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Sample records for artificial rumen rusitec

  1. Synergism of Cattle and Bison Inoculum on Ruminal Fermentation and Select Bacterial Communities in an Artificial Rumen (Rusitec) Fed a Barley Straw Based Diet

    PubMed Central

    Oss, Daniela B.; Ribeiro, Gabriel O.; Marcondes, Marcos I.; Yang, WenZhu; Beauchemin, Karen A.; Forster, Robert J.; McAllister, Tim A.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of increasing the proportion of bison relative to cattle inoculum on fermentation and microbial populations within an artificial rumen (Rusitec). The experiment was a completely randomized design with a factorial treatment structure (proportion cattle:bison inoculum; 0:100, 33:67, 67:33, and 100:0) replicated in two Rusitec apparatuses (n = 8 fermenters). The experiment was 15 d with 8 d of adaptation and 7 d of sampling. Fermenters were fed a diet of 70:30 barley straw:concentrate (DM basis). True digestibility of DM was determined after 48 h of incubation from d 13 to 15, and daily ammonia (NH3) and volatile fatty acid (VFA) production were measured on d 9–12. Protozoa counts were determined at d 9, 11, 13, and 15 and particle-associated bacteria (PAB) from d 13 to 15. Select bacterial populations in the PAB were measured using RT-qPCR. Fermenter was considered the experimental unit and day of sampling as a repeated measure. Increasing the proportion of bison inoculum resulted in a quadratic effect (P < 0.05) on straw, concentrate and total true DM disappearance and on straw and total neutral detergent fiber (aNDF) disappearance, with greater disappearances observed with mixed inoculum. There were no effect of source or proportion of inoculum on ADF disappearance (P > 0.05). Increasing bison inoculum linearly increased (P < 0.05) concentrate aNDF disappearance, total and concentrate N disappearance as well as total daily VFA and acetate production. A positive quadratic response (P < 0.05) was observed for daily NH3-N, propionate, butyrate, valerate, isovalerate and isobutyrate production, as well as the acetate:propionate ratio. Increasing the proportion of bison inoculum linearly increased (P < 0.05) total protozoa numbers. No effects were observed on pH, total gas and methane production, microbial N synthesis, or copies of 16S rRNA associated with total bacteria, Selenomonas ruminantium or Prevotella bryantii. Increasing bison

  2. Effects of defaunation on fermentation characteristics and biotin balance in an artificial rumen-simulation system (RUSITEC) receiving diets with different amounts and types of cereal.

    PubMed

    Abel, H; Schröder, B; Lebzien, P; Flachowsky, G

    2006-01-01

    Biotin is required by rumen microbes for efficient fermentation. To evaluate the role of protozoa in ruminal biotin metabolism, five diets composed of grass hay or of grass hay/cereal grain mixtures were supplied to faunated or defaunated RUSITEC fermenters. In the mixed diets, hay was replaced to 33:67 or 67:33 w/w on an air-dried basis by either wheat or maize grain in order to simulate different cellulolytic and amylolytic fermentation conditions. Defaunation increased SCFA production, whereas NH4 concentration and the release of CH4 were reduced. Biotin input declined when cereal grain was used to replace the hay. With the exception of the high-wheat treatment, defaunated fermenters yielded higher biotin outputs than faunated fermenters. The biotin balance, calculated as the difference between the total biotin output (biotin in the solid residue contained in the nylon bags after fermentation plus the biotin in the effluent) and the biotin input with the feed, was negative for all the dietary treatments apart from fermenters supplied with the high-maize diet. It was less negative or, in the case of the high-maize diets, more positive for defaunated compared with faunated fermenters. It was concluded that, under normal faunated conditions, protozoa directly utilise or indirectly affect the bacterial synthesis and/or utilisation of biotin. With diets of a high fermentation potential, as realised with the high-wheat diet, protozoa prevent the development of a bacterial population that would utilise high or synthesise low amounts of biotin.

  3. Effects of an exogenous enzyme preparation on microbial protein synthesis, enzyme activity and attachment to feed in the Rumen Simulation Technique (Rusitec).

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; McAllister, T A; Rode, L M; Beauchemin, K A; Morgavi, D P; Nsereko, V L; Iwaasa, A D; Yang, W

    2001-03-01

    The effects of an exogenous enzyme preparation, the application method and feed type on ruminal fermentation and microbial protein synthesis were investigated using the rumen simulation technique (Rusitec). Steam-rolled barley grain and chopped alfalfa hay were sprayed with water (control, C), an enzyme preparation with a predominant xylanase activity (EF), or autoclaved enzyme (AEF) 24 h prior to feeding, or the enzyme was supplied in the buffer infused into the Rusitec (EI). Microbial N incorporation was measured using (15NH4)2SO4 in the buffer. Spent feed bags were pummelled mechanically in buffer to segregate the feed particle-associated (FPA) and feed particle-bound (FPB) bacterial fractions. Enzymes applied to feed reduced neutral-detergent fibre content, and increased the concentration of reducing sugars in barley grain, but not alfalfa hay. Ruminal cellulolytic bacteria were more numerous with EF than with C. Disappearance of DM from barley grain was higher with EF than with C, but alfalfa was unaffected by EF. Treatment EF increased incorporation of 15N into FPA and FPB fractions at 24 and 48 h. In contrast, AEF reduced the 24 h values, relative to C; AEF and C were similar at 48 h. Infused enzyme (EI) did not affect 15N incorporation. Xylanase activity in effluent was increased by EF and EI, compared to C, but not by AEF. Xylanase activity in FPA was higher at 48 h than at 24 h with all treatments; it was higher with EF than C at 24 and 48 h, but was not altered by AEF or EI. Applying enzymes onto feeds before feeding was more effective than dosing directly into the artificial rumen for increasing ruminal fibrolytic activity.

  4. Redirection of Metabolic Hydrogen by Inhibiting Methanogenesis in the Rumen Simulation Technique (RUSITEC)

    PubMed Central

    Guyader, Jessie; Ungerfeld, Emilio M.; Beauchemin, Karen A.

    2017-01-01

    A decrease in methanogenesis is expected to improve ruminant performance by allocating rumen metabolic hydrogen ([2H]) to more energy-rendering fermentation pathways for the animal. However, decreases in methane (CH4) emissions of up to 30% are not always linked with greater performance. Therefore, the aim of this study was to understand the fate of [2H] when CH4 production in the rumen is inhibited by known methanogenesis inhibitors (nitrate, NIT; 3-nitrooxypropanol, NOP; anthraquinone, AQ) in comparison with a control treatment (CON) with the Rumen Simulation Technique (RUSITEC). Measurements started after 1 week adaptation. Substrate disappearance was not modified by methanogenesis inhibitors. Nitrate mostly seemed to decrease [2H] availability by acting as an electron acceptor competing with methanogenesis. As a consequence, NIT decreased CH4 production (−75%), dissolved dihydrogen (H2) concentration (−30%) and the percentages of reduced volatile fatty acids (butyrate, isobutyrate, valerate, isovalerate, caproate and heptanoate) except propionate, but increased acetate molar percentage, ethanol concentration and the efficiency of microbial nitrogen synthesis (+14%) without affecting gaseous H2. Nitrooxypropanol decreased methanogenesis (−75%) while increasing both gaseous and dissolved H2 concentrations (+81% and +24%, respectively). Moreover, NOP decreased acetate and isovalerate molar percentages and increased butyrate, valerate, caproate and heptanoate molar percentages as well as n-propanol and ammonium concentrations. Methanogenesis inhibition with AQ (−26%) was associated with higher gaseous H2 production (+70%) but lower dissolved H2 concentration (−76%), evidencing a lack of relationship between the two H2 forms. Anthraquinone increased ammonium concentration, caproate and heptanoate molar percentages but decreased acetate and isobutyrate molar percentages, total microbial nitrogen production and efficiency of microbial protein synthesis (

  5. Comparison of fermentation of diets of variable composition and microbial populations in the rumen of sheep and Rusitec fermenters. II. Protozoa population and diversity of bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Martínez, M E; Ranilla, M J; Tejido, M L; Saro, C; Carro, M D

    2010-08-01

    Four ruminally and duodenally cannulated sheep and 8 Rusitec fermenters were used to determine the effects of dietary characteristics on microbial populations and bacterial diversity. The purpose of the study was to assess how closely fermenters can mimic the differences between diets found in vivo. The 4 experimental diets contained forage to concentrate (F:C) ratios of 70:30 (high forage; HF) or 30:70 (high concentrate; HC) with either alfalfa hay (A) or grass hay (G) as the forage. Total bacterial numbers were greater in the rumen of sheep fed HF diets compared with those fed HC diets, whereas the opposite was found in fermenters. The numbers of cellulolytic bacteria were not affected by F:C ratio in any fermentation system, but cellulolytic numbers were 2.7 and 1.8 times greater in sheep than in fermenters for HF and HC diets, respectively. Neither total bacterial nor cellulolytic numbers were affected by the type of forage in sheep or fermenters. Decreasing F:C ratio increased total protozoa and Entodiniae numbers in sheep by about 29 and 25%, respectively, but it had no effect in fermenters. Isotrichidae and Ophryoscolecinae numbers in sheep were not affected by changing F:C ratio, but both disappeared completely from fermenters fed HC diets. Total protozoa and Entodiniae numbers were greater in sheep fed A diets than in those fed G diets, whereas the opposite was found in fermenters. Results indicate that under the conditions of the present study, protozoa population in Rusitec fermenters was not representative of that in the rumen of sheep fed the same diets. In addition, protozoa numbers in fermenters were 121 and 226 times lower than those in the sheep rumen for HF and HC diets, respectively. The automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA was used to analyze the diversity of liquid- and solid-associated bacteria in both systems. A total of 170 peaks were detected in the automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis

  6. Effects of replacing dietary starch with neutral detergent-soluble fibre on ruminal fermentation, microbial synthesis and populations of ruminal cellulolytic bacteria using the rumen simulation technique (RUSITEC).

    PubMed

    Zhao, X H; Liu, C J; Liu, Y; Li, C Y; Yao, J H

    2013-12-01

    A rumen simulation technique (RUSITEC) apparatus with eight 800 ml fermenters was used to investigate the effects of replacing dietary starch with neutral detergent-soluble fibre (NDSF) by inclusion of sugar beet pulp in diets on ruminal fermentation, microbial synthesis and populations of ruminal cellulolytic bacteria. Experimental diets contained 12.7, 16.4, 20.1 or 23.8% NDSF substituted for starch on a dry matter basis. The experiment was conducted over two independent 15-day incubation periods with the last 8 days used for data collection. There was a tendency that 16.4% NDSF in the diet increased the apparent disappearance of organic matter (OM) and neutral detergent fibre (NDF). Increasing dietary NDSF level increased carboxymethylcellulase and xylanase activity in the solid fraction and apparent disappearance of acid detergent fibre (ADF) but reduced the 16S rDNA copy numbers of Ruminococcus albus in both liquid and solid fractions and R. flavefaciens in the solid fraction. The apparent disappearance of dietary nitrogen (N) was reduced by 29.6% with increased dietary NDSF. Substituting NDSF for starch appeared to increase the ratios of acetate/propionate and methane/volatile fatty acids (VFA) (mol/mol). Replacing dietary starch with NDSF reduced the daily production of ammonia-N and increased the growth of the solid-associated microbial pellets (SAM). Total microbial N flow and efficiency of microbial synthesis (EMS), expressed as g microbial N/kg OM fermented, tended to increase with increased dietary NDSF, but the numerical increase did not continue as dietary NDSF exceeded 20.1% of diet DM. Results suggested that substituting NDSF for starch up to 16.4% of diet DM increased digestion of nutrients (except for N) and microbial synthesis, and further increases (from 16.4% to 23.8%) in dietary NDSF did not repress microbial synthesis but did significantly reduce digestion of dietary N.

  7. Comparison of fermentation of diets of variable composition and microbial populations in the rumen of sheep and Rusitec fermenters. I. Digestibility, fermentation parameters, and microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Martínez, M E; Ranilla, M J; Tejido, M L; Ramos, S; Carro, M D

    2010-08-01

    Four ruminally and duodenally cannulated sheep and 8 Rusitec fermenters were used to determine the effects of forage to concentrate (F:C) ratio and type of forage in the diet on ruminal fermentation and microbial protein synthesis. The purpose of the study was to assess how closely fermenters can mimic the dietary differences found in vivo. The 4 experimental diets contained F:C ratios of 70:30 or 30:70 with either alfalfa hay or grass hay as the forage. Microbial growth was determined in both systems using (15)N as a microbial marker. Rusitec fermenters detected differences between diets similar to those observed in sheep by changing F:C ratio on pH; neutral detergent fiber digestibility; total volatile fatty acid concentrations; molar proportions of acetate, propionate, butyrate, isovalerate, and caproate; and amylase activity. In contrast, Rusitec fermenters did not reproduce the dietary differences found in sheep for NH(3)-N and lactate concentrations, dry matter (DM) digestibility, proportions of isobutyrate and valerate, carboxymethylcellulase and xylanase activities, and microbial growth and its efficiency. Regarding the effect of the type of forage in the diet, Rusitec fermenters detected differences between diets similar to those found in sheep for most determined parameters, with the exception of pH, DM digestibility, butyrate proportion, and carboxymethylcellulase activity. Minimum pH and maximal volatile fatty acid concentrations were reached at 2h and at 6 to 8h postfeeding in sheep and fermenters, respectively, indicating that feed fermentation was slower in fermenters compared with that in sheep. There were differences between systems in the magnitude of most determined parameters. In general, fermenters showed lower lactate concentrations, neutral detergent fiber digestibility, acetate:propionate ratios, and enzymatic activities. On the contrary, fermenters showed greater NH(3)-N concentrations, DM digestibility, and proportions of propionate

  8. A Metagenomics Approach to Evaluate the Impact of Dietary Supplementation with Ascophyllum nodosum or Laminaria digitata on Rumen Function in Rusitec Fermenters

    PubMed Central

    Belanche, Alejandro; Jones, Eleanor; Parveen, Ifat; Newbold, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing need to identify alternative feeds for livestock that do not compete with foods for humans. Seaweed might provide such a resource, but there is limited information available on its value as an animal feed. Here we use a multi-omics approach to investigate the value of two brown seaweeds, Ascophyllum nodosum (ASC) and Laminaria digitata (LAM), as alternative feeds for ruminants. These seaweeds were supplemented at 5% inclusion rate into a control diet (CON) in a rumen simulation fermenter. The seaweeds had no substantial effect on rumen fermentation, feed degradability or methane emissions. Concentrations of total bacteria, anaerobic fungi, biodiversity indices and abundances of the main bacterial and methanogen genera were also unaffected. However, species-specific effects of brown seaweed on the rumen function were noted: ASC promoted a substantial decrease in N degradability (−24%) due to its high phlorotannins content. Canonical correspondence analysis of the bacterial community revealed that low N availability led to a change in the structure of the bacterial community. ASC also decreased the concentration of Escherichia coli O157:H7 post-inoculation. In contrast, LAM which has a much lower phlorotannin content did not cause detrimental effects on N degradability nor modified the structure of the bacterial community in comparison to CON. This adaptation of the microbial community to LAM diets led to a greater microbial ability to digest xylan (+70%) and carboxy-methyl-cellulose (+41%). These differences among brown seaweeds resulted in greater microbial protein synthesis (+15%) and non-ammonia N flow (+11%) in LAM than in ASC diets and thus should led to a greater amino acid supply to the intestine of the animal. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that incorporation of brown seaweed into the diet can be considered as a suitable nutritional strategy for ruminants; however, special care must be taken with those seaweeds with high

  9. Fortification of dried distillers grains plus solubles with grape seed meal in the diet modulates methane mitigation and rumen microbiota in Rusitec.

    PubMed

    Khiaosa-Ard, R; Metzler-Zebeli, B U; Ahmed, S; Muro-Reyes, A; Deckardt, K; Chizzola, R; Böhm, J; Zebeli, Q

    2015-04-01

    The role of dried distillers grains plus solubles (DDGS) and associative effects of different levels of grape seed meal (GSM) fortified in DDGS, used as both protein and energy sources in the diet, on ruminal fermentation and microbiota were investigated using rumen-simulation technique. All diets consisted of hay and concentrate mixture with a ratio of 48:52 [dry matter (DM) basis], but were different in the concentrate composition. The control diet contained soybean meal (13.5% of diet DM) and barley grain (37%), whereas DDGS treatments, unfortified DDGS (19.5% of diet DM), or DDGS fortified with GSM, either at 1, 5, 10, or 20% were used entirely in place of soybean meal and part of barley grain at a 19.5 to 25% inclusion level. All diets had similar DM, organic matter, and crude protein contents, but consisted of increasing neutral detergent fiber and decreasing nonfiber carbohydrates levels with DDGS-GSM inclusion. Compared with the soy-based control diet, the unfortified DDGS treatment elevated ammonia concentration (19.1%) of rumen fluid associated with greater crude protein degradation (~19.5%). Methane formation decreased with increasing GSM fortification levels (≥ 5%) in DDGS by which the methane concentration significantly decreased by 18.9 to 23.4 and 12.8 to 17.6% compared with control and unfortified DDGS, respectively. Compared with control, unfortified DDGS decreased butyrate proportion, and GSM fortification in the diet further decreased this variable. The proportions of genus Prevotella and Clostridium cluster XIVa were enhanced by the presence of DDGS without any associative effect of GSM fortification. The abundance of methanogenic archaea was similar, but their composition differed among treatments; whereas Methanosphaera spp. remained unchanged, proportion of Methanobrevibacter spp. decreased in DDGS-based diets, being the lowest with 20% GSM inclusion. The abundance of Ruminococcus flavefaciens, anaerobic fungi, and protozoa were decreased

  10. Fermentation of Ammonia Fiber Expansion Treated and Untreated Barley Straw in a Rumen Simulation Technique Using Rumen Inoculum from Cattle with Slow versus Fast Rate of Fiber Disappearance.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Candace L; Ribeiro, Gabriel O; Oba, Masahito; McAllister, Tim A; Beauchemin, Karen A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of rumen inoculum from heifers with fast vs. slow rate of in situ fiber digestion on the fermentation of complex versus easily digested fiber sources in the forms of untreated and Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX) treated barley straw, respectively, using an artificial rumen simulation technique (Rusitec). In situ fiber digestion was measured in a previous study by incubating untreated barley straw in the rumen of 16 heifers fed a diet consisting of 700 g/kg barley straw and 300 g/kg concentrate. The two heifers with fastest rate of digestion (Fast ≥ 4.18% h(-1)) and the two heifers with the slowest rate of digestion (Slow ≤ 3.17% h(-1)) were chosen as inoculum donors for this study. Two Rusitec apparatuses each equipped with eight fermenters were used in a completely randomized block design with two blocks (apparatus) and four treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments (Fast or Slow rumen inoculum and untreated or AFEX treated straw). Fast rumen inoculum and AFEX straw both increased (P < 0.05) disappearance of dry matter (DMD), organic matter, true DMD, neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, and nitrogen (N) with an interactive effect between the two (P < 0.05). Fast rumen inoculum increased (P > 0.05) methane production per gram of digested material for both untreated and AFEX straw, and reduced (interaction, P < 0.05) acetate: propionate ratio for untreated straw. Greater relative populations of Ruminococcus albus (P < 0.05) and increased microbial N production (P = 0.045) were observed in Fast rumen inoculum. AFEX straw in Fast inoculum had greater total bacterial populations than Slow, but for untreated straw this result was reversed (interaction, P = 0.013). These findings indicate that differences in microbial populations in rumen fluid contribute to differences in the capacity of rumen inoculum to digest fiber.

  11. Fermentation of Ammonia Fiber Expansion Treated and Untreated Barley Straw in a Rumen Simulation Technique Using Rumen Inoculum from Cattle with Slow versus Fast Rate of Fiber Disappearance

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Candace L.; Ribeiro, Gabriel O.; Oba, Masahito; McAllister, Tim A.; Beauchemin, Karen A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of rumen inoculum from heifers with fast vs. slow rate of in situ fiber digestion on the fermentation of complex versus easily digested fiber sources in the forms of untreated and Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX) treated barley straw, respectively, using an artificial rumen simulation technique (Rusitec). In situ fiber digestion was measured in a previous study by incubating untreated barley straw in the rumen of 16 heifers fed a diet consisting of 700 g/kg barley straw and 300 g/kg concentrate. The two heifers with fastest rate of digestion (Fast ≥ 4.18% h-1) and the two heifers with the slowest rate of digestion (Slow ≤ 3.17% h-1) were chosen as inoculum donors for this study. Two Rusitec apparatuses each equipped with eight fermenters were used in a completely randomized block design with two blocks (apparatus) and four treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments (Fast or Slow rumen inoculum and untreated or AFEX treated straw). Fast rumen inoculum and AFEX straw both increased (P < 0.05) disappearance of dry matter (DMD), organic matter, true DMD, neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, and nitrogen (N) with an interactive effect between the two (P < 0.05). Fast rumen inoculum increased (P > 0.05) methane production per gram of digested material for both untreated and AFEX straw, and reduced (interaction, P < 0.05) acetate: propionate ratio for untreated straw. Greater relative populations of Ruminococcus albus (P < 0.05) and increased microbial N production (P = 0.045) were observed in Fast rumen inoculum. AFEX straw in Fast inoculum had greater total bacterial populations than Slow, but for untreated straw this result was reversed (interaction, P = 0.013). These findings indicate that differences in microbial populations in rumen fluid contribute to differences in the capacity of rumen inoculum to digest fiber. PMID:27899919

  12. Lower Methane Emissions from Yak Compared with Cattle in Rusitec Fermenters

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Jiandui; Zhou, Jianwei; Huang, Xiaodan; Long, Ruijun

    2017-01-01

    Globally methane (CH4) emissions from ruminant livestock account for 29% of total CH4 emissions. Inherited variation about CH4 emissions of different animal species might provide new opportunity for manipulating CH4 production. Six rumen-simulating fermenters (Rusitec) were set up for this study lasting for 16 d. The diet consisted of forage to concentrate ratio of 50:50 with barley straw as the forage. Treated vessels were supplied with rumen fluid from yak or cattle (3 vessels per animal species). Microbial growth was measured using 15N as a marker. The microbial community structure from liquid- and solid-fraction of each vessel was determined based on the 16S rRNA genes targeting both bacteria and archaea with MiSeq platform. CH4 yield was lower when the inoculum used from yak than that from cattle (0.26 and 0.33 mmol CH4/g dry matter intake, respectively). Lower H2 production was observed in Rusitec fermenters with rumen fluid from yak compare with that from cattle (0.28 and 0.86 mmol/d, respectively). The apparent digestibility of neutral detergent fiber, the isovalerate percentage with respect to the total amount of volatile fatty acids, the hydrogen recovery, and the proportion of liquid-associated microbial nitrogen derived from ammonia-nitrogen were higher in Rusitec fermenters incubated with rumen fluid from cattle than that from yak. The relative abundances of methanogens were no difference between two animal species. We hypothesize that more H2 production contributes to the higher methane emissions in cattle compare with yak. PMID:28076447

  13. Efficiency of monolaurin in mitigating ruminal methanogenesis and modifying C-isotope fractionation when incubating diets composed of either C3 or C4 plants in a rumen simulation technique (Rusitec) system.

    PubMed

    Klevenhusen, Fenja; Bernasconi, Stefano M; Hofstetter, Thomas B; Bolotin, Jakov; Kunz, Carmen; Soliva, Carla R

    2009-11-01

    Mitigation of methanogenesis in ruminants has been an important goal for several decades. Free lauric acid, known to suppress ruminal methanogenesis, has a low palatability; therefore, in the present study the aim was to evaluate the mitigation efficacy of its esterified form (monolaurin). Further, 13C-isotope abundance (delta13C) and 13C-12C fractionation during methanogenesis and fermentation were determined to evaluate possible microbial C-isotope preferences. Using the rumen simulation technique, four basal diets, characterised either by the C3 plants grass (hay) and wheat (straw and grain), or the C4 plant (13C excess compared with C3 plants) maize (straw and grain), and a mixture of the latter two, were incubated with and without monolaurin (50 g/kg dietary DM). Added to hay, monolaurin did not significantly affect methanogenesis. When added to the other diets (P < 0.05 for the wheat-based diet) methane formation was lowered. Monolaurin decreased fibre disappearance (least effect with the hay diet), acetate:propionate ratio, and protozoal counts. Feed residues and SCFA showed the same delta13C as the diets. Methane was depleted in 13C while CO2 was enriched in 13C compared with the diets. Monolaurin addition resulted in 13C depletion of CO2 and enrichment in CH4 (the latter only in the hay diet). In conclusion, monolaurin proved to effectively decrease methanogenesis in the straw-grain diets although this effect might partly be explained by the concomitantly reduced fibre disappearance. The influence on 13C-isotope abundance and fractionation supports the hypothesis that ruminal microbes seem to differentiate to some extent between C-isotopes during methanogenesis and fermentation.

  14. Decrease of ruminal methane production in Rusitec fermenters through the addition of plant material from rhubarb (Rheum spp.) and alder buckthorn (Frangula alnus).

    PubMed

    García-González, R; González, J S; López, S

    2010-08-01

    Roots of rhubarb (Rheum spp.) and bark of alder buckthorn (Frangula alnus) were tested as feed additives for decreasing ruminal methane production released from anaerobic fermentation of a forage-based diet in a rumen-simulating fermenter (Rusitec). Sixteen fermentation units (vessels) were set up for the experiment lasting 19 d. Treated vessels were supplied with 1g/d of rhubarb or alder buckthorn (4 vessels per plant species); another 4 vessels received 12 microM sodium monensin (positive control), and the remaining 4 vessels were controls (no additive). Upon termination of the experimental period, batch cultures were inoculated with the liquid contents of the vessels for examining in vitro fermentation kinetics of cellulose, starch, barley straw, and the same substrate used in the Rusitec cultures. Monensin induced changes in fermentation in agreement with those reported in the literature, and inocula from those cultures decreased the fermentation rate and total gas produced in the gas kinetics study. Rhubarb decreased methane production, associated with limited changes in the profile of volatile fatty acids throughout the duration of the study, whereas digestibility and total volatile fatty acids production were not affected. Rhubarb inocula did not affect gas production kinetics except for cellulose. Alder buckthorn decreased only methane concentration in fermentation gas, and this effect was not always significant. The use of rhubarb (milled rhizomes of Rheum spp.) in the diets of ruminants may effectively modulate ruminal fermentation by abating methane production, thus potentially involving productive and environmental benefits.

  15. Rumen transfaunation.

    PubMed

    DePeters, E J; George, L W

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this invited mini-review is to summarize the rumen transfaunation literature. Rumen transfaunation using the cud from a healthy donor animal to treat a sick recipient animal was practiced long before our understanding of rumen microorganisms. Around the mid-1900 s, scientists began to explore the benefits of rumen transfaunation and the associated microbial populations. Rumen transfaunation has been used clinically to treat indigestion and to enhance the return of normal rumen function following surgical correction of a left-displaced abomasum. Rumen transfaunation was also used to introduce unique rumen microorganisms into animals that were exposed to toxic compounds in plants. Rumen liquor contains chemical constituents that likely contribute to the beneficial effects of re-establishing a normal reticulo-rumen anaerobic fermentation. Recommendations for collecting rumen fluid, storage and volumes transferred are discussed. Rumen transfaunation is a common practice to treat indigestion on dairy and livestock operations. The support of a healthy microbial community in the digestive tract is also used for humans. Fecal microbiota transplantation has been used to treat digestive disorders in humans. Rumen transfaunation, although not widely studied with respect to mode of action, is an effective, practical, and easy method to treat simple indigestion of ruminants.

  16. Rumen Microbiology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ruminant animals such as cattle, sheep, and goats are able to digest low-quality fibrous feedstuffs because they maintain a mutually beneficial relationship with microorganisms resident in their forestomach, the rumen. Ruminal microorganisms are bacteria, protozoa, fungi, and viruses that live in a...

  17. Changes in Rumen Microbial Community Composition during Adaption to an In Vitro System and the Impact of Different Forages

    PubMed Central

    Lengowski, Melanie B.; Zuber, Karin H. R.; Witzig, Maren; Möhring, Jens; Boguhn, Jeannette; Rodehutscord, Markus

    2016-01-01

    This study examined ruminal microbial community composition alterations during initial adaption to and following incubation in a rumen simulation system (Rusitec) using grass or corn silage as substrates. Samples were collected from fermenter liquids at 0, 2, 4, 12, 24, and 48 h and from feed residues at 0, 24, and 48 h after initiation of incubation (period 1) and on day 13 (period 2). Microbial DNA was extracted and real-time qPCR was used to quantify differences in the abundance of protozoa, methanogens, total bacteria, Fibrobacter succinogenes, Ruminococcus albus, Ruminobacter amylophilus, Prevotella bryantii, Selenomonas ruminantium, and Clostridium aminophilum. We found that forage source and sampling time significantly influenced the ruminal microbial community. The gene copy numbers of most microbial species (except C. aminophilum) decreased in period 1; however, adaption continued through period 2 for several species. The addition of fresh substrate in period 2 led to increasing copy numbers of all microbial species during the first 2–4 h in the fermenter liquid except protozoa, which showed a postprandial decrease. Corn silage enhanced the growth of R. amylophilus and F. succinogenes, and grass silage enhanced R. albus, P. bryantii, and C. aminophilum. No effect of forage source was detected on total bacteria, protozoa, S. ruminantium, or methanogens or on total gas production, although grass silage enhanced methane production. This study showed that the Rusitec provides a stable system after an adaption phase that should last longer than 48 h, and that the forage source influenced several microbial species. PMID:26928330

  18. Symbiosis and Rumen Protozoa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Raymond D.

    1970-01-01

    Protozoa inhabiting the rumen of large grazing animals can be used to illustrate symbiotic animal associations. Gives a key to the ciliates most commonly found, several drawings, and a chart relating rumen fauna to the phylogenetic tree of the hosts. (EB)

  19. Rumen management during aphagia.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, A S

    2008-09-01

    Ruminants that for any reason are unable to eat enough to survive can be supported via rumen fistulation. To successfully accomplish this task, an understanding of rumen physiology is necessary. Some adaptation and modification of the normal physiological processes will be necessary because the extended time normally required to ingest food will, for obvious practical reasons, be reduced to a few minutes repeated once to three times a day. The physiology of significance to aphagic or dysphagic animals is discussed and relevant examples of clinical cases are used to illustrate practical applications.

  20. Control of rumen methanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Van Nevel, C J; Demeyer, D I

    1996-09-01

    During the last decades, considerable research on methane production in the rumen and its inhibition has been carried out. Initially, as methane production represents a significant loss of gross energy in the feed (2-15%), the ultimate goal of such intervention in rumen fermentation was an increase in feed efficiency. A second reason favouring research on methane inhibition is its role in the global warming phenomenon and in the destruction of the ozone layer. In this review, the authors describe briefly several interventions for reducing methane emission by ruminants. The objective can be reached by intervention at the dietary level by ration manipulation (composition, feeding level) or by the use of additives or supplements. Examples of additives are polyhalogenated compounds, ionophores and other antibiotics. Supplementation of the ration with lipids also lowered methanogenesis. More biotechnological interventions, e.g., defaunation, probiotics and introduction of reductive acetogenesis in the rumen, are also mentioned. It can be concluded that drastic inhibition of methane production is not unequivocally successful as a result of several factors, such as: instantaneous inhibition often followed by restoration of methanogenesis due to adaptation of the microbes or degradation of the additive, toxicity for the host animal, negative effects on overall digestion and productive performance. Therefore, methanogenesis and its inhibition cannot be considered as a separate part of rumen fermentation and its consequences on the animal should be taken into account.

  1. Short communication: malic acid does not promote vaccenic acid accumulation in mixed ruminal fluid with fractionated fish oil by a rumen-simulation technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Wang, J Q; Bu, D P; Liu, S J; Liang, S; Wei, H Y; Zhou, L Y; Liu, K L

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether malic acid could promote the accumulation of vaccenic acid in the rumen. The control diet was composed of a 65:35 ratio of forage to concentrate with 1% (dry matter basis) added fractionated fish oil (rich in docosahexaenoic acid), and treatment diets consisted of the control diet with added malic acid to achieve final concentrations of 10 mM (treatment 1) and 20 mM (treatment 2), respectively. The experiment was conducted with rumen-simulation equipment (Rusitec) consisting of 9 fermenters. Each treatment included 3 fermenters as replicates. After 7 d of incubation, concentrations of vaccenic acid from treatment 1 (4.38% fatty acids) and treatment 2 (4.46% fatty acids) were similar to that of the control treatment (4.51% fatty acids). The disappearance of docosahexaenoic acid was not different among the control, treatment 1, or treatment 2. These data indicated that malic acid did not promote the accumulation of vaccenic acid in ruminal fluid.

  2. Feeding, evaluating, and controlling rumen function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimal rumen function is pivotal to health, production, and profit in dairy systems. Achieving that function requires an understanding of feeds and systems of nutritional evaluation. A key influence on optimal rumen function includes dry matter intake. The function of feeds in the rumen depends on ...

  3. Studies on potential effects of fumaric acid on rumen microbial fermentation, methane production and microbial community.

    PubMed

    Riede, Susanne; Boguhn, Jeannette; Breves, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The greenhouse gas methane (CH4) contributes substantially to global climate change. As a potential approach to decrease ruminal methanogenesis, the effects of different dosages of fumaric acid (FA) on ruminal microbial metabolism and on the microbial community (archaea, bacteria) were studied using a rumen simulation technique (RUSITEC). FA acts as alternative hydrogen acceptor diverting 2H from methanogenesis of archaea towards propionate formation of bacteria. Three identical trials were conducted with 12 fermentation vessels over a period of 14 days. In each trial, four fermentation vessels were assigned to one of the three treatment groups differing in FA dosage: low fumaric acid (LFA), high fumaric acid (HFA) and without FA (control). FA was continuously infused with the buffer. Grass silage and concentrate served as substrate. FA led to decreases in pH and to higher production rates of total short chain fatty acids (SCFA) mediated by increases in propionate for LFA of 1.69 mmol d(-1) and in propionate and acetate production for HFA of 4.49 and 1.10 mmol d(-1), respectively. Concentrations of NH3-N, microbial crude protein synthesis, their efficiency, degradation of crude nutrients and detergent fibre fraction were unchanged. Total gas and CH4 production were not affected by FA. Effects of FA on structure of microbial community by means of single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analyses could not be detected. Given the observed increase in propionate production and the unaffected CH4 production it can be supposed that the availability of reduction equivalents like 2H was not limited by the addition of FA in this study. It has to be concluded from the present study that the application of FA is not an appropriate approach to decrease the ruminal CH4 production.

  4. Ergot alkaloids decrease rumen epithelial blood flow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to determine if ergot alkaloids affect blood flow to the absorptive surface of the rumen of steers. Steers (n=8 total) were pair-fed alfalfa cubes at 1.5× NEM and received ground endophyte-infected tall fescue seed (E+) or endophyte-free tall fescue seed (E-) via rumen...

  5. Effects of dilution rate and retention time of concentrate on efficiency of microbial growth, methane production, and ruminal fermentation in Rusitec fermenters.

    PubMed

    Martínez, M E; Ranilla, M J; Ramos, S; Tejido, M L; Carro, M D

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of 2 dilution rates (DL) and 2 concentrate retention times (RT) on microbial growth, methane production, and fermentation of a 30:70 alfalfa hay:concentrate diet in Rusitec fermenters maintained at similar pH. The DL were 3.78 (low DL, LDL) and 5.42%/h (high DL, HDL), and concentrate RT was either 24 h (T24) or 48 h (T48). Forage RT was 48 h in all fermenters. Apparent disappearance of diet DM and NDF was greater in HDL fermenters compared with LDL fermenters, but there was a significant DL x concentrate RT interaction, showing that the effect of DL was more pronounced in T48 compared with T24 fermenters. Methane production was not affected by DL, but was greater in T48 compared with T24 fermenters, which was consistent with the increased fiber degradation in T48 fermenters. Increasing DL augmented volatile fatty acid production and molar proportions of propionate, isovalerate, and valerate, and reduced those of caproate, but no effects were observed on acetate, butyrate, and isobutyrate proportions. Increasing concentrate RT resulted in greater volatile fatty acid production and proportions of acetate, butyrate, and caproate, but reduced those of propionate, valerate, and isovalerate. Ammonia-N production was not affected by concentrate RT, but was greater at HDL compared with LDL. Microbial growth was not affected by DL, but microbial growth efficiency was lower in HDL compared with LDL fermenters. Concentrate RT affected microbial growth and its efficiency, with both being greater in T48 compared with T24 fermenters. Carboxymetylcellulase and xylanase activities in ruminal fluid were greater in HDL compared with LDL fermenters, but were not affected by concentrate RT. There were DL x concentrate RT interactions for diet apparent disappearance, molar proportions of propionate, butyrate, isovalerate, and caproate, and acetate:propionate ratio, indicating that effects of DL on these variables were

  6. Citric Acid Metabolism in the Bovine Rumen

    PubMed Central

    Wright, D. E.

    1971-01-01

    Rumen microorganisms rapidly metabolize citric acid to carbon dioxide and acetic acid. The rate of metabolism varied between 0.00008 and 0.76 μmoles per g per min, the rate becoming higher as the citric acid concentration increased. The addition of potassium chloride to rumen contents decreased the rate of utilization. The results indicate that dietary citric acid is unlikely to accumulate in the rumen to a sufficiently high level to be an important factor in hypomagnesemia, except where other factors such as very high potassium levels in the food influence its metabolism. PMID:5549696

  7. Passive mechanical properties of ovine rumen tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, Stephen J.; Cater, John E.; Walker, Cameron G.; Amirapu, Satya; Waghorn, Garry C.; Suresh, Vinod

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical and structural properties of ovine rumen tissue have been determined using uniaxial tensile testing of tissue from four animals at five rumen locations and two orientations. Animal and orientation did not have a significant effect on the stress-strain response, but there was a significant difference between rumen locations. Histological studies showed two orthogonal muscle layers in all regions except the reticulum, which has a more isotropic structure. A quasi-linear viscoelastic model was fitted to the relaxation stage for each region. Model predictions of the ramp stage had RMS errors of 13-24% and were within the range of the experimental data.

  8. Diversity of rumen bacteria in canadian cervids.

    PubMed

    Gruninger, Robert J; Sensen, Christoph W; McAllister, Timothy A; Forster, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Interest in the bacteria responsible for the breakdown of lignocellulosic feedstuffs within the rumen has increased due to their potential utility in industrial applications. To date, most studies have focused on bacteria from domesticated ruminants. We have expanded the knowledge of the microbial ecology of ruminants by examining the bacterial populations found in the rumen of non-domesticated ruminants found in Canada. Next-generation sequencing of 16S rDNA was employed to characterize the liquid and solid-associated bacterial communities in the rumen of elk (Cervus canadensis), and white tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Despite variability in the microbial populations between animals, principle component and weighted UniFrac analysis indicated that bacterial communities in the rumen of elk and white tail deer are distinct. Populations clustered according to individual host animal and not the association with liquid or solid phase of the rumen contents. In all instances, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were the dominant bacterial phyla, although the relative abundance of these differed among ruminant species and between phases of rumen digesta, respectively. In the elk samples Bacteroidetes were more predominant in the liquid phase whereas Firmicutes was the most prevalent phyla in the solid digesta (P = 1×10(-5)). There were also statistically significant differences in the abundance of OTUs classified as Fibrobacteres (P = 5×10(-3)) and Spirochaetes (P = 3×10(-4)) in the solid digesta of the elk samples. We identified a number of OTUs that were classified as phylotypes not previously observed in the rumen environment. Our results suggest that although the bacterial diversity in wild North American ruminants shows overall similarities to domesticated ruminants, we observed a number of OTUs not previously described. Previous studies primarily focusing on domesticated ruminants do not fully represent the microbial diversity of the rumen and

  9. Diversity of Rumen Bacteria in Canadian Cervids

    PubMed Central

    Gruninger, Robert J.; Sensen, Christoph W.; McAllister, Timothy A.; Forster, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Interest in the bacteria responsible for the breakdown of lignocellulosic feedstuffs within the rumen has increased due to their potential utility in industrial applications. To date, most studies have focused on bacteria from domesticated ruminants. We have expanded the knowledge of the microbial ecology of ruminants by examining the bacterial populations found in the rumen of non-domesticated ruminants found in Canada. Next-generation sequencing of 16S rDNA was employed to characterize the liquid and solid-associated bacterial communities in the rumen of elk (Cervus canadensis), and white tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Despite variability in the microbial populations between animals, principle component and weighted UniFrac analysis indicated that bacterial communities in the rumen of elk and white tail deer are distinct. Populations clustered according to individual host animal and not the association with liquid or solid phase of the rumen contents. In all instances, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were the dominant bacterial phyla, although the relative abundance of these differed among ruminant species and between phases of rumen digesta, respectively. In the elk samples Bacteroidetes were more predominant in the liquid phase whereas Firmicutes was the most prevalent phyla in the solid digesta (P = 1×10−5). There were also statistically significant differences in the abundance of OTUs classified as Fibrobacteres (P = 5×10−3) and Spirochaetes (P = 3×10−4) in the solid digesta of the elk samples. We identified a number of OTUs that were classified as phylotypes not previously observed in the rumen environment. Our results suggest that although the bacterial diversity in wild North American ruminants shows overall similarities to domesticated ruminants, we observed a number of OTUs not previously described. Previous studies primarily focusing on domesticated ruminants do not fully represent the microbial diversity of the rumen and

  10. Protease activities of rumen protozoa.

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, C W; Lovelock, L K; Krumholz, L; Buchanan-Smith, J G

    1984-01-01

    Intact, metabolically active rumen protozoa prepared by gravity sedimentation and washing in a mineral solution at 10 to 15 degrees C had comparatively low proteolytic activity on azocasein and low endogenous proteolytic activity. Protozoa washed in 0.1 M potassium phosphate buffer (pH 6.8) at 4 degrees C and stored on ice autolysed when they were warmed to 39 degrees C. They also exhibited low proteolytic activity on azocasein, but they had a high endogenous proteolytic activity with a pH optimum of 5.8. The endogenous proteolytic activity was inhibited by cysteine proteinase inhibitors, for example, iodoacetate (63.1%) and the aspartic proteinase inhibitor, pepstatin (43.9%). Inhibitors specific for serine proteinases and metalloproteinases were without effect. The serine and cysteine proteinase inhibitors of microbial origin, including antipain, chymostatin, and leupeptin, caused up to 67% inhibition of endogenous proteolysis. Hydrolysis of casein by protozoa autolysates was also inhibited by cysteine proteinase inhibitors. Some of the inhibitors decreased endogenous deamination, in particular, phosphoramidon, which had little inhibitory effect on proteolysis. Protozoal and bacterial preparations exhibited low hydrolytic activities on synthetic proteinase and carboxypeptidase substrates, although the protozoa had 10 to 78 times greater hydrolytic activity (per milligram of protein) than bacteria on the synthetic aminopeptidase substrates L-leucine-p-nitroanilide, L-leucine-beta-naphthylamide, and L-leucinamide. The aminopeptidase activity was partially inhibited by bestatin. It was concluded that cysteine proteinases and, to a lesser extent, aspartic proteinases are primarily responsible for proteolysis in autolysates of rumen protozoa. The protozoal autolysates had high aminopeptidase activity; low deaminase activity was observed on endogenous amino acids. PMID:6364968

  11. Gene expression in bovine rumen epithelium during weaning indentifies molecular regulators of rumen development and growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During weaning, rumen epithelial cell function must transition from a pre-ruminant to a true ruminant state for efficient nutrient absorption and metabolism. During this time, the rumen increases from 30 to 70% of the capacity of the gut, significantly impacting net efficiency of feed conversion in ...

  12. Diversity of phytases in the rumen.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Brenda A; McAllister, Tim A; Sharma, Ranjana; Selinger, L Brent

    2007-01-01

    Examples of a new class of phytase related to protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) were recently isolated from several anaerobic bacteria from the rumen of cattle. In this study, the diversity of PTP-like phytase gene sequences in the rumen was surveyed by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Two sets of degenerate primers were used to amplify sequences from rumen fluid total community DNA and genomic DNA from nine bacterial isolates. Four novel PTP-like phytase sequences were retrieved from rumen fluid, whereas all nine of the anaerobic bacterial isolates investigated in this work contained PTP-like phytase sequences. One isolate, Selenomonas lacticifex, contained two distinct PTP-like phytase sequences, suggesting that multiple phytate hydrolyzing enzymes are present in this bacterium. The degenerate primer and PCR conditions described here, as well as novel sequences obtained in this study, will provide a valuable resource for future studies on this new class of phytase. The observed diversity of microbial phytases in the rumen may account for the ability of ruminants to derive a significant proportion of their phosphorus requirements from phytate.

  13. Effects of pressed beet pulp silage inclusion in maize-based rations on performance of high-yielding dairy cows and parameters of rumen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Boguhn, J; Kluth, H; Bulang, M; Engelhard, T; Rodehutscord, M

    2010-01-01

    Beet pulp contains high amounts of pectins that can reduce the risk of rumen disorders compared to using feedstuffs high in starch. The objective was to study the effects of inclusion of ensiled pressed beet pulp in total mixed rations (TMR) for high-yielding dairy cows. Two TMR containing no or about 20% (on dry matter (DM) basis) beet pulp silage were used. The beet pulp silage mainly replaced maize silage and corn cob silage. The TMR were intentionally equal in the concentrations of energy and utilisable crude protein (CP) at the duodenum. TMR were fed to 39 and 40 dairy cows, respectively, for 118 days. The average daily milk yield was about 43 kg/day. No significant differences in milk yield and milk fat or milk protein content were detected. DM intake of cows was significantly reduced by the inclusion of beet pulp silage (23.0 v. 24.5 kg/day). However, a digestibility study, separately conducted with sheep, showed a significantly higher organic matter digestibility and metabolisable energy concentration for the TMR that contained beet pulp silage. In vitro gas production kinetics indicated that the intensity of fermentation was lower in the TMR that contained beet pulp silage. In vitro production of short-chain fatty acids, studied using a Rusitec, did not differ between the TMR. However, the inclusion of beet pulp silage in the ration caused a significant reduction in the efficiency of microbial CP synthesis in vitro. The amino acid profile of microbial protein remained unchanged. It was concluded that beet pulp silage has specific effects on ruminal fermentation that may depress feed intake of cows but improve digestibility. An inclusion of beet pulp silage of up to 20% of DM in rations for high-yielding dairy cows is possible without significant effects on milk yield and milk protein or milk fat.

  14. Gene expression in bovine rumen epithelium during weaning identifies molecular regulators of rumen development and growth.

    PubMed

    Connor, Erin E; Baldwin, Ransom L; Li, Cong-jun; Li, Robert W; Chung, Hoyoung

    2013-03-01

    During weaning, epithelial cell function in the rumen transitions in response to conversion from a pre-ruminant to a true ruminant environment to ensure efficient nutrient absorption and metabolism. To identify gene networks affected by weaning in bovine rumen, Holstein bull calves were fed commercial milk replacer only (MRO) until 42 days of age, then were provided diets of either milk + orchardgrass hay (MH) or milk + grain-based calf starter (MG). Rumen epithelial RNA was extracted from calves sacrificed at four time points: day 14 (n = 3) and day 42 (n = 3) of age while fed the MRO diet and day 56 (n = 3/diet) and day 70 (n = 3/diet) while fed the MH and MG diets for transcript profiling by microarray hybridization. Five two-group comparisons were made using Permutation Analysis of Differential Expression® to identify differentially expressed genes over time and developmental stage between days 14 and 42 within the MRO diet, between day 42 on the MRO diet and day 56 on the MG or MH diets, and between the MG and MH diets at days 56 and 70. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) of differentially expressed genes during weaning indicated the top 5 gene networks involving molecules participating in lipid metabolism, cell morphology and death, cellular growth and proliferation, molecular transport, and the cell cycle. Putative genes functioning in the establishment of the rumen microbial population and associated rumen epithelial inflammation during weaning were identified. Activation of transcription factor PPAR-α was identified by IPA software as an important regulator of molecular changes in rumen epithelium that function in papillary development and fatty acid oxidation during the transition from pre-rumination to rumination. Thus, molecular markers of rumen development and gene networks regulating differentiation and growth of rumen epithelium were identified for selecting targets and methods for improving and assessing rumen development and

  15. Effects of corn processing on growth characteristics, rumen development, and rumen parameters in neonatal dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Lesmeister, K E; Heinrichs, A J

    2004-10-01

    Neonatal Holstein calves were fed texturized calf starters containing 33% whole (WC), dry-rolled (DRC), roasted-rolled (RC), or steam-flaked (SFC) corn to investigate how corn processing method affects intake, growth, rumen and blood metabolites, and rumen development. In the first experiment, 92 Holstein calves (52 male and 40 female) were started at 2 +/- 1 d of age and studied for 42 d. Starter dry matter (DM) intake was measured and fecal scoring conducted daily. Growth and blood parameter measurements were conducted weekly. A subset of 12 male calves (3/treatment) was euthanized at 4 wk of age and rumen tissue sampled for rumen epithelial development measurements. Experiment 2 consisted of 12 male Holstein calves ruminally cannulated at 7 +/- 1 d of age. Rumen fluid and blood samples were collected during wk 2 to 6. In the first experiment, postweaning and overall starter and total DM intake were significantly higher in calves fed starter with DRC than RC or SFC. Postweaning and overall starter and total DM intake were significantly higher in calves fed starter with WC than SFC. Postweaning average daily gain was significantly greater in calves fed starter with DRC than SFC. Blood volatile fatty acid concentrations were significantly higher in calves fed starter with SFC than in calves fed all other treatments. Papillae length and rumen wall thickness at 4 wk were significantly greater in calves fed starter with SFC than DRC and WC, respectively. In experiment 2, calves fed starter with WC had higher rumen pH and lower rumen volatile fatty acid concentrations than calves fed all other starters. Rumen propionate production was increased in calves receiving starter with SFC; however, rumen butyrate production was higher in calves fed starter with RC. Results indicate that the type of processed corn incorporated into calf starter can influence intake, growth, and rumen parameters in neonatal calves. Calves consuming starter containing RC had similar body weight

  16. Insights into Abundant Rumen Ureolytic Bacterial Community Using Rumen Simulation System

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Di; Zhao, Shengguo; Wang, Pengpeng; Zheng, Nan; Bu, Dengpan; Beckers, Yves; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-01-01

    Urea, a non-protein nitrogen for dairy cows, is rapidly hydrolyzed to ammonia by urease produced by ureolytic bacteria in the rumen, and the ammonia is used as nitrogen for rumen bacterial growth. However, there is limited knowledge with regard to the ureolytic bacteria community in the rumen. To explore the ruminal ureolytic bacterial community, urea, or acetohydroxamic acid (AHA, an inhibitor of urea hydrolysis) were supplemented into the rumen simulation systems. The bacterial 16S rRNA genes were sequenced by Miseq high-throughput sequencing and used to reveal the ureoltyic bacteria by comparing different treatments. The results revealed that urea supplementation significantly increased the ammonia concentration, and AHA addition inhibited urea hydrolysis. Urea supplementation significantly increased the richness of bacterial community and the proportion of ureC genes. The composition of bacterial community following urea or AHA supplementation showed no significant difference compared to the groups without supplementation. The abundance of Bacillus and unclassified Succinivibrionaceae increased significantly following urea supplementation. Pseudomonas, Haemophilus, Neisseria, Streptococcus, and Actinomyces exhibited a positive response to urea supplementation and a negative response to AHA addition. Results retrieved from the NCBI protein database and publications confirmed that the representative bacteria in these genera mentioned above had urease genes or urease activities. Therefore, the rumen ureolytic bacteria were abundant in the genera of Pseudomonas, Haemophilus, Neisseria, Streptococcus, Actinomyces, Bacillus, and unclassified Succinivibrionaceae. Insights into abundant rumen ureolytic bacteria provide the regulation targets to mitigate urea hydrolysis and increase efficiency of urea nitrogen utilization in ruminants. PMID:27446045

  17. Maximizing efficiency of rumen microbial protein production

    PubMed Central

    Hackmann, Timothy J.; Firkins, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Rumen microbes produce cellular protein inefficiently partly because they do not direct all ATP toward growth. They direct some ATP toward maintenance functions, as long-recognized, but they also direct ATP toward reserve carbohydrate synthesis and energy spilling (futile cycles that dissipate heat). Rumen microbes expend ATP by vacillating between (1) accumulation of reserve carbohydrate after feeding (during carbohydrate excess) and (2) mobilization of that carbohydrate thereafter (during carbohydrate limitation). Protozoa account for most accumulation of reserve carbohydrate, and in competition experiments, protozoa accumulated nearly 35-fold more reserve carbohydrate than bacteria. Some pure cultures of bacteria spill energy, but only recently have mixed rumen communities been recognized as capable of the same. When these communities were dosed glucose in vitro, energy spilling could account for nearly 40% of heat production. We suspect that cycling of glycogen (a major reserve carbohydrate) is a major mechanism of spilling; such cycling has already been observed in single-species cultures of protozoa and bacteria. Interconversions of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) may also expend ATP and depress efficiency of microbial protein production. These interconversions may involve extensive cycling of intermediates, such as cycling of acetate during butyrate production in certain butyrivibrios. We speculate this cycling may expend ATP directly or indirectly. By further quantifying the impact of reserve carbohydrate accumulation, energy spilling, and SCFA interconversions on growth efficiency, we can improve prediction of microbial protein production and guide efforts to improve efficiency of microbial protein production in the rumen. PMID:26029197

  18. Metabolism of Peptides by Rumen Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Wright, D. E.

    1967-01-01

    Rumen microorganisms utilize tryptic peptides from Chlorella protein, forming carbon dioxide, volatile fatty acids, and bacterial protein. Peptide carbon is more efficiently converted into bacterial protein than is amino acid carbon. A progressive degradation of the peptides was demonstrated by use of columns of Sephadex G-25. PMID:6035045

  19. The requirements for rumen-degradable protein per unit of fermentable organic matter differ between fibrous feed sources

    PubMed Central

    Soliva, Carla R.; Amelchanka, Sergej L.; Kreuzer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ruminant feed evaluation systems use constant minimum requirements of rumen-degradable protein (RDP) and often relate this to apparently degradable organic matter (OM). However, studies with tropical forages indicate that RDP: apparently degraded OM might not be constant across high-fiber diets. This was tested with semi-continuous ruminal cultures (Rusitec) using dried contrasting low-protein fiber sources: brachiaria hay (high in fiber, medium lignified), apple pomace (medium in fiber, highly lignified), and sugar beet pulp (medium in fiber and lignification). Each feed was incubated at 14 g dry matter day−1 with 0, 0.85, 1.7, 3.4, 6.8, 13.6, or 27.2 mg g−1 urea. The amount of urea needed to reach a similar basal concentration of ammonia in the incubation fluid was tested for each feed in advance. Apparent fiber and OM degradability were determined after 48 h of incubation. Data was evaluated by regressions and analysis of variance. The response curve of incubation fluid ammonia to urea supplementation was similar in slope in all feeds. Plateaus in apparent OM degradability in relation to ammonia concentration were determined. The ammonia concentration where apparent OM and fiber degradability reached 95% of maximum was approached in the order of pomace < pulp < hay. With regard to fiber degradability, a plateau was reached at ≥ 80 g kg−1 crude protein only with hay and pomace, whilst a linear relationship existed between RDP and OM degradation for pulp. In hay the ratio RDP: OM degraded was equal to 1.6 but was only 1.0 in the other feeds. There was no obvious lack of branched short-chain fatty acids at low RDP. Thus, the hypothesis was confirmed but the demand for RDP seems even higher in tropical forage compared to food industrial byproducts. The efficiency of urea to promote apparent OM and fiber degradation was also variable. Thus, it seems that minimum thresholds of either RDP or ruminal ammonia concentration may not be reflected appropriately by

  20. Rumen content stratification in the giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis).

    PubMed

    Sauer, Cathrine; Clauss, Marcus; Bertelsen, Mads F; Weisbjerg, Martin R; Lund, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Ruminants differ in the degree of rumen content stratification, with 'cattle-types' (i.e., the grazing and intermediate feeding ruminants) having stratified content, whereas 'moose-types' (i.e., the browsing ruminants) have unstratified content. The feeding ecology, as well as the digestive morphophysiology of the giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis), suggest that it is a 'moose-type' ruminant. Correspondingly, the giraffe should have an unstratified rumen content and an even rumen papillation pattern. Digesta samples were collected from along the digestive tract of 27 wild-caught giraffes kept in bomas for up to 2months, and 10 giraffes kept in zoological gardens throughout their lives. Samples were analysed for concentration of dry matter, fibre fractions, volatile fatty acids and NH3, as well as mean particle size and pH. There was no difference between the dorsal and ventral rumen region in any of these parameters, indicating homogenous rumen content in the giraffes. In addition to the digesta samples, samples of dorsal rumen, ventral rumen and atrium ruminis mucosa were collected and the papillary surface enlargement factor was determined, as a proxy for content stratification. The even rumen papillation pattern observed also supported the concept of an unstratified rumen content in giraffes. Zoo giraffes had a slightly more uneven papillation pattern than boma giraffes. This finding could not be matched by differences in physical characteristics of the rumen content, probably due to an influence of fasting time ante mortem on these parameters.

  1. The Role of Ciliate Protozoa in the Rumen.

    PubMed

    Newbold, Charles J; de la Fuente, Gabriel; Belanche, Alejandro; Ramos-Morales, Eva; McEwan, Neil R

    2015-01-01

    First described in 1843, Rumen protozoa with their striking appearance were assumed to be important for the welfare of their host. However, despite contributing up to 50% of the bio-mass in the rumen, the role of protozoa in rumen microbial ecosystem remains unclear. Phylogenetic analysis of 18S rDNA libraries generated from the rumen of cattle, sheep, and goats has revealed an unexpected diversity of ciliated protozoa although variation in gene copy number between species makes it difficult to obtain absolute quantification. Despite repeated attempts it has proven impossible to maintain rumen protozoa in axenic culture. Thus it has been difficult to establish conclusively a role of ciliate protozoa in rumen fiber degradation. The development of techniques to clone and express ciliate genes in λ phage, together with bioinformatic indices to confirm the ciliate origin of the genes has allowed the isolation and characterization of fibrolytic genes from rumen protozoa. Elimination of the ciliate protozoa increases microbial protein supply by up to 30% and reduces methane production by up to 11%. Our recent findings suggest that holotrich protozoa play a disproportionate role in supporting methanogenesis whilst the small Entodinium are responsible for much of the bacterial protein turnover. As yet no method to control protozoa in the rumen that is safe and practically applicable has been developed, however a range of plant extract capable of controlling if not completely eliminating rumen protozoa have been described.

  2. The Role of Ciliate Protozoa in the Rumen

    PubMed Central

    Newbold, Charles J.; de la Fuente, Gabriel; Belanche, Alejandro; Ramos-Morales, Eva; McEwan, Neil R.

    2015-01-01

    First described in 1843, Rumen protozoa with their striking appearance were assumed to be important for the welfare of their host. However, despite contributing up to 50% of the bio-mass in the rumen, the role of protozoa in rumen microbial ecosystem remains unclear. Phylogenetic analysis of 18S rDNA libraries generated from the rumen of cattle, sheep, and goats has revealed an unexpected diversity of ciliated protozoa although variation in gene copy number between species makes it difficult to obtain absolute quantification. Despite repeated attempts it has proven impossible to maintain rumen protozoa in axenic culture. Thus it has been difficult to establish conclusively a role of ciliate protozoa in rumen fiber degradation. The development of techniques to clone and express ciliate genes in λ phage, together with bioinformatic indices to confirm the ciliate origin of the genes has allowed the isolation and characterization of fibrolytic genes from rumen protozoa. Elimination of the ciliate protozoa increases microbial protein supply by up to 30% and reduces methane production by up to 11%. Our recent findings suggest that holotrich protozoa play a disproportionate role in supporting methanogenesis whilst the small Entodinium are responsible for much of the bacterial protein turnover. As yet no method to control protozoa in the rumen that is safe and practically applicable has been developed, however a range of plant extract capable of controlling if not completely eliminating rumen protozoa have been described. PMID:26635774

  3. Determining the culturability of the rumen bacterial microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Creevey, Christopher J; Kelly, William J; Henderson, Gemma; Leahy, Sinead C

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the Hungate1000 project is to generate a reference set of rumen microbial genome sequences. Toward this goal we have carried out a meta-analysis using information from culture collections, scientific literature, and the NCBI and RDP databases and linked this with a comparative study of several rumen 16S rRNA gene-based surveys. In this way we have attempted to capture a snapshot of rumen bacterial diversity to examine the culturable fraction of the rumen bacterial microbiome. Our analyses have revealed that for cultured rumen bacteria, there are many genera without a reference genome sequence. Our examination of culture-independent studies highlights that there are few novel but many uncultured taxa within the rumen bacterial microbiome. Taken together these results have allowed us to compile a list of cultured rumen isolates that are representative of abundant, novel and core bacterial species in the rumen. In addition, we have identified taxa, particularly within the phylum Bacteroidetes, where further cultivation efforts are clearly required. This information is being used to guide the isolation efforts and selection of bacteria from the rumen microbiota for sequencing through the Hungate1000. PMID:24986151

  4. The giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) rumen microbiome.

    PubMed

    Roggenbuck, Michael; Sauer, Cathrine; Poulsen, Morten; Bertelsen, Mads F; Sørensen, Søren J

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that wild ruminants are sources of previously undescribed microorganisms, knowledge of which can improve our understanding of the complex microbial interactions in the foregut. Here, we investigated the microbial community of seven wild-caught giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis), three of which were fed natural browse and four were fed Boskos pellets, leafy alfalfa hay, and cut savanna browse, by characterizing the 16S rRNA gene diversity using 454 FLX high-throughput sequencing. The microbial community composition varied according to diet, but differed little between the ruminal fluid and solid fraction. The giraffe rumen contained large levels of the phyla of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes independent of diet, while Prevotella, Succinclasticium, and Methanobrevibacter accounted for the largest abundant taxonomic assigned genera. However, up to 21% of the generated sequences could not been assigned to any known bacterial phyla, and c. 70% not to genus, revealing that the giraffe rumen hosts a variety of previously undescribed bacteria.

  5. The large bowel--a supplementary rumen?

    PubMed

    Argenzio, R A; Stevens, C E

    1984-01-01

    The rumen and the mammalian large intestine are similar in many respects. Microbial protein appears to be synthesized and degraded in the digesta of both organs in a comparable manner. The VFA end-products of carbohydrate fermentation are produced in similar concentrations. Digesta pH is maintained with buffer added by the saliva or ileal fluid, HCO3 released into the lumen and rapid absorption of the organic acids. VFA are absorbed at equivalent rates by rumen epithelium and large intestinal mucosa. Over-production of VFA produces similar adverse effects. There is a considerable amount of species variation in the relative length and volume as well as the extent of sacculation of the large intestine. The caecum is the primary site for retention of digesta and microbial fermentation in the large intestine of rabbits, rodents and a few other species. However, the proximal colon is the major site of retention and fermentation in most mammals. Absorptions of Na and VFA appear to account for absorption of most of the water removed during passage of digesta through the large intestine. A relatively slow rate of Na absorption and release of HCO3 appears to provide the fluid and buffering capacity needed for efficient microbial digestion in the rumen and in the large intestine of some species. A more rapid absorption of Na by the large intestine of other species would aid in the conservation of Na and water. The many similarities between the large intestine and the rumen suggest that further comparison can provide additional information on both the function and diseases of these two organs. The rumen has proved to be accessible to a variety of procedures useful for the study of microbial digestive processes and its epithelium has provided a non-glandular tissue for studies of inorganic ion transport as well as the transport and metabolism of VFA. Comparative studies of the large intestine also can provide a better understanding of the functions and malfunctions of the

  6. Variability of Actinobacteria, a minor component of rumen microflora.

    PubMed

    Suľák, M; Sikorová, L; Jankuvová, J; Javorský, P; Pristaš, P

    2012-07-01

    Actinobacteria (Actinomycetes) are a significant and interesting group of gram-positive bacteria. They are regular, though infrequent, members of the microbial life in the rumen and represent up to 3 % of total rumen bacteria; there is considerable lack of information about ecology and biology of rumen actinobacteria. During the characterization of variability of rumen treponemas using non-cultivation approach, we also noted the variability of rumen actinobacteria. By using Treponema-specific primers a specific 16S rRNA gene library was prepared from cow and sheep rumen total DNA. About 10 % of recombinant clones contained actinobacteria-like sequences. Phylogenetic analyses of 11 clones obtained showed the high variability of actinobacteria in the ruminant digestive system. While some sequences are nearly identical to known sequences of actinobacteria, we detected completely new clusters of actinobacteria-like sequences, representing probably new, as yet undiscovered, group of rumen Actinobacteria. Further research will be necessary for understanding their nature and functions in the rumen.

  7. Gene expression profiling in bovine rumen during development and weaning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In calves, efficient nutrient delivery, absorption, and metabolism depend upon the transition of the rumen from a pre-ruminant to a true ruminant state during weaning. The rumen epithelium is responsible for several physiologically important functions, including absorption, transport, volatile fatty...

  8. Quantifying terpenes in rumen fluid, serum, and plasma from sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determining the fate of terpenes consumed by browsing ruminants require methods to quantify their presence in blood and rumen fluid. Our objective was to modify an existing procedure for plasma terpenes to quantify 25 structurally diverse mono- and sesquiterpenes in serum, plasma, and rumen fluid fr...

  9. Changes in rumen bacterial communities and rumen chemistry in primiparous Holstein cows during the periparturient period

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to study the changes in: 1) rumen bacterial community composition (BCC) and fermentation as influenced by feeding regimen and period; and 2) pH and VFA profiles among selected cows with minimum (stable) and maximum variation (unstable) between pre- and post-parturie...

  10. Rumen modulatory effect of thyme, clove and peppermint oils in vitro using buffalo rumen liquor

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Debashis; Tomar, S. K.; Kumar, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was conducted to examine the rumen modulatory effect of thyme, clove and peppermint oils on rumen fermentation pattern in vitro using roughage based diet. Materials and Methods: Thyme, clove and peppermint oils were tested at concentration of 0, 30, 300 and 600 mg/l (ppm) of total culture fluid using in vitro gas production technique in wheat straw based diet (concentrate: Wheat straw 50:50). Different in vitro parameters e.g., total gas production, methane production, nutrient degradability, volatile fatty acid (VFA) production and ammonia nitrogen concentration were studied using buffalo rumen liquor. Results: Thyme oil at higher dose level (600 ppm) reduced (p<0.05) total gas production, feed degradability and ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) concentration whereas total VFA concentration was significantly lower (p>0.05) in 300 and 600 ppm dose levels. 600 ppm dose level of clove oil reduced (p<0.05) total gas production, feed degradability, total VFA and acetate to propionate ratio. Methane production was significantly reduced (p<0.05) in 300 and 600 ppm dose levels of clove and peppermint oil. Conclusion: Right combination of these essential oils may prove to enhance performance of animals by reducing methane production and inhibiting protein degradation in rumen. PMID:27047073

  11. Role of rumen butyrate in regulation of nitrogen utilization and urea nitrogen kinetics in growing sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate, a major rumen VFA, has been indirectly linked to enhancement of urea recycling based on increased expression of urea transporter (UT-B) in the rumen epithelia of steers fed a rumen butyrate-enhancing diet. Two studies were conducted to quantify the effect of elevated rumen butyrate concent...

  12. Reponses of sheep to a vaccination of entodinial or mixed rumen protozoal antigens to reduce rumen protozoal numbers.

    PubMed

    Williams, Yvette J; Rea, Suzanne M; Popovski, Sam; Pimm, Carolyn L; Williams, Andrew J; Toovey, Andrew F; Skillman, Lucy C; Wright, André-Denis G

    2008-01-01

    Two rumen protozoa vaccine formulations containing either whole fixed Entodinium or mixed rumen protozoa cells were tested on Merino sheep with the aim of decreasing the number and/or activity of protozoa in the rumen. Negative control (no antigen) and positive control (Tetrahymena corlissi antigens) treatments were also included in the experiment. Blood and saliva were sampled to measure the specific immune response. Protozoal numbers in the rumen were monitored by microscopic counts. Vaccination with protozoal formulations resulted in the presence of specific IgG in plasma and saliva, but saliva titres were low. Titres after secondary vaccination were higher (P 0.05) by the vaccination and there was also no difference (P>0.05) between treatments in rumen fluid ammonia-N concentration or wool growth. In vitro studies investigated the binding ability of the antibodies and estimated the amount of antibody required to reduce cell numbers in the rumen. The studies showed that the antibodies did bind to and reduced protozoa numbers, but the amount of antibody generated by vaccination was not enough to produce results in an in vivo system. It is suggested that the vaccine could be improved if specific protozoal antigens are determined and isolated and that improved understanding of the actions of protozoa antibodies in rumen fluid and the relationships between levels of antibodies and numbers of protozoa in the rumen is needed.

  13. Attempts to induce reductive acetogenesis into a sheep rumen.

    PubMed

    Immig, I; Demeyer, D; Fiedler, D; Van Nevel, C; Mbanzamihigo, L

    1996-01-01

    A rumen fistulated wether was used for continuous infusion of a 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (BES) solution (2 g/d in 50 ml of water). The infusion was started after introduction of a pulse dose of BES (2 g) into the rumen. Immediately after introduction of the pulse dose, methane concentration in rumen gases was lowered from about 40 to less than 1%, with concomittant decreases and increases in the molar proportions of acetic and propionic acids respectively in the rumen volatile fatty acids. After 4 days of infusion however, and despite repeated pulse dosage of BES, methanogenesis adapted to BES and methane concentration in rumen gases reached 20%. Addition of BES to incubations of rumen contents with hay resulted in considerable inhibition of methanogenesis. Extra addition of methanol in such incubations increased both acetate and methane production, whereas addition of formate had no effect. In a second experiment using a second rumen fistulated whether, a 4 day control period was followed by 10 days of daily introduction of 11 of cattle cecal contents into the rumen. The cattle cecal contents were collected from slaughterhouse cattle, filtered and kept at -20 degrees C until use. Comparison of in vitro fermentation of thawed with fresh contents showed absence of methanogenesis but not of reductive acetogenesis after freezing and thawing. Evidence for the latter was sought by calculation of metabolic hydrogen recoveries from amounts of end products formed in incubations. In a similar way, evidence for induction of reductive acetogenesis was sought from incubations in vitro, carried out with rumen contents obtained before, during and after introduction of cecal contents into the rumen. No such evidence was obtained.

  14. Identity of rumen fluke in deer.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Ailis; Browne, John A; Hogan, Sean; Bassière, Thomas; DeWaal, Theo; Mulcahy, Grace; Zintl, Annetta

    2014-11-01

    As evidence is growing that in many temperate areas paramphistome infections are becoming more common and widespread, this study was undertaken to determine the role of deer as reservoirs for rumen fluke infections in livestock. A total of 144 deer faecal samples (88 from fallow deer, 32 from red deer and 24 samples from sika, sika/red deer hybrids) were screened for the presence of fluke eggs. Based on the ITS-2 rDNA locus plus flanking 5.8S and 28S sequences (ITS-2+), fluke eggs were identified to species level. Our results indicate that, of the 3 deer species, fallow deer had the highest fluke infection rates. Two rumen fluke species, Calicophoron daubneyi and Paramphistomum leydeni, with morphologically distinct eggs, were identified. Concurrent infections of the two paramphistome species and liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, were common. Considering the comparatively low egg burdens observed in this study, it is unlikely that deer represent a significant source of infection for Irish livestock.

  15. Interplay between rumen digestive disorders and diet-induced inflammation in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Zebeli, Q; Metzler-Zebeli, B U

    2012-12-01

    In this review, an overview is provided on the current achievements regarding the interplay between rumen digestive disorders and diet-induced inflammation in dairy cattle. It starts with a review of factors favoring the disturbances in the rumen metabolism, which culminate with development of sub-acute rumen acidosis (SARA). The latter digestive disorder is often linked to greater metabolic stress of gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota and lowered fiber digestion, as well as with disruption of the barrier functions of the GI epithelia, which open the route of deleterious molecules to translocate from the GI lumen into the portal system. A model is suggested to illustrate the mechanisms of the involvement of digestive disorders in the disruption of the host's inner homeostasis leading to activation of acute phase response (APR). The latter is part of multifaceted innate immune and metabolic responses of the host. According to this model, endotoxin, its toxicity, and other metabolic compounds of microbial origin are regarded as important immunogenic components of GI tract, which when favored by disruption of host barriers triggers a systemic APR. Although the activation of an APR is viewed as a protective reaction aiming to reestablish the disturbed homeostasis, the presence of inflammatory state over long periods might be associated with negative consequences for the host. The review concludes that prolonged systemic inflammation can: (1) cause significant changes in the energy and lipid metabolism in different body tissues, (2) lead to the development of refractory states associated with immune suppression and increased susceptibility to various diseases, and (3) artificially increase host's requirements in energy and nutrients, lowering the efficiency of energy and feed use by the animal. The paper emphasizes the critical role that formulation of healthy diets plays for curbing down inflammation and enhancing metabolic health of dairy cows.

  16. Novel rumen bacterial diversity in two geographically separated sub-species of reindeer.

    PubMed

    Sundset, Monica A; Praesteng, Kirsti E; Cann, Isaac K O; Mathiesen, Svein D; Mackie, Roderick I

    2007-10-01

    Svalbard reindeer (Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus) live under austere nutritional conditions on the high-arctic archipelago of Svalbard, while semi-domesticated Norwegian reindeer (R. tarandus tarandus) migrate between lush coastal summer pastures and inland winter pastures with lichens on mainland Norway. Svalbard reindeer are known to have high rumen concentrations of cellulolytic bacteria, ranging from 15% of the viable population in summer to 35% in winter, compared to only 2.5% in Norwegian reindeer. Their rumen bacterial diversity was investigated through comparative analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences ( approximately 1.5 kb in length) generated from clone libraries (n = 121) and bacterial isolates (n = 51). LIBSHUFF comparisons of the composition of the two 16S rRNA libraries from Norwegian reindeer showed a significant effect of artificial feeding compared to natural pasture, but failed to yield significant differences between libraries from Norwegian reindeer and Svalbard reindeer. The combined sequences from reindeer were not significantly different from those reported in wild Thompson's gazelle in Kenya but did differ from those reported in domestic cattle in Japan. A total of 90 distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified by employing a criterion of 97% similarity, while the Chao1 index estimated the reindeer bacterial rumen population richness at 698 OTUs. The majority of the clone library sequences (92.5%) represented novel strains with <97% identity to any known sequence in the public database, most of them affiliated with the bacterial phylum Firmicutes (low G+C Gram-positives) related to the order Clostridiales (76.7%), while Gram-negative bacteria in the Bacteriodales (Prevotella-Bacteroides group) contributed to 22.5%. Also, six of the isolates were putatively novel strains, possibly representing new species in the Clostridium subphylum (cluster XIVa), Actinomyces and Butyrivibrio.

  17. Rumen temperature change monitored with remote rumen temperature boluses after challenges with bovine viral diarrhea virus and Mannheimia haemolytica.

