Science.gov

Sample records for asian americans

  1. Asians and Asian Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Francisco Unified School District, CA.

    This is a selected bibliography of some good and some outstanding audio-visual educational materials in the library of the Educational Materials Bureau, Audio-Visual Education Section, that may be considered of particular interest in the study of Asians and Asian-Americans. The bibliography is arranged alphabetically within the following subject…

  2. Asian Americans and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Corporation Board of Trustees Leadership Council History Managing Diabetes Childhood Diabetes Nutrition Exercise Online Diabetes Classes ... Support Planned Giving Philanthropy Team Diabetes Information & Resources » Managing Diabetes » Asian Americans & Diabetes Newly Diagnosed Managing Diabetes ...

  3. Therapy for Asian Americans

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Joe

    1978-01-01

    In order that Asian Americans be more adequately provided with mental health services, it will be necessary to: (1) have a thorough educational campaign over a long period of time to help Asians overcome their negative prejudices against mental illness, (2) devise culturally relevant diagnostic techniques, and (3) have treatment consonant with the cultural backgrounds of the patients and befitting the role expectations of the patients. It is likely that even with an excellent educational campaign, appropriate diagnoses, and culturally sensitive treatment methods, the first patients we will see will be those most seriously and chronically disturbed, probably when the family feels no longer able to cope with their psychotic behavior. We hope that subsequently, through the educational campaign and also through the outreach efforts of the Asian Mental Health Clinic, Asian Americans who are not psychotic but who want relief from psychosomatic symptoms, tension, depression, or help with family or marital problems will apply. PMID:702561

  4. Asian Americans in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karnow, Stanley; Yoshihara, Nancy

    This booklet is a detailed primer on the Asian American experience in the United States covering history, family and acculturation, education, culture and the arts, economics, discrimination and violence, and politics. An introduction reviews some basic demographics and looks at racial issues in light of the riots in Los Angeles (California) in…

  5. Asian-American Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, William T.; Yu, Elena S. H.

    Although Asian Americans enjoy the image of a "successful minority," they also have endured hardships and prejudices. This report traces the history of the Japanese and Chinese experience in the United States. Some similarities are discernible in the immigration patterns of the two ethnic populations. The first wave of immigrants…

  6. Asian Americans in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karnow, Stanley; Yoshihara, Nancy

    This booklet is a detailed primer on the Asian American experience in the United States covering history, family and acculturation, education, culture and the arts, economics, discrimination and violence, and politics. An introduction reviews some basic demographics and looks at racial issues in light of the riots in Los Angeles (California) in…

  7. Asian American Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Paul Public Schools, Minn.

    This comprehensive Asian American curriculum and resource guide for elementary school teachers consists of lessons developed as part of an in-service teacher education workshop. The guide is divided into three topic areas: stereotyping; similarities; and differences. The format for lessons in all sections contains a title, key concepts,…

  8. Asian American Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Paul Public Schools, Minn.

    This comprehensive Asian American curriculum and resource guide for elementary school teachers consists of lessons developed as part of an in-service teacher education workshop. The guide is divided into three topic areas: stereotyping; similarities; and differences. The format for lessons in all sections contains a title, key concepts,…

  9. Roots: An Asian American Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tachiki, Amy, Ed.; And Others

    A documentary collection of the experiences of Asian Americans from a multitude of perspectives, including a scholarly focus and also containing contemporary expressions, comprises "Roots: An Asian American Reader." The volume is said to be designed to meet the needs of Asian Americans by providing a compilation of materials in readily…

  10. History of Asian American psychology.

    PubMed

    Leong, Frederick T L; Okazaki, Sumie

    2009-10-01

    An overview of the history of Asian American psychology is provided by reviewing the context for the development of the field as well as the early founding of the Asian American Psychological Association (AAPA). The presidents of AAPA as well as key events and conferences are noted. The involvement of AAPA leaders in national mental health policies and activities are reviewed. The substantive areas of Asian American psychology and the education and training of Asian American psychologists are also discussed. The article ends with some comments about the future of Asian American psychology. Copyright 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Ethnopsychopharmacology considerations for Asians and Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Wong, Felicia K; Pi, Edmond H

    2012-03-01

    Asians comprise more than 60% of the world's population and are the fastest growing minority group in the United States. Today's psychiatrist must learn to recognize and appreciate the unique factors that influence mental health outcomes in this group. Asian Americans are affected by psychiatric disorders at similar rates as non-Asians, but are significantly underrepresented in psychiatric clinics. When Asians and Asian Americans do present for psychiatric treatment, they often do so with higher severity of illness, and variable levels of compliance. Studies over the past three decades have suggested that pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of various psychotropic medications may be different in Asians, leading to differences in dosage requirements and side-effect profiles. These variations appear to be largely determined by genetic predisposition, but are also influenced by other factors such as environment, social support, cultural perceptions, and physicians' prescribing habits. In this paper, we provide an overview of biological and socio-cultural issues as they relate to psychopharmacology in Asians and Asian Americans, with the hope that a better understanding of these issues will lead to improved mental health care delivery to this population both in the United States, as well as in Asian countries.

  12. Minority Women's Health: Asian-Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Home > Minority Women's Health > Asian-Americans Minority Women's Health Asian-Americans Health conditions common in Asian- ... to top Health conditions common in Asian-American women Breast cancer Cancer Cervical cancer Diabetes Heart disease ...

  13. Asian American Curriculum Guide: Elementary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Paul Public Schools, Minn.

    Designed to meet the need for elementary school students to understand the status, needs, and contributions of Asian Americans, this curriculum guide was developed as a result of an in-service teacher education workshop. The basic premise of the guide is the recognition that student awareness and understanding of Asian Americans should be…

  14. Handbook of Asian American Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lee C., Ed.; Zane, Nolan W. S., Ed.

    This handbook integrates descriptions and evaluations of current psychological research on all ethnic subgroups of Asian Americans, providing insights into the diverse and varied nature of Asian American cultures. Following a Foreword by Dick Suinn, the chapters are: (1) "An Overview" (Lee C. Lee); (2) "Research Methods: The Construct Validity of…

  15. Additional Resources on Asian Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kodama, Corinne Maekawa; Lee, Sunny; Liang, Christopher T. H.; Alvarez, Alvin N.; McEwen, Marylu K.

    2002-01-01

    The authors identify Asian American associations and organizations, academic journals, periodicals, and media resources. Selected annotated resources on Asian American activism and politics, counseling and psychology, educational issues, gender and sexual orientation, history, policy reports, and racial and ethnic identity are also included.…

  16. Asian American Curriculum Guide: Elementary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Paul Public Schools, Minn.

    Designed to meet the need for elementary school students to understand the status, needs, and contributions of Asian Americans, this curriculum guide was developed as a result of an in-service teacher education workshop. The basic premise of the guide is the recognition that student awareness and understanding of Asian Americans should be…

  17. Handbook of Asian American Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lee C., Ed.; Zane, Nolan W. S., Ed.

    This handbook integrates descriptions and evaluations of current psychological research on all ethnic subgroups of Asian Americans, providing insights into the diverse and varied nature of Asian American cultures. Following a Foreword by Dick Suinn, the chapters are: (1) "An Overview" (Lee C. Lee); (2) "Research Methods: The Construct Validity of…

  18. Osteoporosis and Asian American Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... not supported by your browser. Home Osteoporosis Women Osteoporosis and Asian American Women Publication available in: PDF ( ... Are Available? Resources For Your Information What Is Osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones ...

  19. Adjustment disorders in Asians and Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Phillip D; Abhari, Bahareh

    2014-02-01

    In the DSM-5, adjustment disorders have undergone a conceptual shift with a new designation as a constellation of stress-related conditions in response to exposure to a distressing event which may be perceived as traumatic or non-traumatic. This is in contrast to its previous description in DSM-IV-TR, which focused on the presence of significant distress following a crisis event, but did not require the individual to meet the criteria for a more serious disorder. This paper will present a brief overview of the clinical nosology, etiology, and treatment modalities for adjustment disorders with Asian and Asian American populations. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Asian American Education: Identities, Racial Issues, and Languages. Research on the Education of Asian Pacific Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rong, Xue Lan, Ed.; Endo, Russell, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Asian American Education--Asian American Identities, Racial Issues, and Languages presents groundbreaking research that critically challenges the invisibility, stereotyping, and common misunderstandings of Asian Americans by disrupting "customary" discourse and disputing "familiar" knowledge. The chapters in this anthology…

  1. Asian American Education: Identities, Racial Issues, and Languages. Research on the Education of Asian Pacific Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rong, Xue Lan, Ed.; Endo, Russell, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Asian American Education--Asian American Identities, Racial Issues, and Languages presents groundbreaking research that critically challenges the invisibility, stereotyping, and common misunderstandings of Asian Americans by disrupting "customary" discourse and disputing "familiar" knowledge. The chapters in this anthology…

  2. 16 Extraordinary Asian Americans. Student Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobb, Nancy

    Asian Americans have made many contributions to American life. The 1990 U.S. Census showed that Asian Americans represented about 3% of the total U.S. population. This textbook presents the stories of 16 Asian Americans and their significant accomplishments. Brief biographies are presented of: (1) Daniel K. Inouye, U.S. Senator from Hawaii; (2)…

  3. 16 Extraordinary Asian Americans. Student Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobb, Nancy

    Asian Americans have made many contributions to American life. The 1990 U.S. Census showed that Asian Americans represented about 3% of the total U.S. population. This textbook presents the stories of 16 Asian Americans and their significant accomplishments. Brief biographies are presented of: (1) Daniel K. Inouye, U.S. Senator from Hawaii; (2)…

  4. We, the Asian Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of the Census (DOC), Suitland, MD.

    On April 1, 1970, we were counted along with the rest of the people in the nation. The Census Bureau found that we constitute about one percent of the population. There are 1,369,412 of us--591,290 Japanese-Americans, 435,062 Chinese-Americans, 343,060 Filipino-Americans, 70,000 Korean-Americans, 100,000 Hawaiians, 107,000 Turkish, 85,000…

  5. Racism and Asian American Student Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Jennifer Y.

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a theoretical analysis and ethnographic account of Asian American student leadership in higher education. Existing literature highlights Asian and Asian American leadership styles as cultural differences. I shift the analysis from culture to racism in order to work toward a more socially just conception of Asian American…

  6. Racism and Asian American Student Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Jennifer Y.

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a theoretical analysis and ethnographic account of Asian American student leadership in higher education. Existing literature highlights Asian and Asian American leadership styles as cultural differences. I shift the analysis from culture to racism in order to work toward a more socially just conception of Asian American…

  7. Early Education for Asian American Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitano, Margie K.

    1980-01-01

    A review of early education for Asian American children (Japanese, Chinese, Filipinos, Vietnamese, Koreans, Hawaiians, and Samoans) focuses on the 1975 Asian American Education Project, a study of the learning characteristics of preschool age children and its educational implications. (CM)

  8. Culturally Speaking: Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, Sherry

    2004-01-01

    The celebration of the Asian Pacific American heritage month is to be held in May 2004. The librarians are advised to include authentic literature by and about Asian Americans for cross-cultural understanding.

