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Sample records for asdex upgrade enhancements

  1. The enhanced ASDEX Upgrade pellet centrifuge launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Plöckl, B.; Lang, P. T.

    2013-10-15

    Pellets played an important role in the program of ASDEX Upgrade serving both for investigations on efficient particle fuelling and high density scenarios but also for pioneering work on Edge Localised Mode (ELM) pacing and mitigation. Initially designed for launching fuelling pellets from the magnetic low field side, the system was converted already some time ago to inject pellets from the magnetic high field side as much higher fuelling efficiency was found using this configuration. In operation for more than 20 years, the pellet launching system had to undergo a major revision and upgrading, in particular of its control system. Furthermore, the control system installed adjacent to the launcher had to be transferred to a more distant location enforcing a complete galvanic separation from torus potential and a fully remote control solution. Changing from a hybrid system consisting of PLC S5/S7 and some hard wired relay control to a state of the art PLC system allowed the introduction of several new operational options enabling more flexibility in the pellet experiments. This article describes the new system architecture of control hardware and software, the operating procedure, and the extended operational window. First successful applications for ELM pacing and triggering studies are presented as well as utilization for the development of high density scenarios.

  2. The enhanced ASDEX Upgrade pellet centrifuge launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plöckl, B.; Lang, P. T.

    2013-10-01

    Pellets played an important role in the program of ASDEX Upgrade serving both for investigations on efficient particle fuelling and high density scenarios but also for pioneering work on Edge Localised Mode (ELM) pacing and mitigation. Initially designed for launching fuelling pellets from the magnetic low field side, the system was converted already some time ago to inject pellets from the magnetic high field side as much higher fuelling efficiency was found using this configuration. In operation for more than 20 years, the pellet launching system had to undergo a major revision and upgrading, in particular of its control system. Furthermore, the control system installed adjacent to the launcher had to be transferred to a more distant location enforcing a complete galvanic separation from torus potential and a fully remote control solution. Changing from a hybrid system consisting of PLC S5/S7 and some hard wired relay control to a state of the art PLC system allowed the introduction of several new operational options enabling more flexibility in the pellet experiments. This article describes the new system architecture of control hardware and software, the operating procedure, and the extended operational window. First successful applications for ELM pacing and triggering studies are presented as well as utilization for the development of high density scenarios.

  3. Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohm, H.; Angioni, C.; Arslanbekov, R.; Atanasiu, C.; Becker, G.; Becker, W.; Behler, K.; Behringer, K.; Bergmann, A.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V.; Bolshukhin, D.; Bolzonella, T.; Borrass, K.; Brambilla, M.; Braun, F.; Buhler, A.; Carlson, A.; Conway, G. D.; Coster, D. P.; Drube, R.; Dux, R.; Egorov, S.; Eich, T.; Engelhardt, K.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Fantz, U.; Faugel, H.; Finken, K. H.; Foley, M.; Franzen, P.; Fuchs, J. C.; Gafert, J.; Fournier, K. B.; Gantenbein, G.; Gehre, O.; Geier, A.; Gernhardt, J.; Goodman, T.; Gruber, O.; Gude, A.; Günter, S.; Haas, G.; Hartmann, D.; Heger, B.; Heinemann, B.; Herrmann, A.; Hobirk, J.; Hofmeister, F.; Hohenöcker, H.; Horton, L. D.; Igochine, V.; Jacchia, A.; Jakobi, M.; Jenko, F.; Kallenbach, A.; Kardaun, O.; Kaufmann, M.; Keller, A.; Kendl, A.; Kim, J.-W.; Kirov, K.; Kochergov, R.; Kollotzek, H.; Kraus, W.; Krieger, K.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Kurzan, B.; Lang, P. T.; Lasnier, C.; Lauber, P.; Laux, M.; Leonard, A. W.; Leuterer, F.; Lohs, A.; Lorenz, A.; Lorenzini, R.; Maggi, C.; Maier, H.; Mank, K.; Manso, M.-E.; Mantica, P.; Maraschek, M.; Martines, E.; Mast, K.-F.; McCarthy, P.; Meisel, D.; Meister, H.; Meo, F.; Merkel, P.; Merkel, R.; Merkl, D.; Mertens, V.; Monaco, F.; Mück, A.; Müller, H. W.; Münich, M.; Murmann, H.; Na, Y.-S.; Neu, G.; Neu, R.; Neuhauser, J.; Nguyen, F.; Nishijima, D.; Nishimura, Y.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Nunes, I.; Pautasso, G.; Peeters, A. G.; Pereverzev, G.; Pinches, S. D.; Poli, E.; Proschek, M.; Pugno, R.; Quigley, E.; Raupp, G.; Reich, M.; Ribeiro, T.; Riedl, R.; Rohde, V.; Roth, J.; Ryter, F.; Saarelma, S.; Sandmann, W.; Savtchkov, A.; Sauter, O.; Schade, S.; Schilling, H.-B.; Schneider, W.; Schramm, G.; Schwarz, E.; Schweinzer, J.; Schweizer, S.; Scott, B. D.; Seidel, U.; Serra, F.; Sesnic, S.; Sihler, C.; Silva, A.; Sips, A. C. C.; Speth, E.; Stäbler, A.; Steuer, K.-H.; Stober, J.; Streibl, B.; Strumberger, E.; Suttrop, W.; Tabasso, A.; Tanga, A.; Tardini, G.; Tichmann, C.; Treutterer, W.; Troppmann, M.; Urano, H.; Varela, P.; Vollmer, O.; Wagner, D.; Wenzel, U.; Wesner, F.; Westerhof, E.; Wolf, R.; Wolfrum, E.; Würsching, E.; Yoon, S.-W.; Yu, Q.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.; Zehrfeld, H.-P.

    2003-12-01

    Recent results from the ASDEX Upgrade experimental campaigns 2001 and 2002 are presented. An improved understanding of energy and particle transport emerges in terms of a 'critical gradient' model for the temperature gradients. Coupling this to particle diffusion explains most of the observed behaviour of the density profiles, in particular, the finding that strong central heating reduces the tendency for density profile peaking. Internal transport barriers (ITBs) with electron and ion temperatures in excess of 20 keV (but not simultaneously) have been achieved. By shaping the plasma, a regime with small type II edge localized modes (ELMs) has been established. Here, the maximum power deposited on the target plates was greatly reduced at constant average power. Also, an increase of the ELM frequency by injection of shallow pellets was demonstrated. ELM free operation is possible in the quiescent H-mode regime previously found in DIII-D which has also been established on ASDEX Upgrade. Regarding stability, a regime with benign neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) was found. During electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) stabilization of NTMs, bgrN could be increased well above the usual onset level without a reappearance of the NTM. Electron cyclotron resonance heating and ECCD have also been used to control the sawtooth repetition frequency at a moderate fraction of the total heating power. The inner wall of the ASDEX Upgrade vessel has increasingly been covered with tungsten without causing detrimental effects on the plasma performance. Regarding scenario integration, a scenario with a large fraction of noninductively driven current (geq50%), but without ITB has been established. It combines improved confinement (tgrE/tgrITER98 ap 1.2) and stability (bgrN les 3.5) at high Greenwald fraction (ne/nGW ap 0.85) in steady state and with type II ELMy edge and would offer the possibility for long pulses with high fusion power at reduced current in ITER.

  4. Enhancement of the FIDA diagnostic at ASDEX Upgrade for velocity space tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, M.; Geiger, B.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Reich, M.; Salewski, M.; Odstrčil, T.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-02-01

    Recent upgrades to the FIDA (fast-ion D-alpha) diagnostic at ASDEX Upgrade are discussed. The diagnostic has been extended from three to five line of sight arrays with different angles to the magnetic field, and a spectrometer redesign allows the simultaneous measurement of red- and blue-shifted parts of the Doppler spectrum. These improvements make it possible to reconstruct the 2D fast-ion velocity distribution f≤ft(E,{{v}\\parallel}/v\\right) from the FIDA measurements by tomographic inversion under a wide range of plasma parameters. Two applications of the tomography are presented: a comparison between the distributions resulting from 60 keV and 93 keV neutral beam injection and a velocity-space resolved study of fast-ion redistribution induced by a sawtooth crash inside and outside the sawtooth inversion radius.

  5. Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, O.; Bosch, H.-S.; Günter, S.; Herrmann, A.; Kallenbach, A.; Kaufmann, M.; Krieger, K.; Lackner, K.; Mertens, V.; Neu, R.; Ryter, F.; Schweinzer, J.; Stäbler, A.; Suttrop, W.; Wolf, R.; Asmussen, K.; Bard, A.; Becker, G.; Behler, K.; Behringer, K.; Bergmann, A.; Bessenrodt-Weberpals, M.; Borrass, K.; Braams, B.; Brambilla, M.; Brandenburg, R.; Braun, F.; Brinkschulte, H.; Brückner, R.; Brüsehaber, B.; Büchl, K.; Buhler, A.; Callaghan, H. P.; Carlson, A.; Coster, D. P.; Cupido, L.; de Peña Hempel, S.; Dorn, C.; Drube, R.; Dux, R.; Egorov, S.; Engelhardt, W.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Fantz, U.; Feist, H.-U.; Franzen, P.; Fuchs, J. C.; Fussmann, G.; Gafert, J.; Gantenbein, G.; Gehre, O.; Geier, A.; Gernhardt, J.; Gubanka, E.; Gude, A.; Haas, G.; Hallatschek, K.; Hartmann, D.; Heinemann, B.; Herppich, G.; Herrmann, W.; Hofmeister, F.; Holzhauer, E.; Jacobi, D.; Kakoulidis, M.; Karakatsanis, N.; Kardaun, O.; Khutoretski, A.; Kollotzek, H.; Kötterl, S.; Kraus, W.; Kurzan, B.; Kyriakakis, G.; Lang, P. T.; Lang, R. S.; Laux, M.; Lengyel, L. L.; Leuterer, F.; Lorenz, A.; Maier, H.; Manso, M.; Maraschek, M.; Markoulaki, M.; Mast, K.-F.; McCarthy, P. J.; Meisel, D.; Meister, H.; Merkel, R.; Meskat, J. P.; Müller, H. W.; Münich, M.; Murmann, H.; Napiontek, B.; Neu, G.; Neuhauser, J.; Niethammer, M.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Pautasso, G.; Peeters, A. G.; Pereverzev, G.; Pinches, S.; Raupp, G.; Reinmüller, K.; Riedl, R.; Rohde, V.; Röhr, H.; Roth, J.; Salzmann, H.; Sandmann, W.; Schilling, H.-B.; Schlögl, D.; Schmidtmann, K.; Schneider, H.; Schneider, R.; Schneider, W.; Schramm, G.; Schweizer, S.; Schwörer, R. R.; Scott, B. D.; Seidel, U.; Serra, F.; Sesnic, S.; Sihler, C.; Silva, A.; Speth, E.; Steuer, K.-H.; Stober, J.; Streibl, B.; Thoma, A.; Treutterer, W.; Troppmann, M.; Tsois, N.; Ullrich, W.; Ulrich, M.; Varela, P.; Verbeek, H.; Vollmer, O.; Wedler, H.; Weinlich, M.; Wenzel, U.; Wesner, F.; Wunderlich, R.; Xantopoulos, N.; Yu, Q.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.; Zehrfeld, H.-P.; Zohm, H.; Zouhar, M.

    1999-09-01

    The closed ASDEX Upgrade Divertor II, `LYRA', is capable of handling heating powers of up to 20 MW or P/R of 12 MW/m, owing to a reduction of the maximum heat flux to the target plates by more than a factor of 2 compared with the open Divertor I. This reduction is caused by high radiative losses from carbon and hydrogen inside the divertor region and is in agreement with B2-EIRENE modelling predictions. At medium densities in the H mode, the type I ELM behaviour shows no dependence on the heating method (NBI, ICRH). ASDEX Upgrade-JET dimensionless identity experiments showed compatibility of the L-H transition with core physics constraints, while in the H mode confinement, inconsistencies with the invariance principle were established. At high densities close to the Greenwald density, the MHD limited edge pressures, the influence of divertor detachment on separatrix parameters and increasing edge transport lead to limited edge densities and finally to temperatures below the critical edge temperatures for H mode. This results in a drastic increase of the H mode threshold power and an upper H mode density limit with gas puff refuelling. The H mode confinement degradation approaching this density limit is caused by the ballooning mode limited edge pressures and `stiff' temperature profiles relating core and edge temperatures. Repetitive high field side pellet injection allows for H mode operation well above the Greenwald density; moreover, higher confinement than with gas fuelling is found up to the highest densities. Neoclassical tearing modes limit the achievable β depending on the collisionality at the resonant surface. In agreement with the polarization current model, the onset β is found to be proportional to the ion gyroradius in the collisionless regime, while higher collisionalities are stabilizing. The fractional energy loss connected with saturated modes at high pressures is about 25%. A reduction of neoclassical mode amplitude and an increase of β have

  6. Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, O.; Arslanbekov, R.; Atanasiu, C.; Bard, A.; Becker, G.; Becker, W.; Beckmann, M.; Behler, K.; Behringer, K.; Bergmann, A.; Bilato, R.; Bolshukin, D.; Borrass, K.; Bosch, H.-S.; Braams, B.; Brambilla, M.; Brandenburg, R.; Braun, F.; Brinkschulte, H.; Brückner, R.; Brüsehaber, B.; Büchl, K.; Buhler, A.; Bürbaumer, H.; Carlson, A.; Ciric, M.; Conway, G.; Coster, D. P.; Dorn, C.; Drube, R.; Dux, R.; Egorov, S.; Engelhardt, W.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Fantz, U.; Faugel, H.; Foley, M.; Franzen, P.; Fu, P.; Fuchs, J. C.; Gafert, J.; Gantenbein, G.; Gehre, O.; Geier, A.; Gernhardt, J.; Gubanka, E.; Gude, A.; Günter, S.; Haas, G.; Hartmann, D.; Heinemann, B.; Herrmann, A.; Hobirk, J.; Hofmeister, F.; Hohenöcker, H.; Horton, L.; Hu, L.; Jacobi, D.; Jakobi, M.; Jenko, F.; Kallenbach, A.; Kardaun, O.; Kaufmann, M.; Kendl, A.; Kim, J.-W.; Kirov, K.; Kochergov, R.; Kollotzek, H.; Kraus, W.; Krieger, K.; Kurzan, B.; Kyriakakis, G.; Lackner, K.; Lang, P. T.; Lang, R. S.; Laux, M.; Lengyel, L.; Leuterer, F.; Lorenz, A.; Maier, H.; Mank, K.; Manso, M.-E.; Maraschek, M.; Mast, K.-F.; McCarthy, P. J.; Meisel, D.; Meister, H.; Meo, F.; Merkel, R.; Mertens, V.; Meskat, J. P.; Monk, R.; Müller, H. W.; Münich, M.; Murmann, H.; Neu, G.; Neu, R.; Neuhauser, J.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Nunes, I.; Pautasso, G.; Peeters, A. G.; Pereverzev, G.; Pinches, S.; Poli, E.; Pugno, R.; Raupp, G.; Ribeiro, T.; Riedl, R.; Riondato, S.; Rohde, V.; Röhr, H.; Roth, J.; Ryter, F.; Salzmann, H.; Sandmann, W.; Sarelma, S.; Schade, S.; Schilling, H.-B.; Schlögl, D.; Schmidtmann, K.; Schneider, R.; Schneider, W.; Schramm, G.; Schweinzer, J.; Schweizer, S.; Scott, B. D.; Seidel, U.; Serra, F.; Sesnic, S.; Sihler, C.; Silva, A.; Sips, A.; Speth, E.; Stäbler, A.; Steuer, K.-H.; Stober, J.; Streibl, B.; Strumberger, E.; Suttrop, W.; Tabasso, A.; Tanga, A.; Tardini, G.; Tichmann, C.; Treutterer, W.; Troppmann, M.; Tsois, N.; Ullrich, W.; Ulrich, M.; Varela, P.; Vollmer, O.; Wenzel, U.; Wesner, F.; Wolf, R.; Wolfrum, E.; Wunderlich, R.; Xantopoulos, N.; Yu, Q.; Zarrabian, M.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.; Zehrfeld, H.-P.; Zeiler, A.; Zohm, H.

    2001-10-01

    Ion and electron temperature profiles in conventional L and H mode on ASDEX Upgrade are generally stiff and limited by a critical temperature gradient length ∇T/T as given by ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence. ECRH experiments indicate that electron temperature (Te) profiles are also stiff, as predicted by electron temperature gradient turbulence with streamers. Accordingly, the core and edge temperatures are proportional to each other and the plasma energy is proportional to the pedestal pressure for fixed density profiles. Density profiles are not stiff, and confinement improves with density peaking. Medium triangularity shapes (δ<0.45) show strongly improved confinement up to the Greenwald density nGW and therefore higher βvalues, owing to increasing pedestal pressure, and H mode density operation extends above nGW. Density profile peaking at nGW was achieved with controlled gas puffing rates, and first results from a new high field side pellet launcher allowing higher pellet velocities are promising. At these high densities, small type II ELMs provide good confinement with low divertor power loading. In advanced scenarios the highest performance was achieved in the improved H mode with HL-89PβN approx 7.2 at δ = 0.3 for five confinement times, limited by neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) at low central magnetic shear (qmin approx 1). The T profiles are still governed by ITG and trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence, and confinement is improved by density peaking connected with low magnetic shear. Ion internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges - mostly with reversed shear (qmin>1) and L mode edge - achieved HL-89P <= 2.1 and are limited to βN <= 1.7 by internal and external ideal MHD modes. Turbulence driven transport is suppressed, in agreement with the E × B shear flow paradigm, and core transport coefficients are at the neoclassical ion transport level, where the latter was established by Monte Carlo simulations. Reactor relevant ion

  7. The compact neutron spectrometer at ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Zimbal, A.; Tittelmeier, K.; Schuhmacher, H.; Tardini, G.; Neu, R.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2011-12-15

    The first neutron spectrometer of ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) was installed in November 2008. It is a compact neutron spectrometer (CNS) based on a BC501A liquid scintillating detector, which can simultaneously measure 2.45-MeV and 14-MeV neutrons emitted from deuterium (D) plasmas and {gamma} radiation. The scintillating detector is coupled to a digital pulse shape discrimination data acquisition (DPSD) system capable of count rates up to 10{sup 6} s{sup -1}. The DPSD system can operate in acquisition and processing mode. With the latter n-{gamma} discrimination is performed off-line based on the two-gate method. The paper describes the tests of the CNS and its installation at AUG. The neutron emission from the D plasma measured during a discharge with high auxiliary heating power was used to validate the CNS performance. The study of the optimal settings for the DPSD data processing to maximize the n-{gamma} discrimination capability of the CNS is reported. The CNS measured both 2.45-MeV and 14-MeV neutrons emitted in AUG D plasmas with a maximum count rate of 5.4 x10{sup 5} s{sup -1} (>10 times higher than similar spectrometers previously achieved) with an efficiency of 9.3 x 10{sup -10} events per AUG neutron.

  8. The tungsten divertor experiment at ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neu, R.; Asmussen, K.; Krieger, K.; Thoma, A.; Bosch, H.-S.; Deschka, S.; Dux, R.; Engelhardt, W.; García-Rosales, C.; Gruber, O.; Herrmann, A.; Kallenbach, A.; Kaufmann, M.; Mertens, V.; Ryter, F.; Rohde, V.; Roth, J.; Sokoll, M.; Stäbler, A.; Suttrop, W.; Weinlich, M.; Zohm, H.; Alexander, M.; Becker, G.; Behler, K.; Behringer, K.; Behrisch, R.; Bergmann, A.; Bessenrodt-Weberpals, M.; Brambilla, M.; Brinkschulte, H.; Büchl, K.; Carlson, A.; Chodura, R.; Coster, D.; Cupido, L.; de Blank, H. J.; de Peña Hempel, S.; Drube, R.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Feist, J.-H.; Feneberg, W.; Fiedler, S.; Franzen, P.; Fuchs, J. C.; Fußmann, G.; Gafert, J.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; Haas, G.; Herppich, G.; Herrmann, W.; Hirsch, S.; Hoek, M.; Hoenen, F.; Hofmeister, F.; Hohenöcker, H.; Jacobi, D.; Junker, W.; Kardaun, O.; Kass, T.; Kollotzek, H.; Köppendörfer, W.; Kurzan, B.; Lackner, K.; Lang, P. T.; Lang, R. S.; Laux, M.; Lengyel, L. L.; Leuterer, F.; Manso, M. E.; Maraschek, M.; Mast, K.-F.; McCarthy, P.; Meisel, D.; Merkel, R.; Müller, H. W.; Münich, M.; Murmann, H.; Napiontek, B.; Neu, G.; Neuhauser, J.; Niethammer, M.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Pasch, E.; Pautasso, G.; Peeters, A. G.; Pereverzev, G.; Pitcher, C. S.; Poschenrieder, W.; Raupp, G.; Reinmüller, K.; Riedl, R.; Röhr, H.; Salzmann, H.; Sandmann, W.; Schilling, H.-B.; Schlögl, D.; Schneider, H.; Schneider, R.; Schneider, W.; Schramm, G.; Schweinzer, J.; Scott, B. D.; Seidel, U.; Serra, F.; Speth, E.; Silva, A.; Steuer, K.-H.; Stober, J.; Streibl, B.; Treutterer, W.; Troppmann, M.; Tsois, N.; Ulrich, M.; Varela, P.; Verbeek, H.; Verplancke, Ph; Vollmer, O.; Wedler, H.; Wenzel, U.; Wesner, F.; Wolf, R.; Wunderlich, R.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.; Zehrfeld, H.-P.

    1996-12-01

    Tungsten-coated tiles, manufactured by plasma spray on graphite, were mounted in the divertor of the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak and cover almost 90% of the surface facing the plasma in the strike zone. Over 600 plasma discharges have been performed to date, around 300 of which were auxiliary heated with heating powers up to 10 MW. The production of tungsten in the divertor was monitored by a W I line at 400.8 nm. In the plasma centre an array of spectral lines at 5 nm emitted by ionization states around W XXX was measured. From the intensity of these lines the W content was derived. Under normal discharge conditions W-concentrations around 0741-3335/38/12A/013/img12 or even lower were found. The influence on the main plasma parameters was found to be negligible. The maximum concentrations observed decrease with increasing heating power. In several low power discharges accumulation of tungsten occurred and the temperature profile was flattened. The concentrations of the intrinsic impurities carbon and oxygen were comparable to the discharges with the graphite divertor. Furthermore, the density and the 0741-3335/38/12A/013/img13 limits remained unchanged and no negative influence on the energy confinement or on the H-mode threshold was found. Discharges with neon radiative cooling showed the same behaviour as in the graphite divertor case.

  9. An adaptive real-time disruption predictor for ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannas, B.; Fanni, A.; Pautasso, G.; Sias, G.; Sonato, P.

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, a neural predictor has been built using plasma discharges selected from two years of ASDEX Upgrade experiments, from July 2002 to July 2004. In order to test the real-time prediction capability of the system, its performance has been evaluated using discharges coming from different experimental campaigns, from June 2005 to July 2007. All disruptions that occurred in the chosen experimental campaigns were included with the exception of those occurring in the ramp-up phase, in the ramp-down phase (if the disruption does not happen in the first 100 ms), those caused by massive gas injection and disruptions following vertical displacement events. The large majority of selected disruptions are of the cooling edge type and typically preceded by the growth of tearing modes, degradation of the thermal confinement and enhanced plasma radiation. A very small percentage of them happen at large beta after a short precursor phase. For each discharge, seven plasma diagnostic signals have been selected from numerous signals available in real-time. During the training procedure, a self-organizing map has been used to reduce the database size in order to improve the training of the neural network. Moreover, an optimization procedure has been performed to discriminate between safe and pre-disruptive phases. The prediction success rate has been further improved, performing an adaptive training of the network whenever a missed alarm is triggered by the predictor.

  10. Laser-scattering system of the tokomak ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murmann, Heindieter; Dorn, Christian; Roehr, Horst M.; Schramm, Gerold

    1990-08-01

    Asdex Upgrade (AUG) is a toroidal magnetic plasma confinement experiment for nuclear fusion research. It is of the tokamak type, having maximum values for toroidal plasma current and magnetic field of 2 MA and 3.9 T respectively. The experiment will go into operation this year. Measurement of electron temperature and density are of extreme importance for the understanding of basic plasma phenomena. One of the most unambiguous measuring methods is Thomson scattering with pulsed high power lasers as a light source. The scattering system for AUG described here is an improved version of the existing device on ASDEX. Special emphasis has been put on wide flexibility to match different discharge conditions, and operating reliability combined with high total optical transmission and spacial and temporal resolution without losing the capability of recording the long term development of plasma parameters during a discharge.

  11. 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging at ASDEX Upgrade (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Classen, I. G. J.; Boom, J. E.; Vries, P. C. de; Suttrop, W.; Schmid, E.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Schneider, P. A.; Tobias, B.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.; Donne, A. J. H.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Park, H. K.; Munsat, T.

    2010-10-15

    The newly installed electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade provides measurements of the 2D electron temperature dynamics with high spatial and temporal resolution. An overview of the technical and experimental properties of the system is presented. These properties are illustrated by the measurements of the edge localized mode and the reversed shear Alfven eigenmode, showing both the advantage of having a two-dimensional (2D) measurement, as well as some of the limitations of electron cyclotron emission measurements. Furthermore, the application of singular value decomposition as a powerful tool for analyzing and filtering 2D data is presented.

  12. Imaging motional Stark effect measurements at ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, O. P.; Burckhart, A.; McDermott, R.; Pütterich, T.; Wolf, R. C.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of results from the Imaging Motional Stark Effect (IMSE) diagnostic obtained during its first measurement campaign at ASDEX Upgrade since installation as a permanent diagnostic. A brief overview of the IMSE technique is given, followed by measurements of a standard H-mode discharge, which are compared to equilibrium reconstructions showing good agreement where expected. The development of special discharges for the calibration of pitch angle is reported and safety factor profile changes during sawteeth crashes are shown, which can be resolved to a few percent due to the high sensitivity at good time resolution of the new IMSE system.

  13. First results with 3-strap ICRF antennas in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobkov, V.; Braun, F.; Dux, R.; Herrmann, A.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Kallenbach, A.; Neu, R.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Ochoukov, R.; Pütterich, Th.; Tuccilo, A.; Tudisco, O.; Wang, Y.; Yang, Q.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-08-01

    The 3-strap antennas in ASDEX Upgrade allow ICRF operation with low tungsten (W) content in the confined plasma with W-coated antenna limiters. With the 3-strap antenna configuration, the local W impurity source at the antenna is drastically reduced and the core W concentration is similar to that of the boron coated 2-strap antenna at a given ICRF power. Operation of the 3-strap antennas with the power ratio between the central and the outer straps of 1.5:1 and 2:1 is adopted to minimize the ICRF-specific W release.

  14. Structure and dynamics of sawteeth crashes in ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Igochine, V.; Guenter, S.; Lackner, K.; Pereverzev, G.; Zohm, H.; Boom, J.; Classen, I.; Dumbrajs, O.

    2010-12-15

    The crash phase of the sawteeth in ASDEX Upgrade tokamak [Herrmann et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 44(3), 569 (2003)] is investigated in detail in this paper by means of soft x-ray (SXR) and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics. Analysis of precursor and postcursor (1,1) modes shows that the crash does not affect the position of the resonant surface q=1. Our experimental results suggest that sawtooth crash models should contain two ingredients to be consistent with experimental observations: (1) the (1,1) mode structure should survive the crash and (2) the flux changes should be small to preserve the position of the q=1 surface close to its original location. Detailed structure of the reconnection point was investigated with ECE imaging diagnostic. It is shown that reconnection starts locally. The expelled core is hot which is consistent with SXR tomography results. The observed results can be explained in the framework of a stochastic model.

  15. Structure and dynamics of sawteeth crashes in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igochine, V.; Boom, J.; Classen, I.; Dumbrajs, O.; Günter, S.; Lackner, K.; Pereverzev, G.; Zohm, H.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2010-12-01

    The crash phase of the sawteeth in ASDEX Upgrade tokamak [Herrmann et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 44(3), 569 (2003)] is investigated in detail in this paper by means of soft x-ray (SXR) and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics. Analysis of precursor and postcursor (1,1) modes shows that the crash does not affect the position of the resonant surface q =1. Our experimental results suggest that sawtooth crash models should contain two ingredients to be consistent with experimental observations: (1) the (1,1) mode structure should survive the crash and (2) the flux changes should be small to preserve the position of the q =1 surface close to its original location. Detailed structure of the reconnection point was investigated with ECE imaging diagnostic. It is shown that reconnection starts locally. The expelled core is hot which is consistent with SXR tomography results. The observed results can be explained in the framework of a stochastic model.

  16. Real time capable infrared thermography for ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieglin, B.; Faitsch, M.; Herrmann, A.; Brucker, B.; Eich, T.; Kammerloher, L.; Martinov, S.

    2015-11-01

    Infrared (IR) thermography is widely used in fusion research to study power exhaust and incident heat load onto the plasma facing components. Due to the short pulse duration of today's fusion experiments, IR systems have mostly been designed for off-line data analysis. For future long pulse devices (e.g., Wendelstein 7-X, ITER), a real time evaluation of the target temperature and heat flux is mandatory. This paper shows the development of a real time capable IR system for ASDEX Upgrade. A compact IR camera has been designed incorporating the necessary magnetic and electric shielding for the detector, cooler assembly. The camera communication is based on the Camera Link industry standard. The data acquisition hardware is based on National Instruments hardware, consisting of a PXIe chassis inside and a fibre optical connected industry computer outside the torus hall. Image processing and data evaluation are performed using real time LabVIEW.

  17. Real time capable infrared thermography for ASDEX Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Sieglin, B; Faitsch, M; Herrmann, A; Brucker, B; Eich, T; Kammerloher, L; Martinov, S

    2015-11-01

    Infrared (IR) thermography is widely used in fusion research to study power exhaust and incident heat load onto the plasma facing components. Due to the short pulse duration of today's fusion experiments, IR systems have mostly been designed for off-line data analysis. For future long pulse devices (e.g., Wendelstein 7-X, ITER), a real time evaluation of the target temperature and heat flux is mandatory. This paper shows the development of a real time capable IR system for ASDEX Upgrade. A compact IR camera has been designed incorporating the necessary magnetic and electric shielding for the detector, cooler assembly. The camera communication is based on the Camera Link industry standard. The data acquisition hardware is based on National Instruments hardware, consisting of a PXIe chassis inside and a fibre optical connected industry computer outside the torus hall. Image processing and data evaluation are performed using real time LabVIEW.

  18. Ammonia production in nitrogen seeded plasma discharges in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, V.; Oberkofler, M.

    2015-08-01

    In present tokamaks nitrogen seeding is used to reduce the power load onto the divertor tiles. Some fraction of the seeded nitrogen reacts with hydrogen to form ammonia. The behaviour of ammonia in ASDEX Upgrade is studied by mass spectrometry. Injection without plasma shows strong absorption at the inner walls of the vessel and isotope exchange reactions. During nitrogen seeding in H-mode discharges the onset of a saturation of the nitrogen retention is observed. The residual gas consists of strongly deuterated methane and ammonia with almost equal amounts of deuterium and protium. This confirms the role of surface reactions in the ammonia formation. The results are consistent with findings in previous investigations. A numerical decomposition of mass spectra is under development and will be needed for quantitative evaluation of the results obtained.

  19. Analysis of ICRF-Accelerated Ions in ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Mantsinen, M. J.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2007-09-28

    MHD-induced losses of fast ions with energy in the MeV range have been observed during high-power ICRF heating of hydrogen minority ions in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak (R{sub 0}{approx_equal}1.65 m, a{approx_equal}0.5 m). ICRF heating and ICRF-driven fast ions in discharges exhibiting fast ion losses due to toroidal Alfven eigenmodes and a new core-localised MHD instability are analysed. It is found that the lost ions are ICRF-accelerated trapped protons with energy in the range of 0.3-1.6 MeV, orbit widths of 20-35 cm, and turning points at r/a>0.5 and at major radii close to the cyclotron resonance {omega} = {omega}{sub cH}(R). The presence of such protons is consistent with ICRF modelling.

  20. Real time capable infrared thermography for ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Sieglin, B. Faitsch, M.; Herrmann, A.; Brucker, B.; Eich, T.; Kammerloher, L.; Martinov, S.

    2015-11-15

    Infrared (IR) thermography is widely used in fusion research to study power exhaust and incident heat load onto the plasma facing components. Due to the short pulse duration of today’s fusion experiments, IR systems have mostly been designed for off-line data analysis. For future long pulse devices (e.g., Wendelstein 7-X, ITER), a real time evaluation of the target temperature and heat flux is mandatory. This paper shows the development of a real time capable IR system for ASDEX Upgrade. A compact IR camera has been designed incorporating the necessary magnetic and electric shielding for the detector, cooler assembly. The camera communication is based on the Camera Link industry standard. The data acquisition hardware is based on National Instruments hardware, consisting of a PXIe chassis inside and a fibre optical connected industry computer outside the torus hall. Image processing and data evaluation are performed using real time LabVIEW.

  1. New Frequency Step-Tunable Ecrh System for Asdex Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, D.; Leuterer, F.; Manini, A.; Monaco, F.; Münich, M.; Ryter, F.; Schütz, H.; Zohm, H.; Franke, T.; Heidinger, R.; Thumm, M.; Kasparek, W.; Gantenbein, G.; Litvak, A. G.; Popov, L. G.; Nichiporenko, V. O.; Myasnikov, V. E.; Denisov, G. G.; Tai, E. M.; Solyanova, E. A.; Malygin, S. A.

    2006-02-01

    A new broadband ECRH (Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating) system is currently under construction at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. This system will employ multi-frequency gyrotrons step-tunable in the range 105 140 GHz. In its final stage the system will consist of 4 gyrotrons with a total power of 4 MW and a pulse length of 10 s. It employs a fast steerable launcher for feedback controlled deposition that allows for poloidal steering of 10° within 100 ms. Transmission line elements, such as corrugated waveguides, polarizer mirrors and vacuum windows, are designed to cope for this frequency band.

  2. Recent ASDEX Upgrade research in support of ITER and DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H. Zohmthe ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2015-10-01

    Recent experiments on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak aim at improving the physics base for ITER and DEMO to aid the machine design and prepare efficient operation. Type I edge localized mode (ELM) mitigation using resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) has been shown at low pedestal collisionality (νped\\ast <0.4) . In contrast to the previous high ν* regime, suppression only occurs in a narrow RMP spectral window, indicating a resonant process, and a concomitant confinement drop is observed due to a reduction of pedestal top density and electron temperature. Strong evidence is found for the ion heat flux to be the decisive element for the L-H power threshold. A physics based scaling of the density at which the minimum PLH occurs indicates that ITER could take advantage of it to initiate H-mode at lower density than that of the final Q = 10 operational point. Core density fluctuation measurements resolved in radius and wave number show that an increase of R/LTe introduced by off-axis electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) mainly increases the large scale fluctuations. The radial variation of the fluctuation level is in agreement with simulations using the GENE code. Fast particles are shown to undergo classical slowing down in the absence of large scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) events and for low heating power, but show signs of anomalous radial redistribution at large heating power, consistent with a broadened off-axis neutral beam current drive current profile under these conditions. Neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) suppression experiments using electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) with feedback controlled deposition have allowed to test several control strategies for ITER, including automated control of (3,2) and (2,1) NTMs during a single discharge. Disruption mitigation studies using massive gas injection (MGI) can show an increased fuelling efficiency with high field side injection, but a saturation of the fuelling efficiency is observed at high injected

  3. Progress in controlling ICRF-edge interactions in ASDEX upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bobkov, Vl. Ochoukov, R.; Bilato, R.; Braun, F.; Carralero, D.; Dux, R.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Jacquot, J.; Lunt, T.; Potzel, S.; Pütterich, Th.; Jacquet, Ph.; Monakhov, I.; Zhang, W.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Stepanov, I.; Colas, L.; Meyer, O.; Czarnecka, A.; and others

    2015-12-10

    RF measurements during variation of the strap voltage balance of the original 2-strap ICRF antenna in ASDEX Upgrade at constant power are consistent with electromagnetic calculations by HFSS and TOPICA, more so for the latter. RF image current compensation is observed at the antenna limiters in the experiment at a local strap voltage of about half of the value of the remote strap, albeit with a non-negligible uncertainty in phasing. The RF-specific tungsten (W) source at the broad-limiter 2-strap antenna correlates strongly with the RF voltage at the local strap at the locations not connected to opposite side of the antenna along magnetic field lines. The trends of the observed increase of the RF loading with injection of local gas are well described by a combined EMC3-Eirene – FELICE calculations, with the most efficient improvement confirmed for the outer-midplane valves, but underestimated by about 1/3. The corresponding deuterium density tailoring is also likely responsible for the decrease of local W sources observed in the experiment.

  4. Application of AXUV diode detectors at ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bernert, M. Eich, T.; Burckhart, A.; Fuchs, J. C.; Giannone, L.; Kallenbach, A.; McDermott, R. M.; Sieglin, B.

    2014-03-15

    In the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, a radiation measurement for a wide spectral range, based on semiconductor detectors, with 256 lines of sight and a time resolution of 5μs was recently installed. In combination with the foil based bolometry, it is now possible to estimate the absolutely calibrated radiated power of the plasma on fast timescales. This work introduces this diagnostic based on AXUV (Absolute eXtended UltraViolet) n-on-p diodes made by International Radiation Detectors, Inc. The measurement and the degradation of the diodes in a tokamak environment is shown. Even though the AXUV diodes are developed to have a constant sensitivity for all photon energies (1 eV-8 keV), degradation leads to a photon energy dependence of the sensitivity. The foil bolometry, which is restricted to a time resolution of less than 1 kHz, offers a basis for a time dependent calibration of the diodes. The measurements of the quasi-calibrated diodes are compared with the foil bolometry and found to be accurate on the kHz time scale. Therefore, it is assumed, that the corrected values are also valid for the highest time resolution (200 kHz). With this improved diagnostic setup, the radiation induced by edge localized modes is analyzed on fast timescales.

  5. Real-time diamagnetic flux measurements on ASDEX Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Giannone, L; Geiger, B; Bilato, R; Maraschek, M; Odstrčil, T; Fischer, R; Fuchs, J C; McCarthy, P J; Mertens, V; Schuhbeck, K H

    2016-05-01

    Real-time diamagnetic flux measurements are now available on ASDEX Upgrade. In contrast to the majority of diamagnetic flux measurements on other tokamaks, no analog summation of signals is necessary for measuring the change in toroidal flux or for removing contributions arising from unwanted coupling to the plasma and poloidal field coil currents. To achieve the highest possible sensitivity, the diamagnetic measurement and compensation coil integrators are triggered shortly before plasma initiation when the toroidal field coil current is close to its maximum. In this way, the integration time can be chosen to measure only the small changes in flux due to the presence of plasma. Two identical plasma discharges with positive and negative magnetic field have shown that the alignment error with respect to the plasma current is negligible. The measured diamagnetic flux is compared to that predicted by TRANSP simulations. The poloidal beta inferred from the diamagnetic flux measurement is compared to the values calculated from magnetic equilibrium reconstruction codes. The diamagnetic flux measurement and TRANSP simulation can be used together to estimate the coupled power in discharges with dominant ion cyclotron resonance heating. PMID:27250425

  6. A compact lithium pellet injector for tokamak pedestal studies in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arredondo Parra, R.; Moreno Quicios, R.; Ploeckl, B.; Birkenmeier, G.; Herrmann, A.; Kocsis, G.; Laggner, F. M.; Lang, P. T.; Lunt, T.; Macian-Juan, R.; Rohde, V.; Sellmair, G.; Szepesi, T.; Wolfrum, E.; Zeidner, W.; Neu, R.

    2016-02-01

    Experiments have been performed at ASDEX Upgrade, aiming to investigate the impact of lithium in an all-metal-wall tokamak and attempting to enhance the pedestal operational space. For this purpose, a lithium pellet injector has been developed, capable of injecting pellets carrying a particle content ranging from 1.82 × 1019 atoms (0.21 mg) to 1.64 × 1020 atoms (1.89 mg). The maximum repetition rate is about 2 Hz. Free flight launch from the torus outboard side without a guiding tube was realized. In such a configuration, angular dispersion and speed scatter are low, and a transfer efficiency exceeding 90% was achieved in the test bed. Pellets are accelerated in a gas gun; hence special care was taken to avoid deleterious effects by the propellant gas pulse. Therefore, the main plasma gas species was applied as propellant gas, leading to speeds ranging from 420 m/s to 700 m/s. In order to minimize the residual amount of gas to be introduced into the plasma vessel, a large expansion volume equipped with a cryopump was added into the flight path. In view of the experiments, an optimal propellant gas pressure of 50 bars was chosen for operation, since at this pressure maximum efficiency and low propellant gas flux coincide. This led to pellet speeds of 585 m/s ± 32 m/s. Lithium injection has been achieved at ASDEX Upgrade, showing deep pellet penetration into the plasma, though pedestal broadening has not been observed yet.

  7. A compact lithium pellet injector for tokamak pedestal studies in ASDEX Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Arredondo Parra, R; Moreno Quicios, R; Ploeckl, B; Birkenmeier, G; Herrmann, A; Kocsis, G; Laggner, F M; Lang, P T; Lunt, T; Macian-Juan, R; Rohde, V; Sellmair, G; Szepesi, T; Wolfrum, E; Zeidner, W; Neu, R

    2016-02-01

    Experiments have been performed at ASDEX Upgrade, aiming to investigate the impact of lithium in an all-metal-wall tokamak and attempting to enhance the pedestal operational space. For this purpose, a lithium pellet injector has been developed, capable of injecting pellets carrying a particle content ranging from 1.82 × 10(19) atoms (0.21 mg) to 1.64 × 10(20) atoms (1.89 mg). The maximum repetition rate is about 2 Hz. Free flight launch from the torus outboard side without a guiding tube was realized. In such a configuration, angular dispersion and speed scatter are low, and a transfer efficiency exceeding 90% was achieved in the test bed. Pellets are accelerated in a gas gun; hence special care was taken to avoid deleterious effects by the propellant gas pulse. Therefore, the main plasma gas species was applied as propellant gas, leading to speeds ranging from 420 m/s to 700 m/s. In order to minimize the residual amount of gas to be introduced into the plasma vessel, a large expansion volume equipped with a cryopump was added into the flight path. In view of the experiments, an optimal propellant gas pressure of 50 bars was chosen for operation, since at this pressure maximum efficiency and low propellant gas flux coincide. This led to pellet speeds of 585 m/s ± 32 m/s. Lithium injection has been achieved at ASDEX Upgrade, showing deep pellet penetration into the plasma, though pedestal broadening has not been observed yet. PMID:26931850

  8. A compact lithium pellet injector for tokamak pedestal studies in ASDEX Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Arredondo Parra, R; Moreno Quicios, R; Ploeckl, B; Birkenmeier, G; Herrmann, A; Kocsis, G; Laggner, F M; Lang, P T; Lunt, T; Macian-Juan, R; Rohde, V; Sellmair, G; Szepesi, T; Wolfrum, E; Zeidner, W; Neu, R

    2016-02-01

    Experiments have been performed at ASDEX Upgrade, aiming to investigate the impact of lithium in an all-metal-wall tokamak and attempting to enhance the pedestal operational space. For this purpose, a lithium pellet injector has been developed, capable of injecting pellets carrying a particle content ranging from 1.82 × 10(19) atoms (0.21 mg) to 1.64 × 10(20) atoms (1.89 mg). The maximum repetition rate is about 2 Hz. Free flight launch from the torus outboard side without a guiding tube was realized. In such a configuration, angular dispersion and speed scatter are low, and a transfer efficiency exceeding 90% was achieved in the test bed. Pellets are accelerated in a gas gun; hence special care was taken to avoid deleterious effects by the propellant gas pulse. Therefore, the main plasma gas species was applied as propellant gas, leading to speeds ranging from 420 m/s to 700 m/s. In order to minimize the residual amount of gas to be introduced into the plasma vessel, a large expansion volume equipped with a cryopump was added into the flight path. In view of the experiments, an optimal propellant gas pressure of 50 bars was chosen for operation, since at this pressure maximum efficiency and low propellant gas flux coincide. This led to pellet speeds of 585 m/s ± 32 m/s. Lithium injection has been achieved at ASDEX Upgrade, showing deep pellet penetration into the plasma, though pedestal broadening has not been observed yet.

  9. Upgrade to the control system of the reflectometry diagnostic of ASDEX upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Graca, S.; Santos, J.; Manso, M.E.

    2004-10-01

    The broadband frequency modulation-continuous wave microwave/millimeter wave reflectometer of ASDEX upgrade tokamak (Institut fuer Plasma Physik (IPP), Garching, Germany) developed by Centro de Fusao Nuclear (Lisboa, Portugal) with the collaboration of IPP, is a complex system with 13 channels (O and X modes) and two types of operation modes (swept and fixed frequency). The control system that ensures remote operation of the diagnostic incorporates VME and CAMAC bus based acquisition/timing systems. Microprocessor input/output boards are used to control and monitor the microwave circuitry and associated electronic devices. The implementation of the control system is based on an object-oriented client/server model: a centralized server manages the hardware and receives input from remote clients. Communication is handled through transmission control protocol/internet protocol sockets. Here we describe recent upgrades of the control system aiming to: (i) accommodate new channels; (ii) adapt to the heterogeneity of computing platforms and operating systems; and (iii) overcome remote access restrictions. Platform and operating system independence was achieved by redesigning the graphical user interface in JAVA. As secure shell is the standard remote access protocol adopted in major fusion laboratories, secure shell tunneling was implemented to allow remote operation of the diagnostic through the existing firewalls.

  10. Upgrade to the control system of the reflectometry diagnostic of ASDEX upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graça, S.; Santos, J.; Manso, M. E.

    2004-10-01

    The broadband frequency modulation-continuous wave microwave/millimeter wave reflectometer of ASDEX upgrade tokamak (Institut für Plasma Physik (IPP), Garching, Germany) developed by Centro de Fusão Nuclear (Lisboa, Portugal) with the collaboration of IPP, is a complex system with 13 channels (O and X modes) and two types of operation modes (swept and fixed frequency). The control system that ensures remote operation of the diagnostic incorporates VME and CAMAC bus based acquisition/timing systems. Microprocessor input/output boards are used to control and monitor the microwave circuitry and associated electronic devices. The implementation of the control system is based on an object-oriented client/server model: a centralized server manages the hardware and receives input from remote clients. Communication is handled through transmission control protocol/internet protocol sockets. Here we describe recent upgrades of the control system aiming to: (i) accommodate new channels; (ii) adapt to the heterogeneity of computing platforms and operating systems; and (iii) overcome remote access restrictions. Platform and operating system independence was achieved by redesigning the graphical user interface in JAVA. As secure shell is the standard remote access protocol adopted in major fusion laboratories, secure shell tunneling was implemented to allow remote operation of the diagnostic through the existing firewalls.

  11. LETTER: H-mode threshold and confinement in helium and deuterium in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryter, F.; Pütterich, T.; Reich, M.; Scarabosio, A.; Wolfrum, E.; Fischer, R.; Gemisic Adamov, M.; Hicks, N.; Kurzan, B.; Maggi, C.; Neu, R.; Rohde, V.; Tardini, G.; ASDEX Upgrade TEAM

    2009-06-01

    In 2008, experiments have been carried out in ASDEX Upgrade to compare H-mode power threshold and confinement time in helium and deuterium. A scan in magnetic field and a wide density variation indicate that the threshold power in the two gases is very similar. The density dependence of the threshold exhibits a clear minimum. Confinement in helium is about 30% lower than in deuterium, mainly due to the reduction in the ion density caused by Z = 2 in helium.

  12. Dual array 3D electron cyclotron emission imaging at ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Classen, I. G. J. Bogomolov, A. V.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Suttrop, W.; Boom, J. E.; Tobias, B. J.; Donné, A. J. H.

    2014-11-15

    In a major upgrade, the (2D) electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic (ECEI) at ASDEX Upgrade has been equipped with a second detector array, observing a different toroidal position in the plasma, to enable quasi-3D measurements of the electron temperature. The new system will measure a total of 288 channels, in two 2D arrays, toroidally separated by 40 cm. The two detector arrays observe the plasma through the same vacuum window, both under a slight toroidal angle. The majority of the field lines are observed by both arrays simultaneously, thereby enabling a direct measurement of the 3D properties of plasma instabilities like edge localized mode filaments.

  13. Dual array 3D electron cyclotron emission imaging at ASDEX Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Classen, I G J; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C; Bogomolov, A V; Suttrop, W; Boom, J E; Tobias, B J; Donné, A J H

    2014-11-01

    In a major upgrade, the (2D) electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic (ECEI) at ASDEX Upgrade has been equipped with a second detector array, observing a different toroidal position in the plasma, to enable quasi-3D measurements of the electron temperature. The new system will measure a total of 288 channels, in two 2D arrays, toroidally separated by 40 cm. The two detector arrays observe the plasma through the same vacuum window, both under a slight toroidal angle. The majority of the field lines are observed by both arrays simultaneously, thereby enabling a direct measurement of the 3D properties of plasma instabilities like edge localized mode filaments. PMID:25430246

  14. Simulations of gas puff effects on edge density and ICRF coupling in ASDEX upgrade using EMC3-Eirene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Lunt, T.; Bobkov, V.; Coster, D.; Brida, D.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Jacquet, P.; Feng, Y.

    2015-12-10

    Simulations were carried out with the 3D plasma transport code EMC3-EIRENE, to study the deuterium gas (D{sub 2}) puff effects on edge density and the coupling of Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) power in ASDEX Upgrade. Firstly we simulated an inter-ELM phase of an H-mode discharge with a moderate (1.2 × 10{sup 22} electrons/s) lower divertor gas puff. Then we changed the gas source positions to the mid-plane or top of machine while keeping other conditions the same. Cases with different mid-plane or top gas valves are investigated. Our simulations indicate that compared to lower divertor gas puffing, the mid-plane gas puff can enhance the local density in front of the antennas most effectively, while a rather global (toroidally uniform) but significantly smaller enhancement is found for top gas puffing. Our results show quantitative agreement with the experiments.

  15. Status, Operation, and Extension of the ECRH System at ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, D.; Stober, J.; Leuterer, F.; Monaco, F.; Müller, S.; Münich, M.; Rapson, C. J.; Reich, M.; Schubert, M.; Schütz, H.; Treutterer, W.; Zohm, H.; Thumm, M.; Scherer, T.; Meier, A.; Gantenbein, G.; Jelonnek, J.; Kasparek, W.; Lechte, C.; Plaum, B.; Goodman, T.; Litvak, A. G.; Denisov, G. G.; Chirkov, A.; Zapevalov, V.; Malygin, V.; Popov, L. G.; Nichiporenko, V. O.; Myasnikov, V. E.; Tai, E. M.; Solyanova, E. A.; Malygin, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    The upgraded electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) system at ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) has been routinely used with eight gyrotrons during the last experimental campaign. A further upgrade will replace the existing system of four short-pulse (140 GHz, 2 s, 500 kW) gyrotrons. The final goal is to have around 6.5-7 MW at 140 GHz (or 5.5 MW at 105 GHz) from eight units available in the plasma during the whole AUG discharge (10 s). The system operates at 140 and 105 GHz with X2, O2 and X3 schemes. For B > 3 T also an ITER-like O1-scenario can be run using the 105 GHz option. Four of the eight launching antennas are capable of fast poloidal movements necessary for real-time control of the location of power deposition.

  16. A fast feedback controlled magnetic drive for the ASDEX Upgrade fast-ion loss detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayllon-Guerola, J.; Gonzalez-Martin, J.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Rivero-Rodriguez, J.; Herrmann, A.; Vorbrugg, S.; Leitenstern, P.; Zoletnik, S.; Galdon, J.; Garcia Lopez, J.; Rodriguez-Ramos, M.; Sanchis-Sanchez, L.; Dominguez, A. D.; Kocan, M.; Gunn, J. P.; Garcia-Vallejo, D.; Dominguez, J.

    2016-11-01

    A magnetically driven fast-ion loss detector system for the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak has been designed and will be presented here. The device is feedback controlled to adapt the detector head position to the heat load and physics requirements. Dynamic simulations have been performed taking into account effects such as friction, coil self-induction, and eddy currents. A real time positioning control algorithm to maximize the detector operational window has been developed. This algorithm considers dynamical behavior and mechanical resistance as well as measured and predicted thermal loads. The mechanical design and real time predictive algorithm presented here may be used for other reciprocating systems.

  17. Fringe jump analysis and implementation of polarimetry on the ASDEX Upgrade DCN interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Mlynek, A. Casali, L.; Eixenberger, H.; Ford, O.

    2014-11-15

    The ASDEX Upgrade tokamak is equipped with a 5-channel DCN interferometer with a probing wavelength of 195 μm. Up to now, phase measurement and density calculation have been accomplished by hard-wired phase counting electronics. Meanwhile, a fast digitizer has been installed which acquires the raw signals. That way, the various causes of counting errors by integer multiples of 2π, so-called fringe jumps, can be analyzed, and phase reconstruction schemes based on digital signal processing can be developed. In addition, a prototype polarimeter setup has been installed on one channel and allows for measurement of the Faraday rotation experienced by the probing beam.

  18. Effect of 3D magnetic perturbations on the plasma rotation in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martitsch, A. F.; Kasilov, S. V.; Kernbichler, W.; Kapper, G.; Albert, C. G.; Heyn, M. F.; Smith, H. M.; Strumberger, E.; Fietz, S.; Suttrop, W.; Landreman, M.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-07-01

    The toroidal torque due to the non-resonant interaction with external magnetic perturbations (TF ripple and perturbations from ELM mitigation coils) in ASDEX Upgrade is modelled with help of the NEO-2 and SFINCS codes and compared to semi-analytical models. It is shown that almost all non-axisymmetric transport regimes contributing to neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) are realized within a single discharge at different radial positions. The NTV torque is obtained to be roughly a quarter of the NBI torque. This indicates the presence of other important momentum sources. The role of these momentum sources and possible integral torque balance measurements are briefly discussed.

  19. ELM behaviour and linear MHD stability of edge ECRH heated ASDEX Upgrade plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burckhart, A.; Dunne, M.; Wolfrum, E.; Fischer, R.; McDermott, R.; Viezzer, E.; Willensdorfer, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-05-01

    In order to test the peeling–ballooning ELM model, ECRH heating was applied to the edge of ASDEX Upgrade type-I ELMy H-mode plasmas to alter the pedestal pressure and current density profiles. The discharges were analysed with respect to ideal MHD stability. While the ELM frequency increased and the pedestal gradients relaxed with edge ECRH, the MHD stability boundary did not change. The results indicate that the peeling–ballooning model is insufficient to fully explain the triggering of ELM instabilities in the presence of edge ECRH heating.

  20. 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging at ASDEX Upgrade (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, I. G. J.; Boom, J. E.; Suttrop, W.; Schmid, E.; Tobias, B.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Donné, A. J. H.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; de Vries, P. C.; Park, H. K.; Munsat, T.; García-Muñoz, M.; Schneider, P. A.

    2010-10-01

    The newly installed electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade provides measurements of the 2D electron temperature dynamics with high spatial and temporal resolution. An overview of the technical and experimental properties of the system is presented. These properties are illustrated by the measurements of the edge localized mode and the reversed shear Alfvén eigenmode, showing both the advantage of having a two-dimensional (2D) measurement, as well as some of the limitations of electron cyclotron emission measurements. Furthermore, the application of singular value decomposition as a powerful tool for analyzing and filtering 2D data is presented.

  1. Commissioning activities and first results from the collective Thomson scattering diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Meo, F.; Bindslev, H.; Korsholm, S. B.; Furtula, V.; Leipold, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Nielsen, S. K.; Salewski, M.; Leuterer, F.; Woskov, P.; Stober, J.; Wagner, D.

    2008-10-15

    The collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic installed on ASDEX Upgrade uses millimeter waves generated by the newly installed 1 MW dual frequency gyrotron as probing radiation at 105 GHz. It measures backscattered radiation with a heterodyne receiver having 50 channels (between 100 and 110 GHz) to resolve the one-dimensional velocity distribution of the confined fast ions. The steerable antennas will allow different scattering geometries to fully explore the anisotropic fast ion distributions at different spatial locations. This paper covers the capabilities and operational limits of the diagnostic. It then describes the commissioning activities carried out to date. These activities include gyrotron studies, transmission line alignment, and beam pattern measurements in the vacuum vessel. Overlap experiments in near perpendicular and near parallel have confirmed the successful alignment of the system. First results in near perpendicular of scattered spectra in a neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) plasma (minority hydrogen) on ASDEX Upgrade have shown evidence of ICRH heating phase of hydrogen.

  2. Commissioning activities and first results from the collective Thomson scattering diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade (invited).

    PubMed

    Meo, F; Bindslev, H; Korsholm, S B; Furtula, V; Leuterer, F; Leipold, F; Michelsen, P K; Nielsen, S K; Salewski, M; Stober, J; Wagner, D; Woskov, P

    2008-10-01

    The collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic installed on ASDEX Upgrade uses millimeter waves generated by the newly installed 1 MW dual frequency gyrotron as probing radiation at 105 GHz. It measures backscattered radiation with a heterodyne receiver having 50 channels (between 100 and 110 GHz) to resolve the one-dimensional velocity distribution of the confined fast ions. The steerable antennas will allow different scattering geometries to fully explore the anisotropic fast ion distributions at different spatial locations. This paper covers the capabilities and operational limits of the diagnostic. It then describes the commissioning activities carried out to date. These activities include gyrotron studies, transmission line alignment, and beam pattern measurements in the vacuum vessel. Overlap experiments in near perpendicular and near parallel have confirmed the successful alignment of the system. First results in near perpendicular of scattered spectra in a neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) plasma (minority hydrogen) on ASDEX Upgrade have shown evidence of ICRH heating phase of hydrogen.

  3. Development of the Q  =  10 scenario for ITER on ASDEX Upgrade (AUG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweinzer, J.; Beurskens, M.; Frassinetti, L.; Joffrin, E.; Bobkov, V.; Dux, R.; Fischer, R.; Fuchs, C.; Kallenbach, A.; Hopf, C.; Lang, P. T.; Mlynek, A.; Pütterich, T.; Ryter, F.; Stober, J.; Tardini, G.; Wolfrum, E.; Zohm, H.; the EUROfusion MST1 Team; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-10-01

    The development of the baseline H-mode scenario foreseen for ITER on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, i.e. discharges at q 95  =  3, relatively low β N ~ 1.8, high normalized density n/n GW ~ 0.85 and high triangularity δ  =  0.4, focused on the integration of elements foreseen for ITER and available on ASDEX Upgrade, such as ELM mitigation techniques and impurity seeding in combination with a metallic wall. Values for density and energy confinement simultaneously came close to the requirements of the ITER baseline scenario as long as β N stayed above 2. At lower heating power and thus lower β N normalized energy confinement H 98y2 ~ 0.85 is obtained. It has been found that stationary discharges are not easily achieved under these conditions due to the low natural ELM frequency occurring at the low q 95/high δ operational point. Up until now the ELM parameters were uncontrollable with the tools developed in other scenarios. Therefore studies on an alternative operational point at higher β N and q 95 have been conducted. In order to prepare for the ITER first non-activation operational phase, Helium operation has been investigated as well.

  4. Improved Collective Thomson Scattering measurements of fast ions at ASDEX upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, J.; Nielsen, S. K.; Stejner, M.; Salewski, M.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Meo, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Schubert, M.; Stober, J.; Tardini, G.; Wagner, D.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-08-21

    Understanding the behaviour of the confined fast ions is important in both current and future fusion experiments. These ions play a key role in heating the plasma and will be crucial for achieving conditions for burning plasma in next-step fusion devices. Microwave-based Collective Thomson Scattering (CTS) is well suited for reactor conditions and offers such an opportunity by providing measurements of the confined fast-ion distribution function resolved in space, time and 1D velocity space. We currently operate a CTS system at ASDEX Upgrade using a gyrotron which generates probing radiation at 105 GHz. A new setup using two independent receiver systems has enabled improved subtraction of the background signal, and hence the first accurate characterization of fast-ion properties. Here we review this new dual-receiver CTS setup and present results on fast-ion measurements based on the improved background characterization. These results have been obtained both with and without NBI heating, and with the measurement volume located close to the centre of the plasma. The measurements agree quantitatively with predictions of numerical simulations. Hence, CTS studies of fast-ion dynamics at ASDEX Upgrade are now feasible. The new background subtraction technique could be important for the design of CTS systems in other fusion experiments.

  5. Tungsten erosion in the baffle and outboard regions of the ITER-like ASDEX Upgrade divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, H.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2004-12-01

    Similar to the design of the next-step device ITER, ASDEX Upgrade is equipped with vertical divertor targets with adjacent baffles extending towards the main chamber. In ITER, it is intended to employ tungsten as a plasma-facing material in this baffle area. Tungsten-coated graphite tiles were installed in the divertor baffle and the outboard side regions of ASDEX Upgrade for a full experimental campaign. The erosion behavior of tungsten was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and by measuring the thickness of the tungsten coatings before and after exposure. The coatings had an initial thickness of approximately 450 nm. Two distinct erosion mechanisms were observed: in the outer baffle region a reduction of the coatings' thickness up to 100 nm was determined after about 6300 s of plasma discharge. On the roof baffle and on the inner baffle modules, no clear reduction of the film thickness was found. In the tracks of arcs, however, the tungsten coatings were completely removed. This represents an erosion of 5-10% of the tungsten-coated surface area in this region.

  6. Measurement of turbulent electron temperature fluctuations on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using correlated electron cyclotron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freethy, S. J.; Conway, G. D.; Classen, I.; Creely, A. J.; Happel, T.; Köhn, A.; Vanovac, B.; White, A. E.

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent temperature fluctuations are measured on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using pairs of closely spaced, narrow-band heterodyne radiometer channels and a standard correlation technique. The pre-detection spacing and bandwidth of the radiometer channel pairs is chosen such that they are physically separated less than a turbulent correlation length, but do not overlap. The radiometer has 4 fixed filter frequency channels and two tunable filter channels for added flexibility in the measurement position. Relative temperature fluctuation amplitudes are observed in a helium plasma to be δT/T = (0.76 ± 0.02)%, (0.67 ± 0.02)%, and (0.59 ± 0.03)% at normalised toroidal flux radius of ρtor = 0.82, 0.75, and 0.68, respectively.

  7. Electromagnetic effects on turbulent transport in high-performance ASDEX Upgrade discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Doerk, H.; Dunne, M.; Ryter, F.; Schneider, P. A.; Wolfrum, E.; Jenko, F.