    PubMed

    Rose-Dye, T K; Burciaga-Robles, L O; Krehbiel, C R; Step, D L; Fulton, R W; Confer, A W; Richards, C J

    2011-04-01

    Remote rumen temperature monitoring is a potential method for early disease detection in beef cattle. This experiment was conducted to determine if remotely monitored rumen temperature boluses could detect a temperature change in steers exposed to bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and challenged with a common bovine respiratory disease pathogen, Mannheimia haemolytica (MH). Twenty-four Angus crossbred steers (BW = 313 ± 31 kg) were allotted to 1 of 4 treatments: 1) no challenge (control); 2) challenge by a 72-h exposure to 2 steers persistently infected with BVDV; 3) bacterial challenge with MH; and 4) viral challenge by a 72-h exposure to 2 steers persistently infected with BVDV followed by bacterial challenge with MH (BVDV + MH). Remotely monitored rumen temperature boluses programmed to transmit temperature every minute were placed in the rumen before the time of exposure to steers persistently infected with BVDV. Rectal temperatures were taken before MH challenge (0) and at 2, 4, 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, 72, and 96 h after MH challenge. Rumen temperatures were recorded 3 d before (-72 h; period of BVDV exposure) through 14 d after (336 h) MH challenge. Rumen temperatures were analyzed as a randomized complete block design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments and a first-order autoregressive covariance structure for repeated measures. A treatment × day interaction was observed for average daily rumen temperature (P < 0.01). A treatment difference (P < 0.01) was observed on d 0, when MH-challenged steers had greater rumen temperatures than steers not challenged with MH. There was no BVDV × day interaction (P > 0.01). Rumen temperatures averaged every 2 h resulted in a BVDV × hour interaction (P < 0.01) and an MH × hour interaction (P < 0.01). The BVDV × hour differences occurred at h -18 to -14, 40 to 46, 110, 122, and 144 to 146 (P < 0.01). The MH × hour difference occurred at h 4 to 24 (P < 0.01). Maximum rumen temperature was increased (P

  18. Differences in Ureolytic Bacterial Composition between the Rumen Digesta and Rumen Wall Based on ureC Gene Classification

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Di; Zhao, Shengguo; Zheng, Nan; Bu, Dengpan; Beckers, Yves; Denman, Stuart E.; McSweeney, Christopher S.; Wang, Jiaqi

    2017-01-01

    Ureolytic bacteria are key organisms in the rumen producing urease enzymes to catalyze the breakdown of urea to ammonia for the synthesis of microbial protein. However, little is known about the diversity and distribution of rumen ureolytic microorganisms. The urease gene (ureC) has been the target gene of choice for analysis of the urea-degrading microorganisms in various environments. In this study, we investigated the predominant ureC genes of the ureolytic bacteria in the rumen of dairy cows using high-throughput sequencing. Six dairy cows with rumen fistulas were assigned to a two-period cross-over trial. A control group (n = 3) were fed a total mixed ration without urea and the treatment group (n = 3) were fed rations plus 180 g urea per cow per day at three separate times. Rumen bacterial samples from liquid and solid digesta and rumen wall fractions were collected for ureC gene amplification and sequencing using Miseq. The wall-adherent bacteria (WAB) had a distinct ureolytic bacterial profile compared to the solid-adherent bacteria (SAB) and liquid-associated bacteria (LAB) but more than 55% of the ureC sequences did not affiliate with any known taxonomically assigned urease genes. Diversity analysis of the ureC genes showed that the Shannon and Chao1 indices for the rumen WAB was lower than those observed for the SAB and LAB (P < 0.01). The most abundant ureC genes were affiliated with Methylococcaceae, Clostridiaceae, Paenibacillaceae, Helicobacteraceae, and Methylophilaceae families. Compared with the rumen LAB and SAB, relative abundance of the OTUs affiliated with Methylophilus and Marinobacter genera were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the WAB. Supplementation with urea did not alter the composition of the detected ureolytic bacteria. This study has identified significant populations of ureolytic WAB representing genera that have not been recognized or studied previously in the rumen. The taxonomic classification of rumen ureC genes in the dairy

  19. Increased blood concentration of isopropanol in ketotic dairy cows and isopropanol production from acetone in the rumen.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroshi

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate acetone and isopropanol metabolism in bovine ketosis, the blood concentrations of isopropanol, acetone, plasma 3-hydroxybutyrate (3-HB) and other metabolites were analyzed in 12 healthy controls and 15 ketotic dairy cows including fatty liver and inferior prognosis after laparotomy for displaced abomasum. In ruminal fluid taken from 6 ketotic cows, ruminal isopropanol and acetone were also analyzed. Ketotic cows showed higher concentrations of isopropanol, acetone, 3-HB and nonesterified fatty acid, and higher activities of aspartate transaminase and gamma-glutamyl transferase than control cows. Blood samples had higher concentration of isopropanol accompanied by increased acetone. In the ketotic cows, acetone was detected not only in blood but also in ruminal fluid, while higher ruminal isopropanol did not necessarily accompany its elevation in the blood. Using 2 steers with rumen cannula, all ruminal content was emptied and then substituted with artificial saliva to evaluate the importance of ruminal microbes in isopropanol production. Under each condition of intact and emptied rumen, acetone was infused into the rumen and blood isopropanol was analyzed. The elevation in the blood isopropanol concentration after acetone infusion was markedly inhibited by the emptying. Here, increased blood concentrations of isopropanol and acetone were observed in ketotic cows, and the importance of ruminal microbes in isopropanol production was confirmed.

  20. Methanogens: Methane Producers of the Rumen and Mitigation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Hook, Sarah E.; Wright, André-Denis G.; McBride, Brian W.

    2010-01-01

    Methanogens are the only known microorganisms capable of methane production, making them of interest when investigating methane abatement strategies. A number of experiments have been conducted to study the methanogen population in the rumen of cattle and sheep, as well as the relationship that methanogens have with other microorganisms. The rumen methanogen species differ depending on diet and geographical location of the host, as does methanogenesis, which can be reduced by modifying dietary composition, or by supplementation of monensin, lipids, organic acids, or plant compounds within the diet. Other methane abatement strategies that have been investigated are defaunation and vaccines. These mitigation methods target the methanogen population of the rumen directly or indirectly, resulting in varying degrees of efficacy. This paper describes the methanogens identified in the rumens of cattle and sheep, as well as a number of methane mitigation strategies that have been effective in vivo. PMID:21253540

  1. Rumen metabolism and absorption of a /sup 14/C-labelled elastomeric copolymer and its value as a roughage substitute for cattle

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, E.E.; Meyer, R.M.; Call, E.P.

    1981-05-01

    Several synthetic elastomeric and plastomeric polymers were tested for suitability as artificial roughages. They were fed to rumenfistulated cattle fed grain only. Several of the polymers were regurgitated, remasticated and reswallowed, and they formed thin strands of intermeshed fiber that produced a large, loosely woven hay-like mass that floated on the rumen contents. An elastomeric polymer consisting of copolymers of 80 to 90% ethylene and 10 to 20% propylene, with a tensile strength at yield of 45.7 kg/cm2, a hardness of 30 units (Shore D hardness scale) and a tensile strength at 300% elongation of 51.0 kg/cm2, was selected for further testing. The copolymer was fed at about 90 g/head daily for 127 days to cattle fed grain only. At slaughter, rumens contained an average of 8.0 kg copolymer (dry basis). Cattle fed the copolymer had healthier rumen papillae and epithelia of the abomasum and small intestines than did control animals fed grain only. Using /sup 14/C-labeled copolymer, we found that the copolymer was not degraded by rumen microorganisms or acid-pepsin solution. When /sup 14/C-labeled copolymer was fed to milking cows, no /sup 14/C activity was found in milk, blood or urine. Upon slaughter, about 100% of the /sup 14/C activity was recovered from digesta and feces. We concluded that the copolymer was not absorbed from the digestive tract.

  2. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltz, David L.

    1982-01-01

    Describes kinds of results achieved by computer programs in artificial intelligence. Topics discussed include heuristic searches, artificial intelligence/psychology, planning program, backward chaining, learning (focusing on Winograd's blocks to explore learning strategies), concept learning, constraint propagation, language understanding…

  3. Artificial Limbs

    MedlinePlus

    ... you are missing an arm or leg, an artificial limb can sometimes replace it. The device, which is ... activities such as walking, eating, or dressing. Some artificial limbs let you function nearly as well as before.

  4. Development of three-layered rumen escapable capsules for cattle

    PubMed Central

    SEYAMA, Tomohiro; HIRAYASU, Hirofumi; YAMAWAKI, Kenji; ADACHI, Takuhiko; SUGIMOTO, Takayuki; KASAI, Koji

    2016-01-01

    A new rumen escapable tool is presented for cattle in prospect of developing medical treatment or supplementing trace elements for disease prevention. This tool consists of a three-layered capsule that dissolves in the lower digestive tract, but not in the rumen. The capsule was manufactured by capsule-forming techniques through the use of liquid surface tension. This method does not involve high-temperature treatment, so the capsule can contain not only lipophilic substances but also hydrophilic or heat-sensitive substances. Furthermore, the capsule has a specific gravity of 1.3 and diameter of 6.0 mm, which were previously shown to be appropriate to avoid rumination. The objective of this study was to confirm the effectiveness of the capsule pertinent to rumen escaping. In order to validate rumen escape, capsules containing 30 g of water-soluble vitamin (thiamine hydrochloride) per head were administered to four lactating cows assigned in a crossover trial. In the group administered encapsulated thiamine hydrochloride, blood thiamine levels increased from 12.4 ± 1.03 ng/ml before administration to 54.8 ± 2.21 ng/ml at 6 hr following administration, whereas the level remained at 13.3 ± 2.05 ng/ml in the control group administered via aqueous solution. This indicates that the three-layered capsules passed through the rumen and dissolved in the lower digestive tract, thus functioning as a rumen escapable tool. PMID:27546371

  5. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Technology Quarterly, 1985

    1985-01-01

    This issue of "Information Technology Quarterly" is devoted to the theme of "Artificial Intelligence." It contains two major articles: (1) Artificial Intelligence and Law" (D. Peter O'Neill and George D. Wood); (2) "Artificial Intelligence: A Long and Winding Road" (John J. Simon, Jr.). In addition, it contains two sidebars: (1) "Calculating and…

  6. Using rumen probes to examine effects of conjugated linoleic acids and dietary concentrate proportion on rumen pH and rumen temperature of periparturient dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Petzold, M; Meyer, U; Spilke, J; Dänicke, S

    2014-08-01

    The study aimed to examine the influence of supplemented conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) to periparturient cows receiving different concentrate proportions antepartum on rumen pH (RpH) and rumen temperature (RT). Twenty pregnant German Holstein cows were equipped with rumen probes for continuous RpH and RT measurement in a frequency of 15 min to investigate effects of dietary concentrate and CLA around parturition and the impact of parturition itself on RpH and RT. Cows had ad libitum access to partial mixed rations, 3 weeks prior to calving until day 7 post-partum. Antepartum, cows received 100 g/day control fat (CON) or CLA supplement, either in low (20%; CON-20, CLA-20) or high concentrate diet (60%; CON-60, CLA-60). Post-partum, concentrate proportion was adjusted to 50% while fat supplementation continued. Compared with adapted feeding, high concentrate proportions antepartum tended to increase DMI and reduced RpH. Groups CON-60 and CLA-60 spent more than 4 h per day below RpH 5.6 during late pregnancy, indicating the presence of subacute rumen acidosis (SARA). The RT remained unaffected antepartum. Before calving, cows spent less time below RpH 5.6 and SARA could be detected in each group post-partum. Mean RpH increased slightly antepartum, whereas few hours before parturition a sharp decrease in RpH could be observed, accompanied with increased RT. Overall, it seems that CLA supplementation influences RpH and RT. Bearing in mind that rumen parameters fluctuate during day and herd level must be known, rumen probes for continuous RpH and RT measurement could be a useful management tool for animal health surveillance and may also help to predict parturition.

  7. Metagenomics detects functional shifts in the bovine rumen microbiota in response to propionate intake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimizing rumen microbial ecosystem output is essential towards improved ruminant agriculture. Ruminal infusion or intake of propionate, one of the predominant volatile fatty acids, has important implications for host physiology. However, how the rumen microbiota responds to propionate administrat...

  8. Changes in rumen bacterial community composition following feeding of silage inoculated with a commercial silage inoculant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some silage inoculants yield an increase in milk production without increasing fiber digestibility, possibly through altering the rumen microflora. We hypothesized that silage treated with a commercial inoculant (Lactobacillus plantarum, LP) would improve milk production and would alter rumen bacter...

  9. Board-invited review: Rumen microbiology: Leading the way in microbial ecology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Robert Hungate, considered the father of rumen microbiology, was the first to initiate a systematic exploration of the microbial ecosystem of the rumen, but he was not alone. The techniques he developed to isolate and identify cellulose-digesting bacteria from the rumen have had a major impact not ...

  10. Rumen fluid metabolomics analysis associated with feed efficiency on crossbred steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rumen plays a central role in the efficiency of digestion in ruminants. To identify potential differences in rumen function that lead to differences in feed efficiency, rumen metabolomic analysis by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/ time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) and multivariate/u...

  11. The Contribution of Mathematical Modeling to Understanding Dynamic Aspects of Rumen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bannink, André; van Lingen, Henk J.; Ellis, Jennifer L.; France, James; Dijkstra, Jan

    2016-01-01

    All mechanistic rumen models cover the main drivers of variation in rumen function, which are feed intake, the differences between feedstuffs and feeds in their intrinsic rumen degradation characteristics, and fractional outflow rate of fluid and particulate matter. Dynamic modeling approaches are best suited to the prediction of more nuanced responses in rumen metabolism, and represent the dynamics of the interactions between substrates and micro-organisms and inter-microbial interactions. The concepts of dynamics are discussed for the case of rumen starch digestion as influenced by starch intake rate and frequency of feed intake, and for the case of fermentation of fiber in the large intestine. Adding representations of new functional classes of micro-organisms (i.e., with new characteristics from the perspective of whole rumen function) in rumen models only delivers new insights if complemented by the dynamics of their interactions with other functional classes. Rumen fermentation conditions have to be represented due to their profound impact on the dynamics of substrate degradation and microbial metabolism. Although the importance of rumen pH is generally acknowledged, more emphasis is needed on predicting its variation as well as variation in the processes that underlie rumen fluid dynamics. The rumen wall has an important role in adapting to rapid changes in the rumen environment, clearing of volatile fatty acids (VFA), and maintaining rumen pH within limits. Dynamics of rumen wall epithelia and their role in VFA absorption needs to be better represented in models that aim to predict rumen responses across nutritional or physiological states. For a detailed prediction of rumen N balance there is merit in a dynamic modeling approach compared to the static approaches adopted in current protein evaluation systems. Improvement is needed on previous attempts to predict rumen VFA profiles, and this should be pursued by introducing factors that relate more to

  12. Artificial Intelligence,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PATTERN RECOGNITION, * ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE , *TEXTBOOKS, COMPUTER PROGRAMMING, MATHEMATICAL LOGIC, ROBOTS, PROBLEM SOLVING, STATISTICAL ANALYSIS, GAME THEORY, NATURAL LANGUAGE, SELF ORGANIZING SYSTEMS.

  13. Rumen microbial communities influence metabolic phenotypes in lambs

    PubMed Central

    Morgavi, Diego P.; Rathahao-Paris, Estelle; Popova, Milka; Boccard, Julien; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Boudra, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    The rumen microbiota is an essential part of ruminants shaping their nutrition and health. Despite its importance, it is not fully understood how various groups of rumen microbes affect host-microbe relationships and functions. The aim of the study was to simultaneously explore the rumen microbiota and the metabolic phenotype of lambs for identifying host-microbe associations and potential biomarkers of digestive functions. Twin lambs, separated in two groups after birth were exposed to practices (isolation and gavage with rumen fluid with protozoa or protozoa-depleted) that differentially restricted the acquisition of microbes. Rumen microbiota, fermentation parameters, digestibility and growth were monitored for up to 31 weeks of age. Microbiota assembled in isolation from other ruminants lacked protozoa and had low bacterial and archaeal diversity whereas digestibility was not affected. Exposure to adult sheep microbiota increased bacterial and archaeal diversity independently of protozoa presence. For archaea, Methanomassiliicoccales displaced Methanosphaera. Notwithstanding, protozoa induced differences in functional traits such as digestibility and significantly shaped bacterial community structure, notably Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae lower up to 6 folds, Prevotellaceae lower by ~40%, and Clostridiaceae and Veillonellaceae higher up to 10 folds compared to microbiota without protozoa. An orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis of urinary metabolome matched differences in microbiota structure. Discriminant metabolites were mainly involved in amino acids and protein metabolic pathways while a negative interaction was observed between methylotrophic methanogens Methanomassiliicoccales and trimethylamine N-oxide. These results stress the influence of gut microbes on animal phenotype and show the potential of metabolomics for monitoring rumen microbial functions. PMID:26528248

  14. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornburg, David D.

    1986-01-01

    Overview of the artificial intelligence (AI) field provides a definition; discusses past research and areas of future research; describes the design, functions, and capabilities of expert systems and the "Turing Test" for machine intelligence; and lists additional sources for information on artificial intelligence. Languages of AI are…

  15. The fate of glycerol entering the rumen of dairy cows and sheep.

    PubMed

    Werner Omazic, A; Kronqvist, C; Zhongyan, L; Martens, H; Holtenius, K

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the fate of glycerol entering the rumen, in particular whether glycerol could be absorbed across the rumen epithelium. Three non-lactating rumen-fistulated cows were used to calculate the overall disappearance rate of glycerol in vivo and evaluate the rate of ruminal glycerol absorption. Rumen epithelial tissues isolated from sheep were used to characterise glycerol transport properties. The rate of rumen microbial degradation of glycerol was then studied in an in vitro system under anaerobic and thermo-regulated conditions. The results showed that glycerol can be absorbed from the rumen in significant amounts. The fractional rate of absorption of glycerol was not affected by variations in glycerol concentration in the buffer solution in the in vivo study. The glycerol absorption apparently occurred largely by passive diffusion and was probably not facilitated by carriers. Glycerol also disappeared via microbial digestion and outflow from the rumen through the omasal orifice.

  16. Modeling the distribution of ciliate protozoa in the reticulo-rumen using linear programming.

    PubMed

    Hook, S E; Dijkstra, J; Wright, A-D G; McBride, B W; France, J

    2012-01-01

    The flow of ciliate protozoa from the reticulo-rumen is significantly less than expected given the total density of rumen protozoa present. To maintain their numbers in the reticulo-rumen, protozoa can be selectively retained through association with feed particles and the rumen wall. Few mathematical models have been designed to model rumen protozoa in both the free-living and attached phases, and the data used in the models were acquired using classical techniques. It has therefore become necessary to provide an updated model that more accurately represents these microorganisms and incorporates the recent literature on distribution, sequestration, and generation times. This paper represents a novel approach to synthesizing experimental data on rumen microorganisms in a quantitative and structured manner. The development of a linear programming model of rumen protozoa in an approximate steady state will be described and applied to data from healthy ruminants consuming commonly fed diets. In the model, protozoa associated with the liquid phase and protozoa attached to particulate matter or sequestered against the rumen wall are distinguished. Growth, passage, death, and transfer of protozoa between both pools are represented. The results from the model application using the contrasting diets of increased forage content versus increased starch content indicate that the majority of rumen protozoa, 63 to 90%, are found in the attached phase, either attached to feed particles or sequestered on the rumen wall. A slightly greater proportion of protozoa are found in the attached phase in animals fed a hay diet compared with a starch diet. This suggests that experimental protocols that only sample protozoa from the rumen fluid could be significantly underestimating the size of the protozoal population of the rumen. Further data are required on the distribution of ciliate protozoa in the rumen of healthy animals to improve model development, but the model described herein

  17. Papaya (Carica papaya) leaf methanolic extract modulates in vitro rumen methanogenesis and rumen biohydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Saeid; Goh, Yong M; Rajion, Mohamed A; Jahromi, Mohammad F; Ahmad, Yusof H; Ebrahimi, Mahdi

    2017-02-01

    Papaya leaf methanolic extract (PLE) at concentrations of 0 (CON), 5 (LLE), 10 (MLE) and 15 (HLE) mg/250 mg dry matter (DM) with 30 mL buffered rumen fluid were incubated for 24 h to identify its effect on in vitro ruminal methanogenesis and ruminal biohydrogenation (BH). Total gas production was not affected (P > 0.05) by addition of PLE compared to the CON at 24 h of incubation. Methane (CH4 ) production (mL/250 mg DM) decreased (P < 0.05) with increasing levels of PLE. Acetate to propionate ratio was lower (P <0.05) in MLE (2.02) and HLE (1.93) compared to the CON (2.28). Supplementation of the diet with PLE significantly (P <0.05) decreased the rate of BH of C18:1n-9 (oleic acid; OA), C18:2n-6 (linoleic acid; LA), C18:3n-3 (linolenic acid; LNA) and C18 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) compared to CON after 24 h incubation, which resulted in higher concentrations of BH intermediates such as C18:1 t11 (vaccenic acid; VA), c9t11 conjugated LA (CLA) (rumenic acid; RA) and t10c12 CLA. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that the total bacteria, total protozoa, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens and methanogen population in HLE decreased (P <0.05) compared to CON, but the total bacteria and B. fibrisolvens population were higher (P < 0.05) in CON compared to the PLE treatment groups.

  18. Rumen perforation caused by horn injury in two cows.

    PubMed

    Braun, Ueli; Gerspach, Christian; Stettler, Manuela; Grob, Daniela; Sydler, Titus

    2016-01-20

    Post-operative complications of trocarisation and rumenotomy are the most common causes of peritonitis associated with a rumen disorder. Since horn injury leading to rumen perforation has not previously been reported in the literature, two cows with this condition are reported. Small superficial skin lesions were observed in one of the cows and the other had a perforating skin lesion in the left abdomen. Both cows had signs of hypovolaemic shock. Ultrasonography revealed hypoechoic fluid, echoic lesions and occasional fibrinous septa caudoventral to the reticulum. Caudally the fluid extended to the left flank fold and occupied about one third of the peritoneal cavity. The area of the skin perforation in the left abdomen was swollen and the muscle layers could not be differentiated using ultrasonography. Diffuse fibrino-purulent peritonitis was diagnosed in both cows, and because of a poor prognosis, they were euthanased and necropsied. Perforation of the abdominal wall and rumen with diffuse fibrino-purulent peritonitis was present. Ultrasonography is a suitable tool to characterise the inflammatory lesions between the rumen and left abdominal wall and objectify the interpretation of clinical findings. Horn injury should be included in the rule outs for cattle with left abdominal skin wounds and diffuse peritonitis.

  19. The microbial composition and metabolic potential of the ovine rumen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rumen is efficient at biotransforming nitroaromatic explosive compounds, such as TNT, RDX, and HMX, which have been used widely in US military munitions. These compounds are present in > 4,000 military items, from large bombs to very small igniters. However, their manufacturing processes have g...

  20. Does Dietary Mitigation of Enteric Methane Production Affect Rumen Function and Animal Productivity in Dairy Cows?

    PubMed Central

    Veneman, Jolien B.; Muetzel, Stefan; Hart, Kenton J.; Faulkner, Catherine L.; Moorby, Jon M.; Perdok, Hink B.; Newbold, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that the rumen microbiome and rumen function might be disrupted if methane production in the rumen is decreased. Furthermore concerns have been voiced that geography and management might influence the underlying microbial population and hence the response of the rumen to mitigation strategies. Here we report the effect of the dietary additives: linseed oil and nitrate on methane emissions, rumen fermentation, and the rumen microbiome in two experiments from New Zealand (Dairy 1) and the UK (Dairy 2). Dairy 1 was a randomized block design with 18 multiparous lactating cows. Dairy 2 was a complete replicated 3 x 3 Latin Square using 6 rumen cannulated, lactating dairy cows. Treatments consisted of a control total mixed ration (TMR), supplementation with linseed oil (4% of feed DM) and supplementation with nitrate (2% of feed DM) in both experiments. Methane emissions were measured in open circuit respiration chambers and rumen samples were analyzed for rumen fermentation parameters and microbial population structure using qPCR and next generation sequencing (NGS). Supplementation with nitrate, but not linseed oil, decreased methane yield (g/kg DMI; P<0.02) and increased hydrogen (P<0.03) emissions in both experiments. Furthermore, the effect of nitrate on gaseous emissions was accompanied by an increased rumen acetate to propionate ratio and consistent changes in the rumen microbial populations including a decreased abundance of the main genus Prevotella and a decrease in archaeal mcrA (log10 copies/ g rumen DM content). These results demonstrate that methane emissions can be significantly decreased with nitrate supplementation with only minor, but consistent, effects on the rumen microbial population and its function, with no evidence that the response to dietary additives differed due to geography and different underlying microbial populations. PMID:26509835

  1. Cellulose fermentation by a rumen anaerobic fungus in both the absence and the presence of rumen methanogens

    SciTech Connect

    Bauchop, T.; Mountfort, D.O.

    1981-12-01

    The fermentation of cellulose by an ovine rumen anaerobic fungus in the absence and presence of rumen methanogens is described. In the monoculture, moles of product as a percentage of the moles of hexose fermented were: acetate, 72.7; carbon dioxide, 37.6; formate, 83.1; ethanol, 37.4; lactate, 67.0; and hydrogen 35.3. In the coculture, acetate was the major product (134.7%), and carbon dioxide increased (88.7%). Lactate and ethanol production decreased to 2.9 and 19% respectively, little formate was detected (1%), and hydrogen did not accumulate. Substantial amounts of methane were produced in the coculture (58.7%). Studies with (2-14C) acetate indicated that acetate was not a precursor of methane. The demonstration of cellulose fermentation by a fungus extends the range of known rumen organisms capable of participating in cellulose digestion and provides further support for a role of anaerobic fungi in rumen fiber digestion. The effect of the methanogens on the pattern of fermentation is interpreted as a shift in flow of electrons away from electron sink products to methane via hydrogen. The study provides a new example of intermicrobial hydrogen transfer and the first demonstration of hydrogen formation by a fungus. (Refs. 27).

  2. Role and function of short chain fatty acids in rumen epithelial metabolism, development and importance of the rumen epithelium in understanding control of transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The epithelial lining of the rumen is uniquely placed to have impact on the nutrient metabolism of the animal. The symbiotic relationship with the microbial populations that inhabit the rumen, serves to provide a constant supply of nutrients from roughage that would otherwise be unusable. Metaboli...

  3. Effects of Bacillus subtilis natto and Different Components in Culture on Rumen Fermentation and Rumen Functional Bacteria In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Li, Jinan; Bu, Dengpan; Nan, Xuemei; Du, Hong

    2016-05-01

    This study was to investigate the effects of live or autoclaved Bacillus subtilis natto, their fermented products and media on rumen fermentation and rumen functional bacteria in vitro. Rumen fluid from three multiparous lactating Holstein cows was combined and transferred into serum bottles after diluted. Fifteen serum bottles were divided into five treatments, which were designed as following: CTR (the fermentation of 0.5 g TMR and ruminal fluids from dairy cows), LBS (CTR plus a minimum of 10(11) cfu live Bacillus subtilis natto), ABS (CTR plus a minimum of 10(11) cfu autoclaved Bacillus subtilis natto), BSC (CTR plus 1 ml Bacillus subtilis natto fermentation products without bacteria), and BSM (CTR plus 1 ml liquid fermentation medium). When separated from the culture, live Bacillus subtilis natto individually increased the concentrations of ammonia-N (P < 0.01), MCP production (P < 0.01), and tended to elevate total VFA (P = 0.07), but decreased the ratio of acetate and propionate (P < 0.01). Autoclaved Bacillus subtilis natto has the similar function with the live bacteria except for the ratio of acetate and propionate. Except B. fibrisolvens, live or autoclaved Bacillus subtilis natto did not influence or decreased the 16S rRNA gene quantification of the detected bacteria. BSC and BSM altered the relative expression of certain functional bacteria in the rumen. These results indicated that it was Bacillus subtilis natto thalli that played the important role in promoting rumen fermentation when applied as a probiotic in dairy ration.

  4. Technical note: Bacterial diversity and fermentation end products in rumen fluid samples collected via oral lavage or rumen cannula.

    PubMed

    Lodge-Ivey, S L; Browne-Silva, J; Horvath, M B

    2009-07-01

    A study was conducted to determine if sampling rumen contents via a ruminal cannula or oral lavage tube would yield similar denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles of the bacterial community. Two species of ruminally cannulated animals were used for this study (cattle, n = 2; sheep, n = 3). All animals were allowed ad libitum access to feed. Cattle were fed baled unprocessed sorghum-sudan hay (12% CP, 68% NDF; DM basis), whereas sheep were maintained on chopped alfalfa (18% CP, 40% NDF; DM basis). Ruminal fluid was collected (approximately 20 mL) once per week for 3 wk from each animal using a poly tube equipped with a suction strainer with a hand-held suction pump through the rumen cannula or oral cavity. The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrates that yield of bacterial diversity was not different between the 2 sampling methods (P = 0.73). When samples were grouped according to band pattern similarity, groups were most stable according to individual animal and species rather than sampling method. Total VFA and molar proportions of individual VFA did not differ by sampling method (P > 0.40). Additionally, rumen ammonia concentrations were similar for both sampling methods (19.3 vs. 19.1 mM +/- 8.0 for cannula vs. lavage, respectively; P = 0.98). These data indicate that rumen samples collected via oral lavage or rumen cannula yield similar results. This knowledge will allow sample collection from a greater population of animals and an ability to maintain the value of research livestock that can be lost due to the surgical implantation of a ruminal cannula.

  5. Research note: investigation on the metabolism of glycerol in the rumen of bulls.

    PubMed

    Kijora, C; Bergner, H; Götz, K P; Bartelt, J; Szakács, J; Sommer, A

    1998-01-01

    Two bulls, each fitted with rumen and duodenal cannulas, received (in addition to a hay-grain diet) twice daily an infusion of 200 g glycerol into the rumen over a period of six days. During this preliminary in vivo investigation, the influence of a glycerol application on the rumen environment over a six-day adaptation period was examined. Samples of rumen fluid were collected daily, two hours after glycerol infusion. An additional 15N-urea application into the rumen was given on days 1 (without glycerol infusion), 3 and 7 (with glycerol infusion). Extra samples of rumen fluid and blood plasma (from puncture of vena jungularis) were taken through the 12th hour following urea application. Rumen fluid pH was reduced due to glycerol intake from 6.3 (day 1, without glycerol) to 5.4 by day 7. Molar proportion of acetic acid to propionic acid decreased from 3.5 (day 1) to 2.1 (days 6 and 7). Average glycerol disappearance rate from the rumen was 4.7 gl-1 h-1 for the first hour. Only small amounts of glycerol could be detected in the duodenal digesta. Blood plasma glycerol content was significantly higher after glycerol application (0.061 mmol l-1 vs. 0.019 mmol l-1). The incorporation of 15N into the rumen bacteria and the proportion of bacterial N (as percent of TCA-precipitable N in the rumen fluid) were lower after glycerol influsion. These results, coupled with the lower concentration of iso-acids (isobutyric and isovaleric acids) in the rumen fluid, indicate that the high amount of glycerol infusion (10% of DMI) reduced protein metabolism of rumen bacteria throughout the experimental period.

  6. Rumen passage kinetics of forage- and concentrate-derived fiber in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Krämer, M; Lund, P; Weisbjerg, M R

    2013-05-01

    Rumen passage kinetics of forage and concentrate fiber were analyzed to determine intrinsic feed effects and extrinsic ration effects on the retention time of fiber in the rumen. Sixteen Danish Holstein cows (557 ± 37 kg of body weight, 120 ± 21 d in milk, mean ± SD), 8 fitted with ruminal cannulas, were used in a completely randomized block experiment. Treatments differed in forage type (corn silage vs. grass silage) and forage:concentrate ratio (50:50 vs. 75:25 on organic matter basis). Fiber passage kinetics were studied based on rumen evacuations and on marker excretion profiles in feces fitted to 1 and 2 pool models. Each cow received ytterbium (Yb)-labeled fiber of the forage fed in the ration, samarium (Sm)-labeled fiber of the forage not fed in the ration, and concentrate fiber labeled with lanthanum (La), all as a single pulse dose. Nineteen fecal grab samples were taken per cow. Rumen liquid passage was studied using chromium-EDTA dosed as a single pulse into the rumen, followed by sampling of rumen liquid from both the ventral and medial rumen. Rumen mean retention time did not differ between forages when based on Yb-excretion profiles but was numerically longer for grass silage- than for corn silage-based rations using rumen evacuation data. Liquid rate of passage did not differ when calculated from medial or ventral rumen liquid samples, indicating that estimates for the probability of rumen liquid escape were independent of rumen sampling site. Total mean retention time decreased from forage fiber to concentrate fiber to liquid. The forage type itself (corn silage or grass silage) rather than the ration composition seemed to determine the total-tract retention time of forage fiber.

  7. Effects of plants containing secondary compounds and plant oils on rumen fermentation and ecology.

    PubMed

    Wanapat, Metha; Kongmun, Pongthon; Poungchompu, Onanong; Cherdthong, Anusorn; Khejornsart, Pichad; Pilajun, Ruangyote; Kaenpakdee, Sujittra

    2012-03-01

    A number of experiments have been conducted to investigate effects of tropical plants containing condensed tannins and/or saponins present in tropical plants and some plant oils on rumen fermentation and ecology in ruminants. Based on both in vitro and in vivo trials, the results revealed important effects on rumen microorganisms and fermentation including methane production. Incorporation and/or supplementation of these plants containing secondary metabolites have potential for improving rumen ecology and subsequently productivity in ruminants.

  8. Relationship between chemical composition and in situ rumen degradation characteristics of maize silages in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Ali, M; van Duinkerken, G; Cone, J W; Klop, A; Blok, M C; Spek, J W; Bruinenberg, M H; Hendriks, W H

    2014-11-01

    Several in situ studies have been conducted on maize silages to determine the effect of individual factors such as maturity stage, chop length and ensiling of maize crop on the rumen degradation but the information on the relationship between chemical composition and in situ rumen degradation characteristics remains scarce. The objectives of this study were to determine and describe relationships between the chemical composition and the rumen degradation characteristics of dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM), CP, starch and aNDFom (NDF assayed with a heat stable amylase and expressed exclusive of residual ash) of maize silages. In all, 75 maize silage samples were selected, with a broad range in chemical composition and quality parameters. The samples were incubated in the rumen for 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 72 and 336 h, using the nylon bag technique. Large range was found in the rumen degradable fractions of DM, OM, CP, starch and aNDFom because of the broad range in chemical composition and quality parameters. The new database with in situ rumen degradation characteristics of DM, OM, CP, starch and aNDFom of the maize silages was obtained under uniform experimental conditions; same cows, same incubation protocol and same chemical analysis procedures. Regression equations were developed with significant predictors (P<0.05) describing moderate and weak relationships between the chemical composition and the washout fraction, rumen undegradable fraction, potentially rumen degradable fraction, fractional degradation rate and effective rumen degradable fraction of DM, OM, CP, starch and aNDFom.

  9. Effects of early feeding on the host rumen transcriptome and bacterial diversity in lambs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weimin; Li, Chong; Li, Fadi; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Liu, Ting; Nian, Fang; Yue, Xiangpeng; Li, Fei; Pan, Xiangyu; La, Yongfu; Mo, Futao; Wang, Fangbin; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Early consumption of starter feed promotes rumen development in lambs. We examined rumen development in lambs fed starter feed for 5 weeks using histological and biochemical analyses and by performing high-throughput sequencing in rumen tissues. Additionally, rumen contents of starter feed-fed lambs were compared to those of breast milk-fed controls. Our physiological and biochemical findings revealed that early starter consumption facilitated rumen development, changed the pattern of ruminal fermentation, and increased the amylase and carboxymethylcellulase activities of rumen micro-organisms. RNA-seq analysis revealed 225 differentially expressed genes between the rumens of breast milk- and starter feed-fed lambs. These DEGs were involved in many metabolic pathways, particularly lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, and included HMGCL and HMGCS2. Sequencing analysis of 16S rRNA genes revealed that ruminal bacterial communities were more diverse in breast milk-than in starter feed-fed lambs, and each group had a distinct microbiota. We conclude that early starter feeding is beneficial to rumen development and physiological function in lambs. The underlying mechanism may involve the stimulation of ruminal ketogenesis and butanoate metabolism via HMGCL and HMGCS2 combined with changes in the fermentation type induced by ruminal microbiota. Overall, this study provides insights into the molecular mechanisms of rumen development in sheep. PMID:27576848

  10. Slow ammonia release from urea: rumen and metabolism studies.

    PubMed

    Owens, F N; Lusby, K S; Mizwicki, K; Forero, O

    1980-03-01

    A new slow-release urea (SRU) made by coating prilled urea with a tung oil-linseed oil-talc-catalyst mixture was evaluated for ammonia-nitrogen release rate, animal acceptability, toxicity and effects on dry matter digestibility, diet intake and nitrogen retention. When added at a level equal to 1% urea in an 80% concentrate steer diet and fed twice daily, SRU gave a ruminal ammonia-nitrogen peak 1 hr postfeeding of 32 mg/dl compared to a peak from prilled urea of 53 mg/dl at 30 minutes. Bi-hourly feeding of prilled urea and SRU produced similar rumen ammonia-nitrogen levels and demonstrated that SRU was almost completely hydrolyzed in the rumen. Steers fasted for 26 hr and refed with supplements containing 10% urea from prilled urea had rumen ammonia levels of 120 ml/dl and showed muscle tremors 35 min after feeding. Rumen ammonia levels of steers fed equivalent urea from SRU remained below 35 ml/dl and exhibited no toxicity symptoms. Sheep fed ad libitum cottonseed hulls were offered a supplement containing 5% or 10% urea from urea or SRU once daily. Intake of SRU supplement was 7 and 17% greater, while cottonseed hull intakes were similar for sheep fed urea or SRU at the 5 and 10% levels. In a nitrogen balance trial, steers were fed ad libitum cottonseed hulls unsupplemented or supplemented with isonitrogenous amounts of SRU, prilled urea or soybean meal. Added nitrogen from all sources increased cottonseed hull intake. Steers fed SRU consumed more (P less than .05) cottonseed hulls than steers fed urea. Dry matter digestibility and nitrogen retention values tended to be highest for steers fed soybean meal supplement with little difference noted between prilled urea and SRU supplements.

  11. Effect of phytosterols on rumen fermentation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xi, Y M; Jin, Z H; Lin, L J; Han, Z Y

    2014-05-16

    We investigated the effect of phytosterols on rumen fermentation in vitro using gas syringes as incubators. Phytosterols were dissolved in ethyl acetate (8.3%) and added at various concentrations to the common diet in rumen fluid. In vitro gas production (GP) was recorded after 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h incubation. Incubation was stopped at 6, 12, and 24 h and the inoculants were then tested for pH, dry matter digestibility (DMD), microbial protein yield (MCP), lactic acid, NH3-N, and volatile fatty acids (VFAs). GP was consistently higher than the control; particularly, treatments at 12, 18, and 24 h reached extremely significant levels (P < 0.01). Compared to the control group, the pH of ruminal fluid was slightly lower after incubation, and DMD and MCP increased with increasing phytosterol level except for the content of MCP at 6 h, which changed only minimally. Lactate was significantly lower after treatment compared to the control at 12 h (P < 0.01) and 24 h (P < 0.05), while NH3-N at 12 h (P < 0.05) and 24 h (P < 0.01) after treatment decreased significantly. Acetate, propionate, butyrate, and total VFA for all treatments were higher than those of the control, particularly for butyrate at 6 h (P < 0.01). These results suggest that phytosterols modify rumen fermentation by inhibiting released harmful products and promoting the release of beneficial product, which may be useful for improving nutrient utilization and animal health.

  12. The effect of rumen ciliates on chitinolytic activity, chitin content and the number of fungal zoospores in the rumen fluid of sheep.

    PubMed

    Miltko, Renata; Bełżecki, Grzegorz; Herman, Andrzej; Kowalik, Barbara; Skomiał, Jacek

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of selected protozoa on the degradation and concentration of chitin and the numbers of fungal zoospores in the rumen fluid of sheep. Three adult ewes were fed a hay-concentrate diet, defaunated, then monofaunated with Entodinium caudatum or Diploplastron affine alone and refaunated with natural rumen fauna. The average density of the protozoa population varied from 6.1 · 10(4) (D. affine) to 42.2 · 10(4) cells/ml rumen fluid (natural rumen fauna). The inoculation of protozoa in the rumen of defaunated sheep increased the total activity of chitinolytic enzymes from 2.9 to 3.6 μmol N-acetylglucosamine/g dry matter (DM) of rumen fluid per min, the chitin concentration from 6.3 to 7.2 mg/g DM of rumen fluid and the number of fungal zoospores from 8.1 to 10.9 · 10(5) cells/ml rumen fluid. All examined indices showed diurnal variations. Ciliate population density was highest immediately prior to feeding and lowest at 4 h thereafter. The opposite effects were observed for the numbers of fungal zoospores, the chitin concentration and chitinolytic activity. Furthermore, it was found that chitin from zoospores may account for up to 95% of total microbial chitin in the rumen fluid of sheep. In summary, the examined ciliate species showed the ability of chitin degradation as well as a positive influence on the development of the ruminal fungal population.

  13. Shifts in the rumen microbiota due to the type of carbohydrate and level of protein ingested by dairy cattle are associated with changes in rumen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Belanche, Alejandro; Doreau, Michel; Edwards, Joan E; Moorby, Jon M; Pinloche, Eric; Newbold, Charles J

    2012-09-01

    Balancing energy and nitrogen in the rumen is a key to both profitability and environmental sustainability. Four dairy cows were used in a Latin square experimental design to investigate the effect of severe nitrogen underfeeding (110 vs. 80% of requirements) and the type of carbohydrate consumed [neutral detergent fiber rich (FIB) vs. starch rich (STA)] on the rumen ecosystem. These dietary treatments modified both rumen fermentation and microbial populations. Compared with STA diets, consumption of FIB diets increased bacterial and fungal diversity in the rumen and also increased the concentrations of cellulolytic microorganisms, including protozoa (+38%), anaerobic fungi (+59%), and methanogens (+27%). This microbial adaptation to fiber utilization led to similar digestibility values for the 2 carbohydrate sources and was accompanied by a shift in the rumen fermentation patterns; when the FIB diets were consumed, the cows had greater ruminal pH, ammonia concentrations, and molar proportions of acetate and propionate compared with when they consumed the STA diets. Certain rumen microorganisms were sensitive to a shortage of nitrogen; rumen concentrations of ammonia were 49% lower when the low-protein (LP) diets were consumed as were total bacteria (-13%), anaerobic fungi (-28%), methanogens (-27%), protozoa (-19%), cellulolytic bacteria, and microbial diversity compared with when the high-protein (HP) diets were consumed. As a result, the digestibility of the LP diets was less than that of the HP diets. These findings demonstrated that the rumen microbial ecosystem is directly linked to the rumen fermentation pattern and, to some extent, to the efficiency of diet utilization by dairy cattle.

  14. Artificial ribonucleases.

    PubMed

    Morrow, J R

    1994-01-01

    Many inorganic and organic compounds promote the reactions catalyzed by RNase A. Both the transesterification step, where a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate is formed with concomitant cleavage of RNA, and the hydrolysis step, where the 2',3'-cyclic phosphate is converted to a phosphate monoester, may be mimicked with compounds that are readily synthesized in the laboratory. Electrophilic activation of the phosphate ester and charge neutralization are generally important means by which artificial RNases promote phosphate diester displacement reactions. Several artificial RNases operate by a bifunctional general acid/general base mechanism, as does RNase A. Provision of an intramolecular nucleophile appears to be an important pathway for metal complex promoted phosphate diester hydrolysis. In contrast to the successful design of compounds that promote the reactions catalyzed by RNase A, there are no artificial nucleases to date that will cleave the 3' P-O bond of RNA or hydrolyze an oligonucleotide of DNA. Artificial RNases based on both metal complexes and organic compounds have been described. Metal complexes may be particularly effective catalysts for both transesterification and hydrolysis reactions of phosphate diesters. Under physiological conditions (37 degrees C and neutral pH), several metal complexes catalyze the transesterification of RNA. Future work should involve the development of metal complexes which are inert to metal ion release but which maintain open coordination sites for catalytic activity. The design of compounds containing multiple amine or imidazole groups that may demonstrate bifunctional catalysis is a promising route to new artificial RNases. Further design of these compounds and careful placement of catalytic groups may yield new RNase mimics that operate under physiological conditions. The attachment of artificial RNases to recognition agents such as oligodeoxynucleotides to create new sequence-specific endoribonucleases is an exciting field of

  15. Artificial Intelligence.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David R; Palacios-González, César; Harris, John

    2016-04-01

    It seems natural to think that the same prudential and ethical reasons for mutual respect and tolerance that one has vis-à-vis other human persons would hold toward newly encountered paradigmatic but nonhuman biological persons. One also tends to think that they would have similar reasons for treating we humans as creatures that count morally in our own right. This line of thought transcends biological boundaries-namely, with regard to artificially (super)intelligent persons-but is this a safe assumption? The issue concerns ultimate moral significance: the significance possessed by human persons, persons from other planets, and hypothetical nonorganic persons in the form of artificial intelligence (AI). This article investigates why our possible relations to AI persons could be more complicated than they first might appear, given that they might possess a radically different nature to us, to the point that civilized or peaceful coexistence in a determinate geographical space could be impossible to achieve.

  16. Perturbation dynamics of the rumen microbiota in response to exogenous butyrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The capacity of the rumen microbiota to produce volatile fatty acids (VFA) has important implications in animal well-being and production. We investigated temporal changes of the rumen microbiota in response to butyrate infusion using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Phyla were identified in ...

  17. Measurement of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes in serum, plasma, and rumen fluid from sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies involving the consumption, metabolism, and elimination of terpenes by small ruminants consuming terpene-laden shrubs as well as those exploring the potential for natural products as rumen modifiers could benefit from a procedure that measures terpenes in both blood and rumen fluid and that i...

  18. Isolation, characterization and quantification of Clostridium kluyveri from the bovine rumen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A strain of Clostridium kluyveri was isolated from the bovine rumen in a medium containing ethanol as an electron donor and acetate and succinate (common products of rumen fermentation) as electron acceptors. The isolate displayed a narrow substrate range but wide temperature and pH ranges atypical ...

  19. Proteomic analysis of Escherichia coli O157 cultured in bovine rumen fluid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To obtain insights into Escherichia coli O157 (O157) adaptation and survival in the bovine rumen, the first anatomical compartment encountered by this pathogen during transit through the bovine gastrointestinal tract to sites of colonization, we defined the proteome of O157 cultured in rumen fluid (...

  20. Characterization of differentially expressed genes in calf rumen epithelium in response to weaning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During weaning, rumen epithelial cell function must transition from a pre-ruminant to a true ruminant state for efficient nutrient absorption and metabolism. During this time, the rumen grows to represent from 30 to 70% of the capacity of the gut, directly impacting net efficiency of feed conversion...

  1. Effects of hops (Humulus lupulus L.) extract on volatile fatty acid production by rumen bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: To determine the effects of hops extract, on in vitro volatile fatty acid (VFA) production by bovine rumen microorganisms. Methods and Results: When mixed rumen microbes were suspended in media containing carbohydrates, the initial rates of VFA production were suppressed by beta-acid rich hops...

  2. Effects of variation of dietary sulfur on movement of sulfur in sheep rumen

    SciTech Connect

    Kandylis, K.; Bray, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    Effects of variations in dietary sulfur on rumen sulfur dynamics were studied under steady state conditions. In the first experimental period, three sheep were given 33.3 g of a pelleted diet hourly containing 1.59 g sulfur/kg (low) and in the second period the sulfur content was increased to 3.21 g/kg (high) by the addition of sodium sulfate. The daily sulfur intake was 1.158 g on the low sulfur diet and .545 g of this passed from the rumen in protein, .614 g was calculated to be absorbed from the rumen as sulfide, and .052 g was estimated to be recycled to the rumen. For sheep with daily intakes of 2.317 g sulfur, 1.212 g passed from the rumen in protein, 1.078 g was absorbed from the rumen, and .093 g was estimated to be recycled. It was estimated that 127 and 165 g microbial protein were synthesized/kg organic matter truly digested in the rumen for low and high sulfur diets, respectively. A simple model using simultaneous equations was proposed to describe rumen sulfur metabolism.

  3. Seasonal effect on rumen function in sheep on range in the Accra Plains of Ghana.

    PubMed

    Adjorlolo, Leonard Kofi; Adogla-Bessa, Tsatsu; Amaning-Kwarteng, Kofi; Ahunu, Benjamin Kwadjo

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of the seasonal decline in quality and availability of feed on rumen function in sheep grazing without supplementation. Effects of season on rumen pH, ammonia nitrogen concentration and rumen degradation of urea-treated rice straw in grazing sheep were determined. Four fistulated Djallonké sheep were added to a group of grazing sheep and used for this study. Rumen contents were sampled for pH and ammonia in the rainy season and in the dry season. Ammoniated rice straw was incubated in the rumen to determine its degradation characteristics. Rumen pH was higher (p < 0.1) in the dry season than in the rainy season. Rumen ammonia nitrogen concentrations on the other hand were similar (p > 0.05) in the two seasons. In sacco dry matter degradation parameters of urea-ammoniated rice straw showed seasonal differences in the soluble (a) and the insoluble but degradable (b) fractions as well as lag time before the start of degradation. It was concluded that despite higher pH in the dry season and similar ammonia nitrogen concentration in the two seasons, rumen degradability of dry matter of urea-treated rice straw in sheep was higher in the rainy season than that in the dry season.

  4. Effect of feeding duration and rumen fill on behaviour in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Lindström; Redbo

    2000-12-01

    The aim of the present experiment was to test the hypothesis that oral manipulation of feed is a behavioural need in cattle, irrespective of actual rumen load. Twelve rumen fistulated cows were used and subjected to four different treatments: low rumen content+long duration of eating (A), high rumen content+short duration of eating (B), high rumen content+long duration of eating (=positive control) (C) and low rumen content+short duration of eating (=negative control) (D). To obtain treatment A and B, rumen content was transferred by hand from cow A to B through the rumen fistulaes. Each treatment lasted for 3 days with 2 weeks of recovery between each new treatment. The experiment was repeated twice during two consecutive years. All cows were fed the same mixture of silage, concentrate and hay. The cows were videotaped under normal conditions (24h), and on the third day of the experiment. From these videotapes, the behaviours (frequency and duration per 24h) have been analysed.Time spent eating differed between the four treatments (P<0.001), with shortest eating-times in B and D. The cows with low rumen content (A and D) spent shorter time ruminating (P<0.001) than the cows with filled rumen (B and C). The B and D cows (short duration of eating) spent longer time (P<0.001) with behaviours related to feed-searching than the cows with long duration of eating (A and C). The C cows had fewer (P<0.001) bouts of behaviours related to feed-searching than the A, B and D cows. Time spent with stereotypies (tongue-rolling) was longer (P<0.01) in D than in the other treatments. There was a difference (P<0.001) between treatments in eating bouts. The A cows had more (P<0.05) eating bouts than the cows in B, C and D. The cows with low rumen content (A and D) had fewer ruminating bouts (P<0.001) than the cows with filled rumens (B and C). The number of bouts with stereotypies differed (P<0.01), the cows in D having the highest figures compared with all the other treatments

  5. Effects of supplementing concentrates differing in carbohydrate composition in veal calf diets: II. Rumen development.

    PubMed

    Suárez, B J; Van Reenen, C G; Gerrits, W J J; Stockhofe, N; van Vuuren, A M; Dijkstra, J

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this experiment was to examine the effects of concentrates in feed, differing in carbohydrate source, on the rumen development of veal calves. For this purpose, 160 male Holstein Friesian x Dutch Friesian crossbred calves were used in a complete randomized block design with a 5 x 2 factorial arrangement. Dietary treatments consisted of 1) a milk replacer control, 2) a pectin-based concentrate, 3) a neutral detergent fiber-based concentrate, 4) a starch-based concentrate, and 5) a mixed concentrate (equal amounts of the concentrates in treatments 2, 3, and 4). Concentrate diets were provided as pellets in addition to a commercial milk replacer. Calves were euthanized at either 8 or 12 wk of age. Plasma acetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) were measured as indicators of rumen development. Empty rumen weight was determined, and wall samples were taken at slaughter. In most calves, a poorly developed rumen mucosa was observed. Coalescing rumen papillae with embedded hair, feed particles, and cell debris were found in all calves fed the concentrate diets. Calves fed concentrates had significantly heavier rumens than calves fed the control diet. In the dorsal location of the rumen, calves fed concentrate diets showed an increased ratio of mucosa to serosa length compared with calves fed the control diet, whereas in the ventral location only, calves fed the pectin and mixed diets showed larger ratios of mucosa to serosa length. Mucosa thickness and muscle thickness were greater in the ventral and dorsal locations of the rumen, respectively. In both locations, the NDF diet resulted numerically in the lowest mucosa thickness and highest muscle thickness among the concentrate treatments. At 8 wk, calves fed the concentrate diets had higher plasma acetate concentrations than calves on the control treatment. However, at 12 wk, only NDF-fed calves showed significantly higher plasma acetate concentrations. The plasma BHBA concentrations of calves at 8 wk of

  6. Utilization of digital differential display to identify differentially expressed genes related to rumen development.

    PubMed

    Kato, Daichi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Haga, Satoshi; So, KyoungHa; Yamauchi, Eri; Nakano, Miwa; Ishizaki, Hiroshi; Choi, Kichoon; Katoh, Kazuo; Roh, Sang-Gun

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to identify the genes associated with the development of the rumen epithelium by screening for candidate genes by digital differential display (DDD) in silico. Using DDD in NCBI's UniGene database, expressed sequence tag (EST)-based gene expression profiles were analyzed in rumen, reticulum, omasum, abomasum and other tissues in cattle. One hundred and ten candidate genes with high expression in the rumen were derived from a library of all tissues. The expression levels of 11 genes in all candidate genes were analyzed in the rumen, reticulum, omasum and abomasum of nine Japanese Black male calves (5-week-old pre-weaning: n = 3; 15-week-old weaned calves: n = 6). Among the 11 genes, only 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2), aldo-keto reductase family 1, member C1-like (AKR1C1), and fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3) showed significant changes in the levels of gene expression in the rumen between the pre- and post-weaning of calves. These results indicate that DDD analysis in silico can be useful for screening candidate genes related to rumen development, and that the changes in expression levels of three genes in the rumen may have been caused by weaning, aging or both.

  7. Quantifying the Responses of Mixed Rumen Microbes to Excess Carbohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Hackmann, Timothy J.; Diese, Leanne E.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if a mixed microbial community from the bovine rumen would respond to excess carbohydrate by accumulating reserve carbohydrate, energy spilling (dissipating excess ATP energy as heat), or both. Mixed microbes from the rumen were washed with N-free buffer and dosed with glucose. Total heat production was measured by calorimetry. Energy spilling was calculated as heat production not accounted by (i) endogenous metabolism (heat production before dosing glucose) and (ii) synthesis of reserve carbohydrate (heat from synthesis itself and reactions yielding ATP for it). For cells dosed with 5 mM glucose, synthesis of reserve carbohydrate and endogenous metabolism accounted for nearly all heat production (93.7%); no spilling was detected (P = 0.226). For cells dosed with 20 mM glucose, energy spilling was not detected immediately after dosing, but it became significant (P < 0.05) by approximately 30 min after dosing with glucose. Energy spilling accounted for as much as 38.7% of heat production in one incubation. Nearly all energy (97.9%) and carbon (99.9%) in glucose were recovered in reserve carbohydrate, fermentation acids, CO2, CH4, and heat. This full recovery indicates that products were measured completely and that spilling was not a methodological artifact. These results should aid future research aiming to mechanistically account for variation in energetic efficiency of mixed microbial communities. PMID:23584777

  8. Microbial degradation of usnic acid in the reindeer rumen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundset, Monica A.; Barboza, Perry S.; Green, Thomas K.; Folkow, Lars P.; Blix, Arnoldus Schytte; Mathiesen, Svein D.

    2010-03-01

    Reindeer ( Rangifer tarandus) eat and utilize lichens as an important source of energy and nutrients in winter. Lichens synthesize and accumulate a wide variety of phenolic secondary compounds, such as usnic acid, as a defense against herbivores and to protect against damage by UV-light in solar radiation. We have examined where and to what extent these phenolic compounds are degraded in the digestive tract of the reindeer, with particular focus on usnic acid. Three male reindeer were given ad libitum access to a control diet containing no usnic acid for three weeks and then fed lichens ad libitum (primarily Cladonia stellaris) containing 9.1 mg/g DM usnic acid for 4 weeks. Usnic acid intake in reindeer on the lichen diet was 91-117 mg/kg BM/day. In spite of this, no trace of usnic acid or conjugates of usnic acid was found either in fresh rumen fluid, urine, or feces. This suggests that usnic acid is rapidly degraded by rumen microbes, and that it consequently is not absorbed by the animal. This apparent ability to detoxify lichen phenolic compounds may gain increased importance with future enhanced UV-B radiation expected to cause increased protective usnic acid/phenol production in lichens.

  9. Metabolic Fate of Cysteine and Methionine in Rumen Digesta

    PubMed Central

    Nader, C. J.; Walker, D. J.

    1970-01-01

    Estimates were obtained of the extent to which cysteine and methionine were incorporated into the protein of the microbes of rumen digesta without prior degradation and resynthesis. By using the amino acids labeled with both 35S and 14C, it was observed that a large proportion of the 35S appeared in the sulfide pool and of the 14C appeared in volatile fatty acids. By isolating the appropriate amino acid, obtaining the 14C to 35S ratio, and comparing this with the ratio in the added amino acid, the degree of direct incorporation was calculated. For cysteine it was estimated that at most 1% and for methionine, at most 11% of the amino acid in the free pool was incorporated unchanged into microbial protein. As a consequence of these findings, it is considered that the method for measuring microbial protein synthesis in rumen digesta based upon incorporation of 35S from the free sulfide pool is not seriously affected by direct utilization of sulfur amino acids arising from dietary sources. PMID:5485079

  10. Fermentation of cottonseed and other feedstuffs in cattle rumen fluid.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ian C; Ames, Michael L; Rasmussen, Mark A; Reilly, Peter J

    2002-04-10

    Bovine rumen fluid was fermented anaerobically over 48 h with cottonseed, corn, alfalfa, or a mixture of these substrates in anaerobic mineral buffer. Samples taken at different incubation times were derivatized with n-butanol and subjected to gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy. No unusual fermentation end-products from the cottonseed substrate were detected. Cottonseed supported rumen fermentation at levels comparable to those of the other substrates. Major components were usually found in the decreasing order of acetate, propionate, butyrate, and valerate, although acetate and propionate concentrations decreased late in the alfalfa and mixed-feed fermentations, eventually allowing butyrate concentrations to exceed those of propionate. As expected, lactate was produced in high concentrations when corn was fermented. The minor components 2-methylpropionate, 2- and 3-methylbutyrate, phenylacetate, phenylpropionate, and caproate also accumulated, with their relative concentrations varying with the substrate. Succinate was produced in substantial amounts only when corn and alfalfa were fermented; it did not accumulate when cottonseed was the substrate. Samples containing cottonseed were derivatized and subjected to reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, revealing that gossypol concentrations did not change during fermentation.

  11. Effects of feed intake on composition of sheep rumen contents and their microbial population size.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, C A; González, J; Alvir, M R; Redondo, R; Cajarville, C

    2003-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effect of feed intake on the composition of the rumen contents of sheep and on their bacterial densities. Whole rumen contents were sampled after a period of continuous inter-rumen infusion of 15NH3 from four rumen-cannulated wethers successively fed on a hay-concentrate diet (2:1, w/w on a DM basis) at two rates of feed intake: 40 and 80 g DM/kg body weight0.75. Total weight and chemical composition of rumen contents, as well as the distribution by size and chemical composition of particles, were determined. The populations of bacteria associated with the liquid (liquid-associated bacteria, LAB) and solid (solid-associated bacteria, SAB) fractions of rumen digesta and the distribution of SAB according to feed particle size were also examined. The greater feed intake caused an increase in the mass of the rumen contents, while its chemical composition did not change, except for a higher content of organic matter (P=0.023). The distribution of feed particles by size was similar at both levels of intake. The concentrations of neutral- and acid-detergent fibre in feed particles decreased and those of total, dietary, and microbial N increased, both with a quadratic response (P=0.001), as particle size decreased. The proportion of LAB in the microbial biomass of rumen digesta reached only 8.0 %. This proportion and the density of LAB were unaffected by the level of feed intake, whereas an apparent reduction (10.4 %) occurred with the SAB biomass in whole rumen contents. A systematic, but not significant, reduction (mean value 11.9 %) in the level of microbial colonisation in the different particle fractions with the increase of feed intake was also observed.

  12. Rumen fermentation and histology in light lambs as affected by forage supply and lactation length.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Rodríguez, J; Monleón, E; Sanz, A; Badiola, J J; Joy, M

    2012-04-01

    This study determined whether the rumen fermentation and histology traits may reflect the feeding strategy in light lambs (22-24 kg). Thirty-two single Rasa Aragonesa lambs were assigned to one of four treatments in a 2×2 factorial design. The factors were the inclusion of forage in the diet (alfalfa grazing vs. concentrate-fed indoors) and lactation length (weaning at 13 kg vs. suckling until slaughter). A multivariate canonical analysis discriminated individuals among feeding strategies. The main function differentiated weaned concentrate-fed lambs from the rest according to dorsal sac papillae height, ventral sac muscular layer thickness and the proportion of rumen valerate. The second function differentiated suckling concentrate-fed lambs from the rest according to plasma urea levels. Lactation length played an important role on rumen histology and protein utilization, especially in concentrate-fed lambs. Alfalfa grazing light lambs had similar rumen morphometric measures and fermentation characteristics, regardless of milk access.

  13. Parameters of rumen fermentation in a continuously fed sheep: evidence of a microbial rumination pool.

    PubMed

    Hungate, R E; Reichl, J; Prins, R

    1971-12-01

    The feed and feces of a continuously fed sheep were analyzed for carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen, with oxygen as the remainder. The daily feed-feces weight difference was used as the reactant in an equation representing the rumen fermentation. The measured products were the daily production of volatile fatty acids (VFA), CH(4), CO(2), and ammonia. The carbon unaccounted for was assumed to be in the microbial cell material produced in the rumen and absorbed before reaching the feces. The ratio of C to H, O, and N in bacteria was used to represent the elemental composition of the microbes formed in the rumen fermentation, completing the following equation:C(20.03)H(36.99)O(17.406)N(1.345) + 5.65 H(2)O --> C(12)H(24)O(10.1) + 0.83 CH(4) VFA + 2.76 CO(2) + 0.50 NH(3) + C(4.44)H(8.88)O(2.35)N(0.785) microbial cells absorbed With C arbitrarily balanced and O balanced by appropriate addition of water, any error is reflected in the H. The H recovery was 98.5%. The turnover rate constant for rumen liquid equilibrating with polyethylene glycol (PEG) was 2.27 per day. Direct counts and volume measurements of the individual types of bacteria and protozoa in the rumen were used to calculate the total microbial cell volume in the rumen, not equilibrating with it. The dry matter in the rumen (582 g) and the nitrogen content (12.05) of the microbes in the rumen were estimated, the latter constituting 85% of the measured N in the rumen. Calculations for rumen dry matter and nitrogen turning over at the PEG rate introduce big discrepancies with other parameters; a rumination pool must be postulated. Its size and composition are estimated. Arguments are presented to support the view that dry matter and some of the microbes, chiefly the protozoa, do not leave the rumen at the PEG rate. One experiment with the same sheep fed twice daily showed significantly less production of microbial cells than did the continuous (each 2 hr) feeding. Analysis of the microbial cell yield suggests that

  14. Parameters of Rumen Fermentation in a Continuously Fed Sheep: Evidence of a Microbial Rumination Pool

    PubMed Central

    Hungate, R. E.; Reichl, J.; Prins, R.

    1971-01-01

    The feed and feces of a continuously fed sheep were analyzed for carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen, with oxygen as the remainder. The daily feed-feces weight difference was used as the reactant in an equation representing the rumen fermentation. The measured products were the daily production of volatile fatty acids (VFA), CH4, CO2, and ammonia. The carbon unaccounted for was assumed to be in the microbial cell material produced in the rumen and absorbed before reaching the feces. The ratio of C to H, O, and N in bacteria was used to represent the elemental composition of the microbes formed in the rumen fermentation, completing the following equation:C20.03H36.99O17.406N1.345 + 5.65 H2O → C12H24O10.1 + 0.83 CH4 VFA + 2.76 CO2 + 0.50 NH3 + C4.44H8.88O2.35N0.785 microbial cells absorbed With C arbitrarily balanced and O balanced by appropriate addition of water, any error is reflected in the H. The H recovery was 98.5%. The turnover rate constant for rumen liquid equilibrating with polyethylene glycol (PEG) was 2.27 per day. Direct counts and volume measurements of the individual types of bacteria and protozoa in the rumen were used to calculate the total microbial cell volume in the rumen, not equilibrating with it. The dry matter in the rumen (582 g) and the nitrogen content (12.05) of the microbes in the rumen were estimated, the latter constituting 85% of the measured N in the rumen. Calculations for rumen dry matter and nitrogen turning over at the PEG rate introduce big discrepancies with other parameters; a rumination pool must be postulated. Its size and composition are estimated. Arguments are presented to support the view that dry matter and some of the microbes, chiefly the protozoa, do not leave the rumen at the PEG rate. One experiment with the same sheep fed twice daily showed significantly less production of microbial cells than did the continuous (each 2 hr) feeding. Analysis of the microbial cell yield suggests that, on the basis of 11 mg of cells

  15. A metabolomics approach to uncover the effects of grain diets on rumen health in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Saleem, F; Ametaj, B N; Bouatra, S; Mandal, R; Zebeli, Q; Dunn, S M; Wishart, D S

    2012-11-01

    Dairy cows fed high-grain diets during early lactation have a high incidence of metabolic disorders. However, the precise mechanism(s) of how grain feeding causes disease is not clear. In an effort to understand how this diet transition alters the rumen environment and potentially leads to certain metabolic disorders in dairy cattle, we undertook a comprehensive, quantitative metabolomic analysis of rumen fluid samples from dairy cows fed 4 different diets. Using a combination of proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and direct flow injection tandem mass spectroscopy, we identified and quantified 93 metabolites in rumen samples taken from 8 dairy cows fed graded amounts of barley grain (i.e., 0, 15, 30, and 45% of diet dry matter). We also studied temporal changes in the rumen by studying metabolite concentration differences between the first day and the last day of each diet phase following the diet adaptation period. Multivariate analysis showed that rumen metabolites arising from the diet containing 45% barley grain were clearly different from those containing 0, 15, and 30% barley grain. Likewise, a clear separation of the metabolic composition of the ruminal fluid was evident at the beginning and at the end of each diet phase-contrary to the belief that 11 d are suitable for the adaptation of cows to high-grain diets. High-grain diets (>30%) resulted in increased rumen fluid concentrations of several toxic, inflammatory, and unnatural compounds including putrescine, methylamines, ethanolamine, and short-chain fatty acids. Perturbations in several amino acids (phenylalanine, ornithine, lysine, leucine, arginine, valine, and phenylacetylglycine) were also evident. The present study confirms and greatly extends earlier observations on dietary effects on rumen fluid composition and shows that the use of multiple metabolomic platforms permits a far more detailed understanding of metabolic causes and effects. These

  16. Rumen Microorganisms Decrease Bioavailability of Inorganic Selenium Supplements.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, M L; Vorachek, W R; Estill, C T; Whanger, P D; Bobe, G; Davis, T Z; Hall, J A

    2016-06-01

    Despite the availability of selenium (Se)-enriched trace mineral supplements, we have observed low Se status in cattle and sheep offered traditional inorganic Se supplements. Reasons for this may include inadequate intake or low bioavailability of inorganic Se sources. The objective of this study was to determine whether rumen microorganisms (RMO) alter the bioavailability of Se sources commonly used in Se supplements. Rumen microorganisms were isolated from ewes (n = 4) and incubated ex vivo with no Se (control), with inorganic Na selenite or Na selenate, or with organic selenomethionine (SeMet). Total Se incorporated into RMO and the amount of elemental Se formed were determined under equivalent conditions. Incorporation of Se from Na selenite, Na selenate, or SeMet into RMO was measured as fold change compared with control (no added Se). Incorporation of Se into microbial mass was greater for SeMet (13.2-fold greater than no-Se control) compared with inorganic Se supplements (P = 0.02); no differences were observed between inorganic Na selenate (3.3-fold greater than no-Se control) and Na selenite (3.5-fold greater than no-Se control; P = 0.97). Formation of non-bioavailable, elemental Se was less for RMO incubated with SeMet compared with inorganic Se sources (P = 0.01); no differences were observed between Na selenate and Na selenite (P = 0.09). The clinical importance of these results is that the oral bioavailability of organic SeMet should be greater compared with inorganic Se sources because of greater RMO incorporation of Se and decreased formation of elemental Se by RMO.

  17. Fate of genetically modified maize DNA in the oral cavity and rumen of sheep.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Paula S; Chambers, Philip A; Heritage, John; Michael Forbes, J

    2003-02-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to investigate the fate of a transgene in the rumen of sheep fed silage and maize grains from an insect-resistant maize line. A 1914-bp DNA fragment containing the entire coding region of the synthetic cryIA(b) gene was still amplifiable from rumen fluid sampled 5 h after feeding maize grains. The same target sequence, however, could not be amplified from rumen fluid sampled from sheep fed silage prepared from the genetically modified maize line. PCR amplification of a shorter (211-bp), yet still highly specific, target sequence was possible with rumen fluid sampled up to 3 and 24 h after feeding silage and maize grains, respectively. These findings indicate that intact transgenes from silage are unlikely to survive significantly in the rumen since a DNA sequence 211-bp long is very unlikely to transmit genetic information. By contrast, DNA in maize grains persists for a significant time and may, therefore, provide a source of transforming DNA in the rumen. In addition, we have examined the biological activity of plasmid DNA that had previously been exposed to the ovine oral cavity. Plasmid extracted from saliva sampled after incubation for 8 min was still capable of transforming competent Escherichia coli to kanamycin resistance, implying that DNA released from the diet within the mouth may retain sufficient biological activity for the transformation of competent oral bacteria.

  18. High-throughput Methods Redefine the Rumen Microbiome and Its Relationship with Nutrition and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Joshua C.; Wickersham, Tryon A.; Loor, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    Diversity in the forestomach microbiome is one of the key features of ruminant animals. The diverse microbial community adapts to a wide array of dietary feedstuffs and management strategies. Understanding rumen microbiome composition, adaptation, and function has global implications ranging from climatology to applied animal production. Classical knowledge of rumen microbiology was based on anaerobic, culture-dependent methods. Next-generation sequencing and other molecular techniques have uncovered novel features of the rumen microbiome. For instance, pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene has revealed the taxonomic identity of bacteria and archaea to the genus level, and when complemented with barcoding adds multiple samples to a single run. Whole genome shotgun sequencing generates true metagenomic sequences to predict the functional capability of a microbiome, and can also be used to construct genomes of isolated organisms. Integration of high-throughput data describing the rumen microbiome with classic fermentation and animal performance parameters has produced meaningful advances and opened additional areas for study. In this review, we highlight recent studies of the rumen microbiome in the context of cattle production focusing on nutrition, rumen development, animal efficiency, and microbial function. PMID:24940050

  19. Isolation and identification of cellulose-binding proteins from sheep rumen contents.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Atsushi; Iio, Wataru; Mitsumori, Makoto; Minato, Hajime

    2009-03-01

    To extend our understanding of the mechanisms of plant cell wall degradation in the rumen, cellulose-binding proteins (CBPs) from the contents of a sheep rumen were directly isolated and identified using a metaproteomics approach. The rumen CBPs were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and some CBPs revealed endoglucanase activities toward carboxymethyl cellulose. Using mass spectrometry analyses, four CBPs were identified and annotated as known proteins from the predominant rumen cellulolytic bacterium Fibrobacter succinogenes: tetratricopeptide repeat domain protein, OmpA family protein, fibro-slime domain protein, and cellulose-binding endoglucanase F (EGF). Another CBP was identified as the cellulosomal glycosyl hydrolase family 6 exoglucanase, Cel6A, of Piromyces equi. F. succinogenes cells expressing EGF were found to be major members of the bacterial community on the surface or at the inner surface of hay stems by immunohistochemical analyses using anti-EGF antibody. The finding that four of the five CBPs isolated and identified from sheep rumen contents were from F. succinogenes indicates that F. succinogenes is significantly involved in cellulose degradation in the rumen.

  20. Volatile Fatty Acids and the Inhibition of Escherichia coli Growth by Rumen Fluid1

    PubMed Central

    Wolin, Meyer J.

    1969-01-01

    Concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFA) normally found in bovine rumen fluid inhibited growth of Escherichia coli in Antibiotic Medium 3. Acetic, propionic, and butyric acids each produced growth inhibition which was markedly pH-dependent. Little inhibition was observed at pH 7.0, and inhibition increased with decreasing pH. A combination of 60 μmoles of acetate, 20 μmoles of propionate, and 15 μmoles of butyrate per ml gave 96, 69, and 2% inhibition at pH 6.0, 6.5, and 7.0, respectively. Rumen fluid (50%) gave 89 and 48% inhibition at pH 6.0 and 6.5, respectively, and growth stimulation (22%) at pH 7.0. Rumen fluid inhibitory activity was heat-stable, was not precipitated by 63% ethyl alcohol, and was lost by dialysis and by treatment with anion-exchange resins but not with cation-exchange resins. These results are consistent with the idea that VFA are the inhibitory substances in rumen fluid. Previous results which indicated that rumen fluid VFA did not inhibit E. coli growth were due to lack of careful control of the final pH of the growth medium. The E. coli strain used does not grow in rumen fluid alone at pH 7.0. PMID:4886864

  1. Immunization against Rumen Methanogenesis by Vaccination with a New Recombinant Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Litai; Huang, Xiaofeng; Xue, Bai; Peng, Quanhui; Wang, Zhisheng; Yan, Tianhai; Wang, Lizhi

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination through recombinant proteins against rumen methanogenesis provides a mitigation approach to reduce enteric methane (CH4) emissions in ruminants. The objective of present study was to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of a new vaccine candidate protein (EhaF) on methanogenesis and microbial population in the rumen of goats. We amplified the gene mru 1407 encoding protein EhaF using fresh rumen fluid samples of mature goats and successfully expressed recombinant protein (EhaF) in Escherichia coli Rosetta. This product was evaluated using 12 mature goats with half for control and other half injected with 400ug/goat the purified recombinant protein in day 1 and two subsequent booster immunizations in day 35 and 49. All measurements were undertaken from 63 to 68 days after the initial vaccination, with CH4 emissions determined using respiration calorimeter chambers. The results showed that the vaccination caused intensive immune responses in serum and saliva, although it had no significant effect on total enteric CH4 emissions and methanogen population in the rumen, when compared with the control goats. However, the vaccination altered the composition of rumen bacteria, especially the abundance of main phylum Firmicutes and genus Prevotella. The results indicate that protein EhaF might not be an effective vaccine to reduce enteric CH4 emissions but our vaccine have potential to influence the rumen ecosystem of goats. PMID:26445479

  2. Effects of alkyl polyglycoside, a nonionic surfactant, and forage-to-concentrate ratio on rumen fermentation, amino acid composition of rumen content, bacteria and plasma in goats.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Bo; Tan, Zhiliang; Tang, Shaoxun; Han, Xuefeng; Tan, Chuanyan; Zhong, Rongzhen; Hea, Zhixiong; Arigbede, Oluwasanmi Moses

    2011-06-01

    In the present study, the effects of different forage-to-concentrate ratios (F:C) and an alkyl polyglycoside (APG) supplementation on parameters of rumen and blood metabolism were investigated in goats. A 2 x 2 factorial experiment was arranged within a 4 x 4 Latin square design (four 22-day periods), using four wether goats equipped with permanent ruminal cannulas. The experimental diets included two F:C levels (40:60 vs. 60:40), and two APG supplementation levels (None or 13 ml APG daily per animal). Rumen contents and blood samples were collected at the end of each period. Dietary F:C alteration affected plasma urea and influenced the proportions of leucine, histidine, arginine, glycine, proline, alanine, valine, phenylalanine, cysteine and tyrosine in rumen content, and the proportions of methionine, threonine and proline in solid-associated bacteria (SAB) significantly. Dietary APG decreased the proportions of valine and phenylalanine in rumen content, and the histidine content of liquid-associated bacteria. The interaction between dietary F:C and APG was significant for the proportions of glycine and alanine in rumen content, and the proportions of lysine and threonine in SAB. The proportion of lysine was greater, but the proportion of threonine was less in SAB for goats fed high F:C diet without APG supplementation. The proportions of plasma free amino acids and glucose concentration were not affected by experimental treatments. These results indicated that dietary APG addition affected the amino acid composition of the rumen content and ruminal bacteria, but this depended on the dietary F:C ratio. It is necessary to validate the effectiveness of dietary APG supplementation in further studies with more animals.

