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Sample records for artificial photosynthetic systems

  1. Energy transfer in real and artificial photosynthetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hindman, J.C.; Hunt, J.E.; Katz, J.J.

    1995-02-01

    Fluorescence emission from the photosynthetic organisms Tribonema aequale, Anacystis nidulau, and Chlorelia vulgais and from some chlorophyll model systems have been recorded as a function of excitation wavelength and temperature. Considerable similarity was observed in the effects of excitation wavelength and temperature on the fluorescence from intact photosynthetic organisms and the model systems. The parallelism in behavior suggest that self-assembly processes may occur in both the in vivo and in vitro systems that give rise to chlorophyll species at low temperature that may differ significantly from those present at ambient temperatures.

  2. Hybrid artificial photosynthetic systems comprising semiconductors as light harvesters and biomimetic complexes as molecular cocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fuyu; Li, Can

    2013-11-19

    Solar fuel production through artificial photosynthesis may be a key to generating abundant and clean energy, thus addressing the high energy needs of the world's expanding population. As the crucial components of photosynthesis, the artificial photosynthetic system should be composed of a light harvester (e.g., semiconductor or molecular dye), a reduction cocatalyst (e.g., hydrogenase mimic, noble metal), and an oxidation cocatalyst (e.g., photosystem II mimic for oxygen evolution from water oxidation). Solar fuel production catalyzed by an artificial photosynthetic system starts from the absorption of sunlight by the light harvester, where charge separation takes place, followed by a charge transfer to the reduction and oxidation cocatalysts, where redox reaction processes occur. One of the most challenging problems is to develop an artificial photosynthetic solar fuel production system that is both highly efficient and stable. The assembly of cocatalysts on the semiconductor (light harvester) not only can facilitate the charge separation, but also can lower the activation energy or overpotential for the reactions. An efficient light harvester loaded with suitable reduction and oxidation cocatalysts is the key for high efficiency of artificial photosynthetic systems. In this Account, we describe our strategy of hybrid photocatalysts using semiconductors as light harvesters with biomimetic complexes as molecular cocatalysts to construct efficient and stable artificial photosynthetic systems. We chose semiconductor nanoparticles as light harvesters because of their broad spectral absorption and relatively robust properties compared with a natural photosynthesis system. Using biomimetic complexes as cocatalysts can significantly facilitate charge separation via fast charge transfer from the semiconductor to the molecular cocatalysts and also catalyze the chemical reactions of solar fuel production. The hybrid photocatalysts supply us with a platform to study the

  3. Energy conversion at liquid/liquid interfaces: artificial photosynthetic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkov, A. G.; Gugeshashvili, M. I.; Deamer, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    This chapter focuses on multielectron reactions in organized assemblies of molecules at the liquid/liquid interface. We describe the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of such reactions, including the structure of the reaction centers, charge movement along the electron transfer pathways, and the role of electric double layers in artificial photosynthesis. Some examples of artificial photosynthesis at the oil/water interface are considered, including water photooxidation to the molecular oxygen, oxygen photoreduction, photosynthesis of amphiphilic compounds and proton evolution by photochemical processes.

  4. Energy conversion at liquid/liquid interfaces: artificial photosynthetic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkov, A. G.; Gugeshashvili, M. I.; Deamer, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    This chapter focuses on multielectron reactions in organized assemblies of molecules at the liquid/liquid interface. We describe the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of such reactions, including the structure of the reaction centers, charge movement along the electron transfer pathways, and the role of electric double layers in artificial photosynthesis. Some examples of artificial photosynthesis at the oil/water interface are considered, including water photooxidation to the molecular oxygen, oxygen photoreduction, photosynthesis of amphiphilic compounds and proton evolution by photochemical processes.

  5. Studies of zeolite-based artificial photosynthetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haoyu

    used as a model system. A MV2+-loaded zeolite was treated with disilazane reagents under ambient conditions and the grafting of siloxy functionality on the zeolite was confirmed by infrared, NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Surface modification of MV2+-loaded zeolites encapsulated the guest molecules in the zeolite cages and release of MV2+ by ion-exchange with sodium ions was studied. The total amount of MV2+ released was dependent on the concentration of Na+ in solution, and was similar for the derivatized and underivatized samples. In the absence of surface modification, equilibration occurred within 20 minutes, whereas with surface modification, the equilibration time was extended to 7 days. These kinetics are reflected in the effective diffusion coefficients (D) of MV2+, with D = 1.2 x 10-15 cm 2 s-1 for derivatized zeolite Y and D = 0.2 -1.1 x 10-7 cm2 s-1 for the underivatized sample. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  6. Sustainable fuel, food, fertilizer and ecosystems through a global artificial photosynthetic system: overcoming anticompetitive barriers

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Alex; Faunce, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses challenges that artificial photosynthetic (AP) systems will face when entering and competing in a global market characterized by established fossil fuel technology. It provides a perspective on the neoliberal principles underpinning much policy entrenching such environmentally destructive technology and outlines how competition law could aid overcoming these hurdles for AP development. In particular, it critiques the potential for competition law to promote a global AP initiative with greater emphasis on atmospheric carbon dioxide and nitrogen fixation (as well as solar-driven water splitting) to produce an equitable, globally distributed source of human food, fertilizer and biosphere sustainability, as well as hydrogen-based fuel. Some relevant strategies of competition law evaluated in this context include greater citizen–consumer involvement in shaping market values, legal requirements to factor services from the natural environment (i.e. provision of clean air, water, soil pollution degradation) into corporate costs, reform of corporate taxation and requirements to balance maximization of shareholder profit with contribution to a nominated public good, a global financial transactions tax, as well as prohibiting horizontal cartels, vertical agreements and unilateral misuse of market power. PMID:26052427

  7. Sustainable fuel, food, fertilizer and ecosystems through a global artificial photosynthetic system: overcoming anticompetitive barriers.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Alex; Faunce, Thomas

    2015-06-06

    This article discusses challenges that artificial photosynthetic (AP) systems will face when entering and competing in a global market characterized by established fossil fuel technology. It provides a perspective on the neoliberal principles underpinning much policy entrenching such environmentally destructive technology and outlines how competition law could aid overcoming these hurdles for AP development. In particular, it critiques the potential for competition law to promote a global AP initiative with greater emphasis on atmospheric carbon dioxide and nitrogen fixation (as well as solar-driven water splitting) to produce an equitable, globally distributed source of human food, fertilizer and biosphere sustainability, as well as hydrogen-based fuel. Some relevant strategies of competition law evaluated in this context include greater citizen-consumer involvement in shaping market values, legal requirements to factor services from the natural environment (i.e. provision of clean air, water, soil pollution degradation) into corporate costs, reform of corporate taxation and requirements to balance maximization of shareholder profit with contribution to a nominated public good, a global financial transactions tax, as well as prohibiting horizontal cartels, vertical agreements and unilateral misuse of market power.

  8. Nano-sized layered Mn oxides as promising and biomimetic water oxidizing catalysts for water splitting in artificial photosynthetic systems.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Heidari, Sima; Amini, Emad; Khatamian, Masoumeh; Carpentier, Robert; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-04-05

    One challenge in artificial photosynthetic systems is the development of artificial model compounds to oxidize water. The water-oxidizing complex of Photosystem II which is responsible for biological water oxidation contains a cluster of four Mn ions bridged by five oxygen atoms. Layered Mn oxides as efficient, stable, low cost, environmentally friendly and easy to use, synthesize, and manufacture compounds could be considered as functional and structural models for the site. Because of the related structure of these Mn oxides and the catalytic centre of the active site of the water oxidizing complex of Photosystem II, the study of layered Mn oxides may also help to understand more about the mechanism of water oxidation by the natural site. This review provides an overview of the current status of layered Mn oxides in artificial photosynthesis and discuss the sophisticated design strategies for Mn oxides as water oxidizing catalysts.

  9. Triplet excitons in natural photosynthetic and artificial light harvesting systems: Measurement and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartzler, Daniel Allen

    Under full sunlight, unprotected (Bacterio)Chlorophyll ((B)Chl) molecules photodegrade in a matter of minutes. This is the result of the generation of highly reactive singlet oxygen (1O2) by energy transfer from the (B)Chl triplet state (3(B)Chl) to the oxygen ground state. Natural photosynthetic systems must protect themselves from 1O2, typically done by positioning carotenoids within a few angstroms of each (B)Chl molecule to quench 3(B)Chl states. Using phosphorescence spectroscopy and computational modeling, we investigated alternative, carotenoid independent, mechanisms which nature may employ to prevent 1O2 sensitization by lowering the energy of 3(B)Chl below that of 1O2. The two proposed triplet lowering mechanisms investigated were: triplet state lowering by strong pigment-pigment interactions (i.e. triplet exciton formation) and triplet state lowering by pigment-protein interactions. Possible natural examples employing these mechanisms are two structures found in green sulfur bacteria: the chlorosome (an antenna containing ~100000 coupled BChl c, d, or e molecules with unexpectedly high photostability) and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex (an auxiliary antenna containing eight seemingly unprotected BChl a molecules). Measurements performed on linear aggregates of the dye perylene diimide (PDI) show that triplet exciton formation does reduce the triplet state energy. However, direct measurement of triplet state energies for the chlorosome and FMO complex proved experimentally difficult, thus an alternative approach was used to calculate these energies using empirical and excitonic models. Since the use of excitonic modeling requires knowledge of both the pigment site energies and the pigment-pigment interactions (i.e. couplings), work was performed to catalog the monomeric singlet and triplet state energies of all known natural (B)Chl pigments by direct measurement or computational modeling and to characterize the triplet-triplet (T-T) coupling in

  10. Leaf-architectured 3D Hierarchical Artificial Photosynthetic System of Perovskite Titanates Towards CO2 Photoreduction Into Hydrocarbon Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Han; Guo, Jianjun; Li, Peng; Fan, Tongxiang; Zhang, Di; Ye, Jinhua

    2013-04-01

    The development of an ``artificial photosynthetic system'' (APS) having both the analogous important structural elements and reaction features of photosynthesis to achieve solar-driven water splitting and CO2 reduction is highly challenging. Here, we demonstrate a design strategy for a promising 3D APS architecture as an efficient mass flow/light harvesting network relying on the morphological replacement of a concept prototype-leaf's 3D architecture into perovskite titanates for CO2 photoreduction into hydrocarbon fuels (CO and CH4). The process uses artificial sunlight as the energy source, water as an electron donor and CO2 as the carbon source, mimicking what real leaves do. To our knowledge this is the first example utilizing biological systems as ``architecture-directing agents'' for APS towards CO2 photoreduction, which hints at a more general principle for APS architectures with a great variety of optimized biological geometries. This research would have great significance for the potential realization of global carbon neutral cycle.

  11. Leaf-architectured 3D Hierarchical Artificial Photosynthetic System of Perovskite Titanates Towards CO2 Photoreduction Into Hydrocarbon Fuels

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Han; Guo, Jianjun; Li, Peng; Fan, Tongxiang; Zhang, Di; Ye, Jinhua

    2013-01-01

    The development of an “artificial photosynthetic system” (APS) having both the analogous important structural elements and reaction features of photosynthesis to achieve solar-driven water splitting and CO2 reduction is highly challenging. Here, we demonstrate a design strategy for a promising 3D APS architecture as an efficient mass flow/light harvesting network relying on the morphological replacement of a concept prototype-leaf's 3D architecture into perovskite titanates for CO2 photoreduction into hydrocarbon fuels (CO and CH4). The process uses artificial sunlight as the energy source, water as an electron donor and CO2 as the carbon source, mimicking what real leaves do. To our knowledge this is the first example utilizing biological systems as “architecture-directing agents” for APS towards CO2 photoreduction, which hints at a more general principle for APS architectures with a great variety of optimized biological geometries. This research would have great significance for the potential realization of global carbon neutral cycle. PMID:23588925

  12. (13)C-Labeling the carbon-fixation pathway of a highly efficient artificial photosynthetic system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chong; Nangle, Shannon N; Colón, Brendan C; Silver, Pamela A; Nocera, Daniel G

    2017-03-15

    Interfacing the CO2-fixing microorganism, Ralstonia eutropha, to the energy derived from hydrogen produced by water splitting is a viable approach to achieving renewable CO2 reduction at high efficiencies. We employ (13)C-labeling to report on the nature of CO2 reduction in the inorganic water splitting|R. eutropha hybrid system. Accumulated biomass in a reactor under a (13)C-enriched CO2 atmosphere may be sampled at different time points during CO2 reduction. Converting the sampled biomass into gaseous CO2 allows the (13)C/(12)C ratio to be determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. After 2 hours of inoculation and the initiation of water splitting, the microbes adapted and began to convert CO2 into biomass. The observed time evolution of the (13)C/(12)C ratio in accumulated biomass is consistent with a Monod model for carbon fixation. Carbon dioxide produced by catabolism was found to be minimal. This rapid response of the bacteria to a hydrogen input and to subsequent CO2 reduction at high efficiency are beneficial to achieving artificial photosynthesis for the storage of renewable energy.

  13. Carotenoid photoprotection in artificial photosynthetic antennas.

    PubMed

    Kloz, Miroslav; Pillai, Smitha; Kodis, Gerdenis; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L; van Grondelle, Rienk; Kennis, John T M

    2011-05-11

    A series of phthalocyanine-carotenoid dyads in which a phenylamino group links a phthalocyanine to carotenoids having 8-11 backbone double bonds were examined by visible and near-infrared femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy combined with global fitting analysis. The series of molecules has permitted investigation of the role of carotenoids in the quenching of excited states of cyclic tetrapyrroles. The transient behavior varied dramatically with the length of the carotenoid and the solvent environment. Clear spectroscopic signatures of radical species revealed photoinduced electron transfer as the main quenching mechanism for all dyads dissolved in a polar solvent (THF), and the quenching rate was almost independent of carotenoid length. However, in a nonpolar solvent (toluene), quenching rates displayed a strong dependence on the conjugation length of the carotenoid and the mechanism did not include charge separation. The lack of any rise time components of a carotenoid S(1) signature in all experiments in toluene suggests that an excitonic coupling between the carotenoid S(1) state and phthalocyanine Q state, rather than a conventional energy transfer process, is the major mechanism of quenching. A pronounced inhomogeneity of the system was observed and attributed to the presence of a phenyl-amino linker between phthalocyanine and carotenoids. On the basis of accumulated work on various caroteno-phthalocyanine dyads and triads, we have now identified three mechanisms of tetrapyrrole singlet excited state quenching by carotenoids in artificial systems: (i) Car-Pc electron transfer and recombination; (ii)(1) Pc to Car S(1) energy transfer and fast internal conversion to the Car ground state; (iii) excitonic coupling between (1)Pc and Car S(1) and ensuing internal conversion to the ground state of the carotenoid. The dominant mechanism depends upon the exact molecular architecture and solvent environment. These synthetic systems are providing a deeper understanding

  14. Multichromophoric Perylenediimide-Silicon Phthalocyanine-C60 System as an Artificial Photosynthetic Analogue.

    PubMed

    Martín-Gomis, Luis; Peralta-Ruiz, Francisco; Thomas, Michael B; Fernández-Lázaro, Fernando; D'Souza, Francis; Sastre-Santos, Ángela

    2017-03-17

    Sequential photoinduced energy transfer followed by electron transfer and the formation of charge-separated states, which are primary events of natural photosynthesis, have been demonstrated in a newly synthesized multichromophoric covalently linked triad, PDI-SiPc-C60 . The triad comprises a perylenediimide (PDI), which primarily fulfils antenna and electron-acceptor functionalities, silicon phthalocyanine (SiPc) as an electron donor, and fulleropyrrolidine (C60 ) as a second electron acceptor. The multi-step convergent synthetic procedure developed here produced good yields of the triad and control dyads, PDI-SiPc and SiPc-C60 . The structures and geometries of the newly synthesized donor-acceptor systems have been established from spectral, computational, and electrochemical studies with reference to appropriate control compounds. Ultrafast energy transfer from (1) PDI* to SiPc in the case of PDI-SiPc and PDI-SiPc-C60 was witnessed. An energy-level diagram established from spectral and electrochemical data suggested the formation of two types of charge-separated states, that is, PDI-SiPc(.+) -C60(.-) and PDI(.-) -SiPc(.+) -C60 from the (1) SiPc* in the triad, with generation of the latter being energetically more favorable. However, photochemical studies involving femtosecond transient spectroscopy revealed the formation of PDI-SiPc(.+) -C60(.-) as a major charge-separated product. This observation may be rationalized in terms of the closer spatial proximity to SiPc of C60 compared to PDI in the triad. The charge-separated state persisted for a few nanoseconds prior to populating the (3) SiPc* state during charge recombination.

  15. Carotenoid Photoprotection in Artificial Photosynthetic Antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Kloz, Miroslav; Pillai, Smitha; Kodis, Gerdenis; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Kennis, John T. M.

    2011-04-14

    A series of phthalocyanine-carotenoid dyads in which a phenylamino group links a phthalocyanine to carotenoids having 8-11 backbone double bonds were examined by visible and near-infrared femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy combined with global fitting analysis. The series of molecules has permitted investigation of the role of carotenoids in the quenching of excited states of cyclic tetrapyrroles. The transient behavior varied dramatically with the length of the carotenoid and the solvent environment. Clear spectroscopic signatures of radical species revealed photoinduced electron transfer as the main quenching mechanism for all dyads dissolved in a polar solvent (THF), and the quenching rate was almost independent of carotenoid length. However, in a nonpolar solvent (toluene), quenching rates displayed a strong dependence on the conjugation length of the carotenoid and the mechanism did not include charge separation. The lack of any rise time components of a carotenoid S1 signature in all experiments in toluene suggests that an excitonic coupling between the carotenoid S1 state and phthalocyanine Q state, rather than a conventional energy transfer process, is the major mechanism of quenching. A pronounced inhomogeneity of the system was observed and attributed to the presence of a phenyl-amino linker between phthalocyanine and carotenoids. On the basis of accumulated work on various caroteno-phthalocyanine dyads and triads, we have now identified three mechanisms of tetrapyrrole singlet excited state quenching by carotenoids in artificial systems: (i) Car-Pc electron transfer and recombination; (ii)1Pc to Car S1 energy transfer and fast internal conversion to the Car ground state; (iii) excitonic coupling between 1Pc and Car S1 and ensuing internal conversion to the ground state of the carotenoid. The dominant mechanism depends upon the exact molecular architecture and solvent environment

  16. Artificial photosynthetic reaction centers coupled to light-harvesting antennas.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Nori, Franco

    2011-12-01

    We analyze a theoretical model for energy and electron transfer in an artificial photosynthetic system. The photosystem consists of a molecular triad (i.e., with a donor, a photosensitive unit, and an acceptor) coupled to four accessory light-harvesting-antenna pigments. The resonant energy transfer from the antennas to the artificial reaction center (the molecular triad) is described here by the Förster mechanism. We consider two different kinds of arrangements of the accessory light-harvesting pigments around the reaction center. The first arrangement allows direct excitation transfer to the reaction center from all the surrounding pigments. The second configuration transmits energy via a cascade mechanism along a chain of light-harvesting chromophores, where only one chromophore is connected to the reaction center. We show that the artificial photosynthetic system using the cascade energy transfer absorbs photons in a broader wavelength range and converts their energy into electricity with a higher efficiency than the system based on direct couplings between all the antenna chromophores and the reaction center.

  17. Artificial photosynthetic reaction centers coupled to light-harvesting antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu.; Nori, Franco

    2011-12-01

    We analyze a theoretical model for energy and electron transfer in an artificial photosynthetic system. The photosystem consists of a molecular triad (i.e., with a donor, a photosensitive unit, and an acceptor) coupled to four accessory light-harvesting-antenna pigments. The resonant energy transfer from the antennas to the artificial reaction center (the molecular triad) is described here by the Förster mechanism. We consider two different kinds of arrangements of the accessory light-harvesting pigments around the reaction center. The first arrangement allows direct excitation transfer to the reaction center from all the surrounding pigments. The second configuration transmits energy via a cascade mechanism along a chain of light-harvesting chromophores, where only one chromophore is connected to the reaction center. We show that the artificial photosynthetic system using the cascade energy transfer absorbs photons in a broader wavelength range and converts their energy into electricity with a higher efficiency than the system based on direct couplings between all the antenna chromophores and the reaction center.

  18. Multiantenna artificial photosynthetic reaction center complex.

    PubMed

    Terazono, Yuichi; Kodis, Gerdenis; Liddell, Paul A; Garg, Vikas; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L; Gust, Devens

    2009-05-21

    In order to ensure efficient utilization of the solar spectrum, photosynthetic organisms use a variety of antenna chromophores to absorb light and transfer excitation to a reaction center, where photoinduced charge separation occurs. Reported here is a synthetic molecular heptad that features two bis(phenylethynyl)anthracene and two borondipyrromethene antennas linked to a hexaphenylbenzene core that also bears two zinc porphyrins. A fullerene electron acceptor self-assembles to both porhyrins via dative bonds. Excitation energy is transferred very efficiently from all four antennas to the porphyrins. Singlet-singlet energy transfer occurs both directly and by a stepwise funnel-like pathway wherein excitation moves down a thermodynamic gradient. The porphyrin excited states donate an electron to the fullerene with a time constant of 3 ps to generate a charge-separated state with a lifetime of 230 ps. The overall quantum yield is close to unity. In the absence of the fullerene, the porphyrin excited singlet state donates an electron to a borondipyrromethene on a slower time scale. This molecule demonstrates that by incorporating antennas, it is possible for a molecular system to harvest efficiently light throughout the visible from ultraviolet wavelengths out to approximately 650 nm.

  19. Combining light-harvesting and charge separation in a self-assembled artificial photosynthetic system based on perylenediimide chromophores.

    PubMed

    Rybtchinski, Boris; Sinks, Louise E; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2004-10-06

    Self-assembly of robust perylenediimide chromophores is used to produce an artificial light-harvesting antenna structure that in turn induces self-assembly of a functional special pair that undergoes ultrafast, quantitative charge separation. The structure consists of four 1,7-(3',5'-di-tert-butylphenoxy)perylene-3,4:9,10-perylene-3,4:9,10-bis(carboximide) (PDI) molecules attached to a single 1,7-bis(pyrrolidin-1-yl)perylene-3,4:9,10-perylene-3,4:9,10-bis(carboximide) (5PDI) core, which self-assembles to form (5PDI-PDI4)2 in toluene. The system is characterized using both structural methods (NMR, SAXS, mass spectroscopy, and GPC) and photophysical methods (UV-vis, time-resolved fluorescence, and femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy). Energy transfer from (PDI)2 to (5PDI)2 occurs with tau = 21 ps, followed by excited-state symmetry breaking of 1*(5PDI)2 to produce 5PDI*+-5PDI*- quantitatively with tau = 7 ps. The ion pair recombines with tau = 420 ps. Electron transfer occurs only in the dimeric system and does not occur in the disassembled monomer, thus mimicking both antenna and special pair function in photosynthesis.

  20. Phtophysical processes involved within the bichromophoric system 9-benzotriazole-1-ylmethyl-9H-carbazole and its role as an artificial photosynthetic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Paulami; Misra, Tapas; De, Asish; Ghosh, Sanjib; Chaudhury, Shyamal Roy; Chowdhury, Joydeep; Ganguly, Tapan

    2007-03-01

    From both steady state and fluorescence lifetime measurements it reveals that due to photoexcitation of benzotriazole (BZ) part of the bichromophore, 9(1-H-benzotriazole-lylmethyl)-9H-carbazole (BHC), singlet-singlet energy transfer takes place to populate the lowest excited singlet of carbazole (CZ). CZ, thus being excited indirectly via energy transfer process, undergoes strong charge transfer (CT) reaction with the surrounding polar medium acetonitrile (ACN). On the other hand, very weak CT band was apparent when CZ part, within BHC, was directly excited. In less polar tetrahydrofuran (THF) and polar benzonitrile (BN) environment, lack of formation of CT band strongly suggests in favor of the electron-accepting behavior of ACN. Moreover, by measuring the emission spectra of BHC in microcrystals and of 30 bilayers mixed LB film at high mole fraction of BHC molecules, the possibility of excimer formation or aggregation has been ruled out. Thus, BHC, when dissolved in ACN, acts as a triad system of BZ-CZ-ACN where BZ acts as an antenna molecule and CZ as a reaction center. The possible role of the bichromophoric system BHC as an artificial photosynthetic or solar energy conversion device has been hinted.

  1. Hydrogen photoproduction by use of photosynthetic organisms and biomimetic systems.

    PubMed

    Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Kreslavski, Vladimir D; Thavasi, Velmurugan; Zharmukhamedov, Sergei K; Klimov, Vyacheslav V; Nagata, Toshi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2009-02-01

    Hydrogen can be important clean fuel for future. Among different technologies for hydrogen production, oxygenic natural and artificial photosyntheses using direct photochemistry in synthetic complexes have a great potential to produce hydrogen, since both use clean and cheap sources: water and solar energy. Artificial photosynthesis is one way to produce hydrogen from water using sunlight by employing biomimetic complexes. However, splitting of water into protons and oxygen is energetically demanding and chemically difficult. In oxygenic photosynthetic microorganisms such as algae and cyanobacteria, water is split into electrons and protons, which during primary photosynthetic process are redirected by photosynthetic electron transport chain, and ferredoxin, to the hydrogen-producing enzymes hydrogenase or nitrogenase. By these enzymes, e- and H+ recombine and form gaseous hydrogen. Biohydrogen activity of hydrogenase can be very high but it is extremely sensitive to photosynthetic O2. In contrast, nitrogenase is insensitive to O2, but has lower activity. At the moment, the efficiency of biohydrogen production is low. However, theoretical expectations suggest that the rates of photon conversion efficiency for H2 bioproduction can be high enough (>10%). Our review examines the main pathways of H2 photoproduction by using of photosynthetic organisms and biomimetic photosynthetic systems.

  2. Quantum effects in energy and charge transfer in an artificial photosynthetic complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu.; Nori, Franco

    2011-06-01

    We investigate the quantum dynamics of energy and charge transfer in a wheel-shaped artificial photosynthetic antenna-reaction center complex. This complex consists of six light-harvesting chromophores and an electron-acceptor fullerene. To describe quantum effects on a femtosecond time scale, we derive the set of exact non-Markovian equations for the Heisenberg operators of this photosynthetic complex in contact with a Gaussian heat bath. With these equations we can analyze the regime of strong system-bath interactions, where reorganization energies are of the order of the intersite exciton couplings. We show that the energy of the initially excited antenna chromophores is efficiently funneled to the porphyrin-fullerene reaction center, where a charge-separated state is set up in a few picoseconds, with a quantum yield of the order of 95%. In the single-exciton regime, with one antenna chromophore being initially excited, we observe quantum beatings of energy between two resonant antenna chromophores with a decoherence time of ˜100 fs. We also analyze the double-exciton regime, when two porphyrin molecules involved in the reaction center are initially excited. In this regime we obtain pronounced quantum oscillations of the charge on the fullerene molecule with a decoherence time of about 20 fs (at liquid nitrogen temperatures). These results show a way to directly detect quantum effects in artificial photosynthetic systems.

  3. Conformationally Constrained Macrocyclic Diporphyrin-Fullerene Artificial Photosynthetic Reaction Center

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Vikas; Kodis, Gerdenis; Chachisvilis, Mirianas; Hambourger, Michael; Moore, Ana L.; Moore, Thomas A.; Gust, Devens

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers convert excitation energy from absorbed sunlight into chemical potential energy in the form of a charge-separated state. The rates of the electron transfer reactions necessary to achieve long-lived, high-energy charge-separated states with high quantum yields are determined in part by precise control of the electronic coupling among the chromophores, donors and acceptors, and of the reaction energetics. Successful artificial photosynthetic reaction centers for solar energy conversion have similar requirements. Control of electronic coupling in particular necessitates chemical linkages between active component moieties that both mediate coupling and restrict conformational mobility so that only spatial arrangements that promote favorable coupling are populated. Toward this end, we report the synthesis, structure and photochemical properties of an artificial reaction center containing two porphyrin electron donor moieties and a fullerene electron acceptor in a macrocyclic arrangement involving a ring of 42 atoms. The two porphyrins are closely spaced, in an arrangement reminiscent of that of the special pair in bacterial reaction centers. The molecule is produced by an unusual cyclization reaction that yields mainly a product with C2 symmetry and trans-2 disubstitution at the fullerene. The macrocycle maintains a rigid, highly-constrained structure that was determined by UV-vis spectroscopy, NMR, mass spectrometry, and molecular modeling at the semi-empirical PM6 and DFT (B3LYP/6-31G**) levels. Transient absorption results for the macrocycle in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran reveal photoinduced electron transfer from the porphyrin first excited singlet state to the fullerene to form a P•+-C60•−-P charge separated state with a time constant of 1.1 ps. Photoinduced electron transfer to the fullerene excited singlet state to form the same charge-separated state has a time constant of 15 ps. The charge-separated state is formed with a

  4. Photosynthetic acclimation responses of maize seedlings grown under artificial laboratory light gradients mimicking natural canopy conditions.

    PubMed

    Hirth, Matthias; Dietzel, Lars; Steiner, Sebastian; Ludwig, Robert; Weidenbach, Hannah; And, Jeannette Pfalz; Pfannschmidt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In this study we assessed the ability of the C4 plant maize to perform long-term photosynthetic acclimation in an artificial light quality system previously used for analyzing short-term and long-term acclimation responses (LTR) in C3 plants. We aimed to test if this light system could be used as a tool for analyzing redox-regulated acclimation processes in maize seedlings. Photosynthetic parameters obtained from maize samples harvested in the field were used as control. The results indicated that field grown maize performed a pronounced LTR with significant differences between the top and the bottom levels of the plant stand corresponding to the strong light gradients occurring in it. We compared these data to results obtained from maize seedlings grown under artificial light sources preferentially exciting either photosystem II or photosystem I. In C3 plants, this light system induces redox signals within the photosynthetic electron transport chain which trigger state transitions and differential phosphorylation of LHCII (light harvesting complexes of photosystem II). The LTR to these redox signals induces changes in the accumulation of plastid psaA transcripts, in chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence values F \\rm s/F \\rm m, in Chl a/b ratios and in transient starch accumulation in C3 plants. Maize seedlings grown in this light system exhibited a pronounced ability to perform both short-term and long-term acclimation at the level of psaA transcripts, Chl fluorescence values F \\rm s/F \\rm m and Chl a/b ratios. Interestingly, maize seedlings did not exhibit redox-controlled variations of starch accumulation probably because of its specific differences in energy metabolism. In summary, the artificial laboratory light system was found to be well-suited to mimic field light conditions and provides a physiological tool for studying the molecular regulation of the LTR of maize in more detail.

  5. Photovoltaic concepts inspired by coherence effects in photosynthetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brédas, Jean-Luc; Sargent, Edward H.; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2017-01-01

    The past decade has seen rapid advances in our understanding of how coherent and vibronic phenomena in biological photosynthetic systems aid in the efficient transport of energy from light-harvesting antennas to photosynthetic reaction centres. Such coherence effects suggest strategies to increase transport lengths even in the presence of structural disorder. Here we explore how these principles could be exploited in making improved solar cells. We investigate in depth the case of organic materials, systems in which energy and charge transport stand to be improved by overcoming challenges that arise from the effects of static and dynamic disorder -- structural and energetic -- and from inherently strong electron-vibration couplings. We discuss how solar-cell device architectures can evolve to use coherence-exploiting materials, and we speculate as to the prospects for a coherent energy conversion system. We conclude with a survey of the impacts of coherence and bioinspiration on diverse solar-energy harvesting solutions, including artificial photosynthetic systems.

  6. Photovoltaic concepts inspired by coherence effects in photosynthetic systems.

    PubMed

    Brédas, Jean-Luc; Sargent, Edward H; Scholes, Gregory D

    2016-12-20

    The past decade has seen rapid advances in our understanding of how coherent and vibronic phenomena in biological photosynthetic systems aid in the efficient transport of energy from light-harvesting antennas to photosynthetic reaction centres. Such coherence effects suggest strategies to increase transport lengths even in the presence of structural disorder. Here we explore how these principles could be exploited in making improved solar cells. We investigate in depth the case of organic materials, systems in which energy and charge transport stand to be improved by overcoming challenges that arise from the effects of static and dynamic disorder - structural and energetic - and from inherently strong electron-vibration couplings. We discuss how solar-cell device architectures can evolve to use coherence-exploiting materials, and we speculate as to the prospects for a coherent energy conversion system. We conclude with a survey of the impacts of coherence and bioinspiration on diverse solar-energy harvesting solutions, including artificial photosynthetic systems.

  7. Designing artificial photosynthetic devices using hybrid organic-inorganic modules based on polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Symes, Mark D; Cogdell, Richard J; Cronin, Leroy

    2013-08-13

    Artificial photosynthesis aims at capturing solar energy and using it to produce storable fuels. However, while there is reason to be optimistic that such approaches can deliver higher energy conversion efficiencies than natural photosynthetic systems, many serious challenges remain to be addressed. Perhaps chief among these is the issue of device stability. Almost all approaches to artificial photosynthesis employ easily oxidized organic molecules as light harvesters or in catalytic centres, frequently in solution with highly oxidizing species. The 'elephant in the room' in this regard is that oxidation of these organic moieties is likely to occur at least as rapidly as oxidation of water, meaning that current device performance is severely curtailed. Herein, we discuss one possible solution to this problem: using self-assembling organic-polyoxometalate hybrid structures to produce compartments inside which the individual component reactions of photosynthesis can occur without such a high incidence of deleterious side reactions.

  8. Artificial Photosynthetic Reaction Center Exhibiting Acid-Responsive Regulation of Photoinduced Charge Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Pahk, Ian; Kodis, Gerdenis; Fleming, Graham R.; Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.; Gust, Devens

    2016-09-16

    Charge separation (CS) is the primary light-driven reaction in photosynthesis whereas onphotochemical quenching (NPQ) is a photoprotective regulatory mechanism employed by many photosynthetic organisms to dynamically modulate energy flow within the photosynthetic apparatus in response to fluctuating light conditions. Activated by decreases in lumen pH produced during periods of high photon flux, NPQ induces rapid thermal dissipation of excess excitation energy. As a result, the rate of CS decreases, thereby limiting the accumulation of potentially deleterious reactive intermediates and byproducts. In this article, a molecular triad that functionally mimics the effects of NPQ associated with an artificial photosynthetic reaction center is described. Steady-state absorption and emission, time-resolved fluorescence, and transient absorption spectroscopies have been used to demonstrate a 1 order of magnitude reduction in the CS quantum yield via reversible protonation of an excited-state-quenching molecular switch moiety. As in the natural system, the populations of unquenched and quenched states and therefore the overall yields of CS were found to be dependent on acid concentration.

  9. Hybrid system of semiconductor and photosynthetic protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younghye; Shin, Seon Ae; Lee, Jaehun; Yang, Ki Dong; Nam, Ki Tae

    2014-08-01

    Photosynthetic protein has the potential to be a new attractive material for solar energy absorption and conversion. The development of semiconductor/photosynthetic protein hybrids is an example of recent progress toward efficient, clean and nanostructured photoelectric systems. In the review, two biohybrid systems interacting through different communicating methods are addressed: (1) a photosynthetic protein immobilized semiconductor electrode operating via electron transfer and (2) a hybrid of semiconductor quantum dots and photosynthetic protein operating via energy transfer. The proper selection of materials and functional and structural modification of the components and optimal conjugation between them are the main issues discussed in the review. In conclusion, we propose the direction of future biohybrid systems for solar energy conversion systems, optical biosensors and photoelectric devices.

  10. Hybrid system of semiconductor and photosynthetic protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younghye; Shin, Seon Ae; Lee, Jaehun; Yang, Ki Dong; Nam, Ki Tae

    2014-08-29

    Photosynthetic protein has the potential to be a new attractive material for solar energy absorption and conversion. The development of semiconductor/photosynthetic protein hybrids is an example of recent progress toward efficient, clean and nanostructured photoelectric systems. In the review, two biohybrid systems interacting through different communicating methods are addressed: (1) a photosynthetic protein immobilized semiconductor electrode operating via electron transfer and (2) a hybrid of semiconductor quantum dots and photosynthetic protein operating via energy transfer. The proper selection of materials and functional and structural modification of the components and optimal conjugation between them are the main issues discussed in the review. In conclusion, we propose the direction of future biohybrid systems for solar energy conversion systems, optical biosensors and photoelectric devices.

  11. Near infrared light-driven water oxidation in a molecule-based artificial photosynthetic device using an upconversion nano-photosensitizer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaomin; Chen, Hung-Cheng; Kong, Xianggui; Zhang, Youlin; Tu, Langping; Chang, Yulei; Wu, Fei; Wang, Tongtong; Reek, Joost N H; Brouwer, Albert M; Zhang, Hong

    2015-08-21

    We provide the first demonstration of a near infrared light driven water oxidation reaction in a molecule-based artificial photosynthetic device using an upconversion nano-photosensitizer. One very attractive advantage of this system is that using NIR light irradiation does not cause significant photodamage, a serious problem in molecular based artificial photosynthesis under visible light irradiation.

  12. Pigment oligomers as natural and artificial photosynthetic antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    Green photosynthetic bacteria contain antenna complexes known as chlorosomes. These complexes are appressed to the cytoplasmic side of the inner cell membrane and function to absorb light and transfer the energy to the photochemical reaction center, where photochemical energy storage takes place. Chlorosomes differ from all other known photosynthetic antenna complexes in that the geometrical arrangement of pigments is determined primarily by pigment-pigment interactions instead of pigment-protein interactions. The bacteriochlorophyll c, d or e pigments found in chlorosomes form large oligomers with characteristic spectral properties significantly perturbed from those exhibited by monomeric pigments. Because of their close spatial interaction, the pigments are thought to be strongly coupled electronically, and many of the optical properties result from exciton interactions. This presentation will summarize existing knowledge on the chemical composition and properties of chlorosomes, the evidence for the oligomeric nature of chlorosome pigment organization and proposed structures for the oligomers, and the kinetics and mechanisms of energy transfer in chlorosomes.

  13. Systemic regulation of photosynthetic function in field-grown sorghum.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Liu, Yujun; Shi, Lei; Jiang, Chuangdao

    2015-09-01

    The photosynthetic characteristics of developing leaves of plants grown under artificial conditions are, to some extent, regulated systemically by mature leaves; however, whether systemic regulation of photosynthesis occurs in field-grown crops is unclear. To explore this question, we investigated the effects of planting density on growth characteristics, gas exchange, leaf nitrogen concentration and chlorophyll a fluorescence in field-grown sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.). Our results showed that close planting resulted in a marked decline in light intensity in lower canopy. Sorghum plants grown at a high planting density had lower net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (Gs), and transpiration rate (E) than plants grown at a low planting density. Moreover, in the absence of mineral deficiency, close planting induced a slight increase in leaf nitrogen concentration. The decreased photosynthesis in leaves of the lower canopy at high planting density was caused mainly by the low light. However, newly developed leaves exposed to high light in the upper canopy of plants grown at high planting density also exhibited a distinct decline in photosynthesis relative to plants grown at low planting density. Based on these results, the photosynthetic function of the newly developed leaves in the upper canopy was not determined fully by their own high light environment. Accordingly, we suggest that the photosynthetic function of newly developed leaves in the upper canopy of field-grown sorghum plants is regulated systemically by the lower canopy leaves. The differences in systemic regulation of photosynthesis were also discussed between field conditions and artificial conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Bimodal intramolecular excitation energy transfer in a multichromophore photosynthetic model system: hybrid fusion proteins comprising natural phycobilin- and artificial chlorophyll-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiao-Li; Tang, Kun; Zhou, Nan; Zhou, Ming; Hou, Harvey J M; Scheer, Hugo; Zhao, Kai-Hong; Noy, Dror

    2013-09-11

    The phycobilisomes of cyanobacteria and red-algae are highly efficient peripheral light-harvesting complexes that capture and transfer light energy in a cascade of excitation energy transfer steps through multiple phycobilin chromophores to the chlorophylls of core photosystems. In this work, we focus on the last step of this process by constructing simple functional analogs of natural phycobilisome-photosystem complexes that are based on bichromophoric protein complexes comprising a phycobilin- and a chlorophyll- or porphyrin-binding domain. The former is based on ApcE(1-240), the N-terminal chromophore-binding domain of the phycobilisome's L(CM) core-membrane linker, and the latter on HP7, a de novo designed four-helix bundle protein that was originally planned as a high-affinity heme-binding protein, analogous to b-type cytochromes. We fused a modified HP7 protein sequence to ApcEΔ, a water-soluble fragment of ApcE(1-240) obtained by excising a putative hydrophobic loop sequence of residues 77-153. HP7 was fused either to the N- or the C-terminus of ApcEΔ or inserted between residues 76 and 78, thereby replacing the native hydrophobic loop domain. We describe the assembly, spectral characteristics, and intramolecular excitation energy transfer of two unique systems: in the first, the short-wavelength absorbing zinc-mesoporphyrin is bound to the HP7 domain and serves as an excitation-energy donor to the long-wavelength absorbing phycocyanobilin bound to the ApcE domain; in the second, the short-wavelength absorbing phycoerythrobilin is bound to the ApcE domain and serves as an excitation energy donor to the long-wavelength absorbing zinc-bacteriochlorophyllide bound to the HP7 domain. All the systems that were constructed and tested exhibited significant intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer with yields ranging from 21% to 50%. This confirms that our modular, covalent approach for studying EET between the cyclic and open chain tetrapyrroles is

  15. Photosynthetic system in Blastochloris viridis revisited.

    PubMed

    Konorty, Marina; Brumfeld, Vlad; Vermeglio, Andre; Kahana, Nava; Medalia, Ohad; Minsky, Abraham

    2009-06-09

    The bacterium Blastochloris viridis carries one of the simplest photosynthetic systems, which includes a single light-harvesting complex that surrounds the reaction center, membrane soluble quinones, and a soluble periplasmic protein cytochrome c(2) that shuttle between the reaction center and the bc(1) complex and act as electron carriers, as well as the ATP synthase. The close arrangement of the photosynthetic membranes in Bl. viridis, along with the extremely tight arrangement of the photosystems within these membranes, raises a fundamental question about the diffusion of the electron carriers. To address this issue, we analyzed the structure and response of the Bl. viridis photosynthetic system to various light conditions, by using a combination of electron microscopy, whole-cell cryotomography, and spectroscopic methods. We demonstrate that in response to high light intensities, the ratio of both cytochrome c(2) and bc(1) complexes to the reaction centers is increased. The shorter membrane stacks, along with the notion that the bc(1) complex is located at the highly curved edges of these stacks, result in a smaller average distance between the reaction centers and the bc(1) complexes, leading to shorter pathways of cytochrome c(2) between the two complexes. Under anaerobic conditions, the slow diffusion rate is further mitigated by keeping most of the quinone pool reduced, resulting in a concentration gradient of quinols that allows for a constant supply of theses electron carriers to the bc(1) complex.

  16. Artificial neural network model for photosynthetic pigments identification using multi wavelength chromatographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prilianti, K. R.; Hariyanto, S.; Natali, F. D. D.; Indriatmoko, Adhiwibawa, M. A. S.; Limantara, L.; Brotosudarmo, T. H. P.

    2016-04-01

    The development of rapid and automatic pigment characterization method become an important issue due to the fact that there are only less than 1% of plant pigments in the earth have been explored. In this research, a mathematical model based on artificial intelligence approach was developed to simplify and accelerate pigment characterization process from HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography) procedure. HPLC is a widely used technique to separate and identify pigments in a mixture. Input of the model is chromatographic data from HPLC device and output of the model is a list of pigments which is the spectrum pattern is discovered in it. This model provides two dimensional (retention time and wavelength) fingerprints for pigment characterization which is proven to be more accurate than one dimensional fingerprint (fixed wavelength). Moreover, by mimicking interconnection of the neuron in the nervous systems of the human brain, the model have learning ability that could be replacing expert judgement on evaluating spectrum pattern. In the preprocessing step, principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the huge dimension of the chromatographic data. The aim of this step is to simplify the model and accelerate the identification process. Six photosynthetic pigments i.e. zeaxantin, pheophytin a, α-carotene, β-carotene, lycopene and lutein could be well identified by the model with accuracy up to 85.33% and processing time less than 1 second.

  17. Novel conducting polymer-heteropoly acid hybrid material for artificial photosynthetic membranes.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Michael B; Freund, Michael S

    2011-04-01

    Artificial photosynthetic (AP) approaches to convert and store solar energy will require membranes capable of conducting both ions and electrons while remaining relatively transparent and chemically stable. A new approach is applied herein involving previously described in situ chemical polymerization of electronically conducting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) in the presence of proton conducting heteropoly acid (HPA) phosphomolybdic acid (PMA). The electrochemical behaviour of the PEDOT/PMA hybrid material was investigated and it was found that the conducting polymer (CP) is susceptible to irreversible oxidative processes at potentials where water is oxidized. This will be problematic in AP devices should the process occur in very close proximity to a conducting polymer-based membrane. It was found that PEDOT grants the system good electrical performance in terms of conductivity and stability over a large pH window; however, the presence of PMA was not found to provide sufficient proton conductivity. This was addressed in an additional study by tuning the ionic (and in turn, electronic) conductivity in creating composites with the proton-permselective polymer Nafion. It was found that a material of this nature with near-equal conductivity for optimal chemical conversion efficiency will consist of roughly three parts Nafion and one part PEDOT/PMA.

  18. PS2013 Satellite Workshop on Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Niederman, Robert A.; Blankenship, Robert E.; Frank, Harry A.

    2015-02-07

    These funds were used for partial support of the PS2013 Satellite Workshop on Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems, that was held on 8-11 August, 2013, at Washington University, St. Louis, MO. This conference, held in conjunction with the 16th International Congress on Photosynthesis/St. Louis, continued a long tradition of light-harvesting satellite conferences that have been held prior to the previous six international photosynthesis congresses. In this Workshop, the basis was explored for the current interest in replacing fossil fuels with energy sources derived form direct solar radiation, coupled with light-driven electron transport in natural photosynthetic systems and how they offer a valuable blueprint for conversion of sunlight to useful energy forms. This was accomplished through sessions on the initial light-harvesting events in the biological conversion of solar energy to chemically stored energy forms, and how these natural photosynthetic processes serve as a guide to the development of robust bio-hybrid and artificial systems for solar energy conversion into both electricity or chemical fuels. Organized similar to a Gordon Research Conference, a lively, informal and collegial setting was established, highlighting the exchange of exciting new data and unpublished results from ongoing studies. A significant amount of time was set aside for open discussion and interactive poster sessions, with a special session devoted to oral presentations by talented students and postdoctoral fellows judged to have the best posters. This area of research has seen exceptionally rapid progress in recent years, with the availability of a number of antenna protein structures at atomic resolution, elucidation of the molecular surface architecture of native photosynthetic membranes by atomic force microscopy and the maturing of ultrafast spectroscopic and molecular biological techniques for the investigation and manipulation of photosynthetic systems. The conferees

  19. [Effects of low-light stress on photosynthetic characteristics of Paris polyphylla var. chinensis in artificial domestication cultivation].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shun-lin; Tian, Meng-liang; Liu, Jin-liang; Zhao, Ting-ting; Zhang, Zhong

    2014-09-01

    To decide on the optimum artificial domestication cultivation light environment for Paris polyphylla var. chinensis through investigating the effect of light intensity on leaf's gas exchange parameters, photosynthetic parameters, light saturation point and compensation point of Paris polyphylla var. chinensis. Different low-light stress gradients' effect on the growth of Paris polyphylla var. chinensis was compared with no low-light stress treatment through calculating leaf's gas exchange parameters, photosynthetic parameters, light saturation point and compensation point, and then all these parameters were statistically analyzed. Light intensity had significant influence on the photosynthetic characteristics of Paris polyphylla var. chinensis. With the strengthening of the low-light stress, chlorophyll content, gas exchange parameters, photosynthetic parameters P., AQY and light saturation point all gradually increased at first, and then decreased. However, both photosynthetic parameters Rd and light compensation point firstly decreased and then rose again. These results showed that too strong or too weak light intensity affected the optimization of photosynthetic parameters of Paris polyphylla var. chinensis. The optimal illuminance for each parameter was not completely same, but they could all reach a relative ideal state when the shading ranges between 40% and 60%. However, photosynthetic parameters deteriorated rapidly when the shading surpass 80%. For artificially cultivating Paris polyphylla var. chinensis in Baoxing,Sichuan or the similar ecological region, shading 40%-60% is the optimal light environment, which can enhance the photosynthesis of Paris polyphylla var. chinensis and promote the accumulation of photosynthetic products.

  20. Photosynthetic Machineries in Nano-Systems

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, László; Magyar, Melinda; Szabó, Tibor; Hajdu, Kata; Giotta, Livia; Dorogi, Márta; Milano, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centres are membrane-spanning proteins, found in several classes of autotroph organisms, where a photoinduced charge separation and stabilization takes place with a quantum efficiency close to unity. The protein remains stable and fully functional also when extracted and purified in detergents thereby biotechnological applications are possible, for example, assembling it in nano-structures or in optoelectronic systems. Several types of bionanocomposite materials have been assembled by using reaction centres and different carrier matrices for different purposes in the field of light energy conversion (e.g., photovoltaics) or biosensing (e.g., for specific detection of pesticides). In this review we will summarize the current status of knowledge, the kinds of applications available and the difficulties to be overcome in the different applications. We will also show possible research directions for the close future in this specific field. PMID:24678673

  1. Nitrogen and photosynthetic function of hermatypic corals. Oxygen exchange of Stylophora pistillata coral under artificial feeding.

    PubMed

    Leletkin, V A

    2005-01-01

    The change of Stylophora pistillata coral photosynthetic function (oxygen exchange and biomass of symbionts) under starvation and food enrichment was studied to understand the role of heterotrophy in nitrogen supplements of zooxanthellae. The starvation caused the decrease of frequency of zooxanthellae cells division in 7-10 times. The number of degraded algae cells increased in same proportion and, as a result, the density of zooxanthellae in corals decreased about two times during one-two weeks. Under starvation corals kept their photosynthetic capacity at the level of corals in situ by means of enhancing the zooxanthellae gross photosynthesis. The respiration rate of coral had tendency to increase and the dry mass of polyp tissue to decrease. Under artificial feeding which was following starvation the zooxanthellae density increased in 1.5-2 times, and particular food caused more intensive accumulation of zooxanthellae comparing to dissolved inorganic ammonium. The feeding regime did not affect dry mass of polyp tissue and chlorophyll content as well as respiration and gross productivity of the corals. The conclusion about high effectiveness of particular feeding for supplying symbiotic algae with nitrogen was made and trophic status of zooxanthellae in hospite was determined as unlimited by nitrogen.

  2. Phonon-assisted excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Wang, Xin; Fang, Ai-Ping; Li, Hong-Rong

    2016-09-01

    The phonon-assisted process of energy transfer aiming at exploring the newly emerging frontier between biology and physics is an issue of central interest. This article shows the important role of the intramolecular vibrational modes for excitation energy transfer in the photosynthetic systems. Based on a dimer system consisting of a donor and an acceptor modeled by two two-level systems, in which one of them is coupled to a high-energy vibrational mode, we derive an effective Hamiltonian describing the vibration-assisted coherent energy transfer process in the polaron frame. The effective Hamiltonian reveals in the case that the vibrational mode dynamically matches the energy detuning between the donor and the acceptor, the original detuned energy transfer becomes resonant energy transfer. In addition, the population dynamics and coherence dynamics of the dimer system with and without vibration-assistance are investigated numerically. It is found that, the energy transfer efficiency and the transfer time depend heavily on the interaction strength of the donor and the high-energy vibrational mode, as well as the vibrational frequency. The numerical results also indicate that the initial state and dissipation rate of the vibrational mode have little influence on the dynamics of the dimer system. Results obtained in this article are not only helpful to understand the natural photosynthesis, but also offer an optimal design principle for artificial photosynthesis. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174233).

  3. Modeling light-driven proton pumps in artificial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Nori, Franco

    2009-07-21

    We study a model of a light-induced proton pump in artificial reaction centers. The model contains a molecular triad with four electron states (i.e., one donor state, two photosensitive group states, and one acceptor state) as well as a molecular shuttle having one electron and one proton-binding sites. The shuttle diffuses between the sides of the membrane and translocates protons energetically uphill: from the negative side to the positive side of the membrane, harnessing for this purpose the energy of the electron-charge separation produced by light. Using the methods of quantum transport theory we calculate the range of light intensity and transmembrane potentials that maximize both the light-induced proton current and the energy transduction efficiency. We also study the effect of temperature on proton pumping. The light-induced proton pump in our model gives a quantum yield of proton translocation of about 55%. Thus, our results explain previous experiments on these artificial photosynthetic reaction centers.

  4. Artificial Photosynthesis: Hybrid Systems.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yan; Hollmann, Frank

    Oxidoreductases are promising catalysts for organic synthesis. To sustain their catalytic cycles they require efficient supply with redox equivalents. Today classical biomimetic approaches utilizing natural electron supply chains prevail but artificial regeneration approaches bear the promise of simpler and more robust reaction schemes. Utilizing visible light can accelerate such artificial electron transport chains and even enable thermodynamically unfeasible reactions such as the use of water as reductant.This contribution critically summarizes the current state of the art in photoredoxbiocatalysis (i.e. light-driven biocatalytic oxidation and reduction reactions).

  5. Electrochemical and optical studies of model photosynthetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-15

    The objective of this research is to obtain a better understanding of the relationship between the structural organization of photosynthetic pigments and their spectroscopic and electrochemical properties. Defined model systems were studied first. These included the least ordered (solutions) through the most highly ordered (Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers and self-assembled monolayers) systems containing BChl, BPheo, and UQ. Molecules other than the photosynthetic pigments and quinones were also examined, including chromophores (i.e. surface active cyanine dyes and phtahlocyanines) an redox active compounds (methyl viologen (MV) and surfactant ferrocenes), in order to develop the techniques needed to study the photosynthetic components. Because the chlorophylls are photosensitive and labile, it was easier first to develop procedures using stable species. Three different techniques were used to characterize these model systems. These included electrochemical techniques for determining the standard oxidation and reduction potentials of the photosynthetic components as well as methods for determining the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants for BChl and BPheo at metal electrodes (Pt and Au). Resonance Raman (RR) and surface enhanced resonance Raman (SERR) spectroscopy were used to determine the spectra of the photosynthetic pigments and model compounds. SERRS was also used to study several types of photosynthetic preparations.

  6. Photosynthetic responses of field-grown Pinus radiata trees to artificial and aphid-induced defoliation.

    PubMed

    Eyles, Alieta; Smith, David; Pinkard, Elizabeth A; Smith, Ian; Corkrey, Ross; Elms, Stephen; Beadle, Chris; Mohammed, Caroline

    2011-06-01

    The phloem-feeding aphid Essigella californica represents a potential threat to the productivity of Pinus radiata plantations in south-eastern Australia. Five- and nine-year-old field trials were used to characterize the effects of artificial and natural aphid-induced (E. californica) defoliation, respectively, on shoot photosynthesis and growth. Photosynthetic capacity (A(max)) was significantly greater following a 25% (D25) (13.8 µmol m(-2) s(-1)) and a 50% (D50) (15.9 µmol m(-2) s(-1)) single-event upper-crown artificial defoliation, 3 weeks after defoliation than in undefoliated control trees (12.9 µmol m(-2) s(-1)). This response was consistently observed for up to 11 weeks after the defoliation event; by Week 16, there was no difference in A(max) between control and defoliated trees. In the D50 treatment, this increased A(max) was not sufficient to fully compensate for the foliage loss as evidenced by the reduced diameter increment (by 15%) in defoliated trees 36 weeks after defoliation. In contrast, diameter increment of trees in the D25 treatment was unaffected by defoliation. The A(max) of trees experiencing upper-crown defoliation by natural and repeated E. californica infestations varied, depending on host genotype. Despite clear differences in defoliation levels between resistant and susceptible genotypes (17 vs. 35% of tree crown defoliated, respectively), growth of susceptible genotypes was not significantly different from that of resistant genotypes. The observed increases in A(max) in the lower crown of the canopy following attack suggested that susceptible genotypes were able to partly compensate for the loss of foliage by compensatory photosynthesis. The capacity of P. radiata to regulate photosynthesis in response to natural aphid-induced defoliation provides evidence that the impact of E. californica attack on stem growth will be less than expected, at least for up to 35% defoliation.

  7. Triplet–triplet energy transfer in artificial and natural photosynthetic antennas

    DOE PAGES

    Ho, Junming; Kish, Elizabeth; Méndez-Hernandez, Dalvin D.; ...

    2017-06-26

    In photosynthetic organisms, protection against photo-oxidative stress due to singlet oxygen is provided by carotenoid molecules, which quench chlorophyll triplet species before they can sensitize singlet oxygen formation. In anoxygenic photosynthetic organisms, in which exposure to oxygen is low, chlorophyll to carotenoid triplet-triplet energy transfer (T-TET) is slow, in the tens of nanoseconds range, while it is ultrafast in the oxygen-rich chloroplasts of oxygen evolving photosynthetic organisms. In order to better understand the structural features and resulting electronic coupling that leads to T-TET dynamics adapted to ambient oxygen activity, we have carried out experimental and theoretical studies of two isomericmore » carotenoporphyrin molecular dyads having different conformations and therefore different interchromophore electronic interactions. This pair of dyads reproduces the characteristics of fast and slow T-TET including a resonance Raman based spectroscopic marker of strong electronic coupling and fast T-TET that has been observed in photosynthesis. As identified by DFT calculations, the spectroscopic marker associated with fast T-TET is due primarily to a geometrical perturbation of the carotenoid backbone in the triplet state induced by the interchromophore interaction. This is also the case for the natural systems, as demonstrated by the hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations of light harvesting proteins from oxygenic (LHCII) and anoxygenic organisms (LH2). In conclusion, both DFT and EPR analysis further indicates that upon T-TET, the triplet wave function is localized on the carotenoid in both dyads.« less

  8. Light induced transmembrane proton gradient in artificial lipid vesicles reconstituted with photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Milano, Francesco; Trotta, Massimo; Dorogi, Márta; Fischer, Béla; Giotta, Livia; Agostiano, Angela; Maróti, Péter; Kálmán, László; Nagy, László

    2012-06-01

    Photosynthetic reaction center (RC) is the minimal nanoscopic photoconverter in the photosynthetic membrane that catalyzes the conversion of solar light to energy readily usable for the metabolism of the living organisms. After electronic excitation the energy of light is converted into chemical potential by the generation of a charge separated state accompanied by intraprotein and ultimately transmembrane proton movements. We designed a system which fulfills the minimum structural and functional requirements to investigate the physico/chemical conditions of the processes: RCs were reconstituted in closed lipid vesicles made of selected lipids entrapping a pH sensitive indicator, and electron donors (cytochrome c₂ and K₄[Fe(CN)₆]) and acceptors (decylubiquinone) were added to sustain the photocycle. Thanks to the low proton permeability of our preparations, we could show the formation of a transmembrane proton gradient under illumination and low buffering conditions directly by measuring proton-related signals simultaneously inside and outside the vesicles. The effect of selected ionophores such as gramicidin, nigericin and valinomycin was used to gain more information on the transmembrane proton gradient driven by the RC photochemistry.

  9. Cyanobacteria as photosynthetic biocatalysts: a systems biology perspective.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsson, Steinn; Nogales, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The increasing need to replace oil-based products and to address global climate change concerns has triggered considerable interest in photosynthetic microorganisms. Cyanobacteria, in particular, have great potential as biocatalysts for fuels and fine-chemicals. During the last few years the biotechnological applications of cyanobacteria have experienced an unprecedented increase and the use of these photosynthetic organisms for chemical production is becoming a tangible reality. However, the field is still immature and many concerns about the economic feasibility of the biotechnological potential of cyanobacteria remain. In this review we describe recent successes in biofuel and fine-chemical production using cyanobacteria. We discuss the role of the photosynthetic metabolism and highlight the need for systems-level metabolic optimization in order to achieve the true potential of cyanobacterial biocatalysts.

  10. Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawlor, Joseph

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is the field of scientific inquiry concerned with designing machine systems that can simulate human mental processes. The field draws upon theoretical constructs from a wide variety of disciplines, including mathematics, psychology, linguistics, neurophysiology, computer science, and electronic engineering. Some of the…

  11. Wet Artificial Life: The Construction of Artificial Living Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellermann, Harold

    The creation of artificial cell-like entities - chemical systems that are able to self-replicate and evolve - requires the integration of containers, metabolism, and information. In this chapter, we present possible candidates for these subsystems and the experimental achievements made toward their replication. The discussion focuses on several suggested designs to create artificial cells from nonliving material that are currently being pursued both experimentally and theoretically in several laboratories around the world. One particular approach toward wet artificial life is presented in detail. Finally, the evolutionary advantage of cellular aggregates over naked replicator systems and the evolutionary potential of the various approaches are discussed. The enormous progress toward man-made artificial cells nourishes the hope that wet artificial life might be achieved within the next several years.

  12. Biological optimization systems for enhancing photosynthetic efficiency and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Ryan W.; Chinnasamy, Senthil; Das, Keshav C.; de Mattos, Erico Rolim

    2012-11-06

    Biological optimization systems for enhancing photosynthetic efficiency and methods of use. Specifically, methods for enhancing photosynthetic efficiency including applying pulsed light to a photosynthetic organism, using a chlorophyll fluorescence feedback control system to determine one or more photosynthetic efficiency parameters, and adjusting one or more of the photosynthetic efficiency parameters to drive the photosynthesis by the delivery of an amount of light to optimize light absorption of the photosynthetic organism while providing enough dark time between light pulses to prevent oversaturation of the chlorophyll reaction centers are disclosed.

