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Sample records for aryl-ferrocenylpseudo-biarylic complexes part

  1. Physical Simulation of Investment Casting of Complex Shape Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimian, Mehdi; Milenkovic, Srdjan; Maestro, Laura; De Azua, Aitor Eguidazu Ruiz; Sabirov, Ilchat

    2015-05-01

    Development of investment casting process has been a challenge for manufacturers of complex shape parts. Numerous experimental casting trials are typically carried out to determine the optimum casting parameters for fabrication of high-quality products. In this work, it is demonstrated that physical simulation of investment casting can successfully predict microstructure and hardness in as-cast complex shape parts. The physical simulation tool consists of a thermal model and melting/solidification experiments in thermo-mechanical simulator. The thermal model is employed to predict local cooling rate during solidification at each point of a casting. Melting/solidification experiments are carried out under controlled cooling rates estimated by the thermal model. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of the solidified specimens is performed; the obtained results predict the local microstructure and mechanical properties of the casting. This concept is applied to investment casting of complex shape nozzle guide vanes from Mar-M247 Ni-based superalloy. Experimental casting trials are performed and the outcomes of physical simulation tool are validated against experimental results. It is shown that phase composition, secondary dendrite arm spacing, grain size, γ/ γ' eutectic size and volume fraction, size and shape of carbide particles, and local microhardness can be predicted at each point of the casting via physical simulation.

  2. 1. TEST AREA 1115, SOUTH PART OF SUPPORT COMPLEX, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. TEST AREA 1-115, SOUTH PART OF SUPPORT COMPLEX, LOOKING TO EAST FROM ABOVE BUILDING 8655, THE FUEL STORAGE TANK FARM, IN FOREGROUND SHADOW. AT THE RIGHT IS BUILDING 8660, ELECTRICAL SUBSTATION; TO ITS LEFT IS BUILDING 8663, THE HELIUM COMPRESSION PLANT. THE LIGHT TONED STRUCTURE IN THE MIDDLE DISTANCE, CENTER, IS THE MACHINE SHOP FOR TEST STAND 1-3. IN THE FAR DISTANCE IS TEST STAND 1-A, WITH THE WHITE SPHERICAL TANKS, AND TEST STAND 2-A TO ITS RIGHT. ALONG THE HORIZON FROM FAR LEFT ARE TEST STAND 1-D, TEST STAND 1-C, WATER TANKS ABOVE TEST AREA 1-125, AND TEST STAND 1-B IN TEST AREA 1-120. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. Complexation of buffer constituents with neutral complexation agents: part I. Impact on common buffer properties.

    PubMed

    Riesová, Martina; Svobodová, Jana; Tošner, Zdeněk; Beneš, Martin; Tesařová, Eva; Gaš, Bohuslav

    2013-09-17

    The complexation of buffer constituents with the complexation agent present in the solution can very significantly influence the buffer properties, such as pH, ionic strength, or conductivity. These parameters are often crucial for selection of the separation conditions in capillary electrophoresis or high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and can significantly affect results of separation, particularly for capillary electrophoresis as shown in Part II of this paper series (Beneš, M.; Riesová, M.; Svobodová, J.; Tesařová, E.; Dubský, P.; Gaš, B. Anal. Chem. 2013, DOI: 10.1021/ac401381d). In this paper, the impact of complexation of buffer constituents with a neutral complexation agent is demonstrated theoretically as well as experimentally for the model buffer system composed of benzoic acid/LiOH or common buffers (e.g., CHES/LiOH, TAPS/LiOH, Tricine/LiOH, MOPS/LiOH, MES/LiOH, and acetic acid/LiOH). Cyclodextrins as common chiral selectors were used as model complexation agents. We were not only able to demonstrate substantial changes of pH but also to predict the general complexation characteristics of selected compounds. Because of the zwitterion character of the common buffer constituents, their charged forms complex stronger with cyclodextrins than the neutral ones do. This was fully proven by NMR measurements. Additionally complexation constants of both forms of selected compounds were determined by NMR and affinity capillary electrophoresis with a very good agreement of obtained values. These data were advantageously used for the theoretical descriptions of variations in pH, depending on the composition and concentration of the buffer. Theoretical predictions were shown to be a useful tool for deriving some general rules and laws for complexing systems.

  4. Complexation of buffer constituents with neutral complexation agents: part I. Impact on common buffer properties.

    PubMed

    Riesová, Martina; Svobodová, Jana; Tošner, Zdeněk; Beneš, Martin; Tesařová, Eva; Gaš, Bohuslav

    2013-09-17

    The complexation of buffer constituents with the complexation agent present in the solution can very significantly influence the buffer properties, such as pH, ionic strength, or conductivity. These parameters are often crucial for selection of the separation conditions in capillary electrophoresis or high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and can significantly affect results of separation, particularly for capillary electrophoresis as shown in Part II of this paper series (Beneš, M.; Riesová, M.; Svobodová, J.; Tesařová, E.; Dubský, P.; Gaš, B. Anal. Chem. 2013, DOI: 10.1021/ac401381d). In this paper, the impact of complexation of buffer constituents with a neutral complexation agent is demonstrated theoretically as well as experimentally for the model buffer system composed of benzoic acid/LiOH or common buffers (e.g., CHES/LiOH, TAPS/LiOH, Tricine/LiOH, MOPS/LiOH, MES/LiOH, and acetic acid/LiOH). Cyclodextrins as common chiral selectors were used as model complexation agents. We were not only able to demonstrate substantial changes of pH but also to predict the general complexation characteristics of selected compounds. Because of the zwitterion character of the common buffer constituents, their charged forms complex stronger with cyclodextrins than the neutral ones do. This was fully proven by NMR measurements. Additionally complexation constants of both forms of selected compounds were determined by NMR and affinity capillary electrophoresis with a very good agreement of obtained values. These data were advantageously used for the theoretical descriptions of variations in pH, depending on the composition and concentration of the buffer. Theoretical predictions were shown to be a useful tool for deriving some general rules and laws for complexing systems. PMID:23889602

  5. Complex Moving Parts: Assessment Systems and Electronic Portfolios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Martha J.; Robertson, Royce L.

    2013-01-01

    The largest college within an online university of over 50,000 students invested significant resources in translating a complex assessment system focused on continuous improvement and national accreditation into an effective and efficient electronic portfolio (ePortfolio). The team building the system needed a model to address problems met…

  6. How to Build a Complex, Functional Propeller Protein, From Parts.

    PubMed

    Clark, Patricia L

    2016-04-01

    By combining ancestral sequence reconstruction and in vitro evolution, Smock et al. identified single motifs that assemble into a functional five-bladed β-propeller, and a likely route for conversion into the more complex, extant single chain fusion. Interestingly, although sequence diversification destabilized five-motif fusions, it also destabilized aggregation-prone intermediates, increasing the level of functional protein in vivo.

  7. Tectonostratigraphy of the Mesozoic complexes of the northwestern part of the Koryak Highland, Ust' Belaya Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palechek, T. N.; Moiseev, A. V.; Gul'pa, I. V.

    2016-07-01

    New data on the structure, age, and composition of the tectonostratigraphic complexes of the western part of the Koryak Highland are presented. The conclusions on the sedimentation conditions are drawn and primary relations are interpreted for most complexes. New Kimmeridgian-Tithonian and Berriasian assemblages of radiolarians are established. Campanian radiolarians are found for the first time in the region.

  8. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 414 - Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams B Appendix B to Part 414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Pt. 414, App. B Appendix B to...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 414 - Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams B Appendix B to Part 414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Pt. 414, App. B Appendix B to...

  10. Solar proton exposure of an ICRU sphere within a complex structure Part I: Combinatorial geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2016-06-01

    The 3DHZETRN code, with improved neutron and light ion (Z ≤ 2) transport procedures, was recently developed and compared to Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using simplified spherical geometries. It was shown that 3DHZETRN agrees with the MC codes to the extent they agree with each other. In the present report, the 3DHZETRN code is extended to enable analysis in general combinatorial geometry. A more complex shielding structure with internal parts surrounding a tissue sphere is considered and compared against MC simulations. It is shown that even in the more complex geometry, 3DHZETRN agrees well with the MC codes and maintains a high degree of computational efficiency.

  11. Solar proton exposure of an ICRU sphere within a complex structure Part I: Combinatorial geometry.

    PubMed

    Wilson, John W; Slaba, Tony C; Badavi, Francis F; Reddell, Brandon D; Bahadori, Amir A

    2016-06-01

    The 3DHZETRN code, with improved neutron and light ion (Z≤2) transport procedures, was recently developed and compared to Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using simplified spherical geometries. It was shown that 3DHZETRN agrees with the MC codes to the extent they agree with each other. In the present report, the 3DHZETRN code is extended to enable analysis in general combinatorial geometry. A more complex shielding structure with internal parts surrounding a tissue sphere is considered and compared against MC simulations. It is shown that even in the more complex geometry, 3DHZETRN agrees well with the MC codes and maintains a high degree of computational efficiency. PMID:27345203

  12. Technology improvement of chromium on steel parts electrodeposition using complex command and control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stănescu, A.; Alecusan, A. M.; Dimitescu, A.

    2016-08-01

    The paper aims to provide improved technological process of electrochemical deposition of chromium on steel for decorative parts for corrosion protection but also to improve mechanical properties. The proposed idea is perfectly suited to be grafted onto existing electrodeposition installations, but it can be applied successfully in the development of new such plants. Complex command and control systems are designed to operate in high aggressive environmental conditions specific to these types of installations. The theoretical part completes the experimental results obtained on a laboratory facility.

  13. Numerical Prediction of Elastic Springback in An Automotive Complex Structural Part

    SciTech Connect

    Fratini, Livan; Ingarao, Giuseppe; Micari, Fabrizio

    2007-04-07

    The occurrence of elastic springback phenomena in sheet metal processing operations determines a relevant issue in the automotive industry. The routing and production of 3D complex parts for automotive applications is characterized by springback phenomena affecting the final geometry of the components both after the stamping operations and the trimming ones. In the present paper the full routing of a automotive structural part is considered and the springback phenomena occurring after forming and trimming are investigated through FE analyses utilizing an explicit implicit approach. In particular a sensitivity analysis on process parameter influencing springback occurrence is developed: blank holder force, draw bead penetration and blank shape.

  14. Estrogen action and cytoplasmic signaling cascades. Part I: membrane-associated signaling complexes

    PubMed Central

    Segars, James H.; Driggers, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Remarkable progress in recent years has suggested that estrogen action in vivo is complex and often involves activation of cytoplasmic signaling cascades in addition to genomic actions mediated directly through estrogen receptors α and β. Rather than a linear response mediated solely through estrogen-responsive DNA elements, in vivo estrogen might simultaneously activate distinct signaling cascades that function as networks to coordinate tissue responses to estrogen. This complex signaling system provides for exquisite control and plasticity of response to estrogen at the tissue level, and undoubtedly contributes to the remarkable tissue-specific responses to estrogens. In part I of this series, we summarize cytoplasmic signaling modules involving estrogen or estrogen receptors, with particular focus on recently described membrane-associated signaling complexes. PMID:12217492

  15. Method of producing complex aluminum alloy parts of high temper, and products thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, I. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Fully annealed aluminum sheet is first stretch formed to the complex, doubly compound shape of a previously prepared forming die, e.g., an ejection seat blowout panel of a shuttlecraft. The part is then marked with a series of grid lines for monitoring later elongation. Thereafter it is solution heat treated and refrigerated to retard hardening. While still soft, it is stretched a second time on the same die to induce a modicum of work hardening, after which it is aged to the desired stress corrosion resistant temper, preferably the T8 level, to provide the desired hardness and stress corrosion resistance.

  16. Processing of complex sintered reaction bonded silicon nitride parts by microwave heating

    SciTech Connect

    Kiggans, J.O.; Tiegs, T.N.; Kimrey, H.D. ); Holcombe, C.E. )

    1993-01-01

    Several studies have been conducted over the last several years assessing the use of microwave heating for processing reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) and sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN). Although SRBSN test specimens up to 500g have been processed by using microwave heating, samples have been limited to simple shapes such as tiles. In this study, microwave packaging techniques were developed to process complex SRBSN parts and multiple samples within a single cycle. Physical and mechanical properties of test samples were measured. Comparison studies were performed using conventional furnace processing to establish baseline values and expected statistical variation.

  17. Processing of complex sintered reaction bonded silicon nitride parts by microwave heating

    SciTech Connect

    Kiggans, J.O.; Tiegs, T.N.; Kimrey, H.D.; Holcombe, C.E.

    1993-06-01

    Several studies have been conducted over the last several years assessing the use of microwave heating for processing reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) and sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN). Although SRBSN test specimens up to 500g have been processed by using microwave heating, samples have been limited to simple shapes such as tiles. In this study, microwave packaging techniques were developed to process complex SRBSN parts and multiple samples within a single cycle. Physical and mechanical properties of test samples were measured. Comparison studies were performed using conventional furnace processing to establish baseline values and expected statistical variation.

  18. Mental rotation of letters, body parts and complex scenes: separate or common mechanisms?

    PubMed

    Dalecki, Marc; Hoffmann, Uwe; Bock, Otmar

    2012-10-01

    This study compares mental rotation with three stimuli: letters, body parts and complex scenes. Twenty-four subjects saw letters and judged whether they were mirror-reversed or not (task LETTER), saw pictures of a hand and indicated whether it was a right or a left one (task HAND), and saw drawings of a person at a table on which a weapon and a rose laid and decided whether the weapon was to the person's right or left (task SCENE). Stimuli were presented in canonical orientation or rotated by up to 180°. Our analyses focused on intra-subject correlations between reaction times of the different tasks. We found that reaction times for stimuli in canonical orientation co-varied in HAND and LETTER, the increase of reaction times with increasing object rotation co-varied in HAND and SCENE, and reaction times for 180° rotations co-varied between all tasks. We suggest that basic processes like visual perception and decision-making are distinct for scenes versus letters and body parts, that the mechanism for mental rotation of letters is distinct from that for mental self- and body part rotation, and suggest an extra mechanism for 180° rotations that shared among all tasks. These findings confirm and expand hypotheses about mental rotation that were based on comparisons of between-subject means.

  19. Computer program for calculation of complex chemical equilibrium compositions and applications. Part 1: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Sanford; Mcbride, Bonnie J.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the latest in a number of versions of chemical equilibrium and applications programs developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center over more than 40 years. These programs have changed over the years to include additional features and improved calculation techniques and to take advantage of constantly improving computer capabilities. The minimization-of-free-energy approach to chemical equilibrium calculations has been used in all versions of the program since 1967. The two principal purposes of this report are presented in two parts. The first purpose, which is accomplished here in part 1, is to present in detail a number of topics of general interest in complex equilibrium calculations. These topics include mathematical analyses and techniques for obtaining chemical equilibrium; formulas for obtaining thermodynamic and transport mixture properties and thermodynamic derivatives; criteria for inclusion of condensed phases; calculations at a triple point; inclusion of ionized species; and various applications, such as constant-pressure or constant-volume combustion, rocket performance based on either a finite- or infinite-chamber-area model, shock wave calculations, and Chapman-Jouguet detonations. The second purpose of this report, to facilitate the use of the computer code, is accomplished in part 2, entitled 'Users Manual and Program Description'. Various aspects of the computer code are discussed, and a number of examples are given to illustrate its versatility.

  20. Explicit correlation model of multi-source constraints for Re-design parts with complex curved surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhenyuan; Wang, Fuji; Wang, Yongqing; Guo, Dongming

    2014-03-01

    In precision machining of complex curved surface parts with high performance, geometry accuracy is not the only constraint, but the performance should also be met. Performance of this kind of parts is closely related to the geometrical and physical parameters, so the final actual size and shape are affected by multiple source constraints, such as geometry, physics, and performance. These parts are rather difficult to be manufactured and new manufacturing method according to performance requirement is urgently needed. Based on performance and manufacturing requirements for complex curved surface parts, a new classification method is proposed, which divided the complex curved surface parts into two categories: surface re-design complex curved surface parts with multi-source constraints(PRCS) and surface unique complex curved surface parts with pure geometric constraints(PUCS). A correlation model is constructed between the performance and multi-source constraints for PRCS, which reveals the correlation between the performance and multi-source constraints. A re-design method is also developed. Through solving the correlation model of the typical part's performance-associated surface, the mapping relation between the performance-associated surface and the related removal amount is obtained. The explicit correlation model and the method for the corresponding related removal amount of the performance-associated surface are built based on the classification of surface re-design complex curved surface parts with multi-source constraints. Research results have been used in the actual processing of the typical parts such as radome, common bottom components, nozzle, et al., which shows improved efficiency and accuracy of the precision machining for the surface re-design parts with complex curved surface.

  1. Misho mafic complex - A part of paleotethyan oceanic crust or a magmatism in continental rift?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimzadeh, Zohreh; Jahangiri, Ahmad; Saccani, Emilio; Dilek, Yildirim

    2013-04-01

    Misho Mafic Complex (NW Iran) represents a significant component of the West Cimmerian domain in Paleo-Tethys. The Misho Mafic Complex (MMC) consists of gabbro (mainly) and norıte,olivine gabbro, anorthosite and diorite with the east- west sereight. MMC has ıntrussıved ın Kahar sedımrtery Infta- Cambrıan rocks, crosscut by abundant basaltic dykes and the overlying basaltic sheeted dyke complex. Kahar sedimentary rocks are representing the northern margin of Gondwana. Misho mafic complex are covered by Permian sedimentary rocks. The gabbros and basaltic dykes have MORB affinities. MMC formed as a product of interactions between a depleted MORB-type asthenosphere and plume-type material. Mafic rocks represent an early Carboniferous magmatic event developed during the continental break-up of the northern edge of Gondwanaland that led to the opening of Paleotethys. Alternatively, these magmas may have been emplaced into the continental crust at the continental margin soon after the oceanic crust was formed (that is the oceanic crust was still narrow). There is no data for discriminating between these two hypotheses. In first hypothesis MMC is a part of ophiolites related to paleotethyan oceanic crust and the rocks that were above this crustal level should have necessarily been eroded. In another hypothesis Misho complex represents an aborted rift in a triple junction. Above a mantle plume, the continental crust breaks along three directions at 120 degrees. But, soon after, the extension proceeds along two of these three direction. Between them is formed the oceanic crust. The continental extension along the third direction is aborted. Here no oceanic crust if formed and there is only rifted, thinned continental crust. But, also in the aborted branch MORB magmatism can occur for short time. In this hypothesis, the Misho complex was never associated with oceanic crust, but was anyway associated with the opening of the Paleotethys. This magmatism was originally

  2. Redox control of electric melters with complex feed compositions. Part I: analytical methods and models

    SciTech Connect

    Bickford, D F; Diemer, Jr, R B

    1985-01-01

    The redox state of glass from electric melters with complex feed compositions is determined by balance between gases above the melt, and transition metals and organic compounds in the feed. Part I discusses experimental and computational methods of relating flowrates and other melter operating conditions to the redox state of glass, and composition of the melter offgas. Computerized thermodynamic computational methods are useful in predicting the sequence and products of redox reactions and in assessing individual process variations. Melter redox state can be predicted by combining monitoring of melter operating conditions, redox measurement of fused melter feed samples, and periodic redox measurement of product. Mossbauer spectroscopy, and other methods which measure Fe(II)/Fe(III) in glass, can be used to measure melter redox state. Part II develops preliminary operating limits for the vitrification of High-Level Radioactive Waste. Limits on reducing potential to preclude the accumulation of combustible gases, accumulation of sulfides and selenides, and degradation of melter components are the most critical. Problems associated with excessively oxidizing conditions, such as glass foaming and potential ruthenium volatility, are controlled when sufficient formic acid is added to adjust melter feed rheology.

  3. Numerical Prediction Of Elastic Springback In An Automotive Complex Structural Part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, Livan; Ingarao, Giuseppe; Micari, Fabrizio; Lo Franco, Andrea

    2007-05-01

    The routing and production of 3D complex parts for automotive applications is characterized by springback phenomena affecting the final geometry of the components both after the stamping operations and the trimming ones. FE analyses have to assure effectiveness and consistency in order to be utilized as design tool to be coupled to proper compensating techniques allowing to obtain the desired geometry at the and of the production sequence. In the present paper the full routing of a DP 600 steel automotive structural part is considered and the springback phenomena occurring after forming and trimming are investigated through FE analyses utilizing two different commercial codes. Althought finite element analysis is successful in simulating industrial sheet forming operations, the accurate and reliable applications of this phenomenon and its numerical prediction has not been widely demonstrated. In this paper the influence of the main numerical parameters has been considered i.e. type of the utilized shell element and number of integration points along the thickness, with the aim to improve the effectiveness and reliability of the numerical results. The obtained results have been compared with the experimental evidences derived from CMM acquisitions.

  4. Effect of Voice-Part Training and Music Complexity on Focus of Attention to Melody or Harmony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Lindsey R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible effects of choral voice-part training/experience and music complexity on focus of attention to melody or harmony. Participants (N = 150) were members of auditioned university choral ensembles divided by voice-part (sopranos, n = 44; altos, n = 33; tenors, n = 35; basses, n = 38). The music…

  5. Airborne and ground reconnaissance of part of the syenite complex near Wausau, Marathon county, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vickers, R.C.

    1955-01-01

    Airborne and ground reconnaissance for radioactive minerals in part of the syenite complex near Wausau, Marathon county, Wis., found 12 radioactive mineral localities. The rocks in the area are of Precambrian age and consist of syenite and nepheline syenite, which have intruded older granite, greenstone, quartzite, and argillite. There are very few outcrops, and much of the bedrock is deeply weathered and covered by residual soil. Thorium-bearing zircon pegatite float was found within the area of syenite and nepheline syenite at four localities. Reddish-brown euhedral to subeuhedral crystals of well-zoned zircon (variety cyrtolite) comprise more than 40 percent of some of the specimens. The radioactive mineral at four localities outside the area of syneites was identified as thorogummite, which occurred in nodular masses in residual soil. Alinement of the thorogummite float and associated radioactivity suggests that the thorogummite has resulted from weathering of narrow veins or pegmatites containing thorium-bearing minerals. Unidentified thorium-bearing minerals were found at three localities, and a specimen of allanite weighing about 2 pounds was found at one locality. Shallow trenches at two of the largest radioactivity anomalies showed that the radioactive material extended down into weathered bedrock. The occurrences might warrant additional physical exploration should there be sufficient demand for thorium. Further reconnaissance in the area would probably result in the discovery of additional occurrences.

  6. Complex Parts, Complex Data: Why You Need to Understand What Radiation Single Event Testing Data Does and Doesn't Show and the Implications Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Berg, Melanie D.

    2015-01-01

    Electronic parts (integrated circuits) have grown in complexity such that determining all failure modes and risks from single particle event testing is impossible. In this presentation, the authors will present why this is so and provide some realism on what this means. Its all about understanding actual risks and not making assumptions.

  7. Complex Parts, Complex Data: Why You Need to Understand What Radiation Single Event Testing Data Does and Doesn't Show and the Implications Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Label, Kenneth A.; Berg, Melanie D.

    2016-01-01

    Electronic parts (integrated circuits) have grown in complexity such that determining all failure modes and risks from single particle event testing is impossible. In this presentation, the authors will present why this is so and provide some realism on what this means. Its all about understanding actual risks and not making assumptions.

  8. Geology of the Northern Part of the Harcuvar Complex, West-Central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bryant, Bruce; Wooden, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    In west-central Arizona near the northeast margin of the Basin and Range Province, the Rawhide detachment fault separates Tertiary and older rocks lacking significant effects of Tertiary metamorphism from Precambrian, Paleozoic, and Mesozoic rocks in the Harcuvar metamorphic core complex below. Much of the northern part of the Harcuvar complex in the Buckskin and eastern Harcuvar Mountains is layered granitic gneiss, biotite gneiss, amphibolite, and minor pelitic schist that was probably deformed and metamorphosed in Early Proterozoic time. In the eastern Buckskin Mountains, Early and Middle Proterozoic plutons having U-Pb zircon ages of 1,683?6.4 mega-annum (Ma) and 1,388?2.3 Ma, respectively, intruded the layered gneiss. Small plutons of alkaline gabbro and diorite intruded in Late Jurassic time. A sample of mylonitized diorite from this unit has a U-Pb zircon age of 149?2.8 Ma. In the Early Cretaceous, amphibolite facies regional metamorphism was accompanied by partial melting and formation of migmatite. Zircon from a granitic layer in migmatitic gneiss in the eastern Harcuvar Mountains has a U-Pb age of 110?3.7 Ma. In the Late Cretaceous, sills and plutons of the granite of Tank Pass were emplaced in both the Buckskin and eastern Harcuvar Mountains. In the Buckskin Mountains those intrusions are locally numerous enough to form an injection migmatite. A pluton of this granite crops out over almost half the area of the eastern Harcuvar Mountains. Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks were caught as slices along south-vergent Cretaceous thrusts related to the Maria fold and thrust belt and were metamorphosed beneath a thick sheet of Proterozoic crustal rocks. Inception of volcanism and basin formation in upper-plate rocks indicates that regional extension started at about 26 Ma, in late Oligocene. The Swansea Plutonic Suite, composed of rocks ranging from gabbro to granite, intruded the lower-plate rocks in the Miocene and Oligocene(?). Granite and a gabbro

  9. Granitoid generation and laxfordian tectonic evolution in the northern part of the lewisian complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, A.; Lopez, S.; Fernandez, C.

    2003-04-01

    Several terranes have been distinguished in the Lewisian complex of Scotland. The contact between the Rhiconich and Assynt terranes, in the northern part of the mainland Lewisian complex, is outlined by a major shear zone, the Laxford front. The tectonic activity in this shear zone took place mainly during the Early Proterozoic (1900 to 1600 Ma), defining a Laxfordian period of deformation and metamorphism. Generalized migmatization of the tonalite-trondhjemite (TT) gneisses developed coeval with the intrusion of abundant Fe-diorite tabular bodies in the Rhiconich terrane. Field structures indicate that both TT gneisses and Fe-diorites coexisted as melts or partially molten systems. The composition of the TT gneisses changes to granodioritic in the vicinity of the diorite intrusions. It is suggested that percolation of alkali-rich fluids released from the crystallising diorite magma through the TT migmatites could explain this compositional change. The presence of granite and pegmatite dikes is characteristic of the Rhiconich terrane. The observed structural relationships indicate that the migmatization of the TT gneisses and the intrusion of basic and granitic rocks are simultaneous processes, and that they developed in association with the Laxfordian deformation. In contrast, the Assynt terrane is almost devoid of basic and granitic intrusions during the Laxfordian period. The main structures developed within the Laxford front are a WNW-ESE oriented foliation, dipping to the north, and a lineation slightly plunging to the ESE. Kinematic criteria include composite planar fabrics, asymmetric porphyroclast systems and sheath folds, and allow us to deducing a dextral-reverse sense of movement. Similarly, the Laxfordian deformation in the Rhiconich terrane gave place to a pervasive foliation and lineation, north-verging folds and dextral-reverse minor shear zones. Accordingly, the Laxfordian period in the northern Lewisian can be wholly described as a dextral

  10. Exploring Innovation Processes from a Complexity Perspective. Part II. Experiences from the Subsea Increased Oil Recovery Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aasen, Tone Merethe Berg; Johannessen, Stig

    2007-01-01

    In this second part of the papers, exploring innovation processes from a complexity perspective, we present an empirical example to strengthen further the relevance of the approach. The example draws on a longitudinal research initiative conducted in cooperation with the Norwegian petroleum company Statoil ASA. We conducted our research into the…

  11. The classification of complex 4-part humeral fractures revisited: the missing fifth fragment and indications for surgery.

    PubMed

    Russo, Raffaele; Cautiero, Fabio; Della Rotonda, Giuseppe

    2012-05-01

    We describe a new classification of complex 4-part proximal humeral fractures (PHF). Its novelty lies in the involvement of fractures of the calcar area (i.e., the missing fifth fragment) in relation to fragments of the head, tuberosities and shaft. The classification consists of 6 groups (divided into 15 subgroups) of calcar fracture patterns. We hypothesized that this classification could aid surgical decision making in terms of osteosynthesis versus prothesis. To test this hypothesis, two shoulder surgeons, trained in the classification, re-examined the X-rays and CT scans of 100 cases of 4-part PHF to codify each calcar fracture pattern. CT scans proved to be essential for this process. We then theoretically assigned the most appropriate treatment to each subgroup. Subsequent verification of clinical records confirmed our hypothesis that this classification could help the surgeon to decide the best approach to complex 4-part PHF.

  12. Copper(i) complexes with phosphine derived from sparfloxacin. Part I - structures, spectroscopic properties and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Komarnicka, Urszula K; Starosta, Radosław; Kyzioł, Agnieszka; Jeżowska-Bojczuk, Małgorzata

    2015-07-28

    In this paper we present new copper(i) iodide or copper(i) thiocyanate complexes with hydroxymethyldiphenylphosphine (PPh2(CH2OH)) or phosphine derivatives of sparfloxacin, a 3(rd) generation fluoroquinolone antibiotic agent (PPh2(CH2-Sf)) and 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (dmp) or 2,2'-biquinoline (bq) auxiliary ligands. The synthesised complexes were fully characterised by NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopy as well as by mass spectrometry. Selected structures were additionally analysed using X-ray and DFT methods. All complexes proved to be stable in solution in the presence of water and atmospheric oxygen for several days. The cytotoxic activity of the complexes was tested against two cancer cell lines (CT26 - mouse colon carcinoma and A549 - human lung adenocarcinoma). Applying two different incubation times, the studies enabled a preliminary estimation of the dependence of the selectivity and the mechanism of action on the type of diimine and phosphine ligands. The results obtained showed that complexes with PPh2(CH2-Sf) are significantly more active than those with PPh2(CH2OH). On the other hand, the relative impact of diimine on cytotoxicity is less pronounced. However, the dmp complexes are characterised by strong inhibitory properties, while the bq ones are rather not. This confirms the interesting and promising biological properties of the investigated group of copper(i) complexes, which undoubtedly are worthy of further biological studies.

  13. Part I. Cobalt thiolate complexes modeling the active site of cobalt nitrile hydratase. Part II. Formation of inorganic nanoparticles on protein scaffolding in Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Irene Yuk Man

    Part I. A series of novel cobalt dithiolate complexes with mixed imine/amine ligand systems is presented here as electronic and structural models for the active site in the bacterial enzyme class, nitrile hydratase (NHase). Pentadentate cobalt(II) complexes with S2N 3 ligand environments are first studied as precursors to the more relevant cobalt(III) complexes. Adjustment of the backbone length by removal of a methylene group increases the reactivity of the system; whereas reduction of the two backbone imine bonds to allow free rotation about those bonds may decrease reactivity. Reactivity change due to the replacement of the backbone amine proton with a more sterically challenging methyl group is not yet clear. Upon oxidation, the monocationic pentadentate cobalt(III) complex, 1b, shows promising reactivity similar to that of NHase. The metal's open coordination site allows reversible binding of the endogenous, monoanionic ligands, N 3- and NCS-. Oxygenation of the thiolate sulfur atoms by exposure to O2 and H2O 2 produces sulfenate and sulfinate ligands in complex 8, which resembles the crystal structure of "deactivated" Fe NHase. However, its lack of reactivity argues against the oxygenated enzyme structure as the active form. Six-coordinate cobalt(III) complexes with S2N4 amine/amine ligand systems are also presented as analogues of previously reported iron(III) compounds, which mimic the spectroscopic properties of Fe NHase. The cobalt complexes do not seem to similarly model Co NHase. However, the S = 0 cobalt(III) center can be spectroscopically silent and difficult to detect, making comparison with synthetic models using common techniques hard. Part II. Dodecameric Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase mutant, E165C, stacks along its six-fold axis to produce tubular nanostructures in the presence of some divalent metal ions, as does the wild type enzyme. The centrally located, engineered Cys-165 residues appear to bind to various species and may serve as

  14. On the Reconstruction of a Damped Vibrating System from Two Complex Spectra, Part 2: Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FOLTÊTE, E.; GLADWELL, G. M. L.; LALLEMENT, G.

    2001-02-01

    This experimental-theoretical paper discusses whether, and how accurately, the mass, damping and stiffness matrices for a purportedly two-degree-of-freedom (2-d.o.f.) system may be reconstructed from the measured complex eigenvalues and/or eigenvectors. The system consists of two parallel cantilevered beams with end masses connected by a third, curved beam. Three procedures are used to reconstruct the matrices: the modal (M) method using real natural frequencies, real modes and modal damping factors; Danek's (D) reconstruction from complex eigenvalues and eigenvectors; a reconstruction (E) from complex eigenvalues of the original and constrained system. It is shown that the damping matrix constructed via D is extremely sensitive to errors in the phases of the complex eigenvectors. The reconstruction via E uses only eigenvalues which can be measured much more reliably than eigenvectors.

  15. Hanford facility dangerous waste Part A, Form 3 and Part B permit application documentation, Central Waste Complex (WA7890008967)(TSD: TS-2-4)

    SciTech Connect

    Saueressig, D.G.

    1998-05-20

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation submitted for individual, operating, treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, such as the Central Waste Complex (this document, DOE/RL-91-17). Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1996) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needed by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is contained in the Central Waste Complex permit application documentation, in relation to the Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents section. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever appropriate, the Central Waste Complex permit application documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. Information provided in this Central Waste Complex permit application documentation is current as of May 1998.

  16. Complex home care: Part 2- family annual income, insurance premium, and out-of-pocket expenses.

    PubMed

    Piamjariyakul, Ubolrat; Yadrich, Donna Macan; Ross, Vicki M; Smith, Carol E; Clements, Faye; Williams, Arthur R

    2010-01-01

    Annual costs paid by families for intravenous infusion of home parenteral nutrition (HPN) health insurance premiums, deductibles, co-payments for health services, and the wide range of out-of-pocket home health care expenses are significant. The costs of managing complex chronic care at home cannot be completely understood until all out-of-pocket costs have been defined, described, and tabulated. Non-reimbursed and out-of-pocket costs paid by families over years for complex chronic care negatively impact the financial stability of families. National health care reform must take into account the long-term financial burdens of families caring for those with complex home care. Any changes that may increase the out-of-pocket costs or health insurance costs to these families can also have a negative long-term impact on society when greater numbers of patients declare bankruptcy or qualify for medical disability.

  17. Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors. Part 541: Metal Complexes of Heterocyclic Sulfonamides: A New Class of Antiglaucoma Agents

    PubMed Central

    Scozzafava, Andrea; Jitianu, Andrei

    1997-01-01

    Metal complexes of heterocyclic sulfonamides possessing carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitory properties were recently shown to be useful as intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering agents in experimental animals, and might be developed as a novel class of antiglaucoma drugs. Here we report the synthesis of a heterocyclic sulfonamide CA inhibitor and of the metal complexes containing main group metal ions, such as Be(II), Mg(II), Al(III), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) and the new sulfonamide as well as 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-sulfonamide as ligands. The new complexes were characterized by standard physico-chemical procedures, and assayed as inhibitors of three CA isozymes, CA I, II and IV. Some of them (but not the parent sulfonamides) strongly lowered IOP in rabbits when administered as a 2% solution into the eye. PMID:18475811

  18. Spectral transformation in the SOFI complex for processing photographic images on the ES computer, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debabov, A. S.; Usikov, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    A description is given of three programs catalogued in the form of object modules in the library of a system for processing photographic images computer. PFT is the subprogram of the multi-dimensional BPF of real-valued information, in the operative computer memory. INRECO is a subprogram-interface between the real and complex formats for representing two-dimensional spectra and images. FFT2 is a subprogram for calculating the correlation functions of the image using the previous subprograms.

  19. Greater Than the Sum of Parts: Complexity of the Dynamic Epigenome.

    PubMed

    Soshnev, Alexey A; Josefowicz, Steven Z; Allis, C David

    2016-06-01

    Information encoded in DNA is interpreted, modified, and propagated as chromatin. The diversity of inputs encountered by eukaryotic genomes demands a matching capacity for transcriptional outcomes provided by the combinatorial and dynamic nature of epigenetic processes. Advances in genome editing, visualization technology, and genome-wide analyses have revealed unprecedented complexity of chromatin pathways, offering explanations to long-standing questions and presenting new challenges. Here, we review recent findings, exemplified by the emerging understanding of crossregulatory interactions within chromatin, and emphasize the pathologic outcomes of epigenetic misregulation in cancer. PMID:27259201

  20. Rbfox Proteins Regulate Splicing as Part of a Large Multiprotein Complex LASR.

    PubMed

    Damianov, Andrey; Ying, Yi; Lin, Chia-Ho; Lee, Ji-Ann; Tran, Diana; Vashisht, Ajay A; Bahrami-Samani, Emad; Xing, Yi; Martin, Kelsey C; Wohlschlegel, James A; Black, Douglas L

    2016-04-21

    Rbfox proteins control alternative splicing and posttranscriptional regulation in mammalian brain and are implicated in neurological disease. These proteins recognize the RNA sequence (U)GCAUG, but their structures and diverse roles imply a variety of protein-protein interactions. We find that nuclear Rbfox proteins are bound within a large assembly of splicing regulators (LASR), a multimeric complex containing the proteins hnRNP M, hnRNP H, hnRNP C, Matrin3, NF110/NFAR-2, NF45, and DDX5, all approximately equimolar to Rbfox. We show that splicing repression mediated by hnRNP M is stimulated by Rbfox. Virtually all the intron-bound Rbfox is associated with LASR, and hnRNP M motifs are enriched adjacent to Rbfox crosslinking sites in vivo. These findings demonstrate that Rbfox proteins bind RNA with a defined set of cofactors and affect a broader set of exons than previously recognized. The function of this multimeric LASR complex has implications for deciphering the regulatory codes controlling splicing networks.

  1. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part III: Cyanotic Heart Diseases and Complex Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-07-01

    From the stand point of radiographic analysis most of the complex cyanotic congenital heart diseases (CHD), can be divided into those associated with decreased or increased pulmonary vascularity. Combination of a specific cardiac configuration and status of lung vasculature in a clinical context allows plain film diagnosis to be predicted in some CHD. Correlation of the position of the cardiac apex in relation to the visceral situs is an important information that can be obtained from the plain film. This information helps in gathering information about the atrio-ventricular, ventricular arterial concordance or discordance. Categorization of the cyanotic heart disease based on vascularity is presented below. Thorough understanding of cardiac anatomy by different imaging methods is essential in understanding and interpreting complex cardiac disease. Basic anatomical details and background for interpretation are provided in the previous parts of this presentation.

  2. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part III: Cyanotic Heart Diseases and Complex Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    From the stand point of radiographic analysis most of the complex cyanotic congenital heart diseases (CHD), can be divided into those associated with decreased or increased pulmonary vascularity. Combination of a specific cardiac configuration and status of lung vasculature in a clinical context allows plain film diagnosis to be predicted in some CHD. Correlation of the position of the cardiac apex in relation to the visceral situs is an important information that can be obtained from the plain film. This information helps in gathering information about the atrio-ventricular, ventricular arterial concordance or discordance. Categorization of the cyanotic heart disease based on vascularity is presented below. Thorough understanding of cardiac anatomy by different imaging methods is essential in understanding and interpreting complex cardiac disease. Basic anatomical details and background for interpretation are provided in the previous parts of this presentation. PMID:27630924

  3. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part III: Cyanotic Heart Diseases and Complex Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-07-01

    From the stand point of radiographic analysis most of the complex cyanotic congenital heart diseases (CHD), can be divided into those associated with decreased or increased pulmonary vascularity. Combination of a specific cardiac configuration and status of lung vasculature in a clinical context allows plain film diagnosis to be predicted in some CHD. Correlation of the position of the cardiac apex in relation to the visceral situs is an important information that can be obtained from the plain film. This information helps in gathering information about the atrio-ventricular, ventricular arterial concordance or discordance. Categorization of the cyanotic heart disease based on vascularity is presented below. Thorough understanding of cardiac anatomy by different imaging methods is essential in understanding and interpreting complex cardiac disease. Basic anatomical details and background for interpretation are provided in the previous parts of this presentation. PMID:27630924

  4. The highly conserved orthopoxvirus 68k ankyrin-like protein is part of a cellular SCF ubiquitin ligase complex.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Karin M; Schwantes, Astrid; Schnierle, Barbara S; Sutter, Gerd

    2008-05-10

    The 68k ankyrin-like protein (68k-ank) of unknown function is highly conserved among orthopoxviruses and contains ankyrin repeats and an F-box-like domain. We performed a yeast-two-hybrid screen with 68k-ank to find interacting proteins. From a human and a murine cDNA library, 99% of the interaction partners were S-phase kinase-associated protein 1a (Skp1a), a part of the SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. 68k-ank co-immunoprecipitated with components of the endogenous, mammalian SCF ubiquitin ligase. This interaction was F-box domain dependent and could also be observed in infected cells, indicating that SCF complex formation might be important for the viral life cycle.

  5. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part III: Cyanotic Heart Diseases and Complex Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    From the stand point of radiographic analysis most of the complex cyanotic congenital heart diseases (CHD), can be divided into those associated with decreased or increased pulmonary vascularity. Combination of a specific cardiac configuration and status of lung vasculature in a clinical context allows plain film diagnosis to be predicted in some CHD. Correlation of the position of the cardiac apex in relation to the visceral situs is an important information that can be obtained from the plain film. This information helps in gathering information about the atrio-ventricular, ventricular arterial concordance or discordance. Categorization of the cyanotic heart disease based on vascularity is presented below. Thorough understanding of cardiac anatomy by different imaging methods is essential in understanding and interpreting complex cardiac disease. Basic anatomical details and background for interpretation are provided in the previous parts of this presentation.

  6. A reduced-complexity model for river delta formation - Part 1: Modeling deltas with channel dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, M.; Voller, V. R.; Paola, C.

    2014-07-01

    We develop a reduced-complexity model (RCM) delta formation model, in contrast to reductionist models based on high-resolution computational fluid dynamics. The basic framework of this model (referred in this paper as "DeltaRCM") consists of stochastic parcel-based cellular routing schemes for water and sediment and a set of phenomenological rules for sediment deposition and erosion. The outputs of the model include flow field, water surface topography and bed topography that evolves in time. Results show that DeltaRCM is able to: (1) resolve a wide range of channel dynamics, including elongation, bifurcation, avulsion and migration; (2) in response to the changes in input parameters, produce different types of deltas such as alluvial fan deltas at experimental scale. We also identify three key areas of particular model sensitivity, even at the RCM level: (1) avulsion dynamics is sensitive to dynamic free-surface topography; (2) channel network structure is sensitive to instability at channel mouths which creates bars; and (3) out-of-channel sedimentation is sensitive to water surface slope along channel margins. We also demonstrate a simple stratigraphy tracking component which can display the structure of the deposit in terms of distribution of coarse and fine materials along with the age of the deposit. DeltaRCM is a useful tool for understanding the dynamics of river deltas within a relatively simple cellular representation of water and sediment transport.

  7. Localised slip controlled by dehydration embrittlement of partly serpentinised dunites, Leka Ophiolite Complex, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Kristina G.; Austrheim, Håkon; Cordonnier, Benoit; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    Dehydration of serpentinised ultramafic rocks can increase the pore fluid pressure and induce brittle failure; however the extents of strain localisation and unstable frictional sliding are still under debate. Microstructural and mineralogical evidence from dunites of the Leka Ophiolite Complex in the Central Norwegian Caledonides demonstrates that prograde metamorphism of serpentinite veins led to local fluid production and to the growth of large-grained olivine rich in magnetite inclusions. The epitaxial growth of comparatively Fe-poor prograde olivine on Fe-richer relics of primary olivine caused a high variability in Fe-content, even within single crystals. On a larger scale, the average Fe-content of olivine rises towards the vein edges, which reflects a decrease in the degree of initial serpentinisation towards the host rock. The former distribution of serpentine strongly influenced the mechanical response of the rock to the fluid production during deserpentinisation: The faulting caused by the associated dehydration embrittlement occurred along highly localized slip planes in the centres of the meta-serpentinite veins. Around these slip planes, the prograde olivine experienced significant grain size reduction, but very limited shear strain. The strain concentration on narrow faults, also documented by a sharp offset of chromite layers, and the brittle deformation of the surrounding olivine suggest unstable frictional sliding rather than slower creep. This natural example of deserpentinisation-induced embrittlement illustrates that structural heterogeneities in the form of serpentinite veins have first-order controls on strain localisation and frictional sliding. While strain may be distributed during dehydration of a homogeneous serpentinite, as has been observed in recent experimental studies, it may become strongly localised in a heterogeneous rock volume where fluid pressure is locally increased along pre-existing veins. As most of the oceanic lithosphere

  8. Geologic characteristics and movement of the Meadow Creek landslide, part of the Coal Hill landslide complex, western Kane County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ashland, Francis X.; McDonald, Greg N.; Carney, Stephanie M.; Tabet, David E.; Johnson, Cari L.

    2010-01-01

    The Meadow Creek landslide, part of the Coal Hill landslide complex in western Kane County, Utah, is about 1.7 miles (2.7 km) wide and 1.3 miles (2.1 km) long and contains six smaller historical slides. The upper part of the Meadow Creek landslide is gently sloping and consists of displaced and back-rotated blocks of Cretaceous Dakota and Cedar Mountain Formations that form northeast- to locally east-trending ridges that are separated by sediment-filled half-grabens. The lower part of the landslide is gently to moderately sloping, locally incised, and consists of heterogeneous debris that overrides the Jurassic Carmel Formation near Meadow Creek. Monitoring using a survey-grade Global Positioning System (GPS) instrument detected movement of the southern part of the Meadow Creek landslide between October 2005 and October 2008, including movement of two of the historical slides-landslides 1 and 2. The most movement during the measurement period occurred within the limits of persistently moving landslide 1 and ranged from about 24 to 64 inches (61-163 cm). Movement of the abutting southern part of the Meadow Creek landslide ranged from approximately 6 to 10 inches (15-25 cm). State Route 9 crosses over approximately a mile (1.6 km) of the southern part of the Meadow Creek landslide, including landslide 1. The highway and its predecessor (State Route 15) have been periodically displaced and damaged by persistent movement of landslide 1. Most of the landslide characteristics, particularly its size, probable depth, and the inferred weak strength and low permeability of clay-rich gouge derived from the Dakota and Cedar Mountain Formations, are adverse to and pose significant challenges to landslide stabilization. Secondary hazards include piping-induced sinkholes along scarps and ground cracks, and debris flows and rock falls from the main-scarp escarpment.

  9. Construction of the energy matrix for complex atoms. Part V: Electrostatically correlated spin-orbit and electrostatically correlated hyperfine interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elantkowska, Magdalena; Ruczkowski, Jarosław; Dembczyński, Jerzy

    2016-02-01

    The continuation of the previous series of papers related to the construction of the energy matrix for complex atoms is presented. The contributions from the second-order perturbation theory concerning electrostatically correlated spin-orbit interactions (CSO), as well as electrostatically correlated hyperfine interactions (CHFS) to the atomic structure of nlN, nlNn1l1^{N_1} and nlNn1l1^{N_1}n2l2^{N_2} configurations, are considered. This theory assumes that the electron excitation n0l0→ nl affects spin-orbit splitting and magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole hyperfine structure in the same way which will be discussed below. Part I of the series presented, in general terms, a method allowing the analysis of complex electronic systems. Parts II, III and IV provided a description of an electrostatic interaction up to second-order perturbation theory; they constitute the basis for the design of an efficient computer program package for large-scale calculations of accurate wave functions. Analyses presented in the entire series of our papers clearly demonstrate that obtaining the precise wave functions is impossible without considering the contribution from the second-order effects into fine and hyperfine atomic structure.

  10. Effect of changes in complex part of the refractive index on polarization of light scattered from haze and clouds.

    PubMed

    Plass, G N; Kattawar, G W

    1969-12-01

    The polarization and radiance of the reflected and transmitted radiation is calculated for a continental haze model and for a nimbostratus cloud model. The complex part of the index of refraction n(2) is varied from 0 to 1 in the calculation. Various surface albedos and optical thicknesses for the haze and cloud are considered. The polarization is an especially sensitive function of these parameters. For a thin cloud the reflected polarization depends strongly on the surface albedo. Large polarizations often occur, even at large optical thicknesses, when the single scattering albedo is small, because of the small number of multiple scattered photons. The mean optical path, diffuse flux, and cloud albedo are also discussed.

  11. Modeling of optical spectra of the light-harvesting CP29 antenna complex of photosystem II--part II.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ximao; Kell, Adam; Pieper, Jörg; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2013-06-01

    Until recently, it was believed that the CP29 protein from higher plant photosystem II (PSII) contains 8 chlorophylls (Chl's) per complex (Ahn et al. Science 2008, 320, 794-797; Bassi et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 1999, 96, 10056-10061) in contrast to the 13 Chl's revealed by the recent X-ray structure (Pan et al. Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 2011, 18, 309-315). This disagreement presents a constraint on the interpretation of the underlying electronic structure of this complex. To shed more light on the interpretation of various experimental optical spectra discussed in the accompanying paper (part I, DOI 10.1021/jp4004328 ), we report here calculated low-temperature (5 K) absorption, fluorescence, hole-burned (HB), and 300 K circular dichroism (CD) spectra for CP29 complexes with a different number of pigments. We focus on excitonic structure and the nature of the low-energy state using modeling based on the X-ray structure of CP29 and Redfield theory. We show that the lowest energy state is mostly contributed to by a612, a611, and a615 Chl's. We suggest that in the previously studied CP29 complexes from spinach (Pieper et al. Photochem. Photobiol.2000, 71, 574-589) two Chl's could have been lost during the preparation/purification procedure, but it is unlikely that the spinach CP29 protein contains only eight Chl's, as suggested by the sequence homology-based study (Bassi et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.1999, 96, 10056-10061). The likely Chl's missing in wild-type (WT) CP29 complexes studied previously (Pieper et al. Photochem. Photobiol. 2000, 71, 574-589) include a615 and b607. This is why the nonresonant HB spectra shown in that reference were ~1 nm blue-shifted with the low-energy state mostly localized on about one Chl a (i.e., a612) molecule. Pigment composition of CP29 is discussed in the context of light-harvesting and excitation energy transfer.

  12. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects - Part 2: Complex urban VOCs and model PM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebersviller, S.; Lichtveld, K.; Sexton, K. G.; Zavala, J.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jaspers, I.; Jeffries, H. E.

    2012-03-01

    This is the second study in a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOCs), particulate matter (PM), and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber, both in the dark and in sunlight. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of gas-only- and PM-only-biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model living receptors. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects) from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. Our exposure systems permit side-by-side, gas-only- and PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure for either gases or PM. In Part 1 (Ebersviller et al., 2012a), we demonstrated the existence of PM "effect modification" (NAS, 2004) for the case of a single gas-phase toxicant and an inherently non-toxic PM (mineral oil aerosol, MOA). That is, in the presence of the single gas-phase toxicant in the dark, the initially non-toxic PM became toxic to lung cells in the PM-only-biological exposure system. In this Part 2 study, we used sunlit-reactive systems to create a large variety of gas-phase toxicants from a complex mixture of oxides of nitrogen and 54 VOCs representative of those measured in US city air. In these mostly day-long experiments, we have designated the period in the dark just after injection (but before sunrise) as the "Fresh" condition and the period in the dark after sunset as the "Aged" condition. These two conditions were used to expose cells and to collect chemical characterization samples. We used the same inherently non-toxic PM from the Part 1 study as the target PM for "effect

  13. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects - Part 2: Complex urban VOCs and model PM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebersviller, S.; Lichtveld, K.; Sexton, K. G.; Zavala, J.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jaspers, I.; Jeffries, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    This is the second study in a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOCs), particulate matter (PM), and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber, both in the dark and in sunlight. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of gas-only- and PM-only-biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model living receptors. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects) from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. Our exposure systems permit side-by-side, gas-only- and PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure for either gases or PM. In Part 1 (Ebersviller et al., 2012a), we demonstrated the existence of PM "effect modification" (NAS, 2004) for the case of a single gas-phase toxicant and an inherently non-toxic PM (mineral oil aerosol, MOA). That is, in the presence of the single gas-phase toxicant in the dark, the initially non-toxic PM became toxic to lung cells in the PM-only-biological exposure system. In this Part 2 study, we used sunlit-reactive systems to create a large variety of gas-phase toxicants from a complex mixture of oxides of nitrogen and 54 VOCs representative of those measured in US city air. In these mostly day-long experiments, we have designated the period in the dark just after injection (but before sunrise) as the "Fresh" condition and the period in the dark after sunset as the "Aged" condition. These two conditions were used to expose cells and to collect chemical characterization samples. We used the same inherently non-toxic PM from the Part 1 study as the target PM for "effect

  14. Mineralized and unmineralized calderas in Spain; Part II, evolution of the Rodalquilar caldera complex and associated gold-alunite deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rytuba, J.J.; Arribas, A.; Cunningham, C.G.; McKee, E.H.; Podwysocki, M.H.; Smith, James G.; Kelly, W.C.; Arribas, A.

    1990-01-01

    The Rodalquilar caldera complex is located in the western part of the Cabo de Gata volcanic field in southeastern Spain and is the first documented example of epithermal gold-alunite mineralization within a caldera in Europe. The Rodalquilar caldera is an oval collapse structure having a maximum diameter of 8 km and formed at 11 Ma from eruption of the Cinto ash-flow tuff. The oval Lomilla caldera, with a diameter of 2 km, is nested within the central resurgent dome of the older Rodalquilar caldera. The Lomilla caldera resulted from the eruption of the Lazaras ash-flow tuff which was ponded within the moat of the Rodalquilar caldera. The last phase of volcanic activity in the caldera complex was the emplacement of hornblende andesite flows and intrusions. This magmatic event resulted in structural doming of the caldera, opening of fractures and faults, and provided the heat source for the large hydrothermal systems which deposited quartz-alunite type gold deposits and base metal vein systems. The gold-alunite deposits are enclosed in areas of intense acid sulfate alteration and localized in ring and radial faults and fractures present in the east wall of the Lomilla caldera. Like other acid-sulfate type deposits, the Rodalquilar gold-alunite deposits are closely related in time and space to porphyritic, intermediate composition magma emplaced along caldera structures but unrelated to the caldera forming magmatic system. ?? 1990 Springer-Verlag.

  15. SIPPI: A Matlab toolbox for sampling the solution to inverse problems with complex prior information. Part 1—Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejer Hansen, Thomas; Skou Cordua, Knud; Caroline Looms, Majken; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    From a probabilistic point-of-view, the solution to an inverse problem can be seen as a combination of independent states of information quantified by probability density functions. Typically, these states of information are provided by a set of observed data and some a priori information on the solution. The combined states of information (i.e. the solution to the inverse problem) is a probability density function typically referred to as the a posteriori probability density function. We present a generic toolbox for Matlab and Gnu Octave called SIPPI that implements a number of methods for solving such probabilistically formulated inverse problems by sampling the a posteriori probability density function. In order to describe the a priori probability density function, we consider both simple Gaussian models and more complex (and realistic) a priori models based on higher order statistics. These a priori models can be used with both linear and non-linear inverse problems. For linear inverse Gaussian problems we make use of least-squares and kriging-based methods to describe the a posteriori probability density function directly. For general non-linear (i.e. non-Gaussian) inverse problems, we make use of the extended Metropolis algorithm to sample the a posteriori probability density function. Together with the extended Metropolis algorithm, we use sequential Gibbs sampling that allow computationally efficient sampling of complex a priori models. The toolbox can be applied to any inverse problem as long as a way of solving the forward problem is provided. Here we demonstrate the methods and algorithms available in SIPPI. An application of SIPPI, to a tomographic cross borehole inverse problems, is presented in a second part of this paper.