  3. Short communication: Initial evidence supporting existence of potential rumen epidermal stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Yohe, T T; Tucker, H L M; Parsons, C L M; Geiger, A J; Akers, R M; Daniels, K M

    2016-09-01

    The bovine rumen epidermis is a keratinized multilayered tissue that experiences persistent cell turnover. Because of this constant cell turnover, epidermal stem cells and their slightly more differentiated daughter cells, epidermal progenitor cells, must exist in the stratum basale of rumen epidermis. To date, these 2 epidermal cell populations and any unique cellular markers they may possess remain completely uncharacterized in the bovine rumen. An important first step in this new research area is the demonstration of the relative abundance and existence of markers for these cells in rumen tissue. A related second step is to document rumen epidermal proliferative responses to an extrinsic signal such as nutrient concentration within the rumen. The objectives of this experiment were to evaluate the extrinsic effect of diet on (1) gene expression of 6 potential rumen epidermal stem or progenitor cell markers and (2) rumen epidermal cell proliferation within the stratum basale. Twelve preweaned Holstein heifers were fed either a restricted diet (R) or an enhanced diet (EH). Animals on R received a milk replacer (MR) diet fed at 0.44kg of powder dry matter (DM)/d (20.9% crude protein, 29.8% fat, DM basis) and EH received MR at 1.08kg of powder dry matter/d (28.9% crude protein, 26.2% fat, DM basis). All calves had access to a 20% crude protein starter and were weaned during wk 7 of the experiment. Lifetime DM intake was 0.73kg of DM/calf per day for R (5.88 Mcal of net energy/calf per day) and 1.26kg of DM/calf per day for EH (10.68 Mcal of net energy/calf per day). Twenty-four hours before slaughter heifers received an intravenous dose of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine to label proliferating cells. Heifers were slaughtered at 8 wk of age, and rumen samples from the ventral sac region were obtained and stored in RNA preservative and processed for routine histology. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR was used to analyze relative abundance of genes. Candidate

  4. Methane Inhibition Alters the Microbial Community, Hydrogen Flow, and Fermentation Response in the Rumen of Cattle.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Fernandez, Gonzalo; Denman, Stuart E; Yang, Chunlei; Cheung, Jane; Mitsumori, Makoto; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    Management of metabolic hydrogen ([H]) in the rumen has been identified as an important consideration when reducing ruminant CH4 emissions. However, little is known about hydrogen flux and microbial rumen population responses to CH4 inhibition when animals are fed with slowly degradable diets. The effects of the anti-methanogenic compound, chloroform, on rumen fermentation, microbial ecology, and H2/CH4 production were investigated in vivo. Eight rumen fistulated Brahman steers were fed a roughage hay diet (Rhode grass hay) or roughage hay:concentrate diet (60:40) with increasing levels (low, mid, and high) of chloroform in a cyclodextrin matrix. The increasing levels of chloroform resulted in an increase in H2 expelled as CH4 production decreased with no effect on dry matter intakes. The amount of expelled H2 per mole of decreased methane, was lower for the hay diet suggesting a more efficient redirection of hydrogen into other microbial products compared with hay:concentrate diet. A shift in rumen fermentation toward propionate and branched-chain fatty acids was observed for both diets. Animals fed with the hay:concentrate diet had both higher formate concentration and H2 expelled than those fed only roughage hay. Metabolomic analyses revealed an increase in the concentration of amino acids, organic, and nucleic acids in the fluid phase for both diets when methanogenesis was inhibited. These changes in the rumen metabolism were accompanied by a shift in the microbiota with an increase in Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio and a decrease in Archaea and Synergistetes for both diets. Within the Bacteroidetes family, some OTUs assigned to Prevotella were promoted under chloroform treatment. These bacteria may be partly responsible for the increase in amino acids and propionate in the rumen. No significant changes were observed for abundance of fibrolytic bacteria, protozoa, and fungi, which suggests that fiber degradation was not impaired. The observed 30% decrease in

  5. Methane Inhibition Alters the Microbial Community, Hydrogen Flow, and Fermentation Response in the Rumen of Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Fernandez, Gonzalo; Denman, Stuart E.; Yang, Chunlei; Cheung, Jane; Mitsumori, Makoto; McSweeney, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Management of metabolic hydrogen ([H]) in the rumen has been identified as an important consideration when reducing ruminant CH4 emissions. However, little is known about hydrogen flux and microbial rumen population responses to CH4 inhibition when animals are fed with slowly degradable diets. The effects of the anti-methanogenic compound, chloroform, on rumen fermentation, microbial ecology, and H2/CH4 production were investigated in vivo. Eight rumen fistulated Brahman steers were fed a roughage hay diet (Rhode grass hay) or roughage hay:concentrate diet (60:40) with increasing levels (low, mid, and high) of chloroform in a cyclodextrin matrix. The increasing levels of chloroform resulted in an increase in H2 expelled as CH4 production decreased with no effect on dry matter intakes. The amount of expelled H2 per mole of decreased methane, was lower for the hay diet suggesting a more efficient redirection of hydrogen into other microbial products compared with hay:concentrate diet. A shift in rumen fermentation toward propionate and branched-chain fatty acids was observed for both diets. Animals fed with the hay:concentrate diet had both higher formate concentration and H2 expelled than those fed only roughage hay. Metabolomic analyses revealed an increase in the concentration of amino acids, organic, and nucleic acids in the fluid phase for both diets when methanogenesis was inhibited. These changes in the rumen metabolism were accompanied by a shift in the microbiota with an increase in Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio and a decrease in Archaea and Synergistetes for both diets. Within the Bacteroidetes family, some OTUs assigned to Prevotella were promoted under chloroform treatment. These bacteria may be partly responsible for the increase in amino acids and propionate in the rumen. No significant changes were observed for abundance of fibrolytic bacteria, protozoa, and fungi, which suggests that fiber degradation was not impaired. The observed 30% decrease in

  6. Thermodynamic Driving Force of Hydrogen on Rumen Microbial Metabolism: A Theoretical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    van Lingen, Henk J.; Plugge, Caroline M.; Fadel, James G.; Kebreab, Ermias; Bannink, André; Dijkstra, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen is a key product of rumen fermentation and has been suggested to thermodynamically control the production of the various volatile fatty acids (VFA). Previous studies, however, have not accounted for the fact that only thermodynamic near-equilibrium conditions control the magnitude of reaction rate. Furthermore, the role of NAD, which is affected by hydrogen partial pressure (PH2), has often not been considered. The aim of this study was to quantify the control of PH2 on reaction rates of specific fermentation pathways, methanogenesis and NADH oxidation in rumen microbes. The control of PH2 was quantified using the thermodynamic potential factor (FT), which is a dimensionless factor that corrects a predicted kinetic reaction rate for the thermodynamic control exerted. Unity FT was calculated for all glucose fermentation pathways considered, indicating no inhibition of PH2 on the production of a specific type of VFA (e.g., acetate, propionate and butyrate) in the rumen. For NADH oxidation without ferredoxin oxidation, increasing PH2 within the rumen physiological range decreased FT from unity to zero for different NAD+ to NADH ratios and pH of 6.2 and 7.0, which indicates thermodynamic control of PH2. For NADH oxidation with ferredoxin oxidation, increasing PH2 within the rumen physiological range decreased FT from unity at pH of 7.0 only. For the acetate to propionate conversion, FT increased from 0.65 to unity with increasing PH2, which indicates thermodynamic control. For propionate to acetate and butyrate to acetate conversions, FT decreased to zero below the rumen range of PH2, indicating full thermodynamic suppression. For methanogenesis by archaea without cytochromes, FT differed from unity only below the rumen range of PH2, indicating no thermodynamic control. This theoretical investigation shows that thermodynamic control of PH2 on individual VFA produced and associated yield of hydrogen and methane cannot be explained without considering NADH

  7. Manipulating rumen microbiome and fermentation through interventions during early life: a review.

    PubMed

    Yáñez-Ruiz, David R; Abecia, Leticia; Newbold, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    The nutritional manipulations of the rumen microbiome to enhance productivity and health are rather limited by the resilience of the ecosystem once established in the mature rumen. Based on recent studies, it has been suggested that the microbial colonization that occurs soon after birth opens a possibility of manipulation with potential to produce lasting effects into adult life. This paper presents the state-of-the-art in relation to early life nutritional interventions by addressing three areas: the development of the rumen as an organ in regards to the nutrition of the new-born, the main factors that determine the microbial population that first colonizes and establishes in the rumen, and the key immunity players that contribute to shaping the commensal microbiota in the early stage of life to understand host-microbiome specificity. The development of the rumen epithelium and muscularization are differently affected by the nature of the diet and special care should be taken with regards to transition from liquid (milk) to solid feed. The rumen is quickly colonized by all type of microorganisms straight after birth and the colonization pattern may be influenced by several factors such as presence/absence of adult animals, the first solid diet provided, and the inclusion of compounds that prevent/facilitate the establishment of some microorganisms or the direct inoculation of specific strains. The results presented show how early life events may be related to the microbial community structure and/or the rumen activity in the animals post-weaning. This would create differences in adaptive capacity due to different early life experiences and leads to the idea of microbial programming. However, many elements need to be further studied such as: the most sensitive window of time for interventions, the best means to test long term effectiveness, the role of key microbial groups and host-immune regulations.

  8. Manipulation of rumen ecology by dietary lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus Stapf.) powder supplementation.

    PubMed

    Wanapat, M; Cherdthong, A; Pakdee, P; Wanapat, S

    2008-12-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of lemongrass [Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf.] powder (LGP) on rumen ecology, rumen microorganisms, and digestibility of nutrients. Four ruminally fistulated crossbred (Brahman native) beef cattle were randomly assigned according to a 4 x 4 Latin square design. The dietary treatments were LGP supplementation at 0, 100, 200, and 300 g/d with urea-treated rice straw (5%) fed to allow ad libitum intake. Digestibilities of DM, ether extract, and NDF were significantly different among treatments and were greatest at 100 g/d of supplementation. However, digestibility of CP was decreased with LGP supplementation (P < 0.05), whereas ruminal NH(3)-N and plasma urea N were decreased with incremental additions of LGP (P < 0.05). Ruminal VFA concentrations were similar among supplementation concentrations (P > 0.05). Total viable bacteria, amylolytic bacteria, and cellulolytic bacteria were significantly different among treatments and were greatest at 100 g/d of supplementation (4.7 x 10(9), 1.7 x 10(7), and 2.0 x 10(9) cfu/mL, respectively). Protozoal populations were significantly decreased by LGP supplementation. In addition, efficiency of rumen microbial N synthesis based on OM truly digested in the rumen was enriched by LGP supplementation, especially at 100 g/d (34.2 g of N/kg of OM truly digested in the rumen). Based on this study, it could be concluded that supplementation of LGP at 100 g/d improved digestibilities of nutrients, rumen microbial population, and microbial protein synthesis efficiency, thus improving rumen ecology in beef cattle.

  9. Manipulating rumen microbiome and fermentation through interventions during early life: a review

    PubMed Central

    Yáñez-Ruiz, David R.; Abecia, Leticia; Newbold, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    The nutritional manipulations of the rumen microbiome to enhance productivity and health are rather limited by the resilience of the ecosystem once established in the mature rumen. Based on recent studies, it has been suggested that the microbial colonization that occurs soon after birth opens a possibility of manipulation with potential to produce lasting effects into adult life. This paper presents the state-of-the-art in relation to early life nutritional interventions by addressing three areas: the development of the rumen as an organ in regards to the nutrition of the new-born, the main factors that determine the microbial population that first colonizes and establishes in the rumen, and the key immunity players that contribute to shaping the commensal microbiota in the early stage of life to understand host-microbiome specificity. The development of the rumen epithelium and muscularization are differently affected by the nature of the diet and special care should be taken with regards to transition from liquid (milk) to solid feed. The rumen is quickly colonized by all type of microorganisms straight after birth and the colonization pattern may be influenced by several factors such as presence/absence of adult animals, the first solid diet provided, and the inclusion of compounds that prevent/facilitate the establishment of some microorganisms or the direct inoculation of specific strains. The results presented show how early life events may be related to the microbial community structure and/or the rumen activity in the animals post-weaning. This would create differences in adaptive capacity due to different early life experiences and leads to the idea of microbial programming. However, many elements need to be further studied such as: the most sensitive window of time for interventions, the best means to test long term effectiveness, the role of key microbial groups and host-immune regulations. PMID:26528276

  10. Observations on the biology, epidemiology and economic relevance of rumen flukes (Paramphistomidae) in cattle kept in a temperate environment.

    PubMed

    Sargison, Neil; Francis, Emily; Davison, Chloe; Bronsvoort, Barend M deC; Handel, Ian; Mazeri, Stella

    2016-03-30

    There is concern about the probable recent introduction, increased prevalence and potential economic impact of rumen fluke infection of United Kingdom cattle. A study of 339 cattle slaughtered in a Scottish red meat abattoir was undertaken with the aims of describing the prevalence and geographical distribution of rumen fluke infection, estimating its effect on production, and evaluating faecal egg counts (FECs) as a tool to diagnose infection in live animals and study the epidemiology of the disease. The overall proportion of cattle consigned to the abattoir from northern United Kingdom with rumen fluke infection in the forestomachs was 0.29. Rumen flukes were distributed predominantly in the cranial sac of the rumen and adjacent to the reticular groove. Overall, a mean of 213 and median of 44 rumen flukes was identified in the forestomachs of rumen fluke-positive cattle. The mean and median FECs of animals were 26.01 and 5.20 eggs per gram (epg), respectively. There was a significant difference between the mean FECs per rumen fluke of 0.08 and 0.13 epg during summer/autumn and winter sampling periods, respectively. The overall correlation between rumen fluke FECs and the number of flukes in the forestomach was high, albeit lower in the summer/autumn than in the winter period. The sensitivities of rumen fluke FECs for the identification of flukes in the forestomach during the summer/autumn and winter sampling periods were 0.65 and 0.85, respectively. These results will aid in the interpretation of rumen fluke FECs when monitoring cattle health and production and studying the parasite's epidemiology in a temperate environment, thereby informing rational, precise and sustainable disease control.

  11. Artificial Intelligence and Robotics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-02-01

    D-Ai42 488 ARTIFICIAL INEELLIGENCE AND ROBOTICS (U) MASSACHUSETTS i/1 INST OF TECH CAMBRIDGE ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LAB M BRADY FEB 84 AI-M-756...Subtile) S. TYPE OF REPORT A PERIOD COVERED Artificial Intelligence and Robotics 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(*) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER...Identify by block niiniber) -. Since Robotics is the field concerned with the connection of perception to action, Artificial Intelligence must have a

  12. Artificial life and Piaget.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Ulrich; Grobman, K H.

    2003-04-01

    Artificial life provides important theoretical and methodological tools for the investigation of Piaget's developmental theory. This new method uses artificial neural networks to simulate living phenomena in a computer. A recent study by Parisi and Schlesinger suggests that artificial life might reinvigorate the Piagetian framework. We contrast artificial life with traditional cognitivist approaches, discuss the role of innateness in development, and examine the relation between physiological and psychological explanations of intelligent behaviour.

  13. Effects of pistachio by-products in replacement of alfalfa hay on populations of rumen bacteria involved in biohydrogenation and fermentative parameters in the rumen of sheep.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, M H; Tahmasbi, A-M; Khorvash, M; Naserian, A-A; Ghaffari, A H; Valizadeh, H

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of sundried pistachio by-products (PBP) as a replacement of alfalfa hay (AH) on blood metabolites, rumen fermentation and populations of rumen bacteria involved in biohydrogenation (BH) in Baluchi sheep. Four adult male Baluchi sheep (41 ± 1.3 kg, BW) fitted with ruminal cannulae were randomly assigned to four experimental diets in a 4 × 4 Latin square design. The dietary treatments were as follows: (i) control, (ii) 12% PBP (0.33 of AH in basal diet replaced by PBP), (iii) 24% PBP (0.66 of AH in basal diet replaced by PBP) and (iv) 36% PBP (all of AH in basal diet replaced by PBP). The basal diet was 360 g/kg dry matter (DM) alfalfa hay, 160 g/kg DM wheat straw and 480 g/kg DM concentrate. The trial consisted of four periods, each composed of 16 days adaptation and 4 days data collection including measurement of blood metabolites, rumen fermentation and population of bacteria. No differences were observed in rumen pH among the treatments, while rumen ammonia-N concentrations were decreased (p< 0.05) with increasing PBP by up to 36% DM of the diets. Using of 36% PBP in the diet reduced (p < 0.05) total volatile fatty acids (VFA) concentrations and the molar proportion of acetate, while the concentration of propionate, butyrate and acetate to propionate ratio were similar to all other treatments. The concentration of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) decreased (p < 0.01) with increasing PBP by up to 36% DM in the diets of sheep. However, other blood metabolites were not affected by the experimental diets. It was concluded that PBP in replacement of AH had no effects on the relative abundance of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens and Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus in relation to the control diet.

  14. Two-step freezing procedure for cryopreservation of rumen ciliates, an effective tool for creation of a frozen rumen protozoa bank.

    PubMed

    Nsabimana, E; Kisidayová, S; Macheboeuf, D; Newbold, C J; Jouany, J P

    2003-07-01

    The present study aimed at the long-term storage of rumen protozoa as living cells in liquid nitrogen. The two-step or interrupted slow freezing procedure was used to cryopreserve six of the dominant species of rumen ciliates isolated from monofaunated animals, Dasytricha ruminantium, Entodinium caudatum, Epidinium ecaudatum caudatum, Eudiplodinium maggii, Isotricha prostoma, and Polyplastron multivesiculatum. We optimized the first step in the interrupted slow freezing procedure, from the extracellular ice nucleation temperature to the holding temperature, and studied the effects of the cooling rates on survival. In addition to the nature of the cryoprotectant (dimethyl sulfoxide), the equilibration temperature and equilibration time (25 degrees C and 5 min, respectively), and the holding time at subzero temperature (45 min) recommended previously (S. Kisidayová, J. Microbiol. Methods 22:185-192, 1995), we found that a holding temperature of -30 degrees C, a cooling rate from extracellular ice nucleation temperature to holding temperature of between 1.2 degrees C/min and 2.5 degrees C/min, depending on the ciliate, and rumen juice as the freezing and thawing medium markedly improved the survival rate. Survival rates determined after 2 weeks in liquid nitrogen were 100% for Isotricha, 98% for Dasytricha, 85% for Epidinium, 79% for Polyplastron, 63% for Eudiplodinium, and 60% for Entodinium. They were not significantly modified after a period of 1 year in liquid nitrogen. Four of the five ciliate species cryopreserved for 8 months in liquid nitrogen successfully colonized the rumen when inoculated into defaunated animals. These results have made it possible to set up a bank of cryopreserved rumen protozoa.

  15. Straw particle size in calf starters: Effects on digestive system development and rumen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Mena, F X; Heinrichs, A J; Jones, C M; Hill, T M; Quigley, J D

    2016-01-01

    Two trials were conducted to determine effects of straw particle size in calf starter on rumen fermentation and development in calves. Holstein calves (n=17 in trial 1; n=25 in trial 2) were housed in individual pens; bedding (wood shavings) was covered with landscape fabric to completely avoid consumption of bedding. Milk replacer was fed at 12% of birth body weight per day and water offered free choice. Calves were randomly assigned to 4 treatments differing in geometric mean particle length (Xgm) of straw comprising 5% of starter dry matter. Straw was provided within the pellet at manufacture (PS; 0.82 mm Xgm) or mixed with the pellet at time of feeding at Xgm of 3.04 (SS), 7.10 (MS), or 12.7 (LS) mm. Calves (n=12; 3/treatment) in trial 1 were fitted with a rumen cannula by wk 2 of age. A fixed amount of starter that was adjusted with age and orts were fed through the cannula in cannulated calves. Calves were euthanized 6 wk after starter was offered (9 and 7 wk of age for trials 1 and 2, respectively). Rumen digesta pH linearly decreased with age, whereas volatile fatty acid concentration increased with age. Overall pH had a cubic trend with SS lower than that of PS and MS. Molar proportion of acetate decreased with age whereas propionate proportion increased. Overall molar proportions of volatile fatty acids were not affected by diet. Fecal Xgm was not different in spite of changes in diet particle size and rumen digesta of PS being greater than SS, MS, and LS at slaughter. Fecal pH and starch concentration were not affected by diet; however, pH decreased whereas starch content increased with age. Weight of stomach compartments, rumen papillae length and width, and rumen wall thickness did not differ between diets. Omasum weight as a percentage of body weight at harvest linearly decreased as straw particle size increased. Under the conditions of this study, modifying straw particle length in starter grain resulted in minimal rumen fermentation parameter

  16. Artificial Behavior: An Idea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinhauer, Gene D.; Peden, Blaine F.

    1985-01-01

    Contrasts artificial behavior with artificial intelligence, traces Law of Effect's development from a verbal statement into a mathematical model providing algorithms for artificial behavior programs, and describes an attempt to use computer graphics and animation to simulate behavior and teach abstract concepts. (MBR)

  17. Isolation and Identification of Sodium Fluoroacetate Degrading Bacteria from Caprine Rumen in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Camboim, Expedito K. A.; Almeida, Arthur P.; Tadra-Sfeir, Michelle Z.; Junior, Felício G.; Andrade, Paulo P.; McSweeney, Chris S.; Melo, Marcia A.; Riet-Correa, Franklin

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to report the isolation of two fluoroacetate degrading bacteria from the rumen of goats. The animals were adult goats, males, crossbred, with rumen fistula, fed with hay, and native pasture. The rumen fluid was obtained through the rumen fistula and immediately was inoculated 100 μL in mineral medium added with 20 mmol L−1 sodium fluoroacetate (SF), incubated at 39°C in an orbital shaker. Pseudomonas fluorescens (strain DSM 8341) was used as positive control for fluoroacetate dehalogenase activity. Two isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Pigmentiphaga kullae (ECPB08) and Ancylobacter dichloromethanicus (ECPB09). These bacteria degraded sodium fluoroacetate, releasing 20 mmol L−1 of fluoride ion after 32 hours of incubation in Brunner medium containing 20 mmol L−1 of SF. There are no previous reports of fluoroacetate dehalogenase activity for P. kullae and A. dichloromethanicus. Control measures to prevent plant intoxication, including use of fences, herbicides, or other methods of eliminating poisonous plants, have been unsuccessful to avoid poisoning by fluoroacetate containing plants in Brazil. In this way, P. kullae and A. dichloromethanicus may be used to colonize the rumen of susceptible animals to avoid intoxication by fluoroacetate containing plants. PMID:22919294

  18. Metagenomic assessment of the functional potential of the rumen microbiome in Holstein dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Pitta, Dipti W; Indugu, Nagaraju; Kumar, Sanjay; Vecchiarelli, Bonnie; Sinha, Rohini; Baker, Linda D; Bhukya, Bhima; Ferguson, James D

    2016-04-01

    The microbial ecology of the rumen microbiome is influenced by the diet and the physiological status of the dairy cow and can have tremendous influence on the yield and components of milk. There are significant differences in milk yields between first and subsequent lactations of dairy cows, but information on how the rumen microbiome changes as the dairy cow gets older has received little attention. We characterized the rumen microbiome of the dairy cow for phylogeny and functional pathways by lactation group and stage of lactation using a metagenomics approach. Our findings revealed that the rumen microbiome was dominated by Bacteroidetes (70%), Firmicutes (15-20%) and Proteobacteria (7%). The abundance of Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were independently influenced by diet and lactation. Bacteroidetes contributed to a majority of the metabolic functions in first lactation dairy cows while the contribution from Firmicutes and Proteobacteria increased incrementally in second and third lactation dairy cows. We found that nearly 70% of the CAZymes were oligosaccharide breaking enzymes which reflect the higher starch and fermentable sugars in the diet. The results of this study suggest that the rumen microbiome continues to evolve as the dairy cow advances in lactations and these changes may have a significant role in milk production.

  19. Temporal dynamics of the metabolically active rumen bacteria colonizing fresh perennial ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Huws, Sharon A; Edwards, Joan E; Creevey, Christopher J; Rees Stevens, Pauline; Lin, Wanchang; Girdwood, Susan E; Pachebat, Justin A; Kingston-Smith, Alison H

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated successional colonization of fresh perennial ryegrass (PRG) by the rumen microbiota over time. Fresh PRG was incubated in sacco in the rumens of three Holstein × Friesian cows over a period of 8 h, with samples recovered at various times. The diversity of attached bacteria was assessed using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA (cDNA). Results showed that plant epiphytic communities either decreased to low relative abundances or disappeared following rumen incubation, and that temporal colonization of the PRG by the rumen bacteria was biphasic with primary (1 and 2 h) and secondary (4-8 h) events evident with the transition period being with 2-4 h. A decrease in sequence reads pertaining to Succinivibrio spp. and increases in Pseudobutyrivibrio, Roseburia and Ruminococcus spp. (the latter all order Clostridiales) were evident during secondary colonization. Irrespective of temporal changes, the continually high abundances of Butyrivibrio, Fibrobacter, Olsenella and Prevotella suggest that they play a major role in the degradation of the plant. It is clear that a temporal understanding of the functional roles of these microbiota within the rumen is now required to unravel the role of these bacteria in the ruminal degradation of fresh PRG.

  20. Genome sequencing of rumen bacteria and archaea and its application to methane mitigation strategies.

    PubMed

    Leahy, S C; Kelly, W J; Ronimus, R S; Wedlock, N; Altermann, E; Attwood, G T

    2013-06-01

    Ruminant-derived methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas, is a consequence of microbial fermentation in the digestive tract of livestock. Development of mitigation strategies to reduce CH4 emissions from farmed animals is currently the subject of both scientific and environmental interest. Methanogens are the sole producers of ruminant CH4, and therefore CH4 abatement strategies can either target the methanogens themselves or target the other members of the rumen microbial community that produce substrates necessary for methanogenesis. Understanding the relationship that methanogens have with other rumen microbes is crucial when considering CH4 mitigation strategies for ruminant livestock. Genome sequencing of rumen microbes is an important tool to improve our knowledge of the processes that underpin those relationships. Currently, several rumen bacterial and archaeal genome projects are either complete or underway. Genome sequencing is providing information directly applicable to CH4 mitigation strategies based on vaccine and small molecule inhibitor approaches. In addition, genome sequencing is contributing information relevant to other CH4 mitigation strategies. These include the selection and breeding of low CH4-emitting animals through the interpretation of large-scale DNA and RNA sequencing studies and the modification of other microbial groups within the rumen, thereby changing the dynamics of microbial fermentation.

  1. Evaluation of a rapid determination of heat production and respiratory quotient in Holstein steers using the washing rumen technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to validate use of the washed The objective of this study was to validate use of the washed rumen technique for rapid measurement of fasting HP and RQ. The plateau of RQ values was 0.87 ± 0.01 and 0.72 ± 0.01 for unwashed and washed rumen, respectively. The RQ decreas...

  2. Comparison of corn stover cell wall polysaccharide degradability by rumen microbes and a cellulosic ethanol conversion process

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Release of fermentable cell wall sugars in the cellulosic ethanol conversion process is assumed similar to rumen degradability; however, available literature has only reported surrogate rumen degradation measures (dry matter, neutral detergent fiber, and fermentation gases). We determined 72-h in vi...

  3. An evaluation of the differences in the rumen transcriptome among beef steers with extreme feed efficiency phenotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feed is the largest variable cost in beef production and the rumen likely has a critical role in an animal’s ability to efficiently utilize feed. We identified differentially expressed transcripts in animals with extreme differences in postweaning feed intake and gain. Rumen papillae RNA samples wer...

  4. Plant extracts affect in vitro rumen microbial fermentation.

    PubMed

    Busquet, M; Calsamiglia, S; Ferret, A; Kamel, C

    2006-02-01

    Different doses of 12 plant extracts and 6 secondary plant metabolites were incubated for 24 h in diluted ruminal fluid with a 50:50 forage:concentrate diet. Treatments were: control (no additive), plant extracts (anise oil, cade oil, capsicum oil, cinnamon oil, clove bud oil, dill oil, fenugreek, garlic oil, ginger oil, oregano oil, tea tree oil, and yucca), and secondary plant metabolites (anethol, benzyl salicylate, carvacrol, carvone, cinnamaldehyde, and eugenol). Each treatment was supplied at 3, 30, 300, and 3,000 mg/L of culture fluid. At 3,000 mg/L, most treatments decreased total volatile fatty acid concentration, but cade oil, capsicum oil, dill oil, fenugreek, ginger oil, and yucca had no effect. Different doses of anethol, anise oil, carvone, and tea tree oil decreased the proportion of acetate and propionate, which suggests that these compounds may not be nutritionally beneficial to dairy cattle. Garlic oil (300 and 3,000 mg/L) and benzyl salicylate (300 and 3,000 mg/L) reduced acetate and increased propionate and butyrate proportions, suggesting that methane production was inhibited. At 3,000 mg/L, capsicum oil, carvacrol, carvone, cinnamaldehyde, cinnamon oil, clove bud oil, eugenol, fenugreek, and oregano oil resulted in a 30 to 50% reduction in ammonia N concentration. Careful selection and combination of these extracts may allow the manipulation of rumen microbial fermentation.

  5. The effect of cation source and dietary cation-anion difference on rumen ion concentrations in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Catterton, T L; Erdman, R A

    2016-08-01

    Many studies have focused on the influence of dietary cation-anion difference (DCAD) on animal performance but few have examined the effect of DCAD on the rumen ionic environment. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of DCAD, cation source (Na vs. K), and anion source (Cl vs. bicarbonate or carbonate) on rumen environment and fermentation. The study used 5 rumen-fistulated dairy cows and 5 dietary treatments that were applied using a 5×5 Latin square design with 2-wk experimental periods. Treatments consisted of (1) the basal total mixed ration (TMR); (2) the basal TMR plus 340mEq/kg of Na (dry matter basis) using NaCl; (3) the basal TMR plus 340mEq/kg of K using KCl; (4) the basal TMR plus 340mEq/kg of Na using NaHCO3; and (5) the basal TMR plus 340mEq/kg of K using K2CO3. On the last day of each experimental period, rumen samples were collected and pooled from 5 different locations at 0, 1.5, 3, 4.5, 6, 9, and 12h postfeeding for measurement of rumen pH and concentrations of strong ions and volatile fatty acids (VFA). Dietary supplementation of individual strong ions increased the corresponding rumen ion concentration. Rumen Na was decreased by 24mEq/L when K was substituted for Na in the diet, but added dietary Na had no effect on rumen K. Rumen Cl was increased by 10mEq/L in diets supplemented with Cl. Cation source had no effect on rumen pH or total VFA concentration. Increased DCAD increased rumen pH by 0.10 pH units and increased rumen acetate by 4mEq/L but did not increase total VFA. This study demonstrated that rumen ion concentrations can be manipulated by dietary ion concentrations. If production and feed efficiency responses to DCAD and ionophores in the diet are affected by rumen Na and K concentrations, then manipulating dietary Na and K could be used either to enhance or diminish those responses.

  6. Advances in artificial lungs.

    PubMed

    Ota, Kei

    2010-04-01

    Artificial lungs have already been developed as complete artificial organs, and results of many investigations based on innovative concepts have been reported continuously. In open-heart surgery, artificial lungs are used for extracorporeal circulation to maintain gas exchange, and the commercial products currently available perform adequately, including providing for antithrombogenicity. However, patients after cardiopulmonary arrest or severe respiratory/circulatory failure have required long-term assist with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The number of artificial lungs used for ECMO in those cases has shown significant growth in recent years. Therefore, it is expected that durability and antithrombogenicity will ensure the prolonged use of an artificial lung for several weeks or months. Furthermore, interests in research are shifting to use of oxygenators as a bridge to lung transplantation and an implantable artificial lung. This paper discusses recent advances in artificial lungs, focusing on the current state and on trends in research and development.

  7. Rumen ciliate protozoa of domestic sheep (Ovis aries) and goat (Capra aegagrus hircus) in Kyrgyzstan.

    PubMed

    Gürelli, Gözde; Canbulat, Savaş; Aldayarov, Nurbek; Dehority, Burk A

    2016-03-01

    Species composition and concentration of rumen ciliate protozoa were investigated in the rumen contents of 14 domestic sheep and 1 goat living in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. This is the first report on rumen ciliates from ruminants living in Kyrgyzstan. In sheep 12 genera, 28 species and 12 morphotypes were detected, whereas in goat 8 genera, 12 species and 4 morphotypes were detected. The density of ciliates in sheep was (28.1 ± 20.0) × 10(4) cells mL(-1) and in goat was 37.0 × 10(4) cells mL(-1). Dasytricha ruminantium, Isotricha prostoma, Entodinium simulans and Ophryoscolex caudatus were major species (100%) in sheep, and for the first time, Diplodinium rangiferi was detected in a domestic goat.

  8. Influence of several feeds on bacteria in sheep and goat rumen liquor in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Lopez, J; Salmeron, V; Ramos-Cormenzana, A; Silva-Colomer, J; Boza, J

    1990-01-01

    Bacteriological studies were made with in vitro sheep and goat ruminal fluids supplemented with several feeds (alfalfa hay, wheat straw, Agave americana, Opuntia ficus indica and Atriplex nummularia) during anaerobic incubation at 38-39 degrees C. Drastic changes in the bacterial population of sheep ruminal fluids occurred in the presence of different feeds, particularly with addition of feeds of low nutritional quality (wheat straw, A. americana and O. ficus indica). However, the bacterial population in goat rumen liquor was little affected by the addition of the same feeds. These results, which suggest that the rumen bacteria in goats are less affected by different nutritional conditions than the rumen bacteria in sheep, are discussed.

  9. Role of rumen butyrate in regulation of nitrogen utilization and urea nitrogen kinetics in growing sheep.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, U; Hu, Q; Baldwin, R L; Bequette, B J

    2015-05-01

    Butyrate, a major rumen VFA, has been indirectly linked to enhancement of urea recycling on the basis of increased expression of urea transporter in the rumen epithelia of steers fed a rumen butyrate-enhancing diet. Two studies were conducted to quantify the effect of elevated rumen butyrate concentrations on N balance, urea kinetics and rumen epithelial proliferation. Wether sheep (n= 4), fitted with a rumen cannula, were fed a pelleted ration (∼165 g CP/kg DM, 10.3 MJ ME/kg DM) at 1.8 × ME requirement. In Exp. 1, sheep were infused intraruminally with either an electrolyte buffer solution (Con-Buf) or butyrate dissolved in the buffer solution (But-Buf) during 8-d periods in a balanced crossover design. In Exp. 2, sheep were infused intraruminally with either sodium acetate (Na-Ac) or sodium butyrate (Na-But) for 9 d. All solutions were adjusted to pH 6.8 and 8.0 in Exp. 1 and 2, respectively, and VFA were infused at 10% of ME intake. [15N2] urea was continuously infused intravenously for the last 5 d of each period, and total urine and feces were collected. In Exp. 1, 2H5-phenylalanine was continuously infused intravenously over the last 12 h, after which a biopsy from the rumen papillae was taken for measurement of fractional protein synthesis rate (FSR). Butyrate infusion treatments increased (P = 0.1 in Exp. 1; P < 0.05 in Exp. 2) the proportion of rumen butyrate, and acetate infusion increased (P < 0.05) rumen acetate. All animals were in positive N balance (4.2 g N/d in Exp. 1; 7.0 g N/d in Exp. 2), but no difference in N retention was observed between treatments. In Exp. 2, urea entry (synthesis) rate was reduced ( < 0.05) by Na-But compared with the Na-Ac control. In Exp. 1, although But-Buf infusion increased the FSR of rumen papillae (35.3% ± 1.08%/d vs. 28.7% ± 1.08%/d; P < 0.05), urea kinetics were not altered by But-Buf compared with Con-Buf. These studies are the first to directly assess the role of butyrate in urea recycling and its effects on

  10. The Escherichia coli O157:H7 bovine rumen fluid proteome reflects adaptive bacterial responses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To obtain insights into Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157) survival mechanisms in the bovine rumen, we defined the growth characteristics and proteome of O157 cultured in rumen fluid (RF; pH 6.0-7.2 and low volatile fatty acid content) obtained from rumen-fistulated cattle fed low protein content “maintenance diet” under diverse in vitro conditions. Results Bottom-up proteomics (LC-MS/MS) of whole cell-lysates of O157 cultured under anaerobic conditions in filter-sterilized RF (fRF; devoid of normal ruminal microbiota) and nutrient-depleted and filtered RF (dRF) resulted in an anaerobic O157 fRF-and dRF-proteome comprising 35 proteins functionally associated with cell structure, motility, transport, metabolism and regulation, but interestingly, not with O157 virulence. Shotgun proteomics-based analysis using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation used to further study differential protein expression in unfiltered RF (uRF; RF containing normal rumen microbial flora) complemented these results. Conclusions Our results indicate that in the rumen, the first anatomical compartment encountered by this human pathogen within the cattle gastrointestinal tract (GIT), O157 initiates a program of specific gene expression that enables it to adapt to the in vivo environment, and successfully transit to its colonization sites in the bovine GIT. Further experiments in vitro using uRF from animals fed different diets and with additional O157 strains, and in vivo using rumen-fistulated cattle will provide a comprehensive understanding of the adaptive mechanisms involved, and help direct evolution of novel modalities for blocking O157 infection of cattle. PMID:24559513

  11. Taxonomic Identification of Ruminal Epithelial Bacterial Diversity during Rumen Development in Goats

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Jinzhen; Huang, Jinyu; Zhou, Chuanshe

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the colonization process of epithelial bacteria attached to the rumen tissue during rumen development is very limited. Ruminal epithelial bacterial colonization is of great significance for the relationship between the microbiota and the host and can influence the early development and health of the host. MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) were applied to characterize ruminal epithelial bacterial diversity during rumen development in this study. Seventeen goat kids were selected to reflect the no-rumination (0 and 7 days), transition (28 and 42 days), and rumination (70 days) phases of animal development. Alpha diversity indices (operational taxonomic unit [OTU] numbers, Chao estimate, and Shannon index) increased (P < 0.01) with age, and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) revealed that the samples clustered together according to age group. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes were detected as the dominant phyla regardless of the age group, and the abundance of Proteobacteria declined quadratically with age (P < 0.001), while the abundances of Bacteroidetes (P = 0.088) and Firmicutes (P = 0.009) increased with age. At the genus level, Escherichia (80.79%) dominated at day zero, while Prevotella, Butyrivibrio, and Campylobacter surged (linearly; P < 0.01) in abundance at 42 and 70 days. qPCR showed that the total copy number of epithelial bacteria increased linearly (P = 0.013) with age. In addition, the abundances of the genera Butyrivibrio, Campylobacter, and Desulfobulbus were positively correlated with rumen weight, rumen papilla length, ruminal ammonia and total volatile fatty acid concentrations, and activities of carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase) and xylanase. Taking the data together, colonization by ruminal epithelial bacteria is age related (achieved at 2 months) and might participate in the anatomic and functional development of the rumen. PMID:25769827

  12. Microbial and chemical composition of liquid-associated bacteria in goats' rumen and fermenters.

    PubMed

    Abecia, L; Soto, E C; Ramos-Morales, E; Molina-Alcaide, E

    2014-10-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between chemical composition and microbial profile of rumen liquid-associated bacteria (LAB) in vivo (Murciano-Granadina goats) and in a rumen simulation system (single-flow continuous-culture fermenters). To achieve this aim, analyses of purine bases along with some molecular techniques (quantitative PCR to assess abundance and DGGE to identify biodiversity and bacterial profile) were carried out. A control diet (AHC) based on alfalfa hay (AH) and concentrate (C) in a 1:1 ratio and two experimental diets (AHCBI and AHCBII), in which concentrate was partially replaced with multinutrient blocks, were used. Diets AHCBI and AHCBII included multinutrient blocks differing in the relative amount of two-stage olive cake and the source of protein (sunflower meal vs. fava beans). We aimed to investigate the effect of these blocks on rumen microbiota to evaluate their potential as safe substitutes of cereal-based concentrates. Similar patterns of response to diet were found for chemical composition, microbial abundances and diversity in LAB isolated from goat's rumen and fermenters. Whereas bacterial density (log10 gene copies/g FM: 11.6 and 9.4 for bacteria and methanogens, respectively, in rumen) and diversity indexes (Shannon index: 3.6) were not affected by diet, DGGE analyses showed that bacterial community profile was affected. The cluster analysis suggested differences in bacterial profile between LAB pellets isolated from the rumen of goat and fermenters. A relationship between chemical composition and bacterial community composition in LAB pellets seems to exist. Changes in the former were reflected in the bacterial community profile. Further research is needed to clarify the relationship between chemical and microbial composition of ruminal bacterial pellets with diets of different quality.

  13. Effects of juniper essential oil on growth performance, some rumen protozoa, rumen fermentation and antioxidant blood enzyme parameters of growing Saanen kids.

    PubMed

    Yesilbag, D; Biricik, H; Cetin, I; Kara, C; Meral, Y; Cengiz, S S; Orman, A; Udum, D

    2016-10-16

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of juniper essential oil on the growth performance, rumen fermentation parameters, rumen protozoa population, blood antioxidant enzyme parameters and faecal content in growing Saanen kids. Thirty-six male Saanen kids (36 ± 14 days of age) were used in the study. Each group consisted of 9 kids. The control group (G1) was fed with a diet that consisted of the above concentrated feed and oat hay, whereas the experimental groups consumed the same diet but with the concentrated feed uniformly sprayed with juniper essential oil 0.4 ml/kg (G2), 0.8 ml/kg (G3) or 2 ml/kg (G4). There were no differences (p > 0.05) in live weight, live weight gain or feed consumption between the control and experimental groups. There was a significant improvement (p < 0.05) in feed efficiency in the G3 group. There were no differences in the rumen pH, rumen volatile fatty acid (VFA) profile or faecal pH of the control and experimental groups. The rumen NH3 N values were similar at the middle and end of the experiment, but at the start of the experiment, the rumen NH3 N values differed between the control and experimental groups (p < 0.05). The faecal score value was significantly (p < 0.05) decreased in the experimental groups. The addition of juniper essential oil supplementation to the rations caused significant effects on the kids' antioxidant blood parameters. Although the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and catalase values were significantly (p < 0.05) increased in the experimental groups (G2, G3 and G4), especially group G4, the blood glutathione peroxidase (GPX) value significantly decreased in the experimental groups. The results of this study suggest that supplementation of juniper oil is more effective on antioxidant parameters than on performance parameters and may be used as a natural antioxidant product.

  14. Rumen function in vivo and in vitro in sheep fed Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Barros-Rodríguez, Marcos Antonio; Solorio-Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Sandoval-Castro, Carlos Alfredo; Klieve, Athol; Rojas-Herrera, Rafael Antonio; Briceño-Poot, Eduardo Gaspar; Ku-Vera, Juan Carlos

    2015-04-01

    The effect of Leucaena leucocephala inclusion in sheep diets upon rumen function was evaluated. Nine Pelibuey sheep, 32.6 ± 5.33 kg live weight (LW), fitted with rumen cannula were used. A complete randomized block design was employed. Two experimental periods of 60 days each, with 60-day intervals between them, were used. Experimental treatments were as follows (n = 6): T1 (control), 100 % Pennisetum purpureum grass; T2, 20 % L. leucocephala + 80 % P. purpureum; T3, 40 % L. leucocephala + 60 % P. purpureum. In situ rumen neutral detergent fiber (aNDF) and crude protein (CP) degradation, dry matter intake (DMI), volatile fatty acids (VFA) production, estimated methane (CH4) yield, rumen pH, ammonia nitrogen (N-NH3), and protozoa counts were measured. The aNDF in situ rumen degradation of P. purpureum and leucaena was higher (P < 0.05) in T2 and T3. Leucaena CP degradation was higher in T2 and T3 but for P. purpureum it was only significantly higher in T3. Leucaena aNDF and CP degradation rate (c) was 50 % higher (P < 0.05) in T2 and T3, but only higher in T3 for P. purpureum. Voluntary intake and rumen (N-NH3) was higher in T2 and T3 (P = 0.0001, P = 0.005, respectively). Molar VFA proportions were similar for all treatments (P > 0.05). Protozoa counts and in vitro gas production (48 h) were lower in T2 and T3 (P < 0.05, P < 0.0001). Estimated methane yield (mol CH4/day) was higher in sheep fed leucaena (P < 0.0001). However, CH4 yield relative to animal performance (mol CH4/g LW gain) was lower in T2 and T3 (P < 0.0001). In summary, these results indicate that including L. leucocephala in sheep diets did not modify rumen fermentation pattern (same VFA ratios) nor reduce the amount of CH4 per unit of DMI (mol CH4/g DMI). However, leucaena inclusion does increase rumen N-NH3, aNDF and CP digestibility, and voluntary intake.

  15. Detailed Dimethylacetal and Fatty Acid Composition of Rumen Content from Lambs Fed Lucerne or Concentrate Supplemented with Soybean Oil

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Susana P.; Santos-Silva, José; Cabrita, Ana R. J.; Fonseca, António J. M.; Bessa, Rui J. B.

    2013-01-01

    Lipid metabolism in the rumen is responsible for the complex fatty acid profile of rumen outflow compared with the dietary fatty acid composition, contributing to the lipid profile of ruminant products. A method for the detailed dimethylacetal and fatty acid analysis of rumen contents was developed and applied to rumen content collected from lambs fed lucerne or concentrate based diets supplemented with soybean oil. The methodological approach developed consisted on a basic/acid direct transesterification followed by thin-layer chromatography to isolate fatty acid methyl esters from dimethylacetal, oxo- fatty acid and fatty acid dimethylesters. The dimethylacetal composition was quite similar to the fatty acid composition, presenting even-, odd- and branched-chain structures. Total and individual odd- and branched-chain dimethylacetals were mostly affected by basal diet. The presence of 18∶1 dimethylacetals indicates that biohydrogenation intermediates might be incorporated in structural microbial lipids. Moreover, medium-chain fatty acid dimethylesters were identified for the first time in the rumen content despite their concentration being relatively low. The fatty acids containing 18 carbon-chain lengths comprise the majority of the fatty acids present in the rumen content, most of them being biohydrogenation intermediates of 18∶2n−6 and 18∶3n−3. Additionally, three oxo- fatty acids were identified in rumen samples, and 16-O-18∶0 might be produced during biohydrogenation of the 18∶3n−3. PMID:23484024

  16. STANFORD ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE PROJECT.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE , GAME THEORY, DECISION MAKING, BIONICS, AUTOMATA, SPEECH RECOGNITION, GEOMETRIC FORMS, LEARNING MACHINES, MATHEMATICAL MODELS, PATTERN RECOGNITION, SERVOMECHANISMS, SIMULATION, BIBLIOGRAPHIES.

  17. The artificial womb.

    PubMed

    Bulletti, Carlo; Palagiano, Antonio; Pace, Caterina; Cerni, Angelica; Borini, Andrea; de Ziegler, Dominique

    2011-03-01

    The availability of computer-controlled artificial hearts, kidneys, and lungs, as well as the possibility of implanting human embryos in ex vivo uterus models or an artificial endometrium, presents new perspectives for creating an artificial uterus. Survival rates have also improved, with fetuses surviving from as early as 24 weeks of gestation. These advances bring new opportunities for complete or partial ectogenesis through the creation of an artificial womb, one that could sustain the growth and development of fetuses outside of the human body.

  18. Influence of Albizia lebbeck Saponin and Its Fractions on In Vitro Gas Production Kinetics, Rumen Methanogenesis, and Rumen Fermentation Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Sirohi, Sunil Kumar; Goel, Navneet; Singh, Nasib

    2014-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of crude seed powder (CSP) and gross saponins extract (GSE) of seeds of Albizia lebbeck on antimicrobial activity by taking two Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus), two Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhi) bacteria, and two fungi species (Aspergillus niger and Candida butyric) were taken at 25, 50, 100, 250, and 500 µg levels using agar well diffusion method. Zone of inhibition was increased with increasing of concentration of CSP and saponins which indicates that Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli), Gram-positive bacteria (B. cereus), and A. niger were significantly susceptible to inhibition. Another experiment was conducted to study the effect of GSE and saponins fraction A and B of A. lebbeck supplementation at 6% on DM basis on methane production and other rumen fermentation parameters using in vitro gas production test, by taking three different type diets, that is, high fiber diet (D1, 60R : 40C), medium fiber diet (D2, 50R : 50C), and low fiber diet (D3, 40R : 60C). Significant (P ≤ 0.05) increase was seen in IVDMD, methane production; however ammonia nitrogen concentration decreased as compared to control. The methane production was reduced in a range between 12 and 49% by saponin supplemented diets except in case of GSE in D2. Sap A showed the highest methane reduction per 200 mg of truly digested substrate (TDS) than other treatment groups. Results in relation with quantification of methanogens and protozoa by qPCR indicated the decreasing trend with saponins of A. lebbek in comparison with control except total methanogen quantified using mcr-A based primer. PMID:24977047

  19. Effect of DNA extraction methods and sampling techniques on the apparent structure of cow and sheep rumen microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Gemma; Cox, Faith; Kittelmann, Sandra; Miri, Vahideh Heidarian; Zethof, Michael; Noel, Samantha J; Waghorn, Garry C; Janssen, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    Molecular microbial ecology techniques are widely used to study the composition of the rumen microbiota and to increase understanding of the roles they play. Therefore, sampling and DNA extraction methods that result in adequate yields of microbial DNA that also accurately represents the microbial community are crucial. Fifteen different methods were used to extract DNA from cow and sheep rumen samples. The DNA yield and quality, and its suitability for downstream PCR amplifications varied considerably, depending on the DNA extraction method used. DNA extracts from nine extraction methods that passed these first quality criteria were evaluated further by quantitative PCR enumeration of microbial marker loci. Absolute microbial numbers, determined on the same rumen samples, differed by more than 100-fold, depending on the DNA extraction method used. The apparent compositions of the archaeal, bacterial, ciliate protozoal, and fungal communities in identical rumen samples were assessed using 454 Titanium pyrosequencing. Significant differences in microbial community composition were observed between extraction methods, for example in the relative abundances of members of the phyla Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. Microbial communities in parallel samples collected from cows by oral stomach-tubing or through a rumen fistula, and in liquid and solid rumen digesta fractions, were compared using one of the DNA extraction methods. Community representations were generally similar, regardless of the rumen sampling technique used, but significant differences in the abundances of some microbial taxa such as the Clostridiales and the Methanobrevibacter ruminantium clade were observed. The apparent microbial community composition differed between rumen sample fractions, and Prevotellaceae were most abundant in the liquid fraction. DNA extraction methods that involved phenol-chloroform extraction and mechanical lysis steps tended to be more comparable. However, comparison of data

  20. Buccal Swabbing as a Noninvasive Method To Determine Bacterial, Archaeal, and Eukaryotic Microbial Community Structures in the Rumen

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Michelle R.; Jonker, Arjan; McCulloch, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of rumen microbial community structure based on small-subunit rRNA marker genes in metagenomic DNA samples provides important insights into the dominant taxa present in the rumen and allows assessment of community differences between individuals or in response to treatments applied to ruminants. However, natural animal-to-animal variation in rumen microbial community composition can limit the power of a study considerably, especially when only subtle differences are expected between treatment groups. Thus, trials with large numbers of animals may be necessary to overcome this variation. Because ruminants pass large amounts of rumen material to their oral cavities when they chew their cud, oral samples may contain good representations of the rumen microbiota and be useful in lieu of rumen samples to study rumen microbial communities. We compared bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic community structures in DNAs extracted from buccal swabs to those in DNAs from samples collected directly from the rumen by use of a stomach tube for sheep on four different diets. After bioinformatic depletion of potential oral taxa from libraries of samples collected via buccal swabs, bacterial communities showed significant clustering by diet (R = 0.37; analysis of similarity [ANOSIM]) rather than by sampling method (R = 0.07). Archaeal, ciliate protozoal, and anaerobic fungal communities also showed significant clustering by diet rather than by sampling method, even without adjustment for potentially orally associated microorganisms. These findings indicate that buccal swabs may in future allow quick and noninvasive sampling for analysis of rumen microbial communities in large numbers of ruminants. PMID:26276109

  1. Diversity and fluctuation in ciliate protozoan population in the rumen of cattle.

    PubMed

    Abrar, Arfan; Watanabe, Haruki; Kitamura, Tasuku; Kondo, Makoto; Ban-Tokuda, Tomomi; Matsui, Hiroki

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the diversity and fluctuation in the ciliate protozoan population in the rumen of cattle. DNA was extracted from the rumen of three ruminally cannulated, crossbred cattle and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-derived clone library was constructed, using a specific primer set targeting 18S ribosomal RNA genes of ciliate protozoa. DNA fragments of seven selected clones were validated for standard DNA of the protozoa-specific real-time PCR assay. Furthermore, population fluctuation of ciliate protozoa and methanogens in the cattle rumen was determined by real-time PCR. A total of 60 clones were sequenced, phylogenetically analyzed, and classified into 24 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on a 99% similarity criterion. More than 80% sequences were phylogenetically placed in the genus Entodinium. The rest of the sequences were placed in the genus Diploplastron (5%), Dasytricha (8.3%) and Isotricha (3.3%). The results suggest that Entodinium was the dominant group in the rumen of cattle used in this study. The ciliate protozoan population showed no significant change in numbers during the monitoring period and reached a peak at 3 h after feeding. Changes in the protozoa population were lower than those of the methanogens.

  2. Isolation and characterization of novel lipases/esterases from a bovine rumen metagenome.

    PubMed

    Privé, Florence; Newbold, C Jamie; Kaderbhai, Naheed N; Girdwood, Susan G; Golyshina, Olga V; Golyshin, Peter N; Scollan, Nigel D; Huws, Sharon A

    2015-07-01

    Improving the health beneficial fatty acid content of meat and milk is a major challenge requiring an increased understanding of rumen lipid metabolism. In this study, we isolated and characterized rumen bacterial lipases/esterases using functional metagenomics. Metagenomic libraries were constructed from DNA extracted from strained rumen fluid (SRF), solid-attached bacteria (SAB) and liquid-associated rumen bacteria (LAB), ligated into a fosmid vector and subsequently transformed into an Escherichia coli host. Fosmid libraries consisted of 7,744; 8,448; and 7,680 clones with an average insert size of 30 to 35 kbp for SRF, SAB and LAB, respectively. Transformants were screened on spirit blue agar plates containing tributyrin for lipase/esterase activity. Five SAB and four LAB clones exhibited lipolytic activity, and no positive clones were found in the SRF library. Fosmids from positive clones were pyrosequenced and twelve putative lipase/esterase genes and two phospholipase genes retrieved. Although the derived proteins clustered into diverse esterase and lipase families, a degree of novelty was seen, with homology ranging from 40 to 78% following BlastP searches. Isolated lipases/esterases exhibited activity against mostly short- to medium-chain substrates across a range of temperatures and pH. The function of these novel enzymes recovered in ruminal metabolism needs further investigation, alongside their potential industrial uses.

  3. Quantification of transcriptome responses of the rumen epithelium to butyrate infusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as butyrate, produced by gut microorganisms play an important role in energy metabolism and physiology in ruminants as well as in human health. Butyrate is a preferred substrate in the rumen epithelium where approximately 90% of butyrate is metabolized. Additi...

  4. Comparison between two different methods for evaluating rumen papillae measures related to different diets.

    PubMed

    Scocco, Paola; Brusaferro, Andrea; Catorci, Andrea

    2012-07-01

    Although the Geographical Information System (GIS), which integrates computerized drawing computer assisted design (CAD) and relational databases (data base management system (DBMS)), is best known for applications in geographical and planning cartography, it can also use many kinds of information concerning the territory. A multidisciplinary project was initiated since 5 years a multidisciplinary study was initiated to use GIS to integrate environmental and ecological data with findings on animal health, ethology, and anatomy. This study is chiefly aimed at comparing two different methods for measuring the absorptive surface of rumen papillae. To this scope, 21 female sheep (Ovis aries) on different alimentary regimes (e.g., milk and forage mixed diet, early herbaceous diet, dry hay diet, and fresh hay diet at the maximum of pasture flowering and at the maximum of pasture dryness) were used; after slaughtering, 20 papillae were randomly removed from each sample collected from four indicator regions of rumen wall, placed near a metric reference and digitally photographed. The images were developed with the ArcGIS™ software to calculate the area of rumen papillae by means of GIS and to measure their mid-level width and length to calculate the papillae area as previously performed with a different method. Spatial measurements were analyzed using univariate and multivariate methods. This work demonstrates that the GIS methodology can be efficiently used for measuring the absorptive surface of rumen papillae. In addition, GIS demonstrated to be a rapid, precise, and objective tool when compared with previously used method.

  5. Analysis of rumen motility patterns using a wireless telemetry system to characterize bovine reticuloruminal contractions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to characterize rumen motility patterns of cattle fed once daily. Eight ruminally-cannulated Holstein steers (BW = 321 ± 11 kg) were fed alfalfa cubes once daily at 1.5 × NEm top-dressed with a TM-salt pre-mix. Three 24-h collection periods were conducted and each com...

  6. The sheep genome illuminates biology of the rumen and lipid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheep (Ovis aries) are a major source of meat, milk, and fiber in the form of wool and represent a distinct class of animals that have a specialized digestive organ, the rumen, that carries out the initial digestion of plant material. We have developed and analyzed a high-quality reference sheep gen...

  7. Abundance and Genetic Diversity of Microbial Polygalacturonase and Pectate Lyase in the Sheep Rumen Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaru; Luo, Huiying; Huang, Huoqing; Shi, Pengjun; Bai, Yingguo; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Background Efficient degradation of pectin in the rumen is necessary for plant-based feed utilization. The objective of this study was to characterize the diversity, abundance, and functions of pectinases from microorganisms in the sheep rumen. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 103 unique fragments of polygalacturonase (PF00295) and pectate lyase (PF00544 and PF09492) genes were retrieved from microbial DNA in the rumen of a Small Tail Han sheep, and 66% of the sequences of these fragments had low identities (<65%) with known sequences. Phylogenetic tree building separated the PF00295, PF00544, and PF09492 sequences into five, three, and three clades, respectively. Cellulolytic and noncellulolytic Butyrivibrio, Prevotella, and Fibrobacter species were the major sources of the pectinases. The two most abundant pectate lyase genes were cloned, and their protein products, expressed in Escherichia coli, were characterized. Both enzymes probably act extracellularly as their nucleotide sequences contained signal sequences, and they had optimal activities at the ruminal physiological temperature and complementary pH-dependent activity profiles. Conclusion/Significance This study reveals the specificity, diversity, and abundance of pectinases in the rumen ecosystem and provides two additional ruminal pectinases for potential industrial use under physiological conditions. PMID:22815874

  8. Prevalence and Sequence-Based Identity of Rumen Fluke in Cattle and Deer in New Caledonia

    PubMed Central

    Cauquil, Laura; Hüe, Thomas; Hurlin, Jean-Claude; Mitchell, Gillian; Searle, Kate; Skuce, Philip; Zadoks, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    An abattoir survey was performed in the French Melanesian archipelago of New Caledonia to determine the prevalence of paramphistomes in cattle and deer and to generate material for molecular typing at species and subspecies level. Prevalence in adult cattle was high at animal level (70% of 387 adult cattle) and batch level (81%). Prevalence was lower in calves at both levels (33% of 484 calves, 51% at batch level). Animals from 2 of 7 deer farms were positive for rumen fluke, with animal-level prevalence of 41.4% (29/70) and 47.1% (33/70), respectively. Using ITS-2 sequencing, 3 species of paramphistomes were identified, i.e. Calicophoron calicophorum, Fischoederius elongatus and Orthocoelium streptocoelium. All three species were detected in cattle as well as deer, suggesting the possibility of rumen fluke transmission between the two host species. Based on heterogeneity in ITS-2 sequences, the C. calicophorum population comprises two clades, both of which occur in cattle as well as deer. The results suggest two distinct routes of rumen fluke introduction into this area. This approach has wider applicability for investigations of the origin of rumen fluke infections and for the possibility of parasite transmission at the livestock-wildlife interface. PMID:27043709

  9. Lactobacillus plantarum MTD/1, Its Impact on Silage and In vitro Rumen Fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to quantify the impact of Lactobacillus plantarum MTD/1 on silage and in vitro rumen fermentation on alfalfa and corn silage. Four trials were conducted in alfalfa in second (35 and 32% DM) and third harvest (38 and 31% DM), and two in forage corn, hybrids Mycogen 797...

  10. Application of washed rumen technique for rapid determination of fasting heat production in steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of a washed rumen technique as an alternative approach for determining fasting HP in cattle. In Exp. 1, 8 Holstein steers (322±30 kg) were adapted to a cubed alfalfa-based diet (1.5xNEm) for 10 d. After which steers were placed into individual hea...

  11. Effect of feeding cows genetically modified maize on the bacterial community in the bovine rumen.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, S; Gürtler, P; Albrecht, C

    2007-12-01

    Rumen-cannulated cows (n = 4) were fed successively silage made from either conventional or genetically modified (GM) maize. Results revealed no effects of GM maize on the dynamics of six ruminal bacterial strains (investigated by real-time PCR) compared to the conventional maize silage.

  12. In depth analysis of rumen microbial and carbohydrate-active enzymes profile in Indian crossbred cattle.

    PubMed

    Jose, V Lyju; More, Ravi P; Appoothy, Thulasi; Arun, A Sha

    2017-02-28

    Rumen houses a plethora of symbiotic microorganisms empowering the host to hydrolyze plant lignocellulose. In this study, NGS based metagenomic approach coupled with bioinformatic analysis was employed to gain an insight into the deconstruction of lignocellulose by carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) in Indian crossbred Holstein-Friesian cattle. Cattle rumen metagenomic DNA was sequenced using Illumina-MiSeq and 1.9 gigabases of data generated with an average read length of 871 bp. Analysis of the assembled sequences by Pfam-based Carbohydrate-active enzyme Analysis Toolkit identified 17,164 putative protein-encoding CAZymes belonging to different families of glycoside hydrolases (7574), glycosyltransferases (5185), carbohydrate-binding modules (2418), carbohydrate esterases (1516), auxiliary activities (434) and polysaccharide lyases (37). Phylogenetic analysis of putative CAZymes revealed that a significant proportion of CAZymes were contributed by bacteria belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes (40%), Firmicutes (30%) and Proteobacteria (10%). The comparative analysis of HF cross rumen metagenome with other herbivore metagenomes indicated that Indian crossbred cattle rumen is endowed with a battery of CAZymes that may play a central role in lignocellulose deconstruction. The extensive catalog of enzymes reported in our study that hydrolyzes plant lignocellulose biomass, can be further explored for the better feed utilization in ruminants and also for different industrial applications.

  13. Evaluation of bacterial diversity in the rumen and feces of cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rumen is a pre-gastric, anaerobic fermentation chamber populated by a consortium of bacteria, archaea, protozoa, and fungi, which break down feedstuffs in a truly symbiotic relationship within the host animal. The bacterial population is the best known component and is made up of more than 2000...

  14. Exploitation of dietary tannins to improve rumen metabolism and ruminant nutrition.

    PubMed

    Patra, Amlan K; Saxena, Jyotisna

    2011-01-15

    Tannins (hydrolysable and condensed tannin) are polyphenolic polymers of relatively high molecular weight with the capacity to form complexes mainly with proteins due to the presence of a large number of phenolic hydroxyl groups. They are widely distributed in nutritionally important forage trees, shrubs and legumes, cereals and grains, which are considered as anti-nutritional compounds due to their adverse effects on intake and animal performance. However, tannins have been recognised to modulate rumen fermentation favourably such as reducing protein degradation in the rumen, prevention of bloat, inhibition of methanogenesis and increasing conjugated linoleic acid concentrations in ruminant-derived foods. The inclusion of tannins in diets has been shown to improve body weight and wool growth, milk yields and reproductive performance. However, the beneficial effects on rumen modulation and animal performance have not been consistently observed. This review discusses the effects of tannins on nitrogen metabolism in the rumen and intestine, and microbial populations (bacteria, protozoa, fungi and archaea), metabolism of tannins, microbial tolerance mechanisms to tannins, inhibition of methanogenesis, ruminal biohydrogenation processes and performance of animals. The discrepancies of responses of tannins among different studies are attributed to the different chemical structures (degree of polymerisation, procyanidins to propdelphinidins, stereochemistry and C-C bonding) and concentrations of tannins, and type of diets. An establishment of structure-activity relationship would be required to explain differences among studies and obtain consistent beneficial tannin effects.

  15. Bacterial communities in the rumen of Holstein heifers differ when fed orchardgrass as pasture versus hay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rich and diverse microbiota of the rumen provides ruminant animals the capacity to utilize highly fibrous feedstuffs as their energy source, but there is surprisingly little information on the composition of the microbiome of ruminants fed all-forage diets, despite the importance of such agricul...

  16. Insights on alterations to the rumen ecosystem by nitrate and nitrocompounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate and certain short chain nitrocompounds are being investigated as dietary supplements to reduce economic and environmental costs associated with ruminal methane emissions. Thermodynamically, nitrate is a preferred electron acceptor in the rumen that consumes electrons at the expense of metha...

  17. PROPIONIBACTERIUM ACIDIPROPIONICI P169 AND GLUCOGENIC PRECURSORS TO IMPROVE RUMEN PARAMETERS ASSOCIATED WITH LOW QUALITY FORAGE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle grazing dormant western rangelands tend to have a high ruminal acetate to propionate ratio (A:P) and may have low tissue clearance of acetate. Two studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of P. acidipropionici, P169 (P169) on VFA production, forage digestibility, and rumen bacterial eco...

  18. Next generation sequencing to define prokaryotic and fungal diversity in the bovine rumen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A combination of Sanger and 454 sequences of small subunit rRNA loci were used to interrogate the microbial diversity in the bovine rumen of 14 pasture-fed animals. The observed bacterial species richness, based on the V1-V3 region of the 15S rRNA gene, was between 1902 to 2596 species-level operati...

  19. Modeling anaerobic digestion of aquatic plants by rumen cultures: cattail as an example.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bai-Hang; Yue, Zheng-Bo; Ni, Bing-Jie; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing; Harada, Hideki

    2009-04-01

    Despite of the significance of the anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic materials, only a limited number of studies have been carried out to evaluate the lignocellulosic digestion kinetics, and information about the modeling of this process is limited. In this work, a mathematical model, based on the Anaerobic Digestion Model No.1 (ADM1), was developed to describe the anaerobic conversion of lignocellulose-rich aquatic plants, with cattail as an example, by rumen microbes. Cattail was fractionated into slowly hydrolysable fraction (SHF), readily hydrolysable fraction (RHF) and inert fraction in the model. The SHF was hydrolyzed by rumen microbes and resulted in the production of RHF. The SHF and RHF had different hydrolysis rates but both with surface-limiting kinetics. The rumen microbial population diversity, including the cattail-, butyrate-, acetate- and H(2)-degraders, was all incorporated in the model structure. Experiments were carried out to identify the parameters and to calibrate and validate this model. The simulation results match the experimental data, implying that the fractionation of cattail into two biodegradation parts, i.e., SHF and RHF, and modeling their hydrolysis rate with a surface-limiting kinetics were appropriate. The model was capable of simulating the anaerobic biodegradation of cattail by the rumen cultures.

  20. Prevalence and Sequence-Based Identity of Rumen Fluke in Cattle and Deer in New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Cauquil, Laura; Hüe, Thomas; Hurlin, Jean-Claude; Mitchell, Gillian; Searle, Kate; Skuce, Philip; Zadoks, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    An abattoir survey was performed in the French Melanesian archipelago of New Caledonia to determine the prevalence of paramphistomes in cattle and deer and to generate material for molecular typing at species and subspecies level. Prevalence in adult cattle was high at animal level (70% of 387 adult cattle) and batch level (81%). Prevalence was lower in calves at both levels (33% of 484 calves, 51% at batch level). Animals from 2 of 7 deer farms were positive for rumen fluke, with animal-level prevalence of 41.4% (29/70) and 47.1% (33/70), respectively. Using ITS-2 sequencing, 3 species of paramphistomes were identified, i.e. Calicophoron calicophorum, Fischoederius elongatus and Orthocoelium streptocoelium. All three species were detected in cattle as well as deer, suggesting the possibility of rumen fluke transmission between the two host species. Based on heterogeneity in ITS-2 sequences, the C. calicophorum population comprises two clades, both of which occur in cattle as well as deer. The results suggest two distinct routes of rumen fluke introduction into this area. This approach has wider applicability for investigations of the origin of rumen fluke infections and for the possibility of parasite transmission at the livestock-wildlife interface.

  1. Degradation of spent craft brewer’s yeast by caprine rumen hyper ammonia-producing bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spent brewer’s yeast has long been included in ruminant diets as a protein supplement. However, modern craft beers often include more hops (Humulus lupulus L.) compounds than traditional recipes. These compounds include alpha and beta-acids, which are antimicrobial to the rumen hyper ammonia-produci...

  2. Transcriptome differences in the rumen of beef steers with variation in feed intake and gain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feed efficiency is an economically important trait in beef production. The rumen wall interacts with feed, microbial populations and volatile fatty acids important to ruminant nutrition indicating it may play a critical role in the beef steer’s ability to utilize feedstuffs efficiently. To identif...

  3. Quantitative analysis of cellulose degradation and growth of cellulolytic bacteria in the rumen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ruminant animals digest cellulose via a symbiotic relationship with ruminal microorganisms. Because feedstuffs only remain in the rumen for a short time, the rate of cellulose digestion must be very rapid. This speed is facilitated by rumination, a process that returns food to the mouth to be re-...

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Actinomyces glycerinitolerans Strain G10T, Isolated from Sheep Rumen Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Palakawong Na Ayudthaya, Susakul; Strepis, Nikolaos; Pristaš, Peter

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Actinomyces glycerinitolerans strain G10T, which was isolated from sheep rumen fluid, can metabolize a range of substrates, including complex carbohydrates to organic acids (OAs). Here, we report a 3.69-Mbp draft genome of Actinomyces glycerinitolerans. PMID:28209819

  5. Microcetus lappus gen. nov., sp. nov.: new species of ciliated protozoon from the bovine rumen.

    PubMed Central

    Orpin, C G; Mathiesen, S D

    1986-01-01

    A new species of small, ciliated protozoon, Microcetus lappus gen. nov., sp. nov., from the rumen of Norwegian Red cattle is described. M. lappus possesses a novel cytopharyngeal apparatus of two rod-shaped structures, one situated on the dorsal side of the buccal cavity and one on the ventral side, suggesting that it belongs to a previously undescribed taxon. Images PMID:3094449

  6. Effect of dietary starch or micro algae supplementation on rumen fermentation and milk fatty acid composition of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Boeckaert, C; Vlaeminck, B; Dijkstra, J; Issa-Zacharia, A; Van Nespen, T; Van Straalen, W; Fievez, V

    2008-12-01

    Two experiments with rumen-fistulated dairy cows were conducted to evaluate the effects of feeding docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6 n-3)-enriched diets or diets provoking a decreased rumen pH on milk fatty acid composition. In the first experiment, dietary treatments were tested during 21-d experimental periods in a 4 x 4 Latin square design. Diets included a control diet, a starch-rich diet, a bicarbonate-buffered starch-rich diet, and a diet supplemented with DHA-enriched micro algae [Schizochytrium sp., 43.0 g/kg of dry matter intake (DMI)]. Algae were supplemented directly through the rumen fistula. The total mixed ration consisted of grass silage, corn silage, soybean meal, and a standard or glucogenic concentrate. The glucogenic and buffered glucogenic diet had no effect on rumen fermentation and milk fatty acid composition because, unexpectedly, no reduced rumen pH was detected. The algae diet had no effect on rumen pH but provoked decreased butyrate and increased isovalerate molar proportions in the rumen. In addition, algae supplementation affected rumen biohydrogenation of linoleic and linolenic acid as reflected in the modified milk fatty acid composition toward increased conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) cis-9 trans-11, CLA trans-9 cis-11, C18:1 trans-10, C18:1 trans-11, and C22:6 n-3 concentrations. Concomitantly, on average, a 45% decrease in DMI and milk yield was observed. Based on these drastic and impractical results, a second animal experiment was performed for 20 d in which 9.35 g/kg of total DMI of algae were incorporated in the concentrate and supplemented to 3 rumen-fistulated cows. Algae concentrate feeding increased rumen pH, which was associated with decreased rumen short-chain fatty acid concentrations. Moreover, a different shift in rumen short-chain fatty acid proportions was observed compared with the first experiment because molar proportions of butyrate, isobutyrate, and isovalerate increased, whereas acetate molar proportion decreased

  7. Effects of feed additives on rumen and blood profiles during a starch and fructose challenge.

    PubMed

    Golder, H M; Celi, P; Rabiee, A R; Lean, I J

    2014-02-01

    We evaluated the effect of feed additives on the risk of ruminal acidosis in Holstein heifers (n = 40) fed starch and fructose in a challenge study. Heifers were randomly allocated to feed additive groups (n = 8 heifers/group): (1) control (no additives); (2) virginiamycin (VM); (3) monensin + tylosin (MT); (4) monensin + live yeast (MLY); and (5) sodium bicarbonate + magnesium oxide (BUF). Heifers were fed 2.5% of body weight (BW) dry matter intake (DMI) per day of a total mixed ration (62:38 forage:concentrate) and feed additives for a 20-d adaptation period. Fructose (0.1% of BW/d) was included for the last 10d of the adaptation period. On d 21, heifers were fed to target a DMI of 1.0% of BW of wheat, fructose at 0.2% of BW, and their feed additives. Rumen fluid samples obtained by stomach tube and blood samples were collected weekly as well as during a 3.6-h period on challenge day (d 21). Virginiamycin and BUF groups maintained a consistently high DMI across the 20-d adaptation period. The MLY heifers had low DMI of the challenge ration. Average daily gain and feed conversion ratio were not affected by feed additives. All rumen and plasma measures changed weekly over adaptation and over the challenge sampling period with the exception of rumen total lactate and histamine concentrations, plasma oxidative stress index, and ceruloplasmin. Substantial within- and between-group variation was observed in rumen and plasma profiles at challenge sampling. No significant group changes were observed in rumen total volatile fatty acids, propionate, acetate-to-propionate ratio, isobutyrate, caproate, isovalerate, total lactate, d- and l-lactate, and pH measures on challenge day. Acetate concentration was increased in the BUF and control groups on challenge day. Butyrate concentration was lower in the MLY and MT groups compared with other groups at challenge. Valerate concentrations were lowest in the control, VM, and BUF groups and lactate concentrations were numerically

  8. Supersaturation of Dissolved Hydrogen and Methane in Rumen of Tibetan Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Ungerfeld, Emilio M.; Wang, Rong; Zhou, Chuan She; Basang, Zhu Zha; Ao, Si Man; Tan, Zhi Liang

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2) is an essential substrate for methanogens to produce methane (CH4), and also influences pathways of volatile fatty acids (VFA) production in the rumen. Dissolved H2 (H2 (aq)) is the form of H2 available to microbes, and dissolved CH4 (CH4 (aq)) is important for indicating methanogens activity. Rumen H2 (aq) concentration has been estimated by assuming equilibrium with headspace gaseous H2 (H2 (g)) concentration using Henry's law, and has also been directly measured in the liquid phase in some in vitro and in vivo experiments. In this in vivo study, H2 (aq) and CH4 (aq) concentration measured directly in rumen fluid and their corresponding concentrations estimated from their gaseous phase concentrations, were compared to investigate the existence of equilibrium between the gas and liquid phases. Twenty-four Tibetan sheep were randomly assigned to two mixed diets containing the same concentrate mixed with oat grass (OG diet) or barley straw (BS diet). Rumen gaseous phase and contents were sampled using rumenocentesis and oral stomach tubing, respectively. Rumen H2 (aq) and CH4 (aq) concentration and VFA profile differed between sheep fed OG and BS diets. Measured H2 (aq) and CH4 (aq) concentration were greater than H2 (aq) and CH4 (aq) concentrations estimated using gas concentrations, indicating lack of equilibrium between gas and liquid phase and supersaturation of H2 and CH4 in rumen fluid. As a consequence, Gibbs energy changes (ΔG) estimated for various metabolic pathways were different when calculated using dissolved gases concentrations directly measured and when using dissolved gases concentrations assuming equilibrium with the gaseous phase. Dissolved CH4, but not CH4 (g), was positively correlated with H2 (aq). Both H2 (aq) and H2 (g) concentrations were positively correlated with the molar percentage of butyrate and negatively correlated with the molar percentage of acetate. In summary, rumen fluid was supersaturated with both H2 and CH4

  9. Artificial intelligence: Recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on artificial intelligence. Topics considered at the conference included knowledge representation for expert systems, the use of robots in underwater vehicles for resource management, precision logic, an expert system for arc welding, data base management, a knowledge based approach to fault trees, and computer-aided manufacturing using simulation combined with artificial intelligence.