  13. Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Photosynthetic Systems.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Toru; Chen, Wei Jia; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S

    2017-01-25

    Photosynthesis begins when a network of pigment-protein complexes captures solar energy and transports it to the reaction center, where charge separation occurs. When necessary (under low light conditions), photosynthetic organisms perform this energy transport and charge separation with near unity quantum efficiency. Remarkably, this high efficiency is maintained under physiological conditions, which include thermal fluctuations of the pigment-protein complexes and changing local environments. These conditions introduce multiple types of heterogeneity in the pigment-protein complexes, including structural heterogeneity, energetic heterogeneity, and functional heterogeneity. Understanding how photosynthetic light-harvesting functions in the face of these fluctuations requires understanding this heterogeneity, which, in turn, requires characterization of individual pigment-protein complexes. Single-molecule spectroscopy has the power to probe individual complexes. In this review, we present an overview of the common techniques for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy applied to photosynthetic systems and describe selected experiments on these systems. We discuss how these experiments provide a new understanding of the impact of heterogeneity on light harvesting and thus how these systems are optimized to capture sunlight under physiological conditions.

  14. Automated systems to monitor space radiation effect on photosynthetic organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, D.; di Costa, F.; Faraloni, C.; Fasolo, F.; Pace, E.; Perosino, M.; Torzillo, G.; Touloupakis, E.; Zanini, A.; Giardi, M. T.

    We developed automated biodevices to obtain, automatically, measures about the space radiation effect on living photosynthetic organisms, which can be used as biomass and oxygen-producing system on shuttles or ISS. Vitality measurements were performed by optical devices (fluorimeters) measuring fluorescence emission. Fluorescence methodology is a well known applied technique for studying photosynthetic activity, and in particular the oxygen-evolving process of photosynthetic organisms. Different strains of unicellular green algae are properly immobilized on agar growth medium and kept under survial light. The biodevices are characterised by the sensibility and selectivity of the biological component response, together with easy use, versatility, miniature size and low cost. We performed experiments in some facilities, in order to understand separately the effect of radiation of different LET, on the biochemical activity (gamma rays at Joint Research Centre -Varese, Italy; fast neutrons at CERF -- SPS beam at CERN -Geneva, Switzerland). The exposure to different radiation beams of the automatic devices, allowed us to test them under stress condition. In one year, these instrument are expected to be sent to space, inside a spacecraft, in order to study the effect of ionising cosmic radiation during an ESA flight.

  15. Artificial kinesthetic systems for telerehabilitation.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, D; Lorussi, F; Scilingo, E P; Carpi, F; Tognetti, A; Tesconi, M

    2004-01-01

    Artificial sensory motor systems are now under development in a truly wearable form using an innovative technology based on electroactive polymers. The integration of electroactive polymeric materials into wearable garments endorses them with strain sensing and mechanical actuation properties. The methodology underlying the design of haptic garments has necessarily to rely on knowledge of biological perceptual and motor processes which is, however, scattered and fragmented. Notwithstanding, the combined use of new polymeric electroactive materials in the form of fibers and fabrics with emerging concepts of biomimetic nature in sensor data analysis, pseudomuscular actuator control and biomechanical design may not only provide new avenues toward the realization of truly wearable kinesthetic and haptic interfaces, but also clues and instruments to better comprehend human manipulative and gestual functions. In this talk the conception, early stage implementation and preliminary testing of a fabric-based wearable interface endowed with spatially redundant strain sensing and distributed actuation are illustrated with reference to a wearable upper limb artificial kinesthesia system, intended to be used in telerehabilitation of post stroke patient.

  16. Mimicking photosynthetic solar energy transduction.

    PubMed

    Gust, D; Moore, T A; Moore, A L

    2001-01-01

    Increased understanding of photosynthetic energy conversion and advances in chemical synthesis and instrumentation have made it possible to create artificial nanoscale devices and semibiological hybrids that carry out many of the functions of the natural process. Artificial light-harvesting antennas can be synthesized and linked to artificial reaction centers that convert excitation energy to chemical potential in the form of long-lived charge separation. Artificial reaction centers can form the basis for molecular-level optoelectronic devices. In addition, they may be incorporated into the lipid bilayer membranes of artificial vesicles, where they function as components of light-driven proton pumps that generate transmembrane proton motive force. The proton gradient may be used to synthesize adenosine triphosphate via an ATP synthase enzyme. The overall energy transduction process in the liposomal system mimics the solar energy conversion system of a photosynthetic bacterium. The results of this research illustrate the advantages of designing functional nanoscale devices based on biological paradigms.

  17. Bio-Inspired Assembly of Artificial Photosynthetic Antenna Complexes for Development of Nanobiodevices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-24

    biology-based photonics or their synthetic organic photonics could form clean and inexpensive future alternatives for productions of nanosensors and...repeating units consisting of two apoproteins and one or two carotenoids and three BChls while the recent crystal structure of the LH1-RC core...realize various photosynthetic functions using cofactors (BChl a and carotenoid ) assembled into the apoproteins (LH1 and LH2). The light-harvesting

  18. Hourly photosynthetically active radiation estimation in Midwestern United States from artificial neural networks and conventional regressions models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaolei; Guo, Xulin

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between hourly photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and the global solar radiation ( R s ) was analyzed from data gathered over 3 years at Bondville, IL, and Sioux Falls, SD, Midwestern USA. These data were used to determine temporal variability of the PAR fraction and its dependence on different sky conditions, which were defined by the clearness index. Meanwhile, models based on artificial neural networks (ANNs) were established for predicting hourly PAR. The performance of the proposed models was compared with four existing conventional regression models in terms of the normalized root mean square error (NRMSE), the coefficient of determination ( r 2), the mean percentage error (MPE), and the relative standard error (RSE). From the overall analysis, it shows that the ANN model can predict PAR accurately, especially for overcast sky and clear sky conditions. Meanwhile, the parameters related to water vapor do not improve the prediction result significantly.

  19. Hourly photosynthetically active radiation estimation in Midwestern United States from artificial neural networks and conventional regressions models.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaolei; Guo, Xulin

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between hourly photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and the global solar radiation (R s ) was analyzed from data gathered over 3 years at Bondville, IL, and Sioux Falls, SD, Midwestern USA. These data were used to determine temporal variability of the PAR fraction and its dependence on different sky conditions, which were defined by the clearness index. Meanwhile, models based on artificial neural networks (ANNs) were established for predicting hourly PAR. The performance of the proposed models was compared with four existing conventional regression models in terms of the normalized root mean square error (NRMSE), the coefficient of determination (r (2)), the mean percentage error (MPE), and the relative standard error (RSE). From the overall analysis, it shows that the ANN model can predict PAR accurately, especially for overcast sky and clear sky conditions. Meanwhile, the parameters related to water vapor do not improve the prediction result significantly.

  20. Extension of Light-Harvesting Ability of Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Complex 2 (LH2) through Ultrafast Energy Transfer from Covalently Attached Artificial Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Yusuke; Noji, Tomoyasu; Katayama, Tetsuro; Mizutani, Naoto; Komori, Daisuke; Nango, Mamoru; Miyasaka, Hiroshi; Itoh, Shigeru; Nagasawa, Yutaka; Dewa, Takehisa

    2015-10-14

    Introducing appropriate artificial components into natural biological systems could enrich the original functionality. To expand the available wavelength range of photosynthetic bacterial light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2 from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila 10050), artificial fluorescent dye (Alexa Fluor 647: A647) was covalently attached to N- and C-terminal Lys residues in LH2 α-polypeptides with a molar ratio of A647/LH2 ≃ 9/1. Fluorescence and transient absorption spectroscopies revealed that intracomplex energy transfer from A647 to intrinsic chromophores of LH2 (B850) occurs in a multiexponential manner, with time constants varying from 440 fs to 23 ps through direct and B800-mediated indirect pathways. Kinetic analyses suggested that B800 chromophores mediate faster energy transfer, and the mechanism was interpretable in terms of Förster theory. This study demonstrates that a simple attachment of external chromophores with a flexible linkage can enhance the light harvesting activity of LH2 without affecting inherent functions of energy transfer, and can achieve energy transfer in the subpicosecond range. Addition of external chromophores, thus, represents a useful methodology for construction of advanced hybrid light-harvesting systems that afford solar energy in the broad spectrum.

  1. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy: principles and application to photosynthetic systems.

    PubMed

    Berera, Rudi; van Grondelle, Rienk; Kennis, John T M

    2009-01-01

    The photophysical and photochemical reactions, after light absorption by a photosynthetic pigment-protein complex, are among the fastest events in biology, taking place on timescales ranging from tens of femtoseconds to a few nanoseconds. The advent of ultrafast laser systems that produce pulses with femtosecond duration opened up a new area of research and enabled investigation of these photophysical and photochemical reactions in real time. Here, we provide a basic description of the ultrafast transient absorption technique, the laser and wavelength-conversion equipment, the transient absorption setup, and the collection of transient absorption data. Recent applications of ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy on systems with increasing degree of complexity, from biomimetic light-harvesting systems to natural light-harvesting antennas, are presented. In particular, we will discuss, in this educational review, how a molecular understanding of the light-harvesting and photoprotective functions of carotenoids in photosynthesis is accomplished through the application of ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy.

  2. Synthesis and Photophysical Characterization of an Artificial Photosynthetic Reaction Center Exhibiting Acid-Responsive Regulation of Charge Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahk, Ian

    Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) is a photoprotective regulatory mechanism essential to the robustness of the photosynthetic apparatus of green plants. Energy flow within the low-light adapted reaction centers is dynamically optimized to match the continuously fluctuating light conditions found in nature. Activated by compartmentalized decreases in pH resulting from photosynthetic activity during periods of elevated photon flux, NPQ induces rapid thermal dissipation of excess excitation energy that would otherwise overwhelm the apparatus's ability to consume it. Consequently, the frequency of charge separation decreases and the formation of potentially deleterious, high-energy intermediates slows, thereby reducing the threat of photodamage by disallowing their accumulation. Herein is described the synthesis and photophysical analysis of a molecular triad that mimics the effects of NPQ on charge separation within the photosynthetic reaction centers. Steady-state absorption and emission, time-resolved fluorescence, and transient absorption spectroscopies were used to demonstrate reversible quenching of the first singlet excited state affecting the quantum yield of charge separation by approximately one order of magnitude. As in the natural system, the populations of unquenched and quenched states and, therefore, the overall yields of charge separation were found to be dependent upon acid concentration.

  3. Artificial Intelligence and Spacecraft Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugel-Whitehead, Norma R.

    1997-01-01

    This talk will present the work which has been done at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center involving the use of Artificial Intelligence to control the power system in a spacecraft. The presentation will include a brief history of power system automation, and some basic definitions of the types of artificial intelligence which have been investigated at MSFC for power system automation. A video tape of one of our autonomous power systems using co-operating expert systems, and advanced hardware will be presented.

  4. Artificial Intelligence and Spacecraft Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugel-Whitehead, Norma R.

    1997-01-01

    This talk will present the work which has been done at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center involving the use of Artificial Intelligence to control the power system in a spacecraft. The presentation will include a brief history of power system automation, and some basic definitions of the types of artificial intelligence which have been investigated at MSFC for power system automation. A video tape of one of our autonomous power systems using co-operating expert systems, and advanced hardware will be presented.

  5. Learning in Artificial Neural Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matheus, Christopher J.; Hohensee, William E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents an overview and analysis of learning in Artificial Neural Systems (ANS's). It begins with a general introduction to neural networks and connectionist approaches to information processing. The basis for learning in ANS's is then described, and compared with classical Machine learning. While similar in some ways, ANS learning deviates from tradition in its dependence on the modification of individual weights to bring about changes in a knowledge representation distributed across connections in a network. This unique form of learning is analyzed from two aspects: the selection of an appropriate network architecture for representing the problem, and the choice of a suitable learning rule capable of reproducing the desired function within the given network. The various network architectures are classified, and then identified with explicit restrictions on the types of functions they are capable of representing. The learning rules, i.e., algorithms that specify how the network weights are modified, are similarly taxonomized, and where possible, the limitations inherent to specific classes of rules are outlined.

  6. Bio-optical Characteristics and the Vertical Distribution of Photosynthetic Pigments and Photosynthesis in an Artificial Cyanobacterial Mat.

    PubMed

    Kühl; Fenchel

    2000-08-01

    Zonations of photosynthesis and photopigments in artificial cyanobacterial mats were studied with (i) oxygen and pH microsensors, (ii) fiber-optic microprobes for field radiance, scalar irradiance, and PSII fluorescence, and (iii) a light microscope equipped with a spectrometer for spectral absorbance and fluorescence measurements. Our analysis revealed the presence of several distinct 1-2 mm thick cyanobacterial layers mixed with patches of anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. Strong attenuation of visible light confined the euphotic zone to the uppermost 3 mm of the mat, where oxygen levels of 3-4 times air saturation and a pH peak of up to pH 8.8 were observed under saturating irradiance (413 µmol photon m(-2) s(-1)). Oxygen penetration was 5 mm in light and decreased to 1 mm in darkness. Volumetric oxygen consumption in the photic and aphotic zones of illuminated mat was 5.5 and 2.9 times higher, respectively, than oxygen consumption in dark incubated mats. Scalar irradiance reached 100-150% of incident irradiance in the upper 0.5 mm of the mat due to intense scattering in the matrix of cells, exopolymers, and carbonate precipitates. In deeper mat layers scalar irradiance decreased nearly exponentially, and highest attenuation coefficients of 6-7 mm(-1) were found in cyanobacterial layers, where photosynthesis and photopigment fluorescence also peaked. Visible light was attenuated >100 times more strongly than near infrared light. Microscope spectrometry on thin sections of mats allowed detailed spectral absorbance and fluorescence measurements at defined positions relative to the mat surface. Besides strong spectral signals of cyanobacterial photopigments (Chl a and phycobiliproteins), the presence of both green and purple photosynthetic bacteria was evident from spectral signals of Bchl a and Bchl c. Microprofiles of photopigment absorbance correlated well with microdistributions of phototrophs determined in an accompanying study.

  7. Removal of triazine herbicides from freshwater systems using photosynthetic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    González-Barreiro, O; Rioboo, C; Herrero, C; Cid, A

    2006-11-01

    The uptake of the triazine herbicides, atrazine and terbutryn, was determined for two freshwater photosynthetic microorganisms, the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus. An extremely rapid uptake of both pesticides was recorded, although uptake rate was lower for the cyanobacterium, mainly for atrazine. Other parameters related to the herbicide bioconcentration capacity of these microorganisms were also studied. Growth rate, biomass, and cell viability in cultures containing herbicide were clearly affected by herbicide uptake. Herbicide toxicity and microalgae sensitivity were used to determine the effectiveness of the bioconcentration process and the stability of herbicide removal. C. vulgaris showed higher bioconcentration capability for these two triazine herbicides than S. elongatus, especially with regard to terbutryn. This study supports the usefulness of such microorganisms, as a bioremediation technique in freshwater systems polluted with triazine herbicides.

  8. An efficient quantum jump method for coherent energy transfer dynamics in photosynthetic systems under the influence of laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Qing; Fan, Yuan-Jia; Jin, Bih-Yaw; Cheng, Yuan-Chung

    2014-05-01

    We present a non-Markovian quantum jump (NMQJ) approach for simulating coherent energy transfer dynamics in molecular systems in the presence of laser fields. By combining a coherent modified Redfield theory (CMRT) and a NMQJ method, this new approach inherits the broad-range validity from the CMRT and highly efficient propagation from the NMQJ. To implement NMQJ propagation of CMRT, we show that the CMRT master equation can be cast into a generalized Lindblad form. Moreover, we extend the NMQJ approach to treat time-dependent Hamiltonian, enabling the description of excitonic systems under coherent laser fields. As a benchmark of the validity of this new method, we show that the CMRT-NMQJ method accurately describes the energy transfer dynamics in a prototypical photosynthetic complex. Finally, we apply this new approach to simulate the quantum dynamics of a dimer system coherently excited to coupled single-excitation states under the influence of laser fields, which allows us to investigate the interplay between the photoexcitation process and ultrafast energy transfer dynamics in the system. We demonstrate that laser-field parameters significantly affect coherence dynamics of photoexcitations in excitonic systems, which indicates that the photoexcitation process must be explicitly considered in order to properly describe photon-induced dynamics in photosynthetic systems. This work should provide a valuable tool for efficient simulations of coherent control of energy flow in photosynthetic systems and artificial optoelectronic materials.

  9. Spectral modulation observed in artificial photosynthetic complexes by real-time vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Juan; Yuan, Wei; Xing, Xin; Miyatake, Tomohiro; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Leng, Yuxin

    2017-09-01

    By real-time vibrational spectroscopy using 6.8 fs pulses, real-time vibronic coupling in stair-like zinc chlorin aggregates was studied. Besides the observed fast excitonic relaxation, amplitudes of coherent molecular vibrations are found to be linearly dispersed from the resonant peak as a function of their own vibrational frequencies. In addition, the initial phases of the molecular vibrations exhibiting clear π phase jump have been observed. All these results indicate that coherent vibrations in the artificial chlorosome intermediate energy exchange between the laser fields around the resonant peak and those separated from it by photon energy equal to the vibrational frequencies.

  10. Engineering analysis of potential photosynthetic bacterial hydrogen-production systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlevich, A.; Karpuk, M. E.

    1982-06-01

    Photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) are capable of generating hydrogen from organics in effluents from food processing, pulp and paper, and chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Hydrogen evolution takes place under light in the absence of air. The rate of hydrogen production is expected to range between 300 to 600 scf of hydrogen per 1000 galloons of waste stream treated per hour. This hydrogen production system has been demonstrated at a bench-scale level and is ready for engineering development. A conceptual design for a PSB hydrogen production system is described. The system is expected to be sited adjacent to a waste stream source which will be pretreated by fermentation and pH adjustment, innoculated with bacteria, and then passed into the reactor. The reactor effluent can either be discharged into a rapid infiltration system, an irrigation ditch, and/or recycled back into the reactor. Several potential reactor designs have been developed, analyzed, and costed. A large covered pond appears to be the most economical design approach.

  11. [Current progress of the artificial accommodation system].

    PubMed

    Bretthauer, G; Gengenbach, U; Nagel, J A; Beck, C; Fliedner, J; Koker, L; Krug, M; Martin, T; Stachs, O; Guthoff, R F

    2014-12-01

    In case of presbyopia or cataract the "artificial accommodation system" represents one future possibility to durably restore the ability to accommodate. The work presented describes recent progress in the development of the artificial accommodation system. Major advances were achieved in the fields of the actuator system for the active optics, the pupil near reflex sensor, the communication system, the power supply system as well as in system integration. Beside the technical advances, first trials were performed to implant the artificial accommodation system into animals. These trials showed that the new lens shaped design and the C-shaped haptics are beneficial for implantation and secure fixation of the implant inside the capsular bag. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. 14 CFR 23.691 - Artificial stall barrier system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Artificial stall barrier system. 23.691... Construction Control Systems § 23.691 Artificial stall barrier system. If the function of an artificial stall... pitching motion. (d) Each system must be designed so that the artificial stall barrier can be quickly...

  13. 14 CFR 23.691 - Artificial stall barrier system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Artificial stall barrier system. 23.691... Construction Control Systems § 23.691 Artificial stall barrier system. If the function of an artificial stall... pitching motion. (d) Each system must be designed so that the artificial stall barrier can be quickly...

  14. 14 CFR 23.691 - Artificial stall barrier system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Artificial stall barrier system. 23.691... Construction Control Systems § 23.691 Artificial stall barrier system. If the function of an artificial stall... pitching motion. (d) Each system must be designed so that the artificial stall barrier can be quickly...

  15. 14 CFR 23.691 - Artificial stall barrier system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Artificial stall barrier system. 23.691... Construction Control Systems § 23.691 Artificial stall barrier system. If the function of an artificial stall... pitching motion. (d) Each system must be designed so that the artificial stall barrier can be quickly...

  16. 14 CFR 23.691 - Artificial stall barrier system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Artificial stall barrier system. 23.691... Construction Control Systems § 23.691 Artificial stall barrier system. If the function of an artificial stall... pitching motion. (d) Each system must be designed so that the artificial stall barrier can be quickly...

  17. Applications of artificial intelligence and expert systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 30 papers. Some of the titles are: operating systems for CD/ROM; the impact of optical storage technology on education; the future of expert systems in the financial services industry; the future of compact disk/DC-1 explosive ordinance disposal rendered safe information system; and will artificial intelligence improve computer based training (CBT) development process.

  18. Counseling, Artificial Intelligence, and Expert Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illovsky, Michael E.

    1994-01-01

    Considers the use of artificial intelligence and expert systems in counseling. Limitations are explored; candidates for counseling versus those for expert systems are discussed; programming considerations are reviewed; and techniques for dealing with rational, nonrational, and irrational thoughts and feelings are described. (Contains 46…

  19. Why don't plants have diabetes? Systems for scavenging reactive carbonyls in photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Shimakawa, Ginga; Suzuki, Mayumi; Yamamoto, Eriko; Saito, Ryota; Iwamoto, Tatsuya; Nishi, Akiko; Miyake, Chikahiro

    2014-04-01

    In the present paper, we review the toxicity of sugar- and lipid-derived RCs (reactive carbonyls) and the RC-scavenging systems observed in photosynthetic organisms. Similar to heterotrophs, photosynthetic organisms are exposed to the danger of RCs produced in sugar metabolism during both respiration and photosynthesis. RCs such as methylglyoxal and acrolein have toxic effects on the photosynthetic activity of higher plants and cyanobacteria. These toxic effects are assumed to occur uniquely in photosynthetic organisms, suggesting that RC-scavenging systems are essential for their survival. The aldo-keto reductase and the glyoxalase systems mainly scavenge sugar-derived RCs in higher plants and cyanobacteria. 2-Alkenal reductase and alkenal/alkenone reductase catalyse the reduction of lipid-derived RCs in higher plants. In cyanobacteria, medium-chain dehydrogenases/reductases are the main scavengers of lipid-derived RCs.

  20. An integrated multivariable artificial pancreas control system.

    PubMed

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Quinn, Lauretta T; Littlejohn, Elizabeth; Cinar, Ali

    2014-05-01

    The objective was to develop a closed-loop (CL) artificial pancreas (AP) control system that uses continuous measurements of glucose concentration and physiological variables, integrated with a hypoglycemia early alarm module to regulate glucose concentration and prevent hypoglycemia. Eleven open-loop (OL) and 9 CL experiments were performed. A multivariable adaptive artificial pancreas (MAAP) system was used for the first 6 CL experiments. An integrated multivariable adaptive artificial pancreas (IMAAP) system consisting of MAAP augmented with a hypoglycemia early alarm system was used during the last 3 CL experiments. Glucose values and physical activity information were measured and transferred to the controller every 10 minutes and insulin suggestions were entered to the pump manually. All experiments were designed to be close to real-life conditions. Severe hypoglycemic episodes were seen several times during the OL experiments. With the MAAP system, the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia was decreased significantly (P < .01). No hypoglycemia was seen with the IMAAP system. There was also a significant difference (P < .01) between OL and CL experiments with regard to percentage of glucose concentration (54% vs 58%) that remained within target range (70-180 mg/dl). Integration of an adaptive control and hypoglycemia early alarm system was able to keep glucose concentration values in target range in patients with type 1 diabetes. Postprandial hypoglycemia and exercise-induced hypoglycemia did not occur when this system was used. Physical activity information improved estimation of the blood glucose concentration and effectiveness of the control system.

  1. Artificial Neural Network Analysis System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Target detection, multi-target tracking and threat identification of ICBM and its warheads by sensor fusion and data fusion of sensors in a fuzzy neural network system based on the compound eye of a fly.

  2. Missileborne artificial vision system (MAVIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andes, David K.; Witham, James C.; Miles, Michael D.

    1994-03-01

    The Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake has developed a real time, hardware and software system designed to implement and evaluate biologically inspired retinal and cortical models. The hardware is based on the Adaptive Solutions Inc. massively parallel CNAPS system COHO boards. Each COHO board is a standard size 6U VME card featuring 256 fixed point, RISC processors running at 20 MHz in a SIMD configuration. Each COHO board has a Companion board built to support a real time VSB interface to an imaging seeker, a NTSC camera and to other COHO boards. The system is designed to have multiple SIMD machines each performing different Corticomorphic functions. The system level software has been developed which allows a high level description of Corticomorphic structures to be translated into the native microcode of the CNAPS chips. Corticomorphic structures are those neural structures with a form similar to that of the retina, the lateral geniculate nucleus or the visual cortex. This real time hardware system is designed to be shrunk into a volume compatible with air launched tactical missiles. Initial versions of the software and hardware have been completed and are in the early stages of integration with a missile seeker.

  3. Missileborne Artificial Vision System (MAVIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andes, David K.; Witham, James C.; Miles, Michael D.

    1994-01-01

    Several years ago when INTEL and China Lake designed the ETANN chip, analog VLSI appeared to be the only way to do high density neural computing. In the last five years, however, digital parallel processing chips capable of performing neural computation functions have evolved to the point of rough equality with analog chips in system level computational density. The Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, has developed a real time, hardware and software system designed to implement and evaluate biologically inspired retinal and cortical models. The hardware is based on the Adaptive Solutions Inc. massively parallel CNAPS system COHO boards. Each COHO board is a standard size 6U VME card featuring 256 fixed point, RISC processors running at 20 MHz in a SIMD configuration. Each COHO board has a companion board built to support a real time VSB interface to an imaging seeker, a NTSC camera, and to other COHO boards. The system is designed to have multiple SIMD machines each performing different corticomorphic functions. The system level software has been developed which allows a high level description of corticomorphic structures to be translated into the native microcode of the CNAPS chips. Corticomorphic structures are those neural structures with a form similar to that of the retina, the lateral geniculate nucleus, or the visual cortex. This real time hardware system is designed to be shrunk into a volume compatible with air launched tactical missiles. Initial versions of the software and hardware have been completed and are in the early stages of integration with a missile seeker.

  4. A completely implantable total artificial heart system.

    PubMed

    Snyder, A; Rosenberg, G; Weiss, W; Pierce, W; Pae, W; Marlotte, J; Nazarian, R; Ford, S

    1991-01-01

    The authors developed, built, and tested in vivo a completely implanted total artificial heart (TAH) system. The system used a reduced size version of a roller screw energy converter and mating sac blood pumps. The motor drive, pumps, and a compliance chamber were implanted intrathoracically. A canister containing controlling electronics and an emergency battery was implanted in the abdomen. The secondary coil of an inductive energy transmission and telemetry system was placed over the ribs. The system was implanted in three calves, that survived 0.5-13 days with the system. The system maintained safe left atrial pressures and adequate cardiac outputs during each animal's entire course.

  5. From Artificial Chemistries to Systems Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleta, Christoph

    Artificial Chemistries abstract from real-world chemistries by reducing them to systems of interacting and reacting molecules. They have been used to study phenomena in a wide array of fields like social and ecological modelling, evolution or chemical computing. Artificial Chemistries are inherently difficult to study and, thus, methods have been proposed to analyze their complexity. This chapter outlines how the concept of chemical organization and software dedicated at their analysis can help to ease this task. The chemical organizations of a reaction network correspond to sets of molecules that can coexist over long periods of (simulation-) time. Thus, they can be used to study the full dynamic behavior a system can exhibit without the need to simulate it in every detail. Due to this appealing property, Chemical Organization Theory has been used in the study of a wide array of systems ranging from Artificial Chemistries to real-world chemistries and biological systems. Especially the analysis of biological systems motivated an integration of the tools dedicated to the study of chemical organizations into an application framework from Systems Biology. The benefit of this integration is that tools from Systems Biology can be used without much effort along with the tools for the computation of chemical organizations and vice versa. Thus, software for the analysis of chemical organizations seamlessly integrates into a framework covering almost any aspect of network design and analysis.

  6. Architecture for an artificial immune system.

    PubMed

    Hofmeyr, S A; Forrest, S

    2000-01-01

    An artificial immune system (ARTIS) is described which incorporates many properties of natural immune systems, including diversity, distributed computation, error tolerance, dynamic learning and adaptation, and self-monitoring. ARTIS is a general framework for a distributed adaptive system and could, in principle, be applied to many domains. In this paper, ARTIS is applied to computer security in the form of a network intrusion detection system called LISYS. LISYS is described and shown to be effective at detecting intrusions, while maintaining low false positive rates. Finally, similarities and differences between ARTIS and Holland's classifier systems are discussed.

  7. Tailoring superradiance to design artificial quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Paolo; Keitel, Christoph H.; Evers, Jörg

    2016-03-01

    Cooperative phenomena arising due to the coupling of individual atoms via the radiation field are a cornerstone of modern quantum and optical physics. Recent experiments on x-ray quantum optics added a new twist to this line of research by exploiting superradiance in order to construct artificial quantum systems. However, so far, systematic approaches to deliberately design superradiance properties are lacking, impeding the desired implementation of more advanced quantum optical schemes. Here, we develop an analytical framework for the engineering of single-photon superradiance in extended media applicable across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, and show how it can be used to tailor the properties of an artificial quantum system. This “reverse engineering” of superradiance not only provides an avenue towards non-linear and quantum mechanical phenomena at x-ray energies, but also leads to a unified view on and a better understanding of superradiance across different physical systems.

  8. Tailoring superradiance to design artificial quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Longo, Paolo; Keitel, Christoph H; Evers, Jörg

    2016-03-24

    Cooperative phenomena arising due to the coupling of individual atoms via the radiation field are a cornerstone of modern quantum and optical physics. Recent experiments on x-ray quantum optics added a new twist to this line of research by exploiting superradiance in order to construct artificial quantum systems. However, so far, systematic approaches to deliberately design superradiance properties are lacking, impeding the desired implementation of more advanced quantum optical schemes. Here, we develop an analytical framework for the engineering of single-photon superradiance in extended media applicable across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, and show how it can be used to tailor the properties of an artificial quantum system. This "reverse engineering" of superradiance not only provides an avenue towards non-linear and quantum mechanical phenomena at x-ray energies, but also leads to a unified view on and a better understanding of superradiance across different physical systems.

  9. Quantum coherence controls the charge separation in a prototypical artificial light-harvesting system

    PubMed Central

    Andrea Rozzi, Carlo; Maria Falke, Sarah; Spallanzani, Nicola; Rubio, Angel; Molinari, Elisa; Brida, Daniele; Maiuri, Margherita; Cerullo, Giulio; Schramm, Heiko; Christoffers, Jens; Lienau, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The efficient conversion of light into electricity or chemical fuels is a fundamental challenge. In artificial photosynthetic and photovoltaic devices, this conversion is generally thought to happen on ultrafast, femto-to-picosecond timescales and to involve an incoherent electron transfer process. In some biological systems, however, there is growing evidence that the coherent motion of electronic wavepackets is an essential primary step, raising questions about the role of quantum coherence in artificial devices. Here we investigate the primary charge-transfer process in a supramolecular triad, a prototypical artificial reaction centre. Combining high time-resolution femtosecond spectroscopy and time-dependent density functional theory, we provide compelling evidence that the driving mechanism of the photoinduced current generation cycle is a correlated wavelike motion of electrons and nuclei on a timescale of few tens of femtoseconds. We highlight the fundamental role of the interface between chromophore and charge acceptor in triggering the coherent wavelike electron-hole splitting. PMID:23511467

  10. Quantum coherence controls the charge separation in a prototypical artificial light-harvesting system.

    PubMed

    Rozzi, Carlo Andrea; Falke, Sarah Maria; Spallanzani, Nicola; Rubio, Angel; Molinari, Elisa; Brida, Daniele; Maiuri, Margherita; Cerullo, Giulio; Schramm, Heiko; Christoffers, Jens; Lienau, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The efficient conversion of light into electricity or chemical fuels is a fundamental challenge. In artificial photosynthetic and photovoltaic devices, this conversion is generally thought to happen on ultrafast, femto-to-picosecond timescales and to involve an incoherent electron transfer process. In some biological systems, however, there is growing evidence that the coherent motion of electronic wavepackets is an essential primary step, raising questions about the role of quantum coherence in artificial devices. Here we investigate the primary charge-transfer process in a supramolecular triad, a prototypical artificial reaction centre. Combining high time-resolution femtosecond spectroscopy and time-dependent density functional theory, we provide compelling evidence that the driving mechanism of the photoinduced current generation cycle is a correlated wavelike motion of electrons and nuclei on a timescale of few tens of femtoseconds. We highlight the fundamental role of the interface between chromophore and charge acceptor in triggering the coherent wavelike electron-hole splitting.

  11. Artificial intelligence and space power systems automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, David J.

    1987-01-01

    Various applications of artificial intelligence to space electrical power systems are discussed. An overview is given of completed, on-going, and planned knowledge-based system activities. These applications include the Nickel-Cadmium Battery Expert System (NICBES) (the expert system interfaced with the Hubble Space Telescope electrical power system test bed); the early work with the Space Station Experiment Scheduler (SSES); the three expert systems under development in the space station advanced development effort in the core module power management and distribution system test bed; planned cooperation of expert systems in the Core Module Power Management and Distribution (CM/PMAD) system breadboard with expert systems for the space station at other research centers; and the intelligent data reduction expert system under development.

  12. Agency in natural and artificial systems.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Alvaro; Etxeberria, Arantza

    2005-01-01

    We analyze the conditions for agency in natural and artificial systems. In the case of basic (natural) autonomous systems, self-construction and activity in the environment are two aspects of the same organization, the distinction between which is entirely conceptual: their sensorimotor activities are metabolic, realized according to the same principles and through the same material transformations as those typical of internal processes (such as energy transduction). The two aspects begin to be distinguishable in a particular evolutionary trend, related to the size increase of some groups of organisms whose adaptive abilities depend on motility. Here a specialized system develops, which, in the sensorimotor aspect, is decoupled from the metabolic basis, although it remains dependent on it in the self-constructive aspect. This decoupling reveals a complexification of the organization. In the last section of the article this approach to natural agency is used to analyze artificial systems by posing two problems: whether it is possible to artificially build an organization similar to the natural, and whether this notion of agency can be grounded on different organizing principles.

  13. Artificial intelligence and intelligent tutoring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Livergood, N.D.

    1989-01-01

    As a species we have evolved by increasing our mental and physical powers through the deliberate development and use of instruments that amplify our inherent capabilities. Whereas hereditarily given instincts predetermine the actions of lower animal forms, human existence begins with freedom. As humans we can choose what actions we will perform. We have invented a technology called education to prepare ourselves for life. At present, our educational structures and procedures are failing to prepare us efficiently for the demands of modern life. One of the most important new technologies, in relation to human development, is the digital computer. This dissertation proposes that artificial intelligence maintain a highly critical technological awareness. Artificial intelligence, because of its origin as a politically sponsored field of investigation, must strive for constant awareness of its place within the larger political-economic world and its possible misuse by factions intent on manipulation and control. Computerized models of the human mind could be used in developing progressively more sophisticated brainwashing systems. Intelligent tutoring systems comprise an important new technology within the field of artificial intelligence. This dissertation explores specification and design procedures, functions and issues in developing intelligent tutoring systems.

  14. Artificial Immune System Approaches for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    KrishnaKumar, Kalmanje; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Artificial Immune Systems (AIS) combine a priori knowledge with the adapting capabilities of biological immune system to provide a powerful alternative to currently available techniques for pattern recognition, modeling, design, and control. Immunology is the science of built-in defense mechanisms that are present in all living beings to protect against external attacks. A biological immune system can be thought of as a robust, adaptive system that is capable of dealing with an enormous variety of disturbances and uncertainties. Biological immune systems use a finite number of discrete "building blocks" to achieve this adaptiveness. These building blocks can be thought of as pieces of a puzzle which must be put together in a specific way-to neutralize, remove, or destroy each unique disturbance the system encounters. In this paper, we outline AIS models that are immediately applicable to aerospace problems and identify application areas that need further investigation.

  15. Inelastic neutron scattering study of light-induced dynamics of a photosynthetic membrane system

    SciTech Connect

    Furrer, A.; Stoeckli, A.

    2010-01-15

    Inelastic neutron scattering was employed to study photoeffects on the molecular dynamics of membranes of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis. The main photoactive parts of this biomolecular system are the chlorophyll molecules whose dynamics were found to be affected under illumination by visible light in a twofold manner. First, vibrational modes are excited at energies of 12(2) and 88(21) cm{sup -1}. Second, a partial 'freezing' of rotational modes is observed at energies of 1.2(3) and 2.9(5) cm{sup -1}. These results are attributed to a possible coupling between molecular motions and particular mechanisms in the photosynthetic process.

  16. Proactive learning for artificial cognitive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soo-Young

    2010-04-01

    The Artificial Cognitive Systems (ACS) will be developed for human-like functions such as vision, auditory, inference, and behavior. Especially, computational models and artificial HW/SW systems will be devised for Proactive Learning (PL) and Self-Identity (SI). The PL model provides bilateral interactions between robot and unknown environment (people, other robots, cyberspace). For the situation awareness in unknown environment it is required to receive audiovisual signals and to accumulate knowledge. If the knowledge is not enough, the PL should improve by itself though internet and others. For human-oriented decision making it is also required for the robot to have self-identify and emotion. Finally, the developed models and system will be mounted on a robot for the human-robot co-existing society. The developed ACS will be tested against the new Turing Test for the situation awareness. The Test problems will consist of several video clips, and the performance of the ACSs will be compared against those of human with several levels of cognitive ability.

  17. Photosynthetic flagellates as model systems for accessing the impact of space conditions on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebert, Michael; Richter, Peter; Häder, Donat

    Plants are an integral part of the exploration attempts for the planned missions to Mars and Moon. Photosynthetic, motile flagellates like Euglena gracilis can serve as model systems for the better understanding of the impact of microgravity and cosmic radiation on plants. Recent parabolic flights indicate that photosynthesis is impaired by microgravity. While oxygen production decreased during the short-term microgravity phases, other photosynthetic parameters remained constant or increased (photosynthetic yield and Ft as indicated by Pulse Amplitude Modulated Fluorescence measurements (PAM)). Ground-based long-term measurements in static bioreactors indicate a strong circadian rhythm of the related PAM-accessible parameters including oxygen production. Besides the problem of scientific analysis of these findings, practical implications with respect to life support systems or controlled environmental systems (CES) are significant. In two FOTON missions a CES system (AQUACELLS and its successor OMEGAHAB) was flown. The detailed analysis is still ongoing. In the paper oxygen production rates are compared to reference experiments on ground. In addition, the results of an upcoming parabolic flight campaign centred around fast PAM kinetics for a closer understanding of the impaired photosynthetic parameters will be presented.

  18. [Hydrogen peroxide in artificial photosynthesizing systems].

    PubMed

    Lobanov, A V; Komissarov, G G

    2014-01-01

    From the point of view of the concepts of hydrogen peroxide as a source of photosynthetic oxygen (hydrogen) coordination and photochemical properties of chlorophyll and its aggregates towards hydrogen peroxide were considered. The binding energy of H2O and H2O2 with chlorophyll and chlorophyllide depending on their form (monomers, dimers and trimers) was estimated by quantum chemical calculations. It is shown that at an increase of the degree of the pigment aggregation binding energy of H2O2 was more than the energy of H2O. Analysis of experimental results of the photochemical decomposition of hydrogen peroxide using chlorophyll was carried out. Estimates of the thermodynamic parameters (deltaG degrees and deltaH degrees) of the formation of organic compounds from CO2 with water and hydrogen peroxide were compared. The interaction of CO2 with H2O2 requires much less energy consumption than with water for all considered cases. The formation of organic products (formaldehyde, alcohols, carboxylic and carbonylic compounds) and simultaneous production of O2 under the influence of visible light in the systems of inorganic carbon--hydrogen peroxide--chlorophyll (phthalocyanine) is detected by GC/MS method, FTIR spectroscopy, and chemical analysis.

  19. An Artificial Ising System with Phononic Excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, Hamed; Griffith, W. Ashley; Benson, Philip; Nasseri, M. H. B.; Young, R. Paul

    Many intractable systems and problems can be reduced to a system of interacting spins. Here, we report mapping collective phononic excitations from different sources of crystal vibrations to spin systems. The phononic excitations in our experiments are due to micro and nano cracking (yielding crackling noises due to lattice distortion). We develop real time mapping of the multi-array senores to a network-space and then mapping the excitation- networks to spin-like systems. We show that new mapped system satisfies the quench (impulsive) characteristics of the Ising model in 2D classical spin systems. In particular, we show that our artificial Ising system transits between two ground states and approaching the critical point accompanies with a very short time frozen regime, inducing formation of domains separated by kinks. For a cubic-test under a true triaxial test (3D case), we map the system to a 6-spin ring under a transversal-driving field where using functional multiplex networks, the vector components of the spin are inferred (i.e., XY model). By visualization of spin patterns of the ring per each event, we demonstrate that ``kinks'' (as defects) proliferate when system approach from above to its critical point. We support our observations with employing recorded acoustic excitations during distortion of crystal lattices in nano-indentation tests on different crystals (silicon and graphite), triaxial loading test on rock (poly-crystal) samples and a true 3D triaxial test.

  20. Systemic regulation of leaf anatomical structure, photosynthetic performance, and high-light tolerance in sorghum.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chuang-Dao; Wang, Xin; Gao, Hui-Yuan; Shi, Lei; Chow, Wah Soon

    2011-03-01

    Leaf anatomy of C3 plants is mainly regulated by a systemic irradiance signal. Since the anatomical features of C4 plants are different from that of C3 plants, we investigated whether the systemic irradiance signal regulates leaf anatomical structure and photosynthetic performance in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), a C4 plant. Compared with growth under ambient conditions (A), no significant changes in anatomical structure were observed in newly developed leaves by shading young leaves alone (YS). Shading mature leaves (MS) or whole plants (S), on the other hand, caused shade-leaf anatomy in newly developed leaves. By contrast, chloroplast ultrastructure in developing leaves depended only on their local light conditions. Functionally, shading young leaves alone had little effect on their net photosynthetic capacity and stomatal conductance, but shading mature leaves or whole plants significantly decreased these two parameters in newly developed leaves. Specifically, the net photosynthetic rate in newly developed leaves exhibited a positive linear correlation with that of mature leaves, as did stomatal conductance. In MS and S treatments, newly developed leaves exhibited severe photoinhibition under high light. By contrast, newly developed leaves in A and YS treatments were more resistant to high light relative to those in MS- and S-treated seedlings. We suggest that (1) leaf anatomical structure, photosynthetic capacity, and high-light tolerance in newly developed sorghum leaves were regulated by a systemic irradiance signal from mature leaves; and (2) chloroplast ultrastructure only weakly influenced the development of photosynthetic capacity and high-light tolerance. The potential significance of the regulation by a systemic irradiance signal is discussed.

  1. Forster Energy Transfer Theory as Reflected in the Structures of Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sener, Melih; Strumpfer, Johan; Hsin, Jen; Chandler, Danielle; Scheuring, Simon; Hunter, C. Neil; Schulten, Klaus

    2011-02-22

    Förster's theory of resonant energy transfer underlies a fundamental process in nature, namely the harvesting of sunlight by photosynthetic life forms. The theoretical framework developed by Förster and others describes how electronic excitation migrates in the photosynthetic apparatus of plants, algae, and bacteria from light absorbing pigments to reaction centers where light energy is utilized for the eventual conversion into chemical energy. The demand for highest possible efficiency of light harvesting appears to have shaped the evolution of photosynthetic species from bacteria to plants which, despite a great variation in architecture, display common structural themes founded on the quantum physics of energy transfer as described first by Förster. Herein, Förster’s theory of excitation transfer is summarized, including recent extensions, and the relevance of the theory to photosynthetic systems as evolved in purple bacteria, cyanobacteria, and plants is demonstrated. Förster's energy transfer formula, as used widely today in many fields of science, is also derived.

  2. A photocatalyst-enzyme coupled artificial photosynthesis system for solar energy in production of formic acid from CO2.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rajesh K; Baeg, Jin-Ook; Oh, Gyu Hwan; Park, No-Joong; Kong, Ki-jeong; Kim, Jinheung; Hwang, Dong Won; Biswas, Soumya K

    2012-07-18

    The photocatalyst-enzyme coupled system for artificial photosynthesis process is one of the most promising methods of solar energy conversion for the synthesis of organic chemicals or fuel. Here we report the synthesis of a novel graphene-based visible light active photocatalyst which covalently bonded the chromophore, such as multianthraquinone substituted porphyrin with the chemically converted graphene as a photocatalyst of the artificial photosynthesis system for an efficient photosynthetic production of formic acid from CO(2). The results not only show a benchmark example of the graphene-based material used as a photocatalyst in general artificial photosynthesis but also the benchmark example of the selective production system of solar chemicals/solar fuel directly from CO(2).

  3. Artificial Intelligence for VHSIC Systems Design (AIVD) User Reference Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    AD-A259 518 C;ý I RESEARCH TRIANGLE INSTITUTE ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE FOR IVHSIC SYSTEMS DESIGN (AIVD) DTIC USER REFERENCE MANUAL * ScELECTE fl2...Report 14. SUBJECT TERMS IS. MUMBER OF PAGES VHSIC, Software/hardware codesign, Artificial Intelligence graph transformation, ADAS 14. PRICE CODE 17... ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE FOR I VHSIC SYSTEMS DESIGN (AIVD) USER REFERENCE MANUAL December 1988 I Department of the Army ,,’ U.S. Army Electronics Research

  4. Artificial Immune System for Recognizing Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, Terrance

    2005-01-01

    A method of recognizing or classifying patterns is based on an artificial immune system (AIS), which includes an algorithm and a computational model of nonlinear dynamics inspired by the behavior of a biological immune system. The method has been proposed as the theoretical basis of the computational portion of a star-tracking system aboard a spacecraft. In that system, a newly acquired star image would be treated as an antigen that would be matched by an appropriate antibody (an entry in a star catalog). The method would enable rapid convergence, would afford robustness in the face of noise in the star sensors, would enable recognition of star images acquired in any sensor or spacecraft orientation, and would not make an excessive demand on the computational resources of a typical spacecraft. Going beyond the star-tracking application, the AIS-based pattern-recognition method is potentially applicable to pattern- recognition and -classification processes for diverse purposes -- for example, reconnaissance, detecting intruders, and mining data.

  5. Image Analysis of Chlorophyll Fluorescence Transients for Diagnosing the Photosynthetic System of Attached Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Omasa, Kenji; Shimazaki, Ken-Ichiro; Aiga, Ichiro; Larcher, Walter; Onoe, Morio

    1987-01-01

    A new image instrumentation system for quantitative analysis of the rapid change in intensity of chlorophyll fluorescence during dark-light transition (CFI, chlorophyll fluorescence induction), which is a sensitive indicator of the various reactions of photosynthesis, was developed and its performance was evaluated. This system made it possible to resolve CFI at any small leaf area (about 1 square millimeter) of a whole leaf when the plant was illuminated by blue-green light at more than 50 micromoles photons per square meter per second. In order to test the usefulness of this system, we applied it to analyze the effect of SO2 on photosynthetic apparatus in attached sunflower leaves. Dynamic CFI imaging over the whole single leaf, where there was no visible injury, indicated not only the local changes in photosynthetic activity but also the site of inhibition in photosynthetic electron transport system in chloroplasts. The new instrumentation system will be useful for the analytical diagnosis of various stress-actions on plants in situ. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:16665515

  6. Vehicle detection system using artificial retina chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, Koichi; Tamura, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Ken-ichi; Kyuma, Kazuo

    2001-05-01

    The AR chip is a versatile CMOS image sensor, functions are not only normal image acquisition but also on-chip image processing. Such features can accelerate algorithms of image processing and the controls of proper image. We have developed the low-cost and compact vehicle detection system using he AR chips. The system is composed of a processing module and an AR camera module. The AR Camera module has dual artificial retina chips to cover the wide dynamic range of the outdoor brightness environment. The ND filter is coated on the lens of one of the chips, each AR chip covers different range of the brightness. The control algorithm of image acquisition is designed to select an adequate chip based on the image quality. The images of the selected chip are processed by on-chip functions for pre-processing and they are transferred to the processing module. Finally the processing module judges the existence of vehicles and detects several kinds of attributive information of the detected vehicle such as moving direction. In our paper, we describe details of the system and the algorithm and we show several result data through field experiments under the real road environment.

  7. Electronic structures and nonlinear optical properties of macrocycles in model compounds and in photosynthetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.X.

    1996-05-01

    Ultrafast energy and electron transfer processes are carried out in natural photosynthetic systems via chlorophyll molecules attached to proteins. The chlorophyll molecules are held by the protein matrices with different relative distances and orientations. The environment around each chlorophyll determines its energetics and function in initial photochemical reactions. One of the most important factors that modify the energetics of the chlorophylls is the electronic interactions between the chlorophylls. This has been demonstrated by the structural details of the two chlorophyll arrays, B800 and B850 in photosynthetic bacterial antenna LHII, as well as the special pair chlorophylls in the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. The former conducts the energy transfer to LFI, then to the reaction center, the latter, the electron transfer. The electronic interactions between chlorophylls in model systems and natural photosynthetic systems have been studied extensively with various techniques, e.g., linear optical absorption, but the nonlinear optical properties, such as high order nonlinear optical susceptibilities, are not well characterized. In this study, we intend to characterize the nonlinear optical susceptibility {Chi} in various molecular systems consisting of chlorophyll, porphyrin and phthalocyanine with different configurations and aggregation states. The goal of this research is twofold, (1) to establish the correlation between the electronic couplings in macrocycles and {Chi} with experimental measurements (e.g., degenerated four wave mixing, DFWM) and theoretical modeling, and (2) to explore the potential applications of biophotonics device based on the {Chi} measurements of various chlorophyll arrays which perform ultrafast energy and electron transfer similar to those desirable functions in photonic devices.

  8. Modeling coherent excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic light harvesting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Pengfei

    2011-12-01

    Recent non-linear spectroscopy experiments suggest the excitation energy transfer in some biological light harvesting systems initially occurs coherently. Treating such processes brings significant challenge for conventional theoretical tools that usually involve different approximations. In this dissertation, the recently developed Iterative Linearized Density Matrix (ILDM) propagation scheme, which is non-perturbative and non-Markovian is extended to study coherent excitation energy transfer in various light harvesting complexes. It is demonstrated that the ILDM approach can successfully describe the coherent beating of the site populations on model systems and gives quantitative agreement with both experimental results and the results of other theoretical methods have been developed recently to going beyond the usual approximations, thus providing a new reliable theoretical tool to study this phenomenon. This approach is used to investigate the excited energy transfer dynamics in various experimentally studied bacteria light harvesting complexes, such as Fenna-Matthews-Olsen (FMO) complex, Phycocyanin 645 (PC645). In these model calculations, quantitative agreement is found between computed de-coherence times and quantum beating pattens observed in the non-linear spectroscopy. As a result of these studies, it is concluded that the stochastic resonance behavior is important in determining the optimal throughput. To begin addressing possible mechanics for observed long de-coherence time, various models which include correlation between site energy fluctuations as well as correlation between site energy and inter-site coupling are developed. The influence of both types of correlation on the coherence and transfer rate is explored using with a two state system-bath hamiltonian parametrized to model the reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides bacteria. To overcome the disadvantages of a fully reduced approach or a full propagation method, a brownian dynamics

  9. [Membrane-based photochemical systems as models for photosynthetic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, J.K.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this research are to improve our conceptual view of the ways in which membranes and interfaces can be used to control chemical reactivity. We have focused on understanding three elementary processes that are central to developing membrane-based integrated chemical systems for water photolysis or related photoconversion/photostorage processes. Specifically, we have sought to identify: the influence of interfaces upon charge separation/recombination reactions, pathways for transmembrane charge separation across hydrocarbon bilayer membranes, and mechanisms of water oxidation catalyzed by transition metal coordination complexes. Historically, the chemical dynamics of each of these processes has been poorly understood, with numerous unresolved issues and conflicting viewpoints appearing in the literature. As described in this report our recent research has led to considerable clarification of the underlying reaction mechanisms.

  10. Theoretical examination of quantum coherence in a photosynthetic system at physiological temperature

    PubMed Central

    Ishizaki, Akihito; Fleming, Graham R.

    2009-01-01

    The observation of long-lived electronic coherence in a photosynthetic pigment–protein complex, the Fenna–Matthews–Olson (FMO) complex, is suggestive that quantum coherence might play a significant role in achieving the remarkable efficiency of photosynthetic electronic energy transfer (EET), although the data were acquired at cryogenic temperature [Engel GS, et al. (2007) Evidence for wavelike energy transfer through quantum coherence in photosynthetic systems. Nature 446:782–786]. In this paper, the spatial and temporal dynamics of EET through the FMO complex at physiological temperature are investigated theoretically. The numerical results reveal that quantum wave-like motion persists for several hundred femtoseconds even at physiological temperature, and suggest that the FMO complex may work as a rectifier for unidirectional energy flow from the peripheral light-harvesting antenna to the reaction center complex by taking advantage of quantum coherence and the energy landscape of pigments tuned by the protein scaffold. A potential role of quantum coherence is to overcome local energetic traps and aid efficient trapping of electronic energy by the pigments facing the reaction center complex. PMID:19815512

  11. From natural to bioassisted and biomimetic artificial water channel systems.

    PubMed

    Barboiu, Mihail; Gilles, Arnaud

    2013-12-17

    Within biological systems, natural channels and pores transport metabolites across the cell membranes. Researchers have explored artificial ion-channel architectures as potential mimics of natural ionic conduction. All these synthetic systems have produced an impressive collection of alternative artificial ion-channels. Amazingly, researchers have made far less progress in the area of synthetic water channels. The development of synthetic biomimetic water channels and pores could contribute to a better understanding of the natural function of protein channels and could offer new strategies to generate highly selective, advanced water purification systems. Despite the imaginative work by synthetic chemists to produce sophisticated architectures that confine water clusters, most synthetic water channels have used natural proteins channels as the selectivity components, embedded in the diverse arrays of bioassisted artificial systems. These systems combine natural proteins that present high water conductance states under natural conditions with artificial lipidic or polymeric matrixes. Experimental results have demonstrated that natural biomolecules can be used as bioassisted building blocks for the construction of highly selective water transport through artificial membranes. A next step to further the potential of these systems was the design and construction of simpler compounds that maintain the high conduction activity obtained with natural compounds leading to fully synthetic artificial biomimetic systems. Such studies aim to use constitutional selective artificial superstructures for water/proton transport to select functions similar to the natural structures. Moving to simpler water channel systems offers a chance to better understand mechanistic and structural behaviors and to uncover novel interactive water-channels that might parallel those in biomolecular systems. This Account discusses the incipient development of the first artificial water channels

  12. Electrochemical and optical studies of model photosynthetic systems. Final progress report, July 1, 1984--August 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-15

    The objective of this research is to obtain a better understanding of the relationship between the structural organization of photosynthetic pigments and their spectroscopic and electrochemical properties. Defined model systems were studied first. These included the least ordered (solutions) through the most highly ordered (Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers and self-assembled monolayers) systems containing BChl, BPheo, and UQ. Molecules other than the photosynthetic pigments and quinones were also examined, including chromophores (i.e. surface active cyanine dyes and phtahlocyanines) an redox active compounds (methyl viologen (MV) and surfactant ferrocenes), in order to develop the techniques needed to study the photosynthetic components. Because the chlorophylls are photosensitive and labile, it was easier first to develop procedures using stable species. Three different techniques were used to characterize these model systems. These included electrochemical techniques for determining the standard oxidation and reduction potentials of the photosynthetic components as well as methods for determining the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants for BChl and BPheo at metal electrodes (Pt and Au). Resonance Raman (RR) and surface enhanced resonance Raman (SERR) spectroscopy were used to determine the spectra of the photosynthetic pigments and model compounds. SERRS was also used to study several types of photosynthetic preparations.

  13. Building Artificial Vision Systems with Machine Learning

    SciTech Connect

    LeCun, Yann

    2011-02-23

    Three questions pose the next challenge for Artificial Intelligence (AI), robotics, and neuroscience. How do we learn perception (e.g. vision)? How do we learn representations of the perceptual world? How do we learn visual categories from just a few examples?

  14. Using synthetic model systems to understand charge separation and spin dynamics in photosynthetic reaction centers.

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, M. R.

    1998-08-27

    Our current work in modeling reaction center dynamics has resulted in the observation of each major spin-dependent photochemical pathway that is observed in reaction centers. The development of new, simpler model systems has permitted us to probe deeply into the mechanistic issues that drive these dynamics. Based on these results we have returned to biomimetic chlorophyll-based electron donors to mimic these dynamics. Future studies will focus on the details of electronic structure and energetic of both the donor-acceptor molecules and their surrounding environment that dictate the mechanistic pathways and result in efficient photosynthetic charge separation.

  15. Systemic signalling in photosynthetic induction of Rumex K-1 (Rumex patientia × Rumex tianschaious) leaves.

    PubMed

    Hou, Fei; Jin, Li-Qiao; Zhang, Zi-Shan; Gao, Hui-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    The rapid induction of photosynthesis is critical for plants under light-fleck environment. Most previous studies about photosynthetic induction focused upon single leaf, but they did not consider the systemic integrity of plant. Here, we verified whether systemic signalling is involved in photosynthetic induction. Rumex K-1 (Rumex patientia × Rumex tianschaious) plants were grown under light-fleck condition. After whole night dark adaptation, different numbers of leaves (system leaf or SL) were pre-illuminated with light, and then the photosynthetic induction of other leaves (target leaf or TL) was investigated. This study showed that the pre-illumination of SL promoted photosynthetic induction in TL. This promotion was independent of the number of SL, the light intensity on SL and the distance between SL and TL, indicating that this systemic signalling is non-dose-dependent. More interestingly, the photosynthetic induction was promoted by only the pre-illumination of morphological upper leaf rather than the pre-illumination of morphological lower leaf, indicating that the transfer of this signal is directional. The results showed that the transfer of this systemic signalling depends upon the phloem. This systemic signalling helps plants to use light energy more efficiently under light flecks.

  16. Interactions between Artificial Gravity, the Affected Physiological Systems, and Nutrition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heer, Martina; Baecker, Nathalie; Zwart, Sara; Smith, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Malnutrition, either by insufficient supply of some nutrients or by overfeeding, has a profound effect on the health of an organism. Therefore, optimal nutrition is a necessity in normal gravity on Earth, in microgravity, and when applying artificial gravity to the human system. Reduced physical activity, such as observed in microgravity or bed rest, has an effect on many physiological systems, such as the cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, immune, and body fluids regulation systems. There is currently no countermeasure that is effective to counteract both the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning when applied for a short duration (see Chapter 1). Artificial gravity therefore seems the simplest physiological approach to keep these systems intact. The application of intermittent daily dose of artificial gravity by means of centrifugation has often been proposed as a potential countermeasure against the physiological deconditioning induced by spaceflight. However, neither the optimal gravity level, nor its optimal duration of exposure have been enough studied to recommend a validated, effective, and efficient artificial gravity application. As discussed in previous chapters, artificial gravity has a very high potential to counteract any changes caused by reduced physical activity. The nutrient supply, which ideally should match the actual needs, will interact with these changes and therefore has also to be taken into account. This chapter reviews the potential interactions between these nutrients (energy intake, vitamins, minerals) and the other physiological systems affected by artificial gravity generated by an on-board short-radius centrifuge.

  17. Plasmon-enhanced absorption in a metal nanoparticles and photosynthetic molecules hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhiyuan; Govorov, Alexander

    2010-03-01

    Photosystem I from cyanobacteria is one of nature's most efficient light harvesting complexes, converting light energy into electronic energy with a quantum yield of 100% and an energy yield about 58%. It is very attractive to the nanotechnology community because of its nanoscale dimensions and excellent optoelectronic properties. This protein has the potential to be utilized in devices such as solar cells, electric switches, photo-detectors, etc. However, there is one limiting factor for potential applications of a single monolayer of these photosynthetic proteins. One monolayer absorbs less than 1% of sunlight's energy, despite their excellent optoelectronic properties. Recently, experiments [1] have been conducted to enhance light absorption with the assistance of metal nanoparticles as artificial antenna for the photosystem I. Here, we present a theoretical description of the strong plasmon-assisted interactions between the metal nanoparticles and the optical dipoles of the reaction centers observed in the experiments. The resonance and off-resonance plasmon effects enhance the electromagnetic fields around the photosystem-I molecules and, in this way, lead to enhanced absorption. [4pt] [1] I. Carmeli, I. Lieberman, L. Kraversky, Zhiyuan Fan, A. O. Govorov, G. Markovich, and S. Richter, submitted.

  18. Regulation of Photosynthetic Electron Transport and Photoinhibition

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Thomas; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja Krieger

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms and isolated photosystems are of interest for technical applications. In nature, photosynthetic electron transport has to work efficiently in contrasting environments such as shade and full sunlight at noon. Photosynthetic electron transport is regulated on many levels, starting with the energy transfer processes in antenna and ending with how reducing power is ultimately partitioned. This review starts by explaining how light energy can be dissipated or distributed by the various mechanisms of non-photochemical quenching, including thermal dissipation and state transitions, and how these processes influence photoinhibition of photosystem II (PSII). Furthermore, we will highlight the importance of the various alternative electron transport pathways, including the use of oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor and cyclic flow around photosystem I (PSI), the latter which seem particularly relevant to preventing photoinhibition of photosystem I. The control of excitation pressure in combination with the partitioning of reducing power influences the light-dependent formation of reactive oxygen species in PSII and in PSI, which may be a very important consideration to any artificial photosynthetic system or technical device using photosynthetic organisms. PMID:24678670

  19. An integrated artificial photosynthesis system based on peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bin; Li, Ying; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Chunfeng; Qin, Meng; Cao, Yi; Wang, Wei

    2014-07-21

    A peptide nanotube platform that integrates both light-harvesting and catalytic units was successfully engineered for artificial photosynthesis. Peptide nanotubes not only serve as a hub for physically combining both units, but also work as mediators that transfer the energy from photo-excited chromophores to catalytic centers. The direct conversion of NAD(+) to NADH upon light illumination was demonstrated. This represents a promising step towards efficient and fully integrated artificial photosynthesis systems.

