of Saturn's atmosphere and magnetosphere?

  15. Saturn: atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Gombosi, Tamas I; Ingersoll, Andrew P

    2010-03-19

    The Cassini spacecraft has been in orbit around Saturn since 30 June 2004, yielding a wealth of data about the Saturn system. This review focuses on the atmosphere and magnetosphere and briefly outlines the state of our knowledge after the Cassini prime mission. The mission has addressed a host of fundamental questions: What processes control the physics, chemistry, and dynamics of the atmosphere? Where does the magnetospheric plasma come from? What are the physical processes coupling the ionosphere and magnetosphere? And, what are the rotation rates of Saturn's atmosphere and magnetosphere? PMID:20299587

  16. On the problem of detection of seismo-ionospheric phenomena by multi-instrumental radiophysical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Iurii; Zakharenkova, Irina; Shagimuratov, Irk; Suslova, Olga

    2012-07-01

    Analysis of the previous works on lithosphere-ionosphere interactions confirmed the necessity to use simultaneous observations from several independent diagnostics tools in order to raise the reliability of the observed seismo-ionospheric effects. The influence on the ionosphere from below is weaker in comparison with effects of solar or geomagnetic origin. Due to this reason it is very actual the problem of detection of seismo-ionospheric anomalies on the background of strong regular and quasi-regular variation of space weather parameters. For the given research we use integrated processing of the ionospheric data from different sources: total electron content (TEC) data obtained on the basis of regular GPS observations of IGS stations located in Sakhalin and Japan regions, ionospheric E and F2 layers peak parameters, derived from data of Japan ionosonde network and electron density profiles, obtained by FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC radio occultation measurements. As a case-study it was analyzed the Nevelsk earthquake (M 6.2) that took place at the Far East of Russian Federation on August 2, 2007. On July 29, 2007, several days prior to earthquake, the characteristic anomaly was found out as the day-time significant enhancement of TEC at the vicinity of earthquake. This enhancement reached the maximal value of 4-6 TECU in absolute values, that is 40-50% to the background conditions, and it was situated very close to the epicenter position. The noticeable enhancement of F2 peak critical frequency (foF2) was observed over Wakkanai ionosonde. For the evening hours (19-22 LT) it reached the value of 6.8-7.7 MHz whereas monthly median was 5.3-5.7 MHz. This foF2 increase was coincided in time with the appearance of TEC anomaly in TEC maps over the considered region (taken from GIMs IONEX). In order to separate seismo-ionospheric perturbations from geomagnetic disturbances it was done the comparative analysis of the revealed ionospheric effect possibly related with seismic activity

  17. Capabilities and Limitations of Radio Occultation Measurements for Ionosphere Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajj, G. A.; Romans, L. J.; Pi, X.; Wang, Chunming

    1999-01-01

    The paper: (1) describes the range of capabilities of GPS radio occultation missions in ionospheric research: (a) ionospheric profiling; (b) ionospheric imaging; (c) ionospheric data assimilation; and (d) measurement of scintillation. (2) Identify strengths and weaknesses of measurements: (a) coverage; (b) resolution; and (c) uniqueness of solution.

  18. Experimental investigation of ULF/VLF radio wave generation and propagation in the upper atmosphere and ionosphere during EISCAT heating experiment in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryakhovskiy, Iliya; Gavrilov, Boris; Zetzer, Julius; Rietveld, Michael; Poklad, Yuriy; Blagoveshchenskaya, Nataly

    Powerful high frequency radio waves transmitted from high-power HF heating facilities modify the ionospheric plasma. The X-mode HF pump wave generates strong small-scale artificial field aligned irregularities in the F region of the ionosphere when the heater frequency is near or above the critical frequency of F2 layer [Blagoveshchenskaya et al]. One of the tasks of the Russian EISCAT heating campaign in February 2012 was an investigation of the generation and propagation of ULF/VLF signals generated as the result of HF radiation modulation. Despite the numerous attempts of long-range detection of such signals, there are a few successful results. The most reliable and important results were obtained by [Barr et al.] more than 20 years ago. They measured the VLF radio waves in Lindau, Germany at the distance of about 2000 km from EISCAT Heater. We present the results of the ULF/VLF registrations at the same distance during heating campaign of February 2012. The measurements were conducted at Mikhnevo Geohysical Observatory located in 80 km to the south of Moscow and at the distance of about 1900 km from Tromsø. For measurements were used a sensitive receivers with crossed air-coil loop antennas in the frequency range from 800 Hz to 30 kHz in the femtotesla amplitude range. We recorded the radial and azimuthal magnetic component of the signals and from their ratio obtained the mode polarization. The radiated heater frequency was modulated by 517, 1017, 2017, 3017, 4017 and 6017 Hz. It was shown the signals with frequency less than 2 kHz propagate in the QTEM mode, and signals at the frequency from 2 to 4 kHz are in the QTE mode. Observed magnetic field strengths and waveguide polarizations are found to be in line with the predictions of simple waveguide models. Qualitative coincidence of the signals polarization character and its dependence on the frequency specifies adequacy of numerical models and reliability of the data received in campaign 2012

  19. Design and Application of Wuhan Ionospheric Oblique Backscattering Sounding System with the Addition of an Antenna Array (WIOBSS-AA).

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiao; Chen, Gang; Wang, Jin; Song, Huan; Gong, Wanlin

    2016-01-01

    The Wuhan Ionospheric Oblique Backscattering Sounding System with the addition of an antenna array (WIOBSS-AA) is the newest member of the WIOBSS family. It is a multi-channel radio system using phased-array antenna technology. The transmitting part of this radio system applies an array composed of five log-periodic antennas to form five beams that span an area to the northwest of the radar site. The hardware and the antenna array of the first multi-channel ionosonde in the WIOBSS family are introduced in detail in this paper. An ionospheric detection experiment was carried out in Chongyang, Hubei province, China on 16 March 2015 to examine the performance of WIOBSS-AA. The radio system demonstrated its ability to obtain ionospheric electron density information over a wide area. The observations indicate that during the experiment, the monitored large-area ionospheric F2-layer was calm and electron density increased with decreasing latitude. PMID:27314360

  20. Design and Application of Wuhan Ionospheric Oblique Backscattering Sounding System with the Addition of an Antenna Array (WIOBSS-AA)

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiao; Chen, Gang; Wang, Jin; Song, Huan; Gong, Wanlin

    2016-01-01

    The Wuhan Ionospheric Oblique Backscattering Sounding System with the addition of an antenna array (WIOBSS-AA) is the newest member of the WIOBSS family. It is a multi-channel radio system using phased-array antenna technology. The transmitting part of this radio system applies an array composed of five log-periodic antennas to form five beams that span an area to the northwest of the radar site. The hardware and the antenna array of the first multi-channel ionosonde in the WIOBSS family are introduced in detail in this paper. An ionospheric detection experiment was carried out in Chongyang, Hubei province, China on 16 March 2015 to examine the performance of WIOBSS-AA. The radio system demonstrated its ability to obtain ionospheric electron density information over a wide area. The observations indicate that during the experiment, the monitored large-area ionospheric F2-layer was calm and electron density increased with decreasing latitude. PMID:27314360

  1. Development of a campaign to study equatorial ionospheric phenomena over Guam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habash Krause, L.; Balthazor, R.; McHarg, M. G.; Reinisch, B. W.

    2008-08-01

    The United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) is in the process of developing a series of ground-based and space-based experiments to investigate the equatorial ionosphere over Guam and the southern crest of the Equatorial Appleton Anomaly over New Guinea. On the ground the Digital Ionospheric Sounder (University of Massachusetts, Lowell DPS-4 unit) and a dual-frequency GPS TEC/scintillation monitor will be used to investigate ionospheric phenomena in both campaign and long-term survey modes. In campaign mode, we will combine these observations with those collected from space during USAFA's FalconSAT-3 and FalconSAT-5 low Earth orbit satellite missions, which will be active over a period of several years beginning in the first quarter of the 2007 calendar year. Additionally, we will investigate the long-term morphology of key ionospheric characteristics useful for driving the International Reference Ionosphere, such as critical frequencies (f oE, f oF1, f oF2, etc.), the M(3000) F2 parameter (the maximum useable frequency for a signal refracted within the F2 layer and received on the ground at a distance of 3000 km away), and a variety of other characteristics. Specific targets of investigation include: (a) a comparison of TEC observed by the GPS receiver with those calculated by IRI driven by DPS-4 observations, (b) a comparison of plasma turbulence observed on-orbit with ionospheric conditions as measured from the ground, and (c) a comparison between topside ionospheric satellite in situ measurements of plasma density during an overpass of a Digisonde versus the calculated value based on extrapolation of the electron density profiles using Digisonde data and a topside α-Chapman function. This last area of investigation is discussed in detail in this paper.

  2. Precise Point Positioning with Ionosphere Estimation and application of Regional Ionospheric Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galera Monico, J. F.; Marques, H. A.; Rocha, G. D. D. C.

    2015-12-01

    The ionosphere is one of most difficult source of errors to be modelled in the GPS positioning, mainly when applying data collected by single frequency receivers. Considering Precise Point Positioning (PPP) with single frequency data the options available include, for example, the use of Klobuchar model or applying Global Ionosphere Maps (GIM). The GIM contains Vertical Electron Content (VTEC) values that are commonly estimated considering a global network with poor covering in certain regions. For this reason Regional Ionosphere Maps (RIM) have been developed considering local GNSS network, for instance, the La Plata Ionospheric Model (LPIM) developed inside the context of SIRGAS (Geocentric Reference System for Americas). The South American RIM are produced with data from nearly 50 GPS ground receivers and considering these maps are generated for each hour with spatial resolution of one degree it is expected to provide better accuracy in GPS positioning for such region. Another possibility to correct for ionosphere effects in the PPP is to apply the ionosphere estimation technique based on Kalman filter. In this case, the ionosphere can be treated as a stochastic process and a good initial guess is necessary what can be obtained from an ionospheric map. In this paper we present the methodology involved with ionosphere estimation by using Kalman filter and also the application of global and regional ionospheric maps in the PPP as first guess. The ionosphere estimation strategy was implemented in the house software called RT_PPP that is capable of accomplishing PPP either for single or dual frequency data. GPS data from Brazilian station near equatorial region were processed and results with regional maps were compared with those by using global maps. Improvements of the order 15% were observed. In case of ionosphere estimation, the estimated coordinates were compared with ionosphere free solution and after PPP convergence the results reached centimeter accuracy.

  3. Long-Term and Transient Variability of the Low Ionosphere from Very Low Frequency Ground-Based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin, Jean Pierre

    2012-07-01

    At least three regions are forming the lower part of the ionosphere: the transient C-region at sunrise, the D-region during daytime and the bottom E-region at nighttime. These regions are accessible only through rocket in situ measurements and radio sounding techniques from the ground. Contrary to the upper layers, any prediction is difficult in the low ionosphere because of its important time variability, and its complex chemistry. In this work we will review the time variability of the low ionosphere on different timescales as deduced from Very Low Frequency ground based observations. Long-term variations are essentially due to the solar activity cycle and the solar rotation, and these variations reflect level changes of the ionizing Lyman-alpha radiation. On shorter transient timescales, solar flares and geomagnetic disturbances affect the low ionosphere when large amount of solar X-ray photons and/or particles are injected and deposit their energy at altitudes between 70 and 30 km. Then, the monitoring the low ionosphere regions may be used as an indirect and efficient tool to study space weather conditions. The transient time variability of the low ionosphere can also originate from below, that is due to the neutral atmosphere dynamics, which also includes meteorological phenomena. Then planetary and gravity waves can penetrate the lower ionosphere. To a lower extent, tidal oscillations and acoustic waves may affect the lowermost part of the ionosphere, although experimental researches in these domains are necessary. Finally, lightning induced perturbations of the low ionosphere will be discussed, and, these include sprites, transient gamma-ray flashes (TGF), blue elves and Lightning Precipitation Events (LPE).

  4. Ionospheric Challenges for GNSS Based Augmentation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, P.; Valladares, C. E.

    2007-12-01

    The ionosphere is a highly dynamic physical phenomenon that presents a variable source of error for Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals and GNSS based operational systems. The Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Wide-Area Augmentation System (WAAS) was designed to enhance the GNSS standard positioning service by providing additional accuracy, availability and integrity that is sufficient for use in commercial aviation. It is the first of a number of planned regional Satellite Based Augmentation Systems (SBAS). Other systems in development include the European EGNOS system, the MSAS system in Japan and the GAGAN system in India. In addition, the South American countries are investigating the feasibility of operating an SBAS system in this region. Much of the WAAS ionospheric research and development focused on defining and mitigating ionospheric challenges characteristic of the mid-latitude regions, where the ionosphere is well studied and relatively quiescent. The EGNOS and MSAS systems will primarily operate under a similarly quiescent mid-latitude ionosphere. SBAS system development in South America, India and other low-latitude regions, however, will have to contend with much more extreme conditions. These conditions include strong spatial and temporal gradients, plasma depletions and scintillation. All of these conditions have a potential to limit SBAS performance in the low latitude regions. This presentation will review the effects that the ionosphere has on the mid-latitude WAAS system. It will present the techniques that are used to mitigate ionospheric disturbances induced on the system during severe geomagnetic activity and it will quantify the effect that this activity has on system performance. The presentation will then present data from the South American Low-latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (LISN) that can be used to infer the ionospheric effects on SBAS performance in the most challenging low-latitude ionospheric environment

  5. New model of Saturn's ionosphere with an influx of water from the rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Waite, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    A radically different model of Saturn's ionosphere is proposed in which water plays a major role as a minor constituent present by downward diffusion from an external source. The model ionosphere is a classical F2 type layer resulting from the photodissociative production of H(+) from H2 and rapid chemical loss by a series of charge exchange reactions with water. A planet-wide influx of about 4 x 10 to the 7th molecules/sq cm/s of water from the rings is consistent with the observed ionospheric electron densities. An enhanced influx of water occurs at latitudes (-38, +44 deg) connected magnetically at the inner edge of Saturn's B ring, where an electromagnetic erosion process takes place. The present-day influx at these latitudes may be as large as 2 x 10 to the 9th molecules/sq cm/s.

  6. Exploring artificial layered heterostructures of LaM'O3/LaM''O3 (M'M''= NiCr, FeCr and NiV).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Kareev, M.; Freeland, J. W.; Kareev, A.; Lee, H. N.; Chakhalian, J.

    2008-03-01

    Digital synthesis of atomically sharp interfaces between strongly correlated electron systems can provide a template to build completely new materials. Here we present our results on magnetism and electronic structure in LaM'O3/LaM''O3 (M'M''= NiCr, FeCr and NiV) superlattices by using polarized X-ray spectroscopies. Using laser MBE, the (111) and (100) oriented ultra-thin superlattices were grown with alternating layer thicknesses of 1 unit cell. In the bulk, LaMO3 (M=Cr,Fe,V) are antiferromagnetic insulators while LaNiO3 is a paramagnetic metal. The evolution of element specific magnetism and charge at the interface of LFO/LCO, LNO/LVO and LNO/LCO superlattices with temperature and an applied magnetic field will be discussed in detail. The superlattice results will be contrasted to the bulk magnetic properties of the constituent layers. The work has been supported by U.S. DOD-ARO under Contract No. 0402-17291.