  16. 3D geometrical inspection of complex geometry parts using a novel laser triangulation sensor and a robot.

    PubMed

    Brosed, Francisco Javier; Aguilar, Juan José; Guillomía, David; Santolaria, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses different non contact 3D measuring strategies and presents a model for measuring complex geometry parts, manipulated through a robot arm, using a novel vision system consisting of a laser triangulation sensor and a motorized linear stage. First, the geometric model incorporating an automatic simple module for long term stability improvement will be outlined in the article. The new method used in the automatic module allows the sensor set up, including the motorized linear stage, for the scanning avoiding external measurement devices. In the measurement model the robot is just a positioning of parts with high repeatability. Its position and orientation data are not used for the measurement and therefore it is not directly "coupled" as an active component in the model. The function of the robot is to present the various surfaces of the workpiece along the measurement range of the vision system, which is responsible for the measurement. Thus, the whole system is not affected by the robot own errors following a trajectory, except those due to the lack of static repeatability. For the indirect link between the vision system and the robot, the original model developed needs only one first piece measuring as a "zero" or master piece, known by its accurate measurement using, for example, a Coordinate Measurement Machine. The strategy proposed presents a different approach to traditional laser triangulation systems on board the robot in order to improve the measurement accuracy, and several important cues for self-recalibration are explored using only a master piece. Experimental results are also presented to demonstrate the technique and the final 3D measurement accuracy. PMID:22346569

  17. 3D Geometrical Inspection of Complex Geometry Parts Using a Novel Laser Triangulation Sensor and a Robot

    PubMed Central

    Brosed, Francisco Javier; Aguilar, Juan José; Guillomía, David; Santolaria, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses different non contact 3D measuring strategies and presents a model for measuring complex geometry parts, manipulated through a robot arm, using a novel vision system consisting of a laser triangulation sensor and a motorized linear stage. First, the geometric model incorporating an automatic simple module for long term stability improvement will be outlined in the article. The new method used in the automatic module allows the sensor set up, including the motorized linear stage, for the scanning avoiding external measurement devices. In the measurement model the robot is just a positioning of parts with high repeatability. Its position and orientation data are not used for the measurement and therefore it is not directly “coupled” as an active component in the model. The function of the robot is to present the various surfaces of the workpiece along the measurement range of the vision system, which is responsible for the measurement. Thus, the whole system is not affected by the robot own errors following a trajectory, except those due to the lack of static repeatability. For the indirect link between the vision system and the robot, the original model developed needs only one first piece measuring as a “zero” or master piece, known by its accurate measurement using, for example, a Coordinate Measurement Machine. The strategy proposed presents a different approach to traditional laser triangulation systems on board the robot in order to improve the measurement accuracy, and several important cues for self-recalibration are explored using only a master piece. Experimental results are also presented to demonstrate the technique and the final 3D measurement accuracy. PMID:22346569

  18. 3D geometrical inspection of complex geometry parts using a novel laser triangulation sensor and a robot.

    PubMed

    Brosed, Francisco Javier; Aguilar, Juan José; Guillomía, David; Santolaria, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses different non contact 3D measuring strategies and presents a model for measuring complex geometry parts, manipulated through a robot arm, using a novel vision system consisting of a laser triangulation sensor and a motorized linear stage. First, the geometric model incorporating an automatic simple module for long term stability improvement will be outlined in the article. The new method used in the automatic module allows the sensor set up, including the motorized linear stage, for the scanning avoiding external measurement devices. In the measurement model the robot is just a positioning of parts with high repeatability. Its position and orientation data are not used for the measurement and therefore it is not directly "coupled" as an active component in the model. The function of the robot is to present the various surfaces of the workpiece along the measurement range of the vision system, which is responsible for the measurement. Thus, the whole system is not affected by the robot own errors following a trajectory, except those due to the lack of static repeatability. For the indirect link between the vision system and the robot, the original model developed needs only one first piece measuring as a "zero" or master piece, known by its accurate measurement using, for example, a Coordinate Measurement Machine. The strategy proposed presents a different approach to traditional laser triangulation systems on board the robot in order to improve the measurement accuracy, and several important cues for self-recalibration are explored using only a master piece. Experimental results are also presented to demonstrate the technique and the final 3D measurement accuracy.

  19. Minimum chemical requirements for adhesin activity of the acid-stable part of Candida albicans cell wall phosphomannoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Kanbe, T; Cutler, J E

    1998-12-01

    This study was conducted to define adhesive characteristics of the acid-stable moiety of the Candida albicans phosphomannoprotein complex (PMPC) on adherence of this fungus to marginal zone macrophages of the mouse spleen. Complete digestion of the acid-stable moiety (Fr.IIS) of the C. albicans PMPC with an alpha-mannosidase or hydrolysis with 0.6 N sulfuric acid destroyed adhesin activity, as determined by the inability of the soluble digests to inhibit yeast cell adherence to the splenic marginal zone. Fr.IIS adhesin activity was decreased following digestion with an alpha-1,2-specific mannosidase. Oligomannosyls consisting of one to six mannose units, which were isolated from the acid-stable part of the PMPC, did not inhibit yeast cell binding and thus do not function alone as adhesin sites in the PMPC. To gain more insight into the minimum requirements for adhesin activity, PMPCs were isolated from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type strain and from mutant strains mnn1, mnn2, and mnn4; the PMPCs were designated scwt/Fr.II, scmn1/Fr.II, scmn2/Fr.II, and scmn4/Fr.II, respectively. S. cerevisiae scmn2/Fr.II lacks oligomannosyl side chain branches from the outer core mannan, and scmn2/Fr.II was the only PMPC without adhesin activity. S. cerevisiae scwt/Fr.II, scmn1/Fr.II, and scmn4/Fr.II showed adhesin activities less than that of C. albicans Fr.II. These three S. cerevisiae PMPCs are generally similar to Fr. IIS, except that the S. cerevisiae structure has fewer and shorter side chains. Immunofluorescence microscopy show that the acid-stable part of the PMPC is displayed homogeneously on the C. albicans yeast cell surface, which would be expected for a surface adhesin. Our results indicate that both the mannan core and the oligomannosyl side chains are responsible for the adhesin activity of the acid-stable part of the PMPC. PMID:9826359

  20. Epigenetic modification of DRG neuronal gene expression subsequent to nerve injury: Etiological contribution to complex regional pain syndromes (Part I)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fuzhou; Stefano, George B.; Kream, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    DRG is of importance in relaying painful stimulation to the higher pain centers and therefore could be a crucial target for early intervention aimed at suppressing primary afferent stimulation. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a common pain condition with an unknown etiology. Recently added new information enriches our understanding of CRPS pathophysiology. Researches on genetics, biogenic amines, neurotransmitters, and mechanisms of pain modulation, central sensitization, and autonomic functions in CRPS revealed various abnormalities indicating that multiple factors and mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of CRPS. Epigenetics refers to mitotically and meiotically heritable changes in gene expression that do not affect the DNA sequence. As epigenetic modifications potentially play an important role in inflammatory cytokine metabolism, neurotransmitter responsiveness, and analgesic sensitivity, they are likely key factors in the development of chronic pain. In this dyad review series, we systematically examine the nerve injury-related changes in the neurological system and their contribution to CRPS. In this part, we first reviewed and summarized the role of neural sensitization in DRG neurons in performing function in the context of pain processing. Particular emphasis is placed on the cellular and molecular changes after nerve injury as well as different models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. These were considered as the potential molecular bases that underlie nerve injury-associated pathogenesis of CRPS. PMID:24961509

  1. Gas migration pathways in a complex faulted hangingwall in the western part of the Norwegian Danish Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauritzen, Emil K.; Clausen, Ole R.; Andresen, Katrine J.

    2013-04-01

    The studied fault is positioned in the westernmost Danish part of the Norwegian Danish Basin at the southern margin of the Northern Permian Basin. The dominating fault is the so called D-1 fault, which is part of a fault trend which follows the southern pinch-out line of the Zechstein salt and detach along the top Zechstein evaporites. Just north of the D-1 fault is the only Danish commercial HC producing area outside the Mesozoic Central Graben -the Siri Canyon- located The presence of gas within the Neogene sediments at the hanging-wall of the D-1 fault was reported in the D-1 well and the D-1 fault was analyzed in detail using 2-D seismic data in the early 90-ies. Due to the open seismic grid used then it was not possible to link the presence of possible gas occurrences and the faults as well as linking the small faults associated to the hanging-wall deformation. The area was subject to renewed interest due to the HC discoveries in the Siri Valley and industrial 3-D seismic data was acquired covering the D-1 fault.The 3D seismic data has enabled a very detailed mapping of the entire D-1 fault complex as well as seismic attribute analysis (courtesy OpendTect). The D-1 fault is in map-view characterized by segments approximately 10 km long striking E-W and NE-SW respectively. In the Cretaceous and Cenozoic part is the main fault coherent whereas the antithetic and secondary synthetic faults in the hanging-wall are smaller (both with respect to offset and length). The character of the internal hanging-wall faults varies along strike of the main fault. In areas adjacent to NE-SW striking segments is the number of faults much higher and they strike both parallel to the main fault and at an angle to it; whereas the faults are longer, less numerous and dominantly parallel to the main fault in the E-W striking central parts. Gas occurrences are observed as bright-spots associated to small faults in the hanging-wall next to the NE-SW striking segments, whereas

  2. Forest Fires, Oil Spills, and Fractal Geometry: An Investigation in Two Parts. Part 2: Using Fractal Complexity to Analyze Mathematical Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biehl, L. Charles

    1999-01-01

    Presents an activity that utilizes the mathematical models of forest fires and oil spills that were generated (in the first part of this activity, published in the November 1998 issue) by students using probability and cellular automata. (ASK)

  3. Remobilization and degradation of Muostakh Island (Laptev Sea) as part of the collapsing Arctic coastal ice complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-García, L.; Vonk, J.; Charkin, A.; Kosmach, D.; Dudarev, O.; Semiletov, I.; Gustafsson, Ö.

    2010-05-01

    East Siberiańs permafrost is thought to contain about 400 GtC (Giga = 109) [1] in form of the so-called Yedoma or Ice Complex, a huge stock of carbon mainly as frozen loess deposits formed during the Last Glacial Maximum (~40,000 years ago). The Pleistocene Ice Complex has not undergone much alteration by soil microorganisms since deposited, which makes it particularly sensitive to global warming effects on large-scale C dynamics. Accelerated coastal erosion of the Ice Complexes is brought on by a combination of thermal collapse, sea-level rise and enhanced wave fetch from loss of coastal sea-ice cover [2, 3]. Despite coastal erosion is estimated to deliver as much OC to the East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS) as all the great Russian-Arctic rivers combined [3], the process is poorly understood, in particular with regard to the fate of the OM derived from coastal erosion. This study aims to alleviate the lack of information on the remobilization of OM from massive coastal erosion in the ESAS. The erosion evolution of a significant example of this destructive geological process (Muostakh Island, SE Laptev Sea), has been observed over the past decade and it has been estimated a retreat rate up to 20 m during the summer months (from 2001 to 2009). In summer 2006, soil samples were collected from Muostakh at 11 different locations along four 'erosion transects', spanning reliefs with ranges of approximately 25 m from the top plateau to the water boundary. On-site CO2measurements were carried out on the surface along five different transects across the island. Quantification of the organic carbon (OC), bulk 14C content and biomarker analysis (n-alkanes, n-alkanoic acids, n-alkanols, sterols) were performed to elucidate whether the old carbon forms eroded from Muostakh Island are subject to degradation. Elemental and isotopic analyses showed a vertical trend of younger (~modern) and C-enriched (OC~38%) material toward the plateau of the island, in contrast to the older

  4. "Why Not Stoichiometry" versus "Stoichiometry—Why Not?" Part III: Extension of GATES/GEB on Complex Dynamic Redox Systems.

    PubMed

    Michałowska-Kaczmarczyk, Anna M; Michałowski, Tadeusz; Toporek, Marcin; Asuero, Agustin G

    2015-01-01

    In the third part of a series of articles issued under a common title, some examples of complex dynamic redox systems are presented and considered from analytical and physico-chemical viewpoints; the analysis is a leitmotiv for detailed, physico-chemical considerations. All attainable physico-chemical knowledge is involved in algorithms applied for resolution of the systems, realized with use of iterative computer programs. The first redox system (System I) is related to titration of FeSO4 + H2C2O4 with KMnO4 solution in acidic (H2SO4) medium, where simultaneous determination of both analytes from a single curve of potentiometric titration is possible. The possibility of the formation of precipitates (FeC2O4 and/or MnC2O4) in this system is taken into considerations. The second system (System II) relates to the complete analytical procedure involved in the iodometric determination of Cu; four consecutive steps of this analysis are considered. As a reasonable tool for explanation of processes occurring during simulated redox titration, speciation diagrams are suggested. This explanation is based on graphical presentation of results obtained from the calculations. The calculations made for this purpose are performed in accordance with principles of the generalized approach to electrolytic systems (GATES) with generalized electron balance (GEB) or GATES/GEB and realized with use of iterative computer programs offered by MATLAB. The reactions proceeding in this system can be formulated, together with their efficiencies, at any stage of the titration. Stoichiometry is considered as the derivative concept when put in context with GATES/GEB. The article illustrates the enormous possibilities and advantages offered by GATES/GEB.

  5. RCRA Part B Permit Application for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory - Volume 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Pamela R. Cunningham

    1992-07-01

    This section of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Part B permit application describes the waste characteristics Of the transuranic (TRU) mixed wastes at the RWMC waste management units to be permitted: the Intermediate-Level Transuranic Storage Facility (ILTSF) and the Waste Storage Facility (WSF). The ILTSF is used to store radioactive remote-handled (RH) wastes. The WSF will be used to store radioactive contact-handled (CH) wastes. The Transuranic Storage Area (TSA) was established at the RWMC to provide interim storage of TRU waste. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A defines TRU waste as waste contaminated with alpha-emitting transuranium radionuclides with half-lives greater than 20 years in concentrations greater than 100 nanocuries per gram (nCi/g) o f waste material. The TSA serves generators both on and off the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The ILTSF is located at the TSA, and the WSF will be located there also. Most of the wastes managed at the TSA are mixed wastes, which are radioactive wastes regulated under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) that also contain hazardous materials regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. These wastes include TRU mixed wastes and some low-level mixed wastes. Accordingly, the TSA is subject to the permitting requirements of RCRA and the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA). Prior to 1982, DOE orders defined TRU wastes as having transuranium radionuclides in concentrations greater than 10 nCi/g, The low-level mixed wastes managed at the TSA are those wastes with 10 to 100 nCi/g of TRU radionuclides that prior to 1982 were considered TRU waste.

  6. Biological evaluation of mechlorethamine-Pt(II) complex, part II: antimicrobial screening and lox study of the complex and its ligand.

    PubMed

    Radojević, Ivana D; Petrović, Zorica D; Čomić, Ljiljana R; Simijonović, Dušica; Petrović, Vladimir P; Hadjipavlou-Litina, Dimitra

    2012-09-01

    The reaction of K(2)PtCl(4) with anticancer-alkylating agent mechlorethamine hydrochloride (CH(3)NH(C(2)H(4)Cl)(2) x HCl = HN2×HCl), in the molar ratio 1 : 2, affords the complex [H2N2](2)[PtCl(4)]. In vitro antimicrobial and lipoxygenase inhibitory activities of the complex and its precursor were evaluated. Antimicrobial activity of the HN2×HCl and [H2N2](2)[PtCl(4)] complex was investigated against 29 species of microorganisms. Testing is performed by microdilution method. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum microbicidal concentration (MMC) have been determined. The difference between antimicrobial activity of precursor and corresponding platinum(II) complex is noticed and the activity of the precursor was higher. Tested compounds demonstrated the high and significant antifungal activity and low to moderate antibacterial activity. It was shown that the gram-positive bacteria were more sensitive than the gram-negative. UV absorbance-based enzyme assays were performed with HN2×HCl and [H2N2](2)[PtCl(4)] complex, in order to evaluate their in vitro inhibitory activity of soybean lipoxygenase (LOX), also. Assay with LOX showed significantly greater inhibitory activity of the complex, than the precursor.

  7. From ligand to complexes. Part 2. Remarks on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase inhibition by beta-diketo acid metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, Alessia; Biemmi, Mariano; Carcelli, Mauro; Carta, Fabrizio; Compari, Carlotta; Fisicaro, Emilia; Rogolino, Dominga; Sechi, Mario; Sippel, Martin; Sotriffer, Christoph A; Sanchez, Tino W; Neamati, Nouri

    2008-11-27

    Previously, we synthesized a series of beta-diketo acid metal complexes as novel HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors (J. Med. Chem. 2006, 46, 4248-4260). Herein, a further extension of this study is reported. First, detailed docking studies were performed in order to investigate the mode of binding in the active site of the free ligands and of their metal complexes. Second, a series of potentiometric measurements were conducted for two diketo acids chosen as model ligands, with Mn(2+) and Ca(2+), in order to outline a speciation model. Third, we designed and synthesized a new set of complexes with different stoichiometries and tested them in an in vitro assay specific for IN. Finally, we obtained the first X-ray structure of a metal complex with HIV-1 IN inhibition activity. Analysis of these results supports the hypothesis that the diketo acids could act as complexes and form complexes with the metal ions on the active site of the enzyme.

  8. Complexes With Biologically Active Ligands. Part 71 Synthesis and Fungitoxic Activity of Metal Complexes Containing 1,3,5-tris-(8-Hydroxyquinolino)- Trichlorocyclo-Triphosphazatriene

    PubMed Central

    Barboiu, Mihai; Guran, Cornelia; Jitaru, Ioana; Cimpoesu, Marilena

    1996-01-01

    Complexes containing 1,3,5-tris-(8-hydroxyquinolino)-trichlorocyclotriphosphazatriene, a new cyclophosphazene ligand, and Co(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) were prepared. The new complexes, having the general formula [MLCl2], [ML2]Cl2, (M=Cu, Co, Ni); [NiLAc], [NiL2Ac]Ac and [ML3]X3 (M=Ni, Co, X=Cl, Ac) were characterised by elemental analysis, electronic-, IR spectroscopy, and electrical conductivity measurements. Some of them inhibited the growth of several fungi species (Aspergillus and Candida spp.) PMID:18472899

  9. Spectroscopic study of the light-harvesting CP29 antenna complex of photosystem II--part I.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ximao; Pan, Xiaowei; Li, Mei; Pieper, Jörg; Chang, Wenrui; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2013-06-01

    Recent structural data revealed that the CP29 protein of higher plant photosystem II (PSII) contains 13 chlorophylls (Chl's) per complex (Pan et al. Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 2011, 18, 309), i.e., five Chl's more than in the predicted CP29 homology-based structure model (Bassi et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 1999, 96, 10056). This lack of consensus presents a constraint on the interpretation of CP29 optical spectra and their underlying electronic structure. To address this problem, we present new low-temperature (5 K) absorption, fluorescence, and hole-burned (HB) spectra for CP29 proteins from spinach, which are compared with the previously reported data. We focus on excitation energy transfer (EET) and the nature of the lowest-energy state(s). We argue that CP29 proteins previously studied by HB spectroscopy lacked at least one Chl a molecule (i.e., a615 or a611), which along with Chl a612 contribute to the lowest energy state in more intact CP29, and one Chl b (most likely b607). This is why the low-energy state and fluorescence maxima reported by Pieper et al. (Photochem. Photobiol.2000, 71, 574) were blue-shifted by ~1 nm, the low-energy state appeared to be highly localized on a single Chl a molecule, and the position of the low-energy state was independent of burning fluence. In contrast, the position of the nonresonant HB spectrum shifts blue with increasing fluence in intact CP29, as this state is strongly contributed to by several pigments (i.e., a611, a612, a615, and a610). Zero-phonon hole widths obtained for the Chl b band at 638.5 nm (5 K) revealed two independent Chl b → Chl a EET times, i.e., 4 ± 0.5 and 0.4 ± 0.1 ps. The latter value is a factor of 2 faster than previously observed by HB spectroscopy and very similar to the one observed by Gradinaru et al. (J. Phys. Chem. B 2000, 104, 9330) in pump-probe experiments. EET time from 650 nm Chl b → Chl a and downward EET from Chl(s) a state(s) at 665 nm occurs in 4.9 ± 0.7 ps. These findings

  10. Highly reduced organometallics of the Group IV elements: Part One. The study of (trmpe) metal tetracarbonyl complexes of titanium, zirconium, and hafnium. Part Two. The study of bis-arene titanium complexes prepared from arene radical anions

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    Potassium naphthalenide reduction of solutions of the Group IV transition metal salts MCl[sub 4][center dot]THF, M = Ti, Zr, and Hf, in the presence of the tridentate phosphine ligand 1,1,1-tris(dimethylphosphinomethyl)ethane (trmpe), at -70[degrees] under Ar, followed by carbonylation at atmospheric pressure, provides the zerovalent carbonylphosphine complexes M(CO)[sub 4](trmpe). Yields range from 5% for Hf to 50% for Ti. The complexes were characterized by [sup 31]P and [sup 13]C NMR studies, and the Zr complex additionally by X-ray crystallography. The titanium complex reacts with triphenylstannide to displace one carbon monoxide ligand, forming the [(trmpe)Ti(CO)[sub 3](Sn(C[sub 6]H[sub 5])[sub 3])] anion. The reduction of TiCl[sub 4][center dot]2THF with arene radical anions provides bis-arene sandwich complexes in high yield (80-95%). For arene = naphthalene, the 18-electron [Ti(C[sub 10]H[sub 8])[sub 2

  11. Heat Transfer in a Complex Trailing Edge Passage for a High Pressure Turbine Blade - Part 1: Experimental Measurements. Part 1; Experimental Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunker, Ronald S.; Wetzel, Todd G.; Rigby, David L.; Reddy, D. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational study has been performed to investigate the detailed heat transfer coefficient distributions within a complex blade trailing edge passage. The experimental measurements are made using a steady liquid crystal thermography technique applied to one major side of the passage. The geometry of the trailing edge passage is that of a two-pass serpentine circuit with a sharp 180-degree turning region at the tip. The upflow channel is split by interrupted ribs into two major subchannels, one of which is turbulated. This channel has an average aspect ratio of roughly 14:1. The spanwise extent of the channel geometry includes both area convergence from root to tip, as well as taper towards the trailing edge apex. The average section Reynolds numbers tested in this upflow channel range from 55,000 to 98,000. The tip section contains a turning vane near the extreme comer. The downflow channel has an aspect ratio of about 5:1, and also includes convergence and taper. Turbulators of varying sizes are included in this channel also. Both detailed heat transfer and pressure distribution measurements are presented. The pressure measurements are incorporated into a flow network model illustrating the major loss contributors.

  12. Resonance assignment of DVU2108 that is part of the Orange Protein complex in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    Neca, António J; Soares, Rui; Carepo, Marta S P; Pauleta, Sofia R

    2016-04-01

    We report the 94 % assignment of DVU2108, a protein belonging to the Orange Protein family, that in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough forms a protein complex named the Orange Protein complex. This complex has been shown to be implicated in the cell division of this organism. DVU2108 is a conserved protein in anaerobic microorganisms and in Desulfovibrio gigas the homologous protein was isolated with a novel Mo-Cu cluster non-covalently attached to the polypeptide chain. However, the heterologously produced DVU2108 did not contain any bound metal. These assignments provide the means to characterize the interaction of DVU2108 with the proteins that form the Orange Protein complex using NMR methods. PMID:26373427

  13. Complexes With Biologically Active Ligands. Part 1. Synthesis of Coordination Compounds of Diazoxide With Transition- and Main-Group Cations

    PubMed Central

    Supuran, Claudiu T.

    1996-01-01

    Complexes of diazoxide (3-methyl-7-chloro-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine-1,1-dioxide) - an antihypertensive and hyperglycemic pharmacological agent - with a series of transition- and main-group di-, triand tetravalent metal ions were prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopic, thermogravimetric, magnetic and conductimetric measurements. The complexes were tested as inhibitors of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), proving modest activity towards CA II and better inhibition of CA I. PMID:18472790

  14. Asymmetric synthesis of α-amino acids via homologation of Ni(II) complexes of glycine Schiff bases. Part 3: Michael addition reactions and miscellaneous transformations.

    PubMed

    Aceña, José Luis; Sorochinsky, Alexander E; Soloshonok, Vadim

    2014-09-01

    The major goal of this review is a critical discussion of the literature data on asymmetric synthesis of α-amino acids via Michael addition reactions involving Ni(II)-complexes of amino acids. The material covered is divided into two conceptually different groups dealing with applications of: (a) Ni(II)-complexes of glycine as C-nucleophiles and (b) Ni(II)-complexes of dehydroalanine as Michael acceptors. The first group is significantly larger and consequently subdivided into four chapters based on the source of stereocontrolling element. Thus, a chiral auxiliary can be used as a part of nucleophilic glycine Ni(II) complex, Michael acceptor or both, leading to the conditions of matching vs. mismatching stereochemical preferences. The particular focus of the review is made on the practical aspects of the methodology under discussion and mechanistic considerations.

  15. Automating Embedded Analysis Capabilities and Managing Software Complexity in Multiphysics Simulation, Part I: Template-Based Generic Programming

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlowski, Roger P.; Phipps, Eric T.; Salinger, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    An approach for incorporating embedded simulation and analysis capabilities in complex simulation codes through template-based generic programming is presented. This approach relies on templating and operator overloading within the C++ language to transform a given calculation into one that can compute a variety of additional quantities that are necessary for many state-of-the-art simulation and analysis algorithms. An approach for incorporating these ideas into complex simulation codes through general graph-based assembly is also presented. These ideas have been implemented within a set of packages in the Trilinos framework and are demonstrated on a simple problem from chemical engineering.

  16. Automating Embedded Analysis Capabilities and Managing Software Complexity in Multiphysics Simulation, Part I: Template-Based Generic Programming

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pawlowski, Roger P.; Phipps, Eric T.; Salinger, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    An approach for incorporating embedded simulation and analysis capabilities in complex simulation codes through template-based generic programming is presented. This approach relies on templating and operator overloading within the C++ language to transform a given calculation into one that can compute a variety of additional quantities that are necessary for many state-of-the-art simulation and analysis algorithms. An approach for incorporating these ideas into complex simulation codes through general graph-based assembly is also presented. These ideas have been implemented within a set of packages in the Trilinos framework and are demonstrated on a simple problem from chemical engineering.

  17. Colony geometry and structural complexity of the endangered species Acropora cervicornis partly explains the structure of their associated fish assemblage.

    PubMed

    Agudo-Adriani, Esteban A; Cappelletto, Jose; Cavada-Blanco, Francoise; Croquer, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, significant efforts have been made to describe fish-habitat associations. However, most studies have oversimplified actual connections between fish assemblages and their habitats by using univariate correlations. The purpose of this study was to identify the features of habitat forming corals that facilitate and influences assemblages of associated species such as fishes. For this we developed three-dimensional models of colonies of Acropora cervicornis to estimate geometry (length and height), structural complexity (i.e., volume, density of branches, etc.) and biological features of the colonies (i.e., live coral tissue, algae). We then correlated these colony characteristics with the associated fish assemblage using multivariate analyses. We found that geometry and complexity were better predictors of the structure of fish community, compared to other variables such as percentage of live coral tissue or algae. Combined, the geometry of each colony explained 40% of the variability of the fish assemblage structure associated with this coral species; 61% of the abundance and 69% of fish richness, respectively. Our study shows that three-dimensional reconstructions of discrete colonies of Acropora cervicornis provides a useful description of the colonial structural complexity and may explain a great deal of the variance in the structure of the associated coral reef fish community. This demonstration of the strongly trait-dependent ecosystem role of this threatened species has important implications for restoration and conservation efforts. PMID:27069801

  18. Colony geometry and structural complexity of the endangered species Acropora cervicornis partly explains the structure of their associated fish assemblage.

    PubMed

    Agudo-Adriani, Esteban A; Cappelletto, Jose; Cavada-Blanco, Francoise; Croquer, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, significant efforts have been made to describe fish-habitat associations. However, most studies have oversimplified actual connections between fish assemblages and their habitats by using univariate correlations. The purpose of this study was to identify the features of habitat forming corals that facilitate and influences assemblages of associated species such as fishes. For this we developed three-dimensional models of colonies of Acropora cervicornis to estimate geometry (length and height), structural complexity (i.e., volume, density of branches, etc.) and biological features of the colonies (i.e., live coral tissue, algae). We then correlated these colony characteristics with the associated fish assemblage using multivariate analyses. We found that geometry and complexity were better predictors of the structure of fish community, compared to other variables such as percentage of live coral tissue or algae. Combined, the geometry of each colony explained 40% of the variability of the fish assemblage structure associated with this coral species; 61% of the abundance and 69% of fish richness, respectively. Our study shows that three-dimensional reconstructions of discrete colonies of Acropora cervicornis provides a useful description of the colonial structural complexity and may explain a great deal of the variance in the structure of the associated coral reef fish community. This demonstration of the strongly trait-dependent ecosystem role of this threatened species has important implications for restoration and conservation efforts.

  19. Colony geometry and structural complexity of the endangered species Acropora cervicornis partly explains the structure of their associated fish assemblage

    PubMed Central

    Cappelletto, Jose; Cavada-Blanco, Francoise; Croquer, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, significant efforts have been made to describe fish-habitat associations. However, most studies have oversimplified actual connections between fish assemblages and their habitats by using univariate correlations. The purpose of this study was to identify the features of habitat forming corals that facilitate and influences assemblages of associated species such as fishes. For this we developed three-dimensional models of colonies of Acropora cervicornis to estimate geometry (length and height), structural complexity (i.e., volume, density of branches, etc.) and biological features of the colonies (i.e., live coral tissue, algae). We then correlated these colony characteristics with the associated fish assemblage using multivariate analyses. We found that geometry and complexity were better predictors of the structure of fish community, compared to other variables such as percentage of live coral tissue or algae. Combined, the geometry of each colony explained 40% of the variability of the fish assemblage structure associated with this coral species; 61% of the abundance and 69% of fish richness, respectively. Our study shows that three-dimensional reconstructions of discrete colonies of Acropora cervicornis provides a useful description of the colonial structural complexity and may explain a great deal of the variance in the structure of the associated coral reef fish community. This demonstration of the strongly trait-dependent ecosystem role of this threatened species has important implications for restoration and conservation efforts. PMID:27069801

  20. Nocturnal Low-Level Jet in a Mountain Basin Complex. Part II: Transport and Diffusion of Tracer under Stable Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Darby, Lisa S.; Allwine, K Jerry; Banta, Robert M.

    2006-05-01

    Differences in nighttime transport and diffusion of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer in an urban complex-terrain setting (Salt Lake City, Utah) are investigated using surface and Dopplerlidar wind data, and large-scale surface pressure differences. Interacting scales of motion, as studied through the URBAN 2000 field program combined with the Vertical Transport and Mixing Experiment (VTMX), explained the differences in the tracer behavior during three separate Intensive Operating Periods (IOPs). With an emphasis on nighttime stable boundary layer conditions, these field programs were designed to study flow features responsible for the nighttime transport of airborne substances. This transport has implications for air quality, homeland security, and emergency response issues if the airborne substances are hazardous. The important flow features investigated included thermally forced canyon and slope flows and a low-level jet (LLJ) that dominated the basin-scale winds when the surface pressure gradient was weak. The presence of thermally forced flows contributed to the complexity and hindered the predictability of the tracer motion within and beyond the city. When organized thermally forced flows were present, the tracer tended to stay closer to the city for longer periods of time, even though a strong basin-scale LLJ did develop. When thermally forced flows were short-lived or absent, the basin-scale low-level jet dominated the wind field and enhanced the transport of tracer material out of the city.

  1. Nocturnal Low-Level Jet in a Mountain Basin Complex. Part I: Evolution and Effects on Local Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banta, Robert M.; Darby, Lisa S.; Fast, Jerome D.; Pinto, James O.; Whiteman, C. David; Shaw, William J.; Orr, Brad W.

    2004-10-01

    A Doppler lidar deployed to the center of the Great Salt Lake (GSL) basin during the Vertical Transport and Mixing (VTMX) field campaign in October 2000 found a diurnal cycle of the along-basin winds with northerly up-basin flow during the day and a southerly down-basin low-level jet at night. The emphasis of VTMX was on stable atmospheric processes in the cold-air pool that formed in the basin at night. During the night the jet was fully formed as it entered the GSL basin from the south. Thus, it was a feature of the complex string of basins draining toward the Great Salt Lake, which included at least the Utah Lake basin to the south. The timing of the evening reversal to down-basin flow was sensitive to the larger-scale north south pressure gradient imposed on the basin complex. On nights when the pressure gradient was not too strong, local drainage flow (slope flows and canyon outflow) was well developed along the Wasatch Range to the east and coexisted with the basin jet. The coexistence of these two types of flow generated localized regions of convergence and divergence, in which regions of vertical motion and transport were focused. Mesoscale numerical simulations captured these features and indicated that updrafts on the order of 5 cm s-1 could persist in these localized convergence zones, contributing to vertical displacement of air masses within the basin cold pool.


  2. Solar proton exposure of an ICRU sphere within a complex structure part II: Ray-trace geometry.

    PubMed

    Slaba, Tony C; Wilson, John W; Badavi, Francis F; Reddell, Brandon D; Bahadori, Amir A

    2016-06-01

    A computationally efficient 3DHZETRN code with enhanced neutron and light ion (Z ≤ 2) propagation was recently developed for complex, inhomogeneous shield geometry described by combinatorial objects. Comparisons were made between 3DHZETRN results and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations at locations within the combinatorial geometry, and it was shown that 3DHZETRN agrees with the MC codes to the extent they agree with each other. In the present report, the 3DHZETRN code is extended to enable analysis in ray-trace geometry. This latest extension enables the code to be used within current engineering design practices utilizing fully detailed vehicle and habitat geometries. Through convergence testing, it is shown that fidelity in an actual shield geometry can be maintained in the discrete ray-trace description by systematically increasing the number of discrete rays used. It is also shown that this fidelity is carried into transport procedures and resulting exposure quantities without sacrificing computational efficiency. PMID:27345204

  3. Solar proton exposure of an ICRU sphere within a complex structure part II: Ray-trace geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Wilson, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2016-06-01

    A computationally efficient 3DHZETRN code with enhanced neutron and light ion (Z ≤ 2) propagation was recently developed for complex, inhomogeneous shield geometry described by combinatorial objects. Comparisons were made between 3DHZETRN results and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations at locations within the combinatorial geometry, and it was shown that 3DHZETRN agrees with the MC codes to the extent they agree with each other. In the present report, the 3DHZETRN code is extended to enable analysis in ray-trace geometry. This latest extension enables the code to be used within current engineering design practices utilizing fully detailed vehicle and habitat geometries. Through convergence testing, it is shown that fidelity in an actual shield geometry can be maintained in the discrete ray-trace description by systematically increasing the number of discrete rays used. It is also shown that this fidelity is carried into transport procedures and resulting exposure quantities without sacrificing computational efficiency.

  4. The grand tour of the Ruby-East Humboldt metamorphic core complex, northeastern Nevada: Part 1 - Introduction & road log

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snoke, A.W.; Howard, K.A.; McGrew, A.J.; Burton, B.R.; Barnes, C.G.; Peters, M.T.; Wright, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this geological excursion is to provide an overview of the multiphase developmental history of the Ruby Mountains and East Humboldt Range, northeastern Nevada. Although these mountain ranges are commonly cited as a classic example of a Cordilleran metamorphic core complex developed through large-magnitude, mid-Tertiary crustal extension, a preceding polyphase Mesozoic contractional history is also well preserved in the ranges. An early phase of this history involved Late Jurassic two-mica granitic magmatism, high-temperature but relatively low-pressure metamorphism, and polyphase deformation in the central Ruby Mountains. In the northern Ruby Mountains and East Humboldt Range, a Late Cretaceous history of crustal shortening, metamorphism, and magmatism is manifested by fold-nappes (involving Archean basement rocks in the northern East Humboldt Range), widespread migmatization, injection of monzogranitic and leucogranitic magmas, all coupled with sillimanite-grade metamorphism. Following Late Cretaceous contraction, a protracted extensional deformation partially overprinted these areas during the Cenozoic. This extensional history may have begun as early as the Late Cretaceous or as late as the mid-Eocene. Late Eocene and Oligocene magmatism occurred at various levels in the crust yielding mafic to felsic orthogneisses in the deep crust, a composite granitic pluton in the upper crust, and volcanic rocks at the surface. Movement along a west-rooted, extensional shear zone in the Oligocene and early Miocene led to core-complex exhumation. The shear zone produced mylonitic rocks about 1 km thick at deep crustal levels, and an overprint of brittle detachment faulting at shallower levels as unroofing proceeded. Megabreccias and other synextensional sedimentary deposits are locally preserved in a tilted, upper Eocene through Miocene stratigraphic sequence. Neogene magmatism included the emplacement of basalt dikes and eruption of rhyolitic rocks. Subsequent

  5. Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Simulations and Modeling of Complex Hydrodynamic Flows Part 1. Regular Shock Refraction

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, O; Latini, M

    2004-06-18

    Shock refraction is a fundamental shock phenomenon observed when shocks interact with a material interface separating gases with different properties. Following refraction, a transmitted shock enters the second gas and a reflected wave returns back into the first gas. In the case of regular shock refraction all waves meet at a single point called the triple-point, creating five different states for the two gases. Analytical methods based on shock polar analysis [9, 16] have been developed to determine the state of two ideal gases in each of the five refraction regions. Furthermore, shock refraction constitutes a basic example of complex hydrodynamic flows. For this reason, shock refraction is used in this report as one validation of the high-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) shock-capturing method, as implemented in the HOPE code. The following two-step validation process is adopted. First, analytical results are obtained for the normal and oblique shock refraction (with shock-interface angle {beta}{sub int} = 75) observed for a Ma = 1.2 shock. To validate the single-fluid and the two-fluid implementations of the WENO method, two pairs of gases, argon/xenon, having equal adiabatic exponents {gamma} and air(acetone)/sulfur hexafluoride, having different adiabatic exponents {gamma}, are considered. Both the light-to-heavy and heavy-to-light configurations are considered. Second, numerical simulations are performed using the fifth-order WENO method and values of the density, pressure, temperature, speed of sound, and flow velocity in each of the five refraction regions are compared with the analytical predictions from shock polar analysis. In all cases considered, excellent agreement between the simulation results and the analytical predictions was found. The results from this investigation suggest that the WENO method is a very useful numerical method for the simulation and modeling of complex hydrodynamic flows.

  6. Automating Embedded Analysis Capabilities and Managing Software Complexity in Multiphysics Simulation, Part II: Application to Partial Differential Equations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pawlowski, Roger P.; Phipps, Eric T.; Salinger, Andrew G.; Owen, Steven J.; Siefert, Christopher M.; Staten, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    A template-based generic programming approach was presented in Part I of this series of papers [Sci. Program. 20 (2012), 197–219] that separates the development effort of programming a physical model from that of computing additional quantities, such as derivatives, needed for embedded analysis algorithms. In this paper, we describe the implementation details for using the template-based generic programming approach for simulation and analysis of partial differential equations (PDEs). We detail several of the hurdles that we have encountered, and some of the software infrastructure developed to overcome them. We end with a demonstration where we present shape optimization and uncertaintymore » quantification results for a 3D PDE application.« less

  7. Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Simulations and Modeling of Complex Hydrodynamic Flows. Part 1. Regular Shock Refraction

    SciTech Connect

    Latini, M; Schilling, O

    2005-01-31

    Shock refraction is a fundamental shock phenomenon observed when shocks interact with a material interface separating gases with different properties. Following refraction, a transmitted shock enters the second gas and a reflected wave returns back into the first gas. In the case of regular shock refraction, all of the waves meet at a single point called the triple-point, creating five different states for the two gases. Analytical methods based on shock polar analysis have been developed to determine the state of two ideal gases in each of the five refraction regions. Furthermore, shock refraction constitutes a basic example of complex hydrodynamic flows. For this reason, shock refraction is used in this report as one validation of the high-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) shock-capturing method, as implemented in the HOPE code. The algorithms used in the HOPE code are described in detail, together with its current capabilities. The following two-step validation process is adopted. First, analytical results are obtained for the normal and oblique shock refraction (with shock-interface angle {beta}{sub interface} = 75{sup o}) observed for a Ma = 1.2 shock. To validate the single-fluid and the two-fluid implementations of the WENO method, two pairs of gases, argon/xenon, having equal adiabatic exponents {gamma} and air(acetone)/sulfur hexafluoride, having different adiabatic exponents, are considered. Both the light-to-heavy and heavy-to-light gas configurations are considered. Second, numerical simulations are performed using the fifth-order WENO method and values of the density, pressure, temperature, speed of sound, and flow velocity in each of the five refraction regions are compared with the analytical predictions obtained from shock polar analysis. In all of the cases considered, excellent agreement is found between the simulation results and the analytical predictions. The results from this investigation suggest that the WENO method

  8. Synthesis, complex formation, spectral and crystallographic investigations of new crown ethers containing recognition site for sodium. Part V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayvalı, Z.; Hayvalı, M.; Kılıç, Z.; Hökelek, T.

    2001-10-01

    The monotopic crown ether ligands (5 and 6) and their sodium perchlorate complexes (5a and 6a) have been synthesized. The crystal structure of (5) has been determined, which contains 1 mol of water molecule. Compound (5) crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/ c with a=39.324(8), b=8.011(1), c=16.877(4) Å, β=107.61(2)°, V=5067.5(2) Å 3, Z=8 and Dcalc=1.289 g m -3. The relative macrocyclic inner hole size, estimated as twice the mean distance of the donor atoms from their centroid is approximately 1.68 Å. The phenazone and benzo crown ether precursors about CN imine bond are in anti ( E) configuration. The CN imine bond length and CN-C bond angle are 1.270(3) Å and 120.4(2)°, respectively. Compounds (6) and (6a) are in phenol-imine forms as supported by 1H-NMR and UV-visible data.

  9. Overview of 3D registration techniques including loop minimization for the complete acquisition of large manufactured parts and complex environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batlle, E.; Matabosch, C.; Salvi, J.

    2007-01-01

    3D modelling is becoming an important research topic for visual inspection in automatic quality control. Through visual inspection it is possible to determine whether a product fulfills the required specifications or whether it contains surface or volume imperfections. Although some process such as color analysis can be achieved by 2D techniques, more challenging tasks such as volume inspection of large and complex objects/scenes may require the use of accurate 3D registration techniques. 3D Simultaneous Localization and Mapping has become a very important research topic not only in the computer vision community for quality control applications but also in the robotics field for solving problems such as robot navigation and registration of large surfaces. Although their techniques differ slightly depending on the application, both communities tend to solve similar problems by means of different approaches. This paper presents a survey of the techniques used by the robotics and computer vision communities in which every approach has been compared pointing out their pros and cons and their potential applications.

  10. Epidemiological risk for Trypanosoma cruzi transmission by species of Phyllosoma complex in the occidental part of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Magallón-Gastélum, Ezequiel; Lozano-Kasten, Felipe; Gutierréz, Margarita Soto; Flores-Pérez, Angelica; Sánchez, Beatriz; Espinoza, Bertha; Bosseno, Marie-France; Brenière, Simone F

    2006-03-01

    Domestic and peridomestic triatomine populations were collected in three rural Mexican communities of Jalisco, Nayarit and Zacatecas states. Triatoma longipennis and T. picturata (Phyllosoma complex) were the principal species unequally distributed in the villages: T. longipennis was the main species in two communities and T. picturata in the third one. Peridomestic infestation and colonization indexes were remarkably high ranging from 26.1% to 50% and from 58.3% to 85.7%, respectively. Moreover, domestic (indoor) infestation was observed in only one of the communities infested by T. longipennis. The preliminary study of temporal variation indicates increasing trend of the triatomine population and infestation rates during the dry season. Triatomine infection rates ranged from 41.2% to 60.2% and all the flagellate isolates were assigned to T. cruzi I. The majority of the dwellings were built with modern building materials and the sanitary conditions were generally good. High peridomestic infestations must be considered as a risk factor of Chagas disease transmission and further studies are needed to better understand the peridomestic conditions favoring the establishment of the triatomines. The contribution of such study to enlarger knowledge of epidemiological features of Chagas disease in Mexico is considered.

  11. Heat Transfer in a Complex Trailing Edge Passage for a High Pressure Turbine Blade. Part 2:; Simulation Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, David L.; Bunker, Ronald S.

    2002-01-01

    A combined experimental and numerical study to investigate the heat transfer distribution in a complex blade trailing edge passage was conducted. The geometry consists of a two pass serpentine passage with taper toward the trailing edge, as well as from hub to tip. The upflow channel has an average aspect ratio of roughly 14:1, while the exit passage aspect ratio is about 5:1. The upflow channel is split in an interrupted way and is smooth on the trailing edge side of the split and turbulated on the other side. A turning vane is placed near the tip of the upflow channel. Reynolds numbers in the range of 31,000 to 61,000, based on inlet conditions, were simulated numerically. The simulation was performed using the Glenn-HT code, a full three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver using the Wilcox k-omega turbulence model. A structured multi-block grid is used with approximately 4.5 million cells and average y+ values on the order of unity. Pressure and heat transfer distributions are presented with comparison to the experimental data. While there are some regions with discrepancies, in general the agreement is very good for both pressure and heat transfer.

  12. Determining Omics spatiotemporal dimensions using exciting new nanoscopy techniques to assess complex cell responses to DNA damage: part B--structuromics.

    PubMed

    Falk, Martin; Hausmann, Michael; Lukášová, Emílie; Biswas, Abin; Hildenbrand, Georg; Davídková, Marie; Krasavin, Evgeny; Kleibl, Zdeněk; Falková, Iva; Ježková, Lucie; Štefančíková, Lenka; Ševčík, Jan; Hofer, Michal; Bačíková, Alena; Matula, Pavel; Boreyko, Alla; Vachelová, Jana; Michaelidisová, Anna; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Recent groundbreaking developments in Omics and bioinformatics have generated new hope for overcoming the complexity and variability of (radio)biological systems while simultaneously shedding more light on fundamental radiobiological questions that have remained unanswered for decades. In the era of Omics, our knowledge of how genes and dozens of proteins interact in the frame of complex signaling and repair pathways (or, rather, networks) to preserve the integrity of the genome has been rapidly expanding. Nevertheless, these functional networks must be observed with strong correspondence to the cell nucleus, which is the main target of ionizing radiation. Information regarding these intricate processes cannot be achieved using high-throughput Omics approaches alone; it requires sophisticated structural probing and imaging. In the first part of this review, the article "Giving Omics Spatiotemporal Dimensions Using Exciting New Nanoscopy Techniques to Assess Complex Cell Responses to DNA Damage: Part A--Radiomics," we showed the development of different Omics solutions and how they are contributing to a better understanding of cellular radiation response. In this Part B we show how high-resolution confocal microscopy as well as novel approaches of molecular localization nanoscopy fill the gaps to successfully place Omics data in the context of space and time. The dynamics of double-strand breaks during repair processes and chromosomal rearrangements at the microscale correlated to aberration induction are explained. For the first time we visualize pan-nuclear nucleosomal rearrangements and clustering at the nanoscale during repair processes. Finally, we introduce a novel method of specific chromatin nanotargeting based on a computer database search of uniquely binding oligonucleotide combinations (COMBO-FISH). With these challenging techniques on hand, we speculate future perspectives that may combine specific COMBO-FISH nanoprobing and structural nanoscopy to

  13. Chemical Analysis of a "Miller-Type" Complex Prebiotic Broth: Part I: Chemical Diversity, Oxygen and Nitrogen Based Polymers.

    PubMed

    Wollrab, Eva; Scherer, Sabrina; Aubriet, Frédéric; Carré, Vincent; Carlomagno, Teresa; Codutti, Luca; Ott, Albrecht

    2016-06-01

    In a famous experiment Stanley Miller showed that a large number of organic substances can emerge from sparking a mixture of methane, ammonia and hydrogen in the presence of water (Miller, Science 117:528-529, 1953). Among these substances Miller identified different amino acids, and he concluded that prebiotic events may well have produced many of Life's molecular building blocks. There have been many variants of the original experiment since, including different gas mixtures (Miller, J Am Chem Soc 77:2351-2361, 1955; Oró Nature 197:862-867, 1963; Schlesinger and Miller, J Mol Evol 19:376-382, 1983; Miyakawa et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci 99:14,628-14,631, 2002). Recently some of Miller's remaining original samples were analyzed with modern equipment (Johnson et al. Science 322:404-404, 2008; Parker et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci 108:5526-5531, 2011) and a total of 23 racemic amino acids were identified. To give an overview of the chemical variety of a possible prebiotic broth, here we analyze a "Miller type" experiment using state of the art mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. We identify substances of a wide range of saturation, which can be hydrophilic, hydrophobic or amphiphilic in nature. Often the molecules contain heteroatoms, with amines and amides being prominent classes of molecule. In some samples we detect ethylene glycol based polymers. Their formation in water requires the presence of a catalyst. Contrary to expectations, we cannot identify any preferred reaction product. The capacity to spontaneously produce this extremely high degree of molecular variety in a very simple experiment is a remarkable feature of organic chemistry and possibly prerequisite for Life to emerge. It remains a future task to uncover how dedicated, organized chemical reaction pathways may have arisen from this degree of complexity.

  14. Chemical Analysis of a "Miller-Type" Complex Prebiotic Broth. Part I: Chemical Diversity, Oxygen and Nitrogen Based Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollrab, Eva; Scherer, Sabrina; Aubriet, Frédéric; Carré, Vincent; Carlomagno, Teresa; Codutti, Luca; Ott, Albrecht

    2016-06-01

    In a famous experiment Stanley Miller showed that a large number of organic substances can emerge from sparking a mixture of methane, ammonia and hydrogen in the presence of water (Miller, Science 117:528-529, 1953). Among these substances Miller identified different amino acids, and he concluded that prebiotic events may well have produced many of Life's molecular building blocks. There have been many variants of the original experiment since, including different gas mixtures (Miller, J Am Chem Soc 77:2351-2361, 1955; Oró Nature 197:862-867, 1963; Schlesinger and Miller, J Mol Evol 19:376-382, 1983; Miyakawa et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci 99:14,628-14,631, 2002). Recently some of Miller's remaining original samples were analyzed with modern equipment (Johnson et al. Science 322:404-404, 2008; Parker et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci 108:5526-5531, 2011) and a total of 23 racemic amino acids were identified. To give an overview of the chemical variety of a possible prebiotic broth, here we analyze a "Miller type" experiment using state of the art mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. We identify substances of a wide range of saturation, which can be hydrophilic, hydrophobic or amphiphilic in nature. Often the molecules contain heteroatoms, with amines and amides being prominent classes of molecule. In some samples we detect ethylene glycol based polymers. Their formation in water requires the presence of a catalyst. Contrary to expectations, we cannot identify any preferred reaction product. The capacity to spontaneously produce this extremely high degree of molecular variety in a very simple experiment is a remarkable feature of organic chemistry and possibly prerequisite for Life to emerge. It remains a future task to uncover how dedicated, organized chemical reaction pathways may have arisen from this degree of complexity.

  15. Leucine-induced activation of translational initiation is partly regulated by the branched-chain {alpha}-keto acid dehydrogenase complex in C2C12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, Naoya . E-mail: nakai@hss.osaka-u.ac.jp; Shimomura, Yoshiharu; Tamura, Tomohiro; Tamura, Noriko; Hamada, Koichiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2006-05-19

    Branched-chain amino acid leucine has been shown to activate the translational regulators through the mammalian target of rapamycin. However, the leucine's effects are self-limiting because leucine promotes its own disposal by an oxidative pathway. The irreversible and rate-limiting step in the leucine oxidation pathway is catalyzed by the branched-chain {alpha}-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complex. The complex contains E1 ({alpha}2{beta}2), E2, and E3 subunits, and its activity is abolished by phosphorylation of the E1{alpha} subunit by BCKDH kinase. The relationship between the activity of BCKDH complex and leucine-mediated activation of the protein translation was investigated using the technique of RNA interference. The activity of BCKDH complex in C2C12 cell was modulated by transfection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) for BCKDH E2 subunit or BCKDH kinase. Transfection of siRNAs decreased the mRNA expression and protein amount of corresponding gene. Suppression of either E2 subunit or kinase produced opposite effects on the cell proliferation and the activation of translational regulators by leucine. Suppression of BCKDH kinase for 48 h resulted in decreasing cell proliferation. In contrast, E2 suppression led to increased amount of total cellular protein. The phosphorylation of p70 S6 kinase by leucine was increased in E2-siRNA transfected C2C12 cells, whereas the leucine's effect was diminished in kinase-siRNA transfected cells. These results suggest that the activation of the translational regulators by leucine was partly regulated by the activity of BCKDH complex.