  10. Artificial insemination in poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Artificial insemination is a relative simple yet powerful tool geneticists can employ for the propagation of economically important traits in livestock and poultry. In this chapter, we address the fundamental methods of the artificial insemination of poultry, including semen collection, semen evalu...

  11. Effect of zeolite A on rumen fermentation and phosphorus metabolism in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Grabherr, Hilde; Spolders, Markus; Lebzien, Peter; Hüther, Liane; Flachowsky, Gerhard; Fürll, Manfred; Grün, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of zeolite A on several physiological parameters and on mineral metabolism in the rumino-intestinal-tract of cows. Eight double fistulated (rumen and proximal duodenum) cows were fed maize silage, grass silage and concentrate. Zeolite A was added to the ration over a period of three weeks at 0, 10 and 20 g/kg dry matter (DM). The daily feed amounts were adjusted to the current performance and varied between 3.9 and 15.5 kg/d. Rumen fluid, duodenal chyme and faeces were sampled to characterise the nutrient digestibility. Blood samples were taken to analyse the concentration of inorganic phosphate. Zeolite A supplementation led to a significantly reduced ruminal DM digestibility and fermentation of organic matter. The molar proportion of acetate in the rumen increased, and propionate as well as valerate decreased significantly after zeolite A supplementation. The concentration of the total fatty acids and ruminal pH were not affected. No effect on faecal digestion of DM, organic matter nor on calcium and magnesium digestion was observed. Otherwise the phosphorus (P) concentration in rumen fluid correlated negatively with the mean zeolite A intake (r (2) = 0.75; p = 0.0003). Further, the faecal excretion of P increased significantly for cows with the highest zeolite A dosage (36.9 g P/d) compared to the control group (29.9 g P/d). The lower digestibility of P resulted in a significantly decreased concentration of inorganic P in serum from a basal value of 2.05-1.16 mmol/l six days after starting zeolite A supplementation. The zeolite A treated cows showed a significantly higher Al concentration already in rumen fluid (14.31 and 13.84 mmol/l) compared to the control cows (6.33 mmol/l). The Al flow in the duodenum was also higher for zeolite A treated cows.

  12. Methaphylactic effect of tulathromycin treatment on rumen fluid parameters in feedlot beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Enrico; Armato, Leonardo; Morgante, Massimo; Muraro, Michele; Boso, Matteo; Gianesella, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tulathromycin as a bovine respiratory disease (BRD) metaphylactic treatment on rumen fluid parameters in feedlot cattle in an intensive livestock production farm. One hundred beef cattle, immediately after housing, were divided in 2 equal groups: 50 animals with metaphylactic treatment against BRD (treated group; tulathromycin at 2.5 mg/kg BW) and 50 animals with placebo treatment (control group). Rumen fluid samples were collected from each animal by rumenocentesis in 3 periods: 1 d (T1), 8 d (T8), and 15 d (T15) after treatment. Rumen pH was determined by ruminal fluid using portable pH meter. Total volatile fatty acids (total VFA) were evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). All animals were singularly weighed at T1 and T15. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to determine significant effects of treatment (treated group versus control group) and period (T1, T8, and T15) on rumen fluid parameters and body weight. No clinical signs of BRD or other related diseases were recorded during the periods of study from any animal. Statistically significant differences (P < 0.05) were found between treated group and control group for mean values of ruminal pH (6.02 versus 5.89) and total VFA (5.84 versus 5.13) at 8 d after treatment. The weight gain (Δ) showed an average increase of 8.6 kg in treated group (P < 0.05). The trends of ruminal pH and VFA values suggest an effect of tulathromycin as BRD metaphylactic treatment on the modulation of rumen fermentation, particularly 8 d after administration.

  13. Rumen Microbiome Composition Determined Using Two Nutritional Models of Subacute Ruminal Acidosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Khafipour, Ehsan; Li, Shucong; Plaizier, Jan C.; Krause, Denis O.

    2009-01-01

    Subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) is a metabolic disease in dairy cattle that occurs during early and mid-lactation and has traditionally been characterized by low rumen pH, but lactic acid does not accumulate as in acute lactic acid acidosis. It is hypothesized that factors such as increased gut permeability, bacterial lipopolysaccharides, and inflammatory responses may have a role in the etiology of SARA. However, little is known about the nature of the rumen microbiome during SARA. In this study, we analyzed the microbiome of 64 rumen samples taken from eight lactating Holstein dairy cattle using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms (TRFLP) of 16S rRNA genes and real-time PCR. We used rumen samples from two published experiments in which SARA had been induced with either grain or alfalfa pellets. The results of TRFLP analysis indicated that the most predominant shift during SARA was a decline in gram-negative Bacteroidetes organisms. However, the proportion of Bacteroidetes organisms was greater in alfalfa pellet-induced SARA than in mild or severe grain-induced SARA (35.4% versus 26.0% and 16.6%, respectively). This shift was also evident from the real-time PCR data for Prevotella albensis, Prevotella brevis, and Prevotella ruminicola, which are members of the Bacteroidetes. The real-time PCR data also indicated that severe grain-induced SARA was dominated by Streptococcus bovis and Escherichia coli, whereas mild grain-induced SARA was dominated by Megasphaera elsdenii and alfalfa pellet-induced SARA was dominated by P. albensis. Using discriminant analysis, the severity of SARA and degree of inflammation were highly correlated with the abundance of E. coli and not with lipopolysaccharide in the rumen. We thus suspect that E. coli may be a contributing factor in disease onset. PMID:19783747

  14. Methaphylactic effect of tulathromycin treatment on rumen fluid parameters in feedlot beef cattle

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Enrico; Armato, Leonardo; Morgante, Massimo; Muraro, Michele; Boso, Matteo; Gianesella, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tulathromycin as a bovine respiratory disease (BRD) metaphylactic treatment on rumen fluid parameters in feedlot cattle in an intensive livestock production farm. One hundred beef cattle, immediately after housing, were divided in 2 equal groups: 50 animals with metaphylactic treatment against BRD (treated group; tulathromycin at 2.5 mg/kg BW) and 50 animals with placebo treatment (control group). Rumen fluid samples were collected from each animal by rumenocentesis in 3 periods: 1 d (T1), 8 d (T8), and 15 d (T15) after treatment. Rumen pH was determined by ruminal fluid using portable pH meter. Total volatile fatty acids (total VFA) were evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). All animals were singularly weighed at T1 and T15. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to determine significant effects of treatment (treated group versus control group) and period (T1, T8, and T15) on rumen fluid parameters and body weight. No clinical signs of BRD or other related diseases were recorded during the periods of study from any animal. Statistically significant differences (P < 0.05) were found between treated group and control group for mean values of ruminal pH (6.02 versus 5.89) and total VFA (5.84 versus 5.13) at 8 d after treatment. The weight gain (Δ) showed an average increase of 8.6 kg in treated group (P < 0.05). The trends of ruminal pH and VFA values suggest an effect of tulathromycin as BRD metaphylactic treatment on the modulation of rumen fermentation, particularly 8 d after administration. PMID:26733733

  15. In vitro Screening of Essential Oil Active Compounds for Manipulation of Rumen Fermentation and Methane Mitigation

    PubMed Central

    Joch, M.; Cermak, L.; Hakl, J.; Hucko, B.; Duskova, D.; Marounek, M.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of 11 active compounds of essential oils (ACEO) on rumen fermentation characteristics and methane production. Two trials were conducted. In trial 1, ACEO (eugenol, carvacrol, citral, limonene, 1,4-cineole, p-cymene, linalool, bornyl acetate, α-pinene, and β-pinene) at a dose of 1,000 μL/L were incubated for 24 h in diluted rumen fluid with a 70:30 forage:concentrate substrate (16.2% crude protein; 36.6% neutral detergent fiber). Three fistulated Holstein cows were used as donors of rumen fluid. The reduction in methane production was observed with nine ACEO (up to 86% reduction) compared with the control (p<0.05). Among these, only limonene, 1,4-cineole, bornyl acetate, and α-pinene did not inhibit volatile fatty acid (VFA) production, and only bornyl acetate produced less methane per mol of VFA compared with the control (p<0.05). In a subsequent trial, the effects on rumen fermentation and methane production of two concentrations (500 and 2,000 μL/L) of bornyl acetate, the most promising ACEO from the first trial, were evaluated using the same in vitro incubation method that was used in the first trial. In trial 2, monensin was used as a positive control. Both doses of bornyl acetate decreased (p<0.05) methane production and did not inhibit VFA production. Positive effects of bornyl acetate on methane and VFA production were more pronounced than the effects of monensin. These results confirm the ability of bornyl acetate to decrease methane production, which may help to improve the efficiency of energy use in the rumen. PMID:26954157

  16. Effect of exogenous xylanase on rumen in vitro gas production and degradability of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Togtokhbayar, Norovsambuu; Cerrillo, María A; Rodríguez, Germán Buendía; Elghandour, Mona M M Y; Salem, Abdelfattah Z M; Urankhaich, Chuluunbaatar; Jigjidpurev, Sukhbaatar; Odongo, Nicholas E; Kholif, Ahmed E

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine effects of xylanase on in vitro gas production (GP) and in sacco degradability of wheat straw. Rumen fluid was obtained from three Mongolian native goats fitted with permanent rumen cannulas. The trial consisted of five doses (0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 μL/g of substrate) of a commercial xylanase (Dyadic® xylanase PLUS, Dyadic International, Inc., Jupiter, FL, USA). For the in sacco degradability, different levels of xylanase enzyme were added directly onto 2 g of wheat straw in nylon bags and incubated in the rumen for 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h to estimate degradability of wheat straw. Total GP increased (P < 0.001) at all times of incubation at intermediate levels of xylanase. Methane production had a similar pattern at 3 and 12 h of incubation; increased linearly at 24 h of incubation, and was unaffected at 6 and 48 h of incubation. Rumen NH3 -N concentration increased linearly at 3 h and the highest values were observed with intermediate enzyme levels. All ruminal volatile fatty acids increased linearly with intermediate levels of the fibrolytic enzyme. The in sacco rate of dry matter degradation decreased linearly (P = 0.020) with increasing enzymes. Intermediate levels of xylanase improved rumen kinetic fermentation and degradability. The outcome of this research indicated that the application of xylanase enzyme could improve in vitro GP fermentation of wheat straw.

  17. Onion artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Chun; Shih, Wen-Pin; Chang, Pei-Zen; Lai, Hsi-Mei; Chang, Shing-Yun; Huang, Pin-Chun; Jeng, Huai-An

    2015-05-01

    Artificial muscles are soft actuators with the capability of either bending or contraction/elongation subjected to external stimulation. However, there are currently no artificial muscles that can accomplish these actions simultaneously. We found that the single layered, latticed microstructure of onion epidermal cells after acid treatment became elastic and could simultaneously stretch and bend when an electric field was applied. By modulating the magnitude of the voltage, the artificial muscle made of onion epidermal cells would deflect in opposing directions while either contracting or elongating. At voltages of 0-50 V, the artificial muscle elongated and had a maximum deflection of -30 μm; at voltages of 50-1000 V, the artificial muscle contracted and deflected 1.0 mm. The maximum force response is 20 μN at 1000 V.

  18. Beef quality of young Angus×Nellore cattle supplemented with rumen-protected lipids during rearing and fatting periods.

    PubMed

    Andrade, E N; Polizel Neto, A; Roça, R O; Faria, M H; Resende, F D; Siqueira, G R; Pinheiro, R S B

    2014-12-01

    This work evaluated the beef quality parameters of 108 bulls randomly administered to three treatments during rearing in pastures and two treatments during fatting in feedlots, including mineral and rumen-protected lipids. Meat and fat color, cooking yield, shear force, sensorial traits and chemical and fatty acid compositions were evaluated. Generally, the beef quality parameters were not affected by the rumen protected lipids; however, supplementation with rumen-protected lipids during the rearing period yielded darker beef and brighter fat and increased beef tenderness in meat aged for 28days compared to the meat from animals that received only mineral supplementation. In addition, the percent of meat polyunsaturated fatty acids was negatively affected by the inclusion of protected lipids, yielding 5.58 and 3.72% in animals fed with and without rumen-protected lipids, respectively, during the fatting period.

  19. Effect of tropical browse leaves supplementation on rumen enzymes of sheep and goats fed Dichanthium annulatum grass-based diets.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sultan; Kundu, S S

    2010-08-01

    In a switch-over experiment, eight male animals, four each of sheep and goats of local breeds with mean body weight of 26. 8 +/- 2.0 and 30.0 +/- 2.1 kg, were fed Dichanthium annulatum (DA) grass and four browse species viz. Helictris isora, Securengia virosa, Leucaena leucocephala (LL) and Hardwickia binnata (HB) in four feeding trials to assess their supplementary effect on activity of rumen enzymes. The sheep and goats were offered DA grass with individual browse in 75:25 and 50:50 proportions, respectively, for more than 3 months during each feeding trial, and rumen liquor samples were collected twice at 0 and 4 h post feeding after 60 and 90 days of feeding. Glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzymes were determined in the bacteria and protozoa fractions of rumen liquor, while cellulase enzyme activity was measured in mixed rumen liquor. LL and HB had the highest and lowest contents of CP, while fibre contents were lower in early than later browse leaves. Supplementation of browse leaves significantly (P < 0.05) affect the specific activity of GDH enzyme in bacteria fraction of rumen liquor of animal species, while GDH activity was similar in protozoa fraction of rumen liquor of sheep and goats on all DA grass-browse-supplemented diets except DA-HB (42.8 units/mg protein), where activity was significantly (P < 0.05) low. Specific activities of GOT and GPT enzymes in both bacteria and protozoa fractions of rumen liquor differ significantly (P < 0.05) due to supplementation of browse leaves to DA grass. Browse leaves significantly (P < 0.05) affect the cellulase enzyme activity in animal rumen liquor, being highest on DA-LL (193.4) and lowest on DA-HB diet (144.8 microg sugar/mg protein). Goat exhibited higher activities of GOT and GPT than sheep in both bacteria and protozoa fraction of rumen liquor, while cellulase activity was similar between the animal species on the grass

  20. Using Plant Source as a Buffering Agent to Manipulating Rumen Fermentation in an In vitro Gas Production System.

    PubMed

    Kang, S; Wanapat, M

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of banana flower powder (BAFLOP) supplementation on gas production kinetics and rumen fermentation efficiency in in vitro incubation with different ratios of roughage to concentrate in swamp buffalo and cattle rumen fluid. Two male, rumen fistulated dairy steers and swamp buffaloes were used as rumen fluid donors. The treatments were arranged according to a 2×2×3 factorial arrangement in a Completely randomized design by using two ratios of roughage to concentrate (R:C; 75:25 and 25:75) and 3 levels of BAFLOP supplementation (0, 2 and 4% of dietary substrate) into two different kinds of rumen fluid (beef cattle and swamp buffalo). Under this investigation, the results revealed that the rumen ecology was affected by R:C ratio. The pH declined as a result of using high concentrate ratio; however, supplementation of BAFLOP could buffer the pH which led to an improvement of ruminal efficiency. BAFLOP supplementation affected acetic acid (C2) when the proportion of concentrate was increased. However, there were no effect on total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) and butyric acid (C4) by BAFLOP supplementation. The microbial community was affected by BAFLOP supplementation, especially the bacterial population. As revealed by real-time PCR, the populations of F. succinogenes and R. albus were reduced by the high concentrate treatments while that of R. flavafaciens were increased. The populations of three dominant cellulolytic bacteria were enhanced by BAFLOP supplementation, especially on high concentrate diet. BAFLOP supplementation did not influence the ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) concentration, while R:C did. In addition, the in vitro digestibility was improved by either R:C or BAFLOP supplementation. The BAFLOP supplementation showed an effect on gas production kinetics, except for the gas production rate constant for the insoluble fraction (c), while treatments with high concentrate ratio resulted in the highest

  1. Using Plant Source as a Buffering Agent to Manipulating Rumen Fermentation in an In vitro Gas Production System

    PubMed Central

    Kang, S.; Wanapat, M.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of banana flower powder (BAFLOP) supplementation on gas production kinetics and rumen fermentation efficiency in in vitro incubation with different ratios of roughage to concentrate in swamp buffalo and cattle rumen fluid. Two male, rumen fistulated dairy steers and swamp buffaloes were used as rumen fluid donors. The treatments were arranged according to a 2×2×3 factorial arrangement in a Completely randomized design by using two ratios of roughage to concentrate (R:C; 75:25 and 25:75) and 3 levels of BAFLOP supplementation (0, 2 and 4% of dietary substrate) into two different kinds of rumen fluid (beef cattle and swamp buffalo). Under this investigation, the results revealed that the rumen ecology was affected by R:C ratio. The pH declined as a result of using high concentrate ratio; however, supplementation of BAFLOP could buffer the pH which led to an improvement of ruminal efficiency. BAFLOP supplementation affected acetic acid (C2) when the proportion of concentrate was increased. However, there were no effect on total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) and butyric acid (C4) by BAFLOP supplementation. The microbial community was affected by BAFLOP supplementation, especially the bacterial population. As revealed by real-time PCR, the populations of F. succinogenes and R. albus were reduced by the high concentrate treatments while that of R. flavafaciens were increased. The populations of three dominant cellulolytic bacteria were enhanced by BAFLOP supplementation, especially on high concentrate diet. BAFLOP supplementation did not influence the ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) concentration, while R:C did. In addition, the in vitro digestibility was improved by either R:C or BAFLOP supplementation. The BAFLOP supplementation showed an effect on gas production kinetics, except for the gas production rate constant for the insoluble fraction (c), while treatments with high concentrate ratio resulted in the highest

  2. Effect of dietary rumen-protected choline on milk production of dairy cows: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sales, J; Homolka, P; Koukolová, V

    2010-08-01

    Research studies presented inconsistent results on the effects and action of choline in dairy cow diets. A meta-analysis was conducted to quantify the effects of dietary rumen-protected choline on production characteristics of dairy cows. Dry matter intake (kg/d), milk yield (kg/d), milk fat (% and kg/d), and milk protein (% and kg/d) were evaluated as dependent variables in models. The number of treatment means varied from 20 obtained in 7 studies for milk fat and protein contents to 34 from 11 studies (12 experiments) for milk yield. Accounting for experiment as a random effect, DMI, milk yield, milk protein content, and milk protein yield could adequately be related to levels of dietary rumen-protected choline chloride by a logistic model. Marginal responses in milk yield decreased from 131.5 to 0.037 g of milk/g of dietary rumen-protected choline chloride when supplementation increased from 6 to 50 g/d. From estimated values for the metabolizable Met supplied by diets, it appears that dietary rumen-protected choline chloride functions as a methyl donor to spare Met for milk protein synthesis. However, more accurate input data on Met status of diets are needed to confirm this. Within the range of 6 to 50 g/d of rumen-protected choline chloride, milk fat content decreased linearly at a rate of 0.00339% for a 1g/d increase in dietary rumen-protected choline chloride. This illustrates that dietary rumen-protected choline chloride has no effect on milk fat content. Numerous physiological and dietary factors probably related to responses obtained with dietary rumen-protected choline supplementation, and the precise mechanism of choline action in the lactating dairy cow warrants further investigation.

  3. Strong associations among rumen endotoxin and acute phase proteins with plasma minerals in lactating cows fed graded amounts of concentrate.

    PubMed

    Zebeli, Q; Dunn, S M; Ametaj, B N

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine associations among rumen endotoxin, plasma serum amyloid A (SAA), and C-reactive protein (CRP) with plasma Ca, Fe, Zn, and Cu in lactating cows challenged with graded amounts of rolled barley grain in the diet (i.e., 0, 15, 30, and 45% of DMI). Correlative relationships among variables were determined by linear and nonlinear regression procedures adjusted for the effects of day, animal, and experimental period. Increasing the amount of grain in the diet was successful in inducing an acute phase response, as assessed by augmentation of rumen endotoxin and plasma CRP and SAA (P < 0.01). The correlative analysis revealed inverse, nonlinear relationships of rumen endotoxin and plasma SAA with circulating Ca. Interestingly, plasma Ca reached the asymptotic plateau at 10.6 mg/dL. The increase in rumen endotoxin was associated with an abrupt decrease in plasma Fe (R(2) = 0.91; P < 0.001). A similar relationship, although at a reduced estimation accuracy (R(2) = 0.21; P < 0.01), was observed between rumen endotoxin and plasma Zn. Augmentation of rumen endotoxin and plasma CRP resulted in a positive, biphasic response of plasma Cu. In conclusion, the increase in rumen endotoxin in response to high-grain diets, and the resulting increases in plasma SAA and CRP, were strongly correlated with fluctuations of plasma minerals. Results suggest that new feeding strategies should be developed to curb the release of endotoxin in the rumen fluid to prevent perturbing minerals in the plasma.

  4. Influence of dietary docosahexaenoic acid supplementation on the overall rumen microbiota of dairy cows and linkages with production parameters.

    PubMed

    Torok, Valeria A; Percy, Nigel J; Moate, Peter J; Ophel-Keller, Kathy

    2014-05-01

    The rumen microbiota contributes to greenhouse gas emissions and has an impact on feed efficiency and ruminant product fatty acid composition. Dietary fat supplements have shown promise in reducing enteric methane production and in altering the fatty acid profiles of ruminant-derived products, yet in vivo studies on how these impact the rumen microbiota are limited. In this study, we investigated the rumen bacterial, archaeal, fungal, and ciliate protozoan communities of dairy cows fed diets supplemented with 4 levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (0, 25, 50, and 75 g·cow(-1)·day(-1)) and established linkages between microbial communities and production parameters. Supplementation with DHA significantly (P < 0.05) altered rumen bacterial and archaeal, including methanogenic archaeal, communities but had no significant (P > 0.05) effects on rumen fungal or ciliate protozoan communities. Rumen bacterial communities of cows receiving no DHA were correlated with increased saturated fatty acids (C18:0 and C11:0) in their milk. Furthermore, rumen bacterial communities of cows receiving a diet supplemented with 50 g DHA·cow(-1)·day(-1) were correlated with increases in monounsaturated fatty acids (C20:1n-9) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (C22:5n-3; C22:6n-3; C18:2 cis-9, trans-11; C22:3n-6; and C18:2n-6 trans) in their milk. The significant diet-associated changes in rumen archaeal communities observed did not result in altered enteric methane outputs in these cows.

  5. Artificial Intelligence and Robotics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-20

    8217’AD-A122 414 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND ROBOTICS (.) ARMY SCIENCE 1/j 13OARD WA SH INGTON Od I C PEDEN ET AL. 20 SEP 82 UNCLASSIFIED F/G 15/3 NL LEE...AND ACQUISITION WASHINGTON, D. C. 20310 A RMY CIENCE BOARD AD HOC SUBGROUP REPORT ON ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND ROBOTICS SEPTEMBER 1982 DTIC DEC 1 5...TITLE (aid Subtitle) S TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Army Science Board AHSG Report Final Artificial Intelligence and Robotics S. PERFORMING ORG

  6. Ground transport stress affects bacteria in the rumen of beef cattle: A real-time PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lixin; He, Cong; Zhou, Yanwei; Xu, Lifan; Xiong, Huijun

    2016-10-03

    Transport stress syndrome often appears in beef cattle during ground transportation, leading to changes in their capacity to digest food due to changes in rumen microbiota. The present study aimed to analyze bacteria before and after cattle transport. Eight Xianan beef cattle were transported over 1000 km. Rumen fluid and blood were sampled before and after transport. Real-time PCR was used to quantify rumen bacteria. Cortisol and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) were measured. Cortisol and ACTH were increased on day 1 after transportation and decreased by day 3. Cellulolytic bacteria (Fibrobacter succinogenes and Ruminococcus flavefaciens), Ruminococcus amylophilus and Prevotella albensis were increased at 6 h and declined by 15 days after transport. There was a significant reduction in Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens, Prevotella bryantii, Prevotella ruminicola and Anaerovibrio lipolytica after transport. Rumen concentration of acetic acid increased after transport, while rumen pH and concentrations of propionic and butyric acids were decreased. Body weight decreased by 3 days and increased by 15 days after transportation. Using real-time PCR analysis, we detected changes in bacteria in the rumen of beef cattle after transport, which might affect the growth of cattle after transport.

  7. Technical note: Protozoa-specific antibodies raised in sheep plasma bind to their target protozoa in the rumen.

    PubMed

    Williams, Y J; Rea, S M; Popovski, S; Skillman, L C; Wright, A-D G

    2014-12-01

    Binding of IgG antibodies to Entodinium spp. in the rumen of sheep (Ovis aries) was investigated by adding IgG, purified from plasma, directly into the rumen. Plasma IgG was sourced from sheep that had or had not been immunized with a vaccine containing whole fixed Entodinium spp. cells. Ruminal fluid was sampled approximately 2 h after each antibody dosing. Binding of protozoa by a specific antibody was detected using an indirect fluorescent antibody test. An antibody titer in the ruminal fluid was determined by ELISA, and the concentration of ruminal fluid ammonia-N and ruminal pH were also determined. Entodinium spp. and total protozoa from IgG-infused sheep were enumerated by microscopic counts. Two-hourly additions of IgG maintained a low antibody titer in the rumen for 12 h and the binding of the antibody to the rumen protozoa was demonstrated. Increased ammonia-N concentrations and altered ruminal fluid pH patterns indicated that additional fermentation of protein was occurring in the rumen after addition of IgG. No reduction in numbers of Entodinium spp. was observed (P>0.05). Although binding of antibodies to protozoa has been demonstrated in the rumen, it is unclear how much cell death occurred. On the balance of probability, it would appear that the antibody was degraded or partially degraded, and the impact of this on protozoal populations and the measurement of a specific titer is also unclear.

  8. Interactions of alfalfa hay and sodium propionate on dairy calf performance and rumen development.

    PubMed

    Beiranvand, H; Ghorbani, G R; Khorvash, M; Nabipour, A; Dehghan-Banadaky, M; Homayouni, A; Kargar, S

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to investigate the effects of different levels of alfalfa hay (AH) and sodium propionate (Pro) added to starter diets of Holstein calves on growth performance, rumen fermentation characteristics, and rumen development. Forty-two male Holstein calves (40±2kg of birth weight) were used in a complete randomized design with a 3×2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Dietary treatments were as follows: (1) control = concentrate only; (2) Pro = concentrate with 5% sodium propionate [dry matter (DM) basis]; (3) 5% AH = concentrate + 5% alfalfa hay (DM basis); (4) 5% AH + Pro = concentrate + 5% alfalfa hay + 5% sodium propionate (DM basis); (5) 10% AH = concentrate + 10% alfalfa hay (DM basis); and (6) 10% AH + Pro = concentrate + 10% alfalfa hay + 5% sodium propionate (DM basis). All calves were housed in individual pens bedded with sawdust until 10wk of age. They were given ad libitum access to water and starter throughout the experiment and were fed 2L of milk twice daily. Dry matter intake was recorded daily and body weight weekly. Calves from the control, 10% AH, and 10% AH + Pro treatments were euthanized after wk 10, and rumen wall samples were collected. Feeding of forage was found to increase overall dry matter intake, average daily gain, and final weight; supplementing sodium propionate had no effect on these parameters. Calves consuming forage had lower feed efficiency than those on the Pro diet. Rumen fluid in calves consuming forage had higher pH and greater concentrations of total volatile fatty acids and molar acetate. Morphometric parameters of the rumen wall substantiated the effect of AH supplementation, as plaque formation decreased macroscopically. Overall, the interaction between forage and sodium propionate did not affect calf performance parameters measured at the end of the experiment. Furthermore, inclusion of AH in starter diets positively enhanced the growth performance of male Holstein calves and influenced

  9. Fatty acid profiles associated with microbial colonization of freshly ingested grass and rumen biohydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Kim, E J; Sanderson, R; Dhanoa, M S; Dewhurst, R J

    2005-09-01

    Two in situ studies were conducted to examine the use of odd-chain fatty acid profiles to study microbial colonization of freshly ingested herbage in the rumen as well as fatty acid biohydrogenation. In the first study, fresh perennial ryegrass was subjected to a range of sample preparation methods before incubation in the rumen for 2 or 7 h. In the second study, fresh perennial ryegrass was chopped into 1-cm lengths and incubated in polyester bags in the rumen for 2, 8, and 24 h. After removal of bags from the rumen, 4 different washing methods, ranging from manual squeezing to machine washing, were applied. Fatty acids were extracted from washed residues and determined, as methyl esters, by gas chromatography. The main odd-chain fatty acids (with the exception of anteiso C(15:0)) were not found in fresh grass and were useful markers of the effects of incubation time, sample preparation method, and washing method on microbial colonization/contamination. The concentration of these and other odd-chain fatty acids increased with incubation time in both studies. The results indicate rapid and continued microbial colonization of freshly ingested forages, although patterns of odd-chain fatty acids did not reveal any further information about the types of bacteria-colonizing herbage. Principal component, biplot analysis provided a useful overall description of the processes of microbial colonization and degradation of plant fatty acids on fresh herbage incubated in the rumen. Bolus formation during mastication and ingestion results in extensive damage to herbage; none of the techniques (cutting, crushing, and drying/grinding) investigated in this work was able to replicate the effects of bolus formation in the animal. The study provided further evidence of loss of unfermented feed particles through polyester bag pores, especially when feeds are dried and ground. Biohydrogenation of the polyunsaturated fatty acids of fresh herbage was used principally by solid

  10. Effect of trace minerals and starch on digestibility and rumen fermentation in diets for dairy heifers.

    PubMed

    Pino, F; Heinrichs, A J

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different forms of trace minerals (TM) and the use of different starch levels in dairy heifer diets on rumen fermentation and digestibility. Eight rumen cannulated dairy heifers (15.4 ± 0.8 mo of age and 438.31 ± 18.08 kg of body weight) were subjected to a split-plot, 4 × 4 Latin square design with 19-d periods: 15d of adaptation and 4d of sampling. The whole-plot factor was type of TM; organic as proteinates (OTM) or inorganic sulfates (ITM), and the subplot was starch level (3.54, 12.95, 22.25, and 31.73%). Total collection of feces and urine was completed on d 15 to 19 to determine digestibility and TM excretion. Rumen contents were sampled on d 18 to 19 at 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 22 h after feeding to measure pH and volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations. Plasma samples were collected to evaluate TM concentrations and enzymatic activity for ceruloplasmin, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase. Starch level affected pH, individual VFA concentrations, and nutrient excretion. Trace mineral intake was lower for OTM compared with ITM. No effect of TM form on dry matter digestibility was detected, but as level of starch increased, diet dry matter digestibility increased. Rumen pH was lower for diets with OTM, which is consistent with higher total VFA production and butyrate proportion observed for heifers fed OTM diets. These variables may be explained by the higher bioavailability of OTM and faster utilization and fermentation by rumen microorganisms. Heifers that consumed ITM had higher moisture in feces and higher urine excretion, which increased total manure production. Total excretion of TM was not different by treatment. Blood plasma mineral concentration was not different between treatments except for Mn, which was higher for OTM. Enzymatic activity was not affected by treatments. Mineral intake was reduced and blood mineral levels were not different, suggesting enhanced

  11. Effect of induction of subacute ruminal acidosis on milk fat profile and rumen parameters.

    PubMed

    Colman, E; Fokkink, W B; Craninx, M; Newbold, J R; De Baets, B; Fievez, V

    2010-10-01

    High-concentrate diets can lead to subacute ruminal acidosis and are known to result in changes of the ruminal fermentation pattern and mammary secretion of fatty acids. The objective of this paper is to describe modifications in milk fatty acid proportions, particularly odd- and branched-chain fatty acids and rumen biohydrogenation intermediates, associated with rumen parameters during a 6-wk subacute ruminal acidosis induction protocol with 12 ruminally fistulated multiparous cows. The protocol involved a weekly gradual replacement of a standard dairy concentrate with a wheat-based concentrate (610 g of wheat/kg of concentrate) during the first 5 wk and an increase in the total amount of concentrate in wk 6. Before the end of induction wk 6, cows were switched to a control diet because 7 cows showed signs of sickness. The pH was measured continuously by an indwelling pH probe. Milk and rumen samples were taken on d 2 and 7 of each week. Data were analyzed using a linear mixed model and by principal component analysis. A pH decrease occurred after the first concentrate switch but rumen parameters returned to the original values and remained stable until wk 5. In wk 5 and 6, rumen pH values were indicative of increasing acidotic conditions. After switching to the control diet in wk 6, rumen pH values rapidly achieved normal values. Odd- and branched-chain fatty acids and C18:1 trans-10 increased with increasing amount of concentrate in the diet, whereas C18:1 trans-11 decreased. Four fatty acids [C18:1 trans-10, C15:0 and C17:0+C17:1 cis-9 (negative loadings), and iso C14:0 (positive loading)] largely correlated with the first principal component (PC1), with cows spread along the PC1 axis. The first 4 wk of the induction experiment showed variation across the second principal component (PC2) only, with high loadings of anteiso C13:0 (negative loading) and C18:2 cis-9,trans-11 and C18:1 trans-11 (positive loadings). Weeks 5 and 6 deviated from PC2 and tended toward

  12. Intelligence: Real or artificial?

    PubMed Central

    Schlinger, Henry D.

    1992-01-01

    Throughout the history of the artificial intelligence movement, researchers have strived to create computers that could simulate general human intelligence. This paper argues that workers in artificial intelligence have failed to achieve this goal because they adopted the wrong model of human behavior and intelligence, namely a cognitive essentialist model with origins in the traditional philosophies of natural intelligence. An analysis of the word “intelligence” suggests that it originally referred to behavior-environment relations and not to inferred internal structures and processes. It is concluded that if workers in artificial intelligence are to succeed in their general goal, then they must design machines that are adaptive, that is, that can learn. Thus, artificial intelligence researchers must discard their essentialist model of natural intelligence and adopt a selectionist model instead. Such a strategic change should lead them to the science of behavior analysis. PMID:22477051

  13. Artificial upwelling and mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The authors present results related to artificial upwelling and coastal mariculture using deep ocean water and mixing in coastal waters. They discuss the application of research results for marine waste disposal.

  14. Inflatable artificial sphincter

    MedlinePlus

    ... wall repair Urethral bulking with artificial material Retropubic suspension Tension-free vaginal tape Description This procedure may ... PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 145. Chapple CR. Retropubic suspension surgery for incontinence in women. In: Wein AJ, ...

  15. Bibliography: Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard L.

    1986-01-01

    Annotates reference material on artificial intelligence, mostly at an introductory level, with applications to education and learning. Topics include: (1) programing languages; (2) expert systems; (3) language instruction; (4) tutoring systems; and (5) problem solving and reasoning. (JM)

  16. Introduction to artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheeseman, P.; Gevarter, W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an introductory view of Artificial Intelligence (AI). In addition to defining AI, it discusses the foundations on which it rests, research in the field, and current and potential applications.

  17. Inflatable artificial sphincter - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100115.htm Inflatable artificial sphincter - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  18. Rumen Bacterial Community Composition in Holstein and Jersey Cows Is Different under Same Dietary Condition and Is Not Affected by Sampling Method

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Henry A.; Anderson, Christopher L.; Muller, Makala J.; Kononoff, Paul J.; Fernando, Samodha C.

    2016-01-01

    The rumen microbial community in dairy cows plays a critical role in efficient milk production. However, there is a lack of data comparing the composition of the rumen bacterial community of the main dairy breeds. This study utilizes 16S rRNA gene sequencing to describe the rumen bacterial community composition in Holstein and Jersey cows fed the same diet by sampling the rumen microbiota via the rumen cannula (Holstein cows) or esophageal tubing (both Holstein and Jersey cows). After collection of the rumen sample via esophageal tubing, particles attached to the strainer were added to the sample to ensure representative sampling of both the liquid and solid fraction of the rumen contents. Alpha diversity metrics, Chao1 and observed OTUs estimates, displayed higher (P = 0.02) bacterial richness in Holstein compared to Jersey cows and no difference (P > 0.70) in bacterial community richness due to sampling method. The principal coordinate analysis displayed distinct clustering of bacterial communities by breed suggesting that Holstein and Jersey cows harbor different rumen bacterial communities. Family level classification of most abundant (>1%) differential OTUs displayed that OTUs from the bacterial families Lachnospiraceae and p-2534-18B5 to be predominant in Holstein cows compared to Jersey cows. Additionally, OTUs belonging to family Prevotellaceae were differentially abundant in the two breeds. Overall, the results from this study suggest that the bacterial community between Holstein and Jersey cows differ and that esophageal tubing with collection of feed particles associated with the strainer provides a representative rumen sample similar to a sample collected via the rumen cannula. Thus, in future studies esophageal tubing with addition of retained particles can be used to collect rumen samples reducing the cost of cannulation and increasing the number of animals used in microbiome investigations, thus increasing the statistical power of rumen microbial

  19. Rumen Bacterial Community Composition in Holstein and Jersey Cows Is Different under Same Dietary Condition and Is Not Affected by Sampling Method.

    PubMed

    Paz, Henry A; Anderson, Christopher L; Muller, Makala J; Kononoff, Paul J; Fernando, Samodha C

    2016-01-01

    The rumen microbial community in dairy cows plays a critical role in efficient milk production. However, there is a lack of data comparing the composition of the rumen bacterial community of the main dairy breeds. This study utilizes 16S rRNA gene sequencing to describe the rumen bacterial community composition in Holstein and Jersey cows fed the same diet by sampling the rumen microbiota via the rumen cannula (Holstein cows) or esophageal tubing (both Holstein and Jersey cows). After collection of the rumen sample via esophageal tubing, particles attached to the strainer were added to the sample to ensure representative sampling of both the liquid and solid fraction of the rumen contents. Alpha diversity metrics, Chao1 and observed OTUs estimates, displayed higher (P = 0.02) bacterial richness in Holstein compared to Jersey cows and no difference (P > 0.70) in bacterial community richness due to sampling method. The principal coordinate analysis displayed distinct clustering of bacterial communities by breed suggesting that Holstein and Jersey cows harbor different rumen bacterial communities. Family level classification of most abundant (>1%) differential OTUs displayed that OTUs from the bacterial families Lachnospiraceae and p-2534-18B5 to be predominant in Holstein cows compared to Jersey cows. Additionally, OTUs belonging to family Prevotellaceae were differentially abundant in the two breeds. Overall, the results from this study suggest that the bacterial community between Holstein and Jersey cows differ and that esophageal tubing with collection of feed particles associated with the strainer provides a representative rumen sample similar to a sample collected via the rumen cannula. Thus, in future studies esophageal tubing with addition of retained particles can be used to collect rumen samples reducing the cost of cannulation and increasing the number of animals used in microbiome investigations, thus increasing the statistical power of rumen microbial

  20. Physics of Artificial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bukley, Angie; Paloski, William; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    This chapter discusses potential technologies for achieving artificial gravity in a space vehicle. We begin with a series of definitions and a general description of the rotational dynamics behind the forces ultimately exerted on the human body during centrifugation, such as gravity level, gravity gradient, and Coriolis force. Human factors considerations and comfort limits associated with a rotating environment are then discussed. Finally, engineering options for designing space vehicles with artificial gravity are presented.

  1. Heidegger and artificial intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, G.

    1987-01-01

    The discipline of Artificial Intelligence, in its quest for machine intelligence, showed great promise as long as its areas of application were limited to problems of a scientific and situation neutral nature. The attempts to move beyond these problems to a full simulation of man's intelligence has faltered and slowed it progress, largely because of the inability of Artificial Intelligence to deal with human characteristic, such as feelings, goals, and desires. This dissertation takes the position that an impasse has resulted because Artificial Intelligence has never been properly defined as a science: its objects and methods have never been identified. The following study undertakes to provide such a definition, i.e., the required ground for Artificial Intelligence. The procedure and methods employed in this study are based on Heidegger's philosophy and techniques of analysis as developed in Being and Time. Results of this study show that both the discipline of Artificial Intelligence and the concerns of Heidegger in Being and Time have the same object; fundamental ontology. The application of Heidegger's conclusions concerning fundamental ontology unites the various aspects of Artificial Intelligence and provides the articulation which shows the parts of this discipline and how they are related.

  2. Minimized Bolus-Type Wireless Sensor Node with a Built-In Three-Axis Acceleration Meter for Monitoring a Cow's Rumen Conditions.

    PubMed

    Nogami, Hirofumi; Arai, Shozo; Okada, Hironao; Zhan, Lan; Itoh, Toshihiro

    2017-03-27

    Monitoring rumen conditions in cows is important because a dysfunctional rumen system may cause death. Sub-acute ruminal acidosis (SARA) is a typical disease in cows, and is characterized by repeated periods of low ruminal pH. SARA is regarded as a trigger for rumen atony, rumenitis, and abomasal displacement, which may cause death. In previous studies, rumen conditions were evaluated by wireless sensor nodes with pH measurement capability. The primary advantage of the pH sensor is its ability to continuously measure ruminal pH. However, these sensor nodes have short lifetimes since they are limited by the finite volume of the internal liquid of the reference electrode. Mimicking rumen atony, we attempt to evaluate the rumen condition using wireless sensor nodes with three-axis accelerometers. The theoretical life span of such sensor nodes depends mainly on the transmission frequency of acceleration data and the size of the battery, and the proposed sensor nodes are 30.0 mm in diameter and 70.0 mm in length and have a life span of over 600 days. Using the sensor nodes, we compare the rumen motility of the force transducer measurement with the three-axis accelerometer data. As a result, we can detect discriminative movement of rumen atony.

  3. The Sheep Genome Illuminates Biology of the Rumen and Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Richard; Maddox, Jillian F.; Faraut, Thomas; Wu, Chunhua; Muzny, Donna M.; Li, Yuxiang; Zhang, Wenguang; Stanton, Jo-Ann; Brauning, Rudiger; Barris, Wesley C.; Hourlier, Thibaut; Aken, Bronwen L.; Searle, Stephen M.J.; Adelson, David L.; Bian, Chao; Cam, Graham R.; Chen, Yulin; Cheng, Shifeng; DeSilva, Udaya; Dixen, Karen; Dong, Yang; Fan, Guangyi; Franklin, Ian R.; Fu, Shaoyin; Guan, Rui; Highland, Margaret A.; Holder, Michael E.; Huang, Guodong; Ingham, Aaron B.; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Kalra, Divya; Kovar, Christie L.; Lee, Sandra L.; Liu, Weiqing; Liu, Xin; Lu, Changxin; Lv, Tian; Mathew, Tittu; McWilliam, Sean; Menzies, Moira; Pan, Shengkai; Robelin, David; Servin, Bertrand; Townley, David; Wang, Wenliang; Wei, Bin; White, Stephen N.; Yang, Xinhua; Ye, Chen; Yue, Yaojing; Zeng, Peng; Zhou, Qing; Hansen, Jacob B.; Kristensen, Karsten; Gibbs, Richard A.; Flicek, Paul; Warkup, Christopher C.; Jones, Huw E.; Oddy, V. Hutton; Nicholas, Frank W.; McEwan, John C.; Kijas, James; Wang, Jun; Worley, Kim C.; Archibald, Alan L.; Cockett, Noelle; Xu, Xun; Wang, Wen; Dalrymple, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    Sheep (Ovis aries) are a major source of meat, milk and fiber in the form of wool, and represent a distinct class of animals that have a specialized digestive organ, the rumen, which carries out the initial digestion of plant material. We have developed and analyzed a high quality reference sheep genome and transcriptomes from 40 different tissues. We identified highly expressed genes encoding keratin cross-linking proteins associated with rumen evolution. We also identified genes involved in lipid metabolism that had been amplified and/or had altered tissue expression patterns. This may be in response to changes in the barrier lipids of the skin, an interaction between lipid metabolism and wool synthesis, and an increased role of volatile fatty acids in ruminants, compared to non-ruminant animals. PMID:24904168

  4. CONVERSION OF LACTATE-C14 TO PROPIONATE BY THE RUMEN MICROFLORA12

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, R. L.; Wood, W. A.; Emery, R. S.

    1962-01-01

    Baldwin, R. L. (Michigan State University, East Lansing), W. A. Wood, and R. S. Emery. Conversion of lactate-C14 to propionate by the rumen microflora. J. Bacteriol. 83:907–913. 1962.—Rumen microflora enriched on five different diets calculated to present increasing carbohydrate or lactate availability were used to determine the contribution of the randomizing (succinate) and nonrandomizing (acrylate) routes to propionate with lactate-2-C14 and -3-C14 as substrates. Propionate was labeled as though 70 to 90% was formed via the nonrandomizing route. This percentage was highest on diets containing high levels of carbohydrate or lactate or both. Evidence for the presence of succinic dehydrogenase, acetokinase, phosphotransacetylase, and coenzyme A transphorase was obtained with cell-free extracts. Propionate-2-C14 and lactate-2-C14 were converted by extracts to the activated derivatives of acrylate, lactate, propionate, and acetate. PMID:13864343

  5. Short communication: rearrangement of rumenic Acid in ruminant fats: a marker of thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Destaillats, F; Japiot, C; Chouinard, P Y; Arul, J; Angers, P

    2005-05-01

    Rumenic (cis-9,trans-11 18:2) acid is the main conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomer in milk and other ruminant fats. Anhydrous regular and high-CLA butterfats were heated at 200 degrees C for 2, 4, and 6 h under atmospheric conditions. [1,5] Sigmatropic isomerization of rumenic acid occurred, resulting in the formation of trans-8,cis-10 18:2 acid, as determined by mass spectrometry of its 4,4-dimethyloxazoline derivative. Rate of isomerization was monitored by gas-liquid chromatography, using a 120-m capillary column coated with 70% equivalent cyanoalkylpolysiloxane polymer, and reaction was of first order. Furthermore, [1,5] sigmatropic rearrangement product analysis can be used as an indicator of heat treatment of natural fats and oils containing CLA.

  6. The sheep genome illuminates biology of the rumen and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Xie, Min; Chen, Wenbin; Talbot, Richard; Maddox, Jillian F; Faraut, Thomas; Wu, Chunhua; Muzny, Donna M; Li, Yuxiang; Zhang, Wenguang; Stanton, Jo-Ann; Brauning, Rudiger; Barris, Wesley C; Hourlier, Thibaut; Aken, Bronwen L; Searle, Stephen M J; Adelson, David L; Bian, Chao; Cam, Graham R; Chen, Yulin; Cheng, Shifeng; DeSilva, Udaya; Dixen, Karen; Dong, Yang; Fan, Guangyi; Franklin, Ian R; Fu, Shaoyin; Fuentes-Utrilla, Pablo; Guan, Rui; Highland, Margaret A; Holder, Michael E; Huang, Guodong; Ingham, Aaron B; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Kalra, Divya; Kovar, Christie L; Lee, Sandra L; Liu, Weiqing; Liu, Xin; Lu, Changxin; Lv, Tian; Mathew, Tittu; McWilliam, Sean; Menzies, Moira; Pan, Shengkai; Robelin, David; Servin, Bertrand; Townley, David; Wang, Wenliang; Wei, Bin; White, Stephen N; Yang, Xinhua; Ye, Chen; Yue, Yaojing; Zeng, Peng; Zhou, Qing; Hansen, Jacob B; Kristiansen, Karsten; Gibbs, Richard A; Flicek, Paul; Warkup, Christopher C; Jones, Huw E; Oddy, V Hutton; Nicholas, Frank W; McEwan, John C; Kijas, James W; Wang, Jun; Worley, Kim C; Archibald, Alan L; Cockett, Noelle; Xu, Xun; Wang, Wen; Dalrymple, Brian P

    2014-06-06

    Sheep (Ovis aries) are a major source of meat, milk, and fiber in the form of wool and represent a distinct class of animals that have a specialized digestive organ, the rumen, that carries out the initial digestion of plant material. We have developed and analyzed a high-quality reference sheep genome and transcriptomes from 40 different tissues. We identified highly expressed genes encoding keratin cross-linking proteins associated with rumen evolution. We also identified genes involved in lipid metabolism that had been amplified and/or had altered tissue expression patterns. This may be in response to changes in the barrier lipids of the skin, an interaction between lipid metabolism and wool synthesis, and an increased role of volatile fatty acids in ruminants compared with nonruminant animals.

  7. Efficient anaerobic transformation of raw wheat straw by a robust cow rumen-derived microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    Lazuka, Adèle; Auer, Lucas; Bozonnet, Sophie; Morgavi, Diego P; O'Donohue, Michael; Hernandez-Raquet, Guillermina

    2015-11-01

    A rumen-derived microbial consortium was enriched on raw wheat straw as sole carbon source in a sequential batch-reactor (SBR) process under strict mesophilic anaerobic conditions. After five cycles of enrichment the procedure enabled to select a stable and efficient lignocellulolytic microbial consortium, mainly constituted by members of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes phyla. The enriched community, designed rumen-wheat straw-derived consortium (RWS) efficiently hydrolyzed lignocellulosic biomass, degrading 55.5% w/w of raw wheat straw over 15days at 35°C and accumulating carboxylates as main products. Cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic activities, mainly detected on the cell bound fraction, were produced in the earlier steps of degradation, their production being correlated with the maximal lignocellulose degradation rates. Overall, these results demonstrate the potential of RWS to convert unpretreated lignocellulosic substrates into useful chemicals.

  8. Comparison of grass and legume silages for milk production. 2. In vivo and in sacco evaluations of rumen function.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, R J; Evans, R T; Scollan, N D; Moorby, J M; Merry, R J; Wilkins, R J

    2003-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the basis for higher voluntary intakes and increased alpha-linolenic acid content in milk from cows offered clover silages. Six cows with rumen and duodenal cannulae were used in a four-period changeover-design experiment. Cows received 8 kg/d of dairy concentrate and had ad libitum access to one of six silage treatments: grass, red clover, white clover, alfalfa, and 50/50 (dry matter basis) mixtures of grass with red clover or white clover. The rumen fermentability of grass, red clover, white clover, and grass/red clover silages was also evaluated in a nylon bag study. Legume silages led to increased dry matter intake and milk production in comparison with grass silage. There was no significant effect of legume silages on rumen pH and volatile fatty acid concentrations, but a significant increase in rumen ammonia concentration with the legume silages, reflecting their higher protein content. The inclusion of white clover or alfalfa silage, but not red clover silage, in diets led to an increase in molar proportions of isobutyric, iso-valeric, and n-valeric acids in comparison with diets based on grass silage. Rumen fill was significantly lower, and rumen passage rates were significantly higher for cows offered alfalfa or white clover silages. However, the markedly different particle size distribution of rumen contents with these feeds suggests very different mechanisms for the high intake characteristics: high rates of particle breakdown and passage with alfalfa, and high rates of fermentation and passage with white clover. Microbial energetic efficiency (grams microbial N per kilogram organic matter apparently digested in the rumen) was highest for cows offered alfalfa silage, intermediate for clover silage, and lowest for cows offered grass silage. These differences reflect the higher rumen outflow rates for legume silages in comparison with grass silage. However, the effect of these differences on N-use efficiency

  9. Changes in Microbiota in Rumen Digesta and Feces Due to a Grain-Based Subacute Ruminal Acidosis (SARA) Challenge.

    PubMed

    Plaizier, Jan C; Li, Shucong; Danscher, Anne Mette; Derakshani, Hooman; Andersen, Pia H; Khafipour, Ehsan

    2017-02-08

    The effects of a grain-based subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) challenge on bacteria in the rumen and feces of lactating dairy cows were determined. Six lactating, rumen-cannulated Danish Holstein cows were used in a cross-over study with two periods. Periods included two cows on a control diet and two cows on a SARA challenge. The control diet was a total mixed ration containing 45.5% dry matter (DM), 43.8% DM neutral detergent fiber, and 19.6% DM starch. The SARA challenge was conducted by gradually substituting the control diet with pellets containing 50% wheat and 50% barley over 3 days to reach a diet containing 55.6% DM, 31.3% DM neutral detergent fiber, and 31.8% DM starch, which was fed for four more days. Rumen fluid samples were collected at day 7 and 10 of experimental periods. Feces samples were collected on days 8 and 10 of these periods. Extracted DNA from the rumen and feces samples was analyzed to assess their bacterial communities using MiSeq Illumina sequencing of the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene. The induction of SARA reduced the richness, diversity, and stability of bacterial communities and resulted in distinctly different microbiota in the rumen and feces. Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were the most abundant phyla and, combined, they represented 76.9 and 94.4% of the bacterial community in the rumen fluid and the feces, respectively. Only the relative abundance of Firmicutes in the rumen was increased by the SARA challenge. In rumen fluid and feces, the abundances of nine out of the 90 and 25 out of the 89 taxa, respectively, were affected by the challenge. Hence, SARA challenge altered the composition of the bacterial community at the lower taxonomical level in the feces and therefore also likely in the hindgut, as well as in the rumen. However, only reductions in the bacterial richness and diversity in the rumen fluid and feces were in agreement with those of other studies and had a biological basis. Although the composition of the

  10. Efficiency and rumen responses in younger and older Holstein heifers limit-fed diets of differing energy density.

    PubMed

    Zanton, G I; Heinrichs, A J

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of limit feeding diets of different predicted energy density on the efficiency of utilization of feed and nitrogen and rumen responses in younger and older Holstein heifers. Eight rumen-cannulated Holstein heifers (4 heifers beginning at 257 ± 7 d, hereafter "young," and 4 heifers beginning at 610 ± 16 d, hereafter "old") were limit-fed high [HED; 2.64 Mcal/kg of dry matter (DM), 15.31% crude protein (CP)] or low (LED; 2.42 Mcal/kg of DM, 14.15% CP) energy density diets according to a 4-period, split-plot Latin square design with 28-d periods. Diets were limit-fed to provide isonitrogenous and isoenergetic intake on a rumen empty body weight (BW) basis at a level predicted to support approximately 800 g/d of average daily gain. During the last 7d of each period, rumen contents were subsampled over a 24-h period, rumen contents were completely evacuated, and total collection of feces and urine was made over 4d. Intakes of DM and water were greater for heifers fed LED, although, by design, calculated intake of metabolizable energy did not differ between age groups or diets when expressed relative to rumen empty BW. Rumen pH was lower, ammonia (NH3-N) concentration tended to be higher, and volatile fatty acids (VFA) concentration was not different for HED compared with LED and was unaffected by age group. Rumen content mass was greater for heifers fed LED and for old heifers, so when expressing rumen fermentation responses corrected for this difference in pool size, NH3-N pool size was not different between diets and total moles of VFA in the rumen were greater for heifers fed LED, whereas these pool sizes were greater for old heifers. Total-tract digestibility of potentially digestible neutral detergent fiber (NDF) was greater in heifers fed LED and for young heifers, whereas the fractional rate of ruminal passage and digestion of NDF were both greater in heifers fed LED. Digestibility of N was greater for

  11. The role of holotrichs in the metabolism of dietary linoleic acid in the rumen.

    PubMed

    Girard, V; Hawke, J C

    1978-01-27

    The uptake and metabolism of linoleic acid by rumen holotrichs (mainly Isotricha prostoma and I. intestinalis) has been examined in in vitro infusion experiments. Maximum absorption and metabolism of [1-14C]linoleate by 2 . 10(6) Isotricha suspended in 100 ml buffer was obtained using an infusion rate of 1.6 mg linoleate/h. After 90 min, 84% of the added substrate was recovered within the cells, mainly as free fatty acid or phospholipid. There was a rapid incorporation of radioactivity into phospholipid, mainly phosphatidylcholine, at the commencement of linoleate infusion but no further incorporation after about 40 min. The presence of bacteria during incubations, in approximately the same Isotricha/bacteria ratio as found in the rumen, reduced the uptake of linoleate and the accumulation of free fatty acid by holotrichs but the incorporation into phospholipid remained similar to that obtained in the absence of bacteria. Very little biohydrogenation of linoleic acid occurred in incubations with holotrichs alone. Bacterial suspensions converted linoleic acid to mainly trans monoene and a small amount of stearic acid, but in incubations containing both bacteria and holotrichs, both stearic acid and trans monoene were major products. Using the latter mixed culture, about 20% of the added [1-14C]linoleic acid was present in holotrich phospholipid of which 62% remained as octadecadienoic acid. The Isotricha population was 3 . 10(3)--2 . 10(4)/ml rumen fluid and it contributed about 23% of the linoleic acid in the rumen of a cow on a hay diet.

  12. Metagenomic analysis reveals the influences of milk containing antibiotics on the rumen microbes of calves.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Han, Yunsheng; Yuan, Xue; Wang, Guan; Wang, Zhibo; Pan, Qiqi; Gao, Yan; Qu, Yongli

    2017-04-01

    Milk containing antibiotics is used as cost-effective feed for calves, which may lead to antibiotic residues-associated food safety problems. This study aims to investigate the influence of antibiotics on rumen microbes. Through metagenomic sequencing, the rumen microbial communities of calves fed with pasteurized milk containing antibiotics (B1), milk containing antibiotics (B2) and fresh milk (B3) were explored. Each milk group included calves in 2 (T1), 3 (T2) and 6 (T3) months of age. Using FastQC software and SOAPdenovo 2, the filtered data, respectively, were performed with quality control and sequence splicing. Following KEGG annotation was conducted for the uploaded sequences using KAAS software. Using R software, both species abundance analysis and differential abundance analysis were performed. In the B1 samples, the species abundance of Bacteroidetes gradually decreased along with the extension of feeding time, while that of Fibrobacteres gradually increased. The species abundances of Proteobacteria (p value = 0.01) and Spirochaetes (p value = 0.03) had significant differences among T1, T2 and T3 samples. Meanwhile, only the species abundance of Spirochaetes (p value = 0.04) had significant difference among B1, B2 and B3 samples. Cell cycle involving GSK3β, CDK2 and CDK7 was significantly enriched for the differentially expressed genes in the T1 versus T2 and T1 versus T3 comparison groups. Milk containing antibiotics might have a great influence on these rumen microbes and lead to antibiotic residues-associated food safety problems. Furthermore, GSK3β, CDK2 and CDK7 in rumen bacteria might affect milk fat metabolism in early growth stages of calves.

  13. Metatranscriptomic Analyses of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharide Degradation by Microorganisms in the Cow Rumen

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xin; Tian, Yan; Li, Jinting; Su, Xiaoyun; Wang, Xuewei; Zhao, Shengguo; Liu, Li; Luo, Yingfeng; Liu, Di; Zheng, Huajun; Wang, Jiaqi; Dong, Zhiyang

    2014-01-01

    The bovine rumen represents a highly specialized bioreactor where plant cell wall polysaccharides (PCWPs) are efficiently deconstructed via numerous enzymes produced by resident microorganisms. Although a large number of fibrolytic genes from rumen microorganisms have been identified, it remains unclear how they are expressed in a coordinated manner to efficiently degrade PCWPs. In this study, we performed a metatranscriptomic analysis of the rumen microbiomes of adult Holstein cows fed a fiber diet and obtained a total of 1,107,083 high-quality non-rRNA reads with an average length of 483 nucleotides. Transcripts encoding glycoside hydrolases (GHs) and carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) accounted for ∼1% and ∼0.1% of the total non-rRNAs, respectively. The majority (∼98%) of the putative cellulases belonged to four GH families (i.e., GH5, GH9, GH45, and GH48) and were primarily synthesized by Ruminococcus and Fibrobacter. Notably, transcripts for GH48 cellobiohydrolases were relatively abundant compared to the abundance of transcripts for other cellulases. Two-thirds of the putative hemicellulases were of the GH10, GH11, and GH26 types and were produced by members of the genera Ruminococcus, Prevotella, and Fibrobacter. Most (∼82%) predicted oligosaccharide-degrading enzymes were GH1, GH2, GH3, and GH43 proteins and were from a diverse group of microorganisms. Transcripts for CBM10 and dockerin, key components of the cellulosome, were also relatively abundant. Our results provide metatranscriptomic evidence in support of the notion that members of the genera Ruminococcus, Fibrobacter, and Prevotella are predominant PCWP degraders and point to the significant contribution of GH48 cellobiohydrolases and cellulosome-like structures to efficient PCWP degradation in the cow rumen. PMID:25501482

  14. Rumen protozoa and methanogenesis: not a simple cause-effect relationship.

    PubMed

    Morgavi, Diego P; Martin, Cécile; Jouany, Jean-Pierre; Ranilla, Maria José

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the interactions between hydrogen producers and consumers in the rumen ecosystem is important for ruminant production and methane mitigation. The present study explored the relationships between rumen protozoa, methanogens and fermentation characteristics. A total of six donor sheep harbouring (F, faunated) or not (D, defaunated) protozoa in their rumens (D animals were kept without protozoa for a period of a few months (D - ) or for more than 2 years (D+)) were used in in vitro and in vivo experiments. In vitro the absence of protozoa decreased NH3 and butyrate production and had no effect on methane. In contrast, the liquid-associated bacterial and methanogens fraction of D+ inocula produced more methane than D -  and F inoculum (P < 0·05). In vivo fermentation parameters of donor animals showed the same trend on NH3 and butyrate and showed that D+ animals were high methane emitters, while D -  were the lowest ( - 35 %). The concentration of dissolved dihydrogen measured after feeding followed the opposite trend. Methane emissions did not correlate with the relative abundance of methanogens in the rumen measured by quantitative PCR, but there was a trend for higher methanogens concentration in the solid-associated population of D+ animals compared with D -  animals. In contrast, PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles of methanogens' methyl coenzyme-M reductase A gene showed a clear clustering in liquid-associated fractions for all three groups of donors but fewer differences in solid-associated fractions. These results show that the absence of protozoa may affect differently the methanogen community and methane emissions in wethers.

  15. Atypical rumen acidosis in a dairy herd from whiskey distillery by-products.

    PubMed

    Davenport, D F; Kerr, L A

    2001-06-01

    Decreased milk and reproductive performance, high incidence of gastrointestinal surgeries, and acute deaths were investigated in a herd of Holstein cows. The health problems were due to abnormally low rumen pH's from ingestion of 30 gal/hd/d of a 3.4 pH liquid feed ingredient. A combination of acid neutralizing agents (calcium hydroxide plus sodium carbonate) alleviated the toxic effects of the feed ingredient.

  16. Antiprotozoal Effect of Saponins in the Rumen Can Be Enhanced by Chemical Modifications in Their Structure

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Morales, Eva; de la Fuente, Gabriel; Duval, Stephane; Wehrli, Christof; Bouillon, Marc; Lahmann, Martina; Preskett, David; Braganca, Radek; Newbold, Charles J.

    2017-01-01

    The antiprotozoal effect of saponins is transitory, as when saponins are deglycosylated to the sapogenin by rumen microorganisms they become inactive. We postulated that the substitution of the sugar moiety of the saponin with small polar residues would produce sapogen-like analogs which might be resistant to degradation in the rumen as they would not be enzymatically cleaved, allowing the antiprotozoal effect to persist over time. In this study, we used an acute assay based on the ability of protozoa to break down [14C] leucine-labeled Streptococcus bovis and a longer term assay based on protozoal motility over 24 h to evaluate both the antiprotozoal effect and the stability of this effect with fifteen hederagenin bis-esters esterified with two identical groups, and five cholesterol and cholic acid based derivatives carrying one to three succinate residues. The acute antiprotozoal effect of hederagenin derivatives was more pronounced than that of cholesterol and cholic acid derivatives. Modifications in the structure of hederagenin, cholesterol, and cholic acid derivatives resulted in compounds with different biological activities in terms of acute effect and stability, although those which were highly toxic to protozoa were not always the most stable over time. Most of the hederagenin bis-esters, and in particular hederagenin bis-succinate (TSB24), hederagenin bis-betainate dichloride (TSB37) and hederagenin bis-adipate (TSB47) had a persistent effect against rumen protozoa in vitro, shifting the fermentation pattern toward higher propionate and lower butyrate. These chemically modified triterpenes could potentially be used in ruminant diets as an effective defaunation agent to, ultimately, increase nitrogen utilization, decrease methane emissions, and enhance animal production. Further trials in vivo or in long term rumen simulators are now needed to confirm the in vitro observations presented. PMID:28382023

  17. Rumen development and growth of Balouchi lambs offered alfalfa hay pre- and post-weaning.

    PubMed

    Norouzian, Mohammad Ali; Valizadeh, Reza; Vahmani, Payam

    2011-08-01

    The consumption of solid feed is essential for successful transition from a pre-ruminant to a functional digestive tract. Lambs fed starter rations containing highly fermentable carbohydrates often experience dramatic changes in concentrations of rumen and blood metabolites. The optimal amount of roughage required in the diet of pre-ruminant animals is still unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of feeding alfalfa hay on performance and rumen development in young Balouchi lambs. In a completely randomized design, 30 lambs were fed one of three experimental diets consisting of a control, without alfalfa hay (C), a diet containing 7.5% alfalfa hay (A1), and a diet containing 15% alfalfa hay (A2). Lambs fed A1 and A2 diets had lower dry matter intake during the pre-weaning period (P < 0.01) and overall (P = 0.02), but feed conversion ratio and average daily gain were not affected by feeding alfalfa hay. Concentration of beta-hydroxybutyric acid was higher in C compared with the A1 and A2 groups (P < 0.01). Concentrations of glucose and non-esterified fatty acids did not differ among the groups of animals. Feeding alfalfa hay reduced thickness of the rumen epithelial keratinized layer (P = 0.04) and increased thickness of muscular layer (P = 0.05). We concluded that including 15% alfalfa hay in the starter diet could reduce thickness of the keratinization layer and increase muscularity of rumen wall without adverse effects on growth and performance of newborn lambs.

  18. Effect of environmental factors and influence of rumen and hindgut biogeography on bacterial communities in steers.

    PubMed

    Romero-Pérez, Gustavo A; Ominski, Kim H; McAllister, Tim A; Krause, Denis O

    2011-01-01

    Feces from cattle production are considered important sources of bacterial contamination of food and the environment. Little is known about the combined effects of arctic temperatures and fodder tannins on rumen and hindgut bacterial populations. Individual rumen liquor and rectal fecal samples from donor steers fed either alfalfa silage or sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia Scop.) silage and water ad libitum were collected weekly on the first three sampling days and fortnightly afterwards. The daily ambient temperatures were registered and averaged to weekly mean temperatures. Steers fed sainfoin silage had lower (P < 0.05) concentrations of branched-chain volatile fatty acids (VFA) than those fed alfalfa silage. All VFA concentrations were higher (P < 0.001) in rumen liquor samples than in fecal samples. The interaction of sample type and diet showed a significant effect (P < 0.05) on the proportions of the bacterial community that were from the phyla Proteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia. Ambient temperature had an indirect effect (P < 0.05) on the phylum Firmicutes, as it affected its proportional balance. The bacterial population diversity in samples appeared to decrease concurrently with the ambient temperature. The phylum Firmicutes explained the first principal component at 64.83 and 42.58% of the total variance in rumen liquor and fecal samples, respectively. The sample type had a larger effect on bacterial communities than diet and temperature. Certain bacterial populations seemed to be better adapted than others to environmentally adverse conditions, such as less access time to nutrients due to higher motility and rate of passage of digesta caused by extreme temperatures, or antimicrobials such as tannins, possibly due to an influence of their biogeographical location within the gut.

  19. The complete genome sequence of Eubacterium limosum SA11, a metabolically versatile rumen acetogen.

    PubMed

    Kelly, William J; Henderson, Gemma; Pacheco, Diana M; Li, Dong; Reilly, Kerri; Naylor, Graham E; Janssen, Peter H; Attwood, Graeme T; Altermann, Eric; Leahy, Sinead C

    2016-01-01

    Acetogens are a specialized group of anaerobic bacteria able to produce acetate from CO2 and H2 via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. In some gut environments acetogens can compete with methanogens for H2, and as a result rumen acetogens are of interest in the development of microbial approaches for methane mitigation. The acetogen Eubacterium limosum SA11 was isolated from the rumen of a New Zealand sheep and its genome has been sequenced to examine its potential application in methane mitigation strategies, particularly in situations where hydrogenotrophic methanogens are inhibited resulting in increased H2 levels in the rumen. The 4.15 Mb chromosome of SA11 has an average G + C content of 47 %, and encodes 3805 protein-coding genes. There is a single prophage inserted in the chromosome, and several other gene clusters appear to have been acquired by horizontal transfer. These include genes for cell wall glycopolymers, a type VII secretion system, cell surface proteins and chemotaxis. SA11 is able to use a variety of organic substrates in addition to H2/CO2, with acetate and butyrate as the principal fermentation end-products, and genes involved in these metabolic pathways have been identified. An unusual feature is the presence of 39 genes encoding trimethylamine methyltransferase family proteins, more than any other bacterial genome. Overall, SA11 is a metabolically versatile organism, but its ability to grow on such a wide range of substrates suggests it may not be a suitable candidate to take the place of hydrogen-utilizing methanogens in the rumen.

  20. Comparison of rumen microbial inhibition resulting from various essential oils isolated from relatively unpalatable plant species.

    PubMed

    Oh, H K; Jones, M B; Longhurst, W M

    1968-01-01

    Essential oils were isolated from eight plant species which were relatively unpalatable to sheep and deer. The inhibitory potency of these essential oils upon sheep and deer rumen microorganisms was compared, in terms of total gas and volatile fatty acid (VFA) production, by use of an anaerobic manometric technique. Inhibitory effects of oils from the eight plant species may be placed in four groups: (i) essential oils from vinegar weed (Trichostema lanceoletum) and California bay (Umbellularia californica) inhibited rumen microbial activity most; (ii) lesser inhibition was exhibited by rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) and California mugwort (Artemisia douglasiana) oils, followed by (iii) blue-gum eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus) and sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) oils; and (iv) oils from Douglas fir (Psuedotsuga menziesii) and Jerusalem oak (chenopodium botrys) resulted in the least inhibition, when 0.3 ml of each oil was used. A highly significant correlation coefficient (r = 0.98(**)) between total gas and VFA production indicated the validity of either method to measure the activity of rumen microorganisms. Our results are discussed in relation to the hypothesis that the selectivity and voluntary consumption of ruminants are related to the characteristic odor and antibacterial action of essential oils isolated from relatively unpalatable plant species.

  1. Studies on some characteristics of hydrogen production by cell-free extracts of rumen anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Joyner, A E; Winter, W T; Godbout, D M

    1977-03-01

    Hydrogen production was studied in the following rumen anaerobes: Bacteroides clostridiiformis, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, Enbacterium limosum, Fusobacterium necrophorum, Megasphaera elsdenii, Ruminococcus albus, and Ruminococcus flavefaciens. Clostridium pasteurianum and Escherichia coli were included for comparative purposes. Hydrogen production from dithionite, dithionite-reduced methyl viologen, pyruvate, and formate was determined. All species tested produced hydrogen from dithionite-reduce methyl viologen, but only C. pasteurianum, B. clostridiiformis, E. limosum, and M. elsdenii produced hydrogen from dithionite. All species except E. coli produced hydrogen from pyruvate, but activity was low or absent in extracts of E. limosum, F. necrophorum, R. albus, and R. flavefaciens unless methyl viologen was added. Hydrogen was produced from formate only by E. coli, B. clostridiiformis, E. limosum, F. necrophorum, and R. flavefaciens. Extracts were subjected to ultracentrifugation in an effort to determine the solubility of hydrogenase. The hydrogenase of all species except E. coli appeared to be soluble, although variable amounts of hydrogenase activity were detected in the pellet. Treatment of extracts of the rumen microbial species with DEAE-cellulose resulted in loss ofhydrogen production from pyruvate. Activity was restored by the addition of methyl viologen. It is concluded that hydrogen production in these rumen microorganisms is similar to that in the saccharolytic clostridia.

  2. Replacement of maize by rumen filtrate fermented corn-cob in layer diets.

    PubMed

    Adeyemi, O A; Familade, F O

    2003-11-01

    Laying hens (50 weeks in-lay) were fed for 8 weeks on diets containing corn-cobs fermented with rumen filtrate. The fermented corn-cob was included in the diets at 0%, 5.0%, 10.0%, 15.0% and 20.0% of the total diet at the expense of maize. Feed intake was not significantly (P>0.05) different, although birds on the control diet consumed slightly more feed than birds on the fermented corn-cob based diets. Hen day production and feed per dozen eggs decreased with increase in dietary level of corn-cob (P<0.05). Yolk colour was significantly (P<0.05) affected, rumen filtrate fermented corn-cob appear to promote better yolk coloration. Egg weight and shell thickness were not significantly influenced by dietary treatment. The overall results appear to suggest that rumen filtrate fermentated corn-cob could provide a material that holds promise as a good alternative to maize because of its enhanced crude protein value and reduced crude fibre content.

  3. Identification and characterization of a cellulase-encoding gene from the buffalo rumen metagenomic library.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nhung Hong; Maruset, Lalita; Uengwetwanit, Tanaporn; Mhuantong, Wuttichai; Harnpicharnchai, Piyanun; Champreda, Verawat; Tanapongpipat, Sutipa; Jirajaroenrat, Kanya; Rakshit, Sudip K; Eurwilaichitr, Lily; Pongpattanakitshote, Somchai

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms residing in the rumens of cattle represent a rich source of lignocellulose-degrading enzymes, since their diet consists of plant-based materials that are high in cellulose and hemicellulose. In this study, a metagenomic library was constructed from buffalo rumen contents using pCC1FOS fosmid vector. Ninety-three clones from the pooled library of approximately 10,000 clones showed degrading activity against AZCL-HE-Cellulose, whereas four other clones showed activity against AZCL-Xylan. Contig analysis of pyrosequencing data derived from the selected strongly positive clones revealed 15 ORFs that were closely related to lignocellulose-degrading enzymes belonging to several glycosyl hydrolase families. Glycosyl hydrolase family 5 (GHF5) was the most abundant glycosyl hydrolase found, and a majority of the GHF5s in our metagenomes were closely related to several ruminal bacteria, especially ones from other buffalo rumen metagenomes. Characterization of BT-01, a selected clone with highest cellulase activity from the primary plate screening assay, revealed a cellulase encoding gene with optimal working conditions at pH 5.5 at 50 °C. Along with its stability over acidic pH, the capability efficiently to hydrolyze cellulose in feed for broiler chickens, as exhibited in an in vitro digestibility test, suggests that BT-01 has potential application as a feed supplement.