  20. Electronic energy transfer in model photosynthetic systems: Markovian vs. non-Markovian dynamics.

    PubMed

    Singh, Navinder; Brumer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    A simple numerical algorithm for solving the non-Markovian master equation in the second Born approximation is developed and used to propagate the traditional dimer system that models electronic energy transfer in photosynthetic systems. Specifically, the coupled integro-differential equations for the reduced density matrix are solved by an efficient auxiliary function method in both the energy and site representations. In addition to giving exact results to this order, the approach allows us to access the range of the reorganization energy and decay rates of the phonon auto-correlation function for which the Markovian Redfield theory and the second-order approximation is useful. For example, the use of Redfield theory for lambda > 10 cm(-1) in Fenna-Mathews-Olson (FMO) type systems is shown to be fundamentally inaccurate.

  1. Artificial cells: building bioinspired systems using small-scale biology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Ruder, Warren C; LeDuc, Philip R

    2008-01-01

    Artificial cells have generated much interest since the concept was introduced by Aleksandr Oparin in the 1920s, and they have had an impact on the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry in various areas, including potential therapeutic applications. Here, we discuss the development of small-scale, bio-inspired artificial cell components that recreate the function of key cellular and physiological systems. We describe artificial cells, selected current applications and how small-scale biology could be used to provide what might be a next-generation approach in this area. We believe that this type of work is in its infancy and that exploiting small-scale biological inspiration in the field of artificial cells has great potential for successes in the future.

  2. Structural colors: from natural to artificial systems.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yulan; Tippets, Cary A; Donev, Eugenii U; Lopez, Rene

    2016-09-01

    Structural coloration has attracted great interest from scientists and engineers in recent years, owing to fascination with various brilliant examples displayed in nature as well as to promising applications of bio-inspired functional photonic structures and materials. Much research has been done to reveal and emulate the physical mechanisms that underlie the structural colors found in nature. In this article, we review the fundamental physics of many natural structural colors displayed by living organisms as well as their bio-inspired artificial counterparts, with emphasis on their connections, tunability strategies, and proposed applications, which aim to maximize the technological benefits one could derive from these photonic nanostructures. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:758-775. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1396 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  3. Artificial immune system algorithm in VLSI circuit configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansor, Mohd. Asyraf; Sathasivam, Saratha; Kasihmuddin, Mohd Shareduwan Mohd

    2017-08-01

    In artificial intelligence, the artificial immune system is a robust bio-inspired heuristic method, extensively used in solving many constraint optimization problems, anomaly detection, and pattern recognition. This paper discusses the implementation and performance of artificial immune system (AIS) algorithm integrated with Hopfield neural networks for VLSI circuit configuration based on 3-Satisfiability problems. Specifically, we emphasized on the clonal selection technique in our binary artificial immune system algorithm. We restrict our logic construction to 3-Satisfiability (3-SAT) clauses in order to outfit with the transistor configuration in VLSI circuit. The core impetus of this research is to find an ideal hybrid model to assist in the VLSI circuit configuration. In this paper, we compared the artificial immune system (AIS) algorithm (HNN-3SATAIS) with the brute force algorithm incorporated with Hopfield neural network (HNN-3SATBF). Microsoft Visual C++ 2013 was used as a platform for training, simulating and validating the performances of the proposed network. The results depict that the HNN-3SATAIS outperformed HNN-3SATBF in terms of circuit accuracy and CPU time. Thus, HNN-3SATAIS can be used to detect an early error in the VLSI circuit design.

  4. Tuberculosis disease diagnosis using artificial immune recognition system.

    PubMed

    Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Hessam, Somayeh; Javidnia, Hossein; Amiribesheli, Mohsen; Vahdat, Shaghayegh; Petković, Dalibor; Gani, Abdullah; Kiah, Miss Laiha Mat

    2014-01-01

    There is a high risk of tuberculosis (TB) disease diagnosis among conventional methods. This study is aimed at diagnosing TB using hybrid machine learning approaches. Patient epicrisis reports obtained from the Pasteur Laboratory in the north of Iran were used. All 175 samples have twenty features. The features are classified based on incorporating a fuzzy logic controller and artificial immune recognition system. The features are normalized through a fuzzy rule based on a labeling system. The labeled features are categorized into normal and tuberculosis classes using the Artificial Immune Recognition Algorithm. Overall, the highest classification accuracy reached was for the 0.8 learning rate (α) values. The artificial immune recognition system (AIRS) classification approaches using fuzzy logic also yielded better diagnosis results in terms of detection accuracy compared to other empirical methods. Classification accuracy was 99.14%, sensitivity 87.00%, and specificity 86.12%.

  5. Systems in Science: Modeling Using Three Artificial Intelligence Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunal, Cynthia Szymanski; Karr, Charles L.; Smith, Coralee; Sunal, Dennis W.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary course focusing on modeling scientific systems. Investigates elementary education majors' applications of three artificial intelligence concepts used in modeling scientific systems before and after the course. Reveals a great increase in understanding of concepts presented but inconsistent application. (Author/KHR)

  6. Systems in Science: Modeling Using Three Artificial Intelligence Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunal, Cynthia Szymanski; Karr, Charles L.; Smith, Coralee; Sunal, Dennis W.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary course focusing on modeling scientific systems. Investigates elementary education majors' applications of three artificial intelligence concepts used in modeling scientific systems before and after the course. Reveals a great increase in understanding of concepts presented but inconsistent application. (Author/KHR)

  7. Quantum simulator of an open quantum system using superconducting qubits: exciton transport in photosynthetic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostame, Sarah; Rebentrost, Patrick; Eisfeld, Alexander; Kerman, Andrew J.; Tsomokos, Dimitris I.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2012-02-01

    In the initial stage of photosynthesis, light-harvested energy is transferred with remarkably high efficiency to a reaction center, with the vibrational environment assisting the transport mechanism. It is of great interest to mimic this process with present-day technologies. Here we propose an analog quantum simulator of open system dynamics, where noise engineering of the environment has a central role. In particular, we propose the use of superconducting qubits for the simulation of exciton transport in the Fenna-Matthew-Olson protein, a prototypical photosynthetic complex. Our method allows for a single-molecule implementation and the investigation of energy transfer pathways as well as non-Markovian and spatiotemporal noise-correlation effects.

  8. Entropy and biological systems: Experimentally-investigated entropy-driven stacking of plant photosynthetic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Husen; Liggins, John R.; Chow, Wah Soon

    2014-02-01

    According to the Second Law of Thermodynamics, an overall increase of entropy contributes to the driving force for any physicochemical process, but entropy has seldom been investigated in biological systems. Here, for the first time, we apply Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) to investigate the Mg2+-induced spontaneous stacking of photosynthetic membranes isolated from spinach leaves. After subtracting a large endothermic interaction of MgCl2 with membranes, unrelated to stacking, we demonstrate that the enthalpy change (heat change at constant pressure) is zero or marginally positive or negative. This first direct experimental evidence strongly suggests that an entropy increase significantly drives membrane stacking in this ordered biological structure. Possible mechanisms for the entropy increase include: (i) the attraction between discrete oppositely-charged areas, releasing counterions; (ii) the release of loosely-bound water molecules from the inter-membrane gap; (iii) the increased orientational freedom of previously-aligned water dipoles; and (iv) the lateral rearrangement of membrane components.

  9. Multivariable adaptive identification and control for artificial pancreas systems.

    PubMed

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Quinn, Laurie; Littlejohn, Elizabeth; Cinar, Ali

    2014-03-01

    A constrained weighted recursive least squares method is proposed to provide recursive models with guaranteed stability and better performance than models based on regular identification methods in predicting the variations of blood glucose concentration in patients with Type 1 Diabetes. Use of physiological information from a sports armband improves glucose concentration prediction and enables earlier recognition of the effects of physical activity on glucose concentration. Generalized predictive controllers (GPC) based on these recursive models are developed. The performance of GPC for artificial pancreas systems is illustrated by simulations with UVa-Padova simulator and clinical studies. The controllers developed are good candidates for artificial pancreas systems with no announcements from patients.

  10. Lighting system combining daylight concentrators and an artificial source

    DOEpatents

    Bornstein, Jonathan G.; Friedman, Peter S.

    1985-01-01

    A combined lighting system for a building interior includes a stack of luminescent solar concentrators (LSC), an optical conduit made of preferably optical fibers for transmitting daylight from the LSC stack, a collimating lens set at an angle, a fixture for receiving the daylight at one end and for distributing the daylight as illumination inside the building, an artificial light source at the other end of the fixture for directing artifical light into the fixture for distribution as illumination inside the building, an automatic dimmer/brightener for the artificial light source, and a daylight sensor positioned near to the LSC stack for controlling the automatic dimmer/brightener in response to the daylight sensed. The system also has a reflector positioned behind the artificial light source and a fan for exhausting heated air out of the fixture during summer and for forcing heated air into the fixture for passage into the building interior during winter.

  11. Synthetically tuneable biomimetic artificial photosynthetic reaction centres that closely resemble the natural system in purple bacteria† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Electrochemistry, fitting of data measured by femtosecond laser flash photolysis, vibrational parameters deduced for the molecular fragments from B3LYP vibrational frequency analysis, and vibrational parameters used in the determination of Franck–Condon factors for charge-transfer processes. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc01076h Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sai-Ho; Blake, Iain M.; Larsen, Allan G.; McDonald, James A.; Ohkubo, Kei

    2016-01-01

    Porphyrin-based photosynthetic reaction centre (PRC) mimics, ZnPQ-Q2HP-C60 and MP2Q-Q2HP-C60 (M = Zn or 2H), designed to have a similar special-pair electron donor and similar charge-separation distances, redox processes and photochemical reaction rates to those in the natural PRC from purple bacteria, have been synthesised and extensive photochemical studies performed. Mechanisms of electron-transfer reactions are fully investigated using femtosecond and nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. In benzonitrile, all models show picosecond-timescale charge-separations and the final singlet charge-separations with the microsecond-timescale. The established lifetimes are long compared to other processes in organic solar cells or other organic light harvesting systems. These rigid, synthetically flexible molecules provide the closest mimics to the natural PRC so far synthesised and present a future direction for the design of light harvesters with controllable absorption, redox, and kinetics properties. PMID:27928494

  12. Glucose Synthesis in a Protein-Based Artificial Photosynthesis System.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hao; Yuan, Wenqiao; Zhou, Jack; Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to understand glucose synthesis of a protein-based artificial photosynthesis system affected by operating conditions, including the concentrations of reactants, reaction temperature, and illumination. Results from non-vesicle-based glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) and glucose synthesis showed that the initial concentrations of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), lighting source, and temperature significantly affected glucose synthesis. Higher initial concentrations of RuBP and ATP significantly enhanced GAP synthesis, which was linearly correlated to glucose synthesis, confirming the proper functions of all catalyzing enzymes in the system. White fluorescent light inhibited artificial photosynthesis and reduced glucose synthesis by 79.2 % compared to in the dark. The reaction temperature of 40 °C was optimum, whereas lower or higher temperature reduced glucose synthesis. Glucose synthesis in the vesicle-based artificial photosynthesis system reconstituted with bacteriorhodopsin, F 0 F 1 ATP synthase, and polydimethylsiloxane-methyloxazoline-polydimethylsiloxane triblock copolymer was successfully demonstrated. This system efficiently utilized light-induced ATP to drive glucose synthesis, and 5.2 μg ml(-1) glucose was synthesized in 0.78-ml reaction buffer in 7 h. Light-dependent reactions were found to be the bottleneck of the studied artificial photosynthesis system.

  13. Evolution and Adaptation of Phytoplankton Photosynthetic Pathways to perturbations of the geological carbon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickaby, R. E.; Young, J. N.; Hermoso, M.; Heureux, A.; McCLelland, H.; Lee, R.; Eason Hubbard, M.

    2012-12-01

    The ocean and atmosphere carbon system has varied greatly over geological history both in response to initial evolutionary innovation, and as a driver of adaptive change. Here we establish that positive selection in Rubisco, the most abundant enzyme on the Earth responsible for all photosynthetic carbon fixation, occurred early in Earth's history, and basal to the radiation of the modern marine algal groups. Our signals of positive selection appear to be triggered by changing intracellular concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) due to the emergence of carbon concentrating mechanisms between 1.56 and 0.41 Ba in response to declining atmospheric CO2 . We contend that, at least in terms of carbon, phytoplankton generally were well poised to manage subsequent abrupt carbon cycle perturbations. The physiological pathways for optimising carbon acquisition across a wide range of ambient carbon dioxide concentrations had already been established and were genetically widespread across open ocean phytoplankton groups. We will further investigate some case studies from the Mesozoic and Cenozoic abrupt carbon cycle excursions using isotopic tools to probe the community photosynthetic response and demonstrate the flexibility of phytoplankton photosynthesis in the face of major perturbations. In particular, an unprecedented resolution record across the Toarcian (Early Jurassic) carbon isotope excursion in the Paris Basin reveals a selection and evolution towards a community reliant solely on diffusive carbon dioxide supply for photosynthesis at the height of the excursion at 1500-2500 ppm CO2. The continued flourishing of the phytoplankton biological pump throughout this excursion was able to remove the excess carbon injected into the water column in less than 45 kyrs.

  14. Evaluating neural networks and artificial intelligence systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberts, David S.

    1994-02-01

    Systems have no intrinsic value in and of themselves, but rather derive value from the contributions they make to the missions, decisions, and tasks they are intended to support. The estimation of the cost-effectiveness of systems is a prerequisite for rational planning, budgeting, and investment documents. Neural network and expert system applications, although similar in their incorporation of a significant amount of decision-making capability, differ from each other in ways that affect the manner in which they can be evaluated. Both these types of systems are, by definition, evolutionary systems, which also impacts their evaluation. This paper discusses key aspects of neural network and expert system applications and their impact on the evaluation process. A practical approach or methodology for evaluating a certain class of expert systems that are particularly difficult to measure using traditional evaluation approaches is presented.

  15. An overview of expert systems. [artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gevarter, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    An expert system is defined and its basic structure is discussed. The knowledge base, the inference engine, and uses of expert systems are discussed. Architecture is considered, including choice of solution direction, reasoning in the presence of uncertainty, searching small and large search spaces, handling large search spaces by transforming them and by developing alternative or additional spaces, and dealing with time. Existing expert systems are reviewed. Tools for building such systems, construction, and knowledge acquisition and learning are discussed. Centers of research and funding sources are listed. The state-of-the-art, current problems, required research, and future trends are summarized.

  16. An Artificial Intelligence-Based Distance Education System: Artimat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabiyev, Vasif; Karal, Hasan; Arslan, Selahattin; Erumit, Ali Kursat; Cebi, Ayca

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the artificial intelligence-based distance education system called ARTIMAT, which has been prepared in order to improve mathematical problem solving skills of the students, in terms of conceptual proficiency and ease of use with the opinions of teachers and students. The implementation has been performed…

  17. Integrated Photobioelectrochemical Systems: A Paradigm Shift in Artificial Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Pavel; Pant, Deepak; Patra, Snehangshu

    2017-04-01

    Recent breakthroughs have reinvigorated the century-old research domain of artificial photosynthesis. Here, we highlight CO2-reducing and O2-liberating integrated photobioelectrochemical systems that contain novel enzymatic cathodes and photoanodes. These devices, which are completely self-driven by solar energy with unprecedented efficiency and stability, have important implications for biotechnological research communities.

  18. Teaching Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems: Concepts in Library Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kranch, Douglas A.

    1992-01-01

    Survey of institutions offering a bachelor's or higher degree in library science showed that the higher the level of the program, the more likely that artificial intelligence/expert systems (AI/ES) courses would be offered. Study concludes that all master's and doctoral level programs should include AI/ES units, and that greater emphasis should be…

  19. Artificial intelligence technologies for power system operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Talukdar, S.N.; Cardozo, E.

    1986-01-01

    Researchers in this study examined the potential of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies for improving problem-solving strategies in 16 power system operations. To demonstrate the use of AI in the area they considered most promising, contingency selection-security assessment, they also developed two programs - one to simulate network protection schemes, the other to diagnose faults.

  20. Artificial synapse network on inorganic proton conductor for neuromorphic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Li Qiang; Wan, Chang Jin; Guo, Li Qiang; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2014-01-01

    The basic units in our brain are neurons, and each neuron has more than 1,000 synapse connections. Synapse is the basic structure for information transfer in an ever-changing manner, and short-term plasticity allows synapses to perform critical computational functions in neural circuits. Therefore, the major challenge for the hardware implementation of neuromorphic computation is to develop artificial synapse network. Here in-plane lateral-coupled oxide-based artificial synapse network coupled by proton neurotransmitters are self-assembled on glass substrates at room-temperature. A strong lateral modulation is observed due to the proton-related electrical-double-layer effect. Short-term plasticity behaviours, including paired-pulse facilitation, dynamic filtering and spatiotemporally correlated signal processing are mimicked. Such laterally coupled oxide-based protonic/electronic hybrid artificial synapse network proposed here is interesting for building future neuromorphic systems.

  1. Artificial synapse network on inorganic proton conductor for neuromorphic systems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li Qiang; Wan, Chang Jin; Guo, Li Qiang; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2014-01-01

    The basic units in our brain are neurons, and each neuron has more than 1,000 synapse connections. Synapse is the basic structure for information transfer in an ever-changing manner, and short-term plasticity allows synapses to perform critical computational functions in neural circuits. Therefore, the major challenge for the hardware implementation of neuromorphic computation is to develop artificial synapse network. Here in-plane lateral-coupled oxide-based artificial synapse network coupled by proton neurotransmitters are self-assembled on glass substrates at room-temperature. A strong lateral modulation is observed due to the proton-related electrical-double-layer effect. Short-term plasticity behaviours, including paired-pulse facilitation, dynamic filtering and spatiotemporally correlated signal processing are mimicked. Such laterally coupled oxide-based protonic/electronic hybrid artificial synapse network proposed here is interesting for building future neuromorphic systems.

  2. Issues in the Evaluation of Artificial Intelligence Systems in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Perry L.

    1985-01-01

    The paper discusses the underlying issues in the evaluation of computer systems which apply artificial intelligence in medicine (AIM). Three different levels of evaluation are described: 1) the subjective evaluation of the research contribution of a developmental prototype, 2) the validation of a system's knowledge and performance, 3) the evaluation of the clinical efficacy of an operational system. The paper outlines a number of evaluation issues at each level, and discusses how previous AIM evaluations fit into this framework.

  3. Expert Systems: Artificial Intelligence for Professional Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoech, Dick; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes expert systems which are computer programs which use inference schemes to apply generalized human expertise to the facts of a specific case. Basic concepts, potentials and implications are presented along with the issues involved in their development and use. A simple expert system, written in BASIC, is included to illustrate the…

  4. Clonal Selection Based Artificial Immune System for Generalized Pattern Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, Terry

    2011-01-01

    The last two decades has seen a rapid increase in the application of AIS (Artificial Immune Systems) modeled after the human immune system to a wide range of areas including network intrusion detection, job shop scheduling, classification, pattern recognition, and robot control. JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) has developed an integrated pattern recognition/classification system called AISLE (Artificial Immune System for Learning and Exploration) based on biologically inspired models of B-cell dynamics in the immune system. When used for unsupervised or supervised classification, the method scales linearly with the number of dimensions, has performance that is relatively independent of the total size of the dataset, and has been shown to perform as well as traditional clustering methods. When used for pattern recognition, the method efficiently isolates the appropriate matches in the data set. The paper presents the underlying structure of AISLE and the results from a number of experimental studies.

  5. Educational Game Systems in Artificial Intelligence Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chubarkova, Elena V.; Sadchikov, Ilya A.; Suslova, Irina A.; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrey ?.; Milova, Larisa N.

    2016-01-01

    Article actuality based on fact that existing knowledge system aimed at future professional life of students: a skillful use game activity in educational process will teach students to look for alternative ways solving of real problems. The purpose of article lies in theoretical substantiation, development and testing of criteria, which must be…

  6. Performance Evaluation of Artificial Intelligence Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-17

    difficulty Veit and Callero (1981) have Aq developed an evaluation technique called the Subjective Transfer Function (STF) ’-~ ~approach. In the STF...Information Retrieval, Montreal, Canada. Veit, C.T., M. Callero . (1981) Subjective Transfer Function Approach to Complex System " 4Analysis. Rand Corp

  7. Control system for an artificial heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gebben, V. D.; Webb, J. A., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Inexpensive industrial pneumatic components are combined to produce control system to drive sac-type heart-assistance blood pump with controlled pulsatile pressure that makes pump rate of flow sensitive to venous /atrial/ pressure, while stroke is centered about set operating point and pump is synchronized with natural heart.

  8. Artificial intelligence-methods in decision and control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lirov, Y.V.

    1987-01-01

    Artificial intelligence methods were applied to the design and implementation of some decision and control systems. A so-called semantic approach to control and decisions was developed and artificial intelligence methods were used to provide a realizable implementation. These concepts were tested using applications from robust identification and control of time-varying systems, intelligent navigation, and intelligent simulation of differential games. An aspect of a generalized travelling-salesman problem was solved and intelligent simulation of differential games was implemented in Prolog using an example system for automated learning by tactical decision systems in air combat. These implementations were successful and provide several advantages over traditional approaches. The limitations of these concepts were identified and suggestions for future work are made.

  9. Artificial-intelligence methods in decision and control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lirov, Y.V.

    1987-01-01

    Artificial-intelligence methods were applied to the design and implementation of some decision and control systems. A so-called semantic approach to control and decisions was developed and artificial-intelligence methods were used to provide a realizable implementation. These concepts were tested using applications from robust identification and control of time-varying systems, intelligent navigation, and intelligent simulation of differential games. An aspect of a generalized traveling-salesman problem was solved, and intelligent simulation of differential games was implemented in Prolog using an example system for automated learning by tactical decision systems in air combat. These implementations were successful and provide several advantages over traditional approaches. The limitations of these concepts were identified and suggestions for future work are made.

  10. Artificial Immune System for Multi-Area Economic Dispatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Shankha Suvra; Hazra, Abhik; Basu, Mousumi

    2013-09-01

    This article presents artificial immune system for solving multi-area economic dispatch (MAED) problem with tie line constraints considering transmission losses, multiple fuels, valve-point loading and prohibited operating zones. Artificial immune system is based on the clonal selection principle which implements adaptive cloning, hyper mutation, aging operator and tournament selection. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm has been verified on three different test systems, both small and large, involving varying degree of complexity. Compared with differential evolution, evolutionary programming and real-coded genetic algorithm, considering the quality of the solution obtained, the proposed algorithm seems to be a promising alternative approach for solving the MAED problems in practical power system.

  11. An integrated artificial photosynthesis system based on peptide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Bin; Li, Ying; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Chunfeng; Qin, Meng; Cao, Yi; Wang, Wei

    2014-06-01

    A peptide nanotube platform that integrates both light-harvesting and catalytic units was successfully engineered for artificial photosynthesis. Peptide nanotubes not only serve as a hub for physically combining both units, but also work as mediators that transfer the energy from photo-excited chromophores to catalytic centers. The direct conversion of NAD+ to NADH upon light illumination was demonstrated. This represents a promising step towards efficient and fully integrated artificial photosynthesis systems.A peptide nanotube platform that integrates both light-harvesting and catalytic units was successfully engineered for artificial photosynthesis. Peptide nanotubes not only serve as a hub for physically combining both units, but also work as mediators that transfer the energy from photo-excited chromophores to catalytic centers. The direct conversion of NAD+ to NADH upon light illumination was demonstrated. This represents a promising step towards efficient and fully integrated artificial photosynthesis systems. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures and supporting figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00295d

  12. Carbon dioxide fixation by artificial photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ibusuki, Takashi; Koike, Kazuhide; Ishitani, Osamu

    1993-12-31

    Green plants can absorb atmospheric CO{sub 2} and transform it to sugars, carbohydrates through their photosynthetic systems, but they become the source of CO{sub 2} when they are dead. This is the reason why artificial leaves which can be alive forever should be developed to meet with global warming due to the increase of CO{sub 2} concentration. The goal of artificial photosynthesis is not to construct the same system as the photosynthetic one, but to mimic the ability of green plants to utilize solar energy to make high energy chemicals. Needless to say, the artificial photosynthetic system is desired to be as simple as possible and to be as efficient as possible. From the knowledge on photosynthesis and the results of previous investigations, the critical components of artificial photosynthetic system are understood as follows: (1) light harvesting chromophore, (2) a center for electron transfer and charge separation, (3) catalytic sites for converting small molecules like water and CO{sub 2} (mutilelectron reactions) which are schematically described.

  13. Computer Vision for Artificially Intelligent Robotic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chialo; Ma, Yung-Lung

    1987-04-01

    In this paper An Acoustic Imaging Recognition System (AIRS) will be introduced which is installed on an Intelligent Robotic System and can recognize different type of Hand tools' by Dynamic pattern recognition. The dynamic pattern recognition is approached by look up table method in this case, the method can save a lot of calculation time and it is practicable. The Acoustic Imaging Recognition System (AIRS) is consist of four parts -- position control unit, pulse-echo signal processing unit, pattern recognition unit and main control unit. The position control of AIRS can rotate an angle of ±5 degree Horizental and Vertical seperately, the purpose of rotation is to find the maximum reflection intensity area, from the distance, angles and intensity of the target we can decide the characteristic of this target, of course all the decision is target, of course all the decision is processed bye the main control unit. In Pulse-Echo Signal Process Unit, we ultilize the correlation method, to overcome the limitation of short burst of ultrasonic, because the Correlation system can transmit large time bandwidth signals and obtain their resolution and increased intensity through pulse compression in the correlation receiver. The output of correlator is sampled and transfer into digital data by u law coding method, and this data together with delay time T, angle information OH, eV will be sent into main control unit for further analysis. The recognition process in this paper, we use dynamic look up table method, in this method at first we shall set up serval recognition pattern table and then the new pattern scanned by Transducer array will be devided into serval stages and compare with the sampling table. The comparison is implemented by dynamic programing and Markovian process. All the hardware control signals, such as optimum delay time for correlator receiver, horizental and vertical rotation angle for transducer plate, are controlled by the Main Control Unit, the Main

  14. Suitability of different photosynthetic organisms for an extraterrestrial biological life support system.

    PubMed

    Lehto, Kirsi M; Lehto, Harry J; Kanervo, Eira A

    2006-01-01

    In the present era of intensive space and planetary research, efficient life support systems (LSSs) are needed to maintain suitable living conditions when humans move into space, i.e. away from the Earth's atmosphere. Thus far, such suitable conditions on various space flights and on the space stations (Mir and the International Space Station) have been maintained solely via physical and chemical means (transport of O2, H2O and food from the Earth, cleaning and recycling of air and water). However, for long-duration missions to distant destinations, such as exploratory missions to Mars, biological life support systems (BLSSs) may be needed to convert local CO2 and H2O to O2, and to food. As on earth, this conversion process would need to be based on photosynthesis. Use of higher plants and microalgae as BLSS organisms has been intensively studied. Here we review the growth requirements of these two types of photosynthetic organisms, with particular attention to their suitability for use in harsh Martian conditions, i.e. low temperatures, low atmospheric pressure, high CO2 concentration, high UV radiation and dryness.

  15. An artificial neural network controller for intelligent transportation systems applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vitela, J.E.; Hanebutte, U.R.; Reifman, J.

    1996-04-01

    An Autonomous Intelligent Cruise Control (AICC) has been designed using a feedforward artificial neural network, as an example for utilizing artificial neural networks for nonlinear control problems arising in intelligent transportation systems applications. The AICC is based on a simple nonlinear model of the vehicle dynamics. A Neural Network Controller (NNC) code developed at Argonne National Laboratory to control discrete dynamical systems was used for this purpose. In order to test the NNC, an AICC-simulator containing graphical displays was developed for a system of two vehicles driving in a single lane. Two simulation cases are shown, one involving a lead vehicle with constant velocity and the other a lead vehicle with varying acceleration. More realistic vehicle dynamic models will be considered in future work.

  16. Home care artificial heart monitoring system via internet.

    PubMed

    Chung, J; Lee, J H; Choi, J; Lee, J; Kim, W G; Sun, K; Min, B G

    2004-10-01

    The availability of a remote management system, which provides both physiological-related information about the patient and device-related information about the implanted device, would be helpful during in vivo experiments or clinical trials involving artificial heart implantation. In order to be able to monitor the course of the in vivo experiment continuously regardless of the patient's location, an internet-based remote monitoring system was developed, which can monitor physiological-related information such as pressure (AoP, LAP, RAP, PAP) and flow data, as well as device-related information such as current, direction and pump operating conditions. The home care artificial heart monitoring system which we developed consists of four main components, which are the transcutaneous information transmission system (TITS), local monitoring station (LMS), data server station (DSS), and client monitoring station (CMS). The device-related information and physiological-related information can be transmitted in real time from a patient in a remote non-clinical environment to the specialist situated in a clinic depending on the current capabilities and availability of the internet. The local monitoring station situated at the remote site is composed of a data acquisition and preprocessing unit connected to a computer via its RS-232 port, and which communicate using a Java-based client-server architecture. The remote monitoring system so developed was used during an in vivo experiment of the artificial heart implantation for 2 months and performed successfully according to design specifications.

  17. Effects of artificial gravity on the cardiovascular system: Computational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Artiles, Ana; Heldt, Thomas; Young, Laurence R.

    2016-09-01

    Artificial gravity has been suggested as a multisystem countermeasure against the negative effects of weightlessness. However, many questions regarding the appropriate configuration are still unanswered, including optimal g-level, angular velocity, gravity gradient, and exercise protocol. Mathematical models can provide unique insight into these questions, particularly when experimental data is very expensive or difficult to obtain. In this research effort, a cardiovascular lumped-parameter model is developed to simulate the short-term transient hemodynamic response to artificial gravity exposure combined with ergometer exercise, using a bicycle mounted on a short-radius centrifuge. The model is thoroughly described and preliminary simulations are conducted to show the model capabilities and potential applications. The model consists of 21 compartments (including systemic circulation, pulmonary circulation, and a cardiac model), and it also includes the rapid cardiovascular control systems (arterial baroreflex and cardiopulmonary reflex). In addition, the pressure gradient resulting from short-radius centrifugation is captured in the model using hydrostatic pressure sources located at each compartment. The model also includes the cardiovascular effects resulting from exercise such as the muscle pump effect. An initial set of artificial gravity simulations were implemented using the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Compact-Radius Centrifuge (CRC) configuration. Three centripetal acceleration (artificial gravity) levels were chosen: 1 g, 1.2 g, and 1.4 g, referenced to the subject's feet. Each simulation lasted 15.5 minutes and included a baseline period, the spin-up process, the ergometer exercise period (5 minutes of ergometer exercise at 30 W with a simulated pedal cadence of 60 RPM), and the spin-down process. Results showed that the cardiovascular model is able to predict the cardiovascular dynamics during gravity changes, as well as the expected

  18. Artificial olfactory system with fault-tolerant sensor array.

    PubMed

    Lotfivand, Nasser; Abdolzadeh, Vida; Hamidon, Mohd Nizar

    2016-07-01

    Numerous applications of artificial olfaction resulting from research in many branches of sciences have caused considerable interest in the enhancement of these systems. In this paper, we offer an architecture which is suitable for critical applications, such as medical diagnosis, where reliability and precision are deemed important. The proposed architecture is able to tolerate failures in the sensors of the array. In this study, the discriminating ability of the proposed architecture in detecting complex odors, as well as the performance of the proposed architecture in encountering sensor failure, were investigated and compared with the generic architecture. The results demonstrated that by applying the proposed architecture in the artificial olfactory system, the performance of system in the healthy mode was identical to the classic structure. However, in the faulty situation, the proposed architecture implied high identification ability of odor samples, while the generic architecture showed very poor performance in the same situation. Based on the results, it was possible to achieve high odor identification through the developed artificial olfactory system using the proposed architecture. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Present and future of the artificial heart driving system.

    PubMed

    Shumakov, V I; Itkin, G P; Sumin, A V; Mordashov, V M; Kiselev, U M; Zimin, N K; Drobyshev, A A

    1991-10-01

    The totally artificial heart (TAH) is now in development in two trends. First, there is the development of a bridge system for temporary support of cardiac function. The TAH with the extracorporeal pneumatic driving system Sinus-IS is more efficient and safer. Parallel with this, a portable pneumatic driving system has been developed. That can be considered a stage in the development of the second trend: a totally implantable TAH. This article reviews problems of building of the Micron energy system to be used in implantable TAH designs.

  20. Entropy and biological systems: Experimentally-investigated entropy-driven stacking of plant photosynthetic membranes

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Husen; Liggins, John R.; Chow, Wah Soon

    2014-01-01

    According to the Second Law of Thermodynamics, an overall increase of entropy contributes to the driving force for any physicochemical process, but entropy has seldom been investigated in biological systems. Here, for the first time, we apply Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) to investigate the Mg2+-induced spontaneous stacking of photosynthetic membranes isolated from spinach leaves. After subtracting a large endothermic interaction of MgCl2 with membranes, unrelated to stacking, we demonstrate that the enthalpy change (heat change at constant pressure) is zero or marginally positive or negative. This first direct experimental evidence strongly suggests that an entropy increase significantly drives membrane stacking in this ordered biological structure. Possible mechanisms for the entropy increase include: (i) the attraction between discrete oppositely-charged areas, releasing counterions; (ii) the release of loosely-bound water molecules from the inter-membrane gap; (iii) the increased orientational freedom of previously-aligned water dipoles; and (iv) the lateral rearrangement of membrane components. PMID:24561561

  1. Artificial intelligence, expert systems, computer vision, and natural language processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gevarter, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of artificial intelligence (AI), its core ingredients, and its applications is presented. The knowledge representation, logic, problem solving approaches, languages, and computers pertaining to AI are examined, and the state of the art in AI is reviewed. The use of AI in expert systems, computer vision, natural language processing, speech recognition and understanding, speech synthesis, problem solving, and planning is examined. Basic AI topics, including automation, search-oriented problem solving, knowledge representation, and computational logic, are discussed.

  2. Artificial intelligence, expert systems, computer vision, and natural language processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gevarter, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of artificial intelligence (AI), its core ingredients, and its applications is presented. The knowledge representation, logic, problem solving approaches, languages, and computers pertaining to AI are examined, and the state of the art in AI is reviewed. The use of AI in expert systems, computer vision, natural language processing, speech recognition and understanding, speech synthesis, problem solving, and planning is examined. Basic AI topics, including automation, search-oriented problem solving, knowledge representation, and computational logic, are discussed.

  3. Communications and control for electric power systems: Power system stability applications of artificial neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, N.; Kirkham, Harold

    1994-01-01

    This report investigates the application of artificial neural networks to the problem of power system stability. The field of artificial intelligence, expert systems, and neural networks is reviewed. Power system operation is discussed with emphasis on stability considerations. Real-time system control has only recently been considered as applicable to stability, using conventional control methods. The report considers the use of artificial neural networks to improve the stability of the power system. The networks are considered as adjuncts and as replacements for existing controllers. The optimal kind of network to use as an adjunct to a generator exciter is discussed.

  4. Validation of artificial skin equivalents as in vitro testing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Robert; Marx, Ulrich; Walles, Heike; Schober, Lena

    2011-03-01

    With the increasing complexity of the chemical composition of pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and everyday substances, the awareness of potential health issues and long term damages for humanoid organs is shifting into focus. Artificial in vitro testing systems play an important role in providing reliable test conditions and replacing precarious animal testing. Especially artificial skin equivalents ASEs are used for a broad spectrum of studies like penetration, irritation and corrosion of substances. One major challenge in tissue engineering is the qualification of each individual ASE as in vitro testing system. Due to biological fluctuations, the stratum corneum hornified layer of some ASEs may not fully develop or other defects might occur. For monitoring these effects we developed an fully automated Optical Coherence Tomography device. Here, we present different methods to characterize and evaluate the quality of the ASEs based on image and data processing of OCT B-scans. By analysing the surface structure, defects, like cuts or tears, are detectable. A further indicator for the quality of the ASE is the morphology of the tissue. This allows to determine if the skin model has reached the final growth state. We found, that OCT is a well suited technology for automatically characterizing artificial skin equivalents and validating the application as testing system.

  5. Artificial immune system approach for air combat maneuvering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneshige, John; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje

    2007-04-01

    Since future air combat missions will involve both manned and unmanned aircraft, the primary motivation for this research is to enable unmanned aircraft with intelligent maneuvering capabilities. During air combat maneuvering, pilots use their knowledge and experience of maneuvering strategies and tactics to determine the best course of action. As a result, we try to capture these aspects using an artificial immune system approach. The biological immune system protects the body against intruders by recognizing and destroying harmful cells or molecules. It can be thought of as a robust adaptive system that is capable of dealing with an enormous variety of disturbances and uncertainties. However, another critical aspect of the immune system is that it can remember how previous encounters were successfully defeated. As a result, it can respond faster to similar encounters in the future. This paper describes how an artificial immune system is used to select and construct air combat maneuvers. These maneuvers are composed of autopilot mode and target commands, which represent the low-level building blocks of the parameterized system. The resulting command sequences are sent to a tactical autopilot system, which has been enhanced with additional modes and an aggressiveness factor for enabling high performance maneuvers. Just as vaccinations train the biological immune system how to combat intruders, training sets are used to teach the maneuvering system how to respond to different enemy aircraft situations. Simulation results are presented, which demonstrate the potential of using immunized maneuver selection for the purposes of air combat maneuvering.

  6. Oxygen regulation of development of the photosynthetic membrane system in Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, J.M.; Redlinger, T.E.; Blankenship, R.E.; Fuller, R.C.

    1986-08-01

    Oxygen levels which control induction of the assembly of the pigment-protein photosynthetic polypeptides in dark-grown Chloroflexus aurantiacus were determined. The induction signal by low-oxygen tension is not directly related to the respiratory competence of these photosynthetic cells. Cytochrome c/sub 554/, the primary electron donor to P865/sup +/ of the reaction center, is not present in dark-grown respiratory cells but is induced in parallel with bacteriochlorophylls a and c and at similar oxygen partial pressure. The development of these components of the photosynthetic apparatus and its electron transport chain is completely independent of the presence of any detectable light of bacteriochlorophyll c or a pigments in C. aurantiacus.

  7. Tris-bipyridine based dinuclear ruthenium(ii)-osmium(iii) complex dyads grafted onto TiO2 nanoparticles for mimicking the artificial photosynthetic Z-scheme.

    PubMed

    Favereau, Ludovic; Makhal, Abhinandan; Provost, David; Pellegrin, Yann; Blart, Errol; Göransson, Erik; Hammarström, Leif; Odobel, Fabrice

    2017-02-08

    The Z-Scheme function within molecular systems has been rarely reported for solar energy conversion although it offers the possibility to achieve higher efficiency than single photon absorber photosystems due to the use of a wider range of visible light. In this study, we synthesized and investigated the electrochemical and spectroscopic properties of two new dyads based on ruthenium and osmium tris-bipyridine complexes covalently linked via a butane bridge to explore their ability to realize the Z-scheme function once immobilized on TiO2. These dyads can be grafted onto a nanocrystalline TiO2 film via the osmium complex bearing two dicarboxylic acid bipyridine ligands, while the ruthenium complex contains either two unsubstituted bipyridine ancillary ligands (RuH-Os) or two (4,4'-bis-trifluoromethyl-bipyridine) ancillary ligands (RuCF3-Os). Transient absorption spectroscopy studies of the Ru(ii)-Os(iii) dyads with femtosecond and nanosecond lasers were conducted both in solution and on TiO2. For both conditions, the photophysical studies revealed that the MLCT excited state of the ruthenium complex is strongly quenched and predominantly decays by energy transfer to the LMCT of the adjacent Os(iii) complex, in spite of the high driving force for electron transfer. This unexpected result, which is in sharp contrast to previously reported Ru(ii)-Os(iii) dyads, precluded us to achieve the expected Z-scheme function. However, the above results may be a guide for designing new artificial molecular systems reproducing the complex function of a Z-scheme with molecular systems grafted onto a TiO2 mesoporous film.

  8. Artificial ferroic systems: novel functionality from structure, interactions and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Heyderman, L J; Stamps, R L

    2013-09-11

    Lithographic processing and film growth technologies are continuing to advance, so that it is now possible to create patterned ferroic materials consisting of arrays of sub-1 μm elements with high definition. Some of the most fascinating behaviour of these arrays can be realised by exploiting interactions between the individual elements to create new functionality. The properties of these artificial ferroic systems differ strikingly from those of their constituent components, with novel emergent behaviour arising from the collective dynamics of the interacting elements, which are arranged in specific designs and can be activated by applying magnetic or electric fields. We first focus on artificial spin systems consisting of arrays of dipolar-coupled nanomagnets and, in particular, review the field of artificial spin ice, which demonstrates a wide range of fascinating phenomena arising from the frustration inherent in particular arrangements of nanomagnets, including emergent magnetic monopoles, domains of ordered macrospins, and novel avalanche behaviour. We outline how demagnetisation protocols have been employed as an effective thermal anneal in an attempt to reach the ground state, comment on phenomena that arise in thermally activated systems and discuss strategies for selectively generating specific configurations using applied magnetic fields. We then move on from slow field and temperature driven dynamics to high frequency phenomena, discussing spinwave excitations in the context of magnonic crystals constructed from arrays of patterned magnetic elements. At high frequencies, these arrays are studied in terms of potential applications including magnetic logic, linear and non-linear microwave optics, and fast, efficient switching, and we consider the possibility to create tunable magnonic crystals with artificial spin ice. Finally, we discuss how functional ferroic composites can be incorporated to realise magnetoelectric effects. Specifically, we discuss

  9. Optimization of nonlinear excitation for reducing light-induced changes in photosynthetic systems during imaging with multimodal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisek, Richard; Major, Arkady; Prent, Nicole; Greenhalgh, Catherine; Barzda, Virginijus

    2006-09-01

    Nonlinear microscopy is a very attractive tool for studying photosynthetic organisms on cellular and subcellular levels. The multimodal microscope can be employed to image photosynthetic structures simultaneously with multiphoton excitation fluorescence (MPF), second harmonic generation (SHG), and third harmonic generation (THG) contrast mechanisms. Although the multimodal nonlinear microscope delivers invaluable information about the structure, spectroscopic properties, and functional dynamics of photosynthetic systems, the prompt light-induced changes of highly light sensitive pigment-protein complexes complicate the extensive study of photosynthetic organisms. In this work, we investigated the extent of light-induced changes in chloroplasts from higher plants by imaging with a Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser and a Yb-ion doped potassium gadolinium tungstate (Yb:KGW) femtosecond laser. The Ti:Sapphire laser delivered 800 nm wavelength and ~25 fs duration pulses at a 26.7 MHz repetition rate. In comparison, the Yb:KGW laser provided a 1042 nm wavelength, ~200 fs pulses at a repetition rate of 14.6 MHz. The 800 nm pulses predominantly excited chlorophyll pigments via two-photon excitation, while 1042 nm excitation resulted in two-photon absorption of carotenoids. The induced fluorescence quenching, and decrease in SHG and THG signal was much stronger when imaged with a Ti:Sapphire laser. Prolonged imaging of up to tenths of minutes with the Yb:KGW laser did not result in appreciable changes of all three nonlinear signals. The difference in the light-induced changes most probably appears due to the difference in excited state dynamics following chlorophyll or carotenoid excitation. The slow component of MPF and THG changes as well as change in SHG reflects the light-induced macroorganization of the grana, while the fast MPF and THG component is tentatively attributed to the generation of quenchers from chlorophyll molecules. The success in imaging photosynthetic

  10. Reduction-Induced Suppression of Electron Flow (RISE) in the Photosynthetic Electron Transport System of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942.

    PubMed

    Shaku, Keiichiro; Shimakawa, Ginga; Hashiguchi, Masaki; Miyake, Chikahiro

    2016-07-01

    Accumulation of electrons under conditions of environmental stress produces a reduced state in the photosynthetic electron transport (PET) system and causes the reduction of O2 by PSI in the thylakoid membranes to produce the reactive oxygen species superoxide radical, which irreversibly inactivates PSI. This study aims to elucidate the molecular mechanism for the oxidation of reaction center Chl of PSI, P700, after saturated pulse (SP) light illumination of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 under steady-state photosynthetic conditions. Both P700 and NADPH were transiently oxidized after SP light illumination under CO2-depleted photosynthesis conditions. In contrast, the Chl fluorescence intensity transiently increased. Compared with the wild type, the increase in Chl fluorescence and the oxidations of P700 and NADPH were greatly enhanced in a mutant (Δflv1/3) deficient in the genes encoding FLAVODIIRON 1 (FLV1) and FLV3 proteins even under high photosynthetic conditions. Furthermore, oxidation of Cyt f was also observed in the mutant. After SP light illumination, a transient suppression of O2 evolution was also observed in Δflv1/3. From these observations, we propose that the reduction in the plastquinone (PQ) pool suppresses linear electron flow at the Cyt b6/f complex, which we call the reduction-induced suppression of electron flow (RISE) in the PET system. The accumulation of the reduced form of PQ probably suppresses turnover of the Q cycle in the Cyt b6/f complex.

  11. Artificial intelligence and expert systems in-flight software testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demasie, M. P.; Muratore, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    The authors discuss the introduction of advanced information systems technologies such as artificial intelligence, expert systems, and advanced human-computer interfaces directly into Space Shuttle software engineering. The reconfiguration automation project (RAP) was initiated to coordinate this move towards 1990s software technology. The idea behind RAP is to automate several phases of the flight software testing procedure and to introduce AI and ES into space shuttle flight software testing. In the first phase of RAP, conventional tools to automate regression testing have already been developed or acquired. There are currently three tools in use.

  12. Artificial intelligence and expert systems in-flight software testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demasie, M. P.; Muratore, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    The authors discuss the introduction of advanced information systems technologies such as artificial intelligence, expert systems, and advanced human-computer interfaces directly into Space Shuttle software engineering. The reconfiguration automation project (RAP) was initiated to coordinate this move towards 1990s software technology. The idea behind RAP is to automate several phases of the flight software testing procedure and to introduce AI and ES into space shuttle flight software testing. In the first phase of RAP, conventional tools to automate regression testing have already been developed or acquired. There are currently three tools in use.

  13. Artificial endocrine controller for power management in robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Sauzé, Colin; Neal, Mark

    2013-12-01

    The robots that operate autonomously for extended periods in remote environments are often limited to gather only small amounts of power through photovoltaic solar panels. Such limited power budgets make power management critical to the success of the robot's mission. Artificial endocrine controllers, inspired by the mammalian endocrine system, have shown potential as a method for managing competing demands, gradually switching between behaviors, synchronizing behavior with external events, and maintaining a stable internal state of the robot. This paper reports the results obtained using these methods to manage power in an autonomous sailing robot. Artificial neural networks are used for sail and rudder control, while an artificial endocrine controller modulates the magnitude of actuator movements in response to battery or sunlight levels. Experiments are performed both in simulation and using a real robot. In simulation a 13-fold reduction in median power consumption is achieved; in the robot this is reduced to a twofold reduction because of the limitations of the simulation model. Additional simulations of a long term mission demonstrate the controller's ability to make gradual behavioral transitions and to synchronize behaviors with diurnal and seasonal changes in sunlight levels.

  14. Pathway to artificial pancreas systems revisited: moving downstream.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Aaron

    2015-06-01

    Artificial pancreas (AP) systems, a long-sought quest to replicate mechanically islet physiology that is lost in diabetes, are reaching the clinic, and the potential of automating insulin delivery is about to be realized. Significant progress has been made, and the safety and feasibility of AP systems have been demonstrated in the clinical research center and more recently in outpatient "real-world" environments. An iterative road map to AP system development has guided AP research since 2009, but progress in the field indicates that it needs updating. While it is now clear that AP systems are technically feasible, it remains much less certain that they will be widely adopted by clinicians and patients. Ultimately, the true success of AP systems will be defined by successful integration into the diabetes health care system and by the ultimate metric: improved diabetes outcomes.

  15. Development of a gene cloning system for the hydrogen-producing marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, T.; Matsunaga, N.; Tsubaki, K.; Tanaka, T.

    1986-10-01

    Seventy-six strains of marine photosynthetic bacteria were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis for plasmid DNA content. Among these strains, 12 carried two to four different plasmids with sizes ranging from 3.1 to 11.0 megadaltons. The marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 had two plasmids, pRD06S and pRD06L. The smaller plasmid, pRD06S, had a molecular weight of 3.8 megadaltons and was cut at a single site by restriction endonucleases SalI, SmaI, PstI, XhoI, and BglII. Moreover, the marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 containing plasmid pRD06 had a satisfactory growth rate (doubling time, 7.5 h), a hydrogen-producing rate of 0.96 ..mu..mol/mg (dry weight) of cells per h, and nitrogen fixation capability. Plasmid pRD06S, however, had neither drug resistance nor heavy-metal resistance, and its copy number was less than 10. Therefore, a recombinant plasmid consisting of pRD06S and Escherichia coli cloning vector pUC13 was constructed and cloned in E. coli. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106. As a result, Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 developed ampicillin resistance. Thus, a shuttle vector for gene transfer was constructed for marine photosynthetic bacteria.

  16. An artificial compound eye system for large field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Shi, Lifang; Shi, Ruiying; Dong, Xiaochun; Deng, Qiling; Du, Chunlei

    2012-11-01

    With the rapid development of science and technology, optical imaging system has been widely used, and the performance requirements are getting higher and higher such as lighter weight, smaller size, larger field of view and more sensitive to the moving targets. With the advantages of large field of view, high agility and multi-channels, compound eye is more and more concerned by academia and industry. In this work, an artificial spherical compound eye imaging system is proposed, which is formed by several mini cameras to get a large field of view. By analyzing the relationship of the view field between every single camera and the whole system, the geometric arrangement of cameras is studied and the compound eye structure is designed. By using the precision machining technology, the system can be manufactured. To verify the performance of this system, experiments were carried out, where the compound eye was formed by seven mini cameras which were placed centripetally along a spherical surface so that each camera points in a different direction. Pictures taken by these cameras were mosaiced into a complete image with large field of view. The results of the experiments prove the validity of the design method and the fabrication technology. By increasing the number of the cameras, larger view field even panoramic imaging can be realized by using this artificial compound eye.

  17. A Preliminary Research Plan for Development of a Photosynthetic Link in a Closed Ecological Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P. W.

    1979-01-01

    The use of higher plants in a closed ecological life support system for long duration space missions involving large numbers of people is considered. The approach to planning and developing both the habitat for a long term space mission and closed ecological life support systems are discussed with emphasis on environmental compatibility and integrated systems design. The requirements of photosynthetic processes are summarized and evaluated in terms of their availability within a closed ecological life support environment. Specific references are recommended as a data base for future research on this topic.

  18. An artificial bioindicator system for network intrusion detection.

    PubMed

    Blum, Christian; Lozano, José A; Davidson, Pedro Pinacho

    2015-01-01

    An artificial bioindicator system is developed in order to solve a network intrusion detection problem. The system, inspired by an ecological approach to biological immune systems, evolves a population of agents that learn to survive in their environment. An adaptation process allows the transformation of the agent population into a bioindicator that is capable of reacting to system anomalies. Two characteristics stand out in our proposal. On the one hand, it is able to discover new, previously unseen attacks, and on the other hand, contrary to most of the existing systems for network intrusion detection, it does not need any previous training. We experimentally compare our proposal with three state-of-the-art algorithms and show that it outperforms the competing approaches on widely used benchmark data.

  19. Artificial vision support system (AVS(2)) for improved prosthetic vision.

    PubMed

    Fink, Wolfgang; Tarbell, Mark A

    2014-11-01

    State-of-the-art and upcoming camera-driven, implanted artificial vision systems provide only tens to hundreds of electrodes, affording only limited visual perception for blind subjects. Therefore, real time image processing is crucial to enhance and optimize this limited perception. Since tens or hundreds of pixels/electrodes allow only for a very crude approximation of the typically megapixel optical resolution of the external camera image feed, the preservation and enhancement of contrast differences and transitions, such as edges, are especially important compared to picture details such as object texture. An Artificial Vision Support System (AVS(2)) is devised that displays the captured video stream in a pixelation conforming to the dimension of the epi-retinal implant electrode array. AVS(2), using efficient image processing modules, modifies the captured video stream in real time, enhancing 'present but hidden' objects to overcome inadequacies or extremes in the camera imagery. As a result, visual prosthesis carriers may now be able to discern such objects in their 'field-of-view', thus enabling mobility in environments that would otherwise be too hazardous to navigate. The image processing modules can be engaged repeatedly in a user-defined order, which is a unique capability. AVS(2) is directly applicable to any artificial vision system that is based on an imaging modality (video, infrared, sound, ultrasound, microwave, radar, etc.) as the first step in the stimulation/processing cascade, such as: retinal implants (i.e. epi-retinal, sub-retinal, suprachoroidal), optic nerve implants, cortical implants, electric tongue stimulators, or tactile stimulators.

  20. The role of artificial intelligence techniques in scheduling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geoffroy, Amy L.; Britt, Daniel L.; Gohring, John R.

    1990-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques provide good solutions for many of the problems which are characteristic of scheduling applications. However, scheduling is a large, complex heterogeneous problem. Different applications will require different solutions. Any individual application will require the use of a variety of techniques, including both AI and conventional software methods. The operational context of the scheduling system will also play a large role in design considerations. The key is to identify those places where a specific AI technique is in fact the preferable solution, and to integrate that technique into the overall architecture.

  1. The application of artificial intelligence technology to aeronautical system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouchard, E. E.; Kidwell, G. H.; Rogan, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the automation of one class of aeronautical design activity using artificial intelligence and advanced software techniques. Its purpose is to suggest concepts, terminology, and approaches that may be useful in enhancing design automation. By understanding the basic concepts and tasks in design, and the technologies that are available, it will be possible to produce, in the future, systems whose capabilities far exceed those of today's methods. Some of the tasks that will be discussed have already been automated and are in production use, resulting in significant productivity benefits. The concepts and techniques discussed are applicable to all design activity, though aeronautical applications are specifically presented.

  2. Vaccine-enhanced artificial immune system for multimodal function optimization.

    PubMed

    Woldemariam, Kumlachew M; Yen, Gary G

    2010-02-01

    This paper emulates a biological notion in vaccines to promote exploration in the search space for solving multimodal function optimization problems using artificial immune systems (AISs). In this method, we first divide the decision space into equal subspaces. The vaccine is then randomly extracted from each subspace. A few of these vaccines, in the form of weakened antigens, are then injected into the algorithm to enhance the exploration of global and local optima. The goal of this process is to lead the antibodies to unexplored areas. Using this biologically motivated notion, we design the vaccine-enhanced AIS for multimodal function optimization, achieving promising performance.

  3. Design Considerations for Artificial Lifting of Enhanced Geothermal System Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Xina Xie; K. K. Bloomfield; G. L. Mines; G. M. Shook

    2005-07-01

    This work evaluates the effect of production well pumping requirements on power generation. The amount of work that can be extracted from a geothermal fluid and the rate at which this work is converted to power increase as the reservoir temperature increases. Artificial lifting is an important issue in this process. The results presented are based on a configuration comprising one production well and one injection well, representing an enhanced geothermal system. The effects of the hydraulic conductivity of the geothermal reservoir, the flow rate, and the size of the production casing are considered in the study. Besides submersible pumps, the possibility of using lineshaft pumps is also discussed.

  4. The application of artificial intelligence technology to aeronautical system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouchard, E. E.; Kidwell, G. H.; Rogan, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the automation of one class of aeronautical design activity using artificial intelligence and advanced software techniques. Its purpose is to suggest concepts, terminology, and approaches that may be useful in enhancing design automation. By understanding the basic concepts and tasks in design, and the technologies that are available, it will be possible to produce, in the future, systems whose capabilities far exceed those of today's methods. Some of the tasks that will be discussed have already been automated and are in production use, resulting in significant productivity benefits. The concepts and techniques discussed are applicable to all design activity, though aeronautical applications are specifically presented.

  5. Adaptive conventional power system stabilizer based on artificial neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, M.L.; Segal, R.; Ghodki, B.K.

    1995-12-31

    This paper deals with an artificial neural network (ANN) based adaptive conventional power system stabilizer (PSS). The ANN comprises an input layer, a hidden layer and an output layer. The input vector to the ANN comprises real power (P) and reactive power (Q), while the output vector comprises optimum PSS parameters. A systematic approach for generating training set covering wide range of operating conditions, is presented. The ANN has been trained using back-propagation training algorithm. Investigations reveal that the dynamic performance of ANN based adaptive conventional PSS is quite insensitive to wide variations in loading conditions.

  6. Evaluation of articulation simulation system using artificial maxillectomy models.

    PubMed

    Elbashti, M E; Hattori, M; Sumita, Y I; Taniguchi, H

    2015-09-01

    Acoustic evaluation is valuable for guiding the treatment of maxillofacial defects and determining the effectiveness of rehabilitation with an obturator prosthesis. Model simulations are important in terms of pre-surgical planning and pre- and post-operative speech function. This study aimed to evaluate the acoustic characteristics of voice generated by an articulation simulation system using a vocal tract model with or without artificial maxillectomy defects. More specifically, we aimed to establish a speech simulation system for maxillectomy defect models that both surgeons and maxillofacial prosthodontists can use in guiding treatment planning. Artificially simulated maxillectomy defects were prepared according to Aramany's classification (Classes I-VI) in a three-dimensional vocal tract plaster model of a subject uttering the vowel /a/. Formant and nasalance acoustic data were analysed using Computerized Speech Lab and the Nasometer, respectively. Formants and nasalance of simulated /a/ sounds were successfully detected and analysed. Values of Formants 1 and 2 for the non-defect model were 675.43 and 976.64 Hz, respectively. Median values of Formants 1 and 2 for the defect models were 634.36 and 1026.84 Hz, respectively. Nasalance was 11% in the non-defect model, whereas median nasalance was 28% in the defect models. The results suggest that an articulation simulation system can be used to help surgeons and maxillofacial prosthodontists to plan post-surgical defects that will be facilitate maxillofacial rehabilitation.

  7. Monitoring induced denitrification in an artificial aquifer recharge system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grau-Martinez, Alba; Torrentó, Clara; Folch, Albert; Domènech, Cristina; Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert

    2014-05-01

    literature ɛN values of -4o and -22o respectively (Aravena and Robertson, 1998; Pauwels et al., 2000). Ongoing denitrification batch experiments will allow us to determine the specific nitrogen and oxygen isotopic fractionation induced by the organic reactive layer, in order to estimate more precisely the extent of denitrification during artificial aquifer recharge. These results confirmed that the reactive layer induces denitrification in the recharge ponds area, proving the usefulness of an isotopic approach to characterize water quality improvement occurring during artificial aquifer recharge. References 1. Aravena, R., Robertson, W.D., 1998. Use of multiple isotope tracers to evaluate denitrification in ground water: Study of nitrate from a large-flux septic system plume. Ground Water, 36(6): 975-982. 2. Pauwels, H., J.C., Kloppmann, W., 2000. Denitrification and mixing in a schist aquifer: Influence on water chemistry and isotopes. Chemical Geology, 168(3-4): 307-324. Acknowledgment This study was supported by the projects CGL2011-29975-C04-01 from the Spanish Government, 2009SGR-00103 from the Catalan Government and ENPI/2011/280-008 from the European Commission. Please fill in your abstract text.

  8. ANUBIS: artificial neuromodulation using a Bayesian inference system.

    PubMed

    Smith, Benjamin J H; Saaj, Chakravarthini M; Allouis, Elie

    2013-01-01

    Gain tuning is a crucial part of controller design and depends not only on an accurate understanding of the system in question, but also on the designer's ability to predict what disturbances and other perturbations the system will encounter throughout its operation. This letter presents ANUBIS (artificial neuromodulation using a Bayesian inference system), a novel biologically inspired technique for automatically tuning controller parameters in real time. ANUBIS is based on the Bayesian brain concept and modifies it by incorporating a model of the neuromodulatory system comprising four artificial neuromodulators. It has been applied to the controller of EchinoBot, a prototype walking rover for Martian exploration. ANUBIS has been implemented at three levels of the controller; gait generation, foot trajectory planning using Bézier curves, and foot trajectory tracking using a terminal sliding mode controller. We compare the results to a similar system that has been tuned using a multilayer perceptron. The use of Bayesian inference means that the system retains mathematical interpretability, unlike other intelligent tuning techniques, which use neural networks, fuzzy logic, or evolutionary algorithms. The simulation results show that ANUBIS provides significant improvements in efficiency and adaptability of the three controller components; it allows the robot to react to obstacles and uncertainties faster than the system tuned with the MLP, while maintaining stability and accuracy. As well as advancing rover autonomy, ANUBIS could also be applied to other situations where operating conditions are likely to change or cannot be accurately modeled in advance, such as process control. In addition, it demonstrates one way in which neuromodulation could fit into the Bayesian brain framework.

  9. Current topics in glycemic control by wearable artificial pancreas or bedside artificial pancreas with closed-loop system.

    PubMed

    Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Munekage, Masaya; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Munekage, Eri; Shiga, Mai; Maeda, Hiromichi; Namikawa, Tsutomu

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of diabetes is increasing at an unprecedented pace and has become a serious health concern worldwide during the last two decades. Despite this, adequate glycemic control using an artificial pancreas has not been established, although the 21st century has seen rapid developments in this area. Herein, we review current topics in glycemic control for both the wearable artificial pancreas for type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients and the bedside artificial pancreas for surgical diabetic patients. In type 1 diabetic patients, nocturnal hypoglycemia associated with insulin therapy remains a serious problem that could be addressed by the recent development of a wearable artificial pancreas. This smart phone-like device, comprising a real-time, continuous glucose monitoring system and insulin pump system, could potentially significantly reduce nocturnal hypoglycemia compared with conventional glycemic control. Of particular interest in this space are the recent inventions of a low-glucose suspend feature in the portable systems that automatically stops insulin delivery 2 h following a glucose sensor value <70 mg/dL and a bio-hormonal pump system consisting of insulin and glucagon pumps. Perioperative tight glycemic control using a bedside artificial pancreas with the closed-loop system has also proved safe and effective for not only avoiding hypoglycemia, but also for reducing blood glucose level variability resulting in good surgical outcomes. We hope that a more sophisticated artificial pancreas with closed-loop system will now be taken up for routine use worldwide, providing enormous relief for patients suffering from uncontrolled hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and/or variability in blood glucose concentrations.