  7. Day-to-day ionospheric variability due to lower atmosphere perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Yudin, V. A.; Roble, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    Ionospheric day-to-day variability is a ubiquitous feature, even in the absence of appreciable geomagnetic activities. Although meteorological perturbations have been recognized as an important source of the variability, it is not well represented in previous modeling studies, and the mechanism is not well understood. This study demonstrates that TIME-GCM (Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model) constrained in the stratosphere and mesosphere by the hourly Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) simulations is capable of reproducing observed features of day-to-day variability in the thermosphere-ionosphere. Realistic weather patterns in the lower atmosphere in WACCM was specified by Modern Era Retrospective reanalysis for Research and Application (MERRA). The day-to-day variations in mean zonal wind, migrating and non-migrating tides in the thermosphere, vertical and zonal ExB drifts, and ionosphere F2 layer peak electron density (NmF2) are examined. The standard deviations of the drifts and NmF2 display local time and longitudinal dependence that compare favorably with observations. Their magnitudes are 50% or more of those from observations. The day-to-day thermosphere and ionosphere variability in the model is primarily caused by the perturbations originated in lower atmosphere, since the model simulation is under constant solar minimum and low geomagnetic conditions.

  8. The role of the ionosphere in coupling upstream ULF wave power into the dayside magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Rosenberg, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    A series of recent studies of Pc 3 magnetic pulsations in the dayside outer magnetosphere has given new insights into the possible mechanisms of entry of ULF wave power into the magnetosphere from a bow shock-related upstream source. A comparison is made of data from two 10-hour intervals on successive days in April 1986 and then a possible model for transmission of pulsation signals from the magnetosheath into the dayside magnetosphere is presented. Clear interplanetary magnetic field magnitude control of dayside resonant harmonic pulsations and band-limited very high latitude pulsations, as well as pulsation-modulated precipitation of what appear to be magnetosheath/boundary layer electrons are shown. It is believed that this modulated precipitation may be responsible for the propagation of upstream wave power in the Pc 3 frequency band into the high-latitude ionosphere, from whence it may be transported throughout the dayside outer magnetosphere by means of an 'ionospheric transistor'. In this model, modulations in ionospheric conductivity caused by cusp/cleft precipitation cause varying ionospheric currents with frequency spectra determined by the upstream waves; these modulations will be superimposed on the Birkeland currents, which close via these ionospheric currents. Modulated region 2 Birkeland currents will in turn provide a narrow-band source of wave energy to a wide range of dayside local times in the outer magnetosphere.

  9. Ionosphere-Plasmasphere-Electrodynamics (IPE) model and its coupling to terrestrial weather toward transitioning to operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, N.; Richards, P. G.; Fedrizzi, M.; Fang, T. W.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Codrescu, M.; Li, P.; Theurich, G.; Oehmke, R.; DeLuca, C.; Akmaev, R. A.; Wang, H.; Maute, A. I.; Pedatella, N. M.; Richmond, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Ionosphere-Plasmasphere-Electrodynamics (IPE) model is a new, time dependent, three-dimensional model of ionosphere and plasmasphere recently developed through collaboration between University of Colorado, George Mason University, NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC), NOAA Global Systems Division (GSD), NCAR HAO and NESII. It provides time dependent, global, three-dimensional plasma densities for nine ion species, electron and ion temperatures, and both parallel and perpendicular velocities of the ionosphere and plasmasphere. IPE reproduces not only the climatology of global TEC observations, but the model has also been applied to Space Weather events, such as Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSW) and geomagnetic storms. The model follows the storm time redistribution of the plasma density in the ionosphere and plasmasphere, including the development of the Storm Enhanced Density (SED). While the standalone IPE continues to be improved, IPE has been coupled to Whole Atmosphere Model (WAM), a special configuration of the GFS (Global Forecast System), in order to respond to terrestrial weather. IPE has been included as a component of the NOAA Environmental Modeling System (NEMS) coupled system using the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) and National Unified Operational Prediction Capability (NUOPC) layer. In this presentation, an overview of the IPE model development and current status is presented. Furthermore, the preliminary results from the coupled WAM-IPE model is shown to demonstrate the impact of meteorological perturbations on the ionosphere. The presentation is summarized by the discussions on the challenges in the coupling effort toward the ultimate goal of transitioning to operations.

  10. Ion Escape from the Ionosphere of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, R.; Sittler, E.; Lipatov, A.

    2008-01-01

    Ions have been observed to flow away from Titan along its induced magnetic tail by the Plasma Science Instrument (PLS) on Voyager 1 and the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) on Cassini. In both cases, the ions have been inferred to be of ionospheric origin. Recent plasma measurements made at another unmagnetized body, Venus, have also observed similar flow in its magnetic tail. Much earlier, the possibility of such flow was inferred when ionospheric measurements made from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) were used to derive upward flow and acceleration of H(+), D(+) and O(+) within the nightside ionosphere of Venus. The measurements revealed that the polarization electric field in the ionosphere produced the principal upward force on these light ions. The resulting vertical flow of H(+) and D(+) was found to be the dominant escape mechanism of hydrogen and deuterium, corresponding to loss rates consistent with large oceans in early Venus. Other electrodynamic forces were unimportant because the plasma beta in the nightside ionosphere of Venus is much greater than one. Although the plasma beta is also greater than one on Titan, ion acceleration is expected to be more complex, especially because the subsolar point and the subflow points can be 180 degrees apart. Following what we learned at Venus, upward acceleration of light ions by the polarization electric field opposing gravity in the ionosphere of Titan will be described. Additional electrodynamic forces resulting from the interaction of Saturn's magnetosphere with Titan's ionosphere will be examined using a recent hybrid model.

  11. A cometary ionosphere model for Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cloutier, P. A.; Daniell, R. E., Jr.; Dessler, A. J.; Hill, T. W.

    1978-01-01

    A source for the ionosphere of Io is proposed based on the assumption that the satellite is rather moonlike but continuously bombarded by intense fluxes of energetic particles, which makes its surface electrically conducting so that a significant Birkeland current is drawn up along magnetic field lines from Jupiter's ionosphere. It is suggested that the ion current is neutralized upon contact with Io's surface and that subsequent sputtering of this material from the surface supplies the satellite's neutral atmosphere. A model for the generation and maintenance of Io's ionosphere is outlined, according to which the structure of the ionosphere is determined by the impact of energetic trapped electrons from the Jovian magnetosphere and the ram pressure of the corotational magnetospheric wind. The first of these two processes provides the main ionization mechanism, while the second compresses the upstream (or 'nighttime') ionosphere via Alfven's critical-velocity phenomenon. It is concluded that Io's ionosphere is more nearly analogous to the coma and tail of a comet in the solar wind than to the earthlike case of a permanent gravitationally bound ionosphere.

  12. Coupling of Earth's Atmosphere and Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    The coupling between the Earth's atmosphere and ionosphere is very complex and many aspects are not well understood till date. Recent measurements show that coupling influences both the electron density and electrical conductivity. The ionosphere reacts to various natural hazards related phenomena such as lightening discharges, thunderstorms, high-power explosion, earthquakes, volcano eruptions, and typhoons through a chain of interconnected processes in the lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere interaction system. The precipitation of magnetospheric electrons affects higher latitudes while the radioactive elements emitted during the earthquakes affect electron density and conductivity in the lower atmosphere. Thunderstorms and lightning discharges play a major role in transferring energy from the atmosphere to the ionosphere and in establishing electrical coupling between atmosphere and ionosphere through the global electric circuit (GEC). Electrical processes occurring in the atmosphere couple the atmosphere and ionosphere, because both DC and AC effects operate at the speed of light. The electrostatic and electromagnetic field changes in global electric circuit arise from thunderstorm, lightning discharges, and optical emissions in the mesosphere. In the present paper, our present understanding of how various processes play pivotal role in energy transfer from the lower atmosphere to the ionosphere would be briefly reviewed.

  13. An ionospheric assimilation model along a meridian plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Huijun; Liu, Libo; Ren, Zhipeng; Hu, Lianhuan; Chen, Yiding; Wan, Weixing

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we developed a two-dimensional ionospheric assimilation model that assimilates the observations of peak electron density of F2-layer (NmF2) and the peak height of F2-layer (hmF2) derived from five ionosonde stations along the 120°E meridian, using three-dimensional variation techniques (3DVAR) based on a physics-based ionosphere theoretical model. The assimilation system can well produce the assimilated results along the 120°E meridian plane by using the data of NmF2 and hmF2 at five ionosonde stations from Mohe (52.0°N) to Sanya (18.3°N). The root mean square error (RMSE) between the analysis results of the assimilation model and the ionosonde observations is much lower than that between the results from international reference ionosphere (IRI) and the ionosonde observations. In addition, we carried out the assimilation test by taking the IRI results as the observations to check the assimilated results in the regions without observations. The assimilated result in the southern hemisphere (RMSE=0.29) is much worse than that in the northern hemisphere (RMSE=0.10) because no observations in the southern hemisphere were used. If the data derived from the four ionosonde stations in Australia are used, the assimilated result in the southern hemisphere would be much more accurate. In addition to NmF2 and hmF2, the assimilation model can also adjust the total electron content (TEC). The RMSE between the TEC after assimilation and the observed GPS TEC is much lower than that between the TEC from the IRI model and the observed GPS TEC.

  14. Solar cycle variations in the ionosphere of Mars as seen by multiple Mars Express data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Cano, B.; Lester, M.; Witasse, O.; Milan, S. E.; Hall, B. E. S.; Cartacci, M.; Peter, K.; Morgan, D. D.; Blelly, P.-L.; Radicella, S.; Cicchetti, A.; Noschese, R.; Orosei, R.; Pätzold, M.

    2016-03-01

    The response of the Martian ionosphere to solar activity is analyzed by taking into account variations in a range of parameters during four phases of the solar cycle throughout 2005-2012. Multiple Mars Express data sets have been used (such as Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) in Active Ionospheric Sounding, MARSIS subsurface, and MaRS Radio Science), which currently cover more than 10 years of solar activity. The topside of the main ionospheric layer behavior is empirically modeled through the neutral scale height parameter, which describes the density distribution in altitude, and can be used as a dynamic monitor of the solar wind-Martian plasma interaction, as well as of the medium's temperature. The main peak, the total electron content, and the relationship between the solar wind dynamic pressure and the maximum thermal pressure of the ionosphere with the solar cycle are assessed. We conclude that the neutral scale height was different in each phase of the solar cycle, having a large variation with solar zenith angle during the moderate-ascending and high phases, while there is almost no variation during the moderate-descending and low phases. Between end-2007 and end-2009, an almost permanent absence of secondary layer resulted because of the low level of solar X-rays. Also, the ionosphere was more likely to be found in a more continuously magnetized state. The induced magnetic field from the solar wind, even if weak, could be strong enough to penetrate more than at other solar cycle phases.

  15. Artificial Intelligence.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David R; Palacios-González, César; Harris, John

    2016-04-01

    It seems natural to think that the same prudential and ethical reasons for mutual respect and tolerance that one has vis-à-vis other human persons would hold toward newly encountered paradigmatic but nonhuman biological persons. One also tends to think that they would have similar reasons for treating we humans as creatures that count morally in our own right. This line of thought transcends biological boundaries-namely, with regard to artificially (super)intelligent persons-but is this a safe assumption? The issue concerns ultimate moral significance: the significance possessed by human persons, persons from other planets, and hypothetical nonorganic persons in the form of artificial intelligence (AI). This article investigates why our possible relations to AI persons could be more complicated than they first might appear, given that they might possess a radically different nature to us, to the point that civilized or peaceful coexistence in a determinate geographical space could be impossible to achieve.

  16. Artificial Intelligence.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David R; Palacios-González, César; Harris, John

    2016-04-01

    It seems natural to think that the same prudential and ethical reasons for mutual respect and tolerance that one has vis-à-vis other human persons would hold toward newly encountered paradigmatic but nonhuman biological persons. One also tends to think that they would have similar reasons for treating we humans as creatures that count morally in our own right. This line of thought transcends biological boundaries-namely, with regard to artificially (super)intelligent persons-but is this a safe assumption? The issue concerns ultimate moral significance: the significance possessed by human persons, persons from other planets, and hypothetical nonorganic persons in the form of artificial intelligence (AI). This article investigates why our possible relations to AI persons could be more complicated than they first might appear, given that they might possess a radically different nature to us, to the point that civilized or peaceful coexistence in a determinate geographical space could be impossible to achieve. PMID:26957450

  17. A MLP neural network as an investigator of TEC time series to detect seismo-ionospheric anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhoondzadeh, M.

    2013-06-01

    Anomaly detection is extremely important for earthquake parameters estimation. In this paper, an application of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) in the earthquake precursor's domain has been developed. This study is concerned with investigating the Total Electron Content (TEC) time series by using a Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) neural network to detect seismo-ionospheric anomalous variations induced by the powerful Tohoku earthquake of March 11, 2011.The duration of TEC time series dataset is 120 days at time resolution of 2 h. The results show that the MLP presents anomalies better than referenced and conventional methods such as Auto-Regressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) technique. In this study, also the detected TEC anomalies using the proposed method, are compared to the previous results (Akhoondzadeh, 2012) dealing with the observed TEC anomalies by applying the mean, median, wavelet and Kalman filter methods. The MLP detected anomalies are similar to those detected using the previous methods applied on the same case study. The results indicate that a MLP feed-forward neural network can be a suitable non-parametric method to detect changes of a non linear time series such as variations of earthquake precursors.

  18. Innovative development and application of models for weakly ionized ionospheric plasmas. Final report, 15 May 1990-30 November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Eccles, J.V.; Hingst, J.; Armstrong, R.

    1993-11-01

    Artificial modifications of the ionosphere through chemical releases and ionospheric heating experiments are examined with models of chemistry and transport to advance understanding of ion chemistry of the upper atmosphere. The specific releases investigated were the SF6 released of the CRRES-at-Kwajalein rocket campaign and the CO2 releases of the Red Air I program. Both the SF6 and CO2 releases experienced freezing or clustering of the molecules. This must be accounted for in the composition and airglow observations. In addition, HF heating effects in the E and F region were examined through modeling of energy deposition and resulting chemistry. NO sub x production in a HF ionospheric heater beam is estimated and compared with natural sources of NO sub x. Global effects of HF operation are very small but the local effects can be large enough to permit observable modulation to this environment.

  19. Effect of enhanced x-ray flux on the ionosphere over Cyprus during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Md. Golam; Haralambous, Haris

    2015-06-01

    In this work we study the effect of solar flares on the ionosphere over Cyprus. Solar flares are impulsive solar activity events usually coupled with Coronal Mass Ejection (CME). The arrival and the subsequent impact of solar flares on geospace, following an eruption on the Sun's surface is almost immediate (around 9 min) whereas the impact of CMEs is rather delayed (2-3 days) as the former is based on X-ray radiation whereas the latter phenomenon is related with particles and magnetic fields travelling at lower speeds via the Solar Wind. The penetration of X-rays down to the Dregion following such an event enhances the electron density. This increase can be monitored by ionosondes, which measure the electron density up to the maximum electron density NmF2. The significance of this increase lies on the increase of signal absorption causing limited window of operating frequencies for HF communications. In this study the effect of enhanced X-ray flux on the ionosphere over Cyprus during solar flares has been investigated. To establish the correlation and extent of impact on different layers, data of X-ray intensity from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and ionospheric characteristics (D & F layer) over Nicosia station (35° N, 33° E) were examined for all solar flares during the period 2011-2014. The analysis revealed a positive and good correlation between frequency of minimum reflection, fmin and X-ray intensity for D layer demonstrating that X-rays play a dominant role in the ionization of lower ionosphere. Hence, X-ray flux can be used as a good proxy for studying the solar flare effects on lower ionosphere. The correlation coefficient between maximum electron density of F layer, NmF2 and X-ray intensity was found to be poor.