  9. Asian American Curriculum Guide: Secondary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Paul Public Schools, Minn.

    Created as part of an in-service teacher education workshop, this guide for a secondary school Asian American curriculum is divided into a section for junior high students and a section for senior high students. In each section, the same pattern is followed. Lesson plans are arranged by subject and grade and are followed by student worksheets when…

  10. Asian-Americans: Psychological Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sue, Stanley, Ed.; Wagner, Nathaniel N., Ed.

    The contents of this book, the purpose of which is the integration of research findings with impressionistic material to provide a better understanding of Asian-Americans, are organized into five parts. Among the five articles included in Part 1, "Introductory Section," are: "The Jap Image," D. Ogawa; "The Evacuation: Impact on the Family," James…

  11. Asian American Curriculum Guide: Secondary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Paul Public Schools, Minn.

    Created as part of an in-service teacher education workshop, this guide for a secondary school Asian American curriculum is divided into a section for junior high students and a section for senior high students. In each section, the same pattern is followed. Lesson plans are arranged by subject and grade and are followed by student worksheets when…

  12. Depression among Asian Americans: Review and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Kalibatseva, Zornitsa; Leong, Frederick T. L.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a review of the prevalence and manifestation of depression among Asian Americans and discusses some of the existing issues in the assessment and diagnosis of depression among Asian Americans. The authors point out the diversity and increasing numbers of Asian Americans and the need to provide better mental health services for this population. While the prevalence of depression among Asian Americans is lower than that among other ethnic/racial groups, Asian Americans receive treatment for depression less often and its quality is less adequate. In addition, the previous belief that Asians somatize depression may become obsolete as more evidence appears to support that Westerners may “psychologize” depression. The cultural validity of the current DSM-IV conceptualization of depression is questioned. In the course of the review, the theme of complexity emerges: the heterogeneity of ethnic Asian American groups, the multidimensionality of depression, and the intersectionality of multiple factors among depressed Asian Americans. PMID:21961060

  13. Health care expenditures among Asian American subgroups.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Vargas-Bustamante, Arturo; Ortega, Alexander N

    2013-06-01

    Using two nationally representative data sets, this study examined health care expenditure disparities between Caucasians and different Asian American subgroups. Multivariate analyses demonstrate that Asian Americans, as a group, have significantly lower total expenditures compared with Caucasians. Results also point to considerable heterogeneities in health care spending within Asian American subgroups. Findings suggest that language assistance programs would be effective in reducing disparities among Caucasians and Asian American subgroups with the exception of Indians and Filipinos, who tend to be more proficient in English. Results also indicate that citizenship and nativity were major factors associated with expenditure disparities. Socioeconomic status, however, could not explain expenditure disparities. Results also show that Asian Americans have lower physician and pharmaceutical costs but not emergency department or hospital expenditures. These findings suggest the need for culturally competent policies specific to Asian American subgroups and the necessity to encourage cost-effective treatments among Asian Americans.

  14. Health Care Expenditures Among Asian American Subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Vargas-Bustamante, Arturo; Ortega, Alexander N.

    2014-01-01

    Using two nationally representative data sets, this study examined health care expenditure disparities between Caucasians and different Asian American subgroups. Multivariate analyses demonstrate that Asian Americans, as a group, have significantly lower total expenditures compared with Caucasians. Results also point to considerable heterogeneities in health care spending within Asian American subgroups. Findings suggest that language assistance programs would be effective in reducing disparities among Caucasians and Asian American subgroups with the exception of Indians and Filipinos, who tend to be more proficient in English. Results also indicate that citizenship and nativity were major factors associated with expenditure disparities. Socioeconomic status, however, could not explain expenditure disparities. Results also show that Asian Americans have lower physician and pharmaceutical costs but not emergency department or hospital expenditures. These findings suggest the need for culturally competent policies specific to Asian American subgroups and the necessity to encourage cost-effective treatments among Asian Americans. PMID:23223329

  15. Exploring Asian American racial identity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Grace A; Lephuoc, Paul; Guzmán, Michele R; Rude, Stephanie S; Dodd, Barbara G

    2006-07-01

    In this study the authors used cluster analysis to create racial identity profiles for a sample of Asian Americans using the People of Color Racial Identity Attitudes Scale (PCRIAS). A four-cluster solution was chosen: each cluster corresponded to one PCRIAS subscale and was named accordingly. Scores on the Asian American Racism-Related Stress Inventory and the Color-Blind Racial Attitudes Scale were compared across clusters. As expected, the Dissonance and Immersion clusters were characterized by relatively high racism-related stress and low levels of color-blind attitudes; the Conformity cluster showed roughly the opposite pattern. Surprisingly, the Internalization cluster showed a pattern similar to that for Conformity and thus may reflect "pseudoindependence" as discussed by Helms.

  16. The Asian American: The Historical Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hundley, Norris, Jr., Ed.

    The essays in this volume look at Asian Americans, their ideas and ways of life, on their own terms, relating them to both Asian and United States history. Roger Daniels presents an overview of East Asian immigrants through a review of the literature by American historians. An essay by Stanford M. Lyman, which follows, analyzes San Francisco's…

  17. The Asian American: The Historical Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hundley, Norris, Jr., Ed.

    The essays in this volume look at Asian Americans, their ideas and ways of life, on their own terms, relating them to both Asian and United States history. Roger Daniels presents an overview of East Asian immigrants through a review of the literature by American historians. An essay by Stanford M. Lyman, which follows, analyzes San Francisco's…

  18. Asian Pacific Americans and Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakanishi, Don T.

    Research on several major interrelated dimensions of the Asian Pacific American higher educational experience is reviewed. The interrelated dimensions are (1) the impact of major demographic trends among the Asian Pacific population on its college-going sector; (2) the issues of Asian Pacific American faculty and administrative representation in…

  19. Correlates of suicidal behaviors among Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Duldulao, Aileen Alfonso; Takeuchi, David T; Hong, Seunghye

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the correlates of suicidal ideation, suicide plan and suicide attempt among Asian Americans focusing on nativity and gender. Analyses are performed on data from the National Latino and Asian American Study (N = 2095), the first ever study conducted on the mental health of a national sample of Asian Americans. The sample is comprised of adults with 998 men (47%) and 1,097 (53%) women. Analysis of weighted lifetime prevalence of suicidal behaviors revealed that U.S.-born Asian American women had higher prevalence of suicidal ideation and suicide plan than U.S.-born Asian American men and immigrant Asian American men and women. In multivariate analyses controlling for socio-demographic differences such as ethnicity, marital status and income, differences in suicidal behaviors are found only between U.S.-born women and U.S.-born men. The findings demonstrate the need to disaggregate data by immigrant status as well as socio-demographic correlates.

  20. Asian American Giving to US Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsunoda, Kozue

    2010-01-01

    Asian Americans have had significant impacts on and within mainstream US society, and their great efforts and gifts in the name of charitable causes are no exception. This study aims to examine perceptions within American university development offices about Asian American giving to US higher education. The article begins with a literature review…

  1. Teaching Asian American Students: Classroom Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Linda H.

    This study examined the unique learning styles of Asian-American students, noting different Asian immigrants' backgrounds and relating Asian cultures to children's learning. Data came from a literature review; interviews with 19 families from China, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan who had a total of 33 children ages 6-21 years; and home and…

  2. Asian Americans: growth, change, and diversity.

    PubMed

    Gardner, R W; Robey, B; Smith, P C

    1985-10-01

    The 1980 US census counted 3.5 million Asian Americans, up from 1.4 million in 1970. Asian Americans made up just 1.5% of the total US population of 226.5 million as of April 1, 1980, but this was the 3rd largest racial or ethnic minority after blacks and Hispanics. Asians increased far more during the 1970s (141%) than blacks (17%) or Hispanics (39%). This Bulletin examines the characteristics of Asian Americans, how their numbers have grown, where they live, how different groups vary in age structure, childbearing, health, and longevity. It reports on the kinds of households Asian Americans form and how they fare with regard to education, occupation, and income. Asian Americans are now often perceived as the model minority. As a whole, they are better educated, occupy higher rungs on the occupational ladder, and earn more than the general US population and even white Americans. This Bulletin presents the 1st comprehensive look at many important facts about Asian Americans and how the groups differ. Special tabulations of data collected in the 1980 census are provided. The 1980 census data are the latest available to give a true picture at the national level of Asian Americans and the various groups among them. The Bulletin examines the current numbers of Asian Americans and how this population is defined. The major Asian American groups are Chinese (21%), Filipinos (20%), Japanese (15%), Vietnamese (21%), Koreans (11%), and Asian Indians (10%). Except for the latest-arrived Vietnamese, the fertility of the 6 groups is lower than the white average. The following areas are also discussed: mortality and health; families and households; education; Asian youth; employment; income and poverty; and future prospects.

  3. ASIAN AMERICAN AND PACIFIC ISLANDERS HERITAGE MONTH

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-05-31

    BO THAO-URABE, A MEMBER OF PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA’S COMMISSION ON ASIAN AMERICANS AND PACIFIC ISLANDERS, SPOKE TO TEAM MEMBERS OF NASA’S MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER DURING AN ASIAN AMERICANS AND PACIFIC ISLANDERS MONTH CELEBRATION EVENT MAY 31.

  4. Understanding and Counseling Asian American Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandras, Kananur V.

    Asian American students who encounter personal problems may hesitate to utilize counseling and mental health facilities on campuses, being fearful that family, friends and/or relatives may consider them emotionally unstable. Counselors and mental health workers may lack understanding of language and cultural background of Asian-American students,…

  5. Resurgent Ethnicity among Asian Americans: Ethnic Neighborhood Context and Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Emily

    2012-01-01

    In this study I investigate the associations of neighborhood socioeconomic and social environments with the health of Asian Americans living in both Asian ethnic neighborhoods and non-Asian neighborhoods. I use a sample of 1962 Asian Americans from the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS, 2003-04). Three key findings emerge. First,…

  6. Resurgent Ethnicity among Asian Americans: Ethnic Neighborhood Context and Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Emily

    2012-01-01

    In this study I investigate the associations of neighborhood socioeconomic and social environments with the health of Asian Americans living in both Asian ethnic neighborhoods and non-Asian neighborhoods. I use a sample of 1962 Asian Americans from the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS, 2003-04). Three key findings emerge. First,…

  7. Housing characteristics of older Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Burr, Jeffrey A; Mutchler, Jan E

    2012-09-01

    This study described the housing tenure and residential density of elders from the six largest Asian American ethnic groups in the US: Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Asian Indian, and Vietnamese. These groups were compared to non-Hispanic White elders. Based on data from the 2000 US Census of Population, multilevel regression analyses showed that Japanese elders were most like the non-Hispanic White comparison group across the two housing dimensions. Older Vietnamese persons were least likely to own their homes compared to the other Asian American groups, and with the exception of the Japanese elders, all Asian groups were more likely than non-Hispanic Whites to live in crowded residences. In general, considerable heterogeneity in housing characteristics was observed across the six older Asian American ethnic groups, even after controlling for assimilation and housing discrimination indicators.