  10. Incomplete fuzzy data processing systems using artificial neural network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patyra, Marek J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the implementation of a fuzzy data processing system using an artificial neural network (ANN) is discussed. The binary representation of fuzzy data is assumed, where the universe of discourse is decartelized into n equal intervals. The value of a membership function is represented by a binary number. It is proposed that incomplete fuzzy data processing be performed in two stages. The first stage performs the 'retrieval' of incomplete fuzzy data, and the second stage performs the desired operation on the retrieval data. The method of incomplete fuzzy data retrieval is proposed based on the linear approximation of missing values of the membership function. The ANN implementation of the proposed system is presented. The system was computationally verified and showed a relatively small total error.

  11. Ultrathin Alvarez lens system actuated by artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Petsch, S; Grewe, A; Köbele, L; Sinzinger, S; Zappe, H

    2016-04-01

    A key feature of Alvarez lenses is that they may be tuned in focal length using lateral rather than axial translation, thus reducing the overall length of a focus-tunable optical system. Nevertheless the bulk of classical microsystems actuators limits further miniaturization. We present here a new, ultrathin focus-tunable Alvarez lens fabricated using molding techniques and actuated using liquid crystal elastomer (LCE) artificial muscle actuators. The large deformation generated by the LCE actuators permits the integration of the actuators in-plane with the mechanical and optical system and thus reduces the device thickness to only 1.6 mm. Movement of the Alvarez lens pair of 178 μm results in a focal length change of 3.3 mm, based on an initial focal length of 28.4 mm. This design is of considerable interest for realization of ultraflat focus-tunable and zoom systems.

  12. Incomplete fuzzy data processing systems using artificial neural network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patyra, Marek J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the implementation of a fuzzy data processing system using an artificial neural network (ANN) is discussed. The binary representation of fuzzy data is assumed, where the universe of discourse is decartelized into n equal intervals. The value of a membership function is represented by a binary number. It is proposed that incomplete fuzzy data processing be performed in two stages. The first stage performs the 'retrieval' of incomplete fuzzy data, and the second stage performs the desired operation on the retrieval data. The method of incomplete fuzzy data retrieval is proposed based on the linear approximation of missing values of the membership function. The ANN implementation of the proposed system is presented. The system was computationally verified and showed a relatively small total error.

  13. Development of an Electrohydraulic Total Artificial Heart System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma, Akihiko; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Mizuno, Toshihide; Shioya, Kyoko; Lee, Hwan Sung; Tsukiya, Tomonori; Kakuta, Yukihide; Katagiri, Nobumasa; Nishinaka, Tomohiro; Koshiji, Kohji

    An electrohydraulic total artificial heart (EHTAH) system has been developed. The EHTAH system consists of diaphragm-type blood pumps, an electrohydraulic actuator, an internal control unit, a transcutaneous energy transfer system (TETS), a transcutaneous optical telemetry system (TOTS), and an internal battery. The reciprocating rotation of the impeller generates oil pressure which drives the blood pumps at alternating intervals. The blood pumps and the actuator were successfully integrated into the pump unit without oil conduits. As a result of miniaturizing the blood pumps and the actuator, the displacement volume and weight of the EHTAH system decreased to 872 ml and 2492g, respectively. Furthermore, the maximum flow rate and efficiency increased up to 12 L/min and 15.4%. The pump units and the EHTAH systems were successfully implanted in 36 calves weighing from 55 to 87kg. In the longest case, the ca1f with the pump unit survived for 87 days and the calf with the EHTAH system survived for 70 days. The EHTAH system was powered by the TETS, and was powered everyday by the internal battery for 40 minutes. These results indicate that the EHTAH system has the potential to become a fully implantable cardiac replacement system.

  14. An integrated solar and artificial light system for internal illumination of photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Ogbonna, J C; Soejima, T; Tanaka, H

    1999-04-30

    Exploitation of photosynthetic cells for the production of useful metabolites requires efficient photobioreactors. Many laboratory scale photobioreactors have been reported but most of them are extremely difficult to scale up. Furthermore, the use of open ponds and outdoor tubular photobioreactors is limited by the requirement for large spaces and the difficulty in maintaining sterile conditions. In view of this, we have designed and constructed an internally illuminated stirred tank photobioreactor. The photobioreactor is simple, heat sterilizable and mechanically agitated like the conventional stirred tank bioreactors. Furthermore, it can easily be scaled up while maintaining the light supply coefficient and thus the productivity constant. A device was installed for collecting solar light and distributing it inside the reactor through optical fibers. It was equipped with a light tracking sensor so that the lenses rotate with the position of the sun. This makes it possible to use solar light for photosynthetic cell cultivation in indoor photobioreactors. As a solution to the problems of night biomass loss and low productivity on cloudy days, an artificial light source was coupled with the solar light collecting device. A light intensity sensor monitors the solar light intensity and the artificial light is automatically switched on or off, depending on the solar light intensity. In this way, continuous light supply to the reactor is achieved by using solar light during sunny period, and artificial light at night and on cloudy days.

  15. Interactions between Artificial Gravity, Affected Physiological Systems, and Nutrition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heer, Martina; Baecker, Natalie; Zwart, Sara; Smith, Scott M.

    2007-01-01

    Malnutrition, either by insufficient supply of some nutrients or by overfeeding has a profound effect on the health of an organism. Therefore, optimal nutrition is mandatory on Earth (1 g), in microgravity and also when applying artificial gravity to the human system. Immobilization like in microgravity or bed rest also has a profound effect on different physiological systems, like body fluid regulation, the cardiovascular, the musculoskeletal, the immunological system and others. Up to now there is no countermeasure available which is effective to counteract cardiovascular deconditioning (rf. Chapter 5) together with maintenance of the musculoskeletal system in a rather short period of time. Gravity seems therefore to be one of the main stimuli to keep these systems and application of certain duration of artificial gravity per day by centrifugation has often been proposed as a very potential countermeasure against the weakening of the physiological systems. Up to now, neither optimal intensity nor optimal length of application of artificial gravity has been studied sufficiently to recommend a certain, effective and efficient protocol. However, as shown in chapter 5 on cardiovascular system, in chapter 6 on the neuromuscular system and chapter 7 (bone and connective system) artificial gravity has a very high potential to counteract any degradation caused by immobilization. But, nutrient supply -which ideally should match the actual needs- will interact with these changes and therefore has also to be taken into account. It is well known that astronauts beside the Skylab missions- were and are still not optimally nourished during their stay in space (Bourland et al. 2000;Heer et al. 1995;Heer et al. 2000b;Smith et al. 1997;Smith & Lane 1999;Smith et al. 2001;Smith et al. 2005). It has also been described anecdotally that astronauts have lower appetites. One possible explanation could be altered taste and smell sensations during space flight, although in some early

  16. Light-induced systemic regulation of photosynthesis in primary and trifoliate leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris: effects of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) versus spectrum.

    PubMed

    Murakami, K; Matsuda, R; Fujiwara, K

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this work using Phaseolus vulgaris were to examine whether the light spectrum incident on mature primary leaves (PLs) is related to leaf-to-leaf systemic regulation of developing trifoliate leaves (TLs) in photosynthetic characteristics, and to investigate the relative importance of spectrum and photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) in light-induced systemic regulation. Systemic regulation was induced by altering PPFD and the spectrum of light incident on PLs using a shading treatment and lighting treatments including either white, blue, green or red light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Photosynthetic characteristics were evaluated by measuring the light-limited and light-saturated net photosynthetic rates and the amounts of nitrogen (N), chlorophyll (Chl) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco; EC 4.1.1.39). Shading treatment on PLs decreased the amounts of N, Chl and Rubisco of TLs and tended to decrease the photosynthetic rates. However, we observed no systemic effects induced by the light spectrum on PLs in this study, except that a higher amount of Rubisco of TLs was observed when the PLs were irradiated with blue LEDs. Our results imply that photoreceptors in mature leaves have little influence on photosynthetic rates and amounts of N and Chl of developing leaves through systemic regulation, although the possibility of the action of blue light irradiation on the amount of Rubisco cannot be ruled out. Based on these results, we concluded that the light spectrum incident on mature leaves has little systemic effect on developing leaves in terms of photosynthetic characteristics and that the light-induced systemic regulation was largely accounted for by PPFD.

  17. A Bio-Inspired Electromechanical System: Artificial Hair Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kang-Hun

    Inspired by recent biophysical study on the auditory sensory organs, we study electromechanical system which functions similar to the hair cell of the ear. One of the important mechanisms of hair cells, adaptation, is mimicked by an electromechanical feedback loop. The proposed artificial hair cell functions similar to a living sensory organ in the sense that it senses input force signal in spite of the relatively strong noise. Numerical simulation of the proposed system shows otoacoustic sound emission, which was observed in the experiments on the hair cells of the bullfrog. This spontaneous motion is noise-induced periodic motion which is controlled by the time scale of adaptation process and the mechanical damping.

  18. A Survey of Artificial Immune System Based Intrusion Detection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Hu, Xinlei; Wang, Feng; Zou, Yang

    2014-01-01

    In the area of computer security, Intrusion Detection (ID) is a mechanism that attempts to discover abnormal access to computers by analyzing various interactions. There is a lot of literature about ID, but this study only surveys the approaches based on Artificial Immune System (AIS). The use of AIS in ID is an appealing concept in current techniques. This paper summarizes AIS based ID methods from a new view point; moreover, a framework is proposed for the design of AIS based ID Systems (IDSs). This framework is analyzed and discussed based on three core aspects: antibody/antigen encoding, generation algorithm, and evolution mode. Then we collate the commonly used algorithms, their implementation characteristics, and the development of IDSs into this framework. Finally, some of the future challenges in this area are also highlighted. PMID:24790549

  19. Design of speaker recognition system based on artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanhong; Wang, Li; Lin, Han; Li, Jinlong

    2012-10-01

    Speaker recognition is to recognize speaker's identity from its voice which contains physiological and behavioral characteristics unique to each individual. In this paper, the artificial neural network model, which has very good capacity of non-linear division in characteristic space, is used for pattern matching. The speaker's sample characteristic domain is built for his mixed voice characteristic signals based on Kmeanlbg algorithm. Then the dimension of the inputting eigenvector is reduced, and the redundant information is got rid of. On this basis, BP neural network is used to divide capacity area for characteristic space nonlinearly, and the BP neural network acts as a classifier for the speaker. Finally, a speaker recognition system based on the neural network is realized and the experiment results validate the recognition performance and robustness of the system.

  20. A survey of artificial immune system based intrusion detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Li, Tao; Hu, Xinlei; Wang, Feng; Zou, Yang

    2014-01-01

    In the area of computer security, Intrusion Detection (ID) is a mechanism that attempts to discover abnormal access to computers by analyzing various interactions. There is a lot of literature about ID, but this study only surveys the approaches based on Artificial Immune System (AIS). The use of AIS in ID is an appealing concept in current techniques. This paper summarizes AIS based ID methods from a new view point; moreover, a framework is proposed for the design of AIS based ID Systems (IDSs). This framework is analyzed and discussed based on three core aspects: antibody/antigen encoding, generation algorithm, and evolution mode. Then we collate the commonly used algorithms, their implementation characteristics, and the development of IDSs into this framework. Finally, some of the future challenges in this area are also highlighted.

  1. Using isotopes for design and monitoring of artificial recharge systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Contributors: Hendriksson, N.; Kulongoski, J.T.; Massmann, G.; Newman, B.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past years, the IAEA has provided support to a number of Member States engaged in the implementation of hydrological projects dealing with the design and monitoring of artificial recharge ( A R ) systems, primarily situated in arid and semiarid regions. AR is defined as any engineered system designed to introduce water to, and store water in, underlying aquifers. Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is a specific type of AR used with the purpose of increasing groundwater resources. Different water management strategies have been tested under various geographical, hydrological and climatic regimes. However, the success of such schemes cannot easily be predicted, since many variables need to be taken into account in the early stages of every AR project.

  2. An artificial intelligence system for computer-assisted menu planning.

    PubMed

    Petot, G J; Marling, C; Sterling, L

    1998-09-01

    Planning nutritious and appetizing menus is a complex task that researchers have tried to computerize since the early 1960s. We have attempted to facilitate computer-assisted menu planning by modeling the reasoning an expert dietitian uses to plan menus. Two independent expert systems were built, each designed to plan a daily menu meeting the nutrition needs and personal preferences of an individual client. One system modeled rule-based, or logical, reasoning, whereas the other modeled case-based, or experiential, reasoning. The 2 systems were evaluated and their strengths and weaknesses identified. A hybrid system was built, combining the best of both systems. The hybrid system represents an important step forward because it plans daily menus in accordance with a person's needs and preferences; the Reference Daily Intakes; the Dietary Guidelines for Americans; and accepted aesthetic standards for color, texture, temperature, taste, and variety. Additional work to expand the system's scope and to enhance the user interface will be needed to make it a practical tool. Our system framework could be applied to special-purpose menu planning for patients in medical settings or adapted for institutional use. We conclude that an artificial intelligence approach has practical use for computer-assisted menu planning.

  3. Towards Design of a Stumble Detection System for Artificial Legs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; D’Andrea, Susan E.; Nunnery, Michael J.; Kay, Steven M.; Huang, He

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in design of powered artificial legs have led to increased potential to allow lower limb amputees to actively recover stumbles. To achieve this goal, promptly and accurately identifying stumbles is essential. This study aimed to (1) select potential stumble detection data sources that react reliably and quickly to stumbles and can be measured from a prosthesis, and (2) investigate two different approaches based on selected data sources to detect stumbles and classify stumble types in patients with transfemoral (TF) amputations during ambulation. In the experiments, the normal gait of TF amputees was perturbed by a controllable treadmill or when they walked on an obstacle course. The results showed that the acceleration of prosthetic foot can accurately detect the tested stumbling events 140–240 ms before the critical timing of falling and precisely classify the stumble type. However, the detector based on foot acceleration produced high false alarm rates, which challenged its real application. Combining electromyographic (EMG) signals recorded from residual limb with the foot acceleration significantly reduced the false alarm rate but sacrificed the detection response time. The results of this study may lead to design of a stumble detection system for instrumented, powered artificial legs; however, continued engineering efforts are required to improve the detection performance and resolve the challenges that remain for implementing the stumble detector on prosthetic legs. PMID:21859635

  4. Artificial Neural Network-Based System for PET Volume Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Mhd Saeed; Abbod, Maysam; Amira, Abbes; Zaidi, Habib

    2010-01-01

    Tumour detection, classification, and quantification in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging at early stage of disease are important issues for clinical diagnosis, assessment of response to treatment, and radiotherapy planning. Many techniques have been proposed for segmenting medical imaging data; however, some of the approaches have poor performance, large inaccuracy, and require substantial computation time for analysing large medical volumes. Artificial intelligence (AI) approaches can provide improved accuracy and save decent amount of time. Artificial neural networks (ANNs), as one of the best AI techniques, have the capability to classify and quantify precisely lesions and model the clinical evaluation for a specific problem. This paper presents a novel application of ANNs in the wavelet domain for PET volume segmentation. ANN performance evaluation using different training algorithms in both spatial and wavelet domains with a different number of neurons in the hidden layer is also presented. The best number of neurons in the hidden layer is determined according to the experimental results, which is also stated Levenberg-Marquardt backpropagation training algorithm as the best training approach for the proposed application. The proposed intelligent system results are compared with those obtained using conventional techniques including thresholding and clustering based approaches. Experimental and Monte Carlo simulated PET phantom data sets and clinical PET volumes of nonsmall cell lung cancer patients were utilised to validate the proposed algorithm which has demonstrated promising results.

  5. Artificial Neural Network-Based System for PET Volume Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mhd Saeed; Abbod, Maysam; Amira, Abbes; Zaidi, Habib

    2010-01-01

    Tumour detection, classification, and quantification in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging at early stage of disease are important issues for clinical diagnosis, assessment of response to treatment, and radiotherapy planning. Many techniques have been proposed for segmenting medical imaging data; however, some of the approaches have poor performance, large inaccuracy, and require substantial computation time for analysing large medical volumes. Artificial intelligence (AI) approaches can provide improved accuracy and save decent amount of time. Artificial neural networks (ANNs), as one of the best AI techniques, have the capability to classify and quantify precisely lesions and model the clinical evaluation for a specific problem. This paper presents a novel application of ANNs in the wavelet domain for PET volume segmentation. ANN performance evaluation using different training algorithms in both spatial and wavelet domains with a different number of neurons in the hidden layer is also presented. The best number of neurons in the hidden layer is determined according to the experimental results, which is also stated Levenberg-Marquardt backpropagation training algorithm as the best training approach for the proposed application. The proposed intelligent system results are compared with those obtained using conventional techniques including thresholding and clustering based approaches. Experimental and Monte Carlo simulated PET phantom data sets and clinical PET volumes of nonsmall cell lung cancer patients were utilised to validate the proposed algorithm which has demonstrated promising results. PMID:20936152

  6. Light absorption by phytoplankton, photosynthetic pigments and detritus in the California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosik, Heidi M.; Mitchell, B. GREG

    1995-10-01

    Pigment-specific absorption by total particulates, detritus and phytoplankton was measured throughout the euphotic zone at > 275 stations on three cruises off California in late 1991 and early 1992. A new spectral fluorescence method for assessing photosynthetically active absorption in natural samples was developed and applied. Spatial variability in specific absorption coefficients at the mesoscale was found to be as high as previously observed between mid- and high latitudes, while differences between cruises were very low. In surface waters, the highest values of specific absorption were found in warm, low-pigment surface waters offshore and in the Southern California Bight. Vertical sections reveal that low values occur near the surface only where the pycnocline and nitracline slope toward the sea surface. The highest values of phytoplankton specific absorption occurred at shallow optical depths for stations with deep nitraclines, whereas the lowest values always occurred close to or below the depth of the nitracline. Specific absorption generally increased with increasing temperature, but there were large differences in the relationships between cruises. In the context of previous laboratory observations, these results imply that nutrient availability plays a greater role than direct temperature effects in controlling natural variance in phytoplankton specific absorption. Specific absorption of photosynthetically active phytoplankton pigments was found to be less variable than that of total phytoplankton and showed no systematic trends with temperature, optical depth, or distance from the nitracline. This result leads to a new version of a bio-optical model for primary production which is based only on the photosynthetically active component rather than total phytoplankton absorption.

  7. Artificial model of photosynthetic oxygen evolving complex: catalytic O2 production from water by di-mu-oxo manganese dimers supported by clay compounds.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Masayuki; Narita, Komei; Maruyama, Syou; Sone, Koji; Kuwabara, Takayuki; Shimizu, Ken-ichi

    2007-06-01

    Adsorption of [(OH(2))(terpy)Mn(mu-O)(2)Mn(terpy)(OH(2))](3+) (terpy=2,2':6',2"-terpyridine) (1) onto montmorillonite K10 (MK10) yielded catalytic dioxygen (O(2)) evolution from water using a Ce(IV) oxidant. The Mn K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) of the 1/MK10 hybrid suggested that the oxidation state of the di-mu-oxo Mn(2) core could be Mn(III)-Mn(IV). However the pre-edge peak in the XANES spectrum of 1 adsorbed on MK10 is different from the neat 1 powder. The kinetic analysis of O(2) evolution showed that the catalysis requires cooperation of two equivalents of 1 adsorbed on MK10. The reaction of the [(bpy)(2)Mn(mu-O)(2)Mn(bpy)(2)](3+) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) (2)/MK10 hybrid with a Ce(IV) oxidant evolved O(2). However, the turnover number value was less than unity for 2/MK10, showing that 2 adsorbed on MK10 does not work as a catalyst. The terminal water ligands could be an important for the catalysis by adsorbed 1. The mechanism of O(2) production by photosynthetic oxygen evolving complex is discussed based on catalytic O(2) evolution by 1 adsorbed on MK10.

  8. Effects of natural radiation, photosynthetically active radiation and artificial ultraviolet radiation-B on the chloroplast organization and metabolism of Porphyra acanthophora var. brasiliensis (Rhodophyta, Bangiales).

    PubMed

    Bouzon, Zenilda L; Chow, Fungyi; Zitta, Carmen S; dos Santos, Rodrigo W; Ouriques, Luciane C; Felix, Marthiellen R de L; Osorio, Luz K P; Gouveia, Claudiane; Martins, Roberta de Paula; Latini, Alexandra; Ramlov, Fernanda; Maraschin, Marcelo; Schmidt, Eder C

    2012-12-01

    We undertook a study of Porphyra acanthophora var. brasiliensis to determine its responses under ambient conditions, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and PAR+UVBR (ultraviolet radiation-B) treatment, focusing on changes in ultrastructure, and cytochemistry. Accordingly, control ambient samples were collected in the field, and two different treatments were performed in the laboratory. Plants were exposed to PAR at 60 μmol photons m-2 s-1 and PAR + UVBR at 0.35 W m-2 for 3 h per day during 21 days of in vitro cultivation. Confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis of the vegetative cells showed single stellate chloroplast in ambient and PAR samples, but in PAR+UVBR-exposed plants, the chloroplast showed alterations in the number and form of arms. Under PAR+UVBR treatment, the thylakoids of the chloroplasts were disrupted, and an increase in the number of plastoglobuli was observed, in addition to mitochondria, which appeared with irregular, disrupted morphology compared to ambient and PAR samples. After UVBR exposure, the formation of carpospores was also observed. Plants under ambient conditions, as well as those treated with PAR and PAR+UVBR, all showed different concentrations of enzymatic response, including glutathione peroxidase and reductase activity. In summary, the present study demonstrates that P. acanthophora var. brasiliensis shows the activation of distinct mechanisms against natural radiation, PAR and PAR+UVBR.

  9. Transport, hysteresis and avalanches in artificial spin ice systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia J; Libal, A

    2010-01-01

    We examine the hopping dynamics of an artificial spin ice system constructed from colloids on a kagome optical trap array where each trap has two possible states. By applying an external drive from an electric field which is analogous to a biasing applied magnetic field for real spin systems, we can create polarized states that obey the spin-ice rules of two spins in and one spin out at each vertex. We demonstrate that when we sweep the external drive and measure the fraction of the system that has been polarized, we can generate a hysteresis loop analogous to the hysteretic magnetization versus external magnetic field curves for real spin systems. The disorder in our system can be readily controlled by changing the barrier that must be overcome before a colloid can hop from one side of a trap to the other. For systems with no disorder, the effective spins all flip simultaneously as the biasing field is changed, while for strong disorder the hysteresis curves show a series of discontinuous jumps or avalanches similar to Barkhausen noise.

  10. VWPS: A Ventilator Weaning Prediction System with Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Austin H.; Chen, Guan-Ting

    How to wean patients efficiently off mechanical ventilation continues to be a challenge for medical professionals. In this paper we have described a novel approach to the study of a ventilator weaning prediction system (VWPS). Firstly, we have developed and written three Artificial Neural Network (ANN) algorithms to predict a weaning successful rate based on the clinical data. Secondly, we have implemented two user-friendly weaning success rate prediction systems; the VWPS system and the BWAP system. Both systems could be used to help doctors objectively and effectively predict whether weaning is appropriate for patients based on the patients' clinical data. Our system utilizes the powerful processing abilities of MatLab. Thirdly, we have calculated the performance through measures such as sensitivity and accuracy for these three algorithms. The results show a very high sensitivity (around 80%) and accuracy (around 70%). To our knowledge, this is the first design approach of its kind to be used in the study of ventilator weaning success rate prediction.

  11. Outcrossing and photosynthetic rates vary independently within two Clarkia species: implications for the joint evolution of drought escape physiology and mating system.

    PubMed

    Ivey, Christopher T; Dudley, Leah S; Hove, Alisa A; Emms, Simon K; Mazer, Susan J

    2016-07-21

    Mating systems of plants are diverse and evolutionarily labile. Abiotic environmental factors, such as seasonal drought, may impose selection on physiological traits that could lead to transitions in mating system if physiological traits are genetically correlated with traits that influence mating system. Within Clarkia, self-fertilizing taxa have higher photosynthetic rates, earlier flowering phenology, faster individual floral development and more compressed flowering periods than their outcrossing sister taxa, potentially reducing the selfing taxa's exposure to drought. In theory, this contrast in trait combinations between sister taxa could have arisen via correlated evolution due to pleiotropy or genetic linkage. Alternatively, each trait may evolve independently as part of a life history that is adaptive in seasonally dry environments. To evaluate these hypotheses, we examined relationships between photosynthetic rates (adjusted for plant height and leaf node position) and outcrossing rates (estimated by allozyme variation in progeny arrays) during two consecutive years in multiple wild populations of two mixed-mating Clarkia taxa, each of which is sister to a derived selfing taxon. If the negative association between photosynthetic rate and outcrossing previously observed between sister taxa reflects correlated evolution due to a strong negative genetic correlation between these traits, then a similarly negative relationship would be observed within populations of each taxon. By contrast, if the combination of elevated photosynthetic rates and reduced outcrossing evolved independently within taxa, we predicted no consistent relationship between photosynthetic rate and outcrossing rate. We found no significant difference in outcrossing rates within populations between groups of plants with high versus low photosynthetic rates. Overall, these results provide support for the hypothesis that the joint divergence in photosynthetic rate and mating system observed

  12. Visual system based on artificial retina for motion detection.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Francisco; Díaz, Javier; Ros, Eduardo; del Pino, Begoña

    2009-06-01

    We present a bioinspired model for detecting spatiotemporal features based on artificial retina response models. Event-driven processing is implemented using four kinds of cells encoding image contrast and temporal information. We have evaluated how the accuracy of motion processing depends on local contrast by using a multiscale and rank-order coding scheme to select the most important cues from retinal inputs. We have also developed some alternatives by integrating temporal feature results and obtained a new improved bioinspired matching algorithm with high stability, low error and low cost. Finally, we define a dynamic and versatile multimodal attention operator with which the system is driven to focus on different target features such as motion, colors, and textures.

  13. Artificial neural network for location estimation in wireless communication systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    In a wireless communication system, wireless location is the technique used to estimate the location of a mobile station (MS). To enhance the accuracy of MS location prediction, we propose a novel algorithm that utilizes time of arrival (TOA) measurements and the angle of arrival (AOA) information to locate MS when three base stations (BSs) are available. Artificial neural networks (ANN) are widely used techniques in various areas to overcome the problem of exclusive and nonlinear relationships. When the MS is heard by only three BSs, the proposed algorithm utilizes the intersections of three TOA circles (and the AOA line), based on various neural networks, to estimate the MS location in non-line-of-sight (NLOS) environments. Simulations were conducted to evaluate the performance of the algorithm for different NLOS error distributions. The numerical analysis and simulation results show that the proposed algorithms can obtain more precise location estimation under different NLOS environments.

  14. Artificial carrier for oxygen supply in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Dey, E S; Norrlöw, O; Liu, Y

    2004-04-01

    Several poly (dimethylsiloxanes) (PDMS) copolymers of dimethylsiloxane (DMS) with ethylene or propylene oxide were tested as artificial carriers for the delivery of oxygen to biological systems. Copolymers with a DMS content of 33% or lower enhanced glucose oxidation by 200% in contrast to the 25% increase produced by the same concentration of perfluorodecalin. When 0.05% of the copolymer with 18% DMS was included in the growth media of Bacillus thuriginensis, the biomass (growth rate) increased 1.5-fold. With 0.1% of this copolymer, actinorhodin production by Streptomyces coelicolor A3 (2) occurred in half the normal time and with an increased yield. In conclusion, these PDMS copolymers are a good alternative to perfluorodecalin as oxygen carriers in biotechnological processes.

  15. Development of a linear induction motor based artificial muscle system.

    PubMed

    Gruber, A; Arguello, E; Silva, R

    2013-01-01

    We present the design of a linear induction motor based on electromagnetic interactions. The engine is capable of producing a linear movement from electricity. The design consists of stators arranged in parallel, which produce a magnetic field sufficient to displace a plunger along its axial axis. Furthermore, the winding has a shell and cap of ferromagnetic material that amplifies the magnetic field. This produces a force along the length of the motor that is similar to that of skeletal muscle. In principle, the objective is to use the engine in the development of an artificial muscle system for prosthetic applications, but it could have multiple applications, not only in the medical field, but in other industries.

  16. An artificial immune system algorithm approach for reconfiguring distribution network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syahputra, Ramadoni; Soesanti, Indah

    2017-08-01

    This paper proposes an artificial immune system (AIS) algorithm approach for reconfiguring distribution network with the presence distributed generators (DG). The distribution network with high-performance is a network that has a low power loss, better voltage profile, and loading balance among feeders. The task for improving the performance of the distribution network is optimization of network configuration. The optimization has become a necessary study with the presence of DG in entire networks. In this work, optimization of network configuration is based on an AIS algorithm. The methodology has been tested in a model of 33 bus IEEE radial distribution networks with and without DG integration. The results have been showed that the optimal configuration of the distribution network is able to reduce power loss and to improve the voltage profile of the distribution network significantly.

  17. IPMC cilia system for artificial muscle applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Taeseon; Palmre, Viljar; Stalbaum, Tyler P.; Shen, Qi; Trabia, Sarah; Kim, Kwang Jin

    2016-04-01

    Artificial muscle (AM) technology is an excellent candidate for creating cilia-based structures for bio-inspired locomotion, maneuvering, and acoustic systems. We developed an AM based cilia fiber which are soft, flexible, easily shaped and low power consumption. The developed cilium has a diameter of around 200 µm and prepared through polymer injection technique. Nafion was used for base polymer for cilia and fabricated IPMCs via platinum electroless plating process. The prepared cilia were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetric analysis. The 2 point probe was conducted to measure electrode surface resistance of prepared IPMCs. We further characterized the cross-sectional morphology and studied the electromechanical performances (displacement and blocking force) of the prepared IPMC actuators. Also we created prototype mm-sized AM fiber cilia array (3x20) and tested the actuation of AM cilia fiber under external electric field.

  18. Artificial solid electrolyte interphase for aqueous lithium energy storage systems.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Jian; Yazdi, Alireza Zehtab; Valappil, Gayathri; Haime, Jessica; Chen, Pu

    2017-09-01

    Aqueous lithium energy storage systems address environmental sustainability and safety issues. However, significant capacity fading after repeated cycles of charge-discharge and during float charge limit their practical application compared to their nonaqueous counterparts. We introduce an artificial solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) to the aqueous systems and report the use of graphene films as an artificial SEI (G-SEI) that substantially enhance the overall performance of an aqueous lithium battery and a supercapacitor. The thickness (1 to 50 nm) and the surface area (1 cm(2) to 1 m(2)) of the G-SEI are precisely controlled on the LiMn2O4-based cathode using the Langmuir trough-based techniques. The aqueous battery with a 10-nm-thick G-SEI exhibits a discharge capacity as high as 104 mA·hour g(-1) after 600 cycles and a float charge current density as low as 1.03 mA g(-1) after 1 day, 26% higher (74 mA·hour g(-1)) and 54% lower (1.88 mA g(-1)) than the battery without the G-SEI, respectively. We propose that the G-SEI on the cathode surface simultaneously suppress the structural distortion of the LiMn2O4 (the Jahn-Teller distortion) and the oxidation of conductive carbon through controlled diffusion of Li(+) and restricted permeation of gases (O2 and CO x ), respectively. The G-SEI on both small (~1 cm(2) in 1.15 mA·hour cell) and large (~9 cm(2) in 7 mA·hour cell) cathodes exhibit similar property enhancement, demonstrating excellent potential for scale-up and manufacturing.

  19. 24-epibrassinolide mitigates the adverse effects of manganese induced toxicity through improved antioxidant system and photosynthetic attributes in Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Fariduddin, Qazi; Ahmed, Mumtaz; Mir, Bilal A; Yusuf, Mohammad; Khan, Tanveer A

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish relationship between manganese-induced toxicity and antioxidant system response in Brassica juncea plants and also to investigate whether brassinosteroids activate antioxidant system to confer tolerance to the plants affected with manganese induced oxidative stress. Brassica juncea plants were administered with 3, 6, or 9 mM manganese at 10-day stage for 3 days. At 31-day stage, the seedlings were sprayed with deionized water (control) or 10(-8) M of 24-epibrassinolide, and plants were harvested at 45-day stage to assess growth, leaf gas-exchange traits, and biochemical parameters. The manganese treatments diminished growth along with photosynthetic attributes and carbonic anhydrase activity in the concentration-dependent manner, whereas it enhanced lipid peroxidation, electrolyte leakage, accumulation of H2O2 as well as proline, and various antioxidant enzymes in the leaves of Brassica juncea which were more pronounced at higher concentrations of manganese. However, the follow-up application of 24-epibrassinolide to the manganese stressed plants improved growth, water relations, and photosynthesis and further enhanced the various antioxidant enzymes viz. catalase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase and content of proline. The elevated level of antioxidant enzymes as well as proline could have conferred tolerance to the manganese-stressed plants resulting in improved growth and photosynthetic attributes.

  20. Simulation of HIV infection in artificial immune systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieburg, Hans B.; McCutchan, J. Allen; Clay, Oliver K.; Cabalerro, Lisa; Ostlund, James J.

    1990-09-01

    Infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes a multi-faceted disease process which ultimately leads to severe degenerative conditions in the immune and nervous systems. The complexity of the virus/host-system interaction has brought into sharp focus the need for alternative efforts by which to overcome the limitations of available animal models. This article reports on the dynamics of HIV infection in an artificial immune system (AIS), a novel in silico tool for bio-medical research. Using a method of graphical programming, the HIV/AIS interactions are described at the cellular level and then transferred into the setting of an asynchronous cellular automaton simulation. A specific problem in HIV pathogenesis is addressed: To determine the extent by which the physiological connectivity of a normal B-cell, T-cell, macrophage immune system supports persistence of infection and disease progression to AIDS. Several observations are discussed which will be presented in four categories: (a) the major known manifestations of HIV infection and AIDS; (b) the predictability of latency and sudden progression to disease; (c) the predictability of HIV-dependent alterations of cytokine secretion patterns, and (d) secondary infections, which are found to be a critical element in establishing and maintaining a progressive disease dynamics. The effects of exogenously applied cytokine Interleukin 2 are considered. All results are summarized in a phase-graph model of the global HIV/AIS dynamical system.

  1. Automatic Emboli Detection System for the Artificial Heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steifer, T.; Lewandowski, M.; Karwat, P.; Gawlikowski, M.

    In spite of the progress in material engineering and ventricular assist devices construction, thromboembolism remains the most crucial problem in mechanical heart supporting systems. Therefore, the ability to monitor the patient's blood for clot formation should be considered an important factor in development of heart supporting systems. The well-known methods for automatic embolus detection are based on the monitoring of the ultrasound Doppler signal. A working system utilizing ultrasound Doppler is being developed for the purpose of flow estimation and emboli detection in the clinical artificial heart ReligaHeart EXT. Thesystem will be based on the existing dual channel multi-gate Doppler device with RF digital processing. A specially developed clamp-on cannula probe, equipped with 2 - 4 MHz piezoceramic transducers, enables easy system setup. We present the issuesrelated to the development of automatic emboli detection via Doppler measurements. We consider several algorithms for the flow estimation and emboli detection. We discuss their efficiency and confront them with the requirements of our experimental setup. Theoretical considerations are then met with preliminary experimental findings from a) flow studies with blood mimicking fluid and b) in-vitro flow studies with animal blood. Finally, we discuss some more methodological issues - we consider several possible approaches to the problem of verification of the accuracy of the detection system.

  2. Effects of 24-epibrassinolide on the photosynthetic characteristics, antioxidant system, and chloroplast ultrastructure in Cucumis sativus L. under Ca(NO(3))(2) stress.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lingyun; Shu, Sheng; Sun, Jin; Guo, Shirong; Tezuka, Takafumi

    2012-09-01

    The effects of 0.1 μM 24-epibrassinolide (EBL) on plant growth (plant height, leaf area, fresh weight, and dry weight), chlorophyll content, photosynthetic characteristics, antioxidant enzymes, and chloroplast ultrastructure were investigated using cucumber seedlings (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Jinyou No. 4) with 80 mM Ca(NO(3))(2) to induce stress. The presence of Ca(NO(3))(2) caused significant reductions in net photosynthetic rate (P(N)), stomatal conductance (Gs), intercellular CO(2) concentration (Ci), and transpiration rate (Tr) of leaves. In addition, Ca(NO(3))(2) markedly reduced the chlorophyll content and inhibited photochemical activity, including the actual photochemical efficiency (ΦPSII). In contrast, EBL increased the chlorophyll content, especially chlorophyll b, and minimized the harmful effects on photosynthesis caused by the Ca(NO(3))(2). The application of EBL to the plants subjected to Ca(NO(3))(2)-enhanced photochemical activity. EBL protected the photosynthetic membrane system from oxidative damage due to up-regulating the capacity of the antioxidant systems. Microscopic analyses revealed that Ca(NO(3))(2) affected the structure of the photosynthetic apparatus and membrane system and induced damage of granal thylakoid layers, while EBL recovered the typical shape of chloroplasts and promoted the formation of grana. Taken together, EBL compensated for damage/losses by Ca(NO(3))(2) due to the regulation of photosynthetic characteristics and the antioxidant system.

  3. Ion-exchange polymer artificial muscle and actuating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, Dominique; Tondu, Bertrand; Lopez, Pierre; Aurelle, Yves; Ricard, Alain

    1996-04-01

    Chemomechanical transformations are used to produce a mechanical force from a reversible chemical reaction in order to generate artificial muscular contraction, on the model of the biological muscle. The design and experimentation of an original artificial muscle using an ion-exchange polymer which reacts inside a soft envelope, derived from research on pneumatic artificial McKibben muscle, is presented. Then a chemomechanical actuator constituted of two artificial muscles has been conceived: first results are shown on position control in open-loop mode.

  4. Photosynthetic reaction center as a quantum heat engine.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, Konstantin E; Voronine, Dmitri V; Mukamel, Shaul; Scully, Marlan O

    2013-02-19

    Two seemingly unrelated effects attributed to quantum coherence have been reported recently in natural and artificial light-harvesting systems. First, an enhanced solar cell efficiency was predicted and second, population oscillations were measured in photosynthetic antennae excited by sequences of coherent ultrashort laser pulses. Because both systems operate as quantum heat engines (QHEs) that convert the solar photon energy to useful work (electric currents or chemical energy, respectively), the question arises whether coherence could also enhance the photosynthetic yield. Here, we show that both effects arise from the same population-coherence coupling term which is induced by noise, does not require coherent light, and will therefore work for incoherent excitation under natural conditions of solar excitation. Charge separation in light-harvesting complexes occurs in a pair of tightly coupled chlorophylls (the special pair) at the heart of photosynthetic reaction centers of both plants and bacteria. We show the analogy between the energy level schemes of the special pair and of the laser/photocell QHEs, and that both population oscillations and enhanced yield have a common origin and are expected to coexist for typical parameters. We predict an enhanced yield of 27% in a QHE motivated by the reaction center. This suggests nature-mimicking architectures for artificial solar energy devices.

  5. Adaptive control of artificial pancreas systems - a review.

    PubMed

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Cinar, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Artificial pancreas (AP) systems offer an important improvement in regulating blood glucose concentration for patients with type 1 diabetes, compared to current approaches. AP consists of sensors, control algorithms and an insulin pump. Different AP control algorithms such as proportional-integral-derivative, model-predictive control, adaptive control, and fuzzy logic control have been investigated in simulation and clinical studies in the past three decades. The variability over time and complexity of the dynamics of blood glucose concentration, unsteady disturbances such as meals, time-varying delays on measurements and insulin infusion, and noisy data from sensors create a challenging system to AP. Adaptive control is a powerful control technique that can deal with such challenges. In this paper, a review of adaptive control techniques for blood glucose regulation with an AP system is presented. The investigations and advances in technology produced impressive results, but there is still a need for a reliable AP system that is both commercially viable and appealing to patients with type 1 diabetes.

  6. Artificial intelligence in the service of system administrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haen, C.; Barra, V.; Bonaccorsi, E.; Neufeld, N.

    2012-12-01

    The LHCb online system relies on a large and heterogeneous IT infrastructure made from thousands of servers on which many different applications are running. They run a great variety of tasks: critical ones such as data taking and secondary ones like web servers. The administration of such a system and making sure it is working properly represents a very important workload for the small expert-operator team. Research has been performed to try to automatize (some) system administration tasks, starting in 2001 when IBM defined the so-called “self objectives” supposed to lead to “autonomic computing”. In this context, we present a framework that makes use of artificial intelligence and machine learning to monitor and diagnose at a low level and in a non intrusive way Linux-based systems and their interaction with software. Moreover, the multi agent approach we use, coupled with an “object oriented paradigm” architecture should increase our learning speed a lot and highlight relations between problems.

  7. Photosynthetic approaches to chemical biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Desai, Shuchi H; Atsumi, Shota

    2013-12-01

    National interest and environmental advocates encourage alternatives to petroleum-based products. Besides biofuels, many other valuable chemicals used in every-day life are petroleum derivatives or require petroleum for their production. A plausible alternative to production using petroleum for chemical production is to harvest the abundant carbon dioxide resources in the environment to produce valuable hydrocarbons. Currently, efforts are being made to utilize a natural biological system, photosynthetic microorganisms, to perform this task. Photosynthetic microorganisms are attractive to use for biochemical production because they utilize economical resources for survival: sunlight and carbon dioxide. This review examines the various compounds produced by photosynthetic microorganisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Security framework for networked storage system based on artificial immune system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianzhong; Xie, Changsheng; Zhang, Chengfeng; Zhan, Ling

    2007-11-01

    This paper proposed a theoretical framework for the networked storage system addressing the storage security. The immune system is an adaptive learning system, which can recognize, classify and eliminate 'non-self' such as foreign pathogens. Thus, we introduced the artificial immune technique to the storage security research, and proposed a full theoretical framework for storage security system. Under this framework, it is possible to carry out the quantitative evaluation for the storage security system using modeling language of artificial immune system (AIS), and the evaluation can offer security consideration for the deployment of networked storage system. Meanwhile, it is potential to obtain the active defense technique suitable for networked storage system via exploring the principle of AIS and achieve a highly secure storage system with immune characteristic.

  9. A new and cheap medical examination system with artificial intelligence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Cai, F; Liu, F; Bao, X; Liu, Y

    1995-01-01

    This is a medical examination system with artificial intelligence. It is used to find persons who want to obtain higher professional posts in the medical field, including doctors, dentists, nurses, pharmaceutists, etc. It has a question bank of 536,000 multiple choice questions (MCQs), of which 59,500 have pictures. Ten percent of the MCQs is updated every year; the old MCQs in the question bank are used as exercises for the persons who want to obtain higher professional posts. The system, with three distinctive degrees of difficulty, is applicable to three different professional posts: the assistant physician, the resident, and the attending physician. It ensures the general level of assessment for the same professional post, regardless of when one wants to take the system. In addition, the system also guarantees the consistency of the following three factors: the constituent of sub-professions, the classification of MCQs, and the degree of difficulty of each MCQ. Another feature of the system is that the passing score need not be the traditional standard passing score of 60. The passing score is determined by the system according to the requirements of the different professional posts and the degree of difficulty of the MCQs in the system. Therefore, the new method for passing the system is more rational than the traditional one. Moreover, the final score given by the system will be standardized to eliminate sampling errors. The reliability of the system will also be tested after each examination. If the coefficient of reliability is lower than 0.85, the scores will be canceled and examination will be repeated. The system can accept 96 persons simultaneously taking the examination with on-line computers. The people who work in remote places can take examination in their hospital with a personal computer linked via telephone. The system has already been approved by the relevant authoritative departments in China. It has been running successfully for more than six

  10. Photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris GJ-22 induces systemic resistance against viruses.

    PubMed

    Su, Pin; Tan, Xinqiu; Li, Chenggang; Zhang, Deyong; Cheng, Ju'e; Zhang, Songbai; Zhou, Xuguo; Yan, Qingpin; Peng, Jing; Zhang, Zhuo; Liu, Yong; Lu, Xiangyang

    2017-03-14

    Photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) have been extensively used in agriculture to promote plant growth and to improve crop quality. Their potential application in plant disease management, however, is largely overlooked. In this study, the PSB strain Rhodopseudomonas palustris GJ-22 was investigated for its ability to induce resistance against a plant virus while promoting plant growth. In the field, a foliar spray of GJ-22 suspension protected tobacco plants against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Under axenic conditions, GJ-22 colonized the plant phyllosphere and induced resistance against TMV. Additionally, GJ-22 produced two phytohormones, indole-3-acetic acid and 5-aminolevulinic acid, which promote growth and germination in tobacco. Furthermore, GJ-22-inoculated plants elevated their immune response under subsequent TMV infection. This research may give rise to a novel biological agent with a dual function in disease management while promoting plant growth.

  11. The Thoratec system implanted as a modified total artificial heart: the Bad Oeynhausen technique.

    PubMed

    Arusoglu, Latif; Reiss, Nils; Morshuis, Michiel; Schoenbrodt, Michael; Hakim-Meibodi, Kavous; Gummert, Jan

    2010-12-01

    The CardioWest™ total artificial heart (SynCardia Systems, Tuscon, AZ, USA) is the only FDA-approved total artificial heart determined as a bridge to human heart transplantation for patients dying of biventricular heart failure. Implantation provides immediate hemodynamic restoration and clinical stabilization, leading to end-organ recovery and thus eventually allowing cardiac transplantation. Occasionally, implantation of a total artificial heart is not feasible for anatomical reasons. For this patient group, we have developed an alternative technique using the paracorporeal Thoratec biventricular support system (Thoratec, Pleasanton, CA, USA) as a modified total artificial heart. A detailed description of the implantation technique is presented.

  12. Design of an artificial gravity generating tethered satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, John H.; Mazzoleni, Andre; Santangelo, Andrew

    2001-02-01

    Prolonged exposure in humans to a microgravity environment can lead to significant loss of bone and muscle mass; this presents a formidable obstacle to human exploration of space, particularly for missions requiring travel times of several months or more, such as on a trip to Mars. One possible remedy for this situation is to use a spent booster as a ``counter-weight'' and tether it to the crew cabin for the purpose of spinning up the counter-weight/cabin system about its common center of mass like a dumbbell, hence generating artificial gravity for the crew during long duration missions. However, much needs to be learned about the dynamics and stability of such tethered systems before they can become flight possibilities. The investigation of spin-up dynamics, along with other aspects of tethered systems, is the focus of the ASTOR (Advanced Safety Tether Operation and Reliability) Satellite project, which will be discussed in this paper. After the 65-kg ASTOR satellite is delivered into orbit, the payload will automatically separate into two equal halves and the Emergency Tether Deployment (ETD) system will commence the deployment of the tether. After the deployment process is complete, a spin-up experiment will commence. This will be accomplished by reeling onto a take-up reel in the deployer a portion of the tether. As the tether is reeled back in, a rapid increase in the rotational motion in the system will occur; due to the presence of gravity-gradient torques, however, angular momentum will not be conserved, so equations of motion must be generated and integrated numerically to determine the behavior of the system. Preliminary results of this investigation are presented in this paper. .

  13. Artificial Intelligence Measurement System, Overview and Lessons Learned. Final Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Eva L.; Butler, Frances A.

    This report summarizes the work conducted for the Artificial Intelligence Measurement System (AIMS) Project which was undertaken as an exploration of methodology to consider how the effects of artificial intelligence systems could be compared to human performance. The research covered four areas of inquiry: (1) natural language processing and…

  14. Continuously functioning artificial nephron system: the promise of nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Nissenson, Allen R; Ronco, Claudio; Pergamit, Gayle; Edelstein, Martin; Watts, Richard

    2005-07-01

    Nearly 900,000 patients worldwide have end-stage renal disease and require dialysis or kidney transplantation. Despite the availability of these forms of renal replacement therapy for nearly four decades, mortality and morbidity are high and patients often have a poor quality of life. We have developed a human nephron filter (HNF) utilizing nanotechnology that would eventually make feasible a continuously functioning, wearable or implantable artificial kidney. The device consists of two membranes operating in series within one device cartridge. The first membrane mimics the function of the glomerulus, using convective transport to generate a plasma ultrafiltrate containing all solutes approaching the molecular weight of albumin. The second membrane mimics the function of the renal tubules, selectively reclaiming designated solutes to maintain body homeostasis. No dialysis solution is used in this device. The HNF has been computer-modeled, and operating 12 hr per day, 7 days per week the HNF provides the equivalent of 30 mL/min glomerular filtration rate (compared to half that amount for conventional thrice-weekly hemodialysis). Animal studies should begin in the next 1 to 2 years, and clinical trials would then follow 1 to 2 years subsequent. The HNF system, by eliminating dialysate and utilizing a novel membrane system created through applied nanotechnology, represents a breakthrough in renal replacement therapy based on the functioning of native kidneys. The enhanced solute removal and wearable design should substantially improve patient outcomes and quality of life.

  15. The Twin Bikes System for artificial gravity in space.

    PubMed

    di Prampero, P E

    1994-05-01

    Exposure to microgravity (microgravity < or = 10(-4) g), beside affecting the neurovestibular and respiratory systems, greatly alters the dynamics of the circulation and leads to bone demineralization and muscle atrophy (Grigoriev and Egorov, 1991; Nicogossian, 1989a). When taken together, circulatory deconditioning and muscle atrophy lead to a reduced exercise capacity and tolerance. It is generally believed that the above modifications are completely reversible upon reentry to normal 1 g conditions, even if it is still a matter of debate whether this is really the case after very long space flights. In any case, appropriate countermeasures appear necessary for long term space flights (Nicogossian, 1989b). These countermeasures are generally based on: i) exercise training programmes, ii) appropriate suits maintaining the lower part of the body at a pressure below cabin level, thus partially reversing the headward fluid shift and iii) elastic cords pulling the subject's body towards the floor of the cabin to simulate Earth gravity. In addition, iv) artificial gravity obtained by rotation of the spacecraft, or parts thereof, was proposed since the beginning of the space era to prevent cardiovascular deconditioning and bone and muscle loss. This paper describes the Twin Bikes System and studies testing its usefulness as a tool for maintaining astronauts' physical fitness during microgravity.

  16. Phosphorus fate, management, and modeling in artificially drained systems.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, Peter J A; Smith, Douglas R; Bolster, Carl H; Easton, Zachary M

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorus (P) losses in agricultural drainage waters, both surface and subsurface, are among the most difficult form of nonpoint source pollution to mitigate. This special collection of papers on P in drainage waters documents the range of field conditions leading to P loss in drainage water, the potential for drainage and nutrient management practices to control drainage losses of P, and the ability of models to represent P loss to drainage systems. A review of P in tile drainage and case studies from North America, Europe, and New Zealand highlight the potential for artificial drainage to exacerbate watershed loads of dissolved and particulate P via rapid, bypass flow and shorter flow path distances. Trade-offs are identified in association with drainage intensification, tillage, cover crops, and manure management. While P in drainage waters tends to be tied to surface sources of P (soil, amendments or vegetation) that are in highest concentration, legacy sources of P may occur at deeper depths or other points along drainage flow paths. Most startling, none of the major fate-and-transport models used to predict management impacts on watershed P losses simulate the dominant processes of P loss to drainage waters. Because P losses to drainage waters can be so difficult to manage and to model, major investment are needed (i) in systems that can provide necessary drainage for agronomic production while detaining peak flows and promoting P retention and (ii) in models that can adequately describe P loss to drainage waters.

  17. Production Systems as a Programming Language for Artificial Intelligence Applications. Volume II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    FURNISHED TO DTIC CONTAINED A SIGNIFICANT NUMBER OF PAGES WHICH DO NOT REPRODUCE LEGIBLY. Production Systems as a Programming Language for Artificial ...conciseness (in terms of space on the page) as for GPS, due to Ps’ inherent high-level character; GPS’s language itself was rather artificial and not...close to what would be a natural language expression of the tasks. So, rather than deal in two artificial languages of approximately similar level, the

  18. Artificial sweetener sucralose in U.S. drinking water systems.

    PubMed

    Mawhinney, Douglas B; Young, Robert B; Vanderford, Brett J; Borch, Thomas; Snyder, Shane A

    2011-10-15

    The artificial sweetener sucralose has recently been shown to be a widespread of contaminant of wastewater, surface water, and groundwater. In order to understand its occurrence in drinking water systems, water samples from 19 United States (U.S.) drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) serving more than 28 million people were analyzed for sucralose using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Sucralose was found to be present in source water of 15 out of 19 DWTPs (47-2900 ng/L), finished water of 13 out of 17 DWTPs (49-2400 ng/L) and distribution system water of 8 out of the 12 DWTPs (48-2400 ng/L) tested. Sucralose was only found to be present in source waters with known wastewater influence and/or recreational usage, and displayed low removal (12% average) in the DWTPs where finished water was sampled. Further, in the subset of DWTPs with distribution system water sampled, the compound was found to persist regardless of the presence of residual chlorine or chloramines. In order to understand intra-DWTP consistency, sucralose was monitored at one drinking water treatment plant over an 11 month period from March 2010 through January 2011, and averaged 440 ng/L in the source water and 350 ng/L in the finished water. The results of this study confirm that sucralose will function well as an indicator compound for anthropogenic influence on source, finished drinking and distribution system (i.e., tap) water, as well as an indicator compound for the presence of other recalcitrant compounds in finished drinking water in the U.S.

  19. Photosynthetic Response of Soybean to Microclimate in 26-Year-Old Tree-Based Intercropping Systems in Southern Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaobang; Thevathasan, Naresh V; Gordon, Andrew M; Mohammed, Idris; Gao, Pengxiang

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the effect of light competition and microclimatic modifications on the net assimilation (NA), growth and yield of soybean (Glycine max L.) as an understory crop, three 26-year-old soybean-tree (Acer saccharinum Marsh., Populus deltoides X nigra, Juglans nigra L.) intercropping systems were examined. Tree competition reduced photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) incident on soybeans and reduced net assimilation, growth and yield of soybean. Soil moisture of 20 cm depth close (< 3 m) to the tree rows was also reduced. Correlation analysis showed that NA and soil water content were highly correlated with growth and yield of soybean. When compared with the monoculture soybean system, the relative humidity (RH) of the poplar-soybean, silver maple-soybean, and black walnut-soybean intercropped systems was increased by 7.1%, 8.0% and 5.9%, soil water content was reduced by 37.8%, 26.3% and 30.9%, ambient temperature was reduced by 1.3°C, 1.4°C and 1.0°C, PAR was reduced by 53.6%, 57.9% and 39.9%, and air CO2 concentration was reduced by 3.7μmol·mol(-1), 4.2μmol·mol(-1) and 2.8μmol·mol(-1), respectively. Compared to the monoculture, the average NA of soybean in poplar, maple and walnut treatments was also reduced by 53.1%, 67.5% and 46.5%, respectively. Multivariate stepwise regression analysis showed that PAR, ambient temperature and CO2 concentration were the dominant factors influencing net photosynthetic rate.

  20. Photosynthetic Response of Soybean to Microclimate in 26-Year-Old Tree-Based Intercropping Systems in Southern Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiaobang; Thevathasan, Naresh V.; Gordon, Andrew M.; Mohammed, Idris; Gao, Pengxiang

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the effect of light competition and microclimatic modifications on the net assimilation (NA), growth and yield of soybean (Glycine max L.) as an understory crop, three 26-year-old soybean-tree (Acer saccharinum Marsh., Populus deltoides X nigra, Juglans nigra L.) intercropping systems were examined. Tree competition reduced photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) incident on soybeans and reduced net assimilation, growth and yield of soybean. Soil moisture of 20 cm depth close (< 3 m) to the tree rows was also reduced. Correlation analysis showed that NA and soil water content were highly correlated with growth and yield of soybean. When compared with the monoculture soybean system, the relative humidity (RH) of the poplar-soybean, silver maple-soybean, and black walnut-soybean intercropped systems was increased by 7.1%, 8.0% and 5.9%, soil water content was reduced by 37.8%, 26.3% and 30.9%, ambient temperature was reduced by 1.3°C, 1.4°C and 1.0°C, PAR was reduced by 53.6%, 57.9% and 39.9%, and air CO2 concentration was reduced by 3.7μmol·mol-1, 4.2μmol·mol-1 and 2.8μmol·mol-1, respectively. Compared to the monoculture, the average NA of soybean in poplar, maple and walnut treatments was also reduced by 53.1%, 67.5% and 46.5%, respectively. Multivariate stepwise regression analysis showed that PAR, ambient temperature and CO2 concentration were the dominant factors influencing net photosynthetic rate. PMID:26053375

  1. [The application and development of artificial intelligence in medical diagnosis systems].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhencheng; Jiang, Yong; Xu, Mingyu; Wang, Hongyan; Jiang, Dazong

    2002-09-01

    This paper has reviewed the development of artificial intelligence in medical practice and medical diagnostic expert systems, and has summarized the application of artificial neural network. It explains that a source of difficulty in medical diagnostic system is the co-existence of multiple diseases--the potentially inter-related diseases. However, the difficulty of image expert systems is inherent in high-level vision. And it increases the complexity of expert system in medical image. At last, the prospect for the development of artificial intelligence in medical image expert systems is made.

  2. Honey characterization using computer vision system and artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Shafiee, Sahameh; Minaei, Saeid; Moghaddam-Charkari, Nasrollah; Barzegar, Mohsen

    2014-09-15

    This paper reports the development of a computer vision system (CVS) for non-destructive characterization of honey based on colour and its correlated chemical attributes including ash content (AC), antioxidant activity (AA), and total phenolic content (TPC). Artificial neural network (ANN) models were applied to transform RGB values of images to CIE L*a*b* colourimetric measurements and to predict AC, TPC and AA from colour features of images. The developed ANN models were able to convert RGB values to CIE L*a*b* colourimetric parameters with low generalization error of 1.01±0.99. In addition, the developed models for prediction of AC, TPC and AA showed high performance based on colour parameters of honey images, as the R(2) values for prediction were 0.99, 0.98, and 0.87, for AC, AA and TPC, respectively. The experimental results show the effectiveness and possibility of applying CVS for non-destructive honey characterization by the industry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Artificial intelligence approach for spot application project system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, M. J.; Fisse, G.; Martin, E.; de Boissezon, H.; Galaup, M.

    1993-11-01

    Over the past four years, CNES has been engaged in a major programme focusing on the development of SPOT Operational Application Projects. With a total of sixty projects now complete, we can draw a number of meaningful conclusions and identify a number of objectives to be satisfied by advanced remote sensing methodology. One of the main conclusions points to the importance of human vision in studies on natural complex space imagery. This being so, visual recognition must be one of the main phases of the ``Pilot Project for the Application of Remote Sensing to Agricultural Statistics'': only human experts have the ability to make a meaningful analysis of Spot TM imagery. Non-expert operators will not be able to manage the subsequent rational production phase alone. The first part of this paper describes an approach to the formalization and modelling of expert know-how based on the use of artificial intelligence. The second part puts forward a cooperative operator/computer system based on a cognitive structure. Our proposal comprises 1) a specific knowledge base, 2) an ergonomic interface associated with functional software that is based on automatic image enhancement coupled with perception support functions.

  4. [Cashmere goat bacterial artificial chromosome recombination and cell transfection system].

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian; Cao, Zhongyang; Yang, Yaohui; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-03-01

    The Cashmere goat is mainly used to produce cashmere, which is very popular for its delicate fiber, luscious softness and natural excellent warm property. Keratin associated protein (KAP) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) of the Cashmere goat play an important role in the proliferation and development of cashmere fiber follicle cells. Bacterial artificial chromosome containing kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4 genes were used to increase the production and quality of Cashmere. First, we constructed bacterial artificial chromosomes by homology recombination. Then Tol2 transposon was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes that were then transfected into Cashmere goat fibroblasts by Amaxa Nucleofector technology according to the manufacture's instructions. We successfully constructed the BAC-Tol2 vectors containing target genes. Each vector contained egfp report gene with UBC promoter, Neomycin resistant gene for cell screening and two loxp elements for resistance removing after transfected into cells. The bacterial artificial chromosome-Tol2 vectors showed a high efficiency of transfection that can reach 1% to 6% with a highest efficiency of 10%. We also obtained Cashmere goat fibroblasts integrated exogenous genes (kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4) preparing for the clone of Cashmere goat in the future. Our research demonstrates that the insertion of Tol2 transposons into bacterial artificial chromosomes improves the transfection efficiency and accuracy of bacterial artificial chromosome error-free recombination.

  5. Optimal secondary coil design for inductive powering of the Artificial Accommodation System.

    PubMed

    Nagel, J A; Krug, M; Gengenbach, U; Guth, H; Bretthauer, G; Guthoff, R F

    2011-01-01

    Age-related ailments like presbyopia and cataract are increasing concerns in the aging society. Both go along with a loss of ability to accommodate. A new approach to restore the patients' ability to accommodate is the Artificial Accommodation System. This micro mechatronic system will be implanted into the capsular bag to replace the human crystalline lens. Depending on the patients' actual need for accommodation, the Artificial Accommodation System autonomously adapts the refractive power of its integrated optical element in a way that the projection on the patients' retina results in a sharp image. As the Artificial Accommodation System is an active implant, its subsystems have to be supplied with electrical energy. Evolving technologies, like energy harvesting, which can potentially be used to power an implant like the Artificial Accommodation System are at the current state of art not sufficient to power the Artificial Accommodation System autonomously [1]. In the near future, therefore an inductive power supply system will be developed which includes an energy storage to power the Artificial Accommodation System autonomously over a period of 24 h and can be recharged wirelessly. This Paper describes a new possibility to optimize the secondary coil design in a solely analytical way, based on a new figure of merit. Within this paper the developed figure of merit is applied to optimize the secondary coil design for the Artificial Accommodation System.