  20. Reduction of thermal conductivity in MnSi1.7 multi-layered thin films with artificially inserted Si interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosaki, Y.; Yabuuchi, S.; Nishide, A.; Fukatani, N.; Hayakawa, J.

    2016-08-01

    We report a lowered lattice thermal conductivity in nm-scale MnSi1.7/Si multilayers which were fabricated by controlling thermal diffusions of Mn and Si atoms. The thickness of the constituent layers is 1.5-5.0 nm, which is comparable to the phonon mean free path of both MnSi1.7 and Si. By applying the above nanostructures, we reduced the lattice thermal conductivity down to half that of bulk MnSi1.7/Si composite materials. The obtained value of 1.0 W/K m is the experimentally observed minimum in MnSi1.7-based materials without any heavy element doping and close to the minimum thermal conductivity. We attribute the reduced lattice thermal conductivity to phonon scattering at the MnSi1.7/Si interfaces in the multilayers.

  1. Artificial vision.

    PubMed

    Zarbin, M; Montemagno, C; Leary, J; Ritch, R

    2011-09-01

    A number treatment options are emerging for patients with retinal degenerative disease, including gene therapy, trophic factor therapy, visual cycle inhibitors (e.g., for patients with Stargardt disease and allied conditions), and cell transplantation. A radically different approach, which will augment but not replace these options, is termed neural prosthetics ("artificial vision"). Although rewiring of inner retinal circuits and inner retinal neuronal degeneration occur in association with photoreceptor degeneration in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), it is possible to create visually useful percepts by stimulating retinal ganglion cells electrically. This fact has lead to the development of techniques to induce photosensitivity in cells that are not light sensitive normally as well as to the development of the bionic retina. Advances in artificial vision continue at a robust pace. These advances are based on the use of molecular engineering and nanotechnology to render cells light-sensitive, to target ion channels to the appropriate cell type (e.g., bipolar cell) and/or cell region (e.g., dendritic tree vs. soma), and on sophisticated image processing algorithms that take advantage of our knowledge of signal processing in the retina. Combined with advances in gene therapy, pathway-based therapy, and cell-based therapy, "artificial vision" technologies create a powerful armamentarium with which ophthalmologists will be able to treat blindness in patients who have a variety of degenerative retinal diseases.

  2. Ionospheric irregularity physics modelling. Memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Ossakow, S.L.; Keskinen, M.J.; Zalesak, S.T.

    1982-02-09

    Theoretical and numerical simulation techniques have been employed to study ionospheric F region plasma cloud striation phenomena, equatorial spread F phenomena, and high latitude diffuse auroral F region irregularity phenomena. Each of these phenomena can cause scintillation effects. The results and ideas from these studies are state-of-the-art, agree well with experimental observations, and have induced experimentalists to look for theoretically predicted results. One conclusion that can be drawn from these studies is that ionospheric irregularity phenomena can be modelled from a first principles physics point of view. Theoretical and numerical simulation results from the aforementioned ionospheric irregularity areas will be presented.

  3. Ionosphere of Mars observed by Mars Express.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, Eduard; Fraenz, Markus; Andrews, Dave; Morgan, Dave

    2016-04-01

    The Martian ionosphere is studied at different solar zenith angles using the local electron number densities and total electron content (TEC) derived from the observations by MARSIS onboard Mars Express. The data are complemented by the ASPERA-3 observations which provide us with the information about upward/downward velocity of the low-energy ions and electron precipitation. We consider the Mars Express observations at different solar cycle intervals. Different factors which influence the ionosphere dynamics are analyzed. The focus is made on a role of the crustal magnetic field on the Martian ionosphere and its influence on ion escape.

  4. Ionospheric calibration for single frequency altimeter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, William S.; Born, George H.

    1993-08-01

    This report investigates the potential of using Global Positioning System (GPS) data and a model of the ionosphere to supply a measure of the sub-satellite Total Electron Current (TEC) of the required accuracy (10 TECU rms) for the purpose of calibrating single frequency radar altimeter measurements. Since climatological (monthly mean) models are known to be in error by as much as 50 percent, this work focused on the Parameterized Real-Time Ionospheric Specification Model (PRISM) which has the capability to improve model accuracy by ingesting (adjusting to) in situ ionospheric measurements. A set of globally distributed TEC measurements were generated using GPS data and were used as input to improve the accuracy of the PRISM model. The adjusted PRISM TEC values were compared to TOPEX dual frequency TEC measurements (which are considered truth) for a number of TOPEX sub-satellite tracks. The adjusted PRISM values generally compared to the TOPEX measurements within the 10 TECU accuracy requirements when the sub-satellite track passed within 300 to 400 km of the GPS TEC data or when the track passed through a night time ionosphere. However, when the sub-satellite points were greater than 300 to 400 km away from the GPS TEC data or when a local noon ionosphere was sampled, the adjusted PRISM values generally differed by greater than 10 TECU rms with data excursions from the TOPEX TEC measurements of as much as 40 TECU (an 8 cm path delay error at K band). Therefore, it can be concluded from this analysis that an unrealistically large number of GPS stations would be needed to predict sub-satellite TEC at the 10 TECU level in the day time ionosphere using a model such as PRISM. However, a technique currently being studied at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) may provide a means of supplying adequate TEC data to meet the 10 TECU ionospheric correction accuracy when using a realistic number of ionospheric stations. This method involves using global GPS TEC data to

  5. Ionospheric calibration for single frequency altimeter measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, William S.; Born, George H.

    1993-01-01

    This report investigates the potential of using Global Positioning System (GPS) data and a model of the ionosphere to supply a measure of the sub-satellite Total Electron Current (TEC) of the required accuracy (10 TECU rms) for the purpose of calibrating single frequency radar altimeter measurements. Since climatological (monthly mean) models are known to be in error by as much as 50 percent, this work focused on the Parameterized Real-Time Ionospheric Specification Model (PRISM) which has the capability to improve model accuracy by ingesting (adjusting to) in situ ionospheric measurements. A set of globally distributed TEC measurements were generated using GPS data and were used as input to improve the accuracy of the PRISM model. The adjusted PRISM TEC values were compared to TOPEX dual frequency TEC measurements (which are considered truth) for a number of TOPEX sub-satellite tracks. The adjusted PRISM values generally compared to the TOPEX measurements within the 10 TECU accuracy requirements when the sub-satellite track passed within 300 to 400 km of the GPS TEC data or when the track passed through a night time ionosphere. However, when the sub-satellite points were greater than 300 to 400 km away from the GPS TEC data or when a local noon ionosphere was sampled, the adjusted PRISM values generally differed by greater than 10 TECU rms with data excursions from the TOPEX TEC measurements of as much as 40 TECU (an 8 cm path delay error at K band). Therefore, it can be concluded from this analysis that an unrealistically large number of GPS stations would be needed to predict sub-satellite TEC at the 10 TECU level in the day time ionosphere using a model such as PRISM. However, a technique currently being studied at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) may provide a means of supplying adequate TEC data to meet the 10 TECU ionospheric correction accuracy when using a realistic number of ionospheric stations. This method involves using global GPS TEC data to

  6. The solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere system

    PubMed

    Lyon

    2000-06-16

    The solar wind, magnetosphere, and ionosphere form a single system driven by the transfer of energy and momentum from the solar wind to the magnetosphere and ionosphere. Variations in the solar wind can lead to disruptions of space- and ground-based systems caused by enhanced currents flowing into the ionosphere and increased radiation in the near-Earth environment. The coupling between the solar wind and the magnetosphere is mediated and controlled by the magnetic field in the solar wind through the process of magnetic reconnection. Understanding of the global behavior of this system has improved markedly in the recent past from coordinated observations with a constellation of satellite and ground instruments.

  7. Artificial Ionization and UHF Radar Response Associated with HF Frequencies near Electron Gyro-Harmonics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, B. J.; Fallen, C. T.; Secan, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present new results from O-mode ionospheric heating experiments at the HAARP facility in Alaska to demonstrate that the magnitude of artificial ionization production is critically dependent on the choice of HF frequency near gyro-harmonics. For O-mode heating in the lower F-region ionosphere, typically about 200 km altitude, artificial ionization enhancements are observed in the lower ionosphere (about 150 - 220 km) and also in the topside ionosphere above about 500 km. Lower ionosphere density enhancements are inferred from HF-enhanced ion and plasma-line signals observed with UHF radar. Upper ionospheric density enhancements have been observed with TEC (total electron content) experiments by monitoring satellite radio beacons where signal paths traverse the HF-modified ionosphere. Both density enhancements and corresponding upward plasma fluxes have also been observed in the upper ionosphere via in-situ satellite observations. The data presented focus mainly on observations near the third and fourth gyro-harmonics. The specific values of the height-dependent gyro-harmonics have been computed from a magnetic model of the field line through the HF heated volume. Experiments with several closely spaced HF frequencies around the gyro-harmonic frequency region show that the magnitude of the lower-ionosphere artificial ionization production maximizes for HF frequencies about 1.0 - 1.5 MHz above the gyro-harmonic frequency. The response is progressively larger as the HF frequency is increased in the frequency region near the gyro-harmonics. For HF frequencies that are initially greater than the gyro-harmonic value the UHF radar scattering cross-section is relatively small, and non-existent or very weak signals are observed; as the signal returns drop in altitude due to density enhancements the HF interaction region passes through lower altitudes where the HF frequency is less than the gyro-harmonic value, for these conditions the radar scattering cross-section is

  8. Artificial Aurora Generated by HAARP (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, A. V.; Kendall, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from the ionospheric heating experiment conducted on March 12, 2013 at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska. During the experiment HAARP transmitted X-mode 4.57 MHz waves modulated with the frequency 0.9 mHz and pointed in the direction of the magnetic zenith. The beam was focused to ~20 km spot at the altitude 100 km. The heating produces two effects: First, it generates magnetic field-aligned currents producing D and H components of the magnetic field with frequency 0.9 mHz detected by fluxgate magnetometer in Gakona. Second, the heating produced bright luminous structures in the heated region detected with the SRI telescope in 427.8 nm, 557.7 nm, 630.0 nm wavelengths. We emphasize, that for the best of our knowledge, this is the first experiment where the heating of the ionosphere with X-mode produces luminous structures in the ionosphere. We classify this luminosity as an 'artificial aurora', because it correlate with the intensity of the magnetic field-aligned currents, and such correlation is constantly seen in the natural aurora.

  9. Observations of ionospheric convection vortices - Signatures of momentum transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchenry, M. A.; Clauer, C. R.; Friis-Christensen, E.; Kelly, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    Several classes of traveling vortices in the dayside ionospheric flow have been detected and tracked using the Greenland magnetometer chain. One class observed during quiet times consists of a continuous series of vortices moving generally antisunward for several hours at a time. Assuming each vortex to be the convection pattern produced by a small field aligned current moving across the ionosphere, the amount of field aligned current was found by fitting a modeled ground magnetic signature to measurements from the chain of magnetometers. The calculated field aligned current is seen to be steady for each vortex and neighboring vortices have currents of opposite sign. Low altitude DMSP observations indicate the vortices are on field lines which map to the inner edge of the low latitude boundary layer. Because the vortices are conjugate to the boundary layer, repeat in a regular fashion and travel antisunward, it is argued that this class of vortices is caused by surface waves at the magnetopause. No strong correlations between field aligned current strength and solar wind density, velocity, or Bz is found.

  10. Ionospheric effects of the missile destruction on 9 December 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovsky, Alexander; Shalimov, Sergey; Lukianova, Renata; Lester, Mark

    2014-05-01

    We report on ionosonde and meteor radar observations made in Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory (SGO, 67°22'N, 26°38'E, Finland) on 9 December 2009, during a test launch of the Russian solid propellant military missile. Due to a technical problem, the missile was self-destroyed around 07 UT at an ionospheric height (near 200 km altitude) over the Kola Peninsula (Russia), at a distance about 500 km to east from the observatory. Products of the explosion were spread into a large area and reached the region of SGO meteor radar observations in about 2 h (around 09 UT). After about 3 h (around 10 UT), a sporadic E layer presumably composed of the remains including long-lived metallic (aluminum and its oxides) ions, was observed near the zenith of the SGO ionosonde. We discuss possible mechanisms accounting for transport of the remains. (1) Since the event occurred during a long-lasting period of extremely low solar and magnetic activity, the ionospheric electric field was unlikely to play a substantial role in the transport of the remains and sporadic E layer formation. (2) The horizontal transport of the remains cannot be explained by the neutral winds based on empirical models. (3) Theoretical estimations suggest that the observed transport could be due to thermospheric turbulence.

  11. Sporadic Layer es and Siesmic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimov, Obid; Blokhin, Alexandr; Kalashnikova, Tatyana

    2016-07-01

    To determine the influence of seismogenic disturbances on the calm state of the iono-sphere and assess the impact of turbulence development in sporadic-E during earthquake prepa-ration period we calculated the variation in the range of semitransparency ∆fES = f0ES - fbES. The study was based primarily on the ionograms obtained by vertical sounding of the ionosphere at Dushanbe at nighttime station from 15 to 29 August 1986. In this time period four successive earthquakes took place, which serves the purpose of this study of the impact of seis-mogenic processes on the intensity of the continuous generation of ionospheric turbulence. Analysis of the results obtained for seismic-ionospheric effects of 1986 earthquakes at station Dushanbe has shown that disturbance of ionospheric parameters during earthquake prepa-ration period displays a pronounced maximum with a duration of t = 1-6 hours. Ionospheric effects associated with the processes of earthquake preparation emerge quite predictably, which verifies seismogenic disturbances in the ionosphere. During the preparation of strong earthquakes, ionograms of vertical sounding produced at station Dushanbe - near the epicenter area - often shown the phenomenon of spreading traces of sporadic Es. It is assumed that the duration of manifestation of seismic ionospheric precursors in Du-shanbe τ = 1 - 6 hours may be associated with deformation processes in the Earth's crust and var-ious faults, as well as dissimilar properties of the environment of the epicentral area. It has been shown that for earthquakes with 4.5 ≤ M ≤ 5.5 1-2 days prior to the event iono-spheric perturbations in the parameters of the sporadic layer Es and an increase in the value of the range of semitransparency Es - ΔfEs were observed, which could lead to turbulence at altitudes of 100-130 km.

  12. Wavelet neural networks using particle swarm optimization training in modeling regional ionospheric total electron content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari Razin, Mir Reza; Voosoghi, Behzad

    2016-11-01

    Wavelet neural networks (WNNs) are a new class of neural networks (NNs) that has been developed using a combined method of multi-layer artificial neural networks and wavelet analysis (WA). In this paper, WNNs is used for modeling and prediction of total electron content (TEC) of ionosphere with high spatial and temporal resolution. Generally, back-propagation (BP) algorithm is used to train the neural network. While this algorithm proves to be very effective and robust in training many types of network structures, it suffers from certain disadvantages such as easy entrapment in a local minimum and slow convergence. To improve the performance of WNN in training step, the adjustment of network weights using particle swarm optimization (PSO) was proposed. The results obtained in this paper were compared with standard NN (SNN) by BP training algorithm (SNN-BP), SNN by PSO training algorithm (SNN-PSO) and WNN by BP training algorithm (WNN-BP). For numerical experiments, observations collected at 36 GPS stations in 5 days of 2012 from Iranian permanent GPS network (IPGN) are used. The average minimum relative errors in 5 test stations for WNN-PSO, WNN-BP, SNN-BP and SNN-PSO compared with GPS TEC are 10.59%, 12.85%, 13.18%, 13.75% and average maximum relative errors are 14.70%, 17.30%, 18.53% and 20.83%, respectively. Comparison of diurnal predicted TEC values from the WNN-PSO, SNN-BP, SNN-PSO and WNN-BP models with GPS TEC revealed that the WNN-PSO provides more accurate predictions than the other methods in the test area.