    2015-04-15

    Modern tokamak H-mode discharges routinely operate at high plasma beta. Dedicated experiments performed on multiple machines measure contradicting dependence of the plasma confinement on this important parameter. In view of designing high-performance scenarios for next-generation devices like ITER, a fundamental understanding of the involved physics is crucial. Theoretical results—most of which have been obtained for simplified setups—indicate that increased beta does not only modify the characteristics of microturbulence but also potentially introduces fundamentally new physics. Empowered by highly accurate measurements at ASDEX Upgrade, the GENE turbulence code is used to perform a comprehensive gyrokinetic study of dedicated H-Mode plasmas. We find the stabilization of ion-temperature-gradient driven turbulence to be the most pronounced beta effect in these experimentally relevant cases. The resulting beta-improved core confinement should thus be considered for extrapolations to future machines.

  8. Gyrokinetic studies of core turbulence features in ASDEX Upgrade H-mode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, A. Bañón Told, D.; Happel, T.; Görler, T.; Abiteboul, J.; Bustos, A.; Doerk, H.; Jenko, F.

    2015-04-15

    Gyrokinetic validation studies are crucial for developing confidence in the model incorporated in numerical simulations and thus improving their predictive capabilities. As one step in this direction, we simulate an ASDEX Upgrade discharge with the GENE code, and analyze various fluctuating quantities and compare them to experimental measurements. The approach taken is the following. First, linear simulations are performed in order to determine the turbulence regime. Second, the heat fluxes in nonlinear simulations are matched to experimental fluxes by varying the logarithmic ion temperature gradient within the expected experimental error bars. Finally, the dependence of various quantities with respect to the ion temperature gradient is analyzed in detail. It is found that density and temperature fluctuations can vary significantly with small changes in this parameter, thus making comparisons with experiments very sensitive to uncertainties in the experimental profiles. However, cross-phases are more robust, indicating that they are better observables for comparisons between gyrokinetic simulations and experimental measurements.

  9. Resolving the bulk ion region of millimeter-wave collective Thomson scattering spectra at ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Stejner, M. Nielsen, S.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Meo, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Rasmussen, J.; Salewski, M.; Moseev, D.; Schubert, M.; Stober, J.; Wagner, D. H.

    2014-09-15

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) measurements provide information about the composition and velocity distribution of confined ion populations in fusion plasmas. The bulk ion part of the CTS spectrum is dominated by scattering off fluctuations driven by the motion of thermalized ion populations. It thus contains information about the ion temperature, rotation velocity, and plasma composition. To resolve the bulk ion region and access this information, we installed a fast acquisition system capable of sampling rates up to 12.5 GS/s in the CTS system at ASDEX Upgrade. CTS spectra with frequency resolution in the range of 1 MHz are then obtained through direct digitization and Fourier analysis of the CTS signal. We here describe the design, calibration, and operation of the fast receiver system and give examples of measured bulk ion CTS spectra showing the effects of changing ion temperature, rotation velocity, and plasma composition.

  10. Studies of ICRF Discharge Conditioning (ICRF-DC) on ASDEX Upgrade, JET and TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Lyssoivan, A.; Koch, R.; Eester, D. van; Wassenhove, G. van; Vervier, M.; Weynants, R.; Gauthier, E.; Bobkov, V.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Hartmann, D.A.; Rohde, V.; Suttrop, W.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Monakhov, I.; Walden, A.

    2005-09-26

    The present paper reviews the recent results achieved in the ICRF-DC experiments performed in helium/hydrogen mixtures in the non-circular tokamaks ASDEX Upgrade and JET and first tests of the ICRF discharges in helium/oxygen mixtures in the circular tokamak TEXTOR. Special emphasis was given to study the physics of ICRF discharges. A new recipe for safe and reliable RF plasma production [{approx}(3-5)x1017 m-3, Te{approx}(3-5) eV] with improved antenna coupling efficiency (by 1.5-3 times) and improved radial/poloidal homogeneity was proposed and successfully tested: coupling the RF power in the FW-IBW mode conversion scenario in plasmas with two ion species. The first results on ICRF wall conditioning in helium/hydrogen and in helium/oxygen mixtures are analyzed.

  11. A detailed comparison of antenna impedance measurements on ASDEX Upgrade with the ion cyclotron range of frequencies antenna code TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, I.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Bobkov, V.; Faugel, H.; Coster, D.; Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.; Siegl, G.; Bilato, R.; Brambilla, M.; Verdoolaege, G.; Braun, F.; Fünfgelder, H.; D'Inca, R.; Suttrop, W.; Kallenbach, A.; Schweinzer, J.; Wolfrum, E.; Fischer, R.; Mlynek, A.; Nikolaeva, V.; Guimarais, L.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-09-01

    New antenna diagnostics on the ASDEX Upgrade, in the form of voltage and current probe pairs on the feeding lines of each ion cyclotron range of frequencies antenna, close to the input ports, have made it possible to study in detail the behavior of the ASDEX Upgrade two-strap antenna under changing loading conditions, and compare these measurements with the results of simulations using the TOPICA code. The present work extends previous studies by using the input impedance (more precisely, the complex voltage reflection coefficient Γ ) on each antenna port for comparison, instead of the more commonly used loading resistance or coupled power. The electron density profiles used for the simulation were reconstructed from the deuterium-carbon-nitrogen interferometer and lithium beam emission spectroscopy measurements, edge-localized mode-synchronized and averaged over time intervals from 10 to 200 ms depending on the case; 112 cases were compared from seven ASDEX Upgrade discharges with widely different plasma parameters and two operating frequencies (30 and 36.5 MHz). Very good agreement in \\vert Γ\\vert was found with the measurements on antenna 3 (<3% averaged over a shot), and good agreement was found with antennas 1 and 2 (<10%) the code reproduced the correct trend in loading resistance {{R}\\text{L}} in a significant majority of cases, although the discrepancies in the absolute values were rather high (up to  ˜50%) due to high reflection. Sources of discrepancy are discussed.

  12. Non-monotonic growth rates of sawtooth precursors evidenced with a new method on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vezinet, D.; Igochine, V.; Weiland, M.; Yu, Q.; Gude, A.; Meshcheriakov, D.; Sertoli, M.; the Asdex Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a new method to derive, from soft x-ray (SXR) tomography, robust estimates of the core displacement, growth rate and frequency of a 1/1 sawtooth crash precursor. The method is valid for very peaked SXR profiles and is robust against both the inversion algorithm and the presence of tungsten in a rotating plasma. Three typical ASDEX Upgrade crashes are then analysed. In all cases a postcursor is observed, suggesting incomplete reconnection. Despite different dynamics, in all three cases the growth rate of the core displacement shows similar features. First, it is not constant, supporting the idea of non-linear growth. Second, it can be divided into clearly identified phases with quasi-constant growth rates, suggesting sudden change of growth regime rather than smooth transitions. Third, its evolution is non-monotonic, with phases of accelerated growth followed by damped phases. This damping is interpreted for two cases respectively as an effect of fast ions and of mode coupling, based on the result of a MHD simulation. The mode frequency is observed in all cases to be closely related to the plasma bulk rotation profile, with little or no visible effect of the electron diamagnetic drift frequency. The onset criterion could not be clearly identified and it is shown that the role of the pressure gradient is not as expected from a naive extrapolation of the linear stability theory.

  13. A new compact solid-state neutral particle analyser at ASDEX Upgrade: Setup and physics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, P. A.; Blank, H.; Geiger, B.; Mank, K.; Martinov, S.; Ryter, F.; Weiland, M.; Weller, A.

    2015-07-15

    At ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), a new compact solid-state detector has been installed to measure the energy spectrum of fast neutrals based on the principle described by Shinohara et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3640 (2004)]. The diagnostic relies on the usual charge exchange of supra-thermal fast-ions with neutrals in the plasma. Therefore, the measured energy spectra directly correspond to those of confined fast-ions with a pitch angle defined by the line of sight of the detector. Experiments in AUG showed the good signal to noise characteristics of the detector. It is energy calibrated and can measure energies of 40-200 keV with count rates of up to 140 kcps. The detector has an active view on one of the heating beams. The heating beam increases the neutral density locally; thereby, information about the central fast-ion velocity distribution is obtained. The measured fluxes are modeled with a newly developed module for the 3D Monte Carlo code F90FIDASIM [Geiger et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 65010 (2011)]. The modeling allows to distinguish between the active (beam) and passive contributions to the signal. Thereby, the birth profile of the measured fast neutrals can be reconstructed. This model reproduces the measured energy spectra with good accuracy when the passive contribution is taken into account.

  14. Estimation of sheath potentials in front of ASDEX upgrade ICRF antenna with SSWICH asymptotic code

    SciTech Connect

    Křivská, A.; Colas, L.; Milanesio, D.

    2015-12-10

    Multi-megawatt Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) heating became problematic in ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak after coating of ICRF antenna limiters and other plasma facing components by tungsten. Strong impurity influx was indeed produced at levels of injected power markedly lower than in the previous experiments. It is assumed that the impurity production is mainly driven by parallel component of Radio-Frequency (RF) antenna electric near-field E// that is rectified in sheaths. In this contribution we estimate poloidal distribution of sheath Direct Current (DC) potential in front of the ICRF antenna and simulate its relative variations over the parametric scans performed during experiments, trying to reproduce some of the experimental observations. In addition, relative comparison between two types of AUG ICRF antenna configurations, used for experiments in 2014, has been performed. For this purpose we use the Torino Polytechnic Ion Cyclotron Antenna (TOPICA) code and asymptotic version of the Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for Ion Cyclotron Heating (SSWICH) code. Further, we investigate correlation between amplitudes of the calculated oscillating sheath voltages and the E// fields computed at the lateral side of the antenna box, in relation with a heuristic antenna design strategy at IPP Garching to mitigate RF sheaths.

  15. Machine safety issues with respect to the extension of ECRH systems at ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuberta, Martin; Herrmann, Albrecht; Monaco, Francesco; Rohde, Volker; Schütz, Harald; Stober, Jörg; Vierle, Thomas; Vorbrugg, Stefan; Wagner, Dietmar; Zasche, Dieter; Zehetbauer, Thomas; Zeidner, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    The beam intensity of electron cyclotron resonance heating at ASDEX Upgrade has the potential to seriously damage in-vessel components, whenever not fully absorbed by the plasma. Operation is, therefore, interlocked with both plasma current and density above a given threshold. Microwave protection detectors installed in several ports on the low field side switch the heating system off, in case the stray radiation exceeds a given threshold. During regular inspections, however, damages were reported in the vicinity of the launchers and in particular around the tiles of the heat shield. On one hand, it was found that insulating material, which may not face the plasma, degraded due to millimetre wave absorption. The waves entered the free space behind the heat shield through gaps. On the other hand, local damage even of metallic components was observed on surfaces, which were directly exposed to the microwave beam. Polarisation errors, which led to a local shine through of significant beam power, were responsible. We note that this happened mainly on the high field side in a certain distance to the microwave protection detectors, which were not triggered by the events. In order to increase the level of protection, we identify three necessary measures: Firstly, polarisation control is to be automated such, that mode content and shine through can be monitored. Secondly, by installing additional detectors, the spatial coverage of stray radiation monitoring is enlarged. Thirdly, the heat shield tiles will be redesigned in order to increase the shielding against millimetre waves.

  16. Transport analysis of high radiation and high density plasmas in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casali, L.; Bernert, M.; Dux, R.; Fischer, R.; Kallenbach, A.; Kurzan, B.; Lang, P.; Mlynek, A.; McDermott, R. M.; Ryter, F.; Sertoli, M.; Tardini, G.; Zohm, H.

    2014-12-01

    Future fusion reactors, foreseen in the "European road map" such as DEMO, will operate under more demanding conditions compared to present devices. They will require high divertor and core radiation by impurity seeding to reduce heat loads on divertor target plates. In addition, DEMO will have to work at high core densities to reach adequate fusion performance. The performance of fusion reactors depends on three essential parameters: temperature, density and energy confinement time. The latter characterizes the loss rate due to both radiation and transport processes. The DEMO foreseen scenarios described above were not investigated so far, but are now addressed at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. In this work we present the transport analysis of such scenarios. Plasma with high radiation by impurity seeding: transport analysis taking into account the radiation distribution shows no change in transport during impurity seeding. The observed confinement improvement is an effect of higher pedestal temperatures which extend to the core via stiffness. A non coronal radiation model was developed and compared to the bolometric measurements in order to provide a reliable radiation profile for transport calculations. High density plasmas with pellets: the analysis of kinetic profiles reveals a transient phase at the start of the pellet fuelling due to a slower density build up compared to the temperature decrease. The low particle diffusion can explain the confinement behaviour.

  17. Effect of collisional heat transfer in ICRF power modulation experiment on ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujii, N.; D'Inca, R.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, Vl. V.; Brambilla, M.; Schneider, P.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-02-12

    ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) heating experiments were performed in D-H plasmas at various H concentrations on ASDEX Upgrade. The rf power was modulated to measure the electron power deposition profile from electron temperature modulation. To minimize the contribution from indirect collisional heating and the effect of radial transport, the rf power was modulated at 50 Hz. However, peaking of electron temperature modulation was still observed around the hydrogen cyclotron resonance indicating collisional heating contribution. Time dependent simulation of the hydrogen distribution function was performed for the discharges, using the full-wave code AORSA (E.F. Jaeger, et al., Phys. Plasmas, Vol. 8, page 1573 (2001)) coupled to the Fokker-Planck code CQL3D (R.W. Harvey, et al., Proc. IAEA (1992)). In the present experimental conditions, it was found that modulation of the collisional heating was comparable to that of direct wave damping. Impact of radial transport was also analyzed and found to appreciably smear out the modulation profile and reduce the phase delay.

  18. A new compact solid-state neutral particle analyser at ASDEX Upgrade: Setup and physics modeling.

    PubMed

    Schneider, P A; Blank, H; Geiger, B; Mank, K; Martinov, S; Ryter, F; Weiland, M; Weller, A

    2015-07-01

    At ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), a new compact solid-state detector has been installed to measure the energy spectrum of fast neutrals based on the principle described by Shinohara et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3640 (2004)]. The diagnostic relies on the usual charge exchange of supra-thermal fast-ions with neutrals in the plasma. Therefore, the measured energy spectra directly correspond to those of confined fast-ions with a pitch angle defined by the line of sight of the detector. Experiments in AUG showed the good signal to noise characteristics of the detector. It is energy calibrated and can measure energies of 40-200 keV with count rates of up to 140 kcps. The detector has an active view on one of the heating beams. The heating beam increases the neutral density locally; thereby, information about the central fast-ion velocity distribution is obtained. The measured fluxes are modeled with a newly developed module for the 3D Monte Carlo code F90FIDASIM [Geiger et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 65010 (2011)]. The modeling allows to distinguish between the active (beam) and passive contributions to the signal. Thereby, the birth profile of the measured fast neutrals can be reconstructed. This model reproduces the measured energy spectra with good accuracy when the passive contribution is taken into account. PMID:26233384

  19. First results and analysis of collective Thomson scattering (CTS) fast ion distribution measurements on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meo, F.; Stejner, M.; Salewski, M.; Bindslev, H.; Eich, T.; Furtula, V.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leuterer, F.; Leipold, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Moseev, D.; Nielsen, S. K.; Reiter, B.; Stober, J.; Wagner, D.; Woskov, P.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2010-05-01

    Experimental knowledge of the fast ion physics in magnetically confined plasmas is essential. The collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic is capable of measuring localized 1D ion velocity distributions and anisotropies dependent on the angle to the magnetic field. The CTS installed at ASDEX-Upgrade (AUG) uses mm-waves generated by the 1 MW dual frequency gyrotron. The successful commissioning the CTS at AUG enabled first scattering experiments and the consequent milestone of first fast ion distribution measurements on AUG presented in this paper. The first fast ion distribution results have already uncovered some physics of confined fast ions at the plasma centre with off-axis neutral beam heating. However, CTS experiments on AUG H-mode plasmas have also uncovered some unexpected signals not related to scattering that required additional analysis and treatment of the data. These secondary emission signals are generated from the plasma-gyrotron interaction therefore contain additional physics. Despite their existence that complicate the fast ion analysis, they do not prevent the diagnostic's capability to infer the fast ion distribution function on AUG.

  20. Design and performance of the collective Thomson scattering receiver at ASDEX Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Furtula, V; Salewski, M; Leipold, F; Michelsen, P K; Korsholm, S B; Meo, F; Moseev, D; Nielsen, S K; Stejner, M; Johansen, T

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the design of the fast-ion collective Thomson scattering receiver for millimeter wave radiation installed at ASDEX Upgrade, a tokamak for fusion plasma experiments. The receiver can detect spectral power densities of a few eV against the electron cyclotron emission background on the order of 100 eV under presence of gyrotron stray radiation that is several orders of magnitude stronger than the signal to be detected. The receiver down converts the frequencies of scattered radiation (100-110 GHz) to intermediate frequencies (IF) (4.5-14.5 GHz) by heterodyning. The IF signal is divided into 50 IF channels tightly spaced in frequency space. The channels are terminated by square-law detector diodes that convert the signal power into DC voltages. We present measurements of the transmission characteristics and performance of the main receiver components operating at mm-wave frequencies (notch, bandpass, and lowpass filters, a voltage-controlled variable attenuator, and an isolator), the down-converter unit, and the IF components (amplifiers, bandpass filters, and detector diodes). Furthermore, we determine the performance of the receiver as a unit through spectral response measurements and find reasonable agreement with the expectation based on the individual component measurements.

  1. Design and performance of the collective Thomson scattering receiver at ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Furtula, V.; Salewski, M.; Leipold, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Korsholm, S. B.; Meo, F.; Moseev, D.; Nielsen, S. K.; Stejner, M.; Johansen, T.

    2012-01-15

    Here we present the design of the fast-ion collective Thomson scattering receiver for millimeter wave radiation installed at ASDEX Upgrade, a tokamak for fusion plasma experiments. The receiver can detect spectral power densities of a few eV against the electron cyclotron emission background on the order of 100 eV under presence of gyrotron stray radiation that is several orders of magnitude stronger than the signal to be detected. The receiver down converts the frequencies of scattered radiation (100-110 GHz) to intermediate frequencies (IF) (4.5-14.5 GHz) by heterodyning. The IF signal is divided into 50 IF channels tightly spaced in frequency space. The channels are terminated by square-law detector diodes that convert the signal power into DC voltages. We present measurements of the transmission characteristics and performance of the main receiver components operating at mm-wave frequencies (notch, bandpass, and lowpass filters, a voltage-controlled variable attenuator, and an isolator), the down-converter unit, and the IF components (amplifiers, bandpass filters, and detector diodes). Furthermore, we determine the performance of the receiver as a unit through spectral response measurements and find reasonable agreement with the expectation based on the individual component measurements.

  2. Optimized tokamak power exhaust with double radiative feedback in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallenbach, A.; Bernert, M.; Eich, T.; Fuchs, J. C.; Giannone, L.; Herrmann, A.; Schweinzer, J.; Treutterer, W.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2012-12-01

    A double radiative feedback technique has been developed on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak for optimization of power exhaust with a standard vertical target divertor. The main chamber radiation is measured in real time by a subset of three foil bolometer channels and controlled by argon injection in the outer midplane. The target heat flux is in addition controlled by nitrogen injection in the divertor private flux region using either a thermoelectric sensor or the scaled divertor radiation obtained by a bolometer channel in the outer divertor. No negative interference of the two radiation controllers has been observed so far. The combination of main chamber and divertor radiative cooling extends the operational space of a standard divertor configuration towards high values of P/R. Pheat/R = 14 MW m-1 has been achieved so far with nitrogen seeding alone as well as with combined N + Ar injection, with the time-averaged divertor peak heat flux below 5 MW m-2. Good plasma performance can be maintained under these conditions, namely H98(y,2) = 1 and βN = 3.

  3. A new compact solid-state neutral particle analyser at ASDEX Upgrade: Setup and physics modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, P. A.; Blank, H.; Geiger, B.; Mank, K.; Martinov, S.; Ryter, F.; Weiland, M.; Weller, A.

    2015-07-01

    At ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), a new compact solid-state detector has been installed to measure the energy spectrum of fast neutrals based on the principle described by Shinohara et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3640 (2004)]. The diagnostic relies on the usual charge exchange of supra-thermal fast-ions with neutrals in the plasma. Therefore, the measured energy spectra directly correspond to those of confined fast-ions with a pitch angle defined by the line of sight of the detector. Experiments in AUG showed the good signal to noise characteristics of the detector. It is energy calibrated and can measure energies of 40-200 keV with count rates of up to 140 kcps. The detector has an active view on one of the heating beams. The heating beam increases the neutral density locally; thereby, information about the central fast-ion velocity distribution is obtained. The measured fluxes are modeled with a newly developed module for the 3D Monte Carlo code F90FIDASIM [Geiger et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 65010 (2011)]. The modeling allows to distinguish between the active (beam) and passive contributions to the signal. Thereby, the birth profile of the measured fast neutrals can be reconstructed. This model reproduces the measured energy spectra with good accuracy when the passive contribution is taken into account.

  4. Collective Thomson scattering measurements of fast-ion transport due to sawtooth crashes in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, J.; Nielsen, S. K.; Stejner, M.; Galdon-Quiroga, J.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Geiger, B.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Jaulmes, F.; Korsholm, S. B.; Lazanyi, N.; Leipold, F.; Ryter, F.; Salewski, M.; Schubert, M.; Stober, J.; Wagner, D.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROFusion MST1 Team

    2016-11-01

    Sawtooth instabilities can modify heating and current-drive profiles and potentially increase fast-ion losses. Understanding how sawteeth redistribute fast ions as a function of sawtooth parameters and of fast-ion energy and pitch is hence a subject of particular interest for future fusion devices. Here we present the first collective Thomson scattering (CTS) measurements of sawtooth-induced redistribution of fast ions at ASDEX Upgrade. These also represent the first localized fast-ion measurements on the high-field side of this device. The results indicate fast-ion losses in the phase-space measurement volume of about 50% across sawtooth crashes, in good agreement with values predicted with the Kadomtsev sawtooth model implemented in TRANSP and with the sawtooth model in the EBdyna_go code. In contrast to the case of sawteeth, we observe no fast-ion redistribution in the presence of fishbone modes. We highlight how CTS measurements can discriminate between different sawtooth models, in particular when aided by multi-diagnostic velocity-space tomography, and briefly discuss our results in light of existing measurements from other fast-ion diagnostics.

  5. Comparisons between global and local gyrokinetic simulations of an ASDEX Upgrade H-mode plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Alejandro Bañón; Told, Daniel; Jenko, Frank; Görler, Tobias; Happel, Tim

    2016-04-01

    We investigate by means of local and global nonlinear gyrokinetic GENE simulations an ASDEX Upgrade H-mode plasma. We find that for the outer core positions (i.e., ρ tor ≈ 0.5 - 0.7 ), nonlocal effects are important. For nominal input parameters local simulations over-predict the experimental heat fluxes by a large factor, while a good agreement is found with global simulations. This was a priori not expected, since the values of 1 / ρ ⋆ were large enough that global and local simulations should have been in accordance. Nevertheless, due to the high sensitivity of the heat fluxes with respect to the input parameters, it is still possible to match the heat fluxes in local simulations with the experimental and global results by varying the ion temperature gradient within the experimental uncertainties. In addition to that, once an agreement in the transport quantities between local (flux-matched) and global simulations is achieved, an agreement for other quantities, such as density and temperature fluctuations, is also found. The case presented here clearly shows that even in the presence of global size-effects, the local simulation approach is still a valid and accurate approach.

  6. Design and performance of the collective Thomson scattering receiver at ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtula, V.; Salewski, M.; Leipold, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Korsholm, S. B.; Meo, F.; Moseev, D.; Nielsen, S. K.; Stejner, M.; Johansen, T.

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the design of the fast-ion collective Thomson scattering receiver for millimeter wave radiation installed at ASDEX Upgrade, a tokamak for fusion plasma experiments. The receiver can detect spectral power densities of a few eV against the electron cyclotron emission background on the order of 100 eV under presence of gyrotron stray radiation that is several orders of magnitude stronger than the signal to be detected. The receiver down converts the frequencies of scattered radiation (100-110 GHz) to intermediate frequencies (IF) (4.5-14.5 GHz) by heterodyning. The IF signal is divided into 50 IF channels tightly spaced in frequency space. The channels are terminated by square-law detector diodes that convert the signal power into DC voltages. We present measurements of the transmission characteristics and performance of the main receiver components operating at mm-wave frequencies (notch, bandpass, and lowpass filters, a voltage-controlled variable attenuator, and an isolator), the down-converter unit, and the IF components (amplifiers, bandpass filters, and detector diodes). Furthermore, we determine the performance of the receiver as a unit through spectral response measurements and find reasonable agreement with the expectation based on the individual component measurements

  7. Investigation of scrape-off layer and divertor heat transport in ASDEX Upgrade L-mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieglin, B.; Eich, T.; Faitsch, M.; Herrmann, A.; Scarabosio, A.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-05-01

    Power exhaust is one of the major challenges for the development of a fusion power plant. Predictions based upon a multimachine database give a scrape-off layer power fall-off length {λq}≤slant 1 mm for large fusion devices such as ITER. The power deposition profile on the target is broadened in the divertor by heat transport perpendicular to the magnetic field lines. This profile broadening is described by the power spreading S. Hence both {λq} and S need to be understood in order to estimate the expected divertor heat load for future fusion devices. For the investigation of S and {λq} L-Mode discharges with stable divertor conditions in hydrogen and deuterium were conducted in ASDEX Upgrade. A strong dependence of S on the divertor electron temperature and density is found which is the result of the competition between parallel electron heat conductivity and perpendicular diffusion in the divertor region. For high divertor temperatures it is found that the ion gyro radius at the divertor target needs to be considered. The dependence of the in/out asymmetry of the divertor power load on the electron density is investigated. The influence of the main ion species on the asymmetric behaviour is shown for hydrogen, deuterium and helium. A possible explanation for the observed asymmetry behaviour based on vertical drifts is proposed.

  8. Multi-view fast-ion D-alpha spectroscopy diagnostic at ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, B.; Dux, R.; McDermott, R. M.; Potzel, S.; Reich, M.; Ryter, F.; Weiland, M.; Wünderlich, D.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2013-11-15

    A novel fast-ion D-alpha (FIDA) diagnostic that is based on charge exchange spectroscopy has been installed at ASDEX Upgrade. The diagnostic uses a newly developed high-photon-throughput spectrometer together with a low-noise EM-CCD camera that allow measurements with 2 ms exposure time. Absolute intensities are obtained by calibrating the system with an integrating sphere and the wavelength dependence is determined to high accuracy using a neon lamp. Additional perturbative contributions to the spectra, such as D{sub 2}-molecular lines, the Stark broadened edge D-alpha emission, and passive FIDA radiation have been identified and can be subtracted or avoided experimentally. The FIDA radiation from fast deuterium ions after charge exchange reactions can therefore be analyzed continuously without superimposed line emissions at large Doppler shifts. Radial information on the fast ions is obtained from radially distributed lines of sight. The investigation of the fast-ion velocity distribution is possible due to three different viewing geometries. The independent viewing geometries access distinct parts of the fast-ion velocity space and make tomographic reconstructions possible.

  9. Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results—development of integrated operating scenarios for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günter, S.; Angioni, C.; Apostoliceanu, M.; Atanasiu, C.; Balden, M.; Becker, G.; Becker, W.; Behler, K.; Behringer, K.; Bergmann, A.; Bilato, R.; Bizyukov, I.; Bobkov, V.; Bolzonella, T.; Borba, D.; Borrass, K.; Brambilla, M.; Braun, F.; Buhler, A.; Carlson, A.; Chankin, A.; Chen, J.; Chen, Y.; Cirant, S.; Conway, G.; Coster, D.; Dannert, T.; Dimova, K.; Drube, R.; Dux, R.; Eich, T.; Engelhardt, K.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Fantz, U.; Fattorini, L.; Foley, M.; Franzen, P.; Fuchs, J. C.; Gafert, J.; Gal, K.; Gantenbein, G.; García Muñoz, M.; Gehre, O.; Geier, A.; Giannone, L.; Gruber, O.; Haas, G.; Hartmann, D.; Heger, B.; Heinemann, B.; Herrmann, A.; Hobirk, J.; Hohenöcker, H.; Horton, L.; Huart, M.; Igochine, V.; Jacchia, A.; Jakobi, M.; Jenko, F.; Kallenbach, A.; Kálvin, S.; Kardaun, O.; Kaufmann, M.; Keller, A.; Kendl, A.; Kick, M.; Kim, J.-W.; Kirov, K.; Klose, S.; Kochergov, R.; Kocsis, G.; Kollotzek, H.; Konz, C.; Kraus, W.; Krieger, K.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Kurzan, B.; Lackner, K.; Lang, P. T.; Lauber, P.; Laux, M.; Leuterer, F.; Likonen, J.; Lohs, A.; Lorenz, A.; Lorenzini, R.; Lyssoivan, A.; Maggi, C.; Maier, H.; Mank, K.; Manini, A.; Manso, M.-E.; Mantica, P.; Maraschek, M.; Martin, P.; Mast, K. F.; Mayer, M.; McCarthy, P.; Meyer, H.; Meisel, D.; Meister, H.; Menmuir, S.; Meo, F.; Merkel, P.; Merkel, R.; Merkl, D.; Mertens, V.; Monaco, F.; Mück, A.; Müller, H. W.; Münich, M.; Murmann, H.; Na, Y.-S.; Narayanan, R.; Neu, G.; Neu, R.; Neuhauser, J.; Nishijima, D.; Nishimura, Y.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Nunes, I.; Pacco-Düchs, M.; Pautasso, G.; Peeters, A. G.; Pereverzev, G.; Pinches, S.; Poli, E.; Posthumus-Wolfrum, E.; Pütterich, T.; Pugno, R.; Quigley, E.; Radivojevic, I.; Raupp, G.; Reich, M.; Riedl, R.; Ribeiro, T.; Rohde, V.; Roth, J.; Ryter, F.; Saarelma, S.; Sandmann, W.; Santos, J.; Schall, G.; Schilling, H.-B.; Schirmer, J.; Schneider, W.; Schramm, G.; Schweinzer, J.; Schweizer, S.; Scott, B.; Seidel, U.; Serra, F.; Sihler, C.; Silva, A.; Sips, A.; Speth, E.; Stäbler, A.; Steuer, K.-H.; Stober, J.; Streibl, B.; Strintzi, D.; Strumberger, E.; Suttrop, W.; Tardini, G.; Tichmann, C.; Treutterer, W.; Troppmann, M.; Tsalas, M.; Urano, H.; Varela, P.; Wagner, D.; Wesner, F.; Würsching, E.; Ye, M. Y.; Yoon, S.-W.; Yu, Q.; Zaniol, B.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.; Zehrfeld, H.-P.; Zilker, M.; Zohm, H.

    2005-10-01

    Significant progress has been made on ASDEX Upgrade during the last two years in the basic understanding of transport, in the extension of the improved H-mode in parameter space and towards an integrated operating scenario and in the development of control methods for major performance limiting instabilities. The important features were the understanding of particle transport and the control of impurity accumulation based on it, the satisfactory operation with predominantly tungsten-clad walls, the improved H-mode operation over density ranges and for temperature ratios covering (non-simultaneously) the ITER requirements on ν*, n/nGW and Te/Ti, the ELM frequency control by pellet injection and the optimization of NTM suppression by DC-ECCD through variation of the launching angle. From these experiments an integrated scenario has emerged which extrapolates to a 50% improvement in n T τ or a 30% reduction of the required current when compared with the ITER base-line assumptions, with moderately peaked electron and controllable high-Z density profiles.

  10. A new compact solid-state neutral particle analyser at ASDEX Upgrade: Setup and physics modeling.

    PubMed

    Schneider, P A; Blank, H; Geiger, B; Mank, K; Martinov, S; Ryter, F; Weiland, M; Weller, A

    2015-07-01

    At ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), a new compact solid-state detector has been installed to measure the energy spectrum of fast neutrals based on the principle described by Shinohara et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3640 (2004)]. The diagnostic relies on the usual charge exchange of supra-thermal fast-ions with neutrals in the plasma. Therefore, the measured energy spectra directly correspond to those of confined fast-ions with a pitch angle defined by the line of sight of the detector. Experiments in AUG showed the good signal to noise characteristics of the detector. It is energy calibrated and can measure energies of 40-200 keV with count rates of up to 140 kcps. The detector has an active view on one of the heating beams. The heating beam increases the neutral density locally; thereby, information about the central fast-ion velocity distribution is obtained. The measured fluxes are modeled with a newly developed module for the 3D Monte Carlo code F90FIDASIM [Geiger et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 65010 (2011)]. The modeling allows to distinguish between the active (beam) and passive contributions to the signal. Thereby, the birth profile of the measured fast neutrals can be reconstructed. This model reproduces the measured energy spectra with good accuracy when the passive contribution is taken into account.

  11. Effect of collisional heat transfer in ICRF power modulation experiment on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujii, N.; D'Inca, R.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, Vl. V.; Brambilla, M.; van Eester, D.; Harvey, R. W.; Jaeger, E. F.; Lerche, E. A.; Schneider, P.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-02-01

    ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) heating experiments were performed in D-H plasmas at various H concentrations on ASDEX Upgrade. The rf power was modulated to measure the electron power deposition profile from electron temperature modulation. To minimize the contribution from indirect collisional heating and the effect of radial transport, the rf power was modulated at 50 Hz. However, peaking of electron temperature modulation was still observed around the hydrogen cyclotron resonance indicating collisional heating contribution. Time dependent simulation of the hydrogen distribution function was performed for the discharges, using the full-wave code AORSA (E.F. Jaeger, et al., Phys. Plasmas, Vol. 8, page 1573 (2001)) coupled to the Fokker-Planck code CQL3D (R.W. Harvey, et al., Proc. IAEA (1992)). In the present experimental conditions, it was found that modulation of the collisional heating was comparable to that of direct wave damping. Impact of radial transport was also analyzed and found to appreciably smear out the modulation profile and reduce the phase delay.

  12. Frequency measurements of the gyrotrons used for collective Thomson scattering diagnostics at TEXTOR and ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Woskov, P.; Bindslev, H.; Leipold, F.; Meo, F.; Nielsen, S. K.; Tsakadze, E. L.; Korsholm, S. B.; Scholten, J.; Tito, C.; Westerhof, E.; Oosterbeek, J. W.; Leuterer, F.; Monaco, F.; Muenich, M.; Wagner, D.

    2006-10-15

    High resolution frequency measurements of the 110 GHz gyrotron at TEXTOR and the 105 GHz mode of the two-frequency gyrotron (Odissey-1) at ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) have been made in support of fast ion collective Thomson scattering diagnostics. Measurements were done by harmonic heterodyne methods using both fast Fourier transform spectroscopy with digital oscilloscopes and fast scanning spectrum analyzers. Accurate frequencies were obtained with a frequency counter. At TEXTOR, at 180 kW forward power the starting frequency was 109.970{+-}0.005 GHz and chirped down as much as 27 MHz depending on the duty factor. At AUG, at 500 kW forward power the frequency started at 104.786 GHz and chirped down 104 MHz, with 90% of the chirp occurring in the first 100 ms. Plasma perturbation of the TEXTOR gyrotron was observed when both ion cyclotron resonance heating antennas and neutral beam injection were operating, producing modulation at 29 and 58 MHz in the gyrotron output. Each gyrotron was observed to have an instrumental measurement limited linewidth of 120 kHz full width at half maximum.

  13. Estimation of sheath potentials in front of ASDEX upgrade ICRF antenna with SSWICH asymptotic code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Křivská, A.; Bobkov, V.; Colas, L.; Jacquot, J.; Milanesio, D.; Ochoukov, R.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-megawatt Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) heating became problematic in ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak after coating of ICRF antenna limiters and other plasma facing components by tungsten. Strong impurity influx was indeed produced at levels of injected power markedly lower than in the previous experiments. It is assumed that the impurity production is mainly driven by parallel component of Radio-Frequency (RF) antenna electric near-field E// that is rectified in sheaths. In this contribution we estimate poloidal distribution of sheath Direct Current (DC) potential in front of the ICRF antenna and simulate its relative variations over the parametric scans performed during experiments, trying to reproduce some of the experimental observations. In addition, relative comparison between two types of AUG ICRF antenna configurations, used for experiments in 2014, has been performed. For this purpose we use the Torino Polytechnic Ion Cyclotron Antenna (TOPICA) code and asymptotic version of the Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for Ion Cyclotron Heating (SSWICH) code. Further, we investigate correlation between amplitudes of the calculated oscillating sheath voltages and the E// fields computed at the lateral side of the antenna box, in relation with a heuristic antenna design strategy at IPP Garching to mitigate RF sheaths.

  14. Pellet refuelling of particle loss due to ELM mitigation with RMPs in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak at low collisionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valovič, M.; Lang, P. T.; Kirk, A.; Suttrop, W.; Cavedon, M.; Cseh, G.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, L. R.; Garzotti, L.; Guimarais, L.; Kocsis, G.; Mlynek, A.; Plőckl, B.; Scannell, R.; Szepesi, T.; Tardini, G.; Thornton, A.; Viezzer, E.; Wolfrum, E.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-06-01

    The complete refuelling of the plasma density loss (pump-out) caused by mitigation of edge localised modes (ELMs) is demonstrated on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The plasma is refuelled by injection of frozen deuterium pellets and ELMs are mitigated by external resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs). In this experiment relevant dimensionless parameters, such as relative pellet size, relative RMP amplitude and pedestal collisionality are kept at the ITER like values. Refuelling of density pump out of the size of Δ n/n∼ 30% requires a factor of two increase of nominal fuelling rate. Energy confinement and pedestal temperatures are not restored to pre-RMP values by pellet refuelling.

  15. A new beam emission polarimetry diagnostic for measuring the magnetic field line angle at the plasma edge of ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viezzer, E.; Dux, R.; Dunne, M. G.

    2016-11-01

    A new edge beam emission polarimetry diagnostic dedicated to the measurement of the magnetic field line angle has been installed on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The new diagnostic relies on the motional Stark effect and is based on the simultaneous measurement of the polarization direction of the linearly polarized π (parallel to the electric field) and σ (perpendicular to the electric field) lines of the Balmer line Dα. The technical properties of the system are described. The calibration procedures are discussed and first measurements are presented.

  16. Impact of a pulsed supersonic deuterium gas jet on the ELM behaviour in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, P. T.; Neuhauser, J.; Bucalossi, J.; Chankin, A.; Coster, D. P.; Drube, R.; Dux, R.; Haas, G.; Horton, L. D.; Kalvin, S.; Kocsis, G.; Maraschek, M.; Mertens, V.; Rohde, V.; Rozhansky, V.; Schneider, R.; Senichenkov, I.; Veselova, I.; Wolfrum, E.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2005-09-01

    The possibility for pacing of type-I edge localized modes (ELMs) in H-mode plasmas by intermittent gas injection was investigated in ASDEX Upgrade as a possible alternative to, and in comparison with, ELM control by pellets. A Laval nozzle type molecular deuterium injector was used, delivering 1.7 ms long jets with up to about 1020D per pulse at a supersonic flow velocity of 2.2 km s-1. With a repetition rate of 2 Hz and a fast rise time of ap25 µs, comparable to typical ELM rise times, the injector seemed to be well-suited for single ELM trigger tests. When applied to H-mode discharges with a moderate type-I ELM frequency of 40-60 Hz, no prompt (<0.5 ms) ELM triggering could be achieved, in contrast to the experience with pellets. There was, however, clear evidence for a delayed effect in the form of an inverse correlation of the gas pulse amplitude with the time interval between the gas pulse and the next ELM. The apparent lack of prompt ELM triggering seems to be due to a self-blocking of the gas jet by an extremely fast formation of a high density plasma layer in the separatrix vicinity, while the delayed effect may be simply caused by the jet-induced axisymmetric edge profile modification, similar to the delayed ELM cascade observed after a prompt ELM in case of large pellet injection. The delayed trigger effect observed might still be useful for ELM control in future machines, but the related high gas fuelling at elevated pulse frequency could make it unattractive in view of overall plasma performance.

  17. Collection strategy, inner morphology, and size distribution of dust particles in ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    M. Balden; N. Endstrasser; P. W. Humrickhouse; V. Rohde; M. Rasinski; U. von Toussaint; S. Elgeti; R. Neu

    2014-04-01

    The dust collection and analysis strategy in ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) is described. During five consecutive operation campaigns (2007–2011), Si collectors were installed, which were supported by filtered vacuum sampling and collection with adhesive tapes in 2009. The outer and inner morphology (e.g. shape) and elemental composition of the collected particles were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. The majority of the ~50?000 analysed particles on the Si collectors of campaign 2009 contain tungsten—the plasma-facing material in AUG—and show basically two different types of outer appearance: spheroids and irregularly shaped particles. By far most of the W-dominated spheroids consist of a solid W core, i.e. solidified W droplets. A part of these particles is coated with a low-Z material; a process that seems to happen presumably in the far scrape-off layer plasma. In addition, some conglomerates of B, C and W appear as spherical particles after their contact with plasma. By far most of the particles classified as B-, C- and W-dominated irregularly shaped particles consist of the same conglomerate with varying fraction of embedded W in the B–C matrix and some porosity, which can exceed 50%. The fragile structures of many conglomerates confirm the absence of intensive plasma contact. Both the ablation and mobilization of conglomerate material and the production of W droplets are proposed to be triggered by arcing. The size distribution of each dust particle class is best described by a log-normal distribution allowing an extrapolation of the dust volume and surface area. The maximum in this distribution is observed above the resolution limit of 0.28 µm only for the W-dominated spheroids, at around 1 µm. The amount of W-containing dust is extrapolated to be less than 300 mg on the horizontal areas of AUG.

  18. H-mode pedestal scaling in DIII-D, ASDEX Upgrade, and JET

    SciTech Connect

    Beurskens, M. N. A.; Lomas, P.; Saarelma, S.; Scannell, R.; Balboa, I.; Brix, M.; Flanagan, J.; Giroud, C.; Kempenaars, M.; Maddison, G.; McDonald, D.; Schneider, P. A.; Wolfrum, E.; Maggi, C. F.; Frassinetti, L.; Nunes, I.

    2011-05-15

    Multidevice pedestal scaling experiments in the DIII-D, ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), and JET tokamaks are presented in order to test two plasma physics pedestal width models. The first model proposes a scaling of the pedestal width {Delta}/a {proportional_to} {rho}*{sup 1/2} to {rho}* based on the radial extent of the pedestal being set by the point where the linear turbulence growth rate exceeds the ExB velocity. In the multidevice experiment where {rho}* at the pedestal top was varied by a factor of four while other dimensionless parameters where kept fixed, it has been observed that the temperature pedestal width in real space coordinates scales with machine size, and that therefore the gyroradius scaling suggested by the model is not supported by the experiments. The density pedestal width is not invariant with {rho}* which after comparison with a simple neutral fuelling model may be attributed to variations in the neutral fuelling patterns. The second model, EPED1, is based on kinetic ballooning modes setting the limit of the radial extent of the pedestal region and leads to {Delta}{sub {psi} {proportional_to}} {beta}{sub p}{sup 1/2}. All three devices show a scaling of the pedestal width in normalised poloidal flux as {Delta}{sub {psi} {proportional_to}} {beta}{sub p}{sup 1/2}, as described by the kinetic ballooning model; however, on JET and AUG, this could not be distinguished from an interpretation where the pedestal is fixed in real space. Pedestal data from all three devices have been compared with the predictive pedestal model EPED1 and the model produces pedestal height values that match the experimental data well.

  19. The role of carbon and nitrogen on the H-mode confinement in ASDEX Upgrade with a metal wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beurskens, M. N. A.; Dunne, M. G.; Frassinetti, L.; Bernert, M.; Cavedon, M.; Fischer, R.; Järvinen, A.; Kallenbach, A.; Laggner, F. M.; McDermott, R. M.; Potzel, S.; Schweinzer, J.; Tardini, G.; Viezzer, E.; Wolfrum, E.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-05-01

    Carbon (CD4) and nitrogen (N2) have been seeded in ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) with a tungsten wall and have both led to a 20-30% confinement improvement. The reference plasma is a standard target plasma with I p /B T  =  1 MA/2.5 T, total input power P tot ~ 12 MW and normalized pressure of β N ~ 1.8. Carbon and nitrogen are almost perfectly exchangeable for the core, pedestal and divertor plasma in this experiment where impurity concentrations of C and N of 2% are achieved and Z eff only mildly increases from ~1.3 to ~1.7. As the radiation potentials of C and N are similar and peak well below 100 eV, both impurities act as divertor radiators and radiate well outside the pedestal region. The outer divertor is purposely kept in an attached state when C and N are seeded to avoid confinement degradation by detachment. As reported in earlier publications for nitrogen, carbon is also seen to reduce the high field side high density (the so-called HFSHD) in the scrape off layer above the inner divertor strike point by about 50%. This is accompanied by a confinement improvement for both low (δ ~ 0.25) and high (δ ~ 0.4) triangularity configurations for both seeding gases, due to an increase of pedestal temperature and stiff core temperature profiles. The electron density profiles show no apparent change due to the seeding. As an orthogonal effect, increasing the triangularity leads to an additionally increased pedestal density, independent of the impurity seeding. This experiment further closes the gap in understanding the confinement differences observed in carbon and metal wall devices; the absence of carbon can be substituted by nitrogen which leads to a similar confinement benefit. So far, no definite physics explanation for the confinement enhancement has been obtained, but the experimental observations in this paper provide input for further model development.

  20. Numerical and experimental study of the redistribution of energetic and impurity ions by sawteeth in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaulmes, F.; Geiger, B.; Odstrčil, T.; Weiland, M.; Salewski, M.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Rasmussen, J.; Stejner, M.; Nielsen, S. K.; Westerhof, E.; the EUROfusion MST1 Team; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-11-01

    In the non-linear phase of a sawtooth, the complete reconnection of field lines around the q  =  1 flux surface often occurs resulting in a radial displacement of the plasma core. A complete time-dependent electromagnetic model of this type of reconnection has been developed and implemented in the EBdyna_go code. This contribution aims at studying the behaviour of ions, both impurity and fast particles, in the pattern of reconnecting field lines during sawtoothing plasma experiments in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak by using the newly developed numerical framework. Simulations of full reconnection with tungsten impurity that include the centrifugal force are achieved and recover the soft x-ray measurements. Based on this full-reconnection description of the sawtooth, a simple tool dedicated to estimate the duration of the reconnection is introduced. This work then studies the redistribution of fast ions during several experimentally observed sawteeth. In some cases of sawteeth at ASDEX Upgrade, full reconnection is not always observed or expected so the code gives an upper estimate of the actual experimental redistribution. The results of detailed simulations of the crashes are compared with measurements from various diagnostics such as collective Thomson scattering and fast-ion D-alpha (FIDA) spectroscopy, including FIDA tomography. A convincing qualitative agreement is found in different parts of velocity space.

  1. Optimization of the FM-CW reflectometry W-band antenna for core density profile measurements on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacquin, S.; Wagner, D.; Manso, M.; Borreicho, J.; Farinha, L.

    2003-03-01

    A numerical study of the focused hog-horn antenna used for the W-band channel of the ASDEX Upgrade frequency modulated continuous wave reflectometry system is performed here. A mode matching code is used to accuretely model wave propagation in waveguide and antenna structures. Then the field distribution (amplitude and phase) in the horn aperture given by this code is used as an input for other codes computing wave propagation in the plasma. Evaluating the received energy in the antenna, we first analyze plasma effects as the nonalignment between the antenna and the plasma equatorial plane. We show in the case of an unfocused antenna that ray-tracing results are in qualitative agreement with full wave calculations. Simulations also confirm that hog-horn antennas allow improving the measurement performances in comparison with unfocused antennas. The role of location of the focusing point of a hog-horn antenna (depending on the antenna design) is then studied. It appears that the focusing point position should be optimized to maximize the energy received in the antenna. Finally, we show that a new design for the W-band antenna on the ASDEX Upgrade broadband reflectometry system could improve the performances of this diagnostic.

  2. On the role of the edge density profile for the L-H transition power threshold in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, L. M.; Wolfrum, E.; Ryter, F.; Birkenmeier, G.; Laggner, F. M.; Viezzer, E.; Fischer, R.; Willensdorfer, M.; Kurzan, B.; Lunt, T.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-02-01

    The L-H transition power threshold ({{P}\\text{L-\\text{H}}} ) in full tungsten (W) wall discharges is lower by 25% compared to those with graphite (C) mix tungsten walls in ASDEX Upgrade (Ryter et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 113003). The lower power threshold in the full tungsten wall discharges has been found to correlate with higher edge density as well as steeper edge density gradient. An estimate of the minimum in the neoclassical radial electric field well inside the separatrix yields a constant value for all analyzed L-H transitions at fixed toroidal magnetic field ({{B}\\text{T}} ). The decrease of the threshold power is explained by the steeper edge density gradient in the discharges with full tungsten wall.

  3. Implementation of the new multichannel X-mode edge density profile reflectometer for the ICRF antenna on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiam, D. E.; Silva, A.; Bobkov, V.; Carvalho, P. J.; Carvalho, P. F.; Cavazzana, R.; Conway, G. D.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Fattorini, L.; Faugel, H.; Fernandes, A.; Fünfgelder, H.; Gonçalves, B.; Guimarais, L.; De Masi, G.; Meneses, L.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Pereira, R. C.; Rocchi, G.; Santos, J. M.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Tudisco, O.

    2016-11-01

    A new multichannel frequency modulated continuous-wave reflectometry diagnostic has been successfully installed and commissioned on ASDEX Upgrade to measure the plasma edge electron density profile evolution in front of the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antenna. The design of the new three-strap ICRF antenna integrates ten pairs (sending and receiving) of microwave reflectometry antennas. The multichannel reflectometer can use three of these to measure the edge electron density profiles up to 2 × 1019 m-3, at different poloidal locations, allowing the direct study of the local plasma layers in front of the ICRF antenna. ICRF power coupling, operational effects, and poloidal variations of the plasma density profile can be consistently studied for the first time. In this work the diagnostic hardware architecture is described and the obtained density profile measurements were used to track outer radial plasma position and plasma shape.

  4. Gaseous electron multiplier-based soft x-ray plasma diagnostics development: Preliminary tests at ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshova, M.; Malinowski, K.; Czarski, T.; Wojeński, A.; Vezinet, D.; Poźniak, K. T.; Kasprowicz, G.; Mazon, D.; Jardin, A.; Herrmann, A.; Kowalska-Strzeciwilk, E.; Krawczyk, R.; Kolasiński, P.; Zabołotny, W.; Zienkiewicz, P.

    2016-11-01

    A Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM)-based detector is being developed for soft X-ray diagnostics on tokamaks. Its main goal is to facilitate transport studies of impurities like tungsten. Such studies are very relevant to ITER, where the excessive accumulation of impurities in the plasma core should be avoided. This contribution provides details of the preliminary tests at ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) with a focus on the most important aspects for detector operation in harsh radiation environment. It was shown that both spatially and spectrally resolved data could be collected, in a reasonable agreement with other AUG diagnostics. Contributions to the GEM signal include also hard X-rays, gammas, and neutrons. First simulations of the effect of high-energy photons have helped understanding these contributions.

  5. Electron density determination in the divertor volume of ASDEX Upgrade via Stark broadening of the Balmer lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potzel, S.; Dux, R.; Müller, H. W.; Scarabosio, A.; Wischmeier, M.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-02-01

    In this article we present the development of a new diagnostic capable of determining the electron density in the divertor volume of ASDEX Upgrade (AUG). It is based on the spectroscopic measurement of the Stark broadening of the Balmer lines. In this work two approaches of calculating the Stark broadening, i.e. the unified theory and the model microfield method, are compared. It will be shown that both approaches yield similar results in the case of Balmer lines with high upper principal quantum numbers n. In addition, for typical AUG parameters the influence of the Zeeman splitting on the high n Balmer lines is found to be negligible. Moreover, an assumption for the Doppler broadening of Tn = 5 eV, which is the maximum Frank-Condon dissociation energy of recycled neutrals, is sufficient. The initial electron density measurements performed using this method are found to be consistent with both Langmuir probe and pressure gauge data.

  6. ICRF wave field measurements in the presence of scrape off layer turbulence on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoukov, R.; Bobkov, V.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Jacquot, J.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Suárez López, G.

    2016-11-01

    A new array of B-dot probes was installed on ASDEX Upgrade. The purpose of the new diagnostic is to study Ion Cyclotron Range-off Frequencies (ICRF) wave field distributions in the evanescent scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma region on the low field side of ASDEX Upgrade. The vacuum measurements (no gas, BT = 0 T) reveal ICRF wave field measurements consistent with the profiles expected from the newly installed 3-strap ICRF antennas outside the antenna box: the shape of the toroidal distribution of both the amplitude and the phase is the same for the case of only the central straps being active, as for the case of only the side straps being active. These profiles become strongly modified during plasma operations. The modifications can be separated into two types: "Inter-edge localized mode (ELM)" and "During-ELM" periods. The phase distribution of the ICRF wave fields remains well-defined during the Inter-ELM period; however, it becomes more spread out over the entire 360° range during ELMs. The observed modulations cannot be explained by the observed changes in the ICRF power, as monitored in the transmission line. However, they are consistent with ICRF coupling changes introduced by plasma filaments: the plasma density perturbations due to the filaments are high enough to change the nature of the fast ICRF wave field from evanescent to propagating. The coverage of the present diagnostic is being expanded to include both the low field side and the high field side probes. Additionally, a manipulator probe head is being developed to measure ICRF wave field radial profiles across the SOL region.

  7. Measurements and modeling of Alfven eigenmode induced fast ion transport and loss in DIII-D and ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Van Zeeland, M. A.; Fisher, R. K.; Hyatt, A. W.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Pace, D. C.; Muscatello, C. M.; Zhu, Y. B.; Garcia Munoz, M.; Geiger, B.; Maraschek, M.; Suttrop, W.; Tardini, G.; Kramer, G. J.; White, R. B.; Gorelenkova, M.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Nazikian, R.; Aekaeslompolo, S.; Austin, M. E.; Boom, J. E.

    2011-05-15

    Neutral beam injection into reversed magnetic shear DIII-D and ASDEX Upgrade plasmas produces a variety of Alfvenic activity including toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes and reversed shear Alfven eigenmodes (RSAEs). These modes are studied during the discharge current ramp phase when incomplete current penetration results in a high central safety factor and increased drive due to multiple higher order resonances. Scans of injected 80 keV neutral beam power on DIII-D showed a transition from classical to AE dominated fast ion transport and, as previously found, discharges with strong AE activity exhibit a deficit in neutron emission relative to classical predictions. By keeping beam power constant and delaying injection during the current ramp, AE activity was reduced or eliminated and a significant improvement in fast ion confinement observed. Similarly, experiments in ASDEX Upgrade using early 60 keV neutral beam injection drove multiple unstable RSAEs. Periods of strong RSAE activity are accompanied by a large (peak {delta}S{sub n}/S{sub n{approx_equal}}60%) neutron deficit. Losses of beam ions modulated at AE frequencies were observed using large bandwidth energy and pitch resolving fast ion loss scintillator detectors and clearly identify their role in the process. Modeling of DIII-D loss measurements using guiding center following codes to track particles in the presence of ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) calculated AE structures (validated by comparison to experiment) is able to reproduce the dominant energy, pitch, and temporal evolution of these losses. While loss of both co and counter current fast ions occurs, simulations show that the dominant loss mechanism observed is the mode induced transition of counter-passing fast ions to lost trapped orbits. Modeling also reproduces a coherent signature of AE induced losses and it was found that these coherent losses scale proportionally with the amplitude; an additional incoherent contribution scales

  8. Laboratory astrophysics on ASDEX Upgrade: Measurements and analysis of K-shell O, F, and Ne spectra in the 9 - 20 A region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, S. B.; Fournier, K. B.; Finkenthal, M. J.; Smith, R.; Puetterich, T.; Neu, R.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution measurements of K-shell emission from O, F, and Ne have been performed at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak in Garching, Germany. Independently measured temperature and density profiles of the plasma provide a unique test bed for model validation. We present comparisons of measured spectra with calculations based on transport and collisional-radiative models and discuss the reliability of commonly used diagnostic line ratios.

  9. 3D ELM fluctuation measurements with the new dual array ECE-Imaging diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, Ivo; Vanovac, Branka; Domier, Calvin; Luhmann, Neville; Bogomolov, Anton; Suttrop, Wolfgang; Tobias, Benjamin; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-11-01

    In a major upgrade, the (2D) electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic (ECE-Imaging) at ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) has been equipped with a second detector array, and has been successfully commissioned. The two detector arrays observe the plasma through the same vacuum window, both under a slight toroidal angle, to enable quasi-3D measurements of the electron temperature. The system measures a total of 288 channels, in two toroidally separated 2D arrays of approximately 50 cm vertically by 10 cm radially. The toroidal separation between the two poloidal observation planes is about 40 cm, such that the majority of the field lines is observed by both arrays simultaneously, thereby enabling a direct measurement of the 3D properties of plasma instabilities like ELM filaments. The toroidal separation of 40 cm is sufficient for the accurate measurement of both phase differences and transit times of (rotating) plasma structures, enabling a distinction between time varying 2D structures and true 3D structures (not possible with 2D diagnostics). The research will mainly focus on the investigation of the 3D structure of the temperature fluctuations related to edge localized modes (ELMs), in particular precursors and filaments. The first results on ELMs will be reported.

  10. Evidence for Strong Inversed Shear of Toroidal Rotation at the Edge-Transport Barrier in the ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Puetterich, T; Wolfrum, E.; Dux, R.; Maggi, C. F.

    2009-01-16

    The toroidal rotation of H-mode plasmas in ASDEX Upgrade is studied in the outermost 5 cm of the confined plasma. The projection of the rotation velocity along the line of sight (approximately toroidal) is measured using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy, with a radial resolution of up to 3 mm and a temporal resolution of 1.9 ms. At about 1 cm inside the separatrix the rotation exhibits a local minimum. From there, the rotation in codirection increases towards the plasma center and towards the separatrix. The latter increase is the focus of this work. It is situated in the region of the edge transport barrier and amounts to 10-20 km/s. It is observed for D{sup +}, He{sup 2+}, B{sup 5+}, and C{sup 6+}. The described rotation feature at the edge is not visible during an ELM crash and is probably connected to the occurrence of steep gradients in this plasma region.

  11. Comparison of experiment and models of geodesic acoustic mode frequency and amplitude geometric scaling in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, P.; Conway, G. D.; Stroth, U.; Biancalani, A.; Palermo, F.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-04-01

    In a set of dedicated ASDEX Upgrade shape-scan experiments, the influence of plasma geometry on the frequency and amplitude behaviour of the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM), measured by Doppler reflectometry, is studied. In both limiter and divertor configurations, the plasma elongation was varied between circular and highly elongated states (1.1<κ <1.8 ). Also, the edge safety factor was scanned between 3  <  q  <  5. The GAM frequency {ω\\text{GAM}} and amplitude are used to test several models (heuristic, fluid and gyrokinetic based), which incorporate various plasma geometry effects. The experimentally observed effect of decreasing {ω\\text{GAM}} with increasing κ is predicted by most models. Other geometric factors, such as inverse aspect ratio ε and Shafranov shift gradient {Δ\\prime} are also seen to be influential in determining a reliable lower {ω\\text{GAM}} boundary. The GAM amplitude is found to vary with boundary elongation {κ\\text{b}} and safety factor q. The collisional damping is compared to multiple models for the collisionless damping. Collisional damping appears to play a stronger role in the divertor configuration, while collisional and collisionless damping both may contribute to the GAM amplitude in the limiter configuration.

  12. Interpretation of the effects of electron cyclotron power absorption in pre-disruptive tokamak discharges in ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, S.; Lazzaro, E.; Granucci, G.; Esposito, B.; Maraschek, M.; Zohm, H.; Sauter, O.; Brunetti, D.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2012-09-15

    Tokamak disruptions are events of fatal collapse of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) confinement configuration, which cause a rapid loss of the plasma thermal energy and the impulsive release of magnetic energy and heat on the tokamak first wall components. The physics of the disruptions is very complex and non-linear, strictly associated with the dynamics of magnetic tearing perturbations. The crucial problem of the response to the effects of localized heat deposition and current driven by external (rf) sources to avoid or quench the MHD tearing instabilities has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The analysis of the conditions under which a disruption can be prevented by injection of electron cyclotron (EC) rf power, or, alternatively, may be caused by it, shows that the local EC heating can be more significant than EC current drive in ensuring neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) stability, due to two main reasons: first, the drop of temperature associated with the island thermal short circuit tends to reduce the neoclassical character of the instability and to limit the EC current drive generation; second, the different effects on the mode evolution of both the location of the power deposition relative to the island separatrix and the island shape deformation lead to less strict requirements of precise power deposition focussing. A contribution to the validation of theoretical models of the events associated with NTM is given and can be used to develop concepts for their control, relevant also for ITER-like scenarios.

  13. Interpretation of the effects of electron cyclotron power absorption in pre-disruptive tokamak discharges in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, S.; Lazzaro, E.; Esposito, B.; Granucci, G.; Maraschek, M.; Sauter, O.; Zohm, H.; Brunetti, D.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2012-09-01

    Tokamak disruptions are events of fatal collapse of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) confinement configuration, which cause a rapid loss of the plasma thermal energy and the impulsive release of magnetic energy and heat on the tokamak first wall components. The physics of the disruptions is very complex and non-linear, strictly associated with the dynamics of magnetic tearing perturbations. The crucial problem of the response to the effects of localized heat deposition and current driven by external (rf) sources to avoid or quench the MHD tearing instabilities has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The analysis of the conditions under which a disruption can be prevented by injection of electron cyclotron (EC) rf power, or, alternatively, may be caused by it, shows that the local EC heating can be more significant than EC current drive in ensuring neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) stability, due to two main reasons: first, the drop of temperature associated with the island thermal short circuit tends to reduce the neoclassical character of the instability and to limit the EC current drive generation; second, the different effects on the mode evolution of both the location of the power deposition relative to the island separatrix and the island shape deformation lead to less strict requirements of precise power deposition focussing. A contribution to the validation of theoretical models of the events associated with NTM is given and can be used to develop concepts for their control, relevant also for ITER-like scenarios.