  4. Monensin-resistant bacteria in the rumens of calves on monensin-containing and unmedicated diets.

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, K A; Boling, J A

    1983-01-01

    Total and monensin-resistant anaerobic bacterial populations and volatile fatty acid concentrations were examined in the rumens of steers fed monensin-containing (33 mg/kg) and unmedicated diets. Total anaerobic counts on a habitat-simulating medium ranged from 7.1 X 10(8) to 7.1 X 10(9) CFU/g of rumen ingesta and were not significantly different in animals fed the two diets. The mean percentage of the anaerobic population resistant to monensin (10 micrograms/ml) was significantly greater in animals receiving the monensin-supplemented diet for 33 days than in those receiving the unmedicated diet (63.6 and 32.8%, respectively). Treatment group differences in monensin resistance tended to develop later than characteristic differences in acetate/propionate ratios. Relative proportions of resistant organisms in monensin-fed animals remained significantly greater for at least 18 days after monensin was deleted from the ration, whereas acetate/propionate ratios increased to values comparable to those in the control within 10 days. These data suggest that monensin-resistant bacteria may be present in greater numbers in the rumens of animals fed monensin-supplemented diets. However, greater proportions of monensin-resistant organisms were not necessarily associated with altered fermentation patterns. PMID:6614902

  5. Divergent functional isoforms drive niche specialisation for nutrient acquisition and use in rumen microbiome.

    PubMed

    Rubino, Francesco; Carberry, Ciara; M Waters, Sinéad; Kenny, David; McCabe, Matthew S; Creevey, Christopher J

    2017-04-01

    Many microbes in complex competitive environments share genes for acquiring and utilising nutrients, questioning whether niche specialisation exists and if so, how it is maintained. We investigated the genomic signatures of niche specialisation in the rumen microbiome, a highly competitive, anaerobic environment, with limited nutrient availability determined by the biomass consumed by the host. We generated individual metagenomic libraries from 14 cows fed an ad libitum diet of grass silage and calculated functional isoform diversity for each microbial gene identified. The animal replicates were used to calculate confidence intervals to test for differences in diversity of functional isoforms between microbes that may drive niche specialisation. We identified 153 genes with significant differences in functional isoform diversity between the two most abundant bacterial genera in the rumen (Prevotella and Clostridium). We found Prevotella possesses a more diverse range of isoforms capable of degrading hemicellulose, whereas Clostridium for cellulose. Furthermore, significant differences were observed in key metabolic processes indicating that isoform diversity plays an important role in maintaining their niche specialisation. The methods presented represent a novel approach for untangling complex interactions between microorganisms in natural environments and have resulted in an expanded catalogue of gene targets central to rumen cellulosic biomass degradation.

  6. Enrichment and Isolation of Rumen Bacteria That Reduce trans- Aconitic Acid to Tricarballylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Russell, James B.

    1985-01-01

    Bacteria from the bovine rumen capable of reducing trans-aconitate to tricarballylate were enriched in an anaerobic chemostat containing rumen fluid medium and aconitate. After 9 days at a dilution rate of 0.07 h−1, the medium was diluted and plated in an anaerobic glove box. Three types of isolates were obtained from the plates (a crescent-shaped organism, a pleomorphic rod, and a spiral-shaped organism), and all three produced tricarballylate in batch cultures that contained glucose and trans-aconitate. In glucose-limited chemostats (0.10 h−1), trans-aconitate reduction was associated with a decrease in the amount of reduced products formed from glucose. The crescent-shaped organism produced less propionate, the pleomorphic rod produced less ethanol, and the spiral made less succinate and possibly H2. Aconitate reduction by the pleomorphic rod and the spiral organism was associated with a significant increase in cellular dry matter. Experiments with stock cultures of predominant rumen bacteria indicated that Selenomonas ruminantium, a species taxonomically similar to the crescent-shaped isolate, was an active reducer of trans-aconitate. Strains of Bacteroides ruminicola, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, and Megasphaera elsdenii produced little if any tricarballylate. Wolinella succinogenes produced some tricarballylate. Based on its stability constant for magnesium (Keq = 115), tricarballylate could be a factor in the hypomagnesemia that leads to grass tetany. Images PMID:16346691

  7. Rumen Bacterial Degradation of Forage Cell Walls Investigated by Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Danny E.; Amos, Henry E.

    1975-01-01

    The association of rumen bacteria with specific leaf tissues of the forage grass Kentucky-31 tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) during in vitro degradation was investigated by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Examination of degraded leaf cross-sections revealed differential rates of tissue degradation in that the cell walls of the mesophyll and pholem were degraded prior to those of the outer bundle sheath and epidermis. Rumen bacteria appeared to degrade the mesophyll, in some cases, and phloem without prior attachment to the plant cell walls. The degradation of bundle sheath and epidermal cell walls appeared to be preceded by attachment of bacteria to the plant cell wall. Ultrastructural features apparently involved in the adhesion of large cocci to plant cells were observed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The physical association between plant and rumen bacterial cells during degradation apparently varies with tissue types. Bacterial attachment, by extracellular features in some microorganisms, is required prior to degradation of the more resistant tissues. Images PMID:16350017

  8. The effects of organic selenium supplementation on the rumen ciliate population in sheep.

    PubMed

    Mihaliková, K; Gresáková, L; Boldizárová, K; Faix, S; Leng, L; Kisidayová, S

    2005-01-01

    The effect of selenium supplementation on the rumen protozoan population of sheep was demonstrated. Both the total and generic counts of rumen ciliates in sheep fed a diet with basal Se content (70 microg/kg dry matter) were compared to those of animals given feed supplemented with inorganic (disodium selenite) or organic Se (selenized yeast) (310 microg/kg dry matter). The genera of Entodinium, Isotricha, Dasytricha, Ophryoscolex, Diploplastron and Polyplastron occurred in all sheep except for the control, in which Ophryoscolex was not observed. The population of Ophryoscolex caudatus f. tricoronatus was significantly higher in sheep supplemented with organic Se than in animals given inorganic Se (by 160 %). Supplementation of feed with selenized yeast induced significant growth in the Diploplastron population (by 63 %) while no change occurred in sheep given selenite. The populations of Dasytricha ruminantium and Polyplastron multivesiculatum were higher than control in both Se-supplemented groups. The ciliate population of Entodinium spp. was not influenced by Se supplements. Our results suggest a protective effect of Se feed supplementation on the development of some rumen ciliate species in young ruminants.

  9. Degradation of terpenes and terpenoids from Mediterranean rangelands by mixed rumen bacteria in vitro.

    PubMed

    Malecky, M; Albarello, H; Broudiscou, L P

    2012-04-01

    This in vitro study aimed at estimating the disappearance rates of 14 terpenes and terpenoids after 24-h incubation with mixed bacteria from caprine rumens. These compounds comprised nine monoterpene hydrocarbons (δ-3-carene, p-cymene, β-myrcene, (E)- and (Z)-β-ocimene, α-phellandrene, α-terpinene, γ-terpinene and α-terpinolene), four oxygenated monoterpenes ((E)- and (Z)-linalool oxide, 4-terpinenol, α + γ terpineol) and one sesquiterpene hydrocarbon (β-cedrene). They were individually exposed to goat rumen microflora for 24 h in 70 ml culture tubes at an input level of 0.5 ml/l. Terpenoids were the least degraded, 100% of (E)-linalool oxide, 95% of (Z)-linalool oxide, 91% of 4-terpinenol and 75% of terpineol remained intact after 24-h incubation. In contrast, α-terpinolene concentration in fermentation broth extracts was below quantification limit, thus indicating an extensive, if not complete, degradation by rumen bacteria. Only 2% of the initial amounts of α-phellandrene were recovered. The other monoterpenes and β-cedrene were partly degraded, with losses ranging from 67% for δ-3-carene to 90% for (E)-β-ocimene. The corresponding rates of disappearance were between 2.67 and 4.08 μmol/ml inoculum per day.

  10. Application of rumen microbes to enhance food waste hydrolysis in acidogenic leach-bed reactors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bing Hua; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2014-09-01

    Effect of rumen microorganisms on hydrolysis of food waste in leach bed reactor (LBR) was investigated. LBRs were inoculated (20%, w/w) with cow manure and anaerobically digested sludge at different ratios, 0:1 (LBR-A), 1:3 (LBR-B), 1:1 (LBR-C), 3:1 (LBR-D) and 1:0 (LBR-E). High volatile solids (VS) conversion efficiency of 68% was achieved in LBR-E. Compared with LBR-A, chemical oxygen demand, total soluble products and total Kjeldahl nitrogen leaching of LBR-E were increased by 16%, 14.3% and 27%, respectively. Recovery of the highest amounts of ethanol and butyrate in LBR-E indicated that the metabolic pathway mediated by rumen microorganisms was favorable for subsequent methanogenesis. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that the enhanced hydrolysis in LBR-E was mainly due to strong degraders, e.g. Enterobacter, Bifidobacterium thermacidophilum and Caloramator sourced from cow manure. Results demonstrate that rumen microorganisms rapidly degrade the VS and produce useful VFAs with high methane yields in subsequent methanogenesis.

  11. Effects of Flavonoids on Rumen Fermentation Activity, Methane Production, and Microbial Population

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Norhani; Oskoueian, Armin

    2013-01-01

    This research was carried out to evaluate the effects of flavone, myricetin, naringin, catechin, rutin, quercetin, and kaempferol at the concentration of 4.5% of the substrate (dry matter basis) on the rumen microbial activity in vitro. Mixture of guinea grass and concentrate (60 : 40) was used as the substrate. The results showed that all the flavonoids except naringin and quercetin significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the dry matter degradability. The gas production significantly (P < 0.05) decreased by flavone, myricetin, and kaempferol, whereas naringin, rutin, and quercetin significantly (P < 0.05) increased the gas production. The flavonoids suppressed methane production significantly (P < 0.05). The total VFA concentration significantly (P < 0.05) decreased in the presence of flavone, myricetin, and kaempferol. All flavonoids except naringin and quercetin significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the carboxymethyl cellulase, filter paperase, xylanase, and β-glucosidase activities, purine content, and the efficiency of microbial protein synthesis. Flavone, myricetin, catechin, rutin, and kaempferol significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the population of rumen microbes. Total populations of protozoa and methanogens were significantly (P < 0.05) suppressed by naringin and quercetin. The results of this research demonstrated that naringin and quercetin at the concentration of 4.5% of the substrate (dry matter basis) were potential metabolites to suppress methane production without any negative effects on rumen microbial fermentation. PMID:24175289

  12. Influence of substrate and microbial interaction on efficiency of rumen microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Demeyer, D; Van Nevel, C

    1986-01-01

    Microbial N produced in the rumen and flowing to the duodenum (Ni) is related to the total amount of OM fermented or apparently digested in the rumen (OMf). This relationship, best expressed as microbial N yield (gNi/kgOMf), is affected mainly by the physical and chemical properties of feed carbohydrates and the amounts ingested. These factors influence yields at three levels of increasing complexity: Bacterial fermentation within one compartment following the continuous culture model. Fermentation pattern as such does not seem to affect yields. High fermentation rates are associated with lactate production, low methane production and transient polysaccharide synthesis. These effects induce acidification and lower yields, partly compensated by faster growth. Protozoal action, determined by the presence of sequestration spaces provided mainly by roughage diets. The presence of protozoa depresses microbial N yield but allows more complete fibre digestion. Compartmentation and differential passage. With roughage diets, optimal microbial N yield seems to require well developed microbial compartmentation, involving a large proportion of microbes in a large-particle pool with a slow turnover, balanced by a small proportion in liquid, small-particle pools with a fast turnover. Such a situation is associated with long roughage feeding. It is hypothesized that microbial N yields in the rumen may vary between two extremes which are associated with the feeding of long roughage on the one hand or with concentrate (starch) feeding on the other.

  13. Effects of nitrate adaptation by rumen inocula donors and substrate fiber proportion on in vitro nitrate disappearance, methanogenesis, and rumen fermentation acid.

    PubMed

    Lin, M; Schaefer, D M; Zhao, G Q; Meng, Q X

    2013-07-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the main effects of dietary nitrate adaptation by cattle and alfalfa cell wall to starch ratio in in vitro substrates on nitrate disappearance and nitrite and volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations, as well as hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4) accumulations. Rumen fluid from steers fed diets containing urea or nitrate was added into in vitro incubations containing sodium nitrate as the sole nitrogen source and 20 cell wall : 80 starch or 80 cell wall : 20 starch as the carbohydrate source. The results showed that during 24 h incubation, rumen fluid inoculums from steers adapted to dietary nitrate resulted in more rapid nitrate disappearance by 6 h of incubation (P < 0.01), no significant effect on nitrite concentration and diminished CH4 accumulation (P < 0.05). Cell wall to starch ratio did not affect nitrate disappearance, CH4 accumulation and total VFA concentration. The higher cell wall ratio had the lower total gas production and H2 concentration (P < 0.05). Ammonia-N (NH3-N) concentration increased because of adaptation of donors to nitrate feeding (P < 0.05). Nitrate adaptation did not alter total VFA concentration, but increased acetate, and decreased propionate and butyrate molar proportions (P < 0.01).

  14. Use of a geographic information system to evaluate morphometric variations of rumen papillae related to diet and pasture vegetative cycle.

    PubMed

    Scocco, Paola; Ceccarelli, Piero; Gatti, Renata; Catorci, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    The morphometric variations of the rumen papillae due to different alimentary diets has been analysed using a geographic information system (GIS), as the preliminary stage of a wider study aimed at creating a geo-database to link environmental data (pasture structure and composition, pastoral value) with parameters measuring animal welfare (body condition score, volatile fatty acids concentration, haematochemical profile) both during a pasture vegetative cycle and in different conditions of animal load on pastures, with the ultimate goal of contributing to grassland management. A first step was to collect samples of rumen wall tissue from different groups of sheep (lambs to milky and mixed diet, and adult at the maximum of flowering and at the end of pasture vegetative cycle) to verify morphometric differences in rumen papillae due to different diets. Wall tissues of rumen samples were removed from the dorsal and ventral sac and preserved in a formalin solution. Twenty papillae from the dorsal and ventral sac were taken from each sample and their images were elaborated with ArcGISTM software. Results show that the morphometric variation of papillae is related with the pasture productivity trend: the maximum size of rumen papillae occurs immediately after the phytomass and flowering spike; in this phase the animals utilise a very nourishing and quantitatively abundant pasture. After this phase, a deterioration of pasture occurs and the surface of rumen papillae surface decreases rapidly. Results obtained further confirm the existence of a close relationship between quality and quantity of phytomass and the extent of rumen papillae absorptive surface, demonstrating the effects of this relationship during a pasture vegetative cycle.

  15. Impact of levels of total digestible nutrients on microbiome, enzyme profile and degradation of feeds in buffalo rumen

    PubMed Central

    Kala, Anju; Kamra, D. N.; Kumar, Avinash; Agarwal, Neeta; Chaudhary, L. C.; Joshi, C. G.

    2017-01-01

    The present study was aimed at understanding a shift in rumen microbiome of buffaloes fed various levels of total digestible nutrients. To understand the process, the metagenomics of rumen microbes, in vivo and in vitro rumen fermentation studies were carried out. Three rumen fistulated adult male Murrah buffaloes were fed three isonitrogenous diets varying in total digestible nutrients (70, 85 and 100% of TDN requirement) in 3X3 switch over design. On dry matter basis, wheat straw/ roughage content were 81, 63 and 51% and that of maize grain was 8, 16 and 21% in three diets respectively. After 20 d of feeding, rumen liquor and rumen contents were sampled just before (0h) and 4h post feeding. Ruminococcus flavefaciens and R. albus (estimated with real time PCR) were higher in high roughage diets. The predominant phyla in all the three groups were Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes followed by Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Fibrobacteres. A core group of more than fifty rumen bacteria was present in all the animals with very little variations due to level of TDN. The most predominant bacterial genera reported in order of decreasing abundance were: Prevotella, Bacteroides, Clostridium, Ruminococcus, Eubacterium, Parabacteroides, Fibrobacter, Butyrivibrio etc. The higher diversity of the enyzmes families GH 23, GH 28, GH 39, GH 97, GH 106, and GH 127 (the enzymes active in fibre and starch degradation) were significantly higher on 100%TDN diet while CE 14 (required for the hydrolysis of bond between carbohydrate and lignin) was higher on low TDN (70%) diet, indicating ester bond cleavage was better in animals fed high roughage (wheat straw) diet. PMID:28207851

  16. Vaccination of cattle with a methanogen protein produces specific antibodies in the saliva which are stable in the rumen.

    PubMed

    Subharat, Supatsak; Shu, Dairu; Zheng, Tao; Buddle, Bryce M; Janssen, Peter H; Luo, Dongwen; Wedlock, D Neil

    2015-04-15

    Methane is produced in the rumen of cattle by a group of archaea (single-celled organisms forming a domain distinct from bacteria and eucarya) called methanogens. Vaccination against methanogens has the potential to reduce methane emissions by inducing antibodies in saliva which are transferred to the rumen and diminish the ability of methanogens to produce methane. Since it is likely that an effective vaccination strategy will need to produce high levels of methanogen-specific antibody in the saliva; the choice of adjuvant, route of vaccination and stability of saliva-derived antibody in the rumen all need to be considered. In this study, stability of IgA and IgG in rumen fluid was determined using an in vitro assay. IgA levels in cattle saliva were reduced by only 40% after 8h exposure to rumen contents while IgG levels were reduced by 80%. These results indicated that antibody is relatively stable in the bovine rumen. A trial was conducted in cattle to investigate induction of immune responses to a methanogen protein, recombinant glycosyl transferase protein (rGT2) from Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1. Groups of cattle (n=6) were vaccinated subcutaneously with rGT2, formulated with Montanide ISA61 with or without the TLR4 agonist, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL). A control group (n=6) was not vaccinated. Strong antigen-specific IgG and moderate IgA responses were measured in the serum and saliva of the vaccinated animals and antibody was also detected in the rumen.

  17. Impact of levels of total digestible nutrients on microbiome, enzyme profile and degradation of feeds in buffalo rumen.

    PubMed

    Kala, Anju; Kamra, D N; Kumar, Avinash; Agarwal, Neeta; Chaudhary, L C; Joshi, C G

    2017-01-01

    The present study was aimed at understanding a shift in rumen microbiome of buffaloes fed various levels of total digestible nutrients. To understand the process, the metagenomics of rumen microbes, in vivo and in vitro rumen fermentation studies were carried out. Three rumen fistulated adult male Murrah buffaloes were fed three isonitrogenous diets varying in total digestible nutrients (70, 85 and 100% of TDN requirement) in 3X3 switch over design. On dry matter basis, wheat straw/ roughage content were 81, 63 and 51% and that of maize grain was 8, 16 and 21% in three diets respectively. After 20 d of feeding, rumen liquor and rumen contents were sampled just before (0h) and 4h post feeding. Ruminococcus flavefaciens and R. albus (estimated with real time PCR) were higher in high roughage diets. The predominant phyla in all the three groups were Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes followed by Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Fibrobacteres. A core group of more than fifty rumen bacteria was present in all the animals with very little variations due to level of TDN. The most predominant bacterial genera reported in order of decreasing abundance were: Prevotella, Bacteroides, Clostridium, Ruminococcus, Eubacterium, Parabacteroides, Fibrobacter, Butyrivibrio etc. The higher diversity of the enyzmes families GH 23, GH 28, GH 39, GH 97, GH 106, and GH 127 (the enzymes active in fibre and starch degradation) were significantly higher on 100%TDN diet while CE 14 (required for the hydrolysis of bond between carbohydrate and lignin) was higher on low TDN (70%) diet, indicating ester bond cleavage was better in animals fed high roughage (wheat straw) diet.

  18. Artificial consciousness, artificial emotions, and autonomous robots.

    PubMed

    Cardon, Alain

    2006-12-01

    Nowadays for robots, the notion of behavior is reduced to a simple factual concept at the level of the movements. On another hand, consciousness is a very cultural concept, founding the main property of human beings, according to themselves. We propose to develop a computable transposition of the consciousness concepts into artificial brains, able to express emotions and consciousness facts. The production of such artificial brains allows the intentional and really adaptive behavior for the autonomous robots. Such a system managing the robot's behavior will be made of two parts: the first one computes and generates, in a constructivist manner, a representation for the robot moving in its environment, and using symbols and concepts. The other part achieves the representation of the previous one using morphologies in a dynamic geometrical way. The robot's body will be seen for itself as the morphologic apprehension of its material substrata. The model goes strictly by the notion of massive multi-agent's organizations with a morphologic control.

  19. Diurnal Dynamics of Gaseous and Dissolved Metabolites and Microbiota Composition in the Bovine Rumen

    PubMed Central

    van Lingen, Henk J.; Edwards, Joan E.; Vaidya, Jueeli D.; van Gastelen, Sanne; Saccenti, Edoardo; van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Bannink, André; Smidt, Hauke; Plugge, Caroline M.; Dijkstra, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Diurnal patterns of ruminal fermentation metabolites and microbial communities are not commonly assessed when investigating variation in ruminal CH4 production. The aims of this study were to monitor diurnal patterns of: (i) gaseous and dissolved metabolite concentrations in the bovine rumen, (ii) H2 and CH4 emitted, and (iii) the rumen microbiota. Furthermore, the effect of dietary inclusion of linseed oil on these patterns was assessed. Four rumen cannulated multiparous cows were used in a cross-over design with two 17 days periods and two dietary treatments: a control diet and a linseed oil supplemented diet [40% maize silage, 30% grass silage, 30% concentrate on dry matter (DM) basis for both diets; fat contents of 33 vs. 56 g/kg of DM]. On day 11, rumen contents were sampled for 10 h after morning feeding to profile gaseous and dissolved metabolite concentrations and microbiota composition. H2 and CH4 emission (mass per unit of time) was measured in respiration chambers from day 13 to 17. A 100-fold increase in ruminal H2 partial pressure (contribution to the total pressure of rumen headspace gases) was observed at 0.5 h after feeding. This peak was followed by a decline to basal level. Qualitatively similar patterns after feeding were also observed for H2 and CH4 emission, ethanol and lactate concentrations, and propionate molar proportion, although the opposite pattern was seen for acetate molar proportion. Associated with these patterns, a temporal biphasic change in the microbial composition was observed as based on 16S ribosomal RNA with certain taxa specifically associated with each phase. Bacterial concentrations (log10 16S ribosomal RNA gene copies based) were affected by time, and were increased by linseed oil supplementation. Archaeal concentrations (log10 16S ribosomal RNA gene copies based) tended to be affected by time and were not affected by diet, despite linseed oil supplementation decreasing CH4 emission, tending to decrease the partial

  20. Artificial muscles on heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Thomas G.; Shin, Dong Ki; Percy, Steven; Knight, Chris; McGarry, Scott; Anderson, Iain A.

    2014-03-01

    Many devices and processes produce low grade waste heat. Some of these include combustion engines, electrical circuits, biological processes and industrial processes. To harvest this heat energy thermoelectric devices, using the Seebeck effect, are commonly used. However, these devices have limitations in efficiency, and usable voltage. This paper investigates the viability of a Stirling engine coupled to an artificial muscle energy harvester to efficiently convert heat energy into electrical energy. The results present the testing of the prototype generator which produced 200 μW when operating at 75°C. Pathways for improved performance are discussed which include optimising the electronic control of the artificial muscle, adjusting the mechanical properties of the artificial muscle to work optimally with the remainder of the system, good sealing, and tuning the resonance of the displacer to minimise the power required to drive it.

  1. Artificial vision workbench.

    PubMed

    Frenger, P

    1997-01-01

    Machine vision is an important component of medical systems engineering. Inexpensive miniature solid state cameras are now available. This paper describes how these devices can be used as artificial retinas, to take snapshots and moving pictures in monochrome or color. Used in pairs, they produce a stereoscopic field of vision and enable depth perception. Macular and peripheral vision can be simulated electronically. This paper also presents the author's design of an artificial orbit for this synthetic eye. The orbit supports the eye, protects it, and provides attachment points for the ocular motion control system. Convergence and image fusion can be produced, and saccades simulated, along with the other ocular motions. The use of lenses, filters, irises and focusing mechanisms are also discussed. Typical camera-computer interfaces are described, including the use of "frame grabbers" and analog-to-digital image conversion. Software programs for eye positioning, image manipulation, feature extraction and object recognition are discussed, including the application of artificial neural networks.

  2. Artificial intelligence in nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Sacha, G M; Varona, P

    2013-11-15

    During the last decade there has been increasing use of artificial intelligence tools in nanotechnology research. In this paper we review some of these efforts in the context of interpreting scanning probe microscopy, the study of biological nanosystems, the classification of material properties at the nanoscale, theoretical approaches and simulations in nanoscience, and generally in the design of nanodevices. Current trends and future perspectives in the development of nanocomputing hardware that can boost artificial-intelligence-based applications are also discussed. Convergence between artificial intelligence and nanotechnology can shape the path for many technological developments in the field of information sciences that will rely on new computer architectures and data representations, hybrid technologies that use biological entities and nanotechnological devices, bioengineering, neuroscience and a large variety of related disciplines.

  3. Artificial recharge of groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, T.

    1985-01-01

    The vast underground reservoirs formed by aquifers constitute invaluable water supply sources as well as water storage facilities. Because natural replenishment of the supply occurs very slowly, continued excessive exploitation of it causes groundwater levels to decline with time. If not corrected this leads to an eventual depletion of a valuable natural resource. To prevent mining and groundwater pollution, the artificial recharge of groundwater basins is becoming increasingly important in groundwater management as a way to increase this natural supply of water. Artificial recharge can reduce, stop, and even reverse declining levels of groundwater. In addition, it can protect underground freshwater in coastal aquifers against salt-water intrusion from the ocean, and can be used to store surface and reclaimed water for future use. This book is a treatise of the artificial recharge of groundwater, with particular emphasis on recharge with reclaimed municipal wastewater.

  4. Artificial intelligence in nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacha, G. M.; Varona, P.

    2013-11-01

    During the last decade there has been increasing use of artificial intelligence tools in nanotechnology research. In this paper we review some of these efforts in the context of interpreting scanning probe microscopy, the study of biological nanosystems, the classification of material properties at the nanoscale, theoretical approaches and simulations in nanoscience, and generally in the design of nanodevices. Current trends and future perspectives in the development of nanocomputing hardware that can boost artificial-intelligence-based applications are also discussed. Convergence between artificial intelligence and nanotechnology can shape the path for many technological developments in the field of information sciences that will rely on new computer architectures and data representations, hybrid technologies that use biological entities and nanotechnological devices, bioengineering, neuroscience and a large variety of related disciplines.

  5. Inactivation of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli in rumen content- or feces-contaminated drinking water for cattle.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tong; Zhao, Ping; West, Joe W; Bernard, John K; Cross, Heath G; Doyle, Michael P

    2006-05-01

    Cattle drinking water is a source of on-farm Escherichia coli O157:H7 transmission. The antimicrobial activities of disinfectants to control E. coli O157:H7 in on-farm drinking water are frequently neutralized by the presence of rumen content and manure that generally contaminate the drinking water. Different chemical treatments, including lactic acid, acidic calcium sulfate, chlorine, chlorine dioxide, hydrogen peroxide, caprylic acid, ozone, butyric acid, sodium benzoate, and competing E. coli, were tested individually or in combination for inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 in the presence of rumen content. Chlorine (5 ppm), ozone (22 to 24 ppm at 5 degrees C), and competing E. coli treatment of water had minimal effects (<1 log CFU/ml reduction) on killing E. coli O157:H7 in the presence of rumen content at water-to-rumen content ratios of 50:1 (vol/wt) and lower. Four chemical-treatment combinations, including (i) 0.1% lactic acid, 0.9% acidic calcium sulfate, and 0.05% caprylic acid (treatment A); (ii) 0.1% lactic acid, 0.9% acidic calcium sulfate, and 0.1% sodium benzoate (treatment B); (iii) 0.1% lactic acid, 0.9% acidic calcium sulfate, and 0.5% butyric acid (treatment C); and (iv) 0.1% lactic acid, 0.9% acidic calcium sulfate, and 100 ppm chlorine dioxide (treatment D); were highly effective (>3 log CFU/ml reduction) at 21 degrees C in killing E. coli O157:H7, O26:H11, and O111:NM in water heavily contaminated with rumen content (10:1 water/rumen content ratio [vol/wt]) or feces (20:1 water/feces ratio [vol/wt]). Among them, treatments A, B, and C killed >5 log CFU E. coli O157:H7, O26:H11, and O111:NM/ml within 30 min in water containing rumen content or feces, whereas treatment D inactivated approximately 3 to 4 log CFU/ml under the same conditions. Cattle given water containing treatment A or C or untreated water (control) ad libitum for two 7-day periods drank 15.2, 13.8, and 30.3 liters/day, respectively, and cattle given water containing 0.1% lactic

  6. Rumen morphometrics and the effect of digesta pH and volume on volatile fatty acid absorption.

    PubMed

    Melo, L Q; Costa, S F; Lopes, F; Guerreiro, M C; Armentano, L E; Pereira, M N

    2013-04-01

    The effects of rumen digesta volume and pH on VFA absorption and its relation to rumen wall morphology were evaluated. Nine rumen cannulated cows formed 3 groups based on desired variation in rumen morphology: The High group was formed by Holsteins yielding 25.9 kg milk/d and fed on a high-grain total mixed ration (TMR); the Medium group by Holstein-Zebu crossbreds yielding 12.3 kg milk/d and fed on corn silage, tropical pasture, and a commercial concentrate; and the Dry group by nonlactating grazing Jerseys fed exclusively on tropical pasture. Within each group, a sequence of 3 ruminal conditions was induced on each cow in 3 × 3 Latin Squares, with 7-d periods: high digesta volume and high pH (HVHP), low volume and high pH (LVHP), and low volume and low pH (LVLP). Rumen mucosa was biopsied on the first day of Period 1. Ruminal morphometric variables evaluated were mitotic index, absorptive surface and papillae number per square centimeter of wall, area per papillae, papillae area as a percentage of absorptive surface, and epithelium, keratinized layer, and nonkeratinized layer thickness. There was marked variation in rumen morphology among the groups of cows. Grazing Jerseys had decreased rumen wall absorptive surface area and basal cells mitotic index, and increased thickness of the epithelium and of the keratin layer compared with cows receiving concentrates. Mean rumen pH throughout the 4 h sampling period was: 6.78 for HVHP, 7.08 for LVHP, and 5.90 for LVLP (P < 0.01). The capacity of the rumen wall to absorb VFA was estimated by the Valerate/CrEDTA technique. The fractional exponential decay rate for the ratio of valeric acid to Cr (k Val/Cr) was determined by rumen digesta sampling at 20-min intervals during 4 h, after the mixing of markers and the return of the evacuated ruminal content. The k Val/Cr values for treatments HVHP, LVHP, and LVLP were, respectively: 19.6, 23.9, and 35.0 %/h (SEM = 2.01; P = 0.21 for contrast HVHP vs. LVHP and P < 0.01 for

  7. Feeding barley grain steeped in lactic acid modulates rumen fermentation patterns and increases milk fat content in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, S; Zebeli, Q; Mazzolari, A; Bertoni, G; Dunn, S M; Yang, W Z; Ametaj, B N

    2009-12-01

    The objectives of the present in vivo and in situ trials were to evaluate whether feeding barley grain steeped in lactic acid (LA) would affect rumen fermentation patterns, in situ dry matter (DM) degradation kinetics, and milk production and composition in lactating dairy cows. The in vivo trial involved 8 rumen-fistulated Holstein cows fed once daily a total mixed ration containing rolled barley grain (27% in DM) steeped for 48 h in an equal quantity of tap water (CTR) or in 0.5% LA (TRT) in a 2 x 2 crossover design. The in situ trials consisted of incubation of untreated rolled barley grain in cows fed CTR or TRT diets and of incubation of 3 different substrates including CTR or barley grain steeped in 0.5% or 1.0% LA (TRT1 and TRT2, respectively) up to 72 h in the rumen. Results of the in vivo trial indicated that cows fed the TRT diet had greater rumen pH during most intensive fermentation phases at 10 and 12 h post-feeding. The latter effect was associated with a shorter duration in which rumen pH was below 5.8 for cows fed the TRT diet (2.4 h) compared with CTR diet (3.9 h). Furthermore, cows fed the TRT diet had lower concentrations of volatile fatty acids at 2 and 4 h post-feeding. In addition, concentrations of preprandial volatile fatty acids were lower in the rumen fluid of cows fed the TRT diet. Results also showed that molar proportion of acetate was lower, whereas propionate tended to increase by feeding cows the TRT diet. Cows fed the TRT diet demonstrated greater rumen in situ lag time of substrate DM degradation and a tendency to lower the fractional degradation rate. Other in situ results indicated a quadratic effect of LA on the effective rumen degradability of substrates whereby the latter variable was decreased from CTR to TRT1 but increased for TRT2 substrate. Although the diet did not affect actual milk yield, fat-corrected milk, percentages of milk protein, and lactose and concentration of milk urea nitrogen, cows fed the TRT diet increased

  8. Horizontal gene transfer from Bacteria to rumen Ciliates indicates adaptation to their anaerobic, carbohydrates-rich environment

    PubMed Central

    Ricard, Guénola; McEwan, Neil R; Dutilh, Bas E; Jouany, Jean-Pierre; Macheboeuf, Didier; Mitsumori, Makoto; McIntosh, Freda M; Michalowski, Tadeusz; Nagamine, Takafumi; Nelson, Nancy; Newbold, Charles J; Nsabimana, Eli; Takenaka, Akio; Thomas, Nadine A; Ushida, Kazunari; Hackstein, Johannes HP; Huynen, Martijn A

    2006-01-01

    Background The horizontal transfer of expressed genes from Bacteria into Ciliates which live in close contact with each other in the rumen (the foregut of ruminants) was studied using ciliate Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs). More than 4000 ESTs were sequenced from representatives of the two major groups of rumen Cilates: the order Entodiniomorphida (Entodinium simplex, Entodinium caudatum, Eudiplodinium maggii, Metadinium medium, Diploplastron affine, Polyplastron multivesiculatum and Epidinium ecaudatum) and the order Vestibuliferida, previously called Holotricha (Isotricha prostoma, Isotricha intestinalis and Dasytricha ruminantium). Results A comparison of the sequences with the completely sequenced genomes of Eukaryotes and Prokaryotes, followed by large-scale construction and analysis of phylogenies, identified 148 ciliate genes that specifically cluster with genes from the Bacteria and Archaea. The phylogenetic clustering with bacterial genes, coupled with the absence of close relatives of these genes in the Ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, indicates that they have been acquired via Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) after the colonization of the gut by the rumen Ciliates. Conclusion Among the HGT candidates, we found an over-representation (>75%) of genes involved in metabolism, specifically in the catabolism of complex carbohydrates, a rich food source in the rumen. We propose that the acquisition of these genes has greatly facilitated the Ciliates' colonization of the rumen providing evidence for the role of HGT in the adaptation to new niches. PMID:16472398

  9. Gene network analysis identifies rumen epithelial cell proliferation, differentiation and metabolic pathways perturbed by diet and correlated with methane production

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Ruidong; McNally, Jody; Rowe, Suzanne; Jonker, Arjan; Pinares-Patino, Cesar S.; Oddy, V. Hutton; Vercoe, Phil E.; McEwan, John C.; Dalrymple, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    Ruminants obtain nutrients from microbial fermentation of plant material, primarily in their rumen, a multilayered forestomach. How the different layers of the rumen wall respond to diet and influence microbial fermentation, and how these process are regulated, is not well understood. Gene expression correlation networks were constructed from full thickness rumen wall transcriptomes of 24 sheep fed two different amounts and qualities of a forage and measured for methane production. The network contained two major negatively correlated gene sub-networks predominantly representing the epithelial and muscle layers of the rumen wall. Within the epithelium sub-network gene clusters representing lipid/oxo-acid metabolism, general metabolism and proliferating and differentiating cells were identified. The expression of cell cycle and metabolic genes was positively correlated with dry matter intake, ruminal short chain fatty acid concentrations and methane production. A weak correlation between lipid/oxo-acid metabolism genes and methane yield was observed. Feed consumption level explained the majority of gene expression variation, particularly for the cell cycle genes. Many known stratified epithelium transcription factors had significantly enriched targets in the epithelial gene clusters. The expression patterns of the transcription factors and their targets in proliferating and differentiating skin is mirrored in the rumen, suggesting conservation of regulatory systems. PMID:27966600

  10. Bacteria and Archaea community structure in the rumen microbiome of goats (Capra hircus) from the semiarid region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Isabel S; Barreto, Cristine C; Costa, Ohana Y A; Bomfim, Marco A; Castro, Alinne P; Kruger, Ricardo H; Quirino, Betania F

    2011-06-01

    Most studies present in the literature about the rumen microbiome have focused on cattle and sheep. This is the first report of the characterization of the bacterial and archaeal communities present in the liquid and solid-associated fractions of the rumen from free ranging Moxotó breed goats using 16S rRNA gene libraries. PCR was used to amplify the 16S rRNA gene with bacterial and archaeal universal primers and sequences from each library constructed were obtained. Sequences of Bacteria from the phyla Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were predominant. The overall dominant classes in the rumen were Clostridia and Bacteroidia, which are known to play a role in plant fiber degradation in other ruminants. Unclassified Bacteria accounted for 4.7% of the liquid fraction sequences and 16.4% of the solid fraction sequences. From the archaeal libraries only sequences from the phylum Euryarcheota were identified and were assigned to the class Methanobacteria of the genera Methanobrevibacter and Methanosphaera. A group of Archaea not previously known to be associated with the rumen was identified: uncultured methanogens belonging to the "uncultured marine bacteria" groups II and III. The local water contained high salt concentrations and this may explain the presence of these groups in the Moxotó goat rumen.

  11. Pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass by cattle rumen fluid for methane production: Bacterial flora and enzyme activity analysis.

    PubMed

    Baba, Yasunori; Matsuki, Yu; Mori, Yumi; Suyama, Yoshihisa; Tada, Chika; Fukuda, Yasuhiro; Saito, Masanori; Nakai, Yutaka

    2017-01-29

    We attempted to develop a pretreatment method for methane fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass using cattle rumen fluid, treated as slaughterhouse waste. When rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) was added to the methane fermentation after being solubilized with rumen fluid, 1.5 times more methane was produced compared with untreated rapeseed. Analysis of the bacterial flora during rumen fluid treatment using the MiSeq next-generation sequencer showed that the predominant phylum shifted from Bacteroidetes, composed of amylolytic Prevotella spp., to Firmicutes, composed of cellulolytic and xylanolytic Ruminococcus spp., in only 6 h. In total, 7 cellulolytic, 25 cello-oligosaccharolytic, and 11 xylanolytic bacteria were detected after investigating the most abundant sequences of detected taxa. The relative abundance of two Ruminococcus species (Ruminococcus albus and R. flavefaciens), known as cellulolytic, cello-oligosaccharolytic, and xylanolytic bacteria, increased with increasing cellulose and hemicellulose degradation rates, and, finally, comprised 48% of all operational taxonomic units. The chronological observation of enzyme activities showed that cellulolytic and xylanolytic activities increased 6 h later, and that oligosaccharolytic activity increased 24 h later. This study detected six bacteria that participate in the degradation of aromatics derived from lignin, which have rarely been reported in rumen fluid. The constitution of the detected bacteria suggests that the aromatics were converted into acetate via benzoate. The list of microbes that cover all lignocellulose-degrading candidates will provide fundamental knowledge for future studies focusing on rumen microbes.

  12. Influence of diet and monensin on development of anaerobic fungi in the rumen, duodenum, cecum, and feces of cows.

    PubMed Central

    Grenet, E; Fonty, G; Jamot, J; Bonnemoy, F

    1989-01-01

    Three cows with fistulated rumens, duodenums, and ceca were fed five different diets: lucerne hay, lucerne hay plus whey (40:60), lucerne hay plus beets (50:50), corn silage plus monensin (40 ppm [40 g/kg] of dry matter intake), and lucerne hay plus monensin (80 ppm of dry matter intake). The fungal population was observed in the rumen, duodenum, cecum, and rectum and varied with diet; it was most abundant with lucerne hay alone and with corn silage plus monensin. The proportion of particles colonized by fungi in the duodenum, the cecum, and feces was measured by microscopic observation and varied from 5 to 50%, depending on the diet. The further sporangia attached to the plant particles were from the rumen, the more likely they were to be devoid of spores. Results confirmed the influence of diet on the development of the ruminal fungal population and showed that monensin does not eliminate these microorganisms. They also confirmed the presence of anaerobic fungi in the ruminant intestine. It is likely that anaerobic fungi leave the rumen attached to plant particles. However, large colonies of nonrhizoidal-type fungi were observed in cecum samples and in feces; at these sites, environmental conditions are perhaps more favorable for this type of fungus than they are in the rumen. PMID:2802609

  13. Response of the Rumen Microbiota of Sika Deer (Cervus nippon) Fed Different Concentrations of Tannin Rich Plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhipeng; Wright, André-Denis G; Liu, Hanlu; Fan, Zhongyuan; Yang, Fuhe; Zhang, Zhigang; Li, Guangyu

    2015-01-01

    High throughput sequencing was used to examine the rumen microbiota of sika deer fed high (OLH) and low concentration (OLL) of tannin rich oak leaves. The results showed that Prevotella spp. were the most dominant bacteria. The most predominant methanogens were the members of the order Methanoplasmatales. The dominant rumen protozoa were Entodinium longinucleatum, Eudiplodinium maggii, and Epidinium caudatum, and the fungal communities were mostly represented by Piromyces spp. Moreover, the relative abundance of Pseudobutyrivibrio spp. (P=0.026), unidentified bacteria (P=0.028), and Prevotella spp. (P=0.022) was lower in the OLH group than in the OLL group. The concentration of propionate in the OLH group was greater than in the OLL group (P=0.006). Patterns of relationships showed that methanogens belonging to the order Methanoplasmatales were negatively correlated with Treponema spp., Ent. Longinucleatum, and acetate. Methanosphaera stadtmanae was positively correlated to propionate, while Methanobrevibacter ruminantium was negatively associated with Methanobrevibacter thaueri and Methanobrevibacter millerae. Tannins altered the rumen microbes and fermentation patterns. However, the response of the entire rumen microbiota and the relationship between rumen microorganisms and the fermentation parameters were not fully understood.

  14. Effects of feeding Mediterranean buffalo sorghum silage versus maize silage on the rumen microbiota and milk fatty acid content.

    PubMed

    Ann Huws, Sharon; Chiariotti, Antonella; Sarubbi, Fiorella; Carfì, Francesca; Pace, Vilma

    2012-01-01

    Sorghum presents a sustainable feedstock for Mediterranean buffaloes due to its reduced water and nitrogen requirements compared with maize, which is currently fed primarily. We investigated the effects of feeding sorghum as opposed to maize on Mediterranean buffalo rumen microbial diversity and milk fatty acid content. Four cannulated lactating Mediterranean buffalo cows were fed a basal diet for one month before switching either to maize or sorghum-silage based diets for a 3-month period. Buffaloes were then changed over to the contrasting diet for a further one month. Rumen and milk samples were collected at the end of each month. DGGE- and T-RFLP-based dendrograms generated from rumen samples did not show an effect of diet on rumen bacterial diversity. Milk samples also did not differ in terms of their fatty acid content post sorghum feeding as compared with maize feeding. Thus, sorghum provides an environmentally beneficial alternative to maize for feeding Mediterranean buffalo with little effect on rumen microbial diversity or milk fatty acid composition compared with maize feeding.

  15. Response of the Rumen Microbiota of Sika Deer (Cervus nippon) Fed Different Concentrations of Tannin Rich Plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhipeng; Wright, André-Denis G.; Liu, Hanlu; Fan, Zhongyuan; Yang, Fuhe; Zhang, Zhigang; Li, Guangyu

    2015-01-01

    High throughput sequencing was used to examine the rumen microbiota of sika deer fed high (OLH) and low concentration (OLL) of tannin rich oak leaves. The results showed that Prevotella spp. were the most dominant bacteria. The most predominant methanogens were the members of the order Methanoplasmatales. The dominant rumen protozoa were Entodinium longinucleatum, Eudiplodinium maggii, and Epidinium caudatum, and the fungal communities were mostly represented by Piromyces spp. Moreover, the relative abundance of Pseudobutyrivibrio spp. (P=0.026), unidentified bacteria (P=0.028), and Prevotella spp. (P=0.022) was lower in the OLH group than in the OLL group. The concentration of propionate in the OLH group was greater than in the OLL group (P=0.006). Patterns of relationships showed that methanogens belonging to the order Methanoplasmatales were negatively correlated with Treponema spp., Ent. Longinucleatum, and acetate. Methanosphaera stadtmanae was positively correlated to propionate, while Methanobrevibacter ruminantium was negatively associated with Methanobrevibacter thaueri and Methanobrevibacter millerae. Tannins altered the rumen microbes and fermentation patterns. However, the response of the entire rumen microbiota and the relationship between rumen microorganisms and the fermentation parameters were not fully understood. PMID:25955033

  16. Effects of one-seed juniper and polyethylene glycol on intake, rumen fermentation, and plasma amino acids in sheep and goats fed supplemental protein and tannins.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We tested the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on juniper and total intake, rumen fermentation, and plasma amino acids (AA) of 12 does and 12 ewes fed sudangrass and basal diets containing 10% quebracho tannins with no protein supplement (Control; 5% CP) or high rumen degradable (RDP 15% CP) or u...

  17. Relationships between inflammation- and immunity-related transcript abundance in the rumen and jejunum of beef steers with divergent average daily gain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bovine rumen papillae are in contact with a wide array of microorganisms and the metabolites they produce, which may activate an inflammatory and/or immune response. Cytokines, chemokines, and their receptor genes were tested for differential expression in the rumen and jejunum of beef steers w...

  18. Artificial Gravity Research Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the forward working plan to identify what countermeasure resources are needed for a vehicle with an artificial gravity module (intermittent centrifugation) and what Countermeasure Resources are needed for a rotating transit vehicle (continuous centrifugation) to minimize the effects of microgravity to Mars Exploration crewmembers.

  19. Artificial Intelligence Study (AIS).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGNECE HARDWARE ....... 2-50 AI Architecture ................................... 2-49 AI Hardware ....................................... 2...Epstein (1986) has suggested that this version of PROLOG has been used for business and industrial applications in Eastern Europe. The Japanese have...have been in building expert systems in the business analysis area. Expert systems for policy and rate selection for insurance (i.e., risk analysis) and

  20. Artificial intelligence and robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Peden, I.C.; Braddock, J.V.; Brown, W.; Langendorf, R.M.

    1982-09-01

    This report examines the state-of-the-art in artificial intelligence and robotics technologies and their potential in terms of Army needs. Assessment includes battlefield technology, research and technology insertions, management considerations and recommendations related to research and development personnel, and recommendations regarding the Army's involvement in the automated plant.

  1. Artificial intelligence. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, P.H.

    1984-01-01

    This book introduces the basic concepts of the field of artificial intelligence. It contains material covering the latest advances in control, representation, language, vision, and problem solving. Problem solving in design and analysis systems is addressed. Mitcell's version-space learning procedure, Morevec's reduced-images stereo procedure, and the Strips problem solver are covered.

  2. Artificial Intelligence and CALL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, John H.

    The potential application of artificial intelligence (AI) to computer-assisted language learning (CALL) is explored. Two areas of AI that hold particular interest to those who deal with language meaning--knowledge representation and expert systems, and natural-language processing--are described and examples of each are presented. AI contribution…

  3. Terahertz Artificial Dielectric Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendis, Rajind; Nagai, Masaya; Wang, Yiqiu; Karl, Nicholas; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2016-03-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized a lens for the THz regime based on artificial dielectrics. These are man-made media that mimic properties of naturally occurring dielectric media, or even manifest properties that cannot generally occur in nature. For example, the well-known dielectric property, the refractive index, which usually has a value greater than unity, can have a value less than unity in an artificial dielectric. For our lens, the artificial-dielectric medium is made up of a parallel stack of 100 μm thick metal plates that form an array of parallel-plate waveguides. The convergent lens has a plano-concave geometry, in contrast to conventional dielectric lenses. Our results demonstrate that this lens is capable of focusing a 2 cm diameter beam to a spot size of 4 mm, at the design frequency of 0.17 THz. The results further demonstrate that the overall power transmission of the lens can be better than certain conventional dielectric lenses commonly used in the THz regime. Intriguingly, we also observe that under certain conditions, the lens boundary demarcated by the discontinuous plate edges actually resembles a smooth continuous surface. These results highlight the importance of this artificial-dielectric technology for the development of future THz-wave devices.

  4. Artificial Intelligence Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Computer Science, New Delhi, India , December 1986. (Also University of Texas, Artificial Intelligence Laboratory AITR-41, August 1987). Kumar, V. and...the Tenth ICAI ) A187-55 Expert Systems for Monitoring and Control, D. Dvorak, May 1987. Many large-scale industrial processes and services are

  5. Artificial intelligence and psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Servan-Schreiber, D

    1986-04-01

    This paper provides a brief historical introduction to the new field of artificial intelligence and describes some applications to psychiatry. It focuses on two successful programs: a model of paranoid processes and an expert system for the pharmacological management of depressive disorders. Finally, it reviews evidence in favor of computerized psychotherapy and offers speculations on the future development of research in this area.

  6. Artificial limb connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    Connection simplifies and eases donning and removing artificial limb; eliminates harnesses and clamps; and reduces skin pressures by allowing bone to carry all tensile and part of compressive loads between prosthesis and stump. Because connection is modular, it is easily modified to suit individual needs.

  7. Micromachined Artificial Haircell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chang (Inventor); Engel, Jonathan (Inventor); Chen, Nannan (Inventor); Chen, Jack (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A micromachined artificial sensor comprises a support coupled to and movable with respect to a substrate. A polymer, high-aspect ratio cilia-like structure is disposed on and extends out-of-plane from the support. A strain detector is disposed with respect to the support to detect movement of the support.

  8. Artificial intelligence within AFSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gersh, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    Information on artificial intelligence research in the Air Force Systems Command is given in viewgraph form. Specific research that is being conducted at the Rome Air Development Center, the Space Technology Center, the Human Resources Laboratory, the Armstrong Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory, the Armamant Laboratory, and the Wright Research and Development Center is noted.

  9. Effect of casein infusion in the rumen, duodenum or both sites on factors affecting forage intake and performance of dairy cows fed red clover-grass silage.

    PubMed

    Khalili, H; Huhtanen, P

    2002-04-01

    Four lactating dairy cows were used in a balanced 4 x 4 Latin square design to examine the effects of casein infusion in the rumen, duodenum, or both on the intake of red clover-grass silage, chewing behavior, diet digestion, microbial protein synthesis, rumen fermentation, digestion, and passage kinetics, milk production, and milk composition. Duodenal infusion increased eating time, silage intake, rumen neutral detergent fiber pool, yields of milk, protein, and lactose, and concentration of milk protein, and tended to decrease that of milk fat. Ruminal infusion tended to decrease eating time, and increased significantly microbial protein synthesis, rumen ammonia-N concentration, molar proportions of isovalerate and valerate, digestion rate of digestible neutral detergent fiber, passage rate of indigestible neutral detergent fiber, and milk urea content, and decreased rumen neutral detergent fiber pool. Silage intake, and yields of milk, protein, and lactose were highest when casein was simultaneously infused in both sites.

  10. Researchers Create Artificial Mouse 'Embryo'

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_163881.html Researchers Create Artificial Mouse 'Embryo' Experiment used two types of gene-modified stem ... they've created a kind of artificial mouse embryo using stem cells, which can be coaxed to ...

  11. High Potential Source for Biomass Degradation Enzyme Discovery and Environmental Aspects Revealed through Metagenomics of Indian Buffalo Rumen

    PubMed Central

    Singh, K. M.; Reddy, Bhaskar; Patel, Dishita; Patel, A. K.; Patel, J. B.; Joshi, C. G.

    2014-01-01

    The complex microbiomes of the rumen functions as an effective system for plant cell wall degradation, and biomass utilization provide genetic resource for degrading microbial enzymes that could be used in the production of biofuel. Therefore the buffalo rumen microbiota was surveyed using shot gun sequencing. This metagenomic sequencing generated 3.9 GB of sequences and data were assembled into 137270 contiguous sequences (contigs). We identified potential 2614 contigs encoding biomass degrading enzymes including glycoside hydrolases (GH: 1943 contigs), carbohydrate binding module (CBM: 23 contigs), glycosyl transferase (GT: 373 contigs), carbohydrate esterases (CE: 259 contigs), and polysaccharide lyases (PE: 16 contigs). The hierarchical clustering of buffalo metagenomes demonstrated the similarities and dissimilarity in microbial community structures and functional capacity. This demonstrates that buffalo rumen microbiome was considerably enriched in functional genes involved in polysaccharide degradation with great prospects to obtain new molecules that may be applied in the biofuel industry. PMID:25136572

  12. Metagenomic analysis of the rumen microbial community following inhibition of methane formation by a halogenated methane analog

    PubMed Central

    Denman, Stuart E.; Martinez Fernandez, Gonzalo; Shinkai, Takumi; Mitsumori, Makoto; McSweeney, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Japanese goats fed a diet of 50% Timothy grass and 50% concentrate with increasing levels of the anti-methanogenic compound, bromochloromethane (BCM) were investigated with respect to the microbial population and functional shifts in the rumen. Microbial ecology methods identified species that exhibited positive and negative responses to the increasing levels of BCM. The methane-inhibited rumen appeared to adapt to the higher H2 levels by shifting fermentation to propionate which was mediated by an increase in the population of H2-consuming Prevotella and Selenomonas spp. Metagenomic analysis of propionate production pathways was dominated by genomic content from these species. Reductive acetogenic marker gene libraries and metagenomics analysis indicate that reductive acetogenic species do not play a major role in the BCM treated rumen. PMID:26528253

  13. Composition of bacteria harvested from the liquid and solid fractions of the rumen of sheep as influenced by feed intake.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, C A; González, J; Alvir, M R; Repetto, J L; Centeno, C; Lamrani, F

    2000-09-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of the feed intake on the chemical composition of bacteria associated with the solid (solid-associated bacteria; SAB) and liquid (liquid-associated bacteria; LAB) fractions of rumen digesta, the digestive passage kinetics and their relationships. Whole rumen contents were sampled after a period of continuous infusion of 15NH3 from four ruminally-cannulated wethers provided successively with a hay-concentrate diet (2 : 1 w/w on a DM basis) at two rates of feed intake: 40 and 80 g DM/kg body weight 0.75. SAB had a higher content of organic matter and total lipids (P < 0.001) and a similar N content as compared with LAB. The concentration of purines and 15N was lower (P = 0.011 and P < 0.001 respectively) in SAB than LAB, whereas the opposite was observed for the concentration of amino acids (mg/g DM; P = 0.031). An increase in feed intake produced an increase in the N (P = 0.034) and purine (P = 0.066) concentrations in bacteria and a decrease (P = 0.033) in their amino acid concentrations. Significant increases of rumen outflow rates of liquid and particles were also observed with increased feed intake. Rates of rumen outflow showed positive and negative linear relationships (P < 0.001) with the purine : N ratio and the proportion of amino acid on total N of bacteria respectively. SAB contained significantly higher proportions of leucine, isoleucine, lysine and phenylalanine and lower proportions of alanine, methionine and valine than LAB. The increase in feed intake also induced significant changes in the amino acid profile of bacteria, increasing arginine and methionine and decreasing alanine and glycine proportions. Results show that the outflow rate of rumen contents is a major factor in determining the proportion of nucleic acids and protein in rumen bacteria and explains some of the differences observed between LAB and SAB.

  14. The comparison of digestibility of treated sugarcane tops silage by bacteria or whole microorganisms of Holstein cow and buffalo rumen

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Afrooz; Chaji, Morteza; Mohammadabadi, Tahereh

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of adding sulfuric acid to sugarcane tops silage on rumen bacteria and whole rumen microorganisms (WRM) and compare the digestibility of sugarcane tops treated with different amount of urea, molasses and sulfuric acid between Holstein cow and Khouzestan buffalo. Regardless of the type of the treatment, potential of gas production (B) by cow WRM (130.670 mL) was more than buffalo (104.060 mL) (p < 0.05), but the rate of gas production (C) by buffalo WRM was greater than cow (0.021 and 0.014 mL per hr, respectively) (p < 0.05). The C in treatment containing only 2.40% sulfuric acid (0.033 mL per hr) was significantly highest (p < 0.05). Regardless of the type of the treatment, the B by cow rumen bacteria (75.040 mL) was more than buffalo (67.150 mL), (p < 0.05), while the C by rumen bacteria of buffalo (0.030 mL per hr) was more than cow (0.017 mL per hr), (p < 0.05). Regardless of the type of the animal, the B coefficient of rumen bacteria in treatment only containing 2.40% sulfuric acid was higher than control (p < 0.05). Therefore, the addition of sulfuric acid not only had no negative effect on microorganisms particularly bacteria, but also probably due to present of sulfur in acid, had positive effect on nutrients digestibility, and growth of microorganisms. The digestibility of sugarcane tops silage treated by cow rumen bacteria and whole microorganisms was higher than buffalo. PMID:27872716

  15. Effect of chloride on pH microclimate and electrogenic Na+ absorption across the rumen epithelium of goat and sheep.

    PubMed

    Leonhard-Marek, S; Breves, G; Busche, R

    2006-08-01

    Active Na+ absorption across rumen epithelium comprises Na+/H+ exchange and a nonselective cation conductance (NSCC). Luminal chloride is able to stimulate Na+ absorption, which has been attributed to an interaction between Cl-/HCO3- and Na+/H+ exchangers. However, isolated rumen epithelial cells also express a Cl- conductance. We investigated whether Cl- has an additional effect on electrogenic Na+ absorption via NSCC. NSCC was estimated from short-circuit current (Isc) across epithelia of goat and sheep rumen in Ussing chambers. Epithelial surface pH (pHs) was measured with 5-N-hexadecanoyl-aminofluorescence. Membrane potentials were measured with microelelectrodes. Luminal, but not serosal, Cl- stimulated the Ca2+ and Mg2+ sensitive Isc. This effect was independent of the replacing anion (gluconate or acetate) and of the presence of bicarbonate. The mean pHs of rumen epithelium amounted to 7.47 +/- 0.03 in a low-Cl- solution. It was increased by 0.21 pH units when luminal Cl- was increased from 10 to 68 mM. Increasing mucosal pH from 7.5 to 8.0 also increased the Ca2+ and Mg2+ sensitive Isc and transepithelial conductance and reduced the fractional resistance of the apical membrane. Luminal Cl- depolarized the apical membrane of rumen epithelium. 5-Nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoate reduced the divalent cation sensitive Isc, but only in low-Cl- solutions. The results show that luminal Cl- can increase the microclimate pH via apical Cl-/HCO3- or Cl-/OH- exchangers. Electrogenic Na+ absorption via NSCC increases with pH, explaining part of the Cl- effects on Na+ absorption. The data further show that the Cl- conductance of rumen epithelium must be located at the basolateral membrane.

  16. RIM-DB: a taxonomic framework for community structure analysis of methanogenic archaea from the rumen and other intestinal environments

    PubMed Central

    Seedorf, Henning; Kittelmann, Sandra; Henderson, Gemma

    2014-01-01

    Methane is formed by methanogenic archaea in the rumen as one of the end products of feed fermentation in the ruminant digestive tract. To develop strategies to mitigate anthropogenic methane emissions due to ruminant farming, and to understand rumen microbial differences in animal feed conversion efficiency, it is essential that methanogens can be identified and taxonomically classified with high accuracy. Currently available taxonomic frameworks offer only limited resolution beyond the genus level for taxonomic assignments of sequence data stemming from high throughput sequencing technologies. Therefore, we have developed a QIIME-compatible database (DB) designed for species-level taxonomic assignment of 16S rRNA gene amplicon data targeting methanogenic archaea from the rumen, and from animal and human intestinal tracts. Called RIM-DB (Rumen and Intestinal Methanogen-DB), it contains a set of 2,379 almost full-length chimera-checked 16S rRNA gene sequences, including 20 previously unpublished sequences from isolates from three different orders. The taxonomy encompasses the recently-proposed seventh order of methanogens, the Methanomassiliicoccales, and allows differentiation between defined groups within this order. Sequence reads from rumen contents from a range of ruminant-diet combinations were taxonomically assigned using RIM-DB, Greengenes and SILVA. This comparison clearly showed that taxonomic assignments with RIM-DB resulted in the most detailed assignment, and only RIM-DB taxonomic assignments allowed methanogens to be distinguished taxonomically at the species level. RIM-DB complements the use of comprehensive databases such as Greengenes and SILVA for community structure analysis of methanogens from the rumen and other intestinal environments, and allows identification of target species for methane mitigation strategies. PMID:25165621

  17. The Genome Sequence of the Rumen Methanogen Methanobrevibacter ruminantium Reveals New Possibilities for Controlling Ruminant Methane Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Leahy, Sinead C.; Kelly, William J.; Altermann, Eric; Ronimus, Ron S.; Yeoman, Carl J.; Pacheco, Diana M.; Li, Dong; Kong, Zhanhao; McTavish, Sharla; Sang, Carrie; Lambie, Suzanne C.; Janssen, Peter H.; Dey, Debjit; Attwood, Graeme T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Methane (CH4) is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG), having a global warming potential 21 times that of carbon dioxide (CO2). Methane emissions from agriculture represent around 40% of the emissions produced by human-related activities, the single largest source being enteric fermentation, mainly in ruminant livestock. Technologies to reduce these emissions are lacking. Ruminant methane is formed by the action of methanogenic archaea typified by Methanobrevibacter ruminantium, which is present in ruminants fed a wide variety of diets worldwide. To gain more insight into the lifestyle of a rumen methanogen, and to identify genes and proteins that can be targeted to reduce methane production, we have sequenced the 2.93 Mb genome of M. ruminantium M1, the first rumen methanogen genome to be completed. Methodology/Principal Findings The M1 genome was sequenced, annotated and subjected to comparative genomic and metabolic pathway analyses. Conserved and methanogen-specific gene sets suitable as targets for vaccine development or chemogenomic-based inhibition of rumen methanogens were identified. The feasibility of using a synthetic peptide-directed vaccinology approach to target epitopes of methanogen surface proteins was demonstrated. A prophage genome was described and its lytic enzyme, endoisopeptidase PeiR, was shown to lyse M1 cells in pure culture. A predicted stimulation of M1 growth by alcohols was demonstrated and microarray analyses indicated up-regulation of methanogenesis genes during co-culture with a hydrogen (H2) producing rumen bacterium. We also report the discovery of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases in M. ruminantium M1, the first reported in archaeal species. Conclusions/Significance The M1 genome sequence provides new insights into the lifestyle and cellular processes of this important rumen methanogen. It also defines vaccine and chemogenomic targets for broad inhibition of rumen methanogens and represents a significant contribution to

  18. Bacterial community composition and fermentation patterns in the rumen of sika deer (Cervus nippon) fed three different diets.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhipeng; Wright, André-Denis G; Liu, Hanlu; Bao, Kun; Zhang, Tietao; Wang, Kaiying; Cui, Xuezhe; Yang, Fuhe; Zhang, Zhigang; Li, Guangyu

    2015-02-01

    Sika deer (Cervus nippon) rely on microorganisms living in the rumen to convert plant materials into chemical compounds, such as volatile fatty acids (VFAs), but how the rumen bacterial community is affected by different forages and adapt to altered diets remains poorly understood. The present study used 454-pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes to examine the relationship between rumen bacterial diversity and metabolic phenotypes using three sika deer in a 3 × 3 latin square design. Three sika deer were fed oak leaves (OL), corn stover (CS), or corn silage (CI), respectively. After a 7-day feeding period, when compared to the CS and CI groups, the OL group had a lower proportion of Prevotella spp. and a higher proportion of unclassified bacteria belonging to the families Succinivibrionaceae and Paraprevotellaceae (P<0.05). Meanwhile, the concentration of isobutyrate was significantly lower (P<0.05) in the OL group than in the CS and CI groups. There was no significant change of dominant bacterial genera in the OL group after 28 days of feeding. Conversely, total volatile fatty acids (TVFAs) showed an increase after 28 days of feeding, mainly due to the increasing of acetate, propionate, and valerate (P<0.05). The interplay between bacteria and metabolism in the OL group differed from that in the CS and CI groups, especially for the interaction of TVFAs and acetate/propionate. Overall, the current study suggested that Prevotella spp. played critical roles in the fermentation of feed in the rumen of sika deer. However, the differences in interplay patterns between rumen bacterial community composition and metabolic phenotypes were altered in the native and domesticated diets indicating the changed fermentation patterns in the rumen of sika deer.

  19. Effects of dietary supplementation of rumen-protected folic acid on rumen fermentation, degradability and excretion of urinary purine derivatives in growing steers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Liu, Qiang; Guo, Gang; Huo, WenJie; Ma, Le; Zhang, YanLi; Pei, CaiXia; Zhang, ShuanLin; Wang, Hao

    2016-12-01

    The present experiment was undertaken to determine the effects of dietary addition of rumen-protected folic acid (RPFA) on ruminal fermentation, nutrient degradability, enzyme activity and the relative quantity of ruminal cellulolytic bacteria in growing beef steers. Eight rumen-cannulated Jinnan beef steers averaging 2.5 years of age and 419 ± 1.9 kg body weight were used in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design. The four treatments comprised supplementation levels of 0 (Control), 70, 140 and 210 mg RPFA/kg dietary dry matter (DM). On DM basis, the ration consisted of 50% corn silage, 47% concentrate and 3% soybean oil. The DM intake (averaged 8.5 kg/d) was restricted to 95% of ad libitum intake. The intake of DM, crude protein (CP) and net energy for growth was not affected by treatments. In contrast, increasing RPFA supplementation increased average daily gain and the concentration of total volatile fatty acid and reduced ruminal pH linearly. Furthermore, increasing RPFA supplementation enhanced the acetate to propionate ratio and reduced the ruminal ammonia N content linearly. The ruminal effective degradability of neutral detergent fibre from corn silage and CP from concentrate improved linearly and was highest for the highest supplementation levels. The activities of cellobiase, xylanase, pectinase and α-amylase linearly increased, but carboxymethyl-cellulase and protease were not affected by the addition of RPFA. The relative quantities of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, Ruminococcus albus, Ruminococcus flavefaciens and Fibrobacter succinogenes increased linearly. With increasing RPFA supplementation levels, the excretion of urinary purine derivatives was also increased linearly. The present results indicated that the supplementation of RPFA improved ruminal fermentation, nutrient degradability, activities of microbial enzymes and the relative quantity of the ruminal cellulolytic bacteria in a dose-dependent manner. According to the conditions of this

  20. Level of Leucaena leucocephala silage feeding on intake, rumen fermentation, and nutrient digestibility in dairy steers.

    PubMed

    Giang, Nguyen Thien Truong; Wanapat, Metha; Phesatcha, Kampanat; Kang, Sungchhang

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this experiment was to determine effects of Leucaena silage (LS) feeding on feed intake, nutrient digestibility, and rumen fermentation in dairy steers. Four rumen fistulated dairy steers, 167 ± 12 kg body weight (BW), were randomly assigned to receive dietary treatments according to a 4 × 4 Latin square design. Treatments were as follows: T1 = 100 % untreated rice straw (RS), T2 = 70 % RS + 30 % LS, T3 = 40 % RS + 60 % LS, and T4 = 100 % LS, respectively. All animals were fed rice straw and LS ad libitum with concentrate mixture supplemented at 0.2 % BW. The results found that dry matter intake and nutrient digestibility were the highest in dairy steers fed 60 % LS (P < 0.05). Ruminal temperature and pH were not affected by LS feeding (P > 0.05) while ruminal ammonia nitrogen and blood urea nitrogen concentration were linearly increased with increasing levels of LS feeding (P < 0.01). On the other hand, total volatile fatty acids and propionate (C3) were improved by LS feeding especially in steers fed 60 % LS (P < 0.05) whereas acetate (C2) production and C2/C3 ratio were decreased. Moreover, methane production was reduced together with increasing LS feeding level (P < 0.05). Based on this study, it could be concluded that 60 % LS feeding could enhance feed intake, digestibility, and rumen fermentation end-product while reducing methane production in dairy steers. This study suggested that LS could be used as high-quality roughage for ruminant feeding in the tropical region.

  1. Influence of rumen protozoa on methane emission in ruminants: a meta-analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Guyader, J; Eugène, M; Nozière, P; Morgavi, D P; Doreau, M; Martin, C

    2014-11-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the effects of protozoa concentration on methane emission from ruminants. A database was built from 59 publications reporting data from 76 in vivo experiments. The experiments included in the database recorded methane production and rumen protozoa concentration measured on the same groups of animals. Quantitative data such as diet chemical composition, rumen fermentation and microbial parameters, and qualitative information such as methane mitigation strategies were also collected. In the database, 31% of the experiments reported a concomitant reduction of both protozoa concentration and methane emission (g/kg dry matter intake). Nearly all of these experiments tested lipids as methane mitigation strategies. By contrast, 21% of the experiments reported a variation in methane emission without changes in protozoa numbers, indicating that methanogenesis is also regulated by other mechanisms not involving protozoa. Experiments that used chemical compounds as an antimethanogenic treatment belonged to this group. The relationship between methane emission and protozoa concentration was studied with a variance-covariance model, with experiment as a fixed effect. The experiments included in the analysis had a within-experiment variation of protozoa concentration higher than 5.3 log10 cells/ml corresponding to the average s.e.m. of the database for this variable. To detect potential interfering factors for the relationship, the influence of several qualitative and quantitative secondary factors was tested. This meta-analysis showed a significant linear relationship between methane emission and protozoa concentration: methane (g/kg dry matter intake)=-30.7+8.14×protozoa (log10 cells/ml) with 28 experiments (91 treatments), residual mean square error=1.94 and adjusted R 2=0.90. The proportion of butyrate in the rumen positively influenced the least square means of this relationship.

  2. Accumulation of reserve carbohydrate by rumen protozoa and bacteria in competition for glucose.

    PubMed

    Denton, Bethany L; Diese, Leanne E; Firkins, Jeffrey L; Hackmann, Timothy J

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if rumen protozoa could form large amounts of reserve carbohydrate compared to the amounts formed by bacteria when competing for glucose in batch cultures. We separated large protozoa and small bacteria from rumen fluid by filtration and centrifugation, recombined equal protein masses of each group into one mixture, and subsequently harvested (reseparated) these groups at intervals after glucose dosing. This method allowed us to monitor reserve carbohydrate accumulation of protozoa and bacteria individually. When mixtures were dosed with a moderate concentration of glucose (4.62 or 5 mM) (n = 2 each), protozoa accumulated large amounts of reserve carbohydrate; 58.7% (standard error of the mean [SEM], 2.2%) glucose carbon was recovered from protozoal reserve carbohydrate at time of peak reserve carbohydrate concentrations. Only 1.7% (SEM, 2.2%) was recovered in bacterial reserve carbohydrate, which was less than that for protozoa (P < 0.001). When provided a high concentration of glucose (20 mM) (n = 4 each), 24.1% (SEM, 2.2%) of glucose carbon was recovered from protozoal reserve carbohydrate, which was still higher (P = 0.001) than the 5.0% (SEM, 2.2%) glucose carbon recovered from bacterial reserve carbohydrate. Our novel competition experiments directly demonstrate that mixed protozoa can sequester sugar away from bacteria by accumulating reserve carbohydrate, giving protozoa a competitive advantage and stabilizing fermentation in the rumen. Similar experiments could be used to investigate the importance of starch sequestration.

  3. Taxonomic Assessment of Rumen Microbiota Using Total RNA and Targeted Amplicon Sequencing Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuyong; Henderson, Gemma; Sun, Xu; Cox, Faith; Janssen, Peter H.; Guan, Le Luo

    2016-01-01

    Taxonomic characterization of active gastrointestinal microbiota is essential to detect shifts in microbial communities and functions under various conditions. This study aimed to identify and quantify potentially active rumen microbiota using total RNA sequencing and to compare the outcomes of this approach with the widely used targeted RNA/DNA amplicon sequencing technique. Total RNA isolated from rumen digesta samples from five beef steers was subjected to Illumina paired-end sequencing (RNA-seq), and bacterial and archaeal amplicons of partial 16S rRNA/rDNA were subjected to 454 pyrosequencing (RNA/DNA Amplicon-seq). Taxonomic assessments of the RNA-seq, RNA Amplicon-seq, and DNA Amplicon-seq datasets were performed using a pipeline developed in house. The detected major microbial phylotypes were common among the three datasets, with seven bacterial phyla, fifteen bacterial families, and five archaeal taxa commonly identified across all datasets. There were also unique microbial taxa detected in each dataset. Elusimicrobia and Verrucomicrobia phyla; Desulfovibrionaceae, Elusimicrobiaceae, and Sphaerochaetaceae families; and Methanobrevibacter woesei were only detected in the RNA-Seq and RNA Amplicon-seq datasets, whereas Streptococcaceae was only detected in the DNA Amplicon-seq dataset. In addition, the relative abundances of four bacterial phyla, eight bacterial families and one archaeal taxon were different among the three datasets. This is the first study to compare the outcomes of rumen microbiota profiling between RNA-seq and RNA/DNA Amplicon-seq datasets. Our results illustrate the differences between these methods in characterizing microbiota both qualitatively and quantitatively for the same sample, and so caution must be exercised when comparing data. PMID:27446027

  4. Effects of Forage Sources on Rumen Fermentation Characteristics, Performance, and Microbial Protein Synthesis in Midlactation Cows

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Hou, Yujie; Yang, Hongbo; Shi, Renhuang; Wu, Caixia; Huo, Yongjiu; Zhao, Guoqi

    2014-01-01

    Eight multiparous Holstein cows (632±12 kg BW; 135±16 DIM) were used in a replicated 4×4 Latin square design to evaluate the effects of forage sources on rumen fermentation characteristics, performance, and microbial protein (MCP) synthesis. The forage portion of the diets contained alfalfa hay (AH), oat hay (OH), Leymus chinensis (LC), or rice straw (RS) as the primary source of fiber. Diets were isonitrogenous and isocaloric, and cows were fed four corn silages based total mixed rations with equivalent nonfiber carbohydrate (NFC) and forage neutral detergent fiber (NDF). Dry matter intake was not affected by the source of dietary forages, ranging from 18.83 to 19.20 kg/d, consequently, milk yield was similar among diets. Because of the numerical differences in milk fat and milk protein concentrations, 4% FCM and ECM yields were unchanged (p>0.05). Mean rumen pH, NH3-N content, and concentrations of volatile fatty acids in the rumen fluid were not affected by the treatments (p>0.05). Dietary treatments did not affect the total tract apparent digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, and crude protein (p>0.05); however, digestibility of NDF and acid detergent fiber in RS diet was higher compared with AH, OH, and LC diets (p<0.05). Total purine derivative excretion was higher in cows fed AH, OH, and LC diets compared with those fed RS diet (p<0.05), consequently, estimated MCP synthesis was 124.35 g/d higher in cows fed AH diet compared with those fed RS diet (p<0.05). The results indicated that cows fed AH, OH, LC, and RS diets with an equivalent forage NDF and NFC have no unfavourable effect on the ruminal fermentation and productive parameters. PMID:25050001

  5. Eubacterium rangiferina, a novel usnic acid-resistant bacterium from the reindeer rumen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundset, Monica A.; Kohn, Alexandra; Mathiesen, Svein D.; Præsteng, Kirsti E.

    2008-08-01

    Reindeer are able to eat and utilize lichens as an important source of energy and nutrients. In the current study, the activities of antibiotic secondary metabolites including usnic, antranoric, fumarprotocetraric, and lobaric acid commonly found in lichens were tested against a collection of 26 anaerobic rumen bacterial isolates from reindeer ( Rangifer tarandus tarandus) using the agar diffusion method. The isolates were identified based on their 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene sequences. Usnic acid had a potent antimicrobial effect against 25 of the isolates, belonging to Clostridiales, Enterococci, and Streptococci. Isolates of Clostridia and Streptococci were also susceptible to atranoric and lobaric acid. However, one isolate (R3_91_1) was found to be resistant to usnic, antranoric, fumarprotocetraric, and lobaric acid. R3_91_1 was also seen invading and adhering to lichen particles when grown in a liquid anaerobic culture as demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy. This was a Gram-negative, nonmotile rod (0.2-0.7 × 2.0-3.5 μm) with a deoxyribonucleic acid G + C content of 47.0 mol% and main cellular fatty acids including 15:0 anteiso-dimethyl acetal (DMA), 16:0 iso-fatty acid methyl ester (FAME), 13:0 iso-3OH FAME, and 17:0 anteiso-FAME, not matching any of the presently known profiles in the MIDI database. Combined, the phenotypic and genotypic traits including the 16S rRNA gene sequence show that R3_91_1 is a novel species inside the order Clostridiales within the family Lachnospiraceae, for which we propose the name Eubacterium rangiferina. This is the first record of a rumen bacterium able to tolerate and grow in the presence of usnic acid, indicating that the rumen microorganisms in these animals have adapted mechanisms to deal with lichen secondary metabolites, well known for their antimicrobial and toxic effects.