  13. A Unified Fluid Model for Low-latitude Ionosphere Turbulence Causes Radiowave Scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, E.; Horton, W.

    2012-12-01

    Nonlinear dynamics of the low latitudes E-layer simulated with a systems of differential equations describing the neutral wind driven Farley-Buneman instability and the density-gradient-drift instability as rising bubbles and falling higher electron density spikes. The simulations extent earlier nonlinear studies by using empirical models for the atmosphere and ionosphere backgrounds to give realistic local time-altitude parameters within a Python wrapped F90 simulations. New equations that keep both the compressional and rotational ion flows that apply in the lower F layer are analyzed to describe plumes extending to the peak of the F layer. A ray-tracing technique is used to describe the small angle scattering at high frequency [Gigahertz] GNSS signals treated as rays in the turbulent ionospheric plasma.

  14. Artificial layered perovskite oxides A(B{sub 0.5}B′{sub 0.5})O{sub 3} as potential solar energy conversion materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hungru; Umezawa, Naoto

    2015-02-07

    Perovskite oxides with a d{sup 0} electronic configuration are promising photocatalysts and exhibit high electron mobilities. However, their band gaps are too large for efficient solar energy conversion. On the other hand, transition metal cations with partially filled d{sup n} electronic configurations give rise to visible light absorption. In this study, by using hybrid density functional theory calculations, it is demonstrated that the virtues of the two categories of materials can be combined in perovskite oxide A(B{sub 0.5}B′{sub 0.5})O{sub 3} with a layered B-site ordering along the [001] direction. The electronic structures of the four selected perovskite oxide compounds, La(Ti{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 0.5})O{sub 3}, La(Ti{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5})O{sub 3}, Sr(Nb{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.5})O{sub 3}, and Sr(Nb{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5})O{sub 3} are calculated and discussed.

  15. Clouds and troughs of total electron content detected with the ionospheric weather index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaeva, Tamara

    2016-07-01

    The ionospheric weather W index has been developed with the different thresholds of change in the F2 layer peak electron density NmF2 (proportional to foF2 critical frequency) or total electron content TEC relative their quiet reference for quantifying the ionosphere variability. The thresholds of DTEC=log(TEC/TECq) are selected for the positive and negative logarithm of TEC ratio to the quiet reference median, TECq, at any given location on the Earth. The global W-index maps are produced from Global Ionospheric Maps of Total Electron Content, GIM-TEC, and provided online at http://www.izmiran.ru/services/iweather/ and http://www.iololab.org/. Based on W-index maps, Catalogues of the ionospheric storms and sub-storms are produced available for the users. The second generation of the ionospheric weather indices, designated V index, is recently introduced and applied for the retrospective study of GIM-TEC variability during 1999-2015. Using sliding-window statistical analysis, moving daily-hourly TEC median TECq for 15 preceding days with estimated variance bounds are obtained at cells of GIM-TEC. The ionosphere variability index, V, is expressed in terms of ΔTEC deviation from the median normalized by the standard deviation STD. V index segmentation is introduced from Vn=-4 in step of 1 to Vp=4 specifying TEC storm if an instant TEC is outside of TECq+-1STD. The global maps of V index allow distinguish the clouds of enhanced TEC (positive storm signatures) and troughs of TEC depletion (negative storm signatures) as compared to the background quiet reference TECq map. It is found that the large-scale TEC clouds and troughs are observed in space all over the world constituting up to 20-50 percent of cells of GIM-TEC. The time variation of these plasma patches is partly following to geomagnetic SSC storm onset. As concerns the interplanetary and the solar wind, SW, sources of the ionospheric storms the TEC storms are observed both with IMF and SW precursors and

  16. Coupling between tsunamis and ionosphere: ground-based and space-based observation opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coisson, Pierdavide; Makela, Jonathan J.; Occhipinti, Giovanni; Astafyeva, Elvira; alam Kherani, Esfhan; Lognonne, Philippe

    2012-07-01

    Large scale phenomena as tsunamis propagating through the ocean excite gravity waves that can reach ionospheric heights. The coupling between the ground/ocean and the atmosphere up to the ionosphere opens the possibility to observe in the upper atmosphere the effects of the propagation of tsunamis. During all recent major tsunami events ionospheric waves have been observed by ground GPS networks, satellite altimeters and, recently, also by an airglow imager. During the tsunami event of 11 March 2011 an all-sky camera in Hawaii observes the Internal Gravity Waves (IGW) during about one-and-a-half hours before the arrival of the, while it was crossing the Pacific Ocean in that region. Collocated ionospheric measurements were also done with GNSS sounding and Jason satellite. We present results of assessment studies of ground-based and space-based ionospheric remote sensing for tsunami propagation monitoring. We analyze the cases of airglow imager, Over-The-Horizon (OTH) radar, GPS, radio occultation and GNSS reflectometry. We describe modeling results of IGW excited by a realistic tsunami propagation model through the ocean near Hawaii. The model includes the propagation of the gravity wave in the atmosphere, the coupling between neutral and charged particles in the ionosphere and the production of the airglow emission at 630.0 nm. Synthetic all-sky images are calculated by integration of the emission along rays from the camera location to though the airglow layer. Additional ground-based observations could be provided by (OTH) radars, which operate in High Frequency (HF) band and can be used to monitor the bottomside ionosphere. Synthetic radar measurements computed using HF numerical ray-tracing confirm the possibility to detect IGW excited by tsunamis. The large coverage of OTH radar and its sensitivity to low-altitude plasma anomalies provides a wide range of observation. Additionally, we analyze the capabilities of space-based radio occultation and GNSS

  17. Auroral pulsations from ionospheric winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakada, M. P.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that auroral pulsations are due to oscillatory electrical circuits in the ionosphere that are driven by the negative resistance of jet stream winds is examined. For the condenser plates, the highly conducting surfaces above the edges of the jet stream are postulated. The dielectric constant of the plasma between the plates is quite large. The current that is driven perpendicular to and by the jet stream closes along the plates and through Pedersen currents in the F region above the stream. This closed loop gives the inductance and resistance for the circuit. Periods of oscillation for this circuit appear to be in the range of Pc 1 to Pc 3. In accord with observations, this circuit appears to be able to limit the brightness of pulsations.

  18. Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaniol, Craig

    1994-01-01

    The Community College Division is pleased to report progress of NASA funded research at West Virginia State College. During this reporting period, the project research group has continued with activities to develop instrumentation capability designed to monitor resonant cavity frequencies in the atmospheric region between the Earth's surface and the ionosphere. In addition, the project's principal investigator, Dr. Craig Spaniol, and NASA technical officer, Dr. John Sutton, have written and published technical papers intended to expand the scientific and technical framework needed for project research. This research continues to provide an excellent example of government and education working together to provide significant research in the college environment. This cooperative effort has provided many students with technical project work which compliments their education.

  19. Development and global oscillations of cometary ionospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Houpis, H.L.F.; Mendis, D.A.

    1981-02-01

    Representing the cometary ionosphere by a single fluid model characterized by an average ionization time scale, we have studied both its development as a comet approaches the sun and its response to sudden changes in the solar wind conditions. Three different nuclear sizes, small average, and very large, as well as three different modes of energy addition to the atmosphere, adiabatic, isothermal, and suprathermal, are considered. The crucial parameter determining both the nature and the size of the ionosphere is the average ionization time scale within the ionosphere. We identify two different ionization time scales: one during ''quiet'' solar wind conditions when photoionization is the principal source of ionization there, and a secod, much shorter time scale, subsequent to the encounter by a comet of a solar wind high-speed stream, when a beam of energetic electrons discharged from the comet's tail into the ionosphere is the main ionizing agent.

  20. Magnetic Fluctuations in the Martian Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espley, Jared

    2010-01-01

    The Martian ionosphere is influenced by both the solar wind and the regional magnetic fields present in the Martian crust. Both influences ought to cause time variable changes in the magnetic fields present in the ionosphere. I report observations of these magnetic field fluctuations in the Martian ionosphere. I use data from the Mars Global Surveyor magnetometer instrument. By using data from the aerobraking low altitude passes (approx. 200 km) I find that there are numerous fluctuations both near and far from the strong crustal sources. Using data from the 400 km altitude mapping phase (which is near the topside of the primary ionosphere), I look at the comparative strength of the fluctuations relative to the solar wind and temporal variations. I discuss which wave modes and instabilities could be contributing to these fluctuations. I also discuss the implications of these fluctuations for understanding energy transfer in the Martian system and the effects on atmospheric escape.

  1. Space weather. Ionospheric control of magnetotail reconnection.

    PubMed

    Lotko, William; Smith, Ryan H; Zhang, Binzheng; Ouellette, Jeremy E; Brambles, Oliver J; Lyon, John G

    2014-07-11

    Observed distributions of high-speed plasma flows at distances of 10 to 30 Earth radii (R(E)) in Earth's magnetotail neutral sheet are highly skewed toward the premidnight sector. The flows are a product of the magnetic reconnection process that converts magnetic energy stored in the magnetotail into plasma kinetic and thermal energy. We show, using global numerical simulations, that the electrodynamic interaction between Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere produces an asymmetry consistent with observed distributions in nightside reconnection and plasmasheet flows and in accompanying ionospheric convection. The primary causal agent is the meridional gradient in the ionospheric Hall conductance which, through the Cowling effect, regulates the distribution of electrical currents flowing within and between the ionosphere and magnetotail. PMID:25013068

  2. The theory of ionospheric focused heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Duncan, L. M.

    1987-01-01

    Ionospheric modification by high power radio waves and by chemical releases are combined in a theoretical study of ionospheric focused heating. The release of materials which promote electron-ion recombination creates a hole in the bottomside ionosphere. The ionospheric hole focuses high power radio waves from a ground-based transmitter to give a 20 dB or greater enhancement in power density. The intense radio beam excites atomic oxygen by collisions with accelerated electrons. Airglow from the excited oxygen provides a visible trace of the focused beam. The large increase in the intensity of the radio beam stimulates new wave-plasma interactions. Numerical simulations show that the threshold for the two-plasmon decay instability is exceeded. The interaction of the pump electromagnetic wave with the backward plasmon produces a scattered electromagnetic wave at 3/2 the pump frequency. The scattered wave provides a unique signature of the two-plasmon decay process for ground-based detection.

  3. Wave coupling of atmosphere-ionosphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharenko, L. P.

    2011-12-01

    The dynamic coupling of atmosphere-ionosphere system is a complex interdisciplinary problem. Current thinking suggests that the upward propagation of internal atmospheric waves (planetary waves, tides, gravity waves) from the lower atmosphere is an essential source of energy and momentum for the thermosphere and embedded ionosphere. Studies over the last decade presented fascinating experimental and modeling evidence of global coupling from the troposphere to mesosphere, thermosphere and ionosphere. They were enabled by unprecedented availability of satellite data, in particularly from TIMED, MLS, CHAMP, and GRACE, focused experimental campaigns from ground-based instruments, and major advances in global coupling models. This paper will summarize several developments over the past decade, including non-migrating structures in the ionosphere and thermosphere, advances in studies of gravity waves and planetary waves, and their implications for better understanding of ITM. The paper will also identify questions that need to be answered in the future, and outline promising topics of future development.

  4. The upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, Larry H.

    1992-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: the dynamic atmosphere of Mars; possible similarities with Earth and Venus; the atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars; solar wind interactions; future approved missions; and possible future mission.

  5. Pulsating aurora: The importance of the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.C.

    1980-05-01

    A number of different, but mainly optical, observations made in pulsating auroras are presented. These observations indicate that active ionospheric processes are likely to play an important role in causing and/or modifying pulsating aurora.

  6. Remote Sensing of Ionosphere by IONOLAB Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikan, Feza

    2016-07-01

    Ionosphere is a temporally and spatially varying, dispersive, anisotropic and inhomogeneous medium that is characterized primarily by its electron density distribution. Electron density is a complex function of spatial and temporal variations of solar, geomagnetic, and seismic activities. Ionosphere is the main source of error for navigation and positioning systems and satellite communication. Therefore, characterization and constant monitoring of variability of the ionosphere is of utmost importance for the performance improvement of these systems. Since ionospheric electron density is not a directly measurable quantity, an important derivable parameter is the Total Electron Content (TEC), which is used widely to characterize the ionosphere. TEC is proportional to the total number of electrons on a line crossing the atmosphere. IONOLAB is a research group is formed by Hacettepe University, Bilkent University and Kastamonu University, Turkey gathered to handle the challenges of the ionosphere using state-of-the-art remote sensing and signal processing techniques. IONOLAB group provides unique space weather services of IONOLAB-TEC, International Reference Ionosphere extended to Plasmasphere (IRI-Plas) model based IRI-Plas-MAP, IRI-Plas-STEC and Online IRI-Plas-2015 model at www.ionolab.org. IONOLAB group has been working for imaging and monitoring of ionospheric structure for the last 15 years. TEC is estimated from dual frequency GPS receivers as IONOLAB-TEC using IONOLAB-BIAS. For high spatio-temporal resolution 2-D imaging or mapping, IONOLAB-MAP algorithm is developed that uses automated Universal Kriging or Ordinary Kriging in which the experimental semivariogram is fitted to Matern Function with Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). For 3-D imaging of ionosphere and 1-D vertical profiles of electron density, state-of-the-art IRI-Plas model based IONOLAB-CIT algorithm is developed for regional reconstruction that employs Kalman Filters for state

  7. The ionospheric signature of flux transfer events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, S. W. H.; Freeman, M. P.; Lockwood, Mike; Smith, M. F.

    1991-01-01

    The effects at ionospheric heights which take place when transient reconnection events (i.e., Flux Tranfer Events (FTEs)) occur at the dayside magnetopause are considered. The nature of the FTE related ionospheric flows, the associated current systems, and the plasma precipitation, are discussed. In particular, the nature of the time dependent cusp precipitation which occurs on this case is outlined and expectations are compared with those based on steady magnetopause reconnection.

  8. Thermosphere and ionosphere response on seismogenic disturbances of the global electric circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, Mikhail; Namgaladze, Aleksandr; Knyazeva, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Conditions of warm, humid and ionized air over the active tectonic faults favor the formation of clouds and generation of the intense vertical electric current between the Earth and ionosphere. The latter arises due to separation and vertical transport of the oppositely charged particles by the gravity force and pressure gradients. Additional transport of charged particles into the ionosphere causes disturbances of the ionosphere plasma (under the action of the electric currents in the E-layer and electromagnetic plasma drift in the F2-layer) and thermosphere neutral gas (via the momentum transfer from electric to neutral particles). The thermosphere and ionosphere variations formed under the action of the electric field created by this vertical electric current have been calculated by using the Upper Atmosphere Model (UAM), and a good agreement was found between observed and the UAM calculated perturbations of the electric field, electron and ion concentrations, total electron content (TEC), ion and electron temperatures as well as wind velocities and neutral gas temeperature and concentrations. The roles of the internal gravity waves and electromagnetic plasma drift in generation of the seismogenic TEC variations are discussed.

  9. The ionosphere and the Latin America VLF Network Mexico (LAVNet-Mex) station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgazzi, A.; Lara, A.; Paz, G.; Raulin, J. P.