  16. Delta III reverse shoulder arthroplasty in the treatment of complex 3- and 4-part fractures of the proximal humerus: 6 to 42 months of follow up

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a growing tendency for complex proximal humerus fractures (PHF) in osteoporotic patients to be treated with reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). It has been proposed that RSA has more benefits than other treatment options. The aim of our study was to investigate preoperative characteristics as well as clinical and radiological outcomes in patients with complex 3- or 4-part PHF who had undergone primary RSA. Methods Patients with a minimum follow-up of 6 months who had undergone a primary RSA after 3- or 4-part PHF in the period between 2008 and 2011 were eligible for the study. Clinical records, X-rays and CT-scans were investigated and a clinical examination was performed. Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score and Constant-Murley score (CMS) were calculated. Sixteen patients were examined as part of the study. The mean follow-up was 20 months (range 6-42 months). According to Codman-Hertel classification we encountered 15 Hertel “12” and 1 Hertel “8” type fractures. Results Thirty-two patients (27 female – 84.4%) with a mean age of 72 years underwent operations to treat complex 3- and 4-part fractures of the proximal humerus. Sixteen patients were reexamined. In 14 cases the dominant upper extremity was on the right, in 2 cases it was on the left, in 6 cases the right side was affected and in 10 cases the left side was affected. The mean CMS was 54.8 (range 18-95) and the mean DASH was 37.5 (range 2.9-81). A trend was established between the CMS and dominance of the affected shoulder. The CMS was better if the affected shoulder was on the non-dominant side (p-value 0.051). No statistical difference was noted between age and clinical outcome. Conclusions Our mid-term follow-up shows satisfying results in terms of the treatment of severe displaced fractures in elderly patients with RSA. RSA can provide immediate relief and good shoulder function in elderly patients. Nevertheless, the question of longevity of these

  17. Late Proterozoic island-arc complexes and tectonic belts in the southern part of the Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenwood, William R.; Stoeser, D.B.; Fleck, R.J.; Stacey, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Two main subdivisions of layered rocks are recognized in the southern Arabian Shield south of lat 22? N. These are an older ensimatic-arc complex, which formed 1100-800 m.y. ago, and a younger marginal-arc complex, which formed 800-690 m.y. ago. The older ensimatic-arc complex, located in the southwestern part of the Shield, includes graywacke and mafic to intermediate volcanic rocks of the essentially contemporaneous Baish, Bahah, and Jiddah groups. Although the younger arc complex is also dominantly ensimatic in character, it is also partly superimposed over the older ensimaticarc complex. The superimposed portions of the younger arc complex are represented by the Ablah, Samran, and possibly the Ararat groups. The ensimatic portion of the younger arc group is represented by the Halaban group, which was deposited to the east and northeast of the older ensimatic-arc complex. The Halaban group includes andesitic and dacitic volcanic rocks and associated clastic sedimentary rocks. The layered rocks of both arc complexes are intruded by dioritic (quartz diorite, tonalite, trondhjemite) plutonic rocks. The southern Shield is also subdivided into a number of structurally bounded, north-trending tectonic belts. Within the older ensimatic complex, three belts are recognized. From west to east, these are the Lith, Bidah, and Tayyah belts. Within these three belts, progressive facies changes indicate a gradation from deep-water facies in the south to shallow-water or-terrestrial facies in the north. The distribution of dioritic batholiths, as well as the distribution of layered-rock facies, suggests a northwest-trending axis for the older ensimatic-arc complex. The younger arc complex is present within six belts, the Makkah source papers. In Fleck and others (1980), the term 'quartz diorite' includes both tonalite and quartz diorite as defined in the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) system of plutonic rock classification (Streckeisen, 1973). Initial 87Sr/86

  18. K/Ar mineral geochronology of the northern part of the Sithonia Plutonic Complex (Chalkidiki, Greece): implications for its thermal history and geodynamic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipera, Kyriaki; Koroneos, Antonis; Soldatos, Triantafyllos; Pécskay, Zoltán; Christofides, Georgios

    2013-04-01

    New K/Ar mineral ages of thirty nine samples (biotite, muscovite, K-feldspar) from the two-mica granodiorite to granite and leucogranite of the northern part of the Sithonia Plutonic Complex (Chalkidiki, Greece) are given in the present study. These data along with existing Rb/Sr mica and U/Pb zircon ages are used to investigate the thermal history of the plutonic complex and shed light on the process that affected it, and caused discordant Rb/Sr and K/Ar mineral ages. The K/Ar mineral dating yielded ages ranging from 38 to 49 Ma for muscovites, 32 to 47 Ma for biotites and 37 to 43 Ma for K-feldspars, respectively. The comparison of the K/Ar, Rb/Sr and U/Pb mineral ages and the closure temperatures of the different isotopic systems for the different minerals indicate a rapid cooling rate for the Sithonia pluton. The latter supports the hypothesis that the pluton was formed in a post orogenic extensional regime. Moreover, the K/Ar mineral isochrones indicate that a reheating of the pluton took place before 37 Ma and partially rejuvenated the K/Ar and Rb/Sr isotopic system of the minerals

  19. Determining Omics spatiotemporal dimensions using exciting new nanoscopy techniques to assess complex cell responses to DNA damage: part A--radiomics.

    PubMed

    Falk, Martin; Hausmann, Michael; Lukášová, Emílie; Biswas, Abin; Hildenbrand, Georg; Davídková, Marie; Krasavin, Evgeny; Kleibl, Zdeněk; Falková, Iva; Ježková, Lucie; Štefančíková, Lenka; Ševčík, Jan; Hofer, Michal; Bačíková, Alena; Matula, Pavel; Boreyko, Alla; Vachelová, Jana; Michaelidesová, Anna; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Recent ground-breaking developments in Omics have generated new hope for overcoming the complexity and variability of biological systems while simultaneously shedding more light on fundamental radiobiological questions that have remained unanswered for decades. In the era of Omics, our knowledge of how genes and proteins interact in the frame of complex networks to preserve genome integrity has been rapidly expanding. Nevertheless, these functional networks must be observed with strong correspondence to the cell nucleus, which is the main target of ionizing radiation. Nuclear architecture and nuclear processes, including DNA damage responses, are precisely organized in space and time. Information regarding these intricate processes cannot be achieved using high-throughput Omics approaches alone, but requires sophisticated structural probing and imaging. Based on the results obtained from studying the relationship between higher-order chromatin structure, DNA double-strand break induction and repair, and the formation of chromosomal translocations, we show the development of Omics solutions especially for radiation research (radiomics) (discussed in this article) and how confocal microscopy as well as novel approaches of molecular localization nanoscopy fill the gaps to successfully place the Omics data in the context of space and time (discussed in our other article in this issue, "Determining Omics Spatiotemporal Dimensions Using Exciting New Nanoscopy Techniques to Assess Complex Cell Responses to DNA Damage: Part B--Structuromics"). Finally, we introduce a novel method of specific chromatin nanotargeting and speculate future perspectives, which may combine nanoprobing and structural nanoscopy to observe structure-function correlations in living cells in real time. Thus, the Omics networks obtained from function analyses may be enriched by real-time visualization of Structuromics.

  20. Molecular components of the B cell antigen receptor complex of class IgD differ partly from those of IgM.

    PubMed Central

    Wienands, J; Hombach, J; Radbruch, A; Riesterer, C; Reth, M

    1990-01-01

    Two classes of immunoglobulin, IgM and IgD, are present as antigen receptors on the surface of mature B lymphocytes. We show here that IgD molecules are noncovalently associated in the B cell membrane with a heterodimer consisting of two proteins of 35 kd (IgD-alpha) and 39 kd (Ig-beta), respectively. The two novel proteins are not found in the IgD-expressing myeloma J558L delta m, which fails to bring IgD antigen receptor onto the cell surface. In a surface IgD positive variant line of this myeloma, however, membrane-bound IgD molecules are associated with the heterodimer, suggesting that the formation of an antigen receptor complex is required for surface IgD expression. We further demonstrate that the IgD-associated heterodimer differs partly from that of the IgM antigen receptor and that its binding to the heavy chain only requires the presence of the last constant domain and the transmembrane part of the delta m chain. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2303036

  1. Mg-K mafic magmatism and catastrophic melting of the Variscan crust in the southern part of the Velay complex (Massif Central, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couzinié, Simon; Moyen, Jean-François; Villaros, Arnaud; Marignac, Christian; Paquette, Jean-Louis; Scarrow, Jane

    2013-04-01

    The Late Carboniferous Velay complex is a large migmatite dome extending over the central-eastern part of the French Massif Central. Two stages of migmatization were recognized in the southern edge of the complex : (1) "Pre-Velay" anatexis under biotite stable and water saturated conditions. (2) "Velay" water-absent melting synchronous with emplacement of the peraluminous S-type Velay granite cutting across the Early Carboniferous nappe stack. Field study of the southern part of the dome shows that Mg-K-rich micaceous diorites of mantle origin, locally called vaugnerites, outcrop as intrusive bodies in three main settings : (1) Meter-sized stocks are intimately associated with several granite plutons, the comagmatic ascent and crystallization of mafic and felsic melts being evidenced by lobate contacts and intricate shapes. (2) Decameter-sized medium to coarse-grained massifs and sills emplaced in unmolten to metatexitic paragneisses. (3) Fine-grained decimeter-sized concordant lenses are found as clusters in metatexitic to diatexitic orthogneisses. Seven vaugnerites were dated either directly or indirectly through their co-magmatic host granite. In situ (LA-ICP-MS) zircon and monazite U-Pb ages are indistinguishable within analytical uncertainties, spanning from 303.7 ± 3.1 to 307.4 ± 1.8 Ma except for one slightly younger (294.4 ± 3.9 Ma) sample . Granites and vaugnerites of the study area emplaced mainly during a short period of time at ca. 305 Ma. Assuming vaugnerite intrusions are coeval implies that their varied shapes are a consequence of contrasting behavior of the mafic magma depending on the host. Granites from the southern Velay are exactly of the same age, ca. 305 Ma, although several generations can be clearly identified based on field relationships. They display complex zircon inheritance patterns involving Proterozoic to Cambro-Ordovician components; in details, the inheritance pattern varies between (or even within) plutons, pointing to the

  2. Metamorphic evolution of garnet amphibolite in the northern part of the Chuacús Complex, Guatemala: Insights from petrography, mineral chemistry and phase equilibria modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández Uribe, D.; Maldonado, R.; Ortega-Gutierrez, F.

    2015-12-01

    The Chuacús Complex, in central Guatemala, is part of the Guatemala Suture Complex, which represents the tectonic limit of the North America and Caribbean plate. The Chuacús Complex is constitute by a polymetamorphic high-pressure sequence of quartzofeldespathic orto and para-gneiss, calcsilicate, marble, pelitic schist, and amphibolite with eclogite relicts. Two representative garnet amphibolite samples were selected for detailed study. This rocks present a mineral assemblage composed of garnet, calcic amphibole, sodic-calcic amphibole, sodic plagioclase, quartz, minor zoisite and white mica. Both samples contain considerable amounts of titanite and ilmenite. Garnet varies in grain shape, size and show different textural features. The coarse-grained porphydoblasts are mostly subhedral to euhedral and exhibit prograde compositional zoning, with increasing spessartine content to the core (Alm44-49Grs32-34Sps18-20Pyr1.1-1.5), and increasing almandine and pyrope component to the rim (Alm64-66 Grs29-31Pyr3.3-4.6Sps0.37-0.96). Amphibole exhibit a constant grain size and shape. Its chemical composition varies along the samples from calcic amphibole (Si=6.57-6.93; Xmg=0.41-0.66) to sodic-calcic amphibole (Si=6.61-6.69; Xmg=0.49-0.54). In order to constrain the P-T evolution, multiequilibria thermobarometry was combined with thermodynamic modeling. Multiequilibria thermobarometry calculated in the system NCKMnFMASHTO shows a P-T evolution from 15 kbar and 400 °C to 19 kbar and 540 °C. In the other hand, preliminary equilibrium assemblage diagrams calculated in the system NCKFMASHTO shows a P-T evolution from 11 kbar to 13.5 kbar and from 550 °C to 650°C, for the observed mineral assemblage. This work describes the textural, paragenetic and thermobarometric features from this lithotype and their petrogenetic implications are discussed. This study provides new petrological data that contributes with the understanding of the tectonic evolution of the Guatemala Suture

  3. Complexity Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sandra L.; Anderson, Beth C.

    To determine whether consensus existed among teachers about the complexity of common classroom materials, a survey was administered to 66 pre-service and in-service kindergarten and prekindergarten teachers. Participants were asked to rate 14 common classroom materials as simple, complex, or super-complex. Simple materials have one obvious part,…

  4. Polymetamorphic evolution of the upper part of the Iezer Complex (Leaota Massif, South Carpathians) constrained by petrological data and monazite ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negulescu, Elena; Săbău, Gavril; Massonne, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-01

    The Leaota Massif in Romania consists of a flat-lying sequence of five structurally concordant units displaying mutual and partly internal lithologic and metamorphic contrasts. The lower part of the lithologic sequence is the Iezer Complex, a medium-grade psammopelitic unit with a structurally concordant thin granite sill located at its upper part. The lower limit of the granite is marked discontinuously by hornfels, also present as enclaves, which experienced intense strain and a subsequent low-pressure thermal overprint. Both granite and hornfels were affected by a medium-temperature, medium- to high-pressure event (Săbău, 2000). This event was also identified in gneisses below the hornfels. These rocks contain the assemblage garnet-phengite-chloritoid-kyanite which had overprinted an older garnet-kyanite-staurolite-biotite-muscovite assemblage. Available U-Th zircon ages indicate 472.7 ± 7.3 Ma (Balintoni et al. 2009) for the granite. Monazite geochronology (Săbău & Negulescu, 2013) reveals for the associated hornfels (1) inherited ages of 528 ± 17.86 Ma overprinted by pervasive Ordovician contact metamorphism (462 ± 4.54 Ma), slightly postdating the age of magmatic zircon in the granite, (2) Silurian to Early Devonian recrystallization episodes, and (3) a Variscan medium- to high-pressure metamorphic overprint responsible for the garnet-phengite-kyanite assemblage. New petrological and geochronological data constraining the polymetamorphic evolution of the upper part of the Iezer Complex were acquired from kyanite-garnet mylonitic gneisses made up of large garnet porphyroclasts embedded in a strongly deformed matrix. Large garnets are rich in quartz, phengite, epidote, kyanite, rutile, and ilmenite inclusions. Biotite, chlorite, apatite, monazite, and Al-cerite inclusions are also present. Garnet porphyroclasts are wrapped by laminae of small garnet - white mica - biotite - quartz or zoisite - kyanite - plagioclase alternating with bands made up of fine

  5. GRID2D/3D: A computer program for generating grid systems in complex-shaped two- and three-dimensional spatial domains. Part 1: Theory and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T. I.-P.; Bailey, R. T.; Nguyen, H. L.; Roelke, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    An efficient computer program, called GRID2D/3D was developed to generate single and composite grid systems within geometrically complex two- and three-dimensional (2- and 3-D) spatial domains that can deform with time. GRID2D/3D generates single grid systems by using algebraic grid generation methods based on transfinite interpolation in which the distribution of grid points within the spatial domain is controlled by stretching functions. All single grid systems generated by GRID2D/3D can have grid lines that are continuous and differentiable everywhere up to the second-order. Also, grid lines can intersect boundaries of the spatial domain orthogonally. GRID2D/3D generates composite grid systems by patching together two or more single grid systems. The patching can be discontinuous or continuous. For continuous composite grid systems, the grid lines are continuous and differentiable everywhere up to the second-order except at interfaces where different single grid systems meet. At interfaces where different single grid systems meet, the grid lines are only differentiable up to the first-order. For 2-D spatial domains, the boundary curves are described by using either cubic or tension spline interpolation. For 3-D spatial domains, the boundary surfaces are described by using either linear Coon's interpolation, bi-hyperbolic spline interpolation, or a new technique referred to as 3-D bi-directional Hermite interpolation. Since grid systems generated by algebraic methods can have grid lines that overlap one another, GRID2D/3D contains a graphics package for evaluating the grid systems generated. With the graphics package, the user can generate grid systems in an interactive manner with the grid generation part of GRID2D/3D. GRID2D/3D is written in FORTRAN 77 and can be run on any IBM PC, XT, or AT compatible computer. In order to use GRID2D/3D on workstations or mainframe computers, some minor modifications must be made in the graphics part of the program; no

  6. The Sun, Its Extended Corona, the Interplanetary Space, the Earth's Magnetosphere, Ionosphere, Middle and Low Atmosphere, are All Parts of a Complex System - the Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2011-01-01

    Various manifestations of solar activity cause disturbances known as space weather effects in the interplanetary space, near-Earth environment, and all the Earth's "spheres. Longterm variations in the frequency, intensity and relative importance of the manifestations of solar activity are due to the slow changes in the output of the solar dynamo, and they define space climate. Space climate governs long-term variations in geomagnetic activity and is the primary natural driver of terrestrial climate. To understand how the variable solar activity affects the Earth's environment, geomagnetic activity and climate on both short and long time scales, we need to understand the origins of solar activity itself and its different manifestations, as well as the sequence of coupling processes linking various parts of the system. This session provides a forum to discuss the chain of processes and relations from the Sun to the Earth's surface: the origin and long-term and short-term evolution of solar activity, initiation and temporal variations in solar flares, CMEs, coronal holes, the solar wind and its interaction with the terrestrial magnetosphere, the ionosphere and its connection to the neutral dominated regions below and the plasma dominated regions above, the stratosphere, its variations due to the changing solar activity and its interactions with the underlying troposphere, and the mechanisms of solar influences on the lower atmosphere on different time-scales. Particularly welcome are papers highlighting the coupling processes between the different domains in this complex system.

  7. ARF-B2: A Protein Complex that Specifically Binds to Part of the Anaerobic Response Element of Maize Adh 11

    PubMed Central

    Ferl, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Crude whole cell extracts from maize (Zea mays L.) suspension cells were examined for DNA binding proteins that specifically interact with a portion of the maize Adh 1 promoter that was previously shown to be in contact with a trans-acting factor in vivo. A 17 base pair, double-stranded oligonucleotide probe was constructed that centered around a strong in vivo dimethylsulfate footprint (B2) that coincides with part of the anaerobic response element (ARE). Gel retardation assays were used to characterize a major, specific DNA binding protein activity found in the crude extracts. The activity is present in both aerobic and hypoxically treated cultures and has been designated ARF-B2 (ARE binding factor). ARF-B2 appears to be a multicomponent complex, with a 54 kilodalton subunit termed ARF-B2α in primary contact with the target DNA. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:16667563

  8. Coronal partings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulin, Igor F.; Dumin, Yurii V.

    2016-02-01

    The basic observational properties of "coronal partings"-the special type of quasi-one-dimensional magnetic structures, identified by a comparison of the coronal X-ray and EUV images with solar magnetograms-are investigated. They represent the channels of opposite polarity inside the unipolar large-scale magnetic fields, formed by the rows of magnetic arcs directed to the neighboring sources of the background polarity. The most important characteristics of the partings are discussed. It can be naturally assumed that-from the evolutionary and spatial points of view-the partings can transform into the coronal holes and visa versa. The classes of global, intersecting, and complex partings are identified.

  9. Displaced/re-worked rhodolith deposits infilling parts of a complex Miocene multistorey submarine channel: A case history from the Sassari area (Sardinia, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murru, Marco; Bassi, Davide; Simone, Lucia

    2015-08-01

    In the Sassari area (north-western Sardinia, Italy), the Miocene Porto Torres sub-basin sequences represent the complex multistorey mixed carbonate-siliciclastic submarine feature called the Sassari Channel. During the late Burdigalian-early Serravallian, repeated terrigenous supplies from uplifted Paleozoic crystalline substrata fed the Sassari Channel system by means of turbidity and locally hyper-concentrated turbidity flows. Shelfal areas were the source of terrigenous clasts, but open shelf rhodalgal/foramol carbonate areas were very productive and largely also contributed to the channel infilling. Re-worked sands and skeletal debris were discontinuously re-sedimented offshore as pure terrigenous, mixed and/or carbonate deposits. Major sediment supply was introduced between the latest Burdigalian and the start of the middle Langhian, during which a large amount of carbonate, mixed and siliciclastic sediments reached the Porto Torres Basin (Sassari Channel I). Contributions from shallow proximal source areas typify the lower intervals (Unit A) in marginal sectors of the channel. Upward, these evolve into autochthonous rhodolith deposits, winnowed by strong currents in relatively shallow well lit settings within a complex network of narrow tidally-controlled channels (Unit D) locally bearing coral assemblages. Conversely, re-sedimented rhodoliths from the Units B and C accumulated under conditions of higher turbidity. In deeper parts of the channel taxonomically diversified rhodoliths point to the mixing of re-deposited skeletal components from different relatively deep bathmetric settings. In the latest early Langhian, major re-sedimentation episodes, resulting in large prograding bodies (Unit D), triggered by repeated regression pulses in a frame of persistent still stand. During these episodes photophile assemblages dwelled in the elevated margin sectors of the channel. A significant latest early Langhian drop in relative sea-level resulted in impressive mass

  10. In Bacillus subtilis LutR is part of the global complex regulatory network governing the adaptation to the transition from exponential growth to stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Irigül-Sönmez, Öykü; Köroğlu, Türkan E; Öztürk, Büşra; Kovács, Ákos T; Kuipers, Oscar P; Yazgan-Karataş, Ayten

    2014-02-01

    The lutR gene, encoding a product resembling a GntR-family transcriptional regulator, has previously been identified as a gene required for the production of the dipeptide antibiotic bacilysin in Bacillus subtilis. To understand the broader regulatory roles of LutR in B. subtilis, we studied the genome-wide effects of a lutR null mutation by combining transcriptional profiling studies using DNA microarrays, reverse transcription quantitative PCR, lacZ fusion analyses and gel mobility shift assays. We report that 65 transcriptional units corresponding to 23 mono-cistronic units and 42 operons show altered expression levels in lutR mutant cells, as compared with lutR(+) wild-type cells in early stationary phase. Among these, 11 single genes and 25 operons are likely to be under direct control of LutR. The products of these genes are involved in a variety of physiological processes associated with the onset of stationary phase in B. subtilis, including degradative enzyme production, antibiotic production and resistance, carbohydrate utilization and transport, nitrogen metabolism, phosphate uptake, fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis, protein synthesis and translocation, cell-wall metabolism, energy production, transfer of mobile genetic elements, induction of phage-related genes, sporulation, delay of sporulation and cannibalism, and biofilm formation. Furthermore, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay performed in the presence of both SinR and LutR revealed a close overlap between the LutR and SinR targets. Our data also revealed a significant overlap with the AbrB regulon. Together, these findings reveal that LutR is part of the global complex, interconnected regulatory systems governing adaptation of bacteria to the transition from exponential growth to stationary phase. PMID:24196425

  11. Complex therapeutic-diagnostic endoscopy with laser irradiation and in-Situ spectrophotometry of erosive-ulcerative impairments of upper part of the gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogatkin, Dmitrii A.; Tereschenko, Sergey G.; Lapaeva, Ludmila G.; Gorenkov, Roman V.

    2002-05-01

    Today in the world there are a lot of effective methods to treat different disease with the use of low-level laser (LLL) radiation. And there are a number of well-known effective noninvasive optical diagnostic techniques, such as a laser fluorescence spectroscopy (LFS), elastic-scattering spectroscopy (ESS), absorption spectroscopy (ABSS), etc. In this paper the first experience of the complex laser-optical therapeutic-diagnostic treatment for the erosive-ulcerative impairments (EUI) of the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract (UPGT) are discussed. The EUI of the UPGT very often have a resistance to a medicamentous therapy and the treatment of that is very difficult in this case. The method of LLL irradiation through an endoscope has been used to increase the efficiency of LLL-therapy and to monitor a general process of recovery respectively. The standard biopsy was investigated to estimate the effect of care as well. As it is shown in this paper the in-situ ABSS allows to optimize the LLL treatment parameters for each patient and for each procedure if the laser has effect on a blood circulation in the irradiated zone. In this case the doctors can see the considerable effect and the reduction period of the cure for EUI. Otherwise, the ABSS indicates that there will be no any effect of LLL therapy for such patient and another methods of treatment are needed. The LFS in this case shows the absence of effect during the care course too. On the basis of analysis of the obtained results this paper presents our current understanding of mechanisms of the laser-induced fluorescence diagnostics and LLL therapy effect for EUI of the UPGT. Today this technique has the official approval of the Ministry of Health of Russian Federation.

  12. Fragments of deeper parts of the hanging wall mantle preserved as orogenic peridotites in the central belt of the Seve Nappe Complex, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clos, Frediano; Gilio, Mattia; van Roermund, Herman L. M.

    2014-04-01

    Formation conditions of olivine microstructures are investigated in the Kittelfjäll spinel peridotite (KSP), a fragment of lithospheric mantle which occurs as an isolated body within high grade metamorphic crustal rocks of the Seve Nappe Complex (SNC), southern Västerbotten, central Sweden. The KSP is an orogenic peridotite containing a well developed penetrative compositional layering, defined by highly depleted dunite with olivine Mg# (100 × Mg/Mg + Fe) of 92.0-93.5 and harzburgite with lower Mg# (91.0-92.5). Dunite is characterized by three contrasting olivine microstructures formed in response to different tectonometamorphic events: Coarse-grained, highly strained olivine porphyroclasts (M1) up to 20 cm long are surrounded by dynamically recrystallized olivine grains (M2) defining a characteristic olivine "foam" microstructure (grain size: 200-2000 μm). An olivine "mortar" (M3) microstructure (10-50 μm) forms a penetrative fabric element only in strongly localized, cm-to-m sized shear zones that crosscut earlier structures/foliations. Olivine fabric analysis in synergy, with mineralogical and chemical analyses, reveals that the KSP body represents old, possibly Archean, sub-continental lithospheric mantle that was crustally emplaced into the Caledonian tectonic edifice from the hanging wall mantle during exhumation of the subducted Seve Nappe Complex (Jämtlandian orogeny ~ 454 Ma). Olivine porphyroclasts (M1) grew at high temperature during dominant isobaric cooling after extensive polybaric melt extraction (> 40%) and subsequent refertilization. The onset of the early Caledonian deformation is interpreted to be related to the crustal emplacement of the KSP during eduction of the SNC. This phase is characterized by the development of the olivine M2 foam microstructure, formed at 650-830 °C/1-2 GPa by dislocation creep processes producing an E-type CPO's by the operation of the [100](001) and subordinate [001](100) slip systems with operating flow stress

  13. Unravelling the complex interaction between mantle and crustal magmas encoded in the lavas of San Vincenzo (Tuscany, Italy). Part I: Petrography and Thermobarometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridolfi, Filippo; Braga, Roberto; Cesare, Bernardo; Renzulli, Alberto; Perugini, Diego; Del Moro, Stefano

    2016-02-01

    The San Vincenzo Volcanic Complex was emplaced ~ 4.4 Ma. ago and consists of cordierite-bearing lavas which are the result of a complex interaction between mantle-derived and crustal anatectic magmas. The lavas are mostly characterized by porphyritic, glassy peraluminous rhyolites hosting variable contents of magmatic enclaves (clinopyroxene-bearing latites and amphibole-bearing clinopyroxene crystal mushes), sialic and ultramafic cognates (syenogranites, anorthosites, cordierite-biotite and pyroxenite inclusions), and crustal rocks (sillimanite-cordierite xenoliths, cordierite and biotite xenocrysts) of centimetric-to-millimetric size. Mineral chemistry shows large variations as well. Plagioclase and sanidine are represented respectively by An21-79Or1-13 and An≤ 1Or57-77. Cordierite has a Mg# of 51-78%, while garnet shows almandine compositions with low CaO (≤ 2 wt.%) and variable MnO contents (1-5 wt.%). Clinopyroxene indicates large ranges of Mg# (68-92%) and Al2O3 (0.5-6.3 wt.%), and relatively high CaO contents (up to 24 wt.%); orthopyroxene shows both ferroan enstatite (Mg# = 60-78%) and magnesian ferrosilite (Mg# = 39-44%) compositions; whereas amphibole shows only Mg-rich calcic compositions. On the basis of textural characteristics, as well as Ti and XMg variations, we have identified six different types of biotite associated with oxide minerals such as ilmenite and spinels of both aluminium (Al > 1 in Y site) and iron (Fe > 1 in Y site) subgroups. Compositional/textural relationships indicate crystallization at both equilibrium and disequilibrium conditions. Minerals with euhedral habits and homogeneous compositions usually occur in the same thin sections of partly-equilibrated crustal xenoliths (and xenocrysts) and zones of "active" mixing between mantle-derived and crustal magmas characterized by "needle-like" and skeletal microlites, and subhedral microphenocrysts of amphibole and biotite. These hybrid-mixed features, as well as the occurrence of

  14. Unravelling the complex interaction between mantle and crustal magmas encoded in the lavas of San Vincenzo (Tuscany, Italy). Part I: Petrography and Thermobarometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridolfi, Filippo; Braga, Roberto; Cesare, Bernardo; Renzulli, Alberto; Perugini, Diego; Del Moro, Stefano

    2016-02-01

    The San Vincenzo Volcanic Complex was emplaced ~ 4.4 Ma. ago and consists of cordierite-bearing lavas which are the result of a complex interaction between mantle-derived and crustal anatectic magmas. The lavas are mostly characterized by porphyritic, glassy peraluminous rhyolites hosting variable contents of magmatic enclaves (clinopyroxene-bearing latites and amphibole-bearing clinopyroxene crystal mushes), sialic and ultramafic cognates (syenogranites, anorthosites, cordierite-biotite and pyroxenite inclusions), and crustal rocks (sillimanite-cordierite xenoliths, cordierite and biotite xenocrysts) of centimetric-to-millimetric size. Mineral chemistry shows large variations as well. Plagioclase and sanidine are represented respectively by An21-79Or1-13 and An≤ 1Or57-77. Cordierite has a Mg# of 51-78%, while garnet shows almandine compositions with low CaO (≤ 2 wt.%) and variable MnO contents (1-5 wt.%). Clinopyroxene indicates large ranges of Mg# (68-92%) and Al2O3 (0.5-6.3 wt.%), and relatively high CaO contents (up to 24 wt.%); orthopyroxene shows both ferroan enstatite (Mg# = 60-78%) and magnesian ferrosilite (Mg# = 39-44%) compositions; whereas amphibole shows only Mg-rich calcic compositions. On the basis of textural characteristics, as well as Ti and XMg variations, we have identified six different types of biotite associated with oxide minerals such as ilmenite and spinels of both aluminium (Al > 1 in Y site) and iron (Fe > 1 in Y site) subgroups. Compositional/textural relationships indicate crystallization at both equilibrium and disequilibrium conditions. Minerals with euhedral habits and homogeneous compositions usually occur in the same thin sections of partly-equilibrated crustal xenoliths (and xenocrysts) and zones of "active" mixing between mantle-derived and crustal magmas characterized by "needle-like" and skeletal microlites, and subhedral microphenocrysts of amphibole and biotite. These hybrid-mixed features, as well as the occurrence of

  15. [Application of hair analysis of selected psychoactive substances for medico-legal purposes. Part II. Cases of complex fatal poisonings: interactions of heroine - cocaine - amphetamines].

    PubMed

    Rojek, Sebastian; Kłys, Małgorzata; Rzepecka-Woźniak, Ewa; Konopka, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    The study represents an attempt at employing segmental hair analysis in complex poisonings with xenobiotic mixtures of heroine - cocaine - amphetamines in the context of the cause of death as a consequence of complex interaction mechanisms which occurred prior to death. Two cases of complex poisonings: heroine - cocaine and heroine - cocaine - amphetamines were analyzed and documented with macro- and microscopic examinations and complex toxicological examinations, including the analysis of classic biological material, i.e. samples of selective blood, and alternative material, i.e. hair samples. Determinations of opioids, cocaine and its metabolite and amphetamines in the hair biological matrix were performed using high performance liquid chromatography--atmospheric pressure chemical ionization--tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-APCI-MS-MS). Segmental hair analysis of the investigated cases indicated a prolonged intake of similar psychoactive substances and a developed adaptation of the addicted to interaction mechanisms, which, however, led gradually to multiorgan anatomopathological changes, and in consequence to death.

  16. Complexes With Biologically Active Ligands. Part 111. Synthesis and Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitory Activity of Metal Complexes of 4,5-Disubstituted-3-Mercapto-1,2,4-Triazole Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Scozzafava, Andrea; Cavazza, Christine; Saramet, Ioana; Briganti, Fabrizio; Banciu, Mircea D.

    1998-01-01

    Complexes containing five 4,5-disubstituted-3-mercapto-1,2,4-triazoles and Zn(II), Hg(II) and Cu(I) were synthesized and characterized by standard procedures (elemental analysis; IR, electronic and NMR spectroscopy, conductimetry and TG analysis). Both the thione as well as the thiolate forms of the ligands were evidenced to interact with the metal ions in the prepared complexes. The original mercaptans and their metal complexes behave as inhibitors of three carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes, CA I, II and IV, but did not lower intraocular pressure in rabbits in animal models of glaucoma. PMID:18475819

  17. Complexes with biologically active ligands. Part 11. Synthesis and carbonic anhydrase inhibitory activity of metal complexes of 4,5-disubstituted-3-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Scozzafava, A; Cavazza, C; Supuran, C T; Saramet, I; Briganti, F; Banciu, M D

    1998-01-01

    Complexes containing five 4,5-disubstituted-3-mercapto-1,2,4-triazoles and Zn(II), Hg(II) and Cu(I) were synthesized and characterized by standard procedures (elemental analysis; IR, electronic and NMR spectroscopy, conductimetry and TG analysis). Both the thione as well as the thiolate forms of the ligands were evidenced to interact with the metal ions in the prepared complexes. The original mercaptans and their metal complexes behave as inhibitors of three carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes, CA I, II and IV, but did not lower intraocular pressure in rabbits in animal models of glaucoma.

  18. Asymmetric synthesis of α-amino acids via homologation of Ni(II) complexes of glycine Schiff bases; Part 1: alkyl halide alkylations.

    PubMed

    Sorochinsky, Alexander E; Aceña, José Luis; Moriwaki, Hiroki; Sato, Tatsunori; Soloshonok, Vadim A

    2013-10-01

    Alkylations of chiral or achiral Ni(II) complexes of glycine Schiff bases constitute a landmark in the development of practical methodology for asymmetric synthesis of α-amino acids. Straightforward, easy preparation as well as high reactivity of these Ni(II) complexes render them ready available and inexpensive glycine equivalents for preparing a wide variety of α-amino acids, in particular on a relatively large scale. In the case of Ni(II) complexes containing benzylproline moiety as a chiral auxiliary, their alkylation proceeds with high thermodynamically controlled diastereoselectivity. Similar type of Ni(II) complexes derived from alanine can also be used for alkylation providing convenient access to quaternary, α,α-disubstituted α-amino acids. Achiral type of Ni(II) complexes can be prepared from picolinic acid or via recently developed modular approach using simple secondary or primary amines. These Ni(II) complexes can be easily mono/bis-alkylated under homogeneous or phase-transfer catalysis conditions. Origin of diastereo-/enantioselectivity in the alkylations reactions, aspects of practicality, generality and limitations of this methodology is critically discussed.

  19. School-Based Study of Complex Environmental Exposures and Related Health Effects in Children: Part A - Exposure. Final Report and Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. School of Public Health.

    The School Health Initiative: Environment, Learning, and Disease (SHIELD) study examined children's exposure to complex mixtures of environmental agents (i.e., volatile organic chemicals, environmental tobacco smoke, allergens, bioaerosols, metals, and pesticides). Environmental, personal, and biological data were collected on ethnically and…

  20. Handbook of Techniques and Guides for the Study of the San Francisco Bay-Delta-Estuary Complex, Part 2. Key to the Phytoplankton Phyla and Genera.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helrich, Jane

    Project MER (Marine Ecology Research) is aimed at improving environmental education in the San Francisco Bay Area schools. This document is the second of a series of guides designed to help students and teachers gather data concerning the San Francisco Bay-Delta-Estuary Complex and to organize these data to make a contribution to the literature of…

  1. The Oxa1 protein forms a homooligomeric complex and is an essential part of the mitochondrial export translocase in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Nargang, Frank E; Preuss, Marc; Neupert, Walter; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2002-04-12

    The Oxa1 protein is a ubiquitous constituent of the inner membrane of mitochondria. Oxa1 was identified in yeast as a crucial component of the protein export machinery known as the OXA translocase, which facilitates the integration of proteins from the mitochondrial matrix into the inner membrane. We have identified the Neurospora crassa Oxa1 protein which shows a sequence identity of 22% to the yeast homologue. Despite the low level of identity, the function of the homologues is conserved as the N. crassa gene fully complemented a yeast null mutant. Genetic analysis revealed that Oxa1 is essential for viability in N. crassa. Cells propagated under conditions that severely reduce Oxa1 levels grew extremely slowly and were deficient in subunits of complex I and complex IV. Isolation of the Oxa1 complex from N. crassa mitochondria revealed a 170-180-kDa complex that contained exclusively Oxa1. Since the Oxa1 monomer has a molecular weight of 43,000, our data suggest that the OXA translocase consists of a homooligomer most likely containing four Oxa1 subunits.

  2. Complexes With Biologically Active Ligands. Part 101 Inhibition of Carbonic Anhydrase Isozymes I and II With Metal Complexes of Imidazo[2,1−b ]-1,3,4-Thiadiazole-2-Sulfonamide

    PubMed Central

    Scozzafava, Andrea

    1997-01-01

    The title compound was prepared by an improved variant of the literature procedure, and metal complexes containing its anion and the following metal ions: Zn(II), Cd(II), Hg(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), V(IV), Fe(III) and Ag(I) were synthesized and characterized by standard procedures (elemental analysis; IR, electronic, NMR and EPR spectroscopy; TG, magnetic and conductimetric measurements). The parent sulfonamide and its metal complexes are potent inhibitors of two carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes, CA I and II, and they might possess applications as selective cerebrovasodilating agents. PMID:18475761

  3. Complexes With Biologically Active Ligands. Part 91 Metal Complexes of 5-Benzoylamino- and 5-(3-Nitrobenzoyl-Amino)-1,3,4-Thiadiazole-2-Sulfonamide as Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jitianu, Andrei; llies, Marc A.; Briganti, Fabrizio; Scozzafava, Andrea

    1997-01-01

    Complexes containing the anions of 5-benzoylamido-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-sulfonamide and 5-(3-nitro-benzoylamido)-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-sulfonamid as ligands, and V(IV); Cr(III); Fe(III); Co(II); Ni(II); Cu(II) and Ag(I) were synthesized and characterized by standard procedures (elemental analysis; IR, electronic, and EPR spectroscopy; TG, magnetic and conductimetric measurements). The original sulfonamides and their metal complexes are strong inhibitors of two carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes, CA I and II. PMID:18475759

  4. Handbook of Techniques and Guides for the Study of the San Francisco Bay-Delta-Estuary Complex, Part 3. Key to the Invertebrates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shettler, James

    Project MER (Marine Ecology Research) is aimed at improving environmental education in the San Francisco Bay Area schools. As part of meeting this goal, it is hoped that students and teachers can see the results of their efforts being put to practical use. This guide is the third of a series produced to help students and teachers gather data…

  5. Handbook of Techniques and Guides for the Study of the San Francisco Bay-Delta-Estuary Complex, Part 4. Key to the Coastal Marine Fishes of California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alameda County School Dept., Hayward, CA.

    Project MER (Marine Ecology Research) is aimed at improving environmental education in the San Francisco Bay Area schools. As part of meeting this goal, it is hoped that students and teachers can see the results of their efforts being put to practical use. This guide is the fourth of a series which was produced to help students and teachers gather…

  6. Handbook of Techniques and Guides for the Study of the San Francisco Bay-Delta-Estuary Complex, Part 5. Keys to the Freshwater and Anadromous Fishes of California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimsey, J. B.; Fisk, Leonard O.

    1960-01-01

    This key to freshwater and anadromous fishes of California is included as the fifth of a series of guides being produced by Project MER (Marine Ecology Research). This project is part of the effort to improve environmental education in the San Francisco Bay Area schools by gathering and organizing data on the ecological character of the San…

  7. Handbook of Techniques and Guides for the Study of the San Francisco Bay-Delta-Estuary Complex, Part 6. Key to the Common Fishes of San Francisco Bay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikora, Bob

    Project MER (Marine Ecology Research) is aimed at improving environmental education in the San Francisco Bay Area schools. As part of meeting this goal, it is hoped that students and teachers can see the results of their efforts being put to practical use. This guide is the sixth of a series produced to help students and teachers gather data…

  8. Mutations in UNC80, Encoding Part of the UNC79-UNC80-NALCN Channel Complex, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Severe Infantile Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shamseldin, Hanan E.; Faqeih, Eissa; Alasmari, Ali; Zaki, Maha S.; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2016-01-01

    Brain channelopathies represent a growing class of brain disorders that usually result in paroxysmal disorders, although their role in other neurological phenotypes, including the recently described NALCN-related infantile encephalopathy, is increasingly recognized. In three Saudi Arabian families and one Egyptian family all affected by a remarkably similar phenotype (infantile encephalopathy and largely normal brain MRI) to that of NALCN-related infantile encephalopathy, we identified a locus on 2q34 in which whole-exome sequencing revealed three, including two apparently loss-of-function, recessive mutations in UNC80. UNC80 encodes a large protein that is necessary for the stability and function of NALCN and for bridging NALCN to UNC79 to form a functional complex. Our results expand the clinical relevance of the UNC79-UNC80-NALCN channel complex. PMID:26708753

  9. 1,3,4-Thiadiazole Derivatives. Part 91. Synthesis and Biological Activity of Metal Complexes of 5-(2-Aminoethyl)-2-Amino-1,3,4-Thiadiazole

    PubMed Central

    Barboiu, Mihai; Cimpoesu, Marilena; Guran, Cornelia

    1996-01-01

    Metal complexes of the title ligand (L) containing Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) were prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, electronic spectroscopy and conductimetry. The new derivatives, possessing the following formulae, CuL2(OH)2, NiL2Cl2, and [Co2LCl4]n showed in vitro antifungal activity against Aspergillus and Candida spp. PMID:18472898

  10. 1,3,4-thiadiazole derivatives. Part 9. Synthesis and biological activity of metal complexes of 5-(2-aminoethyl)-2-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole.

    PubMed

    Barboiu, M; Cimpoesu, M; Guran, C; Supuran, C T

    1996-01-01

    Metal complexes of the title ligand (L) containing Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) were prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, electronic spectroscopy and conductimetry. The new derivatives, possessing the following formulae, CuL(2)(OH)(2), NiL(2)Cl(2), and [Co(2)LCl(4)](n) showed in vitro antifungal activity against Aspergillus and Candida spp.

  11. AKT and GSK-3 Are Necessary for Direct Ezrin Binding to NHE3 as Part of a C-terminal Stimulatory Complex

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Varsha; Lin, Rong; Yang, Jianbo; Cha, Boyoung; Sarker, Rafiquel; Tse, Chung Ming; Donowitz, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Basal activity of the BB Na+/H+ exchanger NHE3 requires multiprotein complexes that form on its C terminus. One complex stimulates basal NHE3 activity and contains ezrin and phosphoinositides as major components; how it stimulates NHE3 activity is not known. This study tested the hypothesis that ezrin dynamically associates with this complex, which sets ezrin binding. NHE3 activity was reduced by an Akti. This effect was eliminated if ezrin binding to NHE3 was inhibited by a point mutant. Recombinant AKT phosphorylated NHE3 C terminus in the domain ezrin directly binds. This domain (amino acids 475–589) is predicted to be α-helical and contains a conserved cluster of three serines (Ser515, Ser522, and Ser526). Point mutations of two of these (S515A, S515D, or S526A) reduced basal NHE3 activity and surface expression and had no Akti inhibition. S526D had NHE3 activity equal to wild type with normal Akti inhibition. Ezrin binding to NHE3 was regulated by Akt, being eliminated by Akti. NHE3-S515A and -S526D did not bind ezrin; NHE3-S515D had reduced ezrin binding; NHE3-S526D bound ezrin normally. NHE3-Ser526 is predicted to be a GSK-3 kinase phosphorylation site. A GSK-3 inhibitor reduced basal NHE3 activity as well as ezrin-NHE3 binding, and this effect was eliminated in NHE3-S526A and -S526D mutants. The conclusions were: 1) NHE3 basal activity is regulated by a signaling complex that is controlled by sequential effects of two kinases, Akt and GSK-3, which act on a Ser cluster in the same NHE3 C-terminal domain that binds ezrin; and 2) these kinases regulate the dynamic association of ezrin with NHE3 to affect basal NHE3 activity. PMID:24398676

  12. Improving ozone modeling in complex terrain at a fine grid resolution: Part I - examination of analysis nudging and all PBL schemes associated with LSMs in meteorological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yunhee; Fu, Joshua S.; Miller, Terry L.

    2010-02-01

    Meteorological variables such as temperature, wind speed, wind directions, and Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) heights have critical implications for air quality simulations. Sensitivity simulations with five different PBL schemes associated with three different Land Surface Models (LSMs) were conducted to examine the impact of meteorological variables on the predicted ozone concentrations using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) version 4.5 with local perspective. Additionally, the nudging analysis for winds was adopted with three different coefficients to improve the wind fields in the complex terrain at 4-km grid resolution. The simulations focus on complex terrain having valley and mountain areas at 4-km grid resolution. The ETA M-Y (Mellor-Yamada) and G-S (Gayno-Seaman) PBL schemes are identified as favorite options and promote O 3 formation causing the higher temperature, slower winds, and lower mixing height among sensitivity simulations in the area of study. It is found that PX (Pleim-Xiu) simulation does not always give optimal meteorological model performance. We also note that the PBL scheme plays a more important role in predicting daily maximum 8-h O 3 than land surface models. The results of nudging analysis for winds with three different increased coefficients' values (2.5, 4.5, and 6.0 × 10 -4 s -1) over seven sensitivity simulations show that the meteorological model performance was enhanced due to improved wind fields, indicating the FDDA nudging analysis can improve model performance considerably at 4-km grid resolution. Specifically, the sensitivity simulations with the coefficient value (6.0 × 10 -4) yielded more substantial improvements than with the other values (2.5 and 4.5 × 10 -4). Hence, choosing the nudging coefficient of 6.0 × 10 -4 s -1 for winds in MM5 may be the best choice to improve wind fields as an input, as well as, better model performance of CMAQ in the complex terrain area. As a result, a finer grid resolution is

  13. Mineral resource potential of the Stillwater Complex and adjacent rocks in the northern part of the Mount Wood and Mount Douglas quadrangles, southwestern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, Norman J; Dohrenwend, John C.

    1973-01-01

    The Stillwater Complex contains the largest potential chromite and platinum metal resources and second largest nickel resources in the United States. The Ultramafic zone has produced about 900,000 long tons of chromite concentrate and contains unmined reserves equivalent to 2,520,000 long tons of Cr2O3. Nickel and copper sulfide minerals that occur in the Basal zone and adjacent hornfelsed metasedimentary rocks represent one of the largest nickel potentials in the United States---a known reserve of 150 million tons of 0.25 percent nickel and 0.25 percent copper. The complex has been estimated to contain the largest potential source of platinum metals in the United States---possibly over 150 million troy ounces in the lower chromite zones and the Basal zone. In addition, the anorthosites in the Banded and Upper zones are reported to represent a potential alumina resource of almost 2 billion tons. An iron-formation also is present in the adjacent Precambrian metasedimentary rocks, and a coal bed is present in the Upper Cretaceous Eagle Sandstone nearby. The eventual utilization of these resources depends on the availability of large quantities of energy, and thus they may not be recovered unless new sources of energy or new recovery techniques are developed.

  14. [The use of immunomodulating therapy as part of complex treatment of secondary peritonitis induces reduction of inflammation in patients of different age].

    PubMed

    Epifanova, N Iu; Koniaev, I G; Epifanov, Iu A; Golubeva, V L; Serova, L D

    2011-01-01

    We present experience of using anti-thymocytic immunoglobulin (ATG) in complex therapy of patients with extensive secondary peritonitis at the age of 29-83 years. The research was based on 60 patient cases: 29 (48%) of whom were given anti-thymocytic immunoglobulin (ATG) Antilymfolin in post operative period and 31 patient of the control group who did not receive immunomodulating therapy within the complex treatment. The received data clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of anti-thymocytic immunoglobulin (ATG) usage for normalization of innate immunity indices and inflammation reduction. Immunostimulating effect in patients given anti-thymocytic immunoglobulin (ATG) could be seen on the fourth day of the threatment. The drug is equally effective in patients of young and middle age as well as in patients of elderly and senility age. The positive influence of anti-thymocytic immunoglobulin (ATG) on inflammation is shown with the reduction of CRP, gamma-globuline, alpha1-protein fraction serum levels normalization. The use of Antilymfolin induces the regression of inflammation and apparently improves the quality and duration of treatment and rehabilitation.

  15. Complex communication signals: the case of the Blue-black Grassquit Volatinia jacarina (Aves, Emberizidae) song. Part I--a structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Fandiño-Mariño, Hernán; Vielliard, Jacques M E

    2004-06-01

    The song of the Blue-black Grassquit Volatinia jacarina is different for every individual and the structural differences between individuals are quite complex. Samples of songs from different Brazilian localities, as well as from Venezuela and Mexico, were studied through a comparative analysis of their sonograms. From the structural point of view, the results show a song composed of a single note that is compacted in a "window" between 2 and 13 kHz and rarely occupying more than half of a second. The note is essentially pure and is repeatedly uttered with a high level of fidelity. A global frequency modulation decreases from the beginning to the end of the song. The main song components are referred to as "Blocks" and are of three types: "Vibrations" (Buzzes or Vibratos), "Arabesques" (complex notes) and "Isolated Modulations" (simple syllables). Among other characteristics are double voices, which are quite diverse and probably function as codes for individual recognition. This song is considered a special case where a signature system has been developed to a high level of inter-individual variability.

  16. Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors. Part 551 Metal Complexes of 1,3,4-Thiadiazole-2-Sulfonamide Derivatives: In Vitro Inhibition Studies With Carbonic Anhydrase Isozymes I, II and IV

    PubMed Central

    Scozzafava, Andrea; Briganti, Fabrizio; Ilies, Marc A.; Jitianu, Andrei

    1998-01-01

    Coordination compounds of 5-chloroacetamido-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-sulfonamide (Hcaz) with V(IV), Cr(lll), Fe(ll), Co(ll), Ni(ll) and Cu(ll) have been prepared and characterized by standard procedures (spectroscopic, magnetic, EPR, thermogravimetric and conductimetric measurements). Some of these compounds showed very good in vitro inhibitory properties against three physiologically relevant carbonic anhydrase (CA)isozymes, i.e., CA I, II, and IV. The differences between these isozymes in susceptibility to inhibition by these metal complexes is discussed in relationship to the characteristic features of their active sites, and is rationalized in terms useful for developing isozyme-specific CA inhibitors. PMID:18475829

  17. Significance of the tropical fire ant Solenopsis geminata (hymenoptera: formicidae) as part of the natural enemy complex responsible for successful biological control of many tropical irrigated rice pests.

    PubMed

    Way, M J; Heong, K L

    2009-10-01

    The tropical fire ant Solenopsis geminata (Fabricius) often nests very abundantly in the earthen banks (bunds) around irrigated rice fields in the tropics. Where some farmers habitually drain fields to the mud for about 3-4 days, the ants can quickly spread up to about 20 m into the fields where they collect food, including pest prey such as the eggs and young of the apple snail Pomacea caniculata (Lamarck) and insects such as lepidopterous larvae and hoppers, notably Nilaparvata lugens (Stäl) the brown planthopper (Bph) and green leafhoppers Nephotettix spp. Even in drained fields, the activity of S. geminata is restricted by rainfall in the wet season. The relatively few ant workers that forage characteristically into drained fields and on to the transplanted clumps of rice plants (hills) kill the normally few immigrant Bph adults but are initially slower acting than other species of the natural enemy complex. However, larger populations of Bph are fiercely attacked and effectively controlled by rapidly recruited ant workers; whereas, in the absence of the ant, the other natural enemies are inadequate. In normal circumstances, there is no ant recruitment in response to initially small populations of immigrant Bph and no evidence of incompatibility between ant foragers and other natural enemies such as spiders. However, when many ants are quickly and aggressively recruited to attack large populations of Bph, they temporarily displace some spiders from infested hills. It is concluded that, in suitable weather conditions and even when insecticides kill natural enemies within the rice field, periodic drainage that enables S. geminata to join the predator complex is valuable for ant-based control of pests such as snails and Lepidoptera, and especially against relatively large populations of Bph. Drainage practices to benefit ants are fully compatible with recent research, which shows that periodic drainage combats problems of 'yield decline' in intensively irrigated

  18. Alkali-metal ion coordination in uranyl(VI) poly-peroxo complexes in solution, inorganic analogues to crown-ethers. Part 2. Complex formation in the tetramethyl ammonium-, Li(+)-, Na(+)- and K(+)-uranyl(VI)-peroxide-carbonate systems.

    PubMed

    Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Szabó, Zoltán; Vallet, Valerie; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2015-10-01

    The constitution and equilibrium constants of ternary uranyl(vi) peroxide carbonate complexes [(UO2)p(O2)q(CO3)r](2(p-q-r)) have been determined at 0 °C in 0.50 M MNO3, M = Li, K, and TMA (tetramethyl ammonium), ionic media using potentiometric and spectrophotometric data; (17)O NMR data were used to determine the number of complexes present. The formation of cyclic oligomers, "[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]n", n = 4, 5, 6, with different stoichiometries depending on the ionic medium used, suggests that Li(+), Na(+), K(+) and TMA ions act as templates for the formation of uranyl peroxide rings where the uranyl-units are linked by μ-η(2)-η(2) bridged peroxide-ions. The templating effect is due to the coordination of the M(+)-ions to the uranyl oxygen atoms, where the coordination of Li(+) results in the formation of Li[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]4(7-), Na(+) and K(+) in the formation of Na/K[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) complexes, while the large tetramethyl ammonium ion promotes the formation of two oligomers, TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) and TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-). The NMR spectra demonstrate that the coordination of Na(+) in the five- and six-membered oligomers is significantly stronger than that of TMA(+); these observations suggest that the templating effect is similar to the one observed in the synthesis of crown-ethers. The NMR experiments also demonstrate that the exchange between TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) and TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) is slow on the (17)O chemical shift time-scale, while the exchange between TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) and Na[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) is fast. There was no indication of the presence of large clusters of the type identified by Burns and Nyman (M. Nyman and P. C. Burns, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012, 41, 7314-7367) and possible reasons for this and the implications for the synthesis of large clusters are briefly discussed.

  19. [Transmission of agents of the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) between swine herds: a review. Part 2--Pathogen transmission via semen, air and living/nonliving vectors].

    PubMed

    Woeste, K; Grosse Beilage, E

    2007-10-01

    The transmission of PRDC-pathogens (PRRSV, influenza virus A, PCV2, M. hyopneumoniae, A. pleuropneumoniae) between swine herds, which was summarized in the first part of the review, mainly occurs via pig movement. The risk of pathogen transmission by insemination with contaminated semen plays only a relevant role in the infection with PRRSV and PCV2. A risk of the aerogen transmission of pathogens between herds within a distance of 2 to 3 km is described for M. hyopneumoniae and PRRSV. Evidence for the other pathogens is not investigated. The PRDC-pathogens are frequently detected in wild boar populations. Therefore, the transmission between wild boars and domestic pigs seems possible by close contacts. PRRSV and M. hyopneumoniae can be transmitted by contaminated clothes and boots, but the use of sanitation protocols appears to limit their spread. Live vectors like rodents or birds seemed to have no special importance for the transmission of PRDC-pathogens. PMID:17970334

  20. Comparison of 3-Dimensional Shoulder Complex Kinematics in Individuals With and Without Shoulder Pain, Part 1: Sternoclavicular, Acromioclavicular, and Scapulothoracic Joints

    PubMed Central

    LAWRENCE, REBEKAH L.; BRAMAN, JONATHAN P.; LAPRADE, ROBERT F.; LUDEWIG, PAULA M.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional. OBJECTIVES To compare sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, and scapulothoracic joint motion between symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals during shoulder motion performed in 3 planes of humerothoracic elevation. BACKGROUND Differences in scapulothoracic kinematics are associated with shoulder pain. Several studies have measured these differences using surface sensors, but the results of this technique may be affected by skin-motion artifact. Furthermore, previous studies have not included the simultaneous measurement of sternoclavicular and acromioclavicular joint motion. METHODS Transcortical bone pins were inserted into the clavicle, scapula, and humerus of 12 asymptomatic and 10 symptomatic individuals for direct, bone-fixed tracking using electromagnetic sensors. Angular positions for the sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, and scapulothoracic joints were measured during shoulder flexion, abduction, and scapular plane abduction. RESULTS Differences between groups were found for sternoclavicular and scapulothoracic joint positions. Symptomatic individuals consistently demonstrated less sternoclavicular posterior rotation, regardless of angle, phase, or plane of shoulder motion. Symptomatic individuals also demonstrated less scapulothoracic upward rotation at 30° and 60° of humerothoracic elevation during shoulder abduction and scapular plane abduction. CONCLUSION The results of this study show that differences in shoulder complex kinematics exist between symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. However, the magnitude of these differences was small, and the resulting clinical implications are not yet fully understood. The biomechanical coupling of the sternoclavicular and acromioclavicular joints requires further research to better understand scapulothoracic movement deviations and to improve manual therapy and exercise-based physical therapy interventions. PMID:25103135

  1. Geometrical and optical benchmarking of copper(II) guanidine-quinoline complexes: insights from TD-DFT and many-body perturbation theory (part II).