  14. Experimental analysis and WallDYN simulations of the global nitrogen migration in ASDEX Upgrade L-mode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisl, G.; Schmid, K.; Oberkofler, M.; Krieger, K.; Lisgo, S. W.; Aho-Mantila, L.; Reimold, F.; Lunt, T.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-03-01

    This work presents ASDEX Upgrade experiments, where the nitrogen deposition and re-erosion on divertor manipulator samples and the effect of its transport through the plasma were studied. These results are compared to WallDYN-DIVIMP simulations based on SOLPS plasma backgrounds and employing an improved WallDYN model, which includes the effusion of nitrogen from saturated surfaces. On one hand, this allows the WallDYN code and the new saturation model with a comprehensive data set to be benchmarked, on the other hand the simulations help in the interpretation of the experimental results. Both, experimental results and simulations, show that the N content in the region of the outer strike line reaches its steady-state value within one discharge. The simulations also reproduce the experimentally observed nitrogen content in samples exposed to N2-seeded discharges. With respect to the boron deposition, the nitrogen deposition in a non-seeded discharge and the re-erosion of nitrogen discrepancies to the WallDYN-DIVIMP simulations are observed. Based on SDTrimSP simulations, these are attributed to the missing depth resolution of the WallDYN surface model. A detailed comparison of spectroscopic measurements to WallDYN simulations, based on a novel synthetic spectroscopy diagnostic for WallDYN, shows that the nitrogen fluxes in the plasma are well described by the simulations. From a comparison of several WallDYN-DIVIMP simulations employing customized onion-skin model plasma backgrounds the physical processes controlling the nitrogen concentration in the core plasma and the applicability of onion-skin model plasma backgrounds are discussed. From these simulations the private flux zone with the gas valve, the outer baffle and the high field side main wall are identified as the main sources for the nitrogen content of the core plasma.

  15. Optical emission measurements of H 2 and D 2 molecules in the divertor region of ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantz, U.; Behringer, K.; Gafert, J.; Coster, D.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    A spectroscopic method has been developed for measuring molecular influxes and particle densities in fusion edge plasmas, which is based on the H 2 and D 2 Fulcher emission bands around 600 nm wavelength. A first application to the ASDEX Upgrade divertor plasma is described. The influx of hydrogen molecules was determined from the population of the upper Fulcher state using the theoretical number of ionization and dissociation events per Fulcher photon ( Seff + Deff)/XB Ful, as calculated by a collisional-radiative model. These results were compared with expectations on the basis of the atomic hydrogen fluxes and a typical molecule/atom ratio. Measurements and calculations agree in their time dependence, but the experimental values are somewhat lower, which may be within the error margin or of more significance. The Fulcher radiation was also compared directly to B2-EIRENE predictions, resulting in a higher discrepancy. In addition, the vibrational population of the ground state molecules was determined from that of the excited state using a method based on Franck-Condon factors. It can be characterized by a Tvib between 3000 and 9000 K, inversely correlated with electron temperature. This variation is predicted by the collisional-radiative code and even allows an estimate of Te. Vibrational excitation increases ionization and dissociation rate coefficients, as clearly demonstrated by the code calculations. It is therefore very likely that the observed discrepancy in molecular intensity is mainly caused by the omission of vibrational excitation in the present version of B2-EIRENE. The described flux measurements are expected to be accurate above Te=5 eV, but are more difficult at lower temperatures due to the strong Te dependence of ( Seff + Deff)/XB Ful in that region.

  16. Profile measurements of the electron temperature on the ASDEX Upgrade, COMPASS, and ISTTOK tokamak using Thomson scattering, triple, and ball-pen probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamek, J.; Müller, H. W.; Silva, C.; Schrittwieser, R.; Ionita, C.; Mehlmann, F.; Costea, S.; Horacek, J.; Kurzan, B.; Bilkova, P.; Böhm, P.; Aftanas, M.; Vondracek, P.; Stöckel, J.; Panek, R.; Fernandes, H.; Figueiredo, H.

    2016-04-01

    The ball-pen probe (BPP) technique is used successfully to make profile measurements of the electron temperature on the ASDEX Upgrade (Axially Symmetric Divertor Experiment), COMPASS (COMPact ASSembly), and ISTTOK (Instituto Superior Tecnico TOKamak) tokamak. The electron temperature is provided by a combination of the BPP potential (ΦBPP) and the floating potential (Vfl) of the Langmuir probe (LP), which is compared with the Thomson scattering diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade and COMPASS. Excellent agreement between the two diagnostics is obtained for circular and diverted plasmas and different heating mechanisms (Ohmic, NBI, ECRH) in deuterium discharges with the same formula Te = (ΦBPP - Vfl)/2.2. The comparative measurements of the electron temperature using BPP/LP and triple probe (TP) techniques on the ISTTOK tokamak show good agreement of averaged values only inside the separatrix. It was also found that the TP provides the electron temperature with significantly higher standard deviation than BPP/LP. However, the resulting values of both techniques are well in the phase with the maximum of cross-correlation function being 0.8.

  17. Profile measurements of the electron temperature on the ASDEX Upgrade, COMPASS, and ISTTOK tokamak using Thomson scattering, triple, and ball-pen probes.

    PubMed

    Adamek, J; Müller, H W; Silva, C; Schrittwieser, R; Ionita, C; Mehlmann, F; Costea, S; Horacek, J; Kurzan, B; Bilkova, P; Böhm, P; Aftanas, M; Vondracek, P; Stöckel, J; Panek, R; Fernandes, H; Figueiredo, H

    2016-04-01

    The ball-pen probe (BPP) technique is used successfully to make profile measurements of the electron temperature on the ASDEX Upgrade (Axially Symmetric Divertor Experiment), COMPASS (COMPact ASSembly), and ISTTOK (Instituto Superior Tecnico TOKamak) tokamak. The electron temperature is provided by a combination of the BPP potential (ΦBPP) and the floating potential (Vfl) of the Langmuir probe (LP), which is compared with the Thomson scattering diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade and COMPASS. Excellent agreement between the two diagnostics is obtained for circular and diverted plasmas and different heating mechanisms (Ohmic, NBI, ECRH) in deuterium discharges with the same formula Te = (ΦBPP - Vfl)/2.2. The comparative measurements of the electron temperature using BPP/LP and triple probe (TP) techniques on the ISTTOK tokamak show good agreement of averaged values only inside the separatrix. It was also found that the TP provides the electron temperature with significantly higher standard deviation than BPP/LP. However, the resulting values of both techniques are well in the phase with the maximum of cross-correlation function being 0.8. PMID:27131677

  18. Profile measurements of the electron temperature on the ASDEX Upgrade, COMPASS, and ISTTOK tokamak using Thomson scattering, triple, and ball-pen probes.

    PubMed

    Adamek, J; Müller, H W; Silva, C; Schrittwieser, R; Ionita, C; Mehlmann, F; Costea, S; Horacek, J; Kurzan, B; Bilkova, P; Böhm, P; Aftanas, M; Vondracek, P; Stöckel, J; Panek, R; Fernandes, H; Figueiredo, H

    2016-04-01

    The ball-pen probe (BPP) technique is used successfully to make profile measurements of the electron temperature on the ASDEX Upgrade (Axially Symmetric Divertor Experiment), COMPASS (COMPact ASSembly), and ISTTOK (Instituto Superior Tecnico TOKamak) tokamak. The electron temperature is provided by a combination of the BPP potential (ΦBPP) and the floating potential (Vfl) of the Langmuir probe (LP), which is compared with the Thomson scattering diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade and COMPASS. Excellent agreement between the two diagnostics is obtained for circular and diverted plasmas and different heating mechanisms (Ohmic, NBI, ECRH) in deuterium discharges with the same formula Te = (ΦBPP - Vfl)/2.2. The comparative measurements of the electron temperature using BPP/LP and triple probe (TP) techniques on the ISTTOK tokamak show good agreement of averaged values only inside the separatrix. It was also found that the TP provides the electron temperature with significantly higher standard deviation than BPP/LP. However, the resulting values of both techniques are well in the phase with the maximum of cross-correlation function being 0.8.

  19. High power ECRH and ECCD in moderately collisional ASDEX Upgrade Hmodes and status of EC system upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stober, J.; Sommer, F.; Angioni, C.; Bock, A.; Fable, E.; Leuterer, F.; Monaco, F.; Müller, F.; Münich, S.; Petzold, B.; Poli, E.; Schubert, M.; Schütz, H.; Wagner, D.; Zohm, H.; Kasparek, W.; Plaum, B.; Meier, A.; Scherer, Th.; Strauß, D.; Jelonnek, J.; Thumm, M.; Litvak, A.; Denisov, G. G.; Chirkov, A. V.; Tai, E. M.; Popov, L. G.; Nichiporenko, V. O.; Myasnikov, V. E.; Soluyanova, E. A.; Malygin, V.

    2015-03-01

    This contribution deals with H-modes with significant heat exchange between electrons and ions, but which can still show large differences between electron and ion-temperatures especially inside half minor radius. These conditions are referred to as moderately collisional. A systematic study shows that an increasing fraction of electron heating increases the transport in the ion channel mainly due to the dependence of the ITG dominated ion transport on the ratio Te/Ti in agreement with modeling. The rotational shear in the plasmas under study was so small that it hardly influences ITG stability, such that variations of the rotation profile due to a change of the heating method were of minor importance. These findings connect to studies of advanced tokamak scenarios using ECCD as a tool to modify the q-profile. The electron heating connected to the ECCD tends to increase the transport in the ion channel quite in contrast to the goal to operate at reduced current but with increased confinement. The confinement only increases as the fraction of ion heating is increased by adding more NBI. An ITER case was modeled as well. Due to the larger value of νei ・ τE the ratio Te/Ti is only moderately reduced even with strong electron heating and the confinement reduction is small even for the hypothetic case of using only ECRH as additional heating. Finally the paper discusses the ongoing upgrade of the AUG ECRH-system.

  20. Toroidal modelling of RMP response in ASDEX Upgrade: coil phase scan, q 95 dependence, and toroidal torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Ryan, D.; Kirk, A.; Li, Li; Suttrop, W.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, R.; Fuchs, J. C.; Kurzan, B.; Piovesan, P.; Willensdorfer, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-05-01

    The plasma response to the vacuum resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields, produced by the ELM control coils in ASDEX Upgrade experiments, is computationally modelled using the MARS-F/K codes (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681, Liu et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 112503). A systematic investigation is carried out, considering various plasma and coil configurations as in the ELM control experiments. The low q plasmas, with {{q}95}˜ 3.8 (q 95 is the safety factor q value at 95% of the equilibrium poloidal flux), responding to low n (n is the toroidal mode number) field perturbations from each single row of the ELM coils, generates a core kink amplification effect. Combining two rows, with different toroidal phasing, thus leads to either cancellation or reinforcement of the core kink response, which in turn determines the poloidal location of the peak plasma surface displacement. The core kink response is typically weak for the n  =  4 coil configuration at low q, and for the n  =  2 configuration but only at high q ({{q}95}˜ 5.5 ). A phase shift of around 60 degrees for low q plasmas, and around 90 degrees for high q plasmas, is found in the coil phasing, between the plasma response field and the vacuum RMP field, that maximizes the edge resonant field component. This leads to an optimal coil phasing of about 100 (-100) degrees for low (high) q plasmas, that maximizes both the edge resonant field component and the plasma surface displacement near the X-point of the separatrix. This optimal phasing closely corresponds to the best ELM mitigation observed in experiments. A strong parallel sound wave damping moderately reduces the core kink response but has minor effect on the edge peeling response. For low q plasmas, modelling shows that both the resonant electromagnetic torque and the neoclassical toroidal viscous (NTV) torque (due to the presence of 3D magnetic field perturbations) contribute to the toroidal flow damping, in particular near the

  1. Toroidal modelling of RMP response in ASDEX Upgrade: coil phase scan, q 95 dependence, and toroidal torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Ryan, D.; Kirk, A.; Li, Li; Suttrop, W.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, R.; Fuchs, J. C.; Kurzan, B.; Piovesan, P.; Willensdorfer, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-05-01

    The plasma response to the vacuum resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields, produced by the ELM control coils in ASDEX Upgrade experiments, is computationally modelled using the MARS-F/K codes (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681, Liu et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 112503). A systematic investigation is carried out, considering various plasma and coil configurations as in the ELM control experiments. The low q plasmas, with {{q}95}∼ 3.8 (q 95 is the safety factor q value at 95% of the equilibrium poloidal flux), responding to low n (n is the toroidal mode number) field perturbations from each single row of the ELM coils, generates a core kink amplification effect. Combining two rows, with different toroidal phasing, thus leads to either cancellation or reinforcement of the core kink response, which in turn determines the poloidal location of the peak plasma surface displacement. The core kink response is typically weak for the n  =  4 coil configuration at low q, and for the n  =  2 configuration but only at high q ({{q}95}∼ 5.5 ). A phase shift of around 60 degrees for low q plasmas, and around 90 degrees for high q plasmas, is found in the coil phasing, between the plasma response field and the vacuum RMP field, that maximizes the edge resonant field component. This leads to an optimal coil phasing of about 100 (‑100) degrees for low (high) q plasmas, that maximizes both the edge resonant field component and the plasma surface displacement near the X-point of the separatrix. This optimal phasing closely corresponds to the best ELM mitigation observed in experiments. A strong parallel sound wave damping moderately reduces the core kink response but has minor effect on the edge peeling response. For low q plasmas, modelling shows that both the resonant electromagnetic torque and the neoclassical toroidal viscous (NTV) torque (due to the presence of 3D magnetic field perturbations) contribute to the toroidal flow damping, in particular near the

  2. ELM control at the L → H transition by means of pellet pacing in the ASDEX Upgrade and JET all-metal-wall tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, P. T.; Meyer, H.; Birkenmeier, G.; Burckhart, A.; Carvalho, I. S.; Delabie, E.; Frassinetti, L.; Huijsmans, G.; Kocsis, G.; Loarte, A.; Maggi, C. F.; Maraschek, M.; Ploeckl, B.; Rimini, F.; Ryter, F.; Saarelma, S.; Szepesi, T.; Wolfrum, E.; ASDEX Upgrade Team; Contributors, JET

    2015-04-01

    In ITER, pellets are used for ELM pacing and fueling. More importantly, ELM control and in particular control of the first ELM needs to be demonstrated in the non-nuclear phase of ITER during operation in H or He. Whilst D pellets have been established as an ELM control technique in the stationary phase with D target plasmas in devices with C as plasma-facing component, the behavior of other isotopes in non-stationary phases are not so well known. Here, we report on new pellet triggering experiments in ASDEX Upgrade and JET that mimic specific ITER operating scenarios. Both machines are equipped with an all-metal wall; recent investigations have shown that pellet triggering and pacing become more intricate when an all-metal wall surface is employed. In both machines, ELM triggering has been shown to occur after injection of D pellets into D plasmas during extended ELM-free phases, often following the L → H transition. In both devices the pellets are found to induce ELMs under conditions far from the stability boundary for type-I ELMs. Near the L → H transition, induced ELMs in some cases are more likely to have type-III rather than type-I characteristics. Furthermore, in ASDEX Upgrade this study was conducted during L → H transitions in the current ramp-up phase as envisaged for ITER. In addition, the pellet’s ELM trigger potential has been proven in ASDEX Upgrade with a correct isotopic compilation for the non-nuclear phase in ITER, viz. H pellets into either He or H plasmas. Results from this study are encouraging since they have demonstrated the pellets’ potential to provoke ELMs even under conditions that are quite far from the stability boundaries attributed to the occurrence of spontaneous ELMs. However, with the recent change from carbon to an all-metal plasma-facing component, examples have been found in both machines where pellets failed to establish ELM control under conditions where this would be expected and needed. Consequently, a major task

  3. Novel mono-static arrangement of the ASDEX Upgrade high field side reflectometers compatible with electron cyclotron resonance heating stray radiation.

    PubMed

    Silva, A; Varela, P; Meneses, L; Manso, M

    2012-10-01

    The ASDEX Upgrade frequency modulated continuous wave broadband reflectometer system uses a mono-static antenna configuration with in-vessel hog-horns and 3 dB directional couplers. The operation of the new electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) launcher and the start of collective Thomson scattering experiments caused several events where the fragile dummy loads inside the high field side directional couplers were damaged, due to excessive power resulting from the ECRH stray fields. In this paper, we present a non-conventional application of the existing three-port directional coupler that hardens the system to the ECRH stray fields and at the same time generates the necessary reference signal. Electromagnetic simulations and laboratory tests were performed to validate the proposed solution and are compared with the in-vessel calibration tests.

  4. A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic for amplitude, polarization, and wavenumber measurements of ion cyclotron range-of frequency fields on ASDEX Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Ochoukov, R; Bobkov, V; Faugel, H; Fünfgelder, H; Noterdaeme, J-M

    2015-11-01

    A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic has been installed on an ASDEX Upgrade tokamak to characterize ion cyclotron range-of frequency (ICRF) wave generation and interaction with magnetized plasma. The diagnostic consists of a field-aligned array of B-dot probes, oriented to measure fast and slow ICRF wave fields and their field-aligned wavenumber (k(//)) spectrum on the low field side of ASDEX Upgrade. A thorough description of the diagnostic and the supporting electronics is provided. In order to compare the measured dominant wavenumber of the local ICRF fields with the expected spectrum of the launched ICRF waves, in-air near-field measurements were performed on the newly installed 3-strap ICRF antenna to reconstruct the dominant launched toroidal wavenumbers (k(tor)). Measurements during a strap current phasing scan in tokamak discharges reveal an upshift in k(//) as strap phasing is moved away from the dipole configuration. This result is the opposite of the k(tor) trend expected from in-air near-field measurements; however, the near-field based reconstruction routine does not account for the effect of induced radiofrequency (RF) currents in the passive antenna structures. The measured exponential increase in the local ICRF wave field amplitude is in agreement with the upshifted k(//), as strap phasing moves away from the dipole configuration. An examination of discharges heated with two ICRF antennas simultaneously reveals the existence of beat waves at 1 kHz, as expected from the difference of the two antennas' operating frequencies. Beats are observed on both the fast and the slow wave probes suggesting that the two waves are coupled outside the active antennas. Although the new diagnostic shows consistent trends between the amplitude and the phase measurements in response to changes applied by the ICRF antennas, the disagreement with the in-air near-field measurements remains. An electromagnetic model is currently under development to address this issue.

  5. A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic for amplitude, polarization, and wavenumber measurements of ion cyclotron range-of frequency fields on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoukov, R.; Bobkov, V.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-11-01

    A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic has been installed on an ASDEX Upgrade tokamak to characterize ion cyclotron range-of frequency (ICRF) wave generation and interaction with magnetized plasma. The diagnostic consists of a field-aligned array of B-dot probes, oriented to measure fast and slow ICRF wave fields and their field-aligned wavenumber (k//) spectrum on the low field side of ASDEX Upgrade. A thorough description of the diagnostic and the supporting electronics is provided. In order to compare the measured dominant wavenumber of the local ICRF fields with the expected spectrum of the launched ICRF waves, in-air near-field measurements were performed on the newly installed 3-strap ICRF antenna to reconstruct the dominant launched toroidal wavenumbers (ktor). Measurements during a strap current phasing scan in tokamak discharges reveal an upshift in k// as strap phasing is moved away from the dipole configuration. This result is the opposite of the ktor trend expected from in-air near-field measurements; however, the near-field based reconstruction routine does not account for the effect of induced radiofrequency (RF) currents in the passive antenna structures. The measured exponential increase in the local ICRF wave field amplitude is in agreement with the upshifted k//, as strap phasing moves away from the dipole configuration. An examination of discharges heated with two ICRF antennas simultaneously reveals the existence of beat waves at 1 kHz, as expected from the difference of the two antennas' operating frequencies. Beats are observed on both the fast and the slow wave probes suggesting that the two waves are coupled outside the active antennas. Although the new diagnostic shows consistent trends between the amplitude and the phase measurements in response to changes applied by the ICRF antennas, the disagreement with the in-air near-field measurements remains. An electromagnetic model is currently under development to address this issue.

  6. A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic for amplitude, polarization, and wavenumber measurements of ion cyclotron range-of frequency fields on ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Ochoukov, R.; Bobkov, V.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-11-15

    A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic has been installed on an ASDEX Upgrade tokamak to characterize ion cyclotron range-of frequency (ICRF) wave generation and interaction with magnetized plasma. The diagnostic consists of a field-aligned array of B-dot probes, oriented to measure fast and slow ICRF wave fields and their field-aligned wavenumber (k{sub //}) spectrum on the low field side of ASDEX Upgrade. A thorough description of the diagnostic and the supporting electronics is provided. In order to compare the measured dominant wavenumber of the local ICRF fields with the expected spectrum of the launched ICRF waves, in-air near-field measurements were performed on the newly installed 3-strap ICRF antenna to reconstruct the dominant launched toroidal wavenumbers (k{sub tor}). Measurements during a strap current phasing scan in tokamak discharges reveal an upshift in k{sub //} as strap phasing is moved away from the dipole configuration. This result is the opposite of the k{sub tor} trend expected from in-air near-field measurements; however, the near-field based reconstruction routine does not account for the effect of induced radiofrequency (RF) currents in the passive antenna structures. The measured exponential increase in the local ICRF wave field amplitude is in agreement with the upshifted k{sub //}, as strap phasing moves away from the dipole configuration. An examination of discharges heated with two ICRF antennas simultaneously reveals the existence of beat waves at 1 kHz, as expected from the difference of the two antennas’ operating frequencies. Beats are observed on both the fast and the slow wave probes suggesting that the two waves are coupled outside the active antennas. Although the new diagnostic shows consistent trends between the amplitude and the phase measurements in response to changes applied by the ICRF antennas, the disagreement with the in-air near-field measurements remains. An electromagnetic model is currently under development to

  7. Modelling of the ICRF induced E  ×  B convection in the scrape-off-layer of ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Feng, Y.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Bobkov, V.; Colas, L.; Coster, D.; Lunt, T.; Bilato, R.; Jacquot, J.; Ochoukov, R.; Van Eester, D.; Křivská, A.; Jacquet, P.; Guimarais, L.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-09-01

    In magnetic controlled fusion devices, plasma heating with radio-frequency (RF) waves in the ion cyclotron (IC) range of frequency relies on the electric field of the fast wave to heat the plasma. However, the slow wave can be generated parasitically. The electric field of the slow wave can induce large biased plasma potential (DC potential) through sheath rectification. The rapid variation of the rectified potential across the equilibrium magnetic field can cause significant convective transport (E  ×  B drifts) in the scrape-off layer (SOL). In order to understand this phenomenon and reproduce the experiments, 3D realistic simulations are carried out with the 3D edge plasma fluid and kinetic neutral code EMC3-Eirene in ASDEX Upgrade. For this, we have added the prescribed drift terms to the EMC3 equations and verified the 3D code results against the analytical ones in cylindrical geometry. The edge plasma potential derived from the experiments is used to calculate the drift velocities, which are then treated as input fields in the code to obtain the final density distributions. Our simulation results are in good agreement with the experiments.

  8. M3D-C1 simulations of plasma response in ELM-mitigated ASDEX Upgrade and DIII-D discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, B. C.; Ferraro, N. M.; Haskey, S. R.; Logan, N. C.

    2015-11-01

    The extended magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code M3D-C1 is used to study the time-independent, linear response of tokamak equilibria to applied, 3D magnetic perturbations. In doing so, we seek to develop a more complete understanding of what MHD phenomena are responsible for the mitigation and suppression of edge-localized modes (ELMs) and to explain why the success of ELM suppression experiments differs both within a single tokamak and across different tokamaks. We consider such experiments on ASDEX Upgrade and DIII-D. We examine how resonant and non-resonant plasma responses are affected by varying the relative magnitude and phase of sets of magnetic coils. The importance of two-fluid effects, rotation profiles, plasma β, collisionality, bootstrap current profiles, and various numerical parameters are explored. The results are verified against other MHD codes (e.g., IPEC, MARS), correlated to observations of ELM mitigation or suppression, and validated against observed magnetic responses. Work supported in part by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC02-09CH11466, and the FES Postdoctoral Research Program.

  9. Direct observations of L-I-H and H-I-L transitions with the X-point reciprocating probe in ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, S. H.; Manz, P.; Stroth, U.; Tsalas, M.; Tynan, G. R.

    2014-04-15

    A reciprocating Langmuir probe was used to directly measure the behavior of turbulence and flows in the X-point region during transitions between low-(L) and high-confinement (H) mode in ASDEX Upgrade. The probe traverses the divertor horizontally in 140 ms, typically 2–5 cm below the X-point. Toroidal Mach number, density, floating potential (ϕ{sub f}), and electron temperature (T{sub e}) are measured. In the regime accessible to the probe (P{sub inj}<1.5 MW, line-integrated core density <4×10{sup 19} m{sup −2}), the L-H transition features an intermediate phase (I-phase), characterized by limit-cycle oscillations at 0.5–3 kHz [Conway et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 065001 (2011)]. The probe measurements reveal that this pulsing affects both the density and the toroidal Mach number. It is present in both the low-(LFS) and high-field sides (HFS) of the scrape-off layer, while high-amplitude broadband turbulence usually dominates the private-flux region. Profile comparisons between L-mode and I-phase show lower density in pulsing regions and small shifts in T{sub e}, directed oppositely on LFS and HFS, which are compensated by shifts in ϕ{sub f} to yield a surprisingly unchanged plasma potential profile. Directly observed L-I-phase transitions reveal that the onset of the pulsing is preceded by a fast 50% density drop in the HFS X-point region. Back transitions to L-mode occur essentially symmetrically, with the pulsing stopping first, followed by a fast recovery to L-mode density levels in the divertor.

  10. B2-Eirene modelling of ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coster, D. P.; Schneider, R.; Neuhauser, J.; Bosch, H.-S.; Wunderlich, R.; Fuchs, C.; Mast, F.; Kallenbach, A.; Dux, R.; Becker, G.; Braams, B. J.; Reiter, D.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    1997-02-01

    The extension of the computational region of the coupled fluid plasma, Monte-Carlo neutrals code, B2-Eirene, to the plasma center is discussed. The simulation of completely detached H-mode plasma is presented, as is the modelling of He and Ne compression.

  11. Divertor efficiency in ASDEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, W.; Becker, G.; Behringer, K.; Campbell, D.; Eberhagen, A.; Fussmann, G.; Gehre, O.; Gierke, G. V.; Glock, E.; Haas, G.; Huang, M.; Karger, F.; Keilhacker, M.; KlÜber, O.; Kornherr, M.; Lisitano, G.; Mayer, H.-M.; Meisel, D.; Müller, E. R.; Murmann, H.; Niedermeyer, H.; Poschenrieder, W.; Rapp, H.; Schneider, F.; Siller, G.; Steuer, K.-H.; Venus, G.; Vernickel, H.; Wagner, F.

    1982-12-01

    The divertor efficiency in ASDEX is discussed for ohmically heated plasmas. The parameters of the boundary layer both in the torus midplane and the divertor chamber have been measured. The results are reasonably well understood in terms of parallel and perpendicular transport. A high pressure of neutral hydrogen builds up in the divertor chamber and Franck-Condon particles recycle back through the divertor throat. Due to dissociation processes the boundary plasma is effectively cooled before it reaches the neutralizer plates. The shielding property of the boundary layer against impurity influx is comparable to that of a limiter plasma. The transport of iron is numerically simulated for an iron influx produced by sputtering of charge exchange neutrals at the wall. The results are consistent with the measured iron concentration. First results from a comparison of the poloidal divertor with toroidally closed limiters (stainless steel, carbon) are given. Diverted discharges are considerably cleaner and easier to create.

  12. Pellet imaging techniques on ASDEX

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G.A. ); Buechl, K.; Hofmann, J.; Lang, R.; Loch, R.; Rudyj, A.; Sandmann, W. )

    1990-01-01

    As part of a USDOE/ASDEX collaboration, a detailed examination of pellet ablation in ASDEX with a variety of diagnostics has allowed a better understanding of a number of features of hydrogen ice pellet ablation in a plasma. In particular, fast gated photos with an intensified Xybion CCD video camera allow in-situ velocity measurements of the pellet as it penetrates the plasma. With time resolution of typically 100 nanoseconds and exposures every 50 microseconds, the evolution of each pellet in a multi-pellet ASDEX tokamak plasma discharge can be followed. When the pellet cloud track has striations, the light intensity profile through the cloud is hollow (dark near the pellet), whereas at the beginning or near the end of the pellet trajectory the track is typically smooth (without striations) and has a gaussian-peaked light emission profile. New, single pellet Stark broadened D{sub {alpha}}D{sub {beta}}, and D{sub {gamma}} spectra, obtained with a tangentially viewing scanning mirror/spectrometer with Reticon array readout, are consistent with cloud densities of 2 {times} 10{sup 17}cm{sup {minus}3} or higher in the regions of strongest light emission. A spatially resolved array of D{sub {alpha}} detectors shows that the light variations during the pellet ablation are not caused solely by a modulation of the incoming energy flux as the pellet crosses rational q-surfaces, but instead are a result of a dynamic, non-stationary, ablation process. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Upgrading and enhancing the generator protection system by making use of current digital systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chau, N.H.; Gardell, J.D.; Patel, S.C.

    1996-06-01

    Upgrading of power plant systems and equipment is becoming a major theme for many utilities. Due to operational cost pressures, competitiveness, life extension, and the desire for better productivity, condition assessment programs are being implemented. One aspect of this is the enhancement/upgrade of existing generator protection schemes with digital systems. Traditionally this protection has been provided by a complement of discrete component relays. These relays have included both electromechanical and static types. Considering a digital enhancement/upgrade offers the owner of installed generation equipment several unique advantages. These include more complete machine protection, diagnostics capabilities for greater productivity and maintenance optimization, life extension with minimal implementation, and the operational advantages of sequence of events, present values and communications capabilities.

  14. Developing Multimedia Enhanced Content to Upgrade Subject Content Knowledge of Secondary School Teachers in Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mtebe, Joel S.; Kibga, Elia Y.; Mwambela, Alfred A.; Kissaka, Mussa M.

    2015-01-01

    The failure rates and lack of interest amongst students in science and mathematics in secondary schools in Tanzania is a serious problem. The Ministry of Education and Vocational Training (MoEVT) implemented a project to enhance and upgrade the pedagogical knowledge and subject content knowledge of teachers in selected difficult topics in science…

  15. A CONCEPTUAL 3-GEV LANSCE LINAC UPGRADE FOR ENHANCED PROTON RADIOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, Robert W; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Merrill, Frank E.; O'Hara, James F.; Rees, Daniel E.; Walstrom, Peter L.

    2012-05-14

    A conceptual design of a 3-GeV linac upgrade that would enable enhanced proton radiography at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is presented. The upgrade is based on the use of superconducting accelerating cavities to increase the present LANSCE linac output energy from 800 MeV to 3 GeV. The LANSCE linac currently provides negative hydrogen ion (H{sup -}) and proton (H{sup +}) beams to several user facilities that support Isotope Production, NNSA Stockpile Stewardship, and Basic Energy Science programs. Required changes to the front-end, the accelerating structures, and to the RF systems to meet the new performance goals, and changes to the existing beam switchyard to maintain operations for a robust user program are also described.

  16. Viewgraphs presented at the ASDEX/DOE workshop on disruptions in divertor tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Granetz, R.; Gruber, O.; Zohm, H.

    1994-09-01

    The emphasis of this year`s ASDEX/DOE workshop was on disruptions in diverted tokamaks. The meeting was held here at MIT on 14--15 March. It is particularly appropriate that MIT hosted the workshop this year, since Alcator C-Mod had just recently completed its very first run campaign, and disruptions are one of the key areas of research in our program. There were a total of 14 speakers, with participants from IPP (Garching), CRPP (Lausanne), Culham, General Atomics, PPPL, Sandia, ORNL, the ITER JCT, and MIT. The subjects addressed included statistical analysis of disruption probabilities in ASDEX, modelling of the vertical axisymmetric plasma motion in DIII-D, impact of disruptions on the design of the ITER divertors, modelling of runaway electrons, and TSC calculations of disruption-induced currents and forces in TPX, etc. One item of particular interest to us was the experimental correlation of halo current magnitude with plasma current on ASDEX-Upgrade. The data indicates at least a linear, and possibly even a quadractic dependence. This has important implications for Alcator C-Mod, since it would predict halo currents of order 1 MA or more at full performance. At the conclusion of the talks, an informal discussion of disruption databases was held, primarily for the purpose of helping us develop a useful one for C-Mod.

  17. Pellet imaging techniques in the ASDEX tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G.A. ); Buechl, K.; Hofmann, J.; Lang, R.; Loch, R.; Rudyj, A.; Sandmann, W. )

    1990-11-01

    As part of a USDOE/ASDEX collaboration, a detailed examination of pellet ablation in ASDEX with a variety of diagnostics has allowed a better understanding of a number of features of hydrogen ice pellet ablation in a plasma. In particular, fast-gated photos with an intensified Xybion CCD video camera allow {ital in} {ital situ} velocity measurements of the pellet as it penetrates the plasma. With time resolution of typically 100 ns and exposures every 50 {mu}s, the evolution of each pellet in a multipellet ASDEX tokamak plasma discharge can be followed. When the pellet cloud track has striations, the light intensity profile through the cloud is hollow (dark near the pellet), whereas at the beginning or near the end of the pellet trajectory the track is typically smooth (without striations) and has a gaussian-peaked light emission profile. New, single pellet Stark broadened {ital D}{sub {alpha}}, {ital D}{sub {beta}}, and {ital D}{sub {gamma}} spectra, obtained with a tangentially viewing scanning mirror/spectrometer with Reticon array readout, are consistent with cloud densities of 2{times}10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3} or higher in the regions of strongest light emission. A spatially resolved array of {ital D}{sub {alpha}} detectors shows that the light variations during the pellet ablation are not caused solely by a modulation of the incoming energy flux as the pellet crosses rational {ital q} surfaces, but instead are a result of dynamic, nonstationary, ablation process.

  18. EPIC Computer Upgrade

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 30 Commander Dan Burbank and Flight Engineer Don Pettit work on installing hardware for the Enhanced Processor and Integrated Communications (EPIC) upgrade of the International Space Sta...

  19. Fueling efficiency of gas puffing in ASDEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, H.-M.; Wagner, F.; Becker, G.; Behringer, K.; Campbell, D.; Eberhagen, A.; Engelhardt, W.; Fussman, G.; Gehre, O.; Gierke, G. v.; Glock, E.; Haas, G.; Huang, M.; Karger, F.; Keilhacker, M.; Klüber, O.; Niedermeyer, H.; Poschenrieder, W.; Rapp, H.; Schneider, F.; Siller, G.; Steuer, K.-H.; Venus, G.

    1982-12-01

    The fueling efficiency for gas puffing, i.e. the fraction of the external gas flux that is ionized inside the separatrix, is reduced in divertor discharges since part of it is ionized in the scrape-off layer and pumped off by the divertor. The fueling efficiency is determined by switching-off the gas feed during the stationary phase of a discharge and dividing the time derivative of the total number of particles inside the separatrix by the external gas flux. The determination of this time derivative must take into account profile changes. In ASDEX the fueling efficiency ranges from close to 1.0 for discharges with a stainless steel poloidal limiter and decreases to about 0.2 at high densities ( 6 × 10 13 cm -3 line average) for diverted discharges. These results are compared with estimates of the fueling efficiency which include molecular disintegration, plasma albedo for neutral atoms and imperfect wall reflection.

  20. Captain upgrade CRM training: A new focus for enhanced flight operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taggart, William R.

    1993-01-01

    Crew Resource Management (CRM) research has resulted in numerous payoffs of applied applications in flight training and standardization of air carrier flight operations. This paper describes one example of how basic research into human factors and crew performance was used to create a specific training intervention for upgrading new captains for a major United States air carrier. The basis for the training is examined along with some of the specific training methods used, and several unexpeced results.

  1. Shuttle Upgrade Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the Space Shuttle upgrade plan, including details on safety enhancements, reliability and maintainability improvements, investment protection (mission life remaining), Next Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle technologies, HEDS exploration strategic goals, and upgrades for safety and supportability.

  2. The upgraded cold neutron triple-axis spectrometer FLEXX - enhanced capabilities by new instrumental options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habicht, Klaus; Lucía Quintero-Castro, Diana; Toft-Petersen, Rasmus; Kure, Mathias; Mäde, Lucas; Groitl, Felix; Le, Manh Duc

    2015-01-01

    The upgrade of the cold neutron triple axis spectrometer FLEXX, a work-horse instrument for inelastic neutron scattering matching the sample environment capabilities at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, has been successfully accomplished. Experiments confirmed an order of magnitude gain in flux now allowing for intensity demanding options to be fully exploited at FLEXX. In this article, we describe the layout and design of two newly available FLEXX instrument options in detail. The new Heusler analyzer gives an increase of the detected polarized neutron flux due to its superior focusing properties, significantly improving the feasibility of future polarized and neutron resonance spin echo experiments. The MultiFLEXX option provides simultaneous access to large regions in wavevector and energy space for inelastic excitations thus adding mapping capabilities to the spectrometer.

  3. SOVENT BASED ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY FOR IN-SITU UPGRADING OF HEAVY OIL SANDS

    SciTech Connect

    Munroe, Norman

    2009-01-30

    With the depletion of conventional crude oil reserves in the world, heavy oil and bitumen resources have great potential to meet the future demand for petroleum products. However, oil recovery from heavy oil and bitumen reservoirs is much more difficult than that from conventional oil reservoirs. This is mainly because heavy oil or bitumen is partially or completely immobile under reservoir conditions due to its extremely high viscosity, which creates special production challenges. In order to overcome these challenges significant efforts were devoted by Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University and The Center for Energy Economics (CEE) at the University of Texas. A simplified model was developed to assess the density of the upgraded crude depending on the ratio of solvent mass to crude oil mass, temperature, pressure and the properties of the crude oil. The simplified model incorporated the interaction dynamics into a homogeneous, porous heavy oil reservoir to simulate the dispersion and concentration of injected CO2. The model also incorporated the characteristic of a highly varying CO2 density near the critical point. Since the major challenge in heavy oil recovery is its high viscosity, most researchers have focused their investigations on this parameter in the laboratory as well as in the field resulting in disparaging results. This was attributed to oil being a complex poly-disperse blend of light and heavy paraffins, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes, which have diverse behaviors at reservoir temperature and pressures. The situation is exacerbated by a dearth of experimental data on gas diffusion coefficients in heavy oils due to the tedious nature of diffusivity measurements. Ultimately, the viscosity and thus oil recovery is regulated by pressure and its effect on the diffusion coefficient and oil swelling factors. The generation of a new phase within the crude and the differences in mobility between the new crude matrix and the

  4. 209-E Upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, B.J.; DeMyer, J.J.

    1985-02-04

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has initiated a review of the Safeguards and Security systems at the Critical Mass Laboratory with regards to determining appropriate upgrading actions that assure that an effective and efficient Safeguards and Security posture consistent with DOE-RL policies, procedures, and priorities is effected. As a result of this review, PNL has concluded that specific upgrades are required at CML that provide a demonstrated enhancement to the overall security posture of the facility and are based upon prudent expenditures of government funds. It was further concluded that additional recommended upgrades provide minimal improvement to the overall security system at a significant outlay of funds.

  5. Pellet imaging techniques in the ASDEX tokamak (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G.A. ); Buechl, K.; Hofmann, J.; Lang, R.; Loch, R.; Rudyj, A.; Sandmann, W. )

    1990-10-01

    As part of a USDOE/ASDEX collaboration, a detailed examination of pellet ablation in ASDEX with a variety of diagnostics has allowed a better understanding of a number of features of hydrogen ice pellet ablation in a plasma. In particular, fast-gated photos with an intensified Xybion CCD video camera allow {ital in} {ital situ} velocity measurements of the pellet as it penetrates the plasma. With time resolution of typically 100 ns and exposures every 50 {mu}s, the evolution of each pellet in a multipellet ASDEX tokamak plasma discharge can be followed. When the pellet cloud track has striations, the light intensity profile through the cloud is hollow (dark near the pellet), whereas at the beginning or near the end of the pellet trajectory the track is typically smooth (without striations) and has a gaussian-peaked light emission profile. New, single pellet Stark broadened {ital D}{sub {alpha}}, {ital D}{sub {beta}}, and {ital D}{sub {gamma}} spectra, obtained with a tangentially viewing scanning mirror/spectrometer with Reticon array readout, are consistent with cloud densities of 2{times}10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3} or higher in the regions of strongest light emission. A spatially resolved array of {ital D}{sub {alpha}} detectors shows that the light variations during the pellet ablation are not caused solely by a modulation of the incoming energy flux as the pellet crosses rational {ital q} surfaces, but instead are a result of dynamic, nonstationary, ablation process.

  6. High frequency magnetic fluctuations correlated with the inter-ELM pedestal evolution in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laggner, F. M.; Wolfrum, E.; Cavedon, M.; Mink, F.; Viezzer, E.; Dunne, M. G.; Manz, P.; Doerk, H.; Birkenmeier, G.; Fischer, R.; Fietz, S.; Maraschek, M.; Willensdorfer, M.; Aumayr, F.; the EUROfusion MST1 Team; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-06-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms that determine the structure of the high confinement mode (H-mode) pedestal, the evolution of the plasma edge electron density and temperature profiles between edge localised modes (ELMs) is investigated. The onset of radial magnetic fluctuations with frequencies above 200 kHz is found to correlate with the stagnation of the electron temperature pedestal gradient. During the presence of these magnetic fluctuations the gradients of the edge electron density and temperature are clamped and stable against the ELM onset. The detected magnetic fluctuation frequency is analysed for a variety of plasma discharges with different electron pressure pedestals. It is shown that the magnetic fluctuation frequency scales with the neoclassically estimated \\text{E} × \\text{B} velocity at the plasma edge. This points to a location of the underlying instability in the gradient region. Furthermore, the magnetic signature of these fluctuations indicates a global mode structure with toroidal mode numbers of approximately 10. The fluctuations are also observed on the high field side with significant amplitude, indicating a mode structure that is symmetric on the low field side and high field side. The associated fluctuations in the current on the high field side might be attributed to either a strong peeling part or the presence of non-adiabatic electron response.

  7. Trends of W behavior in ICRF assisted discharges in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecka, A.; Bobkov, V.; Dux, R.; Pütterich, T.; Sertoli, M.

    2015-08-01

    During Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) operation with metallic plasma facing components, plasma wall interaction processes are modified, which needs to be understood in order to reduce the ICRF-related rise in impurity concentration and maximize ICRF coupling. This contribution is focused on gathering and analyzing a database on W-behavior during ICRF spanning a multi-parameter space. The gas puff dependence is investigated in selected pulses that feature the injection of deuterium (D2) main gas, with impurity gas nitrogen (N2), argon (Ar) and krypton (Kr). CW was found to decrease with the total gas injection rate, which was also correlated with the changes of electron density in the location of the CW measurements. Although the addition of N2, Ar and Kr impacted on the increase in sputtering, to achieve a similar CW level with mixed puffing, one needs to inject considerably more gas. Moreover, CW is shown to change after implementation of boron coatings on the ICRF antenna limiters.

  8. Environmental assessment: Solid waste retrieval complex, enhanced radioactive and mixed waste storage facility, infrastructure upgrades, and central waste support complex, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to take action to: retrieve transuranic (TRU) waste because interim storage waste containers have exceeded their 20-year design life and could fail causing a radioactive release to the environment provide storage capacity for retrieved and newly generated TRU, Greater-than-Category 3 (GTC3), and mixed waste before treatment and/or shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP); and upgrade the infrastructure network in the 200 West Area to enhance operational efficiencies and reduce the cost of operating the Solid Waste Operations Complex. This proposed action would initiate the retrieval activities (Retrieval) from Trench 4C-T04 in the 200 West Area including the construction of support facilities necessary to carry out the retrieval operations. In addition, the proposed action includes the construction and operation of a facility (Enhanced Radioactive Mixed Waste Storage Facility) in the 200 West Area to store newly generated and the retrieved waste while it awaits shipment to a final disposal site. Also, Infrastructure Upgrades and a Central Waste Support Complex are necessary to support the Hanford Site`s centralized waste management area in the 200 West Area. The proposed action also includes mitigation for the loss of priority shrub-steppe habitat resulting from construction. The estimated total cost of the proposed action is $66 million.

  9. ISS Update: Computer Upgrade on Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean interviews Gary Cox, EPIC Project Manager, about EPIC (Enhanced Processor and Integrated Communications), the computer upgrade program for the International ...

  10. Impurity production and plasma performance in ASDEX discharges with ohmic and auxiliary heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fussmann, G.; ASDEX Team; NI Team; Icrh Team; Hofmann, J.; Janeschitz, G.; Lenoci, M.; Mast, F.; McCormick, K.; Murmann, H.; Poschenrieder, W.; Roth, J.; Setzensack, C.; Staudenmaier, G.; Steuer, K.-H.; Taglauer, E.; Verbeek, H.; Wagner, F.; Becker, G.; Bosch, H. S.; Brocken, H.; Eberhagen, A.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; Gierke, G. V.; Clock, E.; Gruber, O.; Haas, G.; Izvozchikov, A.; Karger, F.; Kaufmann, M.; Keilhacker, M.; Klüber, O.; Kornherr, M.; Lackner, K.; Lisitano, G.; Mayer, H. M.; Meisel, D.; Mertens, V.; Müller, E. R.; Neuhauser, J.; Niedermeyer, H.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Pietrzyk, Z. A.; Rapp, H.; Riedler, H.; Röhr, H.; Ryter, F.; Schneider, F.; Siller, G.; Smeulders, P.; Söldner, F. X.; Speth, E.; Steinmetz, K.; Tsois, N.; Ugniewski, S.; Vollmer, O.; Wesner, F.; Zasche, D.

    1987-02-01

    A review is given on investigations in the ASDEX Tokamak on impurities in ohmically, NI and ICRH heated plasmas. For ohmic discharges in H 2 and D 2 it is found that iron release from the wall can be explained by sputtering due to neutral charge exchange (CX) atoms. In the case of He, however, significant contributions caused by ion sputtering are inferred. Comparing discharges with C limiters in He and D 2 suggests that in the case of hydrogen chemical processes are involved in C sputtering. By means of wall carbonization the concentrations of metal ions in the plasma could be substantially reduced. This achievement is of particular importance for NI counter-injection and ICRH, where under non-carbonized conditions severe impurity problems occur. We studied impurity confinement in the case of various heating scenarios by means of the laser injection technique. The poorest confinement is found for the L-phase of NI. Metal injection into the high confinement H-phase generally causes temporary suppression of the edge localized modes (ELM's). With respect to ICRH we conclude that enhanced wall erosion — probably due to the production of high energy ions in the boundary — together with a slightly increased impurity confinement is the dominant reason for the increase of the metallic concentrations. Impurity sputtering as an alternative strong erosion process was experimentally ruled out.

  11. Site-specific economic and ecological analysis of enhanced production, upgrade and feed-in of biomethane from organic wastes.

    PubMed

    Lindorfer, J; Schwarz, M M

    2013-01-01

    The present study analyses the cost structure and ecological performance of biomethane production and feed-in from organic wastes and manure in a site-specific approach for Upper Austria. The theoretically available quantities of biowaste and manure can feed representative biogas plant capacities resulting in relatively high biomethane full costs in the natural gas grid of at least 9.0 €-cents/kWh, which shows strong economies of scale when feed-in flows of methane from 30 to 120 Nm(3)/h are considered. From the ecological point of view small plant capacities are to be preferred since the environmental effect, i.e. the global warming potential (up to -22% of CO(2eq)), is lower in comparison to higher capacities as a consequence of reduced transport in the evaluated scenarios. To enforce the combined energetic use of the biowaste fraction, co-operation between compost facility, gas grid and biogas plant operators is necessary to use existing infrastructure, logistics and knowledge to promote the production, upgrade and feed-in of biomethane from biowastes at attractive locations in Upper Austria and in the whole of Europe. PMID:23202576

  12. HVCM Topology Enhancements to Support a Power Upgrade Required by a Second Target Station (STS) at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Solley, Dennis J; Anderson, David E; Patel, Gunjan P; Peplov, Vladimir V; Saethre, Robert B; Wezensky, Mark W

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the topology used in the HVCMs at SNS to process power for both the cold and warm linac sections of the klystron gallery in support of extended operations at the megawatt level. In anticipation of a second target station and higher anticipated power levels, an enhancement to the present topology is being investigated. SPICE circuit simulations and preliminary experimental data will be presented.

  13. TCS Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossnickle, J. A.; Miller, K. E.

    2004-11-01

    The original TCS experiment has demonstrated the robust ability to form and sustain FRCs in steady-state using Rotating Magnetic Fields (RMF). Radiation levels, which are due in large part to Oxygen, are seen to increase dramatically after the initial formation phase ( ˜0.5 msec), causing a severe drop in the plasma temperature. Since the RMF magnitude and frequency determine the plasma density, as the temperature is limited, so is the FRC's external field and energy confinement time. In order to improve temperatures and flux levels, TCS is being extensively upgraded. All o-ring sealed flanges will be replaced with wire sealed flanges, and heating blankets installed to bake the system to 200 C. Internal flux rings, shielded with Tantalum, will be installed to shield the quartz and stainless steel vacuum wall from the plasma. Unique aspects of this design are related to the interface between the quartz section needed to allow penetration of the RMF from the external antennas and the adjacent stainless steel vacuum chambers. Wall conditioning will include glow discharge, Ti gettering, siliconization, and/or boronization. The total system will be described.

  14. Upgrading food wastes by means of bromelain and papain to enhance growth and immunity of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Choi, W M; Lam, C L; Mo, W Y; Wong, M H

    2016-04-01

    The fast growing of global aquaculture industry accompanied with increasing pressure on the supply and price of traditional feed materials (e.g., fish meal and soy bean meal). This circumstance has urged the need to search alternative sources of feed stuff. Food waste was used as feed stuff in rearing fish which possess substantial protein and lipid. Grass carp are major species reared in Hong Kong with lower nutritional requirements; it is also an ideal species for investigating the feasibility of using food waste as fish feeds for local aquaculture industry. The growth and immunity, reflected by total protein, total immunologlobulin (IgI), and nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) activity of grass carp blood, were depressed when feeding with food waste feeds without enzymes. However, the supplementation of bromelain and papain in fish feed enhanced the efficient use of food waste by grass carp, which in turn improved the fish immunity. The present results indicated that the addition of those enzymes could enhance the feed utilization by fish and hematological parameters of grass carp, and the improvement on growth and immunity superior to the control (commercial feed) was observed with the addition of bromelain and papain supplement. Addition of 1 and 2 % mixture of bromelain and papain could significantly enhance the lipid utilization in grass carp.

  15. Upgrading food wastes by means of bromelain and papain to enhance growth and immunity of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Choi, W M; Lam, C L; Mo, W Y; Wong, M H

    2016-04-01

    The fast growing of global aquaculture industry accompanied with increasing pressure on the supply and price of traditional feed materials (e.g., fish meal and soy bean meal). This circumstance has urged the need to search alternative sources of feed stuff. Food waste was used as feed stuff in rearing fish which possess substantial protein and lipid. Grass carp are major species reared in Hong Kong with lower nutritional requirements; it is also an ideal species for investigating the feasibility of using food waste as fish feeds for local aquaculture industry. The growth and immunity, reflected by total protein, total immunologlobulin (IgI), and nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) activity of grass carp blood, were depressed when feeding with food waste feeds without enzymes. However, the supplementation of bromelain and papain in fish feed enhanced the efficient use of food waste by grass carp, which in turn improved the fish immunity. The present results indicated that the addition of those enzymes could enhance the feed utilization by fish and hematological parameters of grass carp, and the improvement on growth and immunity superior to the control (commercial feed) was observed with the addition of bromelain and papain supplement. Addition of 1 and 2 % mixture of bromelain and papain could significantly enhance the lipid utilization in grass carp. PMID:26092357

  16. The upgraded DØ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahmed, S. N.; Ahn, S. H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, J. T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Angstadt, R.; Anosov, V.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Assis Jesus, A. C. S.; Atramentov, O.; Autermann, C.; Avila, C.; Babukhadia, L.; Bacon, T. C.; Badaud, F.; Baden, A.; Baffioni, S.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Bardon, O.; Barg, W.; Bargassa, P.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, C.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Baturitsky, M. A.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Baumbaugh, B.; Beauceron, S.; Begalli, M.; Beaudette, F.; Begel, M.; Bellavance, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Besson, A.; Beuselinck, R.; Beutel, D.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Binder, M.; Biscarat, C.; Bishoff, A.; Black, K. M.; Blackler, I.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Bloch, D.; Blumenschein, U.; Bockenthien, E.; Bodyagin, V.; Boehnlein, A.; Boeriu, O.; Bolton, T. A.; Bonamy, P.; Bonifas, D.; Borcherding, F.; Borissov, G.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Boswell, C.; Bowden, M.; Brandt, A.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burdin, S.; Burke, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Busato, E.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, D.; Butler, J. M.; Cammin, J.; Caron, S.; Bystricky, J.; Canal, L.; Canelli, F.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, B. C. K.; Casey, D.; Cason, N. M.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapin, D.; Charles, F.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chi, E.; Chiche, R.; Cho, D. K.; Choate, R.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Chopra, S.; Christenson, J. H.; Christiansen, T.; Christofek, L.; Churin, I.; Cisko, G.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Clément, B.; Clément, C.; Coadou, Y.; Colling, D. J.; Coney, L.; Connolly, B.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Corcoran, M.; Coss, J.; Cothenet, A.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, B.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cristetiu, M.; Cummings, M. A. C.; Cutts, D.; da Motta, H.; Das, M.; Davies, B.; Davies, G.; Davis, G. A.; Davis, W.; De, K.; de Jong, P.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; De La Taille, C.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Dean, S.; Degenhardt, J. D.; Déliot, F.; Delsart, P. A.; Del Signore, K.; DeMaat, R.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Doets, M.; Doidge, M.; Dong, H.; Doulas, S.; Dudko, L. V.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duperrin, A.; Dvornikov, O.; Dyer, J.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Edwards, T.; Ellison, J.; Elmsheuser, J.; Eltzroth, J. T.; Elvira, V. D.; Eno, S.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, D.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fagan, J.; Fast, J.; Fatakia, S. N.; Fein, D.; Feligioni, L.; Ferapontov, A. V.; Ferbel, T.; Ferreira, M. J.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fleck, I.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Flattum, E.; Fleuret, F.; Flores, R.; Foglesong, J.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franklin, C.; Freeman, W.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Galea, C. F.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, E.; Gao, M.; Garcia, C.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gardner, J.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, A.; Gay, P.; Gelé, D.; Gelhaus, R.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gillberg, D.; Geurkov, G.; Ginther, G.; Gobbi, B.; Goldmann, K.; Golling, T.; Gollub, N.; Golovtsov, V.; Gómez, B.; Gomez, G.; Gomez, R.; Goodwin, R.; Gornushkin, Y.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graham, D.; Graham, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Gray, K.; Greder, S.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Green, J. A.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groer, L.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Gu, W.; Guglielmo, J.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggard, E.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hall, I.; Hall, R. E.; Han, C.; Han, L.; Hance, R.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harrington, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hauser, R.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Hazen, E.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hong, S. J.; Hooper, R.; Hou, S.; Houben, P.; Hu, Y.; Huang, J.; Huang, Y.; Hynek, V.; Huffman, D.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jacquier, Y.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jayanti, R.; Jenkins, A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, Y.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnson, P.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Jöstlein, H.; Jouravlev, N.; Juarez, M.; Juste, A.; Kaan, A. P.; Kado, M. M.; Käfer, D.; Kahl, W.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kalk, J.; Kalmani, S. D.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, J.; Katsanos, I.; Kau, D.; Kaur, R.; Ke, Z.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Kesisoglou, S.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. M.; Kim, H.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, T. J.; Kirsch, N.; Klima, B.; Klute, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Konrath, J.-P.; Komissarov, E. V.; Kopal, M.; Korablev, V. M.; Kostritski, A.; Kotcher, J.; Kothari, B.; Kotwal, A. V.; Koubarovsky, A.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozminski, J.; Kryemadhi, A.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krane, J.; Kravchuk, N.; Krempetz, K.; Krider, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kubinski, R.; Kuchinsky, N.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kumar, A.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kvita, J.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Kwarciany, R.; Lager, S.; Lahrichi, N.; Landsberg, G.; Larwill, M.; Laurens, P.; Lavigne, B.; Lazoflores, J.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Le Meur, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Leggett, C.; Lehner, F.; Leitner, R.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Leveque, J.; Lewis, P.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Li, X.; Lima, J. G. R.; Lincoln, D.; Lindenmeyer, C.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Litmaath, M.; Lizarazo, J.; Lobo, L.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lounis, A.; Love, P.; Lu, J.; Lubatti, H. J.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Luo, C.; Lynker, M.; Lyon, A. L.; Machado, E.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madaras, R. J.; Mättig, P.; Magass, C.; Magerkurth, A.; Magnan, A.-M.; Maity, M.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P. K.; Malbouisson, H. B.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manakov, V.; Mao, H. S.; Maravin, Y.; Markley, D.; Markus, M.; Marshall, T.; Martens, M.; Martin, M.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Mattingly, S. E. K.; Matulik, M.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McCroskey, R.; McKenna, M.; McMahon, T.; Meder, D.; Melanson, H. L.; Melnitchouk, A.; Mendes, A.; Mendoza, D.; Mendoza, L.; Meng, X.; Merekov, Y. P.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Michaut, M.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mikhailov, V.; Miller, D.; Mitrevski, J.; Mokhov, N.; Molina, J.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Moore, R. W.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G. S.; Mostafa, M.; Moua, S.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Mutaf, Y. D.; Nagaraj, P.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimhan, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nelson, S.; Neuenschwander, R. T.; Neustroev, P.; Noeding, C.; Nomerotski, A.; Novaes, S. F.; Nozdrin, A.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurczyk, A.; Nurse, E.; O'Dell, V.; O'Neil, D. C.; Oguri, V.; Olis, D.; Oliveira, N.; Olivier, B.; Olsen, J.; Oshima, N.; Oshinowo, B. O.; Otero y Garzón, G. J.; Padley, P.; Papageorgiou, K.; Parashar, N.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Pawloski, G.; Perea, P. M.; Perez, E.; Peters, O.; Pétroff, P.; Petteni, M.; Phaf, L.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pogorelov, Y.; Pol, M.-E.; Pompoš, A.; Polosov, P.; Pope, B. G.; Popkov, E.; Porokhovoy, S.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Pritchard, W.; Prokhorov, I.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Przybycien, M. B.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ramberg, E.; Ramirez-Gomez, R.; Rani, K. J.; Ranjan, K.; Rao, M. V. S.; Rapidis, P. A.; Rapisarda, S.; Raskowski, J.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ray, R. E.; Reay, N. W.; Rechenmacher, R.; Reddy, L. V.; Regan, T.; Renardy, J.-F.; Reucroft, S.; Rha, J.; Ridel, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robinson, S.; Rodrigues, R. F.; Roco, M.; Rotolo, C.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rucinski, R.; Rud, V. I.; Russakovich, N.; Russo, P.; Sabirov, B.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santoro, A.; Satyanarayana, B.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schmitt, C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schukin, A. A.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sengupta, S.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shankar, H. C.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Sheahan, P.; Shephard, W. D.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shishkin, A. A.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skow, D.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smith, D. E.; Smith, R. P.; Smolek, K.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, X.; Song, Y.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sopczak, A.; Sorín, V.; Sosebee, M.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Spartana, N.; Spurlock, B.; Stanton, N. R.; Stark, J.; Steele, J.; Stefanik, A.; Steinberg, J.; Steinbrück, G.; Stevenson, K.; Stolin, V.; Stone, A.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strandberg, J.; Strang, M. A.; Strauss, M.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Sznajder, A.; Talby, M.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Tamburello, P.; Taylor, W.; Telford, P.; Temple, J.; Terentyev, N.; Teterin, V.; Thomas, E.; Thompson, J.; Thooris, B.; Titov, M.; Toback, D.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tolian, C.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, D.; Toole, T.; Torborg, J.; Touze, F.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trippe, T. G.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; Utes, M.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Vachon, B.; van den Berg, P. J.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vartapetian, A.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vaupel, M.; Vaz, M.; Verdier, P.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vigneault, M.; Villeneuve-Seguier, F.; Vishwanath, P. R.; Vlimant, J.-R.; Von Toerne, E.; Vorobyov, A.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vysotsky, V.; Wahl, H. D.; Walker, R.; Wallace, N.; Wang, L.; Wang, Z.-M.; Warchol, J.; Warsinsky, M.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weber, M.; Weerts, H.; Wegner, M.; Wermes, N.; Wetstein, M.; White, A.; White, V.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wijnen, T.; Wijngaarden, D. A.; Wilcer, N.; Willutzki, H.; Wilson, G. W.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wittlin, J.; Wlodek, T.; Wobisch, M.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wu, Z.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Q.; Xuan, N.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, R.; Yan, M.; Yarema, R.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Yen, Y.; Yip, K.; Yoo, H. D.; Yoffe, F.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabi, A.; Zanabria, M.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Zdrazil, M.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zheng, H.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zitoun, R.; Zmuda, T.; Zutshi, V.; Zviagintsev, S.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    2006-09-01

    The DØ experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to DØ.

  17. Final Upgrading Report: The Vermont Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Robert E.

    This report describes Vermont's experience with a program to upgrade the working poor and thus increase their total family income. Upgrading refers to enhancing one's job skills which ultimately will lead to increased earnings within one's given occupation. Employer cooperation was encouraged through use of on-site job facilities where supervised…

  18. Vacuum upgrade and enhanced performances of the double imaging electron/ion coincidence end-station at the vacuum ultraviolet beamline DESIRS.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaofeng; Garcia, Gustavo A; Gil, Jean-François; Nahon, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    We report here the recent upgrade of the SAPHIRS permanent photoionization end-station at the DESIRS vacuum ultraviolet beamline of synchrotron SOLEIL, whose performances have been enhanced by installing an additional double-skimmer differential chamber. The smaller molecular beam profile obtained at the interaction region has increased the mass resolution of the double imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence (i(2)PEPICO) spectrometer, DELICIOUS III, installed in the photoionization chamber of the SAPHIRS endstation, by a factor of two, to M/ΔM ∼ 1700 (FWHM). The electron kinetic energy resolution offered by the velocity map imaging (VMI) part of the spectrometer has been improved down to 2.8% (ΔE/E) as we show on the N2 photoionization case in the double skimmer configuration. As a representative example of the overall state-of-the-art i(2)PEPICO performances, experimental results of the dissociation of state-selected O2(+)(B(2)∑(g)(-), v(+) = 0-6) molecular ions performed at the fixed photon energy of hν = 21.1 eV are presented. PMID:26724007

  19. Vacuum upgrade and enhanced performances of the double imaging electron/ion coincidence end-station at the vacuum ultraviolet beamline DESIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaofeng; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Gil, Jean-François; Nahon, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    We report here the recent upgrade of the SAPHIRS permanent photoionization end-station at the DESIRS vacuum ultraviolet beamline of synchrotron SOLEIL, whose performances have been enhanced by installing an additional double-skimmer differential chamber. The smaller molecular beam profile obtained at the interaction region has increased the mass resolution of the double imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence (i2PEPICO) spectrometer, DELICIOUS III, installed in the photoionization chamber of the SAPHIRS endstation, by a factor of two, to M/ΔM ˜ 1700 (FWHM). The electron kinetic energy resolution offered by the velocity map imaging (VMI) part of the spectrometer has been improved down to 2.8% (ΔE/E) as we show on the N2 photoionization case in the double skimmer configuration. As a representative example of the overall state-of-the-art i2PEPICO performances, experimental results of the dissociation of state-selected O2+ (B 2 ∑ g - , v+ = 0-6) molecular ions performed at the fixed photon energy of hν = 21.1 eV are presented.