    2014-08-01

    In order to detect and study the ionospheric response to solar flares (transient high energy solar radiation), we have constructed a radio receiver station at Mexico City, which is part of the “Latin American Very low frequency Network” (LAVNet-Mex). This station extends to the northern hemisphere the so called “South American VLF Network”. LAVNet is able to detect small changes in the amplitude and phase of VLF electromagnetic waves (generated by strong transmitters located all around the world) which are affected by changes of the lowest layer of the ionosphere, where these waves are “reflected”. In this way, LAVNet is an excellent tool to study the dynamics of the lower ionospheric layers. In this work we present a technical description and show the capabilities of the new LAVNet-Mex station. Moreover, as an example of its performance, we present the analysis of the ionospheric effects of two solar flares detected on October 16, 2010 and June 7, 2011.

  10. Anomalous ionospheric variations prior to major earthquakes during 2015 affecting Indian low latitude station Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sumedha; Upadhayaya, Arun Kumar

    2016-07-01

    We have analyzed five major earthquakes (M>6) that occurred during the year 2015, affecting Indian ionosphere, using F2 layer critical frequency (foF2) data obtained using Digisonde from a low latitude station, Delhi (28.6°N, 77.2°E, 42.4°N dip). Normal day-to-day variability occurring in ionosphere is segregated by calculating F2 layer critical frequency variations (ΔfoF2) from the normal quiet time behavior apart from calculating interquartile range. We find that ionospheric F2 region across Delhi by and large shows some significant perturbations 3-4 days prior to these earthquake events. These observed perturbations indicate towards seismo-ionospheric coupling as solar and geomagnetic indices were normally quiet and stable during the period of these events. Further, it was also observed that the effect of earthquake was prominently observed even outside the earthquake preparation zone, calculated using Dobrovolsky et al. [1979].

  11. Mass loss of shuttle space suit orthofabric under simulated ionospheric atomic oxygen bombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    Many polymeric materials used for thermal protection and insulation on spacecraft degrade significantly under prolonged bombardment by ionospheric atomic oxygen. The covering fabric of the multilayered shuttle space suit is composed of a loose weave of GORE-TEX fibers, Nomex and Kevlar-29, which are all polymeric materials. The complete evaluation of suit fabric degradation from ionospheric atomic oxygen is of importance in reevaluating suit lifetime and inspection procedures. The mass loss and visible physical changes of each test sample was determined. Kapton control samples and data from previous asher and flight tests were used to scale the results to reflect ionospheric conditions at about 220 km altitude. It is predicted that the orthofabric loses mass in the ionosphere at a rate of about 66% of the original orthofabric mass/yr. The outer layer of the two-layer orthofabric test samples shows few easily visible signs of degradation, even when observed at 440X. It is concluded that the orthofabric could suffer significant loss of performance after much less than a year of total exposure time, while the degradation might be undetectable in post flight visual examinations of space suits.

  12. Artificial Intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Shirai, Y.; Tsujii, Jun-ichi

    1985-01-01

    Based on the Japanese 5th Generation Computer Program, this volume provides coverage of the fundamental concepts and various techniques in the different applications of Artificial Intelligence. Also presented are the methods which can be used to put these concepts and techniques into practice. Explanations are presented of all the basic topics in the field, including the representation of problems; searching techniques; the control of problem solving; programming languages for Al, such as LISP, PLANNER, CONNIVER, and PROLOG; the representation and utilization of knowledge; and the approach to human intelligence.

  13. The peculiarities of power terrestrial ELF emission in the Earth's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korepanov, Valery; Dudkin, Fedir; Pronenko, Vira; Chvach, Valery

    2016-04-01

    The near-Earth space is saturated with electromagnetic (EM) waves of terrestrial origin in a wide frequency range. The most powerful natural sources of EM emission are thunderstorms and triggered by them Schumann resonance (SR) radiation which is the narrowband EM noise that occurs due to the global thunderstorm activity in the Earth-ionosphere cavity in frequency range about 7-100 Hz. The considerable part of the terrestrial EM emission belongs to everyday human activity which increases year by year with unpredictable consequences. At the beginning of space exploration era it was considered that high frequency EM waves freely penetrate through the Earth's ionosphere, but the terrestrial EM emission below very low frequency range is limited by ionospheric F2 layer boundary due to great EM losses in plasma. About 40 years ago the power lines harmonic radiation (multiple of 50/60 Hz) was found at satellite observations in a few kilohertz range, nevertheless the ionosphere was considered fully opaque for extremely low frequency (ELF) EM emission. However recently, in spite of theoretical estimations, the SR harmonics and power line emission (PLE) 50/60 Hz were discovered during flights of low Earth orbiting satellites C/NOFS (Simões et al., 2011) and Chibis-M (Dudkin et al., 2015) at heights 400-800 km, i.e. over F2-layer. Last results are a great challenge to the theory of ELF EM emission propagation in the Earth's ionosphere as well as for study of long-term influence of constantly increasing electric energy consumption by human civilization in the Earth's environment. We present the analysis of the space and time distribution for observed PLE and SR harmonics, their connection with power terrestrial sources of ELF emission and possible relation between measured values and ionosphere conditions. Also some electromagnetic parameters have been estimated. Simões, F. A., R. F. Pfaff, and H. T. Freudenreich (2011), Satellite observations of Schumann resonances in the

  14. Perturbations of ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling by powerful VLF emissions from ground-based transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, A. S. Markov, G. A.; Ryabov, A. O.; Parrot, M.

    2012-12-15

    The characteristics of the plasma-wave disturbances stimulated in the near-Earth plasma by powerful VLF radiation from ground-based transmitters are investigated. Radio communication VLF transmitters of about 1 MW in power are shown to produce artificial plasma-wave channels (density ducts) in the near-Earth space that originate in the lower ionosphere above the disturbing emission source and extend through the entire ionosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth along the magnetic field lines. Measurements with the onboard equipment of the DEMETER satellite have revealed that under the action of emission from the NWC transmitter, which is one of the most powerful VLF radio transmitters, the generation of quasi-electrostatic (plasma) waves is observed on most of the satellite trajectory along the disturbed magnetic flux tube. This may probably be indicative of stimulated emission of a magnetospheric maser.

  15. Peculiarities in the evolution of the BUM of stimulated radio emission of the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V. L.; Grach, S. M.; Erukhimov, L. M.; Komrakov, G. P.; Sergeev, E. N.; Tide, B.; Carozzi, T.

    1996-03-01

    We present measured spectral and dynamic characteristics of the broad upshifted maximum (BUM) in the spectrum of artificial ionospheric radio emission (AIRE). It is shown that BUM is already formed starting from pump-wave frequencies that are smaller by at least 10 kHz than the values of electron gyrofrequency harmonic nfHe determined by the disappearance of the principal downshifted maximum (DM) in AIRE spectrum. The characteristics of additional maxima in BUM spectrum, which are a multiple of its principal maximum, are studied. It is shown that the frequency of BUM intensity maximum does not depend on the pump-wave frequency and the characteristic times of its evolution increase sharply for fPW close to nfHe. We discuss the possibility of existence of the “fast“ and “slow“ components in BUM spectrum, which have significantly different evolution times. Experimental results on BUM behavior for different regimes of ionosphere modification are presented.

  16. Ionospheric Response Due to Seismic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Dinesh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Signatures of the seismic activity in the ionospheric F2 region have been studied by analyzing the measurement of electron and ion temperatures during the occurrence of earthquake. The ionospheric electron and ion temperatures data recorded by the RPA payload aboard the Indian SROSS-C2 satellite during the period from January 1995 to December 2000 were used for the altitude range 430-630 km over Indian region. The normal day's electron and ion temperatures have been compared to the temperatures recorded during the seismic activity. The details of seismic events were obtained from USGS earthquake data information website. It has been found that the average electron temperature is enhanced during the occurrence of earthquakes by 1.2 to 1.5 times and this enhancement was for ion temperature ranging from 1.1to 1.3 times over the normal day's average temperatures. The above careful quantitative analysis of ionospheric electron and ion temperatures data shows the consistent enhancement in the ionospheric electron and ion temperatures. It is expected that the seismogenic vertical electrical field propagates up to the ionospheric heights and induces Joule heating that may cause the enhancement in ionospheric temperatures.

  17. The lower ionosphere at high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    The lower ionosphere is a particularly difficult region to both observe and model. Although radars and rockets have probed this region for more than two decades, our overall understanding of the interplay between radiative, chemical, dynamical, and electrodynamical processes in the lower ionosphere is relatively poor in comparison to the other regions of the solar-terrestrial system. Part of the problem is that the various radar and rocket campaigns have focused on different scientific issues, have been of limited duration, or have been restricted to specific geographical locations. However, the lower ionosphere is a complex region, being acted upon by magnetospheric processes from above and stratospheric processes from below. Within the lower ionosphere are chemical reactions involving negative, positive, and cluster ions; transport processes that sometimes involve ordinary diffusion, turbulence, and wave-particle interactions due to plasma instabilities; radiative processes that could involve multiple scattering effects; and energetics that could result in non-Maxwellian ion velocity distribution functions. A further complication arises in that the processes acting on and within the lower ionosphere do so on widely different spatial and temporal scales, and these scales are directly reproduced in the medium. An overview of our current knowledge of the lower ionosphere is presented in this brief review, with the emphasis on the high latitude region.

  18. Active plasma antenna in the Earth's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugunov, Yu. V.; Markov, G. A.

    2001-11-01

    We discuss a new method for controlled stimulation of global perturbations in the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere and new possibilities of diagnostics of the wave-particle interaction in the ionospheric and magnetospheric plasma. The method is based on the excitation of an RF plasma-wave discharge in the electromagnetic field of a rocket-borne dipole antenna in the lower oblique-resonance frequency band. The evolution of the discharge leads to the creation of strong local disturbances at ionospheric altitudes in the form of magnetic-field-aligned plasma irregularities with controllable properties. The method was verified in 6 rocket flights at middle and polar latitudes. We review the results of these experiments, focusing considerable attention on those which show significant plasma disturbances in the magnetic flux tube where the rocket is located and which demonstrate the diversity of capabilities of this method. In particular, it is shown that a deep (by an order of magnitude) modulation of energetic (>=40keV) precipitating electrons is available. We have demonstrated that a modulated discharge in the ionosphere can operate as an active plasma antenna. A generation of ``echo'' signals at the discharge modulation frequency and an excitation of the ionospheric Alfvén resonator in the PC band have also been observed. Along with numerous scientific advantages, the method has appeared to be energy-effective and low-cost, which makes it very promising for ionospheric and magnetospheric studies as well as for various practical applications.

  19. Application of IRI-Plas in Ionospheric Tomography and HF Communication Studies with Assimilation of GPS-TEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikan, Feza; Gulyaeva, Tamara; Sezen, Umut; Arikan, Orhan; Toker, Cenk; Hakan Tuna, MR.; Erdem, Esra

    2016-07-01

    International Reference Ionosphere is the most acknowledged climatic model of ionosphere that provides electron density profile and hourly, monthly median values of critical layer parameters of the ionosphere for a desired location, date and time between 60 to 2,000 km altitude. IRI is also accepted as the International Standard Ionosphere model. Recently, the IRI model is extended to the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite orbital range of 20,000 km. The new version is called IRI-Plas and it can be obtained from http://ftp.izmiran.ru/pub/izmiran /SPIM/. A user-friendly online version is also provided at www.ionolab.org as a space weather service. Total Electron Content (TEC), which is defined as the line integral of electron density on a given ray path, is an observable parameter that can be estimated from earth based GPS receivers in a cost-effective manner as GPS-TEC. One of the most important advantages of IRI-Plas is the possible input of GPS-TEC to update the background deterministic ionospheric model to the current ionospheric state. This option is highly useful in regional and global tomography studies and HF link assessments. IONOLAB group currently implements IRI-Plas as a background model and updates the ionospheric state using GPS-TEC in IONOLAB-CIT and IONOLAB-RAY algorithms. The improved state of ionosphere allows the most reliable 4-D imaging of electron density profiles and HF and satellite communication link simulations.This study is supported by TUBITAK 115E915 and joint TUBITAK 114E092 and AS CR 14/001.

  20. Simulations of Atmospheric Neutral Wave Coupling to the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siefring, C. L.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2005-12-01

    The densities in the E- and F-layer plasmas are much less than the density of background neutral atmosphere. Atmospheric neutral waves are primary sources of plasma density fluctuations and are the sources for triggering plasma instabilities. The neutral atmosphere supports acoustic waves, acoustic gravity waves, and Kelvin Helmholtz waves from wind shears. These waves help determine the structure of the ionosphere by changes in neutral density that affect ion-electron recombination and by neutral velocities that couple to the plasma via ion-neutral collisions. Neutral acoustic disturbances can arise from thunderstorms, chemical factory explosions and intentional high-explosive tests. Based on conservation of energy, acoustic waves grow in amplitude as they propagate upwards to lower atmospheric densities. Shock waves can form in an acoustic pulse that is eventually damped by viscosity. Ionospheric effects from acoustic waves include transient perturbations of E- and F-Regions and triggering of E-Region instabilities. Acoustic-gravity waves affect the ionosphere over large distances. Gravity wave sources include thunderstorms, auroral region disturbances, Space Shuttle launches and possibly solar eclipses. Low frequency acoustic-gravity waves propagate to yield traveling ionospheric disturbances (TID's), triggering of Equatorial bubbles, and possible periodic structuring of the E-Region. Gravity wave triggering of equatorial bubbles is studied numerically by solving the equations for plasma continuity and ion velocity along with Ohms law to provide an equation for the induced electric potential. Slow moving gravity waves provide density depressions on bottom of ionosphere and a gravitational Rayleigh-Taylor instability is initiated. Radar scatter detects field aligned irregularities in the resulting plasma bubble. Neutral Kelvin-Helmholtz waves are produced by strong mesospheric wind shears that are also coincident with the formation of intense E-layers. An

  1. Radiotomographic imaging and GNSS remote sensing of the midlatitude ionosphere modified by powerful HF radiowaves.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunitsyn, V.; Andreeva, E. S.; Padokhin, A. M.; Vorontsov, A.; Frolov, V. L.; Komrakov, G.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Siefring, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    We present the results of the radiotomographic imaging and GNSS remote sensing of the artificial ionospheric disturbances obtained in the recent experiments on the modification of the midlatitude ionosphere by powerful HF radiowaves carried out at the Sura heating facility. The experiments were conducted using both O- and X- mode radiowaves, in daytime and nighttime conditions with various schemes of the radiation of the heating wave. Radio transmissions from the low- (Parus, e-POP on CASSIOPE) and high-orbital (GPS/GLONASS) navigational satellites received at the mobile network of receiving sites were used for the remote sensing of the heated area of the ionosphere. We study the variations in TEC caused by HF heating showing that the GNSS TEC spectra often contain frequency components corresponding to the modulation periods of the ERP of the heating wave. The manifestations of the heating-induced variations in TEC are most prominent in the area of magnetic zenith of the pumping wave. In this work we also present the radiotomographic reconstructions (including first time e-POP-SURA reconstructions) of the spatial structure of the disturbed area of the ionosphere corresponding to the directivity pattern of the heater as well as the spatial structure of the wave- like disturbances, which are possibly heating-induced AGWs, diverging from the heated area of the ionosphere. The spatial period of observed disturbances is 200-250 km and they are easily traced up to a distance of 700-800 km from the heated region, which is in good agreement with the modeling results.