  6. The photosynthetic acclimation of Lolium perenne growing in a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) system

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, Jonathan B.

    1994-11-01

    Stands of Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. cv. Bastion) were grown in the field at ambient or elevated (600μmol/mol) CO2 concentration, high (560Kg/ha) or low (140Kg/ha) nitrogen addition and with a frequent (every 4 weeks) or infrequent (every 8 weeks) cutting regime. Plants were in the second year of a 3 year experiment. Exposure to elevated CO2 was carried out with a Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) system which provides the most "realistic" system of CO2 fumigation currently available. Elevated CO2 increased diurnal CO2 assimilation by between 34 and 88% whilst reducing rates of stomatal conductance by between 1 and 42%. However, analysis of the A vs. Ci response showed considerable acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus in response to elevated CO2 - Vcmax as an in vivo measure of RubisCO activity, decreased by between 29 and 35% in high CO2, whilst Jmax, as a measure of the RubP regeneration capacity, showed no significant change. Two out of three additional perennial grassland species studied showed similar acclamatory behavior to Ryegrass. Diurnal assimilation rate, Jmax and, in most cases, Vcmax, increased significantly directly after cutting of Ryegrass stands, but nitrogen treatment had little effect on any of these parameters. Neither stomatal density, stomatal index nor stomatal pore length of Ryegrass were significantly altered by growth in elevated CO2. The results are discussed in terms of the limitation imposed on maximizing photosynthetic and growth responses of Ryegrass at elevated CO2, by the ability of perennial species to increase long-term sink capacity under these conditions.

  7. Response of photosynthetic systems to salinity stress in the desert cyanobacterium Scytonema javanicum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinlu; Jin, Liang; Wang, Xiaojuan; Cai, Wenkai; Liu, Yongding; Wang, Gaohong

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the physiological and biochemical characteristics of Scytonema javanicum, a pioneer species isolated from desert biological crusts, under salinity stress. Pigment analysis showed that salinity decreased chlorophyll a and phycocyanin content, while low salinity increased carotenoid concentration and high salinity decreased carotenoid concentration. Salinity also inhibited CO2 assimilation rate and photosynthetic oxygen evolution in this cyanobacterium. Chlorophyll a fluorescence transient parameters (φPo, φEo, ψO, RC/ABS, RC/CS, PIABS, and PICS) were decreased under salt stress, while dVo/dto(Mo), Vj and φDo were increased. The decrease of ETRmax and Yield and the change of chlorophyll a fluorescence transients showed that salt stress had an important influence on photosynthesis. These results indicated that the effects of salinity stress on photosynthesis in S. javanicum may depend on the inhibition of electron transport and the inactivation of the reaction centers, but this inhibition may occur in the electron transport pathway at the PSII donor and acceptor sites.

  8. Photoinduced energy transfer in associated but noncovalently linked photosynthetic model systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, J.L.; Wang, B.; Harriman, A. )

    1995-01-18

    The synthesis and photophysical characterization of nucleobase-substituted porphyrins designed to form rigid hydrogen-bonded ensembles, and to allow for energy transfer within the resulting complexes, is reported Watson-Crick nucleobase-pairing interactions between guanosine- and cytidine-bearing porphyrins are used to assemble the hydrogen-bonded ensembles. Likewise, zinc(II) and free-base porphyrins are used respectively as the donors and acceptors within these ensembles that, depending on design, contain either two or three total porphyrin subunits within the supramolecular assembly. The association constant for guanosine-to-cytidine association representing the primary interaction in each donor-acceptor assembly, is ca, 22 000 [+-] 200 M[sup [minus]1] in CD[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] as determined from [sup 1]H NMR titration analyses. Both singlet and triplet energy transfer was observed within the various donor-acceptor assemblies. Whereas the singlet-state energy-transfer dynamics are consistent with a Foerster-type process, triplet energy transfer within the same complex is believed to occur through the hydrogen-bonded interface. The presently-described noncovalent approach to donor-acceptor ensemble generation is thus considered to provide a novel and useful approach to modeling aspects of the photon antennae that are part of the natural photosynthetic process. 31 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Embodied artificial evolution: Artificial evolutionary systems in the 21st Century.

    PubMed

    Eiben, A E; Kernbach, S; Haasdijk, Evert

    2012-12-01

    Evolution is one of the major omnipresent powers in the universe that has been studied for about two centuries. Recent scientific and technical developments make it possible to make the transition from passively understanding to actively using evolutionary processes. Today this is possible in Evolutionary Computing, where human experimenters can design and manipulate all components of evolutionary processes in digital spaces. We argue that in the near future it will be possible to implement artificial evolutionary processes outside such imaginary spaces and make them physically embodied. In other words, we envision the "Evolution of Things", rather than just the evolution of digital objects, leading to a new field of Embodied Artificial Evolution (EAE). The main objective of this paper is to present a unifying vision in order to aid the development of this high potential research area. To this end, we introduce the notion of EAE, discuss a few examples and applications, and elaborate on the expected benefits as well as the grand challenges this developing field will have to address.

  10. A Modular Artificial Intelligence Inference Engine System (MAIS) for support of on orbit experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, Thomas M., III

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a Modular Artificial Intelligence Inference Engine System (MAIS) support tool that would provide health and status monitoring, cognitive replanning, analysis and support of on-orbit Space Station, Spacelab experiments and systems.

  11. Multifunctional astronomical self-organizing system of autonomous navigation and orientation for artificial Earth satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. I.; Danilova, T. V.

    2017-03-01

    We describe the methods and algorithms of a multifunctional astronomical system of the autonomous navigation and orientation for artificial Earth satellites based on the automatization of the system approach to the design and programming problems of the subject area.

  12. Blood feeding of Ornithodoros turicata larvae using an artificial membrane system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An artificial membrane system was adapted to feed Ornithodoros turicata larvae from a laboratory colony using defibrinated swine blood. Aspects related to larval feeding and molting to the 1st nymphal instar were evaluated. Fifty-five percent of all larvae exposed to the artificial membrane in two e...

  13. Implications of Human Pattern Processing for the Design of Artificial Knowledge Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes-Roth, Barbara

    This paper presents evidence that four design principles commonly embodied in artificial knowledge systems are inconsistent with human cognitive capabilities. Because these principles are widely accepted as characteristics of human knowledge processing, common theoretical properties related to cognitive psychology and artificial intelligence which…

  14. Pegylated polystyrene particles as a model system for artificial cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fenghua; Engbers, Gerard H M; Gessner, Andrea; Müller, Reiner H; Feijen, Jan

    2004-07-01

    Pegylated polystyrene particles (PS-PEG) were prepared as a model system for artificial cells, by modification of carboxyl polystyrene particles (PS-COOH) with homo- and hetero-bifunctional polyethylene glycols (PEG, MW 1500, 3400, and 5000) containing an amino end group for immobilization and an amino, hydroxyl, or methoxy end group that is exposed at the surface after immobilization. Protein adsorption from human plasma dilutions (85 v %) onto PS-PEG with a PEG surface concentration higher than 40 pmol/cm2 was reduced up to 90-95% compared with protein adsorption onto PS-COOH with a final protein surface concentration of approximately 30 ng/cm2. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analyses showed that 30% of the total amount of adsorbed proteins onto PS-PEG are dysopsonins (i.e., nonadhesive proteins like albumin and apolipoproteins). For PS-COOH, <15% of the amount of adsorbed proteins are dysopsonins. In addition, the generation of terminal complement compound (TCC) by PS-PEG particles with a PEG surface concentration lower than approximately 55 pmol/cm2 is not significant. The low protein adsorption, the relatively high percentage of adsorbed dysopsonins, and the low level of complement activation may prevent the uptake of PS-PEG by the mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS) in vivo. Moreover, PS-PEG (PEG surface concentration > approximately 35 pmol/cm2) shows minimal interaction with cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), which mimics the endothelial lining of the blood vessel wall. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Evolving a photosynthetic organelle.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Takuro; Archibald, John M

    2012-04-24

    The evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria is believed to represent a singularity in the history of life. The enigmatic amoeba Paulinella and its 'recently' acquired photosynthetic inclusions provide a fascinating system through which to gain fresh insight into how endosymbionts become organelles.The plastids, or chloroplasts, of algae and plants evolved from cyanobacteria by endosymbiosis. This landmark event conferred on eukaryotes the benefits of photosynthesis--the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy--and in so doing had a huge impact on the course of evolution and the climate of Earth 1. From the present state of plastids, however, it is difficult to trace the evolutionary steps involved in this momentous development, because all modern-day plastids have fully integrated into their hosts. Paulinella chromatophora is a unicellular eukaryote that bears photosynthetic entities called chromatophores that are derived from cyanobacteria and has thus received much attention as a possible example of an organism in the early stages of organellogenesis. Recent studies have unlocked the genomic secrets of its chromatophore 23 and provided concrete evidence that the Paulinella chromatophore is a bona fide photosynthetic organelle 4. The question is how Paulinella can help us to understand the process by which an endosymbiont is converted into an organelle.

  16. Influence of earthworm Eisenia fetida on Iris pseudacorus's photosynthetic characteristics, evapotranspiration losses and purifying capacity in constructed wetland systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Defu; Li, Yingxue; Fan, Xiaolong; Guan, Yidong; Fang, Hua; Zhao, Xiaoli

    2013-01-01

    Four constructed wetland systems were studied to investigate the effects of adding Eisenia fetida on the purifying capacity of constructed wetlands. Addition of E. fetida increased the photosynthetic rate (Pn), transpiration rate (Tr) and chlorophyll meter value of leaves of Iris pseudacorus L. in the constructed wetlands by 16, 35 and 7%, respectively. Compared with the substrate only system, evapotranspiration losses were increased by 8, 48 and 56% for the wetland systems with substrate and E. fetida, with substrate and I. pseudacorus, and with substrate, I. pseudacorus and E. fetida, respectively. Addition of E. fetida to the substrate only and substrate and plant wetland systems decreased the substrate bulk density by 3 and 6%, respectively. The addition of E. fetida to the system with substrate and plants increased the removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand (CODMn), total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus by 5, 7 and 22%, respectively. Evapotranspiration losses were significantly positively correlated with the removal efficiency of CODMn (P < 0.01). The significantly negative correlation between the removal efficiency TN and bulk density was found (P < 0.05). Therefore, E. fetida could stimulate I. pseudacorus growth and improve the substrate bulk density in the constructed wetland, resulting in enhanced purifying capacity.

  17. Artificial immune system for diabetes meal plans optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prilianti, K. R.; Callista, P. B.; Setiawan, H.

    2017-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a disease that occurs because the body lacks of insulin or the insulin produced by the pancreas cannot work effectively such that the glucose level in the blood cannot well controlled. One of the most common causes of diabetes mellitus type 2 is obesity, therefore this disease can be controlled with the appropriate diet regarding to the daily calorie requirement. Hence, the level of blood glucose is maintained. Unfortunately, because the lack of proper diet education and facility, many people cannot work on proper daily healthy diet by their own. In this research Artificial Immune System algorithm was applied to build a model that help diabetes mellitus patient arrange their meal plans. The model can calculate the amount of daily calorie needed and arrange the appropriate daily meal plans based on it. The meal plans vary according to the patient calorie needs. The required input data are age, gender, weight, height, and type of patient daily main activity. The experiments show that this model has a good result. The result is already approaching the patients' daily calorie need, i.e. 97.6% (actual need is not less than 80% and not greater than 100%). Carbohydrate of the meal plan is 55-57% (actual need is not less than 45% and not greater than 60%) whereas the protein approximate 15-18% (actual need is not less than 15% and not greater than 20%) and fat of approximate 22-24% (actual need is not less than 20% and not greater than 25%).

  18. Products of an Artificially Induced Hydrothermal System at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    S. Levy

    2000-08-07

    Studies of mineral deposition in the recent geologic past at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, address competing hypotheses of hydrothermal alteration and deposition from percolating groundwater. The secondary minerals being studied are calcite-opal deposits in fractures and lithophysal cavities of ash-flow tuffs exposed in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), a 7.7-km tunnel excavated by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project within Yucca Mountain. An underground field test in the ESF provided information about the minerals deposited by a short-lived artificial hydrothermal system and an opportunity for comparison of test products with the natural secondary minerals. The heating phase lasted nine months, followed by a nine-month cooling period. Natural pore fluids were the only source of water during the thermal test. Condensation and reflux of water driven away from the heater produced fluid flow in certain fractures and intersecting boreholes. The mineralogic products of the thermal test are calcite-gypsum aggregates of less than 4-micrometer crystals and amorphous silica as glassy scale less than 0.2 mm thick and as mounds of tubules with diameters less than 0.7 micrometers. The minute crystal sizes of calcite and gypsum from the field test are very different from the predominantly coarser calcite crystals (up to cm scale) in natural secondary-mineral deposits at the site. The complex micrometer-scale textures of the amorphous silica differ from the simple forms of opal spherules and coatings in the natural deposits, even though some natural spherules are as small as 1 micrometer. These differences suggest that the natural minerals, especially if they were of hydrothermal origin, may have developed coarser or simpler forms during subsequent episodes of dissolution and redeposition. The presence of gypsum among the test products and its absence from the natural secondary-mineral assemblage may indicate a higher degree of evaporation during the test than

  19. In vitro selection with artificial expanded genetic information systems.

    PubMed

    Sefah, Kwame; Yang, Zunyi; Bradley, Kevin M; Hoshika, Shuichi; Jiménez, Elizabeth; Zhang, Liqin; Zhu, Guizhi; Shanker, Savita; Yu, Fahong; Turek, Diane; Tan, Weihong; Benner, Steven A

    2014-01-28

    Artificially expanded genetic information systems (AEGISs) are unnatural forms of DNA that increase the number of independently replicating nucleotide building blocks. To do this, AEGIS pairs are joined by different arrangements of hydrogen bond donor and acceptor groups, all while retaining their Watson-Crick geometries. We report here a unique case where AEGIS DNA has been used to execute a systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) experiment. This AEGIS-SELEX was designed to create AEGIS oligonucleotides that bind to a line of breast cancer cells. AEGIS-SELEX delivered an AEGIS aptamer (ZAP-2012) built from six different kinds of nucleotides (the standard G, A, C, and T, and the AEGIS nonstandard P and Z nucleotides, the last having a nitro functionality not found in standard DNA). ZAP-2012 has a dissociation constant of 30 nM against these cells. The affinity is diminished or lost when Z or P (or both) is replaced by standard nucleotides and compares well with affinities of standard GACT aptamers selected against cell lines using standard SELEX. The success of AEGIS-SELEX relies on various innovations, including (i) the ability to synthesize GACTZP libraries, (ii) polymerases that PCR amplify GACTZP DNA with little loss of the AEGIS nonstandard nucleotides, and (iii) technologies to deep sequence GACTZP DNA survivors. These results take the next step toward expanding the power and utility of SELEX and offer an AEGIS-SELEX that could possibly generate receptors, ligands, and catalysts having sequence diversities nearer to that displayed by proteins.

  20. Development of built-in type and noninvasive sensor systems for smart artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Hiromasa; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Yamane, Takashi; Jikuya, Tomoaki; Tsutsui, Tatsuo

    2003-01-01

    It is very important to grasp the artificial heart condition and the physiologic conditions for the implantable artificial heart. In our laboratory, a smart artificial heart (SAH) has been proposed and developed. An SAH is an artificial heart with a noninvasive sensor; it is a sensorized and intelligent artificial heart for safe and effective treatment. In this study, the following sensor systems for SAH are described: noninvasive blood temperature sensor system, noninvasive blood pressure sensor system, and noninvasive small blood flow sensor system. These noninvasive sensor systems are integrated and included around the artificial heart to evaluate these sensor systems for SAH by the mockup experiments and the animal experiments. The blood temperature could be measured stably by the temperature sensor system. Aortic pressure was estimated, and sucking condition was detected by the pressure sensor system. The blood flow was measured by the flow meter system within 10% error. As a result of these experiments, we confirmed the effectiveness of the sensor systems for SAH.

  1. Research on architecture of intelligent design platform for artificial neural network expert system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Honghong

    2017-09-01

    Based on the review of the development and current situation of CAD technology, the necessity of combination of artificial neural network and expert system, and then present an intelligent design system based on artificial neural network. Moreover, it discussed the feasibility of realization of a design-oriented expert system development tools on the basis of above combination. In addition, knowledge representation strategy and method and the solving process are given in this paper.

  2. An artificial neural network system for diagnosing gas turbine engine fuel faults

    SciTech Connect

    Illi, O.J. Jr.; Greitzer, F.L.; Kangas, L.J.; Reeve, T.

    1994-04-01

    The US Army Ordnance Center & School and Pacific Northwest Laboratories are developing a turbine engine diagnostic system for the M1A1 Abrams tank. This system employs Artificial Neural Network (AN) technology to perform diagnosis and prognosis of the tank`s AGT-1500 gas turbine engine. This paper describes the design and prototype development of the ANN component of the diagnostic system, which we refer to as ``TEDANN`` for Turbine Engine Diagnostic Artificial Neural Networks.

  3. Network intrusion detection by the coevolutionary immune algorithm of artificial immune systems with clonal selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamatova, T.; Zhukov, V.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents the application of the artificial immune systems apparatus as a heuristic method of network intrusion detection for algorithmic provision of intrusion detection systems. The coevolutionary immune algorithm of artificial immune systems with clonal selection was elaborated. In testing different datasets the empirical results of evaluation of the algorithm effectiveness were achieved. To identify the degree of efficiency the algorithm was compared with analogs. The fundamental rules based of solutions generated by this algorithm are described in the article.

  4. Artificial Intelligence,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PATTERN RECOGNITION, * ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE , *TEXTBOOKS, COMPUTER PROGRAMMING, MATHEMATICAL LOGIC, ROBOTS, PROBLEM SOLVING, STATISTICAL ANALYSIS, GAME THEORY, NATURAL LANGUAGE, SELF ORGANIZING SYSTEMS.

  5. Removal of organic micropollutants in an artificial recharge system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valhondo, C.; Nödler, K.; Köck-Schulmeyer, M.; Hernandez, M.; Licha, T.; Ayora, C.; Carrera, J.

    2012-04-01

    Emerging contaminants including pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), personal care products (PCPs) and pesticides are increasingly being identified in the environment. Emerging pollutants and their transformation products show low concentration in the environment (ng/L), but the effects of the mixtures and lifelong exposure to humans are currently unknown. Many of these contaminants are removed under aerobic conditions in water treatment plants. However, several pharmaceuticals and metabolites present in wastewater are not eliminated by conventional treatment processes. Several lab studies, however, show that the behaviour of many of these micropollutants is affected by the dominant redox conditions. However, data from field experiments are limited and sometimes contradictory. Artificial recharge is a widespread technology to increase the groundwater resources. In this study we propose a design to enhance the natural remediation potential of the aquifer with the installation of a reactive layer at the bottom of the infiltration pond. This layer is a mixture of compost, aquifer material, clay and iron oxide. This layer is intended to provide an extra amount of DOC to the recharge water and to promote biodegradation by means of the development of different redox zones along the travel path through the unsaturated zone and within the aquifer. Moreover, compost, clay and iron oxide of the layer are assumed to increase sorption surfaces for neutral, cationic and anionic compounds, respectively. The infiltration system is sited in Sant Vicenç dels Horts (Barcelona, Spain). It consists of a decantation pond, receiving raw water from the Llobregat River (highly affected from treatment plant effluents), and an infiltration pond (5600 m2). The infiltration rate is around 1 m3/m2/day. The system is equipped with a network of piezometers, suction cups and tensiometers. Infiltration periods have been performed before and after the installation of the reactive layer

  6. Artificial Enzyme-based Logic Operations to Mimic an Intracellular Enzyme-participated Redox Balance System.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyan; Pu, Fang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2017-07-06

    Owing to the biocatalytic properties of artificial enzymes and the redox characteristic of glutathione, a colorimetric and resettable biological operation was successfully designed to mimic enzyme-participated redox balance in living systems. As one promising candidate of a natural enzyme, artificial enzyme possesses many advantages and has been used in numerous fields. Similar to natural enzymes, communications are also present between different artificial enzymes. With the assistance of four artificial enzymes, three simple biological logic gates were fabricated to help us deepen the understanding of communications between artificial enzymes. In the presence of glutathione, the system could be easily reset without any complicated procedures. We prospect that this work may push forward the exploration of communications between different artificial enzymes and the design of novel artificial enzyme-based biological gates or nanodevices. We hope that our mimic system may help us further understand the functioning of complex biological pathways in biological systems. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Modeling molecular computing systems by an artificial chemistry - its expressive power and application.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Kazuto; Watanabe, Tooru; Kobayashi, Keiji; Nakamura, Masaki; Kishi, Koji; Kazuno, Mitsuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    Artificial chemistries are mainly used to construct virtual systems that are expected to show behavior similar to living systems. In this study, we explore possibilities of applying an artificial chemistry to modeling natural biochemical systems-or, to be specific, molecular computing systems-and show that it may be a useful modeling tool for molecular computation. We previously proposed an artificial chemistry based on string pattern matching and recombination. This article first demonstrates that this artificial chemistry is computationally universal if it has only rules that have one reactant or two reactants. We think this is a good property of an artificial chemistry that models molecular computing, because natural elementary chemical reactions, on which molecular computing is based, are mostly unimolecular or bimolecular. Then we give two illustrative example models for DNA computing in our artificial chemistry: one is for the type of computation called the Adleman-Lipton paradigm, and the other is for a DNA implementation of a finite automaton. Through the construction of these models we observe preferred properties of the artificial chemistry for modeling molecular computing, such as having no spatial structure and being flexible in choosing levels of abstraction.

  8. Measurement of time-resolved oxygen concentration changes in photosynthetic systems by nitroxide-based EPR oximetry.

    PubMed

    Strzalka, K; Walczak, T; Sarna, T; Swartz, H M

    1990-09-01

    The application of recent developments of EPR oximetry to photosynthetic systems is described and used to study rapid processes in isolated thylakoid membranes from spinach and in intact photoautotrophic soybean cells. Using the peak heights of 15N perdeuterated Tempone and two microwave power levels oxygen evolution and consumption were measured. The method measured time-resolved oxygen concentration changes in the micromolar range. Oxygen evolution was linearly proportionate to the chlorophyl concentration of thylakoid membrane over the range studied (0-2 mg/ml). Oxygen evolution associated with single turnover light pulses was consistent with the four state model. The time (t1/2) to reach equilibrium of oxygen concentrations after a single turnover pulse was 0.4-0.5 ms, indicating that the evolution of oxygen coupled to the S4-S0 transition may be shorter than reported previously. The time for equilibrium of oxygen after single turnover pulses in soybean cells was relatively long (400 ms), which suggests that there are significant barriers to the free diffusion of oxygen in this system. The method also was used to study oxygen consumption by the electron transport chain of photosystem I and photosystem II. We conclude that EPR oximetry can provide quantitative and time-resolved data on oxygen concentrations with a sensitivity that is useful for studies of such systems.

  9. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Linda C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A series of articles focuses on artificial intelligence research and development to enhance information systems and services. Topics discussed include knowledge base designs, expert system development tools, natural language processing, expert systems for reference services, and the role that artificial intelligence concepts should have in…

  10. The role of artificial intelligence and expert systems in increasing STS operations productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culbert, C.

    1985-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is discussed. A number of the computer technologies pioneered in the AI world can make significant contributions to increasing STS operations productivity. Application of expert systems, natural language, speech recognition, and other key technologies can reduce manpower while raising productivity. Many aspects of STS support lend themselves to this type of automation. The artificial intelligence section of the mission planning and analysis division has developed a number of functioning prototype systems which demonstrate the potential gains of applying AI technology.

  11. Knowledge Based Simulation: An Artificial Intelligence Approach to System Modeling and Automating the Simulation Life Cycle.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-13

    Simulation: An Artificial Intelligence Approach to System Modeling and Automating the Simulation Life Cycle Mark S. Fox, Nizwer Husain, Malcolm...McRoberts and Y.V.Reddy CMU-RI-TR-88-5 Intelligent Systems Laboratory The Robotics Institute Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania D T T 13...years of research in the application of Artificial Intelligence to Simulation. Our focus has been in two areas: the use of Al knowledge representation

  12. The role of artificial intelligence and expert systems in increasing STS operations productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culbert, C.

    1985-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is discussed. A number of the computer technologies pioneered in the AI world can make significant contributions to increasing STS operations productivity. Application of expert systems, natural language, speech recognition, and other key technologies can reduce manpower while raising productivity. Many aspects of STS support lend themselves to this type of automation. The artificial intelligence section of the mission planning and analysis division has developed a number of functioning prototype systems which demonstrate the potential gains of applying AI technology.

  13. [Effects of water depth on the growth of Vallisneria natans and photosynthetic system II photochemical characteristics of the leaves].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Zhang, Qi-Chao; Sun, Shu-Yun; Chen, Kai-Ning

    2014-06-01

    The effects of water depth on the growth of Vallisneria natans and photosynthetic system II photochemical characteristics of the leaves were investigated at three depths of 0.6, 1.3 and 2.0 m. The rapid fluorescence induction kinetics curves (OJIP) of the leaves were measured with Plant Efficiency Analyzer and analyzed with JIP-test. The results indicated that the light intensities at water depths of 0.6, 1.3 and 2.0 m were obviously different and the growth of V. natans was restricted under water depth of 2.0 m. Biomass, number of ramets, number of leaves, total root length, root surface area and other morphological indices decreased significantly with the increasing water depth, and the maximum leaf length, average leaf length, maximum leaf width changed insignificantly with the water depth. With the increasing water depth, absorption flux per reaction center (ABS/RC), trapped energy flux per RC (TR0/RC), electron transport flux per RC (ET0/RC), reduction of end acceptors at photosynthetic system I (PS I ) electron acceptor side per RC (RE0/ RC) decreased significantly. The dissipated energy flux per RC (DI0/RC) also decreased significantly, which led to no obvious difference in quantum yield for the reduction of end acceptors of PS I per photon absorbed (phiR0) and the efficiency for the trapped exciton to move an electron into the electron transport chain from QA- to the PS I end electron acceptors (deltaR0). Because the amount of active PS II RCs per CS increased significantly, photosynthesis per area of V. natans grown at 2.0 m was significantly greater than that of V. natans grown at 0.6 m. The performance index PIs, Ples, Plabs,.otal photochemistry efficiency of leaves of V. natans grown at 2.0 m was significantly in- creased, suggesting that light stress may promote a more efficient conversion of light energy to active chemical energy. V. natans leaves accommodate the low light intensity environment through activating inactive reaction centers but not

  14. Development of failure detection system based on vibration signal for smart artificial heart: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Shinichi; Kuwabara, Takashi; Koguchi, Harutoshi; Yamane, Takashi; Tsutsui, Tatsuo; Sankai, Yoshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    To realize safe and effective medical treatment for patients with implantable artificial hearts, we have developed a smart artificial heart (SAH). The SAH can grasp the mechanical condition of the artificial heart and the physiological condition of the patient. The purpose of this study is to develop a failure detection system based on the vibration signal from artificial heart in order to enhance the ability of failure detection for the SAH. We suppose this vibration signal reflects not only the mechanical condition of the artificial heart but also a part of the physiological condition of the patient. The developed failure detection system is composed of a vibration sensor unit and a failure detection algorithm. The algorithm has a standard frequency pattern, which is made from the vibration signal of good condition of both the artificial heart and patient. Observing the difference from the standard frequency pattern, the algorithm detects failure conditions. Therefore, this algorithm does not need prior knowledge of vibration characteristics corresponding to failures. After confirming that the vibration signal are affected by pump speed and pulsation in two kinds of mock circulatory loops, we performed thrombogenesis detection by using the failure detection system in mock circulatory loop with sheep blood. As a result, this system indicated a possibility of detecting the initial sign of thrombogenesis earlier than current signal. In conclusion, we think that this failure detection system can cooperate with other sensor systems of the SAH and enhance the ability of failure detection for the SAH.

  15. Exploration of the antioxidant system and photosynthetic system of a marine algicidal Bacillus and its effect on four harmful algal bloom species.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shaoling; Shu, Wanjiao; Tan, Shuo; Zhao, Ling; Yin, Pinghe

    2016-01-01

    A novel marine bacterium, strain B1, initially showed 96.4% algicidal activity against Phaeocystis globosa. Under this situation, 3 other harmful algal species (Skeletonema costatum, Heterosigma akashiwo, and Prorocentrum donghaiense) were chosen to study the algicidal effects of strain B1, and the algicidal activities were 91.4%, 90.7%, and 90.6%, respectively. To explore the algicidal mechanism of strain B1 on these 4 harmful algal species, the characteristics of the antioxidant system and photosynthetic system were studied. Sensitivity to strain B1 supernatant, enzyme activity, and gene expression varied with algal species, while the algicidal patterns were similar. Strain B1 supernatant increased malondialdehyde contents; decreased chlorophyll a contents; changed total antioxidant and superoxide dismutase activity; and restrained psbA, psbD, and rbcL genes expression, which eventually resulted in the algal cells death. The algicidal procedure was observed using field emission scanning electron microscopy, which indicated that algal cells were lysed and cellular substances were released. These findings suggested that the antioxidant and photosynthetic system of these 4 algal species was destroyed under strain B1 supernatant stress. This is the first report to explore and compare the mechanism of a marine Bacillus against harmful algal bloom species of covered 4 phyla.

  16. Artificial intelligence (AI) systems for interpreting complex medical datasets.

    PubMed

    Altman, R B

    2017-05-01

    Advances in machine intelligence have created powerful capabilities in algorithms that find hidden patterns in data, classify objects based on their measured characteristics, and associate similar patients/diseases/drugs based on common features. However, artificial intelligence (AI) applications in medical data have several technical challenges: complex and heterogeneous datasets, noisy medical datasets, and explaining their output to users. There are also social challenges related to intellectual property, data provenance, regulatory issues, economics, and liability. © 2017 ASCPT.

  17. Skin friction related behaviour of artificial turf systems.

    PubMed

    Tay, Sock Peng; Fleming, Paul; Hu, Xiao; Forrester, Steph

    2017-08-01

    The occurrence of skin friction related injuries is an issue for artificial turf sports pitches and remains a barrier to their acceptance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the current industry standard Securisport® Sports Surface Tester that measures skin surface related frictional behaviour of artificial turf. Little research has been published about the device and its efficacy, despite its widespread use as a standard FIFA test instrument. To achieve a range of frictional behaviours, several "third generation" (3G) carpet and infill combinations were investigated; friction time profiles throughout the Securisport rotations were assessed in combination with independent measurements of skin roughness before and after friction testing via 3D surface scanning. The results indicated that carpets without infill had greatest friction (coefficients of friction 0.97-1.20) while those completely filled with sand or rubber had similar and lower values independent of carpet type (coefficient of friction (COF) ≈0.57). Surface roughness of a silicone skin (s-skin) decreased after friction testing, with the largest change on sand infilled surfaces, indicating an "abrasive" polishing effect. The combined data show that the s-skin is damaged in a surface-specific manner, thus the Securisport COF values appear to be a poor measure of the potential for skin abrasion. It is proposed that the change in s-skin roughness improves assessment of the potential for skin damage when players slide on artificial turf.

  18. Photosynthetic Characterization of Plant Functional Types from Coastal Tundra to Improve Representation of the Arctic in Earth System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, A.; Xu, C.; McDowell, N. G.; Sloan, V. L.; Norby, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    The primary goal of Earth System Models (ESMs) is to improve understanding and projection of future global change. In order to do this they must accurately represent the carbon fluxes associated with the terrestrial carbon cycle. Photosynthetic CO2 uptake is well described by the Farquhar, von Caemmerer and Berry model of photosynthesis, and most ESMs use a derivation of this model. One of the key parameters required by the Farquhar, von Caemmerer and Berry model is an estimate of the maximum rate of carboxylation by the enzyme Rubisco (Vc,max). In ESMs the parameter Vc,max is usually fixed for a given plant functional type (PFT) and often estimated from the empirical relationship between leaf N content and Vc,max. However, uncertainty in the estimation of Vc,max has been shown to account for significant variation in model estimation of gross primary production, particularly in the Arctic. As part of a new multidisciplinary project to improve the representation of the Arctic in ESMs (Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic) we have begun to characterize photosynthetic parameters and N acquisition in the key Arctic PFTs. We measured the response of photosynthesis (A) to internal CO2 concentration (ci) in situ in two sedges (Carex aquatilis, Eriophorum angustifolium), a grass (Dupontia fisheri) and a forb (Petasites frigidus) growing on the Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, AK. The values of Vc,max (normalized to 25oC) currently used to represent Arctic PFTs in ESMs are approximately half of the values we measured in these species in July, 2012, on the coastal tundra in Barrow. We hypothesize that these plants have a greater fraction of leaf N invested in Rubisco (FLNR) than is assumed by the models. The parameter Vc,max is used directly as a driver for respiration in some ESMs, and in other ESMs Vc,max is linked to leaf N content and N acquisition through FLNR. Therefore, these results have implications for ESMs beyond photosynthesis, and suggest that

  19. An automated diagnosis system of liver disease using artificial immune and genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chunlin; Peng, Lingxi

    2013-04-01

    The rise of health care cost is one of the world's most important problems. Disease prediction is also a vibrant research area. Researchers have approached this problem using various techniques such as support vector machine, artificial neural network, etc. This study typically exploits the immune system's characteristics of learning and memory to solve the problem of liver disease diagnosis. The proposed system applies a combination of two methods of artificial immune and genetic algorithm to diagnose the liver disease. The system architecture is based on artificial immune system. The learning procedure of system adopts genetic algorithm to interfere the evolution of antibody population. The experiments use two benchmark datasets in our study, which are acquired from the famous UCI machine learning repository. The obtained diagnosis accuracies are very promising with regard to the other diagnosis system in the literatures. These results suggest that this system may be a useful automatic diagnosis tool for liver disease.

  20. Manganese oxide supported on gold/iron as a water-oxidizing catalyst in artificial photosynthetic systems.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Hosseini, Seyedeh Maedeh; Zand, Zahra

    2016-05-31

    Herein, we reported that KMnO4 with iron nanoparticles coated with gold layers was a promising catalyst for water oxidation. The compound was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy and electrochemistry. The new compound was a conductive, recyclable, highly dispersible, magnetically separable, environmentally friendly, and nano-sized catalyst for water oxidation via cerium(iv) ammonium nitrate or Ru(bpy)3(3+) and electrochemical water oxidation. The turnover frequency of Mn oxide/gold/iron for water oxidation via cerium(iv) ammonium nitrate is 0.4 mmol O2 per mol Mn per second, which shows that this catalyst is among the best Mn-based catalysts for water oxidation. We also showed a strategy for placing this catalyst on the surface of an electrode without adding any other compounds.

  1. Nanolayered manganese oxide/C(60) composite: a good water-oxidizing catalyst for artificial photosynthetic systems.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Abasi, Mahnaz; Tomo, Tatsuya; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-08-21

    For the first time, we considered Mn oxide/C60 composites as water-oxidizing catalysts. The composites were synthesized by easy and simple procedures, and characterized by some methods. The water-oxidizing activities of these composites were also measured in the presence of cerium(iv) ammonium nitrate. We found that the nanolayered Mn oxide/C60 composites show promising activity toward water oxidation.

  2. A Framework for Intelligent Instructional Systems: An Artificial Intelligence Machine Learning Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Lee A.

    1987-01-01

    Presents and develops a general model of the nature of a learning system and a classification for learning systems. Highlights include the relationship between artificial intelligence and cognitive psychology; computer-based instructional systems; intelligent instructional systems; and the role of the learner's knowledge base in an intelligent…

  3. Analysis of reductant supply systems for ferredoxin-dependent sulfite reductase in photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic organs of maize.

    PubMed

    Yonekura-Sakakibara, K; Onda, Y; Ashikari, T; Tanaka, Y; Kusumi, T; Hase, T

    2000-03-01

    Sulfite reductase (SiR) catalyzes the reduction of sulfite to sulfide in chloroplasts and root plastids using ferredoxin (Fd) as an electron donor. Using purified maize (Zea mays L.) SiR and isoproteins of Fd and Fd-NADP(+) reductase (FNR), we reconstituted illuminated thylakoid membrane- and NADPH-dependent sulfite reduction systems. Fd I and L-FNR were distributed in leaves and Fd III and R-FNR in roots. The stromal concentrations of SiR and Fd I were estimated at 1.2 and 37 microM, respectively. The molar ratio of Fd III to SiR in root plastids was approximately 3:1. Photoreduced Fd I and Fd III showed a comparable ability to donate electrons to SiR. In contrast, when being reduced with NADPH via FNRs, Fd III showed a several-fold higher activity than Fd I. Fd III and R-FNR showed the highest rate of sulfite reduction among all combinations tested. NADP(+) decreased the rate of sulfite reduction in a dose-dependent manner. These results demonstrate that the participation of Fd III and high NADPH/NADP(+) ratio are crucial for non-photosynthetic sulfite reduction. In accordance with this view, a cysteine-auxotrophic Escherichia coli mutant defective for NADPH-dependent SiR was rescued by co-expression of maize SiR with Fd III but not with Fd I.

  4. Photosynthetic and Other Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Isoforms in the Single-Cell, Facultative C4 System of Hydrilla verticillata1

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Srinath K.; Magnin, Noël C.; Reiskind, Julia B.; Bowes, George

    2002-01-01

    The submersed monocot Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle is a facultative C4 plant. It typically exhibits C3 photosynthetic characteristics, but exposure to low [CO2] induces a C4 system in which the C4 and Calvin cycles co-exist in the same cell and the initial fixation in the light is catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Three full-length cDNAs encoding PEPC were isolated from H. verticillata, two from leaves and one from root. The sequences were 95% to 99% identical and shared a 75% to 85% similarity with other plant PEPCs. Transcript studies revealed that one isoform, Hvpepc4, was exclusively expressed in leaves during C4 induction. This and enzyme kinetic data were consistent with it being the C4 photosynthesis isoform. However, the C4 signature serine of terrestrial plant C4 isoforms was absent in this and the other H. verticillata sequences. Instead, alanine, typical of C3 sequences, was present. Western analyses of C3 and C4 leaf extracts after anion-exchange chromatography showed similar dominant PEPC-specific bands at 110 kD. In phylogenetic analyses, the sequences grouped with C3, non-graminaceous C4, and Crassulacean acid metabolism PEPCs but not with the graminaceous C4, and formed a clade with a gymnosperm, which is consistent with H. verticillata PEPC predating that of other C4 angiosperms. PMID:12376652

  5. Genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of the light emitted by artificial illumination systems.

    PubMed

    De Flora, Silvio

    2013-03-01

    The light delivered by artificial illumination systems, and in particular by halogen quartz bulbs, contains UVA, UVB, and UVC radiation, is genotoxic to both bacterial and human cells and is potently carcinogenic to hairless mice. Since IARC has classified UV radiation in Group 1, any source of UV light poses a carcinogenic hazard to humans. Suitable regulations would be needed in order to control the safety of the light emitted by artificial light sources.

  6. A New Rule-Based System for the Construction and Structural Characterization of Artificial Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štambuk, Nikola; Konjevoda, Paško; Gotovac, Nikola

    In this paper, we present a new rule-based system for an artificial protein design incorporating ternary amino acid polarity (polar, nonpolar, and neutral). It may be used to design de novo α and β protein fold structures and mixed class proteins. The targeted molecules are artificial proteins with important industrial and biomedical applications, related to the development of diagnostic-therapeutic peptide pharmaceuticals, antibody mimetics, peptide vaccines, new nanobiomaterials and engineered protein scaffolds.

  7. Photosynthetic Responses of Plant Communities to Sand Burial on the Machair Dune Systems of the Outer Hebrides, Scotland

    PubMed Central

    KENT, MARTIN; OWEN, NIA W.; DALE, M. PAMELA

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims The effects of both short-term (2 weeks) and long-term (6 weeks) burial on the photosynthetic efficiency of four typical plant sub-communities of the machair sand dunes of the Outer Hebrides are described. Previous studies have examined the photosynthetic responses on individual species rather than the response at the community level. • Methods Three replicate turves from four different sub-community types (foredune grassland, dune slack, three-year fallow and unploughed grassland) were subjected to short- and long-term burial treatments after acclimatisation in an unheated greenhouse for approximately 10 weeks. Three replicate control turves from each sub-community were left unburied. After treatment, photosynthetic rate was measured at 16–20 h and 40–44 h after re-exposure, using an infra-red gas analyser, with standardization by total leaf area for each turf. Effects of sub-community type, burial duration and time since re-exposure were analysed by 3-factor split-plot analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures for time since re-exposure in the subplots. • Key Results Buried turves were characterized by a low dark respiration rate, which may represent a maintenance response to burial. After removal of sand, each machair sub-community showed some capacity for an elastic photosynthetic response. There were no differences between the effects of short- and long-term burial on the photosynthetic efficiency of machair vegetation, although turves buried for 6 weeks generally attained photosynthetic rates approaching those of control rates sooner than turves buried for 2 weeks. Photosynthetic responses to burial varied between sub-communities, with the slack turves exhibiting the poorest capacity for recovery within the investigated 44-h period. • Conclusions In the machair environment, the ability to maintain photosynthetic equipment whilst buried, and the ability to bring about a relatively rapid reinstatement of

  8. A Novel Artificial Intelligence System for Endotracheal Intubation.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Jestin N; Das, Samarjit; De la Torre, Fernando; Frisch, Adam; Guyette, Francis X; Hodgins, Jessica K; Yealy, Donald M

    2016-01-01

    Adequate visualization of the glottic opening is a key factor to successful endotracheal intubation (ETI); however, few objective tools exist to help guide providers' ETI attempts toward the glottic opening in real-time. Machine learning/artificial intelligence has helped to automate the detection of other visual structures but its utility with ETI is unknown. We sought to test the accuracy of various computer algorithms in identifying the glottic opening, creating a tool that could aid successful intubation. We collected a convenience sample of providers who each performed ETI 10 times on a mannequin using a video laryngoscope (C-MAC, Karl Storz Corp, Tuttlingen, Germany). We recorded each attempt and reviewed one-second time intervals for the presence or absence of the glottic opening. Four different machine learning/artificial intelligence algorithms analyzed each attempt and time point: k-nearest neighbor (KNN), support vector machine (SVM), decision trees, and neural networks (NN). We used half of the videos to train the algorithms and the second half to test the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of each algorithm. We enrolled seven providers, three Emergency Medicine attendings, and four paramedic students. From the 70 total recorded laryngoscopic video attempts, we created 2,465 time intervals. The algorithms had the following sensitivity and specificity for detecting the glottic opening: KNN (70%, 90%), SVM (70%, 90%), decision trees (68%, 80%), and NN (72%, 78%). Initial efforts at computer algorithms using artificial intelligence are able to identify the glottic opening with over 80% accuracy. With further refinements, video laryngoscopy has the potential to provide real-time, direction feedback to the provider to help guide successful ETI.

  9. Solar fuels via artificial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L

    2009-12-21

    Because sunlight is diffuse and intermittent, substantial use of solar energy to meet humanity's needs will probably require energy storage in dense, transportable media via chemical bonds. Practical, cost effective technologies for conversion of sunlight directly into useful fuels do not currently exist, and will require new basic science. Photosynthesis provides a blueprint for solar energy storage in fuels. Indeed, all of the fossil-fuel-based energy consumed today derives from sunlight harvested by photosynthetic organisms. Artificial photosynthesis research applies the fundamental scientific principles of the natural process to the design of solar energy conversion systems. These constructs use different materials, and researchers tune them to produce energy efficiently and in forms useful to humans. Fuel production via natural or artificial photosynthesis requires three main components. First, antenna/reaction center complexes absorb sunlight and convert the excitation energy to electrochemical energy (redox equivalents). Then, a water oxidation complex uses this redox potential to catalyze conversion of water to hydrogen ions, electrons stored as reducing equivalents, and oxygen. A second catalytic system uses the reducing equivalents to make fuels such as carbohydrates, lipids, or hydrogen gas. In this Account, we review a few general approaches to artificial photosynthetic fuel production that may be useful for eventually overcoming the energy problem. A variety of research groups have prepared artificial reaction center molecules. These systems contain a chromophore, such as a porphyrin, covalently linked to one or more electron acceptors, such as fullerenes or quinones, and secondary electron donors. Following the excitation of the chromophore, photoinduced electron transfer generates a primary charge-separated state. Electron transfer chains spatially separate the redox equivalents and reduce electronic coupling, slowing recombination of the charge

  10. The Photosynthetic Cycle

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Calvin, Melvin

    1955-03-21

    A cyclic sequence of transformations, including the carboxylation of RuDP (ribulose diphosphate) and its re-formation, has been deduced as the route for the creation of reduced carbon compounds in photosynthetic organisms. With the demonstration of RuDP as substrate for the carboxylation in a cell-free system, each of the reactions has now been carried out independently in vitro. Further purification of this last enzyme system has confirmed the deduction that the carboxylation of RuDP leads directly to the two molecules of PGA (phosphoglyceric acid) involving an internal dismutation and suggesting the name "carboxydismutase" for the enzyme. As a consequence of this knowledge of each of the steps in the photosynthetic CO{sub 2} reduction cycle, it is possible to define the reagent requirements to maintain it. The net requirement for the reduction of one molecule of CO{sub 2} is four equivalents of [H]and three molecules of ATP (adenine triphosphate). These must ultimately be supplied by the photochemical reaction. Some possible ways in which this may be accomplished are discussed.

  11. Robust Min-system oscillation in the presence of internal photosynthetic membranes in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    MacCready, Joshua S; Schossau, Jory; Osteryoung, Katherine W; Ducat, Daniel C

    2017-02-01

    The oscillatory Min system of Escherichia coli defines the cell division plane by regulating the site of FtsZ-ring formation and represents one of the best-understood examples of emergent protein self-organization in nature. The oscillatory patterns of the Min-system proteins MinC, MinD and MinE (MinCDE) are strongly dependent on the geometry of membranes they bind. Complex internal membranes within cyanobacteria could disrupt this self-organization by sterically occluding or sequestering MinCDE from the plasma membrane. Here, it was shown that the Min system in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 oscillates from pole-to-pole despite the potential spatial constraints imposed by their extensive thylakoid network. Moreover, reaction-diffusion simulations predict robust oscillations in modeled cyanobacterial cells provided that thylakoid network permeability is maintained to facilitate diffusion, and suggest that Min proteins require preferential affinity for the plasma membrane over thylakoids to correctly position the FtsZ ring. Interestingly, in addition to oscillating, MinC exhibits a midcell localization dependent on MinD and the DivIVA-like protein Cdv3, indicating that two distinct pools of MinC are coordinated in S. elongatus. Our results provide the first direct evidence for Min oscillation outside of E. coli and have broader implications for Min-system function in bacteria and organelles with internal membrane systems. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. New Trends in Computing Anticipatory Systems : Emergence of Artificial Conscious Intelligence with Machine Learning Natural Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Daniel M.

    2008-10-01

    This paper deals with the challenge to create an Artificial Intelligence System with an Artificial Consciousness. For that, an introduction to computing anticipatory systems is presented, with the definitions of strong and weak anticipation. The quasi-anticipatory systems of Robert Rosen are linked to open-loop controllers. Then, some properties of the natural brain are presented in relation to the triune brain theory of Paul D. MacLean, and the mind time of Benjamin Libet, with his veto of the free will. The theory of the hyperincursive discrete anticipatory systems is recalled in view to introduce the concept of hyperincursive free will, which gives a similar veto mechanism: free will as unpredictable hyperincursive anticipation The concepts of endo-anticipation and exo-anticipation are then defined. Finally, some ideas about artificial conscious intelligence with natural language are presented, in relation to the Turing Machine, Formal Language, Intelligent Agents and Mutli-Agent System.

  13. Using artificial systems to explore the ecology and evolution of symbioses.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Babak; Chen, Chi-Chun; Hillesland, Kristina L; Waite, Adam; Shou, Wenying

    2011-04-01

    The web of life is weaved from diverse symbiotic interactions between species. Symbioses vary from antagonistic interactions such as competition and predation to beneficial interactions such as mutualism. What are the bases for the origin and persistence of symbiosis? What affects the ecology and evolution of symbioses? How do symbiotic interactions generate ecological patterns? How do symbiotic partners evolve and coevolve? Many of these questions are difficult to address in natural systems. Artificial systems, from abstract to living, have been constructed to capture essential features of natural symbioses and to address these key questions. With reduced complexity and increased controllability, artificial systems can serve as useful models for natural systems. We review how artificial systems have contributed to our understanding of symbioses.

  14. Measurement of photosynthetic response to plant water stress using a multi-modal sensing system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant yield and productivity are significantly affected by abiotic stresses such as water or nutrient deficiency. An automated, timely detection of plant stress can mitigate stress development, thereby maximizing productivity and fruit quality. A multi-modal sensing system was developed and evalua...

  15. New genome sequence data and molecular tools promote the use of photosynthetic and edible cyanobacteria in bioregenerative systems to support human space exploration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leys, Natalie; Morin, Nicolas; Janssen, Paul; Mergeay, Max

    Cyanobacteria are daily used as nutritional supplements (e.g. Spirulina) and are considered for promising applications beyond Earth, in space, where they can play a crucial role in closed miniaturised biological waste recycling systems that are currently developed to support future long-term space missions. Cyanobacteria can be cultured with artificial light in controllable photobioreactors, and used for the efficient removal of CO2 from and production of O2 in the at-mosphere of the confined spacecraft, for removal of nitrate from waste water that is recycled to potable water, and as complementary food source. In this context, the filamentous cyanobac-terium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 was selected as part of the bio-regenerative life-support system MELiSSA from the European Space Agency. For bioprocess control and optimisation, the access to its genetic information and the development of molecular tools is crucial. Here we report on our efforts to determine the full genome of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005. The obtained sequence data were analysed in detail to gain a better insight in the photosynthetic, nutritive, or potential toxic potential of this strain. In addition, the sensitivity of PCC 8005 to ionizing radiation was investigated because prolonged exposure of PCC 8005 to cosmic radiation in space might have a deleterious effect on its metabolism and oxygenic properties. To our knowledge, of the 6 different research groups across the globe trying to sequence Arthrospira strains, none of them, including us, were yet able to obtain a complete genome sequence. For Arthrospira sp. strain PCC 8005, we obtained 119 contigs (assembled in 16 scaffolds), representing 6,3 Mb, with 5,856 predicted protein-coding sequences (CDSs) and 176 genes encoding RNA. The PCC 8005 genome displays an unusual high number of large repeated sequences, covering around 8% of the genome, which likely hampered the sequenc-ing. The PCC 8005 genome is also ridden by mobile

  16. Entropy: A Unifying Path for Understanding Complexity in Natural, Artificial and Social Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    Pesquisas Fisicas, and National Institute for Science and Technology for Complex Systems...Table of Contents 1 – Brief History and Epistemological Motivation 2 – Illustrative Applications to Complex Natural and Artificial Systems 3...Illustrative Applications to Complex Socio-Technical Systems 4 – Final Remarks 1- Brief History and Epistemological Motivation Energy and entropy are

  17. Effects of artificial lighting on the detection of plant stress with spectral reflectance remote sensing in bioregenerative life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Richards, Jeffrey T.

    2006-09-01

    Plant-based life support systems that utilize bioregenerative technologies have been proposed for long-term human missions to both the Moon and Mars. Bioregenerative life support systems will utilize higher plants to regenerate oxygen, water, and edible biomass for crews, and are likely to significantly lower the ‘equivalent system mass’ of crewed vehicles. As part of an ongoing effort to begin the development of an automatic remote sensing system to monitor plant health in bioregenerative life support modules, we tested the efficacy of seven artificial illumination sources on the remote detection of plant stresses. A cohort of pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.) were grown 42 days at 25 °C, 70% relative humidity, and 300 μmol m-2 s-1 of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; from 400 to 700 nm). Plants were grown under nutritional stresses induced by irrigating subsets of the plants with 100, 50, 25, or 10% of a standard nutrient solution. Reflectance spectra of the healthy and stressed plants were collected under seven artificial lamps including two tungsten halogen lamps, plus high pressure sodium, metal halide, fluorescent, microwave, and red/blue light emitting diode (LED) sources. Results indicated that several common algorithms used to estimate biomass and leaf chlorophyll content were effective in predicting plant stress under all seven illumination sources. However, the two types of tungsten halogen lamps and the microwave illumination source yielded linear models with the highest residuals and thus the highest predictive capabilities of all lamps tested. The illumination sources with the least predictive capabilities were the red/blue LEDs and fluorescent lamps. Although the red/blue LEDs yielded the lowest residuals for linear models derived from the remote sensing data, the LED arrays used in these experiments were optimized for plant productivity and not the collection of remote sensing data. Thus, we propose that if adjusted to optimize the

  18. Development of haptic based piezoresistive artificial fingertip: Toward efficient tactile sensing systems for humanoids.

    PubMed

    TermehYousefi, Amin; Azhari, Saman; Khajeh, Amin; Hamidon, Mohd Nizar; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2017-08-01

    Haptic sensors are essential devices that facilitate human-like sensing systems such as implantable medical devices and humanoid robots. The availability of conducting thin films with haptic properties could lead to the development of tactile sensing systems that stretch reversibly, sense pressure (not just touch), and integrate with collapsible. In this study, a nanocomposite based hemispherical artificial fingertip fabricated to enhance the tactile sensing systems of humanoid robots. To validate the hypothesis, proposed method was used in the robot-like finger system to classify the ripe and unripe tomato by recording the metabolic growth of the tomato as a function of resistivity change during a controlled indention force. Prior to fabrication, a finite element modeling (FEM) was investigated for tomato to obtain the stress distribution and failure point of tomato by applying different external loads. Then, the extracted computational analysis information was utilized to design and fabricate nanocomposite based artificial fingertip to examine the maturity analysis of tomato. The obtained results demonstrate that the fabricated conformable and scalable artificial fingertip shows different electrical property for ripe and unripe tomato. The artificial fingertip is compatible with the development of brain-like systems for artificial skin by obtaining periodic response during an applied load. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. A comparative study of artificial intelligent-based maximum power point tracking for photovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain Mutlag, Ammar; Mohamed, Azah; Shareef, Hussain

    2016-03-01

    Maximum power point tracking (MPPT) is normally required to improve the performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems. This paper presents artificial intelligent-based maximum power point tracking (AI-MPPT) by considering three artificial intelligent techniques, namely, artificial neural network (ANN), adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system with seven triangular fuzzy sets (7-tri), and adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system with seven gbell fuzzy sets. The AI-MPPT is designed for the 25 SolarTIFSTF-120P6 PV panels, with the capacity of 3 kW peak. A complete PV system is modelled using 300,000 data samples and simulated in the MATLAB/SIMULINK. The AI-MPPT has been tested under real environmental conditions for two days from 8 am to 18 pm. The results showed that the ANN based MPPT gives the most accurate performance and then followed by the 7-tri-based MPPT.

  20. Design and performance of heart assist or artificial heart control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, J. A., Jr.; Gebben, V. D.

    1978-01-01

    The factors leading to the design of a controlled driving system for either a heart assist pump or artificial heart are discussed. The system provides square pressure waveform to drive a pneumatic-type blood pump. For assist usage the system uses an R-wave detector circuit that can detect the R-wave of the electrocardiogram in the presence of electrical disturbances. This circuit provides a signal useful for synchronizing an assist pump with the natural heart. It synchronizes a square wave circuit, the output of which is converted into square waveforms of pneumatic pressure suitable for driving both assist device and artificial heart. The pressure levels of the driving waveforms are controlled by means of feedback channels to maintain physiological regulation of the artificial heart's output flow. A more compact system that could achieve similar regulatory characteristics is also discussed.

  1. Electrochemical and optical studies on model photosynthetic systems: Progress report for the period 7/1/84 to 12/1/86

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, T.M.

    1986-12-01

    Objective of this research is to study the relation between the structure of photosynthetic pigments and their spectroscopic and electrochemical properties. Model systems under study progress from the least ordered (solutions) through the most highly ordered (Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers) systems containing BChl, BPheo, and UQ. Vesicles, intermediate between solutions and LB monolayers, are also under investigation. Molecules other than the photosynthetic pigments and quinones have been examined, including chromophores (i.e., surface active cyanine dyes and phthalocyanines) and redox active compounds (methyl viologen (MV) and surfactant ferrocenes), in order to develop the techniques needed to study the photosynthetic components. The chlorophylls are photosensitive and labile. Thus, it is easier first to develop procedures using stable species. During this period, we have focused on the application of electrochemical methods for determining the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants of BChl and BPheo at metal electrodes (Pt and Au). We have also determined the effect of adsorption on the redox properties of quinones. Resonance Raman (RR) and surface enhanced resonance Raman (SERR) spectroscopy were used to study solution and surface species.

  2. Comparison of Scale in a Photosynthetic Reactor System for Algal Remediation of Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Sniffen, Kaitlyn D; Sales, Christopher M; Olson, Mira S

    2017-03-06

    An experimental methodology is presented to compare the performance of two different sized reactors designed for wastewater treatment. In this study, ammonia removal, nitrogen removal and algal growth are compared over an 8-week period in paired sets of small (100 L) and large (1,000 L) reactors designed for algal remediation of landfill wastewater. Contents of the small and large scale reactors were mixed before the beginning of each weekly testing interval to maintain equivalent initial conditions across the two scales. System characteristics, including surface area to volume ratio, retention time, biomass density, and wastewater feed concentrations, can be adjusted to better equalize conditions occurring at both scales. During the short 8-week representative time period, starting ammonia and total nitrogen concentrations ranged from 3.1-14 mg NH3-N/L, and 8.1-20.1 mg N/L, respectively. The performance of the treatment system was evaluated based on its ability to remove ammonia and total nitrogen and to produce algal biomass. Mean ± standard deviation of ammonia removal, total nitrogen removal and biomass growth rates were 0.95±0.3 mg NH3-N/L/day, 0.89±0.3 mg N/L/day, and 0.02±0.03 g biomass/L/day, respectively. All vessels showed a positive relationship between the initial ammonia concentration and ammonia removal rate (R(2)=0.76). Comparison of process efficiencies and production values measured in reactors of different scale may be useful in determining if lab-scale experimental data is appropriate for prediction of commercial-scale production values.

  3. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornburg, David D.

    1986-01-01

    Overview of the artificial intelligence (AI) field provides a definition; discusses past research and areas of future research; describes the design, functions, and capabilities of expert systems and the "Turing Test" for machine intelligence; and lists additional sources for information on artificial intelligence. Languages of AI are…

  4. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornburg, David D.

    1986-01-01

    Overview of the artificial intelligence (AI) field provides a definition; discusses past research and areas of future research; describes the design, functions, and capabilities of expert systems and the "Turing Test" for machine intelligence; and lists additional sources for information on artificial intelligence. Languages of AI are…

  5. Influence of environment induced correlated fluctuations in electronic coupling on coherent excitation energy transfer dynamics in model photosynthetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Pengfei; Coker, David F.

    2012-03-01

    Two-dimensional photon-echo experiments indicate that excitation energy transfer between chromophores near the reaction center of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides occurs coherently with decoherence times of hundreds of femtoseconds, comparable to the energy transfer time scale in these systems. The original explanation of this observation suggested that correlated fluctuations in chromophore excitation energies, driven by large scale protein motions could result in long lived coherent energy transfer dynamics. However, no significant site energy correlation has been found in recent molecular dynamics simulations of several model light harvesting systems. Instead, there is evidence of correlated fluctuations in site energy-electronic coupling and electronic coupling-electronic coupling. The roles of these different types of correlations in excitation energy transfer dynamics are not yet thoroughly understood, though the effects of site energy correlations have been well studied. In this paper, we introduce several general models that can realistically describe the effects of various types of correlated fluctuations in chromophore properties and systematically study the behavior of these models using general methods for treating dissipative quantum dynamics in complex multi-chromophore systems. The effects of correlation between site energy and inter-site electronic couplings are explored in a two state model of excitation energy transfer between the accessory bacteriochlorophyll and bacteriopheophytin in a reaction center system and we find that these types of correlated fluctuations can enhance or suppress coherence and transfer rate simultaneously. In contrast, models for correlated fluctuations in chromophore excitation energies show enhanced coherent dynamics but necessarily show decrease in excitation energy transfer rate accompanying such coherence enhancement. Finally, for a three state model of the Fenna-Matthews-Olsen light

  6. Effects of system-bath coupling on a photosynthetic heat engine: A polaron master-equation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, M.; Shen, H. Z.; Zhao, X. L.; Yi, X. X.