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Alexander; Rohrmüller, Martin; Jesser, Anton; dos Santos Vieira, Ines; Schmidt, Wolf Gero; Herres-Pawlis, Sonja

    2014-11-01

    Ground- and excited-state properties of copper(II) charge-transfer systems have been investigated starting from density-functional calculations with particular emphasis on the role of (i) the exchange and correlation functional, (ii) the basis set, (iii) solvent effects, and (iv) the treatment of dispersive interactions. Furthermore (v), the applicability of TD-DFT to excitations of copper(II) bis(chelate) charge-transfer systems is explored by performing many-body perturbation theory (GW + BSE), independent-particle approximation and ΔSCF calculations for a small model system that contains simple guanidine and imine groups. These results show that DFT and TD-DFT in particular in combination with hybrid functionals are well suited for the description of the structural and optical properties, respectively, of copper(II) bis(chelate) complexes. Furthermore, it is found an accurate theoretical geometrical description requires the use of dispersion correction with Becke-Johnson damping and triple-zeta basis sets while solvent effects are small. The hybrid functionals B3LYP and TPSSh yielded best performance. The optical description is best with B3LYP, whereby heavily mixed molecular transitions of MLCT and LLCT character are obtained which can be more easily understood using natural transition orbitals. An natural bond orbital analysis sheds light on the donor properties of the different donor functions and the intraguanidine stabilization during coordination to copper(I) and (II).

  2. [Physical therapy as part of a complex orthopedic rheumatology approach. Physiotherapy, cryotherapy, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, local intra-articular joint injections].

    PubMed

    Arnold, I; Guttke, T

    2012-07-01

    In this review only some of the physical therapeutic options for treating chronic inflammatory diseases are discussed. These include a wide variety of procedures and should not exclusively be assessed using the criteria of evidence-based medicine because in most studies there was no blinding or for ethical reasons no placebo group was included. Nevertheless, these treatment options are quite essential as part of a multimodal treatment concept for patients with inflammatory joint diseases. The increasing interest in adjuvant therapeutic options emphasizes the need for further well designed studies concerning the effectiveness of physical therapy. Dynamic exercise is closely integrated into the treatment strategy for rheumatoid arthritis. In addition to a conditioning stimulus to joints and cartilage it is known that physical therapy is useful in preventing mechanisms of disease chronification. Locally applied and whole body cryotherapy leads to muscular relaxation resulting in a more effective treatment intensity of subsequent exercise. With extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) a new promising therapeutic approach is available. However, the evidence level is still weak when used for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Locally applied steroid injections still have a significant value when treating inflammatory synovial conditions.

  3. Mass-specific optical absorption coefficients and imaginary part of the complex refractive indices of mineral dust components measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2015-01-01

    Mass-specific optical absorption coefficients (MACs) and the imaginary part (κ) of the refractive indices of various mineral dust components including silicate clays (illite, kaolin and bentonite), oxides (quartz, hematite and rutile), and carbonate (limestone) were determined at the wavelengths of 1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm. The MAC values were calculated from aerosol optical absorption coefficients measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) instrument, the mass concentration and the number size distribution of the generated aerosol samples as well as the size transfer functions of the measuring instruments. Values of κ were calculated from the measured and particle-loss-corrected data by using a Mie-theory-based retrieval algorithm. The determined values could be used for comparisons with calculated wavelength-dependent κ values typically deduced from bulk-phase measurements by using indirect measurement methods. Accordingly, the presented comparison of the measured and calculated aerosol optical absorption spectra revealed the strong need for standardized sample preparation and measurement methodology in case of bulk-phase measurements.

  4. 2D dry granular free-surface flow over complex topography with obstacles. Part I: experimental study using a consumer-grade RGB-D sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caviedes-Voullième, Daniel; Juez, Carmelo; Murillo, Javier; García-Navarro, Pilar

    2014-12-01

    Avalanches, debris flows and other types of gravity-driven granular flows are a common hazard in mountainous regions. These regions often have human settlements in the lower parts of valleys, with human structures dangerously exposed to the destructive effects of these geophysical flows. Therefore a scientific effort has been made to understand, model and simulate geophysical granular flows. In order for computer models and simulations to be of predictive value they need to be validated under controlled, yet nature-like conditions. This work presents an experimental study of granular flow over a simplified mountain slope and valley topography. The experimental facility has a rough bed with very high slope at the upstream end and adverse slope on the downstream end, following a parabolic profile. Obstacles are present in the lower regions. Transient measurements of the moving granular surfaces were taken with a consumer-grade RGB-D sensor, providing transient 2D elevation fields around the obstacles. Three experimental configurations were tested, with semispheres of different diameters and a square dike obstacle. The experimental results are very consistent and repeatable. The quantitative, transient and two-dimensional data for all three experiments constitute excellent benchmarking tests for computational models, such as the one presented in a companion paper.

  5. Irinotecan Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Irinotecan lipid complex is used in combination with other medications to treat pancreatic cancer that has spread to other parts of ... after treatment with other chemotherapy medications. Irinotecan lipid complex is in a class of antineoplastic medications called ...

  6. Reverse engineering of complex biological body parts by squared distance enabled non-uniform rational B-spline technique and layered manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Pandithevan, Ponnusamy

    2015-02-01

    In tissue engineering, the successful modeling of scaffold for the replacement of damaged body parts depends mainly on external geometry and internal architecture in order to avoid the adverse effects such as pain and lack of ability to transfer the load to the surrounding bone. Due to flexibility in controlling the parameters, layered manufacturing processes are widely used for the fabrication of bone tissue engineering scaffold with the given computer-aided design model. This article presents a squared distance minimization approach for weight optimization of non-uniform rational B-spline curve and surface to modify the geometry that exactly fits into the defect region automatically and thus to fabricate the scaffold specific to subject and site. The study showed that though the errors associated in the B-spline curve and surface were minimized by squared distance method than point distance method and tangent distance method, the errors could be minimized further in the rational B-spline curve and surface as the optimal weight could change the shape that desired for the defect site. In order to measure the efficacy of the present approach, the results were compared with point distance method and tangent distance method in optimizing the non-rational and rational B-spline curve and surface fitting for the defect site. The optimized geometry then allowed to construct the scaffold in fused deposition modeling system as an example. The result revealed that the squared distance-based weight optimization of the rational curve and surface in making the defect specific geometry best fits into the defect region than the other methods used.

  7. Plasma etching of Hf-based high-k thin films. Part I. Effect of complex ions and radicals on the surface reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Ryan M.; Chang, Jane P.

    2009-03-15

    The effect of ion and radical compositions in BCl{sub 3}/Cl{sub 2} plasmas was assessed in this work with a focus on the formation of etch products in patterning hafnium aluminate, a potential high-k gate oxide material. The plasma composition became increasingly more complex as the percentage of boron trichloride was increased, which led to the formation of a significant amount of boron-containing species including B{sup +}, BCl{sup +}, BCl{sub 2}{sup +}, BCl{sub 3}{sup +}, B{sub 2}Cl{sub 3}{sup +}, and B{sub 2}OCl{sub 3}{sup +} in the plasma. The BCl{sub 2}{sup +} ions were found to be the dominant species in BCl{sub 3} containing plasmas at most conditions; however, increasing the pressure or decreasing the power led to an increase in the formation of higher mass ions. Several compositions of Hf{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}O{sub y} thin films ranging from pure HfO{sub 2} to pure Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were etched in BCl{sub 3}/Cl{sub 2} plasmas as functions of ion energy and plasma composition. The etch product distributions were measured and the dominant metal-containing etch products were HfCl{sub x} and AlCl{sub x} in a Cl{sub 2} plasma and HfCl{sub x}, HfBOCl{sub 4}, and Al{sub x}Cl{sub y} in a BCl{sub 3} plasma, and their concentrations increased with increasing ion energy. Oxygen was detected removed in the form of ClO in Cl{sub 2} and as trichloroboroxin ((BOCl){sub 3}) in BCl{sub 3}. Both the etch rate and the etch product formation are enhanced in BCl{sub 3}/Cl{sub 2} plasmas, as compared to those in Cl{sub 2} plasmas, due to the change in the composition and reactivity of the dominant ions and radicals.

  8. The Hox-4.8 gene is localized at the 5' extremity of the Hox-4 complex and is expressed in the most posterior parts of the body during development.

    PubMed

    Dollé, P; Izpisúa-Belmonte, J C; Boncinelli, E; Duboule, D

    1991-12-01

    We report the isolation and expression pattern of a novel mouse homeobox gene, Hox-4.8. Hox-4.8 is the most 5'-located homeobox gene in the HOX-4 complex. Sequence analysis confirmed that Hox-4.8 is a member of the subfamily of AbdominalB-related Hox-4 genes and revealed strong interspecies conservation. As for the human locus, Hox-4.8 is probably the last Hox gene in this part of the HOX-4 complex. During development, Hox-4.8 transcripts are restricted to the extremities of the embryonic anteroposterior axis and limbs as well as in the developing tail bud and to the most posterior segment of the gut (the rectum). Within the limb mesenchyme, Hox-4.8 is expressed in more posterodistal regions than those of its neighbour Hox-4.7. Hence, Hox-4.8 expression appears to be related to the last significant phenotypic changes towards the extremities of the embryonic body and limb axes. PMID:1685889

  9. Synthesis and reactivity of fluoro complexes: Part 2. Rhodium(I) fluoro complexes with alkene and phosphine ligands. Synthesis of the first isolated rhodium(I) bifluoride complexes. Structure of [Rh3(mu3-OH)2(COD)(3)](HF2) by X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Vicente, José; Gil-Rubio, Juan; Bautista, Delia; Sironi, Angelo; Masciocchi, Norberto

    2004-09-01

    The reaction between [Rh(mu-OH)(COD)](2) (COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene) and 73% HF in THF gives [Rh(3)(mu(3)-OH)(2)(COD)(3)](HF(2)) (1). Its crystal structure, determined by ab initio X-ray powder diffraction methods (from conventional laboratory data), contains complex trimetallic cations linked together in 1D chains by a mu(3)-OH...F-H-F...HO-mu(3) sequence of strong hydrogen bonds. The complex [Rh(mu-F)(COE)(2)](2) (COE = cyclooctene; 2), prepared by reacting [Rh(mu-OH)(COE)(2)](2) with NEt(3).3HF (3:2), has been characterized. Complex 1 reacts with PR(3) (1:3) to give [RhF(COD)(PR(3))] [R = Ph (3), C(6)H(4)OMe-4 (4), (i)Pr (5), Cy (6)] that can be prepared directly by reacting [Rh(mu-OH)(COD)](2) with 73% HF and PR(3) (1:2:2). The reactions of 1 with PPh(3) or Et(3)P have been studied by NMR spectroscopy at different molar ratios. Complexes [RhF(PEt(3))(3)] (7), [RhF(COD)(PEt(3))] (8), and [RhF(PPh(3))(3)] (9) have been detected. The complex [Rh(F)(NBD)(iPr(3)P)] (NBD = norbornadiene; 10) was prepared by the sequential treatment of [Rh(mu-OMe)(NBD)](2) with 1 equiv of NEt(3).3HF and (i)Pr(3)P. The first isolated bifluoride rhodium(I) complexes [Rh(FHF)(COD)(PR(3))] [R = Ph (11), (i)Pr (12), Cy (13)], obtained by reacting fluoro complexes 3, 5, and 6 with NEt(3).3HF (3:1), have been characterized. The crystal structures of 3 and 11 have been determined.

  10. Acute intravenous synaptamine complex variant KB220™ "normalizes" neurological dysregulation in patients during protracted abstinence from alcohol and opiates as observed using quantitative electroencephalographic and genetic analysis for reward polymorphisms: part 1, pilot study with 2 case reports.

    PubMed

    Miller, David K; Bowirrat, Abdalla; Manka, Matthew; Miller, Merlene; Stokes, Stanley; Manka, Debra; Allen, Cameron; Gant, Charles; Downs, B William; Smolen, Andrew; Stevens, Emily; Yeldandi, Swetha; Blum, Kenneth

    2010-11-01

    It is well established that in both food- and drug-addicted individuals, there is dopamine resistance due to an association with the DRD2 gene A1 allele. Evidence is emerging whereby the potential of utilizing a natural, nonaddicting, safe, putative D2 agonist may find its place in recovery from reward deficiency syndrome (RDS) in patients addicted to psychoactive chemicals. Utilizing quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) as an imaging tool, we show the impact of Synaptamine Complex Variant KB220™ as a putative activator of the mesolimbic system. We demonstrate for the first time that its intravenous administration reduces or "normalizes" aberrant electrophysiological parameters of the reward circuitry site. For this pilot study, we report that the qEEGs of an alcoholic and a heroin abuser with existing abnormalities (ie, widespread theta and widespread alpha activity, respectively) during protracted abstinence are significantly normalized by the administration of 1 intravenous dose of Synaptamine Complex Variant KB220™. Both patients were genotyped for a number of neurotransmitter reward genes to determine to what extent they carry putative dopaminergic risk alleles that may predispose them for alcohol or heroin dependence, respectively. The genes tested included the dopamine transporter (DAT1, locus symbol SLC6A3), dopamine D4 receptor exon 3 VNTR (DRD4), DRD2 TaqIA (rs1800497), COMT val158 met SNP (rs4680), monoamine oxidase A upstream VNTR (MAOA-uVNTR), and serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5HTTLPR, locus symbol SLC6A4). We emphasize that these are case studies, and it would be unlikely for all individuals to carry all putative risk alleles. Based on previous research and our qEEG studies (parts 1 and 2 of this study), we cautiously suggest that long-term activation of dopaminergic receptors (ie, DRD2 receptors) will result in their proliferation and lead to enhanced "dopamine sensitivity" and an increased sense of happiness

  11. Specific interactions with TBP and TFIIB in vitro suggest that 14-3-3 proteins may participate in the regulation of transcription when part of a DNA binding complex.

    PubMed

    Pan, S; Sehnke, P C; Ferl, R J; Gurley, W B

    1999-08-01

    The 14-3-3 family of multifunctional proteins is highly conserved among animals, plants, and yeast. Several studies have shown that these proteins are associated with a G-box DNA binding complex and are present in the nucleus in several plant and animal species. In this study, 14-3-3 proteins are shown to bind the TATA box binding protein (TBP), transcription factor IIB (TFIIB), and the human TBP-associated factor hTAF(II)32 in vitro but not hTAF(II)55. The interactions with TBP and TFIIB were highly specific, requiring amino acid residues in the box 1 domain of the 14-3-3 protein. These interactions do not require formation of the 14-3-3 dimer and are not dependent on known 14-3-3 recognition motifs containing phosphoserine. The 14-3-3-TFIIB interaction appears to occur within the same domain of TFIIB that binds the human herpes simplex virus transcriptional activator VP16, because VP16 and 14-3-3 were able to compete for interaction with TFIIB in vitro. In a plant transient expression system, 14-3-3 was able to activate GAL4-dependent beta-glucuronidase reporter gene expression at low levels when translationally fused with the GAL4 DNA binding domain. The in vitro binding with general transcription factors TBP and TFIIB together with its nuclear location provide evidence supporting a role for 14-3-3 proteins as transcriptional activators or coactivators when part of a DNA binding complex. PMID:10449590

  12. Prediction of a Flash Flood in Complex Terrain. Part I: A Comparison of Rainfall Estimates from Radar, and Very Short Range Rainfall Simulations from a Dynamic Model and an Automated Algorithmic System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Thomas T.; Brandes, Edward A.; Sun, Juanzhen; Yates, David N.; Mueller, Cynthia K.

    2000-06-01

    Operational prediction of flash floods caused by convective rainfall in mountainous areas requires accurate estimates or predictions of the rainfall distribution in space and time. The details of the spatial distribution are especially critical in complex terrain because the watersheds generally are small in size, and position errors in the placement of the rainfall can distribute the rain over the wrong watershed. In addition to the need for good rainfall estimates, accurate flood prediction requires a surface-hydrologic model that is capable of predicting stream or river discharge based on the rainfall-rate input data. In part 1 of this study, different techniques for the estimation and prediction of convective rainfall are applied to the Buffalo Creek, Colorado, flash flood of July 1996, during which over 75 mm of rain from a thunderstorm fell on the watershed in less than 1 h. The hydrologic impact of the rainfall was exacerbated by the fact that a considerable fraction of the watershed experienced a wildfire approximately two months prior to the rain event.Precipitation estimates from the National Weather Service Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler and the National Center for Atmospheric Research S-band, dual-polarization radar, collocated east of Denver, Colorado, were compared. Very short range simulations from a convection-resolving dynamic model that was initialized variationally using the radar reflectivity and Doppler winds were compared with simulations from an automated algorithmic forecast system that also employs the radar data. The radar estimates of rain rate and the two forecasting systems that employ the radar data have degraded accuracy by virtue of the fact that they are applied in complex terrain. Nevertheless, the dynamic model and automated algorithms both produce simulations that could be useful operationally for input to surface-hydrologic models employed for flood warning. Part 2 of this study, reported in a companion paper, describes

  13. GRID2D/3D: A computer program for generating grid systems in complex-shaped two- and three-dimensional spatial domains. Part 2: User's manual and program listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. T.; Shih, T. I.-P.; Nguyen, H. L.; Roelke, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    An efficient computer program, called GRID2D/3D, was developed to generate single and composite grid systems within geometrically complex two- and three-dimensional (2- and 3-D) spatial domains that can deform with time. GRID2D/3D generates single grid systems by using algebraic grid generation methods based on transfinite interpolation in which the distribution of grid points within the spatial domain is controlled by stretching functions. All single grid systems generated by GRID2D/3D can have grid lines that are continuous and differentiable everywhere up to the second-order. Also, grid lines can intersect boundaries of the spatial domain orthogonally. GRID2D/3D generates composite grid systems by patching together two or more single grid systems. The patching can be discontinuous or continuous. For continuous composite grid systems, the grid lines are continuous and differentiable everywhere up to the second-order except at interfaces where different single grid systems meet. At interfaces where different single grid systems meet, the grid lines are only differentiable up to the first-order. For 2-D spatial domains, the boundary curves are described by using either cubic or tension spline interpolation. For 3-D spatial domains, the boundary surfaces are described by using either linear Coon's interpolation, bi-hyperbolic spline interpolation, or a new technique referred to as 3-D bi-directional Hermite interpolation. Since grid systems generated by algebraic methods can have grid lines that overlap one another, GRID2D/3D contains a graphics package for evaluating the grid systems generated. With the graphics package, the user can generate grid systems in an interactive manner with the grid generation part of GRID2D/3D. GRID2D/3D is written in FORTRAN 77 and can be run on any IBM PC, XT, or AT compatible computer. In order to use GRID2D/3D on workstations or mainframe computers, some minor modifications must be made in the graphics part of the program; no

  14. Rapid Discrimination for Traditional Complex Herbal Medicines from Different Parts, Collection Time, and Origins Using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Near-Infrared Spectral Fingerprints with Aid of Pattern Recognition Methods

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Haiyan; Fan, Yao; Zhang, Xu; Lan, Hanyue; Yang, Tianming; Shao, Mei; Li, Sihan

    2015-01-01

    As an effective method, the fingerprint technique, which emphasized the whole compositions of samples, has already been used in various fields, especially in identifying and assessing the quality of herbal medicines. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and near-infrared (NIR), with their unique characteristics of reliability, versatility, precision, and simple measurement, played an important role among all the fingerprint techniques. In this paper, a supervised pattern recognition method based on PLSDA algorithm by HPLC and NIR has been established to identify the information of Hibiscus mutabilis L. and Berberidis radix, two common kinds of herbal medicines. By comparing component analysis (PCA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and particularly partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) with different fingerprint preprocessing of NIR spectra variables, PLSDA model showed perfect functions on the analysis of samples as well as chromatograms. Most important, this pattern recognition method by HPLC and NIR can be used to identify different collection parts, collection time, and different origins or various species belonging to the same genera of herbal medicines which proved to be a promising approach for the identification of complex information of herbal medicines. PMID:26345990

  15. Rapid Discrimination for Traditional Complex Herbal Medicines from Different Parts, Collection Time, and Origins Using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Near-Infrared Spectral Fingerprints with Aid of Pattern Recognition Methods.

    PubMed

    Fu, Haiyan; Fan, Yao; Zhang, Xu; Lan, Hanyue; Yang, Tianming; Shao, Mei; Li, Sihan

    2015-01-01

    As an effective method, the fingerprint technique, which emphasized the whole compositions of samples, has already been used in various fields, especially in identifying and assessing the quality of herbal medicines. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and near-infrared (NIR), with their unique characteristics of reliability, versatility, precision, and simple measurement, played an important role among all the fingerprint techniques. In this paper, a supervised pattern recognition method based on PLSDA algorithm by HPLC and NIR has been established to identify the information of Hibiscus mutabilis L. and Berberidis radix, two common kinds of herbal medicines. By comparing component analysis (PCA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and particularly partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) with different fingerprint preprocessing of NIR spectra variables, PLSDA model showed perfect functions on the analysis of samples as well as chromatograms. Most important, this pattern recognition method by HPLC and NIR can be used to identify different collection parts, collection time, and different origins or various species belonging to the same genera of herbal medicines which proved to be a promising approach for the identification of complex information of herbal medicines. PMID:26345990

  16. Motorcycle Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    An article in NASA Tech Briefs describing a vacuum bagging process for forming composite parts helped a small Oklahoma Company to improve its manufacturing process. President of Performance Extremes, Larry Ortega, and his partners make motorcycle parts from carbon/epoxy to reduce weight. Using vacuum bags, parts have a better surface and fewer voids inside. When heat used in the vacuum bag process caused deformation upon cooling, a solution found in another tech brief solved the problem. A metal plate inside the vacuum bag made for more even heat transfer. A third article described a simple procedure for repairing loose connector pins, which the company has also utilized.

  17. Complexity and behavioral economics.

    PubMed

    Rosser, J Barkley; Rosser, Marina V

    2015-04-01

    This paper will consider the relationship between complexity economics and behavioral economics. A crucial key to this is to understand that Herbert Simon was both the founder of explicitly modern behavioral economics as well as one of the early developers of complexity theory. Bounded rationality was essentially derived from Simon's view of the impossibility of full rationality on the part of economic agents. Modern complexity theory through such approaches as agent-based modeling offers an approach to understanding behavioral economics by allowing for specific behavioral responses to be assigned to agents who interact within this context, even without full rationality. Other parts of modern complexity theory are considered in terms of their relationships with behavioral economics. Fundamentally, complexity provides an ultimate foundation for bounded rationality and hence the need to use behavioral economics in a broader array of contexts than most economists have thought appropriate.

  18. Syntactic Complexity as an Aspect of Text Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantz, Roger S.; Starr, Laura E.; Bailey, Alison L.

    2015-01-01

    Students' ability to read complex texts is emphasized in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for English Language Arts and Literacy. The standards propose a three-part model for measuring text complexity. Although the model presents a robust means for determining text complexity based on a variety of features inherent to a text as well as…

  19. Heat production in different populations of human blood cells exposed to immune complexes in vitro: the importance of the Fc parts of immunoglobulins and the influence of active complement.

    PubMed Central

    Fäldt, R; Ankerst, J; Monti, M; Wadsö, I

    1982-01-01

    By use of a batch microcalorimeter of the thermopile type, heat production was measured in isolated populations of human peripheral blood cells exposed to defined immune complexes formed in vitro. It was found that most of the heat production recorded in whole blood after admixture of immune complexes occurs in the granulocytes. Under these conditions small but constantly higher activation values were found in the absence of active complement. It was shown that complexes consisting of antigen and F(ab)2 fragments prepared from the specific antibodies were able to initiate heat production in the cells only in the presence of active complement. These experiments indicate that immune complexes are able to induce increased heat production in the cells either by binding to Fc receptors or by activation of complement through the alternative pathway and subsequent binding of the generated C3b to C3b receptors on the heat-producing cells. PMID:7076279

  20. Low-dimensional compounds containing bioactive ligands. Part VI: Synthesis, structures, in vitro DNA binding, antimicrobial and anticancer properties of first row transition metal complexes with 5-chloro-quinolin-8-ol.

    PubMed

    Potočňák, Ivan; Vranec, Peter; Farkasová, Veronika; Sabolová, Danica; Vataščinová, Michaela; Kudláčová, Júlia; Radojević, Ivana D; Čomić, Ljiljana R; Markovic, Bojana Simovic; Volarevic, Vladislav; Arsenijevic, Nebojsa; Trifunović, Srećko R

    2016-01-01

    A series of new 3d metal complexes with 5-chloro-quinolin-8-ol (ClQ), [Mn(ClQ)2] (1), [Fe(ClQ)3] (2), [Co(ClQ)2(H2O)2] (3), [Ni(ClQ)2(H2O)2] (4), [Cu(ClQ)2] (5), [Zn(ClQ)2(H2O)2] (6), [Mn(ClQ)3]·DMF (7) and [Co(ClQ)3]·DMF·(EtOH)0.35 (8) (DMF=N,N-dimethylformamide), has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy and TG-DTA thermal analysis. X-ray structure analysis of 7 and 8 revealed that these molecular complexes contain three chelate ClQ molecules coordinated to the central atoms in a deformed octahedral geometry and free space between the complex units is filled by solvated DMF and ethanol molecules. Antimicrobial activity of 1-6 was tested by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum microbicidal concentration against 12 strains of bacteria and 5 strains of fungi. The intensity of antimicrobial action varies depending on the group of microorganism and can be sorted: 1>ClQ>6>3/4>2>5. Complexes 1-6 exhibit high cytotoxic activity against MDA-MB, HCT-116 and A549 cancer cell lines. Among them, complex 2 is significantly more cytotoxic against MDA-MB cells than cisplatin at all tested concentrations and is not cytotoxic against control mesenchymal stem cells indicating that this complex seems to be a good candidate for future pharmacological evaluation. Interaction of 1-6 with DNA was investigated using UV-VIS spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and agarose gel electrophoresis. The binding studies indicate that 1-6 can interact with CT-DNA through intercalation; complex 2 has the highest binding affinity. Moreover, complexes 1-6 inhibit the catalytic activity of topoisomerase I.

  1. Metal flux and dynamic speciation at (bio)interfaces. Part V: The roles of simple, fulvic and aggregate complexes on Pb flux in freshwater ligand mixtures, computed at planar consuming interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zeshi; Buffle, Jacques

    2009-03-01

    The computations of metal flux in aquatic systems, at consuming interfaces like oganism membranes are of major importance in ecotoxicology and dynamic risk assessment. In this paper, the flux of Pb(II), at a planar consuming interface in natural waters, is studied. The system includes (a) simple ligands (OH -, CO32-); (b) fulvics and (c) aggregates, as complexants, i.e. those which may play the major roles in controlling the metal flux in aquatic media. The effects of various physico-chemical factors, in particular, the diffusion layer thickness, the stability constants of fulvic and aggregate complexes, the complexing site distribution of fulvics and the size distribution of aggregates, are studied in details.

  2. Cosmic Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    neutrons, liberating a little energy and creating complexity. Then, the expanding universe cooled some more, and neutrons and protons, no longer kept apart by immense temperatures, found themselves unstable and formed helium nuclei. Then, a little more cooling, and atomic nuclei and electrons were no longer kept apart, and the universe became transparent. Then a little more cooling, and the next instability began: gravitation pulled matter together across cosmic distances to form stars and galaxies. This instability is described as a "negative heat capadty" in which extracting energy from a gravitating system makes it hotter -- clearly the 2nd law of thermodynamics does not apply here! (This is the physicist's part of the answer to e e cummings' question: what is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart?) Then, the next instability is that hydrogen and helium nuclei can fuse together to release energy and make stars burn for billions of years. And then at the end of the fuel source, stars become unstable and explode and liberate the chemical elements back into space. And because of that, on planets like Earth, sustained energy flows support the development of additional instabilities and all kinds of complex patterns. Gravitational instability pulls the densest materials into the core of the Earth, leaving a thin skin of water and air, and makes the interior churn incessantly as heat flows outwards. And the heat from the sun, received mostly near the equator and flowing towards the poles, supports the complex atmospheric and oceanic circulations. And because or that, the physical Earth is full of natural chemical laboratories, concentrating elements here, mixing them there, raising and lowering temperatures, ceaselessly experimenting with uncountable events where new instabilities can arise. At least one of them was the new experiment called life. Now that we know that there are at least as many planets as there are stars, it is hard to imagine that nature's ceasess

  3. Cosmic Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    neutrons, liberating a little energy and creating complexity. Then, the expanding universe cooled some more, and neutrons and protons, no longer kept apart by immense temperatures, found themselves unstable and formed helium nuclei. Then, a little more cooling, and atomic nuclei and electrons were no longer kept apart, and the universe became transparent. Then a little more cooling, and the next instability began: gravitation pulled matter together across cosmic distances to form stars and galaxies. This instability is described as a "negative heat capadty" in which extracting energy from a gravitating system makes it hotter -- clearly the 2nd law of thermodynamics does not apply here! (This is the physicist's part of the answer to e e cummings' question: what is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart?) Then, the next instability is that hydrogen and helium nuclei can fuse together to release energy and make stars burn for billions of years. And then at the end of the fuel source, stars become unstable and explode and liberate the chemical elements back into space. And because of that, on planets like Earth, sustained energy flows support the development of additional instabilities and all kinds of complex patterns. Gravitational instability pulls the densest materials into the core of the Earth, leaving a thin skin of water and air, and makes the interior churn incessantly as heat flows outwards. And the heat from the sun, received mostly near the equator and flowing towards the poles, supports the complex atmospheric and oceanic circulations. And because or that, the physical Earth is full of natural chemical laboratories, concentrating elements here, mixing them there, raising and lowering temperatures, ceaselessly experimenting with uncountable events where new instabilities can arise. At least one of them was the new experiment called life. Now that we know that there are at least as many planets as there are stars, it is hard to imagine that nature's ceasess

  4. Measurement of complex surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.M.

    1993-05-01

    Several of the components used in coil fabrication involve complex surfaces and dimensions that are not well suited to measurements using conventional dimensional measuring equipment. Some relatively simple techniques that are in use in the SSCL Magnet Systems Division (MSD) for incoming inspection will be described, with discussion of their suitability for specific applications. Components that are submitted for MSD Quality Assurance (QA) dimensional inspection may be divided into two distinct categories; the first category involves components for which there is an approved drawing and for which all nominal dimensions are known; the second category involves parts for which `reverse engineering` is required, the part is available but there are no available drawings or dimensions. This second category typically occurs during development of coil end parts and coil turn filler parts where it is necessary to manually shape the part and then measure it to develop the information required to prepare a drawing for the part.

  5. Comment on "theoretical acquirement of the red shift of nu(F-H) upon complexation with Ne" by Guoqun Liu and Xianxi Zhang [Spectrochim. Acta Part A 69 (2008) 917-920].

    PubMed

    McDowell, Sean A C

    2008-12-15

    This Comment shows that the agreement between theory and experiment for the vibrational red shift of the FH stretch upon complexation with Ne claimed by the authors of the captioned manuscript is not justified and should be considered as merely fortuitous.

  6. Adamantyl-group containing mixed-mode acrylamide-based continuous beds for capillary electrochromatography. Part I: study of a synthesis procedure including solubilization of N-adamantyl-acrylamide via complex formation with a water-soluble cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Al-Massaedh, Ayat Allah; Pyell, Ute

    2013-04-19

    A new synthesis procedure for highly crosslinked macroporous amphiphilic N-adamantyl-functionalized mixed-mode acrylamide-based monolithic stationary phases for capillary electrochromatography (CEC) is investigated employing solubilization of the hydrophobic monomer by complexation with a cyclodextrin. N-(1-adamantyl)acrylamide is synthesized and characterized as a hydrophobic monomer forming a water soluble-inclusion complex with statistically methylated-β-cyclodextrin. The stoichiometry, the complex formation constant and the spatial arrangement of the formed complex are determined. Mixed-mode monolithic stationary phases are synthesized by in situ free radical copolymerization of cyclodextrin-solubilized N-adamantyl acrylamide, a water soluble crosslinker (piperazinediacrylamide), a hydrophilic monomer (methacrylamide), and a negatively charged monomer (vinylsulfonic acid) in aqueous medium in bind silane-pretreated fused silica capillaries. The synthesized monolithic stationary phases are amphiphilic and can be employed in the reversed- and in the normal-phase mode (depending on the composition of the mobile phase), which is demonstrated with polar and non-polar analytes. Observations made with polar analytes and polar mobile phase can only be explained by a mixed-mode retention mechanism. The influence of the total monomer concentration (%T) on the chromatographic properties, the electroosmotic mobility, and on the specific permeability is investigated. With a homologues series of alkylphenones it is confirmed that the hydrophobicity (methylene selectivity) of the stationary phase increases with increasing mass fraction of N-(1-adamantyl)acrylamide in the synthesis mixture. PMID:23489493

  7. Preparation of Rh[16aneS4-diol](211)At and Ir[16aneS4-diol](211)At complexes as potential precursors for astatine radiopharmaceuticals. Part I: Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Pruszyński, Marek; Bilewicz, Aleksander; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2008-04-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate a new approach that can be applied for labeling biomolecules with (211)At. Many astatine compounds that have been synthesized are unstable in vivo, providing motivation for seeking different (211)At labeling strategies. The approach evaluated in this study was to attach astatide anions to soft metal cations, which are also complexed by a bifunctional ligand. Ultimately, this complex could in principle be subsequently conjugated to a biomolecule with the proper selection of ligand functionality. We report here the attachment of (211)At(-) and *I(-) (*I = (131)I or (125)I) anions to the soft metal cations Rh(III) and Ir(III), which are complexed by the 1,5,9,13-tetrathiacyclohexadecane-3,11-diol (16aneS4-diol) ligand. Radioactive *I(-) anions were used for preliminary studies directed at the optimization of reaction conditions and to provide a baseline for comparison of results with (211)At. Four complexes Rh[16aneS4-diol]*I/(211)At and Ir[16aneS4-diol]*I/(211)At were synthesized in high yield in a one-step procedure, and the products were characterized mainly by paper electrophoresis and reversed-phase HPLC. The influences of time and temperature of heating and concentrations of metal cations and sulfur ligand 16aneS4-diol, as well as pH on the reaction yields were determined. Yields of about 80% were obtained when the quantities of Rh(III) or Ir(III) cations and 16aneS4-diol ligand in the solutions were 62.5 nmol and 250 nmol, respectively, and the pH ranged 3.0-4.0. Syntheses required heating for 1-1.5 h at 75-80 degrees C. The influence of microwave heating on the time and completeness of the complexation reaction was evaluated and compared with the conventional method of heating in an oil bath. Microwave synthesis accelerates reactions significantly. With microwave heating, yields of about 75% for Rh[16aneS4-diol](131)I and Ir[16aneS4-diol](131)I complexes were obtained after only 20 min exposure of the reaction mixtures to

  8. Preparation of Rh[16aneS4-diol](211)At and Ir[16aneS4-diol](211)At complexes as potential precursors for astatine radiopharmaceuticals. Part I: Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Pruszyński, Marek; Bilewicz, Aleksander; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2008-04-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate a new approach that can be applied for labeling biomolecules with (211)At. Many astatine compounds that have been synthesized are unstable in vivo, providing motivation for seeking different (211)At labeling strategies. The approach evaluated in this study was to attach astatide anions to soft metal cations, which are also complexed by a bifunctional ligand. Ultimately, this complex could in principle be subsequently conjugated to a biomolecule with the proper selection of ligand functionality. We report here the attachment of (211)At(-) and *I(-) (*I = (131)I or (125)I) anions to the soft metal cations Rh(III) and Ir(III), which are complexed by the 1,5,9,13-tetrathiacyclohexadecane-3,11-diol (16aneS4-diol) ligand. Radioactive *I(-) anions were used for preliminary studies directed at the optimization of reaction conditions and to provide a baseline for comparison of results with (211)At. Four complexes Rh[16aneS4-diol]*I/(211)At and Ir[16aneS4-diol]*I/(211)At were synthesized in high yield in a one-step procedure, and the products were characterized mainly by paper electrophoresis and reversed-phase HPLC. The influences of time and temperature of heating and concentrations of metal cations and sulfur ligand 16aneS4-diol, as well as pH on the reaction yields were determined. Yields of about 80% were obtained when the quantities of Rh(III) or Ir(III) cations and 16aneS4-diol ligand in the solutions were 62.5 nmol and 250 nmol, respectively, and the pH ranged 3.0-4.0. Syntheses required heating for 1-1.5 h at 75-80 degrees C. The influence of microwave heating on the time and completeness of the complexation reaction was evaluated and compared with the conventional method of heating in an oil bath. Microwave synthesis accelerates reactions significantly. With microwave heating, yields of about 75% for Rh[16aneS4-diol](131)I and Ir[16aneS4-diol](131)I complexes were obtained after only 20 min exposure of the reaction mixtures to

  9. Preparation of Rh[16aneS4-diol]211 At and Ir[16aneS4-diol]211 At Complexes as Potential Precursors for Astatine Radiopharmaceuticals. Part I: Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pruszyński, Marek; Bilewicz, Aleksander; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate a new approach that can be applied for labeling biomolecules with 211At. Many astatine compounds that have been synthesized are unstable in vivo, providing motivation for seeking different 211At labeling strategies. The approach evaluated in this study was to attach astatide anions to soft metal cations, which are also complexed by a bifunctional ligand. Ultimately, this complex could in principle be subsequently conjugated to a biomolecule with the proper selection of ligand functionality. We report here the attachment of 211At− and *I− (*I = 131I or 125I) anions to the soft metal cations Rh(III) and Ir(III), which are complexed by the 1,5,9,13-tetrathiacyclohexadecane-3,11-diol (16aneS4-diol) ligand. Radioactive *I− anions were used for preliminary studies directed at the optimization of reaction conditions and to provide a baseline for comparison of results with 211At. Four complexes Rh[16aneS4-diol]*I/211At and Ir[16aneS4-diol]*I/211 At were synthesized in high yield in a one-step procedure, and the products were characterized mainly by paper electrophoresis and reversed-phase HPLC. The influences of time and temperature of heating and concentrations of metal cations and sulfur ligand 16aneS4-diol, as well as pH on the reaction yields were determined. Yields of about 80% were obtained when the quantities of Rh(III) or Ir(III) cations and 16aneS4-diol ligand in the solutions were 62.5 nmol and 250 nmol, respectively, and the pH ranged 3.0–4.0. Syntheses required heating for 1–1.5 h at 75–80 °C. The influence of microwave heating on the time and completeness of the complexation reaction was evaluated and compared with the conventional method of heating in an oil bath. Microwave synthesis accelerates reactions significantly. With microwave heating, yields of about 75% for Rh[16aneS4-diol]131I and Ir[16aneS4-diol]131I complexes were obtained after only 20 min exposure of the reaction mixtures to microwave

  10. Handbook of Techniques and Guides for the Study of the San Francisco Bay-Delta-Estuary Complex, Part 1. Monitoring Techniques for the Measurement of Physico-Chemical and Biological Parameters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alameda County School Dept., Hayward, CA.

    Project MER (Marine Ecology Research) is aimed at improving environmental education in the San Francisco Bay Area schools. As part of meeting this goal, it is hoped that students and teachers can see the results of their efforts being put to practical use. This guide is the first of a series produced to help the students and teachers gather data…

  11. Asymmetric synthesis of α-amino acids via homologation of Ni(II) complexes of glycine Schiff bases. Part 2: aldol, Mannich addition reactions, deracemization and (S) to (R) interconversion of α-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Sorochinsky, Alexander E; Aceña, José Luis; Moriwaki, Hiroki; Sato, Tatsunori; Soloshonok, Vadim

    2013-11-01

    This review provides a comprehensive treatment of literature data dealing with asymmetric synthesis of α-amino-β-hydroxy and α,β-diamino acids via homologation of chiral Ni(II) complexes of glycine Schiff bases using aldol and Mannich-type reactions. These reactions proceed with synthetically useful chemical yields and thermodynamically controlled stereoselectivity and allow direct introduction of two stereogenic centers in a single operation with predictable stereochemical outcome. Furthermore, new application of Ni(II) complexes of α-amino acids Schiff bases for deracemization of racemic α-amino acids and (S) to (R) interconversion providing additional synthetic opportunities for preparation of enantiomerically pure α-amino acids, is also reviewed. Origin of observed diastereo-/enantioselectivity in the aldol, Mannich-type and deracemization reactions, generality and limitations of these methodologies are critically discussed.

  12. Voltammetry as a virtual potentiometric sensor in modelling of a metal-ligand system and refinement of stability constants. Part 4. An electrochemical study of NiII complexes with methylene diphosphonic acid.

    PubMed

    Cukrowski, Ignacy; Mogano, Daniel M; Zeevaart, Jan Rijn

    2005-12-01

    The Ni(II)-MDP-OH system (MDP=methylene diphosphonic acid) and stability constants of complexes formed at ionic strength 0.15M at 298K were established by direct current polarography (DCP) and glass electrode potentiometry (GEP). The final M-L-OH model could only be arrived to by employing recent concept of virtual potentiometry (VP). VP-data were generated from non-equilibrium and dynamic DC polarographic technique. The VP and GEP data were refined simultaneously by software dedicated to potentiometric studies of metal complexes. Species distribution diagrams that were generated for different experimental conditions employed in this work assisted in making the final choice regarding the metal-ligand model. The model established contains ML, ML(2), ML(OH) and ML(OH)(2) with stability constants, as logbeta, 7.94+/-0.02, 13.75+/-0.02, 12.04 (fixed value), and 16.75+/-0.05, respectively. It has been demonstrated that virtual potential must be used in modelling operations (predictions of species formed) when a polarographic signal decreases significantly due to the formation of polarographically inactive species (or formation of inert complexes). The linear free energy relationships that included stability constant logK(1) for Ni(II)-MDP established in this work together with other available data were used to predict logK(1) values for Sm(III) and Ho(III) with MDP. The logK(1) values for Sm(III)-MDP and Ho(III)-MDP were estimated to be 9.65+/-0.10 and 9.85+/-0.10, respectively. PMID:16213588

  13. Alkali-metal ion coordination in uranyl(VI) poly-peroxide complexes in solution. Part 1: the Li⁺, Na⁺ and K⁺--peroxide-hydroxide systems.

    PubMed

    Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Vallet, Valerie; Szabó, Zoltán; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2015-01-28

    The alkali metal ions Li(+), Na(+) and K(+) have a profound influence on the stoichiometry of the complexes formed in uranyl(VI)-peroxide-hydroxide systems, presumably as a result of a templating effect, resulting in the formation of two complexes, M[(UO2)(O2)(OH)]2(-) where the uranyl units are linked by one peroxide bridge, μ-η(2)-η(2), with the second peroxide coordinated "end-on", η(2), to one of the uranyl groups, and M[(UO2)(O2)(OH)]4(3-), with a four-membered ring of uranyl ions linked by μ-η(2)-η(2) peroxide bridges. The stoichiometry and equilibrium constants for the reactions: M(+) + 2UO2(2+) + 2HO2(-) + 2H2O → M[(UO2)(O2)(OH)]2(-) + 4H(+) (1) and M(+) + 4UO2(2+) + 4HO2(-) + 4H2O → M[(UO2)(O2)(OH)]4(3-) + 8H(+) (2) have been measured at 25 °C in 0.10 M (tetramethyl ammonium/M(+))NO3 ionic media using reaction calorimetry. Both reactions are strongly enthalpy driven with large negative entropies of reaction; the observation that ΔH(2) ≈ 2ΔH(1) suggests that the enthalpy of reaction is approximately the same when peroxide is added in bridging and "end-on" positions. The thermodynamic driving force in the reactions is the formation of strong peroxide bridges and the role of M(+) cations is to provide a pathway with a low activation barrier between the reactants and in this way "guide" them to form peroxide bridged complexes; they play a similar role as in the synthesis of crown-ethers. Quantum chemical (QC) methods were used to determine the structure of the complexes, and to demonstrate how the size of the M(+)-ions affects their coordination geometry. There are several isomers of Na[(UO2)(O2)(OH)]2(-) and QC energy calculations show that the ones with a peroxide bridge are substantially more stable than the ones with hydroxide bridges. There are isomers with different coordination sites for Na(+) and the one with coordination to the peroxide bridge and two uranyl oxygen atoms is the most stable one.

  14. Complex derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, Stefano; Caldarelli, Guido; Georg, Co-Pierre; May, Robert; Stiglitz, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    The intrinsic complexity of the financial derivatives market has emerged as both an incentive to engage in it, and a key source of its inherent instability. Regulators now faced with the challenge of taming this beast may find inspiration in the budding science of complex systems.

  15. Designing Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glanville, Ranulph

    2007-01-01

    This article considers the nature of complexity and design, as well as relationships between the two, and suggests that design may have much potential as an approach to improving human performance in situations seen as complex. It is developed against two backgrounds. The first is a world view that derives from second order cybernetics and radical…

  16. Effects of soluble organic complexants and their degradation products on the removal of selected radionuclides from high-level waste. Part 3, Distributions of Sr, Cs, Tc, Pu, and Am onto 33 absorbers from four variations of a 3:1 dilution of Hanford complexant concentrate (CC) simulant: Part 4, The effects of varying dilution ratios on the distributions of Sr, Cs, Tc, Pu, and Am onto 12 absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1995-09-01

    Many of the radioactive waste storage tanks at USDOE facilities contain organic compounds that have been degraded by radiolysis and chemical reactions during decades of storage. Objective of this study was to measure effects of soluble organic complexants and their degradation products on sorption of Sr, Cs, Tc, Pu and Am onto 33 absorbers that in the absence of these organic compounds offer high sorption of these elements. The elements were in a generic simulant for Hanford complexant concentrate supernate that initially contained six organic complexants: EDTA, HEDTA, NTA, citrate, gluconate, and iminodiacetate. This simulant was tested as prepared and after gamma-irradiation to approximately 34 Mrads. Two other variations consisted of the unirradiated and irradiated simulants after treatment at 450C and 15,000 psi in a hydrothermal organic-destruction process. These experiments were conducted with a 3:1 water-to-simulant dilution of each of the four simulant variations. To determine effects of varying dilution ratios on the sorption of these five elements from the unirradiated and gamma-irradiated simulants that were not treated with the hydrothermal process, we measured their distribution from a 1:1 dilution, using 1 M NaOH as the diluent, onto the 12 best-performing absorbers. We then measured the sorption of these five elements from solutions having diluent-simulant ratios of 0, 0.5, 2.0, and 3.0 onto the three absorbers that performed best for sorbing Sr, Pu and Am from the 1:1 dilution. For each of 900 element/absorber/solution combinations, we measured distribution coefficients (Kd values) twice for each period for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about absorber stability and sorption kinetics. The 5400 measured Kd values indicate that the sorption of Sr, Pu, and Am is significantly decreased by the organic complexants in these simulant solutions, whereas the sorption of Cs and Tc is much less affected.

  17. Petrology and U/Pb geochronology of the Santa Maria Ipalapa region in the southeastern part of the Xolapa Complex, Mexico: Constrains of the metamorphic evolution of the Xolapa Terrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez Aguilar, F.; Victoria Morales, A.; Maldonado, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Xolapa Complex is a metamorphic-plutonic basement that forms a large belt with more than 600 km length and 50-100 km wide along the Pacific coast of southeastern Mexico. This Complex is constituted by a high grade sequence of meta-sedimentary and meta-igneous rocks, locally migmatisized, and which are intruded by strongly deformed plutonic rocks. Because of their representative characteristics, two samples were analyzed: 1) Para-schist: this rocks present a mineral assemblage composed of biotite, sillimanite, plagioclase, k-feldspar and garnet, and 2) Amphibolite: which are constituted by amphibole, plagioclase, biotite and garnet. The garnet porphydoblasts in the para-schist are subhedral, presents retrograde compositional zoning, with almandine and pyrope rich core (Alm74-75Sps7.-10.1Pyr12.1-12.5Grs3.8-3.9) and spessartine rich rim (Alm69-71Sps14-19Pyr7.9-9.6Grs3.6-3.7). The garnet in amphibolite, presents a prograde growth zoning with a slight increase in spessartine in the core (Alm59-60Grs24-25Pyr8.0-8.3Sps7.3-7.6), and low content of spessartine component toward the rim (Alm60-62Grs23-24Pyr8.8-9.6Sps5.4-5.5). In order to constrain the P-T evolution of the region, multiequilibria thermobarometry was applied to both samples, the para-schist unit presents P-T data from 706 (ºC) and 7.5 (kbar), in the other hand the garnet amphibolite unit shows P-T data from 734 (ºC) and 7 (kbar). This study provides new geochronological data (U/Pb in zircons) for the amphibolite facies metamorphism and for the migmatitic event in the region that contributes to the understanding of the tectonic evolution of southeastern Mexico.

  18. Carney Complex

    MedlinePlus

    ... Screening guidelines may change over time as new technologies are developed and more is learned about Carney complex. It is important to talk with your doctor about appropriate screening tests. Learn more about what to expect when having ...

  19. Oceanic core complex and newly-formed basalts in axial part of Mid-Atlantic Ridge (5-7oN): Implications for formation and evolution of slow-spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortnikov, N. S.; Sharkov, E. V.

    2011-12-01

    Data on petrography, mineralogy and U-Pb and Sr isotope studies of rocks exposed in the axial valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 5oN to 7oN are discussed. Samples were collected in 10th cruise of R/V "Academik Ioffe" (2001-2002) and 22nd cruise of R/V "Professor Logachev" (2003). Dredged rocks are serpentinized mantle peridotites, gabbros, including ferrogabbros and trondhjemites as well as fresh basalts with chilled glassy crusts. Plutonic rocks are strongly altered and tectonized. The association of rocks is identical to that defined as oceanic core complexes (OCC), described by Tucholke et al. (1998), Escartin et al. (2003), Ildefonse et al. (2007), MacLeod et al. (2009). Two complexes of altered gabbros: (1) primitive magnesian gabbros, derived from MORB, and (2) hornblende-bearing ferrogabbros defined as siliceous Fe-Ti-oxide series were found. The latter are saturated and supersaturated with silica under relatively high water content. Such features are usually typical of subduction-related magmas, but they have high contents of Ti, Fe, Nb, Ta and P, which characterize plume-related magmas. SHRIMP-studies of the magmatic zircon grains with oscillatory zoning, extracted from the gabbros, showed that their U-Pb age range from 0.7 to 2.3 Ma. Newly-formed fresh basaltic flows covered protrusions in the rift valleys and fill in dips in axial valleys where they overlap both altered gabbros and serpentinites. Fresh basalts are close in composition to oceanic platobasalts. These basalts are considered to be derived due to crystallizing differentiation in shallow transitional magmatic chambers (intrusions). This assumes the present-day magmatic activity beneath the spreading zone in this area. Several centimeters-scale Sr-isotopic heterogeneity in basalts was discovered. It is considered as a result of incomplete dissolution in basaltic magmas of gabbro fragments, captured during rapid ascent of the melt through the lower crust. This is evidence that a magmatic

  20. Stereospecific ligands and their complexes. Part XII. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro antiproliferative activity of platinum(IV) complexes with some O,O‧-dialkyl esters of (S,S)-ethylenediamine-N,N‧-di-2-propanoic acid against colon cancer (HCT-116) and breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojković, Danijela Lj.; Jevtić, Verica V.; Radić, Gordana P.; Đačić, Dragana S.; Ćurčić, Milena G.; Marković, Snežana D.; Ðinović, Vesna M.; Petrović, Vladimir P.; Trifunović, Srećko R.

    2014-03-01

    Synthesis of three new platinum(IV) complexes C1-C3, with bidentate N,N‧-ligand precursors, O,O‧-dialkyl esters (alkyl = propyl, butyl and pentyl), of (S,S)-ethylenediamine-N,N‧-di-2-propanoic acid, H2-S,S-eddp were reported. The reported platinum(IV) complexes characterized by elemental analysis and their structures were discussed on the bases of their infrared, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. In vitro antiproliferative activity was determined on tumor cell lines: human colon carcinoma HCT-116 and human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231, using MTT test.

  1. In situ chemical and Sr-Nd-O isotopic compositions of apatite from the Tongshi intrusive complex in the southern part of the North China Craton: Implications for petrogenesis and metallogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen-Gang; Fan, Hong-Rui; Hu, Fang-Fang; Santosh, M.; Yang, Kui-Feng; Lan, Ting-Guang

    2015-06-01

    The Tongshi intrusive complex from the southeastern margin of the North China Craton is composed of syenite and monzonite, and was emplaced at ca. 180 Ma. Apatite from the syenite and monzonite were analyzed to better understand the petrogenesis of the complex and its mineralization potential. The cathodoluminescence images of some apatites from the monzonite exhibit core-rim texture, whereas the apatites from the syenite display uniform inner texture. The core and rim domains of the apatites exhibit distinct Sr isotopes and major-trace element compositions, whereas only little variation is displayed by the oxygen isotopes. The core portions of the apatites were inferred to be inherited from the protolith of the monzonite during remelting process. The calculated δ18O values of the syenite range from 3.5‰ to 4.1‰ with an average of 3.8‰ (SE = 0.21), which is significantly lower than that of the monzonite sample (with a range of 6.4-6.9‰, and mean at 6.7‰). In conjunction with the heterogeneity of Nd isotopic compositions (with normalized 143Nd/144Nd ratios varying from 0.51151 to 0.51236, and εNd (t = 180 Ma) values from -20.3 to -4.8) of the apatites from the syenite, it is proposed that the syenite melts may have been contaminated by crustal components which were earlier hydrothermally altered at high temperature. Based on element diffusion theory, we calculate the temperature of this crustal contamination to be higher than 637 °C, the closure temperature of Sm-Nd isotopic diffusion in apatite, and estimate that the duration of this process is probably shorter than 0.13 Ma. The oxygen fugacity of the syenite and monzonite calculated by apatite Mn content indicate that high oxidization state of the syenite magma can enhance the metallic mineralization potential. In contrast, the lower oxygen fugacity of the monzonite melt was unfavorable for metal enrichment, thus leading to insignificant mineralization. Our study recommends more focus for gold

  2. β-Lactam antibiotics. Spectroscopy and molecular orbital (MO) calculations . Part I: IR studies of complexation in penicillin-transition metal ion systems and semi-empirical PM3 calculations on simple model compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupka, Teobald

    1997-12-01

    IR studies were preformed to determine possible transition metal ion binding sites of penicillin. the observed changes in spectral position and shape of characteristic IR bands of cloxacillin in the presence of transition metal ions (both in solutions and in the solid state) indicate formation of M-L complexes with engagement of -COO - and/or -CONH- functional groups. The small shift of νCO towards higher frequencies rules out direct M-L interaction via β-lactam carbonyl. PM3 calculations on simple model compounds (substituted formamide, cyclic ketones, lactams and substituted monocyclic β-lactams) have been performed. All structures were fully optimized and the calculated bond lengths, angles, heats of formation and CO stretching frequencies were discussed to determine the β-lactam binding sites and to explain its susceptibility towards nucleophilic attack (hydrolysis in vitro) and biological activity. The relative changes of calculated values were critically compared with available experimental data and same correlation between structural parameters and in vivo activity was shown.