  2. Storm Signatures and Irregularities in the Equatorial Ionosphere Observed by Using FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. G.; Chen, L.; Hsu, R.; Lee, I.; Chang, G.; Yu, S.; Liu, T.

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports that fluctuations in the vertical electron density triggering by magnetic storms and irregularities of S4 scintillations in the equatorial ionosphere probed by FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C). For the storm study, the electron density profiles derived by the F3/C RO (radio occultation) in high-, mid- and low-latitudes during the quiet time and disturbed periods are subdivided into four sectors, noon, dusk, midnight, and dawn, to find wavy characteristics. The wavelet transformation is further applied to examine the profiles before and during the storm period. Above 300km, the ionosphere becomes very structured, and the amplitude in fluctuations of 15~30km wavelength significantly enhances during the storm period, especially high latitude region. The concurrence in changes of the geomagnetic index and the ionospheric density suggest that penetration electric fields and energy inputs at high latitudes play important roles. On the other hand, the F3/C RO provides an excellent opportunity to monitor three-dimensional structures and dynamics of the ionospheric scintillations during the low solar activity year of 2007-2013. Measurements of the global F3/C S4 index are subdivided and examined in various latitudes, longitudes, altitudes, and seasons. The F-region scintillations in the equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere start around post-sunset period and often persist till post-midnight hours (0300 MLT, magnetic local time) during the March and September equinox as well as December Solstice seasons. The E-region scintillations reveal a clear solar zenith effect and yield pronounced intensities in mid-latitudes during the Summer Solstice seasons, which are well correlated with occurrences of the sporadic E-layer. Finally, impact of the F3/C follow-on, FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2, mission on ionospheric space weather monitoring will be briefed.

  3. The role of the ionosphere in coupling upstream ULF wave power into the dayside magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Engebretson, M.J. ); Cahill, L.J. Jr. ); Arnoldy, R.L. ); Anderson, B.J. ); Rosenberg, T.J. ); Carpenter, D.L.; Inan, U.S. ); Eather, R.H. )

    1991-02-01

    A series of recent studies of Pc 3 magnetic pulsations in the dayside outer magnetosphere has given new insights into the possible mechanisms of entry of ULF wave power into the magnetosphere from a bow shock related upstream source. In this paper, the authors first review many of these new observational results by presenting a comparison of data from two 10-hour intervals on successive days in April 1986 and then present a possible model for transmission of pulsation signals from the magnetosheath into the dayside magnetosphere. Simultaneous multi-instrument observations at South Pole Station, located below the cusp/cleft ionosphere near local noon, magnetic field observations by the AMPTE CCE satellite in the dayside outer magnetosphere, and upstream magnetic field observations by the IMP 8 satellite show clear interplanetary magnetic field field magnitude control of dayside resonant harmonic pulsations and band-limited very high latitude pulsations, as well as pulsation-modulated precipitation of what appear to be magnetosheath/boundary layer electrons. They believe that this modulated precipitation may be responsible for the propagation of upstream wave power in the Pc 3 frequency band into the high-latitude ionosphere, from whence it may be transported throughout the dayside outer magnetosphere by means of an ionospheric transistor. In this model, modulations in ionospheric conductivity caused by cusp/cleft precipitation cause varying ionospheric currents with frequency spectra determined by the upstream waves; these modulations will be superimposed on the Birkeland currents, which close via these ionospheric currents. Modulated region 2 Birkeland currents will in turn provide a narrow-band source of wave energy to a wide range of dayside local times in the outer magnetosphere.

  4. Empirical model of the main ionospheric trough for the nighttime winter conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpachev, A. T.; Klimenko, M. V.; Klimenko, V. V.; Pustovalova, L. V.

    2016-08-01

    For the first time we developed an empirical model of the main ionospheric trough, MIT, for quiet (Kp=2) nighttime (18:00-06:00 LT) winter conditions in the Northern and Southern hemispheres for all levels of solar activity. The model consists of two parts: (1) the MIT position model in terms of geographical latitude and longitude; (2) the MIT shape model in terms of the latitudinal-longitudinal foF2 variations in the range of 45-75 °N latitudes in the Northern hemisphere and of 40-80 °S in the Southern hemisphere. Thus, an empirical model of the quiet nighttime subauroral ionosphere has been developed. To construct this model the Interkosmos-19 and CHAMP satellites data have been used. The in-situ Ne measurements at the CHAMP heights were transformed to the electron density at F2 layer peak height (i.e. to NmF2 and then to foF2). In the frame of the model the diurnal and longitudinal variations in the MIT minimum position were revealed and studied in detail. Also the longitudinal and latitudinal variations in foF2 in the MIT region were investigated. Accuracy of the model was tested according to the ground-based ionospheric stations data. It is shown that the constructed model much more adequately reproduces the variations in the winter nighttime subauroral ionospheric structure, including the MIT position and shape variations, than the International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI-2012). The online version of the MIT model is available on the IZMIRAN website: http://www.izmiran.ru/ionosphere/sm-mit/.

  5. Testing Ionospheric Faraday Rotation Corrections in CASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Moellenbrock, George

    2015-04-01

    The Earth’s ionosphere introduces direction- and time-dependent effects over a range of physical and temporal scales and so is a major source for unmodeled phase offsets for low frequency radioastronomical observations. Ionospheric effects are often the limiting factor to making sensitive radioastronomical measurements to probe the solar corona or coronal mass ejections at low frequencies (< 5 GHz). It has become common practice to use global ionospheric models derived from the Global Positioning System (GPS) to provide a means of externally calibrating low frequency data. We have developed a new calibration algorithm in the Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA) package. CASA, which was developed to meet the data post-processing needs of next generation telescopes such as the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), did not previously have the capability to mitigate ionospheric effects. This algorithm uses GPS-based global ionosphere maps to mitigate the first and second order ionospheric effects (dispersion delay and Faraday rotation, respectively). We investigated several data centers as potential sources for global ionospheric models and chose the International Global Navigation Satellite System Service data product because data from other sources are generally too sparse to use without additional interpolation schemes. This implementation of ionospheric corrections in CASA has been tested on several sets of VLA observations and all of them showed a significant reduction of the dispersion delay. In order to rigorously test CASA’s ability to mitigate ionospheric Faraday rotation, we made VLA full-polarization observations of the standard VLA phase calibrators J0359+5057 and J0423+4150 in August 2014, using L band (1 - 2 GHz), S band (2 - 4 GHz), and C band (4 - 6 GHz) frequencies in the D array configuration. The observations were 4 hours in duration, beginning near local sunrise. In this paper, we give a general description of how these corrections are

  6. A new computerized ionosphere tomography model using the mapping function and an application to the study of seismic-ionosphere disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jian; Yao, Yibin; Liu, Lei; Zhai, Changzhi; Wang, Zemin

    2016-08-01

    A new algorithm for ionosphere tomography using the mapping function is proposed in this paper. First, the new solution splits the integration process into four layers along the observation ray, and then, the single-layer model (SLM) is applied to each integration part using a mapping function. Next, the model parameters are estimated layer by layer with the Kalman filtering method by introducing the scale factor (SF) γ to solve the ill-posed problem. Finally, the inversed images of different layers are combined into the final CIT image. We utilized simulated data from 23 IGS GPS stations around Europe to verify the estimation accuracy of the new algorithm; the results show that the new CIT model has better accuracy than the SLM in dense data areas and the CIT residuals are more closely grouped. The stability of the new algorithm is discussed by analyzing model accuracy under different error levels (the max errors are 5TECU, 10TECU, 15TECU, respectively). In addition, the key preset parameter, SFγ , which is given by the International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI2012). The experiment is designed to test the sensitivity of the new algorithm to SF variations. The results show that the IRI2012 is capable of providing initial SF values. Also in this paper, the seismic-ionosphere disturbance (SID) of the 2011 Japan earthquake is studied using the new CIT algorithm. Combined with the TEC time sequence of Sat.15, we find that the SID occurrence time and reaction area are highly related to the main shock time and epicenter. According to CIT images, there is a clear vertical electron density upward movement (from the 150-km layer to the 450-km layer) during this SID event; however, the peak value areas in the different layers were different, which means that the horizontal movement velocity is not consistent among the layers. The potential physical triggering mechanism is also discussed in this paper. Compared with the SLM, the RMS of the new CIT model is improved by

  7. Resolving Ionospheric E-region Modeling Challenges: The Solar Photon Flux Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Joseph; Sojka, Jan; David, Michael; Tobiska, Kent; Schunk, Robert; Woods, Tom; Eparvier, Frank

    2013-04-01

    The EVE instrument of the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) provides for the first time EUV and XUV measurements of the solar irradiance that adequately define the major source of ionization of the atmosphere. In our study we modeled the E-region of the ionosphere and analyzed how it is affected by the solar irradiance data obtained by EVE and contrast this with the S2000 Solar Irradiance model, used previously. The ionosphere has two major layers, the E-layer at 100 km, and the F-layer at 300 km. The difference in solar irradiances are small except at some wavelength bands, it is these differences that lead to a better understanding of the physical/chemical processes of the E-region. Observations of the ionospheric layers is best achieved using incoherent scatter radars (ISR). We have compared our model with ISR data available from Arecibo Puerto Rico in an effort to understand how specific solar irradiance wavelength bands affect the E-region. This study focuses on two specific wavelength bands 0.1-15 nm and 91-103 nm. Both are responsible for E-region production, but in quite different manners.

  8. Artificial gravity.

    PubMed

    Scott, William B

    2005-04-25

    NASA's Artificial Gravity program consists of a team of researchers from Wyle Laboratories, NASA Johnson Space Center, and the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB). The short-radius centrifuge (SRC), built by Wyle Laboratories, will be integrated with UTMB's conducted bedrest studies, which mimic the detrimental effects of weightlessness (or microgravity). Bedrest subjects will be spun on the SRC at various accelerations and for various time periods, while being monitored medically. Parameters such as bone loss, muscle atrophy, balance control, and oxygen consumption will then be compared in order to research ways of mitigating the impact on astronauts' physiology. Other potential benefits from these studies extend to population groups on Earth, such as bedridden patients. PMID:15852559

  9. Artificial rheotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Palacci, Jérémie; Sacanna, Stefano; Abramian, Anaïs; Barral, Jérémie; Hanson, Kasey; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Pine, David J.; Chaikin, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Motility is a basic feature of living microorganisms, and how it works is often determined by environmental cues. Recent efforts have focused on developing artificial systems that can mimic microorganisms, in particular their self-propulsion. We report on the design and characterization of synthetic self-propelled particles that migrate upstream, known as positive rheotaxis. This phenomenon results from a purely physical mechanism involving the interplay between the polarity of the particles and their alignment by a viscous torque. We show quantitative agreement between experimental data and a simple model of an overdamped Brownian pendulum. The model notably predicts the existence of a stagnation point in a diverging flow. We take advantage of this property to demonstrate that our active particles can sense and predictably organize in an imposed flow. Our colloidal system represents an important step toward the realization of biomimetic microsystems with the ability to sense and respond to environmental changes. PMID:26601175

  10. Ionospheric Variability and Storms on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendillo, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this grant was to conduct the first-ever study of ionospheric variability on Mars. To do so, we used data from the Radio Science (RS) experiment onboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) satellite. Dr. David Hinson of the RS team at Stanford University was a most helpful and valuable colleague throughout the studies we conducted. For the initial RS datasets available from the MGS mission, there were no severe storms caused by solar wind activity, so we concentrated on day-to-day effects. This turned out to be a wise approach since understanding "normal variability" had to be done before any claim could be made about "space weather" effects. Our approach was three-fold: (1) select a good dataset for characterization of ionosphere variability at Mars, one for which excellent terrestrial data were also available. This turned out to be the period 9-27 March 1999; (2) once the variability at Mars was described, develop and use a new photochemical model of the martian ionosphere to find the extent to which solar variability on those days caused or contributed to the observed patterns; (3) use the results from the above, together with additional datasets from the MGS/RS experiment, to describe some practical consequences that the martian ionosphere would have upon NASA s proposed navigation and communications systems for Mars. The results of these studies showed that: (a) solar variability is the dominant source of ionospheric variability at Mars (during periods of quiet solar wind), (b) that current models do a good job in portraying such effects at the height of the ionospheric peak electron density, and (c) that ionospheric structure on Mars can affect attempts at precise position-fixing at Mars should relatively high (GPS-like) frequencies not be used in a Mars communications and navigation system.

  11. Ionospheric Storms in Equatorial Region: Digisonde Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paznukhov, V.; Altadill, D.; Blanch, E.

    2011-12-01

    We present a study of the ionospheric storms observed in the low-latitude and equatorial ionosphere at several digisonde stations: Jicamarca (Geomagnetic Coordinates: 2.0 S, 355.3 E), Kwajalein Island (3.8 N, 238.2 E), Ascension Island (2.5 S, 56.8 E), Fortaleza (4.8 N, 33.7 W), and Ramey (28.6 N, 5.2 E). The strongest geomagnetic storms from years 1995-2009 have been analyzed. The main ionospheric characteristics, hmF2 and foF2 were used in the study, making it possible to investigate the changes in the ionosphere peak density and height during the storms. All digisonde data were manually processed to assure the accuracy of the measurements. Solar wind data, geomagnetic field variations, and auroral activity indices have been used to characterize the geomagnetic environment during the events. It was found in our analysis that the major drivers for the ionospheric storms, electric field and neutral wind have approximately equal importance at the low-latitude and equatorial latitudes. This is noticeably different from the behavior of the ionsphere in the middle latitudes, where the neutral wind is usually a dominant factor. It was found that the auroral index, AE is the best precursor of the ionospheric effects observed during the storms in this region. We analyze the difference between time delays of the storm effects observed at the stations located in different local time sectors. The overall statistics of the time delays of the storms as a function of the local time at the stations is also presented. Several very interesting cases of sudden very strong ionospheric uplifting and their possible relation to the equatorial super fountain effect are investigated in greater details.

  12. Role of Ionospheric Plasmas in Earth's Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    This tutorial will summarize observations and theories indicating a prominent role of ionospheric plasma in the Earth's magnetotail. At the Global scale, I will argue that it is ionospheric plasma momentum and dynamic pressure that are responsible for the production of plasmoids, through the action of a transient near-Earth neutral or X-line, which serves to release excessive plasma pressure from the magnetotail field. Ionospheric plasma gains the momentum and energy to produce plasmoids and their related effects through its interaction with the solar wind, beginning at the dayside reconnection region and extending across the polar caps through the magnetotail lobes. This distant neutral line can be depicted as a feature much like that found in cometary magnetospheres, where disconnection limits the amount of IMF hung up on the cometary coma. On the other hand, the near-Earth neutral one can be seen as a feature unique to planets with an intrinsic magnetic field and internal source of plasma, the heating of which produces pressures too large to be restrained. Ionospheric plasmas also have other more local roles to play in the magnetotail. The circulation influences the composition of the plasma sheet, and the resultant wave environment, giving rise to reduced wave propagation speeds. Important heavy ion cyclotron resonances, and enhanced finite gyro-radius effects including non-adiabatic particle acceleration. At minimum, the presence of ionospheric plasma must influence the rate of reconnection via its enhanced mass density. Other non-MHD effects of ionospheric plasma presence are likely to be important but need much more investigation to be well understood. The MMS mission is designed to penetrate the subtle diffusion region physics that is involved, and its ability to observe ionospheric plasma involvement in reconnection will contribute significantly toward that goal.