  8. Explaining Asian Americans' academic advantage over whites.

    PubMed

    Hsin, Amy; Xie, Yu

    2014-06-10

    The superior academic achievement of Asian Americans is a well-documented phenomenon that lacks a widely accepted explanation. Asian Americans' advantage in this respect has been attributed to three groups of factors: (i) socio-demographic characteristics, (ii) cognitive ability, and (iii) academic effort as measured by characteristics such as attentiveness and work ethic. We combine data from two nationally representative cohort longitudinal surveys to compare Asian-American and white students in their educational trajectories from kindergarten through high school. We find that the Asian-American educational advantage is attributable mainly to Asian students exerting greater academic effort and not to advantages in tested cognitive abilities or socio-demographics. We test explanations for the Asian-white gap in academic effort and find that the gap can be further attributed to (i) cultural differences in beliefs regarding the connection between effort and achievement and (ii) immigration status. Finally, we highlight the potential psychological and social costs associated with Asian-American achievement success.

  9. Asian Americans. A Status Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    with U.S. standards. However, Southeast Asian refugees suffer higher rates of tuberculosis and hepatitis B than the U.S. population as a whole and...Facing 64 Southeast Asian Refugees Seeking Medical Treatment Appendix VIII: Major Contributors to This Fact Sheet 65 Bibliography 66 Tables Tal’e 1.1...indicate that Southeast Asian refugees are carriers of-or suffer from- tuberculosis, hepatitis B, and malaria at much higher rates than the U.S

  10. Cardiovascular disease mortality in Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Jose, Powell O; Frank, Ariel T H; Kapphahn, Kristopher I; Goldstein, Benjamin A; Eggleston, Karen; Hastings, Katherine G; Cullen, Mark R; Palaniappan, Latha P

    2014-12-16

    Asian Americans are a rapidly growing racial/ethnic group in the United States. Our current understanding of Asian-American cardiovascular disease mortality patterns is distorted by the aggregation of distinct subgroups. The purpose of the study was to examine heart disease and stroke mortality rates in Asian-American subgroups to determine racial/ethnic differences in cardiovascular disease mortality within the United States. We examined heart disease and stroke mortality rates for the 6 largest Asian-American subgroups (Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese) from 2003 to 2010. U.S. death records were used to identify race/ethnicity and cause of death by International Classification of Diseases-10th revision coding. Using both U.S. Census data and death record data, standardized mortality ratios (SMRs), relative SMRs (rSMRs), and proportional mortality ratios were calculated for each sex and ethnic group relative to non-Hispanic whites (NHWs). In this study, 10,442,034 death records were examined. Whereas NHW men and women had the highest overall mortality rates, Asian Indian men and women and Filipino men had greater proportionate mortality burden from ischemic heart disease. The proportionate mortality burden of hypertensive heart disease and cerebrovascular disease, especially hemorrhagic stroke, was higher in every Asian-American subgroup compared with NHWs. The heterogeneity in cardiovascular disease mortality patterns among diverse Asian-American subgroups calls attention to the need for more research to help direct more specific treatment and prevention efforts, in particular with hypertension and stroke, to reduce health disparities for this growing population. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. On Asian American Ice Queens and Multigeneration Asian Ethnics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuan, Mia

    1999-01-01

    Reactions to the success of ice-skating stars Kristi Yamaguchi and Michelle Kwan illustrate the ways in which Asian ethnics continue to find themselves excluded from the U.S. racial and cultural center. Although they may be long-time Americans, they are not perceived as such. (SLD)

  12. Health Education: Addressing the Asian-American Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Annann; Hong, Luoluo

    This paper examines the health status of Asian Americans. In introductory sections, the paper looks at: patterns of Asian immigration, myths surrounding Asian Americans as a "model minority," such as the false notion that Asian Americans as a group are always academic and economic achievers despite their minority status; institutional,…

  13. Recent Population Growth and Change among Asian-Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vann, Barbara H.; Ryu, Jai P.

    Data from the 1990 Census and recent Current Population Survey reports are used to describe population change among Asian-Americans. Comparisons are made between Asian-Americans and the general non-Asian population and among Asian-Americans, focusing on four subgroups: Chinese, Filipinos, Japanese, and Koreans. Specific features examined in…

  14. Policy Implications of Trends for Asian American Students. Student Achievement Policy Brief #2: Asian American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kober, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Asian American students, who comprise almost 5% of public school students in the U.S., are a very diverse group. In the aggregate, Asian Americans often have the highest achievement on state tests among major racial/ethnic subgroups. But this overall high performance can sometimes lead educators and policymakers to overlook the needs of…

  15. Selected Bibliography on Asian and Pacific American Children and Families. Asian Pacific American Education Occasional Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education, Berkeley, CA.

    This is an annotated bibliography of recent articles, books, and scholarly papers on Asian and Pacific American children and families. Works are divided by topical area, with a primary focus on literature related to the education of Asian/Pacific American children. There are four main topical divisions: (1) education; (2) family; (3) mental…

  16. Invisible Asian Americans: The Intersection of Sexuality, Race, and Education among Gay Asian Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ocampo, Anthony C.; Soodjinda, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Most research on Asian American education has centered on addressing and deconstructing the model minority stereotype. While recent studies have highlighted the socioeconomic and cultural heterogeneity among Asian American students, few have examined how sexual identity and masculinity mitigate their academic experiences. In this article, we draw…

  17. Invisible Asian Americans: The Intersection of Sexuality, Race, and Education among Gay Asian Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ocampo, Anthony C.; Soodjinda, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Most research on Asian American education has centered on addressing and deconstructing the model minority stereotype. While recent studies have highlighted the socioeconomic and cultural heterogeneity among Asian American students, few have examined how sexual identity and masculinity mitigate their academic experiences. In this article, we draw…

  18. Blurring Racial and Ethnic Boundaries in Asian American Families: Asian American Family Patterns, 1980-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hidalgo, Danielle Antoinette; Bankston, Carl L.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the authors use statistics from the U.S. Census to examine trends in intermarriage, racial and ethnic combinations, and categorizations among Asian Americans. Specifically, the authors want to consider the extent to which family patterns may contribute to Asian Americans and their descendants' continuing as distinct, becoming members…

  19. Examining Factors Influencing Asian American and Latino American Students' College Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang-Yeung, Leilani Weichun

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation examines the gap in college enrollment between Asian Americans and Latino Americans regarding the effects of family and school factors, classifying them into the six ethnic/generational status groups (Asian American first generation, Asian American second generation, Asian American third generation and plus, Latino American first…

  20. Examining Factors Influencing Asian American and Latino American Students' College Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang-Yeung, Leilani Weichun

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation examines the gap in college enrollment between Asian Americans and Latino Americans regarding the effects of family and school factors, classifying them into the six ethnic/generational status groups (Asian American first generation, Asian American second generation, Asian American third generation and plus, Latino American first…

  1. Help-Seeking Experiences and Attitudes among African American, Asian American, and European American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masuda, Akihiko; Anderson, Page L.; Twohig, Michael P.; Feinstein, Amanda B.; Chou, Ying-Yi; Wendell, Johanna W.; Stormo, Analia R.

    2009-01-01

    The study examined African American, Asian American, and European American college students' previous direct and indirect experiences of seeking professional psychological services and related attitudes. Survey data were collected from 254 European American, 182 African American and 82 Asian American college students. Results revealed that fewer…

  2. The World of the Elderly Asian American

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalish, Richard A.; Moriwaki, Sharon

    1973-01-01

    Describes the psychosocial aspects of the past and the present living situation for today's elderly Chinese and Japanese Americans; many values to which first-generation Asian Americans were for maintaining adequate life satisfaction during the later years. (Author/JM)

  3. Asian Americans: Chinese-Americans, Japanese-Americans, Korean-Americans. Staff Development Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panter, Keiko; And Others

    This staff development module is designed to: (1) introduce significant facts basic to understanding the cultural and historical heritage of three Asian-American cultures; (2) develop an accurate knowledge and awareness of the experiences of Asian-Americans; and (3) relate the geography and past history of China, Korea, and Japan to the United…

  4. Asian Americans: Chinese-Americans, Japanese-Americans, Korean-Americans. Staff Development Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panter, Keiko; And Others

    This staff development module is designed to: (1) introduce significant facts basic to understanding the cultural and historical heritage of three Asian-American cultures; (2) develop an accurate knowledge and awareness of the experiences of Asian-Americans; and (3) relate the geography and past history of China, Korea, and Japan to the United…

  5. A Part, Yet Apart: South Asians in Asian America. Asian American History and Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shankar, Lavina Dhingra, Ed.; Srikanth, Rajini, Ed.

    The essays in this collection consider the extent to which South Asian Americans are included within "Asian America" as the term is applied to academic programs and admissions policies, grassroots community organizing and politics, and critical analyses of cultural products. The essays are: (1) "Within Kaleidoscope Eyes: The…

  6. A Part, Yet Apart: South Asians in Asian America. Asian American History and Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shankar, Lavina Dhingra, Ed.; Srikanth, Rajini, Ed.

    The essays in this collection consider the extent to which South Asian Americans are included within "Asian America" as the term is applied to academic programs and admissions policies, grassroots community organizing and politics, and critical analyses of cultural products. The essays are: (1) "Within Kaleidoscope Eyes: The…

  7. South Asian high and Asian-Pacific-American climate teleconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peiqun; Song, Yang; Kousky, Vernon E.

    2005-11-01

    Growing evidence indicates that the Asian monsoon plays an important role in affecting the weather and climate outside of Asia. However, this active role of the monsoon has not been demonstrated as thoroughly as has the variability of the monsoon caused by various impacting factors such as sea surface temperature and land surface. This study investigates the relationship between the Asian monsoon and the climate anomalies in the Asian-Pacific-American (APA) sector. A hypothesis is tested that the variability of the upper-tropospheric South Asian high (SAH), which is closely associated with the overall heating of the large-scale Asian monsoon, is linked to changes in the subtropical western Pacific high (SWPH), the mid-Pacific trough, and the Mexican high. The changes in these circulation systems cause variability in surface temperature and precipitation in the APA region. A stronger SAH is accompanied by a stronger and more extensive SWPH. The enlargement of the SWPH weakens the mid-Pacific trough. As a result, the southern portion of the Mexican high becomes stronger. These changes are associated with changes in atmospheric teleconnections, precipitation, and surface temperature throughout the APA region. When the SAH is stronger, precipitation increases in southern Asia, decreases over the Pacific Ocean, and increases over the Central America. Precipitation also increases over Australia and central Africa and decreases in the Mediterranean region. While the signals in surface temperature are weak over the tropical land portion, they are apparent in the mid latitudes and over the eastern Pacific Ocean.