    2017-07-01

    Stimulated by suggestions of quantum effects in energy transport in photosynthesis, the fundamental principles responsible for the near-unit efficiency of the conversion of solar to chemical energy became active again in recent years. Under natural conditions, the formation of stable charge-separation states in bacteria and plant reaction centers is strongly affected by the coupling of electronic degrees of freedom to a wide range of vibrational motions. These inspire and motivate us to explore the effects of the environment on the operation of such complexes. In this paper, we apply the polaron master equation, which offers the possibilities to interpolate between weak and strong system-bath coupling, to study how system-bath couplings affect the exciton-transfer processes in the Photosystem II reaction center described by a quantum heat engine (QHE) model over a wide parameter range. The effects of bath correlation and temperature, together with the combined effects of these factors are also discussed in detail. We interpret these results in terms of noise-assisted transport effect and dynamical localization, which correspond to two mechanisms underpinning the transfer process in photosynthetic complexes: One is resonance energy transfer and the other is the dynamical localization effect captured by the polaron master equation. The effects of system-bath coupling and bath correlation are incorporated in the effective system-bath coupling strength determining whether noise-assisted transport effect or dynamical localization dominates the dynamics and temperature modulates the balance of the two mechanisms. Furthermore, these two mechanisms can be attributed to one physical origin: bath-induced fluctuations. The two mechanisms are manifestations of the dual role played by bath-induced fluctuations depending on the range of parameters. The origin and role of coherence are also discussed. It is the constructive interplay between noise and coherent dynamics, rather

  7. A Paradigmatic Example of an Artificially Intelligent Instructional System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, John Seely; Burton, Richard R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the philosophy of intelligent instructional systems and presents an example of such a system, BLOCKS. The notion of BLOCKS as a paradigmatic system is explicated from both the system development and educational points of view. (Author/VT)

  8. A Paradigmatic Example of an Artificially Intelligent Instructional System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, John Seely; Burton, Richard R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the philosophy of intelligent instructional systems and presents an example of such a system, BLOCKS. The notion of BLOCKS as a paradigmatic system is explicated from both the system development and educational points of view. (Author/VT)

  9. Design of a hydraulic analog of the circulatory system for evaluating artificial hearts.

    PubMed

    Donovan, F M

    1975-01-01

    A major problem in improving artificial heart designs is the absence of methods for accurate in vitro testing of artificial heart systems. A mock circulatory system has been constructed which hydraulically simulates the systemic and pulmonary circulations of the normal human. The device is constructed of 1/2 in. acrylic sheet and has overall dimensions of 24 in. wide, 16 in. tall, and 8 in. deep. The artificial heart to be tested is attached to the front of the device, and pumps fluid from the systemic venous chamber into the pulmonary arterial chamber and from the pulmonary venous chamber into the systemic arterial chamber. Each of the four chambers is hermetically sealed. The compliance of each chamber is determined by the volume of air trapped above the fluid in that chamber. The pulmonary and systemic resistances are set automatically by bellows-operated valves to simulate the barroreceptor response in the systemic arteries and the passive pulmonary resistance response in the pulmonary arteries. Cardiac output is measured by a turbine flowmeter in the systemic circulation. Results using the Kwan-Gett artificial heart show a good comparison between the mock circulatory system response and the calf response.

  10. Development of the CODER System: A Testbed for Artificial Intelligence Methods in Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Edward A.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the CODER system, which was developed to investigate the application of artificial intelligence methods to increase the effectiveness of information retrieval systems, particularly those involving heterogeneous documents. Highlights include the use of PROLOG programing, blackboard-based designs, knowledge engineering, lexicological…

  11. Monitoring of space station life support systems with miniature mass spectrometry and artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, Richard A.; Johnson, Jodie V.; Wong, Carla M.

    1987-01-01

    The combination of quadrupole ion trap tandem mass spectroscopy with artificial intelligence is a promising approach for monitoring the performance of the life support systems in the space station. Such an analytical system can provide the selectivity, sensitivity, speed, small size, and decision making intelligence to detect, identify, and quantify trace toxic compounds which may accumulate in the space station habitat.

  12. Implications of Artificial Intelligence for End User Use of Online Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Linda C.

    1980-01-01

    Reviewed are several studies which demonstrate how artificial intelligence techniques can be applied in the design of end user-oriented interfaces (which would eliminate the need for an intermediary) to existing online systems, as well as in the development of future generations of online systems intended for the end user. (Author/SW)

  13. Implications of Artificial Intelligence for End User Use of Online Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Linda C.

    1980-01-01

    Reviewed are several studies which demonstrate how artificial intelligence techniques can be applied in the design of end user-oriented interfaces (which would eliminate the need for an intermediary) to existing online systems, as well as in the development of future generations of online systems intended for the end user. (Author/SW)

  14. Development of the CODER System: A Testbed for Artificial Intelligence Methods in Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Edward A.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the CODER system, which was developed to investigate the application of artificial intelligence methods to increase the effectiveness of information retrieval systems, particularly those involving heterogeneous documents. Highlights include the use of PROLOG programing, blackboard-based designs, knowledge engineering, lexicological…

  15. Developing a scalable artificial photosynthesis technology through nanomaterials by design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nathan S.

    2016-12-01

    An artificial photosynthetic system that directly produces fuels from sunlight could provide an approach to scalable energy storage and a technology for the carbon-neutral production of high-energy-density transportation fuels. A variety of designs are currently being explored to create a viable artificial photosynthetic system, and the most technologically advanced systems are based on semiconducting photoelectrodes. Here, I discuss the development of an approach that is based on an architecture, first conceived around a decade ago, that combines arrays of semiconducting microwires with flexible polymeric membranes. I highlight the key steps that have been taken towards delivering a fully functional solar fuels generator, which have exploited advances in nanotechnology at all hierarchical levels of device construction, and include the discovery of earth-abundant electrocatalysts for fuel formation and materials for the stabilization of light absorbers. Finally, I consider the remaining scientific and engineering challenges facing the fulfilment of an artificial photosynthetic system that is simultaneously safe, robust, efficient and scalable.

  16. Teaching artificial neural systems to drive: Manual training techniques for autonomous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepanski, J. F.; Macy, S. A.

    1987-01-01

    A methodology was developed for manually training autonomous control systems based on artificial neural systems (ANS). In applications where the rule set governing an expert's decisions is difficult to formulate, ANS can be used to extract rules by associating the information an expert receives with the actions taken. Properly constructed networks imitate rules of behavior that permits them to function autonomously when they are trained on the spanning set of possible situations. This training can be provided manually, either under the direct supervision of a system trainer, or indirectly using a background mode where the networks assimilates training data as the expert performs its day-to-day tasks. To demonstrate these methods, an ANS network was trained to drive a vehicle through simulated freeway traffic.

  17. How to build an information gathering and processing system: lessons from naturally and artificially intelligent systems.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Jackie; Demery, Zoe P; Arriola-Rios, Veronica; Sloman, Aaron

    2012-02-01

    Imagine a situation in which you had to design a physical agent that could collect information from its environment, then store and process that information to help it respond appropriately to novel situations. What kinds of information should it attend to? How should the information be represented so as to allow efficient use and re-use? What kinds of constraints and trade-offs would there be? There are no unique answers. In this paper, we discuss some of the ways in which the need to be able to address problems of varying kinds and complexity can be met by different information processing systems. We also discuss different ways in which relevant information can be obtained, and how different kinds of information can be processed and used, by both biological organisms and artificial agents. We analyse several constraints and design features, and show how they relate both to biological organisms, and to lessons that can be learned from building artificial systems. Our standpoint overlaps with Karmiloff-Smith (1992) in that we assume that a collection of mechanisms geared to learning and developing in biological environments are available in forms that constrain, but do not determine, what can or will be learnt by individuals.

  18. Novel artificial anal sphincter system based on transcutaneous energy transmission system tested in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongbing; Liu, Hua; Xu, Qianqian; Yan, Guozheng

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes a novel artificial anal sphincter system (AASS) for severe fecal incontinence. The AASS is composed of an artificial anal sphincter (AAS), an external transcutaneous energy transmission system (TETS), and an external control device. The AAS is composed of a cuff, a micropump, a reservoir, and a remote control device. It is designed to be implanted into the body of the patient. The function of the AAS is to open and close the patient's natural anus. Patients suffering from loss of their natural sphincter lose rectal sensation and are thus unable to perceive imminent fecal incontinence. In order to restore rectal sensation, a pressure sensor in the AAS cuff is designed to detect pressure in the colon. The pressure reflects the present quantity of colon contents, allowing patients to control the AAS to open or close the anus according to the pressure. The TETS is designed to provide electrical energy to the implanted AAS without wire connections. The external control device is designed to receive the pressure information from the AAS and send the patient's command to the implanted device. This paper provides a thorough discussion of the design of the novel AASS and describes the performance of the AASS when tested in vivo on two Beagle dogs who were chosen to be the subjects for receiving the implant. The experimental results verified that the performance of the AASS met the functional requirements it was designed for; however, the trial also revealed some challenges to be further studied.

  19. Signal processing using artificial neural network for BOTDA sensor system.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Wang, Liang; Guo, Nan; Tam, Hwa-Yaw; Lu, Chao

    2016-03-21

    We experimentally demonstrate the use of artificial neural network (ANN) to process sensing signals obtained from Brillouin optical time domain analyzer (BOTDA). The distributed temperature information is extracted directly from the local Brillouin gain spectra (BGSs) along the fiber under test without the process of determination of Brillouin frequency shift (BFS) and hence conversion from BFS to temperature. Unlike our previous work for short sensing distance where ANN is trained by measured BGSs, here we employ ideal BGSs with different linewidths to train the ANN in order to take the linewidth variation due to different conditions from the training and testing phases into account, making it feasible for long distance sensing. Moreover, the performance of ANN is compared with other two techniques, Lorentzian curve fitting and cross-correlation method, and our results show that ANN has higher accuracy and larger tolerance to measurement error, especially at large frequency scanning step. We also show that the temperature extraction from BOTDA measurements employing ANN is significantly faster than the other two approaches. Hence ANN can be an excellent alternative tool to process BGSs measured by BOTDA and obtain temperature distribution along the fiber, especially when large frequency scanning step is adopted to significantly reduce the measurement time but without sacrifice of sensing accuracy.

  20. Development and Application of a Three-Dimensional Artificial Visual System

    PubMed Central

    Coggins, James M.; Fogarty, Kevin E.; Fay, Frederic S.

    1985-01-01

    A three-dimensional artificial visual system has been developed to aid in the analysis of three-dimensional fluorescence images of smooth muscle cells. The artificial visual system consists of three sets of three-dimensional spatial filters that locate the discrete bodies of protein concentration in a cell, classify the concentration bodies as globular or oval, and determine the three-dimensional orientation of the oval bodies. A graphic model of the protein distribution is then created. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2

  1. Nanoporous biomaterials for uremic toxin adsorption in artificial kidney systems: A review.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Wee-Keat; Ishikawa, Kunio; Othman, Radzali; Yeoh, Fei-Yee

    2017-07-01

    Hemodialysis, one of the earliest artificial kidney systems, removes uremic toxins via diffusion through a semipermeable porous membrane into the dialysate fluid. Miniaturization of the present hemodialysis system into a portable and wearable device to maintain continuous removal of uremic toxins would require that the amount of dialysate used within a closed-system is greatly reduced. Diffused uremic toxins within a closed-system dialysate need to be removed to maintain the optimum concentration gradient for continuous uremic toxin removal by the dialyzer. In this dialysate regenerative system, adsorption of uremic toxins by nanoporous biomaterials is essential. Throughout the years of artificial kidney development, activated carbon has been identified as a potential adsorbent for uremic toxins. Adsorption of uremic toxins necessitates nanoporous biomaterials, especially activated carbon. Nanoporous biomaterials are also utilized in hemoperfusion for uremic toxin removal. Further miniaturization of artificial kidney system and improvements on uremic toxin adsorption capacity would require high performance nanoporous biomaterials which possess not only higher surface area, controlled pore size, but also designed architecture or structure and surface functional groups. This article reviews on various nanoporous biomaterials used in current artificial kidney systems and several emerging nanoporous biomaterials. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1232-1240, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A Paradigmatic Example of an Artificially Intelligent Instructional System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, John Seely; Burton, Richard R.

    This paper describes the philosophy of intelligent instructional systems and presents an example of one such system in the domain of manipulative mathematics--BLOCKS. The notion of BLOCKS as a paradigmatic system is explicated from both the system development and educational viewpoints. From a developmental point of view, the modular design of…

  3. Artificial feel system using magneto-rheological fluid on aircraft control stick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, Vignesh; Kim, Daewon

    2016-04-01

    The conventional feel system in aircraft occupies large space in the cockpit and has complicated designs. The primary objective of this research is to develop an artificial feel force system that can overcome some drawbacks of the current system. A novel feel system using magneto-rheological (MR) fluid is constructed to precisely control the shear stress under the magnetic field. To validate the functionality of the MR artificial feel system, the final system is fabricated and multiple tests are performed to acquire force-velocity characteristics that are compared to the mathematical model derived. In addition, the PID closed loop control algorithm is developed to simulate the dynamic system model. Both experimental and simulation results are compared to validate the derived system model. The system response time and sampling rates are evaluated and compared to the conventional system at the end. It is concluded that the developed artificial feel system can precisely control and acts as a fail proof system when incorporated with a modern fly-by-wire aircraft system.

  4. Progress in cybernetics and systems research. Vol. XI. Data base design. International Information Systems. Semiotic Systems. Artificial Intelligence. Cybernetics and Philosophy. Special aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Trappl, R.; Findler, N.V.; Horn, W.

    1982-01-01

    This book covers current research topics in six areas. These are data base design, international information systems, semiotic systems, artificial intelligence, cybernetics and philosophy, and special aspects of systems research. 1326 references.

  5. Detection Technique for Artificially Illuminated Objects in the Outer Solar System and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Existing and planned optical telescopes and surveys can detect artificially illuminated objects, comparable in total brightness to a major terrestrial city, at the outskirts of the Solar System. Orbital parameters of Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) are routinely measured to exquisite precisions of<10−3. Here, we propose to measure the variation of the observed flux F from such objects as a function of their changing orbital distances D. Sunlight-illuminated objects will show a logarithmic slope α ≡ (d log F/d log D)=−4, whereas artificially illuminated objects should exhibit α=−2. The proposed Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and other planned surveys will provide superb data and allow measurement of α for thousands of KBOs. If objects with α=−2 are found, follow-up observations could measure their spectra to determine whether they are illuminated by artificial lighting. The search can be extended beyond the Solar System with future generations of telescopes on the ground and in space that would have the capacity to detect phase modulation due to very strong artificial illumination on the nightside of planets as they orbit their parent stars. Key Words: Astrobiology—SETI—Kuiper belt objects—Artificial illumination. Astrobiology 12, 290–294. PMID:22490065

  6. A multiuser detector based on artificial bee colony algorithm for DS-UWB systems.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhendong; Liu, Xiaohui; Wu, Zhilu

    2013-01-01

    Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm is an optimization algorithm based on the intelligent behavior of honey bee swarm. The ABC algorithm was developed to solve optimizing numerical problems and revealed premising results in processing time and solution quality. In ABC, a colony of artificial bees search for rich artificial food sources; the optimizing numerical problems are converted to the problem of finding the best parameter which minimizes an objective function. Then, the artificial bees randomly discover a population of initial solutions and then iteratively improve them by employing the behavior: moving towards better solutions by means of a neighbor search mechanism while abandoning poor solutions. In this paper, an efficient multiuser detector based on a suboptimal code mapping multiuser detector and artificial bee colony algorithm (SCM-ABC-MUD) is proposed and implemented in direct-sequence ultra-wideband (DS-UWB) systems under the additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel. The simulation results demonstrate that the BER and the near-far effect resistance performances of this proposed algorithm are quite close to those of the optimum multiuser detector (OMD) while its computational complexity is much lower than that of OMD. Furthermore, the BER performance of SCM-ABC-MUD is not sensitive to the number of active users and can obtain a large system capacity.

  7. A Multiuser Detector Based on Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm for DS-UWB Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohui

    2013-01-01

    Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm is an optimization algorithm based on the intelligent behavior of honey bee swarm. The ABC algorithm was developed to solve optimizing numerical problems and revealed premising results in processing time and solution quality. In ABC, a colony of artificial bees search for rich artificial food sources; the optimizing numerical problems are converted to the problem of finding the best parameter which minimizes an objective function. Then, the artificial bees randomly discover a population of initial solutions and then iteratively improve them by employing the behavior: moving towards better solutions by means of a neighbor search mechanism while abandoning poor solutions. In this paper, an efficient multiuser detector based on a suboptimal code mapping multiuser detector and artificial bee colony algorithm (SCM-ABC-MUD) is proposed and implemented in direct-sequence ultra-wideband (DS-UWB) systems under the additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel. The simulation results demonstrate that the BER and the near-far effect resistance performances of this proposed algorithm are quite close to those of the optimum multiuser detector (OMD) while its computational complexity is much lower than that of OMD. Furthermore, the BER performance of SCM-ABC-MUD is not sensitive to the number of active users and can obtain a large system capacity. PMID:23983638

  8. Development of a control system for artificially rehabilitated limbs: a review.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, M S H; Choudhury, I A; Dahari, M

    2015-04-01

    Development of an advanced control system for prostheses (artificial limbs) is necessary to provide functionality, effectiveness, and preferably the feeling of a sound living limb. The development of the control system has introduced varieties of control strategies depending on the application. This paper reviews some control systems used for prosthetics, orthotics, and exoskeletons. The advantages and limitations of different control systems for particular applications have been discussed and presented in a comparative manner to help in deciding the appropriate method for pertinent application.

  9. Vein matching using artificial neural network in vein authentication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noori Hoshyar, Azadeh; Sulaiman, Riza

    2011-10-01

    Personal identification technology as security systems is developing rapidly. Traditional authentication modes like key; password; card are not safe enough because they could be stolen or easily forgotten. Biometric as developed technology has been applied to a wide range of systems. According to different researchers, vein biometric is a good candidate among other biometric traits such as fingerprint, hand geometry, voice, DNA and etc for authentication systems. Vein authentication systems can be designed by different methodologies. All the methodologies consist of matching stage which is too important for final verification of the system. Neural Network is an effective methodology for matching and recognizing individuals in authentication systems. Therefore, this paper explains and implements the Neural Network methodology for finger vein authentication system. Neural Network is trained in Matlab to match the vein features of authentication system. The Network simulation shows the quality of matching as 95% which is a good performance for authentication system matching.

  10. Evaluation of a novel artificial pancreas: closed loop glycemic control system with continuous blood glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Yuuki; Kinoshita, Yoshihiko; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Munekage, Masaya; Munekage, Eri; Takezaki, Yuka; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Yamashita, Koichi; Yamazaki, Rie; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Tarumi, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Masaki; Mishina, Suguru; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2013-04-01

    A closed-loop glycemic control system using an artificial pancreas has been applied with many clinical benefits in Japan since 1987. To update this system incorporating user-friendly features, we developed a novel artificial pancreas (STG-55). The purpose of this study was to evaluate STG-55 for device usability, performance of blood glucose measurement, glycemic control characteristics in vivo in animal experiments, and evaluate its clinical feasibility. There are several features for usability improvement based on the design concepts, such as compactness, display monitor, batteries, guidance function, and reduction of the preparation time. All animal study data were compared with a clinically available artificial pancreas system in Japan (control device: STG-22). We examined correlations of both blood glucose levels between two groups (STG-55 vs. control) using Clarke's error grid analysis, and also compared mean glucose infusion rate (GIR) during glucose clamp. The results showed strong correlation in blood glucose concentrations (Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient: 0.97; n = 1636). Clarke's error grid analysis showed that 98.4% of the data fell in Zones A and B, which represent clinically accurate or benign errors, respectively. The difference in mean GIRs was less than 0.2 mg/kg/min, which was considered not significant. Clinical feasibility study demonstrated sufficient glycemic control maintaining target glucose range between 80 and 110 (mg/dL), and between 140 and 160 without any hypoglycemia. In conclusion, STG-55 was a clinically acceptable artificial pancreas with improved interface and usability. A closed-loop glycemic control system with STG-55 would be a useful tool for surgical and critical patients in intensive care units, as well as diabetic patients. © 2013, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2013, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Photosynthetic water splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1981-01-01

    The photosynthetic unit of hydrogen evolution, the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production, and hydrogenic photosynthesis are discussed in the section on previous work. Recent results are given on simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen, kinetic studies, microscopic marine algae-seaweeds, and oxygen profiles.

  12. Utilization of artificial intelligence techniques for the Space Station power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evatt, Thomas C.; Gholdston, Edward W.

    1988-01-01

    Due to the complexity of the Space Station Electrical Power System (EPS) as currently envisioned, artificial intelligence/expert system techniques are being investigated to automate operations, maintenance, and diagnostic functions. A study was conducted to investigate this technology as it applies to failure detection, isolation, and reconfiguration (FDIR) and health monitoring of power system components and of the total system. Control system utilization of expert systems for load scheduling and shedding operations was also researched. A discussion of the utilization of artificial intelligence/expert systems for Initial Operating Capability (IOC) for the Space Station effort is presented along with future plans at Rocketdyne for the utilization of this technology for enhanced Space Station power capability.

  13. Utilization of artificial intelligence techniques for the Space Station power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evatt, Thomas C.; Gholdston, Edward W.

    1988-01-01

    Due to the complexity of the Space Station Electrical Power System (EPS) as currently envisioned, artificial intelligence/expert system techniques are being investigated to automate operations, maintenance, and diagnostic functions. A study was conducted to investigate this technology as it applies to failure detection, isolation, and reconfiguration (FDIR) and health monitoring of power system components and of the total system. Control system utilization of expert systems for load scheduling and shedding operations was also researched. A discussion of the utilization of artificial intelligence/expert systems for Initial Operating Capability (IOC) for the Space Station effort is presented along with future plans at Rocketdyne for the utilization of this technology for enhanced Space Station power capability.

  14. Composition on the Computer: Simple Systems and Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gerald M.; Erlwein, Bradley R.

    1988-01-01

    Examines the orderly process of rhetorical composition and inquires whether that system can be implemented as an expert system on a computer or word processor, in order to expand our understanding of the human composition process. (SR)

  15. Artificial Intelligence for Explosive Ordnance Disposal System (AI-EOD)

    SciTech Connect

    Madrid, R.; Williams, B.; Holland, J.

    1992-03-01

    Based on a dynamically configurable neural net that learns in a single pass of the training data, this paper describes a system used by the military in the identification of explosive ordnance. Allowing the technician to input incomplete, contradictory, and wrong information, this system combines expert systems and neural nets to provide a state-of-the-art search, retrieval, and image and text management system.

  16. [Artificial organs].

    PubMed

    Raguin, Thibaut; Dupret-Bories, Agnès; Debry, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Research has been fighting against organ failure and shortage of donations by supplying artificial organs for many years. With the raise of new technologies, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, many organs can benefit of an artificial equivalent: thanks to retinal implants some blind people can visualize stimuli, an artificial heart can be proposed in case of cardiac failure while awaiting for a heart transplant, artificial larynx enables laryngectomy patients to an almost normal life, while the diabetic can get a glycemic self-regulation controlled by smartphones with an artificial device. Dialysis devices become portable, as well as the oxygenation systems for terminal respiratory failure. Bright prospects are being explored or might emerge in a near future. However, the retrospective assessment of putative side effects is not yet sufficient. Finally, the cost of these new devices is significant even if the advent of three dimensional printers may reduce it. © 2017 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  17. Artificial intelligence costs, benefits, and risks for selected spacecraft ground system automation scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walter F.; Silverman, Barry G.; Kahn, Martha; Hexmoor, Henry

    1988-01-01

    In response to a number of high-level strategy studies in the early 1980s, expert systems and artificial intelligence (AI/ES) efforts for spacecraft ground systems have proliferated in the past several years primarily as individual small to medium scale applications. It is useful to stop and assess the impact of this technology in view of lessons learned to date, and hopefully, to determine if the overall strategies of some of the earlier studies both are being followed and still seem relevant. To achieve that end four idealized ground system automation scenarios and their attendant AI architecture are postulated and benefits, risks, and lessons learned are examined and compared. These architectures encompass: (1) no AI (baseline); (2) standalone expert systems; (3) standardized, reusable knowledge base management systems (KBMS); and (4) a futuristic unattended automation scenario. The resulting artificial intelligence lessons learned, benefits, and risks for spacecraft ground system automation scenarios are described.

  18. Artificial intelligence costs, benefits, risks for selected spacecraft ground system automation scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walter F.; Silverman, Barry G.; Kahn, Martha; Hexmoor, Henry

    1988-01-01

    In response to a number of high-level strategy studies in the early 1980s, expert systems and artificial intelligence (AI/ES) efforts for spacecraft ground systems have proliferated in the past several years primarily as individual small to medium scale applications. It is useful to stop and assess the impact of this technology in view of lessons learned to date, and hopefully, to determine if the overall strategies of some of the earlier studies both are being followed and still seem relevant. To achieve that end four idealized ground system automation scenarios and their attendant AI architecture are postulated and benefits, risks, and lessons learned are examined and compared. These architectures encompass: (1) no AI (baseline), (2) standalone expert systems, (3) standardized, reusable knowledge base management systems (KBMS), and (4) a futuristic unattended automation scenario. The resulting artificial intelligence lessons learned, benefits, and risks for spacecraft ground system automation scenarios are described.

  19. Artificial intelligence costs, benefits, and risks for selected spacecraft ground system automation scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walter F.; Silverman, Barry G.; Kahn, Martha; Hexmoor, Henry

    1988-01-01

    In response to a number of high-level strategy studies in the early 1980s, expert systems and artificial intelligence (AI/ES) efforts for spacecraft ground systems have proliferated in the past several years primarily as individual small to medium scale applications. It is useful to stop and assess the impact of this technology in view of lessons learned to date, and hopefully, to determine if the overall strategies of some of the earlier studies both are being followed and still seem relevant. To achieve that end four idealized ground system automation scenarios and their attendant AI architecture are postulated and benefits, risks, and lessons learned are examined and compared. These architectures encompass: (1) no AI (baseline); (2) standalone expert systems; (3) standardized, reusable knowledge base management systems (KBMS); and (4) a futuristic unattended automation scenario. The resulting artificial intelligence lessons learned, benefits, and risks for spacecraft ground system automation scenarios are described.

  20. An Artificial Neural System for Autonomous Undersea Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    behavior across a number of species, while the third column lists new features of the nervous systems that likely support the advances in capability. Note...Scale. Phylum Example Advance Ability Protozoa Paramecium No Nervous System Swim Food Discrimination Coelenterata Hydra Nerve Nets Spontaneity Anemone...Structure and Function in the Nervous System of Invertebrates. (2 volumes), W.H. Freeman and Company, San Francisco, 1965. 2. Camhi, J.M. Neuroethology

  1. An open and configurable embedded system for EMG pattern recognition implementation for artificial arms.

    PubMed

    Jun Liu; Fan Zhang; Huang, He Helen

    2014-01-01

    Pattern recognition (PR) based on electromyographic (EMG) signals has been developed for multifunctional artificial arms for decades. However, assessment of EMG PR control for daily prosthesis use is still limited. One of the major barriers is the lack of a portable and configurable embedded system to implement the EMG PR control. This paper aimed to design an open and configurable embedded system for EMG PR implementation so that researchers can easily modify and optimize the control algorithms upon our designed platform and test the EMG PR control outside of the lab environments. The open platform was built on an open source embedded Linux Operating System running a high-performance Gumstix board. Both the hardware and software system framework were openly designed. The system was highly flexible in terms of number of inputs/outputs and calibration interfaces used. Such flexibility enabled easy integration of our embedded system with different types of commercialized or prototypic artificial arms. Thus far, our system was portable for take-home use. Additionally, compared with previously reported embedded systems for EMG PR implementation, our system demonstrated improved processing efficiency and high system precision. Our long-term goals are (1) to develop a wearable and practical EMG PR-based control for multifunctional artificial arms, and (2) to quantify the benefits of EMG PR-based control over conventional myoelectric prosthesis control in a home setting.

  2. Intelligent Tutoring System: A Tool for Testing the Research Curiosities of Artificial Intelligence Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaratan, Huseyin

    2003-01-01

    An ITS (Intelligent Tutoring System) is a teaching-learning medium that uses artificial intelligence (AI) technology for instruction. Roberts and Park (1983) defines AI as the attempt to get computers to perform tasks that if performed by a human-being, intelligence would be required to perform the task. The design of an ITS comprises two distinct…

  3. Nonlinear System Of Equations For Multicomponent Analysis Of Artificial Food Coloring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santosa, I. E.; Budiasih, L. K.

    2010-12-01

    In multicomponent analysis of artificial food coloring (AFC), nonlinear relation of the absorbance and the concentration forms a nonlinear system of equations. The Newton's method based algorithm has been used to calculate individual AFC concentration in the mixture of two AFCs. The absorbance was measured using a spectrophotometer at two different wavelengths.

  4. Automatic Keyword Identification by Artificial Neural Networks Compared to Manual Identification by Users of Filtering Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boger, Zvi; Kuflik, Tsvi; Shoval, Peretz; Shapira, Bracha

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of information filtering (IF) and information retrieval focuses on the use of an artificial neural network (ANN) as an alternative method for both IF and term selection and compares its effectiveness to that of traditional methods. Results show that the ANN relevance prediction out-performs the prediction of an IF system. (Author/LRW)

  5. Automatic Keyword Identification by Artificial Neural Networks Compared to Manual Identification by Users of Filtering Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boger, Zvi; Kuflik, Tsvi; Shoval, Peretz; Shapira, Bracha

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of information filtering (IF) and information retrieval focuses on the use of an artificial neural network (ANN) as an alternative method for both IF and term selection and compares its effectiveness to that of traditional methods. Results show that the ANN relevance prediction out-performs the prediction of an IF system. (Author/LRW)

  6. Application of ZnO varistor protection to capacitors of artificially commutated inverter in MTDC system

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar, P.; Chandrasekharaiah, H.S. . Dept. of High Voltage Engineering)

    1991-02-01

    The dynamic analysis of a mesh type multiterminal HVDC (MTDC) transmission system including an artificially commutated inverted (ACI) with varistor protected series capacitors is carried out using digital simulation technique. The study shows that the varistor protection is feasible and improves the performance of normal rated inverters which connect weak ac systems. It reduces the magnitude of dynamic overvoltage and the peak direct current at the ACI during abnormal conditions resulting in a significantly improved dynamic performance of the MTDC system.

  7. A Red-Light Running Prevention System Based on Artificial Neural Network and Vehicle Trajectory Data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pengfei; Li, Yan; Guo, Xiucheng

    2014-01-01

    The high frequency of red-light running and complex driving behaviors at the yellow onset at intersections cannot be explained solely by the dilemma zone and vehicle kinematics. In this paper, the author presented a red-light running prevention system which was based on artificial neural networks (ANNs) to approximate the complex driver behaviors during yellow and all-red clearance and serve as the basis of an innovative red-light running prevention system. The artificial neural network and vehicle trajectory are applied to identify the potential red-light runners. The ANN training time was also acceptable and its predicting accurate rate was over 80%. Lastly, a prototype red-light running prevention system with the trained ANN model was described. This new system can be directly retrofitted into the existing traffic signal systems. PMID:25435870

  8. Physiological Targets of Artificial Gravity: The Sensory-Motor System. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, William; Groen, Eric; Clarke, Andrew; Bles, Willem; Wuyts, Floris; Paloski, William; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    This chapter describes the pros and cons of artificial gravity applications in relation to human sensory-motor functioning in space. Spaceflight creates a challenge for sensory-motor functions that depend on gravity, which include postural balance, locomotion, eye-hand coordination, and spatial orientation. The sensory systems, and in particular the vestibular system, must adapt to weightlessness on entering orbit, and again to normal gravity upon return to Earth. During this period of adaptation, which persists beyond the actual gravity-level transition itself the sensory-motor systems are disturbed. Although artificial gravity may prove to be beneficial for the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems, it may well have negative side effects for the neurovestibular system, such as spatial disorientation, malcoordination, and nausea.

  9. An artificial system for selecting the optimal surgical team.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Nahid; Mahvash, Mohsen; Zenati, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We introduce an intelligent system to optimize a team composition based on the team's historical outcomes and apply this system to compose a surgical team. The system relies on a record of the procedures performed in the past. The optimal team composition is the one with the lowest probability of unfavorable outcome. We use the theory of probability and the inclusion exclusion principle to model the probability of team outcome for a given composition. A probability value is assigned to each person of database and the probability of a team composition is calculated from them. The model allows to determine the probability of all possible team compositions even if there is no recoded procedure for some team compositions. From an analytical perspective, assembling an optimal team is equivalent to minimizing the overlap of team members who have a recurring tendency to be involved with procedures of unfavorable results. A conceptual example shows the accuracy of the proposed system on obtaining the optimal team.

  10. DIALOGUES BETWEEN HUMANS AND AN ARTIFICIAL BELIEF SYSTEM,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    questions and establishes the credibility of the information as well as of its human source. It is currently being used to study the problem of change and resistance to change in a belief system. (Author)

  11. Hybrid Intelligent Perception System: Intelligent perception through combining Artificial Neural Networks and an Expert System

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, C.W.; Spelt, P.F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a report of work-in-progress on a project to combine Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) and Expert Systems (ESs) into a hybrid, self-improving pattern recognition system. The purpose of this project is to explore methods of combining multiple classifiers into a Hybrid Intelligent Perception (HIP) System. The central research issue to be addressed for a multiclassifier hybrid system is whether such a system can perform better than the two classifiers taken by themselves. ANNs and ESs have different strengths and weaknesses, which are being exploited in this project in such a way that they are complementary to each other: Strengths in one system make up for weaknesses in the other, and vice versa. There is presently considerable interest in the AI community in ways to exploit the strengths of these methodologies to produce an intelligent system which is more robust and flexible than one using either technology alone. Perception, which involves both data-driven (bottom-up) and concept-driven (top-down) processing, is a process which seems especially well-suited to displaying the capabilities of such a hybrid system. This work has been funded for the past six months by an Oak Ridge National Laboratory seed grant, and most of the system components are operating in both the PC and the hypercube computer environments. Here we report on the efforts to develop the low-level ANNs and a graphic representation of their knowledge, and discuss ways of using an ES to integrate and supervise the entire system. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Artificial Immune System for Flight Envelope Estimation and Protection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-31

    Figure 1.7. AIS-Based ACM Process 31 Figure 1.8. AIS-Based ACM System Design 32 Figure 1.9. On-Line AC Detection... ACM ) based on the AIS paradigm can be considered to include three main components functionally connected in a closed loop as shown in Figure 1.7...off-line ACM system design and implementation  on-line AC detection, identification, evaluation, and accommodation  post-processing of flight data

  13. Effect of Artificial Gravity: Central Nervous System Neurochemical Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.; D'Amelio, Fernando; Eng, Lawrence F.

    1997-01-01

    The major objective of this project was to assess chemical and morphological modifications occurring in muscle receptors and the central nervous system of animals subjected to altered gravity (2 x Earth gravity produced by centrifugation and simulated micro gravity produced by hindlimb suspension). The underlying hypothesis for the studies was that afferent (sensory) information sent to the central nervous system by muscle receptors would be changed in conditions of altered gravity and that these changes, in turn, would instigate a process of adaptation involving altered chemical activity of neurons and glial cells of the projection areas of the cerebral cortex that are related to inputs from those muscle receptors (e.g., cells in the limb projection areas). The central objective of this research was to expand understanding of how chronic exposure to altered gravity, through effects on the vestibular system, influences neuromuscular systems that control posture and gait. The project used an approach in which molecular changes in the neuromuscular system were related to the development of effective motor control by characterizing neurochemical changes in sensory and motor systems and relating those changes to motor behavior as animals adapted to altered gravity. Thus, the objective was to identify changes in central and peripheral neuromuscular mechanisms that are associated with the re-establishment of motor control which is disrupted by chronic exposure to altered gravity.

  14. Blood feeding of Ornithodoros turicata larvae using an artificial membrane system.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Filatov, S; Lopez, J E; Pérez DE León, A A; Teel, P D

    2017-06-01

    An artificial membrane system was adapted to feed Ornithodoros turicata (Ixodida: Argasidae) larvae from a laboratory colony using defibrinated swine blood. Aspects related to larval feeding and moulting to the first nymphal instar were evaluated. A total of 55.6% of all larvae exposed to the artificial membrane in two experimental groups fed to repletion and 98.0% of all fed larvae moulted. Mortality rates of first instar nymphs differed significantly depending on the sorting tools used to handle engorged larvae (χ(2)  = 35.578, P < 0.0001): engorged larvae handled with featherweight forceps showed significantly higher mortality (odds ratio = 4.441) than those handled with a camel-hair brush. Differences in the physical properties of the forceps and camel-hair brush may affect the viability of fragile soft tick larvae even when care and the same technique are used to sort them during experimental manipulations. The current results represent those of the first study to quantify successful feeding to repletion, moulting and post-moulting mortality rates in O. turicata larvae using an artificial membrane feeding system. Applications of the artificial membrane feeding system to fill gaps in current knowledge of soft tick biology and the study of soft tick-pathogen interactions are discussed. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  15. Guidance for human interface with artificial intelligence systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Scott S.; Woods, David D.

    1991-01-01

    The beginning of a research effort to collect and integrate existing research findings about how to combine computer power and people is discussed, including problems and pitfalls as well as desirable features. The goal of the research is to develop guidance for the design of human interfaces with intelligent systems. Fault management tasks in NASA domains are the focus of the investigation. Research is being conducted to support the development of guidance for designers that will enable them to make human interface considerations into account during the creation of intelligent systems.

  16. METEOR - an artificial intelligence system for convective storm forecasting

    SciTech Connect

    Elio, R.; De haan, J.; Strong, G.S.

    1987-03-01

    An AI system called METEOR, which uses the meteorologist's heuristics, strategies, and statistical tools to forecast severe hailstorms in Alberta, is described, emphasizing the information and knowledge that METEOR uses to mimic the forecasting procedure of an expert meteorologist. METEOR is then discussed as an AI system, emphasizing the ways in which it is qualitatively different from algorithmic or statistical approaches to prediction. Some features of METEOR's design and the AI techniques for representing meteorological knowledge and for reasoning and inference are presented. Finally, some observations on designing and implementing intelligent consultants for meteorological applications are made. 7 references.

  17. A Review of Intelligent Driving Style Analysis Systems and Related Artificial Intelligence Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Meiring, Gys Albertus Marthinus; Myburgh, Hermanus Carel

    2015-12-04

    In this paper the various driving style analysis solutions are investigated. An in-depth investigation is performed to identify the relevant machine learning and artificial intelligence algorithms utilised in current driver behaviour and driving style analysis systems. This review therefore serves as a trove of information, and will inform the specialist and the student regarding the current state of the art in driver style analysis systems, the application of these systems and the underlying artificial intelligence algorithms applied to these applications. The aim of the investigation is to evaluate the possibilities for unique driver identification utilizing the approaches identified in other driver behaviour studies. It was found that Fuzzy Logic inference systems, Hidden Markov Models and Support Vector Machines consist of promising capabilities to address unique driver identification algorithms if model complexity can be reduced.

  18. Optimization with artificial neural network systems - A mapping principle and a comparison to gradient based methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, Harrison Monfook

    1988-01-01

    General formulae for mapping optimization problems into systems of ordinary differential equations associated with artificial neural networks are presented. A comparison is made to optimization using gradient-search methods. The performance measure is the settling time from an initial state to a target state. A simple analytical example illustrates a situation where dynamical systems representing artificial neural network methods would settle faster than those representing gradient-search. Settling time was investigated for a more complicated optimization problem using computer simulations. The problem was a simplified version of a problem in medical imaging: determining loci of cerebral activity from electromagnetic measurements at the scalp. The simulations showed that gradient based systems typically settled 50 to 100 times faster than systems based on current neural network optimization methods.

  19. A Review of Intelligent Driving Style Analysis Systems and Related Artificial Intelligence Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Meiring, Gys Albertus Marthinus; Myburgh, Hermanus Carel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the various driving style analysis solutions are investigated. An in-depth investigation is performed to identify the relevant machine learning and artificial intelligence algorithms utilised in current driver behaviour and driving style analysis systems. This review therefore serves as a trove of information, and will inform the specialist and the student regarding the current state of the art in driver style analysis systems, the application of these systems and the underlying artificial intelligence algorithms applied to these applications. The aim of the investigation is to evaluate the possibilities for unique driver identification utilizing the approaches identified in other driver behaviour studies. It was found that Fuzzy Logic inference systems, Hidden Markov Models and Support Vector Machines consist of promising capabilities to address unique driver identification algorithms if model complexity can be reduced. PMID:26690164

  20. Optimization with artificial neural network systems - A mapping principle and a comparison to gradient based methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, Harrison Monfook

    1988-01-01

    General formulae for mapping optimization problems into systems of ordinary differential equations associated with artificial neural networks are presented. A comparison is made to optimization using gradient-search methods. The performance measure is the settling time from an initial state to a target state. A simple analytical example illustrates a situation where dynamical systems representing artificial neural network methods would settle faster than those representing gradient-search. Settling time was investigated for a more complicated optimization problem using computer simulations. The problem was a simplified version of a problem in medical imaging: determining loci of cerebral activity from electromagnetic measurements at the scalp. The simulations showed that gradient based systems typically settled 50 to 100 times faster than systems based on current neural network optimization methods.

  1. Development of a Through Tubing (Microhole) Artificial Lift System

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Bodden

    2006-09-30

    The goal of this project was to develop a small diameter pump system capable of being deployed through existing production tubing strings in oil/gas wells. The pump system would then pump water up an inner tubing string (likely coil tubing) and allow gas to flow in the annulus between the coil tubing and production tubing. Accomplishing this would allow wells that are currently loaded up (unable to flow at high enough rates to lift the fluid out of the wellbore) to continue to produce additional gas/oil reserves. The project was unable to complete a working test system due to unforeseen complexities in coupling the system components together in part due to the small diameter. Although several of the individual components were sourced and secured, coupling them together and getting electricity to the motor proved technically more difficult than expected. Thus, the project is no longer active due primarily to the complications realized in coupling the components and the difficulties in getting electricity to the submersible motor in a slimhole system. The other problem in finishing this project was the lack of financial resources. When the grant was first applied for it was expected that it would be awarded in early 2004. Since the grant was not actually awarded until the end of August 2004, GPS had basically run out of $$$ and the principle developer (Steve Bodden) had to find a full time job which began in late July 2004. When the grant was finally awarded in late August, it was still hoped that the project could proceed as a part time development but with less financial exposure to the partners in GPS. This became very problematic as it still had many technical obstacles to overcome to get it to the stage of prototype testing.

  2. Artificial Intelligence Systems as Prognostic and Predictive Tools in Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Enshaei, A; Robson, C N; Edmondson, R J

    2015-11-01

    The ability to provide accurate prognostic and predictive information to patients is becoming increasingly important as clinicians enter an era of personalized medicine. For a disease as heterogeneous as epithelial ovarian cancer, conventional algorithms become too complex for routine clinical use. This study therefore investigated the potential for an artificial intelligence model to provide this information and compared it with conventional statistical approaches. The authors created a database comprising 668 cases of epithelial ovarian cancer during a 10-year period and collected data routinely available in a clinical environment. They also collected survival data for all the patients, then constructed an artificial intelligence model capable of comparing a variety of algorithms and classifiers alongside conventional statistical approaches such as logistic regression. The model was used to predict overall survival and demonstrated that an artificial neural network (ANN) algorithm was capable of predicting survival with high accuracy (93 %) and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.74 and that this outperformed logistic regression. The model also was used to predict the outcome of surgery and again showed that ANN could predict outcome (complete/optimal cytoreduction vs. suboptimal cytoreduction) with 77 % accuracy and an AUC of 0.73. These data are encouraging and demonstrate that artificial intelligence systems may have a role in providing prognostic and predictive data for patients. The performance of these systems likely will improve with increasing data set size, and this needs further investigation.

  3. Detection technique for artificially illuminated objects in the outer solar system and beyond.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Abraham; Turner, Edwin L

    2012-04-01

    Existing and planned optical telescopes and surveys can detect artificially illuminated objects, comparable in total brightness to a major terrestrial city, at the outskirts of the Solar System. Orbital parameters of Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) are routinely measured to exquisite precisions of<10(-3). Here, we propose to measure the variation of the observed flux F from such objects as a function of their changing orbital distances D. Sunlight-illuminated objects will show a logarithmic slope α ≡ (d log F/d log D)=-4, whereas artificially illuminated objects should exhibit α=-2. The proposed Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and other planned surveys will provide superb data and allow measurement of α for thousands of KBOs. If objects with α=-2 are found, follow-up observations could measure their spectra to determine whether they are illuminated by artificial lighting. The search can be extended beyond the Solar System with future generations of telescopes on the ground and in space that would have the capacity to detect phase modulation due to very strong artificial illumination on the nightside of planets as they orbit their parent stars.

  4. Groundwater artificial recharge solutions for integrated management of watersheds and aquifer systems under extreme drought scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo-Ferreira, Joao-Paulo; Oliveira, Luís.; Diamantino, Catarina

    2010-05-01

    The paper addresses groundwater artificial recharge solutions for integrated management of watersheds and aquifer systems under extreme drought scenarios. The conceptual idea of Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) is considered as one of the scientific based solutions towards scientific based mitigation measures to climate variability and change in many parts of the world. In Portugal two European Union sponsored 6th Framework Programme for Research Projects have been addressing this topic, namely GABARDINE Project on "Groundwater artificial recharge based on alternative sources of water: Advanced integrated technologies and management" and the Coordinated Action ASEMWATERNet, a "Multi-Stakeholder Platform for ASEM S&T Cooperation on Sustainable Water Use". An application of Aquifer Storage and Recovery methodologies aiming drought mitigation and Integrated Water Resource Management of the Algarve (Portugal). The technique of artificial recharge of groundwater is used in many parts of the world with several aims, e.g. water storing in appropriate aquifers for the mitigation of future water needs during droughts or as protection against pollution or even for the recovery of groundwater quality. Artificial recharge of the aquifer systems of Campina de Faro and Silves-Querença is addressed in this paper, proposed to be an alternative to decrease the vulnerability of the Algarve to a future drought. Integrated management of water resources in the Algarve is not a clear issue since the last decade, when groundwater resources that supplied almost all water needs, have been drastically replaced by surface water stored in new reservoirs.

  5. An overview of the artificial intelligence and expert systems component of RICIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feagin, Terry

    1987-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems are the important component of RICIS (Research Institute and Information Systems) research program. For space applications, a number of problem areas that should be able to make good use of the above tools include: resource allocation and management, control and monitoring, environmental control and life support, power distribution, communications scheduling, orbit and attitude maintenance, redundancy management, intelligent man-machine interfaces and fault detection, isolation and recovery.

  6. Repeated action of a constant magnetic field on the blood coagulation system in artificially produced anemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabrodina, L. V.

    1974-01-01

    Changes are discussed in the coagulatory system of the blood in rabbits under the influence of a constant magnetic field of an intensity of 2500 oersteds against the background of artificially induced anemia. Reversibility of the changes produced and the presence of the adaptational effect are noted. Taking all this into consideration, the changes involving the coagulatory system of the blood which arise under the influence of a constant magnetic field may be considered to have a nerve-reflex nature.

  7. Repeated action of a constant magnetic field on the blood coagulation system in artificially produced anemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabrodina, L. V.

    1974-01-01

    Changes are discussed in the coagulatory system of the blood in rabbits under the influence of a constant magnetic field of an intensity of 2500 oersteds against the background of artificially induced anemia. Reversibility of the changes produced and the presence of the adaptational effect are noted. Taking all this into consideration, the changes involving the coagulatory system of the blood which arise under the influence of a constant magnetic field may be considered to have a nerve-reflex nature.

  8. An Artificial Neural Network Control System for Spacecraft Attitude Stabilization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    training is based on the concept of enforced performance. A neural network will learn to meet a specific performance goal if the performance standard...is the only solution to a problem. Performance index training is devised to teach the neural network the time-optimal control law for the system. Real...time adaptation of a neural network in closed loop control of the Crew/Equipment Retriever was demonstrated in computer simulations.

  9. Precise Selenodetic Coordinate System on Artificial Light Refers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagrov, Alexander; Pichkhadze, Konstantin M.; Sysoev, Valentin

    Historically a coordinate system for the Moon was established on the base of telescopic observations from the Earth. As the angular resolution of Earth-to-Space telescopic observations is limited by Earth atmosphere, and is ordinary worse then 1 ang. second, the mean accuracy of selenodetic coordinates is some angular minutes, which corresponds to errors about 900 meters for positions of lunar objects near center of visible lunar disk, and at least twice more when objects are near lunar poles. As there are no Global Positioning System nor any astronomical observation instruments on the Moon, we proposed to use an autonomous light beacon on the Luna-Globe landing module to fix its position on the surface of the moon ant to use it as refer point for fixation of spherical coordinates system for the Moon. The light beacon is designed to be surely visible by orbiting probe TV-camera. As any space probe has its own stars-orientation system, there is not a problem to calculate a set of directions to the beacon and to the referent stars in probe-centered coordinate system during flight over the beacon. Large number of measured angular positions and time of each observation will be enough to calculate both orbital parameters of the probe and selenodetic coordinates of the beacon by methods of geodesy. All this will allow fixing angular coordinates of any feature of lunar surface in one global coordinate system, referred to the beacon. The satellite’s orbit plane contains ever the center mass of main body, so if the beacon will be placed closely to a lunar pole, we shall determine pole point position of the Moon with accuracy tens times better then it is known now. When angular accuracy of self-orientation by stars of the orbital module of Luna-Glob mission will be 6 angular seconds, then being in circular orbit with height of 200 km the on-board TV-camera will allow calculation of the beacon position as well as 6" corresponding to spatial resolution of the camera. It mean

  10. [Analysis of photosynthetic characteristics and its influencing factors of medicinal plant Mirabilis himalaica].

    PubMed

    Guo, Qi-Qiang; Quan, Hong; Lan, Xiao-Zhong; Li, Lian-Qiang; Li, Hui-E

    2014-07-01

    To study photosynthetic characteristics and its influencing factors in leaves of medicinal plant Mirabilis himalaica, and provide an evidence for guiding artificial planting and improving the quantity. The light-response and diurnal photosynthesis course of leaves at the booting stages of 1-3 year old M. himalaica were measured with LI-6400 system. The Results showed that the light response curves were fitted well by non rectangle hyperbola equation (R2 > or = 0.98). The values of the maximum photosynthetic rate (Pmax) and light use efficiency of three-year old M. himalaica leaves were higher than those of 1-2 year old individuals. The diurnal variation of net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and stomatal conductance (Gs) of 2-3 year old M. himalaica were typical double-peak curves determinately regulated by stomatal conductance. However, transpiration rate (Tr) of 1-3 year old plants leaves were single-peak curve, which was self-protection of harm reduction caused by the higher temperature at noontime. Correlation analysis showed that the changes between photosynthetic active radiation (PFD), air temperature (T ) and Pn, were significant positive related. Therefore, M. himalaica is a typical sun plant, which should be planted under the sufficient sunshine field and prolong the growing ages suitably in order to improve the yield.

  11. Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems: Natural and Artificial Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, Robert D. (Editor); Thompson, Brad G. (Editor); Tibbitts, Theodore W. (Editor); Volk, Tyler (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The scientists supported by the NASA sponsored Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) program have played a major role in creating a Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) section devoted to the development of bioregenerative life support for use in space. The series of 22 papers were sponsored by Subcommission F.4. The papers deal with many of the diverse aspects of life support, and with outgrowth technologies that may have commercial applications in fields such as biotechnology and bioengineering. Papers from researchers in France, Canada, Japan and the USSR are also presented.

  12. Photosynthetic alterations of pea leaves infected systemically by pea enation mosaic virus: A coordinated decrease in efficiencies of CO(2) assimilation and photosystem II photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Kyseláková, Helena; Prokopová, Jitka; Nauš, Jan; Novák, Ondřej; Navrátil, Milan; Safářová, Dana; Spundová, Martina; Ilík, Petr

    2011-11-01

    We have investigated photosynthetic changes of fully expanded pea leaves infected systemically by pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) that often attacks legumes particularly in northern temperate regions. A typical compatible virus-host interaction was monitored during 40 post-inoculation days (dpi). An initial PEMV-induced decrease in photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation was detected at 15 dpi, when the virus appeared in the measured leaves. This decrease was not induced by stomata closure and corresponded with a decrease in the efficiency of photosystem II photochemistry (Φ(PSII)). Despite of a slight impairment of oxygen evolution at this stage, PSII function was not primarily responsible for the decrease in Φ(PSII). Chlorophyll fluorescence imaging revealed that Φ(PSII) started to decrease from the leaf tip to the base. More pronounced symptoms of PEMV disease appeared at later stages, when a typical mosaic and enations appeared in the infected leaves and oxidative damage of cell membranes was detected. From 30 dpi, a degradation of photosynthetic pigments accelerated, stomata were closing and corresponding pronounced decline in CO(2) assimilation was observed. A concomitant photoprotective responses, i.e. an increase in non-photochemical quenching and accumulation of de-epoxidized xanthophylls, were also detected. Interestingly, alternative electron sinks in chloroplasts were not stimulated by PEMV infection, which is in contradiction to earlier reports dealing with virus-induced plant stresses. The presented results show that the PEMV-induced alterations in mature pea leaves accelerated leaf senescence during which a decrease in Φ(PSII) took place in coordinated manner with an inhibition of CO(2) assimilation.

  13. Testbeam results of the first real-time embedded tracking system with artificial retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, N.; Abba, A.; Caponio, F.; Citterio, M.; Coelli, S.; Fu, J.; Merli, A.; Monti, M.; Petruzzo, M.

    2017-02-01

    We present the testbeam results of the first real-time embedded tracking system based on artificial retina algorithm. The tracking system prototype is capable of fast track reconstruction with a latency of the response below 1 μs and track parameter resolutions that are comparable with the offline results. The artificial retina algorithm was implemented in hardware in a custom data acquisition board based on commercial FPGA. The system was tested successfully using a 180 GeV/c proton beam at the CERN SPS with a maximum track rate of about 280 kHz. Online track parameters were found in good agreement with offline results and with the simulated response.

  14. Risk assessment of sewer condition using artificial intelligence tools: application to the SANEST sewer system.

    PubMed

    Sousa, V; Matos, J P; Almeida, N; Saldanha Matos, J

    2014-01-01

    Operation, maintenance and rehabilitation comprise the main concerns of wastewater infrastructure asset management. Given the nature of the service provided by a wastewater system and the characteristics of the supporting infrastructure, technical issues are relevant to support asset management decisions. In particular, in densely urbanized areas served by large, complex and aging sewer networks, the sustainability of the infrastructures largely depends on the implementation of an efficient asset management system. The efficiency of such a system may be enhanced with technical decision support tools. This paper describes the role of artificial intelligence tools such as artificial neural networks and support vector machines for assisting the planning of operation and maintenance activities of wastewater infrastructures. A case study of the application of this type of tool to the wastewater infrastructures of Sistema de Saneamento da Costa do Estoril is presented.

  15. Vehicle Signal Analysis Using Artificial Neural Networks for a Bridge Weigh-in-Motion System.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungkon; Lee, Jungwhee; Park, Min-Seok; Jo, Byung-Wan

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the procedures for development of signal analysis algorithms using artificial neural networks for Bridge Weigh-in-Motion (B-WIM) systems. Through the analysis procedure, the extraction of information concerning heavy traffic vehicles such as weight, speed, and number of axles from the time domain strain data of the B-WIM system was attempted. As one of the several possible pattern recognition techniques, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was employed since it could effectively include dynamic effects and bridge-vehicle interactions. A number of vehicle traveling experiments with sufficient load cases were executed on two different types of bridges, a simply supported pre-stressed concrete girder bridge and a cable-stayed bridge. Different types of WIM systems such as high-speed WIM or low-speed WIM were also utilized during the experiments for cross-checking and to validate the performance of the developed algorithms.

  16. Vehicle Signal Analysis Using Artificial Neural Networks for a Bridge Weigh-in-Motion System

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungkon; Lee, Jungwhee; Park, Min-Seok; Jo, Byung-Wan

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the procedures for development of signal analysis algorithms using artificial neural networks for Bridge Weigh-in-Motion (B-WIM) systems. Through the analysis procedure, the extraction of information concerning heavy traffic vehicles such as weight, speed, and number of axles from the time domain strain data of the B-WIM system was attempted. As one of the several possible pattern recognition techniques, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was employed since it could effectively include dynamic effects and bridge-vehicle interactions. A number of vehicle traveling experiments with sufficient load cases were executed on two different types of bridges, a simply supported pre-stressed concrete girder bridge and a cable-stayed bridge. Different types of WIM systems such as high-speed WIM or low-speed WIM were also utilized during the experiments for cross-checking and to validate the performance of the developed algorithms. PMID:22408487

  17. Artificial Immune System Approach for Airborne Vehicle Maneuvering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneshige, John T. (Inventor); Krishnakumar, Kalmanje S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method and system for control of a first aircraft relative to a second aircraft. A desired location and desired orientation are estimated for the first aircraft, relative to the second aircraft, at a subsequent time, t=t2, subsequent to the present time, t=t1, where the second aircraft continues its present velocity during a subsequent time interval, t1.ltoreq.t.ltoreq.t2, or takes evasive action. Action command sequences are examined, and an optimal sequence is chosen to bring the first aircraft to the desired location and desired orientation relative to the second aircraft at time t=t2. The method applies to control of combat aircraft and/or of aircraft in a congested airspace.

  18. Systems-Wide Analysis of Acclimation Responses to Long-Term Heat Stress and Recovery in the Photosynthetic Model Organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hemme, Dorothea; Veyel, Daniel; Mühlhaus, Timo; Sommer, Frederik; Jüppner, Jessica; Unger, Ann-Katrin; Sandmann, Michael; Fehrle, Ines; Schönfelder, Stephanie; Steup, Martin; Geimer, Stefan; Kopka, Joachim; Giavalisco, Patrick; Schroda, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We applied a top-down systems biology approach to understand how Chlamydomonas reinhardtii acclimates to long-term heat stress (HS) and recovers from it. For this, we shifted cells from 25 to 42°C for 24 h and back to 25°C for ≥8 h and monitored abundances of 1856 proteins/protein groups, 99 polar and 185 lipophilic metabolites, and cytological and photosynthesis parameters. Our data indicate that acclimation of Chlamydomonas to long-term HS consists of a temporally ordered, orchestrated implementation of response elements at various system levels. These comprise (1) cell cycle arrest; (2) catabolism of larger molecules to generate compounds with roles in stress protection; (3) accumulation of molecular chaperones to restore protein homeostasis together with compatible solutes; (4) redirection of photosynthetic energy and reducing power from the Calvin cycle to the de novo synthesis of saturated fatty acids to replace polyunsaturated ones in membrane lipids, which are deposited in lipid bodies; and (5) when sinks for photosynthetic energy and reducing power are depleted, resumption of Calvin cycle activity associated with increased photorespiration, accumulation of reactive oxygen species scavengers, and throttling of linear electron flow by antenna uncoupling. During recovery from HS, cells appear to focus on processes allowing rapid resumption of growth rather than restoring pre-HS conditions. PMID:25415976

  19. Responses of the photosynthetic electron transport system to excess light energy caused by water deficit in wild watermelon.

    PubMed

    Sanda, Satoko; Yoshida, Kazuo; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Kawamura, Tadayuki; Munekage, Yuri Nakajima; Akashi, Kinya; Yokota, Akiho

    2011-07-01

    In plants, drought stress coupled with high levels of illumination causes not only dehydration of tissues, but also oxidative damage resulting from excess absorbed light energy. In this study, we analyzed the regulation of electron transport under drought/high-light stress conditions in wild watermelon, a xerophyte that shows strong resistance to this type of stress. Under drought/high-light conditions that completely suppressed CO(2) fixation, the linear electron flow was diminished between photosystem (PS) II and PS I, there was no photoinhibitory damage to PS II and PS I and no decrease in the abundance of the two PSs. Proteome analyses revealed changes in the abundance of protein spots representing the Rieske-type iron-sulfur protein (ISP) and I and K subunits of NAD(P)H dehydrogenase in response to drought stress. Two-dimensional electrophoresis and immunoblot analyses revealed new ISP protein spots with more acidic isoelectric points in plants under drought stress. Our findings suggest that the modified ISPs depress the linear electron transport activity under stress conditions to protect PS I from photoinhibition. The qualitative changes in photosynthetic proteins may switch the photosynthetic electron transport from normal photosynthesis mode to stress-tolerance mode. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2011.

  20. Artificial frame filling using adaptive neural fuzzy inference system for particle image velocimetry dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdemir, Bayram; Doǧan, Sercan; Aksoy, Muharrem H.; Canli, Eyüp; Özgören, Muammer

    2015-03-01

    Liquid behaviors are very important for many areas especially for Mechanical Engineering. Fast camera is a way to observe and search the liquid behaviors. Camera traces the dust or colored markers travelling in the liquid and takes many pictures in a second as possible as. Every image has large data structure due to resolution. For fast liquid velocity, there is not easy to evaluate or make a fluent frame after the taken images. Artificial intelligence has much popularity in science to solve the nonlinear problems. Adaptive neural fuzzy inference system is a common artificial intelligence in literature. Any particle velocity in a liquid has two dimension speed and its derivatives. Adaptive Neural Fuzzy Inference System has been used to create an artificial frame between previous and post frames as offline. Adaptive neural fuzzy inference system uses velocities and vorticities to create a crossing point vector between previous and post points. In this study, Adaptive Neural Fuzzy Inference System has been used to fill virtual frames among the real frames in order to improve image continuity. So this evaluation makes the images much understandable at chaotic or vorticity points. After executed adaptive neural fuzzy inference system, the image dataset increase two times and has a sequence as virtual and real, respectively. The obtained success is evaluated using R2 testing and mean squared error. R2 testing has a statistical importance about similarity and 0.82, 0.81, 0.85 and 0.8 were obtained for velocities and derivatives, respectively.

  1. An innovative artificial recharge system to enhance groundwater storage in basaltic terrain: example from Maharashtra, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhusari, Vijay; Katpatal, Y. B.; Kundal, Pradeep

    2016-08-01

    The management of groundwater poses challenges in basaltic terrain as its availability is not uniform due to the absence of primary porosity. Indiscriminate excessive withdrawal from shallow as well as deep aquifers for meeting increased demand can be higher than natural recharge, causing imbalance in demand and supply and leading to a scarcity condition. An innovative artificial recharge system has been conceived and implemented to augment the groundwater sources at the villages of Saoli and Sastabad in Wardha district of Maharashtra, India. The scheme involves resectioning of a stream bed to achieve a reverse gradient, building a subsurface dam to arrest subsurface flow, and installation of recharge shafts to recharge the deeper aquifers. The paper focuses on analysis of hydrogeological parameters like porosity, specific yield and transmissivity, and on temporal groundwater status. Results indicate that after the construction of the artificial recharge system, a rise of 0.8-2.8 m was recorded in the pre- and post-monsoon groundwater levels in 12 dug wells in the study area; an increase in the yield was also noticed which solved the drinking water and irrigation problems. Spatial analysis was performed using a geographic information system to demarcate the area of influence of the recharge system due to increase in yields of the wells. The study demonstrates efficacy, technical viability and applicability of an innovative artificial recharge system constructed in an area of basaltic terrain prone to water scarcity.