  6. Eubacterium rangiferina, a novel usnic acid-resistant bacterium from the reindeer rumen.

    PubMed

    Sundset, Monica A; Kohn, Alexandra; Mathiesen, Svein D; Praesteng, Kirsti E

    2008-08-01

    Reindeer are able to eat and utilize lichens as an important source of energy and nutrients. In the current study, the activities of antibiotic secondary metabolites including usnic, antranoric, fumarprotocetraric, and lobaric acid commonly found in lichens were tested against a collection of 26 anaerobic rumen bacterial isolates from reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) using the agar diffusion method. The isolates were identified based on their 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene sequences. Usnic acid had a potent antimicrobial effect against 25 of the isolates, belonging to Clostridiales, Enterococci, and Streptococci. Isolates of Clostridia and Streptococci were also susceptible to atranoric and lobaric acid. However, one isolate (R3_91_1) was found to be resistant to usnic, antranoric, fumarprotocetraric, and lobaric acid. R3_91_1 was also seen invading and adhering to lichen particles when grown in a liquid anaerobic culture as demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy. This was a Gram-negative, nonmotile rod (0.2-0.7 x 2.0-3.5 microm) with a deoxyribonucleic acid G + C content of 47.0 mol% and main cellular fatty acids including 15:0 anteiso-dimethyl acetal (DMA), 16:0 iso-fatty acid methyl ester (FAME), 13:0 iso-3OH FAME, and 17:0 anteiso-FAME, not matching any of the presently known profiles in the MIDI database. Combined, the phenotypic and genotypic traits including the 16S rRNA gene sequence show that R3_91_1 is a novel species inside the order Clostridiales within the family Lachnospiraceae, for which we propose the name Eubacterium rangiferina. This is the first record of a rumen bacterium able to tolerate and grow in the presence of usnic acid, indicating that the rumen microorganisms in these animals have adapted mechanisms to deal with lichen secondary metabolites, well known for their antimicrobial and toxic effects.

  7. Seasonal changes in the digesta-adherent rumen bacterial communities of dairy cattle grazing pasture

    PubMed Central

    Attwood, Graeme T.; Rakonjac, Jasna; Moon, Christina D.; Waghorn, Garry C.; Janssen, Peter H.

    2017-01-01

    The complex microbiota that resides within the rumen is responsible for the break-down of plant fibre. The bacteria that attach to ingested plant matter within the rumen are thought to be responsible for initial fibre degradation. Most studies examining the ecology of this important microbiome only offer a ‘snapshot’ in time. We monitored the diversity of rumen bacteria in four New Zealand dairy cows, grazing a rye-grass and clover pasture over five consecutive seasons, using high throughput pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. We chose to focus on the digesta-adherent bacterial community to learn more about the stability of this community over time. 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed a high level of bacterial diversity, totalling 1539 operational taxonomic units (OTUs, grouped at 96% sequence similarity) across all samples, and ranging from 653 to 926 OTUs per individual sample. The nutritive composition of the pasture changed with the seasons as did the production phase of the animals. Sequence analysis showed that, overall, the bacterial communities were broadly similar between the individual animals. The adherent bacterial community was strongly dominated by members of Firmicutes (82.1%), followed by Bacteroidetes (11.8%). This community differed between the seasons, returning to close to that observed in the same season one year later. These seasonal differences were only small, but were statistically significant (p < 0.001), and were probably due to the seasonal differences in the diet. These results demonstrate a general invariability of the ruminal bacterial community structure in these grazing dairy cattle. PMID:28296930

  8. Calcium transport in bovine rumen epithelium as affected by luminal Ca concentrations and Ca sources

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Bernd; Wilkens, Mirja R; Ricken, Gundula E; Leonhard-Marek, Sabine; Fraser, David R; Breves, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative role of different segments of the gastrointestinal tract for Ca absorption, the respective mechanisms, and their regulation are not fully identified for ruminants, that is, cattle. In different in vitro experiments the forestomach wall has been demonstrated to be a major site for active Ca absorption in sheep and goats. In order to further clarify the role of the bovine rumen for Ca transport with special attention to luminal Ca concentrations, its ionic form, and pH, electrophysiological and unidirectional flux rate measurements were performed with isolated bovine rumen epithelial tissues. For Ca flux studies (Jms, Jsm) in vitro Ussing chamber technique was applied. Standard RT-PCR method was used to characterize TRPV6 and PMCA1 as potential contributors to transepithelial active Ca transport. At Ca concentrations of 1.2 mmol L−1 on both sides of the tissues, Jms were higher than Jsm resulting under some conditions in significant Ca net flux rates (Jnet), indicating the presence of active Ca transport. In the absence of an electrical gradient, Jnet could significantly be stimulated in the presence of luminal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Increasing the luminal Ca concentrations up to 11.2 mmol L−1 resulted in significant increases in Jms without influencing Jsm. Providing Ca in its form as respective chloride, formate, or propionate salts there was no significant effect on Jms. No transcripts specific for Ca channel TRPV6 could be demonstrated. Our results indicate different mechanisms for Ca absorption in bovine rumen as compared with those usually described for the small intestines. PMID:26564067

  9. Analysis of the rumen bacterial diversity of goats during shift from forage to concentrate diet.

    PubMed

    Grilli, Diego Javier; Fliegerová, Kateřina; Kopečný, Jan; Lama, Sebastián Paez; Egea, Vanina; Sohaefer, Noelia; Pereyra, Celia; Ruiz, María Soledad; Sosa, Miguel Angel; Arenas, Graciela Nora; Mrázek, Jakub

    2016-12-01

    High-grain feeding used in the animal production is known to affect the host rumen bacterial community, but our understanding of consequent changes in goats is limited. This study was therefore aimed to evaluate bacterial population dynamics during 20 days adaptation of 4 ruminally cannulated goats to the high-grain diet (grain: hay - ratio of 40:60). The dietary transition of goats from the forage to the high-grain-diet resulted in the significant decrease of rumen fluid pH, which was however still higher than value established for acute or subacute ruminal acidosis was not diagnosed in studied animals. DGGE analysis demonstrated distinct ruminal microbial populations in hay-fed and grain-fed animals, but the substantial animal-to-animal variation were detected. Quantitative PCR showed for grain-fed animals significantly higher number of bacteria belonging to Clostridium leptum group at 10 days after the incorporation of corn into the diet and significantly lower concentration of bacteria belonging to Actinobacteria phylum at the day 20 after dietary change. Taxonomic distribution analysed by NGS at day 20 revealed the similar prevalence of the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes in all goats, significantly higher presence of the unclassified genus of groups of Bacteroidales and Ruminococcaceae in grain-fed animals and significantly higher presence the genus Prevotella and Butyrivibrio in the forage-fed animals. The three different culture-independent methods used in this study show that high proportion of concentrate in goat diet does not induce any serious disturbance of their rumen ecosystem and indicate the good adaptive response of caprine ruminal bacteria to incorporation of corn into the diet.

  10. Rumen metabolism of swamp buffaloes fed rice straw supplemented with cassava hay and urea.

    PubMed

    Ampapon, Thiwakorn; Wanapat, Metha; Kang, Sungchhang

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this experiment were to investigate effects of cassava hay (CH) and urea (U) supplementation on feed intake, digestibility, rumen fermentation, and microbial protein synthesis of swamp buffaloes fed on rice straw. Four rumen-fistulated swamp buffaloes, 365 ± 15.0 kg, were randomly assigned according to a 4 × 4 Latin square design to receive four dietary treatments: T1 = CH 400 g/head/day + U 0 g/head/day, T2 = CH + U 30 g/head/day, T3 = CH + U 60 g/head/day, and T4 = CH + U 90 g/head/day, respectively. Results revealed that feed intake was not affected while nutrient digestibilities were increased (P < 0.05) with increasing U level supplementation especially at 90 g/head/day. Ruminal pH and temperature were not altered by urea supplementation, whereas ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) and blood urea nitrogen were increased with urea supplement (P < 0.05). In addition, total volatile fatty acid and butyric acid were similar among treatments, while propionic acid (C3) was increased by level of urea supplement (P < 0.05), but acetic acid (C2) and C2/C3 ratio were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). On the other hand, protozoal population and methane production were decreased by CH and urea supplement, while bacterial population particularly those of proteolytic, cellulolytic, and amylolytic bacteria and efficiency of microbial nitrogen synthesis were linearly increased (P < 0.05). Based on this experiment, it suggested that supplementation of urea and cassava hay for buffaloes fed rice straw improved rumen ecology and increased fermentation end products and microbial protein synthesis while reducing protozoal populations and methane production. Urea supplements of 60-90 g/head/day when fed with cassava hay are recommended for swamp buffaloes consuming rice straw.

  11. Isolation and characteristics of a skatole-producing Lactobacillus sp. from the bovine rumen.

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, M T; Carlson, J R; Holdeman, L V

    1977-01-01

    A bacterium that is capable of decarboxylating indoleacetic acid to skatole (3-methylindole) has been isolated from an L-tryptophan enrichment of bovine rumen fluid. The bacterium is a gram-positive, nonmotile, nonsporeforming rod. It is an obligate anaerobe, and strains predominatly produce D-(-)-lactic acid, with smaller amounts of L-(+)-lactic acid and acetic acid, from sugar. All four strains isolated gave a negative reaction to the indole test because they cannot form skatole directly from tryptophan. This is the first report of indoleacetic acid decarboxylation to skatole in pure culture and the demonstration of skatole production by a Lactobacillus species. Images PMID:563703

  12. Effects of Eucalyptus Crude Oils Supplementation on Rumen Fermentation, Microorganism and Nutrient Digestibility in Swamp Buffaloes

    PubMed Central

    Thao, N. T.; Wanapat, M.; Cherdthong, A.; Kang, S.

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of eucalyptus (E. Camaldulensis) crude oils (EuO) supplementation on voluntary feed intake and rumen fermentation characteristics in swamp buffaloes. Four rumen fistulated swamp buffaloes, body weight (BW) of 420±15.0 kg, were randomly assigned according to a 2×2 factorial arrangement in a 4×4 Latin square design. The dietary treatments were untreated rice straw (RS) without EuO (T1) and with EuO (T2) supplementation, and 3% urea-treated rice straw (UTRS) without EuO (T3) and with EuO (T4) supplementation. The EuO was supplemented at 2 mL/h/d in respective treatment. Experimental animals were kept in individual pens and concentrate mixture was offered at 3 g/kg BW while roughage was fed ad libitum. Total dry matter and roughage intake, and apparent digestibilites of organic matter and neutral detergent fiber were improved (p<0.01) by UTRS. There was no effect of EuO supplementation on feed intake and nutrient digestibility. Ruminal pH and temperature were not (p>0.05) affected by either roughage sources or EuO supplementation. However, buffaloes fed UTRS had higher ruminal ammonia nitrogen and blood urea nitrogen as compared with RS. Total volatile fatty acid and butyrate proportion were similar among treatments, whereas acetate was decreased and propionate molar proportion was increased by EuO supplementation. Feeding UTRS resulted in lower acetate and higher propionate concentration compared to RS. Moreover, supplementation of EuO reduced methane production especially in UTRS treatment. Protozoa populations were reduced by EuO supplementation while fungi zoospores remained the same. Total, amylolytic and cellulolytic bacterial populations were increased (p<0.01) by UTRS; However, EuO supplementation did not affect viable bacteria. Nitrogen intake and in feces were found higher in buffaloes fed UTRS. A positive nitrogen balance (absorption and retention) was in buffaloes fed UTRS. Supplementation of EuO did

  13. Temporal Metagenomic and Metabolomic Characterization of Fresh Perennial Ryegrass Degradation by Rumen Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mayorga, Olga L.; Kingston-Smith, Alison H.; Kim, Eun J.; Allison, Gordon G.; Wilkinson, Toby J.; Hegarty, Matthew J.; Theodorou, Michael K.; Newbold, Charles J.; Huws, Sharon A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between ingested plant material and the attached microbiome is essential for developing methodologies to improve ruminant nutrient use efficiency. We have previously shown that perennial ryegrass (PRG) rumen bacterial colonization events follow a primary (up to 4 h) and secondary (after 4 h) pattern based on the differences in diversity of the attached bacteria. In this study, we investigated temporal niche specialization of primary and secondary populations of attached rumen microbiota using metagenomic shotgun sequencing as well as monitoring changes in the plant chemistry using mid-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Metagenomic Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology (MG-RAST) taxonomical analysis of shotgun metagenomic sequences showed that the genera Butyrivibrio, Clostridium, Eubacterium, Prevotella, and Selenomonas dominated the attached microbiome irrespective of time. MG-RAST also showed that Acidaminococcus, Bacillus, Butyrivibrio, and Prevotella rDNA increased in read abundance during secondary colonization, whilst Blautia decreased in read abundance. MG-RAST Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) functional analysis also showed that the primary function of the attached microbiome was categorized broadly within “metabolism;” predominantly amino acid, carbohydrate, and lipid metabolism and transport. Most sequence read abundances (51.6, 43.8, and 50.0% of COG families pertaining to amino acid, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, respectively) within these categories were higher in abundance during secondary colonization. Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathways analysis confirmed that the PRG-attached microbiota present at 1 and 4 h of rumen incubation possess a similar functional capacity, with only a few pathways being uniquely found in only one incubation time point only. FT-IR data for the plant residues also showed that the main changes in plant chemistry between primary and secondary colonization was

  14. Rumen protozoa in South African sheep with a summary of the worldwide distribution of sheep protozoa.

    PubMed

    Booyse, Dirk; Dehority, Burk A

    2011-07-15

    Protozoa species were identified in rumen contents of four domestic sheep (Ovis aries) from South Africa. All animals were fed a forage diet which consisted of 50% lucerne and 50% teff hay. Ten new host records were identified, bringing the total number of species and forms observed in sheep in South Africa to 30. The occurrence and geographic distribution of ciliate protozoa in both domestic and wild sheep from around the world are summarised. It was found that 15 genera and 131 species occur in domestic sheep globally.

  15. Effects of different vegetable oils on rumen fermentation and conjugated linoleic acid concentration in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Amitava; Mandal, Guru Prasad; Patra, Amlan Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of different vegetable oils on rumen fermentation and concentrations of beneficial cis-9 trans-11 C18:2 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and trans-11 C18:1 fatty acid (FA) in the rumen fluid in an in vitro condition. Materials and Methods: Six vegetable oils including sunflower, soybean, sesame, rice bran, groundnut, and mustard oils were used at three dose levels (0%, 3% and 4% of substrate dry matter [DM] basis) in three replicates for each treatment in a completely randomized design using 6 × 3 factorial arrangement. Rumen fluid for microbial culture was collected from four goats fed on a diet of concentrate mixture and berseem hay at a ratio of 60:40 on DM basis. The in vitro fermentation was performed in 100 ml conical flakes containing 50 ml of culture media and 0.5 g of substrates containing 0%, 3% and 4% vegetable oils. Results: Oils supplementation did not affect (p>0.05) in vitro DM digestibility, and concentrations of total volatile FAs and ammonia-N. Sunflower oil and soybean oil decreased (p<0.05) protozoal numbers with increasing levels of oils. Other oils had less pronounced effect (p>0.05) on protozoal numbers. Both trans-11 C18:1 FA and cis-9, trans-11 CLA concentrations were increased (p<0.05) by sunflower and soybean oil supplementation at 4% level with the highest concentration observed for sunflower oil. The addition of other oils did not significantly (p>0.05) increase the trans-11 C18:1 FA and cis-9, trans-11 CLA concentrations as compared to the control. The concentrations of stearic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids were not altered (p>0.05) due to the addition of any vegetable oils. Conclusion: Supplementation of sunflower and soybean oils enhanced beneficial trans-11 C18:1 FA and cis-9, trans-11 CLA concentrations in rumen fluid, while sesame, rice bran, groundnut, and mustard oils were ineffective in this study. PMID:28246442

  16. [Mixing and propulsion of the contents of the reticulo-rumen].

    PubMed

    Baumont, R; Deswysen, A G

    1991-01-01

    Roughage intake and digestion by ruminants involve complex interactions between the roughage constituents, the microorganisms in the reticulo-rumen (RR) and its motility. Ruminal digestion requires intense activity, ie comminution of feed particles and mixing and propulsion of digesta. The regular repetition of the contraction sequences in the RR every 50 to 70 s subjects the digesta to a consistent pattern of movements. The particles are distributed according to their functional density which depends on the density of the plant structure of the particle, the liquid inside the particle and also the gas, ie on the degree of particle fermentation. An interwoven mat of large low-density particles fills the dorsal sac and the top of the ventral sac of rumen. This mat traps part of the small high density particles. Squeezed by the contractions, the interwoven mat acts like a filter and lets a liquid containing small particles of high density pass into the bottom of the ventral sac. This liquid then flows into the reticulum and passes through the reticulo-omasal orifice (ROO). Chewing during rumination reduces particle size, eliminates particle gas and aids in separating the low-density particles, which are less fermented, from the heavy residues. The outflow of digesta, made possible by the opening of the ROO during the second phase of the reticular contraction, is highly selective. The effluent does not contain particles greater than 2 mm in size in sheep and 4 mm in cattle. This is due to the buoyancy of the large particles in the reticulum, to the self-filtration of the digesta during the passage through the ROO and possibly to backflow from the omasum to the reticulum. Finally, RR motor activity, ie continuously mixing the digesta and monitoring the evacuation of gas and outflow of digesta, allows the homeostasis in the rumen necessary to microbial fermentation. The characteristics of the ingested particles, their rates of size reduction and density increase, the

  17. Artificial structures on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Flandern, T.

    2002-05-01

    Approximately 70,000 images of the surface of Mars at a resolution of up to 1.4 meters per pixel, taken by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft, are now in public archives. Approximately 1% of those images show features that can be broadly described as `special shapes', `tracks, trails, and possible vegetation', `spots, stripes, and tubes', `artistic imagery', and `patterns and symbols'. Rather than optical illusions and tricks of light and shadow, most of these have the character that, if photographed on Earth, no one would doubt that they were the products of large biology and intelligence. In a few cases, relationships, context, and fulfillment of a priori predictions provide objective evidence of artificiality that is exempt from the influence of experimenter biases. Only controlled test results can be trusted because biases are strong and operate both for and against artificiality.

  18. Wide Band Artificial Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Zackary

    2017-01-01

    The Wide Band Artificial Pulsar (WBAP) is an instrument verification device designed and built by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, West Virgina. The site currently operates the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument (GUPPI) and the Versatile Green Bank Astronomical Spectrometer (VEGAS) digital backends for their radio telescopes. The commissioning and continued support for these sophisticated backends has demonstrated a need for a device capable of producing an accurate artificial pulsar signal. The WBAP is designed to provide a very close approximation to an actual pulsar signal. This presentation is intended to provide an overview of the current hardware and software implementations and to also share the current results from testing using the WBAP.

  19. Artificially structured magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Falco, C.M.

    1990-09-28

    This document reports the progress made during the first six months of the current three-year DOE grant on Artificially Structured Magnetic Materials.'' However, because some of the results of our previous three-year DOE grant on Artificially Structured Superconductors'' continue to emerge, both topics are addressed in this Progress Report. This report describes progress with DOE funding during the current calendar year; description of the research to be conducted during the remaining six months of the current grant year; a description of the status of the graduate students working on this research; lists of the invited talks, seminars and colloquia, of other recognition of our research, and of the publications crediting DOE sponsorship; and a summary of current and pending federal support. Since the research proposed to be conducted during the next 2 1/2 years is described in detail in our DOE proposal, it is only briefly reviewed here.

  20. Whither Artificial Reproduction?

    PubMed Central

    Percival-Smith, Robin

    1985-01-01

    Artificial reproduction now offers sub fertile couples a number of options which raise scientific and ethical questions. This article discusses the Canadian and British experiences in formulating regulations and legislation in this important field. Current work on mammalian embryo research foretells the direction which human research will take. This article stresses the need for family physicians' participation in the ethical decisions that accompany these new developments. PMID:21274181

  1. Artificial perception and consciousness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, H. John; Johnson, John L.

    2000-06-01

    Perception has both unconscious and conscious aspects. In all cases, however, what we perceive is a model of reality. By brain construction through evolution, we divide the world into two parts--our body and the outside world. But the process is the same in both cases. We perceive a construct usually governed by sensed data but always involving memory, goals, fears, expectations, etc. As a first step toward Artificial Perception in man-made systems, we examine perception in general here.

  2. Artificial intelligence: Human effects

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdani, M.; Narayanan, A.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents an up-to-date study of the interaction between the fast-growing discipline of artificial intelligence and other human endeavors. The volume explores the scope and limitations of computing, and presents a history of the debate on the possibility of machines achieving intelligence. The authors offer a state-of-the-art survey of Al, concentrating on the ''mind'' (language understanding) and the ''body'' (robotics) of intelligent computing systems.

  3. Introducing artificial intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the field of artificial intelligence. The volume sets Al in a broad context of historical attitudes, imaginative insights, and ideas about intelligence in general. The author offers a wide-ranging survey of Al concerns, including cognition, knowledge engineering, problem inference, speech understanding, and perception. He also discusses expert systems, LISP, smart robots, and other Al products, and provides a listing of all major Al systems.

  4. Effect of increasing dietary nonfiber carbohydrate with starch, sucrose, or lactose on rumen fermentation and productivity of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Gao, X; Oba, M

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate effects of increasing dietary nonfiber carbohydrate (NFC) with starch, sucrose, or lactose on rumen fermentation, volatile fatty acid absorption, and milk production of lactating dairy cows. Twenty-eight multiparous, lactating Holstein cows (141 ± 50 d in milk; 614 ± 53 kg of body weight) including 8 ruminally cannulated cows were used in this study. Cows were assigned to 4 dietary treatments in a 4 × 4 Latin square design with 21-d periods. The treatments were control [27% starch and 4% sugar on a dry matter (DM) basis], a high-NFC diet by increasing dietary starch content (STA; 32% starch and 4% sugar on a DM basis), and 2 more high-NFC diets by increasing dietary sugar content (27% starch and 9% sugar on a DM basis) in which sucrose (SUC) or lactose (LAC) was supplemented. Dry matter intake was greater for cows fed high-NFC diets compared with control diet (27.1 vs. 26.3 kg/d), but rumen pH and milk production did not differ between cows fed control and high-NFC diets. However, cows fed high-disaccharide diets had lower mean rumen pH than those fed STA diet (6.19 vs. 6.32). Although molar proportion of butyrate was greater for high-disaccharide treatments than STA treatment (15.2 vs. 13.7 mol/100 mol), absorption rate of volatile fatty acid in the rumen was not affected by treatment. In addition, cows fed high-disaccharide diets had higher energy-corrected milk yield than cows fed STA diet (39.6 vs. 38.0 kg/d). Dry matter intake did not differ between cows fed 2 high-disaccharide diets. Although cows fed the SUC diet had lower molar proportion of butyrate in the rumen compared with those fed the LAC diet (14.4 vs. 15.9 mol/100 mol), the SUC diet did not decrease rumen pH. In addition, cows fed the SUC diet had lower nutrient digestibility of organic matter than did those fed the LAC diet (59.7 vs. 64.4%), but milk component yields did not differ between the 2 high-disaccharide diet treatments. The results of the

  5. Effect of progressive inoculation of fauna-free sheep with holotrich protozoa and total-fauna on rumen fermentation, microbial diversity and methane emissions

    PubMed Central

    Belanche, Alejandro; de la Fuente, Gabriel; Newbold, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    Rumen methanogenesis represents an energy waste for the ruminant and an important source of greenhouse gas; thus, integrated studies are needed to fully understand this process. Eight fauna-free sheep were used to investigate the effect of successive inoculation with holotrich protozoa then with total fauna on rumen methanogenesis. Holotrichs inoculation neither altered rumen fermentation rate nor diet digestibility, but increased concentrations of acetate (+15%), butyrate (+57%), anaerobic fungi (+0.82 log), methanogens (+0.41 log) and methanogenesis (+54%). Further inoculation with total fauna increased rumen concentrations of protozoa (+1.0 log), bacteria (+0.29 log), anaerobic fungi (+0.78 log), VFA (+8%), ammonia and fibre digestibility (+17%) without affecting levels of methanogens or methanogenesis. Rumen methanogens population was fairly stable in terms of structure and diversity, while the bacterial community was highly affected by the treatments. Inoculation with holotrich protozoa increased bacterial diversity. Further inoculation with total fauna lowered bacterial diversity but increased concentrations of certain propionate and lactate-producing bacteria, suggesting that alternative H2 sinks could be relevant. This experiment suggests that holotrich protozoa have a greater impact on rumen methanogenesis than entodiniomorphids. Thus, further research is warranted to understand the effect of holotrich protozoa on methane formation and evaluate their elimination from the rumen as a potential methane mitigation strategy. PMID:25764558

  6. Effect of progressive inoculation of fauna-free sheep with holotrich protozoa and total-fauna on rumen fermentation, microbial diversity and methane emissions.

    PubMed

    Belanche, Alejandro; de la Fuente, Gabriel; Newbold, Charles J

    2015-03-01

    Rumen methanogenesis represents an energy waste for the ruminant and an important source of greenhouse gas; thus, integrated studies are needed to fully understand this process. Eight fauna-free sheep were used to investigate the effect of successive inoculation with holotrich protozoa then with total fauna on rumen methanogenesis. Holotrichs inoculation neither altered rumen fermentation rate nor diet digestibility, but increased concentrations of acetate (+15%), butyrate (+57%), anaerobic fungi (+0.82 log), methanogens (+0.41 log) and methanogenesis (+54%). Further inoculation with total fauna increased rumen concentrations of protozoa (+1.0 log), bacteria (+0.29 log), anaerobic fungi (+0.78 log), VFA (+8%), ammonia and fibre digestibility (+17%) without affecting levels of methanogens or methanogenesis. Rumen methanogens population was fairly stable in terms of structure and diversity, while the bacterial community was highly affected by the treatments. Inoculation with holotrich protozoa increased bacterial diversity. Further inoculation with total fauna lowered bacterial diversity but increased concentrations of certain propionate and lactate-producing bacteria, suggesting that alternative H2 sinks could be relevant. This experiment suggests that holotrich protozoa have a greater impact on rumen methanogenesis than entodiniomorphids. Thus, further research is warranted to understand the effect of holotrich protozoa on methane formation and evaluate their elimination from the rumen as a potential methane mitigation strategy.

  7. Molecular comparative assessment of the microbial ecosystem in rumen and faeces of goats fed alfalfa hay alone or combined with oats.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Hamid; Yáñez-Ruiz, David R; Martínez-Fernandez, Gonzalo; Abecia, Leticia

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this work was to compare the biomass and community structure of bacteria, protozoa and archaea communities in samples of rumen and faeces of goats and to what extent the diet (alfalfa hay with or without supplemented oats) offered to them exert an influence. Four cannulated adult goats fistulated in the rumen were used in a cross over design experiment in two experimental periods of 26 days, consisting in 14 days of adaptation, 7 days of sampling rumen contents and 5 days of digestibility measurement. Bacterial, protozoa and archaeal biomass and the communities' structure was assessed by real time PCR (qPCR) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), respectively. The numbers of archaea and bacteria in both rumen and faeces were higher and lower, respectively, in animals fed AH diet (P < 0.005). Contrary, protozoal numbers were not affected by the diet but were lower (P < 0.001) in faeces than in rumen. The analysis of the community structure revealed a consistently different population in structure in rumen and faeces for the three studied microbial groups and that supplementing alfalfa hay with oats led to a decrease in the similarity between sites in the rumen and faeces: similarity indexes for bacteria (57 and 27%), archaea (26 and 9%) and protozoa (62 and 22%) in animals fed AH and AHO diets, respectively.

  8. Bioconversion of waste office paper to hydrogen using pretreated rumen fluid inoculum.

    PubMed

    Botta, Lívia Silva; Ratti, Regiane Priscila; Sakamoto, Isabel Kimiko; Ramos, Lucas Rodrigues; Silva, Edson Luiz; Varesche, Maria Bernadete Amâncio

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a microbial consortium from an acid-treated rumen fluid was used to improve the yields of H2 production from paper residues in batch reactors. The anaerobic batch reactors, which contained paper and cellulose, were operated under three conditions: (1) 0.5 g paper/L, (2) 2 g paper/L, and (3) 4 g paper/L. Cellulase was added to promote the hydrolysis of paper to soluble sugars. The H2 yields were 5.51, 4.65, and 3.96 mmol H2/g COD, respectively, with substrate degradation ranging from 56 to 65.4 %. Butyric acid was the primary soluble metabolite in the three reactors, but pronounced solventogenesis was detected in the reactors incubated with increased paper concentrations (2.0 and 4.0 g/L). A substantial prevalence of Clostridium acetobutylicum (99 % similarity) was observed in the acid-treated rumen fluid, which has been recognized as an efficient H2-producing strain in addition to ethanol and n-butanol which were also detected in the reactors.

  9. Effect of cashew nut shell liquid on metabolic hydrogen flow on bovine rumen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Mitsumori, Makoto; Enishi, Osamu; Shinkai, Takumi; Higuchi, Koji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Takenaka, Akio; Nagashima, Kyo; Mochizuki, Masami; Kobayashi, Yasuo

    2014-03-01

    Effect of cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL), a methane inhibitor, on bovine rumen fermentation was investigated through analysis of the metabolic hydrogen flow estimated from concentrations of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and methane. Three cows were fed a concentrate and hay diet without or with a CNSL-containing pellet. Two trials were conducted using CNSL pellets blended with only silica (trial 1) or with several other ingredients (trial 2). Methane production was measured in a respiration chamber system, and energy balance and nutrient digestibility were monitored. The estimated flow of metabolic hydrogen demonstrated that a part of metabolic hydrogen was used for hydrogen gas production, and a large amount of it flowed into production of methane and SCFA in both trial 1 and 2, when CNSL was administered to the bovine rumen. The results obtained by regression analyses showed that the effect of CNSL supply on methane reduction was coupled with a significant (P < 0.01) decrease of acetate and a significant (P < 0.01) increase of propionate and hydrogen gas. These findings reveal that CNSL is able to reduce methane and acetate production, and to increase hydrogen gas and propionate production in vivo.

  10. Influence of Oleic Acid on Rumen Fermentation and Fatty Acid Formation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shaoxun; Guan, Leluo; He, Zhixiong; Guan, Yongjuan; Tan, Zhiliang; Han, Xuefeng; Zhou, Chuanshe; Kang, Jinhe; Wang, Min

    2016-01-01

    A series of batch cultures were conducted to investigate the effects of oleic acid (OA) on in vitro ruminal dry matter degradability (IVDMD), gas production, methane (CH4) and hydrogen (H2) production, and proportion of fatty acids. Rumen fluid was collected from fistulated goats, diluted with incubation buffer, and then incubated with 500 mg Leymus chinensis meal supplemented with different amounts of OA (0, 20, 40, and 60 mg for the CON, OA20, OA40 and OA60 groups, respectively). Incubation was carried out anaerobically at 39°C for 48 h, and the samples were taken at 12, 24 and 48 h and subjected to laboratory analysis. Supplementation of OA decreased IVDMD, the cumulative gas production, theoretical maximum of gas production and CH4 production, but increased H2 production. However, no effect was observed on any parameters of rumen fermentation (pH, ammonia, production of acetate, propionate and butyrate and total volatile fatty acid production). The concentrations of some beneficial fatty acids, such as cis monounsaturated fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) were higher (P < 0.05) from OA groups than those from the control group at 12 h incubation. In summary, these results suggest that the OA supplementation in diet can reduce methane production and increase the amount of some beneficial fatty acids in vitro. PMID:27299526

  11. Factors influencing rumen fermentation: effect of hydrogen on formation of propionate.

    PubMed

    Schulman, M D; Valentino, D

    1976-08-01

    The effect of hydrogen on fermentation of lactate, pyruvate, fumarate, and succinate by resting rumen microorganisms has been investigated. Under an atmosphere of nitrogen, lactate was fermented to yield acetate as the major product (85 to 100 mole %) and propionate (0 to 17 mole %) and butyrate (0 to 3%) as secondary products. Under hydrogen, there was increased formation of both propionate and total volatile fatty acids. The amount of propionate increased 4 to 8 times and total volatile fatty acids 2.5 to 3.2 times. Propionate formation was proportional to the hydrogen concentration and reached a maximum at a partial pressure of hydrogen of .2 N/m2. With [2-carbon-14] lactate, propionate was formed via the dicarboxylic acid pathway under both nitrogen or hydrogen. Hydrogen did not affect significantly the fermentation of pyruvate or succinate. With fumarate under hydrogen, propionate and total volatile fatty acids increased 6.8 and 2 times while acetate was unchanged. The mechanism by which hydrogen exerts these effects is discussed in relation to the role of methanogenesis in the rumen.

  12. Use of Lysozyme as a Feed Additive on In vitro Rumen Fermentation and Methane Emission

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Ashraf A.; Lee, Sung Sill; Mamuad, Lovelia L.; Kim, Seon-Ho; Choi, Yeon-Jae; Bae, Gui-Seck; Lee, Kichoon; Sung, Ha-Guyn; Lee, Sang-Suk

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of lysozyme addition on in vitro rumen fermentation and to identify the lysozyme inclusion rate for abating methane (CH4) production. An in vitro ruminal fermentation technique was done using a commercial concentrate to rice straw ratio of 8:2 as substrate. The following treatments were applied wherein lysozyme was added into 1 mg dry matter substrate at different levels of inclusion: Without lysozyme, 2,000, 4,000, and 8,000 U lysozyme. Results revealed that, lysozyme addition had a significant effect on pH after 24 h of incubation, with the highest pH (p<0.01) observed in 8,000 U lysozyme, followed by the 4,000 U, 2,000 U, and without lysozyme. The highest amounts of acetic acid, propionic acid (p<0.01) and total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) (p<0.05) were found in 8,000 U after 24 h of incubation. The CH4 concentration was the lowest in the 8,000 U and the highest in the without lysozyme addition after 24 h of incubation. There was no significant differences in general bacteria, methanogen, or protozoan DNA copy number. So far, addition of lysozyme increased the acetate, propionate, TVFA, and decreased CH4 concentration. These results suggest that lysozyme supplementation may improve in vitro rumen fermentation and reduce CH4 emission. PMID:27703130

  13. Effects of monensin, pyromellitic diimide and 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid on rumen fermentation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Martin, S A; Macy, J M

    1985-02-01

    The effects of monensin, 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (2-BES) and pyromellitic diimide (diimide) on gas and volatile fatty acid (VFA) production by the rumen microbiota were compared in mixed culture. Oat hay, a hay-concentrate mixture (48% hay, 43% concentrate) and a soluble carbohydrate mixture were used as substrates for microbial growth. The highest concentrations of diimide (10 ppm) and 2-BES (30 microM) decreased methanogenesis by 97 and 76%, respectively, while H2 accumulation was increased 30- and 20-fold, respectively. The effect of monensin on methanogenesis was less dramatic as 10 ppm decreased CH4 accumulation 16% and H2 did not accumulate. Diimide and 2-BES decreased the acetate:propionate ratio with the hay (P less than .05) and soluble carbohydrate mixture (P less than .025). The numbers of saccharolytic, cellulolytic and methanogenic bacteria from sheep fed a diet with diimide (60 ppm) did not differ significantly from sheep fed a control diet. Semicontinuous culture incubations indicated that the mixed rumen microbial population could adapt and degrade diimide after 24 h of incubation.

  14. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel SGNH arylesterase from the goat rumen contents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guozeng; Meng, Kun; Luo, Huiying; Wang, Yaru; Huang, Huoqing; Shi, Pengjun; Pan, Xia; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2011-09-01

    An esterase-encoding gene, estR5, was directly obtained from the genomic DNA of goat rumen contents. The 555-bp full-length gene encodes a 184-residue polypeptide (EstR5) without putative signal peptide. Deduced EstR5 shared the highest identity (50%) to a putative arylesterase from Ruminococcaceae bacterium D16. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that EstR5 was closely related with microbial esterases of gastrointestinal source. A comparison of the conserved motifs shared with GDSL proteins revealed that EstR5 could be grouped into the GDSL family and was further classified into the subfamily of SGNH hydrolases. The gene estR5 was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified to electrophoretic homogeneity. Recombinant EstR5 exhibited highest catalytic efficiency towards α-naphthyl acetate followed by phenyl acetate and p-nitrophenyl acetate and had no activity towards PNP esters with acyl chains longer than C8. The enzyme exhibited optimal activity at around 60°C and pH 8.0, was stable at pH ranging from 6.0 to 11.0 and was slightly activated by detergent Tween, Nonidet P-40, and Triton X-100. These properties suggest that EstR5 has great potential for basic research and industrial applications. To our knowledge, this is the first arylesterase obtained from rumen microenvironment.

  15. Preliminary in vitro study on the effect of xanthohumol on rumen methanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zmora, Pawel; Cieslak, Adam; Jedrejek, Dariusz; Stochmal, Anna; Pers-Kamczyc, Emilia; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Nowak, Agnieszka; Szczechowiak, Joanna; Lechniak, Dorota; Szumacher-Strabel, Malgorzata

    2012-02-01

    There is a great interest in reducing the methane emission from ruminants as one possible cause of global warming. The aim of the presented study was to determine the effects of xanthohumol, one of the hop (Humulus lupulus) phytofactors, on methane production, microbial population and basic parameters of ruminal fermentation. The experiment was carried out in a batch culture system. The basic substrate (400 mg) consisting of meadow hay and barley meal (60:40) was supplemented with 0 (Control), 0.1, 0.2 or 1.0 mg of xanthohumol. The basic parameters of rumen fermentation and composition of microbial population were measured after 24 h of incubation. For the first time, the results of this in vitro study have demonstrated that xanthohumol is capable to reduce the methane production, even at the lowest dose applied (0.1 mg/400 mg). The observed reduction in methane production by 12-13% was not accompanied by altering the basic rumen fermentation parameters. However, the practical utility of this supplement needs further investigation under long-term in vivo conditions.

  16. Isolation and characterization of a non-specific endoglucanase from a metagenomic library of goat rumen.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jianbo; Huang, Shuai; Jiang, Haiqin; Zhang, Yunhai; Li, Lvmu; Wang, Juhua; Fan, Caiyun

    2016-01-01

    A cellulase gene (cel28a) was isolated from a rumen microbial metagenome library of goat rumen microorganisms, cloned into E. coli, and expressed in active form. The gene has a length of 1596 bp obtained using a genome walking Kit and encodes a protein of 509 amino acids with a calculated MW of 55 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence was homologous with cellulases belonging to the glycosyl hydrolase family 5 (GH5). The expressed protein showed activity toward carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and xylan, suggesting non-specific endoglucanase activity. The optimal conditions for endoglucanase and xylanase activities were 50 °C and pH 5.0. The metal ions (Ca(2+), Fe(2+), Mn(2+) and Co(2+)) stimulated the cellulase activity of cel28a, while the other metal ions and chemicals (Ni(2+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), SDS and EDTA) inhibited the cellulase activity. Further examination of substrate preference showed a higher activity with CMC, oat spelt xylan and birchwood xylan than with filter paper and microcrystalline cellulose, again suggesting that the protein was an endoglucanase with xylanase activity.

  17. Quantitative analysis of cellulose degradation and growth of cellulolytic bacteria in the rumen.

    PubMed

    Russell, James B; Muck, Richard E; Weimer, Paul J

    2009-02-01

    Ruminant animals digest cellulose via a symbiotic relationship with ruminal microorganisms. Because feedstuffs only remain in the rumen for a short time, the rate of cellulose digestion must be very rapid. This speed is facilitated by rumination, a process that returns food to the mouth to be rechewed. By decreasing particle size, the cellulose surface area can be increased by up to 10(6)-fold. The amount of cellulose digested is then a function of two competing rates, namely the digestion rate (K(d)) and the rate of passage of solids from the rumen (K(p)). Estimation of bacterial growth on cellulose is complicated by several factors: (1) energy must be expended for maintenance and growth of the cells, (2) only adherent cells are capable of degrading cellulose and (3) adherent cells can provide nonadherent cells with cellodextrins. Additionally, when ruminants are fed large amounts of cereal grain along with fiber, ruminal pH can decrease to a point where cellulolytic bacteria no longer grow. A dynamic model based on STELLA software is presented. This model evaluates all of the major aspects of ruminal cellulose degradation: (1) ingestion, digestion and passage of feed particles, (2) maintenance and growth of cellulolytic bacteria and (3) pH effects.

  18. Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance Marker Genes between Lactic Acid Bacteria in Model Rumen and Plant Environments▿

    PubMed Central

    Toomey, Niamh; Monaghan, Áine; Fanning, Séamus; Bolton, Declan

    2009-01-01

    Three wild-type dairy isolates of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and one Lactococcus lactis control strain were analyzed for their ability to transfer antibiotic resistance determinants (plasmid or transposon located) to two LAB recipients using both in vitro methods and in vivo models. In vitro transfer experiments were carried out with the donors and recipients using the filter mating method. In vivo mating examined transfer in two natural environments, a rumen model and an alfalfa sprout model. All transconjugants were confirmed by Etest, PCR, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and Southern blotting. The in vitro filter mating method demonstrated high transfer frequencies between all LAB pairs, ranging from 1.8 × 10−5 to 2.2 × 10−2 transconjugants per recipient. Transconjugants were detected in the rumen model for all mating pairs tested; however, the frequencies of transfer were low and inconsistent over 48 h (ranging from 1.0 × 10−9 to 8.0 × 10−6 transconjugants per recipient). The plant model provided an environment that appeared to promote comparatively higher transfer frequencies between all LAB pairs tested over the 9-day period (transfer frequencies ranged from 4.7 × 10−4 to 3.9 × 10−1 transconjugants per recipient). In our test models, dairy cultures of LAB can act as a source of mobile genetic elements encoding antibiotic resistance that can spread to other LAB. This observation could have food safety and public health implications. PMID:19270126

  19. Analysis of rumen methanogen diversity in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) under three different diets.

    PubMed

    Franzolin, Raul; St-Pierre, Benoit; Northwood, Korinne; Wright, André-Denis G

    2012-07-01

    The water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) is a prominent livestock species for the production of milk and meat in many countries. We investigated the diversity of rumen methanogens in Mediterranean water buffaloes maintained in Brazil under different diets: corn silage, grazing pasture, or sugar cane. A total of 467 clones were isolated from three methanogen 16S rRNA gene clone libraries that each represented a distinct feed type. The 467 clones were assigned to 19 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Four OTUs were represented in all three libraries, eight OTUs were library-specific, six OTUs were found in only the corn silage and pasture grazing libraries, and one OTU was shared only between pasture grazing and sugar cane libraries. We found that Methanobrevibacter-related sequences were the most abundant in the water buffaloes sampled for our analysis, in contrast to previously reported studies showing that Methanomicrobium mobile-like methanogens were the most abundant methanogens in water buffaloes of Murrah and Surti breeds sampled in India. Considering the worldwide distribution of water buffaloes and the likely wide variety of diets provided, our results combined with studies from other groups support that larger scope analyses of microbiomes for this livestock species would provide great insight into the contribution of geographical location, breed, and diet in determining the population structure of rumen microorganisms.

  20. Critical evaluation of essential oils as rumen modifiers in ruminant nutrition: A review.

    PubMed

    Cobellis, Gabriella; Trabalza-Marinucci, Massimo; Yu, Zhongtang

    2016-03-01

    Ruminant livestock systems contribute significantly to emission of methane, a potent greenhouse gas as they waste a portion of the ingested energy (2-15%) as methane and a large proportion (75-95%) of the ingested nitrogen as ammonia. Recently, numerous researches have been conducted to evaluate plant secondary metabolites, including essential oils (EO), as natural feed additives in ruminant nutrition and to exploit their potential to improve rumen fermentation efficiency. Essential oils appeared to be very promising compounds as they selectively reduced methane production and protein breakdown in both in vitro and in vivo studies. However, in some studies, the use of EO as feed additives was accompanied with decreased feed degradability and lowered volatile fatty acid. These adverse effects could be attributed to their broad and often non-specific antimicrobial activities within the rumen. Future research should be directed to identification of the active and useful EO compounds, optimization of EO doses, and use of a whole-farm approach with a focus on animal welfare, performance and economic benefits.

  1. Oral Samples as Non-Invasive Proxies for Assessing the Composition of the Rumen Microbial Community

    PubMed Central

    Tapio, Ilma; Shingfield, Kevin J.; McKain, Nest; Bonin, Aurélie; Fischer, Daniel; Bayat, Ali R.; Vilkki, Johanna; Taberlet, Pierre; Snelling, Timothy J.; Wallace, R. John

    2016-01-01

    Microbial community analysis was carried out on ruminal digesta obtained directly via rumen fistula and buccal fluid, regurgitated digesta (bolus) and faeces of dairy cattle to assess if non-invasive samples could be used as proxies for ruminal digesta. Samples were collected from five cows receiving grass silage based diets containing no additional lipid or four different lipid supplements in a 5 x 5 Latin square design. Extracted DNA was analysed by qPCR and by sequencing 16S and 18S rRNA genes or the fungal ITS1 amplicons. Faeces contained few protozoa, and bacterial, fungal and archaeal communities were substantially different to ruminal digesta. Buccal and bolus samples gave much more similar profiles to ruminal digesta, although fewer archaea were detected in buccal and bolus samples. Bolus samples overall were most similar to ruminal samples. The differences between both buccal and bolus samples and ruminal digesta were consistent across all treatments. It can be concluded that either proxy sample type could be used as a predictor of the rumen microbial community, thereby enabling more convenient large-scale animal sampling for phenotyping and possible use in future animal breeding programs aimed at selecting cattle with a lower environmental footprint. PMID:26986467

  2. Water salinity effects on performance and rumen parameters of lactating grazing Holstein cows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtorta, Silvia E.; Gallardo, Miriam R.; Sbodio, Oscar A.; Revelli, Germán R.; Arakaki, Cristina; Leva, Perla E.; Gaggiotti, Mónica; Tercero, Esteban J.

    2008-01-01

    Eighteen multiparous lactating grazing Holstein cows, 9 ruminally cannulated, average 136.1 ± 14.6 days in milk, were randomly assigned to three treatments consisting of water containing different levels of total dissolved solids (TDS; mg/l): Treatment 1 = 1,000; Treatment 2 = 5,000 and Treatment 3 = 10,000, at the Experimental Dairy Unit at Rafaela Experimental Station (31°11'S latitude) during summer 2005. Animals were arranged in a randomized complete block design with three 28-day experimental periods, with 3 weeks for water adaptation and 1 week for measurements. Feed and water intake, milk production and composition, body weight and condition score and rumen parameters were evaluated. No treatment effects were observed in any of the variables evaluated, with the exception of water intake, which was higher for animals receiving 10,000 mg/l TDS in the drinking water (189 l/day vs. 106 and 122 l/day for cows receiving water with 1,000 and 5,000 mg/l TDS, respectively). Water intake was significantly higher for animals in treatment 10,000 ( P < 0.05). It was concluded that the rumen presents a surprising buffer capacity and that consideration of TDS alone is insufficient to characterize drinking water quality.

  3. Bacterial community in the rumen of Tibetan sheep and Gansu alpine fine-wool sheep grazing on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinqiang; Li, Yongjuan; Luo, Yuzhu

    2017-02-24

    The rumen microbiome plays a vital role in ruminant nutrition and health, and its community is affected by environmental factors. However, little is known about the rumen bacterial community of ruminants living in the special ecological environment of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) of China. The objectives of this study were to investigate the rumen bacterial community of the typical plateau sheep (Tibetan sheep, TS, and Gansu alpine fine-wool sheep, GS) grazing on the QTP, using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, and to evaluate the relationship between the rumen bacterial community and the QTP environment. A total of 116 sequences (201 clones) were examined and divided into 53 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the TS library and 46 OTUs in the GS library. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the sequences that belonged to the Firmicutes were the most predominant bacteria in both TS and GS libraries, representing 79.4% and 62.8% of the total clones, respectively. The remaining sequences belonged to Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, or were unclassified bacteria. Sequence analysis revealed that the TS and GS rumens harbored many novel sequences associated with uncultured bacteria that accounted for 63.6% and 46.8% of the total clones, respectively. Comparison of the composition and diversity of the TS and GS rumen bacteria revealed few overlapping known bacteria between the two breeds, and a higher diversity in TS. The rumen bacteria of the plateau sheep showed higher percentages of bacteria that belonged to Firmicutes and novel species compared with the low-elevation sheep. The unique bacterial community in the plateau sheep rumens is perhaps one of the major reasons that they can adapt to the harsh plateau environment. These results can help identify the rumen bacterial community of the ruminants in the QTP, and provide bacteria resources and basic data to improve ruminant productivity.

  4. Rumen development process in goats as affected by supplemental feeding v. grazing: age-related anatomic development, functional achievement and microbial colonisation.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jinzhen; Li, Xiaopeng; Beauchemin, Karen A; Tan, Zhiliang; Tang, Shaoxun; Zhou, Chuanshe

    2015-03-28

    The aim of the present study was to describe age-related changes in anatomic, functional and microbial variables during the rumen development process, as affected by the feeding system (supplemental feeding v. grazing), in goats. Goats were slaughtered at seven time points that were selected to reflect the non-rumination (0, 7 and 14 d), transition (28 and 42 d) and rumination (56 and 70 d) phases of rumen development. Total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) concentration (P= 0·002), liquid-associated bacterial and archaeal copy numbers (P< 0·01) were greater for supplemental feeding v. grazing, while rumen pH (P< 0·001), acetate molar proportion (P= 0·003) and solid-associated microbial copy numbers (P< 0·05) were less. Rumen papillae length (P= 0·097) and extracellular (P= 0·093) and total (P= 0·073) protease activity potentials in supplemented goats tended to be greater than those in grazing goats. Furthermore, from 0 to 70 d, irrespective of the feeding system, rumen weight, rumen wall thickness, rumen papillae length and area, TVFA concentration, xylanase, carboxymethylcellulase activity potentials, and microbial copy numbers increased (P< 0·01) with age, while the greatest amylase and protease activity potentials occurred at 28 d. Most anatomic and functional variables evolved progressively from 14 to 42 d, while microbial colonisation was fastest from birth to 28 d. These outcomes suggest that the supplemental feeding system is more effective in promoting rumen development than the grazing system; in addition, for both the feeding systems, microbial colonisation in the rumen is achieved at 1 month, functional achievement at 2 months, and anatomic development after 2 months.

  5. Morphometric and immunohistochemical study of the rumen of red deer during prenatal development

    PubMed Central

    Franco, A J; Masot, A J; Aguado, MaC; Gómez, L; Redondo, E

    2004-01-01

    A detailed study of the ontogenesis of deer stomach has not been undertaken to date, and our aim was to sequence several histological phenomena that occur during the ontogenesis of one of the gastric compartments, the rumen. Histomorphometric and immunohistochemical analyses were carried out on 50 embryos and fetuses of deer from the initial stages of prenatal life until birth. For the purposes of testing, the animals were divided into five experimental groups: group I, 1.4–3.6 cm crown–rump length, 30–60 days, 1–25% of gestation; group II, 4.5–7.2 cm crown–rump length, 67–90 days, 25–35% of gestation; group III, 8–19 cm crown–rump length, 97–135 days, 35–50% of gestation; group IV, 21–33 cm crown–rump length, 142–191 days, 45–70% of gestation; and group V, 36–40 cm crown–rump length, 205–235 days, 75–100% of gestation. The rumen of the primitive gastric tube was observed at approximately 60 days. At 67 days the rumen consisted of three layers: internal or mucosal, middle or muscular, and external or serosal layer. The stratification of the epithelial layer was accompanied by changes in its structure with the appearance of ruminal pillars and papillae. The outline of the ruminal papillae began to appear at 142 days of prenatal development as evaginations of the basal zone toward the ruminal lumen, pulling with it in its configuration the stratum basale, the lamina propria and the submucosa. From the pluripotential blastemic tissue at 60 days we witnessed the histodifferentiation of the primitive tunica muscularis, composed of two layers of myoblasts with a defined arrangement. It was also from the pluripotential blastemic tissue, at 97 days, that the lamina propria and the submucosa were differentiated. The serosa showed continuity in growth as well as differentiation, already detected in the undifferentiated outline phase. The tegumentary mucosa of deer rumen was shown without secretory capacity in the initial embryonic

  6. Feeding rumen-protected methionine pre- and post-partum increases milk protein content and yield in early lactation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives were to evaluate the effects of feeding rumen-protected methionine (MET) from 23 d (±12) before calving until 98 days in milk (DIM) on lactation performance, dry matter intake (DMI), body condition score (BCS) and body weight (BW) change of dairy cows. Multiparous Holstein cows (n = 223) ...

  7. Responses in digestion, rumen fermentation and microbial populations to inhibition of methane formation by a halogenated methane analogue.

    PubMed

    Mitsumori, Makoto; Shinkai, Takumi; Takenaka, Akio; Enishi, Osamu; Higuchi, Koji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Nonaka, Itoko; Asanuma, Narito; Denman, Stuart E; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2012-08-01

    The effects of the anti-methanogenic compound, bromochloromethane (BCM), on rumen microbial fermentation and ecology were examined in vivo. Japanese goats were fed a diet of 50 % Timothy grass and 50 % concentrate and then sequentially adapted to low, mid and high doses of BCM. The goats were placed into the respiration chambers for analysis of rumen microbial function and methane and H2 production. The levels of methane production were reduced by 5, 71 and 91 %, and H2 production was estimated at 545, 2941 and 3496 mmol/head per d, in response to low, mid and high doses of BCM, respectively, with no effect on maintenance feed intake and digestibility. Real-time PCR quantification of microbial groups showed a significant decrease relative to controls in abundance of methanogens and rumen fungi, whereas there were increases in Prevotella spp. and Fibrobacter succinogenes, a decrease in Ruminococcus albus and R. flavefaciens was unchanged. The numbers of protozoa were also unaffected. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and quantitative PCR analysis revealed that several Prevotella spp. were the bacteria that increased most in response to BCM treatment. It is concluded that the methane-inhibited rumen adapts to high hydrogen levels by shifting fermentation to propionate via Prevotella spp., but the majority of metabolic hydrogen is expelled as H2 gas.

  8. Comparisons of Salmonella conjugation and virulence gene hyperexpression mediated by rumen protozoa from domestic and exotic ruminants.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Matt T; Xiong, Nalee; Dier, Jeffery D; Anderson, Kristi L; Rasmussen, Mark A; Franklin, Sharon K; Carlson, Steve A

    2011-08-05

    Recent studies have identified a phenomenon in which ciliated protozoa engulf Salmonella and the intra-protozoal environment hyperactivates virulence gene expression and provides a venue for conjugal transfer of antibiotic resistance plasmids. The former observation is relegated to Salmonella bearing the SGI1 multiresistance integron while the latter phenomenon appears to be a more generalized event for recipient Salmonella. Our previous studies have assessed virulence gene hyperexpression only with protozoa from the bovine rumen while conjugal transfer has been demonstrated in rumen protozoa from cattle and goats. The present study examined virulence gene hyperexpression for Salmonella exposed to rumen protozoa obtained from cattle, sheep, goats, or two African ruminants (giraffe and bongo). Conjugal transfer was also assessed in these protozoa using Salmonella as the recipient. Virulence gene hyperexpression was only observed following exposure to the rumen protozoa from cattle and sheep while elevated virulence was also observed in these animals. Conjugal transfer events were, however, observed in all protozoa evaluated. It therefore appears that the protozoa-based hypervirulence is not universal to all ruminants while conjugal transfer is more ubiquitous.

  9. Estimating Rumen Degradable Protein in Forage Legume Hays and Silages by In Situ Disappearance Kinetics vs. Alternative Methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently, the in situ kinetic method is considered the “gold standard” for estimating rumen degradable protein (RDP) in forages. When such estimates are impractical (e.g. numerous samples, limited sample quantities, or lack of ruminally fistulated cattle) alternative RDP methods are used, but their...

  10. Effect of ciliate protozoa on the activity of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes and fibre breakdown in the rumen ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Williams, A G; Withers, S E

    1991-02-01

    The effect of ciliate protozoa on the activity of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes in microbial populations from the digesta solids and liquor fractions of rumen contents was examined after the refaunation of ciliate-free sheep with an A-type rumen protozoal population. Although the culturable rumen bacterial population was reduced after refaunation the number of fibrolytic micro-organisms detected was higher; the xylanolytic bacterial population and numbers of fungal zoospores were increased after refaunation. The proportion of propionic acid was lower in the refaunated animals, whereas the concentration of ammonia and the acidic metabolites acetate, butyrate and valerate were all increased. The range of enzyme activities present in the digesta subpopulations were the same in defaunated and refaunated animals. The activities of the polysaccharide-degrading enzymes, however, were increased in the microbial populations associated with the digesta solids after refaunation, and at 16 h after feeding the activities were 4-8 times (beta-D-xylosidase 20 times) higher than the levels detected in the adherent population from defaunated sheep. The protozoa, either directly through their own enzymes or indirectly as a consequence of their effects on the population size and activity of the other fibrolytic micro-organisms present, have an important role in determining the level of activity of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes in the rumen ecosystem. Although the extent of ryegrass (Lolium perenne) hay digestion was similar after 24 h in the absence or presence of protozoa, the initial ruminal degradation was higher in refaunated sheep.

  11. Metatranscriptomics Reveals the Active Bacterial and Eukaryotic Fibrolytic Communities in the Rumen of Dairy Cow Fed a Mixed Diet

    PubMed Central

    Comtet-Marre, Sophie; Parisot, Nicolas; Lepercq, Pascale; Chaucheyras-Durand, Frédérique; Mosoni, Pascale; Peyretaillade, Eric; Bayat, Ali R.; Shingfield, Kevin J.; Peyret, Pierre; Forano, Evelyne

    2017-01-01

    Ruminants have a unique ability to derive energy from the degradation of plant polysaccharides through the activity of the rumen microbiota. Although this process is well studied in vitro, knowledge gaps remain regarding the relative contribution of the microbiota members and enzymes in vivo. The present study used RNA-sequencing to reveal both the expression of genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) by the rumen microbiota of a lactating dairy cow and the microorganisms forming the fiber-degrading community. Functional analysis identified 12,237 CAZymes, accounting for 1% of the transcripts. The CAZyme profile was dominated by families GH94 (cellobiose-phosphorylase), GH13 (amylase), GH43 and GH10 (hemicellulases), GH9 and GH48 (cellulases), PL11 (pectinase) as well as GH2 and GH3 (oligosaccharidases). Our data support the pivotal role of the most characterized fibrolytic bacteria (Prevotella, Ruminocccus and Fibrobacter), and highlight a substantial, although most probably underestimated, contribution of fungi and ciliate protozoa to polysaccharide degradation. Particularly these results may motivate further exploration of the role and the functions of protozoa in the rumen. Moreover, an important part of the fibrolytic bacterial community remains to be characterized since one third of the CAZyme transcripts originated from distantly related strains. These findings are used to highlight limitations of current metatranscriptomics approaches to understand the functional rumen microbial community and opportunities to circumvent them. PMID:28197133

  12. Health status of birds fed diets containing three differently processed discarded vegetable-bovine blood-rumen content mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ekunseitan, D A; Balogun, O O; Sogunle, O M; Yusuf, A O; Ayoola, A A; Egbeyale, L T; Adeyemi, O A; Allison, I B; Iyanda, A I

    2013-04-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of feeding three differently processed mixtures on health status of broilers. A total of 1080 day-old Marshal broilers were fed; discarded vegetable-fresh bovine blood-fresh rumen digesta (P1), discarded vegetable-ensiled bovine blood-fresh rumen digesta (P2) and discarded vegetable-fresh bovine blood-ensiled rumen digesta (P3) at three levels of inclusion (0, 3 and 6%). Data on blood parameters was taken and were subjected to 3 x 3 factorial arrangements in a completely randomized design. Birds fed P1 had least values (p < 0.05) of serum glucose, total protein, globulin, uric acid and creatinine at starter phase. Birds fed diets containing 3 and 6% level of inclusion recorded the highest (p < 0.05) Packed cell volume, Haemoglobin, White blood cell and Red blood cell values. However, those fed at 0% level of inclusion recorded the highest albumin value. At finisher phase, birds fed P2 and P3 had the highest glucose, uric acid and creatinine values. 6% level of inclusion significantly (p < 0.05) increased the total protein and albumin values. Therefore, for enhanced performance and without comprising the health condition of birds; broiler chickens could be fed diets containing discarded vegetable-fresh bovine blood-ensiled rumen digesta (P3) up to 6% level of inclusion.

  13. Microbial population in the rumen of swamp buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) as influenced by coconut oil and mangosteen peel supplementation.

    PubMed

    Pilajun, R; Wanapat, M

    2013-06-01

    Four, rumen fistulated swamp buffalo bulls were used to study microbial populations in the rumen when supplemented with coconut oil and mangosteen peel. Animals were randomly assigned to a 4 × 4 Latin square design. Four treatments were un-supplemented (Control), supplementation with coconut oil at 50 g/kg (CO5), supplementation with mangosteen peel at 30 g/kg (MP3) and supplementation with CO5 and MP3 (COM), of total DM intake. Animals received concentrate at 10 g/kg of BW, and rice straw was given ad libitum. Abundance of total bacteria was increased by CO5 supplementation, whereas populations of protozoa and Fibrobacter succinogenes were reduced by CO5 and COM supplementation. Dietary supplementation did not affect methanogen, Ruminococcus flavefaciens or Ruminococcus albus abundances. Dietary treatments changed denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) band patterns of methanogens and protozoa when compared with the control group, especially when supplemented with MP3. Supplementation of COM resulted in the greatest difference in pattern of DGGE bands for total bacteria compared with the control. Coconut oil and mangosteen peel supplementation resulted in changing of rumen microbial abundances and communities; however, combination of them could be more benefit to improve rumen fermentation of swamp buffalo fed on rice straw.

  14. Access to warm drinking water prevents rumen temperature drop without affecting in situ NDF disappearance in grazing winter range cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ingestion of large quantities of cold water or frozen forage may result in changes in temperature of ruminal contents. Rumen microorganisms may be sensitive to temperature changes in the ruminal environment. Therefore, this study was conducted to assess the variability in ruminal temperature and e...

  15. Effect of intake on fasting heat production, respiratory quotient and plasma metabolites measured using the washed rumen technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to investigate the effect of intake prior to fasting on concentrations of metabolites and hormones, respiratory quotient (RQ) and fasting heat production (HP) using the washed rumen technique and to compare these values with those from the fed state. Six Holstein steers (360 ± 22 k...

  16. Evaluation of a rapid determination of heat production and respiratory quotient in holstein steers using the washed rumen technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to validate use of the washed rumen technique for rapid measurement of fasting heat production (FHP) and RQ, and to compare this with heart rate (HR) and core temperature (CT). Eight Holstein steers (322 ± 30 kg) were maintained in a controlled temperature (21°C) envi...

  17. Evaluation of a rapid determination of heat production and respiratory quotient in Holstein steers using the washed rumen technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to validate use of the washed rumen technique for rapid measurement of fasting heat production (FHP) and respiratory quotient (RQ), and compare this with heart rate (HR) and core temperature (CT). The experiment used 8 Holstein steers (322±30 kg) under controlled temp...

  18. Development of feeding systems and strategies of supplementation to enhance rumen fermentation and ruminant production in the tropics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The availability of local feed resources in various seasons can contribute as essential sources of carbohydrate and protein which significantly impact rumen fermentation and the subsequent productivity of the ruminant. Recent developments, based on enriching protein in cassava chips, have yielded yeast fermented cassava chip protein (YEFECAP) providing up to 47.5% crude protein (CP), which can be used to replace soybean meal. The use of fodder trees has been developed through the process of pelleting; Leucaena leucocephala leaf pellets (LLP), mulberry leaf pellets (MUP) and mangosteen peel and/or garlic pellets, can be used as good sources of protein to supplement ruminant feeding. Apart from producing volatile fatty acids and microbial proteins, greenhouse gases such as methane are also produced in the rumen. Several methods have been used to reduce rumen methane. However, among many approaches, nutritional manipulation using feed formulation and feeding management, especially the use of plant extracts or plants containing secondary compounds (condensed tannins and saponins) and plant oils, has been reported. This approach could help todecrease rumen protozoa and methanogens and thus mitigate the production of methane. At present, more research concerning this burning issue - the role of livestock in global warming - warrants undertaking further research with regard to economic viability and practical feasibility. PMID:23981662

  19. Hops (Humulus lupulus) ß-acid as an inhibitor of caprine rumen hyper-ammonia-producing bacteria in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobial plant secondary metabolites increase rumen efficiency and decrease waste products (i.e. ammonia, methane) in some cases. A promising source of bioactive secondary metabolites is the hops plant (Humulus lupulus L.), which produces '-acid, a suite of structurally similar, potent antibact...

  20. RNA-Seq detection of differential gene expression in the rumen of beef steers associated with feed efficiency phenotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficient utilization of feedstuffs is an economically important trait in beef production. The rumen is important to the digestive process of steers interacting with feed, microbial populations, and volatile fatty acids indicating it may play a critical role in feed efficiency. To gain an unders...

  1. Effect of variable water intake as mediated by dietary potassium carbonate supplementation on rumen dynamics in lactating dairy cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water is a critical nutrient for dairy cows, with intake varying with environment, production, and diet. However, little work has evaluated the effects of water intake on rumen parameters. Using dietary potassium carbonate (Kcarb) as a K supplement to increase water intake, the objective of this stu...

  2. Effect of Entodinium caudatum on starch intake and glycogen formation by Eudiplodinium maggii in the rumen and reticulum.

    PubMed

    Bełżecki, Grzegorz; McEwan, Neil R; Kowalik, Barbara; Michałowski, Tadeusz; Miltko, Renata

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to quantify the engulfed starch and reserve α-glucans (glycogen) in the cells of the ciliates Eudiplodinium maggii, as well the α-glucans in defaunated and selectively faunated sheep. The content of starch inside the cell of ciliates varied from 21 to 183mg/g protozoal DM relative to the rumen fauna composition whereas, the glycogen fluctuated between 17 and 126mg/g dry matter (DM) of this ciliate species. Establishment of the population Entodinium caudatum in the rumen of sheep already faunated with E. maggii caused a drop in both types of quantified carbohydrates. The content of α-glucans in the rumen of defaunated sheep varied from 4.4 to 19.9mg/g DM and increased to 7.4-29.9 or 11.8-33.9mg/g DM of rumen contents in the presence of only E. maggii or E. maggii and E. caudatum, respectively. The lowest content of the carbohydrates was always found just before feeding and the highest at 4h thereafter. The α-glucans in the reticulum varied 7.5-40.1, 14.3-76.8 or 21.9-106.1mg/g DM of reticulum content for defaunated, monofaunated or bifaunated sheep, respectively. The results indicated that both ciliate species engulf starch granules and convert the digestion products to the glycogen, diminishing the pool of starch available for amylolytic bacteria.

  3. Artificial intelligence in hematology.

    PubMed

    Zini, Gina

    2005-10-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is a computer based science which aims to simulate human brain faculties using a computational system. A brief history of this new science goes from the creation of the first artificial neuron in 1943 to the first artificial neural network application to genetic algorithms. The potential for a similar technology in medicine has immediately been identified by scientists and researchers. The possibility to store and process all medical knowledge has made this technology very attractive to assist or even surpass clinicians in reaching a diagnosis. Applications of AI in medicine include devices applied to clinical diagnosis in neurology and cardiopulmonary diseases, as well as the use of expert or knowledge-based systems in routine clinical use for diagnosis, therapeutic management and for prognostic evaluation. Biological applications include genome sequencing or DNA gene expression microarrays, modeling gene networks, analysis and clustering of gene expression data, pattern recognition in DNA and proteins, protein structure prediction. In the field of hematology the first devices based on AI have been applied to the routine laboratory data management. New tools concern the differential diagnosis in specific diseases such as anemias, thalassemias and leukemias, based on neural networks trained with data from peripheral blood analysis. A revolution in cancer diagnosis, including the diagnosis of hematological malignancies, has been the introduction of the first microarray based and bioinformatic approach for molecular diagnosis: a systematic approach based on the monitoring of simultaneous expression of thousands of genes using DNA microarray, independently of previous biological knowledge, analysed using AI devices. Using gene profiling, the traditional diagnostic pathways move from clinical to molecular based diagnostic systems.

  4. Study of the effect of presence or absence of protozoa on rumen fermentation and microbial protein contribution to the chyme.

    PubMed

    Belanche, A; Abecia, L; Holtrop, G; Guada, J A; Castrillo, C; de la Fuente, G; Balcells, J

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of presence or absence of protozoa on rumen fermentation and efficiency of microbial protein synthesis under different diets. Of 20 twin paired lambs, 1 lamb of each pair was isolated from the ewe within 24 h after birth and reared in a protozoa-free environment (n = 10), whereas their respective twin-siblings remained with the ewe (faunated, n = 10). When lambs reached 6 mo of age, 5 animals of each group were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 experimental diets consisting of either alfalfa hay as the sole diet, or 50:50 mixed with ground barley grain according to a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. After 15 d of adaptation to the diet, the animals were euthanized and total rumen and abomasal contents were sampled to estimate rumen microbial synthesis using C(31) alkane as flow marker. Different ((15)N and purine bases) and a novel (recombinant DNA sequences) microbial markers, combined with several microbial reference extracts (rumen protozoa, liquid and solid associated bacteria) were evaluated. Absence of rumen protozoa modified the rumen fermentation pattern and decreased total tract OM and NDF digestibility in 2.0 and 5.1 percentage points, respectively. The effect of defaunation on microbial N flow was weak, however, and was dependent on the microbial marker and microbial reference extract considered. Faunated lambs fed with mixed diet showed the greatest rumen protozoal concentration and the least efficient microbial protein synthesis (29% less than the other treatments), whereas protozoa-free lambs fed with mixed diet presented the smallest ammonia concentration and 34% greater efficiency of N utilization than the other treatments. Although (15)N gave the most precise estimates of microbial synthesis, the use of recombinant DNA sequences represents an alternative that allows separate quantification of the bacteria and protozoa contributions. This marker showed that presence of protozoa decrease the

  5. The influence of feed energy density and a formulated additive on rumen and rectal temperature in hanwoo steers.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sangbuem; Mbiriri, David Tinotenda; Shim, Kwanseob; Lee, A-Leum; Oh, Seong-Jin; Yang, Jinho; Ryu, Chaehwa; Kim, Young-Hoon; Seo, Kang-Seok; Chae, Jung-Il; Oh, Young Kyoon; Choi, Nag-Jin

    2014-11-01

    The present study investigated the optimum blending condition of protected fat, choline and yeast culture for lowering of rumen temperature. The Box Benken experimental design, a fractional factorial arrangement, and response surface methodology were employed. The optimum blending condition was determined using the rumen simulated in vitro fermentation. An additive formulated on the optimum condition contained 50% of protected fat, 25% of yeast culture, 5% of choline, 7% of organic zinc, 6.5% of cinnamon, and 6.5% of stevioside. The feed additive was supplemented at a rate of 0.1% of diet (orchard grass:concentrate, 3:7) and compared with a control which had no additive. The treatment resulted in lower volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration and biogas than the control. To investigate the effect of the optimized additive and feed energy levels on rumen and rectal temperatures, four rumen cannulated Hanwoo (Korean native beef breed) steers were in a 4×4 Latin square design. Energy levels were varied to low and high by altering the ratio of forage to concentrate in diet: low energy (6:4) and high energy (4:6). The additive was added at a rate of 0.1% of the diet. The following parameters were measured; feed intake, rumen and rectal temperatures, ruminal pH and VFA concentration. This study was conducted in an environmentally controlled house with temperature set at 30°C and relative humidity levels of 70%. Steers were housed individually in raised crates to facilitate collection of urine and feces. The adaptation period was for 14 days, 2 days for sampling and 7 days for resting the animals. The additive significantly reduced both rumen (p<0.01) and rectal temperatures (p<0.001) without depressed feed intake. There were interactions (p<0.01) between energy level and additive on ruminal temperature. Neither additive nor energy level had an effect on total VFA concentration. The additive however, significantly increased (p<0.01) propionate and subsequently had lower

  6. The Influence of Feed Energy Density and a Formulated Additive on Rumen and Rectal Temperature in Hanwoo Steers

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sangbuem; Mbiriri, David Tinotenda; Shim, Kwanseob; Lee, A-Leum; Oh, Seong-Jin; Yang, Jinho; Ryu, Chaehwa; Kim, Young-Hoon; Seo, Kang-Seok; Chae, Jung-Il; Oh, Young Kyoon; Choi, Nag-Jin

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the optimum blending condition of protected fat, choline and yeast culture for lowering of rumen temperature. The Box Benken experimental design, a fractional factorial arrangement, and response surface methodology were employed. The optimum blending condition was determined using the rumen simulated in vitro fermentation. An additive formulated on the optimum condition contained 50% of protected fat, 25% of yeast culture, 5% of choline, 7% of organic zinc, 6.5% of cinnamon, and 6.5% of stevioside. The feed additive was supplemented at a rate of 0.1% of diet (orchard grass:concentrate, 3:7) and compared with a control which had no additive. The treatment resulted in lower volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration and biogas than the control. To investigate the effect of the optimized additive and feed energy levels on rumen and rectal temperatures, four rumen cannulated Hanwoo (Korean native beef breed) steers were in a 4×4 Latin square design. Energy levels were varied to low and high by altering the ratio of forage to concentrate in diet: low energy (6:4) and high energy (4:6). The additive was added at a rate of 0.1% of the diet. The following parameters were measured; feed intake, rumen and rectal temperatures, ruminal pH and VFA concentration. This study was conducted in an environmentally controlled house with temperature set at 30°C and relative humidity levels of 70%. Steers were housed individually in raised crates to facilitate collection of urine and feces. The adaptation period was for 14 days, 2 days for sampling and 7 days for resting the animals. The additive significantly reduced both rumen (p<0.01) and rectal temperatures (p<0.001) without depressed feed intake. There were interactions (p<0.01) between energy level and additive on ruminal temperature. Neither additive nor energy level had an effect on total VFA concentration. The additive however, significantly increased (p<0.01) propionate and subsequently had lower

  7. Artificial mismatch hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Guo, Zhen; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1998-01-01

    An improved nucleic acid hybridization process is provided which employs a modified oligonucleotide and improves the ability to discriminate a control nucleic acid target from a variant nucleic acid target containing a sequence variation. The modified probe contains at least one artificial mismatch relative to the control nucleic acid target in addition to any mismatch(es) arising from the sequence variation. The invention has direct and advantageous application to numerous existing hybridization methods, including, applications that employ, for example, the Polymerase Chain Reaction, allele-specific nucleic acid sequencing methods, and diagnostic hybridization methods.

  8. Artificial cell division.

    PubMed

    Mange, Daniel; Stauffer, André; Petraglio, Enrico; Tempesti, Gianluca

    2004-01-01

    After a survey of the theory and some realizations of self-replicating machines, this paper presents a novel self-replicating loop endowed with universal construction and computation properties. Based on the hardware implementation of the so-called Tom Thumb algorithm, the design of this loop leads to a new kind of cellular automaton made of a processing and a control units. The self-replication of the Swiss flag serves as an artificial cell division example of the loop which, according to autopoietic evaluation criteria, corresponds to a cell showing the phenomenology of a living system.