  8. Correlates of Suicidal Behaviors Among Asian Americans

    PubMed Central

    Duldulao, Aileen Alfonso; Takeuchi, David T.; Hong, Seunghye

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the correlates of suicidal ideation, suicide plan and suicide attempt among Asian Americans focusing on nativity and gender. Analyses are performed on data from the National Latino and Asian American Study (N=2095), the first ever study conducted on the mental health of a national sample of Asian Americans. The sample is comprised of adults with 998 men (47%) and 1,097 (53%) women. Weighted logistic regression analyses reveal that US-born women have a higher percentage than other groups who have suicidal ideation, suicidal plans and attempts at suicide. In multivariate analyses controlling for socio-demographic differences such as ethnicity, marital status and income, differences in suicidal behaviors are found only between US-born women and US-born men. The findings demonstrate the need to disaggregate data by immigrant status as well as socio-demographic correlates. PMID:19591001

  9. Annual Review of Asian American Psychology, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Yeong; Shen, Yishan; Hou, Yang; Tilton, Kelsey E.; Juang, Linda; Wang, Yijie

    2015-01-01

    This 2014 review of Asian American psychology is the sixth review in the series. It includes 316 articles that met the inclusion criteria established by the past five annual reviews. Featured articles were derived from three sources: 137 were generated via the search term “Asian American” in PyscINFO, 111 were generated via a search for specific Asian American ethnic groups, and 32 were generated via author searches of articles that met the inclusion criteria. The top primary topic was health and health-related behaviors, the most frequently employed study design was cross-sectional, and the most studied Asian American ethnic group was Chinese. This year’s review includes information on the target population of the primary topic, the age range and developmental period of participants, and whether the study design was cross-sectional or longitudinal. It also identifies top authors and journals contributing to the 2014 annual review. These new features reveal that the most common target population of the primary topic was youths; studies most commonly included emerging adults ages 18–25; cross-sectional study design was employed more often than longitudinal design; the top contributor to the 2014 review was Stephen Chen, who authored the highest number of papers included; and the Asian American Journal of Psychology generated the highest number of publications for this review. PMID:26925199

  10. Dating and Sexual Attitudes in Asian-American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, May; Markham, Christine; Lin, Hua; Flores, Glenn; Chacko, Mariam R.

    2009-01-01

    Dating behaviors and sexual attitudes of Asian-American youth were examined in a cross-sectional, mixed-methods study in the context of adherence to Asian values, measured by the Asian Values Scale (AVS). In all, 31 Asian-American adolescents (age 14-18 years old) from a Houston community center were interviewed regarding dating behaviors and…

  11. Dating and Sexual Attitudes in Asian-American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, May; Markham, Christine; Lin, Hua; Flores, Glenn; Chacko, Mariam R.

    2009-01-01

    Dating behaviors and sexual attitudes of Asian-American youth were examined in a cross-sectional, mixed-methods study in the context of adherence to Asian values, measured by the Asian Values Scale (AVS). In all, 31 Asian-American adolescents (age 14-18 years old) from a Houston community center were interviewed regarding dating behaviors and…

  12. Reaching Asian Americans: sampling strategies and incentives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo-Kyung; Cheng, Yu-Yao

    2006-07-01

    Reaching and recruiting representative samples of minority populations is often challenging. This study examined in Chinese and Korean Americans: 1) whether using two different sampling strategies (random sampling vs. convenience sampling) significantly affected characteristics of recruited participants and 2) whether providing different incentives in the mail survey produced different response rates. We found statistically significant, however mostly not remarkable, differences between random and convenience samples. Offering monetary incentives in the mail survey improved response rates among Chinese Americans, while offering a small gift did not improve response rates among either Chinese or Korean Americans. This information will be useful for researchers and practitioners working with Asian Americans.

  13. Asian-American Media Skills Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Roberta M., Comp.

    This handbook is for teachers to use in the classroom and as a reference source for information about Asia and Asian-Americans. The handbook uses information about geography and culture to teach skills such as almanac, atlas, and encyclopedia use. Other student exercises include: how to sequence a Chinese fairy tale and present it to the class,…

  14. Asian American Career Development: A Qualitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fouad, Nadya A.; Kantamneni, Neeta; Smothers, Melissa K.; Chen, Yung-Lung; Fitzpatrick, Mary; Terry, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    This study used a modified version of consensual qualitative research design to examine how contextual, cultural, and personal variables influence the career choices of a diverse group of 12 Asian Americans. Seven domains of influences on career choices emerged including family, culture, external factors, career goals, role models, work values,…

  15. Bibliographic Resources on Pacific/Asian Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endo, Russell

    This bibliographic listing of sources on Pacific/Asian American groups provides titles of existing bibliographies and literature reviews. Over 100 entries are included in the document. Most of the entries were published during the 1970's, with a few dating from the late 1960's and several from 1980 and 1981. The objective is to offer researchers,…

  16. Asian-American Women in Educational Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Lily

    The under-representation of Asian American women in educational research and development is related to both sociocultural and historical barriers. Some of these barriers (racial and sexual discrimination, lack of role models, and lack of professional contacts) are shared by women of all ethnic minorities. There are also, however, unique barriers…

  17. Asian American Career Development: A Qualitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fouad, Nadya A.; Kantamneni, Neeta; Smothers, Melissa K.; Chen, Yung-Lung; Fitzpatrick, Mary; Terry, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    This study used a modified version of consensual qualitative research design to examine how contextual, cultural, and personal variables influence the career choices of a diverse group of 12 Asian Americans. Seven domains of influences on career choices emerged including family, culture, external factors, career goals, role models, work values,…

  18. We, the Asians and Pacific Islander Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Dwight L.; And Others

    This booklet, fifth in a series of six, presents a descriptive statistical profile of the Asian and Pacific Islander Americans based on data from the 1980 U.S. Census. The census identifies more than 20 specific population groups, and growth in terms of numbers and diversity is highlighted. Total population for these groups numbered 3.7 million…

  19. Asian Pacific Perspectives: Japanese Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Unified School District, CA.

    These instructional materials on Japanese Americans for elementary students were developed through the K.E.Y.S. project (Knowledge of English Yields Success). Information is included on early immigrants, their historical and cultural background, and current problems of Japanese Americans. Resource guides describe the purpose of the unit, how to…

  20. Asian Pacific Perspectives: Japanese Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Unified School District, CA.

    These instructional materials on Japanese Americans for elementary students were developed through the K.E.Y.S. project (Knowledge of English Yields Success). Information is included on early immigrants, their historical and cultural background, and current problems of Japanese Americans. Resource guides describe the purpose of the unit, how to…

  1. Assessment of Anxiety and Depression in Asian American Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, Christina B.

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the current state of research on the assessment of anxiety and depression in Asian American children and adolescents. Contrary to lay perceptions of Asian Americans as a "model minority," research indicates that rates of depression and anxiety among Asian American adults are comparable to those found among European American…

  2. Economic Hardship and Adaptation among Asian American Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishii-Kuntz, Masako; Gomel, Jessica N.; Tinsley, Barbara J.; Parke, Ross D.

    2010-01-01

    Asian American families are often portrayed as affluent, having achieved a high level of education and occupational prestige. Despite this model-minority image, many Asian Americans suffer from economic hardship. Using a sample of 95 Asian Americans, this study examines the effect of perceived economic hardship on coping behavior, family…

  3. Asian Americans in the History of Education: An Historiographical Essay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamura, Eileen H.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the types of essays and book reviews appearing in the History of Education Quarterly. Focuses on ethnic and immigrant education and Asian American educational history. Finds only one essay and one book review from 1990-1999 on Asian American education. Highlights eight other books and articles relating to Asian American education. (DAJ)

  4. Asian and Pacific American Education: Directions for the 1980s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison. Bureau for Food and Nutrition Services.

    The overall themes of the papers given at the 1979 Conference on Asian and Pacific American Education are summarized here. Topics are equal educational opportunities for Asian and Pacific Americans; the educational needs of Pacific American communities; school district policymaking; the responsiveness of postsecondary education to Asian and…

  5. 1980 Resolutions: National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education, Berkeley, CA.

    This paper contains nineteen resolutions adopted by the National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education (NAAPAE). The resolutions concern (1) the maintenance of Asian/Pacific American linguistic and cultural traditions by educational institutions, (2) the support of Asian/Pacific American studies programs, (3) NAAPAE support of…

  6. National Conference on Asians in America and Asian Americans. Sponsored by the Asian American Assembly for Policy Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    City Univ. of New York, NY. City Coll. Dept. of Asian Studies.

    In this report, the activities of a conference on Asian Americans and Asians in America are summarized and papers presented are reprinted. Topics considered in the papers include education, employment, affirmative action, identity, pluralism, Chinese cultural background, teaching of English, cross-cultural situations, development of comprehensive…

  7. The Asian American Employment Market: The Japanese Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Kazuo

    The Japanese Americans are numerically the largest of all the Asian American ethnic groups. In contrast to the other Asian American groups in the United States, the Japanese Americans are predominantly native born. Although first and second generation Japanese Americans had been subject to intense employment discrimination before World War II and…

  8. The Asian American Employment Market: The Japanese Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Kazuo

    The Japanese Americans are numerically the largest of all the Asian American ethnic groups. In contrast to the other Asian American groups in the United States, the Japanese Americans are predominantly native born. Although first and second generation Japanese Americans had been subject to intense employment discrimination before World War II and…

  9. Red blood cell antigen genotype analysis for 9087 Asian, Asian American, and Native American blood donors.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Meghan; Harris, Samantha; Haile, Askale; Johnsen, Jill; Teramura, Gayle; Nelson, Karen

    2015-10-01

    There has yet to be a comprehensive analysis of blood group antigen prevalence in Asian Americans and Native Americans. There may be ethnic differences in blood group frequencies that would result in clinically important mismatches through transfusion. Blood donors who self-identified as Asian or Native American were tested using a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) DNA array (HEA BeadChip kit, Bioarray Solutions Ltd) that predicts expression of 38 human erythrocyte antigens (HEAs) and by serology for ABO, D, C, M, N, Jk(a) , and Jk(b) . The prevalence of blood group antigens was compared to published European prevalence. Discrepancies between SNP-predicted and serology-detected antigens were tallied. A total of 9087 blood donors were tested from nine Asian and Native American heritages. The predicted prevalence of selected antigens in the RHCE, JK, FY, MNS, LU, CO, and DO blood group systems were variable between Asian populations, but overall not significantly different than Europeans. Compared to European frequencies, Kell blood group allele frequencies were significantly different in the Chinese, Native American, Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, South Asian, and Southeast Asian heritage blood donors; Diego antigens Di(a) and Di(b) were different in donors of Native American and South Asian ancestries (p < 0.05). Of the donors tested, 4.5% showed a SNP-serology discrepancy that segregated within specific ethnic groups. This study provides HEA allele frequency and antigen prevalence data in a cohort of Asian and Native Americans donors. Several ethnic groups exhibited differences in HEA frequencies compared to Europeans. Genotype-serotype discrepancies were detected in all systems studied. © 2015 AABB.