  2. Wear Characteristics of a Novel Bearing System for Artificial Knee Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suciu, Aneta Nicoleta; Iwatsubo, Takuzo; Matsuda, Mitsumasa; Nishino, Takashi

    This paper presents an experimental investigation upon the wear characteristics of a novel bearing system proposed for the artificial knee joints. Such bearing system is original in the meaning that micro-pockets are machined on surface of the rigid femoral component; a poro-elastic-hydrated layer, called artificial cartilage, covers the rigid tibial substrate. Under compression, the fluid exudes from the artificial cartilage, fills and pressurizes the micro-pockets. In this way, a poro-elasto-hydrodynamic regime of lubrication is developed. Wear tests are performed with different types of artificial cartilages made in PVA hydrogel, articulating against smooth and micro-pocket-covered femoral components. Influence of the number of walking cycles, femoral porosity, depth of the micro-pockets, water content and polymerization degree of the PVA hydrogel upon its wear factor is illustrated. For wear tests performed until 106 walking cycles, in the case of PVA hydrogel with 12300 polymerization degree and 77% water content versus smooth component, the wear factor is on order of 10-6-10-5mm3/Nm for the same artificial cartilage against a femoral component uniformly covered by identical micro-pockets of 50µm depth, on 15% of its surface, the wear factor drops in the range 10-7-10-6mm3/Nm, i. e., the wear factor reduces with 80%. The highest wear reduction due to the micro-pockets presence is obtained in the case of PVA hydrogel with 77% water content, i. e., for a fluid amount similar to that of the natural cartilage.

  3. Artificial Lymphatic Drainage Systems for Vascularized Microfluidic Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Keith H. K.; Truslow, James G.; Khankhel, Aimal H.; Chan, Kelvin L. S.; Tien, Joe

    2012-01-01

    The formation of a stably perfused microvasculature continues to be a major challenge in tissue engineering. Previous work has suggested the importance of a sufficiently large transmural pressure in maintaining vascular stability and perfusion. Here we show that a system of empty channels that provides a drainage function analogous to that of lymphatic microvasculature in vivo can stabilize vascular adhesion and maintain perfusion rate in dense, hydraulically resistive fibrin scaffolds in vitro. In the absence of drainage, endothelial delamination increased as scaffold density increased from 6 mg/mL to 30 mg/mL and scaffold hydraulic conductivity decreased by a factor of twenty. Single drainage channels exerted only localized vascular stabilization, the extent of which depended on the distance between vessel and drainage as well as scaffold density. Computational modeling of these experiments yielded an estimate of 0.40–1.36 cm H2O for the minimum transmural pressure required for vascular stability. We further designed and constructed fibrin patches (0.8 by 0.9 cm2) that were perfused by a parallel array of vessels and drained by an orthogonal array of drainage channels; only with the drainage did the vessels display long-term stability and perfusion. This work underscores the importance of drainage in vascularization, especially when a dense, hydraulically resistive scaffold is used. PMID:23281125

  4. Efficient production of artificially designed gelatins with a Bacillus brevis system.

    PubMed

    Kajino, T; Takahashi, H; Hirai, M; Yamada, Y

    2000-01-01

    Artificially designed gelatins comprising tandemly repeated 30-amino-acid peptide units derived from human alphaI collagen were successfully produced with a Bacillus brevis system. The DNA encoding the peptide unit was synthesized by taking into consideration the codon usage of the host cells, but no clones having a tandemly repeated gene were obtained through the above-mentioned strategy. Minirepeat genes could be selected in vivo from a mixture of every possible sequence encoding an artificial gelatin by randomly ligating the mixed sequence unit and transforming it into Escherichia coli. Larger repeat genes constructed by connecting minirepeat genes obtained by in vivo selection were also stable in the expression host cells. Gelatins derived from the eight-unit and six-unit repeat genes were extracellularly produced at the level of 0.5 g/liter and easily purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation and anion-exchange chromatography. The purified artificial gelatins had the predicted N-terminal sequences and amino acid compositions and a solgel property similar to that of the native gelatin. These results suggest that the selection of a repeat unit sequence stable in an expression host is a shortcut for the efficient production of repetitive proteins and that it can conveniently be achieved by the in vivo selection method. This study revealed the possible industrial application of artificially designed repetitive proteins.

  5. [Energy and memory efficient calculation of the accommodation demand in the artificial accommodation system].

    PubMed

    Nagel, J A; Beck, C; Harms, H; Stiller, P; Guth, H; Stachs, O; Bretthauer, G

    2010-12-01

    Presbyopia and cataract are gaining more and more importance in the ageing society. Both age-related complaints are accompanied with a loss of the eye's ability to accommodate. A new approach to restore accommodation is the Artificial Accommodation System, an autonomous micro system, which will be implanted into the capsular bag instead of a rigid intraocular lens. The Artificial Accommodation System will, depending on the actual demand for accommodation, autonomously adapt the refractive power of its integrated optical element. One possibility to measure the demand for accommodation non-intrusively is to analyse eye movements. We present an efficient algorithm, based on the CORDIC technique, to calculate the demand for accommodation from magnetic field sensor data. It can be shown that specialised algorithms significantly shorten calculation time without violating precision requirements. Additionally, a communication strategy for the wireless exchange of sensor data between the implants of the left and right eye is introduced. The strategy allows for a one-sided calculation of the demand for accommodation, resulting in an overall reduction of calculation time by 50 %. The presented methods enable autonomous microsystems, such as the Artificial Accommodation System, to save significant amounts of energy, leading to extended autonomous run-times.

  6. Transcutaneous Energy and Information Transmission System for a Totally Implantable Artificial Heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Nozomi; Yamamoto, Takahiko; Aoki, Hirooki; Koshiji, Kohji; Homma, Akihiko; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki

    In Totally-Implantable Artificial Heart(TAH) system, Transcutaneous Optical Information Transmission System(TOITS) and Externally Coupled Transcutaneous Energy Transmission System(ECTETS) are effective for driving, controlling and monitoring the TAH. Using these systems, a patient needs to wear an optical coupler and a transcutaneous transformer separately, and then the patient's QOL (Quality of Life) will be deteriorated. In this paper, for improving the QOL, the energy and information transmission using an unified transcutaneous transformer was investigated, and their information transmission characteristics were evaluated.

  7. Transcutaneous Energy and Information Transmission System for a Totally-Implantable Artificial Heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Nozomi; Yamamoto, Takahiko; Aoki, Hirooki; Koshiji, Kohji; Homma, Akihiko; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki

    In Totally-Implantable Artificial Heart (TAH) system, Transcutaneous Optical Information Transmission System (TOITS) and Externally Coupled Transcutaneous Energy Transmission System (ECTETS) are effective for driving, controlling and monitoring the TAH. Using these systems, a patient needs to wear an optical coupler and a transcutaneous transformer separately, and then the patient's QOL (Quality of Life) will be deteriorated. Therefore, we research the energy and information transmission by wearing an unified transcutaneous transformer. In this paper, the unified transcutaneous transformer for the energy and information transmission was investigated. As a result, the unified transformer, by which the coupling between the energy and information transmission was reduced, was developed.

  8. Predicting IVF Outcome: A Proposed Web-based System Using Artificial Intelligence.

    PubMed

    Siristatidis, Charalampos; Vogiatzi, Paraskevi; Pouliakis, Abraham; Trivella, Marialenna; Papantoniou, Nikolaos; Bettocchi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    To propose a functional in vitro fertilization (IVF) prediction model to assist clinicians in tailoring personalized treatment of subfertile couples and improve assisted reproduction outcome. Construction and evaluation of an enhanced web-based system with a novel Artificial Neural Network (ANN) architecture and conformed input and output parameters according to the clinical and bibliographical standards, driven by a complete data set and "trained" by a network expert in an IVF setting. The system is capable to act as a routine information technology platform for the IVF unit and is capable of recalling and evaluating a vast amount of information in a rapid and automated manner to provide an objective indication on the outcome of an artificial reproductive cycle. ANNs are an exceptional candidate in providing the fertility specialist with numerical estimates to promote personalization of healthcare and adaptation of the course of treatment according to the indications. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  9. Synthetic biology with artificially expanded genetic information systems. From personalized medicine to extraterrestrial life.

    PubMed

    Benner, Steven A; Hutter, Daniel; Sismour, A Michael

    2003-01-01

    Over 15 years ago, the Benner group noticed that the DNA alphabet need not be limited to the four standard nucleotides known in natural DNA. Rather, twelve nucleobases forming six base pairs joined by mutually exclusive hydrogen bonding patterns are possible within the geometry of the Watson-Crick pair (Fig. 1). Synthesis and studies on these compounds have brought us to the threshold of a synthetic biology, an artificial chemical system that does basic processes needed for life (in particular, Darwinian evolution), but with unnatural chemical structures. At the same time, the artificial genetic information systems (AEGIS) that we have developed have been used in FDA-approved commercial tests for managing HIV and hepatitis C infections in individual patients, and in a tool that seeks the virus for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). AEGIS also supports the next generation of robotic probes to search for genetic molecules on Mars, Europa, and elsewhere where NASA probes will travel.

  10. Evolution of immune systems from self/not self to danger to artificial immune systems (AIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Edwin L.

    2010-03-01

    self/not self model. The review will end with certain perspectives on artificial immune systems new on the scene and the product of computational immunologists. The tentative view is to question if the immune systems of invertebrates might be amenable to such an analysis? This would offer more credence to the innate system, often pushed aside thus favoring the adaptive responses.

  11. Evolution of immune systems from self/not self to danger to artificial immune systems (AIS).

    PubMed

    Cooper, Edwin L

    2010-03-01

    self/not self model. The review will end with certain perspectives on artificial immune systems new on the scene and the product of computational immunologists. The tentative view is to question if the immune systems of invertebrates might be amenable to such an analysis? This would offer more credence to the innate system, often pushed aside thus favoring the adaptive responses.

  12. Artificial Intelligence in the Allocation of Maintenance Resources for Intelligence Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    Scheduling: An Investigation in Constraint- Directed Reasoning," Proceedings of the Second National Conference on Artiicial Intelligence , 1982, pp. 155-158... Intelligence in the allocation of 5. Report Date maintenance resources for intelligence systems Sept 87 publication 6. 7. Author(s) 8. Performing...Sponsori 13. Type of Report & Period Covered SAME Final AD-A 197 557 14. 15. Supplerr Presented at conference of Artificial Intelligence East 1987 16

  13. Artificial intelligence system for the realtime monitoring and analysis of textural information

    SciTech Connect

    Clippinger, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a prototype artificial intelligence system for the monitoring, filtering, and interpretation of realtime textual information. The user sets alerts for topics of interest and the system scans, parses, and interprets the texts and triggers an alert when an appropriate topic is found. Features and limitations of the system are discussed. Syntactically directed parses were found to be too weak for unrestricted texts. An expectations directed approach using discourse and case frame semantics is proposed as a more efficient and practical alternative. 3 references.

  14. Glucagon in artificial pancreas systems: Potential benefits and safety profile of future chronic use.

    PubMed

    Taleb, Nadine; Haidar, Ahmad; Messier, Virginie; Gingras, Véronique; Legault, Laurent; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi

    2017-01-01

    The role of glucagon in the pathophysiology of diabetes has long been recognized, although its approved clinical use has so far been limited to the emergency treatment of severe hypoglycaemia. A novel use of glucagon as intermittent mini-boluses is proposed in the dual-hormone version (insulin and glucagon) of the external artificial pancreas. Short-term studies suggest that the incorporation of glucagon into artificial pancreas systems has the potential to further decrease hypoglycaemic risk and improve overall glucose control; however, the potential long-term safety and benefits also need to be investigated given the recognized systemic effects of glucagon. In the present report, we review the available animal and human data on the physiological functions of glucagon, as well as its pharmacological use, according to dosing and duration (acute and chronic). Along with its main role in hepatic glucose metabolism, glucagon affects the cardiovascular, renal, pulmonary and gastrointestinal systems. It has a potential role in weight reduction through its central satiety function and its role in increasing energy expenditure. Most of the pharmacological studies investigating the effects of glucagon have used doses exceeding 1 mg, in contrast to the mini-boluses used in the artificial pancreas. The available data are reassuring but comprehensive human studies using small but chronic glucagon doses that are close to the physiological ranges are lacking. We propose a list of variables that could be monitored during long-term trials of the artificial pancreas. Such trials should address the questions about the risk-benefit ratio of chronic glucagon use.

  15. Self-aggregates of natural and modified chlorophylls as photosynthetic light-harvesting antenna systems: substituent effect on the B-ring.

    PubMed

    Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2005-09-01

    Extramembranous light-harvesting antennae called 'chlorosomes' are the main sunlight-absorbing and energy-migrating systems in photosynthetic green bacteria. In a chlorosome, specific chlorophyllous pigments self-aggregate in hydrophobic environments surrounded by a lipid monolayer to form large oligomers. The self-aggregates of chlorosomal chlorophylls possessing a chlorin pi-system absorb sunlight and can emit near-infrared light, which is transferred to a bacteriochlorin pigment situated in the chlorosomal surface membrane. In vivo and in vitro self-aggregates of natural chlorosomal chlorophylls and their models have been investigated by electronic absorption analysis. Here their self-aggregation is reviewed from the viewpoint of substituent effect on the pyrrolic B-ring. Substituents at the 7- and 8-positions did not disturb the formation of their self-aggregates but affected their absorption bands.

  16. SHARP: A multi-mission artificial intelligence system for spacecraft telemetry monitoring and diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Denise L.; James, Mark L.

    1989-01-01

    The Spacecraft Health Automated Reasoning Prototype (SHARP) is a system designed to demonstrate automated health and status analysis for multi-mission spacecraft and ground data systems operations. Telecommunications link analysis of the Voyager 2 spacecraft is the initial focus for the SHARP system demonstration which will occur during Voyager's encounter with the planet Neptune in August, 1989, in parallel with real time Voyager operations. The SHARP system combines conventional computer science methodologies with artificial intelligence techniques to produce an effective method for detecting and analyzing potential spacecraft and ground systems problems. The system performs real time analysis of spacecraft and other related telemetry, and is also capable of examining data in historical context. A brief introduction is given to the spacecraft and ground systems monitoring process at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The current method of operation for monitoring the Voyager Telecommunications subsystem is described, and the difficulties associated with the existing technology are highlighted. The approach taken in the SHARP system to overcome the current limitations is also described, as well as both the conventional and artificial intelligence solutions developed in SHARP.

  17. SHARP: A multi-mission artificial intelligence system for spacecraft telemetry monitoring and diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Denise L.; James, Mark L.

    1989-05-01

    The Spacecraft Health Automated Reasoning Prototype (SHARP) is a system designed to demonstrate automated health and status analysis for multi-mission spacecraft and ground data systems operations. Telecommunications link analysis of the Voyager 2 spacecraft is the initial focus for the SHARP system demonstration which will occur during Voyager's encounter with the planet Neptune in August, 1989, in parallel with real time Voyager operations. The SHARP system combines conventional computer science methodologies with artificial intelligence techniques to produce an effective method for detecting and analyzing potential spacecraft and ground systems problems. The system performs real time analysis of spacecraft and other related telemetry, and is also capable of examining data in historical context. A brief introduction is given to the spacecraft and ground systems monitoring process at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The current method of operation for monitoring the Voyager Telecommunications subsystem is described, and the difficulties associated with the existing technology are highlighted. The approach taken in the SHARP system to overcome the current limitations is also described, as well as both the conventional and artificial intelligence solutions developed in SHARP.

  18. Artificial photosynthesis combines biology with technology for sustainable energy transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.; Gust, Devens

    2013-03-01

    Photosynthesis supports the biosphere. Currently, human activity appropriates about one fourth of terrestrial photosynthetic net primary production (NPP) to support our GDP and nutrition. The cost to Earth systems of "our cut" of NPP is thought to be rapidly driving several Earth systems outside of bounds that were established on the geological time scale. Even with a fundamental realignment of human priorities, changing the unsustainable trajectory of the anthropocene will require reengineering photosynthesis to more efficiently meet human needs. Artificial photosynthetic systems are envisioned that can both supply renewable fuels and serve as platforms for exploring redesign strategies for photosynthesis. These strategies can be used in the nascent field of synthetic biology to make vast, much needed improvements in the biomass production efficiency of photosynthesis.

  19. An Investigation on the Role of Spike Latency in an Artificial Olfactory System

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Eugenio; Polese, Davide; Dini, Francesca; Paolesse, Roberto; Filippini, Daniel; Lundström, Ingemar; Di Natale, Corrado

    2011-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that the reactions to external stimuli may appear only few hundreds of milliseconds after the physical interaction of the stimulus with the proper receptor. This behavior suggests that neurons transmit the largest meaningful part of their signal in the first spikes, and than that the spike latency is a good descriptor of the information content in biological neural networks. In this paper this property has been investigated in an artificial sensorial system where a single layer of spiking neurons is trained with the data generated by an artificial olfactory platform based on a large array of chemical sensors. The capability to discriminate between distinct chemicals and mixtures of them was studied with spiking neural networks endowed with and without lateral inhibitions and considering as output feature of the network both the spikes latency and the average firing rate. Results show that the average firing rate of the output spikes sequences shows the best separation among the experienced vapors, however the latency code is able in a shorter time to correctly discriminate all the tested volatile compounds. This behavior is qualitatively similar to those recently found in natural olfaction, and noteworthy it provides practical suggestions to tail the measurement conditions of artificial olfactory systems defining for each specific case a proper measurement time. PMID:22194721

  20. Periodic Pattern of Genetic and Fitness Diversity during Evolution of an Artificial Cell-Like System.

    PubMed

    Ichihashi, Norikazu; Aita, Takuyo; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    Genetic and phenotypic diversity are the basis of evolution. Despite their importance, however, little is known about how they change over the course of evolution. In this study, we analyzed the dynamics of the adaptive evolution of a simple evolvable artificial cell-like system using single-molecule real-time sequencing technology that reads an entire single artificial genome. We found that the genomic RNA population increases in fitness intermittently, correlating with a periodic pattern of genetic and fitness diversity produced by repeated diversification and domination. In the diversification phase, a genomic RNA population spreads within a genetic space by accumulating mutations until mutants with higher fitness are generated, resulting in an increase in fitness diversity. In the domination phase, the mutants with higher fitness dominate, decreasing both the fitness and genetic diversity. This study reveals the dynamic nature of genetic and fitness diversity during adaptive evolution and demonstrates the utility of a simplified artificial cell-like system to study evolution at an unprecedented resolution. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Development of Global Precipitation Estimation System Using Artificial Neural Network Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, K. L.

    2015-12-01

    The PERSIANN (Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Network) system, developed at UC Irvine, is one unique source to estimate global precipitation in near real-time using infrared and passive microwave information from Geosynchronous Earth Orbital (GEO) and Low Earth Orbital (LEO) satellites. The algorithm uses an Artificial Neural Network to extract cold cloud pixels and neighboring features from GEO-satellites' infrared images to generate rain rate. The precipitation estimates from the neural network are further adjusted by the PMW precipitation estimates produced using the data from LEO satellites. The operational PERSIANN system estimates global precipitation in near real-time. Data sources are also extended to the reconstruction of historical data for the past 30 years for hydroclimate studies. Continuing development of precipitation retrieval using artificial neural network models and advanced machine learning methods are ongoing. Studies including effective feature extraction from satellite multiple spectral imagery, integration of multiple satellite information, and merge of ground and satellite precipitation retrievals. Evaluation of PERSIANN precipitation and its application for catchment scale hydrologic simulation will be discussed.

  2. Electromagnetic effects on the biological tissue surrounding a transcutaneous transformer for an artificial anal sphincter system.

    PubMed

    Zan, Peng; Yang, Bang-hua; Shao, Yong; Yan, Guo-zheng; Liu, Hua

    2010-12-01

    This paper reports on the electromagnetic effects on the biological tissue surrounding a transcutaneous transformer for an artificial anal sphincter. The coupling coils and human tissues, including the skin, fat, muscle, liver, and blood, were considered. Specific absorption rate (SAR) and current density were analyzed by a finite-length solenoid model. First, SAR and current density as a function of frequency (10-10(7) Hz) for an emission current of 1.5 A were calculated under different tissue thickness. Then relations between SAR, current density, and five types of tissues under each frequency were deduced. As a result, both the SAR and current density were below the basic restrictions of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). The results show that the analysis of these data is very important for developing the artificial anal sphincter system.

  3. Electromagnetic effects on the biological tissue surrounding a transcutaneous transformer for an artificial anal sphincter system*

    PubMed Central

    Zan, Peng; Yang, Bang-hua; Shao, Yong; Yan, Guo-zheng; Liu, Hua

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the electromagnetic effects on the biological tissue surrounding a transcutaneous transformer for an artificial anal sphincter. The coupling coils and human tissues, including the skin, fat, muscle, liver, and blood, were considered. Specific absorption rate (SAR) and current density were analyzed by a finite-length solenoid model. First, SAR and current density as a function of frequency (10–107 Hz) for an emission current of 1.5 A were calculated under different tissue thickness. Then relations between SAR, current density, and five types of tissues under each frequency were deduced. As a result, both the SAR and current density were below the basic restrictions of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). The results show that the analysis of these data is very important for developing the artificial anal sphincter system. PMID:21121071

  4. A special purpose embedded system for neural machine interface for artificial legs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaorong; Huang, He; Yang, Qing

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a design and implementation of a neural-machine interface (NMI) for artificial legs that can decode amputee's intended movement in real time. The newly designed NMI integrates an FPGA chip for fast processing and a microcontroller unit (MCU) with multiple on-chip analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) for real-time data sampling. The resulting embedded system is able to sample in real time 12 EMG signals and 6 mechanical signals and execute a special complex phase-dependent classifier for accurate recognition of the user's intended locomotion modes. The implementation and evaluation are based on Altera's Stratix III 3S150 FPGA device coupled with Freescale's MPC5566 MCU. The experimental results for classifying three locomotion modes (level-ground walking, stairs ascent, and stairs descent) based on data collected from an able-bodied human subject have shown acceptable performance for real-time controlling of artificial legs.

  5. Artificial quantum thermal bath: Engineering temperature for a many-body quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Alireza; Neven, Hartmut

    2016-11-01

    Temperature determines the relative probability of observing a physical system in an energy state when that system is energetically in equilibrium with its environment. In this paper we present a theory for engineering the temperature of a quantum system different from its ambient temperature. We define criteria for an engineered quantum bath that, when coupled to a quantum system with Hamiltonian H , drives the system to the equilibrium state e/-H/TTr (e-H /T) with a tunable parameter T . This is basically an analog counterpart of the digital quantum metropolis algorithm. For a system of superconducting qubits, we propose a circuit-QED approximate realization of such an engineered thermal bath consisting of driven lossy resonators. Our proposal opens the path to simulate thermodynamical properties of many-body quantum systems of size not accessible to classical simulations. Also we discuss how an artificial thermal bath can serve as a temperature knob for a hybrid quantum-thermal annealer.

  6. Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullerits, T.; Polivka, T.; Sundström, V.

    Photosynthetic organisms utilize (bacterio) chlorophylls and carotenoids as main light-harvesting pigments. In this chapter, we review bacteriochlorophyll light-harvesting in photosynthetic purple bacteria; we discuss intra- and intercomplex energy transfer processes as well as energy trapping by reaction centers. From the viewpoint of light-harvesting, in most organisms carotenoids are accessory pigments absorbing in the blue-green region of the solar spectrum, where chlorophylls and bacteriochlorophylls have weak absorption. Here, we discuss carotenoid light-harvesting in a pigment-protein complex having carotenoids as main lightharvesting pigment, the peridinin chlorophyll protein (PCP).

  7. Light-dependent regulation of photosynthesis genes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 is coordinately controlled by photosynthetic electron transport via the PrrBA two-component system and the photoreceptor AppA.

    PubMed

    Happ, Hendrik N; Braatsch, Stephan; Broschek, Vera; Osterloh, Lisa; Klug, Gabriele

    2005-11-01

    Formation of the photosynthetic apparatus in Rhodobacter is regulated by oxygen tension and light intensity. Here we show that in anaerobically grown Rhodobacter cells a light-dependent increase in expression of the puc and puf operons encoding structural proteins of the photosynthetic complexes requires an active photosynthetic electron transport. The redox-sensitive CrtJ/PpsR repressor of photosynthesis genes, which was suggested to mediate electron transport-dependent signals, is not involved in this light-dependent signal chain. Our data reveal that the signal initiated in the photosynthetic reaction centre is transmitted via components of the electron transport chain and the PrrB/PrrA two-component system in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Under blue light illumination in the absence of oxygen this signal leads to activation of photosynthesis genes and interferes with a blue-light repression mediated by the AppA photoreceptor and the PpsR transcriptional repressor in R. sphaeroides. Thus, light either sensed by a photoreceptor or initiating photosynthetic electron transport has opposite effects on the transcription of photosynthesis genes. Both signalling pathways involve redox-dependent steps that finally determine the effect of light on gene expression.

  8. Artificial tritrophic exposure system for environmental risk analysis on aphidophagous predators.

    PubMed

    Paula, Débora P; Souza, Lucas M DE; Andow, David A; Sousa, Alex A T Cortês DE; Pires, Carmen S S; Sujii, Edison R

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated an artificial tritrophic exposure system for use in ecotoxicological evaluations of environmental stressors on aphidophagous predators. It consists of an acrylic tube with a Parafilm M sachet containing liquid aphid diet, into which can be added environmental stressors. Immature Cycloneda sanguinea, Harmonia axyridis and Chrysoperla externa, and adult H. axyridis were reared on Myzus persicae. Larval and pupal development and survival of all species and reproductive parameters of H. axyridis were similar to published results. The system provides a suitable tritrophic exposure route, enables ex-ante evaluation of stressors, and improves the accuracy of the assessment.

  9. Selectivity Control of CO2 Reduction in an Inorganic Artificial Photosynthesis System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiba, Hiroshi; Yotsuhashi, Satoshi; Deguchi, Masahiro; Yamada, Yuka; Ohkawa, Kazuhiro

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrated that the selectivity of photo electrochemical CO2 reduction can be controlled in an inorganic artificial photosynthesis system using an AlGaN/GaN photo electrode. By increasing input light intensity and the use of a gold cathode, the Faradaic efficiency of CO dramatically increases from 30% to over 80% while that of H2 decreases. We observed that the cathode potential resulting from illumination determines the ratio of CO and H2. With this system, it is possible to switch the main reaction product from CO to HCOOH, which is also effective even under intense illumination.

  10. Natural and artificial intelligence. Processor systems compared to the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    de Callatay, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    This comparison of artificial intelligence systems to the human brain has implications for a variety of disciplines. Original views are specified and compared with traditional models. Main Features: 1. Integration of logic programming in the brain functions. 2. New computer parallel architecture (for hardware engineers). 3. Main principles of symbolic manipulation by logic programming (for software engineers in Al, expert systems and logic programming). 4. Logical models of brain connections and functions (for neuroscientists). 5. Definition of memory types and functions (for psychologists). 6. Parallel between Al applied to robots and theory of knowledge (for philosophers).

  11. Prodiag--a hybrid artificial intelligence based reactor diagnostic system for process faults

    SciTech Connect

    Reifman, J.; Wei, T.Y.C.; Vitela, J.E.; Applequist, C. A.; Chasensky, T.M.

    1996-03-01

    Commonwealth Research Corporation (CRC) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) are collaborating on a DOE-sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), project to perform feasibility studies on a novel approach to Artificial Intelligence (Al) based diagnostics for component faults in nuclear power plants. Investigations are being performed in the construction of a first-principles physics-based plant level process diagnostic expert system (ES) and the identification of component-level fault patterns through operating component characteristics using artificial neural networks (ANNs). The purpose of the proof-of-concept project is to develop a computer-based system using this Al approach to assist process plant operators during off-normal plant conditions. The proposed computer-based system will use thermal hydraulic (T-H) signals complemented by other non-T-H signals available in the data stream to provide the process operator with the component which most likely caused the observed process disturbance.To demonstrate the scale-up feasibility of the proposed diagnostic system it is being developed for use with the Chemical Volume Control System (CVCS) of a nuclear power plant. A full-scope operator training simulator representing the Commonwealth Edison Braidwood nuclear power plant is being used both as the source of development data and as the means to evaluate the advantages of the proposed diagnostic system. This is an ongoing multi-year project and this paper presents the results to date of the CRADA phase.

  12. [Research on photosynthetic and eco-physiological characteristics of Epimedium pseudowushannense in different growing age].

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiao-Hong; Pan, Jun-Qian; Yang, Xiang-Bo; Jiang, Zhi-Hai; Li, Li; Ge, Fei; Guo, Bao-Lin

    2016-06-01

    Epimedium is a widely used medicinal plants. Due to excessive use of wild resources and resource constraints, artificial cultivation is the only way to achieve sustainable use of resources. E. pseudowushannense is intended to achieve the first cultivated species, but plant production technology is not yet fully mature.The diurnal variation of photosynthetic and eco-physiological characteristics of E. pseudowushannense in different growing age was studied by the CI-340 Portable Photosynthesis System under natural conditions. The net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (C), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), relative humidity (RH), air temperature (Ta), apparent mesophyll conductance (ALMC), transpiration rate (E), leaf temperature (Tl), water use efficiency (WUE) and other photosynthetic physiological factors and environmental factors were measured. The obtained data was analyzed by correlation analysis, path analysis and stepwise multiple-regression analysis to explore the relationship between net photosynthetic rate and physiological and ecological factors. The results show that: ①The daily variation of the Pn, E, ALMC, C of E. pseudowushannense in different growing age took on"two peak type", the Pn was with an obvious midday depression phenomenon at noon.②The Pn, ALMC and C of annuals' were significantly higher than biennial or three-year; but the Ci was basically a three-year > biennial> annual.③The correlation analysis, path analysis and stepwise regression analysis showed that ALMC, Ci, Ta might played important role in the Pn and ranked as ALMC>Ci>Ta. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  13. Distribution of natural and artificial radionuclides in chernozem soil/crop system from stationary experiments.

    PubMed

    Sarap, Nataša B; Rajačić, Milica M; Đalović, Ivica G; Šeremešić, Srđan I; Đorđević, Aleksandar R; Janković, Marija M; Daković, Marko Z

    2016-09-01

    The present paper focuses on the determination of radiological characteristics of cultivated chernozem soil and crops from long-term field experiments, taking into account the importance of distribution and transfer of radionuclides in the soil-plant system, especially in agricultural cropland. The investigation was performed on the experimental fields where maize, winter wheat, and rapeseed were cultivated. Analysis of radioactivity included determination of the gross alpha and beta activity as a screening method, as well as the activities of the following radionuclides: natural ((210)Pb, (235)U, (238)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, (7)Be) and artificial ((90)Sr and (137)Cs). The activities of natural and artificial ((137)Cs) radionuclides were determined by gamma spectrometry, while the artificial radionuclide (90)Sr was determined by a radiochemical analytical method. Based on the obtained results for the specific activity of (40)K, (137)Cs, and (90)Sr, accumulation factors for these radionuclides were calculated in order to estimate transfer of radionuclides from soil to crops. The results of performed analyses showed that there is no increase of radioactivity that could endanger the food production through the grown crops.

  14. Establishment of an Artificial Tick Feeding System to Study Theileria lestoquardi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tajeri, Shahin; Razmi, Gholamreza; Haghparast, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of good experimental models for Theileria sp. infection is important for theileriosis research. Routinely, infection of ticks is accomplished by feeding on parasite-infected animals (sheep, cows and horses), which raises practical and ethical problems, driving the search for alternative methods of tick infection. Artificial tick feeding systems are based mainly on rearing ticks on host-derived or hand-made artificial membranes. We developed a modified feeding assay for infecting nymphal stages of Hyalomma anatolicum ticks with Theileria lestoquardi, a highly pathogenic parasite of sheep. We compared two different membranes: an artificial silicone membrane and a natural alternative using mouse skin. We observed high attachment rates with mouse skin, whereas in vitro feeding of H. anatolicum nymphs on silicone membranes was unsuccessful. We could infect H. anatolicum nymphs with T. lestoquardi and the emerging adult ticks transmitted infective parasites to sheep. In contrast, similar infections with Rhipicephalus bursa, a representative tick with short mouth-parts that was proposed as a vector for T. lestoquardi, appeared not to be a competent vector tick species. This is the first report of an experimentally controlled infection of H. anatolicum with T. lestoquardi and opens avenues to explore tick-parasite dynamics in detail. PMID:28036364

  15. Establishment of an Artificial Tick Feeding System to Study Theileria lestoquardi Infection.

    PubMed

    Tajeri, Shahin; Razmi, Gholamreza; Haghparast, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of good experimental models for Theileria sp. infection is important for theileriosis research. Routinely, infection of ticks is accomplished by feeding on parasite-infected animals (sheep, cows and horses), which raises practical and ethical problems, driving the search for alternative methods of tick infection. Artificial tick feeding systems are based mainly on rearing ticks on host-derived or hand-made artificial membranes. We developed a modified feeding assay for infecting nymphal stages of Hyalomma anatolicum ticks with Theileria lestoquardi, a highly pathogenic parasite of sheep. We compared two different membranes: an artificial silicone membrane and a natural alternative using mouse skin. We observed high attachment rates with mouse skin, whereas in vitro feeding of H. anatolicum nymphs on silicone membranes was unsuccessful. We could infect H. anatolicum nymphs with T. lestoquardi and the emerging adult ticks transmitted infective parasites to sheep. In contrast, similar infections with Rhipicephalus bursa, a representative tick with short mouth-parts that was proposed as a vector for T. lestoquardi, appeared not to be a competent vector tick species. This is the first report of an experimentally controlled infection of H. anatolicum with T. lestoquardi and opens avenues to explore tick-parasite dynamics in detail.

  16. Fuzzy learning vector quantization neural network and its application for artificial odor recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusumoputro, Benyamin; Budiarto, Hary; Jatmiko, Wisnu

    2000-03-01

    In this paper, a kind of fuzzy algorithm for learning vector quantization is developed and used as pattern classifiers with a supervised learning paradigm in artificial odor discrimination system. In this type of FLVQ, the neuron activation is derived through fuzziness of the input data, so that the neural system could deal with the statistical of the measurement error directly. During learning,the similarity between the training vector and the reference vectors are calculated, and the winning reference vector is updated in two ways. Firstly, by shifting the central position of the fuzzy reference vector toward or away from the input vector, and secondly, by modifying its fuzziness. Two types of fuzziness modifications are used, i.e., a constant modification factor and a variable modification factor. This type of FLVQ is different in nature with FALVQ, and in this paper, the performance of FNLVQ network is compared with that of FALVQ in artificial odor recognition system. Experimental results show that both FALVQ and FNLVQ provided high recognition probability in determining various learn-category of odors, however, the FNLVQ neural system has the ability to recognize the unlearn-category of odor that could not recognized by FALVQ neural system.

  17. The INCA system: a further step towards a telemedical artificial pancreas.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Enrique J; Hernando Pérez, M Elena; Vering, Thomas; Rigla Cros, Mercedes; Bott, Oliver; García-Sáez, Gema; Pretschner, Peter; Brugués, Eulalia; Schnell, Oliver; Patte, Caroline; Bergmann, Joachim; Dudde, Ralf; de Leiva, Alberto

    2008-07-01

    Biomedical engineering research efforts have accomplished another level of a "technological solution" for diabetes: an artificial pancreas to be used by patients and supervised by healthcare professionals at any time and place. Reliability of continuous glucose monitoring, availability of real-time programmable insulin pumps, and validation of safe and efficient control algorithms are critical components for achieving that goal. Nevertheless, the development and integration of these new technologies within a telemedicine system can be the basis of a future artificial pancreas. This paper introduces the concept, design, and evaluation of the "intelligent control assistant for diabetes, INCA" system. INCA is a personal digital assistant (PDA)-based personal smart assistant to provide patients with closed-loop control strategies (personal and remote loop), based on a real-time continuous glucose sensor (Guardian RT, Medtronic), an insulin pump (D-TRON, Disetronic Medical Systems), and a mobile general packet radio service (GPRS)-based telemedicine communication system. Patient therapeutic decision making is supervised by doctors through a multiaccess telemedicine central server that provides to diabetics and doctors a Web-based access to continuous glucose monitoring and insulin infusion data. The INCA system has been technically and clinically evaluated in two randomized and crossover clinical trials showing an improvement on glycaemic control of diabetic patients.

  18. System overview of the fully implantable destination therapy--ReinHeart-total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Benedikt; Spiliopoulos, Sotirios; Finocchiaro, Thomas; Graef, Felix; Kuipers, Kristin; Laumen, Marco; Guersoy, Dilek; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Koerfer, Reiner; Tenderich, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the lack of suitable allografts, the demand for long-term mechanical circulatory support in patients with biventricular end-stage heart failure is rising. Currently available Total Artificial Heart (TAH) systems consist of pump units with only limited durability, percutaneous tubes and bulky external equipment that limit the quality of life. Therefore we are focusing on the development of a fully implantable, highly durable destination therapy total artificial heart. The ReinHeart-TAH system consists of a passively filling pump unit driven by a low-wear linear drive between two artificial ventricles, an implantable control unit and a compliance chamber. The TAH is powered by a transcutaneous energy transmission system. The flow distribution inside the ventricles was analysed by fluid structure interaction simulation and particle image velocimetry measurements. Along with durability tests, the hydrodynamic performance and flow balance capability were evaluated in a mock circulation loop. Animal trials are ongoing. Based on fluid structure interaction simulation and particle image velocimetry, blood stagnation areas have been significantly reduced. In the mock circulation loop the ReinHeart-TAH generated a cardiac output of 5 l/min at an operating frequency of 120 bpm and an aortic pressure of 120/80 mmHg. The highly effective preload sensitivity of the passively filling ventricles allowed the sensorless integration of the Frank Starling mechanism. The ReinHeart-TAH effectively replaced the native heart's function in animals for up to 2 days. In vitro and in vivo testing showed a safe and effective function of the ReinHeart-TAH system. This has the potential to become an alternative to transplantation. However, before a first-in-man implant, chronic animal trials still have to be completed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  19. Promise of a Low Power Mobile CPU based Embedded System in Artificial Leg Control

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Robert; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Xiaorong; Huang, He; Yang, Qing

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a low power embedded system using mobile processor technology (Intel Atom™ Z530 Processor) specifically tailored for a neural-machine interface (NMI) for artificial limbs. This embedded system effectively performs our previously developed NMI algorithm based on neuromuscular-mechanical fusion and phase-dependent pattern classification. The analysis shows that NMI embedded system can meet real-time constraints with high accuracies for recognizing the user's locomotion mode. Our implementation utilizes the mobile processor efficiently to allow a power consumption of 2.2 watts and low CPU utilization (less than 4.3%) while executing the complex NMI algorithm. Our experiments have shown that the highly optimized C program implementation on the embedded system has superb advantages over existing PC implementations on MATLAB. The study results suggest that mobile-CPU-based embedded system is promising for implementing advanced control for powered lower limb prostheses. PMID:23367113

  20. Promise of a low power mobile CPU based embedded system in artificial leg control.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Robert; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Xiaorong; Huang, He; Yang, Qing

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a low power embedded system using mobile processor technology (Intel Atom™ Z530 Processor) specifically tailored for a neural-machine interface (NMI) for artificial limbs. This embedded system effectively performs our previously developed NMI algorithm based on neuromuscular-mechanical fusion and phase-dependent pattern classification. The analysis shows that NMI embedded system can meet real-time constraints with high accuracies for recognizing the user's locomotion mode. Our implementation utilizes the mobile processor efficiently to allow a power consumption of 2.2 watts and low CPU utilization (less than 4.3%) while executing the complex NMI algorithm. Our experiments have shown that the highly optimized C program implementation on the embedded system has superb advantages over existing PC implementations on MATLAB. The study results suggest that mobile-CPU-based embedded system is promising for implementing advanced control for powered lower limb prostheses.

  1. Artificial intelligence and the law: will expert systems replace expert lawyers

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, G.S.

    1983-01-01

    Summary form only given, as follows. The commercial availability of expert systems utilizing specially developed knowledge bases raises significant questions about their potential utility in the practice of law. These systems, built with the aid of recent developments in artificial intelligence research, may only prove useful in certain areas of legal practice. Counselling and interviewing are areas where expert systems are likely to effect marked changes in the practice of law. In contract, computerized legal research using a knowledge-based system is more difficult to envision. This is due to complexities presented by the multiplicity of sources of the law, and by conflicting opinions and interpretations in the common law. In the coming decade, use of expert systems in science and medicine will grow rapidly, and attempts will continue to be made to automate the legal reasoning process. As past research efforts have demonstrated, this will not be an easy task.

  2. A General Architecture for Robotics Systems: A Perception-Based Approach to Artificial Life.

    PubMed

    Young, Rupert

    2017-01-01

    Departing from the conventional view of the reasons for the behavior of living systems, this research presents a radical and unique view of that behavior, as the observed side effects of a hierarchical set of simple, continuous, and dynamic negative feedback control systems, by way of an experimental model implemented on a real-world autonomous robotic rover. Rather than generating specific output from input, the systems control their perceptual inputs by varying output. The variables controlled do not exist in the environment, but are entirely internal perceptions constructed as a result of the layout and connections of the neural architecture. As the underlying processes are independent of the domain, the architecture is universal and thus has significant implications not only for understanding natural living systems, but also for the development of robotics systems. The central process of perceptual control has the potential to unify the behavioral sciences and is proposed as the missing behavioral principle of Artificial Life.

  3. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wash, Darrel Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Making a machine seem intelligent is not easy. As a consequence, demand has been rising for computer professionals skilled in artificial intelligence and is likely to continue to go up. These workers develop expert systems and solve the mysteries of machine vision, natural language processing, and neural networks. (Editor)

  4. A Physical Heart Failure Simulation System Utilizing the Total Artificial Heart and Modified Donovan Mock Circulation.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Jessica R; DeCook, Katrina J; Tran, Phat L; Betterton, Edward; Smith, Richard G; Larson, Douglas F; Khalpey, Zain I; Burkhoff, Daniel; Slepian, Marvin J

    2017-07-01

    With the growth and diversity of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) systems entering clinical use, a need exists for a robust mock circulation system capable of reliably emulating and reproducing physiologic as well as pathophysiologic states for use in MCS training and inter-device comparison. We report on the development of such a platform utilizing the SynCardia Total Artificial Heart and a modified Donovan Mock Circulation System, capable of being driven at normal and reduced output. With this platform, clinically relevant heart failure hemodynamics could be reliably reproduced as evidenced by elevated left atrial pressure (+112%), reduced aortic flow (-12.6%), blunted Starling-like behavior, and increased afterload sensitivity when compared with normal function. Similarly, pressure-volume relationships demonstrated enhanced sensitivity to afterload and decreased Starling-like behavior in the heart failure model. Lastly, the platform was configured to allow the easy addition of a left ventricular assist device (HeartMate II at 9600 RPM), which upon insertion resulted in improvement of hemodynamics. The present configuration has the potential to serve as a viable system for training and research, aimed at fostering safe and effective MCS device use. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Photorespiration provides the chance of cyclic electron flow to operate for the redox-regulation of P700 in photosynthetic electron transport system of sunflower leaves.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Daisuke; Hashiguchi, Masaki; Sejima, Takehiro; Makino, Amane; Miyake, Chikahiro

    2016-09-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanism to oxidize the reaction center chlorophyll, P700, in PSI, we researched the effects of partial pressure of O2 (pO2) on photosynthetic characteristic parameters in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) leaves. Under low CO2 conditions, the oxidation of P700 was stimulated; however the decrease in pO2 suppressed its oxidation. Electron fluxes in PSII [Y(II)] and PSI [Y(I)] showed pO2-dependence at low CO2 conditions. H(+)-consumption rate, estimated from Y(II) and CO2-fixation/photorespiration rates (JgH(+)), showed the positive curvature relationship with the dissipation rate of electrochromic shift signal (V H (+) ), which indicates H(+)-efflux rate from lumen to stroma in chloroplasts. Therefore, these electron fluxes contained, besides CO2-fixation/photorespiration-dependent electron fluxes, non-H(+)-consumption electron fluxes including Mehler-ascorbate peroxidase (MAP)-pathway. Y(I) that was larger than Y(II) surely implies the functioning of cyclic electron flow (CEF). Both MAP-pathway and CEF were suppressed at lower pO2, with plastoquinone-pool reduced. That is, photorespiration prepares the redox-poise of photosynthetic electron transport system for CEF activity as an electron sink. Excess Y(II), [ΔY(II)] giving the curvature relationship with V H (+) , and excess Y(I) [ΔCEF] giving the difference between Y(I) and Y(II) were used as an indicator of MAP-pathway and CEF activity, respectively. Although ΔY(II) was negligible and did not show positive relationship to the oxidation-state of P700, ΔCEF showed positive linear relationship to the oxidation-state of P700. These facts indicate that CEF cooperatively with photorespiration regulates the redox-state of P700 to suppress the over-reduction in PSI under environmental stress conditions.

  6. Nanobiocatalytic assemblies for artificial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hong; Nam, Dong Heon; Park, Chan Beum

    2014-08-01

    Natural photosynthesis, a solar-to-chemical energy conversion process, occurs through a series of photo-induced electron transfer reactions in nanoscale architectures that contain light-harvesting complexes, protein-metal clusters, and many redox biocatalysts. Artificial photosynthesis in nanobiocatalytic assemblies aims to reconstruct man-made photosensitizers, electron mediators, electron donors, and redox enzymes for solar synthesis of valuable chemicals through visible light-driven cofactor regeneration. The key requirement in the design of biocatalyzed artificial photosynthetic process is an efficient and forward electron transfer between each photosynthetic component. This review describes basic principles in combining redox biocatalysis with photocatalysis, and highlights recent research outcomes in the development of nanobiocatalytic assemblies that can mimic natural photosystems I and II, respectively. Current issues in biocatalyzed artificial photosynthesis and future perspectives will be briefly discussed.

  7. Enhanced practical photosynthetic CO2 mitigation

    DOEpatents

    Bayless, David J.; Vis-Chiasson, Morgan L.; Kremer, Gregory G.

    2003-12-23

    This process is unique in photosynthetic carbon sequestration. An on-site biological sequestration system directly decreases the concentration of carbon-containing compounds in the emissions of fossil generation units. In this process, photosynthetic microbes are attached to a growth surface arranged in a containment chamber that is lit by solar photons. A harvesting system ensures maximum organism growth and rate of CO.sub.2 uptake. Soluble carbon and nitrogen concentrations delivered to the cyanobacteria are enhanced, further increasing growth rate and carbon utilization.

  8. Method for improving product yields in an anionic metalloporphyrin-based artificial photosynthesis system

    DOEpatents

    Shelnutt, J.A.

    1984-11-29

    A method is disclosed improving product yields in an anionic metalloporphyrin-based artificial photosynthesis system for hydrogen generation. The method comprises forming an aqueous solution comprising an electron donor, methylviologen, and certain metalloporphyrins and metallochlorins, and irradiating said aqueous solution with light in the presence of a catalyst. In the photosynthesis process, solar energy is collected and stored in the form of a hydrogen. Ligands attached above and below the metalloporphyrin and metallochlorin plane are capable of sterically blocking photochemically inactive electrostatically bound ..pi..-..pi.. complexes which can develop.

  9. Method for improving product yields in an anionic metalloporphyrin-based artificial photosynthesis system

    DOEpatents

    Shelnutt, John A.

    1986-01-01

    A method for improving product yields in an anionic metalloporphyrin-based artificial photosynthesis system for hydrogen generation which comprises forming an aqueous solution comprising an electron donor, methylviologen, and certain metalloporphyrins and metallochlorins, and irradiating said aqueous solution with light in the presence of a catalyst. In the photosynthesis process, solar energy is collected and stored in the form of a gas hydrogen. Ligands attached above and below the metalloporphyrin and metallochlorin plane are capable of sterically blocking photochemically inactive electrostatically bound .pi.--.pi. complexes which can develop.

  10. Optimal Solution for an Engineering Applications Using Modified Artificial Immune System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, S.; Chandrasekaran, M.; Ganesan, S.; patan, Mahamed Naveed Khan; Navakanth, Polina

    2017-03-01

    An Engineering optimization leads a essential role in several engineering application areas like process design, product design, re-engineering and new product development, etc. In engineering, an awfully best answer is achieved by comparison to some completely different solutions by utilization previous downside information. An optimization algorithms provide systematic associate degreed economical ways that within which of constructing and comparison new design solutions so on understand at best vogue, thus on best solution efficiency and acquire the foremost wonderful design impact. In this paper, a new evolutionary based Modified Artificial Immune System (MAIS) algorithm used to optimize an engineering application of gear drive design. The results are compared with existing design.

  11. The effect of artificial saliva on the rheological properties of tooth whitening systems.

    PubMed

    Castellon, R G; Combe, E C; Pesun, I J

    2004-12-01

    This work was undertaken to explore the effect of saliva addition on the rheological properties of two contrasting tooth bleaching systems, one of which was a paste (Colgate Platinum) and the other a gel (Zaris, 3M ESPE). Using a dynamic stress rheometer with cone and plate geometry, it was shown that addition of artificial saliva reduced the apparent viscosity of each material. However, in some cases this was accompanied by an increase in elasticity. It is suggested that saliva may not have a deleterious effect on the ability of the materials to remain in the bleaching tray.

  12. Protection of the female reproductive system from natural and artificial insults

    SciTech Connect

    Tilly, Jonathan L.; Kolesnick, Richard N.

    2010-12-14

    Described are methods for protecting the female reproductive system against natural and artificial insults by administering to women a composition comprising an agent that antagonizes one or more acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) gene products. Specifically, methods disclosed herein serve to protect women's germline from damage resulting from cancer therapy regimens including chemotherapy or radiotherapy. In one aspect, the method preserves, enhances, or revives ovarian function in women, by administering to women a composition containing sphingosine-1-phosphate, or an analog thereof. Also disclosed are methods to prevent or ameliorate menopausal syndromes and to improve in vitro fertilization techniques.

  13. Transcutaneous Optical Information Transmission System for a Totally Implantable Artificial Heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takahiko; Koshiji, Kohji

    A transcutaneous optical information transmission system (TOITS) offers the most promising method for noninvasively transmitting the information to control a total artificial heart (TAH). We had used light-emitting diode (LED) and photo diode (PD) with different wavelengths for full-duplex bidirectional communication in the TOITS. In this study, reduction of optical crosstalk in full-duplex bidirectional communication was investigated by using a combination of two orthogonal polarizers with the same wavelength. As a result, we confirmed that optical crosstalk could be prevented for communication through a cow's skin (3.5 mm thick) and that the signal waveform could be transmitted satisfactorily.

  14. Medical application of artificial immune recognition system (AIRS): diagnosis of atherosclerosis from carotid artery Doppler signals.

    PubMed

    Latifoğlu, Fatma; Kodaz, Halife; Kara, Sadik; Güneş, Salih

    2007-08-01

    This study was conducted to distinguish between atherosclerosis and healthy subjects. Hence, we have employed the maximum envelope of the carotid artery Doppler sonograms derived from Fast Fourier Transformation-Welch method and Artificial Immune Recognition System (AIRS). The fuzzy appearance of the carotid artery Doppler signals makes physicians suspicious about the existence of diseases and sometimes causes false diagnosis. Our technique gets around this problem using AIRS to decide and assist the physician to make the final judgment in confidence. AIRS has reached 99.29% classification accuracy using 10-fold cross validation. Results show that the proposed method classified Doppler signals successfully.

  15. Supervised pixel classification using a feature space derived from an artificial visual system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxter, Lisa C.; Coggins, James M.

    1991-01-01

    Image segmentation involves labelling pixels according to their membership in image regions. This requires the understanding of what a region is. Using supervised pixel classification, the paper investigates how groups of pixels labelled manually according to perceived image semantics map onto the feature space created by an Artificial Visual System. Multiscale structure of regions are investigated and it is shown that pixels form clusters based on their geometric roles in the image intensity function, not by image semantics. A tentative abstract definition of a 'region' is proposed based on this behavior.

  16. A development framework for artificial intelligence based distributed operations support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Richard M.; Cottman, Bruce H.

    1990-01-01

    Advanced automation is required to reduce costly human operations support requirements for complex space-based and ground control systems. Existing knowledge based technologies have been used successfully to automate individual operations tasks. Considerably less progress has been made in integrating and coordinating multiple operations applications for unified intelligent support systems. To fill this gap, SOCIAL, a tool set for developing Distributed Artificial Intelligence (DAI) systems is being constructed. SOCIAL consists of three primary language based components defining: models of interprocess communication across heterogeneous platforms; models for interprocess coordination, concurrency control, and fault management; and for accessing heterogeneous information resources. DAI applications subsystems, either new or existing, will access these distributed services non-intrusively, via high-level message-based protocols. SOCIAL will reduce the complexity of distributed communications, control, and integration, enabling developers to concentrate on the design and functionality of the target DAI system itself.

  17. Demonstrating artificial intelligence for space systems - Integration and project management issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, Edmund C.; Difilippo, Denise M.

    1990-01-01

    As part of its Systems Autonomy Demonstration Project (SADP), NASA has recently demonstrated the Thermal Expert System (TEXSYS). Advanced real-time expert system and human interface technology was successfully developed and integrated with conventional controllers of prototype space hardware to provide intelligent fault detection, isolation, and recovery capability. Many specialized skills were required, and responsibility for the various phases of the project therefore spanned multiple NASA centers, internal departments and contractor organizations. The test environment required communication among many types of hardware and software as well as between many people. The integration, testing, and configuration management tools and methodologies which were applied to the TEXSYS project to assure its safe and successful completion are detailed. The project demonstrated that artificial intelligence technology, including model-based reasoning, is capable of the monitoring and control of a large, complex system in real time.

  18. Artificial Immunity Based Cooperative Sustainment Framework for Multi-Agent Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, R. C. M.; Lau, H. Y. K.

    Many studies show that the modelling concept of multi-agent systems (MAS) can be very useful for many industries, such as automated production systems, modern distribution centres and warehouses, port container terminals and transportation systems, etc. However, when applying them to real life where unpredictable factors exists that lead to agent failures, they will not be able to perform as expected or even failed completely. A MAS that can withstand and recover from unpredictable failures is much welcomed by many industries that adopt automation as an integral part of their businesses. Therefore, we propose a cooperative sustainment framework to help MAS to recover the failed agent nodes and extend the system life using artificial immunity inspired design. To verify the usefulness of the design, we carry out some experiments and the result is encouraging.

  19. Propulsion System with Pneumatic Artificial Muscles for Powering Ankle-Foot Orthosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veneva, Ivanka; Vanderborght, Bram; Lefeber, Dirk; Cherelle, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the design of device for control of new propulsion system with pneumatic artificial muscles. The propulsion system can be used for ankle joint articulation, for assisting and rehabilitation in cases of injured ankle-foot complex, stroke patients or elderly with functional weakness. Proposed device for control is composed by microcontroller, generator for muscles contractions and sensor system. The microcontroller receives the control signals from sensors and modulates ankle joint flex- ion and extension during human motion. The local joint control with a PID (Proportional-Integral Derivative) position feedback directly calculates desired pressure levels and dictates the necessary contractions. The main goal is to achieve an adaptation of the system and provide the necessary joint torque using position control with feedback.

  20. Demonstrating artificial intelligence for space systems - Integration and project management issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, Edmund C.; Difilippo, Denise M.

    1990-01-01

    As part of its Systems Autonomy Demonstration Project (SADP), NASA has recently demonstrated the Thermal Expert System (TEXSYS). Advanced real-time expert system and human interface technology was successfully developed and integrated with conventional controllers of prototype space hardware to provide intelligent fault detection, isolation, and recovery capability. Many specialized skills were required, and responsibility for the various phases of the project therefore spanned multiple NASA centers, internal departments and contractor organizations. The test environment required communication among many types of hardware and software as well as between many people. The integration, testing, and configuration management tools and methodologies which were applied to the TEXSYS project to assure its safe and successful completion are detailed. The project demonstrated that artificial intelligence technology, including model-based reasoning, is capable of the monitoring and control of a large, complex system in real time.

  1. Artificial immune system via Euclidean Distance Minimization for anomaly detection in bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montechiesi, L.; Cocconcelli, M.; Rubini, R.

    2016-08-01

    In recent years new diagnostics methodologies have emerged, with particular interest into machinery operating in non-stationary conditions. In fact continuous speed changes and variable loads make non-trivial the spectrum analysis. A variable speed means a variable characteristic fault frequency related to the damage that is no more recognizable in the spectrum. To overcome this problem the scientific community proposed different approaches listed in two main categories: model-based approaches and expert systems. In this context the paper aims to present a simple expert system derived from the mechanisms of the immune system called Euclidean Distance Minimization, and its application in a real case of bearing faults recognition. The proposed method is a simplification of the original process, adapted by the class of Artificial Immune Systems, which proved to be useful and promising in different application fields. Comparative results are provided, with a complete explanation of the algorithm and its functioning aspects.

  2. Design of the solar cell system for recharging the external battery of the totally-implantable artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Tchin-Iou, A V; Min, B G

    1999-12-01

    The solar cell as the advanced alternative energy resource was found to be acceptable for increasing battery running time of the totally-implantable artificial heart. A sample of the wireless charging system with solar cell base gives a maximum battery running time around 9 hours and some physical and psychological freedom to the patient. This improvement will assist the application of the implantable artificial heart for a longer period of time and with added convenience to the recipient.

  3. Geometric Distribution-Based Readers Scheduling Optimization Algorithm Using Artificial Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Litian; Wang, Zizhong John; Duan, Fu

    2016-01-01

    In the multiple-reader environment (MRE) of radio frequency identification (RFID) system, multiple readers are often scheduled to interrogate the randomized tags via operating at different time slots or frequency channels to decrease the signal interferences. Based on this, a Geometric Distribution-based Multiple-reader Scheduling Optimization Algorithm using Artificial Immune System (GD-MRSOA-AIS) is proposed to fairly and optimally schedule the readers operating from the viewpoint of resource allocations. GD-MRSOA-AIS is composed of two parts, where a geometric distribution function combined with the fairness consideration is first introduced to generate the feasible scheduling schemes for reader operation. After that, artificial immune system (including immune clone, immune mutation and immune suppression) quickly optimize these feasible ones as the optimal scheduling scheme to ensure that readers are fairly operating with larger effective interrogation range and lower interferences. Compared with the state-of-the-art algorithm, the simulation results indicate that GD-MRSOA-AIS could efficiently schedules the multiple readers operating with a fairer resource allocation scheme, performing in larger effective interrogation range. PMID:27854342

  4. Balance of a multijoint biomechanical system in natural and artificial environments: a simulation model.

    PubMed

    Shestakov, Mikhail P

    2007-05-01

    The paper is devoted to a neurobionic simulation model for controlling balance in a biomechanical pendulum. The model is realized by a complex of fuzzy regulators and an artificial neural network. Fuzzy regulators are used for simulating the physiological characteristics of the motor system and the functions of the sensory systems. The second level of control is the central integrator. It is realized as an artificial neural network (ANN), which simulates a real process of analysis and synthesis of afferent signals, formation of the model of action, etc.Equilibrium control in a multijoint biomechanical object is a specific example of a self-developing multilevel system of movement control. In the course of elaboration of the model and further examination of its behavior we have received model results which revealed correspondence with the results demonstrated by real subjects in stabilographic tests performed after long-term space flights. We concluded that the model permits us to simulate the peculiarities of human movement control and can be used for creating individual plans of recovery and rehabilitation of patients after long-term motionless or learning movement control in unknown environments.

  5. Microsoft kinect-based artificial perception system for control of functional electrical stimulation assisted grasping.

    PubMed

    Strbac, Matija; Kočović, Slobodan; Marković, Marko; Popović, Dejan B

    2014-01-01

    We present a computer vision algorithm that incorporates a heuristic model which mimics a biological control system for the estimation of control signals used in functional electrical stimulation (FES) assisted grasping. The developed processing software acquires the data from Microsoft Kinect camera and implements real-time hand tracking and object analysis. This information can be used to identify temporal synchrony and spatial synergies modalities for FES control. Therefore, the algorithm acts as artificial perception which mimics human visual perception by identifying the position and shape of the object with respect to the position of the hand in real time during the planning phase of the grasp. This artificial perception used within the heuristically developed model allows selection of the appropriate grasp and prehension. The experiments demonstrate that correct grasp modality was selected in more than 90% of tested scenarios/objects. The system is portable, and the components are low in cost and robust; hence, it can be used for the FES in clinical or even home environment. The main application of the system is envisioned for functional electrical therapy, that is, intensive exercise assisted with FES.

  6. Microsoft Kinect-Based Artificial Perception System for Control of Functional Electrical Stimulation Assisted Grasping

    PubMed Central

    Kočović, Slobodan; Popović, Dejan B.