  9. Epithelial, metabolic and innate immunity transcriptomic signatures differentiating the rumen from other sheep and mammalian gastrointestinal tract tissues

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Ruidong; Oddy, Victor Hutton; Archibald, Alan L.; Vercoe, Phillip E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ruminants are successful herbivorous mammals, in part due to their specialized forestomachs, the rumen complex, which facilitates the conversion of feed to soluble nutrients by micro-organisms. Is the rumen complex a modified stomach expressing new epithelial (cornification) and metabolic programs, or a specialised stratified epithelium that has acquired new metabolic activities, potentially similar to those of the colon? How has the presence of the rumen affected other sections of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of ruminants compared to non-ruminants? Methods. Transcriptome data from 11 tissues covering the sheep GIT, two stratified epithelial and two control tissues, was analysed using principal components to cluster tissues based on gene expression profile similarity. Expression profiles of genes along the sheep GIT were used to generate a network to identify genes enriched for expression in different compartments of the GIT. The data from sheep was compared to similar data sets from two non-ruminants, pigs (closely related) and humans (more distantly related). Results. The rumen transcriptome clustered with the skin and tonsil, but not the GIT transcriptomes, driven by genes from the epidermal differentiation complex, and genes encoding stratified epithelium keratins and innate immunity proteins. By analysing all of the gene expression profiles across tissues together 16 major clusters were identified. The strongest of these, and consistent with the high turnover rate of the GIT, showed a marked enrichment of cell cycle process genes (P = 1.4 E−46), across the whole GIT, relative to liver and muscle, with highest expression in the caecum followed by colon and rumen. The expression patterns of several membrane transporters (chloride, zinc, nucleosides, amino acids, fatty acids, cholesterol and bile acids) along the GIT was very similar in sheep, pig and humans. In contrast, short chain fatty acid uptake and metabolism appeared to be different

  10. Artificial Intelligence in Space Platforms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    computer algorithms, there still appears to be a need for Artificial Inteligence techniques in the navigation area. The reason is that navigaion, in...RD-RI32 679 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN SPACE PLRTFORNSMU AIR FORCE 1/𔃼 INST OF TECH WRIGHT-PRTTERSON AFB OH SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING M A WRIGHT DEC 94...i4 Preface The purpose of this study was to analyze the feasibility of implementing Artificial Intelligence techniques to increase autonomy for

  11. Trimaran Resistance Artificial Neural Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    11th International Conference on Fast Sea Transportation FAST 2011, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, September 2011 Trimaran Resistance Artificial Neural Network Richard...Trimaran Resistance Artificial Neural Network 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e... Artificial Neural Network and is restricted to the center and side-hull configurations tested. The value in the parametric model is that it is able to

  12. Replacing alfalfa hay with dry corn gluten feed and Chinese wild rye grass: Effects on rumen fermentation, rumen microbial protein synthesis, and lactation performance in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Hao, X Y; Gao, H; Wang, X Y; Zhang, G N; Zhang, Y G

    2017-04-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate nutrient digestibility, rumen microbial protein synthesis, and lactation performance when a portion of alfalfa was replaced with combinations of dry corn gluten feed (DCGF) and Chinese wild rye grass in the diet of lactating cows. Six multiparous and 3 primiparous Chinese Holsteins were arranged in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square experiment for 21-d periods. The animals were fed 1 of 3 treatment diets during each period: (1) 0% DCGF (0DCGF); (2) 6.5% DCGF (7DCGF); and (3) 11% DCGF (11DCGF). Diets were isonitrogenous, and a portion of alfalfa hay was replaced with DCGF and Chinese wild rye grass, with similar concentrate mixtures and corn silage contents. The dry matter intake was greater for 11DCGF (21.9 kg/d) than for 0DCGF (20.7 kg/d) or 7DCGF (21.2 kg/d). The treatment diets did not result in difference in milk production, fat and lactose concentration, or yield. Compared with 0DCGF, the ration containing 11% DCGF improved the milk protein concentration. Dry matter and neutral detergent fiber digestibility was greater for 7DCGF (62.7% and 45.6%) and 11DCGF (63.1% and 47.2%) than for 0DCGF (59.4% and 42.3%), and the nitrogen digestibility was similar for the 3 treatments. The concentration of rumen volatile fatty acids was higher in cows fed the 11DCGF diet than in those fed the 0DCGF diet, with no difference between the 7DCGF and 11DCGF diets. The estimated microbial crude protein yield was greater for the 11DCGF diet (1985.1 g/d) than for the 0DCGF diet (1745.0 g/d), with no difference between the 0DCGF and 7DCGF diets. Thus, it appears that feeding DCGF and Chinese wild rye grass in combination can effectively replace a portion of alfalfa hay in the rations of lactating dairy cows.

  13. Effect of phenotypic residual feed intake and dietary forage content on the rumen microbial community of beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Carberry, Ciara A; Kenny, David A; Han, Sukkyan; McCabe, Matthew S; Waters, Sinead M

    2012-07-01

    Feed-efficient animals have lower production costs and reduced environmental impact. Given that rumen microbial fermentation plays a pivotal role in host nutrition, the premise that rumen microbiota may contribute to host feed efficiency is gaining momentum. Since diet is a major factor in determining rumen community structure and fermentation patterns, we investigated the effect of divergence in phenotypic residual feed intake (RFI) on ruminal community structure of beef cattle across two contrasting diets. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) were performed to profile the rumen bacterial population and to quantify the ruminal populations of Entodinium spp., protozoa, Fibrobacter succinogenes, Ruminococcus flavefaciens, Ruminococcus albus, Prevotella brevis, the genus Prevotella, and fungi in 14 low (efficient)- and 14 high (inefficient)-RFI animals offered a low-energy, high-forage diet, followed by a high-energy, low-forage diet. Canonical correspondence and Spearman correlation analyses were used to investigate associations between physiological variables and rumen microbial structure and specific microbial populations, respectively. The effect of RFI on bacterial profiles was influenced by diet, with the association between RFI group and PCR-DGGE profiles stronger for the higher forage diet. qPCR showed that Prevotella abundance was higher (P < 0.0001) in inefficient animals. A higher (P < 0.0001) abundance of Entodinium and Prevotella spp. and a lower (P < 0.0001) abundance of Fibrobacter succinogenes were observed when animals were offered the low-forage diet. Thus, differences in the ruminal microflora may contribute to host feed efficiency, although this effect may also be modulated by the diet offered.

  14. Studies on the production of conjugated linoleic acid from linoleic and vaccenic acids by mixed rumen protozoa.

    PubMed

    Or-Rashid, Mamun M; AlZahal, Ousama; McBride, Brian W

    2008-12-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the capability of mixed rumen protozoa to synthesize conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) from linoleic (LA) and vaccenic acids (VA). Rumen contents were collected from fistulated cows. The protozoal fraction was separated and washed several times with MB9 buffer and then resuspended in autoclaved rumen fluid. The suspensions were anaerobically incubated up to 18 h at 38.5 degrees C with substrates in the presence (P-AB) or the absence of antibacterial-agents (P-No-AB). Neither P-AB nor P-No-AB suspensions were capable of producing CLA from VA (11t-18:1). Linoleic acid was catabolized by P-No-AB to a greater extent than P-AB. Different isomers of CLA were synthesized by P-AB from LA. The 9c11t-CLA was predominant. Thirty seven percent of the maximum accumulated 9c11t-CLA was found in the P-AB suspension as early as 0.1 h into the incubation period. Accumulation of 10t12c-CLA in P-AB suspension was approximately 10.0 times lower than that of 9c11t-CLA. There were no significant productions of VA, 10t-18:1, and 18:0 in P-AB compared with the control, indicating that rumen protozoa have no ability to biohydrogenate CLA isomers. On the other hand, the concentrations of 10t-18:1, VA, and 18:0 in P-No-AB were greater (P < 0.05) compared with those in P-AB, indicating the role of symbiotic bacteria associated with P-No-AB in biohydrogenating CLA isomers. We concluded that mixed rumen protozoa are capable of synthesizing CLA from LA through isomerization reactions. However, they are incapable of metabolizing CLA further. They are also incapable of vaccenic acid biohydrogenation and/or desaturation.

  15. THRESHOLD LOGIC IN ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    COMPUTER LOGIC, ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE , BIONICS, GEOMETRY, INPUT OUTPUT DEVICES, LINEAR PROGRAMMING, MATHEMATICAL LOGIC, MATHEMATICAL PREDICTION, NETWORKS, PATTERN RECOGNITION, PROBABILITY, SWITCHING CIRCUITS, SYNTHESIS

  16. [Artificial neural networks in Neurosciences].

    PubMed

    Porras Chavarino, Carmen; Salinas Martínez de Lecea, José María

    2011-11-01

    This article shows that artificial neural networks are used for confirming the relationships between physiological and cognitive changes. Specifically, we explore the influence of a decrease of neurotransmitters on the behaviour of old people in recognition tasks. This artificial neural network recognizes learned patterns. When we change the threshold of activation in some units, the artificial neural network simulates the experimental results of old people in recognition tasks. However, the main contributions of this paper are the design of an artificial neural network and its operation inspired by the nervous system and the way the inputs are coded and the process of orthogonalization of patterns.

  17. Microscopic artificial swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyfus, Rémi; Baudry, Jean; Roper, Marcus L.; Fermigier, Marc; Stone, Howard A.; Bibette, Jérôme

    2005-10-01

    Microorganisms such as bacteria and many eukaryotic cells propel themselves with hair-like structures known as flagella, which can exhibit a variety of structures and movement patterns. For example, bacterial flagella are helically shaped and driven at their bases by a reversible rotary engine, which rotates the attached flagellum to give a motion similar to that of a corkscrew. In contrast, eukaryotic cells use flagella that resemble elastic rods and exhibit a beating motion: internally generated stresses give rise to a series of bends that propagate towards the tip. In contrast to this variety of swimming strategies encountered in nature, a controlled swimming motion of artificial micrometre-sized structures has not yet been realized. Here we show that a linear chain of colloidal magnetic particles linked by DNA and attached to a red blood cell can act as a flexible artificial flagellum. The filament aligns with an external uniform magnetic field and is readily actuated by oscillating a transverse field. We find that the actuation induces a beating pattern that propels the structure, and that the external fields can be adjusted to control the velocity and the direction of motion.

  18. Development of artificial empathy.

    PubMed

    Asada, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    We have been advocating cognitive developmental robotics to obtain new insight into the development of human cognitive functions by utilizing synthetic and constructive approaches. Among the different emotional functions, empathy is difficult to model, but essential for robots to be social agents in our society. In my previous review on artificial empathy (Asada, 2014b), I proposed a conceptual model for empathy development beginning with emotional contagion to envy/schadenfreude along with self/other differentiation. In this article, the focus is on two aspects of this developmental process, emotional contagion in relation to motor mimicry, and cognitive/affective aspects of the empathy. It begins with a summary of the previous review (Asada, 2014b) and an introduction to affective developmental robotics as a part of cognitive developmental robotics focusing on the affective aspects. This is followed by a review and discussion on several approaches for two focused aspects of affective developmental robotics. Finally, future issues involved in the development of a more authentic form of artificial empathy are discussed.

  19. The total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Cook, Jason A; Shah, Keyur B; Quader, Mohammed A; Cooke, Richard H; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Rao, Kris K; Smallfield, Melissa C; Tchoukina, Inna; Tang, Daniel G

    2015-12-01

    The total artificial heart (TAH) is a form of mechanical circulatory support in which the patient's native ventricles and valves are explanted and replaced by a pneumatically powered artificial heart. Currently, the TAH is approved for use in end-stage biventricular heart failure as a bridge to heart transplantation. However, with an increasing global burden of cardiovascular disease and congestive heart failure, the number of patients with end-stage heart failure awaiting heart transplantation now far exceeds the number of available hearts. As a result, the use of mechanical circulatory support, including the TAH and left ventricular assist device (LVAD), is growing exponentially. The LVAD is already widely used as destination therapy, and destination therapy for the TAH is under investigation. While most patients requiring mechanical circulatory support are effectively treated with LVADs, there is a subset of patients with concurrent right ventricular failure or major structural barriers to LVAD placement in whom TAH may be more appropriate. The history, indications, surgical implantation, post device management, outcomes, complications, and future direction of the TAH are discussed in this review.

  20. The total artificial heart

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Jason A.; Shah, Keyur B.; Quader, Mohammed A.; Cooke, Richard H.; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Rao, Kris K.; Smallfield, Melissa C.; Tchoukina, Inna

    2015-01-01

    The total artificial heart (TAH) is a form of mechanical circulatory support in which the patient’s native ventricles and valves are explanted and replaced by a pneumatically powered artificial heart. Currently, the TAH is approved for use in end-stage biventricular heart failure as a bridge to heart transplantation. However, with an increasing global burden of cardiovascular disease and congestive heart failure, the number of patients with end-stage heart failure awaiting heart transplantation now far exceeds the number of available hearts. As a result, the use of mechanical circulatory support, including the TAH and left ventricular assist device (LVAD), is growing exponentially. The LVAD is already widely used as destination therapy, and destination therapy for the TAH is under investigation. While most patients requiring mechanical circulatory support are effectively treated with LVADs, there is a subset of patients with concurrent right ventricular failure or major structural barriers to LVAD placement in whom TAH may be more appropriate. The history, indications, surgical implantation, post device management, outcomes, complications, and future direction of the TAH are discussed in this review. PMID:26793338

  1. Artificial lung: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Go, T; Macchiarini, P

    2008-10-01

    While the number of the patients suffering from end-stage pulmonary disease has been increasing, the most common treatment for this entity remains mechanical ventilation that entails the risks of lung damage by itself. Although the lung protective strategy for the prevention of further damage to the lung tissue has been elucidated and performed, mechanical ventilation alone as the management tactic coping with the patients of acute respiratory distress syndrome, chronic respiratory failure and lung transplantations has been a frustrated scenario. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or extracorporeal lung assist have been applied to these patients with occasional success, but it always accompanies difficulties such as multiple blood transfusion, labor intensity, technically complexity and tendency to infection. In contrast to advances in the development of cardiac or renal support systems for adults, the development of extra-, para- and intracorporeal mechanical systems for acute or chronic lung respiratory failure has logged far behind. It has been mostly due to the lack of the capable technologies. Entering 21st century with advent of new technology especially invention of the low resistance oxygenator, the developments of artificial lungs have entered the new stage. In this report current status of the artificial lungs will be reviewed.

  2. Microscopic artificial swimmers.

    PubMed

    Dreyfus, Rémi; Baudry, Jean; Roper, Marcus L; Fermigier, Marc; Stone, Howard A; Bibette, Jérôme

    2005-10-06

    Microorganisms such as bacteria and many eukaryotic cells propel themselves with hair-like structures known as flagella, which can exhibit a variety of structures and movement patterns. For example, bacterial flagella are helically shaped and driven at their bases by a reversible rotary engine, which rotates the attached flagellum to give a motion similar to that of a corkscrew. In contrast, eukaryotic cells use flagella that resemble elastic rods and exhibit a beating motion: internally generated stresses give rise to a series of bends that propagate towards the tip. In contrast to this variety of swimming strategies encountered in nature, a controlled swimming motion of artificial micrometre-sized structures has not yet been realized. Here we show that a linear chain of colloidal magnetic particles linked by DNA and attached to a red blood cell can act as a flexible artificial flagellum. The filament aligns with an external uniform magnetic field and is readily actuated by oscillating a transverse field. We find that the actuation induces a beating pattern that propels the structure, and that the external fields can be adjusted to control the velocity and the direction of motion.

  3. Artificial Blood for Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kana; Yokomaku, Kyoko; Kureishi, Moeka; Akiyama, Motofusa; Kihira, Kiyohito; Komatsu, Teruyuki

    2016-01-01

    There is no blood bank for pet animals. Consequently, veterinarians themselves must obtain “blood” for transfusion therapy. Among the blood components, serum albumin and red blood cells (RBCs) are particularly important to save lives. This paper reports the synthesis, structure, and properties of artificial blood for the exclusive use of dogs. First, recombinant canine serum albumin (rCSA) was produced using genetic engineering with Pichia yeast. The proteins showed identical features to those of the native CSA derived from canine plasma. Furthermore, we ascertained the crystal structure of rCSA at 3.2 Å resolution. Pure rCSA can be used widely for numerous clinical and pharmaceutical applications. Second, hemoglobin wrapped covalently with rCSA, hemoglobin–albumin cluster (Hb-rCSA3), was synthesized as an artificial O2-carrier for the RBC substitute. This cluster possesses satisfactorily negative surface net charge (pI = 4.7), which supports enfolding of the Hb core by rCSA shells. The anti-CSA antibody recognized the rCSA exterior quantitatively. The O2-binding affinity was high (P50 = 9 Torr) compared to that of the native Hb. The Hb-rCSA3 cluster is anticipated for use as an alternative material for RBC transfusion, and as an O2 therapeutic reagent that can be exploited in various veterinary medicine situations. PMID:27830776

  4. Electron transport phosphorylation in rumen butyrivibrios: unprecedented ATP yield for glucose fermentation to butyrate

    PubMed Central

    Hackmann, Timothy J.; Firkins, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    From a genomic analysis of rumen butyrivibrios (Butyrivibrio and Pseudobutyrivibrio sp.), we have re-evaluated the contribution of electron transport phosphorylation (ETP) to ATP formation in this group. This group is unique in that most (76%) genomes were predicted to possess genes for both Ech and Rnf transmembrane ion pumps. These pumps act in concert with the NifJ and Bcd-Etf to form a electrochemical potential (ΔμH+ and ΔμNa+), which drives ATP synthesis by ETP. Of the 62 total butyrivibrio genomes currently available from the Hungate 1000 project, all 62 were predicted to possess NifJ, which reduces oxidized ferredoxin (Fdox) during pyruvate conversion to acetyl-CoA. All 62 possessed all subunits of Bcd-Etf, which reduces Fdox and oxidizes reduced NAD during crotonyl-CoA reduction. Additionally, 61 genomes possessed all subunits of the Rnf, which generates ΔμH+ or ΔμNa+ from oxidation of reduced Fd (Fdred) and reduction of oxidized NAD. Further, 47 genomes possessed all six subunits of the Ech, which generates ΔμH+ from oxidation of Fdred. For glucose fermentation to butyrate and H2, the electrochemical potential established should drive synthesis of ∼1.5 ATP by the F0F1-ATP synthase (possessed by all 62 genomes). The total yield is ∼4.5 ATP/glucose after accounting for three ATP formed by classic substrate-level phosphorylation, and it is one the highest yields for any glucose fermentation. The yield was the same when unsaturated fatty acid bonds, not H+, served as the electron acceptor (as during biohydrogenation). Possession of both Ech and Rnf had been previously documented in only a few sulfate-reducers, was rare in other rumen prokaryotic genomes in our analysis, and may confer an energetic advantage to rumen butyrivibrios. This unique energy conservation system might enhance the butyrivibrios’ ability to overcome growth inhibition by unsaturated fatty acids, as postulated herein. PMID:26157432

  5. Insights on Alterations to the Rumen Ecosystem by Nitrate and Nitrocompounds

    PubMed Central

    Latham, Elizabeth A.; Anderson, Robin C.; Pinchak, William E.; Nisbet, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate and certain short chain nitrocompounds and nitro-oxy compounds are being investigated as dietary supplements to reduce economic and environmental costs associated with ruminal methane emissions. Thermodynamically, nitrate is a preferred electron acceptor in the rumen that consumes electrons at the expense of methanogenesis during dissimilatory reduction to an intermediate, nitrite, which is primarily reduced to ammonia although small quantities of nitrous oxide may also be produced. Short chain nitrocompounds act as direct inhibitors of methanogenic bacteria although certain of these compounds may also consume electrons at the expense of methanogenesis and are effective inhibitors of important foodborne pathogens. Microbial and nutritional consequences of incorporating nitrate into ruminant diets typically results in increased acetate production. Unlike most other methane-inhibiting supplements, nitrate decreases or has no effect on propionate production. The type of nitrate salt added influences rates of nitrate reduction, rates of nitrite accumulation and efficacy of methane reduction, with sodium and potassium salts being more potent than calcium nitrate salts. Digestive consequences of adding nitrocompounds to ruminant diets are more variable and may in some cases increase propionate production. Concerns about the toxicity of nitrate's intermediate product, nitrite, to ruminants necessitate management, as animal poisoning may occur via methemoglobinemia. Certain of the naturally occurring nitrocompounds, such as 3-nitro-1-propionate or 3-nitro-1-propanol also cause poisoning but via inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase. Typical risk management procedures to avoid nitrite toxicity involve gradually adapting the animals to higher concentrations of nitrate and nitrite, which could possibly be used with the nitrocompounds as well. A number of organisms responsible for nitrate metabolism in the rumen have been characterized. To date a single rumen bacterium

  6. Effects of heat stress on metabolism, digestibility, and rumen epithelial characteristics in growing Holstein calves.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, M Hossein; Mirzaei-Alamouti, H R; Amanlou, H; Mahjoubi, E; Nabipour, A; Aghaziarati, N; Baumgard, L H

    2016-01-01

    To distinguish between the direct effects of heat stress (HS) and reduced DMI on metabolic and physiological variables, morphometry, and gene expression of transporters involving in ruminal VFA absorption, 16 Holstein bull calves (178.1 ± 7.55 kg of BW) were used in a randomized complete design using 2 experimental periods. In period 1 (P1), all animals were housed in thermoneutral (TN) conditions (20.7 ± 3.0°C and a temperature-humidity index [THI] of 65.2 ± 3.1) and fed ad libitum for 8 d. In period 2 (P2; 9 d), half of the calves ( = 8) were subjected to HS condition (29.9 to 41.0°C and a THI ≥ 85 for 8 h/d) and the other half ( = 8) were maintained in TN conditions but were pair fed (pair-fed thermoneutral [PFTN]) to the HS calves. Heat stress decreased DMI (20%; < 0.01) and, by design, PFTN calves had similar reduced intakes. During P1, ADG was similar between groups (1.7 kg/d), but ADG was reduced similarly for both groups (0.14 kg/d) during P2 ( < 0.01). Compared with P1, HS calves had decreased plasma glucose levels (12.5%; < 0.01) in P2. Basal insulin levels increased in P2 for HS calves (71%; < 0.03), but there was no difference between periods for PFTN calves. Circulating NEFA concentrations did not differ between periods in the HS calves, but PFTN animals had increased basal NEFA levels (100%; < 0.01). Compared with P1, HS calves had increased blood urea nitrogen concentration in P2 ( < 0.01) but blood urea nitrogen did not differ between periods in the PFTN calves. Heat stress had no measurable effect on nutrient digestibility. Rumen papillae height increased (51%; < 0.04) in HS calves whereas papillae top width decreased (40%; < 0.03), but there was no difference between treatments for other morphometric parameters. Gene expression of VFA transporters in rumen epithelium was not affected by thermal treatments. These results confirmed that short-term HS in the current study had no effect on diet digestibility, rumen morphology, or VFA

  7. Estimation of feed crude protein concentration and rumen degradability by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Belanche, A; Weisbjerg, M R; Allison, G G; Newbold, C J; Moorby, J M

    2013-01-01

    Currently, rapid methods are needed for feed analysis. This study examined the potential of Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to predict the nutritional value of a wide range of feeds for ruminants, as an alternative to the in situ technique. Moreover, we investigated whether universal equations could be developed that would allow the low-cost determination of crude protein (CP) concentrations and their kinetics of degradation into the rumen. Protein nutritional values of 663 samples comprising 80 different feed types were determined in terms of concentrations of CP, water-soluble CP (CP(WS)), total-tract mobile bag CP digestibility (CP(TTD)), and in situ CP degradability, including the rumen soluble fraction (CP(A)), the degradable but not soluble fraction (CP(B)), rate of CP(B) degradation (CP(C)), effective degradability (CP(ED)), and potential degradability (CPPD). Infrared spectra of dry samples were collected by attenuated total reflectance from 4000 to 600 cm(-1). Models were developed by partial least squares (PLS) regression in a randomly selected subset of samples, and the precision of the equations was confirmed by using an external validation set. Analysis by FTIR spectroscopy was sufficiently sensitive to allow the accurate prediction of sample CP concentration (R(2)=0.92) and to classify feeds according to their CPWS concentrations using universal models (R(2)=0.78) that included all sample types. Moreover, substantial improvements in predictions were observed when samples were subdivided in groups. Models for forages led to accurate predictions of CP(WS) and fractions CP(A) and CP(B) (R(2)>0.83), whereas models for CP(TTD) and CP(ED) could be used for screening purposes (R(2)>0.67). This study showed that models for protein-rich concentrates alone could also be used for screening according to the feed concentrations of CP(WS), CP(TTD), CP(ED), CP(A), and CP(B), but models for energy-rich concentrates gave relatively poor predictions. The

  8. Evaluation of the Cow Rumen Metagenome; Assembly by Single Copy Gene Analysis and Single Cell Genome Assemblies(Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect

    Sczyrba, Alex

    2011-10-13

    DOE JGI's Alex Sczyrba on "Evaluation of the Cow Rumen Metagenome" and "Assembly by Single Copy Gene Analysis and Single Cell Genome Assemblies" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  9. Evaluation of the Cow Rumen Metagenome; Assembly by Single Copy Gene Analysis and Single Cell Genome Assemblies(Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema

    Sczyrba, Alex [DOE JGI

    2016-07-12

    DOE JGI's Alex Sczyrba on "Evaluation of the Cow Rumen Metagenome" and "Assembly by Single Copy Gene Analysis and Single Cell Genome Assemblies" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  10. Bovine and ovine rumen fluke in Ireland-Prevalence, risk factors and species identity based on passive veterinary surveillance and abattoir findings.

    PubMed

    Toolan, Dónal P; Mitchell, Gillian; Searle, Kate; Sheehan, Maresa; Skuce, Philip J; Zadoks, Ruth N

    2015-09-15

    The prevalence of rumen fluke, the incidence of clinical paramphistomosis and the trematode's species identity were studied in cattle and sheep in the Republic of Ireland using passive veterinary surveillance (faecal examination and necropsy results; 2010-2013) and abattoir data. Based on faecal examination, the prevalence of rumen fluke was higher in cattle than in sheep. Rumen fluke prevalence in cattle and sheep fluctuated over the year and in most years (2011-2013), prevalence was higher in winter (December-February) than in summer (June-August). For 3 of 4 years studied, there was no correlation between monthly prevalence of rumen fluke and prevalence of liver fluke as estimated by faecal examination. At sample level, joint occurrence of rumen fluke and liver fluke was 1.1-2.0 times more common than would be expected under the assumption of independence. Based on necropsy data, a spike in deaths attributed to paramphistomosis was observed in 2012, when rainfall was unusually high. This spike in mortality was not accompanied by a spike in faecal prevalence, emphasizing that the incidence of disease, which is due to high burdens of juvenile rumen fluke in the gut, is not correlated with prevalence of infection, which is measured by faecal examination and reflects presence of adult fluke in the rumen. At slaughter, 52% of 518 cattle from 101 herds were positive for rumen fluke, compared to 14% of 158 sheep. Prevalence in cattle was higher than reported in most studies from mainland Europe and varied by animal category, age, sex, abattoir visit and location (county) of farm from which the animal was submitted for slaughter, but in multivariate analysis, only sampling month and county were significantly associated with detection of rumen fluke. The identity of rumen fluke in cattle and sheep was confirmed as Calicophoron daubneyi. Although C. daubneyi is thought to share an intermediate host snail with Fasciola hepatica, the differences in prevalence between host

  11. Using wireless rumen sensors for evaluating the effects of diet and ambient temperature in nonlactating dairy goats.

    PubMed

    Castro-Costa, A; Salama, A A K; Moll, X; Aguiló, J; Caja, G

    2015-07-01

    Sixteen Murciano-Granadina dairy goats, provided with wireless rumen sensors for pH and temperature, were used to assess the rumen environment variations produced by extreme forage to concentrate diets (experiment 1) and climatic conditions (experiment 2). To avoid the interference of feed intake, goats were fed at maintenance level. Rumen sensors were inserted by surgery and programmed to collect and store rumen pH and temperature every 30min. In experiment 1, 8 dry goats (38.6±2.3kg of body weight) in tiestalls were divided into 2 groups and fed at maintenance level with 2 diets varying in forage-to-concentrate ratio [high forage (HF) 70:30; low forage (LF) 30:70] according to a crossover design. Diets were offered once daily for 4h and tap water (4 L, 9.8±0.4°C) was offered for only 30min at 6h after feeding. Rectal temperatures were recorded 3 times during the day. Rumen pH fell immediately after feeding, reaching a nadir depending on the diet (HF=6.35±0.07 at 11h after feeding; LF=6.07±0.07 at 6h after feeding) and being on average greater (0.31±0.06) in HF than LF goats. No diet effects were detected in rectal (38.2±0.1°C) and ruminal (38.9±0.1°C) mean temperatures, which were positively correlated. Rumen temperature dramatically changed by feeding (1.4±0.1°C) and drinking (-3.4±0.1°C), and 2h were necessary to return to the fasting value (38.2±0.1°C). In experiment 2, 8 dry goats (43.9±1.0kg of body weight) were kept in metabolic cages, fed a 50:50 diet and exposed to 2 climatic conditions following a crossover design. Conditions were thermoneutral (TN; 20 to 23°C day-night) and heat stress (HS; 12-h day at 37°C and 12-h night at 30°C). Humidity (40±5%) and photoperiod (light-dark, 12-12h) were similar. Goats were fed at maintenance level, the feed being offered once daily and water at ambient temperature was freely available. Intake, rectal temperature, and respiratory rate were recorded 3 times daily. Despite no differing in dry matter

  12. Artificial Diets for Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Kristina K.; Hansen, Immo A.

    2016-01-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases are responsible for more than a million human deaths every year. Modern mosquito control strategies such as sterile insect technique (SIT), release of insects carrying a dominant lethal (RIDL), population replacement strategies (PR), and Wolbachia-based strategies require the rearing of large numbers of mosquitoes in culture for continuous release over an extended period of time. Anautogenous mosquitoes require essential nutrients for egg production, which they obtain through the acquisition and digestion of a protein-rich blood meal. Therefore, mosquito mass production in laboratories and other facilities relies on vertebrate blood from live animal hosts. However, vertebrate blood is expensive to acquire and hard to store for longer times especially under field conditions. This review discusses older and recent studies that were aimed at the development of artificial diets for mosquitoes in order to replace vertebrate blood. PMID:28009851

  13. Artificial Quantum Thermal Bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Alireza; Neven, Hartmut

    In this talk, we present a theory for engineering the temperature of a quantum system different from its ambient temperature, that is basically an analog version of the quantum metropolis algorithm. We define criteria for an engineered quantum bath that, when couples to a quantum system with Hamiltonian H, drives the system to the equilibrium state e/- H / T Tr (e - H / T) with a tunable parameter T. For a system of superconducting qubits, we propose a circuit-QED approximate realization of such an engineered thermal bath consisting of driven lossy resonators. We consider an artificial thermal bath as a simulator for many-body physics or a controllable temperature knob for a hybrid quantum-thermal annealer.

  14. Artificial modification meeting reminder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, W. E.

    A symposium on artificial modification of the ionosphere by high-powered radio waves (V. V. Migulin, Honorary Chairman) will be held September 19-23, 1988, at the Scandic Hotel, Tromso, Norway. The symposium, sponsored by Union Radio Scientifique Internationale Commissions (URSI) G and H, is in the URSI series which started at Suzdal in 1983. Information on the scientific program is available from V.V. Migulin, U.S.S.R. Academy of Sciences, 103907, Moscow Center, Marx Avl8, U.S.S.R.; Peter Stubbe, Max- Planck-Institut fuer Aeronomy, D-3411 Katlenburg- Lindau 3, Federal Republic of Germany; or W.E. Gordon, Rice University, Space Physics and Astronomy Dept., Houston, TX 77251. For local arrangements information, contact Asgeir Brekke, Institute Matematisk Realfag, Aurora Observatory, Box 953, N-9001, Tromso, Norway.

  15. Hydraulically actuated artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meller, M. A.; Tiwari, R.; Wajcs, K. B.; Moses, C.; Reveles, I.; Garcia, E.

    2012-04-01

    Hydraulic Artificial Muscles (HAMs) consisting of a polymer tube constrained by a nylon mesh are presented in this paper. Despite the actuation mechanism being similar to its popular counterpart, which are pneumatically actuated (PAM), HAMs have not been studied in depth. HAMs offer the advantage of compliance, large force to weight ratio, low maintenance, and low cost over traditional hydraulic cylinders. Muscle characterization for isometric and isobaric tests are discussed and compared to PAMs. A model incorporating the effect of mesh angle and friction have also been developed. In addition, differential swelling of the muscle on actuation has also been included in the model. An application of lab fabricated HAMs for a meso-scale robotic system is also presented.

  16. Molecular artificial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Serena; Drouet, Samuel; Francàs, Laia; Gimbert-Suriñach, Carolina; Guttentag, Miguel; Richmond, Craig; Stoll, Thibaut; Llobet, Antoni

    2014-11-21

    The replacement of fossil fuels by a clean and renewable energy source is one of the most urgent and challenging issues our society is facing today, which is why intense research has been devoted to this topic recently. Nature has been using sunlight as the primary energy input to oxidise water and generate carbohydrates (solar fuel) for over a billion years. Inspired, but not constrained, by nature, artificial systems can be designed to capture light and oxidise water and reduce protons or other organic compounds to generate useful chemical fuels. This tutorial review covers the primary topics that need to be understood and mastered in order to come up with practical solutions for the generation of solar fuels. These topics are: the fundamentals of light capturing and conversion, water oxidation catalysis, proton and CO2 reduction catalysis and the combination of all of these for the construction of complete cells for the generation of solar fuels.

  17. Compact artificial hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, G. A.; Mann, W. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A relatively simple, compact artificial hand, is described which includes hooks pivotally mounted on first frame to move together and apart. The first frame is rotatably mounted on a second frame to enable "turning at the wrist" movement without limitation. The second frame is pivotally mounted on a third frame to permit 'flexing at the wrist' movement. A hook-driving motor is fixed to the second frame but has a shaft that drives a speed reducer on the first frame which, in turn, drives the hooks. A second motor mounted on the second frame, turns a gear on the first frame to rotate the first frame and the hooks thereon. A third motor mounted on the third frame, turns a gear on a second frame to pivot it.

  18. Artificial Intelligence and Language Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC. Basic Skills Group. Learning Div.

    The three papers in this volume concerning artificial intelligence and language comprehension were commissioned by the National Institute of Education to further the understanding of the cognitive processes that enable people to comprehend what they read. The first paper, "Artificial Intelligence and Language Comprehension," by Terry Winograd,…

  19. In Pursuit of Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watstein, Sarah; Kesselman, Martin

    1986-01-01

    Defines artificial intelligence and reviews current research in natural language processing, expert systems, and robotics and sensory systems. Discussion covers current commercial applications of artificial intelligence and projections of uses and limitations in library technical and public services, e.g., in cataloging and online information and…

  20. Artificial Ligaments: Promise or Panacea?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubell, Adele

    1987-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration has approved a prosthetic ligament for limited use in persons with damaged anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). This article addresses ligament repair, ACL tears, current treatment, development of the Gore-Tex artificial ligament, other artificial ligaments in process, and arguments for and against their use.…

  1. A Primer on Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leal, Ralph A.

    A survey of literature on recent advances in the field of artificial intelligence provides a comprehensive introduction to this field for the non-technical reader. Important areas covered are: (1) definitions, (2) the brain and thinking, (3) heuristic search, and (4) programing languages used in the research of artificial intelligence. Some…

  2. Instructional Applications of Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halff, Henry M.

    1986-01-01

    Surveys artificial intelligence and the development of computer-based tutors and speculates on the future of artificial intelligence in education. Includes discussion of the definitions of knowledge, expert systems (computer systems that solve tough technical problems), intelligent tutoring systems (ITS), and specific ITSs such as GUIDON, MYCIN,…

  3. Generalized Adaptive Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical model of supervised learning by artificial neural network provides for simultaneous adjustments of both temperatures of neurons and synaptic weights, and includes feedback as well as feedforward synaptic connections. Extension of mathematical model described in "Adaptive Neurons For Artificial Neural Networks" (NPO-17803). Dynamics of neural network represented in new model by less-restrictive continuous formalism.

  4. Anisotropic Artificial Impedance Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarfoth, Ryan Gordon

    Anisotropic artificial impedance surfaces are a group of planar materials that can be modeled by the tensor impedance boundary condition. This boundary condition relates the electric and magnetic field components on a surface using a 2x2 tensor. The advantage of using the tensor impedance boundary condition, and by extension anisotropic artificial impedance surfaces, is that the method allows large and complex structures to be modeled quickly and accurately using a planar boundary condition. This thesis presents the theory of anisotropic impedance surfaces and multiple applications. Anisotropic impedance surfaces are a generalization of scalar impedance surfaces. Unlike the scalar version, anisotropic impedance surfaces have material properties that are dependent on the polarization and wave vector of electromagnetic radiation that interacts with the surface. This allows anisotropic impedance surfaces to be used for applications that scalar surfaces cannot achieve. Three of these applications are presented in this thesis. The first is an anisotropic surface wave waveguide which allows propagation in one direction, but passes radiation in the orthogonal direction without reflection. The second application is a surface wave beam shifter which splits a surface wave beam in two directions and reduces the scattering from an object placed on the surface. The third application is a patterned surface which can alter the scattered radiation pattern of a rectangular shape. For each application, anisotropic impedance surfaces are constructed using periodic unit cells. These unit cells are designed to give the desired surface impedance characteristics by modifying a patterned metallic patch on a grounded dielectric substrate. Multiple unit cell geometries are analyzed in order to find the setup with the best performance in terms of impedance characteristics and frequency bandwidth.

  5. Rumen fermentation and production effects of Origanum vulgare L. leaves in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Tekippe, J A; Hristov, A N; Heyler, K S; Cassidy, T W; Zheljazkov, V D; Ferreira, J F S; Karnati, S K; Varga, G A

    2011-10-01

    A lactating cow trial was conducted to study the effects of dietary addition of oregano leaf material (Origanum vulgare L.; OV; 0, control vs. 500 g/d) on ruminal fermentation, methane production, total tract digestibility, manure gas emissions, N metabolism, organoleptic characteristics of milk, and dairy cow performance. Eight primiparous and multiparous Holstein cows (6 of which were ruminally cannulated) were used in a crossover design trial with two 21-d periods. Cows were fed once daily. The OV material was top-dressed and mixed with a portion of the total mixed ration. Cows averaged 80 ± 12.5 d in milk at the beginning of the trial. Rumen pH, concentration of total and individual volatile fatty acids, microbial protein outflow, and microbial profiles were not affected by treatment. Ruminal ammonia-N concentration was increased by OV compared with the control (5.3 vs. 4.3mM). Rumen methane production, which was measured only within 8h after feeding, was decreased by OV. Intake of dry matter (average of 26.6 ± 0.83 kg/d) and apparent total tract digestibly of nutrients did not differ between treatments. Average milk yield, milk protein, lactose, and milk urea nitrogen concentrations were unaffected by treatment. Milk fat content was increased and 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield tended to be increased by OV, compared with the control (3.29 vs. 3.12% and 42.4 vs. 41.0 kg/d, respectively). Fat-corrected (3.5%) milk feed efficiency and milk net energy for lactation (NE(L)) efficiency (milk NE(L) ÷ NE(L) intake) were increased by OV compared with the control (1.64 vs. 1.54 kg/kg and 68.0 vs. 64.4%, respectively). Milk sensory parameters were not affected by treatment. Urinary and fecal N losses, and manure ammonia and methane emissions were unaffected by treatment. Under the current experimental conditions, supplementation of dairy cow diets with 500 g/d of OV increased milk fat concentration, feed and milk NE(L) efficiencies, and tended to increase 3.5% fat

  6. Methane yield phenotypes linked to differential gene expression in the sheep rumen microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Christina D.; Leahy, Sinead C.; Kang, Dongwan; Froula, Jeff; Kittelmann, Sandra; Fan, Christina; Deutsch, Samuel; Gagic, Dragana; Seedorf, Henning; Kelly, William J.; Atua, Renee; Sang, Carrie; Soni, Priya; Li, Dong; Pinares-Patiño, Cesar S.; McEwan, John C.; Janssen, Peter H.; Chen, Feng; Visel, Axel; Wang, Zhong; Attwood, Graeme T.

    2014-01-01

    Ruminant livestock represent the single largest anthropogenic source of the potent greenhouse gas methane, which is generated by methanogenic archaea residing in ruminant digestive tracts. While differences between individual animals of the same breed in the amount of methane produced have been observed, the basis for this variation remains to be elucidated. To explore the mechanistic basis of this methane production, we measured methane yields from 22 sheep, which revealed that methane yields are a reproducible, quantitative trait. Deep metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing demonstrated a similar abundance of methanogens and methanogenesis pathway genes in high and low methane emitters. However, transcription of methanogenesis pathway genes was substantially increased in sheep with high methane yields. These results identify a discrete set of rumen methanogens whose methanogenesis pathway transcription profiles correlate with methane yields and provide new targets for CH4 mitigation at the levels of microbiota composition and transcriptional regulation. PMID:24907284

  7. Anaerobic fermentation of biogas liquid pretreated maize straw by rumen microorganisms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wenyao; Xu, Xiaochen; Gao, Yang; Yang, Fenglin; Wang, Gang

    2014-02-01

    This study intended to investigate the effect of pretreatment of maize straw with biogas liquid on followed fermentation by rumen microorganisms in vitro. The multiple effects including treated time, temperature and dosage of biogas liquid in pretreatment on the followed fermentation performance were analyzed by orthogonal array. The optimum conditions of pretreatment were 9days, 25°C and 50% (v/w) dosage of biogas liquid, which were indicated by the corresponding crystallinity index, dry matter digestibility (DMD) and acetate limiting-step concentration were 57.5%, 73.76% and 1756mg/L, respectively. The ordering sequence of the influential factors for pretreatment was treated time > temperature > dosage of biogas liquid. The results of fermentation showed that the maize straw pretreated by biogas liquid was an efficient and economic pretreatment method of maize straw.

  8. Physicochemical, thermal and computational study of the encapsulation of rumenic acid by natural and modified cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Matencio, Adrián; Hernández-Gil, Carlos Javier García; García-Carmona, Francisco; López-Nicolás, José Manuel

    2017-02-01

    In this work the aggregation behavior of Rumenic acid (RA) is presented for the first time. The results point to a c.m.c. of 35μM at pH 8 and 25°C. This behavior can be modified by introducing CDs into the system to encapsulate the RA. The encapsulation process presented a 1:1 stoichiometry in all the cases studied but the complexation constants were strongly dependent on the type of CDs used, the pH and temperature. Firstly, the effect of the type of CD on the encapsulation process was studied. Among the natural and modified CDs analyzed HPβCD was the best for encapsulating RA. The pKa determined for RA was 4.31. The KF showed different behavior below and above 25°C due to changes in the stoichiometry. Finally, molecular docking calculations provided further insights into how the different interactions influence the complexation constant.

  9. Metagenomic Analysis of the Rumen Microbiome of Steers with Wheat-Induced Frothy Bloat

    PubMed Central

    Pitta, D. W.; Pinchak, W. E.; Indugu, N.; Vecchiarelli, B.; Sinha, R.; Fulford, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    Frothy bloat is a serious metabolic disorder that affects stocker cattle grazing hard red winter wheat forage in the Southern Great Plains causing reduced performance, morbidity, and mortality. We hypothesize that a microbial dysbiosis develops in the rumen microbiome of stocker cattle when grazing on high quality winter wheat pasture that predisposes them to frothy bloat risk. In this study, rumen contents were harvested from six cannulated steers grazing hard red winter wheat (three with bloat score “2” and three with bloat score “0”), extracted for genomic DNA and subjected to 16S rDNA and shotgun sequencing on 454/Roche platform. Approximately 1.5 million reads were sequenced, assembled and assigned for phylogenetic and functional annotations. Bacteria predominated up to 84% of the sequences while archaea contributed to nearly 5% of the sequences. The abundance of archaea was higher in bloated animals (P < 0.05) and dominated by Methanobrevibacter. Predominant bacterial phyla were Firmicutes (65%), Actinobacteria (13%), Bacteroidetes (10%), and Proteobacteria (6%) across all samples. Genera from Firmicutes such as Clostridium, Eubacterium, and Butyrivibrio increased (P < 0.05) while Prevotella from Bacteroidetes decreased in bloated samples. Co-occurrence analysis revealed syntrophic associations between bacteria and archaea in non-bloated samples, however; such interactions faded in bloated samples. Functional annotations of assembled reads to Subsystems database revealed the abundance of several metabolic pathways, with carbohydrate and protein metabolism well represented. Assignment of contigs to CaZy database revealed a greater diversity of Glycosyl Hydrolases dominated by oligosaccharide breaking enzymes (>70%) in non-bloated samples. However, the abundance and diversity of CaZymes were greatly reduced in bloated samples indicating the disruption of carbohydrate metabolism. We conclude that mild to moderate frothy bloat results from tradeoffs both

  10. Effect of dietary concentrate on rumen fermentation, digestibility, and nitrogen losses in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Agle, M; Hristov, A N; Zaman, S; Schneider, C; Ndegwa, P M; Vaddella, V K

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this experiment was to investigate the effect of level of dietary concentrate on rumen fermentation, digestibility, and N losses in lactating dairy cows. The experiment was a replicated 3x3 Latin square design with 6 cows and 16-d adaptation periods. Ruminal contents were exchanged between cows at the beginning of each adaptation period. Data for 2 of the diets tested in this experiment are presented here. The diets contained (dry matter basis): 52% (LowC; control) and 72% (HighC) concentrate feeds. Crude protein contents of the diets were 16.5 and 16.4%, respectively. The HighC diet decreased ruminal pH and ammonia concentration and increased propionate concentration compared with LowC. Acetate:propionate ratio was greater for LowC than for HighC. Rumen methane production and microbial protein synthesis were unaffected by diet. Dry matter intake was similar among diets, but milk yield was increased by HighC compared with LowC (36.0 and 33.2 kg/d, respectively). Milk fat percentage and yield and total-tract apparent NDF digestibility were decreased by HighC compared with LowC. More ruminal ammonia N was transferred into milk protein with HighC than with LowC. Urinary N excretion, plasma urea N, and milk urea N concentration were not affected by diet. The ammonia emitting potential of manure was similar between LowC and HighC diets. Increased concentrate proportion in the diet of dairy cows resulted in reduced ruminal ammonia concentration and enhanced ammonia utilization for milk protein synthesis. These effects, however, did not result in reduced urinary N losses and only marginally improved milk N efficiency. Increasing dietary concentrate was not a successful strategy to mitigate enteric methane production and ammonia emissions from manure.

  11. Pectin induces an in vitro rumen microbial population shift attributed to the pectinolytic Treponema group.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Pu, Yi-Yi; Xie, Qian; Wang, Jia-Kun; Liu, Jian-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Pectin is a non-fiber carbohydrate (NFC) that exists in forages, but it is not clear how pectin exerts its effect on populations of either known microbial species or uncultured ruminal bacteria. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and real-time PCR analysis were used in the present study to investigate the effects of pectin on microbial communities in an in vitro rumen fermentation system. The fermentations were conducted using forage (corn stover or alfalfa), an NFC source (pectin or corn starch), or their combination as the substrates. Addition of pectin increased acetate (P < 0.05), whereas inclusion of starch increased butyrate production (P < 0.05). The pectate lyase activity was higher with alfalfa than with corn straw, or with pectin than with corn starch (P < 0.05), while the amylase activity was higher in corn starch-included treatments than the others (P < 0.05). The cluster analysis of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene showed that the DGGE banding patterns differed significantly between the treatments and led to the identification of three groups that were highly associated with the NFC sources. The specific bands associated with pectin-rich treatments were identified to be dominated by members of the Treponema genus. The growth of the Treponema genus was remarkably supported by the inclusion of pectin, highlighting their specific ability to degrade pectin. The results from the present study expand our knowledge of the microbial populations associated with pectin digestion, which may not only facilitate future research on utilization of pectin in feeds, but also improve our understanding of pectin digestion with respect to the rumen micro-ecosystem.

  12. Diet Assessment Based on Rumen Contents: A Comparison between DNA Metabarcoding and Macroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Ruth V.; Åkesson, Mikael; Kjellander, Petter

    2016-01-01

    Dietary choices are central to our understanding of ecology and evolution. Still, many aspects of food choice have been hampered by time consuming procedures and methodological problems. Faster and cheaper methods, such as DNA metabarcoding, have therefore been widely adopted. However, there is still very little empirical support that this new method is better and more accurate compared to the classic methods. Here, we compare DNA metabarcoding to macroscopic identifications of rumen contents in two species of wild free-ranging ungulates: roe deer and fallow deer. We found that the methods were comparable, but they did not completely overlap. Sometimes the DNA method failed to identify food items that were found macroscopically, and the opposite was also true. However, the total number of taxa identified increased using DNA compared to the macroscopic analysis. Moreover, the taxonomic precision of metabarcoding was substantially higher, with on average 90% of DNA-sequences being identified to genus or species level compared to 75% of plant fragments using macroscopy. In niche overlap analyses, presence/absence data showed that both methods came to very similar conclusions. When using the sequence count data and macroscopic weight, niche overlap was lower than when using presence-absence data yet tended to increase when using DNA compared to macroscopy. Nevertheless, the significant positive correlation between macroscopic quantity and number of DNA sequences counted from the same plant group give support for the use of metabarcoding to quantify plants in the rumen. This study thus shows that there is much to be gained by using metabarcoding to quantitatively assess diet composition compared to macroscopic analysis, including higher taxonomic precision, sensitivity and cost efficiency. PMID:27322387

  13. Effect of Gynosaponin on Rumen In vitro Methanogenesis under Different Forage-Concentrate Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Manatbay, Bakhetgul; Cheng, Yanfen; Mao, Shengyong; Zhu, Weiyun

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effects of gynosaponin on in vitro methanogenesis under different forage-concentrate ratios (F:C ratios). Experiment was conducted with two kinds of F:C ratios (F:C = 7:3 and F:C = 3:7) and gynosaponin addition (0 mg and 16 mg) in a 2×2 double factorial design. In the presence of gynosaponin, methane production and acetate concentration were significantly decreased, whereas concentration of propionate tended to be increased resulting in a significant reduction (p<0.05) of acetate:propionate ratio (A:P ratio), in high-forage substrate. Gynosaponin treatment increased (p<0.05) the butyrate concentration in both F:C ratios. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis showed there was no apparent shift in the composition of total bacteria, protozoa and methanogens after treated by gynosaponin under both F:C ratios. The real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis indicated that variable F:C ratios significantly affected the abundances of Fibrobacter succinogenes, Rumninococcus flavefaciens, total fungi and counts of protozoa (p<0.05), but did not affect the mcrA gene copies of methanogens and abundance of total bacteria. Counts of protozoa and abundance of F.succinogenes were decreased significantly (p<0.05), whereas mcrA gene copies of methanogens were decreased slightly (p<0.10) in high-forage substrate after treated by gynosaponin. However, gynosaponin treatment under high-concentrate level did not affect the methanogenesis, fermentation characteristics and tested microbes. Accordingly, overall results suggested that gynosaponin supplementation reduced the in vitro methanogenesis and improved rumen fermentation under high-forage condition by changing the abundances of related rumen microbes. PMID:25083102

  14. A vaccine against rumen methanogens can alter the composition of archaeal populations.

    PubMed

    Williams, Yvette J; Popovski, Sam; Rea, Suzanne M; Skillman, Lucy C; Toovey, Andrew F; Northwood, Korinne S; Wright, André-Denis G

    2009-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to formulate a vaccine based upon the different species/strains of methanogens present in sheep intended to be immunized and to determine if a targeted vaccine could be used to decrease the methane output of the sheep. Two 16S rRNA gene libraries were used to survey the methanogenic archaea in sheep prior to vaccination, and methanogens representing five phylotypes were found to account for >52% of the different species/strains of methanogens detected. A vaccine based on a mixture of these five methanogens was then formulated, and 32 sheep were vaccinated on days 0, 28, and 103 with either a control or the anti-methanogen vaccine. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis revealed that each vaccination with the anti-methanogen formulation resulted in higher specific immunoglobulin G titers in plasma, saliva, and rumen fluid. Methane output levels corrected for dry-matter intake for the control and treatment groups were not significantly different, and real-time PCR data also indicated that methanogen numbers were not significantly different for the two groups after the second vaccination. However, clone library data indicated that methanogen diversity was significantly greater in sheep receiving the anti-methanogen vaccine and that the vaccine may have altered the composition of the methanogen population. A correlation between 16S rRNA gene sequence relatedness and cross-reactivity for the methanogens (R(2) = 0.90) also exists, which suggests that a highly specific vaccine can be made to target specific strains of methanogens and that a more broad-spectrum approach is needed for success in the rumen. Our data also suggest that methanogens take longer than 4 weeks to adapt to dietary changes and call into question the validity of experimental results based upon a 2- to 4-week acclimatization period normally observed for bacteria.

  15. A Vaccine against Rumen Methanogens Can Alter the Composition of Archaeal Populations▿

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Yvette J.; Popovski, Sam; Rea, Suzanne M.; Skillman, Lucy C.; Toovey, Andrew F.; Northwood, Korinne S.; Wright, André-Denis G.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to formulate a vaccine based upon the different species/strains of methanogens present in sheep intended to be immunized and to determine if a targeted vaccine could be used to decrease the methane output of the sheep. Two 16S rRNA gene libraries were used to survey the methanogenic archaea in sheep prior to vaccination, and methanogens representing five phylotypes were found to account for >52% of the different species/strains of methanogens detected. A vaccine based on a mixture of these five methanogens was then formulated, and 32 sheep were vaccinated on days 0, 28, and 103 with either a control or the anti-methanogen vaccine. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis revealed that each vaccination with the anti-methanogen formulation resulted in higher specific immunoglobulin G titers in plasma, saliva, and rumen fluid. Methane output levels corrected for dry-matter intake for the control and treatment groups were not significantly different, and real-time PCR data also indicated that methanogen numbers were not significantly different for the two groups after the second vaccination. However, clone library data indicated that methanogen diversity was significantly greater in sheep receiving the anti-methanogen vaccine and that the vaccine may have altered the composition of the methanogen population. A correlation between 16S rRNA gene sequence relatedness and cross-reactivity for the methanogens (R2 = 0.90) also exists, which suggests that a highly specific vaccine can be made to target specific strains of methanogens and that a more broad-spectrum approach is needed for success in the rumen. Our data also suggest that methanogens take longer than 4 weeks to adapt to dietary changes and call into question the validity of experimental results based upon a 2- to 4-week acclimatization period normally observed for bacteria. PMID:19201957

  16. Bacterial communities in the rumen of Holstein heifers differ when fed orchardgrass as pasture vs. hay

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Riazuddin; Brink, Geoffrey E.; Stevenson, David M.; Neumann, Anthony P.; Beauchemin, Karen A.; Suen, Garret; Weimer, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    The rich and diverse microbiota of the rumen provides ruminant animals the capacity to utilize highly fibrous feedstuffs as their energy source, but there is surprisingly little information on the composition of the microbiome of ruminants fed all-forage diets, despite the importance of such agricultural production systems worldwide. In three 28-day periods, three ruminally-cannulated Holstein heifers sequentially grazed orchardgrass pasture (OP), then were fed orchardgrass hay (OH), then returned to OP. These heifers displayed greater shifts in ruminal bacterial community composition (determined by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis and by pyrotag sequencing of 16S rRNA genes) than did two other heifers maintained 84 d on the same OP. Phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes dominated all ruminal samples, and quantitative PCR indicated that members of the genus Prevotella averaged 23% of the 16S rRNA gene copies, well below levels previously reported with cows fed total mixed rations. Differences in bacterial community composition and ruminal volatile fatty acid (VFA) profiles were observed between the OP and OH despite similarities in gross chemical composition. Compared to OP, feeding OH increased the molar proportion of ruminal acetate (P = 0.02) and decreased the proportion of ruminal butyrate (P < 0.01), branched-chain VFA (P < 0.01) and the relative population size of the abundant genus Butyrivibrio (P < 0.001), as determined by pyrotag sequencing. Despite the low numbers of animals examined, the observed changes in VFA profile in the rumens of heifers on OP vs. OH are consistent with the shifts in Butyrivibrio abundance and its known physiology as a butyrate producer that ferments both carbohydrates and proteins. PMID:25538699

  17. Effect of feeding palm oil by-products based diets on total bacteria, cellulolytic bacteria and methanogenic archaea in the rumen of goats.

    PubMed

    Abubakr, Abdelrahim; Alimon, Abdul Razak; Yaakub, Halimatun; Abdullah, Norhani; Ivan, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Rumen microorganisms are responsible for digestion and utilization of dietary feeds by host ruminants. Unconventional feed resources could be used as alternatives in tropical areas where feed resources are insufficient in terms of quality and quantity. The objective of the present experiment was to evaluate the effect of diets based on palm oil (PO), decanter cake (DC) or palm kernel cake (PKC) on rumen total bacteria, selected cellulolytic bacteria, and methanogenic archaea. Four diets: control diet (CD), decanter cake diet (DCD), palm kernel cake diet (PKCD) and CD plus 5% PO diet (CPOD) were fed to rumen cannulated goats and rumen samples were collected at the start of the experimental diets (day 0) and on days 4, 6, 8, 12, 18, 24 and 30 post dietary treatments. Feeding DCD and PKCD resulted in significantly higher (P<0.05) DNA copy number of total bacteria, Fibrobacter succinogenes, Ruminococcus flavefeciens, and Ruminococcus albus. Rumen methanogenic archaea was significantly lower (P<0.05) in goats fed PKCD and CPOD and the trend showed a severe reduction on days 4 and 6 post experimental diets. In conclusion, results indicated that feeding DCD and PKC increased the populations of cellulolytic bacteria and decreased the density of methanogenic archaea in the rumen of goats.

  18. Effect of soaking in water and rumen digeta solutions on metabolizable energy content and chemical composition of barley seeds for use in poultry diet.

    PubMed

    Tabatabee, S N; Sadeghi, G H; Tabeidian, S A

    2007-03-15

    An experiment was carried out to evaluate the effect of soaking in water and different rumen digesta solutions on nutritional value of dry barley seeds. Treatments were included distilled water as control and rumen digesta that diluted with distilled water to obtain 20, 40 and 60% digesta solutions. Solutions have added to 10 kg of barley seed samples to achieve final 30% moisture content. After 21 days the chemical composition and energy content of barley seed were determined. Gross energy of barley seeds did not affected by different experimental treatments. Use of 20% rumen digesta solution resulted to a significant (p<0.01) increase in AME and AMEn content of barley seeds. Barley seed that treated with 40% of rumen digesta solution had highest TME and TMEn content and its different from seeds that treated with 60 and 100% rumen digesta solutions was significant (p<0.05). The chemical composition such as dry matter, crud protein, crude fat, crud fiber, ash and NFE were found to be similar and there was no significant difference. However, soaking in rumen digesta solutions increased crud protein, ether extract, crude fiber and ash content of barley seeds numerically.

  19. Effects of grass hay proportion in a corn silage-based diet on rumen digesta kinetics and digestibility in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Win, Kyaw San; Ueda, Koichiro; Kondo, Seiji

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of six levels of orchardgrass hay (GH) proportion (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% or 50% of dry matter) in finely chopped corn silage (CS)-based diets on digesta kinetics of CS and GH in the rumen. Six non-lactating, rumen-cannulated Holstein cows were used in a 6 × 6 Latin square design. Ruminal digesta kinetics was measured by ruminal dosing of feed particle markers (dysprosium for CS, erbium for GH) followed by fecal sampling. The increase of GH proportion had a quadratic effect (P < 0.01) on total tract digestibility of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and acid detergent fiber. The proportion of GH did not affect the particle size distribution of rumen digesta, total weight of dry matter or NDF in the rumen. The rates of large particle size reduction in the rumen for CS tended to increase linearly with increasing GH proportion (P = 0.077). A quadratic effect (P < 0.05) was found with increasing the GH proportion for the ruminal passage rate of small GH particles, but not for CS particles. The results suggested that associative effects between CS and GH could be generated on rumen digesta kinetics when cows were fed a CS-based diet with an increased proportion of GH.

  20. Effects of inclusion levels of banana (Musa spp.) peelings on feed degradability and rumen environment of cattle fed basal elephant grass.

    PubMed

    Nambi-Kasozi, Justine; Sabiiti, Elly Nyambobo; Bareeba, Felix Budara; Sporndly, Eva; Kabi, Fred

    2016-04-01

    The effect of feeding varying banana peeling (BP) levels on rumen environment and feed degradation characteristics was evaluated using three rumen fistulated steers in four treatments. The steers were fed BP at 0, 20, 40, and 60% levels of the daily ration with basal elephant grass (EG) to constitute four diets. Maize bran, cotton seed cake, and Gliricidia sepium were offered to make the diets iso-nitrogenous. The nylon bag technique was used to measure BP and EG dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP), and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) degradabilities at 0, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h. Rumen fluid samples were collected to determine pH and volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations. Effective DM, CP, and NDF degradabilities of BP ranged between 574 and 807, 629-802, and 527-689 g/kg, respectively, being lower at higher BP levels. Elephant grass degradability behaved similarly with relatively high effective CP degradability (548-569 g/kg) but low effective DM and NDF degradability (381-403 and 336-373 g/kg, respectively). Rumen pH and VFA reduced with increasing BP in the diets. Rumen pH dropped to 5.8 and 5.9 at the 40 and 60% BP feeding levels, respectively. Banana peelings were better degraded than EG but higher BP levels negatively affected feed degradability and rumen environment.

  1. Selection of internal reference genes for normalization of reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis in the rumen epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Die, Jose V.; Rowland, Lisa J.; Li, Robert; Oh, Sunghee; Li, Congjun; Connor, Erin E.; Ranilla, Maria-Jose

    2017-01-01

    The rumen is lined on the luminal side by a stratified squamous epithelium that is responsible for not only absorption, but also transport, extensive short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) metabolism and protection. Butyrate has been demonstrated to initiate the differentiation of the tissue following introduction of solid feed to the weaning neonate as well as affecting the metabolism of other nutrients and absorption of nutrients in in vitro experiments. The objective of the present study was to validate expression stability of eight putative reference genes bovine rumen, considering the intrinsic heterogeneity of bovine rumen with regard to different luminal characteristics due to direct infusion of butyrate to double the intra-ruminal content of the rumen liquor. Our focus was on identifying stable reference genes which are suitable to normalize real-time RT-qPCR experiments from rumen samples collected from clinical assays, irrespective of localization within the organ and the across physiological state. The most stably expressed genes included: ACTB, UXT, DBNDD2, RPS9, DDX54 and HMBS. Their high stability values suggest these reference genes will facilitate better evaluation of variation of across an array of conditions including: localization within the rumen, differences among cattle fed an array of rations, as well as response to development in the weaning animal. Moreover, we anticipate these reference genes may be useful for expression studies in other ruminants. PMID:28234977

  2. Effect of Feeding Palm Oil By-Products Based Diets on Total Bacteria, Cellulolytic Bacteria and Methanogenic Archaea in the Rumen of Goats

    PubMed Central

    Abubakr, Abdelrahim; Alimon, Abdul Razak; Yaakub, Halimatun; Abdullah, Norhani; Ivan, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Rumen microorganisms are responsible for digestion and utilization of dietary feeds by host ruminants. Unconventional feed resources could be used as alternatives in tropical areas where feed resources are insufficient in terms of quality and quantity. The objective of the present experiment was to evaluate the effect of diets based on palm oil (PO), decanter cake (DC) or palm kernel cake (PKC) on rumen total bacteria, selected cellulolytic bacteria, and methanogenic archaea. Four diets: control diet (CD), decanter cake diet (DCD), palm kernel cake diet (PKCD) and CD plus 5% PO diet (CPOD) were fed to rumen cannulated goats and rumen samples were collected at the start of the experimental diets (day 0) and on days 4, 6, 8, 12, 18, 24 and 30 post dietary treatments. Feeding DCD and PKCD resulted in significantly higher (P<0.05) DNA copy number of total bacteria, Fibrobacter succinogenes, Ruminococcus flavefeciens, and Ruminococcus albus. Rumen methanogenic archaea was significantly lower (P<0.05) in goats fed PKCD and CPOD and the trend showed a severe reduction on days 4 and 6 post experimental diets. In conclusion, results indicated that feeding DCD and PKC increased the populations of cellulolytic bacteria and decreased the density of methanogenic archaea in the rumen of goats. PMID:24756125

  3. Effect of intake on fasting heat production, respiratory quotient and plasma metabolites measured using the washed rumen technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, D H; McLeod, K R; Koontz, A F; Foote, A P; Klotz, J L; Harmon, D L

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the effect of intake before fasting on concentrations of metabolites and hormones, respiratory quotient (RQ) and fasting heat production (HP) using the washed rumen technique and to compare these values with those from the fed state. Six Holstein steers (360±22 kg) were maintained at 21°C and fed three different energy intakes within a replicated 3×3 Latin square design with 21-day periods. Steers were fed alfalfa cubes to provide 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0×NEm during 19 days of each experimental period. Steers were placed in individual metabolism stalls fitted with indirect calorimetry head-boxes on day 20 of each experimental period (FED steers) and fed their normal meal. On day 21 of each period the reticulorumen was emptied, washed and refilled with ruminal buffer (NaCl=96; NaHCO3=24; KHCO3=30; K2HPO4=2; CaCl2=1.5; MgCl2=1.5 mmol/kg of buffer) aerated with 75% N2 and 25% CO2 before introduction to the rumen (steers were not fed; WASHED steers). Each gas exchange was measured over 24 h. HP for 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0×NEm were 479, 597 and 714 kJ/daykg0.75 (s.e.m. =16), respectively. The plateau RQ was 0.756, 0.824 and 0.860 for the 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0×NEm intakes for the FED steers, respectively. After rumen washing, fasting HP was 331, 359 and 400 kJ/daykg0.75 (s.e.m.=13) for 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0×NEm intakes before fasting, respectively. The RQ for WASHED rumen steers was 0.717, 0.710 and 0.719, respectively. Cortisol and β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations in WASHED rumen steers did not exceed threshold levels for severe energy deficit and stress as can be induced from prolonged fasting. This study demonstrates that a fasting state can be emulated using the washed rumen technique, minimizing the time required as opposed to traditional fasting methodologies, without causing a severe energy deficit and stress.

  4. Effect of pH buffering capacity and sources of dietary sulfur on rumen fermentation, sulfide production, methane production, sulfate reducing bacteria, and total Archaea in in vitro rumen cultures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Meng, Qingxiang; Yu, Zhongtang

    2015-06-01

    The effects of three types of dietary sulfur on in vitro fermentation characteristics, sulfide production, methane production, and microbial populations at two different buffer capacities were examined using in vitro rumen cultures. Addition of dry distilled grain with soluble (DDGS) generally decreased total gas production, degradation of dry matter and neutral detergent fiber, and concentration of total volatile fatty acids, while increasing ammonia concentration. High buffering capacity alleviated these adverse effects on fermentation. Increased sulfur content resulted in decreased methane emission, but total Archaea population was not changed significantly. The population of sulfate reducing bacteria was increased in a sulfur type-dependent manner. These results suggest that types of dietary sulfur and buffering capacity can affect rumen fermentation and sulfide production. Diet buffering capacity, and probably alkalinity, may be increased to alleviate some of the adverse effects associated with feeding DDGS at high levels.

  5. Rumen microbial community composition varies with diet and host, but a core microbiome is found across a wide geographical range.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Gemma; Cox, Faith; Ganesh, Siva; Jonker, Arjan; Young, Wayne; Janssen, Peter H

    2015-10-09

    Ruminant livestock are important sources of human food and global greenhouse gas emissions. Feed degradation and methane formation by ruminants rely on metabolic interactions between rumen microbes and affect ruminant productivity. Rumen and camelid foregut microbial community composition was determined in 742 samples from 32 animal species and 35 countries, to estimate if this was influenced by diet, host species, or geography. Similar bacteria and archaea dominated in nearly all samples, while protozoal communities were more variable. The dominant bacteria are poorly characterised, but the methanogenic archaea are better known and highly conserved across the world. This universality and limited diversity could make it possible to mitigate methane emissions by developing strategies that target the few dominant methanogens. Differences in microbial community compositions were predominantly attributable to diet, with the host being less influential. There were few strong co-occurrence patterns between microbes, suggesting that major metabolic interactions are non-selective rather than specific.

  6. Rumen microbial community composition varies with diet and host, but a core microbiome is found across a wide geographical range

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Gemma; Cox, Faith; Ganesh, Siva; Jonker, Arjan; Young, Wayne; Abecia, Leticia; Angarita, Erika; Aravena, Paula; Nora Arenas, Graciela; Ariza, Claudia; Attwood, Graeme T.; Mauricio Avila, Jose; Avila-Stagno, Jorge; Bannink, André; Barahona, Rolando; Batistotti, Mariano; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Brown-Kav, Aya; Carvajal, Andres M.; Cersosimo, Laura; Vieira Chaves, Alexandre; Church, John; Clipson, Nicholas; Cobos-Peralta, Mario A.; Cookson, Adrian L.; Cravero, Silvio; Cristobal Carballo, Omar; Crosley, Katie; Cruz, Gustavo; Cerón Cucchi, María; de la Barra, Rodrigo; De Menezes, Alexandre B.; Detmann, Edenio; Dieho, Kasper; Dijkstra, Jan; dos Reis, William L. S.; Dugan, Mike E. R.; Hadi Ebrahimi, Seyed; Eythórsdóttir, Emma; Nde Fon, Fabian; Fraga, Martín; Franco, Francisco; Friedeman, Chris; Fukuma, Naoki; Gagić, Dragana; Gangnat, Isabelle; Javier Grilli, Diego; Guan, Le Luo; Heidarian Miri, Vahideh; Hernandez-Sanabria, Emma; Gomez, Alma Ximena Ibarra; Isah, Olubukola A.; Ishaq, Suzanne; Jami, Elie; Jelincic, Juan; Kantanen, Juha; Kelly, William J.; Kim, Seon-Ho; Klieve, Athol; Kobayashi, Yasuo; Koike, Satoshi; Kopecny, Jan; Nygaard Kristensen, Torsten; Julie Krizsan, Sophie; LaChance, Hannah; Lachman, Medora; Lamberson, William R.; Lambie, Suzanne; Lassen, Jan; Leahy, Sinead C.; Lee, Sang-Suk; Leiber, Florian; Lewis, Eva; Lin, Bo; Lira, Raúl; Lund, Peter; Macipe, Edgar; Mamuad, Lovelia L.; Cuquetto Mantovani, Hilário; Marcoppido, Gisela Ariana; Márquez, Cristian; Martin, Cécile; Martinez, Gonzalo; Eugenia Martinez, Maria; Lucía Mayorga, Olga; McAllister, Tim A.; McSweeney, Chris; Mestre, Lorena; Minnee, Elena; Mitsumori, Makoto; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Molina, Isabel; Muenger, Andreas; Munoz, Camila; Murovec, Bostjan; Newbold, John; Nsereko, Victor; O’Donovan, Michael; Okunade, Sunday; O’Neill, Brendan; Ospina, Sonia; Ouwerkerk, Diane; Parra, Diana; Pereira, Luiz Gustavo Ribeiro; Pinares-Patino, Cesar; Pope, Phil B.; Poulsen, Morten; Rodehutscord, Markus; Rodriguez, Tatiana; Saito, Kunihiko; Sales, Francisco; Sauer, Catherine; Shingfield, Kevin; Shoji, Noriaki; Simunek, Jiri; Stojanović-Radić, Zorica; Stres, Blaz; Sun, Xuezhao; Swartz, Jeffery; Liang Tan, Zhi; Tapio, Ilma; Taxis, Tasia M.; Tomkins, Nigel; Ungerfeld, Emilio; Valizadeh, Reza; van Adrichem, Peter; Van Hamme, Jonathan; Van Hoven, Woulter; Waghorn, Garry; John Wallace, R.; Wang, Min; Waters, Sinéad M.; Keogh, Kate; Witzig, Maren; Wright, Andre-Denis G.; Yamano, Hidehisa; Yan, Tianhai; Yanez-Ruiz, David R.; Yeoman, Carl J.; Zambrano, Ricardo; Zeitz, Johanna; Zhou, Mi; Wei Zhou, Hua; Xia Zou, Cai; Zunino, Pablo; Janssen, Peter H.

    2015-01-01

    Ruminant livestock are important sources of human food and global greenhouse gas emissions. Feed degradation and methane formation by ruminants rely on metabolic interactions between rumen microbes and affect ruminant productivity. Rumen and camelid foregut microbial community composition was determined in 742 samples from 32 animal species and 35 countries, to estimate if this was influenced by diet, host species, or geography. Similar bacteria and archaea dominated in nearly all samples, while protozoal communities were more variable. The dominant bacteria are poorly characterised, but the methanogenic archaea are better known and highly conserved across the world. This universality and limited diversity could make it possible to mitigate methane emissions by developing strategies that target the few dominant methanogens. Differences in microbial community compositions were predominantly attributable to diet, with the host being less influential. There were few strong co-occurrence patterns between microbes, suggesting that major metabolic interactions are non-selective rather than specific. PMID:26449758

  7. Lotus corniculatus condensed tannins decrease in vivo populations of proteolytic bacteria and affect nitrogen metabolism in the rumen of sheep.

    PubMed

    Min, B R; Attwood, G T; Reilly, K; Sun, W; Peters, J S; Barry, T N; McNabb, W C

    2002-10-01

    Condensed tannins in forage legumes improve the nutrition of sheep by reducing ruminal degradation of plant protein and increasing crude protein flow to the intestine. However, the effects of condensed tannins in forage legumes on rumen bacterial populations in vivo are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the specific effects of condensed tannins from Lotus corniculatus on four proteolytic rumen bacteria in sheep during and after transition from a ryegrass (Lolium perenne)-white clover (Trifolium repens) diet (i.e., low condensed tannins) to a Lotus corniculatus diet (i.e., higher condensed tannins). The bacterial populations were quantified using a competitive polymerase chain reaction. Lotus corniculatus was fed with or without ruminal infusions of polyethylene glycol (PEG), which binds to and inactivates condensed tannins, enabling the effect of condensed tannins on bacterial populations to be examined. When sheep fed on ryegrass-white clover, populations of Clostridium proteoclasticum B316T, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens C211a, Eubacterium sp. C12b, and Streptococcus bovis B315 were 1.5 x 10(8), 1.1 x 10(6), 4.6 x 10(8), and 7.1 x 10(6) mL(-1), respectively. When the diet was changed to Lotus corniculatus, the average populations (after 8-120 h) of C. proteoclasticum, B. fibrisolvens, Eubacterium sp., and S. bovis decreased (P < 0.001) to 2.4 x 10(7), 1.1 x 10(5), 1.1 x 10(8), and 2.5 x 10(5) mL(-1), respectively. When PEG was infused into the rumen of sheep fed Lotus corniculatus, the populations of C. proteoclasticum, B. fibrisolvens, Eubacterium sp., and S. bovis were higher (P < 0.01-0.001) than in sheep fed Lotus corniculatus without the PEG infusion, with average populations (after 8-120 h) of 4.9 x 10(7), 3.8 x 10(5), 1.9 x 10(8), and 1.0 x 10(6), respectively. Sheep fed the Lotus corniculatus diet had lower rumen proteinase activity, ammonia, and soluble nitrogen (P < 0.05-0.001) than sheep that were fed Lotus corniculatus plus PEG

  8. Determination of main components and anaerobic rumen digestibility of aquatic plants in vitro using near-infrared-reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yue, Zheng-Bo; Zhang, Meng-Lin; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Liu, Rong-Hua; Long, Ying; Xiang, Bing-Ren; Wang, Jin; Yu, Han-Qing

    2010-04-01

    A near-infrared-reflectance (NIR) spectroscopy-based method is established to determine the main components of aquatic plants as well as their anaerobic rumen biodegradability. The developed method is more rapid and accurate compared to the conventional chemical analysis and biodegradability tests. Moisture, volatile solid, Klason lignin and ash in entire aquatic plants could be accurately predicted using this method with coefficient of determination (r(2)) values of 0.952, 0.916, 0.939 and 0.950, respectively. In addition, the anaerobic rumen biodegradability of aquatic plants, represented as biogas and methane yields, could also be predicted well. The algorithm of continuous wavelet transform for the NIR spectral data pretreatment is able to greatly enhance the robustness and predictive ability of the NIR spectral analysis. These results indicate that NIR spectroscopy could be used to predict the main components of aquatic plants and their anaerobic biodegradability.