  10. Asian and Pacific American Education: Learning, Socialization, and Identity. Research on the Education of Asian Pacific Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Clara C., Ed.; Endo, Russell, Ed.; Goodwin, A. Lin, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This research anthology is the third volume in a series sponsored by the Special Interest Group-Research on the Education of Asian and Pacific Americans (SIG-REAPA) of the American Educational Research Association and National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education. This series explores and explains the lived experiences of Asian and…

  11. New Perspectives on Asian American Parents, Students and Teacher Recruitment. Research on the Education of Asian Pacific Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Clara C., Ed.; Endo, Russell, Ed.; Rong, Xue Lan, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This research anthology is the fifth volume in a series sponsored by the Special Interest Group-Research on the Education of Asian and Pacific Americans (SIG-REAPA) of the American Educational Research Association and National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education. This series explores and examines the patterns of Asian parents'…

  12. Asian and Pacific American Education: Learning, Socialization, and Identity. Research on the Education of Asian Pacific Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Clara C., Ed.; Endo, Russell, Ed.; Goodwin, A. Lin, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This research anthology is the third volume in a series sponsored by the Special Interest Group-Research on the Education of Asian and Pacific Americans (SIG-REAPA) of the American Educational Research Association and National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education. This series explores and explains the lived experiences of Asian and…

  13. New Perspectives on Asian American Parents, Students and Teacher Recruitment. Research on the Education of Asian Pacific Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Clara C., Ed.; Endo, Russell, Ed.; Rong, Xue Lan, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This research anthology is the fifth volume in a series sponsored by the Special Interest Group-Research on the Education of Asian and Pacific Americans (SIG-REAPA) of the American Educational Research Association and National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education. This series explores and examines the patterns of Asian parents'…

  14. Asian Pacific Perspectives: Korean Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Unified School District, CA.

    These instructional materials on Korean Americans for elementary students were developed through the K.E.Y.S. project (Knowledge of English Yields Success). Information is included about early immigrants, the second generation, student groups, war brides, recent immigrants, and third and fourth generations. A chart of traditional and modified…

  15. Asian Pacific Perspectives: Korean Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Unified School District, CA.

    These instructional materials on Korean Americans for elementary students were developed through the K.E.Y.S. project (Knowledge of English Yields Success). Information is included about early immigrants, the second generation, student groups, war brides, recent immigrants, and third and fourth generations. A chart of traditional and modified…

  16. Stomach cancer incidence rates among Americans, Asian Americans and Native Asians from 1988 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeerae; Park, Jinju; Nam, Byung-Ho; Ki, Moran

    2015-01-01

    Stomach cancer is the second most common cancer in Eastern Asia, accounting for approximately 50% of all new cases of stomach cancer worldwide. Our objective was to compare the stomach cancer incidence rates of Asian Americans in Los Angeles with those of native Asians to assess the etiology of stomach cancer from 1988 to 2011. To examine these differences, Asian Americans (Korean, Japanese, Chinese, and Filipino Americans living in Los Angeles, California, USA) and native Asians (from Korea, Japan, China, and the Philippines) were selected for this study. Using the Cancer Incidence in Five Continents database, stomach cancer incidence rates were examined. Data from the National Cancer Registry of Korea were used for native Koreans. Between native countries, the incidence rates in Japan, China, the Philippines, and the US declined over time, but the incidence in Korea has remained constant. The incidences among Asian immigrants were lower than those among native Asians. The incidence rates of males were approximately 2 times higher than those among females in Asian countries were. The effect of immigration on stomach cancer incidence suggests that lifestyle factors are a significant determinant of stomach cancer risk. However, the incidence in Korea remains the highest of these countries.

  17. Stomach cancer incidence rates among Americans, Asian Americans and Native Asians from 1988 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeerae; Park, Jinju; Nam, Byung-Ho; Ki, Moran

    2015-01-01

    Stomach cancer is the second most common cancer in Eastern Asia, accounting for approximately 50% of all new cases of stomach cancer worldwide. Our objective was to compare the stomach cancer incidence rates of Asian Americans in Los Angeles with those of native Asians to assess the etiology of stomach cancer from 1988 to 2011. To examine these differences, Asian Americans (Korean, Japanese, Chinese, and Filipino Americans living in Los Angeles, California, USA) and native Asians (from Korea, Japan, China, and the Philippines) were selected for this study. Using the Cancer Incidence in Five Continents database, stomach cancer incidence rates were examined. Data from the National Cancer Registry of Korea were used for native Koreans. Between native countries, the incidence rates in Japan, China, the Philippines, and the US declined over time, but the incidence in Korea has remained constant. The incidences among Asian immigrants were lower than those among native Asians. The incidence rates of males were approximately 2 times higher than those among females in Asian countries were. The effect of immigration on stomach cancer incidence suggests that lifestyle factors are a significant determinant of stomach cancer risk. However, the incidence in Korea remains the highest of these countries PMID:25687951

  18. Asian Americans: Growth, Change, and Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Robert W.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    With heavy immigration fueled by U.S. immigration law changes in 1965 and the influx of over 700,000 Indochinese refugees since the Vietnam War ended in 1975, the number of Asian Americans grew from 1.4 million in 1970 to 3.5 million, 1.5 percent of the U.S. population, by the April 1980 census and an estimated 5.1 million, 2.1 percent of the U.S.…

  19. Asian Americans: Growth, Change, and Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Robert W.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    With heavy immigration fueled by U.S. immigration law changes in 1965 and the influx of over 700,000 Indochinese refugees since the Vietnam War ended in 1975, Asian Americans grew from 1.4 million in 1970 to 3.5 million, 1.5% of the U.S. population, by the April 1980 census and an estimated 5.1 million, 2.1% of the U.S. total, as of September 30,…

  20. "How Asian Am I?": Asian American Youth Cultures, Drug Use, and Ethnic Identity Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Geoffrey; Moloney, Molly; Evans, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes the construction of ethnic identity in the narratives of 100 young Asian Americans in a dance club/rave scene. Authors examine how illicit drug use and other consuming practices shape their understanding of Asian American identities, finding three distinct patterns. The first presents a disjuncture between Asian American…

  1. "How Asian Am I?": Asian American Youth Cultures, Drug Use, and Ethnic Identity Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Geoffrey; Moloney, Molly; Evans, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes the construction of ethnic identity in the narratives of 100 young Asian Americans in a dance club/rave scene. Authors examine how illicit drug use and other consuming practices shape their understanding of Asian American identities, finding three distinct patterns. The first presents a disjuncture between Asian American…

  2. Asian American Youth Language Use: Perspectives across Schools and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shankar, Shalini

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies of Asian American youth language practices have presented compelling insights about the identities and migration experiences of young people of Asian descent. This article offers a detailed examination of the relationship between language use and select issues concerning Asian American youth, including social life, schooling,…

  3. Applying Social Cognitive Career Development Theory to Asian Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Mei

    This paper hypothesized that higher levels of acculturation lead Asian American individuals to have more self-efficacy and interests in non-stereotypical occupations. One hundred eighty-seven Asian American students from various college campuses completed the Suinn-Lew Asian Self-Identify Acculturation Scale, the Confidence Inventory, and the…

  4. Asian American Media and Audiences: An Institutional and Audience Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hur, K. Kyoon

    Noting that despite increasing research into ethnic minority media and audience analysis, specific Asian American populations and the media serving them have been largely ignored, this paper identifies and examines the media organizations serving various Asian American populations. The first part of the paper reviews the growth of Asian American…

  5. Asian American Youth Language Use: Perspectives across Schools and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shankar, Shalini

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies of Asian American youth language practices have presented compelling insights about the identities and migration experiences of young people of Asian descent. This article offers a detailed examination of the relationship between language use and select issues concerning Asian American youth, including social life, schooling,…

  6. Asian American Students: A Look at San Francisco State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okutsu, James K.

    The attitudes of American Asian students at San Francisco State University toward their education were studied. Responses were obtained from 585 students who were enrolled in Asian American Studies classes in spring 1986. Sixty percent of the sample were of Chinese ancestry, 20% were Filipino, and 20% were other Asian (including Japanese, Korean,…

  7. Influx of Asian Pacific Americans/Veterans in American Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Asian Pacific Americans (APA's) are one of the fastest growing racial/ethnic groups within the United States and among most of the college student vast population (Escueta and O'Brien, 1995). APA's represented 5.8% of all college students in 1996, an 83.8% gain in population since 1986 (Wilds and Wilson, 1998), and the fastest increase amongst all…

  8. Being American, being Asian: the bicultural self and autobiographical memory in Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi

    2008-05-01

    Studies of autobiographical memory have shown that the degree to which individuals focus on themselves vs. social relations in their memories varies markedly across cultures. Do the differences result from differing cultural self-views (i.e., an autonomous vs. a relational sense of self), as often suggested in the literature? Experimental evidence is required to answer this question. In the present study, Asian American participants (N=118) were primed to focus on their American or Asian self prior to recalling important autobiographical events, and participants in a control group described things in nature prior to the memory recall. Those whose American self was activated recalled more self-focused and less socially oriented memories than those whose Asian self was made salient, with the control group falling in between. The findings shed light on the mechanism underlying cultural influences on autobiographical remembering. They further highlight the dynamic nature of the memory-self interplay in cultural contexts.