  3. Crystallization of macromolecular complexes: combinatorial complex crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stura, Enrico A.; Graille, Marc; Charbonnier, Jean-Baptiste

    2001-11-01

    The usefulness of antibody complexation, as a way of increasing the chances of crystallization needs to be re-evaluated after many antibody complexes have been crystallized and their structure determined. It is somewhat striking that among these, only a small number is a complex with a large protein antigen. The problem is that the effort of raising, cleaving and purifying an Fab is rewarded only by an extra chance of getting crystals; depending on the relative likelihood of crystallization of the complexed and uncomplexed protein. The example of the complex between HIV gp120, CD4 and an Fab fragment from a neutralizing antibody suggests that further complexation of an antigen-antibody complex with a third protein could, by increasing the number of possible combinations, improve the likelihood of crystallization. We propose the use of Ig-binding proteins as a way of extending the method from HIV gp120 to all proteins for which there are monoclonal antibodies. We discuss this technique, combinatorial complex crystallization (CCC), as part of a multi-component system for the enhancement of crystallization of macromolecular complexes. The method makes use of single Ig-binding domains from Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SpA), Peptostreptococcus magnus protein L (PpL) and the streptococcal protein G (SpG). The generality of the method depends on the ability of these domains to interact with a large repertoire of antibodies without affecting antigen binding. There is strong evidence to suggest that these Ig-binding domains bind outside the antigen-combining site of the antibody without perturbing antigen binding. It is clear from the crystal structure of the single SpG domain complexed with an Fab that the interaction involves mainly the immunoglobulin CH1 domain, a region not involved in antigen recognition. We have recently determined the structure of the complex between a human Fab and the domain D from SpA and found that steric hindrance is unlikely even for large

  4. Consequences of prolonged inhalation of ozone on f344/n rats: Collaborative studies. Part 3. Effects on complex carbohydrates of lung connective tissue. Research report, April 1991-January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnamurthy, B.

    1994-09-01

    Glycosaminoglycans are constituents of proteoglycans, which are integral components of lung connective tissue. Changes in the metabolism of glycosaminoglycans have been noted in pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. The authors studied quantitative and qualitative changes of glycosaminoglycans in the lungs of rats exposed to a range of ozone levels (0, 0.12, 0.5, or 1.0 parts per million) for 20 months. Although wide variations in total glycosaminoglycans concentrations exist among individual animals within each exposure group, regression analyses of data indicated a monotonic and statistically significant decrease of total glycosaminoglycans after ozone exposure. Among individual glycosaminoglycans, hyaluronan, chondroitin 4-sulfate, and chondroitin 6-sulfate levels decreased significantly in animals exposed to ozone when compared with control animals. Heparan sulfate concentration exhibited a significant trend toward increase with increasing doses of ozone, but the difference in heparan sulfate concentration animals exposed to ozone and control animals was not significant. Gel filtration studies of glycosaminoglycans in pooled sampled indicated that the molecular size of hyaluronan in animals exposed to ozone was lower than it was in control animals. The authors noted differences in heparan sulfate`s chemical properties and its affinity to antithrombin III between animals exposed to ozone and control animals. These observations indicate that inhalation of ozone for 20 months affects normal cellular metabolism of proteoglycans, which may contribute to the functional impairment of the lung.

  5. Prediction of a Flash Flood in Complex Terrain. Part II: A Comparison of Flood Discharge Simulations Using Rainfall Input from Radar, a Dynamic Model, and an Automated Algorithmic System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, David N.; Warner, Thomas T.; Leavesley, George H.

    2000-06-01

    Three techniques were employed for the estimation and prediction of precipitation from a thunderstorm that produced a flash flood in the Buffalo Creek watershed located in the mountainous Front Range near Denver, Colorado, on 12 July 1996. The techniques included 1) quantitative precipitation estimation using the National Weather Service's Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler and the National Center for Atmospheric Research's S-band, dual-polarization radars, 2) quantitative precipitation forecasting utilizing a dynamic model, and 3) quantitative precipitation forecasting using an automated algorithmic system for tracking thunderstorms. Rainfall data provided by these various techniques at short timescales (6 min) and at fine spatial resolutions (150 m to 2 km) served as input to a distributed-parameter hydrologic model for analysis of the flash flood. The quantitative precipitation estimates from the weather radar demonstrated their ability to aid in simulating a watershed's response to precipitation forcing from small-scale, convective weather in complex terrain. That is, with the radar-based quantitative precipitation estimates employed as input, the simulated peak discharge was similar to that estimated. The dynamic model showed the most promise in providing a significant forecast lead time for this flash-flood event. The algorithmic system did not show as much skill in comparison with the dynamic model in providing precipitation forcing to the hydrologic model. The discharge forecasts based on the dynamic-model and algorithmic-system inputs point to the need to improve the ability to forecast convective storms, especially if models such as these eventually are to be used in operational flood forecasting.

  6. A dynamic phase-field model for structural transformations and twinning: Regularized interfaces with transparent prescription of complex kinetics and nucleation. Part I: Formulation and one-dimensional characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Vaibhav; Dayal, Kaushik

    2015-12-01

    The motion of microstructural interfaces is important in modeling twinning and structural phase transformations. Continuum models fall into two classes: sharp-interface models, where interfaces are singular surfaces; and regularized-interface models, such as phase-field models, where interfaces are smeared out. The former are challenging for numerical solutions because the interfaces need to be explicitly tracked, but have the advantage that the kinetics of existing interfaces and the nucleation of new interfaces can be transparently and precisely prescribed. In contrast, phase-field models do not require explicit tracking of interfaces, thereby enabling relatively simple numerical calculations, but the specification of kinetics and nucleation is both restrictive and extremely opaque. This prevents straightforward calibration of phase-field models to experiment and/or molecular simulations, and breaks the multiscale hierarchy of passing information from atomic to continuum. Consequently, phase-field models cannot be confidently used in dynamic settings. This shortcoming of existing phase-field models motivates our work. We present the formulation of a phase-field model - i.e., a model with regularized interfaces that do not require explicit numerical tracking - that allows for easy and transparent prescription of complex interface kinetics and nucleation. The key ingredients are a re-parametrization of the energy density to clearly separate nucleation from kinetics; and an evolution law that comes from a conservation statement for interfaces. This enables clear prescription of nucleation - through the source term of the conservation law - and kinetics - through a distinct interfacial velocity field. A formal limit of the kinetic driving force recovers the classical continuum sharp-interface driving force, providing confidence in both the re-parametrized energy and the evolution statement. We present some 1D calculations characterizing the formulation; in a

  7. Complex networks: Patterns of complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2010-07-01

    The Turing mechanism provides a paradigm for the spontaneous generation of patterns in reaction-diffusion systems. A framework that describes Turing-pattern formation in the context of complex networks should provide a new basis for studying the phenomenon.

  8. Indentured Parts List Maintenance and Part Assembly Capture Tool - IMPACT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Bobby; Morris, Jill; Sharpe, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    Johnson Space Center's (JSC's) indentured parts list (IPL) maintenance and parts assembly capture tool (IMPACT) is an easy-to-use graphical interface for viewing and maintaining the complex assembly hierarchies of large databases. IMPACT, already in use at JSC to support the International Space Station (ISS), queries, updates, modifies, and views data in IPL and associated resource data, functions that it can also perform, with modification, for any large commercial database. By enabling its users to efficiently view and manipulate IPL hierarchical data, IMPACT performs a function unlike that of any other tool. Through IMPACT, users will achieve results quickly, efficiently, and cost effectively.

  9. On real quadric line complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, Vyacheslav A.

    2010-12-01

    We describe the topological types of the real parts of the Kummer surfaces associated with real three-dimensional quadric line complexes. The topological type of the real part of such a surface is shown to depend on the number of real singular points: it is determined by the number of such points if any exist, and otherwise the real part of the Kummer surface is either empty or consists of one or two tori.

  10. Complex chimerism

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Kimberly K.; Petroff, Margaret G.; Coscia, Lisa A.; Armenti, Vincent T.; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.

    2013-01-01

    Thousands of women with organ transplantation have undergone successful pregnancies, however little is known about how the profound immunologic changes associated with pregnancy might influence tolerance or rejection of the allograft. Pregnant women with a solid organ transplant are complex chimeras with multiple foreign cell populations from the donor organ, fetus, and mother of the pregnant woman. We consider the impact of complex chimerism and pregnancy-associated immunologic changes on tolerance of the allograft both during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Mechanisms of allograft tolerance are likely dynamic during pregnancy and affected by the influx of fetal microchimeric cells, HLA relationships (between the fetus, pregnant woman and/or donor), peripheral T cell tolerance to fetal cells, and fetal minor histocompatibility antigens. Further research is necessary to understand the complex immunology during pregnancy and the postpartum period of women with a solid organ transplant. PMID:23974274

  11. Steroids Update, Part 1 and Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Calvin; Duda, Marty

    1986-01-01

    Part 1 of this two-part article describes the views of a physician who believes that athletes who want to take steroids are best protected by receiving a prescription and monitoring. Part 2 discusses the more general view of physicians that steroids should not be prescribed but perhaps should be monitored. (MT)

  12. Effects of soluble organic complexants and their degradation products on the removal of selected radionuclides from high-level waste. Part II: Distributions of Sr, Cs, Tc, and Am onto 32 absorbers from four variations of Hanford tank 101-SY simulant solution

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1995-04-01

    Many of the radioactive waste storage tanks at U.S. Department of Energy facilities contain organic compounds that have been degraded by radiolysis and chemical reactions during decades of storage. In this second part of our three-part investigation of the effects of soluble organic complexants and their degradation products, we measured the sorption of strontium, cesium, technetium, and americium onto 32 absorbers that offer high sorption of these elements in the absence of organic complexants. The four solutions tested were (1) a simulant for a 3:1 dilution of Hanford Tank 101-SY contents that initially contained ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), (2) this simulant after gamma-irradiation to 34 Mrads, (3) the unirradiated simulant after treatment with a hydrothermal organic-destruction process, and (4) the irradiated simulant after hydrothermal processing. For each of 512 element/absorber/solution combinations, we measured distribution coefficients (Kds) twice for each period for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about sorption kinetics. On the basis of our 3,072 measured Kd values, the sorption of strontium and americium is significantly decreased by the organic components of the simulant solutions, whereas the sorption of cesium and technetium appears unaffected by the organic components of the simulant solutions.

  13. Researching Complexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumara, Dennis J.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses what Complexity Theory (presented as a rubric that collects theoretical understandings from a number of domains such as ecology, biology, neurology, and education) suggests about mind, selfhood, intelligence, and practices of reading, and the import of these reconceptualizations to reader-response researchers. Concludes that developing…

  14. Complex interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Régules, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Complexity science - which describes phenomena such as collective and emergent behaviour - is the focus of a new centre where researchers are examining everything from the spread of influenza to what a healthy heartbeat looks like. Sergio de Régules reports.

  15. Amorphic complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, G.; Gröger, M.; Jäger, T.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce amorphic complexity as a new topological invariant that measures the complexity of dynamical systems in the regime of zero entropy. Its main purpose is to detect the very onset of disorder in the asymptotic behaviour. For instance, it gives positive value to Denjoy examples on the circle and Sturmian subshifts, while being zero for all isometries and Morse-Smale systems. After discussing basic properties and examples, we show that amorphic complexity and the underlying asymptotic separation numbers can be used to distinguish almost automorphic minimal systems from equicontinuous ones. For symbolic systems, amorphic complexity equals the box dimension of the associated Besicovitch space. In this context, we concentrate on regular Toeplitz flows and give a detailed description of the relation to the scaling behaviour of the densities of the p-skeletons. Finally, we take a look at strange non-chaotic attractors appearing in so-called pinched skew product systems. Continuous-time systems, more general group actions and the application to cut and project quasicrystals will be treated in subsequent work.

  16. Managing Complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Chassin, David P.; Posse, Christian; Malard, Joel M.

    2004-08-01

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today’s most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically-based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This paper explores the state of the art in the use physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and to deriving stable and robust control strategies for them. In particular we review and discussion applications of some analytic methods based on the thermodynamic metaphor according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood.

  17. [Carney complex].

    PubMed

    Kacerovská, D; Michal, M; Síma, R; Grossmann, P; Kazakov, D V

    2011-10-01

    Carney complex is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease, with at least two genetic loci including the PRKAR1A gene located on chromosome 17 and the CNC2 locus mapped to chromosome 2. Clinically this syndrome is characterized by multiple myxomas occurring in different anatomic sites, mucocutaneous pigmentary lesions, and a variety of non-endocrine and endocrine tumors, often causing endocrine abnormalities, involving various organs. Knowledge of morphological findings in CNC patients with their typical locations is necessary to raise suspicion of this syndrome by pathologists. Confirmation of the diagnosis allows regular clinical check-ups and early treatment of these patients. PMID:22145222

  18. Complex Systems

    PubMed Central

    Goldberger, Ary L.

    2006-01-01

    Physiologic systems in health and disease display an extraordinary range of temporal behaviors and structural patterns that defy understanding based on linear constructs, reductionist strategies, and classical homeostasis. Application of concepts and computational tools derived from the contemporary study of complex systems, including nonlinear dynamics, fractals and “chaos theory,” is having an increasing impact on biology and medicine. This presentation provides a brief overview of an emerging area of biomedical research, including recent applications to cardiopulmonary medicine and chronic obstructive lung disease. PMID:16921107

  19. ECG series. Narrow QRS-complex tachycardia: Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Devinder; Teo, Swee-Guan; Omar, Abdul Razakjr Bin; Poh, Kian-Keong

    2014-01-01

    We discuss two cases of incessant atrial tachycardia (AT), including the presentation and clinical course. It is important to differentiate AT from other causes of supraventricular tachycardia, such as atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) and atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia (AVRT), as it would have implications on clinical management. Electrocardiographic features of AT, especially the presence of an AV Wenckebach phenomenon with ‘grouped beating’, are critical for differentiating AT from AVRT and AVNRT. It is also vital to identify the P waves and their relations to QRS on electrocardiography, as this would aid in the differentiation of various supraventricular tachycardias. PMID:25273927

  20. Electrocardiography series. Narrow QRS-complex tachycardia: part 2.

    PubMed

    Singh, Devinder; Teo, Swee-Guan; Omar, Abdul Razakjr Bin; Poh, Kian Keong

    2014-09-01

    We discuss two cases of incessant atrial tachycardia (AT), including the presentation and clinical course. It is important to differentiate AT from other causes of supraventricular tachycardia, such as atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) and atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia (AVRT), as it would have implications on clinical management. Electrocardiographic features of AT, especially the presence of an AV Wenckebach phenomenon with 'grouped beating', are critical for differentiating AT from AVRT and AVNRT. It is also vital to identify the P waves and their relations to QRS on electrocardiography, as this would aid in the differentiation of various supraventricular tachycardias.

  1. Carney complex.

    PubMed

    Espiard, Stéphanie; Bertherat, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Carney complex is a rare, dominantly inherited multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome, affecting endocrine glands as the adrenal cortex (causing Cushing's syndrome), the pituitary and the thyroid. It is associated with many other nonendocrine tumors, including cardiac myxomas, testicular tumors, melanotic schwannoma, breast myxomatosis, and abnormal pigmentation (lentiginosis) or myxomas of the skin. The gene located on the CNC1 locus was identified 12 years ago as the regulatory subunit 1A (R1A) of the protein kinase A (PRKAR1A) located at 17q22-24. Inactivating heterozygous germline mutations of PRKAR1A are observed in about two thirds of Carney complex patients with some genotype-phenotype correlation useful for follow-up and prognosis. More rarely, mutations of phosphodiesterase genes have been reported in patients presenting mainly with Cushing's syndrome. In vitro and in vivo studies help to understand how R1A inactivation leads to tumorigenesis. PRKAR1A appears to be a relatively weak tumorigenic signal which can cooperate with other signaling pathways and tumor suppressors. PMID:23652670

  2. Parts application handbook study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The requirements for a NASA application handbook for standard electronic parts are determined and defined. This study concentrated on identifying in detail the type of information that designers and parts engineers need and expect in a parts application handbook for the effective application of standard parts on NASA projects.

  3. Complex hybrid inflation and baryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Delepine, David; Martínez, Carlos; Ureña-López, L Arturo

    2007-04-20

    We propose a hybrid inflation model with a complex waterfall field which contains an interaction term that breaks the U(1) global symmetry associated with the waterfall field charge. We show that the asymmetric evolution of the real and imaginary parts of the complex field during the phase transition at the end of inflation translates into a charge asymmetry. The latter strongly depends on the vacuum expectation value of the waterfall field, which is well constrained by diverse cosmological observations.

  4. Complex Hybrid Inflation and Baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Delepine, David; Martinez, Carlos; Urena-Lopez, L. Arturo

    2007-04-20

    We propose a hybrid inflation model with a complex waterfall field which contains an interaction term that breaks the U(1) global symmetry associated with the waterfall field charge. We show that the asymmetric evolution of the real and imaginary parts of the complex field during the phase transition at the end of inflation translates into a charge asymmetry. The latter strongly depends on the vacuum expectation value of the waterfall field, which is well constrained by diverse cosmological observations.

  5. Genetic parts to program bacteria.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Christopher A

    2006-10-01

    Genetic engineering is entering a new era, where microorganisms can be programmed using synthetic constructs of DNA encoding logic and operational commands. A toolbox of modular genetic parts is being developed, comprised of cell-based environmental sensors and genetic circuits. Systems have already been designed to be interconnected with each other and interfaced with the control of cellular processes. Engineering theory will provide a predictive framework to design operational multicomponent systems. On the basis of these developments, increasingly complex cellular machines are being constructed to build specialty chemicals, weave biomaterials, and to deliver therapeutics.

  6. Modernizing medical photography, part 1.

    PubMed

    Crompton, Paul

    2004-12-01

    Government, media and public focus on waiting times in the National Health Service in the United Kingdom has forced the organization to look closely at the process by which a patient progresses through an increasingly complex and ever changing system. In an effort to streamline the patient journey or care pathway, modernizers have turned to business and manufacturing for solutions. Whilst medical photographers need to recognize their role in this context, they are also facing major technological modernization through the development of digital photography. Part 1 of this paper looks at the origins of some of the techniques presently being used to modernize the patient journey. Part 2 shows how these tools of modernization can be utilized to harness the advantages of digital technology to provide a modern and appropriate medical photography service in a large, disparate teaching hospital.

  7. [Carney complex].

    PubMed

    Losada Grande, Eladio José; Al Kassam Martínez, Daniel; González Boillos, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    Carney complex (CNC) is an autosomal dominantly inherited syndrome characterized by spotty skin pigmentation, cardiac and cutaneous myxoma, and endocrine overactivity. Skin pigmentation includes lentigines and blue nevi. Myxomas may occur in breast, skin and heart. Cardiac myxomas may be multiple and occur in any cardiac chamber, and are more prone to recurrence. The most common endocrine gland manifestation is an ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome due to primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). PPNAD may occur isolated, with no other signs of CNC. Pituitary and thyroid glands and gonads are also involved. The PRKAR1A gene, located in 17 q22-24, encodes type 1A regulatory subunit of protein kinase A. Inactivating germline mutations of this gene are found in 70% of patients with CNC. PRKAR1A is a key component of the c-AMP signaling pathway that has been implicated in endocrine tumorigenesis. Many different mutations have been reported in the PRKAR1A gene. In almost all cases the sequence change was predicted to lead to a premature stop codon and the resultant mutant mRNA was subject to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. There is no clear genotype-phenotype correlation in patients with CNC. Genetic analysis should be performed in all CNC index cases. All affected patients should be monitored for clinical signs of CNC at least once a year. Genetic diagnosis allows for more effective preparation of more appropriate and effective therapeutic strategies and genetic counseling for patients and gene carriers, and to avoid unnecessary tests to relatives not carrying the gene. PMID:21536508

  8. Women's Health and Complexity Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Eileen

    2000-01-01

    Explores how changes in conceptual frameworks in science, from reductionism to complexity; an outgrowth of the chaos theory that views parts in relation to one another, the entity they form, and the environment, must inform the development of an academic discipline in women's health. (SLD)

  9. Formation of parting in quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgen Kjøll, Hans; Eske Sørensen, Bjørn

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents hydrothermal quartz with macroscopic planar parting from the Mesoproterozoic Modum complex in southern Norway. Similar macroscopic parting in hydrothermal quartz with macroscopic planar structures has only been described from two localities in the world; Madagascar (Flörke et al., 1981) and Southern California (Murdoch et al., 1938). The study area consists of well foliated and banded sillimanite- garnet- amphibolite- mica gneiss that is cut at high angle by hydrothermal veins containing albite, chlinoclore, hornblende, hydroxyl apatite and quartz. The rim of the veins is generally made up of almost pure end-member euhedral albite. Then there is vugs with euhedral hornblende (10-25cm long) and euhedral hydroxyl apatite with size ranging from mm scale to several cm. Some places the quartz encloses apatite and hornblende. The quartz is anhedral, inequigranular with undulose extinction bordering sub grain rotation. It has large planar penetrative parting faces with pearly luster; however this is not consistent throughout the outcrop and some places the penetrative faces disappears and the quartz has a conchoidal fracture. The planar faces continue throughout the specimens with a few mm spacing. Thin sections oriented perpendicular to the most pronounced planar structure show lamellas that extinguishes at small angles (2 degrees) to each other. EBSD mapping of the planar faces shows two orientations {0-111} and {1-101}, corresponding to the r- and z-faces respectively, separated by irregular boundaries. The misorientation between these two crystallographic orientations on the parting is a 60 degree rotation on [0 0 1] in correspondence to the dauphiné twin law. Investigations conducted on thin sections cut orthogonal to the parting shows that the parting cuts and offsets the dauphiné twins, indicating a late genesis of the parting. However some internal stress induced movement of the twins are visible. SEM-CL documents three generations of quartz

  10. Complex I function in mitochondrial supercomplexes.

    PubMed

    Lenaz, Giorgio; Tioli, Gaia; Falasca, Anna Ida; Genova, Maria Luisa

    2016-07-01

    This review discusses the functional properties of mitochondrial Complex I originating from its presence in an assembled form as a supercomplex comprising Complex III and Complex IV in stoichiometric ratios. In particular several lines of evidence are presented favouring the concept that electron transfer from Complex I to Complex III is operated by channelling of electrons through Coenzyme Q molecules bound to the supercomplex, in contrast with the hypothesis that the transfer of reducing equivalents from Complex I to Complex III occurs via random diffusion of the Coenzyme Q molecules in the lipid bilayer. Furthermore, another property provided by the supercomplex assembly is the control of generation of reactive oxygen species by Complex I. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory Complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  11. The complexity of anatomical systems

    PubMed Central

    Grizzi, Fabio; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    Background The conception of anatomical entities as a hierarchy of infinitely graduated forms and the increase in the number of observed anatomical sub-entities and structural variables has generated a growing complexity, thus highlighting new properties of organised biological matter. Results (1) Complexity is so pervasive in the anatomical world that it has come to be considered as a primary characteristic of anatomical systems. (2) Anatomical entities, when viewed at microscopic as well as macroscopic level of observation, show a different degree of complexity. (3) Complexity can reside in the structure of the anatomical system (having many diverse parts with varying interactions or an intricate architecture) or in its behaviour. Often complexity in structure and behaviour go together. (4) Complex systems admit many descriptions (ways of looking at the system) each of which is only partially true. Each way of looking at a complex system requires its own description, its own mode of analysis and its own breaking down of the system in different parts; (5) Almost all the anatomical entities display hierarchical forms: their component structures at different spatial scales or their process at different time scales are related to each other. Conclusion The need to find a new way of observing and measuring anatomical entities, and objectively quantifying their different structural changes, prompted us to investigate the non-Euclidean geometries and the theories of complexity, and to apply their concepts to human anatomy. This attempt has led us to reflect upon the complex significance of the shape of an observed anatomical entity. Its changes have been defined in relation to variations in its status: from a normal (i.e. natural) to a pathological or altered state introducing the concepts of kinematics and dynamics of anatomical forms, speed of their changes, and that of scale of their observation. PMID:16029490

  12. Metallic parts fabrication using the SIS process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojdeh, Mehdi

    Since early 1980s, quite a few techniques of Rapid Prototyping (RP), also known as Layered Manufacturing, have been developed. By building three-dimensional parts in a layer-by-layer additive manner, these techniques allow freeform fabrication of parts of complex geometry. Despite recent advances in fabrication of polymer parts, most of the existing rapid prototyping processes are still not capable of fabrication of accurate metallic parts with acceptable mechanical properties. Insufficient dimensional accuracy, limited number of materials, proper mechanical properties, required post machining and lack of repeatability between builds have greatly limited the market penetration of these techniques. This dissertation presents an innovative layered manufacturing technique for fabrication of dense metallic parts called Selective Inhibition Sintering (SIS), developed at the University of Southern California. The SIS-Metal technology adapts RP capabilities and extends them to the field of fabrication of metallic parts for a variety of applications such as tooling and low volume production. Using this process, a metallic part, with varying 3 dimensional geometries, can be automatically constructed from a wide range of materials. SIS-Metal is the only RP process which is suitable for fabrication of dense, complex shaped, accurate objects using a variety of materials. In the SIS-Metal process a metallic part is built layer by layer by deposition for each layer of an inhibitor material which defines the corresponding layer boundary and then filling the voids of the created geometry with metal powder; and compacting the layer formed to reach a high powder density. The resulting green part is then sintered in a furnace to yield the final functional part. In this research different inhibition techniques were explored and a series of single and multi layer parts was fabricated using the most promising inhibition technique, namely, macro-mechanical inhibition. Dimensional

  13. Microlabels For Auto Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, John P.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed method of unique labeling and identification of automotive parts greatly simplifies recall campaigns and reduces effort and expense associated. Compressed symbols fully characterize each part by type and manufacturing history. Manufacturers notify only those owners whose cars need repairs or modifications. Similar compressed symbology developed for possible use on spacecraft.

  14. Dissecting Diversity Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Frank

    2005-01-01

    This article presents "Dissecting Diversity, Part II," the conclusion of a wide-ranging two-part roundtable discussion on diversity in higher education. The participants were as follows: Lezli Baskerville, J.D., President and CEO of the National Association for Equal Opportunity (NAFEO); Dr. Gerald E. Gipp, Executive Director of the American…

  15. Adaptive Accommodation Control Method for Complex Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sungchul; Kim, Munsang; Park, Shinsuk

    Robotic systems have been used to automate assembly tasks in manufacturing and in teleoperation. Conventional robotic systems, however, have been ineffective in controlling contact force in multiple contact states of complex assemblythat involves interactions between complex-shaped parts. Unlike robots, humans excel at complex assembly tasks by utilizing their intrinsic impedance, forces and torque sensation, and tactile contact clues. By examining the human behavior in assembling complex parts, this study proposes a novel geometry-independent control method for robotic assembly using adaptive accommodation (or damping) algorithm. Two important conditions for complex assembly, target approachability and bounded contact force, can be met by the proposed control scheme. It generates target approachable motion that leads the object to move closer to a desired target position, while contact force is kept under a predetermined value. Experimental results from complex assembly tests have confirmed the feasibility and applicability of the proposed method.

  16. Metabolism. Part III: Lipids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the metabolic processes of complex lipids, including saponification, activation and transport, and the beta-oxidation spiral. Discusses fatty acid degradation in regard to biochemical energy and ketone bodies. (TW)

  17. 1998 Complex Systems Summer School

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-15

    For the past eleven years a group of institutes, centers, and universities throughout the country have sponsored a summer school in Santa Fe, New Mexico as part of an interdisciplinary effort to promote the understanding of complex systems. The goal of these summer schools is to provide graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and active research scientists with an introduction to the study of complex behavior in mathematical, physical, and living systems. The Center for Nonlinear Studies supported the eleventh in this series of highly successful schools in Santa Fe in June, 1998.

  18. Bound Exciton Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, B. K.

    In the preceding chapter, we concentrated on the properties of free excitons. These free excitons may move through the sample and hit a trap, a nonradiative or a radiative recombination center. At low temperatures, the latter case gives rise to either deep center luminescence, mentioned in Sect. 7.1 and discussed in detail in Chap. 9, or to the luminescence of bound exciton complexes (BE or BEC). The chapter continues with the most prominent of these BECs, namely A-excitons bound to neutral donors. The next aspects are the more weakly BEs at ionized donors. The Sect. 7.4 treats the binding or localization energies of BEC from a theoretical point of view, while Sect. 7.5 is dedicated to excited states of BECs, which contain either holes from deeper valence bands or an envelope function with higher quantum numbers. The last section is devoted to donor-acceptor pair transitions. There is no section devoted specifically to excitons bound to neutral acceptors, because this topic is still partly controversially discussed. Instead, information on these A0X complexes is scattered over the whole chapter, however, with some special emphasis seen in Sects. 7.1, 7.4, and 7.5.

  19. [Complex decongestive therapy].

    PubMed

    Heinig, B; Wollina, U

    2015-11-01

    The amount of physical pressure plays an important role in complex decongestive therapy (CDT). As a function of pressure, microcirculation takes place between blood vessels and tissue. As part of the total lymphatic system, lymphatic vessels transport the lymphatic load from the interstitial space to the blood stream. The lymphatic vessel system, characterized by specific anatomical conditions like initial lymphatic vessels, precollectors, collectors, and lymphatic strains, is the therapeutic target of complex decongestive therapy. Components of CDT include manual lymphatic drainage, compression therapy, decongestive kinesitherapy, and good skin care, which increase the transport capacity of the lymphatic vessel system. Currently, CDT is acknowledged as the main conservative treatment of lymphedema of primary and secondary genesis, lipolymphedema, and phlebolymphedema. In clinical practice, we are increasingly confronted with edema of multifactorial genesis requiring a critical discussion and stocktaking of comprehensive clinical findings in terms of the indication for CDT. Therapeutic success depends on a joint application of all CDT components and patient compliance. To an increasing extent, medical research tries to combine successfully CDT with adjunct treatment options. PMID:26315101

  20. Diversity of parasite complex II.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shigeharu; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Ohmori, Junko; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Parasites have developed a variety of physiological functions necessary for completing at least part of their life cycles in the specialized environments of surrounding the parasites in the host. Regarding energy metabolism, which is essential for survival, parasites adapt to the low oxygen environment in mammalian hosts by using metabolic systems that are very different from those of the hosts. In many cases, the parasite employs aerobic metabolism during the free-living stage outside the host but undergoes major changes in developmental control and environmental adaptation to switch to anaerobic energy metabolism. Parasite mitochondria play diverse roles in their energy metabolism, and in recent studies of the parasitic nematode, Ascaris suum, the mitochondrial complex II plays an important role in anaerobic energy metabolism of parasites inhabiting hosts by acting as a quinol-fumarate reductase. In Trypanosomes, parasite complex II has been found to have a novel function and structure. Complex II of Trypanosoma cruzi is an unusual supramolecular complex with a heterodimeric iron-sulfur subunit and seven additional non-catalytic subunits. The enzyme shows reduced binding affinities for both substrates and inhibitors. Interestingly, this structural organization is conserved in all trypanosomatids. Since the properties of complex II differ across a wide range of parasites, this complex is a potential target for the development of new chemotherapeutic agents. In this regard, structural information on the target enzyme is essential for the molecular design of drugs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Respiratory complex II: Role in cellular physiology and disease. PMID:23333273

  1. The Stigma Complex

    PubMed Central

    Pescosolido, Bernice A.; Martin, Jack K.

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, research on stigma has continued. Building on conceptual and empirical work, the recent period clarifies new types of stigmas, expansion of measures, identification of new directions, and increasingly complex levels. Standard beliefs have been challenged, the relationship between stigma research and public debates reconsidered, and new scientific foundations for policy and programs suggested. We begin with a summary of the most recent Annual Review articles on stigma, which reminded sociologists of conceptual tools, informed them of developments from academic neighbors, and claimed findings from the early period of “resurgence.” Continued (even accelerated) progress has also revealed a central problem. Terms and measures are often used interchangeably, leading to confusion and decreasing accumulated knowledge. Drawing from this work but focusing on the past 14 years of stigma research (including mental illness, sexual orientation, HIV/AIDS, and race/ethnicity), we provide a theoretical architecture of concepts (e.g., prejudice, experienced/received discrimination), drawn together through a stigma process (i.e., stigmatization), based on four theoretical premises. Many characteristics of the mark (e.g., discredited, concealable) and variants (i.e., stigma types and targets) become the focus of increasingly specific and multidimensional definitions. Drawing from complex and systems science, we propose a stigma complex, a system of interrelated, heterogeneous parts bringing together insights across disciplines to provide a more realistic and complicated sense of the challenge facing research and change efforts. The Framework Integrating Normative Influences on Stigma (FINIS) offers a multilevel approach that can be tailored to stigmatized statuses. Finally, we outline challenges for the next phase of stigma research, with the goal of continuing scientific activity that enhances our understanding of stigma and builds

  2. On State Complexes and Special Cube Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Valerie J.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the first steps toward a classification of non-positively curved cube complexes called state complexes. A "state complex" is a configuration space for a "reconfigurable system," i.e., an abstract system in which local movements occur in some discrete manner. Reconfigurable systems can be used to describe, for example,…

  3. Spectroscopy of plutonium-organic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Richmann, M.K.; Reed, D.T.

    1995-12-31

    Information on the spectroscopy of plutonium-organic complexes is needed to help establish the speciation of these complexes under environmentally relevant conditions. Laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) and absorption spectrometry were used to characterize the Pu(IV)-citrate and Pu(IV)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) complexes at concentrations of 10{sup {minus}3}--10{sup {minus}7} M in aqueous solution. Good agreement was observed between the band shape of the LPAS and absorption spectra for the Pu(IV)-NTA complex. Agreement for the Pu(IV)-citrate complex was not quite as good. In both cases, a linear dependence of the LPAS signal on laser power and total concentration of the complexes was noted. This work is part of an ongoing research effort to study key subsurface interactions of plutonium-organic complexes.

  4. Characteristics of large capacity ultrasonic complex vibration sources with stepped complex transverse vibration rods.

    PubMed

    Tsujino, J; Ueoka, T

    2004-04-01

    Configurations of large capacity ultrasonic complex vibration sources with multiple longitudinal transducers are proposed and studied. The ultrasonic complex vibration systems are effective and essential for new applications in various industries. The complex vibration source of 27 kHz consists of a complex transverse rod with a welding tip (aluminum alloy, stainless steel and titanium alloy), a complex vibration rod with a flange and stepped part for holding the system, a circular longitudinal vibration disk (aluminum alloy) and six bolt-clamped Langevin type PLT transducers. Three transducer pairs are driven simultaneously using three driving systems at phase difference 120 degrees, and almost circular vibration locus is obtained.

  5. Structure of complexes between aluminum chloride and other chlorides, 2: Alkali-(chloroaluminates). Gaseous complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargittai, M.

    1980-01-01

    The structural chemistry of complexes between aluminum chloride and other metal chlorides is important both for practice and theory. Condensed-phase as well as vapor-phase complexes are of interest. Structural information on such complexes is reviewed. The first emphasis is given to the molten state because of its practical importance. Aluminum chloride forms volatile complexes with other metal chlorides and these vapor-phase complexes are dealt with in the second part. Finally, the variations in molecular shape and geometrical parameters are summarized.

  6. Pieces and Parts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Deborah A.; Ellis, Edith B.

    2006-01-01

    Although critical to understanding human sexuality and reproductive physiology, the male and female reproductive anatomy is often minimally covered by teachers. For teachers and students alike, it is often an embarrassing topic to discuss. This activity allows students and teachers to identify the parts of both reproductive systems with little…

  7. Part-Time Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guichard, Gus; And Others

    The employment of community college instructors on a part-time basis provides the opportunity for students to study under outstanding instructors whose primary employment may be in industry or in other postsecondary institutions and permits colleges to respond better to community needs with the financial resources available to them. Along with…

  8. Basic Electricity. Part 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilmer, Donald C.

    Third (part 3) in a set of four guides designed for the student interested in a vocation in electrical work, this guide includes four units: Unit VI--Ohm's Law, covering six lessons (voltage, current-flow and resistance, the Ohm's Law formula, formula for finding voltage, formula for finding resistance); Unit VII--Voltages, covering five lessons…

  9. Basic Electricity. Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilmer, Donald C.

    This guide, the second (part 2) in a set of four guides, is designed for the student interested in a vocation in electrical work, and includes two units: Unit IV--Electrical Theory, covering thirteen lessons (matter, the atom, electrical charges in the atom, rules of electric charges, electricity, atoms in an electrical conductor, electrical…

  10. Meatcutting Testbook, Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Publications.

    This document contains objective tests for each topic in the Meatcutting Workbook, Part 2, which is designed for apprenticeship meatcutting programs in California. Each of the 30 tests consists of from 5 to 65 multiple-choice items with most tests containing approximately 10 items. The tests are grouped according to the eight units of the…

  11. Rockets -- Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitner, Alfred

    1982-01-01

    If two rockets are identical except that one engine burns in one-tenth the time of the other (total impulse and initial fuel mass of the two engines being the same), which rocket will rise higher? Why? The answer to this question (part 1 response in v20 n6, p410, Sep 1982) is provided. (Author/JN)

  12. Meatcutting Testbook, Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strazicich, Mirko, Ed.

    This document contains objective tests for each lesson in the Meatcutting Workbook, Part I (see note), which is designed for apprenticeship programs in meatcutting in California. Each of the 36 tests contains from 10 to 45 multiple-choice items. The tests are grouped according to the eight units of the workbook: the apprentice meatcutter; applied…

  13. Understanding Math - Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyks, Hollis W.; Austin, Robert J.

    This is the first workbook-text in a two-part series written for deaf students. It is remedial in nature, aimed at the secondary level, and covers addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers. The use of the number 10 in explaining the concepts presented is stressed throughout. For the second workbook, see SE 015 828, and…

  14. Understanding Math - Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyks, Hollis W.; Austin, Robert J.

    This is the second remedial workbook-text in a two-part series written for deaf students at the secondary level. It covers fractions, geometry formulas, decimals and percents, and time. For the first workbook, see SE 015 827, and for the teacher's guide, see SE 015 829. (DT)

  15. JPL Counterfeit Parts Avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risse, Lori

    2012-01-01

    SPACE ARCHITECTURE / ENGINEERING: It brings an extreme test bed for both technologies/concepts as well as procedures/processes. Design and construction (engineering) always go together, especially with complex systems. Requirements (objectives) are crucial. More important than the answers are the questions/Requirements/Tools-Techniques/Processes. Different environments force architects and engineering to think out of the box. For instance there might not be gravity forces. Architectural complex problems have common roots: in Space and on Earth. Let us bring Space down on Earth so we can keep sending Mankind to the stars from a better world. Have fun being architects and engineers...!!! This time is amazing and historical. We are changing the way we inhabit the solar systems!

  16. Treatment of cellulite: Part I. Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Khan, Misbah H; Victor, Frank; Rao, Babar; Sadick, Neil S

    2010-03-01

    Cellulite is a topographic skin change that is nearly ubiquitous in postpubertal women. Treatment remains elusive. The various treatments currently available are only partially or temporarily effective. Newer therapeutic modalities continue to evolve without much understanding of the complex nature of cellulite. The successful treatment of cellulite will ultimately depend upon our understanding of the pathophysiology of cellulite adipose tissue. Part I of this two-part series on cellulite reviews how the concept and perception of cellulite has evolved over time and its proposed etiologies. The article also focuses on the physiology of human adipose tissue, particularly regarding cellulite.

  17. Chart system simplifies identification of complex design assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, H. P.

    1966-01-01

    Identification breakdown chart that lists the component parts required for any specific end item is used to identify rapidly and accurately, from numerous drawings, all the component parts of a complex design assembly. Cylindrical and complex configurations are depicted as continuous flat surfaces for ready identification.

  18. The Quadrantid meteoroid complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegert, Paul; Brown, Peter

    2005-12-01

    minimum age of ˜3500 years for the stream as a whole. This also represents the approximate lower limit for the age of the complex. We have further identified five comets as well as nine additional NEAs which may be part of the aforementioned complex, the latter all having Tisserand parameters less than three, further suggesting that the are extinct comet nuclei.

  19. Protein Complexes in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Caufield, J. Harry; Abreu, Marco; Wimble, Christopher; Uetz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale analyses of protein complexes have recently become available for Escherichia coli and Mycoplasma pneumoniae, yielding 443 and 116 heteromultimeric soluble protein complexes, respectively. We have coupled the results of these mass spectrometry-characterized protein complexes with the 285 “gold standard” protein complexes identified by EcoCyc. A comparison with databases of gene orthology, conservation, and essentiality identified proteins conserved or lost in complexes of other species. For instance, of 285 “gold standard” protein complexes in E. coli, less than 10% are fully conserved among a set of 7 distantly-related bacterial “model” species. Complex conservation follows one of three models: well-conserved complexes, complexes with a conserved core, and complexes with partial conservation but no conserved core. Expanding the comparison to 894 distinct bacterial genomes illustrates fractional conservation and the limits of co-conservation among components of protein complexes: just 14 out of 285 model protein complexes are perfectly conserved across 95% of the genomes used, yet we predict more than 180 may be partially conserved across at least half of the genomes. No clear relationship between gene essentiality and protein complex conservation is observed, as even poorly conserved complexes contain a significant number of essential proteins. Finally, we identify 183 complexes containing well-conserved components and uncharacterized proteins which will be interesting targets for future experimental studies. PMID:25723151

  20. Just Perfect, Part 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul

    2007-01-01

    In "Just Perfect: Part 1," the author defined a perfect number N to be one for which the sum of the divisors d (1 less than or equal to d less than N) is N. He gave the first few perfect numbers, starting with those known by the early Greeks. In this article, the author provides an extended list of perfect numbers, with some comments about their…

  1. H5Part

    2005-12-01

    Particle based simulations of accelerator beam-lines, especially in six dimensional phase space, generate vast amounts of data. Even though a subset of statistical information regarding phase space or analysis needs to be preserved, reading and writing such enormous restart files on massively parallel supercomputing systems remains challenging. H5Part is a very simple data storage schema and provides an API that simplifies the reading/writing of the data to the HDF5 file format. An important foundation formore » a stable visualization and data analysis environment is a stable and portable file storage format and its associated APIs. The presence of a "common file storage format," including associated APIs, will help foster a fundamental level of interoperability across the project’s software infrastructure. It will also haip ensure that key data analysis capabilities are present during the earliest phases of the software development effort. H5Part is built on top of the HDF5 (Hierarchical Data Format). HDF5 offers a self.describing machine-independent binary file format that supports scalable parallel I/O performance for MPI codes on a variety of supercomputlng systems, and works equally well on laptop computers. The API Is available (or C, C++, and Fortran codes. The H5Part file format and APIs enable disparate research groups with different simulation implementations to transparently share datasets and data analysis tools. For instance, the common file format will enable groups that depend on completely different simulation implementations to share data analysis tools like PartView and AVS/Express without any additional programming.« less

  2. Women's health and complexity science.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, E

    2000-11-01

    Conceptual frameworks in science have shifted from reductionism and its focus on ever-smaller parts to complexity, an outgrowth of chaos theory that views those parts in relation to one another, to the larger entity they form and to the environment in which that entity exists. Examples of this conceptual shift are occurring in many areas of science, but nowhere is it more germane than in the medical sciences that serve women. After a historical focus on reproduction and the development of obstetrics-gynecology, medicine has now gained a broader view of the woman using sex- and gender-based science, and a new field called "women's health" is evolving. Complexity science does not invalidate or eliminate the need for reductionist science, it simply makes a wider array of phenomena understandable. Its method allows going beyond the metaphor of the body as a machine and challenges the user to re-examine how health and illness are understood. This article explores how these changes in science must inform the development of an academic discipline in women's health. The conceptual framework of complexity science also advances the discussions about women's health from reproduction to a totally new and exciting exploration of the interactions between reproduction and all other organ functioning that occurs in women in the contexts of their lives. PMID:11078669

  3. Cyanobacterial NADPH dehydrogenase complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Teruo; Mi, Hualing

    2007-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess functionally distinct multiple NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complexes that are essential to CO2 uptake, photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration. The unique nature of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes is the presence of subunits involved in CO2 uptake. Other than CO2 uptake, chloroplastic NDH-1 complex has similar role as cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes in photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration (chlororespiration). In this mini-review we focus on the structure and function of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes and their phylogeny. The function of chloroplastic NDH-1 complex and characteristics of plants defective in NDH-1 are also described forcomparison.

  4. Laser welding of micro plastic parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberstroh, E.; Hoffmann, W.-M.

    2007-02-01

    Most welding processes for plastics do not meet the demands of micro technology and thus cannot be applied in this innovative industrial sector. One of the few techniques which are applicable in this sector is the laser transmission welding, which has distinctive advantages like low mechanical and thermal load of the joining parts. This makes the laser particularly suitable for the welding of micro plastics parts. Thereby, contour welding is a process variant of laser transmission welding enabling the welding of complex and even three-dimensional weld contours. But so far it has not yet been applied for welding plastics parts of micro scale in the industrial practice. Recent research at the Institute of Plastics Processing (IKV) at the RWTH Aachen University shows the feasibility of this process to weld small and complex micro parts. Good mechanical properties can be achieved. However, it is necessary to apply measures to reduce the formation of flash. Moreover, it can be shown that there is a strong influence of some material parameters on the laser welding process so that some plastics are more suitable than others for the contour welding in micro technology.

  5. Immunomodulation. Part IV: Glutamine.

    PubMed

    Bell, Susan Givens

    2006-01-01

    Glutamine, a nonessential amino acid that appears to be conditionally essential during periods of physiologic stress, plays important physiologic roles in the immune system. However, neither enteral nor parenteral glutamine supplementation makes a difference in the rate of systemic infection or of NEC in very low birth weight infants. Thus, the search for agents to enhance the neonate's immune system and to serve as safe and effective adjuvants to antibiotics continues. Part V, the final article in this immunomodulation series, will explore the use of probiotics to support the neonatal immune system.

  6. Endocrine system: part 1.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Carolyn; Hendry, Charles; Farley, Alistair; McLafferty, Ella

    2014-05-27

    This article, which forms part of the life sciences series and is the first of two articles on the endocrine system, examines the structure and function of the organs of the endocrine system. It is important that nurses understand how the endocrine system works and its role in maintaining health. The role of the endocrine system and the types, actions and control of hormones are explored. The gross structure of the pituitary and thyroid glands are described along with relevant physiology. Several disorders of the thyroid gland are outlined. The second article examines growth hormone, the pancreas and adrenal glands.

  7. Dynamical Baryogenesis in Complex Hybrid Inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Delepine, David; Martinez, Carlos; Urena-Lopez, L. Arturo

    2008-07-02

    We propose a hybrid inflation model with a complex waterfall field which contains an interaction term that breaks the U (1) global symmetry associated to the waterfall field charge. We show that the asymmetric evolution of the real and imaginary parts of the complex field during the phase transition at the end of inflation translates into a charge asymmetry. The latter strongly depends on the vev of the waterfall field, which is well constrained by diverse cosmological observations.

  8. What is complex about complex disorders?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Rather than being polygenic, complex disorders probably represent umbrella terms for collections of conditions caused by rare, recent mutations in any of a large number of different genes. PMID:22269335

  9. A novel complex valued cuckoo search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongquan; Zheng, Hongqing

    2013-01-01

    To expand the information of nest individuals, the idea of complex-valued encoding is used in cuckoo search (PCS); the gene of individuals is denoted by plurality, so a diploid swarm is structured by a sequence plurality. The value of independent variables for objective function is determined by modules, and a sign of them is determined by angles. The position of nest is divided into two parts, namely, real part gene and imaginary gene. The updating relation of complex-valued swarm is presented. Six typical functions are tested. The results are compared with cuckoo search based on real-valued encoding; the usefulness of the proposed algorithm is verified.

  10. Synchronization Dynamics in Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Changsong; Zemanová, Lucia; Kurths, Jürgen

    Previous chapters have discussed tools from graph theory and their contribution to our understanding of the structural organization of mammalian brains and its functional implications. The brain functions are mediated by complicated dynamical processes which arise from the underlying complex neural networks, and synchronization has been proposed as an important mechanism for neural information processing. In this chapter, we discuss synchronization dynamics on complex networks. We first present a general theory and tools to characterize the relationship of some structural measures of networks to their synchronizability (the ability of the networks to achieve complete synchronization) and to the organization of effective synchronization patterns on the networks. Then, we study synchronization in a realistic network of cat cortical connectivity by modeling the nodes (which are cortical areas composed of large ensembles of neurons) by a neural mass model or a subnetwork of interacting neurons. We show that if the dynamics is characterized by well-defined oscillations (neural mass model and subnetworks with strong couplings), the synchronization patterns can be understood by the general principles discussed in the first part of the chapter. With weak couplings, the model with subnetworks displays biologically plausible dynamics and the synchronization pattern reveals a hierarchically clustered organization in the network structure. Thus, the study of synchronization of complex networks can provide insights into the relationship between network topology and functional organization of complex brain networks.

  11. Complex-I-ty in aging

    PubMed Central

    Stork, Devon A.

    2016-01-01

    The role of mitochondrial complex I in aging has been studied in both C. elegans and Drosophila, where RNAi knock down of specific complex I subunits has been shown to extend lifespan. More recently, studies in Drosophila have shown that an increase in mitochondrial activity, including complex I-like activity, can also slow aging. In this review, we discuss this apparent paradox. Improved maintenance of mitochondrial activity, mitochondrial homeostasis, may be responsible for lifespan extension in both cases. Decreased electron transport chain activity caused by reducing complex I subunit expression prompts an increase in stress response signaling that leads to enhanced mitochondrial homeostasis during aging. Increased complex I activity, as well as mitochondrial biogenesis, is expected to both directly counteract the decline in mitochondrial health that occurs during aging and may also increase cellular NAD+ levels, which have been linked to mitochondrial homeostatic mechanisms through activation of sirtuins. We suggest that manipulations that increase or decrease complex I activity both converge on improved mitochondrial homeostasis during aging, resulting in prolonged lifespan. PMID:24961226

  12. Quantum physics and complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biamonte, Jacob

    2014-03-01

    There is a widely used and successful theory of ``chemical reaction networks,'' which provides a framework describing systems governed by mass action kinetics. Computer science and population biology use the same ideas under a different name: ``stochastic Petri nets.'' But if we look at these theories from the perspective of quantum theory, they turn out to involve creation and annihilation operators, coherent states and other well-known ideas--yet in a context where probabilities replace amplitudes. I will explain this connection as part of a detailed analogy between quantum mechanics and stochastic mechanics which we've produced several results on recently, including the recent analytical results uniting quantum physics and complex networks. Our general idea is about merging concepts from quantum physics and complex network theory to provide a bidirectional bridge between both disciplines. Support is acknowledged from the Foundational Questions Institute (FQXi) and the Compagnia di San Paolo Foundation.

  13. Vincristine Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Vincristine lipid complex is used to treat a certain type of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; a type of cancer of the ... two different treatments with other medications. Vincristine lipid complex is in a class of medications called vinca ...

  14. Daunorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Daunorubicin lipid complex is used to treat advanced Kaposi's sarcoma (a type of cancer that causes abnormal tissue to grow on ... related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Daunorubicin lipid complex is in a class of medications called anthracyclines. ...

  15. Cytarabine Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Cytarabine lipid complex is used to treat lymphomatous meningitis (a type of cancer in the covering of the spinal cord and brain). Cytarabine lipid complex is in a class of medications called antimetabolites. ...

  16. Doxorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Doxorubicin lipid complex is used to treat ovarian cancer that has not improved or that has worsened after treatment with other medications. Doxorubicin lipid complex is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma (a ...

  17. Complex carbohydrates (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... later. Complex carbohydrate foods provide vitamins, minerals, and fiber that are important to the health of an ... which do not have the vitamins, minerals, and fiber found in complex and natural carbohydrates. Refined sugars ...

  18. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Part 1511 - Small Parts Gage

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Small Parts Gage 2 Figure 2 to Part 1511 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR PACIFIERS Pt.1511, Fig. 2 Figure 2 to Part 1511—Small Parts Gage EC03OC91.069...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Part 1511 - Small Parts Gage

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Small Parts Gage 2 Figure 2 to Part 1511 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR PACIFIERS Pt.1511, Fig. 2 Figure 2 to Part 1511—Small Parts Gage EC03OC91.069...

  20. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Part 1511 - Small Parts Gage

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Small Parts Gage 2 Figure 2 to Part 1511 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR PACIFIERS Pt.1511, Fig. 2 Figure 2 to Part 1511—Small Parts Gage EC03OC91.069...

  1. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Part 1511 - Small Parts Gage

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Small Parts Gage 2 Figure 2 to Part 1511 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR PACIFIERS Pt.1511, Fig. 2 Figure 2 to Part 1511—Small Parts Gage EC03OC91.069...

  2. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Part 1511 - Small Parts Gage

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Small Parts Gage 2 Figure 2 to Part 1511 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR PACIFIERS Pt.1511, Fig. 2 Figure 2 to Part 1511—Small Parts Gage EC03OC91.069...

  3. Simply Complex by Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Harold G.

    2007-01-01

    Reality--real life--is complex, more complex than can be imagined. The majority of our most pressing issues confronted in the management of organizations are overwhelmingly complex. I make the case for a systems design approach as a remedy. Examples introduced in this paper illuminate conceptual tools that advance how people transform their…

  4. Congruently melting complex oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahams, S.C.; Brandle, C.D. Jr.

    1988-04-26

    A device is described comprising: a material including a complex oxide, characterized in that the complex oxide is essentially free of gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, gadolinium gallium garnet and lithium niobate, and the composition of the complex oxide is congruent and differs from stoichiometry by at least 0.1 atomic percent for at least one constituent element.

  5. Goos-Haenchen shift in complex crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Longhi, Stefano; Della Valle, Giuseppe; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2011-10-15

    The Goos-Haenchen (GH) effect for wave scattering from complex PT-symmetric periodic potentials (complex crystals) is theoretically investigated, with specific reference to optical GH shift in photonic crystal slabs with a sinusoidal periodic modulation of both real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant. The analysis highlights some distinct and rather unique features as compared to the GH shift found in ordinary crystals. In particular, as opposed to GH shift in ordinary crystals, which is large at the band gap edges, in complex crystals the GH shift can be large inside the reflection (amplification) band and becomes extremely large as the PT symmetry-breaking threshold is approached.

  6. Electronic communication. Part III.

    PubMed

    Bergren, M D

    1995-02-01

    This is the concluding article of a three-part series on electronic communication for school nurses. The October 1994 column described electronic communication and the hardware and software required. The December 1994 column examined e-mail, bulletin boards, databases, and file transfers. This column will list many health and nursing resources available on-line. Some of the resources are available only through the Internet. Others are accessible by more than one route: dial-in, telnet, gopher, or world wide web. A few of the services, such as MEDLINE, are only accessed with purchased accounts (Glowniak & Bushway, 1994). The electronic resources of interest to school nurses are so numerous it would be impossible to cite all of them in a column of this length. Selected resources for the school health provider will be listed in alphabetical order. PMID:7767047

  7. Rickets: Part I.

    PubMed

    Shore, Richard M; Chesney, Russell W

    2013-01-01

    Rickets is characterized by impaired mineralization and ossification of the growth plates of growing children caused by a variety of disorders, the most frequent of which is nutritional deficiency of vitamin D. Despite ample knowledge of its etiology and the availability of cost-effective methods of preventing it, vitamin D deficiency rickets remains a significant problem in developing and developed countries. This two-part review covers the history, etiology, pathophysiology and clinical and radiographical findings of vitamin D deficiency rickets. Other less frequent causes of rickets and some of the disorders entering into the differential diagnoses of rickets are also considered. Controversial issues surrounding vitamin D deficiency include determination of what constitutes vitamin D sufficiency and the potential relationship between low levels of vitamin D metabolites in many individuals and unexplained fractures in infants.