  20. The upgrade of the Inner Tracking System of ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddhanta, Sabyasachi

    2014-11-01

    ALICE has devised a comprehensive upgrade strategy to enhance its physics capabilities and to exploit the LHC running conditions after the second long shutdown of the LHC scheduled in 2018-2019. Within this upgrade programme, the upgrade of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) forms an important part. The upgraded ITS will have a barrel geometry consisting of seven layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) with high granularity, which would fulfil the material budget, readout and radiation hardness requirements for the upgrade. In this contribution, an overview of the upgraded ITS, its technology and performance studies are presented.

  1. The D0 Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Abachi, S.; D0 Collaboration

    1995-07-01

    In this paper we describe the approved DO Upgrade detector, and its physics capabilities. The DO Upgrade is under construction and will run during the next Fermilab collider running period in early 1999 (Run II). The upgrade is designed to work at the higher luminosities and shorter bunch spacings expected during this run. The major elements of t he upgrade are: a new tracking system with a silicon tracker, scintillating fiber tracker, a 2T solenoid, and a central preshower detector; new calorimeter electronics; new muon trigger and tracking detectors with new muon system electronics; a forward preshower detector; new trigger electronics and DAQ improvements to handle the higher rates.

  2. Hydrocarbonaceous material upgrading method

    SciTech Connect

    Brecher, Lee E.; Mones, Charles G.; Guffey, Frank D.

    2015-06-02

    A hydrocarbonaceous material upgrading method may involve a novel combination of heating, vaporizing and chemically reacting hydrocarbonaceous feedstock that is substantially unpumpable at pipeline conditions, and condensation of vapors yielded thereby, in order to upgrade that feedstock to a hydrocarbonaceous material condensate that meets crude oil pipeline specification.

  3. The upgraded scheme of Hefei Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Li Weimin; Xu Hongliang; Wang Lin; Feng Guangyao; Zhang Shancai; Hao Hao

    2010-06-23

    To enhance the performance of Hefei Light Source, which was designed and constructed two decades ago, an upgrade project would be carried out in the near future. The detail upgrade scheme was described in this paper. Firstly, the magnet lattice of storage ring should be reconstructed with 4 DBA cells, whose advantages are lower beam emittance and more straight section available for insertion devices. Secondly, the beam diagnostics, main power supply, transverse and longitudinal multi-bunch feedback, beam control and manipulation system would be upgrade to improve the beam orbit stability. Finally, the injection system of storage ring and injector, which is composed of electron linac and beam transfer line, would be updated in order to assure smooth beam accumulation process under new low emittance lattice. With above improvement, it is hopeful to increase the brilliance of Hefei Light Source by two orders approximately. After three-year upgrade project, the performance of HLS would meet the demands of advanced SR users.

  4. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    In this project we well evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated. (VC)

  5. RIPS upgrade and physics programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Hideki; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Asahi, Koichiro

    2009-10-01

    The upgrade of RIPS has been proposed in the phase-II program of RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF) project. In this upgrade, the former fragment separator RIPS will be equipped with a new beam line that delivers beams of 115A-MeV heavy io ns extracted from the IRC cyclotron by skipping the final acceleration of SRC. This beam energy is high enough to produce radioactive isotope beams (RIBs) via the projectile-fragmentation reaction. Thus, compared with RIBs produced in the present AVF-RRC acceleration scheme, their production yield are drastically increased by this upgrade, especially in the mass region heavier than Kr. Remarkably, RIPS further enhances research opportunities on spin-related subjects such as nuclear structure studies through electromagnetic nuclear moments: it has been revealed that RIBs produced at this energy can be spin-oriented independently of their atomic and chemical properties. Also, the research subjects include not only nuclear moments but also material science by means, e.g., of the β-NMR, γ-PAD, γ-PAC, laser, and in-beam M"ossbauer methods, because RIBs of this energy allow for a scheme to implant them into sample materials with limited thickness and thus stopped-RI type experiments will be conveniently carried out.

  6. The Upgraded D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahmed, S.N.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, J.T.; Anderson, S.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco de Quito U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /LPSC, Grenoble /Marseille, CPPM /Orsay, LAL /Paris U., VI-VII /DAPNIA, Saclay /Strasbourg, IReS

    2005-07-01

    The D0 experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to D0.

  7. Tapping upgrade potential

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, H.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Modernizing aging hydropower stations presents plant owners with a unique opportunity for improving efficiency and plant output. But several factors should be considered before undertaking a turbine upgrade project.

  8. Optics upgrade for switchyard

    SciTech Connect

    Kobilarcik, Thomas R.; /Fermilab

    2005-08-01

    An upgrade of the Switchyard optics is proposed. This upgrade extends the P3 (old Main Ring) lattice through enclosure C. The septa for the 3-way Meson Area split is moved from enclosure F1 to enclosure M01. The functionality of the Meson Target Train is preserved. Finally, for the purpose of demonstrating that the resulting split can be transported, a straw-man lattice is proposed for enclosure M02 and beyond.

  9. Enhanced Production of Runaway Electrons during a Disruptive Termination of Discharges Heated with Lower Hybrid Power in the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Solis, J. R.; Esposito, B.; Panaccione, L.; Sanchez, R.; Poli, F. M.

    2006-10-20

    We report on the observation of a large production of runaway electrons during a disruptive termination of discharges heated with lower-hybrid waves at the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade. The runaway current plateaus, which can carry up to 80% of the predisruptive current, are observed more often than in normal Ohmic disruptions. The largest runaway currents correspond to the slowest plasma current decay rates. This trend is opposite to what is observed in most tokamaks. We attribute this anomalous behavior to the acceleration of the preexistent wave-resonant suprathermal electrons during the disruption decay phase. These results could be relevant for the operation of the ITER tokamak whenever a sizeable amount of lower-hybrid power is made available.

  10. Upgrade of the BATMAN test facility for H- source development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, B.; Fröschle, M.; Falter, H.-D.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Kraus, W.; Nocentini, R.; Riedl, R.; Ruf, B.

    2015-04-01

    The development of a radio frequency (RF) driven source for negative hydrogen ions for the neutral beam heating devices of fusion experiments has been successfully carried out at IPP since 1996 on the test facility BATMAN. The required ITER parameters have been achieved with the prototype source consisting of a cylindrical driver on the back side of a racetrack like expansion chamber. The extraction system, called "Large Area Grid" (LAG) was derived from a positive ion accelerator from ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) using its aperture size (ø 8 mm) and pattern but replacing the first two electrodes and masking down the extraction area to 70 cm2. BATMAN is a well diagnosed and highly flexible test facility which will be kept operational in parallel to the half size ITER source test facility ELISE for further developments to improve the RF efficiency and the beam properties. It is therefore planned to upgrade BATMAN with a new ITER-like grid system (ILG) representing almost one ITER beamlet group, namely 5 × 14 apertures (ø 14 mm). Additionally to the standard three grid extraction system a repeller electrode upstream of the grounded grid can optionally be installed which is positively charged against it by 2 kV. This is designated to affect the onset of the space charge compensation downstream of the grounded grid and to reduce the backstreaming of positive ions from the drift space backwards into the ion source. For magnetic filter field studies a plasma grid current up to 3 kA will be available as well as permanent magnets embedded into a diagnostic flange or in an external magnet frame. Furthermore different source vessels and source configurations are under discussion for BATMAN, e.g. using the AUG type racetrack RF source as driver instead of the circular one or modifying the expansion chamber for a more flexible position of the external magnet frame.

  11. Cyclotron Institute Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Henry; Yennello, Sherry; Tribble, Robert

    2014-08-26

    The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University has upgraded its accelerator facilities to extend research capabilities with both stable and radioactive beams. The upgrade is divided into three major tasks: (1) re-commission the K-150 (88”) cyclotron, couple it to existing beam lines to provide intense stable beams into the K-500 experimental areas and use it as a driver to produce radioactive beams; (2) develop light ion and heavy ion guides for stopping radioactive ions created with the K-150 beams; and (3) transport 1+ ions from the ion guides into a charge-breeding electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (CB-ECR) to produce highly-charged radioactive ions for acceleration in the K-500 cyclotron. When completed, the upgraded facility will provide high-quality re-accelerated secondary beams in a unique energy range in the world.

  12. Upgrading of cracking gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.; Ragonese, F.P.; Yurchak, S.

    1990-08-21

    This patent describes an integrated catalytic cracking and gasoline upgrading process. It comprises: withdrawing a product stream from the riser reactor of a catalytic cracking process unit; charging the product stream to a primary fractionation zone; withdrawing an intermediate gasoline stream from the primary fractionation zone, the intermediate gasoline stream comprising olefinic gasoline having an ASTM D86 boiling range from about 90{degrees} to about 170{degrees} C.; contacting a first portion of the intermediate gasoline stream and a C{sub 2}{minus}C{sub 5} olefinic stream with a catalyst under conversion conditions to form an upgraded gasoline stream; and charging a second portion of the intermediate gasoline stream together with the upgraded gasoline stream to a gasoline product storage facility.

  13. VISIR upgrade overview and status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, Florian; Käufl, Hans Ulrich; Baksai, Pedro; Dobrzycka, Danuta; Finger, Gert; Ives, Derek; Jakob, Gerd; Lagadec, Eric; Lundin, Lars; Mawet, Dimitri; Mehrgan, Leander; Moerchen, Margaret; Momany, Yazan; Moreau, Vincent; Pantin, Eric; Riquelme, Miguel; Siebenmorgen, Ralf; Silber, Armin; Smette, Alain; Taylor, Julian; van den Ancker, Mario; Venema, Lars; Weilenmann, Ueli; Yegorova, Irina

    2012-09-01

    We present an overview of the VISIR upgrade project. VISIR is the mid-infrared imager and spectrograph at ESO's VLT. The project team is comprised of ESO staff and members of the original VISIR consortium: CEA Saclay and ASTRON. The project plan is based on input from the ESO user community with the goal of enhancing the scientific performance and efficiency of VISIR by a combination of measures: installation of improved hardware, optimization of instrument operations and software support. The cornerstone of the upgrade is the 1k by 1k Si:As Aquarius detector array (Raytheon) which has demonstrated very good performance (sensitivity, stability) in the laboratory IR detector test facility (modified TIMMI 2 instrument). A prism spectroscopic mode will cover the N-band in a single observation. New scientific capabilities for high resolution and high-contrast imaging will be offered by sub-aperture mask (SAM) and phase-mask coronagraphic (4QPM/AGPM) modes. In order to make optimal use of favourable atmospheric conditions a water vapour monitor has been deployed on Paranal, allowing for real-time decisions and the introduction of a userdefined constraint on water vapour. Improved pipelines based on the ESO Reflex concept will provide better support to astronomers. The upgraded VISIR will be a powerful instrument providing background limited performance for diffraction-limited observations at an 8-m telescope. It will offer synergy with facilities such as ALMA, JWST, VLTI and SOFIA, while a wealth of targets is available from survey work (e.g. VISTA, WISE). In addition it will bring confirmation of the technical readiness and scientific value of several aspects of potential mid-IR instrumentation at Extremely Large Telescopes. The intervention on VISIR and installation of hardware has been completed in July and commissioning will take place during July and August. VISIR is scheduled to be available to the users starting Oct 2012.

  14. Parametric investigation of the density profile in the scrape-off layer of ASDEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, K.; Pietrzyk, Z. A.; Murmann, H.; Lenoci, M.; ASDEX Team; Becker, G.; Bosch, H. S.; Brocken, H.; Bühl, K.; Eberhagen, A.; Eckhartt, D.; Fussmann, G.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; Gierke, G. V.; Glock, E.; Gruber, O.; Haas, G.; Hofmann, J.; Izvozchikov, A.; Janeschitz, G.; Karger, F.; Kaufmann, M.; Keilhacker, M.; Klüber, O.; Kornherr, M.; Lackner, K.; Lang, R. S.; Leuterer, F.; Lisitano, G.; Mast, F.; Mayer, H. M.; Meisel, D.; Mertens, V.; Müller, E. R.; Neuhauser, J.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Niedermeyer, H.; Poschenrieder, W.; Rapp, H.; Riedler, H.; Röhr, H.; Roth, J.; Ryter, F.; Sandmann, W.; Schneider, F.; Setzensack, C.; Siller, G.; Smeulders, P.; Söldner, F. X.; Speth, E.; Steinmetz, K.; Steuer, K.-H.; Tsois, N.; Ugniewski, S.; Vlases, G.; Vollmer, O.; Wagner, F.; Wesner, F.; Zasche, D.

    1987-02-01

    Systematic investigations of the scrape-off layer (SOL) in the midplane of ASDEX have been carried out in He, D 2 and H 2 for diverted ohmic discharges over a wide range of plasma conditions: overlinene ˜ 0.5-4.7 × 10 13 cm -3, Ip = 200-450 kA, BT = 16-23 kG, qa˜ 2.4-4.4 and POH = 200-480 kW. For the first two cm outside the separatix, ne is found to decay exponentially with an e-folding length λn given by λn = kqα (He, k = 1.32 cm, α = 0.52; D 2, k =1.29 cm, α = 0.35; H 2, k = 1.18 cm, α = 0.4) when from which follows for qa = 3: λn( D2) ˜ λn( H2) ˜ 0.8 λn( He). The qα scaling is roughly predicted by the simple formula λ n = {D ⊥ L }/{υ ∥} under the assumption D⊥ ∝ mi-0.5 (as has been observed on ASDEX for H 2 and D 2). There appears to be no explicit λn dependence on heating power. λn varies strongly with overlinene in the range overlinene ≤ 1 × 10 13 cm -3, decreasing for example (D 2,H 2; qa = 3.0), from λn ≥ 3 cm at overlinene ˜ 0.5 × 10 13 cm -3 to λn ˜ 1.9 cm for overlinene ≥ 1.5 × 10 13 cm -3, ne at the separatrix is primarily a function of overlinene.

  15. Biochemical upgrading of oils

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1999-01-12

    A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

  16. Upgrading Undergraduate Biology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musante, Susan

    2011-01-01

    On many campuses throughout the country, undergraduate biology education is in serious need of an upgrade. During the past few decades, the body of biological knowledge has grown exponentially, and as a research endeavor, the practice of biology has evolved. Education research has also made great strides, revealing many new insights into how…

  17. Tevatron Detector Upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, Ronald

    2005-03-22

    The D0 and CDF experiments are in the process of upgrading their detectors to cope with the high luminosities projected for the remainder of Tevatron Run II. We discuss the expected Tevatron environment through 2009, the detector challenges due to increasing luminosity in this period, and the solutions undertaken by the two experiments to mitigate detector problems and maximize physics results.

  18. Tevatron detector upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, R.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    The D0 and CDF experiments are in the process of upgrading their detectors to cope with the high luminosities projected for the remainder of Tevatron Run II. They discuss the expected Tevatron environment through 2009, the detector challenges due to increasing luminosity in this period, and the solutions undertaken by the two experiments to mitigate detector problems and maximize physics results.

  19. Analysis Efforts Supporting NSTX Upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    H.Zhang, P. Titus, P. Rogoff, A.Zolfaghari, D. Mangra, M. Smith

    2010-11-29

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a low aspect ratio, spherical torus (ST) configuration device which is located at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) This device is presently being updated to enhance its physics by doubling the TF field to 1 Tesla and increasing the plasma current to 2 Mega-amperes. The upgrades include a replacement of the centerstack and addition of a second neutral beam. The upgrade analyses have two missions. The first is to support design of new components, principally the centerstack, the second is to qualify existing NSTX components for higher loads, which will increase by a factor of four. Cost efficiency was a design goal for new equipment qualification, and reanalysis of the existing components. Showing that older components can sustain the increased loads has been a challenging effort in which designs had to be developed that would limit loading on weaker components, and would minimize the extent of modifications needed. Two areas representing this effort have been chosen to describe in more details: analysis of the current distribution in the new TF inner legs, and, second, analysis of the out-of-plane support of the existing TF outer legs.

  20. VISIR upgrade overview and status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, Florian; Käufl, Hans-Ulrich; Baksai, Pedro; Di Lieto, Nicola; Dobrzycka, Danuta; Duhoux, Philippe; Finger, Gert; Heikamp, Stephanie; Ives, Derek; Jakob, Gerd; Lundin, Lars; Mawet, Dimitri; Mehrgan, Leander; Momany, Yazan; Moreau, Vincent; Pantin, Eric; Riquelme, Miguel; Sandrock, Stefan; Siebenmorgen, Ralf; Smette, Alain; Taylor, Julian; van den Ancker, Mario; Valdes, Guillermo; Venema, Lars; Weilenmann, Ueli

    2014-07-01

    We present an overview of the VISIR upgrade project. VISIR is the mid-infrared imager and spectrograph at ESO's VLT. The project team is comprised of ESO staff and members of the original VISIR consortium: CEA Saclay and ASTRON. The project plan is based on input from the ESO user community with the goal of enhancing the scientific performance and efficiency of VISIR by a combination of measures: installation of improved hardware, optimization of instrument operations and software support. The cornerstone of the upgrade is the 1k by 1k Si:As AQUARIUS detector array (Raytheon) which has been carefully characterized in ESO's IR detector test facility (modified TIMMI 2 instrument). A prism spectroscopic mode will cover the N-band in a single observation. New scientific capabilities for high resolution and high-contrast imaging will be offered by sub-aperture mask (SAM) and phase-mask coronagraphic (4QPM/AGPM) modes. In order to make optimal use of favourable atmospheric conditions a water vapour monitor has been deployed on Paranal, allowing for real-time decisions and the introduction of a user-defined constraint on water vapour. During the commissioning in 2012 it was found that the on-sky sensitivity of the AQUARIUS detector was significantly below expectations and that VISIR was not ready to go back to science operations. Extensive testing of the detector arrays in the laboratory and on-sky enabled us to diagnose the cause for the shortcoming of the detector as excess low frequency noise (ELFN). It is inherent to the design chosen for this detector and can't be remedied by changing the detector set-up. Since this is a form of correlated noise its impact can be limited by modulating the scene recorded by the detector. We have studied several mitigation options and found that faster chopping using the secondary mirror (M2) of the VLT offers the most promising way forward. Faster M2 chopping has been tested and is scheduled for implementation before the end of 2014

  1. Recharging of the ohmic-heating transformer by means of lower-hybrid current drive in the ASDEX tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuterer, F.; Eckhartt, D.; Söldner, F.; Becker, G.; Bernhardi, K.; Brambilla, M.; Brinkschulte, H.; Derfler, H.; Ditte, U.; Eberhagen, A.; Fussman, G.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; Gierke, G. V.; Glock, E.; Gruber, O.; Haas, G.; Hesse, M.; Janeschitz, G.; Karger, F.; Keilhacker, M.; Kissel, S.; Klüber, O.; Kornherr, M.; Lisitano, G.; Magne, R.; Mayer, H. M.; McCormick, K.; Meisel, D.; Mertens, V.; Müller, E. R.; Münich, M.; Murmann, H.; Poschenrieder, W.; Rapp, H.; Ryter, F.; Schmitter, K. H.; Schneider, F.; Siller, G.; Smeulders, P.; Steuer, K. H.; Vien, T.; Wagner, F.; Woyna, F. V.; Zouhar, M.

    1985-07-01

    Recharging of the Ohmic-heating transformer of a tokamak by means of lower-hybrid waves is demonstrated experimentally in ASDEX. The results are analyzed on the basis of a simple transformer circuit. A recharging efficiency is defined and found to depend on rf power, plasma density, and plasma resistivity modified by the applied rf power. Up to now, we achieved in our recharging experiments in ASDEX a flux swing of FİOHMdt=0.24 V sec, at an rf power of PRF=690 kW, with a pulse duration of 1 sec, while maintaining a plasma with n¯e=4×1012 cm-3 and Ip=290 kA.

  2. Electrostatic precipitator upgrading -- Twelve years of progress

    SciTech Connect

    Grieco, G.J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1984 the author presented a paper entitled ``Electrostatic Precipitator Upgrading: A Technology Overview`` which reviewed various technologies for electrostatic precipitator performance enhancement in the utility industry. This evaluation was based on a set of criteria which included: commercial status; space requirements; required outage time for installation; installed cost; operating cost; range of applicability; and performance enhancement factor. The upgrade technologies discussed and evaluated included: gas/particulate flow upgrade; microprocessor controller retrofit; transformer-rectifier (T/R) set upgrade; pulse energization; electrode rapping modification; flue gas conditioning agents such as sulfur trioxide, ammonia and sodium; pulse energization; precipitator rebuild; and precipitator retrofit. The findings of this 1984 survey are summarized on Table 1. The installed costs listed on this table range from a low end cost associated with large precipitators with 250,000 ft{sup 2} of collecting electrode plate area and above, to a high end cost for small precipitators with only 25,000 ft{sup 2} of plate area. Twelve years later this subject is revisited and, surprisingly, significant progress has been made--this in spite of what some experts would characterize as a mature and somewhat stagnant technology field. Commercially proven techniques such as advanced flue gas conditioning, sonic horns, selective fuel blending using powder river basin coals, prudent selection of electrode geometry, and pulse energization are discussed and evaluated. Updated costs are presented for these technologies.

  3. BNL upgrade plans

    SciTech Connect

    Foelsche, H.W.J.

    1987-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is proposing two major upgrade projects for a future experimental program with protons and heavy ions. The first is the construction of a Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) which will use the AGS complex as an injector. The second initiative is an upgrade of the AGS proton intensity and duty cycle. Both objectives require a Booster for the AGS which has recently been approved as a construction project. With the completion of the booster, and with certain modifications of the AGS, the facility will ultimately become capable of supporting average proton currents on the order of 25 to 50 microamperes. The RHIC will provide center-of-mass collision energies of 2 x 100 to 125 GeV/amu for ions up to the heaviest masses, and 2 x 250 GeV for protons.

  4. RHIC LUMINOSITY UPGRADE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2010-05-23

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operates with either ions or polarized protons. After increasing the heavy ion luminosity by two orders of magnitude since its commissioning in 2000, the current luminosity upgrade program aims for an increase by another factor of 4 by means of 3D stochastic cooling and a new 56 MHz SRF system. An Electron Beam Ion Source is being commissioned that will allow the use of uranium beams. Electron cooling is considered for collider operation below the current injection energy. For the polarized proton operation both luminosity and polarization are important. In addition to ongoing improvements in the AGS injector, the construction of a new high-intensity polarized source has started. In RHIC a number of upgrades are under way to increase the intensity and polarization transmission to 250 GeV beam energy. Electron lenses will be installed to partially compensate the head-on beam-beam effect.

  5. CRYOGENICS IN BEPCII UPGRADE.

    SciTech Connect

    JIA,L.; WANG,L.; LI,S.

    2002-07-22

    THIS PAPER PRESENTS A CRYOGENIC DESIGN FOR UPGRADING THE BEIJING ELECTRON POSITRON COLLIDER AT THE INSTITUTE OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS IN BEIJING. THE UPGRADE INVOLVES 3 NEW SUPERCONDUCTING FACILITIES, THE INTERACTION REGION QUADRUPOLE MAGNETS, THE DETECTOR SOLENOID MAGNETS AND THE SRF CAVITIES. FOR COOLING OF THESE DEVICES, A NEW CRYPLANT WITH A TOTAL CAPACITY OF 1.0KW AT 4.5K IS TO BE BUILT AT IHEP. AN INTEGRATED CRYOGENIC DESIGN TO FIT THE BEPCII CRYOGENIC LOADS WITH HIGH EFFICIENCY IS CARRIEDOUT USING COMPUTATIONAL PROCESS ANALYSIS SOFTWARE WITH THE EMPHASES ON ECONOMICS AND SAFETY IN BOTH CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF THE PLANT. THIS PAPER DESCRIBES THE CRYOGENIC CHARACTERISTICS OF EACH SUPERCONDUCTING DEVICE, THEIR COOLING SCHEMES AND THE OVERALL CRYOPLANT.

  6. The LHCb detector upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, H.

    2013-12-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, with its installation scheduled for the second long shutdown (LS2) of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), will transform the data acquisition and processing architecture to a triggerless readout at 40 MHz with subsequent software-based event selection in a CPU farm. In this contribution, an overview of the detector technology options under consideration and the associated challenges is given and selected highlights of the ongoing R&D programme are presented.

  7. The D0 upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Tuts, P.M. . Physics Dept.)

    1992-10-01

    The original D0 detector was proposed in 1983, with a focus on high P[sub T] physics using precision measurements of e's, [mu]'s, jets, and missing E[sub T]. This detector, as of the summer of 1992, has started data taking at the Fermilab Collider. However, by 1995/6 the luminosity will reach 10[sup 31] cm[sup [minus]2]sec[sup [minus]1], and the minimum bunch spacing will drop to 396ns from the present 3.5[mu]s (by the Main Injector era, luminosities will approach 10[sup 32] cm[sup [minus]2]sec[sup [minus]1] and minimum bunch spacings may reach 132ns). These changes in the accelerator conditions force us to upgrade or replace a number of detector subsystems in order to meet these new demands. In addition, the upgrade offers us the opportunity to expand the physics horizons to include not only the all important high P[sub T] physics menu, but also the low P[sub T] physics that has become increasingly important. In this paper we describe the D0 detector upgrade.

  8. The D0 upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Tuts, P.M.; The D0 Collaboration

    1992-10-01

    The original D0 detector was proposed in 1983, with a focus on high P{sub T} physics using precision measurements of e`s, {mu}`s, jets, and missing E{sub T}. This detector, as of the summer of 1992, has started data taking at the Fermilab Collider. However, by 1995/6 the luminosity will reach 10{sup 31} cm{sup {minus}2}sec{sup {minus}1}, and the minimum bunch spacing will drop to 396ns from the present 3.5{mu}s (by the Main Injector era, luminosities will approach 10{sup 32} cm{sup {minus}2}sec{sup {minus}1} and minimum bunch spacings may reach 132ns). These changes in the accelerator conditions force us to upgrade or replace a number of detector subsystems in order to meet these new demands. In addition, the upgrade offers us the opportunity to expand the physics horizons to include not only the all important high P{sub T} physics menu, but also the low P{sub T} physics that has become increasingly important. In this paper we describe the D0 detector upgrade.

  9. The LHCb VELO upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosil Suárez, Álvaro

    2016-07-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2019, will transform the experiment to a trigger-less system reading out the full detector at 40 MHz event rate. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm. The upgraded detector will run at luminosities of 2×1033 cm-2 s-1 and probe physics beyond the Standard Model in the heavy flavour sector with unprecedented precision. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon vertex detector surrounding the interaction region. The current detector will be replaced with a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at 40 MHz. The detector comprises silicon pixel sensors with 55×55 μm2 pitch, read out by the VeloPix ASIC, based on the TimePix/MediPix family. The hottest region will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhits/s yielding a total data rate more than 3 Tbit/s for the upgraded VELO. The detector modules are located in a separate vacuum, separated from the beam vacuum by a thin custom made foil. The detector halves are retracted when the beams are injected and closed at stable beams, positioning the first sensitive pixel at 5.1 mm from the beams. The material budget will be minimised by the use of evaporative CO2 coolant circulating in microchannels within 400 μm thick silicon substrates.

  10. Design analysis of the upgraded TREAT reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, S.K.

    1982-01-01

    The TREAT reactor, fueled by a dilute dispersion of fully enriched UO/sub 2/ in graphite, has been a premier transient testing facility since 1959. A major Upgrade of the reactor is in progress to enhance its transient testing capability in support of the LMFBR safety program. The TREAT Upgrade (TU) reactor features a modified central zone of the core with higher fissile loadings of the same fuel, clad in Inconel to allow operation at higher temperatures. The demanding functional requirements on the reactor necessitated the use of unique features in the core design which, in turn, presented major calculational complexities in the analysis. Special design methods had to be used in many cases to treat these complexities. The addition of an improved Reactor Control System, a safety grade Plant Protection System and an enhanced Coolant/Filtration System produces a reactor that can meet the functional requirements on the reactor in a safe manner.

  11. AMI FW UPGRADEABILITY TEST PROCEDURE AND SECURITY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Isabelle B

    2014-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is producing NISTIR 7823 to define test requirements for Smart Meter upgradability. The term Smart Meter refers specifically to advanced electric meters being deployed to enhance management of electricity distribution for residential and industrial consumers. The underlying functional and security requirements for Smart Meter upgradability are specified in NEMA standard SG-AMI 1-2009. The purpose of NISTIR 7823 is to describe conformance test requirements that may be used voluntarily by testers and/or test laboratories to determine whether Smart Meters and Upgrade Management Systems conform to the requirements of NEMA SG-AMI 1-2009.

  12. The LHCb Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsson, Richard

    2013-11-01

    With the demonstration that LHCb can successfully perform forward precision measurements with event pileup, the operation and trigger strategy evolved significantly during the LHC Run 1 allowing LHCb to collect over 3fb-1 at centre-of-mass energies of 7TeV and 8TeV. Increased bandwidth opened the door for LHCb to extend the physics program. The additional statistics and well managed systematic effects together with the stable trigger and data taking conditions have led to a very large number of world-class measurements and dominance in heavy flavour physics [1], in addition to a reputation of an excellent forward general purpose detector at the LHC. Long Shutdown (LS) 1 (2013-2014) will allow LHCb to fully explore the large statistics collected and prepare LHCb for Run 2 (2015 - 2017). However, even after an additional expected integrated luminosity of 5-6 fb-1 in Run 2, many of the LHCb precision measurements will remain limited by statistics, and some exploratory physics modes will not even be accessible yet. With the need for reconstructing the event topology in order to efficiently trigger on the beauty and the charm hadrons decays, the current 1 MHz readout limit is the main bottle neck to run at higher luminosity and with higher trigger efficiencies. LHCb will therefore undergo a major upgrade in LS 2 ( 2018 - 2019) aimed at collecting an order of magnitude more data by 2028. The upgrade consists of a full readout at the LHC bunch crossing rate ( 40 MHz) with the ultimate flexibility of only a software trigger. In order to increase the instantaneous luminosity up to 2x1033cm-2s-1, several sub-detector upgrades are also underway to cope with the higher occupancies and radiation dose.

  13. Resid upgrading process

    SciTech Connect

    Angevine, P.J.; Chu, P.; Degann, T.F.; Kirker, G.W

    1989-05-30

    This patent describes a process for upgrading a petroleum residua feedstock which comprises contacting the feedstock under hydrotreating conditions with hydrogen and a catalyst composition comprising a catalytic metal component and a support comprising an amorphous magnesia-alumina-aluminum phosphate prepared by: (a) forming an aqueous solution of aluminum, magnesium and phosphoric acid; (b) precipitating amorphous magnesia-alumina-aluminum phosphate by the addition of ammonia to the solution in the presence of a source of organic cation having a size equal to or larger than 2 Angstroms; (c) separating the precipitate; and (d) calcining the precipitate.

  14. The Bevalac Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.; Dwinell, R.D.; Feinberg, B.; Frias, R.; Gough, R.A.; Howard, D.R.; Hunt, D.B.; Krebs, G.F.; Krupnick, J.T.; Lewis, S.A.

    1987-03-01

    This paper describes a proposed upgrade of the Bevalac accelerator complex in which the present Bevatron is replaced with a modern, strong-focusing 17 T-m synchrotron. This new ring is designed to accelerate all ions throughout the periodic table with intensities 100 to 1000 times higher than the present Bevatron. It will also provide a substantially improved beam spill structure and will reduce operating costs. A fast extraction capability can be used to inject a future heavy ion storage ring. Pulse-to-pulse switching of energy and ion species is an important goal. The existing injectors, shielding, experimental facilities and utilities of the present Bevalac will remain substantially intact.

  15. Upgraded Coal Interest Group

    SciTech Connect

    Evan Hughes

    2009-01-08

    The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

  16. CDF calorimeter and its upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Seiya, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The CDF calorimeter systems are briefly reviewed with an emphasis on the calibration and the performance of the central electromagnetic calorimeter. Several physics analyses where the calorimetry plays an important role are discussed. The present gas calorimeter will be upgraded in accord with the collider upgrade. The new system is a scintillator-based calorimeter with optical fiber readout. A status of the CDF calorimeter upgrade project is also described.

  17. Upgraded demonstration vehicle task report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, J.; Hardy, K.; Livingston, R.; Sandberg, J.

    1981-01-01

    Vehicle/battery performance capabilities and interface problems that occurred when upgraded developmental batteries were integrated with upgraded versions of comercially available electric vehicles were investigated. Developmental batteries used included nickel zinc batteries, a nickel iron battery, and an improved lead acid battery. Testing of the electric vehicles and upgraded batteries was performed in the complete vehicle system environment to characterize performance and identify problems unique to the vehicle/battery system. Constant speed tests and driving schedule range tests were performed on a chassis dynamometer. The results from these tests of the upgraded batteries and vehicles were compared to performance capabilities for the same vehicles equipped with standard batteries.

  18. The Fermilab Linac Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, R.J.

    1991-02-01

    The Fermilab Linac Upgrade is planned to increase the energy of the H- linac from 200 to 400 MeV. This is intended to reduce the incoherent space-charge tuneshift at injection into the 8 GeV Booster which can limit either the brightness or the total intensity of the beam. The Linac Upgrade will be achieved by replacing the last four 201.25 MHz drift-tube tanks which accelerate the beam from 116 to 200 MeV, with seven 805 MHz side-coupled cavity modules operating at an average axial field of abut 7.5 MV/m. This will allow acceleration to 400 MeV in the existing Linac enclosure. Each accelerator module will be driven with a klystron-based rf power supply. A prototype rf modulator has been built and tested at Fermilab, and a prototype 12 MW klystron is being fabricated by Litton Electron Devices. Fabrication of production accelerator modules is in progress. 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. SNO+ Readout Electronics Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonventre, Richard; Shokair, Timothy; Knapik, Robert

    2012-03-01

    The SNO+ experiment is designed to explore several topics in neutrino physics including neutrinoless double beta decay, reactor antineutrinos, and low energy solar neutrinos. SNO+ uses the existing Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) detector, with the heavy water target replaced with liquid scintillator. The new target requires an upgrade to the command and control electronics to handle the higher rates expected with scintillation light as compared to Cherenkov light. The readout electronics have been upgraded to autonomously push data to a central data acquisition computer over ethernet from each of the 19 front end crates. The autonomous readout is achieved with a field programmable gate array (FPGA) with an embedded processor. Inside the FPGA fabric a state machine is configured to pull data across the VME-like bus of each crate. A small C program, making use of the open source Light Weight IP (LWIP) libraries, is run directly on the hardware (with no operating system) to push the data via TCP/IP. The hybrid combination of `high-level' C code and a `low-level' VHDL state machine is a cost effective and flexible solution for reading out individual front end crates.

  20. Skill Upgrading, Incorporated. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skill Upgrading, Inc., Baltimore, MD.

    As in two other projects in Cleveland and Newark, New Jersey, this project was set up in Baltimore to provide technical assistance in designing ways to meet in-plant skills needs by upgrading job skills on entry workers through High Intensity Training (HIT). Skill Upgrading, Inc. was established in Maryland to provide training and manpower…

  1. TMX upgrade experimental operating plan

    SciTech Connect

    Coensgen, F.H.; Davis, J.C.; Simonen, T.C.

    1981-07-01

    This document describes the operating plan for the TMX Upgrade experiment. This plan covers the period from November 1981 to March 1983 and describes how the TMX will be brought into operation, our schedules and milestones, and how we will determine if the TMX Upgrade program milestones have been met.

  2. Regime of Improved Confinement and High Beta in Neutral-Beam-Heated Divertor Discharges of the ASDEX Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, F.; Becker, G.; Behringer, K.; Campbell, D.; Eberhagen, A.; Engelhardt, W.; Fussmann, G.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; Gierke, G. V.; Haas, G.; Huang, M.; Karger, F.; Keilhacker, M.; Klüber, O.; Kornherr, M.; Lackner, K.; Lisitano, G.; Lister, G. G.; Mayer, H. M.; Meisel, D.; Müller, E. R.; Murmann, H.; Niedermeyer, H.; Poschenrieder, W.; Rapp, H.; Röhr, H.; Schneider, F.; Siller, G.; Speth, E.; Stäbler, A.; Steuer, K. H.; Venus, G.; Vollmer, O.; Yü, Z.

    1982-11-01

    A new operational regime has been observed in neutral-injection-heated ASDEX divertor discharges. This regime is characterized by high βp values comparable to the aspect ratio A (βp<=0.65A) and by confinement times close to those of Ohmic discharges. The high-βp regime develops at an injection power >=1.9 MW, a mean density n¯e>=3×1013 cm-3, and a q(a) value >=2.6. Beyond these limits or in discharges with material limiter, low βp values and reduced particle and energy confinement times are obtained compared to the Ohmic heating phase.

  3. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  4. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will also be investigated.

  5. Seismic upgrades of healthcare facilities.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, A

    1997-06-01

    Before 1989 seismic upgrading of hospital structures was not a primary consideration among hospital owners. However, after extensive earthquake damage to hospital buildings at Loma Prieta in Northern California in 1989 and then at Northridge in Southern California in 1994, hospital owners, legislators, and design teams become concerned about the need for seismic upgrading of existing facilities. Because the damage hospital structures sustained in the earthquakes was so severe and far-reaching, California has enacted laws that mandate seismic upgrading for existing facilities. Now hospital owners will have to upgrade buildings that do not conform to statewide seismic adequacy laws. By 2030, California expects all of its hospital structures to be sufficiently seismic-resistant. Slowly, regions in the Midwest and on the East Coast are following their example. This article outlines reasons and ways for seismic upgrading of existing facilities.

  6. The LHCb Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akar, S.; Lhcb Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    The LHCb experiment is a high-precision spectrometer searching for New Physics via measurements of CP violation and rare decays in the b- and c-quark sector. The quality of the results obtained from the data collected during the first Run of the LHC has demonstrated the excellent performance and the robustness of the detector. In order to significantly increase the statistical precision on theoretically clean observables in the heavy flavor sector, the level of collected data by the LHCb detector must be increased much beyond 1 fb-1 per year. Therefore, it is planned to upgrade the detector, which will allow a 40 MHz readout with a much more flexible software-based triggering system and redesigned sub-detectors.

  7. The FNAL injector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.; Bollinger, D.S.; Duel, K.L.; Lackey, J.R.; Pellico, W.A.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The present FNAL H{sup -} injector has been operational since the 1970s and consists of two magnetron H{sup -} sources and two 750 keV Cockcroft-Walton Accelerators. In the upgrade, both slit-type magnetron sources will be replaced with circular aperture sources, and the Cockcroft-Waltons with a 200 MHz RFQ (radio frequency quadrupole). Operational experience at BNL (Brookhaven National Laboratory) has shown that the upgraded source and RFQ will be more reliable, improve beam quality and require less manpower than the present system. The present FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory) injector has been operational since 1978 and has been a reliable source of H{sup -} beams for the Fermilab program. At present there are two Cockcroft-Walton injectors, each with a magnetron H{sup -} source with a slit aperture. With these two sources in operation, the injector has a reliability of better than 97%. However, issues with maintenance, equipment obsolescence, increased beam quality demands and retirement of critical personnel, have made it more difficult for the continued reliable running of the H{sup -} injector. The recent past has also seen an increase in both downtime and source output issues. With these problems coming to the forefront, a new 750 keV injector is being built to replace the present system. The new system will be similar to the one at BNL (Brookhaven National Laboratory) that has a similar magnetron source with a round aperture and a 200MHz RFQ. This combination has been shown to operate extremely reliably.

  8. NIRSS Upgrades: Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Politovich, Marcia K.

    2007-01-01

    This year we were able to further the NIRSS program by re-writing the data ingest and display code from LabVIEW to C++ and Java. This was leveraged by a University of Colorado Computer Science Department Senior Project. The upgrade made the display more portable and upgradeable. Comparisons with research aircraft flights conducted during AIRS-2 were also done and demonstrate reasonable skill in determining cloud altitudes and liquid water distribution. Improvements can still be made to the cloud and liquid logic. The icing hazard index was not evaluated here since that represents work in progress and needs to be made compatible with the new CIP-Severity algorithm. CIP is the Current Icing Potential product that uses a combination decision tree/fuzzy logic algorithm to combine numerical weather model output with operational sensor data (NEXRAD, GOES, METARs and voice pilot reports) to produce an hourly icing diagnosis across the CONUS. The new severity algorithm seeks to diagnose liquid water production through rising, cooling air, and depletion by ice processes. The information used by CIP is very different from that ingested by NIRSS but some common ground does exist. Additionally, the role of NIRSS and the information it both needs and provides needs to be determined in context of the Next Generation Air Traffic System (NGATS). The Weather Integrated Products Team has a plan for an Initial Operating Capability (IOC) to take place in 2012. NIRSS is not explicitly a part of that IOC but should be considered as a follow-on as part of the development path to a 2025 full capability.

  9. Upgrades for the TCV tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, Basil; TCV Team

    2013-10-01

    Major upgrades are being implemented on the TCV tokamak to extend its operational domain towards a burning plasma regime. The goals of obtaining high normalized plasma beta and comparable ion and electron temperatures will be achieved with the addition of a 1 MW neutral heating system and 2 MW additional third harmonic EC power. Spatial constraints together with beam occlusion required severe design optimization and the additional of a new large tangential port on the TCV vessel. For EC, the existing vertical launch mirror will be sufficient but new 1MW EC units will be employed with the legacy X3 systems modified for lateral launch. The modifications will not affect TCV's strong RT shaping and EC actuator ranges or the open divertor vacuum chamber that permits access to Snowflake divertor or doublet configurations although some wall protection enhancement is envisaged. TCV can then contribute to disentangling effects of electron-ion coupling, rotation, current and density profile control all as a function of shape in L and H-modes with ITER (or higher) values of plasma beta. Together with fast-ion physics, TCV will also be able to explore heat, particle and momentum transport and turbulence effects in electron-heat dominated discharges for Te/Ti in the (0.02 to 3) range.

  10. NSTX-U Control System Upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, K. G.; Gates, D. A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Lawson, J. E.; Mozulay, R.; Sichta, P.; Tchilinguirian, G. J.

    2014-06-01

    The National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) is undergoing a wealth of upgrades (NSTX-U). These upgrades, especially including an elongated pulse length, require broad changes to the control system that has served NSTX well. A new fiber serial Front Panel Data Port input and output (I/O) stream will supersede the aging copper parallel version. Driver support for the new I/O and cyber security concerns require updating the operating system from Redhat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) v4 to RedHawk (based on RHEL) v6. While the basic control system continues to use the General Atomics Plasma Control System (GA PCS), the effort to forward port the entire software package to run under 64-bit Linux instead of 32-bit Linux included PCS modifications subsequently shared with GA and other PCS users. Software updates focused on three key areas: (1) code modernization through coding standards (C99/C11), (2) code portability and maintainability through use of the GA PCS code generator, and (3) support of 64-bit platforms. Central to the control system upgrade is the use of a complete real time (RT) Linux platform provided by Concurrent Computer Corporation, consisting of a computer (iHawk), an operating system and drivers (RedHawk), and RT tools (NightStar). Strong vendor support coupled with an extensive RT toolset influenced this decision. The new real-time Linux platform, I/O, and software engineering will foster enhanced capability and performance for NSTX-U plasma control.

  11. Upgrades to Monteburns, version 3.0

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, J. D.; Trellue, H. R.

    2012-07-01

    Monteburns, a Monte Carlo burnup code which has the flexibility to model time-dependent isotopic changes for a variety of nuclear systems by linking the neutron transport code MCNP/X to a production/depletion code, has undergone several performance upgrades recently that have increased the code's capabilities. Once limited to a specific number of regions, enhancements have been implemented that afford a much greater number of burn materials, such that users will be more limited by the physical constraints of their computing environment as opposed to inherent limits built into the coding of Monteburns. In conjunction with the increase in the number of burn materials, parallel execution of a production/depletion code of choice has been implemented, such that users have the option of using CINDER90, 0RIGEN2, or the newly released version of ORIGEN. Finally, the recoverable energy per fission calculation was upgraded to include capture gamma energy deposited in all specified materials as a function of irradiation time. The sum of the prompt and delayed recoverable energies from fission was obtained as before. These upgrades were first tested on a rigorous 1/8 core model of a Pressurized Water Reactor with fresh, once- and twice-burned fuel. We can now model several orders of magnitude more materials using Monte Carlo techniques, which is a significant advance in the reactor modeling world. (authors)

  12. NSLS control system upgrade status

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Tang, Y.; Flannigan, J.; Sathe, S.; Keane, J.; Krinsky, S.

    1993-07-01

    The NSLS control system initially installed in 1978 has undergone several modifications but the basic system architecture remained relatively unchanged. The need for faster response, increased reliability and better diagnostics made the control system upgrade a priority. Since the NSLS runs continuously, major changes to the control system are difficult. The upgrade plan had to allow continuous incremental changes to the control system without having any detrimental effect on operations. The plan had to provide for immediate improvement in a few key areas, such as data access rates, and be complete in a short time. At present, most accelerator operations utilize the upgraded control system.

  13. Upgrading Diagnostic Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proxauf, B.; Kimeswenger, S.; Öttl, S.

    2014-04-01

    Diagnostic diagrams of forbidden lines have been a useful tool for observers in astrophysics for many decades now. They are used to obtain information on the basic physical properties of thin gaseous nebulae. Moreover they are also the initial tool to derive thermodynamic properties of the plasma from observations to get ionization correction factors and thus to obtain proper abundances of the nebulae. Some diagnostic diagrams are in wavelengths domains which were difficult to take either due to missing wavelength coverage or low resolution of older spectrographs. Thus they were hardly used in the past. An upgrade of this useful tool is necessary because most of the diagrams were calculated using only the species involved as a single atom gas, although several are affected by well-known fluorescence mechanisms as well. Additionally the atomic data have improved up to the present time. The new diagnostic diagrams are calculated by using large grids of parameter space in the photoionization code CLOUDY. For a given basic parameter the input radiation field is varied to find the solutions with cooling-heating-equilibrium. Empirical numerical functions are fitted to provide formulas usable in e.g. data reduction pipelines. The resulting diagrams differ significantly from those used up to now and will improve the thermodynamic calculations.

  14. Altair performance and upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Olivier; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Herriot, Glen; White, John; Ball, Jesse; Trujillo, Chad

    2014-07-01

    Altair is the facility single conjugate AO system for Gemini North. Although it has been in operation for more than 10 years (and upgraded to LGS in 2007), Altair's performance is degraded by three main issues: vibrations of the telescope and instrument support structure, spatial aliasing on centroid offsets from the M2 support structure print-through on the optical surface and static non-common path aberrations. Monte-Carlo simulations can reproduce the behavior of Altair when including these three effects and they are roughly of the same order of magnitude. Solutions or mitigations are being investigated to overcome these nefarious effects and restore Altair's performance to its nominal level. A simplex algorithm as well as a phase diversity approach are being investigated to measure and correct for static aberrations. A high accuracy phase map of the M2 print-through has been obtained and is being used to calibrate and/or filter centroids affected by aliasing. A new real time computer is under consideration, to be able to handle more advanced controllers, especially notch filters to combat vibrations. In this paper we will report on the various simulations and on-sky results of this rejuvenation of one of Gemini's workhorse instruments.

  15. Endothermic hydrocarbon upgrading process

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1990-08-21

    This patent describes a process for upgrading aliphatic hydrocarbons to aromatic hydrocarbons. It comprises: burning a hydrogen-deficient fuel under oxygen-deficient conditions to evolve a hot gas containing essentially no oxygen; providing an aromatization reaction zone containing a zeolite catalyst; directly transferring a quantity of thermal energy from the hot flue gas to the aromatization reaction zone by flowing hot flue gas through the aromatization reaction zone; contacting an aliphatic hydrocarbon feedstream with the zeolite catalyst under primary conversion conditions in the aromatization reaction zone to evolve an aromatization reaction zone effluent stream containing aromatics; withdrawing the aromatization reaction zone effluent stream from the aromatization zone; separating the aromatization reaction zone effluent stream into a product stream, a secondary conversion feedstream comprising CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub i} and a stream containing C{sub 3}-C{sub 5} aliphatics; and charging the secondary conversion feedstream to a methanol synthesis reaction zone to convert at least a portion of the secondary conversion feedstream to methanol.

  16. Endothermic hydrocarbon upgrading process

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1991-07-09

    This patent describes a process for upgrading aliphatic hydrocarbons to aromatic hydrocarbons. It comprises burning a hydrogen-deficient fuel under oxygen-deficient conditions to evolve a hot flue gas containing essentially no oxygen; providing an aromatization reaction zone containing a zeolite catalyst; directly transferring a quantity of thermal energy from the hot flue gas to the aromatization reaction zone by flowing hot flue gas through the aromatization reaction zone, the quantity of thermal energy being sufficient to supply the endothermic heat of reaction to aromatize at least a portion of the aliphatic feedstream; contacting an aliphatic hydrocarbon feedstream with the zeolite catalyst under primary conversion conditions in the aromatization reaction zone to evolve an aromatization reaction zone effluent stream containing aromatics; withdrawing the aromatization reaction zone effluent stream from the aromatization reaction zone; separating the aromatization reaction zone effluent stream into a product stream, a secondary conversion feedstream comprising CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} and a stream containing C{sub 3}-C{sub 5} aliphatics; and charging the secondary conversion feedstream.

  17. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-01-01

    In this project we intend to study a novel process concept, i.e.,the use of ceramic membranes reactors in upgrading of coal derived liquids. Membrane reactors have been used in a number of catalytic reaction processes in order to overcome the limitations on conversion imposed by thermodynamic equilibrium. They have, furthermore, the inherent capability for combining reaction and separation in a single step. Thus they offer promise for improving and optimizing yield, selectivity and performance of processes involving complex liquids, as those typically found in coal liquid upgrading. Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we wig evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  18. NCSU PULSTAR Reactor instrumentation upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, P.B.; Bilyj, S.J.

    1993-08-12

    The Nuclear Reactor Program at North Carolina State University initiated an upgrade program at the NCSU PULSTAR Reactor in 1990. Twenty-year-old instrumentation is currently undergoing replacement with solid-state and current technology equipment. The financial assistance from the United States Department of Energy has been the primary source of support. This interim report provides the status of the first two phases of the upgrade program.

  19. RISK REDUCTION FOR MATERIAL ACCOUNTABILITY UPGRADES.

    SciTech Connect

    FISHBONE, L.G.; SISKIND, B.

    2005-05-16

    We present in this paper a method for evaluating explicitly the contribution of nuclear material accountability upgrades to risk reduction at nuclear facilities. The method yields the same types of values for conditional risk reduction that physical protection and material control upgrades yield. Thereby, potential material accountability upgrades can be evaluated for implementation in the same way that protection and control upgrades are evaluated.

  20. First operations with the new Collective Thomson Scattering diagnostic on the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin, W.; Bruschi, A.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Castaldo, C.; De Angeli, M.; Figini, L.; Galperti, C.; Garavaglia, S.; Granucci, G.; Grosso, G.; Korsholm, S. B.; Lontano, M.; Mellera, V.; Minelli, D.; Moro, A.; Nardone, A.; Nielsen, S. K.; Rasmussen, J.; Simonetto, A.; Stejner, M.; Tartari, U.

    2015-10-01

    Anomalous emissions were found over the last few years in spectra of Collective Thomson Scattering (CTS) diagnostics in tokamak devices such as TEXTOR, ASDEX and FTU, in addition to real CTS signals. The signal frequency, down-shifted with respect to the probing one, suggested a possible origin in Parametric Decay Instability (PDI) processes correlated with the presence of magnetic islands and occurring for pumping wave power levels well below the threshold predicted by conventional models. A threshold below or close to the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) power levels could limit, under certain circumstances, the use of the ECRH in fusion devices. An accurate characterization of the conditions for the occurrence of this phenomenon and of its consequences is thus of primary importance. Exploiting the front-steering configuration available with the real-time launcher, the implementation of a new CTS setup now allows studying these anomalous emission phenomena in FTU under conditions of density and wave injection geometry that are more similar to those envisaged for CTS in ITER. The upgrades of the diagnostic are presented as well as a few preliminary spectra detected with the new system during the very first operations in 2014. The present work has been carried out under an EUROfusion Enabling Research project. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  1. Bioelectrochemical removal of carbon dioxide (CO2): an innovative method for biogas upgrading.

    PubMed

    Xu, Heng; Wang, Kaijun; Holmes, Dawn E

    2014-12-01

    Innovative methods for biogas upgrading based on biological/in-situ concepts have started to arouse considerable interest. Bioelectrochemical removal of CO2 for biogas upgrading was proposed here and demonstrated in both batch and continuous experiments. The in-situ biogas upgrading system seemed to perform better than the ex-situ one, but CO2 content was kept below 10% in both systems. The in-situ system's performance was further enhanced under continuous operation. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and alkali production with CO2 absorption could be major contributors to biogas upgrading. Molecular studies showed that all the biocathodes associated with biogas upgrading were dominated by sequences most similar to the same hydrogenotrophic methanogen species, Methanobacterium petrolearium (97-99% sequence identity). Conclusively, bioelectrochemical removal of CO2 showed great potential for biogas upgrading.

  2. User and Performance Impacts from Franklin Upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yun

    2009-05-10

    The NERSC flagship computer Cray XT4 system"Franklin" has gone through three major upgrades: quad core upgrade, CLE 2.1 upgrade, and IO upgrade, during the past year. In this paper, we will discuss the various aspects of the user impacts such as user access, user environment, and user issues etc from these upgrades. The performance impacts on the kernel benchmarks and selected application benchmarks will also be presented.

  3. 28 CFR 115.118 - Upgrades to facilities and technologies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Upgrades to facilities and technologies... and technologies. (a) When designing or acquiring any new lockup and in planning any substantial... monitoring technology, the agency shall consider how such technology may enhance the agency's ability...

  4. 28 CFR 115.18 - Upgrades to facilities and technologies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Upgrades to facilities and technologies... to facilities and technologies. (a) When designing or acquiring any new facility and in planning any... other monitoring technology, the agency shall consider how such technology may enhance the...

  5. 28 CFR 115.18 - Upgrades to facilities and technologies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Upgrades to facilities and technologies... to facilities and technologies. (a) When designing or acquiring any new facility and in planning any... other monitoring technology, the agency shall consider how such technology may enhance the...

  6. 28 CFR 115.18 - Upgrades to facilities and technologies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Upgrades to facilities and technologies... to facilities and technologies. (a) When designing or acquiring any new facility and in planning any... other monitoring technology, the agency shall consider how such technology may enhance the...

  7. 28 CFR 115.318 - Upgrades to facilities and technologies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Upgrades to facilities and technologies... facilities and technologies. (a) When designing or acquiring any new facility and in planning any substantial... monitoring technology, the agency shall consider how such technology may enhance the agency's ability...

  8. 28 CFR 115.118 - Upgrades to facilities and technologies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Upgrades to facilities and technologies... and technologies. (a) When designing or acquiring any new lockup and in planning any substantial... monitoring technology, the agency shall consider how such technology may enhance the agency's ability...

  9. 28 CFR 115.318 - Upgrades to facilities and technologies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Upgrades to facilities and technologies... facilities and technologies. (a) When designing or acquiring any new facility and in planning any substantial... monitoring technology, the agency shall consider how such technology may enhance the agency's ability...

  10. 28 CFR 115.318 - Upgrades to facilities and technologies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Upgrades to facilities and technologies... facilities and technologies. (a) When designing or acquiring any new facility and in planning any substantial... monitoring technology, the agency shall consider how such technology may enhance the agency's ability...

  11. 28 CFR 115.118 - Upgrades to facilities and technologies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Upgrades to facilities and technologies... and technologies. (a) When designing or acquiring any new lockup and in planning any substantial... monitoring technology, the agency shall consider how such technology may enhance the agency's ability...

  12. 4 MW upgrade to the DIII-D fast wave current drive system

    SciTech Connect

    deGrassie, J.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Cary, W.P.

    1993-10-01

    The DIII-D fast wave current drive (FWCD) system is being upgraded by an additional 4 MW in the 30 to 120 MHz frequency range. This capability adds to the existing 2 MW 30 to 60 MHz system. Two new ABB transmitters of the type that are in use on the ASDEX-Upgrade tokamak in Garching will be used to drive two new water-cooled four-strap antennas to be installed in DIII-D in early 1994. The transmission and tuning system for each antenna will be similar to that now in use for the first 2 MW system on DIII-D, but with some significant improvements. One improvement consists of adding a decoupler element to counter the mutual coupling between the antenna straps which results in large imbalances in the power to a strap for the usual current drive intrastrap phasing of 90{degrees}. Another improvement is to utilize pressurized, ceramic-insulated transmission lines. The intrastrap phasing will again be controlled in pairs, with a pair of straps coupled in a resonant loop configuration, locking their phase difference at either 0 or 180{degrees}, depending upon the length of line installed. These resonant loops will incorporate a phase shifter so that they will be able to be tuned to resonance at several frequencies in the operating band of the transmitter. With the frequency change capability of the ABB generators, the FWCD frequency will thus be selectable on a shot-to-shot basis, from this preselected set of frequencies. The schedule is for experiments to begin with this added 4 MW capability in mid-1994. The details of the system are described.

  13. Upgrade of the BATMAN test facility for H{sup −} source development

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, B. Fröschle, M.; Falter, H.-D.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Kraus, W.; Nocentini, R.; Riedl, R.; Ruf, B.

    2015-04-08

    The development of a radio frequency (RF) driven source for negative hydrogen ions for the neutral beam heating devices of fusion experiments has been successfully carried out at IPP since 1996 on the test facility BATMAN. The required ITER parameters have been achieved with the prototype source consisting of a cylindrical driver on the back side of a racetrack like expansion chamber. The extraction system, called “Large Area Grid” (LAG) was derived from a positive ion accelerator from ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) using its aperture size (ø 8 mm) and pattern but replacing the first two electrodes and masking down the extraction area to 70 cm2. BATMAN is a well diagnosed and highly flexible test facility which will be kept operational in parallel to the half size ITER source test facility ELISE for further developments to improve the RF efficiency and the beam properties. It is therefore planned to upgrade BATMAN with a new ITER-like grid system (ILG) representing almost one ITER beamlet group, namely 5 × 14 apertures (ø 14 mm). Additionally to the standard three grid extraction system a repeller electrode upstream of the grounded grid can optionally be installed which is positively charged against it by 2 kV. This is designated to affect the onset of the space charge compensation downstream of the grounded grid and to reduce the backstreaming of positive ions from the drift space backwards into the ion source. For magnetic filter field studies a plasma grid current up to 3 kA will be available as well as permanent magnets embedded into a diagnostic flange or in an external magnet frame. Furthermore different source vessels and source configurations are under discussion for BATMAN, e.g. using the AUG type racetrack RF source as driver instead of the circular one or modifying the expansion chamber for a more flexible position of the external magnet frame.

  14. Node weighted network upgrade problems

    SciTech Connect

    Krumke, S.O.; Noltemeier, H.; Marathe, M.V.; Ravi, S.S.

    1996-09-01

    Consider a network where nodes represent processors and edges represent bidirectional communication links. The processor at a node v can be upgraded at an expense of cost(v). Such an upgrade reduces the delay of each link emanating from v by a fixed factor x, where 0 < x < 1. The goal is to find a minimum cost set of nodes to be upgraded so that the resulting network has a spanning tree in which edge is of delay at most a given value {delta}. The authors provide both hardness and approximation results for the problem. They show that the problem is NP-hard and cannot be approximated within any factor {beta} < ln n, unless NP {improper_subset} DTIME(n{sup log log n}), where n is the number of nodes in the network. They then present the first polynomial time approximation algorithms for the problem. For the general case, the approximation algorithm comes within a factor of 2 ln n of the minimum upgrading cost. When the cost of upgrading each node is 1, they present an approximation algorithm with a performance guarantee of 4(2 + ln {Delta}), where {Delta} is the maximum node degree. Finally, they present a polynomial time algorithm for the class of treewidth-bounded graphs.

  15. A Cooling System for the EAPU Shuttle Upgrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tongue, Stephen; Guyette, Greg; Irbeck, Bradley

    2001-01-01

    The Shuttle orbiter currently uses hydrazine-powered APU's for powering its hydraulic system pumps. To enhance vehicle safety and reliability, NASA is pursuing an APU upgrade where the hydrazine powered turbine is replaced by an electric motor pump and battery power supply. This EAPU (Electric APU) upgrade presents several thermal control challenges most notably the new requirement for moderate temperature control of high-power electron ics at 132 of (55.6 C). This paper describes how the existing Water Spray Boiler (WSB), which currently cools the hydraulic fluid and APU lubrication oil, is being modified to provide EAPU thermal management.

  16. The D0 detector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.D.

    1995-02-01

    The Fermilab collider program is undergoing a major upgrade of both the accelerator complex and the two detectors. Operation of the Tevatron at luminosities upwards of ten time that currently provided will occur in early 1999 after the commissioning of the new Fermilab Main Injector. The D0 upgrade program has been established to deliver a detector that will meet the challenges of this environment. A new magnetic tracker consisting of a superconducting solenoid, a silicon vertex detector, a scintillating fiber central tracker, and a central preshower detector will replace the current central tracking and transition radiation chambers. We present the design and performance capabilities of these new systems and describe results from physics simulations that demonstrate the physics reach of the upgraded detector.

  17. NSTX-U Control System Upgrades

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Erickson, K. G.; Gates, D. A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Lawson, J. E.; Mozulay, R.; Sichta, P.; Tchilinguirian, G. J.