  9. Asian and European American cultural values and communication styles among Asian American and European American college students.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong S; Kim, Bryan S K

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined the relationships between adherence to Asian and European cultural values and communication styles among 210 Asian American and 136 European American college students. A principal components analysis revealed that, for both Asian Americans and European Americans, the contentious, dramatic, precise, and open styles loaded onto the first component suggesting low context communication, and interpersonal sensitivity and inferring meaning styles loaded onto the second component suggesting high context communication. Higher adherence to emotional self-control and lower adherence to European American values explained Asian Americans' higher use of the indirect communication, while higher emotional self-control explained why Asian Americans use a less open communication style than their European American counterparts. When differences between sex and race were controlled, adherence to humility was inversely related to contentious and dramatic communication styles but directly related to inferring meaning style, adherence to European American values was positively associated with precise communication and inferring meaning styles, and collectivism was positively related to interpersonal sensitivity style. 2008 APA

  10. Prevention and Intervention of Depression in Asian-American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dieu, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Depression is one of the most common psychological disorders experienced by adolescents. Research has shown depression rates are higher in Asian-American adolescents when compared to their European-American counterparts. This paper will investigate possible programs for preventing and responding to Asian-American youths' depression through a…

  11. Mentoring Asian and Euro-American College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Belle; Tracy, Allison; Kauh, Tina; Taylor, Catherine; Williams, Linda M.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines differences in the mentoring relationships of Asian American and Euro-American college women. Findings showed that the groups view mentoring as equally important but that fewer Asians report having a mentor. However, those who have mentors find them to be just as valuable as do their Euro-American counterparts. (Contains 2…

  12. Prevention and Intervention of Depression in Asian-American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dieu, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Depression is one of the most common psychological disorders experienced by adolescents. Research has shown depression rates are higher in Asian-American adolescents when compared to their European-American counterparts. This paper will investigate possible programs for preventing and responding to Asian-American youths' depression through a…

  13. Factors Affecting the Career Aspirations of Asian Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, S. Alvin

    This study examined the career aspirations of Asian American college students, using a retrospective method of data collection that asked subjects to report various occupational alternatives that they have considered in their lifetime so far. Male (N=52) and female (N=97) Asian Americans were compared with a Euro-American group of 95 males and 151…

  14. Ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and overweight in Asian American adolescents.

    PubMed

    Cook, Won Kim; Tseng, Winston; Bautista, Roxanna; John, Iyanrick

    2016-12-01

    Asian American children and adolescents are an under-investigated subpopulation in obesity research. This study aimed to identify specific profiles of Asian subgroups at high risk of adolescent overweight with special attention to Asian ethnicity, socioeconomic status (SES), and their interaction. Multiple logistic regression models were fitted using a sample of 1533 Asian American adolescents ages 12-17 from the 2007-2012 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS). In addition to Asian ethnicity and socioeconomic status (assessed by family income and parental education level), age, gender, nativity, and two lifestyle variables, fast food consumption and physical activity, were also controlled for in these models. Key predictors of overweight in Asian American adolescents included certain Asian ethnicities (Southeast Asian, Filipino, and mixed ethnicities), low family income (< 300% of the Federal Poverty Level), and being male. Multiplicative interaction terms between low family income and two ethnicities, Southeast Asian and Vietnamese that had the lowest SES among Asian ethnic groups, were significantly associated with greatly elevated odds of being overweight (ORs = 12.90 and 6.67, respectively). These findings suggest that high risk of overweight in Asian American adolescents associated with low family incomes may be further elevated for those in low-income ethnic groups. Future research might investigate ethnic-group SES as a meaningful indicator of community-level socioeconomic disparities that influence the health of Asian Americans.

  15. Lives of Notable Asian Americans: Business, Politics, Science. The Asian American Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragaza, Angelo

    The lives of 12 Asian Americans prominent in business, politics, or science are profiled for young readers. Included are biographical sketches of: (1) Ellison Onizuka, astronaut; (2) Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, Nobel prize-winning astrophysicist; (3) Constance (Connie) Yu-Hwa Chung, television broadcaster; (4) Daniel Inouye, U.S. senator from…

  16. Lives of Notable Asian Americans: Business, Politics, Science. The Asian American Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragaza, Angelo

    The lives of 12 Asian Americans prominent in business, politics, or science are profiled for young readers. Included are biographical sketches of: (1) Ellison Onizuka, astronaut; (2) Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, Nobel prize-winning astrophysicist; (3) Constance (Connie) Yu-Hwa Chung, television broadcaster; (4) Daniel Inouye, U.S. senator from…

  17. The Forgotten Minority: Asian Americans in New York City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, New York.

    Approximately 2.1 percent of New York City's population is Asian American. This report is concerned with the difficulties faced by members of the Chinese, Japanese, Filipino and Korean communities in the areas of immigration, employment, and as a result of media stereotyping of Asians. An overview of individual Asian communities in New York is…

  18. The Forgotten Minority: Asian Americans in New York City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, New York.

    Approximately 2.1 percent of New York City's population is Asian American. This report is concerned with the difficulties faced by members of the Chinese, Japanese, Filipino and Korean communities in the areas of immigration, employment, and as a result of media stereotyping of Asians. An overview of individual Asian communities in New York is…

  19. Asian Americans: Chinese-Americans, Japanese-Americans, Korean-Americans. Resource Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panter, Keiko; And Others

    This report presents information on the experiences of three different Asian-American groups (Chinese, Japanese and Koreans) in the United States. Historical and geographic overviews of each group's country and a brief chronological history of each group's immigration and subsequent role in and influence on U.S. history are provided. Product and…

  20. Asian Americans: Chinese-Americans, Japanese-Americans, Korean-Americans. Resource Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panter, Keiko; And Others

    This report presents information on the experiences of three different Asian-American groups (Chinese, Japanese and Koreans) in the United States. Historical and geographic overviews of each group's country and a brief chronological history of each group's immigration and subsequent role in and influence on U.S. history are provided. Product and…

  1. Prevalence of obesity among young Asian-American children.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anjali; Mitchell, Stephanie; Chirumamilla, Radha; Zhang, Jin; Horn, Ivor B; Lewin, Amy; Huang, Z Jennifer

    2012-12-01

    Asian-American children are considered to be at low risk of obesity, but previous estimates have not distinguished between children from different Asian countries. We estimate the prevalence of obesity among Asian-American children by mother's country of origin, generational status, and family socioeconomic factors using a secondary analysis of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) wave III (children ∼4 years old) dataset. The ECLS-B is a nationally representative study of children born in 2001 that oversampled births to Asian mothers. Asian ethnic categories included Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Asian Indian, Korean, Vietnamese, and Other Asian/Pacific Islander. The primary outcome variable was weight status; overweight = BMI ≥85(th) and obese = BMI ≥95(th) percentile for age and gender. Twenty-six percent [95% confidence interval (CI) 23.6-29.1] of Asian-American 4 year olds were overweight or obese, and 13% (95% CI 10.2-15.2) were obese. Chinese-American children were at lower risk of overweight or obesity (23.5%, 95% CI 18.4-29.5 ) compared to whites (36%, 95% CI 34.3-37.7); Asian-Indian 4 year olds had the lowest rates of overweight or obesity (15.6%, 95% CI 8.0-28.2) and were most likely to be underweight (10%, 95% CI 4.9-19.4). Among Asians,Vietnamese-American children had the highest rate of overweight or obesity (34.7%, 95% CI 0.6-52.3). Vietnamese-American children are at elevated risk of obesity and overweight, whereas Chinese and Asian-Indian children are at low risk. After controlling for Asian ethnicity, maternal education, and household poverty status, Asian-American children whose mothers were born outside the United States were less likely to be obese [odds ratio = 0.55 (0.32-0.95), p = 0.03].

  2. Reviewing Asian America: Locating Diversity. Association for Asian American Studies Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Wendy L., Ed.; Chin, Soo-Young, Ed.; Moy, James S., Ed.; Okihiro, Gary Y., Ed.

    The 18 essays in this collection explore views of Asian American diversity and race relations, and address issues of representation, providing perspectives of academics, writers, and activists. They explore many questions raised by the complex nature of race relations and the relationship of Asian Americans within U.S. society. Although many of…

  3. Promoting Cultural Competence in Counseling Asian American Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Zheng; Siu, Candice R.; Xin, Tao

    2009-01-01

    Asian Americans are commonly perceived as the diligent and high-achieving "model minority." This positive stereotype has negative consequences for this ethnic minority group because it trivializes their social and mental health problems. This image of success has made many overlook the true nature of the struggles many Asian American families have…

  4. Breaking Barriers: An Asian-American Curriculum Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brombach, Catherine; Tice, Natasha Florey

    A 10-day curriculum is presented for upper elementary grades to explore who is in power on the local, state, and federal levels; and to investigate why so few Asian Americans are in power; and to confront personal prejudices and break stereotypes about Asian Americans. The 10 days are devoted to the following: (1) distinguishing between prejudice…

  5. Asian American Transfer Students: The Intersection of Race & Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lui, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    There has been a limited body of research on Asian American students, specifically regarding community college attendance and the transfer process. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore and understand how Asian American transfer students navigate the community college, their transfer processes, as well as their post-transfer…

  6. The Attitudes of Asian Americans toward Affirmative Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teranishi, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Asian Americans are increasingly a factor in the political life of the United States, which makes it important to gain an accurate rendering of their position on key social issues that impact the nation. One area where there is a lack of understanding about the position of Asian Americans is with the issue of affirmative action. The 80-20 National…

  7. Theory and the Subject of Asian American Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palumbo-Liu, David

    1995-01-01

    Addresses how significant the theoretical debates in the humanities and social sciences are for Asian American and ethnic studies and whether theory can be borrowed and applied to Asian American subjects or whether these subjects are too distinctive. The author discusses the intellectual and ideological consequences in deploying postcolonial and…

  8. The Asian American Fakeness Canon, 1972-2002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oishi, Eve

    2007-01-01

    The year 1972 can be seen to inaugurate not a tradition of Asian American New York theater, but the rich and multigenre collection of writing that the author has called "the Asian American fakeness canon." The fakeness canon refers to a collection of writings that take as one of their central points of reference the question of cultural…

  9. Risk Factors and Interventions for Domestic Violence among Asian Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Irene

    This paper discusses domestic violence, examining its epidemiology for the general population and for two Asian American groups. It reviews data from 10 empirical studies on domestic violence among Asian American women. Qualitative studies stress the impact of family ties, family honor, and shame; religious values; fear of the legal system; and…

  10. Contemporary Perspectives on Asian and Pacific American Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endo, Russell, Ed.; And Others

    A variety of issues in the education of Asian American and Pacific American immigrants and refugees are addressed in the following papers: "The Acquisition of English and Ethnic Language Attrition: Implications for Research" (Michael A. Power); "Language Difference and Language Disorder in Asian Language Populations: Assessment and Intervention"…

  11. Immigration, Education and Asian-Americans: A Cohort Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschman, Charles; Wong, Morrison G.

    Asian-Americans are educational overachievers, and have been for many decades. There are various explanations for the high educational achievement of Asian-Americans. The most frequently cited theory is that their native culture places a premium on ambition, persistence, and deferred gratification. Other theories attribute this success to…

  12. Parental Contributions to Southeast Asian American Adolescents' Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ying, Yu-Wen; Han, Meekyung

    2008-01-01

    Informed by acculturation, ecological, and social capital theories, the study examined the contribution of parental acculturation, parental involvement, and intergenerational relationship to well-being in Southeast Asian American adolescents. Using data from the Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study, 491 Southeast Asian American adolescents…

  13. School Climate, Discrimination, and Depressive Symptoms among Asian American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Cixin; Atwal, Kavita

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined a multidimensional, developmental, and transactional model for depressive symptoms among Asian American adolescents using longitudinal data from 1,664 Asian American adolescents in the Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study (CILS). Specifically, the relationships among school climate, acculturation, perceived…

  14. Culturally-Competent School Counseling with Asian American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Linda G.; Phoummarath, Marion J.