  9. Technical note: Three-dimensional imaging of rumen tissue for morphometric analysis using micro-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Steele, M A; Garcia, F; Lowerison, M; Gordon, K; Metcalf, J A; Hurtig, M

    2014-12-01

    Rumen development in calves has been evaluated by measuring papillae length, width, and density using microscopy for over 50 yr. Although common in the literature, disadvantages to this method exist, such as large variations in rumen papillae size and shape, small numbers of total papillae being measured, and the time required. The objective of this study was to develop a more effective technique for assessing rumen papillae using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and to compare this technique with microscopy. Rumen tissue was collected from the ventral sac of 20 postweaned bull calves at 55 d of age, immediately fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin for 48 h, and stored in 70% ethanol at 4°C before the contrast enhancement. After evaluation of contrast-enhancement protocols, it was determined that mercury chloride provided the most pronounced contrast for accurate micro-CT imaging based on relative density of the papillae. A 1-cm(2) tissue section from the ventral sac of all bull calves was tensioned on a rapid prototyped curved plastic holder and imaged at 4 5 μm resolution for 56 min using a GE Locus Explore micro-CT (General Electric, Milwaukee, WI). MicroView V2.2 software (General Electric) was used to create a 3-dimensional virtual model of the entire sample. The length and width of papillae were measured 3-dimensionally and compared with measurements of papillae under the light microscope taken from the same region. The length and width measurements using micro-CT (2.47 ± 0.12 and 0.55 ± 0.01 mm) compared with light microscope (2.96 ± 0.03 and 0.86 ± 0.01 mm) were significantly smaller. The difference may reflect a more accurate determination in the base of the rumen tissue with micro-CT or the specificity of mercury chloride to bind only to intact rumen tissue. The mean number of papillae per centimeter squared viewed using micro-CT was 128.5 ± 33.9 with a total surface area of 681.8 ± 112.4 mm(2) and volume of 156 mm(3) per sample. Micro

  10. Artificial polarization components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cescato, L.; Gluch, Ekkehard; Stork, Wilhelm; Streibl, Norbert

    1990-07-01

    High frequency surface relief structures are optically anisotropic and show interesting polarisation properties 1 . These properties can be used to produce polarizations components such as wave plates polarizers. polarizing beamsplitters etc. Our experimental results show that even gratings with relatively low spatial frequency ( periods A ) exhibit a strong phase retardation and can be used as quarter-wave plates. k INTRODUC11ON The artificial birefringence exhibited by ultrahigh frequency gratings of dielectric materials can be used to produce various polarization components2 . Such components have applications in integrated optics as well as in free space optics. In order to produce the high spatial frequencies complex processes such as electron-beam lithography and reactive ion etching are needed. We show in this paper that sinusoidal holographic gratings in photoresist exhibit also a strong phase ret even at relatively long periods. L EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENTS To obtain the phase retardation of a lower frequency ( period A ) grating a simple setup as used by Enger and 2 can be applied. In our case however there are three measurements necessary to obtain the phase retardation because transmission of the two perpendicularly polarized beams is different from each other. I GRATING PRODUCTION grating 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 period (pmj 0. 74 0. 74 0. 61 0. 54 0. 46 0. 32 0. 54 0. 54 0. 54 ne (sec) 60

  11. Artificial dexterous hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An artificial dexterous hand is provided for conformally engaging and manipulating objects. The hand includes an articulated digit which is connected to an engagement sub-assembly and has a first shape adaption mechanism associated with it. The digit has a digit base and first and second phalanges. The digit base is operatively interconnected to the first phalange by a base joint having a base pulley. The phalanges are operatively interconnected by a separate first phalange joint having a first phalange pulley. The engagement sub-assembly includes a tendon, which is received by the base pulley and by the first phalange pulley, and an actuation device for selectively tensioning the tendon. The first shape adaption mechanism is responsive to and receives the tendon. It is also situated between the base joint and the first phalange joint and is connected to the first phalange. Upon actuation by the actuation device, the phalanges are caused to pivot relative to the base joint and the second phalange is caused to pivot relative to the first phalange. At the same time, the first shape adaption mechanism controls the sequence of the aforementioned pivoting of the phalanges through application of braking force to the tendon.

  12. Artificial dexterous hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An artificial dexterous hand is provided for grasping and manipulating objects. The hand includes left and right thumbs that are operatively connected to an engagement assembly which causes movement of the left and right thumbs. The left thumb has a left thumb base and is movable about three separate first left thumb axes which run through the left thumb base. Correspondingly, the right thumb has a right thumb base and is movable about three separate first right thumb axes which run through the right thumb base. The engagement assembly has a gear assembly which is operatively connected to a motor assembly. Upon actuation by the motor assembly, the gear assembly causes movement of the left and right thumbs about the first left thumb axes and first right thumb axes respectively. The hand can also have a center finger which is operatively connected to the engagement assembly and which is interposed between the left and right thumbs. The finger has a finger base and is movable about two separate first finger axes running through the finger base. Therefore, upon actuation by the motor assembly, the gear assembly will also cause movement of the finger about the first finger axes.

  13. Artificial intelligence in medicine.

    PubMed

    Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne

    2017-04-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a general term that implies the use of a computer to model intelligent behavior with minimal human intervention. AI is generally accepted as having started with the invention of robots. The term derives from the Czech word robota, meaning biosynthetic machines used as forced labor. In this field, Leonardo Da Vinci's lasting heritage is today's burgeoning use of robotic-assisted surgery, named after him, for complex urologic and gynecologic procedures. Da Vinci's sketchbooks of robots helped set the stage for this innovation. AI, described as the science and engineering of making intelligent machines, was officially born in 1956. The term is applicable to a broad range of items in medicine such as robotics, medical diagnosis, medical statistics, and human biology-up to and including today's "omics". AI in medicine, which is the focus of this review, has two main branches: virtual and physical. The virtual branch includes informatics approaches from deep learning information management to control of health management systems, including electronic health records, and active guidance of physicians in their treatment decisions. The physical branch is best represented by robots used to assist the elderly patient or the attending surgeon. Also embodied in this branch are targeted nanorobots, a unique new drug delivery system. The societal and ethical complexities of these applications require further reflection, proof of their medical utility, economic value, and development of interdisciplinary strategies for their wider application.

  14. Programmable artificial phototactic microswimmer.

    PubMed

    Dai, Baohu; Wang, Jizhuang; Xiong, Ze; Zhan, Xiaojun; Dai, Wei; Li, Chien-Cheng; Feng, Shien-Ping; Tang, Jinyao

    2016-12-01

    Phototaxis is commonly observed in motile photosynthetic microorganisms. For example, green algae are capable of swimming towards a light source (positive phototaxis) to receive more energy for photosynthesis, or away from a light source (negative phototaxis) to avoid radiation damage or to hide from predators. Recently, with the aim of applying nanoscale machinery to biomedical applications, various inorganic nanomotors based on different propulsion mechanisms have been demonstrated. The only method to control the direction of motion of these self-propelled micro/nanomotors is to incorporate a ferromagnetic material into their structure and use an external magnetic field for steering. Here, we show an artificial microswimmer that can sense and orient to the illumination direction of an external light source. Our microswimmer is a Janus nanotree containing a nanostructured photocathode and photoanode at opposite ends that release cations and anions, respectively, propelling the microswimmer by self-electrophoresis. Using chemical modifications, we can control the zeta potential of the photoanode and program the microswimmer to exhibit either positive or negative phototaxis. Finally, we show that a school of microswimmers mimics the collective phototactic behaviour of green algae in solution.

  15. Programmable artificial phototactic microswimmer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Baohu; Wang, Jizhuang; Xiong, Ze; Zhan, Xiaojun; Dai, Wei; Li, Chien-Cheng; Feng, Shien-Ping; Tang, Jinyao

    2016-12-01

    Phototaxis is commonly observed in motile photosynthetic microorganisms. For example, green algae are capable of swimming towards a light source (positive phototaxis) to receive more energy for photosynthesis, or away from a light source (negative phototaxis) to avoid radiation damage or to hide from predators. Recently, with the aim of applying nanoscale machinery to biomedical applications, various inorganic nanomotors based on different propulsion mechanisms have been demonstrated. The only method to control the direction of motion of these self-propelled micro/nanomotors is to incorporate a ferromagnetic material into their structure and use an external magnetic field for steering. Here, we show an artificial microswimmer that can sense and orient to the illumination direction of an external light source. Our microswimmer is a Janus nanotree containing a nanostructured photocathode and photoanode at opposite ends that release cations and anions, respectively, propelling the microswimmer by self-electrophoresis. Using chemical modifications, we can control the zeta potential of the photoanode and program the microswimmer to exhibit either positive or negative phototaxis. Finally, we show that a school of microswimmers mimics the collective phototactic behaviour of green algae in solution.

  16. Influence of different periods of exposure to hot environment on rumen function and diet digestibility in sheep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabucci, U.; Lacetera, N.; Danieli, P. P.; Bani, P.; Nardone, A.; Ronchi, B.

    2009-09-01

    Effects of different periods of exposure to hot environments on rumen function, diet digestibility and digesta passage rate were studied in four adult not-pregnant Sardinian ewes housed in a climatic chamber. The ewes were kept in individual metabolic cages. The trial lasted 83 days; 17 days were spent under thermal comfort conditions (TC) [temperature-humidity index (THI) = 65.0 ± 2.0], followed by 49 days under elevated THI (ETHI: THI = 82.0 ± 2.5) and 17 days under thermal comfort (TC; THI = 65.0 ± 1.0). Five digestibility and passage rate trials were carried out during the 83 days. Trials 1 and 5 were carried out under TC; trials 2, 3 and 4 were carried out under ETHI. Values of rectal temperatures (39.7 ± 0.3°C) and respiratory rate (118.4 ± 31.8 breaths/min) indicated that sheep under ETHI were heat-stressed. Heat stress caused an increase ( P < 0.01) in water intake, and reductions ( P < 0.05) in dry matter intake, rumen pH, rumen cellulolytic and amylolytic bacteria count, rumen osmolarity, organic matter, dry matter, neutral detergent fibre, acid detergent fibre and non-structural carbohydrates digestibility coefficients, and a reduction of digesta passage rates. Under ETHI, diet digestibility and passage rate of digesta were reduced in a time-dependent fashion. Variation of diet digestibility under ETHI was not related to passage rate of digesta and feed intake. Reduction of cellulolytic and amylolytic bacteria and the adaptive response to hot environment seem to be related to alteration of digestibility observed in ewes chronically exposed to hot environment.

  17. Biochemical characterization of cellulose-binding proteins (CBPA and CBPB) from the rumen cellulolytic bacterium Eubacterium cellulosolvens 5.

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Miho; Toyoda, Atsushi; Onizawa, Naoki; Nakamura, Yutaka; Minato, Hajime

    2007-10-01

    The cellulose-binding proteins, CBPA and CBPB, of rumen cellulolytic bacterium Eubacterium cellulosolvens 5 were biochemically characterized, and their properties were compared. Recombinant CBPA and CBPB were a typical 1,4-beta-endoglucanase. Both proteins bound to insoluble polysaccharides such as Avicel cellulose, acid swollen cellulose, lichenan, chitin, and oat spelt xylan. On the other hand, only recombinant CBPB bound to agarose and starch.

  18. Forage and sugar in dairy calves' starter diet and their interaction on performance, weaning age and rumen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Beiranvand, H; Ghorbani, G R; Khorvash, M; Kazemi-Bonchenari, M

    2014-06-01

    The effects of sugar and forage inclusion in calves' starter and their interaction on animal performance and rumen fermentation parameters were investigated. Twenty-eight neonatal Holstein male calves 3 days of age with average body weights of 42 ± 4 kg were allocated to four different treatments. All calves were fed a similar basal diet consisting of milk and concentrate. The experimental treatments were: (i) basal diet with no supplementation (Control, hereafter designated by C), (ii) basal diet plus 5% granular sugar cane (Sugar, designated by S), (iii) basal diet plus 5% forage (Forage, designated by F) and (iv) basal diet plus 5% forage with 5% granular sugar cane (F × S). Supplement ingredients were used on a dry matter (DM) basis. Rumen fluid parameters were measured twice on days 35 and 70 of the study period. The calves were weaned when they could consume 1 kg of starter for three consecutive days. The results show that starter intake was not affected by treatment; however, the lowest ADG was observed with calves in the sugar treatment. Weaning age was affected by treatments, and forage showed to reduce milk consumption period down to its shortest. Forage-sugar interaction was found to have no effects on animal performance. The structural body indices as well as the health status of the calves were similar in different treatments. Rumen pH did not differ among the treatment groups. Among the rumen parameters, total VFA concentration and molar proportions of butyrate and propionate did not exhibit any significant differences among the treatments. However, ruminal acetate concentration decreased in calves that fed sugar cane during the early weeks of the study period. Comparison of forage and sugar included in the starter diets revealed that forage reduced weaning age, while sugar cane had a negative effect on calves' performance.

  19. The effect of rumen adaptation to oxalic acid on selection of oxalic-acid-rich plants by goats.

    PubMed

    Duncan, A J; Frutos, P; Young, S A

    2000-01-01

    Rumen microbial degradation is an important route for detoxification of secondary plant compounds encountered in the diets of free-grazing ruminants. Exposure to diets containing particular secondary plant compounds can lead to increased rates of secondary compound degradation in the rumen. An experiment was conducted to determine whether rumen adaptation to oxalic acid would influence the diet selection of goats offered choices between plant species differing in their oxalic acid content. Twelve adult female goats were divided into two groups of six animals each. One group received a daily oral dose, in gelatin capsules, of 0.6 mmol oxalic acid/kg live weight per d throughout the experiment while the other group received placebos consisting of empty gelatin capsules. After an adaptation period of 8 d, the animals were allowed to graze a mixture of spinach (rich in oxalic acid) and cabbage (low in oxalic acid) for 7 h/d on two consecutive days per week during four consecutive 1-week periods. Intervening days were spent on grass pasture. Diet composition and intake were measured using cuticular wax n-alkanes as internal markers. Results showed that adapted goats included a higher proportion of spinach in their diet (P < 0.05) although absolute intakes of spinach were the same for the two groups. Goats in the oxalic-acid-adapted group consumed less cabbage than control animals (P < 0.05) suggesting that adaptation to oxalic acid at the rumen level may have interfered with detoxification of cabbage-derived secondary plant compounds. Voluntary intake increased progressively through the four experimental periods (P < 0.001) with a tendency for higher intakes among control than among adapted animals (P < 0.1). The experiment demonstrates how differences in the rate of degradation of secondary plant compounds may influence diet selection in ruminants.

  20. Isolation, characterization, and in vitro evaluation of bovine rumen submucosa films of collagen or chitosan-treated collagen.

    PubMed

    Gopal Shankar, K; Udhaya Kumar, S; Sowndarya, S; Suresh Babu, P; Rose, C

    2016-01-01

    Bovine rumen is hitherto considered as an inedible waste of meat industry. The rumen tissues can be used as an alternative source of collagen to produce biocompatible materials for clinical application. In an effort to develop a functional biomaterial from the inedible mammalian tissues, this study aims to isolate and characterize bovine rumen submucosa. Initially, the rumen tissue was sequentially processed using chemical and enzymatic treatment to decellularize, neutralize, stabilize, and to produce a native collagen matrix which is referred as collagen film (COL-F). Thus, prepared matrix was treated with 1% (w/v) chitosan solution to produce a hybrid film which is referred as collagen-chitosan film (COL/CS-F). The comparative study includes the evaluation of physical, chemical, and biological properties of the biofilms prepared. The surface topology of COL-F exhibited a continuous collagenous network with fibrous nature, while the chitosan treatment provided smooth plain surface to the parent film. Incorporation of chitosan in COL-F increased the tensile properties, as well as the thermal stability and durability of the films. The Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy results revealed the presence of respective amide peaks, which corresponds to protein (collagen), and the evidence of collagen-chitosan interlinking. The submucosa layer was electrophoretically found to have type I collagen. The X-ray diffraction data showed the presence of amorphous and crystalline peak which attributes to the triple helical structure of collagen in the films. Cytotoxicity studies on the films were performed in vitro using human keratinocytes. The results of cell viability and proliferation demonstrated that COL-F and COL/CS-F exhibit good biocompatibility and therefore can augment cell infiltration and proliferation. However, enhanced cellular activity was observed on the chitosan treated COL-F. These observations demonstrate that the biofilms prepared in this study can be

  1. Comparison of Microbiological and Probiotic Characteristics of Lactobacilli Isolates from Dairy Food Products and Animal Rumen Contents

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Neethu Maria; Bunt, Craig R.; Hussain, Malik Altaf

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacilli are employed in probiotic food preparations and as feed additives in poultry and livestock, due to health benefits associated with their consumption. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the probiotic potential of ten lactobacilli strains isolated from commercial dairy food products and animal rumen contents in New Zealand. Genetic identification of the isolates revealed that all belonged to the genus Lactobacillus, specifically the species L. reuteri, L. rhamnosus and L. plantarum. All isolates did not show any haemolytic behaviour. Isolates of dairy origin showed better tolerance to low pH stress. On the other hand, rumen isolates exhibited a higher tolerance to presence of bile salts. All isolates exhibited resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics, however most were sensitive to ampicillin. Isolates of rumen origin demonstrated a higher inhibitory effect on Listeria monocytogenes, Enterobacter aerogenes and Salmonella menston. Bacterial adherence of all isolates increased with a decrease in pH. This screening study on lactobacilli isolates has assessed and identified potential probiotic candidates for further evaluation. PMID:27682086

  2. Improvement in Saccharification Yield of Mixed Rumen Enzymes by Identification of Recalcitrant Cell Wall Constituents Using Enzyme Fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Badhan, Ajay; Wang, Yu-Xi; Gruninger, Robert; Patton, Donald; Powlowski, Justin; Tsang, Adrian; McAllister, Tim A

    2015-01-01

    Identification of recalcitrant factors that limit digestion of forages and the development of enzymatic approaches that improve hydrolysis could play a key role in improving the efficiency of meat and milk production in ruminants. Enzyme fingerprinting of barley silage fed to heifers and total tract indigestible fibre residue (TIFR) collected from feces was used to identify cell wall components resistant to total tract digestion. Enzyme fingerprinting results identified acetyl xylan esterases as key to the enhanced ruminal digestion. FTIR analysis also suggested cross-link cell wall polymers as principal components of indigested fiber residues in feces. Based on structural information from enzymatic fingerprinting and FTIR, enzyme pretreatment to enhance glucose yield from barley straw and alfalfa hay upon exposure to mixed rumen-enzymes was developed. Prehydrolysis effects of recombinant fungal fibrolytic hydrolases were analyzed using microassay in combination with statistical experimental design. Recombinant hemicellulases and auxiliary enzymes initiated degradation of plant structural polysaccharides upon application and improved the in vitro saccharification of alfalfa and barley straw by mixed rumen enzymes. The validation results showed that microassay in combination with statistical experimental design can be successfully used to predict effective enzyme pretreatments that can enhance plant cell wall digestion by mixed rumen enzymes.

  3. Computed tomography of the abdomen of calves during the first 105 days of life: I. Reticulum, rumen, omasum and abomasum.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Schnetzler, C; Ohlerth, S; Hatz, L; Augsburger, H

    2014-05-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) images of the reticulum, rumen, omasum and abomasum of five healthy Holstein-Friesian bull calves were compared with anatomical transverse cadaver sections of the same calves. The calves were scanned in the transverse plane from the 5th thoracic vertebra to the sacrum six times three weeks apart from birth to 105 days of age. Multiplanar reconstruction was used to create images in sagittal and dorsal planes. After subjective assessment of various anatomical structures, the rumen, omasum and abomasum as well as the ruminal strata (gas cap, fibre mat and fluid phase) were measured. After the last CT scan, all calves were euthanised, and four were kept at -18 °C in sternal position for 14 days. Transverse sections 1.0 to 1.5 cm thick were made from two calves and dorsal and sagittal sections were made from one calf each using a band saw. The CT images and anatomical slices were compared and the structures on the CT images identified. Very clear CT images were obtained from the reticulum, rumen, omasum and abomasum and there was excellent agreement between images and anatomical slices.

  4. Rumen fermentation and microbial population in lactating dairy cows receiving diets containing oilseeds rich in C-18 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Ivan, M; Petit, H V; Chiquette, J; Wright, A-D G

    2013-04-14

    Sixteen Holstein rumen-cannulated primiparous milking dairy cows were fed a control diet (CN) based on maize silage and soyabean meal during a 4-week period before the start of a 21-d experiment with oilseeds containing high concentration of linoleic acid (Linola™) or linolenic acid (NuLin™). Thereafter, four cows received ad libitum one of each of four dietary treatments comprising of CN, Linola (LN), NuLin (NL) and LN/NL (50/50 % combination). Each LN, NL and LN/NL treatment contained 6 % oil of DM. Rumen digesta samples were collected on days 6, 11, 16 and 21 and milk samples on days 13, 15 and 17. There were no effects (P>0.05) of the oilseeds on pH and concentrations of NH3-N and total volatile fatty acids, while the acetate:propionate ratio was decreased (P< 0.05). The oilseeds also decreased (P< 0.05) protozoa and increased (P< 0.1) total cellulolytic bacteria in rumen fluid, especially when containing high dietary linoleic acid (P< 0.05). The milk protein concentration was increased (P< 0.1) by the dietary linoleic acid, which produced most beneficial results. It was concluded that supplements of linoleic acid in diets of ruminants might contribute to better digestion of dietary fibre and increased quality of milk.

  5. Relative diversity and community structure analysis of rumen protozoa according to T-RFLP and microscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Tymensen, Lisa; Barkley, Cindy; McAllister, Tim A

    2012-01-01

    Protozoa are common inhabitants of the rumen where they play roles in host nutrition and methanogenesis. Knowledge of how changes in the composition of protozoa communities affect these processes is limited in part due to a lack of efficient methods for protozoa community analysis. In this study, a terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) assay targeting the 18S rRNA gene was developed for comparative analysis of rumen protozoa communities. Comparison of diversity and structure of protozoa communities from hay-fed versus silage/grain-fed cattle via T-RFLP analysis yielded similar overall results to microscopy analysis. According to both methods, Entodinium spp. were more abundant in the silage/grain-fed cattle and protozoa diversity (as calculated using the Shannon index) was higher for the hay-fed cattle due to greater species evenness. Type B protozoa were more prevalent in the hay-fed cattle, whereas Type A protozoa were more prevalent in the silage/grain-fed cattle. Analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) indicated that the protozoa communities from hay-fed and silage/grain-fed cattle were different, and multivariate analysis indicated that pen mates (i.e., cattle fed the same diet and housed together) tended to have similar protozoa communities types. In summary, we present a T-RFLP method for analyzing rumen protozoa communities which complements traditional microscopy approaches but has the advantage of being amenable to high-throughput.

  6. Response of the rumen archaeal and bacterial populations to anti-methanogenic organosulphur compounds in continuous-culture fermenters.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Fernández, Gonzalo; Abecia, Leticia; Martín-García, A Ignacio; Ramos-Morales, Eva; Denman, Stuart E; Newbold, Charles J; Molina-Alcaide, Eduarda; Yáñez-Ruiz, David R

    2015-08-01

    Study of the efficacy of methanogenesis inhibitors in the rumen has given inconsistent results, mainly due to poorly understood effects on the key microbial groups involved in pathways for methane (CH4) synthesis. The experiment described in this report was designed to assess the effect of propyl propane thiosulfinate (PTS), diallyl disulfide (DDS) and bromochloromethane (BCM) on rumen fermentation, methane production and microbial populations in continuous culture fermenters. No effects on total volatile fatty acids (VFA) were observed with PTS or DDS, but VFA were decreased with BCM. Amylase activity increased with BCM as compared with the other treatments. A decrease in methane production was observed with PTS (48%) and BCM (94%) as compared with control values. The concentration of methanogenic archaea decreased with BCM from day 4 onward and with PTS on days 4 and 8. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed that PTS and BCM decreased the relative abundance of Methanomicrobiales and increased that of Methanobrevibacter and Methanosphaera. The total concentration of bacteria was not modified by any treatment, although treatment with BCM increased the relative abundance of Prevotella and decreased that of Ruminococcus. These results suggest that the inhibition of methane production in the rumen by PTS and BCM is associated with a shift in archaeal biodiversity and changes in the bacterial community with BCM.

  7. Microbial ecology of the rumen evaluated by 454 GS FLX pyrosequencing is affected by starch and oil supplementation of diets.

    PubMed

    Zened, Asma; Combes, Sylvie; Cauquil, Laurent; Mariette, Jérôme; Klopp, Christophe; Bouchez, Olivier; Troegeler-Meynadier, Annabelle; Enjalbert, Francis

    2013-02-01

    To provide a comprehensive examination of the bacterial diversity in the rumen content of cows fed different diets, high-throughput 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing was used. Four rumen fistulated nonlactating Holstein cows received 12 kg of dry matter per day of four diets based on maize silage during four periods: the low-starch diet (22% starch, 3% fat); the high-starch diet, supplemented with wheat plus barley (35% starch, 3% fat); the low-starch plus oil diet, supplemented with 5% of sunflower oil (20% starch, 7.6% fat) and the high-starch plus oil diet (33% starch, 7.3% fat). Samples were taken after 12 days of adaptation, 5 h postfeeding. Whatever the diet, bacterial community of sieved rumen contents was dominated by Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, Prevotellaceae, and Rikenellaceae families were highly present and were clearly affected by cow diet. The highest abundance of Prevotellaceae and the lowest abundance of Ruminococcaceae and Rikenellaceae were found with the high-starch plus oil diet. Dietary starch increased the relative abundance of only three genera: Barnesiella, Oribacterium and Olsenella, but decreased the relative abundances of several genera, with very significant effects for Rikenellaceae_RC9 and Butyrivibrio-Pseudobutyrivibrio. Oil alone had a limited effect, but interestingly, starch plus oil addition differently affected the bacterial populations compared to starch addition without oil.

  8. Role of anaerobic fungi in wheat straw degradation and effects of plant feed additives on rumen fermentation parameters in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dagar, S S; Singh, N; Goel, N; Kumar, S; Puniya, A K

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, rumen microbial groups, i.e. total rumen microbes (TRM), total anaerobic fungi (TAF), avicel enriched bacteria (AEB) and neutral detergent fibre enriched bacteria (NEB) were evaluated for wheat straw (WS) degradability and different fermentation parameters in vitro. Highest WS degradation was shown for TRM, followed by TAF, NEB and least by AEB. Similar patterns were observed with total gas production and short chain fatty acid profiles. Overall, TAF emerged as the most potent individual microbial group. In order to enhance the fibrolytic and rumen fermentation potential of TAF, we evaluated 18 plant feed additives in vitro. Among these, six plant additives namely Albizia lebbeck, Alstonia scholaris, Bacopa monnieri, Lawsonia inermis, Psidium guajava and Terminalia arjuna considerably improved WS degradation by TAF. Further evaluation showed A. lebbeck as best feed additive. The study revealed that TAF plays a significant role in WS degradation and their fibrolytic activities can be improved by inclusion of A. lebbeck in fermentation medium. Further studies are warranted to elucidate its active constituents, effect on fungal population and in vivo potential in animal system.

  9. Comparison of Microbiological and Probiotic Characteristics of Lactobacilli Isolates from Dairy Food Products and Animal Rumen Contents.

    PubMed

    Jose, Neethu Maria; Bunt, Craig R; Hussain, Malik Altaf

    2015-04-15

    Lactobacilli are employed in probiotic food preparations and as feed additives in poultry and livestock, due to health benefits associated with their consumption. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the probiotic potential of ten lactobacilli strains isolated from commercial dairy food products and animal rumen contents in New Zealand. Genetic identification of the isolates revealed that all belonged to the genus Lactobacillus, specifically the species L. reuteri, L. rhamnosus and L. plantarum. All isolates did not show any haemolytic behaviour. Isolates of dairy origin showed better tolerance to low pH stress. On the other hand, rumen isolates exhibited a higher tolerance to presence of bile salts. All isolates exhibited resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics, however most were sensitive to ampicillin. Isolates of rumen origin demonstrated a higher inhibitory effect on Listeria monocytogenes, Enterobacter aerogenes and Salmonella menston. Bacterial adherence of all isolates increased with a decrease in pH. This screening study on lactobacilli isolates has assessed and identified potential probiotic candidates for further evaluation.

  10. Unexpected Formation of Low Amounts of (R)-Configurated anteiso-Fatty Acids in Rumen Fluid Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Abdurahman, Halima; Ruoff, Tanja; Kaffarnik, Stefanie; Steingass, Herbert; Vetter, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Anteiso-fatty acids (aFA) with odd carbon number are a class of branched-chain fatty acids (BCFA) mainly produced by bacteria. Bacterial sources are also made responsible for their occurrence in the low percent-range in lipids of ruminants (meat and milk) and fish. aFAs are chiral molecules and typically occur predominantly in form of (S)-enantiomers, and their primary precursor has been noted to be isoleucine. Yet, low proportions of (R)-aFAs were also detected in fish and cheese samples. Here we investigated the potential formation of (R)-aFAs by means of incubation experiments with rumen fluid from fistulated cows. Supplementation of rumen fluid with both L- and DL-isoleucine, resulted in a significant (α <0.05) increase of the aFA concentrations but in both cases enantiopure (S)-aFAs were observed. By contrast, incubations without addition of any isoleucine lead to a significant (α <0.05) formation of small proportions of (R)-aFAs similarly to those previously observed in fish and cheese. These results were consistently reproduced in three different years with rumen fluid from different cows fed different diets. All findings point to the existence of a further biosynthesis pathway of aFAs with different stereospecificity than the classic one using isoleucine as primer. PMID:28129363

  11. Antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and probiotic potential of Enterococcus hirae isolated from the rumen of Bos primigenius.

    PubMed

    Arokiyaraj, Selvaraj; Hairul Islam, Villianur Ibrahim; Bharanidharan, R; Raveendar, Sebastian; Lee, Jinwook; Kim, Do Hyung; Oh, Young Kyoon; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Kyoung Hoon

    2014-07-01

    In the present study bacterial strains were isolated from the rumen fluids of Bos primigenius and investigated their in vitro probiotic properties with potent antibacterial activity and anti-inflammatory effects. 9 g positive bacterial isolates were obtained and three isolates could able to tolerate gastric conditions, high bile salt concentrations and exhibited significant bactericidal effect against the enteric pathogens Vibrio cholera, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterobacter aerogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi. Moreover it showed above 70% cell surface hydrophobicity, significant low-invasion ability and potential adherence capacity in Caco-2 cells when compared with the control. The proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α) was greatly reduced in rumen bacteria treatment and ARBS-1 modulate the immune response by activating the IL-4 secretion in parallel to TNF-α suppression. The 16s rRNA gene sequence of the active isolates were identified as Enterococcus hirae (ARBS-1), Pediococcus acidilactici (ARBS-4) and Bacillus licheniformis (ARBS-7). This study revealed the probiotic bactericidal properties of E. hirae obtained from the rumen of B. primigenius with potential antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects. Future studies with the strains may yield some novel probiotic product for livestock's.

  12. Effect of forage inclusion and particle size in diets of neonatal lambs on performance and rumen development.

    PubMed

    Norouzian, M A; Valizadeh, R

    2014-12-01

    A slaughter experiment was conducted to determine the effects of alfalfa particle size on rumen morphology and performance of lambs. Twenty-four Balouchi lambs aged 21 days (9.1 ± 1.1 kg) were randomly fed control (diet without alfalfa hay; CON) and mixed rations containing 15% finely ground (FINE; 2 mm) and 15% coarsely chopped alfalfa hay (LONG; 3 to 4 cm). After a 63 days feeding period, nine animals (three per treatment) were slaughtered to obtain ruminal tissue samples for morphological analyses. Alfalfa particle size did not affect (p > 0.05) papillae density, height, width, epithelium depth and surface area. Coarse alfalfa decreased the stratum corneum and increased (p < 0.05) muscle depth compared with fine and control diets. Neither DNA content and nor RNA concentration of rumen tissue was affected by feeding different diets. Forage particle size did not affect the blood concentration of glucose, urea nitrogen (BUN), beta-hydroxybutyric acid (BHBA) and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA). Dry matter intake and feed conversion ratio were higher for control diet; however, there were no significant differences between treatments for average daily gain. These data suggest that coarse alfalfa significantly reduces the stratum corneum and increases muscularity of rumen wall and tended to better feed conversion ratio.

  13. Artificial intelligence: Principles and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdami, M.

    1985-01-01

    The book covers the principles of AI, the main areas of application, as well as considering some of the social implications. The applications chapters have a common format structured as follows: definition of the topic; approach with conventional computing techniques; why 'intelligence' would provide a better approach; and how AI techniques would be used and the limitations. The contents discussed are: Principles of artificial intelligence; AI programming environments; LISP, list processing and pattern-making; AI programming with POP-11; Computer processing of natural language; Speech synthesis and recognition; Computer vision; Artificial intelligence and robotics; The anatomy of expert systems - Forsyth; Machine learning; Memory models of man and machine; Artificial intelligence and cognitive psychology; Breaking out of the chinese room; Social implications of artificial intelligence; and Index.

  14. Artificial intelligence: Deep neural reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Herbert

    2016-10-01

    The human brain can solve highly abstract reasoning problems using a neural network that is entirely physical. The underlying mechanisms are only partially understood, but an artificial network provides valuable insight. See Article p.471

  15. Artificial photosynthesis for solar fuels.

    PubMed

    Styring, Stenbjörn

    2012-01-01

    This contribution was presented as the closing lecture at the Faraday Discussion 155 on artificial photosynthesis, held in Edinburgh Scotland, September 5-7 2011. The world needs new, environmentally friendly and renewable fuels to exchange for fossil fuels. The fuel must be made from cheap and "endless" resources that are available everywhere. The new research area of solar fuels aims to meet this demand. This paper discusses why we need a solar fuel and why electricity is not enough; it proposes solar energy as the major renewable energy source to feed from. The scientific field concerning artificial photosynthesis expands rapidly and most of the different scientific visions for solar fuels are briefly overviewed. Research strategies and the development of artificial photosynthesis research to produce solar fuels are overviewed. Some conceptual aspects of research for artificial photosynthesis are discussed in closer detail.

  16. Food analysis using artificial senses.

    PubMed

    Śliwińska, Magdalena; Wiśniewska, Paulina; Dymerski, Tomasz; Namieśnik, Jacek; Wardencki, Waldemar

    2014-02-19

    Nowadays, consumers are paying great attention to the characteristics of food such as smell, taste, and appearance. This motivates scientists to imitate human senses using devices known as electronic senses. These include electronic noses, electronic tongues, and computer vision. Thanks to the utilization of various sensors and methods of signal analysis, artificial senses are widely applied in food analysis for process monitoring and determining the quality and authenticity of foods. This paper summarizes achievements in the field of artificial senses. It includes a brief history of these systems, descriptions of most commonly used sensors (conductometric, potentiometric, amperometic/voltammetric, impedimetric, colorimetric, piezoelectric), data analysis methods (for example, artificial neural network (ANN), principal component analysis (PCA), model CIE L*a*b*), and application of artificial senses to food analysis, in particular quality control, authenticity and falsification assessment, and monitoring of production processes.

  17. Comparison of Artificial Compressibility Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Housman, Jeffrey; Kwak, Dochan

    2004-01-01

    Various artificial compressibility methods for calculating the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are compared. Each method is described and numerical solutions to test problems are conducted. A comparison based on convergence behavior, accuracy, and robustness is given.

  18. Artificial Reefs and Ocean Dumping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glueck, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Activities and instructional strategies for two multigrade lessons are provided. Activity objectives include describing an artificial reef (such as a sunken ocean liner) as an ecosystem, knowing animal types in the ecosystem, and describing a food web. (JN)

  19. Darwin, artificial selection, and poverty.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Luis

    2010-03-01

    This paper argues that the processes of evolutionary selection are becoming increasingly artificial, a trend that goes against the belief in a purely natural selection process claimed by Darwin's natural selection theory. Artificial selection is mentioned by Darwin, but it was ignored by Social Darwinists, and it is all but absent in neo-Darwinian thinking. This omission results in an underestimation of probable impacts of artificial selection upon assumed evolutionary processes, and has implications for the ideological uses of Darwin's language, particularly in relation to poverty and other social inequalities. The influence of artificial selection on genotypic and phenotypic adaptations arguably represents a substantial shift in the presumed path of evolution, a shift laden with both biological and political implications.

  20. Effects of a specific blend of essential oils on apparent nutrient digestion, rumen fermentation and rumen microbial populations in sheep fed a 50:50 alfalfa hay:concentrate diet

    PubMed Central

    Khateri, N.; Azizi, O.; Jahani-Azizabadi, H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of a specific mixture of essential oils (MEO), containing thyme, clove and cinnamon EO, on rumen microbial fermentation, nutrient apparent digestibility and blood metabolites in fistulated sheep. Methods Six sheep fitted with ruminal fistulas were used in a repeated measurement design with two 24-d periods to investigate the effect of adding MEO at 0 (control), 0.8, and 1.6 mL/d on apparent nutrient digestibility, rumen fermentation characteristics, rumen microbial population and blood chemical metabolites. Animals were fed with a 50:50 alfalfa hay:concentrate diet. Results Ruminal pH, total volatile fatty acids (VFA) concentration, molar proportion of individual VFA, acetate: propionate ratio and methane production were not affected with MEO. Relative to the control, Small peptides plus amino acid nitrogen and large peptides nitrogen concentration in rumen fluid were not affected with MEO supplementation; while, rumen fluid ammonia nitrogen concentration at 0 and 6 h after morning feeding in sheep fed with 1.6 mL/d of MEO was lower (p<0.05) compared to the control and 0.8 mL/d of MEO. At 0 h after morning feeding, ammonia nitrogen concentration was higher (p<0.05) in sheep fed 0.8 mL/d of MEO relative to 1.6 mL/d and control diet. Ruminal protozoa and hyper ammonia producing (HAP) bacteria counts were not affected by addition of MEO in the diet. Relative to the control, no changes were observed in the red and white blood cells, hemoglobin, hematocrit, glucose, beta-hydroxybutyric acid, cholesterol, total protein, albumin, blood urea nitrogen and aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase concentration. Apparent total tract digestibility of dry matter, crude proten, organic matter, and neutral detergent fiber were not influenced by MEO supplementation. Conclusion The results of the present study suggested that supplementation of MEO may have limited effects on apparent nutrient

  1. Interdisciplinary Study on Artificial Intelligence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    systems, uiophysics of information processing, cognitive science, and traditional artificial intelligence. The objective behi d this objective was to...information processing, cognitive science, and traditional * artificial intelligence. The objective behind this objective was to provide a vehicle for reviewing...Another departure from ’classical’ neurodynamics must be sought in the strong coupling between the micro and macroscopic scales. No other physical mechanism

  2. An artificial gravity demonstration experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rupp, C.; Lemke, L.; Penzo, P.

    1989-01-01

    An artificial gravity experiment which is tethered to a Delta second stage and which uses the Small Expendable Deployer System is proposed. Following tether deployment, the Delta vehicle performs the required spin-up maneuver and can then be passivated. A surplus reentry vehicle houses the artificial gravity life science experiments. When the experiments are completed, the reentry phase of the experiment is initiated by synchronizing the spin of the configuration with the required deorbit impulse.

  3. Actuator device for artificial leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An actuator device is described for moving an artificial leg of a person having a prosthesis replacing an entire leg and hip joint. The device includes a first articulated hip joint assembly carried by the natural leg and a second articulated hip joint assembly carried by the prosthesis whereby energy from the movement of the natural leg is transferred by a compressible fluid from the first hip joint assembly to the second hip joint assembly for moving the artificial leg.

  4. The total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Meyer, A; Slaughter, M

    2011-09-01

    In the 1960s, cardiac surgeons and biomedical engineers pioneered the development of total artificial hearts (TAH) for the treatment of left and right heart failure. As we mark the 10th anniversary of the first implantation of the AbioCor device, the use of TAH has been limited, having failed to reach its envisioned potential and promise as an alternative therapy to heart transplantation. The Syncardia/CardioWest device, originally developed 30 years ago as the Jarvik TAH and later renamed the CardioWest TAH, continues to be used clinically in over 50 centers within the US and Europe having supported over 900 patients worldwide. Syncardia continues to develop TAH technology as evidenced by their recent introduction of a new portable pneumatic driver that enables patients to be discharged from the hospital. In contrast to TAH devices, continuous flow ventricular assist devices (VAD) have made tremendous technological strides and are rapidly gaining widespread clinical acceptance. The VAD technology has demonstrated extraordinary safety and reliability records through evolving technologies, advanced biocompatible materials, and improved patient management. Subsequently, the number of TAH implantations remains low compared to the growth in LVAD implants. Nonetheless, the Syncardia/CardioWest TAH remains an important and viable option for patients with severe biventricular failure and end organ dysfunction. Overall, a 79% survival rate has been achieved in patients supported with a Syncardia/CardioWest TAH as bridge-to-transplantation. In this review article, a brief history on the evolution of TAH devices, their current use and emerging use of evolving continuous flow VAD technology as chronic biventricular and TAH device systems are presented.

  5. Ultrasonographic examination of the abdomen of the goat. I. Reticulum, rumen, omasum, abomasum and intestines.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Jacquat, D; Steininger, K

    2013-03-01

    This review article summarizes the ultrasonographic findings of the reticulum, rumen, omasum, abomasum and intestines of goats. Ultrasonographic examination is done on both sides with the goat in a standing position using a linear array or convex transducer with a frequency of 5.0 to 7.5 MHz. The shape, contour and motility of the reticulum are assessed; this organ appears as a crescent-shaped structure with a smooth contour immediately adjacent to the diaphragm. There are 0.8 to 2.1 reticular contractions per minute, which may be mono-, bi- and triphasic. The rumen is examined from the 8th to 12th intercostal spaces (ICSs) and flank on the left, and from the 12th ICS and flank on the right. The ruminal wall appears as a thick echoic line. The dorsal and ventral sacs of the rumen are differentiated based on the longitudinal groove, which forms an echoic notch. Differentiation of the dorsal gas cap, fibre mat and fluid layer is not always straightforward and varies among goats. The omasum is examined from the 6th to 11th ICSs on the right. Only the wall closest to the transducer can be imaged and it appears as a crescent-shaped echoic line medial to the liver. The omasal folds and the wall furthest from the transducer cannot be seen. In about two thirds of goats, active omasal motility is apparent as a transient reduction in size of several centimetres, followed by relaxation and return to its original size. There is an average of 1.1 contractions per minute. The abomasum is examined from the ventral midline and the left and right paramedian regions and can always be seen from the ventral midline. In all but a few goats the abomasum is also visible from the left and right paramedian areas. It appears as a heterogeneous, moderately echoic structure with echogenic stippling. The abomasal folds appear as prominent echoic bands in about two thirds of all goats. The small and large intestines are examined on the right from the 8th to the 12th ICSs. Loops of jejunum and

  6. The effects of frequency of feeding on some quantitative aspects of digestion in the rumens of growing steers.

    PubMed

    McAllan, A B; Lewis, P E; Griffith, E S

    1987-09-01

    Three steers with simple rumen and abomasal cannulas were given ground and pelleted diets containing predominantly dried grass meal (DG) or rolled barley (RB). Diets were given at frequencies of two or eight feeds/d in a simple changeover design. Chromic oxide and polyethylene glycol were given as flow markers and flows (g/24 h) of organic matter (OM), nitrogenous and carbohydrate compounds were calculated. Ribonucleic acid and 35S were used as microbial markers and diaminopimelic acid (DAP) as a bacterial marker. Frequency of feeding had no significant effect on mean rumen pH, ammonia levels or liquid outflow rates with either diet. Rumen volume was decreased and abomasal digesta flow increased on Diet DG with more feeds but these parameters were unaffected with Diet RB. Increased feeding frequency with both feeds resulted in increased numbers of protozoa. There were no significant effects of feeding frequency of Diet DG on the abomasal flows of any of the nitrogenous constituents measured. However, there was a significant increase in microbial-N flow from 33 to 43 g/d with more frequent feeding of diet RB which was not reflected in bacterial-N flow as measured by DAP. The apparent digestion of OM in the rumen, expressed as g/g intake with diet DG was 0.41 and 0.31 for two feeds and eight feeds/d respectively. Corresponding values for diet RB were 0.56 and 0.63 respectively. The reduction in OM digestion with frequent feeding of diet DG was reflected in similarly reduced rumen digestibilities of all dietary carbohydrate components whereas the increase in OM digestion with diet RB was reflected only by the component sugars of the dietary fibre. The efficiencies of microbial protein synthesis (expressed as gMN/kg ADOM) increased from 36 to 46 when the feeding frequency of diet DG was increased from two to eight times/d. No significant effect of frequency of feeding was found for diet RB. Mouth to abomasum degradation of feed-N (expressed as g/g intake) of 0.64 was

  7. Differential effects of monensin and a blend of essential oils on rumen microbiota composition of transition dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Schären, M; Drong, C; Kiri, K; Riede, S; Gardener, M; Meyer, U; Hummel, J; Urich, T; Breves, G; Dänicke, S

    2017-04-01

    In response to oral application, monensin alters the rumen microbiota, increasing ruminal propionate production and energy availability in the animal. Data from different studies indicate that the susceptibility of rumen bacteria to monensin is mainly cell-wall dependent but tracing its activity to specific microbial groups has been challenging. Several studies have shown a similar effect for essential oils but results are inconsistent. To investigate the influence of monensin and a blend of essential oils (BEO, containing thymol, guaiacol, eugenol, vanillin, salicylaldehyde, and limonene) on the rumen microbiome, rumen liquid samples were collected orally on d 56 postpartum from cows that had either received a monensin controlled-release capsule 3 wk antepartum, a diet containing a BEO from 3 wk antepartum onward, or a control diet (n = 12). The samples were analyzed for pH, volatile fatty acid, ammonia, and lipopolysaccharide concentrations and protozoal counts. A 16S rRNA gene fingerprinting analysis (PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism) and sequencing revealed that the BEO treatment had no effect on the rumen microbiota, whereas monensin decreased bacterial diversity. Twenty-three bacterial species-level operational taxonomic units were identified for which monensin caused a significant decrease in their relative abundance, all belonging to the phyla Bacteroidetes (uncultured BS11 gut group and BS9 gut group) and Firmicutes (Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Erysipelotrichaceae). Ten bacterial operational taxonomic units belonging to the phyla Actinobacteria (Coriobacteriaceae), Bacteroidetes (Prevotella), Cyanobacteria (SHA-109), and Firmicutes (Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae) increased in relative abundance due to the monensin treatment. These results confirm the hypothesis that varying effects depending on cell-wall constitution and thickness might apply for monensin sensitivity rather than a clear-cut difference between gram-negative and

  8. Rumen degradability characteristics of normal maize stover and silage, and quality protein maize silage-based diets offered to cows.

    PubMed

    Tamir, Berhan; Gebrehawariat, Ephrem; Tegegne, Azage; Kortu, Mohammed Y

    2012-10-01

    Rumen degradability characteristics of dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM) and crude protein (CP) of normal maize (NM) stover (T1)-, NM silage (T2)- and quality protein maize (QPM) silage (T3)-based diets were studied using three rumen-fistulated Boran × Friesian non-lactating cows (371 ± 32.00 kg) in 3 × 3 Latin Square Design. Cows were supplemented with a similar concentrate mix. In sacco degradability of DM and OM indicated that the (a) values of DM (128) and OM (114) for NM stover were lower (P < 0.001) than that for NM silage (268 and 253) and for QPM silage (323 and 303), respectively. The (a) value for CP was lower (P < 0.05) for QPM silage (286) than for NM stover (404) and NM silage (326). The (b) values of DM in NM stover (597) and NM silage (535) were higher (P < 0.05) than in QPM silage (499). The (b) value of CP in NM stover (372) was lower (P < 0.05) than in NM silage (655) and in QPM silage (608). Rate of degradation of OM in NM stover and NM silage, each with 0.03, was faster (P < 0.01) than in QPM silage (0.02). Moreover, QPM silage had higher potentially degradable fraction for DM (821) (P < 0.05) and OM (840) (P < 0.01) than DM (725) and OM (712) in NM stover. The mean rumen ammonia concentration (209 mg/l) of QPM silage was higher (P < 0.05) than that of NM stover (179 mg/l) and NM silage (170 mg/l). The average rumen pH (6.1) in cows fed QPM silage was lowest (P < 0.05) compared to pH (6.3) in cows fed either NM stover or silage. The concentration of total volatile fatty acids (116 mmol/l) in the rumen of cows incubated with QPM silage was higher (P < 0.001) than in those incubated with NM stover (113 mmol/l) and NM silage (110 mmol/l). It was concluded that QPM silage-based diet was superior in DM and OM degradability, and had higher ammonia and VFA concentration than NM stover-based diet. No differences have been observed in all parameters measured between QPM and NM silages.

  9. Effect of forage:concentrate ratio on fatty acid composition of rumen bacteria isolated from ruminal and duodenal digesta.

    PubMed

    Vlaeminck, B; Fievez, V; Demeyer, D; Dewhurst, R J

    2006-07-01

    Four dairy cows were used to examine the effect of the dietary forage:concentrate ratio [35:65, 50:50, 65:35, and 80:20 on a dry matter (DM) basis] on the fatty acid composition of rumen bacteria isolated from the liquid (LAB) and solid (SAB) phase of the rumen and duodenal digesta. Rumen contents were sampled 4 h after the morning feeding. Solid and liquid phases were separated from rumen contents and duodenal bacteria from a composite duodenal sample by differential centrifugation. Total fatty acid content in bacterial DM was 1.6 to 2.8 times higher in SAB compared with LAB, and increased with dietary concentrate. In combination with published reports, the data show that bacterial fatty acid content and composition is closely related to dietary fatty acids except for C18:2n-6 and C18:3n-3. A decrease in forage:concentrate ratio increased bacterial concentration of trans-10 C18:1, and this increase was 3.4 times higher in LAB compared with SAB. Analysis of odd- and branched-chain fatty acids showed large differences between SAB and LAB, which probably reflected a difference in species composition. The variation in odd- and branched-chain fatty acids between SAB and LAB was used to estimate their relative proportions in duodenal bacteria by means of linear programming, and showed an increased proportion of SAB from 64.7 to 74.8% with increasing forage:concentrate ratio. In addition, increasing the proportion of dietary forage was closely related to the proportion of anteiso C15:0 in total odd- and branched-chain fatty acids (r(pearson) = -0.771). The bacterial concentration of iso C17:0 closely reflected the bacterial growth rate as shown by the relation with cytosine:N (r(pearson) = -0.729). These strong relationships suggest that odd- and branched-chain fatty acids might be used as tool to evaluate nutrient supply to rumen bacteria.

  10. Analysis of rumen microbial populations in lactating dairy cattle fed diets varying in carbohydrate profiles and Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product.

    PubMed

    Mullins, C R; Mamedova, L K; Carpenter, A J; Ying, Y; Allen, M S; Yoon, I; Bradford, B J

    2013-09-01

    The rumen microbial ecosystem is a critical factor that links diets to bovine physiology and productivity; however, information about dietary effects on microbial populations has generally been limited to small numbers of samples and qualitative assessment. To assess whether consistent shifts in microbial populations occur in response to common dietary manipulations in dairy cattle, samples of rumen contents were collected from 2 studies for analysis by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). In one study, lactating Holstein cows (n=8) were fed diets in which a nonforage fiber source replaced an increasing proportion of forages and concentrates in a 4×4 Latin square design, and samples of ruminal digesta were collected at 9-h intervals over 3 d at the end of each period. In the second study, lactating Holstein cows (n=15) were fed diets with or without the inclusion of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product (SCFP) in a crossover design. In this study, rumen liquid and solid samples were collected during total rumen evacuations before and after feeding in a 42-h period. In total, 146 samples of ruminal digesta were used for microbial DNA isolation and analysis by qPCR. Validated primer sets were used to quantify total bacterial and anaerobic fungal populations as well as 12 well-studied bacterial taxa. The relative abundance of the target populations was similar to those previously reported. No significant treatment effects were observed for any target population. A significant interaction of treatment and dry matter intake was observed, however, for the abundance of Eubacterium ruminantium. Increasing dry matter intake was associated with a quadratic decrease in E. ruminantium populations in control animals but with a quadratic increase in E.ruminantium populations in cows fed SCFP. Analysis of sample time effects revealed that Fibrobacter succinogenes and fungal populations were more abundant postfeeding, whereas Ruminococcus albus tended to be more abundant

  11. Effect of Origanum vulgare L. leaves on rumen fermentation, production, and milk fatty acid composition in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Hristov, A N; Lee, C; Cassidy, T; Heyler, K; Tekippe, J A; Varga, G A; Corl, B; Brandt, R C

    2013-02-01

    This experiment investigated the effects of dietary supplementation of Origanum vulgare L. leaf material (OR) on rumen fermentation, production, and milk fatty acid composition in dairy cows. The experimental design was a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square with 8 rumen-cannulated Holstein cows and 20-d experimental periods. Treatments were control (no OR supplementation), 250 g/cow per day OR (LOR), 500 g/d OR (MOR), and 750 g/d OR (HOR). Oregano supplementation had no effect on rumen pH, volatile fatty acid concentrations, and estimated microbial protein synthesis, but decreased ammonia concentration and linearly decreased methane production per unit of dry matter intake (DMI) compared with the unsupplemented control: 18.2, 16.5, 11.7, and 13.6g of methane/kg of DMI, respectively. Proportions of rumen bacterial, methanogen, and fungal populations were not affected by treatment. Treatment had no effect on total-tract apparent digestibility of dietary nutrients, except neutral detergent fiber digestibility was slightly decreased by all OR treatments compared with the control. Urinary N losses and manure odor were not affected by OR, except the proportion of urinary urea N in the total excreted urine N tended to be decreased compared with the control. Oregano linearly decreased DMI (28.3, 28.3, 27.5, and 26.7 kg/d for control, LOR, MOR, and HOR, respectively). Milk yield was not affected by treatment: 43.4, 45.2, 44.1, and 43.4 kg/d, respectively. Feed efficiency was linearly increased with OR supplementation and was greater than the control (1.46, 1.59, 1.60, and 1.63 kg/kg, respectively). Milk composition was unaffected by OR, except milk urea-N concentration was decreased. Milk fatty acid composition was not affected by treatment. In this short-term study, OR fed at 250 to 750 g/d decreased rumen methane production in dairy cows within 8h after feeding, but the effect over a 24-h feeding cycle has not been determined. Supplementation of the diet with OR linearly

  12. Effect of bromochloromethane on methane emission, rumen fermentation pattern, milk yield, and fatty acid profile in lactating dairy goats.

    PubMed

    Abecia, L; Toral, P G; Martín-García, A I; Martínez, G; Tomkins, N W; Molina-Alcaide, E; Newbold, C J; Yáñez-Ruiz, D R

    2012-04-01

    Several technologies have been tested to reduce enteric methanogenesis, but very few have been successfully used in practical conditions for livestock. Furthermore, the consequences of reduced rumen methane production on animal performance and milk quality are poorly understood. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of feeding bromochloromethane (BCM), a halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbon with potential antimethanogenic activity, to dairy goats on rumen methane production, fermentation pattern, the abundance of major microbial groups, and on animal performance and milk composition. Eighteen goats were allocated to 2 experimental groups of 9 animals each: treated (BCM+) or not (BCM-) with 0.30 g of BCM/100 kg of body weight per day. The BCM was administered per os in 2 equal doses per day from parturition to 2 wk postweaning (10 wk). After weaning, methane emissions were recorded over 2 consecutive days (d 57 and 58 on treatment) in polycarbonate chambers. On d 59, individual rumen fluid samples were collected for volatile fatty acid (VFA) analysis and quantification of bacterial, protozoal, and archaeal numbers by real-time PCR. On d 69 and 70, daily milk production was recorded and samples were collected for determination of fat, protein, lactose, casein, and total solids concentration by infrared spectrophotometry, and fatty acid composition by gas chromatography. Treatment with BCM reduced methane production by 33% (21.6 vs. 14.4 L/kg of DMI) compared with nontreated animals, although it did not affect the abundance of rumen bacteria, protozoa, and total methanogenic archaea. The observed improvement in the efficiency of digestive processes was accompanied by a 36% increase in milk yield, probably due to the more propionic type of rumen fermentation and an increase in VFA production. The increase in milk yield was not accompanied by any changes in the concentrations or yields of fat, protein, or lactose. Despite the substantial decrease in methane

  13. Methane Production in Dairy Cows Correlates with Rumen Methanogenic and Bacterial Community Structure

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, Rebecca; Dicksved, Johan; Sun, Li; Gonda, Horacio; Müller, Bettina; Schnürer, Anna; Bertilsson, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Methane (CH4) is produced as an end product from feed fermentation in the rumen. Yield of CH4 varies between individuals despite identical feeding conditions. To get a better understanding of factors behind the individual variation, 73 dairy cows given the same feed but differing in CH4 emissions were investigated with focus on fiber digestion, fermentation end products and bacterial and archaeal composition. In total 21 cows (12 Holstein, 9 Swedish Red) identified as persistent low, medium or high CH4 emitters over a 3 month period were furthermore chosen for analysis of microbial community structure in rumen fluid. This was assessed by sequencing the V4 region of 16S rRNA gene and by quantitative qPCR of targeted Methanobrevibacter groups. The results showed a positive correlation between low CH4 emitters and higher abundance of Methanobrevibacter ruminantium clade. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) on operational taxonomic unit (OTU) level of bacteria showed two distinct clusters (P < 0.01) that were related to CH4 production. One cluster was associated with low CH4 production (referred to as cluster L) whereas the other cluster was associated with high CH4 production (cluster H) and the medium emitters occurred in both clusters. The differences between clusters were primarily linked to differential abundances of certain OTUs belonging to Prevotella. Moreover, several OTUs belonging to the family Succinivibrionaceae were dominant in samples belonging to cluster L. Fermentation pattern of volatile fatty acids showed that proportion of propionate was higher in cluster L, while proportion of butyrate was higher in cluster H. No difference was found in milk production or organic matter digestibility between cows. Cows in cluster L had lower CH4/kg energy corrected milk (ECM) compared to cows in cluster H, 8.3 compared to 9.7 g CH4/kg ECM, showing that low CH4 cows utilized the feed more efficient for milk production which might indicate a more efficient microbial

  14. The effect of supplementing rumen undegradable unsaturated fatty acids on marbling in early-weaned steers.

    PubMed

    Mangrum, K S; Tuttle, G; Duckett, S K; Sell, G S; Krehbiel, C R; Long, N M

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if supplementation with a rumen undegradable unsaturated fatty acids (FA) source improved marbling deposition in early-weaned steers. All steers (Angus, = 23; Angus × Hereford, = 24) were weaned at 150 ± 5 d of age. Steers were blocked by BW and breed and then randomly assigned to either control (CON; average 1.5 kg of corn gluten feed [CGF], = 23) or isocaloric supplementation containing a rumen undegradable fat source (RUF; 200 g of Megalac-R added to an average of 1.06 kg of CGF, = 24) offered 5 d/wk for 110 d. All steers had ad libitum access to pastures throughout treatment and received supplements individually. Steer BW and blood samples were collected at 0, 55, and 110 d of supplementation, and real-time ultrasound measurements were collected at d 110. Following treatment, steers were transported to Oklahoma State University for finishing and subsequent harvesting at a commercial plant. All data were analyzed using the PROC MIXED procedure of SAS either as repeated measures or ANOVA depending on parameters. There were no significant changes in BW from the beginning of treatment to harvest due to treatment. Ultrasound data showed that RUF steers tended ( = 0.08) to have more i.m. fat than CON at d 110. Serum concentrations of FA showed a treatment × day interaction ( < 0.02) for 16:0, 18:0, 18:1-9, 18:2, 20:4, and total FA. These specific FA concentrations slightly increased in CON steers, but there was a more pronounced increase in the concentration of these FA across the supplementation period in RUF steers. Serum triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations were increased ( < 0.01) on d 55 and 110 in RUF steers compared with those in CON steers. Serum leptin concentration in RUF steers was greater ( < 0.01) than CON steers at d 110. After harvest, RUF carcasses had greater ( = 0.01) marbling scores than those of CON carcasses. All other carcass measures were similar between treatments. The percentage of total

  15. [In vitro estimation using radioactive phosphorus of the phosphorus requirements of rumen microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Durand, M; Beaumatin, P; Dumay, C

    1983-01-01

    Microbial requirements for P were assumed to be a function of the amount of microbial protein synthesis (microbial growth) and of the quantity of organic matter (OM) fermented in the rumen. The relationships among P incorporation into microbial matter and protein synthesis, ammonia utilization, volatile fatty acid (VFA) production and organic matter fermented (OMF) were studied in short-term incubations (3 h) using 32P-labelled phosphate. The amount of P incorporated was calculated from extracellular phosphate pool specific activity and the radioactivity incorporated into the microbial sediment during incubation (table 1). The inocula came from sheep fed a protein-free purified diet. In order to vary the intensity of fermentation, carbohydrates with a wide range of degrees of enzymatic susceptibility were used as substrates and the medium was either provided or was deficient in S and trace elements (table 4). Nitrogen was supplied as ammonium salts. Linear regression analyses showed that P incorporation was positively correlated with the criteria of protein synthesis and OM fermentation (figs. 1, 2, 3, 4). However, there was significant phosphorus incorporation when the value for nitrogen incorporation was zero (equation A: (Pi (mg) = 0.162 NH3-N + 0.376; r = 0.9). This was assumed to result either from energetic uncoupling (fermentation without concomitant bacterial growth) or from the lysis of cold microbial cells only. Equation A would reflect total P incorporation and equation A' Pi (mg) = 0.162 NH3-N (mg), net P incorporation. It was assumed that in vitro microbial requirements for P were in the range of 30-70 mg of P/liter of medium for 3-hour incubation, depending on the intensity of fermentation. From a mean value of microbial N yield of 30 g/kg of DOMR (organic matter apparently digested in the rumen), it was calculated that the total and net P requirements in vivo were 6 and 4.9 g/kg of DOMR, respectively, corresponding to 3.9 and 3.2 g/kg of DOM

  16. Effects of Isoflavone-Enriched Feed on the Rumen Microbiota in Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Kasparovska, Jitka; Pecinkova, Martina; Dadakova, Katerina; Krizova, Ludmila; Hadrova, Sylvie; Lexa, Matej; Lochman, Jan; Kasparovsky, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we compared the effects of two diets containing different isoflavone concentrations on the isoflavone transfer from feed into milk and on the rumen microbiota in lactating dairy cows. The on-farm experiment was conducted on twelve lactating Czech Fleckvieh x Holstein cows divided into two groups, each with similar mean milk yield. Twice daily, cows were individually fed a diet based on maize silage, meadow hay and supplemental mixture. Control group (CTRL) received the basal diet while the experimental group (EXP) received the basal diet supplemented with 40% soybean isoflavone extract. The average daily isoflavone intake in the EXP group (16 g/day) was twice as high as that in the CTRL group (8.4 g/day, P<0.001). Total isoflavone concentrations in milk from the CTRL and EXP groups were 96.89 and 276.07 μg/L, respectively (P<0.001). Equol concentrations in milk increased from 77.78 μg/L in the CTRL group to 186.30 μg/L in the EXP group (P<0.001). The V3-4 region of bacterial 16S rRNA genes was used for metagenomic analysis of the rumen microbiome. The experimental cows exhibited fewer OTUs at a distance level of 0.03 compared to control cows (P<0.05) and reduced microbial richness compared to control cows based on the calculated Inverse Simpson and Shannon indices. Non-metric multidimensional scaling analysis showed that the major contributor to separation between the experimental and control groups were changes in the representation of bacteria belonging to the phyla Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Planctomycetes. Surprisingly, a statistically significant positive correlation was found only between isoflavones and the phyla Burkholderiales (r = 0.65, P<0.05) and unclassified Betaproteobacteria (r = 0.58, P<0.05). Previous mouse and human studies of isoflavone effects on the composition of gastrointestinal microbial populations generally report similar findings. PMID:27124615

  17. Rumen dry matter and crude protein degradability of extracted or untreated oilseeds and Leucaena leucocephala leaves.

    PubMed

    Gralak, M A; Kamalu, T; von Keyserlingk, M A; Kulasek, G W

    1997-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the rumen DM and CP degradability characteristics of soyabean, canola seed, peanut, palm kernel and Leucaena leucocephala leaves. The oilseeds were either treated with n-hexane to extract the fat or left untreated. Nylon bags were incubated in each of four rumen cannulated sheep for 0, 2, 4, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. Animals were fed on a diet consisting of meadow hay (ad libitum) and 150 g of concentrate twice daily. Fat extraction caused a decrease (P < or = 0.05) in DM disappearance of soyabean at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 12 h and of peanuts at all incubation times. CP disappearance from peanuts was reduced (P < or = 0.05) as a result of fat extraction at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 12 h. Fat extraction of canola seed increased CP disappearance at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 24 h (P < or = 0.05). However, in the case of defatted canola seed, an increase in DM disappearance (P < or = 0.05) was observed in the first 4 incubation times and a decrease (P < or = 0.05) in the later times. Fat extraction increased (P < or = 0.05) DM disappearance of palm kernel at 0 and 48 h, but reduced it at 4, 6 and 24 h. CP disappearance of palm kernel was improved by treatment (P < or = 0.05) at 0, 4, 24 and 48 h and decreased at 12 h. In the case of palm kernel the largest differences in DM and CP disappearance occurred between the 24 and 48 h incubation times. Degradability characteristics for DM and CP of full-fat soyabean, canola seed and peanut were comparable to those of the full fat samples. Effective DM degradability of soyabean, canola seed and peanuts was 72.2 and 71.9; 74.1 and 66.8; and 85.9 and 70.8 for full fat and extracted feeds, respectively. Effective CP degradability was similar in all oilseeds with the exception of the extracted canola seed. Therefore, the incorporation of full-fat soyabean, canola seed and peanut into ruminant rations can be considered as a means of increasing the energy balance. Both palm kernel DM and CP degradabilities were characterized by slow

  18. Fungal secondary metabolites from Monascus spp. reduce rumen methane production in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Morgavi, D P; Martin, C; Boudra, H

    2013-02-01

    Decreasing methanogenesis without affecting fermentation and digestion of feeds in the rumen can reduce the environmental impact of ruminant production and have a beneficial effect on feed conversion efficiency. In this work, metabolites produced by Monascus spp. molds were assayed for their antimethanogenic activity in vitro and in vivo. The capacity of 7 strains of Monascus to produce secondary metabolites was assessed in solid media. Monitored metabolites included the statins monacolin K, pravastatin, and mevastatin, and the mycotoxin citrinin. Ethanolic extracts from 5 different solid media from 2 selected strains were tested in vitro. Fermentation was not negatively affected by any treatment, but one extract decreased methane production (P < 0.05). This extract was further assayed in 3 consecutive batch incubations where a marked decrease in methane was observed in the third batch (P < 0.05). In contrast, methane produced in flasks with pure monacolin K was not different from controls (P > 0.05). Rice on which the selected Monascus sp. was grown also decreased methane production when used as substrate for in vitro incubations (P < 0.05). The effect of Monascus-fermented rice on methane production was then assayed in vivo. Six wethers were adapted to a diet containing rice grain and hay (1:1 ratio). Rice was then replaced by fermented rice and given to animals for nearly 2 wk. Animals were monitored for a further 2 wk after the treatment. Daily methane emissions decreased (P < 0.05) by 30% after 2 to 3 d into the treatment and remained low throughout the administration period. This change was associated with reduced ruminal acetate to propionate ratio and decreased numbers of methanogens as detected by quantitative PCR (P < 0.05). In contrast, no changes in the methanogenic community were observed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Total bacteria numbers increased (P < 0.05) with changes in the DGGE profile community, whereas protozoa were not

  19. Impact of oxalic acid on rumen function and bacterial community in sheep.

    PubMed

    Belenguer, A; Ben Bati, M; Hervás, G; Toral, P G; Yáñez-Ruiz, D R; Frutos, P

    2013-06-01

    Oxalic acid (OA) is a secondary compound occurring in a wide range of plants consumed by ruminants, especially in saline lands or in arid and semi-arid regions. However, its impact on the rumen microbial community and its changes over time, as well as the potential consequences on ruminal function, remain unknown. To examine this impact, five ewes fitted with a ruminal cannula and fed low-quality grass hay were dosed daily with 0.6 mmol of OA/kg body weight through the cannula for 14 days. On days 0 (before the start), 4, 7 and 14 of the administration period, samples of ruminal digesta were collected throughout the day (0, 3, 6 and 9 h after the morning feeding) for analysis of the bacterial community and fermentation parameters (pH, ammonia and volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations). In addition, two feedstuffs were incubated in situ using the nylon bag technique to estimate ruminal degradation. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism was employed to monitor the dynamics of total bacteria, and quantitative real-time PCR was used to investigate the abundance of the oxalate-degrading Oxalobacter formigenes. Neither pH nor total VFA concentrations were affected. Nevertheless, OA dosing altered molar proportions of most individual VFA and ammonia concentrations (P < 0.001). The dry matter disappearance of alfalfa hay was reduced on days 7 and 14 and that of barley straw only on day 7 (P < 0.01). These slight changes were related to others observed in the relative frequency of a number of terminal restriction fragments. Variations in the ruminal microbiota occurred rapidly with OA administration, which did not modify the bacterial diversity significantly but altered the structure of the community. However, many of these changes were reversed by the end of the experiment, with no significant differences between days 0 and 14 of dosing. These results suggest a rapid adaptation of the rumen bacterial community linked to the estimated increase in the

  20. Nutritional Models of Experimentally-Induced Subacute Ruminal Acidosis (SARA) Differ in Their Impact on Rumen and Hindgut Bacterial Communities in Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Plaizier, Jan C.; Li, Shucong; Tun, Hein M.; Khafipour, Ehsan

    2017-01-01

    Effects of subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) challenges on the bacteria in rumen fluid, cecal digesta, and feces of dairy cows were determined using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and real-time quantitative PCR. Six non-lactating Holstein cows with cannulas in the rumen and cecum were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square arrangement of treatments. During the first 3 wk of each experimental period, cows received a control diet containing 70% forages on a dry matter (DM) basis. In wk 4 of each period, cows received one of three diets: (1) the control diet; (2) a diet in which 34% of the dietary DM was replaced with pellets of ground wheat and barley (GBSC); or (3) a diet in which 37% of dietary DM was replaced with pellets of ground alfalfa (APSC). Rumen fluid, cecal digesta and feces were collected on d 5 of wk 4 of each period and the composition of the bacterial community was studied. Rumen fermentation responses were reported in a companion study. Both SARA-inducing challenges resulted in similar digesta pH depressions (as shown by the companion study), and reduced bacterial richness and diversity in rumen fluid, but GBSC had the larger effect. None of the challenges affected these measures in cecal digesta, and only GBSC reduced bacterial richness and diversity in feces. Only GBSC reduced the abundance of Bacteroidetes in rumen fluid. Abundances of limited number of bacterial genera identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing in the rumen, cecum and feces were affected by the GBSC. The APSC did not affect any of these abundances. Both challenges increased the abundances of several starch, pectin, xylan, dextrin, lactate, succinate, and sugar fermenting bacterial species in the rumen, cecum, and feces as determined by qPCR. Only GBSC increased that of Megasphaera elsdenii in the rumen. Both challenges decreased the abundance of Streptococcus bovis, and increased that of Escherichia coli, in cecal digesta and feces, with GBSC having the larger effect. These results showed that

  1. An Integrated Multi-Omics Approach Reveals the Effects of Supplementing Grass or Grass Hay with Vitamin E on the Rumen Microbiome and Its Function

    PubMed Central

    Belanche, Alejandro; Kingston-Smith, Alison H.; Newbold, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Rumen function is generally suboptimal leading to losses in methane and nitrogen. Analysis of the rumen microbiome is thus important to understanding the underlying microbial activity under different feeding strategies. This study investigated the effect of forage conservation method and vitamin E supplementation on rumen function using a rumen simulation technique. Ryegrass (GRA) or ryegrass hay (HAY) was supplemented with 20% concentrate containing zero or 50 IU/d vitamin E, as α-tocopheryl acetate, according to a 2 × 2 factorial design. The forage conservation method did not substantially change the nutrient composition but had a profound impact on the structure and diversity of the rumen microbiome. HAY diets promoted a more complex bacterial community (+38 OTUs) dominated by Firmicutes. This bacterial adaptation, together with increased rumen protozoa levels and methanogen diversity, was associated with greater fiber disappearance (+12%) in HAY diets, but also with greater rumen true N degradability (+7%) than GRA diets. HAY diets also had a higher metabolic H recovery and methane production (+35%) suggesting more efficient inter-species H transfer between bacteria, protozoa and methanogens. Contrarily, GRA diets promoted more simplified methanogen and bacterial communities, which were dominated by Bacteroidetes and Lactobacillus, thus lactate formation may have acted as an alternative H sink in GRA diets. Moreover the structure of the bacterial community with GRA diets was highly correlated with N utilization, and GRA diets promoted greater bacterial growth and microbial protein synthesis (+16%), as well as a more efficient microbial protein synthesis (+22%). A dose-response experiment using batch cultures revealed that vitamin E supplementation increased rumen fermentation in terms of total VFA and gas production, with protozoal activity higher when supplying α-tocopheryl acetate vs. α-tocopherol. Moreover, α-tocopheryl acetate promoted a small increase

  2. Chewing activities and particle size of rumen digesta and feces of precision-fed dairy heifers fed different forage levels with increasing levels of distillers grains.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Mena, F X; Lascano, G J; Heinrichs, A J

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of 2 differing forage to concentrate ratios (F:C) and various levels of corn dry distillers grain with solubles (DDGS) replacing canola meal in precision-fed dairy heifer rations on chewing behavior, rumen pH and fill, and particle size of rumen contents and feces. A split plot design with F:C as whole plot and DDGS inclusion level as subplot was administered in a 4-period 4 × 4 Latin square. Eight rumen-cannulated Holstein heifers (12.5±0.5 mo of age and 344±15 kg of body weight, respectively) housed in individual stalls were allocated to F:C 50:50 (low forage) or 75:25 [high forage (HF); dry matter basis] and to a sequence of DDGS level (0, 7, 14, and 21%; dry matter basis). Forage was a mix of 50% corn silage and 50% grass hay (dry matter basis). Diets were fed once daily and formulated to provide equal amounts of nutrients and body weight gain. No differences were found for rumen pH between dietary treatments. Time spent eating tended to be longer for HF and was not affected by DDGS inclusion rate. Ruminating time did not differ by F:C, but linearly increased as DDGS increased (422 to 450±21 min/d). Total chewing time tended to be longer for HF and to increase linearly as DDGS increased (553 to 579±33 min/d). Wet rumen digesta weight and volume were greater for HF. Geometric mean particle length of rumen contents was greater for HF 2h prefeeding when analyzed with solubles (particles <0.15 mm). Proportion of rumen solubles decreased as DDGS increased 5h postfeeding. Fecal geometric mean particle length and proportion of particles >1.18 mm increased with increasing levels of DDGS and did not change with F:C. Total chewing time increased by the addition of DDGS and higher F:C. Heifers can compensate for lower physically effective neutral detergent fiber by modifying their chewing behavior. Rumen pH was never at a level that could induce acidosis, and lower eating time at lower F:C was somewhat

  3. Rapid Fermentable Substance Modulates Interactions between Ruminal Commensals and Toll-Like Receptors in Promotion of Immune Tolerance of Goat Rumen

    PubMe