    2014-06-01

    The National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) is undergoing a wealth of upgrades (NSTX-U). These upgrades, especially including an elongated pulse length, require broad changes to the control system that has served NSTX well. A new fiber serial Front Panel Data Port input and output (I/O) stream will supersede the aging copper parallel version. Driver support for the new I/O and cyber security concerns require updating the operating system from Redhat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) v4 to RedHawk (based on RHEL) v6. While the basic control system continues to use the General Atomics Plasma Control System (GA PCS), the effort to forwardmore » port the entire software package to run under 64-bit Linux instead of 32-bit Linux included PCS modifications subsequently shared with GA and other PCS users. Software updates focused on three key areas: (1) code modernization through coding standards (C99/C11), (2) code portability and maintainability through use of the GA PCS code generator, and (3) support of 64-bit platforms. Central to the control system upgrade is the use of a complete real time (RT) Linux platform provided by Concurrent Computer Corporation, consisting of a computer (iHawk), an operating system and drivers (RedHawk), and RT tools (NightStar). Strong vendor support coupled with an extensive RT toolset influenced this decision. The new real-time Linux platform, I/O, and software engineering will foster enhanced capability and performance for NSTX-U plasma control.« less

  18. Old PCs: Upgrade or Abandon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Ernest

    1997-01-01

    Examines the practical realities of upgrading Intel personal computers in libraries, considering budgets and technical personnel availability. Highlights include adding RAM; putting in faster processor chips, including clock multipliers; new hard disks; CD-ROM speed; motherboards and interface cards; cost limits and economic factors; and…

  19. The CEBAF RF Separator System Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hovater; Mark Augustine; Al Guerra; Richard Nelson; Robert Terrell; Mark Wissmann

    2004-08-01

    The CEBAF accelerator uses RF deflecting cavities operating at the third sub-harmonic (499 MHz) of the accelerating frequency (1497 MHz) to ''kick'' the electron beam to the experimental halls. The cavities operate in a TEM dipole mode incorporating mode enhancing rods to increase the cavity's transverse shunt impedance [1]. As the accelerators energy has increased from 4 GeV to 6 GeV the RF system, specifically the 1 kW solid-state amplifiers, have become problematic, operating in saturation because of the increased beam energy demands. Two years ago we began a study to look into replacement for the RF amplifiers and decided to use a commercial broadcast Inductive Output Tube (IOT) capable of 30 kW. The new RF system uses one IOT amplifier on multiple cavities as opposed to one amplifier per cavity as was originally used. In addition, the new RF system supports a proposed 12 GeV energy upgrade to CEBAF. We are currently halfway through the upgrade with three IOTs in operation and the remaining one nearly installed. This paper reports on the new RF system and the IOT performance.

  20. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 1, September 21, 1989--December 20, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    In this project we well evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated. (VC)

  1. Nose-cone calorimeter: PHENIX forward upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chvala, Ondrej

    2009-07-01

    PHENIX is a high rate experiment efficient at measuring rare processes, but has limited acceptance in azimuth and pseudorapidity ( η). The Nose Cone Calorimeter (NCC), a W-Si sampling calorimeter in the region of 0.9< η<3, is one of the upgrades which will significantly increase coverage in both azimuth and pseudorapidity. The NCC will expand PHENIX’s precision measurements of electromagnetic probes in η, reconstruct jets, perform a wide scope of correlation measurements, and enhance triggering capabilities. The detector will significantly contribute to measurements of γ-jet correlations, quarkonia production, and low- x nuclear structure functions. This report discusses details of the detector design and its performance concerning a sample of the physics topics which will benefit from the NCC. In view of recent funding difficulties, outlook of the activities is discussed.

  2. Upgrade of the Plostina infrasound array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghica, Daniela; Ionescu, Constantin; Tataru, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Plostina infrasound station (IPLOR) is a large aperture array deployed in the central part of Romania since 2009, by National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP). The initial set-up consisted of 3 elements (IPH4, IPH5, IPH6); in 2010, a fourth element (IPH7) was added; during 2012, two more sensors were installed in IPH2 and IPH3 sites. All 6 elements are equipped with Chaparral Physics Model 25 sensors. Upgrading works are currently ongoing at IPLOR, aiming to enhance the station performance in terms of automatic signal detection and characterization in the routine processing using PMCC algorithm. The infrasound data quality is improved through station design optimization and installation of more efficient wind-noise reduction systems. Solutions adopted took in account the recommendations provided by the 2011 Expert Group Meeting for the design of IMS infrasound stations, as well as the knowledge acquired during the NIEP participation, as associated member, to the ARISE design study project. After upgrading the IPLOR station to a 6-element array, the analysis of the data shows a visibly enhancement of the detection capability by increasing the lower frequency resolution (below 0.5 Hz). The improved array response indicates reducing spatial aliasing of higher frequency signals and increasing the degree of signal correlation between array elements, which are observed in a better characterization of the signal in terms of back-azimuth and horizontal trace velocity. In September 2013, NIEP started the works to improve the wind-noise reduction conditions at IPLOR station. The pipes and air-inlets installed at IPH4 element were replaced, in order to eliminate the potential points of air leak. The porous hoses at IPH5, IPH6 and IPH7 sites were replaced with new rosette pipe array systems: 20-port rosette design at IPH5 and IPH6, and 19-port rosette design at IPH7. The two circular porous hoses located at the IPH2 and IPH3 sites are scheduled for replacing in 2014. The new

  3. MIPP Plastic Ball electronics upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Baldin, Boris; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    An upgrade electronics design for Plastic Ball detector is described. The Plastic Ball detector was a part of several experiments in the past and its back portion (proposed to be used in MIPP) consists of 340 photomultipliers equipped with a sandwich scintillator. The scintillator sandwich has fast and slow signal component with decay times 10 ns and 1 {micro}s respectively. The upgraded MIPP experiment will collect up to 12,000 events during each 4 second spill and read them out in {approx}50 seconds between spills. The MIPP data acquisition system will employ deadtime-less concept successfully implemented in Muon Electronics of Dzero experiment at Fermilab. An 8-channel prototype design of the Plastic Ball Front End (PBFE) implementing these requirements is discussed. Details of the schematic design, simulation and prototype test results are discussed.

  4. Tevatron beam position monitor upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Wolbers, Stephen; Banerjee, B.; Barker, B.; Bledsoe, S.; Boes, T.; Bowden, M.; Cancelo, G.; Forster, B.; Duerling, G.; Haynes, B.; Hendricks, B.; Kasza, T.; Kutschke, R.; Mahlum, R.; Martens, M.; Mengel, M.; Olson, M.; Pavlicek, V.; Pham, T.; Piccoli, L.; Steimel, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The Tevatron Beam Position Monitor (BPM) readout electronics and software have been upgraded to improve measurement precision, functionality and reliability. The original system, designed and built in the early 1980's, became inadequate for current and future operations of the Tevatron. The upgraded system consists of 960 channels of new electronics to process analog signals from 240 BPMs, new front-end software, new online and controls software, and modified applications to take advantage of the improved measurements and support the new functionality. The new system reads signals from both ends of the existing directional stripline pickups to provide simultaneous proton and antiproton position measurements. Measurements using the new system are presented that demonstrate its improved resolution and overall performance.

  5. The FNAL Injector Upgrade Status

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.; Bollinger, D.S.; Duel, K.L.; Karns, P.R.; Lackey, J.R.; Pellico, W.A; Scarpine, V.E.; Tomlin, R.E.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-14

    The new FNAL H{sup -} injector upgrade is currently being tested before installation in the Spring 2012 shutdown of the accelerator complex. This line consists of an H{sup -} source, low energy beam transport (LEBT), 200 MHz RFQ and medium energy beam transport (MEBT). Beam measurements have been performed to validate the design before installation. The results of the beam measurements are presented in this paper.

  6. The Pegasus-Upgrade Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonck, R. J.; Bongard, M. W.; Barr, J. L.; Frerichs, H. G.; Lewicki, B. T.; Reusch, J. A.; Schmitz, O.; Winz, G. R.

    2015-11-01

    Tokamak operation at near-unity aspect ratio provides access to advanced tokamak physics at modest parameters. High plasma current is accessible at very low toroidal field. This offers H-mode performance at Te levels that allow use of electrostatic and magnetic probe arrays through the edge pedestal region into the plasma core. An upgrade to the Pegasus ST is planned to exploit these features and pursue unique studies in three areas: local measurements of pedestal and ELM dynamics at Alfvenic timescales; direct measurement of the local plasma response to application of 3D magnetic perturbations with high spectral flexibility; and extension of Local Helicity Injection for nonsolenoidal startup to NSTX-U-relevant confinement and stability regimes. Significant but relatively low-cost upgrades to the facility are proposed: a new centerstack with larger solenoid and 2x the number of toroidal field conductors; a new TF power supply and conversion of the 200 MVA OH power supply to a cascaded multilevel inverter configuration; and installation of an extensive 3D-magnetic perturbation coil system for ELM mitigation and suppression studies. The upgraded facility will provide 0.3 MA plasmas with pulse lengths of 50-100 msec flattop, aspect ratio <1.25, and toroidal field up to 0.4 T. These research activities will be integrated into related efforts on DIII-D and NSTX-U. Work supported by US DOE grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  7. The upgraded WIYN bench spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezek, Patricia M.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Willmarth, Daryl; Glaspey, John; Poczulp, Gary; Blanco, Dan; Britanik, Lana; McDougall, Eugene; Corson, Charles; Liang, Ming; Keyes, Joe; Jacoby, George

    2010-07-01

    We present the as-built design overview and post-installation performance of the upgraded WIYN Bench Spectrograph. This Bench is currently fed by either of the general-use multi-fiber instruments at the WIYN 3.5m telescope on Kitt Peak, the Hydra multi-object positioner, and the SparsePak integral field unit (IFU). It is very versatile, and can be configured to accommodate low-order, echelle, and volume phase holographic gratings. The overarching goal of the upgrade was to increase the average spectrograph throughput by ~60% while minimizing resolution loss (< 20%). In order to accomplish these goals, the project has had three major thrusts: (1) a new CCD was provided with a nearly constant 30% increase is throughput over 320-1000 nm; (2) two Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings were delivered; and (3) installed a new all-refractive collimator that properly matches the output fiber irradiance (EE90) and optimizes pupil placement. Initial analysis of commissioning data indicates that the total throughput of the system has increased 50-70% using the 600 l/mm surface ruled grating, indicating that the upgrade has achieved its goal. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that overall image resolution meets the requirement of <20% loss.

  8. Upgraded Fuel Assemblies for BWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, N.L.; Rentmeister, T.; Lippert, H.J.; Mollard, P.

    2007-07-01

    Established with engineering and manufacturing operations in the US and Europe, AREVA NP has been and is supplying nuclear fuel assemblies and associated core components to light water reactors worldwide, representing today more than 170,000 fuel assemblies on the world market and more than 56,000 fuel assemblies for BWR plants. Since first delivered in 1992, ATRIUM{sup TM}(1)10 fuel assemblies have now been supplied to a total of 28 BWR plants in the US, Europe, and Asia resulting in an operating experience over 16 000 fuel assemblies. In the spring of 2001, a BWR record burnup of 71 MWd/kgU was reached by four lead fuel assemblies after eight operating cycles. More recently, ATRIUM 10XP and ATRIUM 10XM fuel assemblies featuring changes in their characteristics and exhibiting upgraded behavior have been delivered to several utilities worldwide. This success story has been made possible thanks to a continuous improvement process with the aim of further upgrading BWR fuel assembly performance and reliability. An overview is given on current AREVA advanced BWR fuel supply regarding: - advanced designs to tailor product selection to specific operating strategies; - performance capabilities of each advanced design option; - testing and operational experience for these advanced designs; - upgraded features available for inclusion with advanced designs. (authors)

  9. Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Radar (DBSAR) Polarimetric Upgrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael F.; Perrine, Martin; McLinden, Matthew; Valett, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Radar (DBSAR) is a state-of-the-art radar system developed at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center for the development and implementation of digital beamforming radar techniques. DBSAR was recently upgraded to polarimetric operation in order to enhance its capability as a science instrument. Two polarimetric approaches were carried out which will be demonstrated in upcoming flight campaigns.

  10. Conceptual design of a 2 tesla superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab D{O} detector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Brzezniak, J.; Fast, R.W.; Krempetz, K.

    1994-05-01

    This paper presents a conceptual design of a superconducting solenoid to be part of a proposed upgrade for the D0 detector. This detector was completed in 1992, and has been taking data since then. The Fermilab Tevatron had scheduled a series of luminosity enhancements prior to the startup of this detector. In response to this accelerator upgrade, efforts have been underway to design upgrades for D0 to take advantage of the new luminosity, and improvements in detector technology. This magnet is conceived as part of the new central tracking system for D0, providing a radiation-hard high-precision magnetic tracking system with excellent electron identification.

  11. The iTPC upgrade for BES-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videbaek, Flemming; STAR Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    STAR has proposed to upgrade the inner sectors of the STAR TPC to increase the segmentation on the inner padplane and to renew the inner sector wires. The upgrade will provide better momentum resolution, better dE/dx resolution and, most importantly, it will provide improved acceptance at high rapidity to | η| <= 1.5 compared to the current TPC configuration of | η| <= 1 and to extend the pt coverage towards lower pt. The enhanced measurement capabilities of STAR after the iTPC upgrade are a vital part of the BES-II effort for 2019-2020. The expanded rapidity coverage provides a major benefit for many analyses, especially those sensitive to changes in correlation lengths near a critical point, like the net-proton Kurtosis which exhibits interesting energy trends that only appear near the edge of the current STAR acceptance. In the area of dielectron measurements it reduces hadron contamination from a dominant source of uncertainty to an expected statistical uncertainty of only 10%, and will enable significantly improved understanding of in-medium modifications. In this talk I will discuss the physics impact and give a technical overview of the detector upgrade. This work was supported in part by the Office of Nuclear Physics within the U.S. DOE Office of Science.

  12. The CDF silicon detector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Azzi, P.

    1998-04-01

    A major silicon upgrade project is under way for the CDFII experiment that will operate during Run II of the Tevatron in the year 2000. The innermost detector, SVXII, will cover the interaction region with three barrels of five layers of double sided microstrip detectors. In the radial gap between the SVXII and the new main tracking chamber (COT) will be located the ISL that consists of two planes of double sided miscrostrip detectors at large pseudorapidity and one in the central region. A description of the project design and its motivation is presented here.

  13. CMS upgrade and future plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoepfner, Kerstin

    2015-05-01

    CMS plans for operation at the LHC phase-II unprecedented in terms of luminosity thus resulting in serious consequences for detector performance. To achieve the goal to maintain the present excellent performance of the CMS detector, several upgrades are necessary. To handle the high phase-II data rates, the readout and trigger systems are redesigned using recent technology developments. The high particle rates will accelerate detector aging and require replacement of the tracker and forward calorimeters. In addition, the muon system will be extended.

  14. Space Station Live: ISS Communications Unit Upgrade

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Nicole Cloutier-Lemasters interviews International Space Station Flight Director Mike Lammers about the recent Ku communications unit upgrade work taking place aboard th...

  15. SOFIA Gets Avionics and Mission Systems Upgrades

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, or SOFIA, has received major upgrades to its telescope control and avionics systems that will significantly improve their efficiency and ope...

  16. Upgrade Of The SDSS Spectrographs For BOSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, Natalie; Barkhouser, R.; Carey, L.; Carr, M.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Gunn, J. E.; Honscheid, K.; Leger, F.; Rockosi, C.; Schlegel, D. J.; Smee, S.

    2010-01-01

    A major upgrade of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) fiber-fed spectrographs was completed in August, 2009. The upgraded spectrographs have 50% more fibers, extended wavelength coverage and much improved throughput. Large format VPH gratings and thick, fully-depleted CCDs are special features of the upgrade, which will enable the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) project to obtain spectra of 1.4M galaxies and 160,000 quasars in five years of dark time observations. We report on the details of the upgrade, including the fiber system, optics, cameras and electronics.

  17. MPTS Operation and Recent Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, B. P.; Diallo, A.; Labik, G.; Stevens, D. R.

    2011-10-01

    NSTX's Multi-Point Thomson Scattering (MPTS) diagnostic has supported plasma operation for over ten years, during which time a phased implementation has been pursued. The measurements span the horizontal midplane covering around 90 percent of the full-bore confined plasma and the scrape-off layer (SOL). While beginning with one 30-Hz Nd:YAG laser and 10 radial positions, MPTS has operated with a second laser - combined frequency of 60 Hz - and 30 radial positions during the past six years. A recent upgrade brings the total number of radial positions to 42. While most of the 12 new channels are set to improve spatial resolution in the pedestal and internal transport barrier (ITB) regions, a limited number of extra channels have been added to the inner edge and the SOL. Many of the new channels resulted from the splitting of existing fiber bundles, an option that had been left open in MPTS's original design. The 42-channel configuration is planned to begin operation during the 2011 NSTX experimental run. Experimental results will be presented. Future plans for the upcoming NSTX center-stack upgrade will be discussed. U.S. Dept. of Energy Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  18. Tritium Plasma Experiment Upgrade for Fusion Tritium and Nuclear Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Taylor, Chase N.; Kolasinski, Robert D.; Buchenauer, Dean A.

    2015-11-01

    The Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) is a unique high-flux linear plasma device that can handle beryllium, tritium, and neutron-irradiated plasma facing materials, and is the only existing device dedicated to directly study tritium retention and permeation in neutron-irradiated materials [M. Shimada et.al., Rev. Sci. Instru. 82 (2011) 083503 and and M. Shimada, et.al., Nucl. Fusion 55 (2015) 013008]. Recently the TPE has undergone major upgrades in its electrical and control systems. New DC power supplies and a new control center enable remote plasma operations from outside of the contamination area for tritium, minimizing the possible exposure risk with tritium and beryllium. We discuss the electrical upgrade, enhanced operational safety, improved plasma performance, and development of tritium plasma-driven permeation and optical spectrometer system. This upgrade not only improves operational safety of the worker, but also enhances plasma performance to better simulate extreme plasma-material conditions expected in ITER, Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF), and Demonstration reactor (DEMO). This work was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under the DOE Idaho Field Office contract number DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  19. 2 MW upgrade of the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2003-06-04

    In January 2002, the Fermilab Director initiated a design study for a high average power, modest energy proton facility. An intensity upgrade to Fermilab's 120-GeV Main Injector (MI) represents an attractive concept for such a facility, which would leverage existing beam lines and experimental areas and would greatly enhance physics opportunities at Fermilab and in the U.S. With a Proton Driver replacing the present Booster, the beam intensity of the MI is expected to be increased by a factor of five. Accompanied by a shorter cycle, the beam power would reach 2 MW. This would make the MI a more powerful machine than the SNS or the J-PARC. Moreover, the high beam energy (120 GeV) and tunable energy range (8-120 GeV) would make it a unique high power proton facility. The upgrade study has been completed and published. This paper gives a summary report.

  20. The upgrade system of BESIII ETOF with MRPC technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Z.; Sun, Y. J.; Li, C.; Heng, Y. K.; Wu, Z.; Cao, P.; Dai, H. L.; Ji, X. L.; Gong, W. X.; Liu, Z.; Luo, X. L.; Sun, W. J.; Wang, S. Y.; Wang, Y.; Yang, R. X.; Ye, M.; Zhao, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    An upgrade, based on Multigap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) technology, of the endcap Time-Of-Flight (ETOF) detector of the Beijing Spectrometer III (BESIII) has been proposed for the replacement of the current scintillator + PMT based ETOF, with the aim of improving the time resolution down to 80 ps sigma. This improvement will enhance the particle identification capability to meet the higher precision requirements of physics. The ETOF system including MRPC modules, Front End Electronics (FEE), CLOCK module, fast control boards and Time to Digital modules (TDIG), has been designed, constructed and parts of the ETOF system have seperately tested. Aiming at examining the quality of entire ETOF system and training the operation of all participated instruments, a cosmic ray test system was built and tested in the laboratory for about three months to guarantee the performance. In this paper the results of the test are presented indicating that the entire ETOF system works well and satisfies the requirements of the upgrade.

  1. Functional performance requirements for seismic network upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.C.

    1991-08-18

    The SRL seismic network, established in 1976, was developed to monitor site and regional seismic activity that may have any potential to impact the safety or reduce containment capability of existing and planned structures and systems at the SRS, report seismic activity that may be relevant to emergency preparedness, including rapid assessments of earthquake location and magnitude, and estimates of potential on-site and off-site damage to facilities and lifelines for mitigation measures. All of these tasks require SRL seismologists to provide rapid analysis of large amounts of seismic data. The current seismic network upgrade, the subject of this Functional Performance Requirements Document, is necessary to improve system reliability and resolution. The upgrade provides equipment for the analysis of the network seismic data and replacement of old out-dated equipment. The digital network upgrade is configured for field station and laboratory digital processing systems. The upgrade consists of the purchase and installation of seismic sensors,, data telemetry digital upgrades, a dedicated Seismic Data Processing (SDP) system (already in procurement stage), and a Seismic Signal Analysis (SSA) system. The field stations and telephone telemetry upgrades include equipment necessary for three remote station upgrades including seismic amplifiers, voltage controlled oscillators, pulse calibrators, weather protection (including lightning protection) systems, seismometers, seismic amplifiers, and miscellaneous other parts. The central receiving and recording station upgrades will include discriminators, helicopter amplifier, omega timing system, strong motion instruments, wide-band velocity sensors, and other miscellaneous equipment.

  2. Project W-420 stack monitoring system upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    CARPENTER, K.E.

    1999-02-25

    This project will execute the design, procurement, construction, startup, and turnover activities for upgrades to the stack monitoring system on selected Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) ventilation systems. In this plan, the technical, schedule, and cost baselines are identified, and the roles and responsibilities of project participants are defined for managing the Stack Monitoring System Upgrades, Project W-420.

  3. Upgrading Programs for Construction Journeymen. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, William S.

    The report describes a study of industry-sponsored upgrading programs for journeymen in construction unions. Interviews with union and training officials, as well as 405 journeymen and 99 contractors, revealed that upgrading activities were concentrated in electrical work, carpentry, and the pipe trades, and that both the number of programs and…

  4. Performance of the upgraded Orroral laser ranging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luck, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: upgrade arrangements, system prior to 1991, elements of the upgrade, laser performance, timing system performance, pass productivity, system precision, system accuracy, telescope pointing and future upgrades and extensions.

  5. Venezuelan plant completes instrument upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, H.; Garcia, C.O.

    1996-07-22

    The Lamarliquido LPG plant, offshore Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela, has received a major upgrade to its control system after 25 years of pneumatic instrumentation. The plant is now operating fully remote from a new central control room with a maximum production of 5,500 b/d, expected to go to 6,600 b/d. The phases of the project included installation and integration of four control systems: distributed control system; fire prevention, detection, and control system; refrigeration process turbocompressor control system; and emergency shutdown system. The paper describes the 1960s vintage instrumentation, the modernization objectives and phases, the distributed control system, the fire control system, gas and fire detection, the turbocompressor system, emergency shutdown system, and plant shutdown logic.

  6. Manastash Ridge Observatory Autoguider Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozo, Jason; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Armstrong, John; Davila, Adrian; Johnson, Courtney; McMaster, Alex; Olinger, Kyle

    2016-06-01

    The Astronomy Undergraduate Engineering Group (AUEG) at the University of Washington has designed and manufactured a novel autoguider system for the 0.8-meter telescope at the Manastash Ridge Observatory in Ellensburg, Washington. The system uses a pickoff mirror placed in the unused optical path, directing the outer field to the guide camera via a system of axi-symmetrically rotating relay mirrors (periscope). This allows the guider to sample nearly 7 times the area that would be possible with the same fixed detector. This system adds closed loop optical feedback to the tracking capabilities of the telescope. When tuned the telescope will be capable of acheiving 0.5 arcsecond tracking or better. Dynamic focusing of the primary optical path will also be an included feature of this system. This unique guider will be a much needed upgrade to the telescope allowing for increased scientific capability.

  7. LHCb Upgrade: Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The evolution of the design since the Technical Design Report in 2014 and the latest R & D results are presented.

  8. CDF level 2 trigger upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Anikeev, K.; Bogdan, M.; DeMaat, R.; Fedorko, W.; Frisch, H.; Hahn, K.; Hakala, M.; Keener, P.; Kim, Y.; Kroll, J.; Kwang, S.; Lewis, J.; Lin, C.; Liu, T.; Marjamaa, F.; Mansikkala, T.; Neu, C.; Pitkanen, S.; Reisert, B.; Rusu, V.; Sanders, H.; /Fermilab /Chicago U. /Pennsylvania U.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the new CDF Level 2 Trigger, which was commissioned during Spring 2005. The upgrade was necessitated by several factors that included increased bandwidth requirements, in view of the growing instantaneous luminosity of the Tevatron, and the need for a more robust system, since the older system was reaching the limits of maintainability. The challenges in designing the new system were interfacing with many different upstream detector subsystems, processing larger volumes of data at higher speed, and minimizing the impact on running the CDF experiment during the system commissioning phase. To meet these challenges, the new system was designed around a general purpose motherboard, the PULSAR, which is instrumented with powerful FPGAs and modern SRAMs, and which uses mezzanine cards to interface with upstream detector components and an industry standard data link (S-LINK) within the system.

  9. Five-megajoule homopolar upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bullion, T.M.; Zowarka, R.C.; Aanstoos, T.A.; Weldon, W.F.; Rylander, H.G.; Woodson, H.H.

    1981-01-01

    The five-megajoule homopolar generator (5-MJ HPG) designed and built in 1974 by the Center for Eelctromechanics at the University of Texas at Austin (CEM-UT) was the result of an engineering feasibility study that examined alternate means of pulsed energy storage for controlled thermonuclear fusion experiments. The machine proved very reliable and useful in a variety of applications, notably pulsed resistance welding, and was modified in 1978 to improve its flexibility and ease of maintenance. CEM-UT is now completing a major upgrading of this HPG to a hydraulically motored, 10-MJ, 47-V, 1.02-MA device capable of welding large-section, high-carbon railroad rail. This report considers the design and fabrication of the new rotor, shaft, brush mechanisms, field coil, making switch, busbar system, and control system, as well as the addition of the 31-MPa (4500 psi) hydraulic motoring system. Future applications of the 10-MJ HPG are also discussed.

  10. Upgrade Summer Severe Weather Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this task was to upgrade to the existing severe weather database by adding observations from the 2010 warm season, update the verification dataset with results from the 2010 warm season, use statistical logistic regression analysis on the database and develop a new forecast tool. The AMU analyzed 7 stability parameters that showed the possibility of providing guidance in forecasting severe weather, calculated verification statistics for the Total Threat Score (TTS), and calculated warm season verification statistics for the 2010 season. The AMU also performed statistical logistic regression analysis on the 22-year severe weather database. The results indicated that the logistic regression equation did not show an increase in skill over the previously developed TTS. The equation showed less accuracy than TTS at predicting severe weather, little ability to distinguish between severe and non-severe weather days, and worse standard categorical accuracy measures and skill scores over TTS.

  11. Energy Efficiency Through Lighting Upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Berst, Kara; Howeth, Maria

    2013-02-26

    Lighting upgrades including neon to LED, incandescent to CFL's and T-12 to T-8 and T-5's were completed through this grant. A total of 16 Chickasaw nation facilities decreased their carbon footprint because of these grant funds. Calculations used were based on comparing the energy usage from the previous year's average and the current energy usage. For facilities without a full year's set of energy bills, the month after installation was compared to the same month from the previous year. Overall, the effect the lighting change-outs had for the gaming centers and casinos far exceeded expectations. For the Madill Gaming Center; both an interior and exterior upgrade was performed which resulted in a 31% decrease in energy consumption. This same reduction was seen in every facility that participated in the grant. Just by simply changing out light bulbs to newer energy efficient equivalents, a decrease in energy usage can be achieved and this was validated by the return on investment seen at Chickasaw Nation facilities. Along with the technical project tasks were awareness sessions presented at Chickasaw Head Starts. The positive message of environmental stewardship was passed down to head start students and passed along to Chickasaw employees. Excitement was created in those that learned what they could do to help reduce their energy bills and many followed through and took the idea home. For a fairy low cost, the general public can also use this technique to lower their energy consumption both at home and at work. Although the idea behind the project was somewhat simple, true benefits have been gained through environmental awareness and reductions of energy costs.

  12. Superbend upgrade of the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Robin, D.; Krupnick, J.; Schlueter, R.; Steier, C.; Marks, S.; Wang, B.; Zbasnik, J.; Benjegerdes, R.; Biocca, A.; Bish, P.; Brown, W.; Byrne, W.; Chen, J.; Decking, W.; DeVries, J.; DeMarco, W.R.; Fahmie, M.; Geyer, A.; Harkins, J.; Henderson, T.; Hinkson, J.; Hoyer, E.; Hull, D.; Jacobson, S.; McDonald, J.; Molinari, P.; Mueller, R.; Nadolski, L.; Nishimura, H.; Nishimura, K.; Ottens, F.; Paterson, J.A.; Pipersky, P.; Portmann, G.; Richie, A.; Rossi, S.; Salvant, B.; Scarvie, T.; Schmidt,A.; Spring, J.; Taylor, C.; Thur, W.; Timossi, C.; Wandesforde, A.

    2004-05-26

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a third generation synchrotron light source located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). There was an increasing demand at the ALS for additional high brightness hard x-ray beamlines in the 7 to 40 keV range. In response to that demand, the ALS storage ring was modified in August 2001. Three 1.3 Tesla normal conducting bending magnets were removed and replaced with three 5 Tesla superconducting magnets (Superbends). The radiation produced by these Superbends is an order of magnitude higher in photon brightness and flux at 12 keV than that of the 1.3 Tesla bends, making them excellent sources of hard x-rays for protein crystallography and other hard x-ray applications. At the same time the Superbends did not compromise the performance of the facility in the VUV and soft x-ray regions of the spectrum. The Superbends will eventually feed 12 new beamlines greatly enhancing the facility's capability and capacity in the hard x-ray region. The Superbend project is the biggest upgrade to the ALS storage ring since it was commissioned in 1993. In this paper we present an overview of the Superbend project, its challenges and the resulting impact on the ALS.

  13. MAPS application for the ITS upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattuca, A.; Alice Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) technology is of central interest for the innermost tracking layers of particle physics experiments since they enhance the detector granularity and thus allow for very high spatial resolution with low material budget. This contribution will focus on the MAPS implementation for the ALICE ITS Upgrade. Within the ongoing R&D program, the ALPIDE chip is under development with a wide pixel matrix consisting of 512 rows and 1024 columns. With this high pixel granularity a fast read out is mandatory. For this purpose a high speed serial link, which works at the targeting speeds of 1.2Gbps/400Mbps, is integrated in the chip in order to send out data at the far end of a differential cable. To overcome the physical limitations imposed by the signal lines and properly reconstruct the signal, pre-emphasis technique is mandatory at such long distances. This contribution summarizes the ongoing studies on the data transmission quality and presents the first measurement of the first produced prototype.

  14. Screening of processing and upgrading schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The RFP was predicated on DOE's desire to enhance the development of advanced transportation fuels made from coal via a program to process mild coal gasification (MCG) liquids into high volumetric energy density (HEDF) test fuels. The desired product fuels were to be cost effectively manufactured, have high volumetric energy density, and be hydrocarbon-based for existing and prototype turbine and diesel engines. The sources for these special fuels consist of the abundant and secure indigenous energy resources of coal. Comparison studies were also to be made using other non-petroleum fossil fuels such as shale oil and tar sands bitumen. METC has concluded that MCG technology has the potential to simultaneously satisfy the transportation and power generation fuel needs in the most cost-effective manner. MCG is based on low temperature pyrolysis, a technique known to the coal community for over a century. Most past pyrolysis developments were aimed at maximizing the liquids yield which results in a low quality tarry product requiring significant and capital intensive upgrading. By properly tailoring the pyrolysis severity to control the liquid yield-liquid quality relationship, it has been found that a higher quality distillate-boiling liquid can be readily skimmed'' from the coal. The resultant liquids have a much higher H/C ratio than conventional pyrolytic tars and therefore can be hydroprocessed at lower cost. These liquids are also extremely enriched in 1-, 2-, and 3-ring aromatics.

  15. Optical link ASICs for LHC upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, K. K.; Kagan, H. P.; Kass, R. D.; Moore, J. R.; Smith, D. S.

    2011-05-01

    We have designed three ASICs for possible applications in a new pixel layer (insertable B-layer or IBL) for the ATLAS detector for the first phase of the LHC luminosity upgrade. The ASICs are a high-speed driver for the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL), a receiver/decoder to decode the signal received at the PIN diode to extract the data and clock, and a clock multiplier to produce a higher frequency clock to serialize the data for transmission. These ASICs were designed using a 130 nm CMOS process to enhance the radiation-hardness. We have characterized the ASICs and the submission has been mostly successful. We irradiated the ASICs with 24 GeV/c protons at CERN to a dosage of 70 Mrad. We observed no significant degradation except the driver circuit in the VCSEL driver fabricated using the thick oxide process in order to provide sufficient voltage to drive a VCSEL. The degradation is due to the radiation induced large threshold shifts in the PMOS transistors used.

  16. Upgrades for the ECH System on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohr, J.; Cengher, M.; Doane, J. L.; Gorelov, Y. A.; Moeller, C. P.; Ponce, D.; Noraky, S.; Penaflor, B. G.; Kolemen, E.

    2012-10-01

    The gyrotron system for electron cyclotron heating on the DIII-D tokamak is being upgraded with the addition of higher efficiency gyrotrons having collector potential depression. Two new gyrotrons, operating at the present frequency of 110 GHz and generating 1.2 MW per unit, have been manufactured and are being installed and tested. The subsequent group of gyrotrons have been designed to generate 1.5 MW for 10 s pulses at 117.5 GHz. The first of these tubes is presently being manufactured at Communications and Power Industries. By the end of 2013, the system will comprise eight high power gyrotrons and, pending the successful performance of the 1.5 MW tube, an upgrade to a 15 MW system will begin. High voltage power supplies, transmission lines, launchers and associated control and data acquisition systems are included in the upgrades as is enhanced ability to steer the rf beams under a variety of pre-programed and reactive scenarios.

  17. Safety analysis report for packaging upgrade plan

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY, D.L.

    1998-11-18

    This Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) Upgrade Plan reflects a revised SARP upgrade schedule based on the most current program needs. A Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) Performance Expectation exists to update, revise, and/or cancel seven onsite SARPS during FY 1999. It is the U.S. Department of Energy's desire that 100% of the SARPs (which existed at the beginning of the PHMC Contract) be upgraded, revised, and/or canceled by the end of the five year contract. This plan is a ''living'' document and is used as a management tool.

  18. Habitat Demonstration Unit Medical Operations Workstation Upgrades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trageser, Katherine H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the design and fabrication associated with upgrades for the Medical Operations Workstation in the Habitat Demonstration Unit. The work spanned a ten week period. The upgrades will be used during the 2011 Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) field campaign. Upgrades include a deployable privacy curtain system, a deployable tray table, an easily accessible biological waste container, reorganization and labeling of the medical supplies, and installation of a retractable camera. All of the items were completed within the ten week period.

  19. Safety upgrades plug car leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    To lessen the chance of a chemical leak occurring during rail transport, some companies are improving tank car sturdiness and safety by adding such features as top-loading valves, on-board monitoring devices, and thicker, more impact-resistant hulls. Results include a dramatic drop in the number of rail incidents and leak tank cars. Chemicals Division of Olin Corporation (Stamford, Connecticut) has assigned its name to a new fleet of chlorine, caustic soda and toluene diisocyanate (TDI) tank cars. Each car carries the company's Care[trademark]Car registered trademark. The upgrade is part of a company-wide quality improvement process started in 1986. The company requires acoustic emissions (AE) testing on all hazardous materials tank cars. If an area has a defect, it expands and makes a slight sound when subjected to stress. In an AE test, cars are subject to simulated bumps and jolts as in rail shipment. Electronic sensors transfer any stress noises onto a computer screen, where an operator can pinpoint the trouble source.

  20. Nose-Cone Calorimeter: upgrade of PHENIX detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chvala, Ondrej

    2008-10-01

    PHENIX experiment at RHIC is efficient at measuring processes involving rare probes, but has limited acceptance in azimuth and pseudorapidity (η). The Nose Cone Calorimeter (NCC), a W-Si sampling calorimeter in the region of 0.9,<η<,, is one of the upgrades which will dramatically increase coverage in azimuth and pseudorapidity. The NCC will expand PHENIX's precision measurements of electromagnetic probes in η, reconstruct jets, and enhance triggering capabilities. It will significantly contribute to measurements of γ-jets, quarkonia, and low-x nuclear structure functions. Details of the detector design, performance, and a sample of the physics topics which will benefit from the NCC, will be discussed.

  1. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Upgrade Piping Loads on Cleanroom Roof

    SciTech Connect

    Sakla, Steve; /Fermilab

    1995-08-28

    The proposed piping layout for the DO upgrade will run along the south wall of DAB. The cryogenic service pipe runs above the upper and lower cleanroom roofs and will need to be supported by the roofs beams. Calculations were done to determine the stresses in the I-beams created by the existing and additional loads due to the upgrade. Refer to drawing no. 3823.115-ME-317283 for drawings of the piping layout. Figure 1 shows the 'plan view' portion of this drawing. The weight of the individual lines were calculated in figure 2 assuming a pipe density of O.28 lbm/in{sup 3} for stainless steel (0.12% C) and a fluid density (assuming LN2 at 1 atm) of 0.03 lbm/in{sup 3}. The weights of the corrugated steel flooring, assembly hall feed cans, support beams, and roof hatch were also included in the analysis. These loads are calculated on pgs. 5-6. A floor load of 50 lbf/ft{sup 2} was also added in order to maintain the existing floor load limit in addition to the added piping loads. Measurements of the dimensions of the I-beams determined that the nominal sizes of the beams were W8 x 21 for the lower roof and W14 x 26 for the upper roof. Pipe lengths were determined from the drawing for each of the lines on pgs. 1-2 of the calculations (refer to all piping by line numbers according to figure 2). A total weight was calculated for lines 3-9 along the south wall and lines 1-2 running along the north wall of the lower cleanroom roof. To simplify the calculations these weights were assumed to be evenly distributed on the 5 I-beam supports of the lower cleanroom roof 2.5 feet in from the south wall. The stress analysis was done using FrameMac, a 2-D finite element program for the Macintosh. Beam 3 was not included in the analysis because it is structurally equivalent to beam 1. The program outputted maximum values for shear stress, bending stress, shear force, and moments in each of the beams analyzed. These values were then compared to the allowable stresses as per the

  2. TMX Upgrade magnet-set geometry design

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.L.

    1981-09-24

    A magnet set, consisting of 24 coils, has been designed for the TMX Upgrade. Like the coil set designed for the TMX experiment, the coils for TMX Upgrade consist of a central-cell set with a minimum-B plug set on each end. Between the central cell and each end plug, there is a flux bundle recircularizing transition set. Physics considerations require that the TMX Upgrade magnet set be almost twice as long as the TMX magnet set (14 m between the outer mirrors). The central circular coils are the only coils used from TMX. The TMX transition set of two C-coils and an octupole is replaced by a C-coil and an Ioffe coil. The TMX plug composed of a baseball coil and two C-coils is replaced by an Ioffe coil, two C-coils and two circular coils. A comparison between the TMX and TMX Upgrade magnet sets is shown.

  3. Advanced Photon Source Upgrade Project - Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Gibbson, Murray

    2016-07-12

    An upgrade to Advanced Photon Source announced by DOE - http://go.usa.gov/ivZ -- will help scientists break through bottlenecks in materials design in order to develop materials with desirable functions.

  4. Recovery Act. Tapoco project. Cheoah upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Paul

    2013-10-02

    Under Funding Opportunity Announcement Number: DE-FOA-0000120, Recovery Act: Hydroelectric Facility Modernization, Alcoa Power Generating Inc. (APGI), a fully owned subsidiary of Alcoa Inc., implemented major upgrades at its Cheoah hydroelectric facility near Robbinsville, North Carolina.

  5. System and process for upgrading hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Smith, Joseph D.; Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2015-08-25

    In one embodiment, a system for upgrading a hydrocarbon material may include a black wax upgrade subsystem and a molten salt gasification (MSG) subsystem. The black wax upgrade subsystem and the MSG subsystem may be located within a common pressure boundary, such as within a pressure vessel. Gaseous materials produced by the MSG subsystem may be used in the process carried out within the black wax upgrade subsystem. For example, hydrogen may pass through a gaseous transfer interface to interact with black wax feed material to hydrogenate such material during a cracking process. In one embodiment, the gaseous transfer interface may include one or more openings in a tube or conduit which is carrying the black wax material. A pressure differential may control the flow of hydrogen within the tube or conduit. Related methods are also disclosed.

  6. Space Station Live: Station Communications Upgrade

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Nicole Cloutier-Lemasters recently spoke with Penny Roberts, one of the leads for the International Space Station Avionics and Software group, about the upgrade of the K...

  7. High Flux Isotope Reactor power upgrade status

    SciTech Connect

    Rothrock, R.B.; Hale, R.E.; Cheverton, R.D.

    1997-03-01

    A return to 100-MW operation is being planned for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Recent improvements in fuel element manufacturing procedures and inspection equipment will be exploited to reduce hot spot and hot streak factors sufficiently to permit the power upgrade without an increase in primary coolant pressure. Fresh fuel elements already fabricated for future use are being evaluated individually for power upgrade potential based on their measured coolant channel dimensions.

  8. CDF central preshower and crack detector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Artikov, A.; Boudagov, J.; Chokheli, D.; Drake, G.; Gallinaro, M.; Giunta, M.; Grudzinski, J.; Huston, J.; Iori, M.; Kim, D.; Kim, M.; /Dubna, JINR /Argonne /Rockefeller U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /Michigan State U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /CHEP, Taegu /Seoul Natl. U.

    2007-02-01

    The CDF Central Preshower and Crack Detector Upgrade consist of scintillator tiles with embedded wavelength-shifting fibers, clear-fiber optical cables, and multi-anode photomultiplier readout. A description of the detector design, test results from R&D studies, and construction phase are reported. The upgrade was installed late in 2004, and a large amount of proton-antiproton collider data has been collected since then. Detector studies using those data are also discussed.

  9. BNL ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY CONTROL SYSTEM UPGRADE.

    SciTech Connect

    MALONE,R.; BEN-ZVI,I.; WANG,X.; YAKIMENKO,V.

    2001-06-18

    Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) has embarked on a complete upgrade of its decade old computer system. The planned improvements affect every major component: processors (Intel Pentium replaces VAXes), operating system (Linux/Real-Time Linux supplants OpenVMS), and data acquisition equipment (fast Ethernet equipment replaces CAMAC serial highway.) This paper summarizes the strategies and progress of the upgrade along with plans for future expansion.

  10. PSL Icing Facility Upgrade Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Thomas A.; Dicki, Dennis J.; Lizanich, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center Propulsion Systems Lab (PSL) was recently upgraded to perform engine inlet ice crystal testing in an altitude environment. The system installed 10 spray bars in the inlet plenum for ice crystal generation using 222 spray nozzles. As an altitude test chamber, the PSL is capable of simulating icing events at altitude in a groundtest facility. The system was designed to operate at altitudes from 4,000 to 40,000 ft at Mach numbers up to 0.8M and inlet total temperatures from -60 to +15 degF. This paper and presentation will be part of a series of presentations on PSL Icing and will cover the development of the icing capability through design, developmental testing, installation, initial calibration, and validation engine testing. Information will be presented on the design criteria and process, spray bar developmental testing at Cox and Co., system capabilities, and initial calibration and engine validation test. The PSL icing system was designed to provide NASA and the icing community with a facility that could be used for research studies of engine icing by duplicating in-flight events in a controlled ground-test facility. With the system and the altitude chamber we can produce flight conditions and cloud environments to simulate those encountered in flight. The icing system can be controlled to set various cloud uniformities, droplet median volumetric diameter (MVD), and icing water content (IWC) through a wide variety of conditions. The PSL chamber can set altitudes, Mach numbers, and temperatures of interest to the icing community and also has the instrumentation capability of measuring engine performance during icing testing. PSL last year completed the calibration and initial engine validation of the facility utilizing a Honeywell ALF502-R5 engine and has duplicated in-flight roll back conditions experienced during flight testing. This paper will summarize the modifications and buildup of the facility to accomplish these tests.

  11. IPNS upgrade: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    Many of Argonne National Laboratory`s (ANL`s) scientific staff members were very active in R&D work related to accelerator-based spoliation sources in the 1970s and early 1980s. In 1984, the Seitz/Eastman Panel of the National Academy of Sciences reviewed U.S. materials science research facilities. One of the recommendations of this panel was that the United States build a reactor-based steady-state source, the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Subsequently, R&D activities related to the design of an accelerator-based source assumed a lower priority. The resumption of pulsed-source studies in this country started simultaneously with design activities in Europe aimed at the European Spallation Source (ESS). The European Community funded a workshop in September 1991 to define the parameters of the ESS. Participants in this workshop included both accelerator builders and neutron source users. A consortium of European countries has proposed to build a 5-MW pulsed source, and a feasibility study is currently under way. Soon after the birth of the ESS, a small group at ANL set about bringing themselves up to date on pulsed-source information since 1984 and studied the feasibility of upgrading ANL`s Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) to 1 MW by means of a rapidly cycling synchrotron that could be housed, along with its support facilities, in existing buildings. In early 1993, the Kohn panel recommended that (1) design and construction of the ANS should be completed according to the proposed project schedule and (2) development of competitive proposals for cost-effective design and construction of a 1-MW pulsed spallation source should be authorized immediately.

  12. Upgrade of the NIST Thermal Neutron Prompt-Gamma-Ray Activation Analysis Facility

    SciTech Connect

    E. A. Mackey; D. L. Anderson; G. Lamaze; R. M. Lindstrom; P. J. Liposky

    2000-11-12

    The thermal neutron prompt-gamma-ray activation analysis facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) was designed and built in the late 1970s. An upgrade of the facility to reduce background and enhance analytical sensitivities is in progress, and is described in this report.

  13. Upgrading of an activated sludge wastewater treatment plant by adding a moving bed biofilm reactor as pre-treatment and ozonation followed by biofiltration for enhanced COD reduction: design and operation experience.

    PubMed

    Kaindl, Nikolaus

    2010-01-01

    A paper mill producing 500,000 ton of graphic paper annually has an on-site wastewater treatment plant that treats 7,240,000 m³ of wastewater per year, mechanically first, then biologically and at last by ozonation. Increased paper production capacity led to higher COD load in the mill effluent while production of higher proportions of brighter products gave worse biodegradability. Therefore the biological capacity of the WWTP needed to be increased and extra measures were necessary to enhance the efficiency of COD reduction. The full scale implementation of one MBBR with a volume of 1,230 m³ was accomplished in 2000 followed by another MBBR of 2,475 m³ in 2002. An ozonation step with a capacity of 75 kg O₃/h was added in 2004 to meet higher COD reduction demands during the production of brighter products and thus keeping the given outflow limits. Adding a moving bed biofilm reactor prior to the existing activated sludge step gives: (i) cost advantages when increasing biological capacity as higher COD volume loads of MBBRs allow smaller reactors than usual for activated sludge plants; (ii) a relief of strain from the activated sludge step by biological degradation in the MBBR; (iii) equalizing of peaks in the COD load and toxic effects before affecting the activated sludge step; (iv) a stable volume sludge index below 100 ml/g in combination with an optimization of the activated sludge step allows good sludge separation--an important condition for further treatment with ozone. Ozonation and subsequent bio-filtration pre-treated waste water provide: (i) reduction of hard COD unobtainable by conventional treatment; (ii) controllable COD reduction in a very wide range and therefore elimination of COD-peaks; (iii) reduction of treatment costs by combination of ozonation and subsequent bio-filtration; (iv) decrease of the color in the ozonated wastewater. The MBBR step proved very simple to operate as part of the biological treatment. Excellent control of the COD

  14. Climate balance of biogas upgrading systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pertl, A.; Mostbauer, P.; Obersteiner, G.

    2010-01-15

    One of the numerous applications of renewable energy is represented by the use of upgraded biogas where needed by feeding into the gas grid. The aim of the present study was to identify an upgrading scenario featuring minimum overall GHG emissions. The study was based on a life-cycle approach taking into account also GHG emissions resulting from plant cultivation to the process of energy conversion. For anaerobic digestion two substrates have been taken into account: (1) agricultural resources and (2) municipal organic waste. The study provides results for four different upgrading technologies including the BABIU (Bottom Ash for Biogas Upgrading) method. As the transport of bottom ash is a critical factor implicated in the BABIU-method, different transport distances and means of conveyance (lorry, train) have been considered. Furthermore, aspects including biogas compression and energy conversion in a combined heat and power plant were assessed. GHG emissions from a conventional energy supply system (natural gas) have been estimated as reference scenario. The main findings obtained underlined how the overall reduction of GHG emissions may be rather limited, for example for an agricultural context in which PSA-scenarios emit only 10% less greenhouse gases than the reference scenario. The BABIU-method constitutes an efficient upgrading method capable of attaining a high reduction of GHG emission by sequestration of CO{sub 2}.

  15. The CDF level 2 calorimetric trigger upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatti, A.; Canepa, A.; Casarsa, M.; Convery, M.; Cortiana, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Donati, S.; Flanagan, G.; Frisch, H.; Fukun, T.; Krop, D.; /Chicago U., EFI /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore

    2009-01-01

    CDF II upgraded the calorimeter trigger to cope with the higher detector occupancy due to the increased Tevatron instantaneous luminosity ({approx} 2.8 x 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}). While the original system was implemented in custom hardware and provided to the L2 trigger a limited-quality jet clustering performed using a reduced resolution measurement of the transverse energy in the calorimeter trigger towers, the upgraded system provides offline-quality jet reconstruction of the full resolution calorimeter data. This allows to keep better under control the dependence of the trigger rates on the instantaneous luminosity and to improve the efficiency and purity of the trigger selections. The upgraded calorimeter trigger uses the general purpose VME board Pulsar, developed at CDF II and already widely used to upgrade the L2 tracking and L2 decision systems. A battery of Pulsars is used to merge and send the calorimeter data to the L2 CPUs, where software-implemented algorithms perform offline-like clustering. In this paper we review the design and the performance of the upgraded system.

  16. Improving spanning trees by upgrading nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Krumke, S.O.; Noltemeier, H.; Wirth, H.C.

    1997-01-16

    We study budget constrained optimal network upgrading problems. Such problems aim at finding optimal strategies for improving a network under some cost measure subject to certain budget constraints. A general problem in this setting is the following. We are given an edge weighted graph G = (V, E) where nodes represent processors and edges represent bidirectional communication links. The processor at a node v {element_of} V can be upgraded at a cost of c(v). Such an upgrade reduces the delay of each link emanating from v. The goal is to find a minimum cost set of nodes to be upgraded so that the resulting network has the best performance with respect to some measure. We consider the problem under two measures, namely, the weight of a minimum spanning tree and the bottleneck weight of a minimum bottleneck spanning tree. We present approximation and hardness results for the problem. Our results are tight to within constant factors. We also show that these approximation algorithms can be used to construct good approximation algorithms for the dual versions of the problems where there is a budget constraint on the upgrading cost and the objectives are minimum weight spanning tree and minimum bottleneck weight spanning tree respectively.

  17. Climate balance of biogas upgrading systems.

    PubMed

    Pertl, A; Mostbauer, P; Obersteiner, G

    2010-01-01

    One of the numerous applications of renewable energy is represented by the use of upgraded biogas where needed by feeding into the gas grid. The aim of the present study was to identify an upgrading scenario featuring minimum overall GHG emissions. The study was based on a life-cycle approach taking into account also GHG emissions resulting from plant cultivation to the process of energy conversion. For anaerobic digestion two substrates have been taken into account: (1) agricultural resources and (2) municipal organic waste. The study provides results for four different upgrading technologies including the BABIU (Bottom Ash for Biogas Upgrading) method. As the transport of bottom ash is a critical factor implicated in the BABIU-method, different transport distances and means of conveyance (lorry, train) have been considered. Furthermore, aspects including biogas compression and energy conversion in a combined heat and power plant were assessed. GHG emissions from a conventional energy supply system (natural gas) have been estimated as reference scenario. The main findings obtained underlined how the overall reduction of GHG emissions may be rather limited, for example for an agricultural context in which PSA-scenarios emit only 10% less greenhouse gases than the reference scenario. The BABIU-method constitutes an efficient upgrading method capable of attaining a high reduction of GHG emission by sequestration of CO(2).

  18. New Hubble Servicing Mission to upgrade instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-10-01

    The history of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope is dominated by the familiar sharp images and amazing discoveries that have had an unprecedented scientific impact on our view of the world and our understanding of the universe. Nevertheless, such important contributions to science and humankind have only been possible as result of regular upgrades and enhancements to Hubble’s instrumentation. Using the Space Shuttle for this fifth Servicing Mission underlines the important role that astronauts have played and continue to play in increasing the Space Telescope’s lifespan and scientific power. Since the loss of Columbia in 2003, the Shuttle has been successfully launched on three missions, confirming that improvements made to it have established the required high level of safety for the spacecraft and its crew. “There is never going to be an end to the science that we can do with a machine like Hubble”, says David Southwood, ESA’s Director of Science. “Hubble is our way of exploring our origins. Everyone should be proud that there is a European element to it and that we all are part of its success at some level.” This Servicing Mission will not just ensure that Hubble can function for perhaps as much as another ten years; it will also increase its capabilities significantly in key areas. This highly visible mission is expected to take place in 2008 and will feature several space walks. As part of the upgrade, two new scientific instruments will be installed: the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and Wide Field Camera 3. Each has advanced technology sensors that will dramatically improve Hubble’s potential for discovery and enable it to observe faint light from the youngest stars and galaxies in the universe. With such an astounding increase in its science capabilities, this orbital observatory will continue to penetrate the most distant regions of outer space and reveal breathtaking phenomena. “Today, Hubble is producing more science than ever before in

  19. High-rate hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis for biogas upgrading: the role of anaerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Xu, Heng; Gong, Shufen; Sun, Yuanzi; Ma, Hailing; Zheng, Mingyue; Wang, Kaijun

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis has been proved to be a feasible biological method for biogas upgrading. To improve its performance, the feasibility of typical anaerobic granules as the inoculum was investigated in both batch and continuous experiments. The results from batch experiments showed that glucose-acclimated granules seemed to perform better than granules acclimated to acidified products (AP, i.e. acetate, propionate and ethanol) in in situ biogas upgrading systems and a slightly higher H2 consumption rate (1.5 mmol H2 g VSS(-1) h(-1)) was obtained for glucose-acclimated granules. For AP-acclimated granules, the inhibition on anaerobic digestion and pH increase (up to 9.55±0.16) took place, and the upgrading performance was adversely affected. In contrast, better performance for AP-acclimated granules was observed in ex situ systems, possibly due to their higher hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activities (HMA). Moreover, when gas-liquid mass transfer limitations were alleviated, the upgrading performance was significantly improved (three-fold) for both glucose-acclimated and AP-acclimated granules. The HMA of anaerobic granules could be further enhanced to improve biogas upgrading performance via continuous cultivation with H2/CO2 as the sole substrate. During the three months' cultivation, secondary granulation and microbial population shift were observed, but anaerobic granules still remained intact and their HMA increased from 0.2 to 0.6 g COD g VSS(-1) d(-1). It indicated that the formation of hydrogenotrophic methanogenic granules, a new type of anaerobic granules specialized for high-rate hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and biogas upgrading, might be possible. Conclusively, anaerobic granules showed great potential for biogas upgrading.

  20. AN APPLICATION OF GAME THEORY: FUNDING INTERDEPENDENT MC and A UPGRADE DECISIONS

    SciTech Connect

    B. G. SCOTT

    2001-06-01

    Funding Material, Control and Accountability (MC&A) system upgrades has been identified as a partial solution for mitigating the diversion threat of weapons-grade nuclear material. Effective MC&A system upgrades are dependent on appropriate decisions based on based on funding, implementation, operation and oversight. Traditional MC&A upgrade decisions inherently assumed that all decision-makers possessed similar payoff vectors allowing for a fairly consistent and unified approach to MC&A system enhancements; however, MC&A upgrade projects in non-traditional environments may be required to take into account situations where the potential payoff vectors among decision-makers may be significantly different. Once a decision-maker is required to take into account the decisions of others, the process can be modeled as a game. Game theory has been previously be used to shed light on many aspects of social and economic behavior where a payoff from a set of strategies is dependent on the strategy of others. In this paper, the application of game theory in the context of MC&A upgrades is discussed. Various MC&A upgrades decision payoff matrices for relevant circumstances are evaluated for static (simultaneous) and dynamic (sequential decisions) games. Optimal strategies and equilibrium conditions for these payoff matrices are analyzed. Additional game factors (bargaining, uncertain outcomes, moral hazards) that may affect the outcome of the game are briefly discussed. By demonstrating the application of game theory to a nontraditional environment that may require MC&A upgrades, this work increases the understanding out how outcomes are logically connected to the respective value decision-makers assign to choices.

  1. MAVIS III -- A Windows 95/NT Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Hardwick, M.F.

    1997-12-01

    MAVIS (Modeling and Analysis of Explosive Valve Interactions) is a computer program that simulates operation of explosively actuated valve. MAVIS was originally written in Fortran in the mid 1970`s and was primarily run on the Sandia Vax computers in use through the early 1990`s. During the mid to late 1980`s MAVIS was upgraded to include the effects of plastic deformation and it became MAVIS II. When the Vax computers were retired, the Gas Transfer System (GTS) Development Department ported the code to the Macintosh and PC platforms, where it ran as a simple console application. All graphical output was lost during these ports. GTS code developers recently completed an upgrade that provides a Windows 95/NT MAVIS application and restores all of the original graphical output. This upgrade is called MAVIS III version 1.0. This report serves both as a user`s manual for MAVIS III v 1.0 and as a general software development reference.

  2. Microbial biocatalyst developments to upgrade fossil fuels.

    PubMed

    Kilbane, John J

    2006-06-01

    Steady increases in the average sulfur content of petroleum and stricter environmental regulations concerning the sulfur content have promoted studies of bioprocessing to upgrade fossil fuels. Bioprocesses can potentially provide a solution to the need for improved and expanded fuel upgrading worldwide, because bioprocesses for fuel upgrading do not require hydrogen and produce far less carbon dioxide than thermochemical processes. Recent advances have demonstrated that biodesulfurization is capable of removing sulfur from hydrotreated diesel to yield a product with an ultra-low sulfur concentration that meets current environmental regulations. However, the technology has not yet progressed beyond laboratory-scale testing, as more efficient biocatalysts are needed. Genetic studies to obtain improved biocatalysts for the selective removal of sulfur and nitrogen from petroleum provide the focus of current research efforts.

  3. Level-2 Calorimeter Trigger Upgrade at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, G.U.; /Purdue U.

    2007-04-01

    The CDF Run II Level-2 calorimeter trigger is implemented in hardware and is based on an algorithm used in Run I. This system insured good performance at low luminosity obtained during the Tevatron Run II. However, as the Tevatron instantaneous luminosity increases, the limitations of the current system due to the algorithm start to become clear. In this paper, we will present an upgrade of the Level-2 calorimeter trigger system at CDF. The upgrade is based on the Pulsar board, a general purpose VME board developed at CDF and used for upgrading both the Level-2 tracking and the Level-2 global decision crate. This paper will describe the design, hardware and software implementation, as well as the advantages of this approach over the existing system.

  4. Developments towards the LHCb VELO upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid Vidal, Xabier

    2016-09-01

    The Vertex Locator (VELO) is a silicon strip detector surrounding the interaction region of the LHCb experiment. The upgrade of the VELO is planned to be installed in 2019-2020, and the current detector will be replaced by a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at a rate of 40 MHz. The new detector is designed to withstand the radiation dose expected at an integrated luminosity of 50 fb-1. The detector will be composed of silicon pixel sensors, read out by the VeloPix ASIC that is being developed based on the TimePix/MediPix family. The prototype sensors for the VELO upgrade are being irradiated in five different facilities and the post-irradiation performance is being measured with testbeams, and in the lab. These proceedings present the VELO upgrade and briefly discuss the results of the sensor testing campaign.

  5. Bitumen and heavy oil upgrading in Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Chrones, J. ); Germain, R.R. )

    1989-01-01

    A review is presented of the heavy oil upgrading industry in Canada. Up to now it has been based on the processing of bitumen extracted from oil sands mining operations at two sites, to produce a residue-free, low sulphur, synthetic crude. Carbon rejection has been the prime process technology with delayed coking being used by Suncor and FLUID COKING at Syncrude. Alternative processes for recovering greater amounts of synthetic crude are examined. These include a variety of hydrogen addition processes and combinations which produce pipelineable materials requiring further processing in downstream refineries with expanded capabilities. The Newgrade Energy Inc. upgrader now under construction in Regina, will use fixed-bed, catalytic, atmospheric-residue, hydrogen processing. Two additional projects, also based on hydrogenation, will use ebullated bed catalyst systems; the expansion of Syncrude, now underway, is using the LC Fining Process whereas the announced Husky Bi-Provincial upgrader is based on H-Oil.

  6. Bitumen and heavy oil upgrading in Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Chrones, J.

    1988-06-01

    A review is presented of the heavy oil upgrading industry in Canada. Up to now it has been based on the processing of bitumen extracted from oil sands mining operations at two sites, to produce a residue-free, low sulfur, synthetic crude. Carbon rejection has been the prime process technology with delayed coking being used by Suncor and FLUID COKING at Syncrude. Alternative processes for recovering greater amounts of synthetic crude are examined. These include a variety of hydrogen addition processes and combinations which produce pipelineable materials requiring further processing in downstream refineries with expanded capabilities. The Newgrade Energy Inc. upgrader, now under construction in Regina, will use fixed-bed, catalytic, atmospheric-residue, hydrogen processing. Two additional products, also based on hydrogenation, will use ebullated bed catalyst systems: the expansion of Syncrude, now underway, is using the LC Fining Process whereas the announced Husky Bi-Provincial upgrader is based on H-Oil.

  7. Government assistance finalized for Biprovincial Upgrader

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    It was announced in September that Government of Canada support for the current phase of the Husky's Biprovincial Upgrader Project will be delivered through tax relief to Husky Oil Operations Ltd. On April 8, 1986, the governments of Canada, Alberta and Saskatchewan agreed to share in the estimated $90 million cost of completing preconstruction engineering work related to the proposed $3.2 billion 55,000 barrel/day upgrader project at Lloydminster, Saskatchewan. The project would upgrade heavy crude oil, which is currently exported from Canada, into a higher quality crude oil that can be processed by Canadian refineries. In addition to the federal support, the governments of Alberta and Saskatchewan agreed to provide $13.5 million each toward the pre-construction engineering costs.

  8. The upstream tracker for the LHCb upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkamp, Olaf

    2016-09-01

    The LHCb collaboration is planning a comprehensive upgrade of the experiment for the long shutdown of the LHC in 2019/20. As part of this upgrade, the tracking station in front of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by a new planar four-layer silicon micro-strip detector with 40 MHz readout and silicon sensors with finer granularity and improved radiation hardness. Key design aspects of this new Upstream Tracker are described and a brief overview of the status of the project is given.

  9. Next linear collider test accelerator injector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, A.D.; Miller, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    The Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) is being constructed at SLAC to demonstrate multibunch beam loading compensation, suppression of higher order deflecting modes and measure transverse components of the accelerating fields in X-band accelerating structures. Currently a simple injector which provides the average current necessary for the beam loading compensations studies is under construction. An injector upgrade is planned to produce bunch trains similar to that of the NLC with microbunch intensity, separation and energy spread, identical to that of NLC. We discuss the design of the NLCTA injector upgrade.

  10. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 2, December 21, 1989--March 20, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  11. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 7, March 21, 1991--June 20, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  12. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 8, June 21, 1991--September 20, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will also be investigated.