    2006-01-01

    Asian American adolescents are frequently overlooked as a population in need of counseling interventions. However, cultural issues such as refugee status or the pressure of high academic achievement can influence an Asian American student's mental health. As there is a dearth of school counseling literature written about what school counselors…

  15. Demographics and Diversity of Asian American College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hune, Shirley

    2002-01-01

    The author provides an overview of the Asian American population, its immigration patterns and trends, current demographics, and higher educational statistics and explains why student affairs professionals need to address the diversity of Asian American students if they are to be better served and supported. (Contains 16 references.) (Author)

  16. Asian Americans in Community Colleges: UCLA Community College Bibliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Amy

    2007-01-01

    The references presented in this bibliography provide an overview of recent scholarship on Asian Americans in community colleges. Included in this bibliography are educational reports, case studies, literature reviews, and analyses that reflect upon the experience of Asian Americans in community colleges. The references also address the barriers…

  17. Asian American Women's Retrospective Reports of Their Sexual Socialization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Janna L.

    2009-01-01

    This study used qualitative research methods to investigate the sexual socialization experiences of young Asian American women, a group often overlooked in psychological research on sexuality. Focus group interviews were conducted with 30 ethnically diverse young Asian American women to explore their perceptions and interpretations of the direct…

  18. Research on the Education of Asian and Pacific Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Clara C., Ed.; Goodwin, A. Lin, Ed.; Lee, Stacey J., Ed.

    This collection of papers examines educational issues concerning K-college Asian and Pacific American students. The 10 papers are: (1) "Educational Aspirations of Southeast Asian Students" (Clara C. Park); (2) "The Effectiveness of Reciprocal Teaching with Vietnamese American Students" (Mai Dao); (3) "Exploring Pacific…

  19. Civil Rights Issues Facing Asian Americans in the 1990s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chun, Ki-Taek; Zalokar, Nadja

    In 1989, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights held a series of roundtable conferences to learn about the civil rights concerns of Asian Americans within their communities. Using information gathered at these conferences as a point of departure, the Commission undertook this study of the wide-ranging civil rights issues facing Asian Americans in the…

  20. Asian American Women's Retrospective Reports of Their Sexual Socialization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Janna L.

    2009-01-01

    This study used qualitative research methods to investigate the sexual socialization experiences of young Asian American women, a group often overlooked in psychological research on sexuality. Focus group interviews were conducted with 30 ethnically diverse young Asian American women to explore their perceptions and interpretations of the direct…

  1. School Climate, Discrimination, and Depressive Symptoms among Asian American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Cixin; Atwal, Kavita

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined a multidimensional, developmental, and transactional model for depressive symptoms among Asian American adolescents using longitudinal data from 1,664 Asian American adolescents in the Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study (CILS). Specifically, the relationships among school climate, acculturation, perceived…

  2. Risk Behaviors Associated with Cigarette Use among Asian American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Harry T.; Wang, Min Qi; Valmidiano, Lillian L.

    2005-01-01

    Asian Americans are one of the fastest growing minority groups in the United States. This study examined the association between several common youth risk behaviors, including cigarette use among Asian American adolescents, using data (N=408) from the 2001 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS). The weighted univariate and multivariate logistic…

  3. Gifted Asian American Adolescent Males: Portraits of Cultural Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kao, Chen-yao; Hebert, Thomas P.

    2006-01-01

    Many gifted Asian American adolescent males face cultural issues that may impact their success. This article presents important cultural dilemmas faced by 2 gifted Asian American young men. Through a qualitative approach, the acculturation experiences of John and Matt, gifted Taiwanese, second generation immigrants, are described.…

  4. Promoting Cultural Competence in Counseling Asian American Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Zheng; Siu, Candice R.; Xin, Tao

    2009-01-01

    Asian Americans are commonly perceived as the diligent and high-achieving "model minority." This positive stereotype has negative consequences for this ethnic minority group because it trivializes their social and mental health problems. This image of success has made many overlook the true nature of the struggles many Asian American families have…

  5. Asian American Transfer Students: The Intersection of Race & Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lui, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    There has been a limited body of research on Asian American students, specifically regarding community college attendance and the transfer process. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore and understand how Asian American transfer students navigate the community college, their transfer processes, as well as their post-transfer…

  6. The Asian American Fakeness Canon, 1972-2002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oishi, Eve

    2007-01-01

    The year 1972 can be seen to inaugurate not a tradition of Asian American New York theater, but the rich and multigenre collection of writing that the author has called "the Asian American fakeness canon." The fakeness canon refers to a collection of writings that take as one of their central points of reference the question of cultural…

  7. The Silent Minority: Asian Americans in Education and Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsia, Jayjia

    Asian Americans are popularly stereotyped as possessing innate characteristics that enable them to achieve excellence in virtually all fields of endeavor. But the reality of contemporary Asian American experiences is more complex, less easily summed up, and not yet thoroughly documented or understood. Current evidence does suggest, however, that…

  8. Review of the Literature on Asian American Mental Health Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Trang Ngoc

    Within the mental health treatment field there is an underutilization of services by Asian Americans. Researchers have questioned how to lessen the gap between the number of Asian Americans who need mental health services and the significantly lower number who successfully use these services. A review of current research points out that matching…

  9. Asian Americans in American History: An AsianCrit Perspective on Asian American Inclusion in State U.S. History Curriculum Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    An, Sohyun

    2016-01-01

    Compared to other groups of color, Asian Americans and their perspectives have rarely been given attention in curriculum studies. This article seeks to address the gap in the literature. It uses AsianCrit, a branch of critical race theory, as a theoretical lens to analyze and explicate common patterns across various states' scripting of Asian…

  10. Asian Americans in American History: An AsianCrit Perspective on Asian American Inclusion in State U.S. History Curriculum Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    An, Sohyun

    2016-01-01

    Compared to other groups of color, Asian Americans and their perspectives have rarely been given attention in curriculum studies. This article seeks to address the gap in the literature. It uses AsianCrit, a branch of critical race theory, as a theoretical lens to analyze and explicate common patterns across various states' scripting of Asian…

  11. Asian and European American Cultural Values, Bicultural Competence, and Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help among Asian American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omizo, Michael M.; Kim, Bryan S. K.; Abel, Nicholas R.

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined the extent to which Asian American adolescents who were living in Hawaii adhered to Asian and European American cultural values in relation to mental health variables including collective self-esteem (membership, private, public, importance to identity), cognitive flexibility, general self-efficacy, and attitudes toward…

  12. Challenging the Model Minority Myth: Engaging Asian American Students in Research on Asian American College Student Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suyemoto, Karen L.; Kim, Grace S.; Tanabe, Miwa; Tawa, John; Day, Stephanie C.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors introduce a method of understanding the experiences and needs of Asian American students on college campuses through the research process. Specifically, the authors offer a students-as-researchers approach to connect the transformative educational aims of Asian American studies to the scholarship, service, and lived…

  13. Asian and European American Cultural Values, Bicultural Competence, and Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help among Asian American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omizo, Michael M.; Kim, Bryan S. K.; Abel, Nicholas R.

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined the extent to which Asian American adolescents who were living in Hawaii adhered to Asian and European American cultural values in relation to mental health variables including collective self-esteem (membership, private, public, importance to identity), cognitive flexibility, general self-efficacy, and attitudes toward…

  14. Asian Americans and European Americans' stigma levels in response to biological and social explanations of depression.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhen Hadassah

    2015-05-01

    Mental illness stigma is prevalent among Asian Americans, and it is a key barrier that prevents them from seeking psychological services. Limited studies have experimentally examined how Asian Americans respond to biological and social explanations of mental illness. Understanding how to educate and communicate about mental illness effectively is crucial in increasing service utilization among Asian Americans. To assess how genetic, neurobiological, and social explanations for the onset of depression affects Asian American and European American's mental illness stigma. 231 Asian Americans and 206 European Americans read about an individual with major depression and were randomly assigned to be informed that the cause was either genetic, neurobiological, social, or unknown. Various stigma outcomes, including social distance, fear, and depression duration were assessed. Consistent with prior research, Asian Americans had higher baseline levels of stigma compared to European Americans. Greater social essentialist beliefs predicted positive stigma outcomes for Asian Americans, such as a greater willingness to be near, help, and hire someone with depression, but genetic essentialist beliefs predicted negative stigma outcomes, such as fear. In addition, a social explanation for the etiology of depression led to lower stigma outcomes for Asian Americans; it decreased their fear of someone with depression and increased the perception that depression is treatable. For European Americans, both genetic and social essentialist beliefs predicted a greater perception of depression treatability. Although genetics do play a role in the development of depression, emphasizing a social explanation for the origin of depression may help reduce stigma for Asian Americans.

  15. Clinically identified postpartum depression in Asian American mothers.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Deepika; Wang, Elsie J; Shen, Jeremy; Wong, Eric C; Palaniappan, Latha P

    2012-01-01

    To identify the clinical diagnosis rate of postpartum depression (PPD) in Asian American subgroups (Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese) compared to non-Hispanic Whites. Cross-sectional study using electronic health records (EHR). A large, outpatient, multiservice clinic in Northern California. A diverse clinical population of non-Hispanic White (N = 4582), Asian Indian (N = 1264), Chinese (N = 1160), Filipino (N = 347), Japanese (N = 124), Korean (N = 183), and Vietnamese (N = 147) mothers. Cases of PPD were identified from EHRs using physician diagnosis codes, medication usage, and age standardized for comparison. The relationship between PPD and other demographic variables (race/ethnicity, maternal age, delivery type, marital status, and infant gender) were examined in a multivariate logistic regression model. The PPD diagnosis rate for all Asian American mothers in aggregate was significantly lower than the diagnosis rate in non-Hispanic White mothers. Moreover, of the six Asian American subgroups, PPD diagnosis rates for Asian Indian, Chinese, and Filipino mothers were significantly lower than non-Hispanic White mothers. In multivariate analyses, race/ethnicity, age, and cesarean were significant predictors of PPD. In this insured population, PPD diagnosis rates were lower among Asian Americans, with variability in rates across the individual Asian American subgroups. It is unclear whether these lower rates are due to underreporting, underdiagnosis, or underutilization of mental health care in this setting. © 2012 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  16. Clinically Identified Postpartum Depression in Asian American Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Deepika; Wang, Elsie J.; Shen, Jeremy; Wong, Eric C.; Palaniappan, Latha P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify the clinical diagnosis rate of postpartum depression (PPD) in Asian American subgroups (Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese) compared to non-Hispanic Whites. Design Cross-sectional study using electronic health records (EHR). Setting A large, outpatient, multiservice clinic in Northern California. Participants A diverse clinical population of non-Hispanic White (N = 4582), Asian Indian (N = 1264), Chinese (N = 1160), Filipino (N = 347), Japanese (N = 124), Korean (N = 183), and Vietnamese (N = 147) mothers. Methods Cases of PPD were identified from EHRs using physician diagnosis codes, medication usage, and age standardized for comparison. The relationship between PPD and other demographic variables (race/ethnicity, maternal age, delivery type, marital status, and infant gender) were examined in a multivariate logistic regression model. Results The PPD diagnosis rate for all Asian American mothers in aggregate was significantly lower than the diagnosis rate in non-Hispanic White mothers. Moreover, of the six Asian American subgroups, PPD diagnosis rates for Asian Indian, Chinese, and Filipino mothers were significantly lower than non-Hispanic White mothers. In multivariate analyses, race/ethnicity, age, and cesarean were significant predictors of PPD. Conclusion In this insured population, PPD diagnosis rates were lower among Asian Americans, with variability in rates across the individual Asian American subgroups. It is unclear whether these lower rates are due to underreporting, underdiagnosis, or underutilization of mental health care in this setting. PMID:22536783