    2014-01-01

    We present a computer vision algorithm that incorporates a heuristic model which mimics a biological control system for the estimation of control signals used in functional electrical stimulation (FES) assisted grasping. The developed processing software acquires the data from Microsoft Kinect camera and implements real-time hand tracking and object analysis. This information can be used to identify temporal synchrony and spatial synergies modalities for FES control. Therefore, the algorithm acts as artificial perception which mimics human visual perception by identifying the position and shape of the object with respect to the position of the hand in real time during the planning phase of the grasp. This artificial perception used within the heuristically developed model allows selection of the appropriate grasp and prehension. The experiments demonstrate that correct grasp modality was selected in more than 90% of tested scenarios/objects. The system is portable, and the components are low in cost and robust; hence, it can be used for the FES in clinical or even home environment. The main application of the system is envisioned for functional electrical therapy, that is, intensive exercise assisted with FES. PMID:25202707

  7. Toward an artificial sensory feedback system for prosthetic mobility rehabilitation: examination of sensorimotor responses.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aman; Torres-Moreno, Ricardo; Zabjek, Karl; Andrysek, Jan

    2014-01-01

    People with lower-limb amputation have reduced mobility due to loss of sensory information, which may be restored by artificial sensory feedback systems built into prostheses. For an effective system, it is important to understand how humans sense, interpret, and respond to the feedback that would be provided. The goal of this study was to examine sensorimotor responses to mobility-relevant stimuli. Three experiments were performed to examine the effects of location of stimuli, frequency of stimuli, and means for providing the response. Stimuli, given as vibrations, were applied to the thigh region, and responses involved leg movements. Sensorimotor reaction time (RT) was measured as the duration between application of the stimulus and initiation of the response. Accuracy of response was also measured. Overall average RTs for one response option were 0.808 +/- 0.142 s, and response accuracies were >90%. Higher frequencies (220 vs 140 Hz) of vibration stimulus provided in anterior regions of the thigh produced the fastest RTs. When participants were presented with more than one stimulus and response option, RTs increased. Findings suggest that long sensorimotor responses may be a limiting factor in the development of an artificial feedback system for mobility rehabilitation applications; however, feed-forward techniques could potentially help to address these limitations.

  8. Inverse simulation system for manual-controlled rendezvous and docking based on artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wanmeng; Wang, Hua; Tang, Guojin; Guo, Shuai

    2016-09-01

    The time-consuming experimental method for handling qualities assessment cannot meet the increasing fast design requirements for the manned space flight. As a tool for the aircraft handling qualities research, the model-predictive-control structured inverse simulation (MPC-IS) has potential applications in the aerospace field to guide the astronauts' operations and evaluate the handling qualities more effectively. Therefore, this paper establishes MPC-IS for the manual-controlled rendezvous and docking (RVD) and proposes a novel artificial neural network inverse simulation system (ANN-IS) to further decrease the computational cost. The novel system was obtained by replacing the inverse model of MPC-IS with the artificial neural network. The optimal neural network was trained by the genetic Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, and finally determined by the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. In order to validate MPC-IS and ANN-IS, the manual-controlled RVD experiments on the simulator were carried out. The comparisons between simulation results and experimental data demonstrated the validity of two systems and the high computational efficiency of ANN-IS.

  9. Geometric Distribution-Based Readers Scheduling Optimization Algorithm Using Artificial Immune System.

    PubMed

    Duan, Litian; Wang, Zizhong John; Duan, Fu

    2016-11-16

    In the multiple-reader environment (MRE) of radio frequency identification (RFID) system, multiple readers are often scheduled to interrogate the randomized tags via operating at different time slots or frequency channels to decrease the signal interferences. Based on this, a Geometric Distribution-based Multiple-reader Scheduling Optimization Algorithm using Artificial Immune System (GD-MRSOA-AIS) is proposed to fairly and optimally schedule the readers operating from the viewpoint of resource allocations. GD-MRSOA-AIS is composed of two parts, where a geometric distribution function combined with the fairness consideration is first introduced to generate the feasible scheduling schemes for reader operation. After that, artificial immune system (including immune clone, immune mutation and immune suppression) quickly optimize these feasible ones as the optimal scheduling scheme to ensure that readers are fairly operating with larger effective interrogation range and lower interferences. Compared with the state-of-the-art algorithm, the simulation results indicate that GD-MRSOA-AIS could efficiently schedules the multiple readers operating with a fairer resource allocation scheme, performing in larger effective interrogation range.

  10. Assessment of Passive Intestinal Permeability Using an Artificial Membrane Insert System.

    PubMed

    Berben, Philippe; Brouwers, Joachim; Augustijns, Patrick

    2017-08-19

    Despite reasonable predictive power of current cell-based and cell-free absorption models for the assessment of intestinal drug permeability, high costs and lengthy preparation steps hamper their use. The use of a simple artificial membrane (without any lipids present) as intestinal barrier substitute would overcome these hurdles. In the present study, a set of 14 poorly water-soluble drugs, dissolved in 2 different media (fasted state simulated/human intestinal fluids [FaSSIF/FaHIF]), were applied to the donor compartment of an artificial membrane insert system (AMI-system) containing a regenerated cellulose membrane. Furthermore, to investigate the predictive capacity of the AMI-system as substitute for the well-established Caco-2 system to assess intestinal permeability, the same set of 14 drugs dissolved in FaHIF were applied to the donor compartment of a Caco-2 system. For 14 drugs, covering a broad range of physicochemical parameters, a reasonable correlation between both absorption systems was observed, characterized by a Pearson correlation coefficient r of 0.95 (FaHIF). Using the AMI-system, an excellent predictive capacity of FaSSIF as surrogate medium for FaHIF was demonstrated (r = 0.96). Based on the acquired data, the AMI-system appears to be a time- and cost-effective tool for the early-stage estimation of passive intestinal permeability for poorly water-soluble drugs. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Heterogeneous systems biocatalysis; the path to the fabrication of self-sufficient artificial metabolic cells.

    PubMed

    López-Gallego, Fernando; Jackson, Eriene; Betancor, Lorena

    2017-09-26

    Industrial biocatalysis is playing a key role in the development of the global bio-economy that must change our current productive model to pair the socio-economical development with the preservation of our already harmed planet. The exploitation of isolated multi-enzyme systems and the discovery of novel biocatalytic activities are leading us to manufacture chemicals that were inaccessible through biological routes in the early past. These endeavors have been grouped in the concept of Systems biocatalysis. However, by using isolated biological machineries, fundamental features underlying the protein confinement found inside the living cells are missed. To re-gain these properties such concept can be expanded to a new concept; heterogeneous systems biocatalysis. This new concept is based on the fabrication of heterogeneous biocatalysts inspired by the spatial organization and compartmentalization that orchestrate metabolic pathways within cells. By assembling biological machineries (including enzymes and cofators) into artificial solid chassis, one can fabricate self-sufficient and robust cell-free systems able to catalyze orchestrated chemical processes. Furthermore, the confinement of enzymes and "artificial cofactor" inside solid materials has also attracted our attention since these self-sufficient systems exert de novo and non natural functionalities. Herein, we pursue going beyond immobilization of multi-enzyme systems, discussing only those enzymatic systems that have been co-immobilized with their cofactor or exogenous partners to enhance their cooperative action. In this article, we review the latest architectures developed to fabricate self-sufficient heterogeneous biocatalysts with application in chemical manufacturing, biosensing or energy production. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Development of a microcontroller-based automatic control system for the electrohydraulic total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Kim, H C; Khanwilkar, P S; Bearnson, G B; Olsen, D B

    1997-01-01

    An automatic physiological control system for the actively filled, alternately pumped ventricles of the volumetrically coupled, electrohydraulic total artificial heart (EHTAH) was developed for long-term use. The automatic control system must ensure that the device: 1) maintains a physiological response of cardiac output, 2) compensates for an nonphysiological condition, and 3) is stable, reliable, and operates at a high power efficiency. The developed automatic control system met these requirements both in vitro, in week-long continuous mock circulation tests, and in vivo, in acute open-chested animals (calves). Satisfactory results were also obtained in a series of chronic animal experiments, including 21 days of continuous operation of the fully automatic control mode, and 138 days of operation in a manual mode, in a 159-day calf implant.

  13. Artificial intelligence technology assessment for the US Army Depot System Command

    SciTech Connect

    Pennock, K A

    1991-07-01

    This assessment of artificial intelligence (AI) has been prepared for the US Army's Depot System Command (DESCOM) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The report describes several of the more promising AI technologies, focusing primarily on knowledge-based systems because they have been more successful in commercial applications than any other AI technique. The report also identifies potential Depot applications in the areas of procedural support, scheduling and planning, automated inspection, training, diagnostics, and robotic systems. One of the principal objectives of the report is to help decisionmakers within DESCOM to evaluate AI as a possible tool for solving individual depot problems. The report identifies a number of factors that should be considered in such evaluations. 22 refs.

  14. Light driven hydrogen production in protein based semi-artificial systems.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Martin; Kawelke, Steffen; Happe, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Photobiological hydrogen production has recently attracted interest in terms of being a potential source for an alternative energy carrier. Especially the natural light driven hydrogen metabolism of unicellular green algae appears as an attractive blueprint for a clean and potentially unlimited dihydrogen source. However, the efficiency of in vivo systems is limited by physiological and evolutionary constraints and scientists only begin to understand the regulatory networks influencing cellular hydrogen production. A growing number of projects aim at circumventing these limitations by focusing on semi-artificial systems. They reconstitute parts of the native electron transfer chains in vitro, combining photosystem I as a photoactive element with a proton reducing catalytic element such as hydrogenase enzymes or noble metal nanoparticles. This review summarizes various approaches and discusses limitations that have to be overcome in order to establish economically applicable systems.

  15. Monitoring natural and artificial radioactivity enhancement in the Aegean Sea using floating measuring systems.

    PubMed

    Tsabaris, C

    2008-11-01

    In the present work, the enhancement of radioactivity due to rainfall in the Aegean Sea using floating measuring systems was observed and quantified. The data were acquired with a NaI underwater detection system, which was installed on a floating measuring system at a depth of 3m. The results of natural and artificial radioactivity are discussed taking into account the rainfall intensity and wind direction. The activity concentration of (214)Bi increased up to (991+/-102)Bq/m(3) after strong rainfall in the North Aegean Sea in winter (humid period) with east wind direction. On other hand, the maximum activity concentration reached the level of (110+/-10)Bq/m(3) in summer (dry period) during south winds.

  16. A movable-mass attitude stabilization system for cable-connected artificial-g space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.; Hardison, T. L.

    1974-01-01

    The development of an active, momentum-exchange system to be used for attitude stabilization of a class of cable-connected artificial-g space stations is studied. A system which employs a single movable control mass is examined for the control of a space station which has the physical appearance of two cylinders connected axially by cables. The dynamic model for the space station includes its aggregate rigid body rotation and relative torsional rotation between the bodies. A zero torsional stiffness design (one cable) and a maximum torsional stiffness design (eight cables) are examined in various stages of deployment, for selected spin velocities ranging from 4 rpm upwards. A linear, time-invariant, feed-back control system is employed, with gains calculated via a root-specification procedure. The movable mass controller provides critical wobble-damping capability for the crew quarters for all configurations and spin velocity.

  17. A game theoretic framework for incentive-based models of intrinsic motivation in artificial systems

    PubMed Central

    Merrick, Kathryn E.; Shafi, Kamran

    2013-01-01

    An emerging body of research is focusing on understanding and building artificial systems that can achieve open-ended development influenced by intrinsic motivations. In particular, research in robotics and machine learning is yielding systems and algorithms with increasing capacity for self-directed learning and autonomy. Traditional software architectures and algorithms are being augmented with intrinsic motivations to drive cumulative acquisition of knowledge and skills. Intrinsic motivations have recently been considered in reinforcement learning, active learning and supervised learning settings among others. This paper considers game theory as a novel setting for intrinsic motivation. A game theoretic framework for intrinsic motivation is formulated by introducing the concept of optimally motivating incentive as a lens through which players perceive a game. Transformations of four well-known mixed-motive games are presented to demonstrate the perceived games when players' optimally motivating incentive falls in three cases corresponding to strong power, affiliation and achievement motivation. We use agent-based simulations to demonstrate that players with different optimally motivating incentive act differently as a result of their altered perception of the game. We discuss the implications of these results both for modeling human behavior and for designing artificial agents or robots. PMID:24198797

  18. A game theoretic framework for incentive-based models of intrinsic motivation in artificial systems.

    PubMed

    Merrick, Kathryn E; Shafi, Kamran

    2013-01-01

    An emerging body of research is focusing on understanding and building artificial systems that can achieve open-ended development influenced by intrinsic motivations. In particular, research in robotics and machine learning is yielding systems and algorithms with increasing capacity for self-directed learning and autonomy. Traditional software architectures and algorithms are being augmented with intrinsic motivations to drive cumulative acquisition of knowledge and skills. Intrinsic motivations have recently been considered in reinforcement learning, active learning and supervised learning settings among others. This paper considers game theory as a novel setting for intrinsic motivation. A game theoretic framework for intrinsic motivation is formulated by introducing the concept of optimally motivating incentive as a lens through which players perceive a game. Transformations of four well-known mixed-motive games are presented to demonstrate the perceived games when players' optimally motivating incentive falls in three cases corresponding to strong power, affiliation and achievement motivation. We use agent-based simulations to demonstrate that players with different optimally motivating incentive act differently as a result of their altered perception of the game. We discuss the implications of these results both for modeling human behavior and for designing artificial agents or robots.

  19. A 2-transistor/1-resistor artificial synapse capable of communication and stochastic learning in neuromorphic systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongqiang; Ambrogio, Stefano; Balatti, Simone; Ielmini, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Resistive (or memristive) switching devices based on metal oxides find applications in memory, logic and neuromorphic computing systems. Their small area, low power operation, and high functionality meet the challenges of brain-inspired computing aiming at achieving a huge density of active connections (synapses) with low operation power. This work presents a new artificial synapse scheme, consisting of a memristive switch connected to 2 transistors responsible for gating the communication and learning operations. Spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP) is achieved through appropriate shaping of the pre-synaptic and the post synaptic spikes. Experiments with integrated artificial synapses demonstrate STDP with stochastic behavior due to (i) the natural variability of set/reset processes in the nanoscale switch, and (ii) the different response of the switch to a given stimulus depending on the initial state. Experimental results are confirmed by model-based simulations of the memristive switching. Finally, system-level simulations of a 2-layer neural network and a simplified STDP model show random learning and recognition of patterns. PMID:25642161

  20. Physiological Characterization of the SynCardia Total Artificial Heart in a Mock Circulation System

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Jessica R.; DeCook, Katrina J.; Tran, Phat L.; Smith, Richard G.; Larson, Douglas F.; Khalpey, Zain I.; Burkhoff, Daniel; Slepian, Marvin J.

    2014-01-01

    The SynCardia total artificial heart (TAH) has emerged as an effective, life-saving bi-ventricular replacement system for a wide variety of patients with end-stage heart failure. While the clinical performance of the TAH is established, modern physiologic characterization, in terms of elastance behavior and pressure-volume characterization has not been defined. Herein we examine the TAH in terms of elastance using a non-ejecting left-ventricle, and then characterize the pressure-volume relationship of the TAH by varying preload and afterload parameters using a Donovan Mock Circulatory System. We demonstrate that the TAH does not operate with time-varying elastance, differing from the human heart. Further, we show that the TAH has a pressure-volume relationship behavior that also differs from that of the human heart. The TAH does exhibit Starling-like behavior, with output increasing via preload dependent mechanisms, without reliance on an alteration of inotropic state within the operating window of the TAH. Within our testing range, the TAH is insensitive to variations in afterload, however this insensitivity has a limit, the limit being the maximum driving pressure of the pneumatic driver. Understanding the physiology of the TAH affords insight into the functional parameters that govern artificial heart behavior providing perspective on differences compared to the human heart. PMID:25551416

  1. Synchronizing a multicellular system by external input: an artificial control strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruiqi; Chen, Luonan; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2006-07-15

    Although there are significant advances on elucidating the collective behaviors on biological organisms in recent years, the essential mechanisms by which the collective rhythms arise remain to be fully understood, and further how to synchronize multicellular networks by artificial control strategy has not yet been well explored. A control strategy is developed to synchronize gene regulatory networks in a multicellular system when spontaneous synchronization cannot be achieved. We first construct an impulsive control system to model the process of periodically injecting coupling substances with constant or random impulsive control amounts into the common extracellular medium, and further study its effects on the dynamics of individual cells. We derive the threshold of synchronization induced by the periodic substance input. Therefore, we can synchronize the multicellular network to a specific collective behavior by changing the frequency and amplitude of the periodic stimuli. Moreover, a two-stage scheme is proposed to facilitate the synchronization in this paper. We show that the presence of the external input may also initiate different dynamics. The multicellular network of coupled repressilators is used to show the effectiveness of the proposed method. The results not only provide a perspective to understand the interactions between external stimuli and intrinsic physiological rhythms, but also may lead to development of realistic artificial control strategy and medical therapy. aihara@sat.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp.

  2. Albumin dialysis in artificial liver support systems: open-loop or closed-loop dialysis mode?

    PubMed

    Pei, Yingying; Sun, Yize; Sun, Sijie; Gao, Dayong; Ding, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    In artificial liver support systems, the open-loop albumin dialysis mode (OLM) is usually used to remove protein-bound toxins from the blood of patients with liver failure. However, there is still interest in the closed-loop albumin dialysis mode (CLM) because this mode may enable not only the regeneration and reuse of albumin but also the miniaturization of artificial liver systems. In this article, we compared the two modes under a fixed amount of albumin in dialysate experimentally and theoretically. The results show that according to the detoxification efficiency in the 3 hour dialysis for removing albumin-bound bilirubin, CLM is better than OLM. The usage efficiency of albumin in CLM is also higher. Moreover, the advantage of CLM is more significant when the concentration of bilirubin in blood is lower. Under a given amount of albumin in dialysate, if the concentration of bilirubin in blood is high, one may further increase the performance of CLM by means of increasing the flow rate of the albumin dialysate or using the highly concentrated albumin dialysate.

  3. Physiological characterization of the SynCardia total artificial heart in a mock circulation system.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Jessica R; DeCook, Katrina J; Tran, Phat L; Smith, Richard G; Larson, Douglas F; Khalpey, Zain I; Burkhoff, Daniel; Slepian, Marvin J

    2015-01-01

    The SynCardia total artificial heart (TAH) has emerged as an effective, life-saving biventricular replacement system for a wide variety of patients with end-stage heart failure. Although the clinical performance of the TAH is established, modern physiological characterization, in terms of elastance behavior and pressure-volume (PV) characterization has not been defined. Herein, we examine the TAH in terms of elastance using a nonejecting left ventricle, and then characterize the PV relation of the TAH by varying preload and afterload parameters using a Donovan Mock Circulatory System. We demonstrate that the TAH does not operate with time-varying elastance, differing from the human heart. Furthermore, we show that the TAH has a PV relation behavior that also differs from that of the human heart. The TAH does exhibit Starling-like behavior, with output increasing via preload-dependent mechanisms, without reliance on an alteration of inotropic state within the operating window of the TAH. Within our testing range, the TAH is insensitive to variations in afterload; however, this insensitivity has a limit, the limit being the maximum driving pressure of the pneumatic driver. Understanding the physiology of the TAH affords insight into the functional parameters that govern artificial heart behavior providing perspective on differences compared with the human heart.

  4. AITSO: A Tool for Spatial Optimization Based on Artificial Immune Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiang; Liu, Yaolin; Liu, Dianfeng; Ma, Xiaoya

    2015-01-01

    A great challenge facing geocomputation and spatial analysis is spatial optimization, given that it involves various high-dimensional, nonlinear, and complicated relationships. Many efforts have been made with regard to this specific issue, and the strong ability of artificial immune system algorithms has been proven in previous studies. However, user-friendly professional software is still unavailable, which is a great impediment to the popularity of artificial immune systems. This paper describes a free, universal tool, named AITSO, which is capable of solving various optimization problems. It provides a series of standard application programming interfaces (APIs) which can (1) assist researchers in the development of their own problem-specific application plugins to solve practical problems and (2) allow the implementation of some advanced immune operators into the platform to improve the performance of an algorithm. As an integrated, flexible, and convenient tool, AITSO contributes to knowledge sharing and practical problem solving. It is therefore believed that it will advance the development and popularity of spatial optimization in geocomputation and spatial analysis. PMID:25678911

  5. An artificial neural network system to identify alleles in reference electropherograms.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Duncan; Harrison, Ash; Powers, David

    2017-09-01

    Electropherograms are produced in great numbers in forensic DNA laboratories as part of everyday criminal casework. Before the results of these electropherograms can be used they must be scrutinised by analysts to determine what the identified data tells them about the underlying DNA sequences and what is purely an artefact of the DNA profiling process. This process of interpreting the electropherograms can be time consuming and is prone to subjective differences between analysts. Recently it was demonstrated that artificial neural networks could be used to classify information within an electropherogram as allelic (i.e. representative of a DNA fragment present in the DNA extract) or as one of several different categories of artefactual fluorescence that arise as a result of generating an electropherogram. We extend that work here to demonstrate a series of algorithms and artificial neural networks that can be used to identify peaks on an electropherogram and classify them. We demonstrate the functioning of the system on several profiles and compare the results to a leading commercial DNA profile reading system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Existence of Natural Frequencies of Systems with Artificial Restraints and Their Convergence in Asymptotic Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilanko, S.

    2002-08-01

    A major limitation of the Rayleigh-Ritz method for determining the natural frequencies of a system is the need to choose admissible functions that do not violate the geometric constraints of that system (Courant 1943 Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society49, 1-23). Several researchers have attempted to overcome this problem by asymptotically modelling the rigid constraints with artificial (imaginary) restraints of very large stiffness (Courant 1943 Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society49 , 1-23; Warburton and Edney 1984 Journal of Sound and Vibration95, 537-552; Gorman 1989 Journal of Applied Mechanics56, 893-899; Kim et al. 1990 Journal of Sound and Vibration143, 379-394; Yuan and Dickinson 1992 Journal of Sound and Vibration153, 203-216; Yuan and Dickinson 1992 Journal of Sound and Vibration159, 39-55; Cheng and Nicolas 1992 Journal of Sound and Vibration155, 231-247; Yuan and Dickinson 1994 Computers and Structures53 , 327-334; Lee and Ng 1994 Applied Acoustics42, 151-163; Amabili and Garziera 1999 Journal of Sound and Vibration224, 519-539; Amabili and Garziera 2000 Journal of Fluids and Structures14, 669-690). While the numerical results thus obtained for the systems considered in the literature were in close agreement with exact values for the natural frequencies corresponding to the first few modes, sample calculations show that the error introduced by the asymptotic modelling increases with mode number and therefore to obtain accurate results for higher modes the magnitude of stiffness should also be increased. In any event, the error due to the asymptotic modelling would remain uncertain, except when the correct frequency values are known. However, the use of artificial restraints with negative stiffness, a new concept which was introduced in a recent publication (Ilanko and Dickinson 1999 Journal of Sound and Vibration219, 370-378) paves the way for estimating the error due to asymptotic modelling. This is possible since in this work, the

  7. BOREAS TE-10 Photosynthetic Response Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor); Middleton, Elizabeth; Sullivan, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) TE-10 (Terrestrial Ecology) team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the gas exchange, reflectance, transmittance, chlorophyll content, carbon content, hydrogen content, nitrogen content, and photosynthetic response of boreal vegetation. This data set contains measurements of quantitative parameters and leaf photosynthetic response to increases in light conducted in the SSA during the growing seasons of 1994 and 1996 using an oxygen electrode system. Leaf photosynthetic responses were not collected in 1996. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  8. Detection of artificial water flows by the lateral line system of a benthic feeding cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    Schwalbe, Margot A B; Sevey, Benjamin J; Webb, Jacqueline F

    2016-04-01

    The mechanosensory lateral line system of fishes detects water motions within a few body lengths of the source. Several types of artificial stimuli have been used to probe lateral line function in the laboratory, but few studies have investigated the role of flow sensing in benthic feeding teleosts. In this study, we used artificial flows emerging from a sandy substrate to assess the contribution of flow sensing to prey detection in the peacock cichlid, Aulonocara stuartgranti, which feeds on benthic invertebrates in Lake Malawi. Using a positive reinforcement protocol, we trained fish to respond to flows lacking the visual and chemical cues generated by tethered prey in prior studies with A. stuartgranti Fish successfully responded to artificial flows at all five rates presented (characterized using digital particle image velocimetry), and showed a range of flow-sensing behaviors, including an unconditioned bite response. Immediately after lateral line inactivation, fish rarely responded to flows and the loss of vital fluorescent staining of hair cells (with 4-di-2-ASP) verified lateral line inactivation. Within 2 days post-treatment, some aspects of flow-sensing behavior returned and after 7 days, flow-sensing behavior and hair cell fluorescence both returned to pre-treatment levels, which is consistent with the reported timing of hair cell regeneration in other vertebrates. The presentation of ecologically relevant water flows to assess flow-sensing behaviors and the use of a positive reinforcement protocol are methods that present new opportunities to study the role of flow sensing in the feeding ecology of benthic feeding fishes.

  9. Artificial Gravity as a Multi-System Countermeasure to Bed Rest Deconditioning: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, L. E.; Paloski, William H.; Young, L. R.

    2006-01-01

    Artificial gravity paradigms may offer effective, efficient, multi-system protection from the untoward effects of adaptation to the microgravity of space or the hypogravity of planetary surfaces. Intermittent artificial gravity (AG) produced by a horizontal short-radius centrifuge (SRC) has recently been utilized on human test subjects deconditioned by bed rest. This presentation will review preliminary results of a 41 day study conducted at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX bed rest facility. During the first eleven days of the protocol, subjects were ambulatory, but confined to the facility. They began a carefully controlled diet, and participated in multiple baseline tests of bone, muscle, cardiovascular, sensory-motor, immunological, and psychological function. On the twelfth day, subjects entered the bed rest phase of the study, during which they were confined to strict 6deg head down tilt bed rest for 21 days. Beginning 24 hrs into this period, treatment subjects received one hour daily exposures to artificial gravity which was produced by spinning the subjects on a 3.0 m radius SRC. They were oriented radially in the supine position so that the centrifugal force was aligned with their long body axis, and while spinning, they "stood" on a force plate, supporting the centrifugal loading (2.5 g at the feet, 1.0 g at the heart). The subject station allowed free translation over approximately 10 cm to ensure full loading of the lower extremities and to allow for anti-orthostatic muscle contractions. Control subjects were positioned on the centrifuge but did not spin. Following the bed rest phase, subjects were allowed to ambulate again, but remained within the facility for an additional 9 days and participated in multiple follow-up tests of physiological function.

  10. Development and evaluation of components for a totally implantable artificial heart system.

    PubMed

    Taenaka, Y; Masuzawa, T; Tatsumi, F; Anai, H; Toda, K; Akagi, H; Nakatani, T; Baba, Y; Fya, K; Wakisaka, Y

    1994-01-01

    The authors have been developing an electrohydraulic (EH) artificial heart system for total implantation. This system consists of intrathoracic ventricles, an abdominally placed EH actuator, flexible silicone oil conduits, externally coupled transcutaneous energy transfer (TET) system, transcutaneous optical telemetry (TOT) system, internal battery, and internal control drive unit. Fitting was evaluated in chronic animal experiments as a pneumatic system in 11 goats weighing 55.2 +/- 4.2 kg and 3 calves of 52.3 +/- 1.2 kg. The longest survival time in calves was 111 days, and that in goats was 51 days. The assembled EH pump was implanted in two goats of 49 and 50 kg as an acute experiment, and 4.2-6.7 L/min of cardiac output was maintained. For the TET system, an internal coil 3 cm in diameter was implanted to make an arch covered by skin. Electric energy was transmitted from the external to the internal coil, and energy of about 20 W was carried through wires to an external load. The DC-to-DC efficiency of the system was 76-83% for 40 days. The TOT system with internal light emitting diodes and external photodiodes also was evaluated in a goat. Disalignment of up to 12 mm was tolerated. Although more improvement is necessary, most of the components showed characteristics desirable for a totally implantable system.

  11. Physical and Physiological Responses of Amateur Football Players on Third-Generation Artificial Turf Systems During Simulated Game Situations.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sánchez, Javier; García-Unanue, Jorge; Felipe, José L; Jiménez-Reyes, Pedro; Viejo-Romero, David; Gómez-López, Maite; Hernando, Enrique; Burillo, Pablo; Gallardo, Leonor

    2016-11-01

    Sánchez-Sánchez, J, García-Unanue, J, Felipe, JL, Jiménez-Reyes, P, Viejo-Romero, D, Gómez-López, M, Hernando, E, Burillo, P, and Gallardo, L. Physical and physiological responses of amateur football players on third generation artificial turf systems during simulated game situations. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3165-3177, 2016-The aim of this study is to evaluate the physical and physiological load imposed on amateur football players in a simulated game situation on different artificial turf systems. For that purpose, 20 football players (21.65 ± 3.10 year old) were monitored with Global Positioning Systems and heart rate bands during 45-minutes games on 4 selected artificial turf systems. The results show more covered distance in high-intensity ranges on the system with lower levels of damping and higher rates of rotational traction (p ≤ 0.05). Likewise, this system of artificial turf demonstrated a high number of sprints (12.65 ± 5.67) and more elevated maximum speed peaks during the last part of the game (28.16 ± 2.90 km·h) in contrast to the systems with better damping capacity (p ≤ 0.05). On the other hand, the physiological load was similar across the 4 artificial turf systems (p > 0.05). Finally, the regression analysis demonstrated a significant influence of the mechanical properties of the surface on global distance (15.4%), number (12.6%), and maximum speed (16.6%) of the sprints. To conclude, the mechanical variability of the artificial turf systems resulted in differences in the activity profiles and the players' perceptions during simulated football games.

  12. Spectroscopic Studies of Photosynthetic Systems and Their Application in Photovoltaic Devices - Equipment Only: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-175

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, M.

    2014-09-01

    Spectral hole-burning (SHB) and single photosynthetic complex spectroscopy (SPCS) will be used to study the excitonic structure and excitation energy transfer (EET) processes of several photosynthetic protein complexes at low temperatures. The combination of SHB on bulk samples and SPCS is a powerful frequency domain approach for obtaining data that will address a number of issues that are key to understanding excitonic structure and energy transfer dynamics. The long-term goal is to reach a better understanding of the ultrafast solar energy driven primary events of photosynthesis as they occur in higher plants, cyanobacteria, purple bacteria, and green algae. A better understanding of the EET and charge separation (CS) processes taking place in photosynthetic complexes is of great interest, since photosynthetic complexes might offer attractive architectures for a future generation of circuitry in which proteins are crystallized.

  13. Use of artificial neural networks for analysis of complex physical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, A.; Altman, B.; O`Gorman, C.; Rodeman, R.; Paez, T.L.

    1996-12-31

    Mathematical models of physical systems are used, among other purposes, to improve our understanding of the behavior of physical systems, predict physical system response, and control the responses of systems. Phenomenological models are frequently used to simulate system behavior, but an alternative is available - the artificial neural network (ANN). The ANN is an inductive, or data-based model for the simulation of input/output mappings. The ANN can be used in numerous frameworks to simulate physical system behavior. ANNs require training data to learn patterns of input/output behavior, and once trained, they can be used to simulate system behavior within the space where they were trained.They do this by interpolating specified inputs among the training inputs to yield outputs that are interpolations of =Ming outputs. The reason for using ANNs for the simulation of system response is that they provide accurate approximations of system behavior and are typically much more efficient than phenomenological models. This efficiency is very important in situations where multiple response computations are required, as in, for example, Monte Carlo analysis of probabilistic system response. This paper describes two frameworks in which we have used ANNs to good advantage in the approximate simulation of the behavior of physical system response. These frameworks are the non-recurrent and recurrent frameworks. It is assumed in these applications that physical experiments have been performed to obtain data characterizing the behavior of a system, or that an accurate finite element model has been run to establish system response. The paper provides brief discussions on the operation of ANNs, the operation of two different types of mechanical systems, and approaches to the solution of some special problems that occur in connection with ANN simulation of physical system response. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate system simulation with ANNs.

  14. Thermal phase transition in artificial spin ice systems induces the formation and migration of monopole-like magnetic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Alejandro

    2016-11-01

    Artificial spin ice systems exhibit monopole-like magnetic excitations. We develop here a theoretical study of the thermal phase transition of an artificial spin ice system, and we elucidate the role of the monopole excitations in the transition temperature. The dynamics of the spin ice is described by an efficient model based on cellular automata, which considers both thermal effects and dipolar interactions. We have established the critical temperature of the phase transition as function of the magnetic moment and the energy barrier of reversion. In addition, we predict that thermal gradients in the system induce the motion of elementary excitations, which could permit to manipulate monopole-like states.

  15. Concurrent study of stability and cytotoxicity of a novel nanoemulsion system - an artificial neural networks approach.

    PubMed

    Seyedhassantehrani, Negar; Karimi, Roya; Tavoosidana, Gholamreza; Amani, Amir

    2017-05-01

    Problems commonly associated with using nanoemulsions are their cytotoxic effects and low stability profiles. Here, for the first time, concentrations of ingredients of a nanoemulsion system were investigated to obtain the most stable nanoemulsion system with the least cytotoxic effect on MCF7 cell line. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) were used to model the experimentally obtained data. Surfactant concentration was found to be the dominant factor in determining the stability - surfactant concentration above a critical point made the preparation unstable, while it appeared not to be influencing the cytotoxicity. Concentration of oil showed a direct relationship to the cytotoxicity with a minimum value required to provide an acceptable safety profile for the preparation. Co-surfactant appeared not to be considerably effective on neither stability nor cytotoxicity. To obtain the optimum preparation with maximum stability and minimum cytotoxicity, surfactant and oil values need to be kept at their maximum and minimum possible, respectively.

  16. Fault diagnosis using noise modeling and a new artificial immune system based algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Farshid; Mojtahedi, Alireza; Ettefagh, Mir Mohammad

    2015-12-01

    A new fault classification/diagnosis method based on artificial immune system (AIS) algorithms for the structural systems is proposed. In order to improve the accuracy of the proposed method, i.e., higher success rate, Gaussian and non-Gaussian noise generating models are applied to simulate environmental noise. The identification of noise model, known as training process, is based on the estimation of the noise model parameters by genetic algorithms (GA) utilizing real experimental features. The proposed fault classification/diagnosis algorithm is applied to the noise contaminated features. Then, the results are compared to that obtained without noise modeling. The performance of the proposed method is examined using three laboratory case studies in two healthy and damaged conditions. Finally three different types of noise models are studied and it is shown experimentally that the proposed algorithm with non-Gaussian noise modeling leads to more accurate clustering of memory cells as the major part of the fault classification procedure.

  17. Fault tolerance of artificial neural networks with applications in critical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protzel, Peter W.; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Arras, Michael K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper investigates the fault tolerance characteristics of time continuous recurrent artificial neural networks (ANN) that can be used to solve optimization problems. The principle of operations and performance of these networks are first illustrated by using well-known model problems like the traveling salesman problem and the assignment problem. The ANNs are then subjected to 13 simultaneous 'stuck at 1' or 'stuck at 0' faults for network sizes of up to 900 'neurons'. The effects of these faults is demonstrated and the cause for the observed fault tolerance is discussed. An application is presented in which a network performs a critical task for a real-time distributed processing system by generating new task allocations during the reconfiguration of the system. The performance degradation of the ANN under the presence of faults is investigated by large-scale simulations, and the potential benefits of delegating a critical task to a fault tolerant network are discussed.

  18. Rapid prototyping facility for flight research in artificial-intelligence-based flight systems concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, E. L.; Regenie, V. A.; Deets, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Dryden Flight Research Facility of the NASA Ames Research Facility of the NASA Ames Research Center is developing a rapid prototyping facility for flight research in flight systems concepts that are based on artificial intelligence (AI). The facility will include real-time high-fidelity aircraft simulators, conventional and symbolic processors, and a high-performance research aircraft specially modified to accept commands from the ground-based AI computers. This facility is being developed as part of the NASA-DARPA automated wingman program. This document discusses the need for flight research and for a national flight research facility for the rapid prototyping of AI-based avionics systems and the NASA response to those needs.

  19. Use of artificial intelligence in analytical systems for the clinical laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Truchaud, Alain; Ozawa, Kyoichi; Pardue, Harry; Schnipelsky, Paul

    1995-01-01

    The incorporation of information-processing technology into analytical systems in the form of standard computing software has recently been advanced by the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI), both as expert systems and as neural networks. This paper considers the role of software in system operation, control and automation, and attempts to define intelligence. AI is characterized by its ability to deal with incomplete and imprecise information and to accumulate knowledge. Expert systems, building on standard computing techniques, depend heavily on the domain experts and knowledge engineers that have programmed them to represent the real world. Neural networks are intended to emulate the pattern-recognition and parallel processing capabilities of the human brain and are taught rather than programmed. The future may lie in a combination of the recognition ability of the neural network and the rationalization capability of the expert system. In the second part of the paper, examples are given of applications of AI in stand-alone systems for knowledge engineering and medical diagnosis and in embedded systems for failure detection, image analysis, user interfacing, natural language processing, robotics and machine learning, as related to clinical laboratories. It is concluded that AI constitutes a collective form of intellectual propery, and that there is a need for better documentation, evaluation and regulation of the systems already being used in clinical laboratories. PMID:18924784

  20. [Application prospect of human-artificial intelligence system in future manned space flight].

    PubMed

    Wei, Jin-he

    2003-01-01

    To make the manned space flight more efficient and safer, a concept of human-artificial (AI) system is proposed in the present paper. The task of future manned space flight and the technique requirement with respect to the human-AI system development were analyzed. The main points are as follows: 1)Astronaut and AI are complementary to each other functionally; 2) Both symbol AI and connectionist AI should be included in the human-AI system, but expert system and Soar-like system are used mainly inside the cabin, the COG-like robots are mainly assigned for EVA either in LEO flight or on the surface of Moon or Mars; 3) The human-AI system is hierarchical in nature with astronaut at the top level; 4) The complex interfaces between astronaut and AI are the key points for running the system reliably and efficiently. As the importance of human-AI system in future manned space flight and the complexity of related technology, it is suggested that the R/D should be planned as early as possible.

  1. Use of artificial intelligence in analytical systems for the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Place, J F; Truchaud, A; Ozawa, K; Pardue, H; Schnipelsky, P

    1995-01-01

    The incorporation of information-processing technology into analytical systems in the form of standard computing software has recently been advanced by the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI), both as expert systems and as neural networks.This paper considers the role of software in system operation, control and automation, and attempts to define intelligence. AI is characterized by its ability to deal with incomplete and imprecise information and to accumulate knowledge. Expert systems, building on standard computing techniques, depend heavily on the domain experts and knowledge engineers that have programmed them to represent the real world. Neural networks are intended to emulate the pattern-recognition and parallel processing capabilities of the human brain and are taught rather than programmed. The future may lie in a combination of the recognition ability of the neural network and the rationalization capability of the expert system.In the second part of the paper, examples are given of applications of AI in stand-alone systems for knowledge engineering and medical diagnosis and in embedded systems for failure detection, image analysis, user interfacing, natural language processing, robotics and machine learning, as related to clinical laboratories.It is concluded that AI constitutes a collective form of intellectual propery, and that there is a need for better documentation, evaluation and regulation of the systems already being used in clinical laboratories.

  2. Using Decision Support System to Find Suitable Sites for Groundwater Artificial Recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemian, D.; Winter, C. L.; Kheirkhah Zarkesh, M. M.; Moradi, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    Some parts of Iran are considered as one of the driest regions of the world, where water is a limiting factor for lasting life therefore using seasonal floodwaters is very important in these arid regions. On the other hand, special attention has been paid to artificial groundwater recharge in these regions. Floodwater spreading on the permeable terrain is one of the flood control and utilization methods. Determination of appropriate site for water spreading is one of the most important stages of this project. Parameters considered in the selection of groundwater artificial recharge locations are diverse and complex. These factors consist of earth sciences (geology, geomorphology and soils), hydrology (runoff, sediment yield, infiltration and groundwater conditions) and socio-economic aspects (irrigated agriculture, flood damage mitigation, environment, job creation and so on). Hence, decision making depends on criteria of diverse nature. The goal of this study is defining a Decision Support System for floodwater site selection in Shahriary area. Four main criteria were selected in this research which are floodwater characters, infiltration, water applications and flood damage. In order to determine the weight of factors, Analytical Hierarchy Process was used. The results showed that soil texture and floodwater volume of infiltration are the most important factors. After providing output maps which had been defined in five scenarios, Kappa Index was used to evaluate the model. Based on the obtained results, the maps showed an acceptable agreement with control zones.

  3. A bio-inspired real-time capable artificial lateral line system for freestream flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Abels, C; Qualtieri, A; De Vittorio, M; Megill, W M; Rizzi, F

    2016-06-03

    To enhance today's artificial flow sensing capabilities in aerial and underwater robotics, future robots could be equipped with a large number of miniaturized sensors distributed over the surface to provide high resolution measurement of the surrounding fluid flow. In this work we show a linear array of closely separated bio-inspired micro-electro-mechanical flow sensors whose sensing mechanism is based on a piezoresistive strain-gauge along a stress-driven cantilever beam, mimicking the biological superficial neuromasts found in the lateral line organ of fishes. Aiming to improve state-of-the-art flow sensing capability in autonomously flying and swimming robots, our artificial lateral line system was designed and developed to feature multi-parameter freestream flow measurements which provide information about (1) local flow velocities as measured by the signal amplitudes from the individual cantilevers as well as (2) propagation velocity, (3) linear forward/backward direction along the cantilever beam orientation and (4) periodicity of pulses or pulse trains determined by cross-correlating sensor signals. A real-time capable cross-correlation procedure was developed which makes it possible to extract freestream flow direction and velocity information from flow fluctuations. The computed flow velocities deviate from a commercial system by 0.09 m s(-1) at 0.5 m s(-1) and 0.15 m s(-1) at 1.0 m s(-1) flow velocity for a sampling rate of 240 Hz and a sensor distance of 38 mm. Although experiments were performed in air, the presented flow sensing system can be applied to underwater vehicles as well, once the sensors are embedded in a waterproof micro-electro-mechanical systems package.

  4. Development of an implantable high-energy and compact battery system for artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, E; Inoue, T; Watanabe, K; Hashimoto, T; Iwazawa, E; Abe, Y; Chinzei, T; Isoyama, T; Kobayashi, S; Saito, I; Sato, F; Matsuki, H; Imachi, K; Mitamura, Y

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of the use of an implantable, high-energy, and compact battery system for an undulation pump total artificial heart (UPTAH). The implantable battery system tested consists of six lithium-ion batteries in series, a charge unit, and a charge/discharge control unit. A lithium-ion battery is currently the best energy-storage device because it has more energy density, a better life cycle, and a smaller temperature rise than those of other secondary batteries. The performance of the implantable battery system was evaluated in an in vitro experiment using an electric load that simulated the UPTAH. Also, sufficiently reliable operation of a system for supplying energy to a UPTAH consisting of a transcutaneous energy transmission system (TETS) and an implantable battery system was confirmed in three experiments using goats. The results of the in vitro and in vivo experiments showed that the implantable battery system supplied sufficient current to the UPTAH for maintenance of physiological conditions in the goat with maximum rise in temperature to less than 43 degrees C.

  5. Development of an artificial compound eye system for three-dimensional object detection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Mengchao; Guo, Fang; Cao, Zhaolou; Wang, Keyi

    2014-02-20

    A compound eye has the advantages of a large field of view, high sensitivity, and compact structure, showing that it can be applicable for 3D object detection. In this work, an artificial compound eye system is developed for 3D object detection, consisting of a layer of lenslets and a prism-like beam-steering lens. A calibration method is developed for this system, with which the correspondences between incident light rays and the relevant image points can be obtained precisely using an active calibration pattern at multiple positions. Theoretically, calibration patterns at two positions are sufficient for system calibration, although more positions will increase the accuracy of the result. 3D positions of point objects are calculated to evaluate the system, which are obtained by the intersection of multiple incident light rays in the least-squares sense. Experimental results show that the system can detect an object with angular accuracy of better than 1 mrad, demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed compound eye system. With a 2D scanning device, the system can be extended for general object detection in 3D space.

  6. Two artificial neural systems for generation of gait swing by means of neuromuscular electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, F; Granat, M H; Cliquet, A

    1997-01-01

    A three-layer artificial neural network was used for adaptive control of gait swing generated by neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) in a spinal cord injured subject. Network inputs consisted of knee and ankle goniometer signals for System 1, and knee and hip angular data for System 2. Controller output was proportional to changes in applied NMES pulse width (PW). Stimulation was applied to the left femoral and common peroneal nerves. The neural networks were trained off-line and on-line. Network performance was assessed by applying a number of different stimulation PWs and later comparing the resulting motion to a sample good step observed during the same test session. On-line training consisted of negative and positive reinforcement applied at chosen times. Both on-line and off-line training algorithms consisted of an enhanced supervised backpropagation scheme. Performance evaluation results favour the use of System 1 over System 2. Also, a network trained off-line and later submitted to on-line punishment appears to be more reliable (in automatic mode) than the same network after it is submitted to on-line reward or to off-line training alone. Finally, the systems' immediate response to on-line learning was favourable in all cases. Based on the results, a version of System 1 was used to generate walking in the test subject. This test indicated that the system is promising.

  7. Artificial Root Exudate System (ARES): a field approach to simulate tree root exudation in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Sangil, Luis; Estradera-Gumbau, Eduard; George, Charles; Sayer, Emma

    2016-04-01

    The exudation of labile solutes by fine roots represents an important strategy for plants to promote soil nutrient availability in terrestrial ecosystems. Compounds exuded by roots (mainly sugars, carboxylic and amino acids) provide energy to soil microbes, thus priming the mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM) and the consequent release of inorganic nutrients into the rhizosphere. Studies in several forest ecosystems suggest that tree root exudates represent 1 to 10% of the total photoassimilated C, with exudation rates increasing markedly under elevated CO2 scenarios. Despite their importance in ecosystem functioning, we know little about how tree root exudation affect soil carbon dynamics in situ. This is mainly because there has been no viable method to experimentally control inputs of root exudates at field scale. Here, I present a method to apply artificial root exudates below the soil surface in small field plots. The artificial root exudate system (ARES) consists of a water container with a mixture of labile carbon solutes (mimicking tree root exudate rates and composition), which feeds a system of drip-tips covering an area of 1 m2. The tips are evenly distributed every 20 cm and inserted 4-cm into the soil with minimal disturbance. The system is regulated by a mechanical timer, such that artificial root exudate solution can be applied at frequent, regular daily intervals. We tested ARES from April to September 2015 (growing season) within a leaf-litter manipulation experiment ongoing in temperate deciduous woodland in the UK. Soil respiration was measured monthly, and soil samples were taken at the end of the growing season for PLFA, enzymatic activity and nutrient analyses. First results show a very rapid mineralization of the root exudate compounds and, interestingly, long-term increases in SOM respiration, with negligible effects on soil moisture levels. Large positive priming effects (2.5-fold increase in soil respiration during the growing

  8. Use of Wearable Sensors and Biometric Variables in an Artificial Pancreas System

    PubMed Central

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Monforti, Colleen; Park, Minsun; Griffith, Garett; Quinn, Laurie; Cinar, Ali

    2017-01-01

    An artificial pancreas (AP) computes the optimal insulin dose to be infused through an insulin pump in people with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) based on information received from a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensor. It has been recognized that exercise is a major challenge in the development of an AP system. The use of biometric physiological variables in an AP system may be beneficial for prevention of exercise-induced challenges and better glucose regulation. The goal of the present study is to find a correlation between biometric variables such as heart rate (HR), heat flux (HF), skin temperature (ST), near-body temperature (NBT), galvanic skin response (GSR), and energy expenditure (EE), 2D acceleration-mean of absolute difference (MAD) and changes in glucose concentrations during exercise via partial least squares (PLS) regression and variable importance in projection (VIP) in order to determine which variables would be most useful to include in a future artificial pancreas. PLS and VIP analyses were performed on data sets that included seven different types of exercises. Data were collected from 26 clinical experiments. Clinical results indicate ST to be the most consistently important (important for six out of seven tested exercises) variable over all different exercises tested. EE and HR are also found to be important variables over several types of exercise. We also found that the importance of GSR and NBT observed in our experiments might be related to stress and the effect of changes in environmental temperature on glucose concentrations. The use of the biometric measurements in an AP system may provide better control of glucose concentration. PMID:28272368

  9. Similarities of artificial photosystems by ruthenium oxo complexes and native water splitting systems

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Koji; Isobe, Hiroshi; Yamanaka, Shusuke; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2012-01-01

    The nature of chemical bonds of ruthenium(Ru)–quinine(Q) complexes, mononuclear [Ru(trpy)(3,5-t-Bu2Q)(OH2)](ClO4)2 (trpy = 2,2′:6′,2′′-terpyridine, 3,5-di-tert-butyl-1,2-benzoquinone) (1), and binuclear [Ru2(btpyan)(3,6-di-Bu2Q)2(OH2)]2+ (btpyan = 1,8-bis(2,2′:6′,2′′-terpyrid-4′-yl)anthracene, 3,6-t-Bu2Q = 3,6-di-tert-butyl-1,2-benzoquinone) (2), has been investigated by broken-symmetry (BS) hybrid density functional (DFT) methods. BS DFT computations for the Ru complexes have elucidated that the closed-shell structure (2b) Ru(II)–Q complex is less stable than the open-shell structure (2bb) consisting of Ru(III) and semiquinone (SQ) radical fragments. These computations have also elucidated eight different electronic and spin structures of tetraradical intermediates that may be generated in the course of water splitting reaction. The Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian model for these species has been derived to elucidate six different effective exchange interactions (J) for four spin systems. Six J values have been determined using total energies of the eight (or seven) BS solutions for different spin configurations. The natural orbital analyses of these BS DFT solutions have also been performed in order to obtain natural orbitals and their occupation numbers, which are useful for the lucid understanding of the nature of chemical bonds of the Ru complexes. Implications of the computational results are discussed in relation to the proposed reaction mechanisms of water splitting reaction in artificial photosynthesis systems and the similarity between artificial and native water splitting systems. PMID:22761310

  10. Use of Wearable Sensors and Biometric Variables in an Artificial Pancreas System.

    PubMed

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Monforti, Colleen; Park, Minsun; Griffith, Garett; Quinn, Laurie; Cinar, Ali

    2017-03-07

    An artificial pancreas (AP) computes the optimal insulin dose to be infused through an insulin pump in people with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) based on information received from a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensor. It has been recognized that exercise is a major challenge in the development of an AP system. The use of biometric physiological variables in an AP system may be beneficial for prevention of exercise-induced challenges and better glucose regulation. The goal of the present study is to find a correlation between biometric variables such as heart rate (HR), heat flux (HF), skin temperature (ST), near-body temperature (NBT), galvanic skin response (GSR), and energy expenditure (EE), 2D acceleration-mean of absolute difference (MAD) and changes in glucose concentrations during exercise via partial least squares (PLS) regression and variable importance in projection (VIP) in order to determine which variables would be most useful to include in a future artificial pancreas. PLS and VIP analyses were performed on data sets that included seven different types of exercises. Data were collected from 26 clinical experiments. Clinical results indicate ST to be the most consistently important (important for six out of seven tested exercises) variable over all different exercises tested. EE and HR are also found to be important variables over several types of exercise. We also found that the importance of GSR and NBT observed in our experiments might be related to stress and the effect of changes in environmental temperature on glucose concentrations. The use of the biometric measurements in an AP system may provide better control of glucose concentration.

  11. Artificial Pancreas Device Systems for the Closed-Loop Control of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Trevitt, Sara; Simpson, Sue; Wood, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Background: Closed-loop artificial pancreas device (APD) systems are externally worn medical devices that are being developed to enable people with type 1 diabetes to regulate their blood glucose levels in a more automated way. The innovative concept of this emerging technology is that hands-free, continuous, glycemic control can be achieved by using digital communication technology and advanced computer algorithms. Methods: A horizon scanning review of this field was conducted using online sources of intelligence to identify systems in development. The systems were classified into subtypes according to their level of automation, the hormonal and glycemic control approaches used, and their research setting. Results: Eighteen closed-loop APD systems were identified. All were being tested in clinical trials prior to potential commercialization. Six were being studied in the home setting, 5 in outpatient settings, and 7 in inpatient settings. It is estimated that 2 systems may become commercially available in the EU by the end of 2016, 1 during 2017, and 2 more in 2018. Conclusions: There are around 18 closed-loop APD systems progressing through early stages of clinical development. Only a few of these are currently in phase 3 trials and in settings that replicate real life. PMID:26589628

  12. Artificial Intelligence in Public Health Prevention of Legionelosis in Drinking Water Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sinčak, Peter; Ondo, Jaroslav; Kaposztasova, Daniela; Virčikova, Maria; Vranayova, Zuzana; Sabol, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Good quality water supplies and safe sanitation in urban areas are a big challenge for governments throughout the world. Providing adequate water quality is a basic requirement for our lives. The colony forming units of the bacterium Legionella pneumophila in potable water represent a big problem which cannot be overlooked for health protection reasons. We analysed several methods to program a virtual hot water tank with AI (artificial intelligence) tools including neuro-fuzzy systems as a precaution against legionelosis. The main goal of this paper is to present research which simulates the temperature profile in the water tank. This research presents a tool for a water management system to simulate conditions which are able to prevent legionelosis outbreaks in a water system. The challenge is to create a virtual water tank simulator including the water environment which can simulate a situation which is common in building water distribution systems. The key feature of the presented system is its adaptation to any hot water tank. While respecting the basic parameters of hot water, a water supplier and building maintainer are required to ensure the predefined quality and water temperature at each sampling site and avoid the growth of Legionella. The presented system is one small contribution how to overcome a situation when legionelosis could find good conditions to spread and jeopardize human lives. PMID:25153475

  13. Artificial intelligence in public health prevention of legionelosis in drinking water systems.

    PubMed

    Sinčak, Peter; Ondo, Jaroslav; Kaposztasova, Daniela; Virčikova, Maria; Vranayova, Zuzana; Sabol, Jakub

    2014-08-21

    Good quality water supplies and safe sanitation in urban areas are a big challenge for governments throughout the world. Providing adequate water quality is a basic requirement for our lives. The colony forming units of the bacterium Legionella pneumophila in potable water represent a big problem which cannot be overlooked for health protection reasons. We analysed several methods to program a virtual hot water tank with AI (artificial intelligence) tools including neuro-fuzzy systems as a precaution against legionelosis. The main goal of this paper is to present research which simulates the temperature profile in the water tank. This research presents a tool for a water management system to simulate conditions which are able to prevent legionelosis outbreaks in a water system. The challenge is to create a virtual water tank simulator including the water environment which can simulate a situation which is common in building water distribution systems. The key feature of the presented system is its adaptation to any hot water tank. While respecting the basic parameters of hot water, a water supplier and building maintainer are required to ensure the predefined quality and water temperature at each sampling site and avoid the growth of Legionella. The presented system is one small contribution how to overcome a situation when legionelosis could find good conditions to spread and jeopardize human lives.

  14. Development of a Safeguard System Using an Episomal Mammalian Artificial Chromosome for Gene and Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Narumi; Uno, Katsuhiro; Komoto, Shinya; Suzuki, Teruhiko; Hiratsuka, Masaharu; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    The development of a safeguard system to remove tumorigenic cells would allow safer clinical applications of stem cells for the treatment of patients with an intractable disease including genetic disorders. Such safeguard systems should not disrupt the host genome and should have long-term stability. Here, we attempted to develop a tumor-suppressing mammalian artificial chromosome containing a safeguard system that uses the immune rejection system against allogeneic tissue from the host. For proof-of-concept of the safeguard system, B16F10 mouse melanoma cells expressing the introduced H2-K(d) major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I)-allogenic haplotype were transplanted into recipient C57BL/6J mice expressing MHC H2-K(b). Subcutaneous implantation of B16F10 cells into C57BL/6J mice resulted in high tumorigenicity. The volume of tumors derived from B16F10 cells expressing allogenic MHC H2-K(d) was decreased significantly (P < 0.01). Suppression of MHC H2-K(d)-expressing tumors in C57BL/6J mice was enhanced by immunization with MHC H2-K(d)-expressing splenocytes (P < 0.01). These results suggest that the safeguard system is capable of suppressing tumor formation by the transplanted cells. PMID:26670279

  15. Brain potentials predict learning, transmission and modification of an artificial symbolic system

    PubMed Central

    Lumaca, Massimo; Baggio, Giosuè

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been argued that symbolic systems evolve while they are being transmitted across generations of learners, gradually adapting to the relevant brain structures and processes. In the context of this hypothesis, little is known on whether individual differences in neural processing capacity account for aspects of ‘variation’ observed in symbolic behavior and symbolic systems. We addressed this issue in the domain of auditory processing. We conducted a combined behavioral and EEG study on 2 successive days. On day 1, participants listened to standard and deviant five-tone sequences: as in previous oddball studies, an mismatch negativity (MMN) was elicited by deviant tones. On day 2, participants learned an artificial signaling system from a trained confederate of the experimenters in a coordination game in which five-tone sequences were associated to affective meanings (emotion-laden pictures of human faces). In a subsequent game with identical structure, participants transmitted and occasionally changed the signaling system learned during the first game. The MMN latency from day 1 predicted learning, transmission and structural modification of signaling systems on day 2. Our study introduces neurophysiological methods into research on cultural transmission and evolution, and relates aspects of variation in symbolic systems to individual differences in neural information processing. PMID:27510496

  16. Topological defects from doping and quenched disorder in artificial ice systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia J; Libal, A

    2010-01-01

    We examine the ice-rule obeying and ice-rule breaking vertices in an artificial spin ice system created using magnetic vortices in type-II superconductors with nanostructured pinning arrays. We show that this system can be doped by changing the external field to move the number of vortices away from commensurability and create sites that contain two or zero vortices. For a square ice, the doping leads to the formation of a grain boundary of vertices that do not obey the ice rules. In commensurate systems where the ice rules are obeyed, we can introduce random disorder at the individual pinning sites to create regions where vortices may not be able to flip from one side of the trap to another. For weak disorder, all of the vertices still obey the ice rules, while at intermediate levels of disorder we find grain boundaries of vertices which do not obey the ice rules. For strong disorder it is possible to create isolated paired vertices that do not obey the ice rules. In summary, we have shown that an artificial square ice can be created using vortices in a type-II superconductor interacting with a periodic array of pinning sites where each site has a double well potential. By defining the direction of the effective spin according to the side of the double well occupied by the vortex, we find that this system obeys the ice rules for square ice. We add disorder to the system in the form of randomness of the height of the potential barrier at the center of the well, and obtain vertex configurations using a rotating drive protocol which is similar to the shaking ac magnetic field used in nanomagnetic systems. For weak disorder the entire system still obeys the square ice rules. For intermediate disorder, ice-rule breaking vertices appear and form grain boundaries, while for strong disorder there are both gain boundaries and isolated paired defects. In a system with uniform potential barrier heights, we introduce disorder by moving away from commensurability and creating

  17. Photosynthetic Photovoltaic Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-21

    PHOTOSYNTHETIC PHOTOVOLTAIC CELLS 5b. GRANT NUMBER F49620-02-1-0399 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER MARC A. BALDO 5e. TASK...building an ’antenna’ on top of a conventional solar cell. Biomimetic organic solar cells operate as follows: The antenna absorbs the light, and acts to...no longer must absorb all the light. Thus, its quantum efficiency can approach 100% potentially doubling the performance of organic solar cells. 15

  18. A distributed optical fiber sensing system for dynamic strain measurement based on artificial reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhenhong; Shan, Yuanyuan; Li, Yanting; Zhang, Yixin; Zhang, Xuping

    2016-10-01

    Phase sensitive optical time domain reflectometry (Φ-OTDR) has been widely used in many applications for its distributed sensing ability on weak disturbance all along the sensing fiber. However, traditional Φ-OTDR cannot make quantitative measurement on the external disturbance due to the randomly distributed position and reflectivity of scatters within the optical fiber. Recently, some methods have been proposed to realize quantitative measurement of dynamic strain. In these literatures, the fiber with or without FBGs in practice was easily damaged and with difficulty of maintenance. PZT is employed to generate strain event in the fiber. There is a large gap compared with the real detecting environment, which will not reveal the full performance of the sensing system. In this paper, a distributed optical fiber sensing (DOFS) system for dynamic strain measurement based on artificial reflector is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. The fiber under test (FUT) is composed by four 20-meter long single mode optical fiber patch cords (OFPCs), which are cascaded with ferrule contactor/physical contact (FC/PC) connectors via fiber flanges. The fiber facet of FC/PC connector forms an artificial reflector. When the interval between the two reflectors is changed, the phase of the interference signal will also be changed. A symmetric 3×3 coupler with table-look-up scheme is introduced to discriminate the phase change through interference intensity. In our experiment, the center 10m section of the second OFPC is attached to the bottom of an aluminum alloy plate. An ordinary loudspeaker box was located on the top of the aluminum alloy plate. The dynamic strain generated by the loudspeaker box is transmitted from the aluminum alloy plate to the OFPC. Experimental results show that the proposed method has a good frequency response characteristic up to 3.2 kHz and a linear intensity response of R2=0.9986 while the optical probe pulse width and repetition rate were 100ns

  19. A survey on the design of multiprocessing systems for artificial intelligence applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wah, Benjamin W.; Li, Guo Jie

    1989-01-01

    Some issues in designing computers for artificial intelligence (AI) processing are discussed. These issues are divided into three levels: the representation level, the control level, and the processor level. The representation level deals with the knowledge and methods used to solve the problem and the means to represent it. The control level is concerned with the detection of dependencies and parallelism in the algorithmic and program representations of the problem, and with the synchronization and sheduling of concurrent tasks. The processor level addresses the hardware and architectural components needed to evaluate the algorithmic and program representations. Solutions for the problems of each level are illustrated by a number of representative systems. Design decisions in existing projects on AI computers are classed into top-down, bottom-up, and middle-out approaches.

  20. Artificial intelligence. Expert systems for clinical diagnosis: are they worth the effort?

    PubMed

    Carroll, B

    1987-10-01

    Modeling the decision-making processes of human experts has been studied by scientists who call themselves psychologists and by scientists who say they are students of artificial intelligence (Al). The psychological research literature suggests that experts' decision-making processes can be adequately captured by simple mathematical models. On the other hand, those in Al who are preoccupied with human expertise maintain that complex computer models, in the form of expert systems, are required to do justice to those same processes. The resultant paradox of simple versus complex decision-making models is investigated here. The relevant literatures in psychology and Al are reviewed and, based on these findings, a resolution of the paradox is offered.