  13. HF-enhanced 4278-Å airglow: evidence of accelerated ionosphere electrons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallen, C. T.; Watkins, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    We report calculations from a one-dimensional physics-based self-consistent ionosphere model (SCIM) demonstrating that HF-heating of F-region electrons can produce 4278-Å airglow enhancements comparable in magnitude to those reported during ionosphere HF modification experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) observatory in Alaska. These artificial 'blue-line' emissions, also observed at the EISCAT ionosphere heating facility in Norway, have been attributed to arise solely from additional production of N2+ ions through impact ionization of N2 molecules by HF-accelerated electrons. Each N2+ ion produced by impact ionization or photoionization has a probability of being created in the N2+(1N) excited state, resulting in a blue-line emission from the allowed transition to its ground state. The ionization potential of N2 exceeds 18 eV, so enhanced impact ionization of N2 implies that significant electron acceleration processes occur in the HF-modified ionosphere. Further, because of the fast N2+ emission time, measurements of 4278-Å intensity during ionosphere HF modification experiments at HAARP have also been used to estimate artificial ionization rates. To the best of our knowledge, all observations of HF-enhanced blue-line emissions have been made during twilight conditions when resonant scattering of sunlight by N2+ ions is a significant source of 4278-Å airglow. Our model calculations show that F-region electron heating by powerful O-mode HF waves transmitted from HAARP is sufficient to increase N2+ ion densities above the shadow height through temperature-enhanced ambipolar diffusion and temperature-suppressed ion recombination. Resonant scattering from the modified sunlit region can cause a 10-20 R increase in 4278-Å airglow intensity, comparable in magnitude to artificial emissions measured during ionosphere HF-modification experiments. This thermally-induced artificial 4278-Å aurora occurs independently of any artificial

  14. Tidal signatures in thermospheric and ionospheric quantities (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhr, H.; Rother, M.; Fejer, B. G.; Haeusler, K.; Alken, P.

    2009-12-01

    Recent years provided more and more evidence for tidal signatures in various kinds of upper atmospheric measurements. In this talk special emphasis is put on non-migrating tides. Several of these tidal modes are believed to be generated in the lower atmosphere, and to propagate from here all the way up to the exosphere. Quantities, that reflect the characteristics of the tides very well, are thermospheric temperature and wind. Based on TIMED and CHAMP measurements the complete tidal spectrum has been derived for these two quantities at both MLT and upper thermospheric (400 km) altitudes. Main features of the tides will be presented, as deduced from these observations. The dynamics of the neutrals is partly transferred to charged particles in the ionospheric E-layer. For that reason some tidal signals are also observable in ionospheric parameters. Since the coupling conditions between neutral and charged particle vary over the course of a day (a year, a solar cycle), the recovery of the tidal signal in electrodynamic quantities is, due to its non-linear distortion, much more sophisticated. Even though, tidal signatures are quite evident in the observations during certain local times. We will show the amplitude and temporal variations for some of the prominent tidal components in the equatorial electrojet, in the vertical plasma drift and in electron density.

  15. Major revision of sunspot number: implication for the ionosphere models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaeva, Tamara

    2016-07-01

    Recently on 1st July, 2015, a major revision of the historical sunspot number series has been carried out as discussed in [Clette et al., Revisiting the Sunspot Number. A 400-Year Perspective on the Solar Cycle, Space Science Reviews, 186, Issue 1-4, pp. 35-103, 2014). The revised SSN2.0 dataset is provided along with the former SSN1.0 data at http://sidc.oma.be/silso/. The SSN2.0 values exceed the former conventional SSN1.0 data so that new SSNs are greater in many cases than the solar radio flux F10.7 values which pose a problem of SSN2.0 implementation as a driver of the International Reference Ionosphere, IRI, its extension to plasmasphere, IRI-Plas, NeQuick model, Russian Standard Ionosphere, SMI. In particular, the monthly predictions of the F2 layer peak are based on input of the ITU-R (former CCIR) and URSI maps. The CCIR and URSI maps coefficients are available for each month of the year, and for two levels of solar activity: low (SSN = 0) and high (SSN = 100). SSN is the monthly smoothed sunspot number from the SSN1.0 data set used as an index of the level of solar activity. For every SSN different from 0 or 100 the critical frequency foF2 and the M3000F2 radio propagation factor used for the peak height hmF2 production may be evaluated by an interpolation. The ionospheric proxies of the solar activity IG12 index or Global Electron Content GEC12 index, driving the ionospheric models, are also calibrated with the former SSN1.0 data. The paper presents a solar proxy intended to calibrate SSN2.0 data set to fit F10.7 solar radio flux and/or SSN1.0 data series. This study is partly supported by TUBITAK EEEAG 115E915.

  16. Vlasov Simulations of Ionospheric Turbulence near the Upper Hybrid Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmi, Amir; Eliasson, Bengt; Shao, Xi; Milikh, Gennady; Sharma, Surja; Papadopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-11-01

    High-frequency, ordinary (O) mode electromagnetic waves incident on a magnetized plasma near the upper hybrid resonance can excite magnetic field aligned density striations, associated with both turbulence and electron heating. We have used Vlasov simulations, which combine low noise and high resolution of all areas of phase space, in one spatial and two velocity dimensions to study the induced turbulence in the presence of striations near the upper hybrid resonance, where the O-mode pump is mode converted to large amplitude upper hybrid oscillations trapped in a striation. By taking moments of the resulting electron and ion distribution functions, we were able to correlate the evolution of stationary electron and ion oscillations with the onset of turbulence, and the heating of electrons in the striation with large amplitude, short wavelength electron Bernstein waves. These Bernstein waves excite stochastic electron heating when the normalized gradients of their electric field exceed the electron gyroradius, breaking the drift approximation, and causing particle orbits in phase space to diverge exponentially, rapidly increasing the electron temperature by several thousand Kelvin. These results are relevant to ongoing high-latitude heating experiments.

  17. An observational study of the nightside ionospheres of Mars and Venus with radio occultation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, M.H.G. ); Luhmann, J.G. ); Kliore, A.J. )

    1990-10-01

    An analysis of Mars and Venus nightside electron density profiles obtained with radio occultation methods shows how the nightside ionospheres of both planets vary with solar zenith angle. From previous studies it is known that the dayside peak electron densities at Mars and Venus show a basic similarity in that they both exhibit Chapman layer-like behavior. In contrast, the peak altitudes at mars behave like an ideal Chapman layer on the dayside, whereas the altitude of the peak at Venus is fairly constant up to the terminator. The effect of major dust storms can also be seen in the peak altitudes at Mars. All Venus nightside electron density profiles show a distinct main peak for both solar minimum and maximum, whereas many profiles from the nightside of Mars do not show any peak at all. This suggests that the electron density in the Mars nightside ionosphere is frequently too low to be detected by radio occultation. On the Pioneer Venus orbiter, disappearing ionospheres were observed near solar maximum in the in-situ data when the solar wind dynamic pressure was exceptionally high. This condition occurs because the high solar wind dynamic pressure decreases the altitude of the ionopause near the terminator below {approximately}250 km, thus reducing the normal nightward transport of dayside ionospheric plasma. On the basis of the Venus observations, one might predict that if a positive correlation of nightside peak density with dynamic pressure was found, it could mean that transport from the dayside is the only significant source for the nightside ionosphere of Mars. The lack of a correlation would imply that the precipitation source at Mars is quite variable.

  18. Ionospheric Scintillation Effects on GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenburgh, R. A.; Smithtro, C.; Groves, K.

    2007-12-01

    . Ionospheric scintillation of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals threatens navigation and military operations by degrading performance or making GPS unavailable. Scintillation is particularly active, although not limited to, a belt encircling the earth within 20 degrees of the geomagnetic equator. As GPS applications and users increases, so does the potential for detrimental impacts from scintillation. We examined amplitude scintillation data spanning seven years from Ascension Island, U.K.; Ancon, Peru; and Antofagasta, Chile in the Atlantic/Americas longitudinal sector at as well as data from Parepare, Indonesia; Marak Parak, Malaysia; Pontianak, Indonesia; Guam; and Diego Garcia, U.K.; in the Pacific longitudinal sector. From these data, we calculate percent probability of occurrence of scintillation at various intensities described by the S4 index. Additionally, we determine Dilution of Precision at one minute resolution. We examine diurnal, seasonal and solar cycle characteristics and make spatial comparisons. In general, activity was greatest during the equinoxes and solar maximum, although scintillation at Antofagasta, Chile was higher during 1998 rather than at solar maximum.

  19. Electric fields in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchhoff, V. W. J. H.

    1975-01-01

    F-region drift velocities, measured by incoherent-scatter radar were analyzed in terms of diurnal, seasonal, magnetic activity, and solar cycle effects. A comprehensive electric field model was developed that includes the effects of the E and F-region dynamos, magnetospheric sources, and ionospheric conductivities, for both the local and conjugate regions. The E-region dynamo dominates during the day but at night the F-region and convection are more important. This model provides much better agreement with observations of the F-region drifts than previous models. Results indicate that larger magnitudes occur at night, and that daily variation is dominated by the diurnal mode. Seasonal variations in conductivities and thermospheric winds indicate a reversal in direction in the early morning during winter from south to northward. On magnetic perturbed days and the drifts deviate rather strongly from the quiet days average, especially around 13 L.T. for the northward and 18 L.T. for the westward component.

  20. On the acoustic model of lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling before earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, C.-V.; Mayer, B.; Dziendziel, P.; Fülbert, F.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Liperovsky, V. A.

    2011-04-01

    In this work, the many-fluid magnetohydrodynamic theory is applied to describe the modification of the electromagnetic field of the ionospheric E-layer by acoustic-type waves. There, altitudinal profiles of the electromagnetic field and the plasma parameters of the atmosphere and ionosphere are taken into account. It is concluded that at E-region altitudes above seismo-active regions, magnetohydrodynamic waves as Alfvén and magnetoacoustic ones might change their amplitude and direction of propagation. Waves of the Farley-Buneman type might also be excited a few days before very strong earthquakes. The collisions between the neutral and charged particles of the E-layer also cause diffusion and heating processes. Thus, changes of the characteristic foE-frequency might be obtained.

  1. Response of the auroral lower ionosphere to solar flares in March 2012 according to ELF observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebed', O. M.; Fedorenko, Yu. V.; Larchenko, A. V.; Pil'gaev, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    The response of the lower ionosphere to the solar flares that occurred in March 2012 is considered. Measurements of the propagation velocity and wave impedance of ELF electromagnetic pulses (atmospherics) performed at Lovozero and Barentsburg high-latitude observatories were used to estimate this response. It was shown that the daily average propagation velocity of atmospherics decreased by 20-30 thousand km/s under disturbed heliogeophysical conditions as compared to the velocity measured under quiet conditions. This is related to a decrease in the effective waveguide height that results from the change in the ionospheric conductivity profile during a solar flare. It was detected that pronounced bursts of wave impedance, the maximums of which exceed the impedance average value by a factor of more than 2, are observed during strong heliogeophysical disturbances. This fact cannot be explained in the scope of a spherically layered model; consequently, such deviations indicate an increase in the D-layer conductivity inhomogeneities.

  2. Ionospheric control of polarization of low-latitude geomagnetic micropulsations at sunrise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saka, O.; Itonaga, M.; Kitamura, T.

    1982-08-01

    The ionospheric control of low latitude pulsation polarization characteristics suggested by Saka et al. (1980) has been confirmed through continuous low latitude Pc3 and Pc4 geomagnetic micropulsation observations. The D-component amplitude increases as much as that of the H-component after sunrise, effecting the tilting of the major polarization ellipse axis from north to northwest. This coincides with the appearance of the E-layer in the ionosphere within an hour, and the time of the coincidence shifts from season to season in parallel with changes of sunrise. The ellipticity of the horizontal plane polarization is not appreciably affected by sunrise. It is suggested that the Hall conductivity increment associated with the E-layer sunrise enhancement affects the characteristics of the D-component on the ground.

  3. Experimental evidence of electromagnetic pollution of ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronenko, Vira; Korepanov, Valery; Dudkin, Denis

    The Earth’s ionosphere responds to external perturbations originated mainly in the Sun, which is the primary driver of the space weather (SW). But solar activity influences on the ionosphere and the Earth's atmosphere (i.e., the energy transfer in the direction of the Sun-magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere-surface of the Earth), though important, is not a unique factor affecting its state - there is also a significant impact of the powerful natural and anthropogenic processes, which occur on the Earth’s surface and propagating in opposite direction along the Earth’s surface-atmosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere chain. Numerous experimental data confirm that the powerful sources and consumers of electrical energy (radio transmitters, power plants, power lines and industrial objects) cause different ionospheric phenomena, for example, changes of the electromagnetic (EM) field and plasma in the ionosphere, and affect on the state of the Earth atmosphere. Anthropogenic EM effects in the ionosphere are already observed by the scientific satellites and the consequences of their impact on the ionosphere are not currently known. Therefore, it is very important and urgent task to conduct the statistically significant research of the ionospheric parameters variations due to the influence of the powerful man-made factors, primarily owing to substantial increase of the EM energy production. Naturally, the satellite monitoring of the ionosphere and magnetosphere in the frequency range from tens of hertz to tens of MHz with wide ground support offers the best opportunity to observe the EM energy release, both in the global and local scales. Parasitic EM radiation from the power supply lines, when entering the ionosphere-magnetosphere system, might have an impact on the electron population in the radiation belt. Its interaction with trapped particles will change their energy and pitch angles; as a result particle precipitations might occur. Observations of EM emission by

  4. Ionospheric calibration for single frequency altimeter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, William S.; Born, George H.; Markin, Robert E.