  8. Canine hypoadrenocorticism: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Susan C.; Peterson, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Hypoadrenocorticism (Addison’s disease) has been referred to as “the great pretender,” due to its ability to mimic other common diseases in the dog and thereby represent a diagnostic challenge. Naturally occurring hypoadrenocorticism is an uncommon canine disease. Young, female dogs are overrepresented. Hypoadrenocorticism typically results from immune-mediated destruction of all adrenocortical layers, resulting in deficiencies of min-eralocorticoids (aldosterone) and glucocorticoids (cortisol). A small number of dogs suffer from glucocorticoid deficiency only. Dogs suffering from hypoadrenocorticism may present in a variety of conditions, from a mildly ill dog to a shocky and recumbent dog. This review discusses etiology, pathophysiology, history, physical examination findings, and diagnostic findings in the Addisonian patient. A follow-up article (Part II) will discuss the definitive diagnosis and management strategies for these patients. PMID:20357943

  9. Carney complex (CNC).

    PubMed

    Bertherat, Jérôme

    2006-01-01

    The Carney complex (CNC) is a dominantly inherited syndrome characterized by spotty skin pigmentation, endocrine overactivity and myxomas. Skin pigmentation anomalies include lentigines and blue naevi. The most common endocrine gland manifestations are acromegaly, thyroid and testicular tumors, and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-independent Cushing's syndrome due to primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). PPNAD, a rare cause of Cushing's syndrome, is due to primary bilateral adrenal defect that can be also observed in some patients without other CNC manifestations or familial history of the disease. Myxomas can be observed in the heart, skin and breast. Cardiac myxomas can develop in any cardiac chamber and may be multiple. One of the putative CNC genes located on 17q22-24, (PRKAR1A), has been identified to encode the regulatory subunit (R1A) of protein kinase A. Heterozygous inactivating mutations of PRKAR1A were reported initially in 45 to 65% of CNC index cases, and may be present in about 80% of the CNC families presenting mainly with Cushing's syndrome. PRKAR1A is a key component of the cAMP signaling pathway that has been implicated in endocrine tumorigenesis and could, at least partly, function as a tumor suppressor gene. Genetic analysis should be proposed to all CNC index cases. Patients with CNC or with a genetic predisposition to CNC should have regular screening for manifestations of the disease. Clinical work-up for all the manifestations of CNC should be performed at least once a year in all patients and should start in infancy. Cardiac myxomas require surgical removal. Treatment of the other manifestations of CNC should be discussed and may include follow-up, surgery, or medical treatment depending on the location of the tumor, its size, the existence of clinical signs of tumor mass or hormonal excess, and the suspicion of malignancy. Bilateral adrenalectomy is the most common treatment for Cushing's syndrome due to PPNAD. PMID

  10. Metal-ligand interaction of lanthanides with coumarin derivatives. Part I. Complexation of 3-(1-aminoethylidene)-2H-chromene-2,4(3H)-dione with La(III), Ce(III), Nd(III) and Ho(III).

    PubMed

    Swiatek, Mirosława; Kufelnicki, Aleksander

    2012-01-01

    Solutions of lanthanum(III), cerium(III), neodymium(III) and holmium(III) nitrates with 3-(1-aminoethylidene)-2H-chromene-2,4(3H)-dione (1) in 10% v/v dioxane-water medium were used. Coordination modes of 1 with the selected lanthanides have been examined. Hydroxo-complexes with deprotonated water molecules from the inner coordination sphere have been stated in basic medium. Stability constants of the forming complex species were determined by potentiometric titrations using Superquad and Hyperquad2003 programs. The most stable complexes are formed with La(III). The UV-Vis spectra of the Nd(III)-1 system confirmed the L:M = 1:1 stoichiometry evaluated potentiometrically.

  11. Vitiligo - Part 1*

    PubMed Central

    Tarlé, Roberto Gomes; do Nascimento, Liliane Machado; Mira, Marcelo Távora; de Castro, Caio Cesar Silva

    2014-01-01

    Vitiligo is a chronic stigmatizing disease, already known for millennia, which mainly affects melanocytes from epidermis basal layer, leading to the development of hypochromic and achromic patches. Its estimated prevalence is 0.5% worldwide. The involvement of genetic factors controlling susceptibility to vitiligo has been studied over the last decades, and results of previous studies present vitiligo as a complex, multifactorial and polygenic disease. In this context, a few genes, including DDR1, XBP1 and NLRP1 have been consistently and functionally associated with the disease. Notwithstanding, environmental factors that precipitate or maintain the disease are yet to be described. The pathogenesis of vitiligo has not been totally clarified until now and many theories have been proposed. Of these, the autoimmune hypothesis is now the most cited and studied among experts. Dysfunction in metabolic pathways, which could lead to production of toxic metabolites causing damage to melanocytes, has also been investigated. Melanocytes adhesion deficit in patients with vitiligo is mainly speculated by the appearance of Köebner phenomenon, recently, new genes and proteins involved in this deficit have been found. PMID:24937821

  12. Using UNIX, Part 2.

    PubMed

    Mann, J

    2001-01-01

    We talked about using 3 UNIX commands. In UNIX, there are many other options for using them. But for the most part, if you can use them like I have shown, you will be able to do everything you need. If you can learn these few points well, I think you will be better off than if I give you 50 options and leave you totally confused about when to do what. On some UNIX systems, an electronic version of the UNIX manual is on the system. This gives a lot more information about each command. However, it is a bit difficult to understand. If you want more information about any command, you can type man COMMAND, e.g., man ls. This will give you more ways to use the ls command. And remember, the command pwd tells what directory you are in, cd/directory changes to another directory, ls lists the contents of the directory you are in, ls more displays the directory contents 1 page at a time (the space bar gives you the next page), ls-al gives a detailed listing of the contents of the directory you are in, ls-al more displays them 1 page at a time (the space bar gives you the next page).

  13. Cardiovascular Health, Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Baman, Timir S.; Gupta, Sanjaya; Day, Sharlene M.

    2010-01-01

    Context: An athlete’s health may be endangered if he or she continues to compete after diagnosis of certain cardiovascular conditions. The most worrisome risk is sudden cardiac death; the annual rate in US athletes is 1 in 50 000 to 200 000. Evidence Acquisition: Part 2 of this review highlights the current guidelines and controversies surrounding compatibility of participation with a variety of cardiac conditions in competitive and recreational athletics. Data sources were limited to peer-reviewed publications from 1984 to the April 2009. Results: The guidelines published by the American College of Cardiology and the European Society of Cardiology provide a framework for safe competitive and recreational sports participation in athletes with a broad spectrum of inherited and acquired cardiovascular disorders. These guidelines are necessarily conservative because it is not currently possible to individualize risk prediction. Few data are available in many areas, particularly in the noncompetitive arena or in older athletes. Conclusions: Published national guidelines are currently the foundation governing return-to-play decisions in athletes with cardiovascular conditions. Further studies are needed to refine risk stratification algorithms to allow athletes with cardiovascular conditions to reap the health benefits of regular exercise and sports participation without undue risk. PMID:23015920

  14. Complexity transmission during replication

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brian K.

    1979-01-01

    The transmission of complexity during DNA replication has been investigated to clarify the significance of this molecular property in a deterministic process. Complexity was equated with the amount of randomness within an ordered molecular structure and measured by the entropy of a posteriori probabilities for discrete (monomer sequences, atomic bonds) and continuous (torsion angle sequences) structural parameters in polynucleotides, proteins, and ligand molecules. A theoretical analysis revealed that sequence complexity decreases during transmission from DNA to protein. It was also found that sequence complexity limits the attainable complexity in the folding of a polypeptide chain and that a protein cannot interact with a ligand moiety of higher complexity. The analysis indicated, furthermore, that in any deterministic molecular process a cause possesses more complexity than its effect. This outcome broadly complies with Curie's symmetry principle. Results from an analysis of an extensive set of experimental data are presented; they corroborate these findings. It is suggested, therefore, that complexity governs the direction of order—order molecular transformations. Two biological implications are (i) replication of DNA in a stepwise, repetitive manner by a polymerase appears to be a necessary consequence of structural constraints imposed by complexity, and (ii) during evolution, increases in complexity had to involve a nondeterministic mechanism. This latter requirement apparently applied also to development of the first replicating system on earth. PMID:287070

  15. Text Complexity: Primary Teachers' Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Jill; Hiebert, Elfrieda H.; Bowen, Kimberly; Relyea-Kim, E. Jackie; Kung, Melody; Elmore, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The research question was, "What text characteristics do primary teachers think are most important for early grades text complexity?" Teachers from across the United States accomplished a two-part task. First, to stimulate teachers' thinking about important text characteristics, primary teachers completed an online paired-text…

  16. Unraveling the complexity of mitochondrial complex I assembly: A dynamic process.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Caballero, Laura; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Nijtmans, Leo

    2016-07-01

    Mammalian complex I is composed of 44 different subunits and its assembly requires at least 13 specific assembly factors. Proper function of the mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme is of crucial importance for cell survival due to its major participation in energy production and cell signaling. Complex I assembly depends on the coordination of several crucial processes that need to be tightly interconnected and orchestrated by a number of assembly factors. The understanding of complex I assembly evolved from simple sequential concept to the more sophisticated modular assembly model describing a convoluted process. According to this model, the different modules assemble independently and associate afterwards with each other to form the final enzyme. In this review, we aim to unravel the complexity of complex I assembly and provide the latest insights in this fundamental and fascinating process. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  17. [First part: the intestinal microbiota].

    PubMed

    Capurso, Lucio

    2016-06-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract contains a large number of commensal (non pathogenic) and pathogenic microbial species that have co-evolved with the human genome and differ in composition and function based on their location, as well as age, sex, race/ethnicity, and diet of their host and we can in fact consider the human body as a mix of human and bacterial cells. It is now evident that the large intestine is much more than an organ for waste material and absorption of water, salts and drugs, and indeed has a very important impact on human health, for a major part related to the specific composition of the complex microbial community in the colon. In man, the large gut receives material from the ileum which has already been digested and the contents are then mixed and retained for 6-12 hours in the caecum and right colon. Thus, the large intestine is an open system, with nutrients flowing in the caecum, and bacteria, their metabolic products, and undigested foodstuffs being excreted as faeces. The anaerobic brakdown of carbohydrate and protein by bacteria is known conventionally as fermentation. In man the major end products are the short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) acetate, propionate, butirate, the gases H2 and CO2, ammonia, amines, phenols and energy, which the bacteria use for growth and the maintenance of cellular function. The microbiota is also an important factor in the development of the immune response. The interaction between the gastrointestinal tract and resident microbiota is well balanced in healthy individuals, but its breakdown can lead to intestinal and extraintestinal disease. PMID:27362717

  18. Two giant stellar complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, Yu. N.; Efremov, E. Yu.

    Common star complexes are huge (0.3-1 kpc in diameter) groups of relatively young stars, associations and clusters. The complexes usually form regular chains along spiral arms of grand design galaxies, being evidently formed and supported by magneto- gravitational instability developing along an arm. Special attention is given to a few large complexes which have signatures of gravitational boundness, such as round shape and high central density. Concentrations of stars and clusters in such a complex in M51 galaxy were found in this paper; we concluded it is possible to suggest that the complex is gravitationally bound. It is also stressed that some properties of the giant complex in NGC 6946 (such as its semicircular and sharp Western edge) are still enigmatic.

  19. Artistic forms and complexity.

    PubMed

    Boon, J-P; Casti, J; Taylor, R P

    2011-04-01

    We discuss the inter-relationship between various concepts of complexity by introducing a complexity 'triangle' featuring objective complexity, subjective complexity and social complexity. Their connections are explored using visual and musical compositions of art. As examples, we quantify the complexity embedded within the paintings of the Jackson Pollock and the musical works of Johann Sebastian Bach. We discuss the challenges inherent in comparisons of the spatial patterns created by Pollock and the sonic patterns created by Bach, including the differing roles that time plays in these investigations. Our results draw attention to some common intriguing characteristics suggesting 'universality' and conjecturing that the fractal nature of art might have an intrinsic value of more general significance. PMID:21382264

  20. Parts and boundaries.

    PubMed

    Jackendoff, R

    1991-12-01

    Within the framework of Conceptual Semantics, a family of conceptual features and functions is developed that accounts for phenomena in the semantics of noun phrases such as the mass-count distinction, plurality, the partitive construction (a leg of the table), the constitutive construction (a house of wood), the "Universal Packager" (three coffees), and boundary words such as end, edge, and crust. Using the strong formal parallelism between noun phrase semantics and event structure that is a hallmark of the Conceptual Semantics approach, the features and functions of the NP system are applied to a wide range of problems in event structure, for example the analysis of the Vendler classes, the meaning of the progressive, the "imperfective paradox", and "aktionsarten" such as the syntactically unexpressed sense of repetition in The light flashed until dawn. Crucial to the analysis is that these features and functions can be expressed in syntactic structure either by being part of lexical conceptual structure, or by use of a morphological affix, or by being associated with the meaning of a construction such as N of NP or nominal compounding. Alternatively, they may remain unexpressed altogether, being introduced into the conceptual structure of a phrase by "rules of construal". This shows that lexical semantics and phrasal semantics interpenetrate deeply, and that there is no strict one-to-one correspondence between syntactic and semantic structures. In addition, the analysis provides further evidence that natural language semantics must be based on a psychological view of meaning--it must be concerned with how language users are constructed to understand and schematize the world. PMID:1790657

  1. 9. SITE OVERVIEW. PART 4 OF 6 PART PANORAMA WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. SITE OVERVIEW. PART 4 OF 6 PART PANORAMA WITH NOS. CA-265-6 TO CA-265-11. ARROYO SECO PARKWAY AS SEEN FROM RADIO TOWER HILL. PART 4 SHOWS ARROYO SECO PARKWAY IN FOREGROUND AND FIGUEROA STREET AT CENTER. LOOKING 316° NW. - Arroyo Seco Parkway, Los Angeles to Pasadena, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. Complexation of Optoelectronic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreisho, A. S.; Il‧in, M. Yu.; Konyaev, M. A.; Mikhailenko, A. S.; Morozov, A. V.; Strakhov, S. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    Problems of increasing the efficiency and the functionality of complex optoelectronic systems for monitoring real atmospheric conditions and of their use are discussed. It is shown by the example of a meteorological complex comprising an infrared wind-sensing lidar and an X-range Doppler radar that the complexation of probing systems working in different electromagnetic-radiation ranges opens up new opportunities for determining the meteorological parameters of a turbulent atmosphere and investigating the interaction of radiation with it.

  3. Genetics of complex diseases.

    PubMed

    Motulsky, Arno G

    2006-02-01

    Approaches to the study of the genetic basis of common complex diseases and their clinical applications are considered. Monogenic Mendelian inheritance in such conditions is infrequent but its elucidation may help to detect pathogenic mechanisms in the more common variety of complex diseases. Involvement by multiple genes in complex diseases usually occurs but the isolation and identification of specific genes so far has been exceptional. The role of common polymorphisms as indicators of disease risk in various studies is discussed.

  4. [On controversies around the Oedipus Complex].

    PubMed

    Drwiega, Marek

    2002-01-01

    In the article the author would like to draw the readers' attention to one of the central issues of psychoanalysis, i.e. Oedipus complex. In the development of the psychoanalysis the classical conception of Oedipus complex presented by Freud gave rise to a severe criticism both on the part of some psychoanalysts, especially women such as e.g. Melanie Klein, and on the part of ethnographers such as B. Malinowski. In the paper the author presents the main controversies concerning this interesting discussion. The fact of the matter is that the Oedipus complex is a hotly debated subject, not only from the cultural point of view but also within the psychoanalytical movement.

  5. [On controversies around the Oedipus Complex].

    PubMed

    Drwiega, Marek

    2002-01-01

    In the article the author would like to draw the readers' attention to one of the central issues of psychoanalysis, i.e. Oedipus complex. In the development of the psychoanalysis the classical conception of Oedipus complex presented by Freud gave rise to a severe criticism both on the part of some psychoanalysts, especially women such as e.g. Melanie Klein, and on the part of ethnographers such as B. Malinowski. In the paper the author presents the main controversies concerning this interesting discussion. The fact of the matter is that the Oedipus complex is a hotly debated subject, not only from the cultural point of view but also within the psychoanalytical movement. PMID:12725020

  6. Decision paths in complex tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galanter, Eugene

    1991-01-01

    Complex real world action and its prediction and control has escaped analysis by the classical methods of psychological research. The reason is that psychologists have no procedures to parse complex tasks into their constituents. Where such a division can be made, based say on expert judgment, there is no natural scale to measure the positive or negative values of the components. Even if we could assign numbers to task parts, we lack rules i.e., a theory, to combine them into a total task representation. We compare here two plausible theories for the amalgamation of the value of task components. Both of these theories require a numerical representation of motivation, for motivation is the primary variable that guides choice and action in well-learned tasks. We address this problem of motivational quantification and performance prediction by developing psychophysical scales of the desireability or aversiveness of task components based on utility scaling methods (Galanter 1990). We modify methods used originally to scale sensory magnitudes (Stevens and Galanter 1957), and that have been applied recently to the measure of task 'workload' by Gopher and Braune (1984). Our modification uses utility comparison scaling techniques which avoid the unnecessary assumptions made by Gopher and Braune. Formula for the utility of complex tasks based on the theoretical models are used to predict decision and choice of alternate paths to the same goal.

  7. Chromatin regulation: how complex does it get?

    PubMed

    Meier, Karin; Brehm, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Gene transcription is tightly regulated at different levels to ensure that the transcriptome of the cell is appropriate for developmental stage and cell type. The chromatin state in which a gene is embedded determines its expression level to a large extent. Activation or repression of transcription is typically accomplished by the recruitment of chromatin-associated multisubunit protein complexes that combine several molecular tools, such as histone-binding and chromatin-modifying activities. Recent biochemical purifications of such complexes have revealed a substantial diversity. On the one hand, complexes that were thought to be unique have been revealed to be part of large complex families. On the other hand, protein subunits that were thought to only exist in separate complexes have been shown to coexist in novel assemblies. In this review we discuss our current knowledge of repressor complexes that contain MBT domain proteins and/or the CoREST co-repressor and use them as a paradigm to illustrate the unexpected heterogeneity and tool sharing of chromatin regulating protein complexes. These recent insights also challenge the ways we define and think about protein complexes in general. PMID:25482055

  8. Chromatin regulation: How complex does it get?

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Karin; Brehm, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Gene transcription is tightly regulated at different levels to ensure that the transcriptome of the cell is appropriate for developmental stage and cell type. The chromatin state in which a gene is embedded determines its expression level to a large extent. Activation or repression of transcription is typically accomplished by the recruitment of chromatin-associated multisubunit protein complexes that combine several molecular tools, such as histone-binding and chromatin-modifying activities. Recent biochemical purifications of such complexes have revealed a substantial diversity. On the one hand, complexes that were thought to be unique have been revealed to be part of large complex families. On the other hand, protein subunits that were thought to only exist in separate complexes have been shown to coexist in novel assemblies. In this review we discuss our current knowledge of repressor complexes that contain MBT domain proteins and/or the CoREST co-repressor and use them as a paradigm to illustrate the unexpected heterogeneity and tool sharing of chromatin regulating protein complexes. These recent insights also challenge the ways we define and think about protein complexes in general. PMID:25482055

  9. Aluminum speciation studies in biological fluids. Part 5. A quantitative investigation of A1(III) complex equilibria with desferrioxamine, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, Tiron, CP20 (L1), and CP94 under physiological conditions, and computer-aided assessment of the aluminum-mobilizing capacities of these ligands in vivo.

    PubMed

    Desroches, S; Biron, F; Berthon, G

    1999-05-30

    While the involvement of environmental aluminum toxicity in the advent of senile dementias is still debated, acute aluminum toxicity of iatrogenic origin is well documented. So far, the only treatment available against it has been desferrioxamine (DFO), which induces major side effects. New drugs are thus highly desirable, and possible DFO substitutes have already been considered through various techniques. An important test for such new drugs is to assess their A1-mobilizing capacity in vivo. This can be done by computer-aided speciation provided formation constants for the corresponding A1(III) complexes are known beforehand. The present work reports an investigation of A1(III) complex equilibria with five sequestering ligands including DFO, and predicts the respective capacities of these to mobilize aluminum in vivo under normal and inflammatory conditions.

  10. Cryogenic Treatment of Metal Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Chillar, Rahul; Agrawal, S. C.

    2006-03-31

    Cryogenic treatment and its variables have been described. Results of eight engineering tests carried out on cryotreated parts have been presented. Cryogenic treatment of metal parts enhances useful properties which in turn, improves various strengths. Our tests viz. Abrasion, Torsion, Fatigue, Tensile, Shear, Hardness and Impact on Mild steel, Cast Iron, Brass and Copper show that the cryogenic treatment improved useful properties of mild steel parts appreciably but did not show promise with brass and copper parts.

  11. [Physicians working part-time].

    PubMed

    Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, Ursula; Hackl, Johann Michael

    2004-04-01

    In order to ensure the best possible medical care and high-quality research, hospital medical staff must be well educated and highly motivated. Part-time work can help to provide good human resources. Moreover, part-time jobs are often necessary as a means of juggling work and family responsibilities. The aim of this study was to illustrate the legal and educational groundwork for part-time work for physicians in Austria and to outline the advantages and drawbacks of part-time work. In March 2003, all medical doctors working part-time at hospitals in the Austrian state of the Tyrol (n = 60) were surveyed by means of a written questionnaire with the aim of finding out their motives for taking a part-time job as well as the positive and negative aspects involved. The response rate was nearly 70% (n = 40). Most of the part-time hospital physicians were female. The vast majority chose part-time employment in order to better balance family and job. Problems involved in part-time work are legal issues (part-time employment does not always qualify for medical training), the comparatively low salary and the fewer career opportunities. All respondents agreed that patient care, teaching and research are not compatible on a part-time basis. Another negative aspect is the generally strong time pressure experienced in part-time jobs. Despite these negative aspects of working part-time, advantages are considered more important, especially the better balancing of job and family and the possibility of an important early professional reintegration. Better acceptance of part-time jobs would help to make part-time work more attractive. An important improvement is associated with the forthcoming changes in the laws governing part-time work and medical training. PMID:15182044

  12. Relatively Inexpensive Rapid Prototyping of Small Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swan, Scott A.

    2003-01-01

    Parts with complex three-dimensional shapes and with dimensions up to 8 by 8 by 10 in. (20.3 by 20.3 by 25.4 cm) can be made as unitary pieces of a room-temperature-curing polymer, with relatively little investment in time and money, by a process now in use at Johnson Space Center. The process is one of a growing number of processes and techniques that are known collectively as the art of rapid prototyping. The main advantages of this process over other rapid-prototyping processes are greater speed and lower cost: There is no need to make paper drawings and take them to a shop for fabrication, and thus no need for the attendant paperwork and organizational delays. Instead, molds for desired parts are made automatically on a machine that is guided by data from a computer-aided design (CAD) system and can reside in an engineering office.

  13. Air Pollution. Part A: Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledbetter, Joe O.

    Two facets of the engineering control of air pollution (the analysis of possible problems and the application of effective controls) are covered in this two-volume text. Part A covers Analysis, and Part B, Prevention and Control. (This review is concerned with Part A only.) This volume deals with the terminology, methodology, and symptomatology…

  14. Exploring Water Pollution. Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1975-01-01

    This is part two of a three part article related to the science activity of exploring environmental problems. Part one dealt with background information for the classroom teacher. Presented here is a suggested lesson plan on water pollution. Objectives, important concepts and instructional procedures are suggested. (EB)

  15. Complexity in Picture Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierschynski, Jarek; Louie, Belinda; Pughe, Bronwyn

    2015-01-01

    One of the key requirements of Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in English Language Arts is that students are able to read and access complex texts across all grade levels. The CCSS authors emphasize both the limitations and lack of accuracy in the current CCSS model of text complexity, calling for the development of new frameworks. In response…

  16. Performance Improvement Assuming Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Individual performers, work teams, and organizations may be considered complex adaptive systems, while most current human performance technologies appear to assume simple determinism. This article explores the apparent mismatch and speculates on future efforts to enhance performance if complexity rather than simplicity is assumed. Included are…

  17. Freestanding Complex Optical Scanners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisbie, David A.

    A complex freestanding optical mark recognition (OMR) scanner is one which is not on-line to an external processor; it has intelligence stemming from an internal processor located within the unit or system. The advantages and disadvantages of a complex OMR can best be assessed after identifying the scanning needs and constraints of the potential…

  18. Visual Complexity: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donderi, Don C.

    2006-01-01

    The idea of visual complexity, the history of its measurement, and its implications for behavior are reviewed, starting with structuralism and Gestalt psychology at the beginning of the 20th century and ending with visual complexity theory, perceptual learning theory, and neural circuit theory at the beginning of the 21st. Evidence is drawn from…

  19. Tuberculosis in complex emergencies.

    PubMed

    Coninx, Rudi

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes the key factors and remaining challenges for tuberculosis (TB) control programmes in complex emergencies. A complex emergency is "a humanitarian crisis in a country, region or society where there is total or considerable breakdown of authority resulting from internal or external conflict and which requires an international response that goes beyond the mandate or capacity of any single agency and/or the ongoing United Nations country programme." Some 200 million people are believed to live in countries affected by complex emergencies; almost all of these are developing countries that also bear the main burden of TB. The effects of complex emergencies impact on TB control programmes, interfering with the goals of identifying and curing TB patients and possibly leading to the emergence of MDR-TB. There are many detailed descriptions of aid interventions during complex emergencies; yet TB control programmes are absent from most of these reports. If TB is neglected, it may quickly result in increased morbidity and mortality, as was demonstrated in Bosnia and Herzegovina and in Somalia. TB is a major disease in complex emergencies and requires an appropriate public health response. While there is no manual to cover complex emergencies, the interagency manual for TB control in refugee and displaced populations provides valuable guidance. These programmes contribute to the body of evidence needed to compile such a manual, and should ensure that the experiences of TB control in complex emergencies lead to the establishment of evidence-based programmes. PMID:17768523

  20. U1A Complex

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

  1. U1A Complex

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-28

    Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

  2. Complexity and Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, Jeanette Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    A central feature of complexity is that it is based on non-linear, recursive relations. However, in most current accounts of complexity such relations, while non-linear, are based on the reductive relations of a Newtonian onto-epistemological framework. This means that the systems that are emergent from the workings of such relations are a…

  3. COMPLEXITY IN ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The enormous complexity of ecosystems is generally obvious under even the most cursory examination. In the modern world, this complexity is further augmented by the linkage of ecosystems to economic and social systems through the human use of the environment for technological pu...

  4. Leading healthcare in complexity.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    Healthcare institutions and providers are in complexity. Networks of interconnections from relationships and technology create conditions in which interdependencies and non-linear dynamics lead to surprising, unpredictable outcomes. Previous effective approaches to leadership, focusing on top-down bureaucratic methods, are no longer effective. Leading in complexity requires leaders to accept the complexity, create an adaptive space in which innovation and creativity can flourish and then integrate the successful practices that emerge into the formal organizational structure. Several methods for doing adaptive space work will be discussed. Readers will be able to contrast traditional leadership approaches with leading in complexity. They will learn new behaviours that are required of complexity leaders, along with challenges they will face, often from other leaders within the organization. PMID:25815410

  5. Leading healthcare in complexity.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    Healthcare institutions and providers are in complexity. Networks of interconnections from relationships and technology create conditions in which interdependencies and non-linear dynamics lead to surprising, unpredictable outcomes. Previous effective approaches to leadership, focusing on top-down bureaucratic methods, are no longer effective. Leading in complexity requires leaders to accept the complexity, create an adaptive space in which innovation and creativity can flourish and then integrate the successful practices that emerge into the formal organizational structure. Several methods for doing adaptive space work will be discussed. Readers will be able to contrast traditional leadership approaches with leading in complexity. They will learn new behaviours that are required of complexity leaders, along with challenges they will face, often from other leaders within the organization.

  6. Hypergraph coloring complexes

    PubMed Central

    Breuer, Felix; Dall, Aaron; Kubitzke, Martina

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to generalize the notion of the coloring complex of a graph to hypergraphs. We present three different interpretations of those complexes–a purely combinatorial one and two geometric ones. It is shown, that most of the properties, which are known to be true for coloring complexes of graphs, break down in this more general setting, e.g., Cohen–Macaulayness and partitionability. Nevertheless, we are able to provide bounds for the f- and h-vectors of those complexes which yield new bounds on chromatic polynomials of hypergraphs. Moreover, though it is proven that the coloring complex of a hypergraph has a wedge decomposition, we provide an example showing that in general this decomposition is not homotopy equivalent to a wedge of spheres. In addition, we can completely characterize those hypergraphs whose coloring complex is connected. PMID:23483700

  7. Evolutionary complexity for protection of critical assets.

    SciTech Connect

    Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Chandross, Michael Evan

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed as part of a one-year LDRD project, 'Evolutionary Complexity for Protection of Critical Assets.' A brief introduction is given to the topics of genetic algorithms and genetic programming, followed by a discussion of relevant results obtained during the project's research, and finally the conclusions drawn from those results. The focus is on using genetic programming to evolve solutions for relatively simple algebraic equations as a prototype application for evolving complexity in computer codes. The results were obtained using the lil-gp genetic program, a C code for evolving solutions to user-defined problems and functions. These results suggest that genetic programs are not well-suited to evolving complexity for critical asset protection because they cannot efficiently evolve solutions to complex problems, and introduce unacceptable performance penalties into solutions for simple ones.

  8. Groundwater cleanup demonstrations at Complex 34, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At Launch Complex 34, the Six-Phase Soil Heating site that is involved in a groundwater cleanup project can be seen. The project involves the Department of Defense, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy and NASA. Concentrations of trichloroethylene solvent have been identified in the soil at the complex as a result of cleaning methods for rocket parts during the Apollo Program, which used the complex, in the 60s. The group formed the Interagency NDAPL Consortium (IDC) to study three contamination cleanup technologies: Six-Phase Soil Heating, Steam Injection and In Situ Oxidation with Potassium Permanganate. All three methods may offer a way to remove the contaminants in months instead of decades. In the background is the block house for the complex. KSC hosted a two-day conference that presented information and demonstrations of the three technologies being tested at the site.

  9. Lessons from complex interventions to improve health.

    PubMed

    Hawe, Penelope

    2015-03-18

    Complexity-resulting from interactions among many component parts-is a property of both the intervention and the context (or system) into which it is placed. Complexity increases the unpredictability of effects. Complexity invites new approaches to logic modeling, definitions of integrity and means of standardization, and evaluation. New metaphors and terminology are needed to capture the recognition that knowledge generation comes from the hands of practitioners/implementers as much as it comes from those usually playing the role of intervention researcher. Failure to acknowledge this may blind us to the very mechanisms we seek to understand. Researchers in clinical settings are documenting health improvement gains made as a consequence of complex systems thinking. Improvement science in clinical settings has much to offer researchers in population health. PMID:25581153

  10. Synchrotron X-ray CT characterization of titanium parts fabricated by additive manufacturing. Part II. Defects.

    PubMed

    Scarlett, Nicola Vivienne Yorke; Tyson, Peter; Fraser, Darren; Mayo, Sheridan; Maksimenko, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Synchrotron X-ray tomography (SXRT) has been applied to the study of defects within three-dimensional printed titanium parts. These parts were made using the Arcam EBM(®) (electron beam melting) process which uses powdered titanium alloy, Ti64 (Ti alloy with approximately 6%Al and 4%V) as the feed and an electron beam for the sintering/welding. The experiment was conducted on the Imaging and Medical Beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. The samples represent a selection of complex shapes with a variety of internal morphologies. Inspection via SXRT has revealed a number of defects which may not otherwise have been seen. The location and nature of such defects combined with detailed knowledge of the process conditions can contribute to understanding the interplay between design and manufacturing strategy. This fundamental understanding may subsequently be incorporated into process modelling, prediction of properties and the development of robust methodologies for the production of defect-free parts.

  11. Synchrotron X-ray CT characterization of titanium parts fabricated by additive manufacturing. Part II. Defects.

    PubMed

    Scarlett, Nicola Vivienne Yorke; Tyson, Peter; Fraser, Darren; Mayo, Sheridan; Maksimenko, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Synchrotron X-ray tomography (SXRT) has been applied to the study of defects within three-dimensional printed titanium parts. These parts were made using the Arcam EBM(®) (electron beam melting) process which uses powdered titanium alloy, Ti64 (Ti alloy with approximately 6%Al and 4%V) as the feed and an electron beam for the sintering/welding. The experiment was conducted on the Imaging and Medical Beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. The samples represent a selection of complex shapes with a variety of internal morphologies. Inspection via SXRT has revealed a number of defects which may not otherwise have been seen. The location and nature of such defects combined with detailed knowledge of the process conditions can contribute to understanding the interplay between design and manufacturing strategy. This fundamental understanding may subsequently be incorporated into process modelling, prediction of properties and the development of robust methodologies for the production of defect-free parts. PMID:27359151

  12. Genomics and the evolutionary origins of nervous system complexity.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Todd H; Rivera, Ajna S

    2008-12-01

    Advances in genomics are leading to increased understanding of the evolution of complexity, especially by beginning to bridge genotype and phenotype. Here, using examples from nervous system evolution, we define general patterns of increased complexity seen across levels of biological organization. We also explore specific evolutionary mechanisms that increase complexity, namely those that increase the number of biological units (parts) in a system. We provide specific neurobiological examples of increased complexity in genes, gene networks, cell types, and tissues/organs. These examples illustrate that while a variety of different mechanisms increase biological complexity, they can be understood in a generalized comparative framework. PMID:19152785

  13. Selenophene transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    White, C.J.

    1994-07-27

    This research shows that selenophene transition metal complexes have a chemistry that is similar to their thiophene analogs. Selenophene coordination has been demonstrated and confirmed by molecular structure in both the {eta}{sup 5}- and the {eta}{sup 1}(Se)-coordination modes. The reaction chemistry of selenophene complexes closely resembles that of the analogous thiophene complexes. One major difference, however, is that selenophene is a better donor ligand than thiophene making the selenophene complexes more stable than the corresponding thiophene complexes. The {sup 77}Se NMR chemical shift values for selenophene complexes fall within distinct regions primarily depending on the coordination mode of the selenophene ligand. In the final paper, the C-H bond activation of {eta}{sup 1}(S)-bound thiophenes, {eta}{sup 1}(S)-benzothiophene and {eta}{sup 1}(Se)-bound selenophenes has been demonstrated. The deprotonation and rearrangement of the {eta}{sup 1}(E)-bound ligand to the carbon bound L-yl complex readily occurs in the presence of base. Reprotonation with a strong acid gives a carbene complex that is unreactive towards nucleophilic attack at the carbene carbon and is stable towards exposure to air. The molecular structure of [Cp(NO)(PPh{sub 3})Re(2-benzothioenylcarbene)]O{sub 3}SCF{sub 3} was determined and contains a Re-C bond with substantial double bond character. Methyl substitution for the thienylcarbene or selenylcarbene gives a carbene that rearranges thermally to give back the {eta}{sup 1}(E)-bound complex. Based on these model reactions, a new mechanism for the H/D exchange of thiophene over the hydrodesulfurization catalyst has been proposed.

  14. Mitochondrial complex I-linked disease.

    PubMed

    Rodenburg, Richard J

    2016-07-01

    Complex I deficiency is the most frequently encountered single mitochondrial single enzyme deficiency in patients with a mitochondrial disorder. Although specific genotype-phenotype correlations are very difficult to identify, the majority of patients present with symptoms caused by leukodystrophy. The poor genotype-phenotype correlations can make establishing a diagnosis a challenge. The classical way to establish a complex I deficiency in patients is by performing spectrophotometric measurements of the enzyme in a muscle biopsy or other patient-derived material (liver or heart biopsy, cultured skin fibroblasts). Complex I is encoded by both the mtDNA and nuclear DNA and pathogenic mutations have been identified in the majority of the 44 genes encoding the structural subunits of complex I. In recent years, the increasing possibilities for diagnostic molecular genetic tests of large gene panels, exomes, and even entire genomes has led to the identification of many novel genetic defects causing complex I deficiency. Complex I mutations not only result in a reduced enzyme activity but also induce secondary effects at the cellular level, such as elevated reactive oxygen species production, altered membrane potential and mitochondrial morphology. At this moment there is no cure for complex I deficiency and the treatment options for complex I patients are restricted to symptomatic treatment. Recent developments, amongst others based on the treatment of the secondary effects of complex I deficiency, have shown to be promising as new therapeutic strategies in vitro and have entered clinical trials. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  15. Complexity and forensic pathology.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard Martin

    2015-12-01

    It has become increasingly apparent that nonlinearity and complexity are the norm in human physiological systems, the relevance of which is informing an enhanced understanding of basic pathological processes such as inflammation, the host response to severe trauma, and critical illness. This article will explore how an understanding of nonlinear systems and complexity might inform the study of the pathophysiology of deaths of medicolegal interest, and how 'complexity thinking' might usefully be incorporated into modern forensic medicine and forensic pathology research, education and practice.

  16. Afterglow Complex Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Samarian, A. A.; Boufendi, L.; Mikikian, M.

    2008-09-07

    The review of the first detailed experimental and theoretical studies of complex plasma in RF discharge afterglow is presented. The studies have been done in a frame of FAST collaborative research project between Complex Plasma Laboratory of the University of Sydney and the GREMI laboratory of Universite d'Orleans. We examined the existing models of plasma decay, presents experimental observations of dust dynamics under different afterglow complex plasma conditions, presents the experimental data obtained (in particular the presence of positively charged particles in discharge afterglow), discusses the use of dust particles as a probe to study the diffusion losses in afterglow plasmas.

  17. Robustness and structure of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shuai

    This dissertation covers the two major parts of my PhD research on statistical physics and complex networks: i) modeling a new type of attack -- localized attack, and investigating robustness of complex networks under this type of attack; ii) discovering the clustering structure in complex networks and its influence on the robustness of coupled networks. Complex networks appear in every aspect of our daily life and are widely studied in Physics, Mathematics, Biology, and Computer Science. One important property of complex networks is their robustness under attacks, which depends crucially on the nature of attacks and the structure of the networks themselves. Previous studies have focused on two types of attack: random attack and targeted attack, which, however, are insufficient to describe many real-world damages. Here we propose a new type of attack -- localized attack, and study the robustness of complex networks under this type of attack, both analytically and via simulation. On the other hand, we also study the clustering structure in the network, and its influence on the robustness of a complex network system. In the first part, we propose a theoretical framework to study the robustness of complex networks under localized attack based on percolation theory and generating function method. We investigate the percolation properties, including the critical threshold of the phase transition pc and the size of the giant component Pinfinity. We compare localized attack with random attack and find that while random regular (RR) networks are more robust against localized attack, Erdoḧs-Renyi (ER) networks are equally robust under both types of attacks. As for scale-free (SF) networks, their robustness depends crucially on the degree exponent lambda. The simulation results show perfect agreement with theoretical predictions. We also test our model on two real-world networks: a peer-to-peer computer network and an airline network, and find that the real-world networks

  18. Range Imaging without Moving Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, J. Bryan; Scott, V. Stanley, III; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Range-imaging instruments of a type now under development are intended to generate the equivalent of three-dimensional images from measurements of the round-trip times of flight of laser pulses along known directions. These instruments could also provide information on characteristics of targets, including roughnesses and reflectivities of surfaces and optical densities of such semi-solid objects as trees and clouds. Unlike in prior range-imaging instruments based on times of flight along known directions, there would be no moving parts; aiming of the laser beams along the known directions would not be accomplished by mechanical scanning of mirrors, prisms, or other optical components. Instead, aiming would be accomplished by using solid-state devices to switch input and output beams along different fiber-optic paths. Because of the lack of moving parts, these instruments could be extraordinarily reliable, rugged, and long-lasting. An instrument of this type would include an optical transmitter that would send out a laser pulse along a chosen direction to a target. An optical receiver coaligned with the transmitter would measure the temporally varying intensity of laser light reflected from the target to determine the distance and surface characteristics of the target. The transmitter would be a combination of devices for generating precise directional laser illumination. It would include a pulsed laser, the output of which would be coupled into a fiber-optic cable with a fan-out and solid-state optical switches that would enable switching of the laser beam onto one or more optical fibers terminated at known locations in an array on a face at the focal plane of a telescope. The array would be imaged by the telescope onto the target space. The receiver optical system could share the aforementioned telescope with the transmitter or could include a separate telescope aimed in the same direction as that of the transmitting telescope. In either case, light reflected

  19. Does the real part contain all the physical information?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raziman, T. V.; Martin, O. J. F.

    2016-09-01

    Polarisation charge formed on nanostructure surfaces upon optical excitation provides a useful tool to understand the underlying physics of plasmonic systems. Plasmonic simulations in the frequency domain typically calculate the polarisation charge as a complex quantity. In this paper, we provide a pedagogical treatment of the complex nature of the polarisation charge and its relevance in plasmonics, and discuss how naively extracting the real part of the complex quantities to obtain physical information can lead to pitfalls. We analyse the charge distributions on various plasmonic systems and explain how to understand and visualise them clearly using techniques such as phase-correction and polarisation ellipse representation, to extract the underlying physical information.

  20. Teaching Literature in an Age of Text Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsup, Janet

    2013-01-01

    The recently released Common Core State Standards increase classroom emphasis on informational texts in high school and recommend a three-part measurement for text complexity when selecting texts for classroom use. In this commentary I argue that fictional narratives can not only meet these stated criteria for complex texts and result in critical…

  1. 9 CFR 381.82 - Diseases of the leukosis complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Diseases of the leukosis complex. 381.82 Section 381.82 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Carcasses and Parts § 381.82 Diseases of the leukosis complex. Carcasses of poultry affected with any one...

  2. 9 CFR 381.82 - Diseases of the leukosis complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Diseases of the leukosis complex. 381.82 Section 381.82 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Carcasses and Parts § 381.82 Diseases of the leukosis complex. Carcasses of poultry affected with any one...

  3. 9 CFR 381.82 - Diseases of the leukosis complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Diseases of the leukosis complex. 381.82 Section 381.82 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Carcasses and Parts § 381.82 Diseases of the leukosis complex. Carcasses of poultry affected with any one...

  4. 9 CFR 381.82 - Diseases of the leukosis complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Diseases of the leukosis complex. 381.82 Section 381.82 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Carcasses and Parts § 381.82 Diseases of the leukosis complex. Carcasses of poultry affected with any one...

  5. 9 CFR 381.82 - Diseases of the leukosis complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Diseases of the leukosis complex. 381.82 Section 381.82 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Carcasses and Parts § 381.82 Diseases of the leukosis complex. Carcasses of poultry affected with any one...

  6. Sibling Curves and Complex Roots 1: Looking Back

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Ansie; Engelbrecht, Johann

    2007-01-01

    This paper, the first of a two-part article, follows the trail in history of the development of a graphical representation of the complex roots of a function. Root calculation and root representation are traced through millennia, including the development of the notion of complex numbers and subsequent graphical representation thereof. The…

  7. Blueprints for Complex Learning: The 4C/ID-Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.; Clark, Richard E.; de Croock, Marcel B. M.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the four-component instructional design system (4C/ID-model) developed for the design of training programs for complex skills. Discusses the structure of training blueprints for complex learning and associated instructional methods, focusing on learning tasks, supportive information, just-in-time information, and part-task practice.…

  8. Complex coacervate core micelles.

    PubMed

    Voets, Ilja K; de Keizer, Arie; Cohen Stuart, Martien A

    2009-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of the literature on the co-assembly of neutral-ionic block, graft, and random copolymers with oppositely charged species in aqueous solution. Oppositely charged species include synthetic (co)polymers of various architectures, biopolymers - such as proteins, enzymes and DNA - multivalent ions, metallic nanoparticles, low molecular weight surfactants, polyelectrolyte block copolymer micelles, metallo-supramolecular polymers, equilibrium polymers, etcetera. The resultant structures are termed complex coacervate core/polyion complex/block ionomer complex/interpolyelectrolyte complex micelles (or vesicles); i.e., in short C3Ms (or C3Vs) and PIC, BIC or IPEC micelles (and vesicles). Formation, structure, dynamics, properties, and function will be discussed. We focus on experimental work; theory and modelling will not be discussed. Recent developments in applications and micelles with heterogeneous coronas are emphasized.

  9. A complex legacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Cristopher

    2011-11-01

    In his tragically short life, Alan Turing helped define what computing machines are capable of, and where they reach inherent limits. His legacy is still felt every day, in areas ranging from computational complexity theory to cryptography and quantum computing.

  10. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  11. Equivariant Complex Cobordism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abram, William C.

    We begin with a development of equivariant stable homotopy theory relevant to our work, including a new result on shift desuspension of suspension spectra. We then build on existing techniques of Kriz to compute the equivariant complex cobordism ring of a finite abelian group. Methods of isotropy separation via Tate diagrams are heavily employed, and the key computational tool is the Isotropy Separation Spectral Sequence that is here introduced. We also consider equivariant formal group laws. There is a G-equivariant formal group law corresponding to any complex oriented G-equivariant spectrum E. Since the equivariant complex cobordism spectrum has a canonical complex orientation, there is a corresponding equivariant formal group law. We compute the G-equivariant formal group law corresponding to this spectrum for G finite abelian. This computation is a step in the direction of Greenlees' Conjecture that this equivariant formal group law is algebraically universal.

  12. Complex Flow Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-05-01

    This report documents findings from a workshop on the impacts of complex wind flows in and out of wind turbine environments, the research needs, and the challenges of meteorological and engineering modeling at regional, wind plant, and wind turbine scales.

  13. Pigment-protein complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Siegelman, H W

    1980-01-01

    The photosynthetically-active pigment protein complexes of procaryotes and eucaryotes include chlorophyll proteins, carotenochlorophyll proteins, and biliproteins. They are either integral components or attached to photosynthetic membranes. Detergents are frequently required to solubilize the pigment-protein complexes. The membrane localization and detergent solubilization strongly suggest that the pigment-protein complexes are bound to the membranes by hydrophobic interactions. Hydrophobic interactions of proteins are characterized by an increase in entropy. Their bonding energy is directly related to temperature and ionic strength. Hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, a relatively new separation procedure, can furnish an important method for the purification of pigment-protein complexes. Phycobilisome purification and properties provide an example of the need to maintain hydrophobic interactions to preserve structure and function.

  14. Inside the complexity labyrinth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Gordon

    2010-02-01

    Although the world we live in is complex, complexity as a science does not have a long history. For generations, most physicists tried to understand everything in terms of interactions between pairs of idealized "test particles". Then, about a 100 years ago, Henri Poincaré pointed out that a fully interacting three-body system was not just the sum of its three component pairs. The famous "three-body problem" was born.

  15. Complex/Symplectic Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Wu-yen; Kachru, Shamit; Tomasiello, Alessandro; /Stanford U., ITP

    2005-10-28

    We construct a class of symplectic non-Kaehler and complex non-Kaehler string theory vacua, extending and providing evidence for an earlier suggestion by Polchinski and Strominger. The class admits a mirror pairing by construction. Comparing hints from a variety of sources, including ten-dimensional supergravity and KK reduction on SU(3)-structure manifolds, suggests a picture in which string theory extends Reid's fantasy to connect classes of both complex non-Kaehler and symplectic non-Kaehler manifolds.

  16. Boiler - tuning basics, part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Leopold, T.

    2009-03-15

    Tuning power plant controls takes nerves of steel and an intimate knowledge of plant systems gained only by experience. Tuning controls also requires equal parts art and science, which probably is why there are so few tuning experts in the power industry. In part 1 of a two-part series, the author explores a mix of the theoretical and practical aspects of tuning boiler control. 5 figs.

  17. Water Pollution: Part I, Municipal Wastewaters; Part II, Industrial Wastewaters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, K. E. M.

    This publication is an annotated bibliography of municipal and industrial wastewater literature. This publication consists of two parts plus appendices. Part one is entitled Municipal Wastewaters and includes publications in such areas as health effects of polluted waters, federal policy and legislation, biology and chemistry of polluted water,…

  18. The meteor complex of P/Encke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porubcan, V.; Stohl, J.

    The Taurid meteor complex associated with P/Encke is studied on the basis of relevant photographic and radar orbits. Orbital characteristics, radiants and durations of the postperihelion showers are compared with corresponding theoretical values derived from the observations of the preperihelion Taurids. The validity of the proposed associations of minor showers with the Taurid complex and the total duration of its activity are evaluated and discussed. Some of the associated showers (the Northern and Southern Chi Orionids, Northern Piscids and Southern Arietids) are confirmed to be in fact, parts of the Taurid shower itself.

  19. Controlling complex Langevin dynamics at finite density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarts, Gert; Bongiovanni, Lorenzo; Seiler, Erhard; Sexty, Dénes; Stamatescu, Ion-Olimpiu

    2013-07-01

    At nonzero chemical potential the numerical sign problem in lattice field theory limits the use of standard algorithms based on importance sampling. Complex Langevin dynamics provides a possible solution, but it has to be applied with care. In this review, we first summarise our current understanding of the approach, combining analytical and numerical insight. In the second part we study SL( C, ℂ) gauge cooling, which was introduced recently as a tool to control complex Langevin dynamics in nonabelian gauge theories. We present new results in Polyakov chain models and in QCD with heavy quarks and compare various adaptive cooling implementations.

  20. The Electronic Structure of Heavy Element Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bursten, Bruce E.

    2000-07-25

    The area of study is the bonding in heavy element complexes, and the application of more sophisticated electronic structure theories. Progress is recounted in several areas: (a) technological advances and current methodologies - Relativistic effects are extremely important in gaining an understanding of the electronic structure of compounds of the actinides, transactinides, and other heavy elements. Therefore, a major part of the continual benchmarking was the proper inclusion of the appropriate relativistic effects for the properties under study. (b) specific applications - These include organoactinide sandwich complexes, CO activation by actinide atoms, and theoretical studies of molecules of the transactinide elements. Finally, specific directions in proposed research are described.

  1. The role of Hsp90 in protein complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Makhnevych, Taras; Houry, Walid A

    2012-03-01

    Hsp90 is a ubiquitous and essential molecular chaperone that plays central roles in many signaling and other cellular pathways. The in vivo and in vitro activity of Hsp90 depends on its association with a wide variety of cochaperones and cofactors, which form large multi-protein complexes involved in folding client proteins. Based on our proteomic work mapping the molecular chaperone interaction networks in yeast, especially that of Hsp90, as well as, on experiments and results presented in the published literature, one major role of Hsp90 appears to be the promotion and maintenance of proper assembly of protein complexes. To highlight this role of Hsp90, the effect of the chaperone on the assembly of the following seven complexes is discussed in this review: snoRNP, RNA polymerase II, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK), telomere complex, kinetochore, RNA induced silencing complexes (RISC), and 26S proteasome. For some complexes, it is observed that Hsp90 mediates complex assembly by stabilizing an unstable protein subunit and facilitating its incorporation into the complex; for other complexes, Hsp90 promotes change in the composition of that complex. In all cases, Hsp90 does not appear to be part of the final assembled complex. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled:Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90). PMID:21945180

  2. An entropy based measure for comparing distributions of complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaram, R.; Castellani, B.

    2016-07-01

    This paper is part of a series addressing the empirical/statistical distribution of the diversity of complexity within and amongst complex systems. Here, we consider the problem of measuring the diversity of complexity in a system, given its ordered range of complexity types i and their probability of occurrence pi, with the understanding that larger values of i mean a higher degree of complexity. To address this problem, we introduce a new complexity measure called case-based entropyCc - a modification of the Shannon-Wiener entropy measure H. The utility of this measure is that, unlike current complexity measures-which focus on the macroscopic complexity of a single system-Cc can be used to empirically identify and measure the distribution of the diversity of complexity within and across multiple natural and human-made systems, as well as the diversity contribution of complexity of any part of a system, relative to the total range of ordered complexity types.

  3. Plane Transformations in a Complex Setting II: Isometries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dana-Picard, Thierry

    2007-01-01

    This paper is the second part of a study of plane transformations using a complex setting. The first part was devoted to homotheties and translations, now attention is turned towards plane isometries. The group theoretic properties of plane isometries are easy to derive and images of classical geometrical objects by these transformations are…

  4. Cancer and bone: a complex complex.

    PubMed

    van Driel, Marjolein; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M

    2014-11-01

    Primary and secondary bone cancers are rare events. However, once settled, a complex process is started involving an extensive amount of factors and interactions. The bone micro-environment is a preferential site for (metastatic) tumor cells to enter, stay, colonize and expand. The fact that the tumor cells affect the complete bone environment involving many cell types and regulatory pathways to stimulate their own growth and escape from therapy is devastating for the patient. Many efforts have been made to get more insight into the mechanisms underlying the communication between bone cells and cancer cells and progress is made in therapeutic interventions. This review will discuss the biological mechanisms of primary bone malignancies (osteosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, chondrosarcoma, multiple myeloma) and secondary bone malignancies (bone metastases) and therapeutic interventions.

  5. Cell complexes through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klette, Reinhard

    2000-10-01

    The history of cell complexes is closely related to the birth and development of topology in general. Johann Benedict Listing (1802 - 1882) introduced the term 'topology' into mathematics in a paper published in 1847, and he also defined cell complexes for the first time in a paper published in 1862. Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777 - 1855) is often cited as the one who initiated these ideas, but he did not publish either on topology or on cell complexes. The pioneering work of Leonhard Euler (1707 - 1783) on graphs is also often cited as the birth of topology, and Euler's work was cited by Listing in 1862 as a stimulus for his research on cell complexes. There are different branches in topology which have little in common: point set topology, algebraic topology, differential topology etc. Confusion may arise if just 'topology' is specified, without clarifying the used concept. Topological subjects in mathematics are often related to continuous models, and therefore quite irrelevant to computer based solutions in image analysis. Compared to this, only a minority of topology publications in mathematics addresses discrete spaces which are appropriate for computer-based image analysis. In these cases, often the notion of a cell complex plays a crucial role. This paper briefly reports on a few of these publications. This paper is not intended to cover the very lively progress in cell complex studies within the context of image analysis during the last two decades. Basically it stops its historic review at the time when this subject in image analysis research gained speed in 1980 - 1990. As a general point of view, the paper indicates that image analysis contributes to a fusion of topological concepts, the geometric and the abstract cell structure approach and point set topology, which may lead towards new problems for the study of topologies defined on geometric or abstract cell complexes.