  13. CMS: Present status, limitations, and upgrade plans

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, H.W.K.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    An overview of the CMS upgrade plans will be presented. A brief status of the CMS detector will be given, covering some of the issues we have so far experienced. This will be followed by an overview of the various CMS upgrades planned, covering the main motivations for them, and the various R&D efforts for the possibilities under study. The CMS detector has been working extremely well since the start of data-taking at the LHC as is evidenced by the numerous excellent results published by CMS and presented at this workshop and recent conferences. Less well documented are the various issues that have been encountered with the detector. In the spirit of this workshop I will cover some of these issues with particular emphasis on problems that motivate some of the upgrades to the CMS detector for this decade of data-taking. Though the CMS detector has been working extremely well and expectations are great for making the most of the LHC luminosity, there have been a number of issues encountered so far. Some of these have been described and while none currently presents a problem for physics performance, some of them are expected to become more problematic, especially at the highest Phase 1 luminosities for which the majority of the integrated luminosity will be collected. These motivate upgrades for various parts of the CMS detector so that the current excellent physics performance can be maintained or even surpassed in the realm of the highest Phase 1 luminosities.

  14. Testing of FMI's Coal Upgrading Process

    SciTech Connect

    Vijay Sethi

    2009-03-21

    WRI and FMI have collaborated to develop and test a novel coal upgrading technology. Proprietary coal upgrading technology is a fluidized bed-based continuous process which allows high through-puts, reducing the coal processing costs. Processing is carried out under controlled oxidizing conditions at mild enough conditions that compared to other coal upgrading technologies; the produced water is not as difficult to treat. All the energy required for coal drying and upgrading is derived from the coal itself. Under the auspices of the Jointly Sponsored Research Program, Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-98FT40323, a nominal 400 lbs/hour PDU was constructed and operated. Over the course of this project, several low-rank coals were successfully tested in the PDU. In all cases, a higher Btu, low moisture content, stable product was produced and subsequently analyzed. Stack emissions were monitored and produced water samples were analyzed. Product stability was established by performing moisture readsorption testing. Product pyrophobicity was demonstrated by instrumenting a coal pile.

  15. Preparation for upgrading western subbituminous coal

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, R.W.; Cha, C.Y.; Sheesley, D.C.

    1990-11-01

    The objective of this project was to establish the physical and chemical characteristics of western coal and determine the best preparation technologies for upgrading this resource. Western coal was characterized as an abundant, easily mineable, clean, low-sulfur coal with low heating value, high moisture, susceptibility to spontaneous ignition, and considerable transit distances from major markets. Project support was provided by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The research was conducted by the Western Research Institute, (WRI) in Laramie, Wyoming. The project scope of work required the completion of four tasks: (1) project planning, (2) literature searches and verbal contacts with consumers and producers of western coal, (3) selection of the best technologies to upgrade western coal, and (4) identification of research needed to develop the best technologies for upgrading western coals. The results of this research suggest that thermal drying is the best technology for upgrading western coals. There is a significant need for further research in areas involving physical and chemical stabilization of the dried coal product. Excessive particle-size degradation and resulting dustiness, moisture reabsorption, and high susceptibility to spontaneous combustion are key areas requiring further research. Improved testing methods for the determination of equilibrium moisture and susceptibility to spontaneous ignition under various ambient conditions are recommended.

  16. The CDF SVX II detector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Skarha, J.E.

    1993-10-01

    The proposed CDF SVX II detector upgrade for secondary vertex detection during the Fermilab Tevatron Run II collider run is described. The general design and important features of this silicon vertex detector are presented. The CDF physics goals which are addressed by this detector are also given.

  17. The BABAR detector: Upgrades, operation and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; del Amo Sanchez, P.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Garra Tico, J.; Lopez, L.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, G. P.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Clark, A. R.; Day, C. T.; Furman, M.; Gill, M. S.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Kukartsev, G.; LeClerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Merchant, A. M.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Suzuki, A.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Zisman, M.; Barrett, M.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Ford, K. E.; Harrison, T. J.; Hart, A. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Morgan, S. E.; O'Neale, S. W.; Penny, R. C.; Smith, D.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Goetzen, K.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Kunze, M.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Schroeder, T.; Steinke, M.; Fella, A.; Antonioli, E.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Foster, B.; Mackay, C.; Walker, D.; Abe, K.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Knecht, N. S.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Randle-Conde, A.; Saleem, M.; Sherwood, D. J.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Korol, A. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Telnov, V. I.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D. S.; Bondioli, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; McMahon, S.; Mommsen, R. K.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Atmacan, H.; Foulkes, S. D.; Gary, J. W.; Layter, J.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Vitug, G. M.; Wang, K.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Schwanke, U.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Cunha, A.; Dahmes, B.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beck, T. W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grothe, M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Nesom, G.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E.; Spradlin, P.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, L.; Wilder, M.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Chen, E.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Dorsten, M. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Echenard, B.; Erwin, R. J.; Fang, F.; Flood, K.; Hitlin, D. G.; Metzler, S.; Narsky, I.; Oyang, J.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Devmal, S.; Geld, T. L.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Abe, T.; Antillon, E. A.; Barillari, T.; Becker, J.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Chen, S.; Clifton, Z. C.; Derrington, I. M.; Destree, J.; Dima, M. O.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Gilman, J. D.; Hachtel, J.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Johnson, D. R.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Ruddick, W. O.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; van Hoek, W. C.; Wagner, S. R.; West, C. G.; Zhang, J.; Ayad, R.; Blouw, J.; Chen, A.; Eckhart, E. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Winklmeier, F.; Zeng, Q. L.; Altenburg, D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dahlinger, G.; Dickopp, M.; Eckstein, P.; Futterschneider, H.; Kaiser, S.; Kobel, M. J.; Krause, R.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Mader, W. F.; Maly, E.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Dohou, F.; Ferrag, S.; Latour, E.; Mathieu, A.; Renard, C.; Schrenk, S.; T'Jampens, S.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Anjomshoaa, A.; Bernet, R.; Clark, P. J.; Lavin, D. R.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Robertson, A. I.; Swain, J. E.; Watson, J. E.; Xie, Y.; Andreotti, D.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Carassiti, V.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Evangelisti, F.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Garzia, I.; Landi, L.; Luppi, E.; Malaguti, R.; Negrini, M.; Padoan, C.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Sarti, A.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; de Sangro, R.; Santoni, M.; Zallo, A.; Bagnasco, S.; Buzzo, A.; Capra, R.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Minutoli, S.; Monge, M. R.; Musico, P.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Pia, M. G.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Bailey, S.; Brandenburg, G.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Won, E.; Wu, J.; Adametz, A.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Flack, R. L.; Gaillard, J. R.; Gunawardane, N. J. W.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Nikolich, M. B.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Sanders, P.; Smith, D.; Taylor, G. P.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Grenier, G. J.; Hamilton, R.; Lee, S.-J.; Mallik, U.; Meyer, N. T.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Fischer, P.-A.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Schott, G.; Albert, J. N.; Arnaud, N.; Beigbeder, C.; Breton, D.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Dû, S.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Nief, J. Y.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Tocut, V.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Wang, L. L.; Wormser, G.; Bionta, R. M.; Brigljević, V.; Lange, D. J.; Simani, M. C.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Forster, I. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, M.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Kay, M.; Parry, R. J.; Payne, D. J.; Schofield, K. C.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Azzopardi, D. E.; Bellodi, G.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; Cormack, C. M.; Di Lodovico, F.; Dixon, P.; George, K. A.; Menges, W.; Potter, R. J. L.; Sacco, R.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Sigamani, M.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Brown, C. L.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Hopkins, D. A.; Jackson, P. S.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McGrath, P.; McMahon, T. R.; Paramesvaran, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Allison, J.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D. S.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Forti, A. C.; Fullwood, J.; Hart, P. A.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Jackson, F.; Jackson, G.; Kelly, M. P.; Kolya, S. D.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Naisbit, M. T.; Savvas, N.; Weatherall, J. H.; West, T. J.; Williams, J. C.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Farbin, A.; Hulsbergen, W. D.; Jawahery, A.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Schieck, J. R.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S. Y.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Henderson, S. W.; Koeneke, K.; Lang, M. I.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yi, M.; Zhao, M.; Zheng, Y.; Klemetti, M.; Lindemann, D.; Mangeol, D. J. J.; Mclachlin, S. E.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Cerizza, G.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Pellegrini, R.; Stracka, S.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Godang, R.; Brunet, S.; Cote, D.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, B.; Nicholson, H.; Cavallo, N.; De Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Allmendinger, T.; Benelli, G.; Brau, B.; Corwin, L. A.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Smith, D. S.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Iwasaki, M.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Potter, C. T.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Borsato, E.; Castelli, G.; Colecchia, F.; Crescente, A.; Dal Corso, F.; Dorigo, A.; Fanin, C.; Furano, F.; Gagliardi, N.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Marzolla, M.; Michelon, G.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Solagna, P.; Stevanato, E.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Akar, S.; Bailly, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; John, M. J. J.; Lebbolo, H.; Leruste, Ph.; Malclès, J.; Marchiori, G.; Martin, L.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Pivk, M.; Prendki, J.; Roos, L.; Sitt, S.; Stark, J.; Thérin, G.; Vallereau, A.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.; Pennazzi, S.; Pioppi, M.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bosi, F.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Morsani, F.; Paoloni, E.; Raffaelli, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Triggiani, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Biesiada, J.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Fernholz, R. E.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Sands, W. R.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Tumanov, A.; Varnes, E. W.; Baracchini, E.; Bellini, F.; Bulfon, C.; Buccheri, E.; Cavoto, G.; D'Orazio, A.; Di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Lamanna, E.; Leonardi, E.; Li Gioi, L.; Lunadei, R.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; del Re, D.; Renga, F.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Serra, M.; Voena, C.; Bünger, C.; Christ, S.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Bly, M.; Brew, C.; Condurache, C.; De Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Ricciardi, S.; Roethel, W.; Wilson, F. F.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Bourgeois, P.; Emery, S.; Escalier, M.; Esteve, L.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; Georgette, Z.; Graziani, G.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; Legendre, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Micout, P.; Serfass, B.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Akre, R.; Aston, D.; Azemoon, T.; Bard, D. J.; Bartelt, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Becla, J.; Benitez, J. F.; Berger, N.; Bertsche, K.; Boeheim, C. T.; Bouldin, K.; Boyarski, A. M.; Boyce, R. F.; Browne, M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Burgess, W.; Cai, Y.; Cartaro, C.; Ceseracciu, A.; Claus, R.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Craddock, W. W.; Crane, G.; Cristinziani, M.; DeBarger, S.; Decker, F. J.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Donald, M.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Ecklund, S.; Erickson, R.; Fan, S.; Field, R. C.; Fisher, A.; Fox, J.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Gaponenko, I.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Haller, G.; Hamilton, J.; Hanushevsky, A.; Hasan, A.; Hast, C.; Hee, C.; Himel, T.; Hryn'ova, T.; Huffer, M. E.; Hung, T.; Innes, W. R.; Iverson, R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kharakh, D.; Kocian, M. L.; Krasnykh, A.; Krebs, J.; Kroeger, W.; Kulikov, A.; Kurita, N.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Libby, J.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Lüth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; McCulloch, M.; McDonald, J.; Melen, R.; Menke, S.; Metcalfe, S.; Messner, R.; Moss, L. J.; Mount, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, D.; Nelson, S.; Nordby, M.; Nosochkov, Y.; Novokhatski, A.; O'Grady, C. P.; O'Neill, F. G.; Ofte, I.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Piemontese, M.; Pierson, S.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Ratkovsky, S.; Reif, R.; Rivetta, C.; Rodriguez, R.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schietinger, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwarz, H.; Schwiening, J.; Seeman, J.; Smith, D.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stanek, M.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Teytelman, D.; Thompson, J. M.; Tinslay, J. S.; Trunov, A.; Turner, J.; van Bakel, N.; van Winkle, D.; Va'vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Weber, T.; West, C. A.; Wienands, U.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wittmer, W.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yan, Y.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Yocky, G.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; Singh, H.; Weidemann, A. W.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Meyer, T. I.; Miyashita, T. S.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, M.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Jain, V.; Liu, J.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Wappler, F. R.; Zain, S. B.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D.; Soffer, A.; De Silva, A.; Lund, P.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Ragghianti, G.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Satpathy, A.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Rashevskaya, I.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Speziali, V.; Frank, E. D.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Agarwal, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Brown, C. M.; Choi, H. H. F.; Fortin, D.; Fransham, K. B.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Back, J. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Puccio, E.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Cheng, B.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Hollar, J. J.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Kutter, P. E.; Li, H.; Liu, R.; Mellado, B.; Mihalyi, A.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Scott, I. J.; Tan, P.; Vuosalo, C. O.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Greene, M. G.; Kordich, T. M. B.

    2013-11-01

    The BABAR detector operated successfully at the PEP-II asymmetric e+e- collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory from 1999 to 2008. This report covers upgrades, operation, and performance of the collider and the detector systems, as well as the trigger, online and offline computing, and aspects of event reconstruction since the beginning of data taking.

  18. Design of the Compact Auburn Torsatron Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwell, G. J.; Gandy, R. F.; Knowlton, S. F.; Watts, C.; Schneider, T. A.; Carnevali, A.

    1998-11-01

    As part of the National Stellarator Proof-of-Principle program, the Compact Auburn Torsatron is in the process of being upgraded operate with ohmic plasma current. The upgrade will be used to investigate MHD stability and plasma disruptions during the transition from pure stellarator plasmas to those in which the rotational transform is partially generated by the ohmic plasma current. The upgrade consists of three main parts: 1) the addition of a new power supply that will allow CAT-U to operate at magnetic fields Bo = 0.5T. This system consists of ten motor-generators capable of producing 8 MW of power for several seconds. 2) the addition of an air-core ohmic heating transformer to drive 25 kA of plasma current for 100 ms with a flux of 0.2-0.3 V-s. 3) Target plasmas for ohmic current stability studies in CAT-U will be generated by ICRF at ω=ω_ci using a Nagoya Type-III antenna as in CHS(T.Watari et al. in Radio Frequency Power in Plasmas (Proc. 12^th) Top. conf. Savannah, GA 1997) AIP Conf. Proc. 403, 57, AIP (1997). The expected RF power is P_RF = 200kW at f = 7.5 MHz. Each of the subsystems for the upgrade of CAT will be discussed.

  19. Upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushpil, Svetlana; ALICE Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    ALICE detector was constructed to study the properties of hot and dense hadronic matter formed in relativistic nuclear collisions. During the second long LHC shutdown in 2019-2020, the collaboration plans to upgrade the current vertex detector, the Inner Tracking System (ITS), in order to increase the reconstruction accuracy of secondary vertices and to lower the threshold of particle transverse momentum measurement. The upgrade strategy of ITS is based on the application of new Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) designed in 0.18 μm CMOS technology. The 50 μm thick chip consists of a single silicon die incorporating a 0.18 μm high-resistivity silicon epitaxial layer (sensor active volume) and matrix of charge collection diodes (pixels) with readout electronics. Radiation hardness of the upgraded ITS is one of the crucial moments in the overall performance of the system. A wide set of MAPS structures with different read-out circuits was produced and is being studied by the ALICE collaboration to optimize the pixel sensor functionality. An overview of the ALICE ITS upgrade and the expected performance improvement will be presented together with selected results from a campaign that includes several irradiation and beam tests.

  20. The Newly Upgraded Large COMPASS Polarized Target

    SciTech Connect

    Gautheron, F.

    2007-06-13

    During the CERN SPS 2005 shutdown the COMPASS target system received a major hardware upgrade for the new period of data taking starting in 2006. A new superconducting magnet with a larger acceptance combined with a new microwave cavity and a three cell target setup have been installed and already showed excellent performances that we present for the first time.

  1. T-Farm complex alarm upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.B.

    1995-01-01

    The alarm and controls associated with the T, TX, and TY farms are located in the 242-T control room. The design data for replacement and upgrades of the alarm panels is in this document. This task was canceled previous to the 90% design review point.

  2. UPGRADES TO Monteburns, VERSION 3.0

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, Jack D; Trellue, Holly R

    2012-06-22

    Monteburns VERSION 3.0 is an upgrade of the existing Monteburns code available through RSICC. The new version includes modern programming style, increased parallel computing, more accurate capture gamma calculations and an automated input generator. This capability was demonstrated through a small PWR core simulation.

  3. Operation status and upgrading of HIRFL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. Y.; Wang, Y. F.; Wei, B. W.

    2001-12-01

    The operation status and the undergoing upgrading at HIRFL machine are presented. The accelerated ion species with the machine have been expanding, including metallic ions and higher energy with the new ECR ion source. The upgrading of HIRFL as the pre-accelerator of CSR storage ring has been processing steadily. The new 14.5 GHz ECR ion source has been put in operation in early 1999. A full-superconducting ECR ion source of 18 GHz is under design. The manufacture of the new vacuum chamber for SFC is just finished and the installation is to be started. The construction of the new B1 buncher is nearly to be finished, and the off-line test and the installation will be started soon. Another two identical bunchers will be ordered after the test. The beam distribution system is under upgrading to make all experiment stations separate from the others and the time-sharing mode possible, and a new cancer-therapy station is also under construction. The other upgrading items include the yoke enlarging of SFC, beam diagnostics, computer control and beam distribution system.

  4. ALPHA: A Case Study in Upgrading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granick, Leonard P. R.; And Others

    An industry-focused upgrading model, based upon job redesigns of entry-level and higher skill positions and a multi-step diagonal/vertical progression ladder was installed in a company having a 150-employee blue collar work force. The model provided for rapid promotion and wage increases of both present employees and new hires, supported by skills…

  5. THERMAL UPGRADING OF 9977 RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL (RAM) TYPE B PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.; Abramczyk, G.

    2012-03-26

    The 9977 package is a radioactive material package that was originally certified to ship Heat Sources and RTG contents up to 19 watts and it is now being reviewed to significantly expand its contents in support of additional DOE missions. Thermal upgrading will be accomplished by employing stacked 3013 containers, a 3013 aluminum spacer and an external aluminum sleeve for enhanced heat transfer. The 7th Addendum to the original 9977 package Safety Basis Report describing these modifications is under review for the DOE certification. The analyses described in this paper show that this well-designed and conservatively analyzed package can be upgraded to carry contents with decay heat up to 38 watts with some simple design modifications. The Model 9977 package has been designed as a replacement for the Department of Transportation (DOT) Fissile Specification 6M package. The 9977 package is a very versatile Type B package which is certified to transport and store a wide spectrum of radioactive materials. The package was analyzed quite conservatively to increase its usefulness and store different payload configurations. Its versatility is evident from several daughter packages such as the 9978 and H1700, and several addendums where the payloads have been modified to suit the Shipper's needs without additional testing.

  6. Fischer-Tropsch wax characterization and upgrading: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, P.P.; Sturtevant, G.C.; Gregor, J.H.; Humbach, M.J.; Padrta, F.G.; Steigleder, K.Z.

    1988-06-06

    The characterization and upgrading of Fischer-Tropsch wax was studied. The focus of the program was to maximize the yield of marketable transportation fuels from the Fischer-Tropsch process. The wax was characterized using gel permeation chromatography (GPC), high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), infrared spectroscopy (IR), gas chromatography (GC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and various other physical analyses. Hydrocracking studies conducted in a pilot plant indicate that Fischer-Tropsch wax is an excellent feedstock. A high yield of excellent quality diesel fuel was produced with satisfactory catalyst performance at relatively mild operating conditions. Correlations for predicting key diesel fuel properties were developed and checked against actual laboratory blend data. The blending study was incorporated into an economic evaluation. Finally, it is possible to take advantage of the high quality of the Fischer-Tropsch derived distillate by blending a lower value light cycle oil (produced from a refinery FCC unit) representing a high aromatic and low cetane number. The blended stream meets diesel pool specifications (up to 60 wt % LCO addition). The value added to this blending stream further enhances the upgrading complex return. 22 refs., 39 figs., 48 tabs.

  7. Analysis of NSTX Upgrade OH Magnet and Center Stack

    SciTech Connect

    A. Zolfaghari, P. Titus, J. Chrzanowski, A. Salehzadeh, F. Dahlgren

    2010-11-30

    The new ohmic heating (OH) coil and center stack for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) upgrade are required to meet cooling and structural requirements for operation at the enhanced 1 Tesla toroidal field and 2 MA plasma current. The OH coil is designed to be cooled in the time between discharges by water flowing in the center of the coil conductor. We performed resistive heating and thermal hydraulic analyses to optimize coolant channel size to keep the coil temperature below 100 C and meet the required 20 minute cooling time. Coupled electromagnetic, thermal and structural FEA analyses were performed to determine if the OH coil meets the requirements of the structural design criteria. Structural response of the OH coil to its self-field and the field from other coils was analyzed. A model was developed to analyze the thermal and electromagnetic interaction of centerstack components such as the OH coil, TF inner legs and the Bellville washer preload mechanism. Torsional loads from the TF interaction with the OH and poloidal fields are transferred through the TF flag extensions via a torque transfer coupling to the rest of the tokamak structure. A 3D FEA analysis was performed to qualify this design. The results of these analyses, which will be presented in this paper, have led to the design of OH coil and centerstack components that meet the requirements of the NSTX-upgrade structural design criteria.

  8. Upgrade of a kicker control system for the HIRFL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan-Yu; Zhou, Wen-Xiong; Luo, Jin-Fu; Zhou, De-Tai; Zhang, Jian-Chuan; Ma, Xiao-Li; Gao, Da-Qing; Shang-Guan, Jing-Bin

    2014-02-01

    A kicker system plays an important role in beam extraction and injection for a ring-like accelerator. The kicker system in the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) is used for beam extraction and injection between two cooling storage rings (CSRs). The system consists of two parts: one part is used for beam extraction from the CSR/main (CSRm), and the other is used for beam injection into the CSR/experimental (CSRe). To meet the requirements of special physics experiments, we upgraded the kicker control system. In this upgraded system, the position of the beam bunches can be determined by measuring the phase of the radio frequency (RF) signal in real time because each beam bunch is synchronized with the RF signal. The digital timing control and delay regulatory function, which are based on a new design using ARM+DSP+FPGA technology, achieved a precision of 2.5 ns, which is a significant improvement over old system's precision of 5 ns. In addition, this system exhibits a better anti-interference capability. Moreover, the efficiency of beam extraction can be enhanced, and the accuracy of the reference voltage setting can reach as low as 0.1%, compared to 2% for the old system.

  9. Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph Upgrades: Hamamatsu CCDs and AO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Katherine; Gimeno, G.; Murowinski, R.; Kleinman, S.; Trujillo, C. A.; Lai, O.

    2014-01-01

    The Gemini Multi-Object Spectrographs (GMOS) at both Gemini North and South have provided crucial access to longslit, MOS and IFU moderate resolution optical spectroscopy for the Gemini international partnership for over a decade. The interim installment of e2v deep depletion CCDs at GMOS-N in November 2011, providing enhanced red sensitivity, was the first major upgrade for either GMOS since the implementation of the Nod&Shuffle mode in 2002. We present plans to replace the original EEV detectors in GMOS-S with new Hamamatsu CCDs, extending wavelength coverage out beyond 1.03 microns. GMOS-N upgrade to Hamamatsu CCDs will follow the successful deployment on GMOS-S. With the extension of GMOS sensitivity further to long wavelengths it becomes even more attractive to extend the number of observing modes to include adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy. As has already been demonstrated with GEMS/GMOS-S imaging, adaptive optics in the 0.8-1 micron wavelength regime on Gemini can effectively transform IQ70 conditions to IQ20 and more than double the spatial resolution over the natural seeing. We present plans to move forward with plans to enable GMOS + adaptive optics as a regular user mode at both sites.

  10. Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine Combustor Flametube Facility Upgraded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, James E.; Nemets, Steve A.; Tornabene, Robert T.; Smith, Timothy D.; Frankenfeld, Bruce J.

    2004-01-01

    In fiscal year 2003, test cell 23 of the Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL 23) at the NASA Glenn Research Center was upgraded with the addition of gaseous hydrogen as a working propellant and the addition of a 450-psig air-supply system. Test flexibility was further enhanced by upgrades to the facility control systems. RCL 23 can now test with gaseous hydrogen flow rates up to 0.05 lbm/sec and jet fuel flow rates up to 0.62 lbm/sec. Research airflow rates up to 3 lbm/sec are possible with the 450-psig supply system over a range of inlet temperatures. Nonvitiated, heated air is supplied from a shell and tube heat exchanger. The maximum nonvitiated facility air temperature is 1100 F at 1.5 lbm/sec. Research-section exhaust temperatures are limited to 3200 F because of material and cooling capacity limits. A variety of support systems are available depending on the research hardware configuration. Test section ignition can be provided via either a hydrogen air torch system or an electronic spark system. Emissions measurements are obtained with either pneumatically or electromechanically actuated gas sample probes, and the electromechanical system allows for radial measurements at a user-specified axial location for measurement of emissions profiles. Gas analysis data can be obtained for a variety of species, including carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NO and NOx), oxygen (O2), unburnt hydrocarbons, and unburnt hydrogen. Facility control is accomplished with a programmable logic control system. Facility operations have been upgraded to a system based on graphical user interface control screens. A data system is available for real-time acquisition and monitoring of both measurements in engineering units and performance calculations. The upgrades have made RCL 23 a highly flexible facility for research into low emissions gas turbine combustor concepts, and the flame tube configuration inherently allows for a variety of fuel nozzle

  11. Guidelines for Home Energy Upgrade Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Multifamily Energy Upgrades (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-08-01

    This fact sheet provides essential information about the 2011 publication of the Workforce Guidelines for Multifamily Home Energy Upgrades, including their origin, their development with the help of industry leaders to create the standard work specifications for retrofit work.

  12. The JLAB 12 GeV Energy Upgrade of CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, Leigh H.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation should describe the progress of the 12GeV Upgrade of CEBAF at Jefferson Lab. The status of the upgrade should be presented as well as details on the construction, procurement, installation and commissioning of the magnet and SRF components of the upgrade.

  13. First Results From the (Multibeam) Hydrosweep DS2 Upgrade on the R/V Maurice Ewing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chayes, D. N.; Slagle, A.; Caress, D. W.; Arko, R. A.

    2001-12-01

    The ATLAS Hydrosweep DS multibeam swath mapping sonar system on the R/V Maurice Ewing was upgraded to a DS2 in May 2000. This upgrade increased the effective swath width from 59 beams over about 89 degrees to as many as 140 beams over approximately 118 degrees, added sidescan image as well as data records from which backscatter can be extracted. The upgrade replaced the outdated processing computer, half-inch tape drive and console with modern workstations and 4mm tape. The upgrade did not require changes to the under hull transducer arrays or transceivers so it was relatively inexpensive and was accomplished in a few days during a transit of the Panama Canal. Evaluation and software enhancements were done during subsequent transits. MB-System was enhanced to support the native, raw data format of the Hydrosweep DS2. We also expect to be able to support the more general SURF format that is also generated by new ATLAS sonar systems in the near future. In addition to the hardware and software upgrades to the multibeam, we installed a POS/MV-320 vertical reference system to take over from our venerable HIPPY-120 as the primary attitude reference for the Hydrosweep on the Ewing. The attitude data from the POS has allowed us to eliminate the turn rate restrictions and to improve the data quality. As an additional benefit the P-Code aided position data produced by the POS is significantly more stable and better behaved than our other navigation sources. The upgraded sonar was used during EW0108 (Taylor) in the Gulf of Corinth. As is usually the case with new implementations or modifications of complex systems, some unexpected behaviors were observed and carefully documented. Good remote support from the manufacturer enabled us to implement fixes and to generate very good quality bathymetry and sidescan images on board and in shore-side post processing. Two related software prototypes are currently being evaluated as part of this upgrade package. One is a web-based real

  14. Charge breeder for the SPIRAL1 upgrade: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunoury, L.; Delahaye, P.; Dubois, M.; Angot, J.; Sole, P.; Bajeat, O.; Barton, C.; Frigot, R.; Jeanne, A.; Jardin, P.; Kamalou, O.; Lecomte, P.; Osmond, B.; Peschard, G.; Lamy, T.; Savalle, A.

    2016-02-01

    In the framework of the SPIRAL1 upgrade under progress at the GANIL lab, the charge breeder based on a LPSC Phoenix ECRIS, first tested at ISOLDE has been modified to benefit of the last enhancements of this device from the 1+/n+ community. The modifications mainly concern the 1 + optics, vacuum techniques, and the RF—buffer gas injection into the charge breeder. Prior to its installation in the midst of the low energy beam line of the SPIRAL1 facility, it has been decided to qualify its performances and several operation modes at the test bench of LPSC lab. This contribution shall present preliminary results of experiments conducted at LPSC concerning the 1 + to n+ conversion efficiencies for noble gases as well as for alkali elements and the corresponding transformation times.

  15. Charge breeder for the SPIRAL1 upgrade: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Maunoury, L; Delahaye, P; Dubois, M; Angot, J; Sole, P; Bajeat, O; Barton, C; Frigot, R; Jeanne, A; Jardin, P; Kamalou, O; Lecomte, P; Osmond, B; Peschard, G; Lamy, T; Savalle, A

    2016-02-01

    In the framework of the SPIRAL1 upgrade under progress at the GANIL lab, the charge breeder based on a LPSC Phoenix ECRIS, first tested at ISOLDE has been modified to benefit of the last enhancements of this device from the 1+/n+ community. The modifications mainly concern the 1 + optics, vacuum techniques, and the RF-buffer gas injection into the charge breeder. Prior to its installation in the midst of the low energy beam line of the SPIRAL1 facility, it has been decided to qualify its performances and several operation modes at the test bench of LPSC lab. This contribution shall present preliminary results of experiments conducted at LPSC concerning the 1 + to n+ conversion efficiencies for noble gases as well as for alkali elements and the corresponding transformation times. PMID:26932061

  16. Canted Undulator Upgrade for GeoSoilEnviroCARS Sector 13 at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Stephen

    2013-02-02

    Support for the beamline component of the canted undulator upgrade of Sector 13 (GeoSoilEnviroCARS; managed and operated by the University of Chicago) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS; Argonne National Laboratory) was received from three agencies (equally divided): NASA-SRLIDAP (now LARS), NSF-EAR-IF (ARRA) and DOE-Single Investigator Small Group (SISGR). The associated accelerator components (undulators, canted front end) were provided by the APS using DOE-ARRA funding. The intellectual merit of the research enabled by the upgrade lies in advancing our knowledge of the composition, structure and properties of earth materials; the processes they control; and the processes that produce them. The upgrade will facilitate scientific advances in the following areas: high pressure mineral physics and chemistry, non-crystalline and nano-crystalline materials at high pressure, chemistry of hydrothermal fluids, reactions at mineral-water interfaces, biogeochemistry, oxidation states of magmas, flow dynamics of fluids and solids, and cosmochemistry. The upgrade, allowing the microprobe to operate 100% of the time and the high pressure and surface scattering and spectroscopy instruments to receive beam time increases, will facilitate much more efficient use of the substantial investment in these instruments. The broad scientific community will benefit by the increase in the number of scientists who conduct cutting-edge research at GSECARS. The user program in stations 13ID-C (interface scattering) and 13ID-D (laser heated diamond anvil cell and large volume press) recommenced in June 2012. The operation of the 13ID-E microprobe station began in the Fall 2012 cycle (Oct.-Dec 2012). The upgraded canted beamlines double the amount of undulator beam time at Sector 13 and provide new capabilities including extended operations of the X-ray microprobe down to the sulfur K edge and enhanced brightness at high energy. The availability of the upgraded beamlines will advance the

  17. Instrumentation and control upgrade plan for Browns Ferry nuclear plant

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, M.R.; Langley, D.T. ); Torok, R.C.; Wilkinson, C.D. ); Stanley, L. )

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive upgrade of the instrumentation and control (I C) systems at a power plant represents a formidable project for any utility. For a nuclear plant, the extra safety and reliability requirements along with regulatory constraints add further complications and cost. The need for the upgrade must, therefore, be very compelling, and the process must be well planned from the start. This paper describes the steps taken to initiate the I C upgrade process for Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA's) Browns Ferry 2 nuclear plant. It explains the impetus for the upgrade, the expected benefits, and the process by which system upgrades will be selected and implemented.

  18. A poloidal section neutron camera for MAST upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Sangaroon, S.; Weiszflog, M.; Cecconello, M.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Wodniak, I.; Keeling, D.; Turnyanskiy, M. [EURATOM Collaboration: MAST Team

    2014-08-21

    The Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak Upgrade (MAST Upgrade) is intended as a demonstration of the physics viability of the Spherical Tokamak (ST) concept and as a platform for contributing to ITER/DEMO physics. Concerning physics exploitation, MAST Upgrade plasma scenarios can contribute to the ITER Tokamak physics particularly in the field of fast particle behavior and current drive studies. At present, MAST is equipped with a prototype neutron camera (NC). On the basis of the experience and results from previous experimental campaigns using the NC, the conceptual design of a neutron camera upgrade (NC Upgrade) is being developed. As part of the MAST Upgrade, the NC Upgrade is considered a high priority diagnostic since it would allow studies in the field of fast ions and current drive with good temporal and spatial resolution. In this paper, we explore an optional design with the camera array viewing the poloidal section of the plasma from different directions.

  19. The Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    R.D. McKeown

    2010-09-01

    Construction of the 12 GeV upgrade to the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is presently underway. This upgrade includes doubling the energy of the electron beam to 12 GeV, the addition of a new fourth experimental hall, and the construction of upgraded detector hardware. An overview of this upgrade project is presented, along with highlights of the anticipated experimental program. The 12 GeV upgrade project at Jefferson Lab will enable a powerful new experimental program that will advance our understanding of the quark/gluon structure of hadronic matter, the nature of Quantum Chromodynamics, and the properties of a new extended standard model of particle interactions. Commissioning of the upgraded beam will be begin in 2013, and the full complement of upgraded experimental equipment will be completed in 2015. This unique facility will provide many opportunities for exploration and discovery for a large international community of nuclear scientists.

  20. CHALLENGES FOR THE SNS RING ENERGY UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A; Gorlov, Timofey V; Holmes, Jeffrey A; Hunter, W Ted; Roseberry, Jr., R Tom; Wang, Jian-Guang

    2012-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source accumulator ring presently operates at a beam power of about 1 MW with a beam energy of about 910 MeV. A power upgrade is planned to increase the beam energy to 1.3 GeV. For the accumulator ring this mostly involves modifications to the injection and extraction sections. A variety of modifications to the existing injection section were necessary to achieve 1 MW, and the tools developed and the lessons learned from this work are now being applied to the design of the new injection section. This paper will discuss the tools and the lessons learned, and also present the design and status of the upgrades to the accumulator ring.

  1. An Upgrade for the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Chemla, Daniel S.; Feinberg, Benedict; Hussain, Zahid; Kirz, Janos; Krebs, Gary F.; Padmore, Howard A.; Robin, David S.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Smith, Neville V.

    2004-09-01

    One of the first third-generation synchrotron light sources, the ALS, has been operating for almost a decade at Berkeley Lab, where experimenters have been exploiting its high brightness for forefront science. However, accelerator and insertion-device technology have significantly changed since the ALS was designed. As a result, the performance of the ALS is in danger of being eclipsed by that of newer, more advanced sources. The ALS upgrade that we are planning includes full-energy, top-off injection with higher storage-ring current and the replacement of five first-generation insertion devices with nine state-of-the art insertion devices and four new application-specific beamlines now being identified in a strategic planning process. The upgrade will help keep the ALS at the forefront of soft x-ray synchrotron light sources for the next two decades.

  2. Biorefining compounds and organocatalytic upgrading methods

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Eugene Y.; Liu, Dajiang

    2016-10-18

    The invention provides new methods for the direct umpolung self-condensation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) by organocatalysis, thereby upgrading the readily available substrate into 5,5'-di(hydroxymethyl)furoin (DHMF). While many efficient catalyst systems have been developed for conversion of plant biomass resources into HMF, the invention now provides methods to convert such nonfood biomass directly into DHMF by a simple process as described herein. The invention also provides highly effective new methods for upgrading other biomass furaldehydes and related compound to liquid fuels. The methods include the organocatalytic self-condensation (umpolung) of biomass furaldehydes into (C.sub.8-C.sub.12)furoin intermediates, followed by hydrogenation, etherification or esterification into oxygenated biodiesel, or hydrodeoxygenation by metal-acid tandem catalysis into premium hydrocarbon fuels.

  3. Upgrades for TwinSol facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, P. D.; Bardayan, D. W.; Kolata, J. J.; Hall, M. R.; Hall, O.; Allen, J.; Becchetti, F. D.

    2016-06-01

    TwinSol, a pair of coupled, superconducting solenoids, was one of the first devices capable of producing beams of radioactive nuclei at energies near the Coulomb barrier. A primary beam from University of Notre Dame (UND) tandem accelerator is used to bombard a primary target producing a secondary beam in flight. TwinSol is used to gather, separate, and focus the recoils. Since it was commissioned at the UND in 1997, at least 58 publications have reported data from its use and there have been hundreds of collaborators from many different countries that use this device. Currently, plans are in place at the UND to provide several upgrades to TwinSol, including a multi-cell gas production target and the possible addition of a third solenoid. Upgrades currently in progress will be discussed along with future plans.

  4. A FOrward CALorimeter Upgrade For PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Hollis, Richard S.

    2011-06-01

    Over the past few years, the PHENIX detector has undergone several upgrades in the forward region (1<|{eta}|<4), initially covered only by the muon arms. The focus of these upgrades is toward a better understanding of the Color-Glass Condensate and the interplay between the different components of the proton's spin valence/sea quark and gluon contributions. This paper highlights the newly proposed forward calorimeter detector, FOCAL. FOCAL is a tungsten-silicon sampling calorimeter with high position and energy resolution, covering a pseudorapidity of 1.6<{eta}<2.5. This future detector aims to constrain the current view of gluon saturation at small x in the Color-Glass Condensate framework, through isolation of direct photons at high-p{sub T} over a broad range of pseudorapidity.

  5. Upgrading Reference Set — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    We are proposing a multi-institutional study to identify molecular biomarkers and clinical measures that will predict presence of Gleason 7 or higher cancer (as evidence in the radical prostatectomy specimen) among patients with a biopsy diagnosis of Gleason score ≤ 6 prostate cancer. This proposal will be conducted in two phases. The first phase will assemble an “Upgrading Reference Set” that will include clinical information as well as biologics on a cohort of 600 men. The first phase will also assess the clinical parameters associated with upgrading, as well as, perform a central pathology review of both biopsies and prostatectomy specimens to confirm tumor grade. The second phase will use the biologics collected in phase 1 to evaluate a series of biomarkers to further refine the prediction of Gleason 7-10 cancer at radical prostatectomy.

  6. ECE Imaging Bandwidth Upgrade for TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domier, C. W.; Zhang, P.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Park, H. K.; van de Pol, M. J.; Spakman, G. W.; Jaspers, R.; Donne, A. J. H.

    2007-11-01

    The 128 channel 2-D Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) Imaging system collects time-resolved 16x8 images of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations on the TEXTOR tokamak. This instrument was upgraded in February 2007 with new wideband ECE electronics which increased the instantaneous frequency coverage by >50% to 6.4 GHz with a corresponding increase in horizontal plasma coverage. Frequency extenders have been developed to combine modules together to double the instantaneous coverage to 12.8 GHz. Technical details regarding both the electronics upgrade and the frequency extenders as well as the preliminary physics results will be presented. Implementation of a similar but new ECEI instrument on the DIII-D tokamak will be extensively discussed.

  7. The ALICE Central Trigger Processor (CTP) upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivda, M.; Alexandre, D.; Barnby, L. S.; Evans, D.; Jones, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Lietava, R.; Pospíšil, J.; Villalobos Baillie, O.

    2016-03-01

    The ALICE Central Trigger Processor (CTP) at the CERN LHC has been upgraded for LHC Run 2, to improve the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) data-taking efficiency and to improve the physics performance of ALICE. There is a new additional CTP interaction record sent using a new second Detector Data Link (DDL), a 2 GB DDR3 memory and an extension of functionality for classes. The CTP switch has been incorporated directly onto the new LM0 board. A design proposal for an ALICE CTP upgrade for LHC Run 3 is also presented. Part of the development is a low latency high bandwidth interface whose purpose is to minimize an overall trigger latency.

  8. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 12, June 21, 1992--September 20, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-12-31

    In this project we intend to study a novel process concept, i.e.,the use of ceramic membranes reactors in upgrading of coal derived liquids. Membrane reactors have been used in a number of catalytic reaction processes in order to overcome the limitations on conversion imposed by thermodynamic equilibrium. They have, furthermore, the inherent capability for combining reaction and separation in a single step. Thus they offer promise for improving and optimizing yield, selectivity and performance of processes involving complex liquids, as those typically found in coal liquid upgrading. Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we wig evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  9. Upgrade of the Upstream Tracker at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Jason; LHCb Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded to allow it operate at higher collider luminosity without the need for a hardware trigger stage. Flavor enriched events will be selected in a software based, high level trigger, using fully reconstructed events. This presentation will describe the design, optimization and the expected performance of the Upstream Tracker (UT), which has a critical role in high level trigger scheme.

  10. SLC Energy Upgrade Program at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loew, G. A.; Allen, M. A.; Cassel, R. L.; Dean, N. R.; Konrad, G. T.; Koontz, R. F.; Lebacqz, J. V.

    1985-03-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Linear Collider (SLC) must reach a nominal center-of-mass energy of 100 GeV to fulfill its high energy physics goals. The energy upgrade program that is being implemented on the SLAC linear accelerator to meet these goals is described. A discussion of the design requirements and available technical options, the rationale for the adopted solution, and the technical problems involved in the engineering and production of klystrons and modulators is presented.

  11. Space Shuttle Upgrades Advanced Hydraulic Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Three Auxiliary Power Units (APU) on the Space Shuttle Orbiter each provide 145 hp shaft power to a hydraulic pump which outputs 3000 psi hydraulic fluid to 41 hydraulic actuators. A hydrazine fuel powered APU utilized throughout the Shuttle program has undergone many improvements, but concerns remain with flight safety, operational cost, critical failure modes, and hydrazine related hazards. The advanced hydraulic power system (AHPS), also known as the electric APU, is being evaluated as an upgrade to replace the hydrazine APU. The AHPS replaces the high-speed turbine and hydrazine fuel supply system with a battery power supply and electric motor/pump that converts 300 volt electrical power to 3000 psi hydraulic power. AHPS upgrade benefits include elimination of toxic hydrazine propellant to improve flight safety, reduction in hazardous ground processing operations, and improved reliability. Development of this upgrade provides many interesting challenges and includes development of four hardware elements that comprise the AHPS system: Battery - The battery provides a high voltage supply of power using lithium ion cells. This is a large battery that must provide 28 kilowatt hours of energy over 99 minutes of operation at 300 volts with a peak power of 130 kilowatts for three seconds. High Voltage Power Distribution and Control (PD&C) - The PD&C distributes electric power from the battery to the EHDU. This 300 volt system includes wiring and components necessary to distribute power and provide fault current protection. Electro-Hydraulic Drive Unit (EHDU) - The EHDU converts electric input power to hydraulic output power. The EHDU must provide over 90 kilowatts of stable, output hydraulic power at 3000 psi with high efficiency and rapid response time. Cooling System - The cooling system provides thermal control of the Orbiter hydraulic fluid and EHDU electronic components. Symposium presentation will provide an overview of the AHPS upgrade, descriptions of the four

  12. Seismic upgrade of the Nova capacitor bank

    SciTech Connect

    Tietbohl, G.L.; Patel, C.S.

    1993-04-05

    The main capacitor bank for the Nova laser system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was found to be seismically unsafe after the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. A method of strengthening the bank was developed, which satisfied the current seismic design criteria and minimized the downtime of the laser system during installation. Before implementation, the design was analyzed by finite element methods and the building was checked for load capacity. The bank is now upgraded to current seismic standards.

  13. Fast sweeping reflectometry upgrade on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Clairet, F.; Bottereau, C.; Molina, D.; Ducobu, L.; Leroux, F.; Barbuti, A.; Heuraux, S.

    2010-10-15

    In order to study the temporal dynamics of turbulence, the sweep time of our reflectometry has been shortened from 20 to 2 {mu}s with 1 {mu}s dead time. Detailed technical aspects of the upgrade are given, namely, about the stability of the ramp generation, the detection setup, and the fast acquisition module. A review of studies (velocity measurement of the turbulence, modifications of the wavenumber spectrum, radial mapping of correlation time, etc.) offered by such improvements is presented.

  14. The Sandia Lightning Simulator Recommissioning and upgrades.

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Leonard E.; Caldwell, Michele

    2005-08-01

    The Sandia lightning simulator at Sandia National Laboratories can provide up to 200 kA for a simulated single lightning stroke, 100 kA for a subsequent stroke, and hundreds of Amperes of continuing current. It has recently been recommissioned after a decade of inactivity and the single-stroke capability demonstrated. The simulator capabilities, basic design components, upgrades, and diagnostic capabilities are discussed in this paper.

  15. Criteria development for upgrading computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efe, Kemal

    1995-01-01

    Being an infrastructure system, the computer network has a fundamental role in the day to day activities of personnel working at KSC. It is easily appreciated that the lack of 'satisfactory' network performance can have a high 'cost' for KSC. Yet, this seemingly obvious concept is quite difficult to demonstrate. At what point do we say that performance is below the lowest tolerable level? How do we know when the 'cost' of using the system at the current level of degraded performance exceeds the cost of upgrading it? In this research, we consider the cost and performance factors that may have an effect in decision making in regards to upgrading computer networks. Cost factors are detailed in terms of 'direct costs' and 'subjective costs'. Performance factors are examined in terms of 'required performance' and 'offered performance.' Required performance is further examined by presenting a methodology for trend analysis based on applying interpolation methods to observed traffic levels. Offered performance levels are analyzed by deriving simple equations to evaluate network performance. The results are evaluated in the light of recommended upgrade policies currently in use for telephone exchange systems, similarities and differences between the two types of services are discussed.

  16. Progress on the NSTX Center Stack Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    L. Dudek, J. Chrzanowski, P. Heitzenroeder, D. Mangra, C. Neumeyer, M. Smith, R. Strykowsky, P. Titus, T. Willard

    2010-09-22

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) will be upgraded to provide increased toroidal field, plasma current and pulse length. This involves the replacement of the so-called center stack, including the inner legs of the Toroidal Field (TF) coil, the Ohmic Heating (OH) coil, and the inner Poloidal Field (PF) coils. In addition the increased performance of the upgrade requires qualification of remaining existing components for higher loads. Initial conceptual design efforts were based on worst-case combinations of possible currents that the power supplies could deliver. This proved to be an onerous requirement and caused many of the outer coils support structures to require costly heavy reinforcement. This has led to the planned implementation of a Digital Coil Protection System (DCPS) to reduce design-basis loads to levels that are more realistic and manageable. As a minimum, all components must be qualified for the increase in normal operating loads with headroom. Design features and analysis efforts needed to meet the upgrade loading are discussed. Mission and features of the DCPS are presented.

  17. The APS control system network upgrade.

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorowicz, K. v.; Leibfritz, D.; McDowell, W. P.

    1999-10-22

    When it was installed,the Advanced Photon Source (APS) control system network was at the state-of-the-art. Different aspects of the system have been reported at previous meetings [1,2]. As loads on the controls network have increased due to newer and faster workstations and front-end computers, we have found performance of the system declining and have implemented an upgraded network. There have been dramatic advances in networking hardware in the last several years. The upgraded APS controls network replaces the original FDDI backbone and shared Ethernet hubs with redundant gigabit uplinks and fully switched 10/100 Ethernet switches with backplane fabrics in excess of 20 Gbits/s (Gbps). The central collapsed backbone FDDI concentrator has been replaced with a Gigabit Ethernet switch with greater than 30 Gbps backplane fabric. Full redundancy of the system has been maintained. This paper will discuss this upgrade and include performance data and performance comparisons with the original network.

  18. Proposal to upgrade the MIPP experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Isenhower, D.; Sadler, M.; Towell, R.; Watson, S.; Peterson, R.J.; Baker, W.; Carey, D.; Christian, D.; Demarteau, M.; Jensen, D.; Johnstone, C.; Meyer, H.; Raja, R.; Ronzhin, A.; Solomey, N.; Wester, W.; Gutbrod, H.; Peters, K.; Feldman, G.; Torun, Y.; Messier, M.D.; /Indiana U. /Iowa U. /Dubna, JINR /Kent State U. /Groningen, KVI /Michigan U. /St. Petersburg, INP /Purdue U. /South Carolina U. /Virginia U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-09-01

    The upgraded MIPP physics results are needed for the support of NuMI projects, atmospheric cosmic ray and neutrino programs worldwide and will permit a systematic study of non-perturbative QCD interactions. The MIPP TPC is the largest contributor to the MIPP event size by far. Its readout system and electronics were designed in the 1990's and limit it to a readout rate of 60 Hz in simple events and {approx} 20 Hz in complicated events. With the readout chips designed for the ALICE collaboration at the LHC, we propose a low cost scheme of upgrading the MIPP data acquisition speed to 3000 Hz. This will also enable us to measure the medium energy numi target to be used for the NOvA/MINERvA experiments. We outline the capabilities of the upgraded MIPP detector to obtain high statistics particle production data on a number of nuclei that will help towards the understanding and simulation of hadronic showers in matter. Measurements of nitrogen cross sections will permit a better understanding of cosmic ray shower systematics in the atmosphere. In addition, we explore the possibilities of providing tagged neutral beams using the MIPP spectrometer that may be crucial for validating the Particle Flow Algorithm proposed for calorimeters for the International Linear Collider detectors. Lastly, we outline the physics potential of such a detector in understanding non-perturbative QCD processes.

  19. Spaceborne scanning lidar system (SSLS) upgrade path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimelman, M.; Tripp, J.; Allen, A.; Hiemstra, D. M.; McDonald, S. A.

    2006-05-01

    The Spaceborne Scanning Lidar System (SSLS) system is a space-qualified scanning lidar system developed by MDA and Optech. It has been operating on orbit since April 2005 as part of the XSS-11 one-year demonstration of space technologies associated with spacecraft autonomous rendezvous and proximity operations. The SSLS has already successfully supported long and medium-range object acquisition and tracking. Short range acquisition, tracking, and imaging tasks are scheduled towards the end of its one-year mission. MDA and Optech view SSLS as the first 'smart' product in the RELAVIS line of scanning lidar products. An upgrade plan, addressing customer needs and lessons learned during SSLS build and operation on orbit, has been established and is currently being implemented. Next generation SSLS lidar will provide improved performance and real-time space object tracking solution based on point cloud data acquired by the lidar. Real-time pose (position and orientation) capability will be provided in addition to the currently provided range, bearing, and centroid telemetry data. The integrated pose solution will provide the user with tracking data while reducing spacecraft databus and processor utilization. This new functionality expands the SSLS role from a 'sensor only' ranging role to a robust long/medium and short range 'ranging and tracking solution' supporting rendezvous and close proximity missions. This paper describes the SSLS upgrade plan and provides information related to the implementation and progress of the upgrade via test results of the new SSLS capabilities.

  20. DAQ Architecture for the LHCb Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guoming; Neufeld, Niko

    2014-06-01

    LHCb will have an upgrade of its detector in 2018. After the upgrade, the LHCb experiment will run at a high luminosity of 2 × 1033 cm-2s-1. The upgraded detector will be read out at 40 MHz with a highly flexible software-based triggering strategy. The Data Acquisition (DAQ) system of LHCb reads out the data fragments from the Front-End Electronics and transports them to the High-Lever Trigger farm at an aggregate throughput of ~ 32 Tbit/s. The DAQ system will be based on high speed network technologies such as InfiniBand and/or 10/40/100 Gigabit Ethernet. Independent of the network technology, there are different possible architectures for the DAQ system. In this paper, we present our studies on the DAQ architecture, where we analyze size, complexity and relative cost. We evaluate and compare several data-flow schemes for a network-based DAQ: push, pull and push with barrel-shifter traffic shaping. We also discuss the requirements and overall implications of the data-flow schemes on the DAQ system.

  1. Upgrade of the LHCb Vertex Locator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leflat, A.

    2014-08-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2018, will transform the entire readout to a trigger-less system operating at 40 MHz. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm, with access to all event information. This will enable the detector to run at luminosities of 1-2 × 1033/cm2/s and probe physics beyond the Standard Model in the heavy sector with unprecedented precision. The upgraded VELO must be low mass, radiation hard and vacuum compatible. It must be capable of fast pattern recognition and track reconstruction and will be required to drive data to the outside world at speeds of up to 2.5 Tbit/s. This challenge is being met with a new Vertex Locator (VELO) design based on hybrid pixel detectors positioned to within 5 mm of the LHC colliding beams. The sensors have 55 × 55 μm square pixels and the VELOPix ASIC which is being developed for the readout is based on the Timepix/Medipix family of chips. The hottest ASIC will have to cope with pixel hit rates of up to 900 MHz. The material budget will be optimised with the use of evaporative CO2 coolant circulating in microchannels within a thin silicon substrate. Microchannel cooling brings many advantages: very efficient heat transfer with almost no temperature gradients across the module, no CTE mismatch with silicon components, and low material contribution. This is a breakthrough technology being developed for LHCb. LHCb is also focussing effort on the construction of a lightweight foil to separate the primary and secondary LHC vacua, the development of high speed cables and radiation qualification of the module. The 40 MHz readout will also bring significant conceptual changes to the way in which the upgrade trigger is operated. Work is in progress to incorporate momentum and impact parameter information into the trigger at the earliest possible stage, using the fast pattern recognition capabilities of the upgraded detector. The current status of the VELO upgrade will

  2. On optimal strategies for upgrading networks

    SciTech Connect

    Krumke, S.O.; Noltemeier, H.; Marathe, M.V.; Ravi, S.S.; Ravi, R.; Sundaram, R.

    1996-07-02

    We study {ital budget constrained optimal network upgrading problems}. Such problems aim at finding optimal strategies for improving a network under some cost measure subject to certain budget constraints. Given an edge weighted graph {ital G(V,E)}, in the {ital edge based upgrading model}, it is assumed that each edge {ital e} of the given network has an associated function {ital c(e)} that specifies for each edge {ital e} the amount by which the length {ital l(e)} is to be reduced. In the {ital node based upgrading model} a node {ital v} can be upgraded at an expense of cost {ital (v)}. Such an upgrade reduces the cost of each edge incident on {ital v} by a fixed factor {rho}, where 0 < {rho} < 1. For a given budget, {ital B}, the goal is to find an improvement strategy such that the total cost of reduction is a most the given budget {ital B} and the cost of a subgraph (e.g. minimum spanning tree) under the modified edge lengths is the best over all possible strategies which obey the budget constraint. Define an ({alpha},{beta})-approximation algorithm as a polynomial-time algorithm that produces a solution within {alpha} times the optimal function value, violating the budget constraint by a factor of at most {Beta}. The results obtained in this paper include the following 1. We show that in general the problem of computing optimal reduction strategy for modifying the network as above is {bold NP}-hard. 2. In the node based model, we show how to devise a near optimal strategy for improving the bottleneck spanning tree. The algorithms have a performance guarantee of (2 ln {ital n}, 1). 3. for the edge based improvement problems we present improved (in terms of performance and time) approximation algorithms. 4. We also present pseudo-polynomial time algorithms (extendible to polynomial time approximation schemes) for a number of edge/node based improvement problems when restricted to the class of treewidth-bounded graphs.

  3. A review on optimization production and upgrading biogas through CO2 removal using various techniques.

    PubMed

    Andriani, Dian; Wresta, Arini; Atmaja, Tinton Dwi; Saepudin, Aep

    2014-02-01

    Biogas from anaerobic digestion of organic materials is a renewable energy resource that consists mainly of CH4 and CO2. Trace components that are often present in biogas are water vapor, hydrogen sulfide, siloxanes, hydrocarbons, ammonia, oxygen, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen. Considering the biogas is a clean and renewable form of energy that could well substitute the conventional source of energy (fossil fuels), the optimization of this type of energy becomes substantial. Various optimization techniques in biogas production process had been developed, including pretreatment, biotechnological approaches, co-digestion as well as the use of serial digester. For some application, the certain purity degree of biogas is needed. The presence of CO2 and other trace components in biogas could affect engine performance adversely. Reducing CO2 content will significantly upgrade the quality of biogas and enhancing the calorific value. Upgrading is generally performed in order to meet the standards for use as vehicle fuel or for injection in the natural gas grid. Different methods for biogas upgrading are used. They differ in functioning, the necessary quality conditions of the incoming gas, and the efficiency. Biogas can be purified from CO2 using pressure swing adsorption, membrane separation, physical or chemical CO2 absorption. This paper reviews the various techniques, which could be used to optimize the biogas production as well as to upgrade the biogas quality.

  4. Exploration of the Equilibrium Operating Space For NSTX-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    S.P. Gerhardt, R. Andre and J.E. Menard

    2012-04-25

    This paper explores a range of high-performance equilibrium scenarios available in the NSTX-Upgrade device [J.E. Menard, submitted for publication to Nuclear Fusion]. NSTX-Upgrade is a substantial upgrade to the existing NSTX device [M. Ono, et al., Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)], with significantly higher toroidal field and solenoid capabilities, and three additional neutral beam sources with significantly larger current drive efficiency. Equilibria are computed with freeboundary TRANSP, allowing a self consistent calculation of the non-inductive current drive sources, the plasma equilibrium, and poloidal field coil current, using the realistic device geometry. The thermal profiles are taken from a variety of existing NSTX discharges, and different assumptions for the thermal confinement scalings are utilized. The no-wall and idealwall n=1 stability limits are computed with the DCON code. The central and minimum safety factors are quite sensitive to many parameters: they generally increases with large outer plasmawall gaps and higher density, but can have either trend with the confinement enhancement factor. In scenarios with strong central beam current drive, the inclusion of non-classical fast ion diffusion raises qmin, decreases the pressure peaking, and generally improves the global stability, at the expense of a reduction in the non-inductive current drive fraction; cases with less beam current drive are largely insensitive to additional fast ion diffusion. The non-inductive current level is quite sensitive to the underlying confinement and profile assumptions. For instance, for BT=1.0 T and Pinj=12.6 MW, the non-inductive current level varies from 875 kA with ITER-98y,2 thermal confinement scaling and narrow thermal profiles to 1325 kA for an ST specific scaling expression and broad profiles. This sensitivity should facilitate the determination of the correct scaling of transport with current and field to use for future fully non-inductive ST devices

  5. High efficiency, low cost scrubber upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Klingspor, J.S.; Walters, M.

    1998-07-01

    ABB introduced the LS-2 technology; a limestone based wet FGD system, which is capable of producing high purity gypsum from low grade limestone, in late 1995. Drawing from 30,000 MWe of worldwide wet FGD experience, ABB has incorporated several innovations in the new system designed to reduce the overall cost of SO{sub 2} compliance. Collectively, these improvements are referred to as LS-2. The improvements include a compact high efficiency absorber, a simple dry grinding system, a closed coupled flue gas reheat system, and a tightly integrated dewatering system. The compact absorber includes features such a high velocity spray zone, significantly improved gas-liquid contact system, compact reaction tank, and a high velocity mist eliminator. The LS-2 system is being demonstrated at Ohio Edison's Niles Plant at the 130 MWe level, and this turnkey installation was designed and erected in a 20-month period. At Niles, all of the gypsum is sold to a local wallboard manufacturer. Many of the features included in the LS-2 design and demonstrated at Niles can be used to improve the efficiency and operation of existing systems including open spray towers and tray towers. The SO{sub 2} removal efficiency can be significantly improved by installing the high efficiency LS-2 style spray header design and the unique wall rings. The absorber bypass can be eliminated or reduced by including the LS-2 style high velocity mist eliminator. Also, the LS-2 style spray header design combined with wall rings allow for an increase in absorber gas velocity at a maintained or improved performance without the need for costly upgrades of the absorber recycle pumps. the first upgrade using LS-2 technology was done at CPA's Coal Creek Station (2{times}545 MWe). The experience form the scrubber upgrade at Coal Creek is discussed along with operating results.

  6. Upgrading the Northern Finland Seismological Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narkilahti, Janne; Kozlovskaya, Elena; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Hurskainen, Riitta; Nevalainen, Jouni

    2016-04-01

    The Finnish National Seismic Network (FNSN) comprises national Helsinki University Seismological network (HE) ISUH and the Northern Finland Seismological Network (FN) hosted by the Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory (SGO) of the University of Oulu. The FN network currently consists of four real-time permanent stations equipped with Streckeisen STS-2 broad band seismometers that are recording continuous digital seismic data. At present, the network is a part of GEOFON Extended Virtual Network and of the ORFEUS Virtual European Broadband Seismograph Network. In the future, the network will be the part of EPOS-European Plate Observing System research infrastructure. As a part of EPOS project activities, the SGO started to upgrade their own network in 2014. The main target of the network upgrade is to increase the permanent station coverage in the European Arctic region, particularly behind the Polar Circle. Another target is to transform the network into a broadband seismic array capable to detect long-period seismic signals originating from seismic events in the Arctic. The first upgrade phase started in 2014, when two new stations were installed and now are working in the test regime. These stations are used as prototypes for testing seismic equipment and technical solutions for real-time data transmission and vault construction under cold climate conditions. The first prototype station is installed in a surface vault and equipped with Nanometrics Trillium 120P sensor, while the other one is installed in a borehole and equipped with Trillium Posthole seismometer. These prototype stations have provided to us valuable experience on the downhole and surface deployment of broadband seismic instruments. We also have been able to compare the capabilities and performance of high sensitivity broadband sensor deployed in borehole with that deployed in surface vault. The results of operation of prototype stations will be used in site selection and installation of four new

  7. REVIVING AND UPGRADING OF THE EP DEVICE

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriquez, I.; Higinbotham, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    At Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, an electron beam is used to probe the fundamental properties of the nucleus. In these experiments, it is essential to know the precise energy of the beam. An important instrument along the beamline to measure the beam energy is the eP device. The device measures the scattered electron angle and the recoil proton angle of an elastic collision. From these angle measurements, the beam energy can be calculated. Many eP device components such as computer software, controls, and mechanical parts needed to be upgraded and/or replaced in order for the eP device to be operational again. A research study was conducted of the current hydrogen target and its properties as well as alternate targets for better performance. As the maximum electron beam energy incident on the eP device will soon be upgraded from 6 GeV to 12 GeV, an analysis was also done on potential changes to the position of the electron and proton detectors in order to accommodate this change. Calculations show that for the new energy upgrade, electron detectors need to be positioned at 5° above and below the beamline to measure the energy of 12 GeV. New proton detectors need to be placed at an angle of 49.2° above and below the beamline to measure energies of 6.6 GeV and 8.8 GeV. With these changes the eP device will measure the range of new energies from 2.2 GeV to 12 GeV. From the target research studies it was found that a carbon nanotube mixture with polypropylene could be the ideal target for the eP device because of its high thermal conductivity and its high hydrogen content. The changes made to the eP device demonstrate the importance of continued research and new technologies.

  8. Upgrade of the area II spectrograph

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Bolduc, C.