    1994-03-01

    This study is a preliminary analysis of the effectiveness (in terms of altimeter calibration accuracy) of various ionosphere models and the Global Positioning System (GPS) to calibrate single frequency altimeter height measurements for ionospheric path delay. In particular, the research focused on ingesting GPS Total Electron Content (TEC) data into the physical Parameterized Real-Time Ionospheric Specification Model (PRISM), which estimates the composition of the ionosphere using independent empirical and physical models and has the capability of adjusting to additional ionospheric measurements. Two types of GPS data were used to adjust the PRISM model: GPS receiver station data mapped from line-of-sight observations to the vertical at the point of interest and a grid map (generated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory) of GPS derived TEC in a sun-fixed longitude frame. The adjusted PRISM TEC values, as well as predictions by the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-90), a climatological (monthly mean) model of the ionosphere, were compared to TOPEX dual-frequency TEC measurements (considered as truth) for a number of TOPEX sub-satellite tracks. For a 13.6 GHz altimeter, a Total Electron Content (TEC) of 1 TECU 10(exp 16) electrons/sq m corresponds to approximately 0.218 centimeters of range delay. A maximum expected TEC (at solar maximum or during solar storms) of 10(exp 18) electrons/sq m will create 22 centimeters of range delay. Compared with the TOPEX data, the PRISM predictions were generally accurate within the TECU when the sub-satellite track of interest passed within 300 to 400 km of the GPS TEC data or when the track passed through a night-time ionosphere. If neither was the case, in particular if the track passed through a local noon ionosphere, the PRISM values differed by more than 10 TECU and by as much as 40 TECU. The IRI-90 model, with no current ability to unseat GPS data, predicted TEC to a slightly higher error of 12 TECU. The performance of

  5. Ionospheric calibration for single frequency altimeter measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, William S.; Born, George H.; Markin, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    This study is a preliminary analysis of the effectiveness (in terms of altimeter calibration accuracy) of various ionosphere models and the Global Positioning System (GPS) to calibrate single frequency altimeter height measurements for ionospheric path delay. In particular, the research focused on ingesting GPS Total Electron Content (TEC) data into the physical Parameterized Real-Time Ionospheric Specification Model (PRISM), which estimates the composition of the ionosphere using independent empirical and physical models and has the capability of adjusting to additional ionospheric measurements. Two types of GPS data were used to adjust the PRISM model: GPS receiver station data mapped from line-of-sight observations to the vertical at the point of interest and a grid map (generated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory) of GPS derived TEC in a sun-fixed longitude frame. The adjusted PRISM TEC values, as well as predictions by the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-90), a climatological (monthly mean) model of the ionosphere, were compared to TOPEX dual-frequency TEC measurements (considered as truth) for a number of TOPEX sub-satellite tracks. For a 13.6 GHz altimeter, a Total Electron Content (TEC) of 1 TECU 10(exp 16) electrons/sq m corresponds to approximately 0.218 centimeters of range delay. A maximum expected TEC (at solar maximum or during solar storms) of 10(exp 18) electrons/sq m will create 22 centimeters of range delay. Compared with the TOPEX data, the PRISM predictions were generally accurate within the TECU when the sub-satellite track of interest passed within 300 to 400 km of the GPS TEC data or when the track passed through a night-time ionosphere. If neither was the case, in particular if the track passed through a local noon ionosphere, the PRISM values differed by more than 10 TECU and by as much as 40 TECU. The IRI-90 model, with no current ability to unseat GPS data, predicted TEC to a slightly higher error of 12 TECU. The performance of

  6. The Ionosphere Real-Time Assimilative Model, IRTAM - A Status Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, Bodo; Galkin, Ivan; Huang, Xueqin; Vesnin, Artem; Bilitza, Dieter

    2014-05-01

    Ionospheric models are generally unable to correctly predict the effects of space weather events on the ionosphere. Taking advantage of today's real-time availability of measured electron density profiles of the bottomside ionosphere, we have developed a technique "IRTAM" to specify real-time foF2 and hmF2 global maps. The measured data arrive at the Lowell GIRO Data Center (LGDC) from some ~70 ionosonde stations of the Global Ionosphere Radio Observatory (GIRO) [Reinisch and Galkin, 2011], usually at a 15 min cadence, and are ingested in LGDC's databases (http://ulcar.uml.edu/DIDBase/). We use the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) electron density model [Bilitza et al., 2011] as the background model. It is an empirical monthly median model that critically depends on the correct values of the F2 layer peak height hmF2 and density NmF2 (or critical frequency foF2). The IRI model uses the so-called CCIR (or URSI) coefficients for the specification of the median foF2 and hmF2 maps. IRTAM assimilates the measured GIRO data in IRI by "adjusting" the CCIR coefficients on-the-fly. The updated maps of foF2 and hmF2 for the last 24 hours before now-time are continuously displayed on http://giro.uml.edu/RTAM [Galkin et al., 2012]. The "adjusted" bottomside profiles can be extended to the topside by using the new Vary-Chap topside profile model [Nsumei et al., 2012] which extends the profile from hmF2 to the plasmasphere. References Bilitza D., L.-A. McKinnell, B. Reinisch, and T. Fuller-Rowell (2011), The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) today and in the future, J. Geodesy, 85:909-920, DOI 10.1007/s00190-010-0427-x Galkin, I. A., B. W. Reinisch, X. Huang, and D. Bilitza (2012), Assimilation of GIRO Data into a Real-Time IRI, Radio Sci., 47, RS0L07, doi:10.1029/2011RS004952. Nsumei, P., B. W. Reinisch, X. Huang, and D. Bilitza (2012), New Vary-Chap profile of the topside ionosphere electron density distribution for use with the IRI Model and the GIRO real time

  7. Mesoscale ionospheric tomography at the Auroral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luntama, J.; Kokkatil, G. V.

    2008-12-01

    FMI (Finnish Meteorological Institute) has used observations from the dense GNSS network in Finland for high resolution regional ionospheric tomography. The observation system used in this work is the VRS (Virtual Reference Station) network in Finland operated by Geotrim Ltd. This network contains 86 GNSS ground stations providing two frequency GPS and GLONASS observations with the sampling rate of 1 Hz. The network covers the whole Finland and the sampling of the ionosphere is very good for observing mesoscale ionospheric structures at the Auroral region. The ionospheric tomography software used by FMI is the MIDAS (Multi-Instrument Data Analysis System) algorithm developed and implemented by the University of Bath (Mitchell and Spencer, 2003). MIDAS is a 3-D extension of the 2-D tomography algorithm originally presented by Fremouw et al. (1992). The research at FMI is based on ground based GNSS data collected in December 2006. The impacts of the two geomagnetic storms during the month are clearly visible in the retrieved electron density and TEC maps and they can be correlated with the magnetic field disturbances measured by the IMAGE magnetometer network. This is the first time that mesoscale structures in the ionospheric plasma can be detected from ground based GNSS observations at the Auroral region. The continuous high rate observation data from the Geotrim network allows monitoring of the temporal evolution of these structures throughout the storms. Validation of the high resolution electron density and TEC maps is a challenge as independent reference observations with a similar resolution are not available. FMI has compared the 3-D electron density maps against the 2-D electron density plots retrieved from the observations from the Ionospheric Tomography Chain operated by the Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory (SGO). Additional validation has been performed with intercomparisons with observations from the ground based magnetometer and auroral camera network

  8. Results From YOUTHSAT - Indian experiment in earths thermosphere-ionosphere region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarun Kumar, Pant

    ionospheric tomograms representing altitude-latitude variation of electron density over the 77oE meridian over the Indian region has been generated around specific times (~10:30 AM/PM). These tomograms have provided, among others: (a) First ever images of the ionospheric nighttime ESF irregularities (b) Quantification of the topside F3 ionospheric layers using Tomography (c) Evidence of wavelike modulations in the overall low and equatorial ionospheric region using tomography (d) Day and night differences in the electron density distribution, (e) Evidence of the presence of the ionospheric top-side layer (f) Modulations in the ionosphere due to space weather activity and (g) Direct evidence of the presence of Travelling Atmospheric Disturbance (TAD). YOUTHSAT recently completed its mission life time of about two years, after having generated a comprehensive set of data on terrestrial upper atmosphere. The YOUTHSAT data are being analysed by various researchers and more results providing a new insight into the upper atmospheric processes are in offing. Some of the important outcomes mentioned above will be discussed in detail.

  9. Excitation of a magnetospheric maser through modification of the Earth's ionosphere by high-power HF radio emission from a ground-based transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Markov, G. A. Belov, A. S.; Frolov, V. L.; Rapoport, V. O.; Parrot, M.

    2010-01-15

    A method for controlled excitation of a magnetospheric maser through the production of artificial density ducts by high-power HF radio emission from the Earth's surface has been proposed and implemented in an in-situ experiment. Artificial density ducts allow one to affect the maser resonator system and the excitation and propagation of low-frequency electromagnetic waves in a disturbed magnetic flux tube. The experimental data presented here were obtained at the mid-latitude Sura heating facility. The characteristics of electromagnetic and plasma disturbances at outer-ionosphere altitudes were measured using the onboard equipment of the DEMETER satellite as it passed through the magnetic flux tube rested on the region of intense generation of artificial ionospheric turbulence.

  10. Ionospheric Specifications for SAR Interferometry (ISSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pi, Xiaoqing; Chapman, Bruce D; Freeman, Anthony; Szeliga, Walter; Buckley, Sean M.; Rosen, Paul A.; Lavalle, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The ISSI software package is designed to image the ionosphere from space by calibrating and processing polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) data collected from low Earth orbit satellites. Signals transmitted and received by a PolSAR are subject to the Faraday rotation effect as they traverse the magnetized ionosphere. The ISSI algorithms combine the horizontally and vertically polarized (with respect to the radar system) SAR signals to estimate Faraday rotation and ionospheric total electron content (TEC) with spatial resolutions of sub-kilometers to kilometers, and to derive radar system calibration parameters. The ISSI software package has been designed and developed to integrate the algorithms, process PolSAR data, and image as well as visualize the ionospheric measurements. A number of tests have been conducted using ISSI with PolSAR data collected from various latitude regions using the phase array-type L-band synthetic aperture radar (PALSAR) onboard Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Advanced Land Observing Satellite mission, and also with Global Positioning System data. These tests have demonstrated and validated SAR-derived ionospheric images and data correction algorithms.

  11. Charge Balance in the Martian Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esman, Teresa; Yelle, Roger V.; Stone, Shane W.; Andersson, Laila; Fowler, Christopher Michael; Benna, Mehdi; Eparvier, Francis; Mahaffy, Paul; Ergun, Bob; Elrod, Meredith K.; MAVEN

    2016-10-01

    We present empirical models of the Martian ionosphere in conjunction with data from the Langmuir Probe and Waves (LPW), Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS), and Extreme Ultraviolet Monitor (EUVM) instruments aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution mission (MAVEN) spacecraft. Among the data provided by MAVEN are electron densities and temperatures, ion and neutral densities, and solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) flux. We explore a number of contributors to the CO2 photoionization rate, with a specific focus on the role of electron temperatures, which, prior to MAVEN, were not well-known. We compare our results with expectations of the ionospheric structure and behavior to confirm our understanding of the basic structure of the Martian ionosphere in the photochemical region. We show that the ionosphere of Mars is well matched by photochemical equilibrium to within the accuracy of the measurements. These results will aid in the development of more complex ionospheric and escape models and lead to a comprehensive and global scale picture of thermal ion escape on Mars.

  12. Ionospheric criticial frequencies and solar cycle effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcik, Ali; Ozguc, Atila; Rozelot, Jean Pierre; Yiǧit, Erdal; Elias, Ana; Donmez, Burcin; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    2016-07-01

    The long term solar activity dependencies of ionospheric F1 and F2 regions critical frequencies (foF1 and foF2) are investigated observationally for the last four solar cycles (1976-2015). We here show that the ionospheric F1 and F2 regions have different solar activity dependencies in terms of the sunspot group (SG) numbers: F1 region critical frequency (foF1) peaks at the same time with small SG numbers, while the foF2 reaches its maximum at the same time with the large SG numbers especially during the solar cycle 23. Thus, we may conclude that the sensitivities of ionospheric F1 and F2 region critical frequencies to sunspot group (SG) numbers are associated with different physical processes that are yet to be investigated in detail. Such new results provide further evidence that the two ionospheric regions have different responses to the solar activity. We also analyzed short term oscillatory behavior of ionospheric critical frequencies and found some solar signatures.

  13. Hydrocarbon ions in the Lower Ionosphere of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Fox, J. L.; Black, J. H.; Moses, J. I.

    2011-12-01

    Radio occultation measurements have shown that persistent electron density layers are observed in the lower ionospheres of Saturn. H2 is the major component of the Saturn lower thermosphere, and in the photon range 845 to 1116 A, it absorbs in discrete transitions from the ground state (X) to vibrational levels of excited electronic states. The cross sections for these absorptions vary greatly from the centers to the wings of the H2 absorption lines. We model here the ionization rates of hydrocarbons by photons that penetrate to low altitudes in the wings and gaps in the H2 absorption spectrum in this wavelength range. The calculation requires construction of very high resolution cross sections for H2, and a similarly high resolution solar flux spectrum. We have constructed a photoabsorption spectrum of H2 at a resolution of 0.001 A, using a new set of cross sections for rovibrational lines in H2 Lyman (B - X), Werner (C - X), and the Rydberg B' - X and D - X band systems. We combined the high resolution cross sections with high resolution solar spectra that were constructed from the SOHO/SUMER (Curdt et al., 2001) measured spectrum for the quiet solar disk and a SOLAR2000 spectrum (e.g., Tobiska, 2004) for low solar activity. We compute the photo- and photo-electron-impact processes for H2, H, He, and CH4, and photo processes for 15 of the most important neutral species in the lower ionosphere of Saturn, including C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, CH3, CH3C2H, H2O, CO, C, CH, C2, O, O2, CO2, H2CO, and CH3OH, with updated cross sections for these processes. We find that significant solar fluxes in this wavelength range, especially at the CIII 977.02 and OVI 1031.91 solar lines, penetrate to near the hydrocarbon homopause, resulting in photoionization of hydrocarbons. For the ionospheric chemistry, we compiled from the literature a set of 727 rate coefficients for ion-neutral, neutral-neutral, and dissociative recombination reactions of 47 ion species and 26 neutral species. The

  14. Ground observation and AMIE-TIEGCM modeling of a storm-time traveling ionospheric disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiokawa, K.; Lu, G.; Otsuka, Y.; Ogawa, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Nishitani, N.; Sato, N.

    2007-05-01

    This paper reports the first comparison between comprehensive observations of equatorward moving traveling ionospheric disturbance at midlatitudes and thermospheric general circulation model with high-latitude energy input based on data assimilation. A prominent traveling ionospheric disturbance (TID) was observed during the major magnetic storm of 31 March 2001. The TID propagated from north to south over Japan with phase speeds of 370-640 m/s. The assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics (AMIE) technique was used as input to the thermosphere-ionosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (TIEGCM) to investigate generation and propagation of the observed TID. In the model, two Joule heating enhancements in the high-latitude dayside sector produced two distinct traveling atmospheric waves (TADs), which propagated to Japan in the midnight sector as enhancements in thermospheric temperature and southward wind speed. The phase speed of the TADs was much faster (˜1100 m/s) in the model, probably due to the overestimation of Joule heating in the model. The second TAD corresponds to the observed prominent TID, while signatures of the first TAD were also seen in the observed ionosonde data. The observed TID was characterized by a decrease in southward wind speed, causing a significant F-layer height decrease and a temporal enhancement of F-layer peak density. These characteristics were reproduced by the model as a rarefaction of the second TAD. The temporal enhancement of F-layer peak density was because of the vertical shear of meridional wind. The absolute value of F-layer electron density in the model was several factors smaller than that observed, probably because of the underestimation of the supply of O+ ions from the plasmasphere.

  15. Generation of whistler waves by continuous HF heating of the upper ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanyan, A.; Milikh, G. M.; Eliasson, B. E.; Sharma, A.; Chang, C.; Parrot, M.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2013-12-01

    We report observations of VLF waves by the DEMETER satellite overflying the HAARP facility during ionospheric heating experiments. The detected VLF waves were in the range 8-17 kHz and coincided with times of continuous heating. The experiments indicate whistler generation due to conversion of artificial lower hybrid waves to whistlers on small scale field-aligned plasma density striations. The observations are compared with theoretical models, taking into account both linear and nonlinear processes. Implications of the mode conversion technique on VLF generation with subsequent injection into the radiation belts to trigger particle precipitation are discussed.

  16. Ionospheric disturbances during November 30-December 1, 1988. IV - Ionospheric disturbances observed by oblique ionospheric sounding network in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Kiyoshi; Takeuchi, Tetsuo

    1992-07-01

    The oblique ionospheric-sounding network of the Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) was used to obtain oblique ionograms every 15 minutes during severe ionospheric disturbances from November 30 through December I, 1988. Vertical-sounding HF signals (l to 25 MHz) from Wakkanai, Akita, Yamagawa, and Okinawa were received at Kokubunji. Oblique ionograms on the night of November 30 exhibit scattered and oblique echoes due to anomalous signal propagation as well as normal echoes. Anomalous propagation occurred when the maximum observable frequency (MOF) largely increased. Furthermore, scattered echoes appeared more frequently and with more intensity on the southernmost path (Okinawa-Kokubunji) than on the northernmost one (Wakkanai-Kokubunji).