  6. Detecting Earthquakes--Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isenberg, C.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Basic concepts associated with seismic wave propagation through the earth and the location of seismic events were explained in part 1 (appeared in January 1983 issue). This part focuses on the construction of a student seismometer for detecting earthquakes and underground nuclear explosions anywhere on the earth's surface. (Author/JN)

  7. Intercultural Communication Bibliography (Part 4).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitao, Kenji; Kitao, S. Kathleen

    The fourth part of a bibliography on intercultural communication is, like the first three parts, intended primarily for Japanese teachers of English as a second language but is also useful for anyone interested in intercultural communication. The bibliography contains 480 citations of books, journal articles, and other sources for information…

  8. "Leading Parts" and Organizational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, L. Dave

    This paper develops a conceptual framework for identifying organizational change and applies the framework to understanding organizational change. The main focus of the framework is the concept of "leading parts." Leading parts may be dominant or catalytic in their impact on systems; and understanding their operation requires analysis of the…

  9. The Moonwatch Programme, Part 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Greg

    2015-08-01

    This part deals with the satellite tracking done in Cape Town and covers the Kinetheodolite setup at the then Royal Observatory and manned by part time amateur observers. It also covers the activities of Roberts at his Kenilworth tracking site. The activities of Bill Hirst and his station at Bergvliet are also described.

  10. Staircase and Fractional Part Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amram, Meirav; Dagan, Miriam; Ioshpe, Michael; Satianov, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The staircase and fractional part functions are basic examples of real functions. They can be applied in several parts of mathematics, such as analysis, number theory, formulas for primes, and so on; in computer programming, the floor and ceiling functions are provided by a significant number of programming languages--they have some basic uses in…

  11. 43. TOP PART OF UMBILICAL MAST, NORTH AND WEST SIDES. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. TOP PART OF UMBILICAL MAST, NORTH AND WEST SIDES. AIR CONDITIONING DUCTING IS VISIBLE ON INTERIOR OF MAST. RAIL IS VISIBLE LEFT OF THE MAST. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  12. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 300 - Oil Spill Response

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... alienation, any member of an Indian tribe. Navigable waters as defined by 40 CFR 110.1 means the waters of... capable of expanding or contracting to accommodate the response effort required by the size or complexity... made immediately in accordance with 33 CFR part 153, subpart B. Notification will be made to the...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 300 - Oil Spill Response

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... alienation, any member of an Indian tribe. Navigable waters as defined by 40 CFR 110.1 means the waters of... capable of expanding or contracting to accommodate the response effort required by the size or complexity... made immediately in accordance with 33 CFR part 153, subpart B. Notification will be made to the...

  14. Part One--The Shift toward Online Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykman, Charlene A.; Davis, Charles K.

    2008-01-01

    This is the first in a series of three papers about online pedagogy and educational practice as part of the JISE "Online Education Forum." This paper deals with the question: "Why is the shift toward online education happening?" This is a complex issue that involves questions of educational access, paradigms for teaching and learning, competition…

  15. Student Satisfaction and Graduate Part-Time Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Monica Moody

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Academic Programs (AAP) of the Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences at Johns Hopkins University (JHU) enrolls approximately 2,700 part-time graduate students across three physical locations. It is a complex organization whose target audience is a sophisticated consumer of higher education. With the support of Eduventures, AAP…

  16. 6. SITE OVERVIEW. PART 1 OF 6 PART PANORAMA WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. SITE OVERVIEW. PART 1 OF 6 PART PANORAMA WITH NOS. CA-265-7 TO CA-265-11. ARROYO SECO PARKWAY AS SEEN FROM RADIO TOWER HILL (APPROXIMATELY 34° 5' BY 118° 12'30" ON USGS LOS ANGELES QUADRANGLE). PART 1 SHOWS GRAND VIEW POINT AT RIGHT REAR (LOCATION OF CAMERA POSITION FOR PHOTOGRAPHS NOS. 265-1 TO CA-265-5) AND FIGUEROA VIADUCT OVERCROSSING; DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES IS AT LEFT REAR. LOOKING 234° SW. - Arroyo Seco Parkway, Los Angeles to Pasadena, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. Sequencing Complex Genomic Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, Evan

    2009-05-28

    Evan Eichler, Howard Hughes Medical Investigator at the University of Washington, gives the May 28, 2009 keynote speech at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM. Part 2 of 2

  18. Sequencing Complex Genomic Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, Evan

    2009-05-28

    Evan Eichler, Howard Hughes Medical Investigator at the University of Washington, gives the May 28, 2009 keynote speech at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM. Part 1 of 2

  19. The MAJORANA Parts Tracking Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y.-D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Combs, D. C.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yu.; Egorov, V.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Esterline, J.; Fast, J. E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, F. M.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J. Diaz; Leviner, L. E.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, L.; Nomachi, M.; Orrell, J. L.; O`Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Petersburg, R.; Phillips, D. G.; Poon, A. W. P.; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, K. J.; Snyder, N.; Soin, A.; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D.; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A. R.; Yu, C.-H.; Yumatov, V.; Zhitnikov, I.

    2015-04-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is an ultra-low background physics experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge. The MAJORANA Parts Tracking Database is used to record the history of components used in the construction of the DEMONSTRATOR. The tracking implementation takes a novel approach based on the schema-free database technology CouchDB. Transportation, storage, and processes undergone by parts such as machining or cleaning are linked to part records. Tracking parts provide a great logistics benefit and an important quality assurance reference during construction. In addition, the location history of parts provides an estimate of their exposure to cosmic radiation. A web application for data entry and a radiation exposure calculator have been developed as tools for achieving the extreme radio-purity required for this rare decay search.

  20. The Majorana Parts Tracking Database

    SciTech Connect

    Abgrall, N.

    2015-01-16

    The Majorana Demonstrator is an ultra-low background physics experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge. The Majorana Parts Tracking Database is used to record the history of components used in the construction of the Demonstrator. The tracking implementation takes a novel approach based on the schema-free database technology CouchDB. Transportation, storage, and processes undergone by parts such as machining or cleaning are linked to part records. Tracking parts provides a great logistics benefit and an important quality assurance reference during construction. In addition, the location history of parts provides an estimate of their exposure to cosmic radiation. In summary, a web application for data entry and a radiation exposure calculator have been developed as tools for achieving the extreme radio-purity required for this rare decay search.

  1. The Majorana Parts Tracking Database

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abgrall, N.

    2015-01-16

    The Majorana Demonstrator is an ultra-low background physics experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge. The Majorana Parts Tracking Database is used to record the history of components used in the construction of the Demonstrator. The tracking implementation takes a novel approach based on the schema-free database technology CouchDB. Transportation, storage, and processes undergone by parts such as machining or cleaning are linked to part records. Tracking parts provides a great logistics benefit and an important quality assurance reference during construction. In addition, the location history of parts provides an estimate of their exposure to cosmic radiation.more » In summary, a web application for data entry and a radiation exposure calculator have been developed as tools for achieving the extreme radio-purity required for this rare decay search.« less

  2. The Majorana Parts Tracking Database

    SciTech Connect

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y-D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Combs, D. C.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yu.; Egorov, V.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Esterline, J.; Fast, J. E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, F. M.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J. Diaz; Leviner, L. E.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, L.; Nomachi, M.; Orrell, J. L.; O׳Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Petersburg, R.; Phillips, D. G.; Poon, A. W. P.; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, K. J.; Snyder, N.; Soin, A.; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D.; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A. R.; Yu, C. -H.; Yumatov, V.; Zhitnikov, I.

    2015-04-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is an ultra-low background physics experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge. The MAJORANA Parts Tracking Database is used to record the history of components used in the construction of the DEMONSTRATOR. Transportation, storage, and processes undergone by parts such as machining or cleaning are linked to part records. Tracking parts provides a great logistics benefit and an important quality assurance reference during construction. In addition, the location history of parts provides an estimate of their exposure to cosmic radiation. A web application for data entry and a radiation exposure calculator have been developed as tools for achieving the extreme radiopurity required for this rare decay search.

  3. GSFC Preferred Parts List PPL-15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adolphsen, J. W. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    A listing is presented of preferred electronic parts, part upgrading procedures, part derating guidelines, and part screening procedures to be used in the selection, procurement, and application of parts for Goddard Space Flight Center space systems and ground support equipment.

  4. GSFC preferred parts lists PPL-17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldini, B. P. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    A listing of preferred parts, part upgrading procedures, part derating guidelines, and part screening procedures to be used in the selection, procurement, and application of parts for Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) space systems and ground support equipment is contained.

  5. Quantum Complexity in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, G.

    Carbon has a unique position among elements in the periodic table. It produces an allotrope, graphene, a mechanically robust two dimensional semimetal. The multifarious properties that graphene exhibits has few parallels among elemental metals. From simplicity, namely carbon atoms connected by pure sp2 bonds, a wealth of novel quantum properties emerge. In classical complex systems such as a spin glass or a finance market, several competing agents or elements are responsible for unanticipated and difficult to predict emergent properties. The complex (sic) structure of quantum mechanics is responsbile for an unanticipated set of emergent properties in graphene. We call this quantum complexity. In fact, most quantum systems, phenomena and modern quantum field theory could be viewed as examples of quantum complexity. After giving a brief introduction to the quantum complexity we focus on our own work, which indicates the breadth in the type of quantum phenomena that graphene could support. We review our theoretical suggestions of, (i) spin-1 collective mode in netural graphene, (ii) relativistic type of phenomena in crossed electric and magnetic fields, (iii) room temperature superconductivity in doped graphene and (iv) composite Fermi sea in neutral graphene in uniform magnetic field and (v) two-channel Kondo effect. Except for the relativistic type of phenomena, the rest depend in a fundamental way on a weak electron correlation that exists in the broad two-dimensional band of graphene.

  6. Complexes and imagination.

    PubMed

    Kast, Verena

    2014-11-01

    Fantasies as imaginative activities are seen by Jung as expressions of psychic energy. In the various descriptions of active imagination the observation of the inner image and the dialogue with inner figures, if possible, are important. The model of symbol formation, as Jung describes it, can be experienced in doing active imagination. There is a correspondence between Jung's understanding of complexes and our imaginations: complexes develop a fantasy life. Complex episodes are narratives of difficult dysfunctional relationship episodes that have occurred repeatedly and are internalized with episodic memory. This means that the whole complex episode (the image for the child and the image for the aggressor, connected with emotions) is internalized and can get constellated in everyday relationship. Therefore inner dialogues do not necessarily qualify as active imaginations, often they are the expression of complex-episodes, very similar to fruitless soliloquies. If imaginations of this kind are repeated, new symbols and new possibilities of behaviour are not found. On the contrary, old patterns of behaviour and fantasies are perpetuated and become cemented. Imaginations of this kind need an intervention by the analyst. In clinical examples different kinds of imaginations are discussed. PMID:25331506

  7. Complexes and imagination.

    PubMed

    Kast, Verena

    2014-11-01

    Fantasies as imaginative activities are seen by Jung as expressions of psychic energy. In the various descriptions of active imagination the observation of the inner image and the dialogue with inner figures, if possible, are important. The model of symbol formation, as Jung describes it, can be experienced in doing active imagination. There is a correspondence between Jung's understanding of complexes and our imaginations: complexes develop a fantasy life. Complex episodes are narratives of difficult dysfunctional relationship episodes that have occurred repeatedly and are internalized with episodic memory. This means that the whole complex episode (the image for the child and the image for the aggressor, connected with emotions) is internalized and can get constellated in everyday relationship. Therefore inner dialogues do not necessarily qualify as active imaginations, often they are the expression of complex-episodes, very similar to fruitless soliloquies. If imaginations of this kind are repeated, new symbols and new possibilities of behaviour are not found. On the contrary, old patterns of behaviour and fantasies are perpetuated and become cemented. Imaginations of this kind need an intervention by the analyst. In clinical examples different kinds of imaginations are discussed.

  8. Hydridomethyl iridium complex

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Robert G.; Buchanan, J. Michael; Stryker, Jeffrey M.; Wax, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    A process for functionalizing methane comprising: (a) reacting methane with a hydridoalkyl metal complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]H(R.sub.2) wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical having from 1 to 5 carbon atoms; Ir represents an iridium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.1 represents an alkyl group; R.sub.2 represents an alkyl group having at least two carbon atoms; and H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of a liquid alkane R.sub.3 H having at least three carbon atoms to form a hydridomethyl complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]HMe where Me represents a methyl radical. (b) reacting said hydridomethyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X"X'"X"" or CHX'X"X'"; wherein X', X", X"', and X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine and chlorine, to halomethyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]MeX: (c) reacting said halomethyl complex with a mercuric halide of the formula HgX.sub.2 to form a methyl mercuric halide of the formula HgMeX; and (d) reacting said methyl mercuric halide with a molecular halogen of the formula X.sub.2 to form methyl halide.

  9. Resource Letter CS-1: Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, M. E. J.

    2011-08-01

    A complex system is a system composed of many interacting parts, often called agents, which displays collective behavior that does not follow trivially from the behaviors of the individual parts. Examples include condensed-matter systems, ecosystems, stock markets and economies, biological evolution, and indeed the whole of human society. Substantial progress has been made in the quantitative understanding of complex systems, particularly since the 1980s, using a combination of basic theory, much of it derived from physics, and computer simulation. The subject is a broad one, drawing on techniques and ideas from a wide range of areas. Here, I give a selection of introductory resources, ranging from classic papers to recent books and reviews.

  10. Lactobacillus species: taxonomic complexity and controversial susceptibilities.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Citron, Diane M

    2015-05-15

    The genus Lactobacillus is a taxonomically complex and is composed of over 170 species that cannot be easily differentiated phenotypically and often require molecular identification. Although they are part of the normal human gastrointestinal and vaginal flora, they can also be occasional human pathogens. They are extensively used in a variety of commercial products including probiotics. Their antimicrobial susceptibilities are poorly defined in part because of their taxonomic complexity and are compounded by the different methods recommended by Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute and International Dairy Foundation. Their use as probiotics for prevention of Clostridium difficile infection is prevalent among consumers worldwide but raises the question of will the use of any concurrent antibiotic effect their ability to survive. Lactobacillus species are generally acid resistant and are able to survive ingestion. They are generally resistant to metronidazole, aminoglycosides and ciprofloxacin with L. acidophilus being susceptible to penicillin and vancomycin, whereas L. rhamnosus and L. casei are resistant to metronidazole and vancomycin.

  11. Lactobacillus species: taxonomic complexity and controversial susceptibilities.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Citron, Diane M

    2015-05-15

    The genus Lactobacillus is a taxonomically complex and is composed of over 170 species that cannot be easily differentiated phenotypically and often require molecular identification. Although they are part of the normal human gastrointestinal and vaginal flora, they can also be occasional human pathogens. They are extensively used in a variety of commercial products including probiotics. Their antimicrobial susceptibilities are poorly defined in part because of their taxonomic complexity and are compounded by the different methods recommended by Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute and International Dairy Foundation. Their use as probiotics for prevention of Clostridium difficile infection is prevalent among consumers worldwide but raises the question of will the use of any concurrent antibiotic effect their ability to survive. Lactobacillus species are generally acid resistant and are able to survive ingestion. They are generally resistant to metronidazole, aminoglycosides and ciprofloxacin with L. acidophilus being susceptible to penicillin and vancomycin, whereas L. rhamnosus and L. casei are resistant to metronidazole and vancomycin. PMID:25922408

  12. Structure of bacterial respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Berrisford, John M; Baradaran, Rozbeh; Sazanov, Leonid A

    2016-07-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) plays a central role in cellular energy production, coupling electron transfer between NADH and quinone to proton translocation. It is the largest protein assembly of respiratory chains and one of the most elaborate redox membrane proteins known. Bacterial enzyme is about half the size of mitochondrial and thus provides its important "minimal" model. Dysfunction of mitochondrial complex I is implicated in many human neurodegenerative diseases. The L-shaped complex consists of a hydrophilic arm, where electron transfer occurs, and a membrane arm, where proton translocation takes place. We have solved the crystal structures of the hydrophilic domain of complex I from Thermus thermophilus, the membrane domain from Escherichia coli and recently of the intact, entire complex I from T. thermophilus (536 kDa, 16 subunits, 9 iron-sulphur clusters, 64 transmembrane helices). The 95Å long electron transfer pathway through the enzyme proceeds from the primary electron acceptor flavin mononucleotide through seven conserved Fe-S clusters to the unusual elongated quinone-binding site at the interface with the membrane domain. Four putative proton translocation channels are found in the membrane domain, all linked by the central flexible axis containing charged residues. The redox energy of electron transfer is coupled to proton translocation by the as yet undefined mechanism proposed to involve long-range conformational changes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  13. Alanine water complexes.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, Vanesa; Sanz, M Eugenia; Peña, Isabel; Mata, Santiago; Cabezas, Carlos; López, Juan C; Alonso, José L

    2014-04-10

    Two complexes of alanine with water, alanine-(H2O)n (n = 1,2), have been generated by laser ablation of the amino acid in a supersonic jet containing water vapor and characterized using Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. In the observed complexes, water molecules bind to the carboxylic group of alanine acting as both proton donors and acceptors. In alanine-H2O, the water molecule establishes two intermolecular hydrogen bonds forming a six-membered cycle, while in alanine-(H2O)2 the two water molecules establish three hydrogen bonds forming an eight-membered ring. In both complexes, the amino acid moiety is in its neutral form and shows the conformation observed to be the most stable for the bare molecule. The microsolvation study of alanine-(H2O)n (n = 1,2) can be taken as a first step toward understanding bulk properties at a microscopic level.

  14. Synchronization in complex networks

    SciTech Connect

    Arenas, A.; Diaz-Guilera, A.; Moreno, Y.; Zhou, C.; Kurths, J.

    2007-12-12

    Synchronization processes in populations of locally interacting elements are in the focus of intense research in physical, biological, chemical, technological and social systems. The many efforts devoted to understand synchronization phenomena in natural systems take now advantage of the recent theory of complex networks. In this review, we report the advances in the comprehension of synchronization phenomena when oscillating elements are constrained to interact in a complex network topology. We also overview the new emergent features coming out from the interplay between the structure and the function of the underlying pattern of connections. Extensive numerical work as well as analytical approaches to the problem are presented. Finally, we review several applications of synchronization in complex networks to different disciplines: biological systems and neuroscience, engineering and computer science, and economy and social sciences.

  15. Nonergodic complexity management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccinini, Nicola; Lambert, David; West, Bruce J.; Bologna, Mauro; Grigolini, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    Linear response theory, the backbone of nonequilibrium statistical physics, has recently been extended to explain how and why nonergodic renewal processes are insensitive to simple perturbations, such as in habituation. It was established that a permanent correlation results between an external stimulus and the response of a complex system generating nonergodic renewal processes, when the stimulus is a similar nonergodic process. This is the principle of complexity management, whose proof relies on ensemble distribution functions. Herein we extend the proof to the nonergodic case using time averages and a single time series, hence making it usable in real life situations where ensemble averages cannot be performed because of the very nature of the complex systems being studied.

  16. Engineering complex tissues.

    PubMed

    Atala, Anthony; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G

    2012-11-14

    Tissue engineering has emerged at the intersection of numerous disciplines to meet a global clinical need for technologies to promote the regeneration of functional living tissues and organs. The complexity of many tissues and organs, coupled with confounding factors that may be associated with the injury or disease underlying the need for repair, is a challenge to traditional engineering approaches. Biomaterials, cells, and other factors are needed to design these constructs, but not all tissues are created equal. Flat tissues (skin); tubular structures (urethra); hollow, nontubular, viscus organs (vagina); and complex solid organs (liver) all present unique challenges in tissue engineering. This review highlights advances in tissue engineering technologies to enable regeneration of complex tissues and organs and to discuss how such innovative, engineered tissues can affect the clinic.

  17. Controllability of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang-Yu; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Barabási, Albert-László

    2011-05-12

    The ultimate proof of our understanding of natural or technological systems is reflected in our ability to control them. Although control theory offers mathematical tools for steering engineered and natural systems towards a desired state, a framework to control complex self-organized systems is lacking. Here we develop analytical tools to study the controllability of an arbitrary complex directed network, identifying the set of driver nodes with time-dependent control that can guide the system's entire dynamics. We apply these tools to several real networks, finding that the number of driver nodes is determined mainly by the network's degree distribution. We show that sparse inhomogeneous networks, which emerge in many real complex systems, are the most difficult to control, but that dense and homogeneous networks can be controlled using a few driver nodes. Counterintuitively, we find that in both model and real systems the driver nodes tend to avoid the high-degree nodes.

  18. Dissociation as complex adaptation.

    PubMed

    Sel, R

    1997-03-01

    In this article the general theory of complex adaptive systems, substantiated by non-linear dynamics, will be used to put the dissociative disorders into a theoretical framework and clarify their genesis and presentation. When a system is far out of equilibrium, dissipative structures may be formed ('order out of chaos', as Prigogine (1) has put it). These structures provide the starting point for further evolution and co-evolution of competing groups of functional schemata divided on a bifurcation surface. Complex adaptation is almost inevitable in a complicated system (such as the brain) driven by non-linear dynamics. Dissociation is thus regarded as a consequence of adaptation to a chaotic environment rich in contrasts. In a sufficiently complex environment a person with dissociative identity disorder is more adapted and thus more likely to occur than a 'normal' monopersonality individual.

  19. Endogenous ion channel complexes: the NMDA receptor.

    PubMed

    Frank, René A W

    2011-06-01

    Ionotropic receptors, including the NMDAR (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor) mediate fast neurotransmission, neurodevelopment, neuronal excitability and learning. In the present article, the structure and function of the NMDAR is reviewed with the aim to condense our current understanding and highlight frontiers where important questions regarding the biology of this receptor remain unanswered. In the second part of the present review, new biochemical and genetic approaches for the investigation of ion channel receptor complexes will be discussed.

  20. Complexation of polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pool, Joanna G.

    Complexation found in nature was the inspiration and motivation to study three model systems to gain understanding into the underlying parameters that govern these events. Static and dynamic light scattering was predominately used to understand the complexation in three model systems: complexation of antimicrobial polymers with biomimetic vesicles, the complexation of protein to a semi-flexible polyelectrolyte and with a flexible polyelectrolyte. Characterization of antimicrobial polymers in solution and their interactions with biomimetic vesicles were investigated in order to understand how antimicrobial polymers interacted with and killed bacteria. These studies observed that an aggregation of the vesicles correlated with antimicrobial activity. For these synthetic polymer systems, aggregation appeared to be a necessary component for antimicrobial activity,but was not indicative of activity. Inspired by complexation found in nature between DNA and RNA and proteins model polyelectrolyte-protein systems were also investigated. The focus of this section was to understand how polymer flexibility, concentration, protein concentration, and ionic strength affected the phase behavior and presence of soluble aggregates in solution. Construction of phase diagrams for both semi-flexible and flexible polyelectrolye systems dsDNA and hyaluronic acid showed different phase diagrams,yet amazingly both systems showed a spontaneous selection of size of ˜230nm away from any phase boundary and was irrespective of salt concentration, polymer concentration, persistence length or protein concentration. It was possible to gain insight into the internal packing of these two polyelectrolyte-protein complexes through static light scattering and fractal dimension analysis. Comparisons of the fractal dimension analysis of the DNA-lysozyme and HA-lysozyme was not affected by salt concentration and from analysis of the fractal dimension it was observed DNA-lysozyme aggregates, had a denser

  1. The algorithm and program complex for splitting on a parts the records of acoustic waves recorded during the work of plasma actuator flush-mounted in the model plane nozzle with the purpose of analyzing their robust spectral and correlation characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernousov, A. D.; Malakhov, D. V.; Skvortsova, N. N.

    2014-03-01

    Currently acute problem of developing new technologies by reducing the noise of aircraft engines, including the directional impact on the noise on the basis of the interaction of plasma disturbances and sound generation pulsations. One of the devices built on this principle being developed in GPI RAS. They are plasma actuators (group of related to each other gaps, built on the perimeter of the nozzle) of various shapes and forms. In this paper an algorithm was developed which allows to separate impulses from the received experimental data, acquired during the work of plasma actuator flush-mounted in the model plane nozzle. The algorithm can be adjusted manually under a variety of situations (work of actuator in a nozzle with or without airflow, adjustment to different frequencies and pulse duration of the actuator). And program complex is developed on the basis of MatLab software, designed for building sustainable robust spectral and autocovariation functions of acoustic signals recorded during the experiments with the model of a nozzle with working actuator.

  2. Cytoplasmic Viral Replication Complexes

    PubMed Central

    den Boon, Johan A.; Diaz, Arturo; Ahlquist, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Many viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm compartmentalize their genome replication and transcription in organelle-like structures that enhance replication efficiency and protection from host defenses. In particular, recent studies with diverse positive-strand RNA viruses have further elucidated the ultrastructure of membrane-bounded RNA replication complexes and their close coordination with virion assembly and budding. The structure, function and assembly of some positive-strand RNA virus replication complexes have parallels and potential evolutionary links with the replicative cores of double-strand RNA virus and retrovirus virions, and more general similarities with the replication factories of cytoplasmic DNA viruses. PMID:20638644

  3. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Corneillie, Todd M.; Xu, Jide

    2012-05-08

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  4. Complexity and Fly Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, Grant; Murray, Joelle

    Complexity is the study of phenomena that emerge from a collection of interacting objects and arises in many systems throughout physics, biology, finance, economics and more. Certain kinds of complex systems can be described by self-organized criticality (SOC). An SOC system is one that is internally driven towards some critical state. Recent experimental work suggests scaling behavior of fly swarms-one of the hallmarks of an SOC system. Our goal is to look for SOC behavior in computational models of fly swarms.

  5. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N; Corneillie, Todd M; Xu, Jide

    2014-05-20

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  6. Planning Complex Projects Automatically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henke, Andrea L.; Stottler, Richard H.; Maher, Timothy P.

    1995-01-01

    Automated Manifest Planner (AMP) computer program applies combination of artificial-intelligence techniques to assist both expert and novice planners, reducing planning time by orders of magnitude. Gives planners flexibility to modify plans and constraints easily, without need for programming expertise. Developed specifically for planning space shuttle missions 5 to 10 years ahead, with modifications, applicable in general to planning other complex projects requiring scheduling of activities depending on other activities and/or timely allocation of resources. Adaptable to variety of complex scheduling problems in manufacturing, transportation, business, architecture, and construction.

  7. Current topics on inhibitors of respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Murai, Masatoshi; Miyoshi, Hideto

    2016-07-01

    There are a variety of chemicals which regulate the functions of bacterial and mitochondrial complex I. Some of them, such as rotenone and piericidin A, have been indispensable molecular tools in mechanistic studies on complex I. A large amount of experimental data characterizing the actions of complex I inhibitors has been accumulated so far. Recent X-ray crystallographic structural models of entire complex I may be helpful to carefully interpret this data. We herein focused on recent hot topics on complex I inhibitors and the subjects closely connected to these inhibitors, which may provide useful information not only on the structural and functional aspects of complex I, but also on drug design targeting this enzyme. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  8. The Exocyst Complex in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Urdiroz, Magdalena; Deeks, Michael J.; Horton, Connor G.; Dawe, Helen R.; Jourdain, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Exocytosis involves the fusion of intracellular secretory vesicles with the plasma membrane, thereby delivering integral membrane proteins to the cell surface and releasing material into the extracellular space. Importantly, exocytosis also provides a source of lipid moieties for membrane extension. The tethering of the secretory vesicle before docking and fusion with the plasma membrane is mediated by the exocyst complex, an evolutionary conserved octameric complex of proteins. Recent findings indicate that the exocyst complex also takes part in other intra-cellular processes besides secretion. These various functions seem to converge toward defining a direction of membrane growth in a range of systems from fungi to plants and from neurons to cilia. In this review we summarize the current knowledge of exocyst function in cell polarity, signaling and cell-cell communication and discuss implications for plant and animal health and disease. PMID:27148529

  9. Groundwater cleanup demonstrations at Complex 34, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At Launch Complex 34, representatives from environmental and Federal agencies head for the block house during presentations about the environmental research project that involves the Department of Defense, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy and NASA in a groundwater cleanup effort. Concentrations of trichloroethylene solvent have been identified in the soil at the complex as a result of cleaning methods for rocket parts during the Apollo Program, which used the complex, in the 60s. The group formed the Interagency NDAPL Consortium (IDC) to study three contamination cleanup technologies: Six Phase Soil Heating, Steam Injection and In Situ Oxidation with Potassium Permanganate. All three methods may offer a way to remove the contaminants in months instead of decades. KSC hosted a two-day conference that presented information and demonstrations of the three technologies being tested at the site.

  10. Groundwater cleanup demonstrations at Complex 34, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At Launch Complex 34, Greg Beyke, with Current Environmental Solutions, talks to representatives from environmental and federal agencies about the environmental research project that involves the Department of Defense, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy and NASA in a groundwater cleanup effort. Concentrations of trichloroethylene solvent have been identified in the soil at the complex as a result of cleaning methods for rocket parts during the Apollo Program, which used the complex, in the 60s. The group formed the Interagency NDAPL Consortium (IDC) to study three contamination cleanup technologies: Six Phase Soil Heating, Steam Injection and In Situ Oxidation with Potassium Permanganate. All three methods may offer a way to remove the contaminants in months instead of decades. KSC hosted a two-day conference that presented information and demonstrations of the three technologies being tested at the site.

  11. Chemical and pharmacological profiles of Echinacea complex.

    PubMed

    Capek, Peter; Šutovská, Martina; Kocmálová, Michaela; Fraňová, Soňa; Pawlaczyk, Izabela; Gancarz, Roman

    2015-08-01

    Echinacea purpurea has a long history in traditional medicine. To verify the pharmacological efficacy of active principles, a polysaccharide-phenolic-protein complex has been isolated from flowering parts of herb by alkaline extraction. It showed on GPC and HPLC one peak of molecular mass around 10 kDa. Chemical and spectroscopic analyses revealed carbohydrate, phenolic and protein contents in Echinacea complex. Pharmacological tests have shown its marked cough suppressing and bronchodilatory effects. The antitussive effect of Echinacea was similar to the narcotic drug codeine and the bronchodilatory effect was more significant than salbutamol, the antiasthmatic drug used in a clinical practice. Pharmacodynamic study shows the beneficial effects of Echinacea complex on the respiratory system and highlights the great potential for development of antitussive and bronchodilatory drugs from natural sources.

  12. Intelligent freeform manufacturing of complex organs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong

    2012-11-01

    Different from the existing tissue engineering strategies, rapid prototyping (RP) techniques aim to automatically produce complex organs directly from computer-aided design freeform models with high resolution and sophistication. Analogous to building a nuclear power plant, cell biology (especially, renewable stem cells), implantable biomaterials, tissue engineering, and single/double/four nozzle RP techniques currently enable researchers in the field to realize a part of the task of complex organ manufacturing. To achieve this multifaceted undertaking, a multi-nozzle rapid prototyping system which can simultaneously integrate an anti-suture vascular system, multiple cell types, and a cocktail of growth factors in a construct should be developed. This article reviews the pros and cons of the existing cell-laden RP techniques for complex organ manufacturing. It is hoped that with the comprehensive multidisciplinary efforts, the implants can virtually replace the functions of a solid internal organ, such as the liver, heart, and kidney.

  13. Six Questions on Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, John F.; Sanayei, Ali

    2011-09-01

    This paper includes an interview with John F. Symons regarding some important questions in "complex systems" and "complexity". In addition, he has stated some important open problems concerning complex systems in his research area from a philosophical point of view.

  14. Salen complexes with dianionic counterions

    DOEpatents

    Job, Gabriel E.; Farmer, Jay J.; Cherian, Anna E.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention describes metal salen complexes having dianionic counterions. Such complexes can be readily precipitated and provide an economical method for the purification and isolation of the complexes, and are useful to prepare novel polymer compositions.

  15. Synchrotron X-ray CT characterization of titanium parts fabricated by additive manufacturing. Part I. Morphology.

    PubMed

    Scarlett, Nicola Vivienne Yorke; Tyson, Peter; Fraser, Darren; Mayo, Sheridan; Maksimenko, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Synchrotron X-ray tomography has been applied to the study of titanium parts fabricated by additive manufacturing (AM). The AM method employed here was the Arcam EBM(®) (electron beam melting) process which uses powdered titanium alloy, Ti64 (Ti alloy with approximately 6%Al and 4%V), as the feed and an electron beam for the sintering/welding. The experiment was conducted on the Imaging and Medical Beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. Samples were chosen to examine the effect of build direction and complexity of design on the surface morphology and final dimensions of the piece.

  16. Synchrotron X-ray CT characterization of titanium parts fabricated by additive manufacturing. Part I. Morphology.

    PubMed

    Scarlett, Nicola Vivienne Yorke; Tyson, Peter; Fraser, Darren; Mayo, Sheridan; Maksimenko, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Synchrotron X-ray tomography has been applied to the study of titanium parts fabricated by additive manufacturing (AM). The AM method employed here was the Arcam EBM(®) (electron beam melting) process which uses powdered titanium alloy, Ti64 (Ti alloy with approximately 6%Al and 4%V), as the feed and an electron beam for the sintering/welding. The experiment was conducted on the Imaging and Medical Beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. Samples were chosen to examine the effect of build direction and complexity of design on the surface morphology and final dimensions of the piece. PMID:27359150

  17. STS-96 Mission Highlights. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In this second part of a three-part video mission-highlights set, on-orbit spacecrew activities performed on the STS-96 Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery and the International Space Station are reviewed. The flight crew consists of Kent V. Rominger, Commander; Rick D. Husband, Pilot; and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette (Canadian), and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev (Russian). The primary goals of this mission were to work on logistics and resupply the International Space Station. This second part in the mission series features video from Flight Day 4-7 (FD 4-7). FD 4 of STS-96 presents astronauts Tammy Jernigan and Dan Barry completing the second longest space walk in shuttle history. Footage includes Jernigan and Barry transferring and installing two cranes from the shuttle's payload bay to locations on the outside of the station. The astronauts enter the International Space Station delivering supplies and prepare the outpost to receive its first resident crew, scheduled to arrive in early 2000 on FD 5. The video also captures the crew involved in logistics transfer activities within the Discovery/ISS orbiting complex. FD 6 includes footage of Valery Tokarev and Canadian astronaut Julie Payette charging out the final six battery recharge controller units for two of Zarya's power-producing batteries and all crew members' involvement in logistics transfer activities from the SPACEHAB module to designated locations in the International Space Station. With the transfer work of FD 6 all but complete, the astronauts conduct some additional work, installing parts of a wireless strain gauge system that will help engineers track the effects of adding modules to the station throughout its assembly. Moving the few remaining items from Discovery to the ISS, then closing a series of hatches within the station's modules leading back to the shuttle are the primary activities contained in FD 7. Final coverage features Discovery

  18. Optical Complex Systems 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Guillaume

    The Optical Complex Systems are more and more in the heart of various systems that industrial applications bring to everyday life. From environment up to spatial applications, OCS is also relevant in monitoring, transportation, robotics, life sciences, sub-marine, and even for agricultural purposes.

  19. The Complexity of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Steve; Ting, Hermia

    2014-01-01

    The profession of teaching is unique because of the extent to which a teacher becomes involved in the lives of their "clients". The level of care required to support students well can be intense, confusing, and overwhelming. Relationships co-evolve within an ever-changing process and care is considered an essential aspect of complex relationships…

  20. Coordination Complexes of Cobalt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Gregory M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Described is an experiment involving the synthesis and spectral studies of cobalt complexes that not only give general chemistry students an introduction to inorganic synthesis but allows them to conduct a systematic study on the effect of different ligands on absorption spectra. Background information, procedures, and experimental results are…

  1. Managing Complex Dynamical Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, John C.; Webster, Robert L.; Curry, Jeanie A.; Hammond, Kevin L.

    2011-01-01

    Management commonly engages in a variety of research designed to provide insight into the motivation and relationships of individuals, departments, organizations, etc. This paper demonstrates how the application of concepts associated with the analysis of complex systems applied to such data sets can yield enhanced insights for managerial action.

  2. Complex Event Recognition Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, William A.; Firby, R. James

    2009-01-01

    Complex Event Recognition Architecture (CERA) is the name of a computational architecture, and software that implements the architecture, for recognizing complex event patterns that may be spread across multiple streams of input data. One of the main components of CERA is an intuitive event pattern language that simplifies what would otherwise be the complex, difficult tasks of creating logical descriptions of combinations of temporal events and defining rules for combining information from different sources over time. In this language, recognition patterns are defined in simple, declarative statements that combine point events from given input streams with those from other streams, using conjunction, disjunction, and negation. Patterns can be built on one another recursively to describe very rich, temporally extended combinations of events. Thereafter, a run-time matching algorithm in CERA efficiently matches these patterns against input data and signals when patterns are recognized. CERA can be used to monitor complex systems and to signal operators or initiate corrective actions when anomalous conditions are recognized. CERA can be run as a stand-alone monitoring system, or it can be integrated into a larger system to automatically trigger responses to changing environments or problematic situations.

  3. Unifying Complexity and Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Da-Guan

    2013-04-01

    Complex systems, arising in many contexts in the computer, life, social, and physical sciences, have not shared a generally-accepted complexity measure playing a fundamental role as the Shannon entropy H in statistical mechanics. Superficially-conflicting criteria of complexity measurement, i.e. complexity-randomness (C-R) relations, have given rise to a special measure intrinsically adaptable to more than one criterion. However, deep causes of the conflict and the adaptability are not much clear. Here I trace the root of each representative or adaptable measure to its particular universal data-generating or -regenerating model (UDGM or UDRM). A representative measure for deterministic dynamical systems is found as a counterpart of the H for random process, clearly redefining the boundary of different criteria. And a specific UDRM achieving the intrinsic adaptability enables a general information measure that ultimately solves all major disputes. This work encourages a single framework coving deterministic systems, statistical mechanics and real-world living organisms.

  4. Leadership Complexities. Research Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Debra J.

    1996-01-01

    Findings from three studies show that effective leaders have greater behavioral complexity and fill multiple roles better than ineffective leaders; listening skills are key to effective leadership; there are no gender differences in emerged leadership; and although task-relevant communication is important to leadership, other research indicates…

  5. Launching Complex Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Kara J.; Shahan, Emily C.; Gibbons, Lynsey K.; Cobb, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Mathematics lessons can take a variety of formats. In this article, the authors discuss lessons organized around complex mathematical tasks. These lessons usually unfold in three phases. First, the task is introduced to students. Second, students work on solving the task. Third, the teacher "orchestrates" a concluding whole-class discussion in…

  6. Complex Digital Visual Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeny, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    This article identifies possibilities for data visualization as art educational research practice. The author presents an analysis of the relationship between works of art and digital visual culture, employing aspects of network analysis drawn from the work of Barabási, Newman, and Watts (2006) and Castells (1994). Describing complex network…

  7. Complex Characters Made Simple

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettle, Sidney F. A.

    2009-01-01

    The physical significance of complex characters is explored with particular reference to the C[subscript 4] point group. While a diagrammatic representation of these characters in this group is possible, the extension to higher groups C[subscript n], n greater than 4 is left as a problem for discussion. (Contains 3 tables, 8 figures, and 1 note.)

  8. Complexity in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doll, William E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Applies complexity theory, a movement in contemporary physics, to instruction of a sixth-grade math class. The mathematical chaos theory, embracing random and nonlinear patterning, contradicts the reductionist, particularist, and atomistic view commonly applied to science and teaching. Fractals and self-organization are similarly powerful,…

  9. Complexity in Cultural Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Despite their diverse national backgrounds, 28 interviewees speak similarly about the complexity of the cultural realities with which they live, and refuse to be pinned down to specific cultural types. While nation is of great importance, unless personally inspiring, it tends to be an external force which is in conflict with a wide variety of…

  10. Surface complexation modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adsorption-desorption reactions are important processes that affect the transport of contaminants in the environment. Surface complexation models are chemical models that can account for the effects of variable chemical conditions, such as pH, on adsorption reactions. These models define specific ...

  11. Complexant stability investigation. Task 2. Organic complexants

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, E.C.

    1985-06-01

    The safety of high-level defense waste operations has always been given highest priority at the Hanford site. This document is part of the continued effort to appraise and reevaluate the safety of the waste stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Reservation. Hanford high-level defense waste consists mainly of moist, inorganic salts, NaNO/sub 3/, NaAl(OH)/sub 4/, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, and other sodium salts. However, in addition to these salts, quantities of organic compounds constitute a significant portion of the waste. The potential reaction of the organic compounds with inorganic salts to form explosive substances is examined and found to be nonexistent or negligible. The concept that the waste mixture might react exothermically is found to be untenable under the present storage conditions. The phenomenon of slurry growth in double-shell waste storage tanks is expected to cause no increase in exothermic reaction potential within the waste. The results of this study indicate that the presence of organic material in the high-level defense waste does not constitute undue hazard under the present storage conditions.

  12. Plant mitochondrial Complex I composition and assembly: A review.

    PubMed

    Subrahmanian, Nitya; Remacle, Claire; Hamel, Patrice Paul

    2016-07-01

    In the mitochondrial inner membrane, oxidative phosphorylation generates ATP via the operation of several multimeric enzymes. The proton-pumping Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is the first and most complicated enzyme required in this process. Complex I is an L-shaped enzyme consisting of more than 40 subunits, one FMN molecule and eight Fe-S clusters. In recent years, genetic and proteomic analyses of Complex I mutants in various model systems, including plants, have provided valuable insights into the assembly of this multimeric enzyme. Assisted by a number of key players, referred to as "assembly factors", the assembly of Complex I takes place in a sequential and modular manner. Although a number of factors have been identified, their precise function in mediating Complex I assembly still remains to be elucidated. This review summarizes our current knowledge of plant Complex I composition and assembly derived from studies in plant model systems such as Arabidopsis thaliana and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Plant Complex I is highly conserved and comprises a significant number of subunits also present in mammalian and fungal Complexes I. Plant Complex I also contains additional subunits absent from the mammalian and fungal counterpart, whose function in enzyme activity and assembly is not clearly understood. While 14 assembly factors have been identified for human Complex I, only two proteins, namely GLDH and INDH, have been established as bona fide assembly factors for plant Complex I. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  13. Catalog of Infrared Observations. Part I: Data. Part II: Appendixes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Schmitz, M.; Mead, J. M.

    The Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO) is a compilation of infrared astronomical data obtained from an extensive literature search of astronomical journals and major astronomical catalogs and surveys. The literature searches are complete for years 1965 through 1986. The Catalog is published in two parts, with the observational data (roughly 200,000 observations of 20,000 individual sources) listed in Part I, and supporting appendices in Part II. The expanded Second Edition contains a new feature: complete IRAS 4-band data for all CIO sources detected, listed with the main Catalog observations, as well as in complete detail in the Appendix. The appendices include an atlas of infrared source positions, two bibliographies of infrared literature upon which the search was based, and an atlas of infrared spectral ranges, and IRAS data for the CIO sources. The complete CIO database is available in printed microfiche and magnetic tape formats.

  14. Computability-theoretic learning complexity.

    PubMed

    Case, John; Kötzing, Timo

    2012-07-28

    Initially discussed are some of Alan Turing's wonderfully profound and influential ideas about mind and mechanism-including regarding their connection to the main topic of the present study, which is within the field of computability-theoretic learning theory. Herein is investigated the part of this field concerned with the algorithmic, trial-and-error inference of eventually correct programs for functions from their data points. As to the main content of this study: in prior papers, beginning with the seminal work by Freivalds et al. in 1995, the notion of intrinsic complexity is used to analyse the learning complexity of sets of functions in a Gold-style learning setting. Herein are pointed out some weaknesses of this notion. Offered is an alternative based on epitomizing sets of functions-sets that are learnable under a given learning criterion, but not under other criteria that are not at least as powerful. To capture the idea of epitomizing sets, new reducibility notions are given based on robust learning (closure of learning under certain sets of computable operators). Various degrees of epitomizing sets are characterized as the sets complete with respect to corresponding reducibility notions! These characterizations also provide an easy method for showing sets to be epitomizers, and they are then employed to prove several sets to be epitomizing. Furthermore, a scheme is provided to generate easily very strong epitomizers for a multitude of learning criteria. These strong epitomizers are the so-called self-learning sets, previously applied by Case & Kötzing in 2010. These strong epitomizers can be easily generated and employed in a myriad of settings to witness with certainty the strict separation in learning power between the criteria so epitomized and other not as powerful criteria!

  15. Membrane Tethering Complexes in the Endosomal System

    PubMed Central

    Spang, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Vesicles that are generated by endocytic events at the plasma membrane are destined to early endosomes. A prerequisite for proper fusion is the tethering of two membrane entities. Tethering of vesicles to early endosomes is mediated by the class C core vacuole/endosome tethering (CORVET) complex, while fusion of late endosomes with lysosomes depends on the homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting (HOPS) complex. Recycling through the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and to the plasma membrane is facilitated by the Golgi associated retrograde protein (GARP) and endosome-associated recycling protein (EARP) complexes, respectively. However, there are other tethering functions in the endosomal system as there are multiple pathways through which proteins can be delivered from endosomes to either the TGN or the plasma membrane. Furthermore, proteins that may be part of novel tethering complexes have been recently identified. Thus, it is likely that more tethering factors exist. In this review, I will provide an overview of different tethering complexes of the endosomal system and discuss how they may provide specificity in membrane traffic. PMID:27243003

  16. Interference in Bohmian mechanics with complex action.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, Yair; Tannor, David J

    2007-10-28

    In recent years, intensive effort has gone into developing numerical tools for exact quantum mechanical calculations that are based on Bohmian mechanics. As part of this effort we have recently developed as alternative formulation of Bohmian mechanics in which the quantum action S is taken to be complex [Y. Goldfarb et al., J. Chem. Phys. 125, 231103 (2006)]. In the alternative formulation there is a significant reduction in the magnitude of the quantum force as compared with the conventional Bohmian formulation, at the price of propagating complex trajectories. In this paper we show that Bohmian mechanics with complex action is able to overcome the main computational limitation of conventional Bohmian methods-the propagation of wave functions once nodes set in. In the vicinity of nodes, the quantum force in conventional Bohmian formulations exhibits rapid oscillations that present a severe numerical challenge. We show that within complex Bohmian mechanics, multiple complex initial conditions can lead to the same real final position, allowing for the accurate description of nodes as a sum of the contribution from two or more crossing trajectories. The idea is illustrated on the reflection amplitude from a one-dimensional Eckart barrier. We believe that trajectory crossing, although in contradiction to the conventional Bohmian trajectory interpretation, provides an important new tool for dealing with the nodal problem in Bohmian methods.

  17. Membrane Tethering Complexes in the Endosomal System.

    PubMed

    Spang, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Vesicles that are generated by endocytic events at the plasma membrane are destined to early endosomes. A prerequisite for proper fusion is the tethering of two membrane entities. Tethering of vesicles to early endosomes is mediated by the class C core vacuole/endosome tethering (CORVET) complex, while fusion of late endosomes with lysosomes depends on the homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting (HOPS) complex. Recycling through the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and to the plasma membrane is facilitated by the Golgi associated retrograde protein (GARP) and endosome-associated recycling protein (EARP) complexes, respectively. However, there are other tethering functions in the endosomal system as there are multiple pathways through which proteins can be delivered from endosomes to either the TGN or the plasma membrane. Furthermore, proteins that may be part of novel tethering complexes have been recently identified. Thus, it is likely that more tethering factors exist. In this review, I will provide an overview of different tethering complexes of the endosomal system and discuss how they may provide specificity in membrane traffic. PMID:27243003

  18. Ontology patterns for complex topographic feature yypes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varanka, Dalia E.

    2011-01-01

    Complex feature types are defined as integrated relations between basic features for a shared meaning or concept. The shared semantic concept is difficult to define in commonly used geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing technologies. The role of spatial relations between complex feature parts was recognized in early GIS literature, but had limited representation in the feature or coverage data models of GIS. Spatial relations are more explicitly specified in semantic technology. In this paper, semantics for topographic feature ontology design patterns (ODP) are developed as data models for the representation of complex features. In the context of topographic processes, component assemblages are supported by resource systems and are found on local landscapes. The topographic ontology is organized across six thematic modules that can account for basic feature types, resource systems, and landscape types. Types of complex feature attributes include location, generative processes and physical description. Node/edge networks model standard spatial relations and relations specific to topographic science to represent complex features. To demonstrate these concepts, data from The National Map of the U. S. Geological Survey was converted and assembled into ODP.

  19. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Work Plan

    SciTech Connect

    W. M. Heileson

    2006-12-01

    This Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for operation of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility Complex (ICDF). This facility includes (a) an engineered landfill that meets the substantial requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl landfill requirements; (b) centralized receiving, inspections, administration, storage/staging, and treatment facilities necessary for CERCLA investigation-derived, remedial, and removal waste at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prior to final disposition in the disposal facility or shipment off-Site; and (c) an evaporation pond that has been designated as a corrective action management unit. The ICDF Complex, including a buffer zone, will cover approximately 40 acres, with a landfill disposal capacity of approximately 510,000 yd3. The ICDF Complex is designed and authorized to accept INL CERCLA-generated wastes, and includes the necessary subsystems and support facilities to provide a complete waste management system. This Remedial Action Work Plan presents the operational approach and requirements for the various components that are part of the ICDF Complex. Summaries of the remedial action work elements are presented herein, with supporting information and documents provided as appendixes to this work plan that contain specific detail about the operation of the ICDF Complex. This document presents the planned operational process based upon an evaluation of the remedial action requirements set forth in the Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision.

  20. Carney complex: an update.

    PubMed

    Correa, Ricardo; Salpea, Paraskevi; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-10-01

    Carney complex (CNC) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome, characterized by pigmented lesions of the skin and mucosa, cardiac, cutaneous and other myxomas and multiple endocrine tumors. The disease is caused by inactivating mutations or large deletions of the PRKAR1A gene located at 17q22-24 coding for the regulatory subunit type I alpha of protein kinase A (PKA) gene. Most recently, components of the complex have been associated with defects of other PKA subunits, such as the catalytic subunits PRKACA (adrenal hyperplasia) and PRKACB (pigmented spots, myxomas, pituitary adenomas). In this report, we review CNC, its clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and molecular etiology, including PRKAR1A mutations and the newest on PRKACA and PRKACB defects especially as they pertain to adrenal tumors and Cushing's syndrome. PMID:26130139

  1. Compressively sensed complex networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Ray, Jaideep; Pinar, Ali

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this project is to develop low dimension parametric (deterministic) models of complex networks, to use compressive sensing (CS) and multiscale analysis to do so and to exploit the structure of complex networks (some are self-similar under coarsening). CS provides a new way of sampling and reconstructing networks. The approach is based on multiresolution decomposition of the adjacency matrix and its efficient sampling. It requires preprocessing of the adjacency matrix to make it 'blocky' which is the biggest (combinatorial) algorithm challenge. Current CS reconstruction algorithm makes no use of the structure of a graph, its very general (and so not very efficient/customized). Other model-based CS techniques exist, but not yet adapted to networks. Obvious starting point for future work is to increase the efficiency of reconstruction.

  2. Debating complexity in modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Randall J.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    1999-01-01

    As scientists trying to understand the natural world, how should our effort be apportioned? We know that the natural world is characterized by complex and interrelated processes. Yet do we need to explicitly incorporate these intricacies to perform the tasks we are charged with? In this era of expanding computer power and development of sophisticated preprocessors and postprocessors, are bigger machines making better models? Put another way, do we understand the natural world better now with all these advancements in our simulation ability? Today the public's patience for long-term projects producing indeterminate results is wearing thin. This increases pressure on the investigator to use the appropriate technology efficiently. On the other hand, bringing scientific results into the legal arena opens up a new dimension to the issue: to the layperson, a tool that includes more of the complexity known to exist in the real world is expected to provide the more scientifically valid answer.

  3. Carney Complex: an update

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Ricardo; Salpea, Paraskevi; Stratakis, Constantine

    2015-01-01

    Carney Complex (CNC) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome, characterized by pigmented lesions of the skin and mucosa, cardiac, cutaneous and other myxomas, and multiple endocrine tumors. The disease is caused by inactivating mutations or large deletions of the PRKAR1A gene located at 17q22–24 coding for the regulatory subunit type I alpha of protein kinase A (PKA) gene. Most recently, components of the complex have been associated with defects of other PKA subunits, such as the catalytic subunits PRKACA (adrenal hyperplasia) and PRKACB (pigmented spots, myxomas, pituitary adenomas). In this report, we review CNC, its clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, and molecular etiology including PRKAR1A mutations and the newest on PRKACA and PRKACB defects especially as they pertain to adrenal tumors and Cushing’s syndrome. PMID:26130139

  4. A complex affair

    PubMed Central

    Bewley, Maria C.; Tash, Brian R.; Tian, Fang; Flanagan, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are protein complexes comprised of claudins, which anchor them in the membrane and numerous cytosolic scaffolding proteins including MAGI, MUPP1, cingulin and members of the Zonula Occludens (ZO) family. Originally, their main function was thought to be as a paracellular barrier. More recently, however, additional roles in signal transduction, differentiation and proliferation have been reported. Dysregulation is associated with a wide range of disease states, including diabetic retinopathy, irritable bowel disease and some cancers. ZO proteins and occludin form a protein complex that appears to act as a master regulator of TJ assembly/disassembly. Recent studies have highlighted the structural character of the primary ZO-1:occludin interaction and identified regions on occludin that control association and disassociation of TJ in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We hypothesize that regions within ZO-1 in the so-called U5 and U6 regions behave in a similar manner. PMID:24665376

  5. Staircase and fractional part functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amram, Meirav; Dagan, Miriam; Ioshpe, Michael; Satianov, Pavel

    2016-10-01

    The staircase and fractional part functions are basic examples of real functions. They can be applied in several parts of mathematics, such as analysis, number theory, formulas for primes, and so on; in computer programming, the floor and ceiling functions are provided by a significant number of programming languages - they have some basic uses in various programming tasks. In this paper, we view the staircase and fractional part functions as a classical example of non-continuous real functions. We introduce some of their basic properties, present some interesting constructions concerning them, and explore some intriguing interpretations of such functions. Throughout the paper, we use these functions in order to explain basic concepts in a first calculus course, such as domain of definition, discontinuity, and oddness of functions. We also explain in detail how, after researching the properties of such functions, one can draw their graph; this is a crucial part in the process of understanding their nature. In the paper, we present some subjects that the first-year student in the exact sciences may not encounter. We try to clarify those subjects and show that such ideas are important in the understanding of non-continuous functions, as a part of studying analysis in general.

  6. Homogeneous complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogacz, Leszek; Burda, Zdzisław; Wacław, Bartłomiej

    2006-07-01

    We discuss various ensembles of homogeneous complex networks and a Monte-Carlo method of generating graphs from these ensembles. The method is quite general and can be applied to simulate micro-canonical, canonical or grand-canonical ensembles for systems with various statistical weights. It can be used to construct homogeneous networks with desired properties, or to construct a non-trivial scoring function for problems of advanced motif searching.

  7. Complexity in Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Cristopher David

    The study of chaos has shown us that deterministic systems can have a kind of unpredictability, based on a limited knowledge of their initial conditions; after a finite time, the motion appears essentially random. This observation has inspired a general interest in the subject of unpredictability, and more generally, complexity; how can we characterize how "complex" a dynamical system is?. In this thesis, we attempt to answer this question with a paradigm of complexity that comes from computer science, we extract sets of symbol sequences, or languages, from a dynamical system using standard methods of symbolic dynamics; we then ask what kinds of grammars or automata are needed a generate these languages. This places them in the Chomsky heirarchy, which in turn tells us something about how subtle and complex the dynamical system's behavior is. This gives us insight into the question of unpredictability, since these automata can also be thought of as computers attempting to predict the system. In the culmination of the thesis, we find a class of smooth, two-dimensional maps which are equivalent to the highest class in the Chomsky heirarchy, the turning machine; they are capable of universal computation. Therefore, these systems possess a kind of unpredictability qualitatively different from the usual "chaos": even if the initial conditions are known exactly, questions about the system's long-term dynamics are undecidable. No algorithm exists to answer them. Although this kind of unpredictability has been discussed in the context of distributed, many-degree-of -freedom systems (for instance, cellular automata) we believe this is the first example of such phenomena in a smooth, finite-degree-of-freedom system.