    1995-08-01

    Because of the low beam energies required for experiments of astrophysical interest, the first test experiments with radioactive {sup 18}F beams can be performed in Area II. Because of the shorter distances between ion source and detector this also results in higher transmission efficiencies. The Enge split-pole spectrograph, which was not used during the last 8 years, was equipped with a new cryopump system, upgrades to the magnet power supply and the NMR system were performed. A rotating target system was built which should alleviate target deterioration effects that were observed in first test experiments.

  9. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  10. Electron cyclotron heating in TMX-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Stallard, B.W.; Hooper, E.B. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    TMX-Upgrade, an improved tandem mirror experiment under construction at LLNL, will use electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) to create thermal barriers and to increase the center cell ion confining potential. Gyrotron oscillators (200 kW, 28 GHz) supply the heating power for the potential confined electron (fundamental heating) and the mirror-confined electrons (harmonic heating) in the thermal barriers. Important issues are temperature limitation and microstability for the hot electrons. Off-midplane heating can control anisotropy-driven microstability. Spacially restricting heating offers the possibility of temperature control by limiting the energy for resonant interaction.

  11. The value of steam turbine upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, K.; Olear, D.

    2005-11-01

    Technological advances in mechanical and aerodynamic design of the turbine steam path are resulting in higher reliability and efficiency. A recent study conducted on a 390 MW pulverized coal-fired unit revealed just how much these new technological advancements can improve efficiency and output. The empirical study showed that the turbine upgrade raised high pressure (HP) turbine efficiency by 5%, intermediate pressure (IP) turbine efficiency by 4%, and low pressure (LP) turbine efficiency by 2.5%. In addition, the unit's highest achievable gross generation increased from 360 MW to 371 MW. 3 figs.

  12. Integrated Instrumentation and Control Upgrade Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, D.; Sun, B.; Wray, L.; Smith, J.

    1992-02-01

    This document presents the first industry-wide integrated research and development plan to support upgrading instrumentation and control (I C) systems in nuclear power plants in the United States. The plan encompasses both solving obsolescence problems and introducing modern I C technology into the industry. Accomplishing this plan will provide the technological base to modernize existing plants, as well as bridge the gap to meet Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) requirements for modern I C systems. This plan defines Research and Development tasks to meet the identified needs for the following technical elements: Instrumentation, Control and Protection, Man-Machine Support Systems, Maintenance, Communications, Verification and Validation, and Specifications and Standards.

  13. SLC Interferometer System and Phase Distribution Upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Akre, Ron; /SLAC

    2011-08-26

    Many of the components used in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) phasing system date back 30 years to the construction of SLAC. At the start of SLC the phase reference system was upgraded with many of the original components remaining. The R.F. drive system phase stability requirements became tighter with operation and optimization of the SLC. This paper describes analysis done on the R.F. drive system and interferometer system during the 1996 run and down time, modifications to the systems during the 1996-97 down time, and the improvements in stability from the modifications.

  14. Fermilab Linac Upgrade: Module conditioning results

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.

    1992-12-01

    The 805 MHz Side-coupled cavity modules for the Fermilab 400 MeV linac upgrade have been conditioned to accept full power. The sparking rate in the cavities and in the side-cells has been reduced to acceptable levels. It required approximately 40 [times] 10[sup 6] pulses for each module to achieve an adequately low sparking rate. This contribution outlines the commissioning procedure, presents the sparking rate improvements and the radiation level improvements through the commissioning process and disc the near-online commissioning plans for this accelerator.

  15. Fermilab Linac Upgrade: Module conditioning results

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.

    1992-12-01

    The 805 MHz Side-coupled cavity modules for the Fermilab 400 MeV linac upgrade have been conditioned to accept full power. The sparking rate in the cavities and in the side-cells has been reduced to acceptable levels. It required approximately 40 {times} 10{sup 6} pulses for each module to achieve an adequately low sparking rate. This contribution outlines the commissioning procedure, presents the sparking rate improvements and the radiation level improvements through the commissioning process and disc the near-online commissioning plans for this accelerator.

  16. Alaska Seismic Network Upgrade and Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandru, J. M.; Hansen, R. A.; Estes, S. A.; Fowler, M.

    2009-12-01

    AEIC (Alaska Earthquake Information Center) has begun the task of upgrading the older regional seismic monitoring sites that have been in place for a number of years. Many of the original sites (some dating to the 1960's) are still single component analog technology. This was a very reasonable and ultra low power reliable system for its day. However with the advanced needs of today's research community, AEIC has begun upgrading to Broadband and Strong Motion Seismometers, 24 bit digitizers and high-speed two-way communications, while still trying to maintain the utmost reliability and maintaining low power consumption. Many sites have been upgraded or will be upgraded from single component to triaxial broad bands and triaxial accerometers. This provided much greater dynamic range over the older antiquated technology. The challenge is compounded by rapidly changing digital technology. Digitizersand data communications based on analog phone lines utilizing 9600 baud modems and RS232 are becoming increasingly difficult to maintain and increasingly expensive compared to current methods that use Ethernet, TCP/IP and UDP connections. Gaining a reliable Internet connection can be as easy as calling up an ISP and having a DSL connection installed or may require installing our own satellite uplink, where other options don't exist. LANs are accomplished with a variety of communications devices such as spread spectrum 900 MHz radios or VHF radios for long troublesome shots. WANs are accomplished with a much wider variety of equipment. Traditional analog phone lines are being used in some instances, however 56K lines are much more desirable. Cellular data links have become a convenient option in semiurban environments where digital cellular coverage is available. Alaska is slightly behind the curve on cellular technology due to its low population density and vast unpopulated areas but has emerged into this new technology in the last few years. Partnerships with organizations

  17. Operation and Upgrades of the LCLS*

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, J.; Akre, R.; Arthur, J.; Bionta, R.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J.; Brachmann, A.; Bucksbaum, P.; Coffee, R.; Decker, F.-J.; Ding, Y.; Dowell, D.; Edstrom, S.; Emma, P.; Fisher, A.; Gilevich, S.; Hastings, J.; Hays, G.; Hering, P.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; /SLAC /Argonne /SLAC

    2010-10-27

    The LCLS FEL began user operations in September 2009 with photon energies from 800eV to 2 KeV and pulse energies above 2 mJ. Both long pulse (50-200 femtosecond FWHM) and short pulse (<10 femtosecond FWHM at 150 uJ) pulses were delivered at user request. In addition the FEL was operated at fundamental photon energies up to 10 KeV in preparation for hard X-ray experiments. FEL operating parameters, performance and reliability results will be presented, in addition to plans for upgrades to the facility.

  18. RHIC BPM SYSTEM PERFORMANCE, UPGRADES, AND TOOLS.

    SciTech Connect

    SATOGATA,T.; CAMERON,P.; CERNIGLIA,P.; CUPOLO,J.; DAWSON,C.; DEGEN,C.; MEAD,J.; PTITSYN,V.; SIKORA,R.

    2002-06-02

    During the RHIC 2001-2 run, the beam position monitor (BPM) system provided independent average orbit and turn-by-turn (TBT) position measurements at 162 locations in each measurement plane and RHIC ring. TBT acquisition was successfully upgraded from 128 turns to 1024 turns per trigger, including injection. Closed orbits were acquired and automatically archived every two seconds through each acceleration ramp for orbit analysis and feed-forward orbit correction. This paper presents the overall system performance during this run, including precision, reproducibility, radiation damage, and analysis tools. We also summarize future plans, including million-turn TBT acquisition for nonlinear dynamics studies.

  19. An engineering upgrade of the CWDD injector

    SciTech Connect

    Pile, G.D.; Carwardine, J.A.; Cooke, M.B.

    1992-09-01

    The majority of injector operation at Culham was performed at voltages below the 2OOkV level required for Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) operation. Whilst many shots were obtained at 2OOkV, operation was considerably more difficult since the supporting subsystems were unable to withstand effects of high voltage breakdowns at this level. Additionally, there were some outstanding issues with regard to full commissioning of the beam transport system. This paper describes the strategy for upgrading the injecter system reliability to the levels required for commissioning and operation of the RFQ.

  20. An engineering upgrade of the CWDD injector

    SciTech Connect

    Pile, G.D.; Carwardine, J.A.; Cooke, M.B. )

    1992-01-01

    The majority of injector operation at Culham was performed at voltages below the 2OOkV level required for Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) operation. Whilst many shots were obtained at 2OOkV, operation was considerably more difficult since the supporting subsystems were unable to withstand effects of high voltage breakdowns at this level. Additionally, there were some outstanding issues with regard to full commissioning of the beam transport system. This paper describes the strategy for upgrading the injecter system reliability to the levels required for commissioning and operation of the RFQ.

  1. Methods and apparatuses for preparing upgraded pyrolysis oil

    DOEpatents

    Brandvold, Timothy A; Baird, Lance Awender; Frey, Stanley Joseph

    2013-10-01

    Methods and apparatuses for preparing upgraded pyrolysis oil are provided herein. In an embodiment, a method of preparing upgraded pyrolysis oil includes providing a biomass-derived pyrolysis oil stream having an original oxygen content. The biomass-derived pyrolysis oil stream is hydrodeoxygenated under catalysis in the presence of hydrogen to form a hydrodeoxygenated pyrolysis oil stream comprising a cyclic paraffin component. At least a portion of the hydrodeoxygenated pyrolysis oil stream is dehydrogenated under catalysis to form the upgraded pyrolysis oil.

  2. Upgrading of existing structures. Final report on phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielsen, B.L.; Tansely, R.S.; Cuzner, G.

    1980-06-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of blast upgrading of existing structures, which consisted of developing failure prediction methodologies for various structure types, both in 'as built' and in upgraded configurations, and verifying these prediction techniques with full-scale load tests. These upgrading schemes were developed for use as shelters in support of Civil Defense crisis relocation planning. Structure types investigated included wood, steel, and concrete floor and roof systems. The results of this study are being used in the development of a shelter manual presenting the various upgrading concepts in an illustrative workbook form for use in the field.

  3. Successful Strategies for Rapidly Upgrading PTC Windchill 9.1 to Windchill 10.1 on a Light Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearrow, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    Topics covered include: The Frugal Times Historical Upgrade Process; Planning for Possible Constraints; PTC Compatibility Matrix; In-Place Upgrade Process; Pre-Upgrade Activities; Upgrade Activities; Post Upgrade Activities; Results of the Upgrade; Tips for an Upgrade On a Shoestring Budget.

  4. Compression station upgrades include advanced noise reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, V.R.; Sherikar, S.

    1998-10-01

    Since its inception in the mid-`80s, AlintaGas` Dampier to Bunbury natural gas pipeline has been constantly undergoing a series of upgrades to boost capacity and meet other needs. Extending northward about 850 miles from near Perth to the northwest shelf, the 26-inch line was originally served by five compressor stations. In the 1989-91 period, three new compressor stations were added to increase capacity and a ninth station was added in 1997. Instead of using noise-path-treatment mufflers to reduce existing noise, it was decided to use noise-source-treatment technology to prevent noise creation in the first place. In the field, operation of these new noise-source treatment attenuators has been very quiet. If there was any thought earlier of guaranteed noise-level verification, it is not considered a priority now. It`s also anticipated that as AlintaGas proceeds with its pipeline and compressor station upgrade program, similar noise-source treatment equipment will be employed and retrofitted into older stations where the need to reduce noise and potential radiant-heat exposure is indicated.

  5. On-line upgrade of program modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldrop, Raymond S.; Volz, Richard A.; Smith, Gary W.; Holzbacher-Valero, A. A.; Goldsack, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a taxonomy of problems that must be solved in order to achieve on-line upgradability of long-lived programs, and presents a solution to the fundamental problems in the taxonomy. The solutions are based upon AdaPT, a set of language extensions designed to aid in the distribution of a single Ada program. AdaPT introduces three major units, the public, the partition, and the node. Publics are primarily used to share type information. Partitions are the basic units of distribution while nodes are used to control the configuration of the program. Nodes and partitions can be created dynamically via the allocator. A node-level routine controls the replacement process. The controlling node creates a new instance of the routine being replaced; the run-time system must ensure that the new instance is the updated one. Once access to the new version has been established, all further calls to the module are redirected to the new version and the caller is informed of the change so that it may make subsequent calls directly. When a module is being upgraded, there is a transition period during which both the old and new versions are present. We require that clients of a potentially replaceable module 'check in' with the controlling node. The controlling node keeps track of the number of clients that have been redirected to the replacement. When all have been redirected, the old version can be deallocated.

  6. Leak detection system upgrades Cochin pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, B.; O`Leary, C.

    1996-02-01

    Amoco Canada`s Cochin pipeline system consists of 1,900 miles of 12-inch pipeline, 31 pump stations, eight injection/delivery stations and five propane terminals. It originates just northeast of Edmonton and crosses into the US in North Dakota, runs south of Lake Michigan, turns northeast to pass through Detroit and terminates in Sarnia, Ontario. In 1991, it was decided to significantly upgrade facilities for operating the Cochin pipeline. The control center hardware was obsolete, including parts and components no longer available. Also, SCADA and modeling software was no longer supported by outside vendors or consultants and there was only limited in-house support available. The land-based communications system was unreliable and expensive. Goals for the upgrade project included maintaining (improving) reliability and minimizing operating risks. Amoco Canada wanted to ensure reliable operations and support, provide reliable and effective leak detection, establish dependable communications, have the capability to respond to market additions or changes and maintain customer and regulatory confidence. Another important goal was to minimize operating costs. Specifically, methods were sought to minimize power costs, communications expense and support and maintenance expenditures while eliminating non-productive work. This paper reviews the resulting design and performance of this system.

  7. Readout of the upgraded ALICE-ITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepankiewicz, A.

    2016-07-01

    The ALICE experiment will undergo a major upgrade during the second long shutdown of the CERN LHC. As part of this program, the present Inner Tracking System (ITS), which employs different layers of hybrid pixels, silicon drift and strip detectors, will be replaced by a completely new tracker composed of seven layers of monolithic active pixel sensors. The upgraded ITS will have more than twelve billion pixels in total, producing 300 Gbit/s of data when tracking 50 kHz Pb-Pb events. Two families of pixel chips realized with the TowerJazz CMOS imaging process have been developed as candidate sensors: the ALPIDE, which uses a proprietary readout and sparsification mechanism and the MISTRAL-O, based on a proven rolling shutter architecture. Both chips can operate in continuous mode, with the ALPIDE also supporting triggered operations. As the communication IP blocks are shared among the two chip families, it has been possible to develop a common Readout Electronics. All the sensor components (analog stages, state machines, buffers, FIFOs, etc.) have been modelled in a system level simulation, which has been extensively used to optimize both the sensor and the whole readout chain design in an iterative process. This contribution covers the progress of the R&D efforts and the overall expected performance of the ALICE-ITS readout system.

  8. Simulating Avionics Upgrades to the Space Shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deger, Daniel; Hill, Kenneth; Braaten, Karsten E.

    2008-01-01

    Cockpit Avionics Prototyping Environment (CAPE) is a computer program that simulates the functions of proposed upgraded avionics for a space shuttle. In CAPE, pre-existing space-shuttle-simulation programs are merged with a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) display-development program, yielding a package of software that enables high-fi46 NASA Tech Briefs, September 2008 delity simulation while making it possible to rapidly change avionic displays and the underlying model algorithms. The pre-existing simulation programs are Shuttle Engineering Simulation, Shuttle Engineering Simulation II, Interactive Control and Docking Simulation, and Shuttle Mission Simulator playback. The COTS program Virtual Application Prototyping System (VAPS) not only enables the development of displays but also makes it possible to move data about, capture and process events, and connect to a simulation. VAPS also enables the user to write code in the C or C++ programming language and compile that code into the end-product simulation software. As many as ten different avionic-upgrade ideas can be incorporated in a single compilation and, thus, tested in a single simulation run. CAPE can be run in conjunction with any or all of four simulations, each representing a different phase of a space-shuttle flight.

  9. Upgrade of the Belle Silicon Vertex Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, M.; Belle SVD Collaboration

    2010-11-01

    The Belle experiment at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) was inaugurated in 1999 and has delivered excellent physics results since then, which were, for example, recognized in the Nobel Prize award 2008 to Kobayashi and Masukawa. An overall luminosity of 895 fb -1 has been recorded as of December 2008, and the present system will be running until 1 ab -1 is achieved. After that, a major upgrade is foreseen for both the KEK-B machine and the Belle detector. Already in 2004, the Letter of Intent for KEK Super B Factory was published. Intermediate steps of upgrade were considered for the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD), which performs very well but already got close to its limit regarding the occupancy in the innermost layer and dead time. Eventually it was decided to keep the existing SVD2 system until 1 ab -1 and completely replace the silicon detector as well as its readout system for Super-Belle. The future SVD will be composed of double-sided silicon sensors as the present detector, but equipped with faster readout electronics, namely the APV25 chips originally made for CMS at CERN. Moreover, it will be enlarged by two additional layers and equipped with a double layer of DEPFET pixel detectors surrounding the beam pipe. The silicon sensors will be fabricated from 6 in. wafers (compared to the current 4 in. types) and the readout chain will be completely replaced, including front-end, repeaters and the back-end electronics in the counting house.

  10. CEBAF Upgrade: Cryomodule Performance And Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, Michael A.; Davis, G. Kirk; Hogan, John P.; Hovater, J. Curt; King, Lawrence; Marhauser, Frank; Park, HyeKyoung; Preble, Joe; Reece, Charles E.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Haipeng; Wiseman, Mark A.

    2014-02-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is currently engaged in the 12 GeV Upgrade Project. The goal of the 12 GeV Upgrade is a doubling of the available beam energy of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. This increase in beam energy will be due in large part to the addition of ten C100 cryomodules plus associated new RF in the CEBAF linacs. The C100 cryomodules are designed to deliver 100 MeV per installed cryomodule. Each C100 cryomodule is built around a string of eight seven-cell, electro-polished, superconducting RF cavities. While an average performance of 100MV per cryomodule is needed to achieve the overall 12 GeV beam energy goal, the actual performance goal for the cryomodules is an average energy gain of 108 MV to provide operational headroom. Cryomodule production started in December 2010. All ten of the C100 cryomodules are installed in the linac tunnels and are on schedule to complete commissioning by September 2013. Performance during Commissioning has ranged from 104 MV to 118 MV. In May, 2012 a test of an early C100 achieved 108 MV with full beam loading. This paper will discuss the performance of the C100 cryomodules along with operational challenges and lessons learned for future designs.

  11. The Latest and Greatest: Upgrade, Replace, or Stall? Part II: Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Walt

    1991-01-01

    Review of upgrades to IBM and Macintosh software includes personal experiences with DOS 5.0, PC Tools Version 7, and Microsoft Word 5.5. Reasons for and problems with upgrades are then discussed, including alternatives to upgrading and problems with skipping upgrades. Guidelines for deciding whether to upgrade and notes from the literature for…

  12. Status and Physics Opportunities of the STAR Heavy Flavor Tracker and the Muon Telescope Detector Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Qiu; Star Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    The STAR Collaboration will complete the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) and the Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) upgrades by 2014. HFT utilizes the state-of-art active pixel detector technology, which will greatly enhance the STAR physics capabilities by measuring heavy quark yield, collectivity and correlations via the topological reconstruction of charmed hadrons over a wide momentum range. The MTD is based on the long Multi-Gap Resistive Plate Chamber detector technology designed to measure muons penetrating the bulk of other detectors and the magnet yoke. It will enable STAR to study di-muon and electron-muon correlations and enhance heavy quarkonium studies. With the addition of these upgrades, STAR is well suited to perform precise measurements of production as well as correlations of rare probes (heavy flavors, dileptons) to systematically investigate the quark-gluon plasma properties at RHIC. For Run 13 63% of the MTD has been installed and data have been taken. Prototype PXL sectors (30% coverage) have also been installed and commissioned. Anticipated physics results and current status of these upgrades is reported.

  13. A Neutral Beam for the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment Upgrade (LTX-U)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, Enrique; Majeski, Richard; Kaita, Robert; Kozub, Thomas; Boyle, Dennis; Schmitt, John; Smirnov, Artem

    2015-11-01

    Neutral beam injection into tokamaks is a proven method of plasma heating and fueling. In LTX, high confinement discharges have been achieved with low-recycling lithium walls. To further improve plasma performance, a neutral beam (NB) will be installed as part of an upgrade to LTX (LTX-U). The NB will provide core plasma fueling with up to 700 kW of injected power. Requirements for accommodating the NB include the addition of injection and beam-dump ports onto the vessel and enhancement of the vacuum vessel pumping capability. Because the NB can also serve as a source of neutrals for charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy, ``active'' spectroscopic diagnostics will also be developed. An overview of these plans and other improvements for upgrading LTX to LTX-U will be presented. Supported by US DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Initial results of the high resolution edge Thomson scattering upgrade at DIII-Da)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldon, D.; Bray, B. D.; Deterly, T. M.; Liu, C.; Watkins, M.; Groebner, R. J.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Snyder, P. B.; Boivin, R. L.; Tynan, G. R.

    2012-10-01

    Validation of models of pedestal structure is an important part of predicting pedestal height and performance in future tokamaks. The Thomson scattering diagnostic at DIII-D has been upgraded in support of validating these models. Spatial and temporal resolution, as well as signal to noise ratio, have all been specifically enhanced in the pedestal region. This region is now diagnosed by 20 view-chords with a spacing of 6 mm and a scattering length of just under 5 mm sampled at a nominal rate of 250 Hz. When mapped to the outboard midplane, this corresponds to ˜3 mm spacing. These measurements are being used to test critical gradient models, in which pedestal gradients increase in time until a threshold is reached. This paper will describe the specifications of the upgrade and present initial results of the system.

  15. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 11, March 21, 1992--June 20, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-12-31

    Membrane reactors have been used in a number of catalytic reaction processes in order to overcome the limitations on conversion imposed by thermodynamic equilibrium. Having the inherent capability for combining reaction and separation in a single step, they offer promise for improving and optimizing yield, selectivity and performance of processes involving complex liquids, such as these typically found in coal liquid upgrading. Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. This project will evaluate the performance of Sol-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. Development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  16. Benefits of Advanced Control Room Technologies: Phase One Upgrades to the HSSL, Research Plan, and Performance Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Le Blanc, Katya; Joe, Jeffrey; Rice, Brandon; Ulrich, Thomas; Boring, Ronald

    2015-05-01

    Control Room modernization is an important part of life extension for the existing light water reactor fleet. None of the 99 currently operating commercial nuclear power plants in the U.S. has completed a full-scale control room modernization to date. A full-scale modernization might, for example, entail replacement of all analog panels with digital workstations. Such modernizations have been undertaken successfully in upgrades in Europe and Asia, but the U.S. has yet to undertake a control room upgrade of this magnitude. Instead, nuclear power plant main control rooms for the existing commercial reactor fleet remain significantly analog, with only limited digital modernizations. Previous research under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program has helped establish a systematic process for control room upgrades that support the transition to a hybrid control room. While the guidance developed to date helps streamline the process of modernization and reduce costs and uncertainty associated with introducing digital control technologies into an existing control room, these upgrades do not achieve the full potential of newer technologies that might otherwise enhance plant and operator performance. The aim of the control room benefits research is to identify previously overlooked benefits of modernization, identify candidate technologies that may facilitate such benefits, and demonstrate these technologies through human factors research. This report describes the initial upgrades to the HSSL and outlines the methodology for a pilot test of the HSSL configuration.

  17. Upgrade of the ALICE muon trigger electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupieux, P.; Joly, B.; Jouve, F.; Manen, S.; Vandaële, R.

    2014-09-01

    The ALICE muon trigger is a large scale detector based on single gap bakelite RPCs. An upgrade of the electronics is needed in order to withstand the increase of luminosity after the LHC Long Shutdown-2 in 2018-2019. The detector will be read out at the minimum bias rate of 100 kHz in Pb-Pb collisions (including a safety factor of 2), two orders of magnitude above the present design. For the most exposed RPCs and in the present conditions of operation, the total integrated charge could be as high as 100 mC/cm2 with rates up to 100 Hz/cm2, which is above the present limit for safe operation. In order to overcome these limitations, upgrade projects of the Front-End (FE) and Readout Electronics are scheduled. The readout upgrade at high rate with low dead time requires changing most of the present electronics. It involves a new design for the 234 Local cards receiving the LVDS signals from the FE electronics and the 16 Regional concentrator cards. The readout chain is completed by a single Common Readout Unit developed for most ALICE sub-detectors. The new architecture of the muon trigger readout will be briefly presented. The present FE electronics, designed for the streamer mode, must be replaced to prevent ageing of the RPCs in the future operating conditions. The new FE called FEERIC (for Front-End Electronics Rapid Integrated Circuit) will have to perform amplification of the analog input signals. This will allow for RPC operation in a low-gain avalanche mode, with a much smaller charge deposit (factor 3-5) in the detector as compared to the present conditions. The purpose is to discriminate RPC signals with a charge threshold around 100 fC, in both polarities, and with a time jitter below 1 ns. We will describe the FE card and FEERIC ASIC features and first prototype performance, report on test results obtained on a cosmic test bench and discuss ongoing developments.

  18. 25 CFR 175.40 - Financing of extensions and upgrades.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Financing of extensions and upgrades. 175.40 Section 175.40 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER... extend or upgrade its electric system to serve additional loads (new or increased loads). (b) If...

  19. 25 CFR 175.40 - Financing of extensions and upgrades.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Financing of extensions and upgrades. 175.40 Section 175.40 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER... extend or upgrade its electric system to serve additional loads (new or increased loads). (b) If...

  20. 25 CFR 175.40 - Financing of extensions and upgrades.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Financing of extensions and upgrades. 175.40 Section 175.40 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER... extend or upgrade its electric system to serve additional loads (new or increased loads). (b) If...

  1. 25 CFR 175.40 - Financing of extensions and upgrades.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Financing of extensions and upgrades. 175.40 Section 175.40 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER... extend or upgrade its electric system to serve additional loads (new or increased loads). (b) If...

  2. 25 CFR 175.40 - Financing of extensions and upgrades.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Financing of extensions and upgrades. 175.40 Section 175.40 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER... extend or upgrade its electric system to serve additional loads (new or increased loads). (b) If...

  3. Syracuse Upgrading Project-December 1967--June 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syracuse Univ. Research Corp., NY.

    The document reports on a training program designed to accelerate in-plant upgrading of skills, first in metal-working, then in health-service occupations, through training provided in off-work time. The project was to evaluate the use of allowances as incentives, and to provide guidelines for future upgrading programs. (Author)

  4. 28 CFR 115.218 - Upgrades to facilities and technologies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Upgrades to facilities and technologies....218 Upgrades to facilities and technologies. (a) When designing or acquiring any new facility and in... surveillance system, or other monitoring technology, the agency shall consider how such technology may...

  5. 28 CFR 115.218 - Upgrades to facilities and technologies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Upgrades to facilities and technologies....218 Upgrades to facilities and technologies. (a) When designing or acquiring any new facility and in... surveillance system, or other monitoring technology, the agency shall consider how such technology may...

  6. 28 CFR 115.218 - Upgrades to facilities and technologies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Upgrades to facilities and technologies....218 Upgrades to facilities and technologies. (a) When designing or acquiring any new facility and in... surveillance system, or other monitoring technology, the agency shall consider how such technology may...

  7. Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.; Biddy, M.; Jones, S.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the cultivation of algal biomass followed by further lipid extraction and upgrading to hydrocarbon biofuels. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the algal lipid extraction and upgrading pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  8. NASA Glenn PSL-3 and 4 Control System Upgrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizanich, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    An overview of the PSL-3&4 Jet Engine Test Facility control system; including its history, a description of the present effort to upgrade from Emerson Ovation v2.2 to V3.3.1, and future upgrade plans is shown.

  9. The CDF II eXtremely fast tracker upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Azzurri, P.; Cochran, E.; Dittmann, J.; Donati, S.; Efron, J.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Fedorko, I.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; /Illinois U., Urbana /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Ohio State U. /Baylor U. /UC, Davis /Athens Natl. Capodistrian U. /Purdue U. /Fermilab

    2006-09-01

    The CDF II Extremely Fast Tracker is the trigger track processor which reconstructs charged particle tracks in the transverse plane of the CDF II central outer tracking chamber. The system is now being upgraded to perform a three dimensional track reconstruction. A review of the upgrade is presented here.

  10. Upgrade and performance of the VERITAS telescope array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajotte, Jean-Francois

    2014-12-01

    The VERITAS collaboration has been observing VHE (E > 100 GeV) gamma rays since 2007. It has recently completed major upgrades of the photomultiplier tubes and pattern trigger. More than a year after these implementations, these efforts have shown to improve the performance with better noise reduction, faster source detection and lowered energy threshold. Further benefits are also expected from these upgrades.

  11. Performance and upgrades of the Fermilab Accumulator stacktail stochastic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Derwent, P.F.; Cullerton, Ed; McGinnis, David; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Sun, Ding; Tinsley, David; /Fermilab

    2005-11-01

    We report on the performance and planned upgrades to the Fermilab Accumulator Stacktail Stochastic Cooling System. The current system has achieved a maximum flux of 16.5e10/hour, limited by the input flux of antiprotons. The upgrades are designed to handle flux in excess of 40e10/hour.

  12. 40 CFR 280.21 - Upgrading of existing UST systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... STORAGE TANKS (UST) UST Systems: Design, Construction, Installation and Notification § 280.21 Upgrading of... Corrosion on Metallic Buried, Partially Buried, or Submerged Liquid Storage Systems”; and (D) American... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Upgrading of existing UST systems....

  13. 40 CFR 280.21 - Upgrading of existing UST systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... STORAGE TANKS (UST) UST Systems: Design, Construction, Installation and Notification § 280.21 Upgrading of... Corrosion on Metallic Buried, Partially Buried, or Submerged Liquid Storage Systems”; and (D) American... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Upgrading of existing UST systems....

  14. 40 CFR 280.21 - Upgrading of existing UST systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... STORAGE TANKS (UST) UST Systems: Design, Construction, Installation and Notification § 280.21 Upgrading of... Corrosion on Metallic Buried, Partially Buried, or Submerged Liquid Storage Systems”; and (D) American... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Upgrading of existing UST systems....

  15. 40 CFR 280.21 - Upgrading of existing UST systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... STORAGE TANKS (UST) UST Systems: Design, Construction, Installation and Notification § 280.21 Upgrading of... Corrosion on Metallic Buried, Partially Buried, or Submerged Liquid Storage Systems”; and (D) American... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Upgrading of existing UST systems....

  16. 40 CFR 280.21 - Upgrading of existing UST systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... STORAGE TANKS (UST) UST Systems: Design, Construction, Installation and Notification § 280.21 Upgrading of... Corrosion on Metallic Buried, Partially Buried, or Submerged Liquid Storage Systems”; and (D) American... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Upgrading of existing UST systems....

  17. The 12 GeV Energy Upgrade at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Fulvia C.

    2012-09-01

    Two new cryomodules and an extensive upgrade of the bending magnets at Jefferson Lab has been recently completed in preparation for the full energy upgrade in about one year. Jefferson Laboratory has undertaken a major upgrade of its flagship facility, the CW re-circulating CEBAF linac, with the goal of doubling the linac energy to 12 GeV. I will discuss here the main scope and timeline of the upgrade and report on recent accomplishments and the present status. I will then discuss in more detail the core of the upgrade, the new additional C100 cryomodules, their production, tests and recent successful performance. I will then conclude by looking at the future plans of Jefferson Laboratory, from the commissioning and operations of the 12 GeV CEBAF to the design of the MEIC electron ion collider.

  18. Facilities upgrade (restoration) report: Fiscal year 1988 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrer, C.H.

    1987-12-01

    The Facilities Upgrade (Restoration) Program was initiated to investigate the extent of deterioration and obsolescence of equipment, facilities, and systems required in support of activities at the Hanford Site, to forecast resources and schedules to remove the identified deficiencies, and to effectively manage the implementation of approved and funded upgrade efforts. The basic objectives of the upgrade program are: to assess the extent of deterioration and obsolescence of equipment, facilities, and systems which are required to support the Nuclear Materials Production and Defense Waste Management Programs; to forecast resources and schedules to restore the decreased capabilities and efficiency which are identified in the assessment in accordance with program needs; to effectively manage and implement the approved and funded program activities; and to update the upgrading assessment and resultant forecasts/resources/schedules annually to assure upgrading priorities are consistent with Nuclear Materials Production and Defense Waste and Byproducts Management`s needs. 12 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. Modern hydrocracking is the key to upgrading processes

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, R.A.

    1989-06-26

    Hydrocracking technology is the key to Canada's heavy oil and bitumen upgrading facilities that have recently started or are due to start up during the next few years. The upgrader at Consumers' Cooperative Refineries Ltd. in Regina Sask.; the capacity addition program (CAP) at Syncrude Canada Ltd.'s Fort McMurray, Alta., plant; Husky Oil Operations Ltd.'s Bi-Provincial upgrader to be built near Lloydminster, Sask.; and the OSLO project to be built near Fort McMurray, all rely on this modern technology for primary upgrading. All of the projects are designed to upgrade heavy oil and bitumen extracted from oil sands to a high-quality synthetic crude oil (SCO) that is a blend of high-quality naphtha and gas oil.

  20. D(O) upgrade muon electronics design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldin, B.; Green, D.; Haggerty, H.; Hansen, S.

    1994-11-01

    The planned luminosity for the upgrade is ten times higher than at present (L (approximately) 10(exp 32)cm(exp -2)/s) and involves a time between collisions as small as 132 ns. To operate in this environment, completely new electronics is required for the 17,500 proportional drift tubes of the system. These electronics include a deadtimeless readout, a digital TDC with about 1 ns binning for the wire signals, fast charge integrators and pipelined ADC's for digitizing the pad electrode signals, a new wire signal triggering scheme and its associated trigger logic, and high level DSP processing. Some test results of measurements performed on prototype channels and a comparison with the existing electronics are presented.

  1. INSERTION DEVICE UPGRADE PLANS AT THE NSLS.

    SciTech Connect

    TANABE, T.; BLEDNYKH, A.; HARDER, D.; LEHECKA, M.; RAKOWSKY, G.; SKARITKA, J.

    2005-05-16

    This paper describes plans to upgrade insertion devices (IDs) at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory, U.S.A. The aging wiggler (W120) at X25 is being replaced by a 1 m long in-vacuum mini-gap undulator (MGU-X25) optimized for a dedicated macromolecular crystallography program. A new, 1/3 m long, undulator (MGU or SCU-X9), will be installed between a pair of RF cavities at X9, and will serve a new beamline dedicated for small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Both IDs will have provision for cryocooling the NdFeB hybrid arrays to 150K to raise the field and K-value and to obtain better spectral coverage. Design issues of the devices and other considerations, especially magnetic measurement at low temperature, will be discussed.

  2. The LHCb trigger and its upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziurda, A.

    2016-07-01

    The current LHCb trigger system consists of a hardware level, which reduces the LHC inelastic collision rate of 30 MHz, at which the entire detector is read out. In a second level, implemented in a farm of 20 k parallel-processing CPUs, the event rate is reduced to about 5 kHz. We review the performance of the LHCb trigger system during Run I of the LHC. Special attention is given to the use of multivariate analyses in the High Level Trigger. The major bottleneck for hadronic decays is the hardware trigger. LHCb plans a major upgrade of the detector and DAQ system in the LHC shutdown of 2018, enabling a purely software based trigger to process the full 30 MHz of inelastic collisions delivered by the LHC. We demonstrate that the planned architecture will be able to meet this challenge.

  3. PEP-II Transverse Feedback Electronics Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.; Chin, M.; Doolittle, L.; Akre, R.

    2005-05-09

    The PEP-II B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) requires an upgrade of the transverse feedback system electronics. The new electronics require 12-bit resolution and a minimum sampling rate of 238 Msps. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is used to implement the feedback algorithm. The FPGA also contains an embedded PowerPC 405 (PPC-405) processor to run control system interface software for data retrieval, diagnostics, and system monitoring. The design of this system is based on the Xilinx(R) ML300 Development Platform, a circuit board set containing an FPGA with an embedded processor, a large memory bank, and other peripherals. This paper discusses the design of a digital feedback system based on an FPGA with an embedded processor. Discussion will include specifications, component selection, and integration with the ML300 design.

  4. Upgrading of a gamma radiation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, M. E.; Coelho, N.; Oliveira, J. E.

    1995-02-01

    A gamma radiation facility installed with the support of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is operating at Sacavém campus of the National Institute for Industrial Technology and Engineering (INETI) under the administration of the Institute of Technology and Innovation for Enterpreneurial Modernization (ITIME). In order to upgrade the safety of the plant and running operation, following national regulations as well as the CEN standards, several improvements have been introduced in the last couple of years. Hence, a new radiation monitoring system, a physical barrier at the entrance of the labyrinth and an electro-penumatic loading/unloading station were installed interlocked to the source. All the previous systems remaining and the new ones are controlled by a PC. The facility can work continuously in automatic mode.

  5. RICH upgrade: Current status and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, A.; LHCb RICH Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of B hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva). The second long shutdown of the LHC is currently scheduled to begin in 2018. During this period the LHCb experiment with all its sub-detectors will be upgraded in order to run at an instantaneous luminosity of 2 × 10^{33} cm-2s-1 and to read out data at a rate of 40MHz into a flexible software-based trigger. The Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) system will require new photon detectors and modifications of the optics of the upstream detector. Tests of the prototype of the smallest constituent of the new RICH system have been performed during testbeam sessions at the Test Beam Facility SPS North Area (CERN) in Autumn 2014.

  6. PEP-II Transverse Feedback Electronics Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.M.; Chin, M.J.; Doolittle, L.R.; Akre, R.; /SLAC

    2006-03-13

    The PEP-II B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) requires an upgrade of the transverse feedback system electronics. The new electronics require 12-bit resolution and a minimum sampling rate of 238 Msps. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is used to implement the feedback algorithm. The FPGA also contains an embedded PowerPC 405 (PPC-405) processor to run control system interface software for data retrieval, diagnostics, and system monitoring. The design of this system is based on the Xilinx{reg_sign} ML300 Development Platform, a circuit board set containing an FPGA with an embedded processor, a large memory bank, and other peripherals. This paper discusses the design of a digital feedback system based on an FPGA with an embedded processor. Discussion will include specifications, component selection, and integration with the ML300 design.

  7. CDF End Plug calorimeter Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, G.; de Barbaro, P.; Mishina, M.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the status of the CDF End Plug Upgrade Project. In this project, the CDF calorimeters in the end plug and the forward regions will be replaced by a single scintillator based calorimeter. After an extensive R&D effort on the tile/fiber calorimetry, we have now advanced to a construction phase. We review the results of the R&D leading to the final design of the calorimeters and the development of tooling devised for this project. The quality control program of the production of the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters is described. A shower maximum detector for the measurement of the shower centroid and the shower profile of electrons, {gamma} and {pi}{sup 0} has been designed. Its performance requirements, R&D results and mechanical design are discussed.

  8. Online track processor for the CDF upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    E. J. Thomson et al.

    2002-07-17

    A trigger track processor, called the eXtremely Fast Tracker (XFT), has been designed for the CDF upgrade. This processor identifies high transverse momentum (> 1.5 GeV/c) charged particles in the new central outer tracking chamber for CDF II. The XFT design is highly parallel to handle the input rate of 183 Gbits/s and output rate of 44 Gbits/s. The processor is pipelined and reports the result for a new event every 132 ns. The processor uses three stages: hit classification, segment finding, and segment linking. The pattern recognition algorithms for the three stages are implemented in programmable logic devices (PLDs) which allow in-situ modification of the algorithm at any time. The PLDs reside on three different types of modules. The complete system has been installed and commissioned at CDF II. An overview of the track processor and performance in CDF Run II are presented.

  9. New Positron Spectrometer for MEG Experiment Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, M.

    2014-08-01

    An upgrade of the MEG experiment, which searches for the lepton flavor violating decay, μ → eγ, at the highest sensitivity ever, is planned in order to improve the sensitivity down to ∼ 5 ×10-14. We plan to employ a stereo wire drift chamber with a unique volume for the tracking and a pixelated scintillation detector with silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readout for the timing measurement with improved efficiency and resolutions. We will describe the expected performance and the R&D status of the new spectrometer especially focusing on the new timing counter, which is expected to contribute better resolution of the relative timing between positron and gamma-ray.

  10. Upgrading the TFTR Transrex Power Supplies

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. Lawson, R. Marsala, S. Ramakrishnan, X. Zhao, P. Sichta

    2009-05-29

    In order to provide improved and expanded experimental capabilities, the existing Transrex power supplies at PPPL are to be upgraded and modernized. Each of the 39 power supplies consists of two six pulse silicon controlled rectifier sections forming a twelve pulse power supply. The first modification is to split each supply into two independent six pulse supplies by replacing the existing obsolete twelve pulse firing generator with two commercially available six pulse firing generators. The second change replaces the existing control link with a faster system, with greater capacity, which will allow for independent control of all 78 power supply sections. The third change replaces the existing Computer Automated Measurement and Control (CAMAC) based fault detector with an Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) compatible unit, eliminating the obsolete CAMAC modules. Finally the remaining relay logic and interfaces to the "Hardwired Control System" will be replaces with a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC).

  11. Integrated Instrumentation and Control Upgrade Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, D.; Sun, B.; Wray, L.; Smith, J.

    1992-02-01

    This document presents the first industry-wide integrated research and development plan to support upgrading instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in nuclear power plants in the United States. The plan encompasses both solving obsolescence problems and introducing modern I&C technology into the industry. Accomplishing this plan will provide the technological base to modernize existing plants, as well as bridge the gap to meet Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) requirements for modern I&C systems. This plan defines Research and Development tasks to meet the identified needs for the following technical elements: Instrumentation, Control and Protection, Man-Machine Support Systems, Maintenance, Communications, Verification and Validation, and Specifications and Standards.

  12. Tracking system of the upgraded LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obłąkowska-Mucha, A.; Szumlak, T.

    2016-07-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment will run at an instantaneous luminosity up to 2 ×1033cm-2s-1 with a fully software based trigger, allowing us to read out the detector at a rate of 40 MHz. For this purpose, the full tracking system will be newly developed: the vertex locator (VELO) will be replaced by a pixel-based detector providing an excellent track reconstruction with an efficiency of above 99%. Upstream of the magnet, a silicon micro-strip detector with a high granularity and an improved acceptance, called the Upstream Tracker (UT) will be placed. The tracking system downstream of the magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre tracker (SciFi), which will consist of 12 layers using 2.5 m long scintillating fibres read out by silicon photo-multipliers.

  13. Wideband ECE Imaging Upgrade for TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domier, C. W.; Zhang, P.; Xia, Z. G.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Park, H.; Mazzucato, E.; van de Pol, M. J.; Classen, I. G. J.; Jaspers, R.; Donne, A. J. H.

    2006-10-01

    A 128 channel 2-D Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) Imaging instrument has been routinely used to study MHD physics such as m=1 and m=2 modes on the TEXTOR tokamak. As presently configured, each array element of the 16 element mixer array measures plasma emission at 8 simultaneous frequencies over a 4 GHz span to form a 16x8 image of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations over an area of 16 cm (vertical) by 6 cm (horizontal). This instrument will be upgraded in October 2006 with new wideband ECE electronics which increase the instantaneous frequency coverage by >50% to 6.4 GHz with a corresponding increase in horizontal plasma coverage. Arranged in a new modular fashion, the system is easily extended to form a 16x16 system spanning 12.8 GHz by employing two modules per array channel, or as high as 16x24 spanning 19.2 GHz by employing three modules per array channel.

  14. UPGRADING NATURAL GAS VIA MEMBRANE SEPARATION PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    S.A.Stern; P.A. Rice; J. Hao

    2000-03-01

    The objective of the present study is to assess the potential usefulness of membrane separation processes for removing CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S from low-quality natural gas containing substantial amounts of both these ''acid'' gases, e.g., up to 40 mole-% CO{sub 2} and 10 mole-% H{sub 2}S. The membrane processes must be capable of upgrading the crude natural gas to pipeline specifications ({le} 2 mole-% CO{sub 2}, {le} 4 ppm H{sub 2}S). Moreover, these processes must also be economically competitive with the conventional separation techniques, such as gas absorption, utilized for this purpose by the gas industry.

  15. LLRF System for the CEBAF Separator Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Plawski, Tomasz E.; Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna; Hovater, J. Curt; Seidman, David J.; Wissmann, Mark J.

    2014-12-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV includes the installation of four new 748.5 MHz normal conducting deflecting cavities in the 5th pass extraction region. This system will work together with the existing 499 MHz RF Separator in order to allow simultaneous delivery of the beam to four CEBAF experimental halls. The RF system employs two digital LLRF systems controlling four cavities in a vector sum. Cavity tune information of the individual cavities is also obtained using a multiplexing scheme of the forward and reflected RF signals. In this paper we will present detailed LLRF design and the current status of the CEBAF 748.5/499 MHz beam extraction system.

  16. Trigger System Upgrades for the SNO+ Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzec, Eric; Sno+ Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The SNO+ experiment will explore many topics in neutrino physics including neutrino-less double beta decay, low-energy solar neutrinos, antineutrinos from reactors and natural sources, nucleon decay, and potentially supernova neutrinos. The SNO+ trigger and readout system consists of electronics both inherited from the SNO detector and newly created specifically to address the challenges presented by the addition of scintillation light. Addition of new utilities to the SNO+ trigger system will allow for a flexible calibration interface, more sophisticated use of the existing trigger system, and new, more targeted, background cuts that will improve physics sensitivity. These utilities will largely be orchestrated by a MicroZed System on Chip (SoC), micro-controller. Their range of application includes automatic fault detection, upgrades of SNO utilities, noise reduction, and interfacing between components of the trigger system.

  17. LCLS LLRF Upgrades to the SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Akre, R.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Hong, B.; Kotturi, K.; Krejcik, P.; Wu, J.; Byrd, J.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-10-04

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC will be the brightest X-ray laser in the world when it comes on line. In order to achieve the brightness a 200fS length electron bunch is passed through an undulator. To create the 200fS, 3kA bunch, a 10pS electron bunch, created from a photo cathode in an RF gun, is run off crest on the RF to set up a position to energy correlation. The bunch is then compressed by chicanes. The stability of the RF system is critical in setting up the position to energy correlation. Specifications derived from simulations require the RF system to be stable to below 200fS in several critical injector stations and the last kilometer of linac. The SLAC linac RF system is being upgraded to meet these requirements.

  18. Steam turbine upgrading: low-hanging fruit

    SciTech Connect

    Peltier, R.

    2006-04-15

    The thermodynamic performance of the steam turbine, more than any other plant component, determines overall plant efficiency. Upgrading steam path components and using computerized design tools and manufacturing techniques to minimise internal leaks are two ways to give tired steam turbines a new lease on life. The article presents three case studies that illustrate how to do that. These are at Unit 1 of Dairyland's J.P. Madgett Station in Alma, WI, a coal-fired subcritical steam plant; the four units at AmerenUE's 600 MW coal-fired Labadie plant west of St. Louis; and Unit 3 of KeyPlan Corp's Northport Power Station on Long Island. 8 figs.

  19. Upgraded HFIR Fuel Element Welding System

    SciTech Connect

    Sease, John D

    2010-02-01

    The welding of aluminum-clad fuel plates into aluminum alloy 6061 side plate tubing is a unique design feature of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel assemblies as 101 full-penetration circumferential gas metal arc welds (GMAW) are required in the fabrication of each assembly. In a HFIR fuel assembly, 540 aluminum-clad fuel plates are assembled into two nested annular fuel elements 610 mm (24-inches) long. The welding process for the HFIR fuel elements was developed in the early 1960 s and about 450 HFIR fuel assemblies have been successfully welded using the GMAW process qualified in the 1960 s. In recent years because of the degradation of the electronic and mechanical components in the old HFIR welding system, reportable defects in plate attachment or adapter welds have been present in almost all completed fuel assemblies. In October 2008, a contract was awarded to AMET, Inc., of Rexburg, Idaho, to replace the old welding equipment with standard commercially available welding components to the maximum extent possible while maintaining the qualified HFIR welding process. The upgraded HFIR welding system represents a major improvement in the welding system used in welding HFIR fuel elements for the previous 40 years. In this upgrade, the new inner GMAW torch is a significant advancement over the original inner GMAW torch previously used. The innovative breakthrough in the new inner welding torch design is the way the direction of the cast in the 0.762 mm (0.030-inch) diameter aluminum weld wire is changed so that the weld wire emerging from the contact tip is straight in the plane perpendicular to the welding direction without creating any significant drag resistance in the feeding of the weld wire.

  20. A major upgrade of the VALD database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikova, T.; Piskunov, N.; Kurucz, R. L.; Stempels, H. C.; Heiter, U.; Pakhomov, Yu; Barklem, P. S.

    2015-05-01

    Vienna atomic line database (VALD) is a collection of critically evaluated laboratory parameters for individual atomic transitions, complemented by theoretical calculations. VALD is actively used by astronomers for stellar spectroscopic studies—model atmosphere calculations, atmospheric parameter determinations, abundance analysis etc. The two first VALD releases contained parameters for atomic transitions only. In a major upgrade of VALD—VALD3, publically available from spring 2014, atomic data was complemented with parameters of molecular lines. The diatomic molecules C2, CH, CN, CO, OH, MgH, SiH, TiO are now included. For each transition VALD provides species name, wavelength, energy, quantum number J and Landé-factor of the lower and upper levels, radiative, Stark and van der Waals damping factors and a full description of electronic configurarion and term information of both levels. Compared to the previous versions we have revised and verify all of the existing data and added new measurements and calculations for transitions in the range between 20 Å and 200 microns. All transitions were complemented with term designations in a consistent way and electron configurations when available. All data were checked for consistency: listed wavelength versus Ritz, selection rules etc. A new bibliographic system keeps track of literature references for each parameter in a given transition throughout the merging process so that every selected data entry can be traced to the original source. The query language and the extraction tools can now handle various units, vacuum and air wavelengths. In the upgrade process we had an intensive interaction with data producers, which was very helpful for improving the quality of the VALD content.

  1. A Neutral Beam Injector Upgrade for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    T. Stevenson; B McCormack; G.D. Loesser; M. Kalish; S. Ramakrishnan; L. Grisham; J. Edwards; M. Cropper; G. Rossi; A. von Halle; M. Williams

    2002-01-18

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) capability with a Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) capable of 80 kiloelectronvolt (keV), 5 Megawatt (MW), 5 second operation. This 5.95 million dollar upgrade reused a previous generation injector and equipment for technical, cost, and schedule reasons to obtain these specifications while retaining a legacy capability of 120 keV neutral particle beam delivery for shorter pulse lengths for possible future NSTX experiments. Concerns with NBI injection included power deposition in the plasma, aiming angles from the fixed NBI fan array, density profiles and beam shine through, orbit losses of beam particles, and protection of the vacuum vessel wall against beam impingement. The upgrade made use of the beamline and cryo panels from the Neutral Beam Test Stand facility, existing power supplies and controls, beamline components and equipment not contaminated by tritium during DT [deuterium-tritium] experiments, and a liquid Helium refrigerator plant to power and cryogenically pump a beamline and three ion sources. All of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) ion sources had been contaminated with tritium, so a refurbishment effort was undertaken on selected TFTR sources to rid the three sources destined for the NSTX NBI of as much tritium as possible. An interconnecting duct was fabricated using some spare and some new components to attach the beamline to the NSTX vacuum vessel. Internal vacuum vessel armor using carbon tiles was added to protect the stainless steel vacuum vessel from beam impingement in the absence of plasma and interlock failure. To date, the NBI has operated to 80 keV and 5 MW and has injected requested power levels into NSTX plasmas with good initial results, including high beta and strong heating characteristics at full rated plasma current.

  2. Guidance for implementing digital I&C upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Betlack, J.; Fink, R.; Torok, R.

    1994-12-31

    Use of the guideline will help ensure that issues associated with digital systems are properly addressed. The guideline provides a process to ensure that the design and development of an upgrade and the basis for licensing the upgrade will be thorough. Properly addressing the issues associated with digital upgrades fundamentally involves the application of sound engineering practices. Understanding the issues and applying the guideline approach will help foster the use of sound engineering practices in digital upgrades. Lessons learned from recent experiences with digital upgrades point to a number of practical recommendations for use with the guideline: 1. Be cautious about incorporating additional complexity, functionality, or features unless there is a clear need and the risks associated with added complexity are considered acceptable. 2. The same process and methods used for treating the digital issues in safety systems also apply for upgrades to important non-safety-related systems. 3. Ensure that the digital equipment is well understood by the utility engineering, operating, and maintenance staffs. Treating digital equipment as a set of {open_quotes}black boxes{close_quotes} is not recommended. 4. Specific activities and methods that should be applied in the design and evaluation of a digital upgrade depend on the specifics of the particular application - decisions must be made on a case-by-case basis, following an acceptable upgrade process. There are no generic, detailed cookbooks for upgrading to digital I&C equipment. 5. Carefully document the design and implementation of the upgrade, including the bases for engineering judgments made in support of the design and licensing evaluations.

  3. LLNL Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) upgrade vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Pickles, W.L.; Chargin, A.K.; Drake, R.P.

    1981-09-15

    TMX Upgrade is a large, tandem, magnetic-mirror fusion experiment with stringent requirements on base pressure (10/sup -8/ torr), low H reflux from the first walls, and peak gas pressure (5 x 10/sup -7/ torr) due to neutral beam gas during plasma operation. The 225 m/sup 3/ vacuum vessel is initially evacuated by turbopumps. Cryopumps provide a continuous sink for gases other than helium, deuterium, and hydrogen. The neutral beam system introduces up to 480 l/s of H or D. The hydrogen isotopes are pumped at very high speed by titanium sublimed onto two cylindrical radially separated stainless steel quilted liners with a total surface area of 540 m/sup 2/. These surfaces (when cooled to about 80/sup 0/K) provide a pumping speed of 6 x 10/sup 7/ l/s for hydrogen. The titanium getter system is programmable and is used for heating as well as gettering. The inner plasma liner can be operated at elevated temperatures to enhance migration of gases away from the surfaces close to the plasma. Glow discharge cleaning is part of the pumpdown procedure. The design features are discussed in conjunction with the operating procedures developed to manage the dynamic vacuum conditions.

  4. Particle and recycling control in translation, confinement, and sustainment upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossnickle, J. A.; Vlases, G. C.; Hoffman, A. L.; Melnik, P. A.; Milroy, R. D.; Tankut, A.; Velas, K. M.

    2010-03-01

    Previous work in the translation, confinement, and sustainment upgrade (TCSU) device [H. Y. Guo et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 056101 (2008)] demonstrated improved plasma parameters; higher temperature, higher poloidal magnetic field, increased current drive, and increased energy confinement, for rotating magnetic field (RMF) driven field reversed configurations (FRC) relative to the earlier TCS device. This was accomplished by improving vacuum conditions and using moderate wall heating (˜100 °C) and glow discharge cleaning for wall conditioning. Two new wall conditioning techniques, siliconization and titanium gettering, have been employed to further reduce impurities and control recycling. Both techniques reduced oxygen line radiation by an order of magnitude, and total radiated power by 50%, but led to little change in overall FRC performance, reinforcing the earlier conclusion that TCSU FRCs are not radiation dominated. Titanium gettering substantially reduced deuterium recycling, requiring a new method of fueling to be developed. This is the first time a FRC has been operated without using wall recycling as the primary method of fueling. The low-recycling FRCs, maintained by enhanced puff fueling, performed similarly to standard recycling fueled FRCs in terms of a key current drive parameter Be/Bω, the ratio of maximum sustained poloidal field to applied RMF field, but better density control allowed for higher temperatures.

  5. Successful initiation of and management through a distributed computer upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Barich, F.T.; Crawford, T.H.

    1995-12-31

    Processing capacity, the lack of data analysis tools, obsolescence, and spare parts issues are forcing utilities to upgrade or replace their plant computer systems with newer, larger systems. As a result, the utility faces an increasing number of new technologies, such as fiber optics and communication standards (FDDI, ATM, etc.), Graphic User Interface using X-Windows, and distributed architectures that eliminate the host based computer. Technologies such as these, if properly applied, can greatly enhance the capabilities and functions of the existing system. Besides this, the utility also faces funtionality previously not available through the plant computer, such as integrated plant monitoring and digital controls, voice, imaging, etc. With computing technology vastly changing from traditional host systems, the utility confronts the question, {open_quotes}what are my needs (now and for the future), and what new system can meet those needs most effectively?{close_quotes}. This paper describes the management process necessary to define the needs and then carry out a successful computer replacement project.

  6. Tank-bottoms reclamation unit upgraded to meet stricter rules

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, G.E. )

    1993-04-12

    Williams Pipe Line Co. (WPL), Tulsa, modified its tank-bottoms reclamation operation at Kansas City, Kan., to meet strict benzene-content levels established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In September 1990, the EPA published its toxicity characteristics rule that established a new toxicity limit of 0.5 ppm for benzene contamination in solid wastes. Waste with more than this limit was to be classified as hazardous WPL's subsequent tests of filter cake from its press showed that a substantial portion contained levels of benzene that exceeded the new regulatory limit. To maintain the filter press' status as a reclamation facility, WPL recognized that it would have to reclaim benzene from the filter cake. In 1991, WPL built a filter-cake dryer and vapor-recovery system downstream of the filter press to reclaim the benzene and other hydrocarbons remaining in the filter cake. The paper describes the Williams' system, the pollution regulations the system must comply with, solid waste characteristics, tank bottom materials, the reclamation center, filter-press operations, the upgraded system, end-product disposition, and system enhancements.

  7. Screening of processing and upgrading schemes. Task 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The RFP was predicated on DOE`s desire to enhance the development of advanced transportation fuels made from coal via a program to process mild coal gasification (MCG) liquids into high volumetric energy density (HEDF) test fuels. The desired product fuels were to be cost effectively manufactured, have high volumetric energy density, and be hydrocarbon-based for existing and prototype turbine and diesel engines. The sources for these special fuels consist of the abundant and secure indigenous energy resources of coal. Comparison studies were also to be made using other non-petroleum fossil fuels such as shale oil and tar sands bitumen. METC has concluded that MCG technology has the potential to simultaneously satisfy the transportation and power generation fuel needs in the most cost-effective manner. MCG is based on low temperature pyrolysis, a technique known to the coal community for over a century. Most past pyrolysis developments were aimed at maximizing the liquids yield which results in a low quality tarry product requiring significant and capital intensive upgrading. By properly tailoring the pyrolysis severity to control the liquid yield-liquid quality relationship, it has been found that a higher quality distillate-boiling liquid can be readily ``skimmed`` from the coal. The resultant liquids have a much higher H/C ratio than conventional pyrolytic tars and therefore can be hydroprocessed at lower cost. These liquids are also extremely enriched in 1-, 2-, and 3-ring aromatics.

  8. A Critical Assessment of Microbiological Biogas to Biomethane Upgrading Systems.

    PubMed

    Rittmann, Simon K-M R

    2015-01-01

    Microbiological biogas upgrading could become a promising technology for production of methane (CH(4)). This is, storage of irregular generated electricity results in a need to store electricity generated at peak times for use at non-peak times, which could be achieved in an intermediate step by electrolysis of water to molecular hydrogen (H(2)). Microbiological biogas upgrading can be performed by contacting carbon dioxide (CO(2)), H(2) and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic Archaea either in situ in an anaerobic digester, or ex situ in a separate bioreactor. In situ microbiological biogas upgrading is indicated to require thorough bioprocess development, because only low volumetric CH(4) production rates and low CH(4) fermentation offgas content have been achieved. Higher volumetric production rates are shown for the ex situ microbiological biogas upgrading compared to in situ microbiological biogas upgrading. However, the ex situ microbiological biogas upgrading currently suffers from H(2) gas liquid mass transfer limitation, which results in low volumetric CH(4) productivity compared to pure H(2)/CO(2) conversion to CH(4). If waste gas utilization from biological and industrial sources can be shown without reduction in volumetric CH(4) productivity, as well as if the aim of a single stage conversion to a CH(4) fermentation offgas content exceeding 95 vol% can be demonstrated, ex situ microbiological biogas upgrading with pure or enrichment cultures of methanogens could become a promising future technology for almost CO(2)-neutral biomethane production.

  9. Technical Design Report for the Upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALICE Collaboration; Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Masoodi, A. Ahmad; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Anderssen, E. C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badala, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bairathi, V.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J..; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastian Van Beelen, J.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Battistin, M.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baudot, J.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Benettoni, M.; Benotto, F.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Besson, A.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhatti, A.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Boehmer, F. V.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bornschein, J.; Borshchov, V. N.; Bortolin, C.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Cariola, P.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Caudron, T.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Claus, G.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Coli, S.; Colledani, C.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Da Riva, E.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Decosse, C.; DelagrangeI, H.; Deloff, A.; Déenes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; De Robertis, G.; De Roo, K.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Divia, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dorheim, S.; Dorokhov, A.; Doziere, G.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dulinski, W.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Ehlers, R. J., III; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernádez Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fiorenza, G.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Franco, M.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gajanana, D.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubilato, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; Gomez Marzoa, M.; Gonzáalez-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Greiner, L. C.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grondin, D.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Hennes, E.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hillemanns, H.; Himmi, A.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Hu-Guo, C.; Humanic, T. J.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Igolkin, S.; Ijzermans, P.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanytskyi, O.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Junique, A.; Jusko, A.; Kalcher, S.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keil, M.; Ketzer, B.; Khan, M. Mohisin.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Krus, M.; Krymov, E. B.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; Lesenechal, Y.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Listratenko, O. M.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loddo, F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luo, J.; Luparello, G.; Luzzi, C.; Gago, A. M.; Jacobs, P. M.; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'kevich, D.; Maltsev, N. A.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mapelli, A.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Marras, D.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Blanco, J. Martin; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Maslov, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Mattiazzo, S.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazumder, R.; Mazza, G.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Mongelli, M.; Montanõ Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Morel, F.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Bhopal, F. Muhammad; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paíc, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Panati, S.; Pant, D.; Pantano, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Passfeld, A.; Pastore, C.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Peryt, I. W.; Pesci, A.; Pestov, Y.; Petagna, P.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Pham, H.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H. O.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Protsenko, M. A.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Puggioni, C.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rasson, J. E.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossewij, M. J.; Rossi, A.; Roudier, S.; Rousset, J.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sacchetti, M.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Sánchez Rodríguez, F. J.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Santoro, R.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schipper, J. D.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, P. A.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senyukhov, S.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Sgura, I.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snoeys, W.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, V. Sooden F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Špalek, J.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Subieta Vasquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Šuljić, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Ter Minasyan, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turchetta, R.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Tymchuk, I. T.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Palomo, L. Valencia; Valentino, V.; Valin, I.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Vannucci, L.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vasta, P.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Verlaat, B.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, V.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Winter, M.; Xiang, C.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2014-08-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is studying the physics of strongly interacting matter, and in particular the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), using proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The ALICE Collaboration is preparing a major upgrade of the experimental apparatus, planned for installation in the second long LHC shutdown in the years 2018-2019. A key element of the ALICE upgrade is the construction of a new, ultra-light, high-resolution Inner Tracking System (ITS) based on monolithic CMOS pixel detectors. The primary focus of the ITS upgrade is on improving the performance for detection of heavy-flavour hadrons, and of thermal photons and low-mass di-electrons emitted by the QGP. With respect to the current detector, the new Inner Tracking System will significantly enhance the determination of the distance of closest approach to the primary vertex, the tracking efficiency at low transverse momenta, and the read-out rate capabilities. This will be obtained by seven concentric detector layers based on a 50 μm thick CMOS pixel sensor with a pixel pitch of about 30×30 μm2. This document, submitted to the LHCC (LHC experiments Committee) in September 2013, presents the design goals, a summary of the R&D activities, with focus on the technical implementation of the main detector components, and the projected detector and physics performance.

  10. The upgrade project for the RF system for the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.; Ciardullo, D.J.; Hayes, T.; Meth, M.; McNerney, A.J.; Otis, A.; Pirkl, W.; Sanders, R.; Spitz, R.; Toldo, F.; Zaltsman, A.

    1993-01-01

    The AGS operates a varied program of proton, heavy ion, and polarized proton acceleration for fixed-target experiments and will soon serve as the injector of these beams into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC. The new Booster synchrotron extends the range of intensities and masses that can be accelerated. The 1.5 GeV injection energy increases the space charge limit by a factor of four to more than 6 [times] 10[sup 13] protons per pulse. To accommodate the increased beam current the rf system will be upgraded to provide more power and lower impedance to the beam. The flexibility of the rf system will also be enhanced by virtue of a new rf beam control system and installation of individual tuning servos for the ten rf cavities. The fundamental necessity for upgrading the rf system is to deliver more power to the accelerating beam. Three key ingredients of the upgrade project addressing this problem is (1) new power amplifiers provide the necessary power, and are closely coupled to the cavities, (2) wideband rf feedback reduces the effective impedance by a factor of 10, and (3) the capacitors loading the acceleration gaps (four per cavity) are increased from 275 pF to 600 pF.

  11. The upgrade project for the RF system for the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.; Ciardullo, D.J.; Hayes, T.; Meth, M.; McNerney, A.J.; Otis, A.; Pirkl, W.; Sanders, R.; Spitz, R.; Toldo, F.; Zaltsman, A.

    1993-06-01

    The AGS operates a varied program of proton, heavy ion, and polarized proton acceleration for fixed-target experiments and will soon serve as the injector of these beams into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC. The new Booster synchrotron extends the range of intensities and masses that can be accelerated. The 1.5 GeV injection energy increases the space charge limit by a factor of four to more than 6 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per pulse. To accommodate the increased beam current the rf system will be upgraded to provide more power and lower impedance to the beam. The flexibility of the rf system will also be enhanced by virtue of a new rf beam control system and installation of individual tuning servos for the ten rf cavities. The fundamental necessity for upgrading the rf system is to deliver more power to the accelerating beam. Three key ingredients of the upgrade project addressing this problem is (1) new power amplifiers provide the necessary power, and are closely coupled to the cavities, (2) wideband rf feedback reduces the effective impedance by a factor of 10, and (3) the capacitors loading the acceleration gaps (four per cavity) are increased from 275 pF to 600 pF.

  12. Technical design report for the upgrade of the ICD for D-Zero Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, L.; De, K. , Draper, P. , Gallas, E. , Li, J. , Sosebee, M. , Stephens, R.W. , White, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Inter Cryostat Detector (ICD) used in Run I of the D0 Experiment will be inoperable in the central, high magnetic field planned for Run II. In Run I, the ICD enhanced the hermeticity and uniformity of the D0 calorimeter system, improving both missing transverse energy and jet energy resolution. The goals for the Run II ICD are the same. In this document, the physics arguments for maintaining the ICD are presented, followed by a detailed description of the planned design changes, prototype tests, construction, installation, and commissioning of the device for the Run II D0 detector. Estimates of costs and schedule can be found on //DOSERVER2/Operations/Upgrade Project/ subareas available via DZERO`s WinFrame Program Manager. This detector is not intended to provide any ``L0`` capabilities (for luminosity monitoring), or to provide any EM coverage in the intermediate region, or to provide additional coverage in the intermediate regions, unlike previous upgrades proposed in this detector region. The ICD upgrade described here maintains most of the Run I capabilities in a high magnetic field environment.

  13. Improving minimum cost spanning trees by upgrading nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Krumke, S.O.; Noltemeier, H.; Wirth, H.C.; Marathe, M.V.; Ravi, R.; Ravi, S.S.; Sundaram, R.

    1998-11-01

    The authors study budget constrained network upgrading problems. The authors are given an undirected edge weighted graph (G = V, E) where node v {element_of} V can be upgraded at a cost of c(v). This upgrade reduces the weight of each edge incident on v. The goal is to find a minimum cost set of nodes to be upgraded so that the resulting network has a minimum spanning tree of weight no more than a given budget D. The results obtained in the paper include the following: (1) on the positive side, they provide a polynomial time approximation algorithm for the above upgrading problem when the difference between the maximum and minimum edge weights is bounded by a polynomial in n, the number of nodes in the graph, the solution produced by the algorithm satisfies the budget constrain, and the cost of the upgrading set produced by the algorithm is O (log n) times the minimum upgrading cost needed to obtain a spanning tree of weight at most D; (2) in contrast , they show that, unless NP {improper_subset} DTIME (n{sup O(log log n)}), there can be no polynomial time approximation algorithm for the problem that produces a solution with upgrading cost at most {alpha} < ln n times the optimal upgrading cost even if the budget can be violated by a factor f(n), for any polynomial time computable function f(n), this result continues to hold, with f(n) = n{sup k} being any polynomial, even when the difference between the maximum and minimum edge weights is bounded by a polynomial in n; and (3) finally, they show that using a simple binary search over the set of admissible values, the dual problem can be solved with an appropriate performance guarantee.

  14. CHESS upgrade 1995: Improved radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, K.

    1996-09-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) stores electrons and positrons at 5.3 GeV for the production and study of B mesons, and, in addition, it supplies synchrotron radiation for CHESS. The machine has been upgraded for 300 mA operation. It is planned that each beam will be injected in about 5 minutes and that particle beam lifetimes will be several hours. In a cooperative effort, staff members at CHESS and LNS have studied sources in CESR that produce radiation in the user areas. The group has been responsible for the development and realization of new tunnel shielding walls that provide a level of radiation protection from 20 to {approx_gt}100 times what was previously available. Our experience has indicated that a major contribution to the environmental radiation is not from photons, but results from neutrons that are generated by particle beam loss in the ring. Neutrons are stopped by inelastic scattering and absorption in thick materials such as heavy concrete. The design for the upgraded walls, the development of a mix for our heavy concrete, and all the concrete casting was done by CHESS and LNS personnel. The concrete incorporates a new material for this application, one that has yielded a significant cost saving in the production of over 200 tons of new wall sections. The material is an artificially enriched iron oxide pellet manufactured in vast quantities from hematite ore for the steel-making industry. Its material and chemical properties (iron and impurity content, strength, size and uniformity) make it an excellent substitute for high grade Brazilian ore, which is commonly used as heavy aggregate in radiation shielding. Its cost is about a third that of the natural ore. The concrete has excellent workability, a 28 day compressive strength exceeding 6000 psi and a density of 220 lbs/cu.ft (3.5 gr/cc). The density is limited by an interesting property of the pellets that is motivated by efficiency in the steel-making application. (Abstract Truncated)

  15. Upgrading of petroleum oil feedstocks using alkali metals and hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A method of upgrading an oil feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the oil feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase separable from the organic oil feedstock material. The upgradant hydrocarbon bonds to the oil feedstock material and increases the number of carbon atoms in the product. This increase in the number of carbon atoms of the product increases the energy value of the resulting oil feedstock.

  16. The upgraded LHCb RICH detector: Status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinale, R.

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb upgrade will take place during the second long shutdown of the LHC (LS2). The upgrade will enable the experiment to run at an instantaneous luminosity of 2 ×1033cm-2s-1 and will read out data at a rate of 40 MHz into a flexible software-based trigger. The two Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors (RICH), installed in the LHCb experiment, will be re-designed to comply with these new operating conditions. The status and perspective of the RICH upgrade project will be presented.

  17. Upgrade of Instrumentation for Purdue Reactor PUR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Revankar, S.T.; Merritt, E.; Bean, R.

    2000-08-28

    The major objective of this program was to upgrade and replace instruments and equipment that significantly improve the performance, control and operational capability of the Purdue University nuclear reactor (PUR-1). Under this major objective two projects on instrument upgrade were implemented. The first one was to convert the vacuum tube control and safety amplifiers (CSA) to solid state electronics, and the other was to upgrade the electrical and electronic shielding. This report is the annual report and gives the efforts and progress achieved on these two projects from July 1999 to June 2000.

  18. Integrated oil production and upgrading using molten alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard

    2016-10-04

    A method that combines the oil retorting process (or other process needed to obtain/extract heavy oil or bitumen) with the process for upgrading these materials using sodium or other alkali metals. Specifically, the shale gas or other gases that are obtained from the retorting/extraction process may be introduced into the upgrading reactor and used to upgrade the oil feedstock. Also, the solid materials obtained from the reactor may be used as a fuel source, thereby providing the heat necessary for the retorting/extraction process. Other forms of integration are also disclosed.

  19. Upgrades to the Fermilab NuMI beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Michael A.; Childress, Sam; Grossman, Nancy; Hurh, Patrick; Hylen, James; Marchionni, Alberto; McCluskey, Elaine; Moore, Craig Damon; Reilly, Robert; Tariq, Salman; Wehmann, Alan; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The NuMI beamline at Fermilab has been delivering high-intensity muon neutrino beams to the MINOS experiment since the spring of 2005. A total of 3.4 x 10{sup 20} protons has been delivered to the NuMI target and a maximum beam power of 320 kW has been achieved. An upgrade of the NuMI facility increasing the beam power capability to 700 kW is planned as part of the NOvA experiment. The plans for this upgrade are presented and the possibility of upgrading the NuMI beamline to handle 1.2 MW is considered.

  20. Taming the Viper: Software Upgrade for VFAUser and Viper

    SciTech Connect

    DORIN,RANDALL T.; MOSER III,JOHN C.

    2000-08-08

    This report describes the procedure and properties of the software upgrade for the Vibration Performance Recorder. The upgrade will check the 20 memory cards for proper read/write operation. The upgrade was successfully installed and uploaded into the Viper and the field laptop. The memory checking routine must run overnight to complete the test, although the laptop need only be connected to the Viper unit until the downloading routine is finished. The routine has limited ability to recognize incomplete or corrupt header and footer files. The routine requires 400 Megabytes of free hard disk space. There is one minor technical flaw detailed in the conclusion.

  1. Upgrade Summer Severe Weather Tool in MIDDS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Mark M.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this task was to upgrade the severe weather database from the previous phase by adding weather observations from the years 2004 - 2009, re-analyze the data to determine the important parameters, make adjustments to the index weights depending on the analysis results, and update the MIDDS GUI. The added data increased the period of record from 15 to 21 years. Data sources included local forecast rules, archived sounding data, surface and upper air maps, and two severe weather event databases covering east-central Florida. Four of the stability indices showed increased severe weather predication. The Total Threat Score (TTS) of the previous work was verified for the warm season of 2009 with very good skill. The TTS Probability of Detection (POD) was 88% and the False alarm rate (FAR) of 8%. Based on the results of the analyses, the MIDDS Severe Weather Worksheet GUI was updated to assist the duty forecaster by providing a level of objective guidance based on the analysis of the stability parameters and synoptic-scale dynamics.

  2. Tritium related safety considerations for mirror upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Ghose, S.K.

    1983-11-30

    One of the primary objectives of the MFTF-B upgrades is to demonstrate the technology of tritium breeding in a reactor-like configuration. This requires use and processing of tritium, involving an inventory of several hundred grams at the plant. This paper reviews the results of a preliminary assessment of the radiation hazard associated with the handling of tritium. The radiation dose consequences due to tritium release from normal operation and due to postulated accidents on plant personnel and the public were assessed. Maximum credible (probability < 10/sup -3/, but > 10/sup -7//yr) accidental releases were estimated to be 10 gm in the reactor building and 100 gm in the tritium-processing building. Higher probability (> 10/sup -3//yr) accidents or component failures would result in much smaller releases. In the reactor building, the most severe accident would result from the rupture of a plasma exhaust duct from the end cell or the tritium feed pipe to the neutral beam injector, accompanied by a fire. In the tritium processing building, the most severe accident would be the rupture of the Isotope Separation System (ISS) distillation columns and vacuum jackets accompanied by a fire.

  3. TCS Overview and Vacuum System Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K. E.; Guo, H. Y.; Hoffman, A. L.; Milroy, R. D.; Pietrzyk, Z. A.; Slough, J. T.

    2003-10-01

    The RMF has been shown to be effective at driving toroidal currents in FRCs. Equilibrium is achieved when the torque applied to the electrons by the RMF balances the torque on the electrons due to plasma resistivity. This torque balance sets a relation between the density, the RMF, and the plasma resistivity. It does not impose a hard constraint on either the external field, or the temperature, which are related to the density through radial pressure balance. Since the temperature appears to have been limited in past experiments by impurity ingestion and subsequent radiation after the initial formation phase, the confining external field was also limited. An upgrade of the TCS vacuum chamber is presently underway to address the impurity issue and thus allow higher temperature and field operation. All o-rings are being removed and heating blankets will be installed to bake the system. Tantalum clad internal flux rings will be installed to shield the quartz vacuum wall from the plasma. Cleaning and wall conditioning will be performed with a glow discharge and boronization and/or titanium gettering.

  4. VXD3: the SLD vertex detector upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, J. A.; SLD Vertex Detector Upgrade Group

    1996-02-01

    The SLD collaboration has built and installed a new CCD vertex detector (VXD3) incorporating 96 CCDs. Each 13 cm 2 CCD has 3.2 × 10 6 pixels for a total of 3.1 × 10 8 pixels in the detector. This system is an upgrade of the pioneering CCD vertex detector (VXD2) which has operated in SLD since 1992. The CCDs of VXD3 are mounted on beryllium substrates and arranged in three concentric cylinders, providing at least three space point measurements along each track. The resolution of the space points is approximately 5 μm in all three coordinates. The design and construction of VXD3 builds on three years of successful performance of VXD2. Significant improvements are expected with VXD3 in impact parameter resolution (approximately a factor of 2) and acceptance (about 20% additional) through optimized geometry and reduced material. New readout electronics have also been developed for this system. This new vertex detector will be commissioned in January 1996 and should commence running immediately thereafter.

  5. An Upgrade of the Aeroheating Software "MINIVER"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louderback, Pierce M.

    2013-01-01

    Many software packages assist engineers with performing flight vehicle analysis, but some of these packages have gone many years without updates or significant improvements to their workflows. One such software, known as MINIVER, is a powerful yet lightweight tool that is used for aeroheating analyses. However, it is an aging program that has not seen major improvements within the past decade. As part of a collaborative effort with Florida Institute of Technology, MINIVER has received a major user interface overhaul, a change in program language, and will be continually receiving updates to improve its capabilities. The user interface update includes a migration from a command-line interface to that of a graphical user interface supported in the Windows operating system. The organizational structure of the preprocessor has been transformed to clearly defined categories to provide ease of data entry. Helpful tools have been incorporated, including the ability to copy sections of cases as well as a generalized importer which aids in bulk data entry. A visual trajectory editor has been included, as well as a CAD Editor which allows the user to input simplified geometries in order to generate MINIVER cases in bulk. To demonstrate its continued effectiveness, a case involving the JAXA OREX flight vehicle will be included, providing comparisons to captured flight data as well as other computational solutions. The most recent upgrade effort incorporated the use of the CAD Editor, and current efforts are investigating methods to link MINIVER projects with SINDA/Fluint and Thermal Desktop.

  6. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the upgrading of biomass derived synthesis gas (‘syngas’) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and risk adverse conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas to hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  7. A Upgrade of the Aeroheating Software "MINIVER"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louderback, Pierce

    2013-01-01

    Many software packages assist engineers with performing flight vehicle analysis, but some of these packages have gone many years without updates or significant improvements to their workflows. One such software package, known as MINIVER, is a powerful yet lightweight tool used for aeroheating analyses. However, it is an aging program that has not seen major improvements within the past decade. As part of a collaborative effort with the Florida Institute of Technology, MINIVER has received a major user interface overhaul, a change in program language, and will be continually receiving updates to improve its capabilities. The user interface update includes a migration from a command-line interface to that of a graphical user interface supported in the Windows operating system. The organizational structure of the pre-processor has been transformed to clearly defined categories to provide ease of data entry. Helpful tools have been incorporated, including the ability to copy sections of cases as well as a generalized importer which aids in bulk data entry. A visual trajectory editor has been included, as well as a CAD Editor which allows the user to input simplified geometries in order to generate MINIVER cases in bulk. To demonstrate its continued effectiveness, a case involving the JAXA OREX flight vehicle will be included, providing comparisons to captured flight data as well as other computational solutions. The most recent upgrade effort incorporated the use of the CAD Editor, and current efforts are investigating methods to link MINIVER projects with SINDA/Fluint and Thermal Desktop.

  8. Upgrade of the NSTX Plasma Control System*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, D.; Gates, D.; Isaacs, M.; Lawson, J.; Ludescher-Furth, C.; Marsala, R.; Matrovito, D.; Sichta, P.

    2007-11-01

    The plasma control system for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has been upgraded to replace the obsolete SKY computer system. The three main improvements with the new system are 1) higher computer speed, 2) lower latency and 3) a recordable absolute time during the discharge. The eight 333 MHz G4 processors in the Sky system were replaced with four dual core AMD Opteron 880 2.4 GHz processors. This provides approximately 7 times the speed for computationally intensive parts of the control system. The data acquisition and control were previously shared between VME and front panel dataport (FPDP) hardware. Two PCI FPDP cards, one each for data input and output made elimination of the VME hardware possible. Presently, the input data is read directly from the FIFO, this results in a loss of speed compared to the full potential of the vmetro FPDP DPIO2 boards using DMA, nevertheless, the present latency is about 2/3 that of the old system. In the old system, time was computed relative to a start trigger and was calculated based on input data frequency and the real-time cpu clock frequency. A digital input and time stamp module (DITS) was developed to provide a 48 bit absolute timestamp for each input data sample. *This work supported by U.S. DOE Contract # DE-AC02-76CH03073.

  9. Fermilab Main Injector Beam Position Monitor Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, B.; Barker, W.; Bledsoe, S.; Boes, T.; Briegel, C.; Capista, D.; Deuerling, G.; Dysert, R.; Forster, R.; Foulkes, S.; Haynes, W.; Hendricks, B.; Kasza, T.; Kutschke, R.; Marchionni, A.; Olson, M.; Pavlicek, V.; Piccoli, L.; Prieto, P.; Rapisarda, S.; Saewert, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    An upgrade of the Beam Position Monitor (BPM) signal processing and data acquisition system for the Fermilab Main Injector is described. The Main Injector is a fast cycling synchrotron that accelerates protons or antiprotons from 8 to 150 GeV. Each Main Injector cycle can have a totally different magnet ramp, RF frequency configuration, beam bunch structure, and injection/extraction pattern from the previous cycle. The new BPM system provides the capabilities and flexibility required by the dynamic and complex machine operations. The system offers measurement capability in the 2.5 MHz and 53 MHz channels to detect the range of bunch structures for protons and antiprotons in both wideband (turn-by-turn) and narrowband (closed-orbit) modes. The new BPM read-out system is based on the digital receiver concept and is highly configurable, allowing the signal processing of nearly all Main Injector beam conditions, including the detection of individual batches. An overview of the BPM system in the Main Injector operating environment, some technology details and first beam measurements are presented.

  10. Fermilab Main Injector Beam Position Monitor Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, B.; Barker, W.; Bledsoe, S.; Boes, T.; Briegel, C.; Capista, D.; Deuerling, G.; Dysert, R.; Forster, R.; Foulkes, S.; Haynes, W.; Hendricks, B.; Kasza, T.; Kutschke, R.; Marchionni, A.; Olson, M.; Pavlicek, V.; Piccoli, L.; Prieto, P.; Rapisarda, S.

    2006-11-20

    An upgrade of the Beam Position Monitor (BPM) signal processing and data acquisition system for the Fermilab Main Injector is described. The Main Injector is a fast cycling synchrotron that accelerates protons or antiprotons from 8 to 150 GeV, Each Main Injector cycle can have a totally different magnet ramp, RF frequency configuration, beam bunch structure, and injection/extraction pattern from the previous cycle. The new BPM system provides the capabilities and flexibility required by the dynamic and complex machine operations. The system offers measurement capability in the 2.5 MHz and 53 MHz channels to detect the range of bunch structures for protons and antiprotons in both wideband (turn-by-turn) and narrowband (closed-orbit) modes. The new BPM read-out system is based on the digital receiver concept and is highly configurable, allowing the signal processing of nearly all Main Injector beam conditions, including the detection of individual batches. An overview of the BPM system in the Main Injector operating environment, some technology details and first beam measurements are presented.

  11. Catalysts for upgrading solvent refined lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, N.K.

    1982-01-01

    The solvent refined lignite (SRL), made at the University of North Dakota Process Development Unit, was a solid having a nominal melting point of 160/sup 0/C. The SRL was pulverized and mixed with a donor solvent, tetralin. The SRL to tetralin ratio of 1:1 was selected to pretreat in a high pressure and temperature reactor. The optimized reactor conditions were a reaction temperature of 475/sup 0/C, an initial hydrogen pressure of 2000 psig and a retention time of 40 minutes. Under these conditions approximately 97% of the SRL was dissolved in tetralin. The resulting solution was used to test the 27 developmental catalysts. The catalysts were developed by impregnating on the ..gamma..-alumina the 3 active metals; MoO/sub 3/, CoO, and WO/sub 3/, each at 3 levels. The effect of these factors on upgrading of the SRL was evaluated in terms of denitrogenation, desulfurization, and hydrocracking. The multiple linear regression analysis showed that the metal compositions for the best overall catalytic performance were 9.5% MoO/sub 3/, 4.3% CoO, and 4% WO/sub 3/ (% of carrier weight). A model was developed based on the results of scanning electron micrographs to explain some of the physical characteristics of the catalysts. The disadvantage of the incipient wetness method used in metal impregnation was explained, and the preferable pore structure and distribution were suggested.

  12. Helmet-mounted display (HMD) upgrade for the US Army's AVCATT simulation program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melzer, James E.; Porter, James W.

    2008-04-01

    The Aviation Combined Arms Tactical Trainer (AVCATT) reconfigurable manned module simulator is the Army's premier deployable helicopter collective training simulator. While successful, improvements to the visual display performance for the Out-The-Window (OTW) visual system have been desired. In a recent selection evaluation, Rockwell Collins' SR100A HMD was chosen for the upgrade, improving display resolution, reducing weight, enhancing comfort and increasing ruggedness. This paper will compare the current XL100A HMD with the improved performance of the new SR100A system.

  13. JouFLU: an upgraded FLUOR beam combiner at the CHARA Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhomé, E.; Scott, N.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Mollier, B.; Reess, J. M.; Chapron, F.; Buey, T.; Sevin, A.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Coudé du Foresto, V.

    2012-07-01

    FLUOR, which has been operational on CHARA since 2002, is an infrared fiber beam combiner. The telescope array will soon be fitted with an adaptive optics system, which will enhance the interferometer performance. In this framework, FLUOR has been entirely redeveloped and will be able to measure visibilities with higher accuracy and better sensitivity. The technical upgrades consist of improving some existing systems and developing new features. The bench, which is now remotely operable, primarily offers spectral dispersion (long fringes scanning), a more sensitive camera and a Fourier Transform Spectrometer mode. This paper presents the detailed opto-mechanical design of JouFLU (FLUOR rejuvenation), and the current instrument status.

  14. Level-2 Milestone 2351: Terascale Simulation Facility Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, A M

    2007-10-02

    This report documents the LLNL TSF upgrade ASC L2 milestone 2351: Terascale Simulation Facility upgrade, due Sept. 30, 2007. The full text of the milestone is included in Attachment 1. The stated goal of the milestone was: 'Complete a 3-MW expansion of electrical power for computing systems in the east computer room of the Terascale Simulation Facility (TSF) and complete the final connection of all air handlers that were delivered as part of the TSF line item'. In this report we detail the upgrade and cover the results of the process to accept the system by testing, adjusting, balancing and finally start-up of the system in accordance with the detailed project commissioning plan to be developed by the system engineers during the design phase of the project. The quarterly reports for the upgrade and the text of the project commissioning plan are included at the end of this document as Attachments 2 and 3.

  15. Thomson scattering diagnostic upgrade on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Ponce-Marquez, D. M.; Bray, B. D.; Deterly, T. M.; Liu, C.; Eldon, D.

    2010-10-15

    The DIII-D Thomson scattering system has been upgraded. A new data acquisition hardware was installed, adding the capacity for additional spatial channels and longer acquisition times for temperature and density measurements. Detector modules were replaced with faster transimpedance circuitry, increasing the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of 2. This allows for future expansion to the edge system. A second phase upgrade scheduled for 2010-2011 includes the installation of four 1 J/pulse Nd:YAG lasers at 50 Hz repetition rate. This paper presents the first completed phase of the upgrade and performance comparison between the original system and the upgraded system. The plan for the second phase is also presented.

  16. SLC-2000: A luminosity upgrade for the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Breidenbach, M.; Decker, F.J.; Helm, R.

    1996-08-01

    The authors discuss a possible upgrade to the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), whose objective is to increase the SLC luminosity by at least a factor 7, to an average Z production rate of more than 35,000 per week. The centerpiece of the upgrade is the installation of a new superconducting final doublet with a field gradient of 240 T/m, which will be placed at a distance of only 70 cm from the interaction point. In addition, several bending magnet in each final focus will be lengthened and two octupole correctors are added. A complementary upgrade of damping rings and bunch compressors will allow optimum use of the modified final focus and can deliver, or exceed, the targeted luminosity. The proposed upgrade will place the SLC physics program in a very competitive position, and will also enable it to pursue its pioneering role as the first and only linear collider.

  17. Berkeley Accelerator Space Effects (BASE) Light Ion FacilityUpgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michael B.; McMahan, Margaret A.; Gimpel, Thomas L.; Tiffany, William S.

    2006-07-07

    The BASE Light Ion Facility upgrades have been completed. All proton beams are now delivered to Cave 4A. New control software, a larger diameter beam window, and improved quality assurance measures have been added.

  18. National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Center Stack Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Neumeyer, C; Chrzanowski, J; Dudek, L; Fan, H; Hatcher, R; Heitzenroeder, P; Menard, J; Ono, M; Ramakrishnan, S; Titus, P; Woolley, R; Zhan, H

    2009-09-24

    The purpose of the NSTX Center Stack Upgrade project is to expand the NSTX operational space and thereby the physics basis for next-step ST facilities. The plasma aspect ratio (ratio of plasma major to minor radius) of the upgrade is increased to 1.5 from the original value of 1.26, which increases the cross sectional area of the center stack by a factor of ~ 3 and makes possible higher levels of performance and pulse duration.

  19. TMX-Upgrade vacuum-system design and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, T.C.; Chargin, A.K.; Drake, R.P.; Nexsen, W.E.; Pickles, W.L.; Poulsen, P.; Stack, T.P.; Wong, R.L.

    1981-10-01

    This paper describes the design and analysis of the TMX Upgrade Vacuum System. TMX Upgrade is a modification of the TMX tandem mirror device. It will employ thermal barriers to further improve plasma confinement. Thermal barriers are produced by microwave heating and neutral-beam pumping. They increase the feasibility of tandem-mirror reactors by reducing both the required magnetic field strengths and the neutral-beam injection voltages.

  20. Shielding for the upgraded Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Vylet, V

    2005-01-01

    The Duke FEL Laboratory is undergoing a series of upgrades staggered over time that will greatly increase the capabilities of the machines and by the same token the importance of radiation safety issues. In this paper, we present the scope of the planned upgrades and provide several specific examples of shielding calculations. We also present our effort to correlate calculations with experimental measurements. PMID:16381713

  1. Status of the SPIRAL I upgrade at GANIL

    SciTech Connect

    Jardin, P.; Bajeat, O.; Delahaye, P.; Dubois, M.; Feierstein, C.; Pellemoine, F.; Lecomte, P.; Leherissier, P.; Maunoury, L.; Saint-Laurent, M. G.; Traykov, E.

    2012-02-15

    The upgrade of the ''Systeme de Production d'Ions Radioactifs en Ligne'' phase I (SPIRAL I) installed at the ''Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds'' (GANIL) situated at Caen, France, is in progress and should be ready by 2014. In parallel, the first part of SPIRAL II facility is currently under construction. The global status of the upgrade is presented: goal, radioactive ion production systems, modification of the production cave and impact of the current safety re-evaluation of GANIL.

  2. Commissioning results from the recently upgraded RHIC LLRF system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.S.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Narayan, G.; Severino, F.; Yuan, S.; Zaltsman, A.

    2011-03-28

    During RHIC Run 10, the first phase of the LLRF Upgrade was successfully completed. This involved replacing the aging VME based system with a modern digital system based on the recently developed RHIC LLRF Upgrade Platform, and commissioning the system as part of the normal RHIC start up process. At the start of Run 11, the second phase of the upgrade is underway, involving a significant expansion of both hardware and functionality. This paper will review the commissioning effort and provide examples of improvements in system performance, flexibility and scalability afforded by the new platform. The RHIC LLRF upgrade is based on the recently developed RHIC LLRF Upgrade Platform. The major design goals of the platform are: (1) Design a stand alone, generic, digital, modular control architecture which can be configured to satisfy all of the application demands we currently have, and which will be supportable and upgradeable into the foreseeable future; and (2) It should integrate seamlessly into existing controls infrastructure, be easy to deploy, provide access to all relevant control parameters (eliminate knobs), provide vastly improved diagnostic data capabilities, and permit remote reconfiguration. Although the system is still in its infancy, we think the initial commissioning results from RHIC indicate that these goals have been achieved, and that we've only begun to realize the benefits the platform provides.

  3. Facilities upgrade (restoration) report: Annual report, Fiscal year 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrer, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    The basic objectives of the upgrade program are as follows: to assess the extent of deterioration and obsolescence of equipment, facilities, and systems that are required to support the Special Nuclear Material Production and Defense Waste and Environmental Restoration; to forecast resources and schedules to restore the decreased capabilities and efficiency that are identified in the assessment in accordance with program needs; to effectively manage and implement the approved and funded program activities; and to update annually the upgrading assessment and resultant forecasts, resources, and schedules to assure upgrading priorities are consistent with Special Nuclear Material Production and Defense Waste and Environmental Restoration. During CY 1982, it was determined that the scope, priority, and costs of the upgrade efforts were defined sufficiently to allow annual reporting of progress toward completing the upgrades. The annual reports for fiscal years (FY) 1983 through 1987 were reformatted to present the progress made during each fiscal year and to forecast the current requirements to correct the remaining upgrade deficiencies. This document updates information furnished in prior-year reports. 13 tabs.

  4. Upgrading of HP turbines for nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, B.A.; Brown, R.D.

    1998-12-31

    Many papers have been written on the upgrading of nuclear plant LP turbines but there are also strong reasons for the upgrading of the HP turbines. Two principal reasons are discussed in this paper. Fouling by deposition on the feedwater side of the stream generator tubes, frequently results in a reduction of pressure at the turbine stop valve and a consequent loss of power output. This loss of power can be largely offset by fitting increased capacity blading in part of the HP turbine which increases the swallowing capacity of the turbine. It is necessary to consider the increased capacity blading, bypassing of heaters and future fouling to arrive at an optimum solution. Since the design of the operating nuclear stations GEC ALSTHOM have made very significant advances in the design of steam turbine HP blading and it is now possible to upgrade the HP turbine with blades of modern design to give a substantial increase in power output. The pay back period for such a upgrade is short and the paper describes some of the Company`s successful nuclear HP upgrading in the UK. The two actions described above can be combined, or indeed, be carried out in conjunction with an LP upgrade.

  5. Upgrading Business Literacy and Information Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Clive

    2002-01-01

    Interviews two practitioners in the field of business communication to better understand developments in business literacy and information skills. Concludes with a brief discussion of the opportunities for business communication experts in enhancing literacy in the workplace. (SG)

  6. The NASA fuel cell upgrade program for the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    SciTech Connect

    Warshay, M.; Prokopius, P.; Le, M.; Voecks, G.

    1997-12-31

    As part of NASA`s overall efforts to improve the Space Shuttle operations, a program to upgrade the existing fuel cell powerplant has begun. The upgrade will involve replacing the alkaline fuel cell (AFC) system with a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system, resulting in a much lower life cycle cost of the powerplant. The program is being implemented by a team comprised of NASA/JSC, NASA/LeRC, and JPL personnel, with support from NASA/KSC. With extremely high annual maintenance costs and subsystem replacement costs, the need for a lower cost Orbiter fuel cell powerplant is obvious. Earlier NASA plant to upgrade the shuttle fuel cell were not adequately funded and only focused upon upgrading the existing AFC. For the current program, the PEM fuel cell system will be implemented because the projected long life (10,000 hrs. vs. 2,000 hrs. for AFC), high power density (PEM projected to produce 50% more power), and enhanced system reliability and safety all lead to significantly lower life cycle powerplant costs. And in addition to the Orbiter application, PEM fuel cell development would support a number of important space applications that the AFC would not, such as Lunar/Mars transportation, the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), Space Station emergency power and/or future energy storage applications, and various portable applications. NASA is also leveraging all of the large scale PEM fuel cell development activities that are ongoing for DOE, DOD, and commercial applications. There is no activity in the AFC area. The Shuttle Fuel Cell Upgrade plan of the JSC/LeRC/JPL team includes the following key elements: (1) Systems Analyses to assure compatibility/maximum utilization by shuttle of the best PEM fuel cell characteristics; (2) Short Stack Testing of the leading PEM fuel cell contractors` hardware; (3) Detailed Task Objective (DTO) Flight Experiment to verify PEM system water management and thermal management under zero-g operation; (4) A Downselect to the best

  7. Cobra Fiber-Optic Positioner Upgrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Charles D.; Braun, David F.; Kaluzny, Joel V.

    2013-01-01

    the time of this reporting, there are still many tests to be performed that will validate system level performance, but on an individual level, the Cobra positioner demonstrates excellent performance and will enable the PFS instrument to make unprecedented measurements of the universe. What is unique about the upgrades made to the Cobra positioner is the improved performance due to the design changes in the hard stops and the ceramic end caps of the motors. Other changes were made to reduce the unit cost of a Cobra positioner without affecting the performance, since thousands of these devices will have to be built for the PFS instrument.

  8. Automation and Upgrade of Thermal System for Large 38-Year-Young Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Andrew T.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center's Space Environment Simulator (SES) facility has been improved by the upgrade of its thermal control hardware and software. This paper describes the preliminary design process, funding constraints, and the proposed enhancements as well as the installation details, the testing difficulties, and the overall benefits realized from this upgrade. The preliminary design process was discussed in a paper presented in October 1996 and will be recapped in this paper to provide background and comparison to actual product. Structuring the procurement process to match the funding constraints allowed Goddard to enhance its capabilities in an environment of reduced budgets. The installation of the new system into a location that has been occupied for over 38 years was one of the driving design factors for the size of the equipment. The installation was completed on time and under budget. The tuning of the automatic sequences for the new thermal system to the existing shroud system required more time and ultimately presented some setbacks to the vendor and the final completion of the system. However, the end product and its benefits to Goddard's thermal vacuum test portfolio will carry the usefulness of this facility well into the next century.

  9. Automation and Upgrade of Thermal System for Large 38-Year Young Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center's Space Environment Simulator (SES) facility has been improved by the upgrade of its thermal control hardware and software. This paper describes the preliminary design process, funding constraints, and the proposed enhancements as well as the installation details, the testing difficulties, and the overall benefits realized from this upgrade. The preliminary design process was discussed in a paper presented in October 1996 and will be recapped in this paper to provide background and comparison to actual product. Structuring the procurement process to match the funding constraints allowed Goddard to enhance its capabilities in an environment of reduced budgets. The installation of the new system into a location that has been occupied for over 38-years was one of the driving design factors for the size of the equipment. The installation was completed on-time and under budget. The tuning of the automatic sequences for the new thermal system to the existing shroud system required more time and ultimately presented some setbacks to the vendor and the final completion of the system. However, the end product and its benefits to Goddard's thermal vacuum test portfolio will carry the usefulness of this facility well into the next century.

  10. Present status and plans for upgrading the Lujan neutron scattering center

    SciTech Connect

    Rhyne, James J

    2010-01-01

    The Lujan Center, part of the LANSCE accelerator complex at Los Alamos National Laboratory, operates a comprehensive neutron scattering facility for the U.S. Department of Energy that serves approximately 300 users per year. This paper will discuss the current instruments and status of the facility and also focus on the plans for a major upgrade of the Center including new instruments and enhancements to specific existing instruments. The instrument suite currently includes two reflectometers (one with full polarization), an engineering diffraction machine, a diffractometer specialized to pair-distribution analysis, 2 general purpose powder diffractometers, and 2 inelastic spectrometers. To complement these spectrometers, a full range of pressure, temperature, and magnetic field sample environments is available for users. As part of the planning for a forthcoming enhancement of Lujan Center, a series of workshops have been held over the past year to encourage user input to the design for new instruments as well as major upgrades of existing machines. Many of the planned facilities are designed to take advantage of the Lujan Center 20 Hz pulse repetition rate and cold source moderators, both of which are beneficial for high-resolution instruments using long neutron wavelengths.

  11. Options to upgrade the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomassen, K.I.; Doggett, J.N.

    1983-04-01

    In this document we describe three options for upgrading MFTF-B, and the nomenclature used for these options is shown on the chart, MFTF-B Upgrade Options. We propose to add a 4-m-long reactor-like insert to the central cell, or to change the end plugs to the new MARS-type configuration, or both. LLNL prefers the third option, labeled MFTF-..cap alpha../sup +/T in the chart, in which both the central cell insert is added and the end plugs are modified. All options are long-pulse or steady-state DT burning experiments. Those upgrades with the insert would be constructed beginning in FY 86, with operation beginning in mid-FY 92. Confirmation of our intent to modify the end plugs would be sought in FY 88 based on positive results from MFTF-B experiments. The upgrade with only the end plug modification would not start until MFTF-B data are available. The timeline for constructing and operating the MFTF-B Upgrade included at the end of this preface is for reference while reading the text. The various modes of operation shown on the chart are described later.

  12. Parris Island Wastewater Treatment Plant SCADA Upgrades Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Meador, Richard J.; Hatley, Darrel D.

    2004-03-18

    Marine Corp Recruit Depot (MCRD), Parris Island, SC, home of the Easter Recruiting Region Marine Corp Boot Camp, found itself in a situation common to Department of Defense (DOD) facilities. It had to deal with several different types of installed energy-related control systems that could not talk to each other. This situation was being exacerbated by the installation of a new and/or unique type of control system for every new building being constructed or older facility that was being upgraded. The Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF) and lift station controls were badly in need of a thorough inspection and a new Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system upgrade to meet environmental, safety, manpower, and maintenance concerns. A project was recently completed to implement such a wastewater treatment SCADA upgrade, which is compatible with other upgrades to the energy monitoring and control systems for Parris Island buildings and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Decision Support for Operations and Maintenance (DSOM) system installed at the Central Energy Plant (CEP). This project included design, specification, procurement, installation, and testing an upgraded SCADA alarm, process monitoring, and display system; and training WWTF operators in its operation. The ultimate goal of this and the other PNNL projects at Parris Island is to allow monitoring and control of energy and environmental components from a central location.

  13. Economic considerations for wastewater upgrading alternatives: an Israeli test case.

    PubMed

    Fine, Pinchas; Halperin, Ramy; Hadas, Efrat

    2006-01-01

    Sewage effluent for land application is becoming an increasingly important source of irrigation water in many semi-arid regions of the world. Two main approaches to the use of sanitation to upgrade effluent for reuse in agriculture were analyzed: (i) sanitizing to the level required for each crop; or (ii) upgrading all effluent to the sanitary level mandated for unrestricted irrigation (<10 fecal coli/100mL). The first approach was authorized by the Israeli health authorities, who consider irrigation with secondary effluent to be complementary to the treatment process. The other approach was conceived mainly by the agricultural and environmental establishments, which debited the additional financial burden to the urban sector and/or the 'general public'. We show that upgrading all effluents in Israel to 'unrestricted irrigation quality' would cost $69 million each year for upgrading alone, in addition to the costs of treatment to the sanitary level required for each individual crop and of observing all the necessary additional precautions and boundaries. This difference in cost stems from the fact that most effluent is used for the irrigation of non-edible crops, for which partial pathogen removal is sufficient. Thus, upgrading to the sanitary level required by the most sensitive crops would be rather wasteful.

  14. JCMT Telescope Control System upgrades for SCUBA-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kackley, Russell; Scott, Douglas; Chapin, Edward; Friberg, Per

    2010-07-01

    The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Telescope Control System (TCS) received significant upgrades to provide new observing capabilities to support the requirements of the SCUBA-2 instrument. The core of the TCS is the Portable Telescope Control System (PTCS), which was developed through collaboration between the Joint Astronomy Centre and the Anglo-Australian Observatory. The PTCS provides a well-designed virtual telescope function library that simplifies these sorts of upgrades. The TCS was previously upgraded to provide the required scanning modes for the JCMT heterodyne instruments. The heterodyne instruments required only relatively simple raster or boustrophedon patterns, which are basically composed of multiple straight-line scans to cover a rectangular area. The most recent upgrades built upon those heterodyne scanning modes to satisfy the SCUBA-2 requirements. With these upgrades, the TCS can scan the telescope in any pattern that can be described as a continuous function of time. This new capability has been utilized during the current SCUBA-2 on-sky commissioning phase to scan the telescope in a variety of patterns (Lissajous, pong, ellipse, and daisy) on the sky. This paper will give a brief description of the PTCS, provide information on the selection of the SCUBA-2 scanning modes, describe the changes to the TCS that were necessary to implement the new scanning modes, and show the performance of the telescope during SCUBA-2 commissioning.

  15. Deployment of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope wide field upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Gary J.; Drory, Niv; Good, John; Lee, Hanshin; Vattiat, Brian; Kriel, Herman; Bryant, Randy; Elliot, Linda; Landriau, Martin; Leck, Ron; Perry, David; Ramsey, Jason; Savage, Richard; Allen, Richard D.; Damm, George; DePoy, D. L.; Fowler, Jim; Gebhardt, Karl; Haeuser, Marco; MacQueen, Phillip; Marshall, J. L.; Martin, Jerry; Prochaska, Travis; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Rheault, Jean-Philippe; Shetrone, Matthew; Schroeder Mrozinski, Emily; Tuttle, Sarah E.; Cornell, Mark E.; Booth, John; Moreira, Walter

    2014-07-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) is an innovative large telescope located in West Texas at the McDonald Observatory. The HET operates with a fixed segmented primary and has a tracker, which moves the four-mirror optical corrector and prime focus instrument package to track the sidereal and non-sidereal motions of objects. A major upgrade of the HET is in progress that will substantially increase the pupil size to 10 meters (from 9.2 m) and the field of view to 22 arcminutes (from 4 arcminutes) by replacing the corrector, tracker, and prime focus instrument package. In addition to supporting existing instruments, and a new low resolution spectrograph, this wide field upgrade will feed a revolutionary new integral field spectrograph called VIRUS, in support of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX§). The upgrade is being installed and this paper discusses the current status.

  16. Upgrade of absolute extreme ultraviolet diagnostic on J-TEXT

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. L.; Cheng, Z. F. Hou, S. Y.; Zhuang, G.; Luo, J.

    2014-11-15

    The absolute extreme ultraviolet (AXUV) diagnostic system is used for radiation observation on J-TEXT tokamak [J. Zhang, G. Zhuang, Z. J. Wang, Y. H. Ding, X. Q. Zhang, and Y. J. Tang, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 073509 (2010)]. The upgrade of the AXUV system is aimed to improve the spatial resolution and provide a three-dimensional image on J-TEXT. The new system consists of 12 AXUV arrays (4 AXUV16ELG arrays, 8 AXUV20ELG arrays). The spatial resolution in the cross-section is 21 mm for the AXUV16ELG arrays and 17 mm for the AXUV20ELG arrays. The pre-amplifier is also upgraded for a higher signal to noise ratio. By upgrading the AXUV imaging system, a more accurate observation on the radiation information is obtained.

  17. Status of the CMS Phase I pixel detector upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spannagel, S.

    2016-09-01

    A new pixel detector for the CMS experiment is being built, owing to the instantaneous luminosities anticipated for the Phase I Upgrade of the LHC. The new CMS pixel detector provides four-hit tracking while featuring a significantly reduced material budget as well as new cooling and powering schemes. A new front-end readout chip mitigates buffering and bandwidth limitations, and comprises a low-threshold comparator. These improvements allow the new pixel detector to sustain and improve the efficiency of the current pixel tracker at the increased requirements imposed by high luminosities and pile-up. This contribution gives an overview of the design of the upgraded pixel detector and the status of the upgrade project, and presents test beam performance measurements of the production read-out chip.

  18. SLHC, the High-Luminosity Upgrade (public event)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In the morning of June 23rd a public event is organised in CERN's Council Chamber with the aim of providing the particle physics community with up-to-date information about the strategy for the LHC luminosity upgrade and to describe the current status of preparation work. The presentations will provide an overview of the various accelerator sub-projects, the LHC physics prospects and the upgrade plans of ATLAS and CMS. This event is organised in the framework of the SLHC-PP project, which receives funding from the European Commission for the preparatory phase of the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade project. Informing the public is among the objectives of this EU-funded project. A simultaneous transmission of this meeting will be broadcast, available at the following address: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  19. The systems engineering upgrade intiative at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ross M.

    2005-01-01

    JPL is implementing an initiative to significantly upgrade our systems engineering capabilities. This Systems Engineering Upgrade Initiative [SUI] has been authorized by the highest level technical management body of JPL and is sponsored with internal funds. The SUI objective is to upgrade system engineering at JPL to a level that is world class, professional and efficient compared to the FY04/05 baseline. JPL system engineering, along with the other engineering disciplines, is intended to support optimum designs; controlled and efficient implementations; and high quality, reliable, cost effective products. SUI technical activities are categorized into those dealing with people, process and tools. The purpose of this paper is to describe the rationale, objectives/plans and current status of the JPL SUI.

  20. The catalytic upgrading of coal-derived liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Guptill, R.; Jung, D.Y.; Kuhlmann, E.J.; Zang, H.K.

    1985-01-01

    Four catalysts of the type customarily used for petroleum distillate hydrotreating have been evaluated for their performance during coal liquid upgrading. One catalyst was Cobalt-Molybdenum, two were Nickel-Molybdenum, and one was Cobalt-Nickel-Molybdenum, all of which were supported on alumina. The results obtained using the preferred catalysts show increased levels of sulfur and nitrogen removal at hydrogen consumption levels that were lower than those observed when using the reference refinery hydrotreating catalyst. In addition, the upgrading of middle and heavy coal liquefaction distillates was simulated. These upgraded coal liquids can meet all of the respective fuel oil specifications for petroleum fuels in the same boiling point ranges except for API gravity.

  1. Reactive plasma upgrade of squalane - a heavy oil simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, P.C.; Watkins, A.D.; Detering, B.A.; Thomas, C.P.

    1995-10-01

    U.S. light crude oil production has steadily declined over the last two decades. However, huge known heavy oil deposits in the North American continent remain largely untapped. In the past 10 years, the API gravity of crude oils has been decreasing by about 0.17% per year, and the sulfur content has been increasing by about 0.027% per year. As the API gravity of crude oil decreases, there will be an urgent need for economically viable new technologies to upgrade the heavy oil to a high API gravity feed stock for the refineries. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is investigating an innovative plasma process to upgrade heavy oil and refinery residuum. This paper will present some of the results and the implications of this technology for heavy oil upgrade and conversion.

  2. Upgrading Fermi Without Traveling to Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has received an upgrade that increased its sensitivity by a whopping 40% and nobody had to travel to space to make it happen! The difference instead stems from remarkable improvement to the software used to analyze Fermi-LATs data, and it has resulted in a new high-energy map of our sky.Animation (click to watch!) comparing the Pass 7 to the Pass 8 Fermi-LAT analysis, in a region in the constellation Carina. Pass 8 provides more accurate directions for incoming gamma rays, so more of them fall closer to their sources, creating taller spikes and a sharper image. [NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration]Pass 8Fermi-LAT has been surveying the whole sky since August 2008. It detects gamma-ray photons by converting them into electron-positron pairs and tracking the paths of these charged particles. But differentiating this signal from the charged cosmic rays that also pass through the detector with a flux that can be 10,000 times larger! is a challenging process. Making this distinction and rebuilding the path of the original gamma ray relies on complex analysis software.Pass 8 is a complete reprocessing of all data collected by Fermi-LAT. The software has gone through many revisions before now, but this is the first revision that has taken into account all of the experience that the Fermi team has gained operating the LAT in its orbital environment.The improvements made in Pass 8 include better background rejection of misclassified charged particles, improvements to the point spread function and effective area of the detector, and an extension of the effective energy range from below 100 MeV to beyond a few hundred GeV. The changes made in Pass 8 have increased the sensitivity of Fermi-LAT by an astonishing 40%.Map of the High-Energy SkySky map of the sources in the 2FHL catalog, classified by their most likely association. Click for a better look! [Ackermann et al. 2016]The first result from the

  3. Upgrade of the ATLAS Central Trigger for LHC Run-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artz, S.; Bauss, B.; Boterenbrood, H.; Buescher, V.; Degele, R.; Dhaliwal, S.; Ellis, N.; Farthouat, P.; Galster, G.; Ghibaudi, M.; Glatzer, J.; Haas, S.; Igonkina, O.; Jakobi, K.; Jansweijer, P.; Kahra, C.; Kaluza, A.; Kaneda, M.; Marzin, A.; Ohm, C.; Silva Oliveira, M. V.; Pauly, T.; Pöttgen, R.; Reiss, A.; Schäfer, U.; Schäffer, J.; Schipper, J. D.; Schmieden, K.; Schreuder, F.; Simioni, E.; Simon, M.; Spiwoks, R.; Stelzer, J.; Tapprogge, S.; Vermeulen, J.; Vogel, A.; Zinser, M.

    2015-02-01

    The increased energy and luminosity of the LHC in the run-2 data taking period requires a more selective trigger menu in order to satisfy the physics goals of ATLAS. Therefore the electronics of the central trigger system is upgraded to allow for a larger variety and more sophisticated trigger criteria. In addition, the software controlling the central trigger processor (CTP) has been redesigned to allow the CTP to accommodate three freely configurable and separately operating sets of sub detectors, each independently using the almost full functionality of the trigger hardware. This new approach and its operational advantages are discussed as well as the hardware upgrades.

  4. High resolution upgrade of the ATF damping ring BPM system

    SciTech Connect

    Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Frisch, J.; May, J.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Seryi, A.; Smith, T.; Woodley, M.; Briegel, C.; Dysert, R.; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    A beam position monitor (BPM) upgrade at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) damping ring has been accomplished in its first stage, carried out by a KEK/FNAL/SLAC collaboration under the umbrella of the global ILC R&D effort. The upgrade consists of a high resolution, high reproducibility read-out system, based on analog and digital downconversion techniques, digital signal processing, and also tests a new automatic gain error correction schema. The technical concept and realization, as well as preliminary results of beam studies are presented.

  5. Status of the ATF Damping Ring BPM Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Briegel, C.; Eddy, N.; Haynes, B.; May, J.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Nicklaus, D.; Prieto, P.; Rechenmacher, R.; Smith, T.; Teranuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Voy, D.; Wendt, M.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2011-12-01

    A substantial upgrade of the beam position monitors (BPM) at the ATF (Accelerator Test Facility) damping ring is currently in progress. Implementing digital read-out signal processing techniques in line with an optimized, low-noise analog downconverter, a resolution well below 1 mum could be demonstrated at 20 (of 96) upgraded BPM stations. The narrowband, high resolution BPM mode permits investigation of all types of non-linearities, imperfections and other obstacles in the machine which may limit the very low target aimed vertical beam emittance of < 2 pm. The technical status of the project, first beam measurements and an outlook to it's finalization are presented.

  6. Research of TREETOPS Structural Dynamics Controls Simulation Upgrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Rose M.

    1996-01-01

    Under the provisions of contract number NAS8-40194, which was entitled 'TREETOPS Structural Dynamics and Controls Simulation System Upgrade', Oakwood College contracted to produce an upgrade to the existing TREETOPS suite of analysis tools. This suite includes the main simulation program, TREETOPS, two interactive preprocessors, TREESET and TREEFLX, an interactive post processor, TREEPLOT, and an adjunct program, TREESEL. A 'Software Design Document', which provides descriptions of the argument lists and internal variables for each subroutine in the TREETOPS suite, was established. Additionally, installation guides for both DOS and UNIX platforms were developed. Finally, updated User's Manuals, as well as a Theory Manual, were generated.

  7. Run 2 upgrades to the CMS Level-1 calorimeter trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreis, B.; Berryhill, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Mishra, K.; Rivera, R.; Uplegger, L.; Apanasevich, L.; Zhang, J.; Marrouche, J.; Wardle, N.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Brooke, J.; Newbold, D.; Paramesvaran, S.; Smith, D.; Baber, M.; Bundock, A.; Citron, M.; Elwood, A.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Laner, C.; Penning, B.; Rose, A.; Tapper, A.; Foudas, C.; Beaudette, F.; Cadamuro, L.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Romanteau, T.; Sauvan, J. B.; Strebler, T.; Zabi, A.; Barbieri, R.; Cali, I. A.; Innocenti, G. M.; Lee, Y.-J.; Roland, C.; Wyslouch, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Northup, M.; Tran, B.; Durkin, T.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.; Thea, A.; Williams, T.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Forbes, R.; Gorski, T.; Klabbers, P.; Levine, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Ruggles, T.; Smith, N.; Smith, W.; Svetek, A.; Tikalsky, J.; Vicente, M.

    2016-01-01

    The CMS Level-1 calorimeter trigger is being upgraded in two stages to maintain performance as the LHC increases pile-up and instantaneous luminosity in its second run. In the first stage, improved algorithms including event-by-event pile-up corrections are used. New algorithms for heavy ion running have also been developed. In the second stage, higher granularity inputs and a time-multiplexed approach allow for improved position and energy resolution. Data processing in both stages of the upgrade is performed with new, Xilinx Virtex-7 based AMC cards.

  8. The 12 GeV JLab Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Elton

    2009-01-01

    The upgrade of the CEBAF Accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV will deliver high luminosity and high quality beams, which will open unique opportunities for studies of the quark and gluon structure of hadrons in the valence region. Such physics will be made accessible by substantial additions to the experimental equipment in combination with the increased energy reach of the upgraded machine. The emphasis of the talk will be on the program in a new experimental Hall D designed to search for gluonic excitations.

  9. The upgrade of the ATLAS first-level calorimeter trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shimpei

    2016-07-01

    The first-level calorimeter trigger (L1Calo) had operated successfully through the first data taking phase of the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Towards forthcoming LHC runs, a series of upgrades is planned for L1Calo to face new challenges posed by the upcoming increases of the beam energy and the luminosity. This paper reviews the ATLAS L1Calo trigger upgrade project that introduces new architectures for the liquid-argon calorimeter trigger readout and the L1Calo trigger processing system.

  10. JET divertor diagnostic upgrade for neutral gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Kruezi, Uron; Sergienko, G; Morgan, P D; Matthews, G F; Brezinsek, S; Vartanian, S

    2012-10-01

    With installation of the ITER-like wall in JET a major diagnostic upgrade to measure the neutral gas pressure and composition in the sub-divertor region has been completed, to characterise retention and outgassing of the new metallic first wall. The upgrade includes two new magnetically shielded systems consisting of sensitive capacitance manometers and residual gas analysers, both capable of providing data during plasma operation. These enable absolute pressure and gas composition measurements (pressure range: 10(-5)-10(-1) mbar, mass range: 1-200 amu, respectively) and have been used to characterise the neutral gas behaviour under various plasma conditions.

  11. The sROD module for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase-II Upgrade Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrió, F.; Castillo, V.; Ferrer, A.; Fiorini, L.; Hernández, Y.; Higón, E.; Mellado, B.; March, L.; Moreno, P.; Reed, R.; Solans, C.; Valero, A.; Valls, J. A.

    2014-02-01

    TileCal is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The main upgrade of the LHC to increase the instantaneous luminosity is scheduled for 2022. The High Luminosity LHC, also called upgrade Phase-II, will imply a complete redesign of the read-out electronics in TileCal. In the new read-out architecture, the front-end electronics aims to transmit full digitized information to the back-end system in the counting rooms. Thus, the back-end system will also provide digital calibrated information with enhanced precision and granularity to the first level trigger to improve the trigger efficiencies. The demonstrator project is envisaged to qualify this new proposed architecture. A reduced part of the detector, 1/256 of the total, will be equipped with the new electronics during 2014 to evaluate the proposed architecture in real conditions. The upgraded Read-Out Driver (sROD) will be the core element of the back-end electronics in Phase-II. The sROD module is designed on a double mid-size AMC format and will operate under an AdvancedTCA framework. The module includes two Xilinx Series 7 Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) for data receiving and processing, as well as the implementation of embedded systems. Related to optical connectors, the sROD uses 4 QSFPs to receive and transmit data from the front-end electronics and 1 Avago MiniPOD to send preprocessed data to the first level trigger system. An SFP module maintains the compatibility with the existing hardware. A complete description of the sROD module for the demonstrator including the main functionalities, circuit design and the control software and firmware will be presented.

  12. Application of the general model 'biological nutrient removal model no. 1' to upgrade two full-scale WWTPs.

    PubMed

    Ruano, M V; Serralta, J; Ribes, J; Garcia-Usach, F; Bouzas, A; Barat, R; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, two practical case studies for upgrading two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) using the general model BNRM 1 (Biological Nutrient Removal Model No. 1) are presented. In the first case study, the Tarragona WWTP was upgraded by reducing the phosphorus load to the anaerobic digester in order to minimize the precipitation problems. Phosphorus load reduction was accomplished by mixing the primary sludge and the secondary sludge and by elutriating the mixed sludge. In the second case study, the Alcantarilla WWTP, the nutrient removal was enhanced by maintaining a relatively low dissolved oxygen concentration in Stage A to maintain the acidogenic bacteria activity. The VFA produced in Stage A favour the denitrification process and biological phosphorus removal in Stage B. These case studies demonstrate the benefits of using the general model BNRMI to simulate settling processes and biological processes related to both anaerobic and aerobic bacteria in the same process unit.

  13. Upgrades at the NASA Langley Research Center National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paryz, Roman W.

    2012-01-01

    Several projects have been completed or are nearing completion at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) National Transonic Facility (NTF). The addition of a Model Flow-Control/Propulsion Simulation test capability to the NTF provides a unique, transonic, high-Reynolds number test capability that is well suited for research in propulsion airframe integration studies, circulation control high-lift concepts, powered lift, and cruise separation flow control. A 1992 vintage Facility Automation System (FAS) that performs the control functions for tunnel pressure, temperature, Mach number, model position, safety interlock and supervisory controls was replaced using current, commercially available components. This FAS upgrade also involved a design study for the replacement of the facility Mach measurement system and the development of a software-based simulation model of NTF processes and control systems. The FAS upgrades were validated by a post upgrade verification wind tunnel test. The data acquisition system (DAS) upgrade project involves the design, purchase, build, integration, installation and verification of a new DAS by replacing several early 1990's vintage computer systems with state of the art hardware/software. This paper provides an update on the progress made in these efforts. See reference 1.

  14. Upgrade of a GEP50 robot control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alounai, Ali T.; Gharsalli, Imed

    2000-03-01

    Recently the ASL at Tennessee Technological University was donated a GEP50 welder. The welding is done via off line point-to-point teaching. A state of the art robot was needed for research but because money was not available to purchase such an expensive item. It was therefore decided to upgrade the GEP50 control system to make the welder a multitasking robot. The robot has five degrees of freedom can be sufficient to pursue some research in robotics control. The problem was that the control system of the welder is limited to point-to-point control, using off-line teaching. To make the GEP50 a multitasking robot that can be controlled using different control strategies, the existing control system of the welder had to be replaced. The upgrade turned to be a low cost operation. This robot is currently in sue to test different advanced control strategies in the ASL. This work discusses all the steps and tasks undertaken during the upgrade operation. The hardware and software required or the upgrade are provided in this paper. The newly developed control system has been implemented and tested successfully.

  15. Status of the Ultracold neutron source upgrade at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Pattie, Robert Wayne Jr.

    2015-10-31

    Several slides show the source and flux of ultracold neutrons produced. In summary, an upgraded UCN source has been designed, and parts are currently being fabricated. Nickel phosphorus-coated guides will improve transport to the experiment hall. The source will be installed in the spring of 2016 and commissioned in the fall of 2016.

  16. Upgrading the Laboratory Preparation of High School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Jack W.; Scamehorn, Richard G.

    1970-01-01

    Describes a college program designed to upgrade the laboratory experience of selected high school chemistry teachers. Small groups of teachers work with college faculty on chemistry problems each weekend. Problems investigated include the use of pH meters, X-ray diffraction, computers, and experiments in chromatography, spectroscopy radiochemistry…

  17. Negative Effects and Occupational Upgrading in a Collective Bargaining Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkin, Randyl D.

    Manpower training and upgrading programs have negative secondary effects upon regular employees. A review of the literature and empirical research on these negative effects indicated that no model has yet been devised and tested to measure these negative effects. This paper suggests a preliminary model for the evaluation of the disruptive effects…

  18. Upgrading a CD-ROM Network for Multimedia Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvia, Margaret

    1995-01-01

    Addresses issues to consider when upgrading library CD-ROM networks for multimedia applications. Topics includes security issues; workstation requirements such as soundboards and monitors; local area network configurations that avoid bottlenecks: Asynchronous Transfer Mode, Ethernet, and Integrated Services Digital Network; server performance…

  19. Upgrading the Household Worker. Final Report (January 1967-September 1968).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willmart Services, Inc., Washington, DC.

    A total of 108 women from low-income families who were underemployed and unemployed and who needed to develop marketable skills were selected for a 9-week training course offered by an agency which was established to upgrade the economic and social status of the household worker. The experimental program combined attitudinal training with training…

  20. 75 FR 68781 - Workforce Guidelines for Home Energy Upgrades

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... residential building energy efficiency retrofits. Job Task Analyses identify and catalog all of the tasks a... based. 4. Build confidence among consumers and the energy efficiency finance community that retrofit... Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Workforce Guidelines for Home Energy Upgrades...