  8. Engineering Complex Tissues

    PubMed Central

    MIKOS, ANTONIOS G.; HERRING, SUSAN W.; OCHAREON, PANNEE; ELISSEEFF, JENNIFER; LU, HELEN H.; KANDEL, RITA; SCHOEN, FREDERICK J.; TONER, MEHMET; MOONEY, DAVID; ATALA, ANTHONY; VAN DYKE, MARK E.; KAPLAN, DAVID; VUNJAK-NOVAKOVIC, GORDANA

    2010-01-01

    This article summarizes the views expressed at the third session of the workshop “Tissue Engineering—The Next Generation,” which was devoted to the engineering of complex tissue structures. Antonios Mikos described the engineering of complex oral and craniofacial tissues as a “guided interplay” between biomaterial scaffolds, growth factors, and local cell populations toward the restoration of the original architecture and function of complex tissues. Susan Herring, reviewing osteogenesis and vasculogenesis, explained that the vascular arrangement precedes and dictates the architecture of the new bone, and proposed that engineering of osseous tissues might benefit from preconstruction of an appropriate vasculature. Jennifer Elisseeff explored the formation of complex tissue structures based on the example of stratified cartilage engineered using stem cells and hydrogels. Helen Lu discussed engineering of tissue interfaces, a problem critical for biological fixation of tendons and ligaments, and the development of a new generation of fixation devices. Rita Kandel discussed the challenges related to the re-creation of the cartilage-bone interface, in the context of tissue engineered joint repair. Frederick Schoen emphasized, in the context of heart valve engineering, the need for including the requirements derived from “adult biology” of tissue remodeling and establishing reliable early predictors of success or failure of tissue engineered implants. Mehmet Toner presented a review of biopreservation techniques and stressed that a new breakthrough in this field may be necessary to meet all the needs of tissue engineering. David Mooney described systems providing temporal and spatial regulation of growth factor availability, which may find utility in virtually all tissue engineering and regeneration applications, including directed in vitro and in vivo vascularization of tissues. Anthony Atala offered a clinician’s perspective for functional tissue

  9. Modeling Complex Calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a software suite that models complex calorimeters in the time and frequency domain. These models can reproduce all measurements that we currently do in a lab setting, like IV curves, impedance measurements, noise measurements, and pulse generation. Since all these measurements are modeled from one set of parameters, we can fully describe a detector and characterize its behavior. This leads to a model than can be used effectively for engineering and design of detectors for particular applications.

  10. NDT for Complex Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnevale, Mario

    2013-04-01

    Non-destructive testing of structures composed of various types of materials is performed using a variety of methods. Most commonly, electromagnetic and acoustic methods are used to perform this task. Advances in computer software and electro-mechanical hardware have resulted in semi-automated systems for performing simple low-cost in-situ concrete testing. These systems are designed to be operated by anyone who can read a manual and push the right buttons. Although useful in many circumstances, we ask: "What happens when concrete structures are not simple and are too complex to be analyzed by these semi-automated systems and, most importantly, by minimally trained operators?" Many infrastructure projects are boldly pushing the limit of traditional engineering design. As structures become more complex, the methods and techniques used to evaluate these structures must also evolve. A first step towards adapting geophysical methods to evaluate complex structures is to develop pre-investigation conceptual models of possible responses that structures will have to available geophysical methods. This approach is important for designing the geometry and data acquisition parameters necessary for achieving the desired results. Examples of case by case assessments of the application of GPR to concrete investigations are examined. These include complex concrete wall structures, soil tunnel structures, and airport runways. HGI's adaption of ground penetrating radar (GPR) and seismic methods for assessing the substrate of a heavily reinforced concrete structure up to seven feet thick is reviewed. A range of GPR antenna frequencies were used to image the concrete and the underlying material. Time and frequency domain GPR analyses where used in the assessment. A multi-channel seismic survey using a roll-along data collection technique was used to assess the resonant frequency of the concrete structure, the nature of the underlying medium, and behavior of the structural system.

  11. Complex posterior urethral injury

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Sanjay B.; Joshi, Pankaj M.; Hunter, Craig; Surana, Sandesh; Shahrour, Walid; Alhajeri, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess treatment strategies for seven different scenarios for treating complex pelvic fracture urethral injury (PFUI), categorised as repeat surgery for PFUI, ischaemic bulbar urethral necrosis (BUN), repair in boys and girls aged ⩽12 years, in patients with a recto-urethral fistula, or bladder neck incontinence, or with a double block at the bulbomembranous urethra and bladder neck/prostate region. Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed the success rates and surgical procedures of these seven complex scenarios in the repair of PFUI at our institution from 2000 to 2013. Results In all, >550 PFUI procedures were performed at our centre, and 308 of these patients were classified as having a complex PFUI, with 225 patients available for follow-up. The overall success rates were 81% and 77% for primary and repeat procedures respectively. The overall success rate of those with BUN was 76%, using various methods of novel surgical techniques. Boys aged ⩽12 years with PFUI required a transpubic/abdominal approach 31% of the time, compared to 9% in adults. Young girls with PFUI also required a transpubic/abdominal urethroplasty, with a success rate of 66%. In patients with a recto-urethral fistula the success rate was 90% with attention to proper surgical principles, including a three-stage procedure and appropriate interposition. The treatment of bladder neck incontinence associated with the tear-drop deformity gave a continence rate of 66%. Children with a double block at the bulbomembranous urethra and at the bladder neck-prostate junction were all continent after a one-stage transpubic/abdominal procedure. Conclusion An understanding of complex pelvic fractures and their appropriate management can provide successful outcomes. PMID:26019978

  12. Complex Flows by Nanohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Alley, E; Covello, P; Alder, B

    2004-03-01

    The study of complex flows by particle simulations is speeded up over molecular dynamics (MD) by more than two orders of magnitude by employing a stochastic collision dynamics method (DSMC) extended to high density (CBA). As a consequence, a picture generated on a single processor shows the typical features of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and is in quantitative agreement with the experimentally found long time behavior.

  13. Putting Grammatical Complexity in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimmer, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Effective writing is to some degree characterised by the ability to use complex grammatical structures. However, grammatical complexity is poorly defined in linguistics and related disciplines such as literacy. This empirical study examined the notion of grammatical complexity and its relevance to literacy. Complexity is multifaceted, so for…

  14. Statistical Factors in Complexation Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Chung-Sun

    1985-01-01

    Four cases which illustrate statistical factors in complexation reactions (where two of the reactants are monodentate ligands) are presented. Included are tables showing statistical factors for the reactions of: (1) square-planar complexes; (2) tetrahedral complexes; and (3) octahedral complexes. (JN)

  15. Observability of complex systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang-Yu; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Barabási, Albert-László

    2013-01-01

    A quantitative description of a complex system is inherently limited by our ability to estimate the system’s internal state from experimentally accessible outputs. Although the simultaneous measurement of all internal variables, like all metabolite concentrations in a cell, offers a complete description of a system’s state, in practice experimental access is limited to only a subset of variables, or sensors. A system is called observable if we can reconstruct the system’s complete internal state from its outputs. Here, we adopt a graphical approach derived from the dynamical laws that govern a system to determine the sensors that are necessary to reconstruct the full internal state of a complex system. We apply this approach to biochemical reaction systems, finding that the identified sensors are not only necessary but also sufficient for observability. The developed approach can also identify the optimal sensors for target or partial observability, helping us reconstruct selected state variables from appropriately chosen outputs, a prerequisite for optimal biomarker design. Given the fundamental role observability plays in complex systems, these results offer avenues to systematically explore the dynamics of a wide range of natural, technological and socioeconomic systems. PMID:23359701

  16. Keynes, Hayek and Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormerod, Paul

    In the spirit of the overall topic of the conference, in this paper I consider the extent to which economic theory includes elements of the complex systems approach. I am setting to one side here the developments over the past decade in applying complex systems analysis to economic problems. This is not because this recent work is not important. It most certainly is. But I want to argue that there is a very distinct tradition of what we would now describe as a complex systems approach in the works of two of the greatest economists of the 20th century. There is of course a dominant intellectual paradigm within economics, that known as `neo-classical'economics. This paradigm is by no means an empty box, and is undoubtedly useful in helping to understand how some aspects of the social and economic worlds work. But even in its heyday, neo-classical economics never succeeded by its empirical success in driving out completely other theoretical approaches, for its success was simply not sufficient to do so. Much more importantly, economics over the past twenty or thirty years has become in an increasing state of flux.

  17. [VGKC-complex antibodies].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-04-01

    Various antibodies are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs). Representative antibodies to VGKCs were first identified by radioimmunoassays using radioisotope-labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were detected only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in patients with Morvan's syndrome and in those with a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins (for example LGI-1 and CASPR-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now commonly known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most commonly detected in patients with limbic encephalitis with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. CASPR-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. Furthermore, VGKC-complex antibodies are tightly associated with chronic idiopathic pain. Hyperexcitability of nociceptive pathways has also been implicated. These antibodies may be detected in sera of some patients with neurodegenerative diseases (for example, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease).

  18. Complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bruehl, Stephen

    2015-07-29

    Complex regional pain syndrome is a chronic pain condition characterized by autonomic and inflammatory features. It occurs acutely in about 7% of patients who have limb fractures, limb surgery, or other injuries. Many cases resolve within the first year, with a smaller subset progressing to the chronic form. This transition is often paralleled by a change from "warm complex regional pain syndrome," with inflammatory characteristics dominant, to "cold complex regional pain syndrome" in which autonomic features dominate. Multiple peripheral and central mechanisms seem to be involved, the relative contributions of which may differ between individuals and over time. Possible contributors include peripheral and central sensitization, autonomic changes and sympatho-afferent coupling, inflammatory and immune alterations, brain changes, and genetic and psychological factors. The syndrome is diagnosed purely on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms. Effective management of the chronic form of the syndrome is often challenging. Few high quality randomized controlled trials are available to support the efficacy of the most commonly used interventions. Reviews of available randomized trials suggest that physical and occupational therapy (including graded motor imagery and mirror therapy), bisphosphonates, calcitonin, subanesthetic intravenous ketamine, free radical scavengers, oral corticosteroids, and spinal cord stimulation may be effective treatments. Multidisciplinary clinical care, which centers around functionally focused therapies is recommended. Other interventions are used to facilitate engagement in functional therapies and to improve quality of life.

  19. Complexity in `simple' metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Bruno; Ashcroft, Neil W.

    2008-03-01

    In electronic and structural terms, the light alkalis have long been regarded as `simple systems', at least under ordinary conditions. However, when compressed they exhibit unforeseen complexity; the melting curve of sodium, for example, has a striking maximum, falling to near room temperature melting where a complex structure (CI16) is found, this being in the cubic class but with 16 atoms per unit cell [1,2]. The light alkalis have been extensively studied using ab initio methods with standard assumptions of transferability made for the key pseudopotential input information, largely atomic based. Lacking still, however, is a somewhat more intuitive and physical understanding of the developments in electronic structure with progressive increase in density. In the present work, the problem is treated with non-linear response theory and non-overlapping pseudopotentials, and the structural complexity traced to effective ion-ion interactions with features that both at short range and long display competing state dependence. [1] Gregoryanz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 185502 (2005) [2] McMahon et al., Chem. Soc. Rev. 35, 943 (2006)

  20. Emergent Complex Network Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhihao; Menichetti, Giulia; Rahmede, Christoph; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-05-01

    Networks are mathematical structures that are universally used to describe a large variety of complex systems such as the brain or the Internet. Characterizing the geometrical properties of these networks has become increasingly relevant for routing problems, inference and data mining. In real growing networks, topological, structural and geometrical properties emerge spontaneously from their dynamical rules. Nevertheless we still miss a model in which networks develop an emergent complex geometry. Here we show that a single two parameter network model, the growing geometrical network, can generate complex network geometries with non-trivial distribution of curvatures, combining exponential growth and small-world properties with finite spectral dimensionality. In one limit, the non-equilibrium dynamical rules of these networks can generate scale-free networks with clustering and communities, in another limit planar random geometries with non-trivial modularity. Finally we find that these properties of the geometrical growing networks are present in a large set of real networks describing biological, social and technological systems.

  1. First pentahaptofullerene metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Masaya, Sawamura; Iikura, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Eiichi

    1996-12-18

    Cyclopentadienyl metal complexes have played important roles in chemistry owing to their unique structures and functional activities. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of an entirely new class of cyclopentadienyl (Cp) metal complexes ({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 60}Ph{sub 5})MLn (MLn = Li, K, Tl, and Cu.PEt{sub 3}). In these molecules, the five Cp carbons represent one pentagon of C{sub 60}, isolated from the remaining 50 sp{sup 2} carbon atoms by five surrounding sp{sup 3} carbon atoms each bearing a phenyl group. The X-ray crystal structure analysis of the thallium complex Tl({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 60}Ph{sub 5}).2.5THF revealed its unique and esthetically pleasing C{sub 5} symmetrical molecular structure with the phenyl groups forming a chiral propeller array. The thallium atom is deeply buried in the cavity created by the phenyl groups, bonding to the five Cp carbons ({eta}{sup 5}-coordination) with an averaged Tl-C distance of 2.87 A. The key finding that we made in this research was a remarkable 5-fold addition of an organocopper reagent to C{sub 60}, which stands in contrast to the monoaddition reaction of Grignard or organolithium reagents. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Calculus: A Computer Oriented Presentation, Part 1 [and] Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenberg, Warren; Walker, Robert J.

    Parts one and two of a one-year computer-oriented calculus course (without analytic geometry) are presented. The ideas of calculus are introduced and motivated through computer (i.e., algorithmic) concepts. An introduction to computing via algorithms and a simple flow chart language allows the book to be self-contained, except that material on…

  3. Border Issues in Education, Part 1 [and] Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander-Kasparik, Rosalind, Ed.; Soulas, John, Comp.

    1994-01-01

    These newsletters examine issues in education along the United States and Mexico border. Topics in Part 1 include the ramifications of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) for education, the impact of immigration on schools, and the structure and history of the Mexican educational system and its reforms in theory and practice. Educators…

  4. X-pinch. Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Pikuz, S. A. Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.

    2015-06-15

    Results of experimental studies of the X-pinch since its invention and implementation in 1982 at the Lebedev Physical Institute are presented. The review consists of two parts. The first part briefly outlines the history of creation and studies of X-pinches, describes the diagnostic techniques and devices developed during these studies, and presents the main results obtained in studying the physical processes occurring in the X-pinch. The second part is devoted to the results of detailed studies of the spatial, temporal, and spectral characteristics of the X-pinch hot spot—the region where the highest plasma parameters are achieved and which is a source of X-ray emission with extreme parameters. Some results of X-pinch simulations are also presented.

  5. On the Madelung Part of Lattice Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, Rudolf

    1995-06-01

    The Born-Haber Cycle (BHC) is critically reviewed, the origin of severe limitations in its appli­ cation is shown. Partly this is based on the construction of the third step, partly it is connected with the fact that most of the "classical" anions of inorganic chemistry are instable, "unobservable" gaseous entities. The Madelung Part of Lattice Energy, MAPLE*, is extentionally analyzed (e.g. TiO2) to demonstrate that the similarity of thermodynamical properties like ΔH°298 of all modifica­ tions, reflected in MAPLE, is non-trivial. The analogous analysis with e.g. BaTiO3 proves that neither the classical "central ion" (here Ti4+) nor the "completing" cation (here Ba2+) but the "anions" coordinating the last mentioned cation BaO gain energy and, in this sense, "stabilize" the complex. Even simple compounds (e.g. A-La2O3) show surprising geometrical arrangements, in striking contrast to often used but simple minded concepts like "Bond Length/Bond Strength" and its derivatives like CHARDI, whereas such "oddities" are explained by MAPLE. The application of the theorem of additivity of MAPLE (MAPLEpolynary = Σ MAPLEbinary), that passes even in the case of hydrates, and its limitations are discussed. Guided by MAPLE, surprisingly complicated structures (e.g. Cs2Li3I5) of polynary derivatives of structurally exceedingly simple binary com­ pounds become "understandable". If "molecular" entities like SO3 are involved, limitations can be excluded using "increments". Last not least, MAPLE is the first known guide to a multi-dimen-sional but strict scheme of characterisation of Solid State Structures in the sense of Linne's ideas, based on geometrical facts only.

  6. Quality of life after percutaneous coronary intervention: part 1.

    PubMed

    Cassar, Stephen; R Baldacchino, Donia

    Quality of life (QOL) is a complex concept comprised of biopsychosocial, spiritual and environmental dimensions. However, the majority of research addresses only its physical function perspectives. This two-part series examines the holistic perspective of QOL of patients after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Part 1 explains the research process of a cross-sectional descriptive study and its limitations. Data were collected by a mailed WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire in Maltese from a systematic sample of patients who had undergone PCI; the response rate was 64% (n=228; males n=169, females n=59, age 40-89 years). Part 1 also considers limitations, such as its cross-sectional design and retrospective data collection. The hierarchy of human needs theory (Maslow, 1999) guided the study. Part 2 gives the findings on the holistic view of QOL. Having social and family support, as a characteristic of Maltese culture appeared to contribute towards a better QOL. PMID:23123651

  7. Quality of life after percutaneous coronary intervention: part 1.

    PubMed

    Cassar, Stephen; R Baldacchino, Donia

    Quality of life (QOL) is a complex concept comprised of biopsychosocial, spiritual and environmental dimensions. However, the majority of research addresses only its physical function perspectives. This two-part series examines the holistic perspective of QOL of patients after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Part 1 explains the research process of a cross-sectional descriptive study and its limitations. Data were collected by a mailed WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire in Maltese from a systematic sample of patients who had undergone PCI; the response rate was 64% (n=228; males n=169, females n=59, age 40-89 years). Part 1 also considers limitations, such as its cross-sectional design and retrospective data collection. The hierarchy of human needs theory (Maslow, 1999) guided the study. Part 2 gives the findings on the holistic view of QOL. Having social and family support, as a characteristic of Maltese culture appeared to contribute towards a better QOL.

  8. Surface Seal for Carbon Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuford, D. M.; Spruiell, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    Surface pores in parts made of graphite or reinforced-carbon/ carbon materials are sealed by a silicon carbide-based coating. Coating inhibits subsurface oxidation and lengthens part life. Starting material for coating is graphite felt, which is converted to silicon carbide felt by processing it according to a prescribed time/temperature schedule. Converted felt is pulverized in a ball mill and resulting powder is mixed with an equal weight of black silicon carbide powder. Powder mixture is combined with an equal weight of adhesive to form a paste.

  9. Grinding Parts For Automatic Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.; Hoult, William S.

    1989-01-01

    Rollers guide grinding tool along prospective welding path. Skatelike fixture holds rotary grinder or file for machining large-diameter rings or ring segments in preparation for welding. Operator grasps handles to push rolling fixture along part. Rollers maintain precise dimensional relationship so grinding wheel cuts precise depth. Fixture-mounted grinder machines surface to quality sufficient for automatic welding; manual welding with attendant variations and distortion not necessary. Developed to enable automatic welding of parts, manual welding of which resulted in weld bead permeated with microscopic fissures.

  10. Understanding quantitative research: part 1.

    PubMed

    Hoe, Juanita; Hoare, Zoë

    This article, which is the first in a two-part series, provides an introduction to understanding quantitative research, basic statistics and terminology used in research articles. Critical appraisal of research articles is essential to ensure that nurses remain up to date with evidence-based practice to provide consistent and high-quality nursing care. This article focuses on developing critical appraisal skills and understanding the use and implications of different quantitative approaches to research. Part two of this article will focus on explaining common statistical terms and the presentation of statistical data in quantitative research.

  11. Parts Specialist. Teacher Edition. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuqua, Lou; And Others

    This set of instructional materials provides secondary and postsecondary students with an opportunity to explore the career choices available in the parts merchandising industry. The skills presented are useful to any student pursuing a career in auto parts, heavy equipment parts, small engine parts, tractor parts, appliance parts, or for any…

  12. Life without complex I: proteome analyses of an Arabidopsis mutant lacking the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex

    PubMed Central

    Fromm, Steffanie; Senkler, Jennifer; Eubel, Holger; Peterhänsel, Christoph; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex (complex I) is of particular importance for the respiratory chain in mitochondria. It is the major electron entry site for the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) and therefore of great significance for mitochondrial ATP generation. We recently described an Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant lacking the genes encoding the carbonic anhydrases CA1 and CA2, which both form part of a plant-specific ‘carbonic anhydrase domain’ of mitochondrial complex I. The mutant lacks complex I completely. Here we report extended analyses for systematically characterizing the proteome of the ca1ca2 mutant. Using various proteomic tools, we show that lack of complex I causes reorganization of the cellular respiration system. Reduced electron entry into the respiratory chain at the first segment of the mETC leads to induction of complexes II and IV as well as alternative oxidase. Increased electron entry at later segments of the mETC requires an increase in oxidation of organic substrates. This is reflected by higher abundance of proteins involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and branched-chain amino acid catabolism. Proteins involved in the light reaction of photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle, tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, and photorespiration are clearly reduced, contributing to the significant delay in growth and development of the double-mutant. Finally, enzymes involved in defense against reactive oxygen species and stress symptoms are much induced. These together with previously reported insights into the function of plant complex I, which were obtained by analysing other complex I mutants, are integrated in order to comprehensively describe ‘life without complex I’. PMID:27122571

  13. Life without complex I: proteome analyses of an Arabidopsis mutant lacking the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Steffanie; Senkler, Jennifer; Eubel, Holger; Peterhänsel, Christoph; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2016-05-01

    The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex (complex I) is of particular importance for the respiratory chain in mitochondria. It is the major electron entry site for the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) and therefore of great significance for mitochondrial ATP generation. We recently described an Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant lacking the genes encoding the carbonic anhydrases CA1 and CA2, which both form part of a plant-specific 'carbonic anhydrase domain' of mitochondrial complex I. The mutant lacks complex I completely. Here we report extended analyses for systematically characterizing the proteome of the ca1ca2 mutant. Using various proteomic tools, we show that lack of complex I causes reorganization of the cellular respiration system. Reduced electron entry into the respiratory chain at the first segment of the mETC leads to induction of complexes II and IV as well as alternative oxidase. Increased electron entry at later segments of the mETC requires an increase in oxidation of organic substrates. This is reflected by higher abundance of proteins involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and branched-chain amino acid catabolism. Proteins involved in the light reaction of photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle, tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, and photorespiration are clearly reduced, contributing to the significant delay in growth and development of the double-mutant. Finally, enzymes involved in defense against reactive oxygen species and stress symptoms are much induced. These together with previously reported insights into the function of plant complex I, which were obtained by analysing other complex I mutants, are integrated in order to comprehensively describe 'life without complex I'.

  14. Disentangling the Trichoderma viridescens complex.

    PubMed

    Jaklitsch, W M; Samuels, G J; Ismaiel, A; Voglmayr, H

    2013-12-01

    Trichoderma viridescens is recognised as a species complex. Multigene analyses based on the translation elongation factor 1-alpha encoding gene (tef1), a part of the rpb2 gene, encoding the second largest RNA polymerase subunit and the larger subunit of ATP citrate lyase (acl1) reveals 13 phylogenetic species with little or no phenotypic differentiation. This is the first use of acl1 in Trichoderma phylogenetics. The typification of T. viridescens s.str. is clarified and Hypocrea viridescens is replaced by the new name T. paraviridescens. Besides these two species, eleven are phylogenetically recognised and T. olivascens, T. viridarium, T. virilente, T. trixiae, T. viridialbum, T. appalachiense, T. neosinense, T. composticola, T. nothescens and T. sempervirentis are formally described and illustrated. Several species produce yellow diffusing pigment on cornmeal dextrose agar, particularly after storage at 15 °C, while T. olivascens is characterised by the formation of an olivaceous pigment. The results are compared with earlier publications on this group of species.

  15. Protein sorting in complex plastids.

    PubMed

    Sheiner, Lilach; Striepen, Boris

    2013-02-01

    Taming a cyanobacterium in a pivitol event of endosymbiosis brought photosynthesis to eukaryotes, and gave rise to the plastids found in glaucophytes, red and green algae, and the descendants of the latter, the plants. Ultrastructural as well as molecular research over the last two decades has demonstrated that plastids have enjoyed surprising lateral mobility across the tree of life. Numerous independent secondary and tertiary endosymbiosis have led to a spread of plastids into a variety of, up to that point, non-photosynthetic lineages. Happily eating and subsequently domesticating one another protists conquered a wide variety of ecological niches. The elaborate evolution of secondary, or complex, plastids is reflected in the numerous membranes that bound them (three or four compared to the two membranes of the primary plastids). Gene transfer to the host nucleus is a hallmark of endosymbiosis and provides centralized cellular control. Here we review how these proteins find their way back into the stroma of the organelle and describe the advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that allow protein translocation across four membranes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Import and Quality Control in Mitochondria and Plastids.

  16. Air Pollution Control, Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Werner, Ed.

    Authoritative reviews in seven areas of current importance in air pollution control are supplied in this volume, the first of a two-part set. Titles contained in this book are: "Dispersion of Pollutants Emitted into the Atmosphere,""The Formation and Control of Oxides of Nitrogen in Air Pollution,""The Control of Sulfur Emissions from Combustion…

  17. Taking Part One GNVQ Forward.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankland, Gillian; Ebrahim, Nazir

    This document is intended to assist practitioners involved in the delivery of Part One General National Vocational Qualifications (GNVQs), which are GNVQs designed for students in the United Kingdom who are at Key Stage 4 and the post-16 level. Section 1 examines the following topics of interest to centers that are contemplating introducing Part…

  18. Machine Shop Fundamentals: Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Michael G.; And Others

    These instructional materials were developed and designed for secondary and adult limited English proficient students enrolled in machine tool technology courses. Part 1 includes 24 lessons covering introduction, safety and shop rules, basic machine tools, basic machine operations, measurement, basic blueprint reading, layout, and bench tools.…

  19. List of Preferred Electronic Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covey, R. E.; Scott, W. R.; Hess, L. M.; Steffy, G.; Stott, F. R.

    1986-01-01

    Components passed stringent qualification tests tabulated and described. Destructive and nondestructive qualification testing confirmed parts capable of withstanding spacecraft environments without excessive degradation and have stable characteristics during operating lives. Testing assessed effects of electrical, environmental, and mechanical stresses in various levels and time durations.

  20. Glues Used in Airplane Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, S W; Truax, T R

    1920-01-01

    This report was prepared for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and presents the results of investigations conducted by the Forest Products Laboratory of the United States Forest Service on the manufacture, preparation, application, testing and physical properties of the different types of glues used in wood airplane parts.

  1. Speech parts as Poisson processes.

    PubMed

    Badalamenti, A F

    2001-09-01

    This paper presents evidence that six of the seven parts of speech occur in written text as Poisson processes, simple or recurring. The six major parts are nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, and conjunctions, with the interjection occurring too infrequently to support a model. The data consist of more than the first 5000 words of works by four major authors coded to label the parts of speech, as well as periods (sentence terminators). Sentence length is measured via the period and found to be normally distributed with no stochastic model identified for its occurrence. The models for all six speech parts but the noun significantly distinguish some pairs of authors and likewise for the joint use of all words types. Any one author is significantly distinguished from any other by at least one word type and sentence length very significantly distinguishes each from all others. The variety of word type use, measured by Shannon entropy, builds to about 90% of its maximum possible value. The rate constants for nouns are close to the fractions of maximum entropy achieved. This finding together with the stochastic models and the relations among them suggest that the noun may be a primitive organizer of written text.

  2. Part-Time Faculty Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillsborough Community Coll., Tampa, FL.

    Policies, regulations, procedures, and general information are provided in this handbook designed to help orient new part-time faculty at Hillsborough Community College (HCC). After introductory material outlining the history of HCC and stressing the importance of the student in HCC's mission, the handbook describes HCC's evening and weekend…

  3. Playing It Safe: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penman, Kenneth A.; Niccolai, Frances R.

    1985-01-01

    Explains how to prevent outdoor sports injuries; discusses related litigation and specific cases involving playing field turf, tennis, skiing, and pools; and sets out facility design and maintenance considerations and recommendations. A sidebar provides information about injury insurance available to NCAA schools. Part I of this article appeared…

  4. Piecing Together a College Education behind Bars. Part One [and] Part Two [and] Part Three [and] Part Four.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Jon Marc

    2002-01-01

    This is a four-part article on how to earn a college degree from inside prison. The author, who earned his master's while in prison, argues that education offers prisoners the best chance of staying out of prison after their release, as well as qualifying them for a decent job and easing social reintegration. The author outlines the approaches…

  5. Laserdisk Directory--Part 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Bruce

    1986-01-01

    Presents third installment of directory published in four parts in June and August issues of "Database" and July and September "Online." Description, company, compatibility, type of laserdisk, search and retrieval software, interface with magnetic media, conditions of usage, price, and status information are given for 11 products. Company names…

  6. Laserdisk Directory--Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Bruce

    1986-01-01

    Second installment of directory published in four parts in "Database" (June and August) and "Online" (July and September) provides descriptions of 17 laserdisk products together with information on the producer, compatibility, type of laserdisk, search and retrieval software, interface with magnetic media, conditions of usage, price, and status.…

  7. Laserdisk Directory--Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Bruce, Comp.

    1986-01-01

    This first installment of four-part "Online/Database Laserdisk Directory" reports on aspects of laserdisks including: product name; product description; company name; conpatibility information; type of laserdisk (compact disc read-only-memory, videodisk); software used; interface with magnetic media capability; conditions of usage; price;…

  8. Laserdisk Directory--Part 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Bruce

    1986-01-01

    This continuation of the previously published four part directory reports information on several additional laserdisk databases and provides updates on some of those included in the original listing. Included in the product descriptions are producers; compatibility; type of laserdisk; software; interface with magnetic media; conditions of usage;…

  9. OCCUPATIONS FOR YOU, PART ONE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DES ROCHES, DEAN L.

    DEVELOPED AS PART OF A CURRICULUM PROJECT DESCRIBED IN VT 004 454 TO HELP YOUNG PEOPLE LEARN BASIC PRINCIPLES AND CONCEPTS OF MECHANICS AND TECHNOLOGY, THIS BOOK WAS DESIGNED TO STIMULATE INTEREST AND ANSWER QUESTIONS ABOUT VOCATIONAL CHOICE, STIMULATE INTEREST IN READING, AND PROVIDE CONTENT TO RELATE TO ACADEMIC STUDY. THE MATERIALS DEVELOPED IN…

  10. Hydroforming of flanged tubular part

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, B. D.; Jang, J. H.; Choi, M. K.; Moon, Y. H.

    2010-06-15

    Tube hydroforming is the technology that utilizes hydraulic pressure to form a tube into desired shapes inside die cavities. Recently, tube hydroforming technology draws attentions of automotive industries due to its advantages such as weight reduction, increased strength, improved quality and reduced tooling cost. Hydroformed automotive parts used as structural components in vehicle body frame or subframe often have to be structurally joined at some point. Therefore it is useful if the hydroformed automotive parts can be given a localized attachment flange. In this study, a tube hydroformed product which has flange has been formed at various processing conditions. To accomplish successful flange hydroforming process, thorough investigation on proper combination of process parameters such as internal hydraulic pressure and tool geometry has been performed. For the process design FE analysis was performed with Dynaform 5.5. With optimized die parting angle and circumferential expansion ratio, hydroforming experiments to form flange were performed and forming characteristics at various process conditions were analyzed. The results show that flanged parts can be successfully produced by tube hydroforming process.

  11. Laserdisk Directory--Part 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Bruce

    1986-01-01

    Fourth installment of a directory published in four parts in "Database" (June and August) and "Online" (July and September) provides descriptions of 12 laserdisk products together with information on the producer, compatibility, type of laserdisk, search and retrieval software, interface with magnetic media, conditions of usage, price, and status.…

  12. Death: A Part of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otero, George G.; Harris, Zoanne

    This two-part curriculum unit includes 20 slides depicting Days of the Dead in Mexico and the United States. The unit is designed to help middle school students compare customs and practices associated with death throughout the world in a way that promotes understanding of the values and needs that produce and are reinforced by death rituals and…

  13. Fabrication of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) parts

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.W.

    1991-12-01

    A literature search was conducted for polyetheretherketone (PEEK) thermoplastic to investigate its physical properties and molding applications. Simple molds were designed, built, and tested using PEEK molding compound. Molding parameters and shrink factors were determined. Physical properties varied with the percent of crystalline PEEK present. Annealing the molded parts enhanced their physical properties and increased the percent crystallinity. 11 refs.

  14. The PC Connection Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, David L.; Zilora, Karen S.

    1986-01-01

    Presents a series of four applications of data acquisition, system control, and data analysis using personal computers. Covers topics of pilot plant information and control, automation of drug safety evaluation, analysis and characterization of petroleum resources, and high-speed analog-digital conversion connections. Part three of a series on…

  15. Local Area Networks: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessy, Raymond E., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses five approaches used by industry/colleges to provide local area network (LAN) capabilities in the analytical laboratory: (1) mixed baseband bus network coupled to a star net; (2) broadband bus network; (3) ring network; (4) star network coupled to broadband net; and (5) simple multiprocessor center. Part I (September issue) focused on…

  16. Part-Time Faculty Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Mainland, Texas City, TX.

    This document contains comprehensive information designed to orient the part-time faculty member to the College of the Mainland. Information included in the handbook covers the history and philosophy of the college; student and instructor rights; a description of social and economic characteristics of the students; a description of the faculty;…

  17. Part height control of laser metal additive manufacturing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yu-Herng

    Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) has been used to not only make but also repair damaged parts in a layer-by-layer fashion. Parts made in this manner may produce less waste than those made through conventional machining processes. However, a common issue of LMD involves controlling the deposition's layer thickness. Accuracy is important, and as it increases, both the time required to produce the part and the material wasted during the material removal process (e.g., milling, lathe) decrease. The deposition rate is affected by multiple parameters, such as the powder feed rate, laser input power, axis feed rate, material type, and part design, the values of each of which may change during the LMD process. Using a mathematical model to build a generic equation that predicts the deposition's layer thickness is difficult due to these complex parameters. In this thesis, we propose a simple method that utilizes a single device. This device uses a pyrometer to monitor the current build height, thereby allowing the layer thickness to be controlled during the LMD process. This method also helps the LMD system to build parts even with complex parameters and to increase material efficiency.

  18. Nonlocality and communication complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhrman, Harry; Cleve, Richard; Massar, Serge; de Wolf, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Quantum information processing is the emerging field that defines and realizes computing devices that make use of quantum mechanical principles such as the superposition principle, entanglement, and interference. Until recently the common notion of computing was based on classical mechanics and did not take into account all the possibilities that physically realizable computing devices offer in principle. The field gained momentum after Shor developed an efficient algorithm for factoring numbers, demonstrating the potential computing powers that quantum computing devices can unleash. In this review the information counterpart of computing is studied. It was realized early on by Holevo that quantum bits, the quantum mechanical counterpart of classical bits, cannot be used for efficient transformation of information in the sense that arbitrary k -bit messages cannot be compressed into messages of k-1 qubits. The abstract form of the distributed computing setting is called communication complexity. It studies the amount of information, in terms of bits or in our case qubits, that two spatially separated computing devices need to exchange in order to perform some computational task. Surprisingly, quantum mechanics can be used to obtain dramatic advantages for such tasks. The area of quantum communication complexity is reviewed and it is shown how it connects the foundational physics questions regarding nonlocality with those of communication complexity studied in theoretical computer science. The first examples exhibiting the advantage of the use of qubits in distributed information-processing tasks were based on nonlocality tests. However, by now the field has produced strong and interesting quantum protocols and algorithms of its own that demonstrate that entanglement, although it cannot be used to replace communication, can be used to reduce the communication exponentially. In turn, these new advances yield a new outlook on the foundations of physics and could even

  19. Complex-valued autoencoders.

    PubMed

    Baldi, Pierre; Lu, Zhiqin

    2012-09-01

    Autoencoders are unsupervised machine learning circuits, with typically one hidden layer, whose learning goal is to minimize an average distortion measure between inputs and outputs. Linear autoencoders correspond to the special case where only linear transformations between visible and hidden variables are used. While linear autoencoders can be defined over any field, only real-valued linear autoencoders have been studied so far. Here we study complex-valued linear autoencoders where the components of the training vectors and adjustable matrices are defined over the complex field with the L(2) norm. We provide simpler and more general proofs that unify the real-valued and complex-valued cases, showing that in both cases the landscape of the error function is invariant under certain groups of transformations. The landscape has no local minima, a family of global minima associated with Principal Component Analysis, and many families of saddle points associated with orthogonal projections onto sub-space spanned by sub-optimal subsets of eigenvectors of the covariance matrix. The theory yields several iterative, convergent, learning algorithms, a clear understanding of the generalization properties of the trained autoencoders, and can equally be applied to the hetero-associative case when external targets are provided. Partial results on deep architecture as well as the differential geometry of autoencoders are also presented. The general framework described here is useful to classify autoencoders and identify general properties that ought to be investigated for each class, illuminating some of the connections between autoencoders, unsupervised learning, clustering, Hebbian learning, and information theory.

  20. The physics of communicability in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Ernesto; Hatano, Naomichi; Benzi, Michele

    2012-05-01

    A fundamental problem in the study of complex networks is to provide quantitative measures of correlation and information flow between different parts of a system. To this end, several notions of communicability have been introduced and applied to a wide variety of real-world networks in recent years. Several such communicability functions are reviewed in this paper. It is emphasized that communication and correlation in networks can take place through many more routes than the shortest paths, a fact that may not have been sufficiently appreciated in previously proposed correlation measures. In contrast to these, the communicability measures reviewed in this paper are defined by taking into account all possible routes between two nodes, assigning smaller weights to longer ones. This point of view naturally leads to the definition of communicability in terms of matrix functions, such as the exponential, resolvent, and hyperbolic functions, in which the matrix argument is either the adjacency matrix or the graph Laplacian associated with the network. Considerable insight on communicability can be gained by modeling a network as a system of oscillators and deriving physical interpretations, both classical and quantum-mechanical, of various communicability functions. Applications of communicability measures to the analysis of complex systems are illustrated on a variety of biological, physical and social networks. The last part of the paper is devoted to a review of the notion of locality in complex networks and to computational aspects that by exploiting sparsity can greatly reduce the computational efforts for the calculation of communicability functions for large networks.

  1. Nonlinear Dynamics, Chaotic and Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Infeld, E.; Zelazny, R.; Galkowski, A.

    2011-04-01

    Part I. Dynamic Systems Bifurcation Theory and Chaos: 1. Chaos in random dynamical systems V. M. Gunldach; 2. Controlling chaos using embedded unstable periodic orbits: the problem of optimal periodic orbits B. R. Hunt and E. Ott; 3. Chaotic tracer dynamics in open hydrodynamical flows G. Karolyi, A. Pentek, T. Tel and Z. Toroczkai; 4. Homoclinic chaos L. P. Shilnikov; Part II. Spatially Extended Systems: 5. Hydrodynamics of relativistic probability flows I. Bialynicki-Birula; 6. Waves in ionic reaction-diffusion-migration systems P. Hasal, V. Nevoral, I. Schreiber, H. Sevcikova, D. Snita, and M. Marek; 7. Anomalous scaling in turbulence: a field theoretical approach V. Lvov and I. Procaccia; 8. Abelian sandpile cellular automata M. Markosova; 9. Transport in an incompletely chaotic magnetic field F. Spineanu; Part III. Dynamical Chaos Quantum Physics and Foundations Of Statistical Mechanics: 10. Non-equilibrium statistical mechanics and ergodic theory L. A. Bunimovich; 11. Pseudochaos in statistical physics B. Chirikov; 12. Foundations of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics J. P. Dougherty; 13. Thermomechanical particle simulations W. G. Hoover, H. A. Posch, C. H. Dellago, O. Kum, C. G. Hoover, A. J. De Groot and B. L. Holian; 14. Quantum dynamics on a Markov background and irreversibility B. Pavlov; 15. Time chaos and the laws of nature I. Prigogine and D. J. Driebe; 16. Evolutionary Q and cognitive systems: dynamic entropies and predictability of evolutionary processes W. Ebeling; 17. Spatiotemporal chaos information processing in neural networks H. Szu; 18. Phase transitions and learning in neural networks C. Van den Broeck; 19. Synthesis of chaos A. Vanecek and S. Celikovsky; 20. Computational complexity of continuous problems H. Wozniakowski; Part IV. Complex Systems As An Interface Between Natural Sciences and Environmental Social and Economic Sciences: 21. Stochastic differential geometry in finance studies V. G. Makhankov; Part V. Conference Banquet

  2. Exploring complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strogatz, Steven H.

    2001-03-01

    The study of networks pervades all of science, from neurobiology to statistical physics. The most basic issues are structural: how does one characterize the wiring diagram of a food web or the Internet or the metabolic network of the bacterium Escherichia coli? Are there any unifying principles underlying their topology? From the perspective of nonlinear dynamics, we would also like to understand how an enormous network of interacting dynamical systems - be they neurons, power stations or lasers - will behave collectively, given their individual dynamics and coupling architecture. Researchers are only now beginning to unravel the structure and dynamics of complex networks.

  3. Complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sebastin, Sandeep J

    2011-05-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) previously known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic neurological disorder involving the limbs characterized by disabling pain, swelling, vasomotor instability, sudomotor abnormality, and impairment of motor function. CRPS is not uncommon after hand surgery and may complicate post-operative care. There is no specific diagnostic test for CRPS and the diagnosis is based on history, clinical examination, and supportive laboratory findings. Recent modifications to diagnostic criteria have enabled clinicians to diagnose this disease more consistently. This review gives a synopsis of CRPS and discusses the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment options based on the limited evidence in the literature. PMID:22022040

  4. Complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sebastin, Sandeep J

    2011-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) previously known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic neurological disorder involving the limbs characterized by disabling pain, swelling, vasomotor instability, sudomotor abnormality, and impairment of motor function. CRPS is not uncommon after hand surgery and may complicate post-operative care. There is no specific diagnostic test for CRPS and the diagnosis is based on history, clinical examination, and supportive laboratory findings. Recent modifications to diagnostic criteria have enabled clinicians to diagnose this disease more consistently. This review gives a synopsis of CRPS and discusses the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment options based on the limited evidence in the literature. PMID:22022040

  5. Visualizing complex systems

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, J.

    1994-12-01

    The complexity of modern power systems has necessitated an increasing degree of computer assistance to ensure efficient and dependable operation. But while the machines are able to process and deliver more data more quickly than ever, the sheer bulk of numerical detail can be overwhelming for an operator trying to make the best decisions in a timely manner. Visualization techniques that help people see patterns and deviations can enable operators to grasp the big picture more intuitively and get to the nub of a problem quickly. 8 figs.

  6. Macroevolution of complex retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Katzourakis, Aris; Gifford, Robert J; Tristem, Michael; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Pybus, Oliver G

    2009-09-18

    Retroviruses can leave a "fossil record" in their hosts' genomes in the form of endogenous retroviruses. Foamy viruses, complex retroviruses that infect mammals, have been notably absent from this record. We have found an endogenous foamy virus within the genomes of sloths and show that foamy viruses were infecting mammals more than 100 million years ago and codiverged with their hosts across an entire geological era. Our analysis highlights the role of evolutionary constraint in maintaining viral genome structure and indicates that accessory genes and mammalian mechanisms of innate immunity are the products of macroevolutionary conflict played out over a geological time scale.

  7. Physics and complexity

    PubMed Central

    Sherrington, David

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with complex macroscopic behaviour arising in many-body systems through the combinations of competitive interactions and disorder, even with simple ingredients at the microscopic level. It attempts to indicate and illustrate the richness that has arisen, in conceptual understanding, in methodology and in application, across a large range of scientific disciplines, together with a hint of some of the further opportunities that remain to be tapped. In doing so, it takes the perspective of physics and tries to show, albeit rather briefly, how physics has contributed and been stimulated. PMID:20123753

  8. Macroevolution of complex retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Katzourakis, Aris; Gifford, Robert J; Tristem, Michael; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Pybus, Oliver G

    2009-09-18

    Retroviruses can leave a "fossil record" in their hosts' genomes in the form of endogenous retroviruses. Foamy viruses, complex retroviruses that infect mammals, have been notably absent from this record. We have found an endogenous foamy virus within the genomes of sloths and show that foamy viruses were infecting mammals more than 100 million years ago and codiverged with their hosts across an entire geological era. Our analysis highlights the role of evolutionary constraint in maintaining viral genome structure and indicates that accessory genes and mammalian mechanisms of innate immunity are the products of macroevolutionary conflict played out over a geological time scale. PMID:19762636

  9. Cleaning of parts for new manufacturing and parts rebuilding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Jeff

    1994-06-01

    Parts cleaning is the largest single expense, and the most time consuming activity, in rebuilding and new manufacturing. On average, 25% to 40% of the total labor and overhead burden is spent on cleaning. EPA and OSHA pressures add to the burden by making some methods and chemicals obsolete. Some of the processes and chemicals in current use will be curtailed and or outlawed in the future. How can a shops and industries make long term decisions or capital investments in cleaning and process improvements when the government keeps changing its rules? At the MART Corporation in Saint Louis, Missouri, we manufacture a line of cabinet-style batch cleaning machines known as Power Washers. Twenty years ago MART invented and patented the Power Washer process, a cleaning method that recycles wash solution and blasts contaminates as they are washed off the more heavily contaminated parts. Since the initial invention MART has continued to R&D the washing process and develop ancillary systems that comply with EPA and OSHA regulations. For applications involving new industrial parts or items requiring specification cleaned surfaces. MART provides filtration and solution conditioning systems, part drying operations, and triple rinsing. Units are available in stainless steel or higher alloys. We are not alone in the washer manufacturing business. You have many choices of cleaning solutions (no pun intended) which will perform in your operations and yield good results. As a manufacturer, we are interested in your success with our equipment. We have all heard the horror stories of companies having selected inappropriate cleaning systems and or processes which then brought the company to its knees, production wise. Assembly, appearance, warranty, and performance shortcomings of finished products can often be directly related to the cleaning process and its shortcomings.

  10. Getting in Taped, Part I and Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cundy, H. M.; Higgins, J.

    1971-01-01

    This article is in two parts: discussion of mathematical concepts involved in converting the reading from the tape-recorder counter which counts the turns of the run-off spool to that from the counter which counts turns of the take-up spool; calculating the length of tape run off when given the reading from the tape-recorder counter of the run-off…

  11. Planetary Data Workshop, Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Technical aspects of the Planetary Data System (PDS) are addressed. Methods and tools for maintaining and accessing large, complex sets of data are discussed. The specific software and applications needed for processing imaging and non-imaging science data are reviewed. The need for specific software that provides users with information on the location and geometry of scientific observations is discussed. Computer networks and user interface to the PDS are covered along with Computer hardware available to this data system.

  12. Method for preparing radiopharmaceutical complexes

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Alun G.; Davison, Alan; Abrams, Michael J.

    1989-05-02

    A method for preparing radiopharmaceutical complexes that are substantially free of the reaction materials used to produce the radiopharmaceutical complex is disclosed. The method involves admixing in a suitable first solvent in a container a target seeking ligand or salt or metal adduct thereof, a radionuclide label, and a reducing agent for said radionuclide, thereby forming said radiopharmaceutical complex; coating the interior walls of the container with said pharmaceutical complex; discarding the solvent containing by-products and unreacted starting reaction materials; and removing the radiopharmaceutical complex from said walls by dissolving it in a second solvent, thereby obtaining said radiopharmaceutical complex substantially free of by-products and unreacted starting materials.

  13. Polyhydride complexes for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, C.M.

    1995-09-01

    Polyhydride metal complexes are being developed for application in hydrogen storage. Efforts have focused on developing complexes with improved available hydrogen weight percentages. We have explored the possibility that complexes containing aromatic hydrocarbon ligands could store hydrogen at both the metal center and in the ligands. We have synthesized novel indenyl hydride complexes and explored their reactivity with hydrogen. The reversible hydrogenation of [IrH{sub 3}(PPh{sub 3})({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 10}H{sub 7})]{sup +} has been achieved. While attempting to prepare {eta}{sup 6}-tetrahydronaphthalene complexes, we discovered that certain polyhydride complexes catalyze both the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of tetrahydronaphthalene.

  14. Shapes of Interacting RNA Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Benjamin M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Shapes of interacting RNA complexes are studied using a filtration via their topological genus. A shape of an RNA complex is obtained by (iteratively) collapsing stacks and eliminating hairpin loops. This shape projection preserves the topological core of the RNA complex, and for fixed topological genus there are only finitely many such shapes. Our main result is a new bijection that relates the shapes of RNA complexes with shapes of RNA structures. This allows for computing the shape polynomial of RNA complexes via the shape polynomial of RNA structures. We furthermore present a linear time uniform sampling algorithm for shapes of RNA complexes of fixed topological genus. PMID:25075750

  15. Complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Greta

    2015-06-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome is an uncommon chronic pain condition. It develops spontaneously or following an injury. The features are limb pain, allodynia, hypersensitivity, hyperalgesia, abnormalities of the vasomotor, sudomotor and motor systems, and trophic changes, with reduced use of the affected limb. The diagnosis is clinical and one of exclusion. The emphasis of therapy is graded rehabilitation and movement of the limb with physiotherapy and occupational therapy. Psychological therapies should be offered if a patient is making no or slow progress in the acute phase, and to all patients in the chronic phase as depression can occur. The goal of pharmacotherapy is to assist functional improvement. The early phase may be managed with simple analgesia. Antineuropathic drugs including tricyclic antidepressants and antiepileptic drugs may be added. Other treatments with some evidence of effectiveness include corticosteroids, calcitonin and bisphosphonates. Vitamin C has been used for primary prevention after wrist fracture and upper and lower limb surgery. There is no evidence that it is effective for treating established complex regional pain syndrome.

  16. Cogeneration in large complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kovacik, J.M.; Franklin, J.C.

    1982-02-01

    Power cogeneration in large chemical plants producing sulfuric acid and phosphate fertilizers is covered. In these plants, a large quantity of ''by-product steam'' is generated which can be expanded prior to extraction for process use. Steam generated in excess of process needs can be expanded through the steam turbine to a condenser. The combination of a sulfuric acid production facility with a phosphate complex producing wet process phosphoric acid and diammonium phosphate provides a unique opportunity for cogeneration. The exothermic oxidation reactions in the production of sulfuric (or nitric) acid provide the thermal energy for ''by-product'' steam production at elevated steam conditions. Expanding the steam generated in an automatic extraction, condensing steam turbine-generator permits power generation without any incremental fuel requirement in the process plant. Furthermore, steam demands for the phosphate complex for evaporators, vaporizers and other uses would be extracted from the steam turbine-generator. Many of the practical energy systems as well as hardware considerations have been briefly discussed. The data and examples presented illustrate the attractive economics and operational flexibility which are available through use of these cogeneration systems.

  17. Complex Semantic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, G. M.; Aguiar, M. S. F.; Carvalho, C. F.; Dantas, D. R.; Cunha, M. V.; Morais, J. H. M.; Pereira, H. B. B.; Miranda, J. G. V.

    Verbal language is a dynamic mental process. Ideas emerge by means of the selection of words from subjective and individual characteristics throughout the oral discourse. The goal of this work is to characterize the complex network of word associations that emerge from an oral discourse from a discourse topic. Because of that, concepts of associative incidence and fidelity have been elaborated and represented the probability of occurrence of pairs of words in the same sentence in the whole oral discourse. Semantic network of words associations were constructed, where the words are represented as nodes and the edges are created when the incidence-fidelity index between pairs of words exceeds a numerical limit (0.001). Twelve oral discourses were studied. The networks generated from these oral discourses present a typical behavior of complex networks and their indices were calculated and their topologies characterized. The indices of these networks obtained from each incidence-fidelity limit exhibit a critical value in which the semantic network has maximum conceptual information and minimum residual associations. Semantic networks generated by this incidence-fidelity limit depict a pattern of hierarchical classes that represent the different contexts used in the oral discourse.

  18. Complexity in language acquisition.

    PubMed

    Clark, Alexander; Lappin, Shalom

    2013-01-01

    Learning theory has frequently been applied to language acquisition, but discussion has largely focused on information theoretic problems-in particular on the absence of direct negative evidence. Such arguments typically neglect the probabilistic nature of cognition and learning in general. We argue first that these arguments, and analyses based on them, suffer from a major flaw: they systematically conflate the hypothesis class and the learnable concept class. As a result, they do not allow one to draw significant conclusions about the learner. Second, we claim that the real problem for language learning is the computational complexity of constructing a hypothesis from input data. Studying this problem allows for a more direct approach to the object of study--the language acquisition device-rather than the learnable class of languages, which is epiphenomenal and possibly hard to characterize. The learnability results informed by complexity studies are much more insightful. They strongly suggest that target grammars need to be objective, in the sense that the primitive elements of these grammars are based on objectively definable properties of the language itself. These considerations support the view that language acquisition proceeds primarily through data-driven learning of some form.

  19. The Orpheus complex.

    PubMed

    Dawson, T

    2000-04-01

    This paper examines the possible psychological implications of two adaptations of the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice, both of which were completed in 1997. The first is by a man: 'Deconstructing Harry', a film by Woody Allen. The second is by a woman: 'Eurydice in the Underworld', a short story written by Kathy Acker in the last year of her life. The paper argues that there are only four 'necessary events' in the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice. It defines the sequence of these events as a 'mythic pattern' that represents the experience of loss, unconscious yearning, depression, and psychological inflation. The film is examined as an expression of an 'Orpheus complex', the short story as an expression of an 'Eurydice complex'. The paper suggests a possible reason for the persistence of interest in the myth throughout the twentieth century. Although it notes that women appear to find it easier to free themselves from identification with the mythic pattern, it also provides reasons for thinking that men may be about to do the same.

  20. The authority of complexity.

    PubMed

    Stehr, N; Grundmann, R

    2001-06-01

    The assertion about the unique 'complexity' or the peculiarly intricate character of social phenomena has, at least within sociology, a long, venerable and virtually uncontested tradition. At the turn of the last century, classical social theorists, for example, Georg Simmel and Emile Durkheim, made prominent and repeated reference to this attribute of the subject matter of sociology and the degree to which it complicates, even inhibits the develop and application of social scientific knowledge. Our paper explores the origins, the basis and the consequences of this assertion and asks in particular whether the classic complexity assertion still deserves to be invoked in analyses that ask about the production and the utilization of social scientific knowledge in modern society. We present John Maynard Keynes' economic theory and its practical applications as an illustration. We conclude that the practical value of social scientific knowledge is not dependent on a faithful, in the sense of complete, representation of social reality. Instead, social scientific knowledge that wants to optimize its practicality has to attend and attach itself to elements of social situations that can be altered or are actionable.