  17. Asian-American Patient Ratings of Physician Primary Care Performance

    PubMed Central

    Taira, Deborah A; Safran, Dana Gelb; Seto, Todd B; Rogers, William H; Kosinski, Mark; Ware, John E; Lieberman, Naomi; Tarlov, Alvin R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine how Asian-American patients’ ratings of primary care performance differ from those of whites, Latinos, and African-Americans. DESIGN Retrospective analyses of data collected in a cross-sectional study using patient questionnaires. SETTING University hospital primary care group practice. PARTICIPANTS In phase 1, successive patients who visited the study site for appointments were asked to complete the survey. In phase 2, successive patients were selected who had most recently visited each physician, going back as far as necessary to obtain 20 patients for each physician. In total, 502 patients were surveyed, 5% of whom were Asian-American. MAIN RESULTS After adjusting for potential confounders, Asian-Americans rated overall satisfaction and 10 of 11 scales assessing primary care significantly lower than whites did. Dimensions of primary care that were assessed include access, comprehensiveness of care, integration, continuity, clinical quality, interpersonal treatment, and trust. There were no differences for the scale of longitudinal continuity. On average, the rating scale scores of Asian-Americans were 12 points lower than those of whites (on 100-point scales). CONCLUSIONS We conclude that Asian-American patients rate physician primary care performance lower than do whites, African-Americans, and Latinos. Future research needs to focus on Asian-Americans to determine the generalizability of these findings and the extent to which they reflect differences in survey response tendencies or actual quality differences. PMID:9127228

  18. Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions: Areas of Growth, Innovation, and Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on Asian American and Pacific Islander Research in Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders represent the fastest growing demographic in the country today. The federal government has responded to this 21st century reality by creating the Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institution (AANAPISI) federal program. This program is a competitive grant process for institutions with…

  19. Getting It Right: Schools and the Asian-American Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Vivian Wu

    2011-01-01

    As a history teacher and advocate for Asian and American students, the author is concerned about what appears to be waning interest in the study of multicultural education and racial politics. In particular, as independent schools become more diverse, as international Asian student populations continue to grow, and as people become increasingly…

  20. Strangers From a Different Shore. A History of Asian Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takaki, Ronald

    This book uses personal narratives to illustrate the history of Asian Americans from the arrival of the first Chinese laborers in Hawaii in the nineteenth century to the recent arrival of Southeast Asian refugees in the 1960s. The histories and contributions of the following groups are outlined: (1) Japanese; (2) Chinese; (3) Koreans; (4)…

  1. Strangers From a Different Shore. A History of Asian Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takaki, Ronald

    This book uses personal narratives to illustrate the history of Asian Americans from the arrival of the first Chinese laborers in Hawaii in the nineteenth century to the recent arrival of Southeast Asian refugees in the 1960s. The histories and contributions of the following groups are outlined: (1) Japanese; (2) Chinese; (3) Koreans; (4)…

  2. Asian American Acculturation and Enculturation: Construct Clarification and Measurement Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Shengying; Moradi, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    An overview of the evolution of Asian American acculturation and enculturation theory and measurement is offered, focusing on major theoretical advancements and methodological issues that are salient for measuring these constructs. Informed by these considerations, an empirical approach is taken to clarifying the dimensions of Asian American…

  3. Getting It Right: Schools and the Asian-American Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Vivian Wu

    2011-01-01

    As a history teacher and advocate for Asian and American students, the author is concerned about what appears to be waning interest in the study of multicultural education and racial politics. In particular, as independent schools become more diverse, as international Asian student populations continue to grow, and as people become increasingly…

  4. Asian Americans: An Agenda for Action; A Conference Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azores, Fortunata M.

    The proceedings of a conference on Asian Americans held in New York City in May 1978 are summarized in this report. The conference consisted of workshops on four issues: employment, voter participation, youth, and the elderly. In the workshop on employment, issues discussed included the participation of Asians in the health system and in the…

  5. Asian American Acculturation and Enculturation: Construct Clarification and Measurement Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Shengying; Moradi, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    An overview of the evolution of Asian American acculturation and enculturation theory and measurement is offered, focusing on major theoretical advancements and methodological issues that are salient for measuring these constructs. Informed by these considerations, an empirical approach is taken to clarifying the dimensions of Asian American…

  6. Asian American Interethnic Relations and Politics. Asians in America: The Peoples of East, Southeast, and South Asia in American Life and Culture Series, Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Franklin, Ed.

    The articles in this anthology address the complex subject of interethnic relations and Asian American politics, transcending ideas of Asian Americans as the model minority. The articles are: (1) "Opening the American Mind and Body: The Role of Asian American Studies" (Shirley Hume); (2) "Surviving Democracy's 'Mistake":…

  7. Asian American Interethnic Relations and Politics. Asians in America: The Peoples of East, Southeast, and South Asia in American Life and Culture Series, Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Franklin, Ed.

    The articles in this anthology address the complex subject of interethnic relations and Asian American politics, transcending ideas of Asian Americans as the model minority. The articles are: (1) "Opening the American Mind and Body: The Role of Asian American Studies" (Shirley Hume); (2) "Surviving Democracy's 'Mistake":…

  8. Asian American mental health: a call to action.

    PubMed

    Sue, Stanley; Yan Cheng, Janice Ka; Saad, Carmel S; Chu, Joyce P

    2012-10-01

    The U.S. Surgeon General's report Mental Health: Culture, Race, and Ethnicity--A Supplement to Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2001) was arguably the best single scholarly contribution on the mental health of ethnic minority groups in the United States. Over 10 years have now elapsed since its publication in 2001. This article highlights advances and illuminates gaps in the knowledge gained about the mental health and psychotherapeutic treatment of Asian Americans in the past decade. Though larger epidemiological surveys point to lower prevalence rates of mental illness in Asian Americans, further advances are needed in culturally valid assessment and quantification of cultural biases in symptom reporting in order to draw definitive conclusions about the state of Asian American mental health. A focus on prevalence in Asian Americans as a whole also shrouds important subgroup elevations such as heightened suicide risk in Asian elderly women or greater posttraumatic stress disorder in Southeast Asian refugees. Despite important developments in our knowledge about mental health prevalence, help-seeking behaviors, and culturally competent treatments for Asian Americans, it appears that troublingly low rates of service utilization still remain even when one accounts for the seemingly low prevalence rates among Asian Americans. Some progress has been made in the cultural adaptations of psychotherapy treatments for Asian Americans. In order to reduce mental health care disparities, greater efforts are needed to provide outreach at the community level and to bridge the gap between mental health and other medical or alternative health facilities. We call for innovation and provide recommendations to address these issues in the next decade.

  9. iCount: A Data Quality Movement for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teranishi, Robert; Lok, Libby; Nguyen, Bach Mai Dolly

    2013-01-01

    In 2013, the National Commission on Asian American and Pacific Islander Research in Education (CARE) and the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (WHIAAPI)--with support from ETS and Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in Philanthropy (AAPIP)--began an Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) data quality campaign.…

  10. Masculine Norms, Avoidant Coping, Asian Values and Depression among Asian American Men

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Derek Kenji; Liao, Liang; Liu, William Ming

    2010-01-01

    Contrary to the “model minority” myth, growing research indicates that the rates of mental health problems among Asian Americans may be higher than initially assumed. This study seeks to add to the scant knowledge regarding the mental health of Asian American men by examining the role of masculine norms, coping and cultural values in predicting depression among this population (N=149). Results reveal that Asian American men who used avoidant coping strategies and endorsed the masculine norm Dominance reported higher levels of depressive symptoms. In contrast, endorsing Winning masculine norms was associated to lower levels of depressive symptoms. Findings suggest that adherence to masculine norms and avoidant coping strategies play a salient role in the mental health of Asian American men. PMID:20657794

  11. Measurement Invariance of the PRIAS with Asian Americans

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Matthew J.; Alvarez, Alvin N.; Li, Robin; Chen, Grace A.; Iwamoto, Derek K.

    2015-01-01

    Racial identity has been linked to a number of important psychological outcomes including perceptions of racism, self-esteem, and psychological well-being in Asian American populations. Although the People of Color Racial Identity Attitudes Scale (PRIAS; Helms, 1995) is the most widely used measure in Asian American racial identity research, numerous competing measurement models of the PRIAS have been identified in independent Asian American samples. Therefore, this study tested these competing PRIAS measurement models and also examined PRIAS measurement invariance across generational status, gender, and ethnicity using a combined sample of 1,946 Asian American college students and community adults. Study findings demonstrated the superiority of a 12-item four factor PRIAS measurement model, which was consistent with Helms’ original racial identity theory and suggest that the PRIAS operates in an equivalent manner across generational status, gender, and ethnicity. Study limitations and future directions for research are discussed. PMID:26191607

  12. Asian American Health - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Asian American Health URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/asianamericanhealth.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  13. Asian and Pacific American Exceptional Children. A Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decano, Pio

    1979-01-01

    Presented in the format of an imaginary dialogue between seven educators of Asian and Pacific American (APA) backgrounds, the article addresses some issues and concerns in the training of special education personnel to work with APA handicapped children. (DLS)

  14. Asian American Concerns. The Report of the Chancellor's Task Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY.

    The rosy picture that Asian-American youth are academic successes by almost any gauge does not in fact hold true for many Asian-American students. These students, who make up 7.3 percent of the population of the public schools, are dropping out at a disturbing rate, and those who remain in school face an array of problems such as harassment from…

  15. Adherence to Asian and European American Cultural Values and Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help among Asian American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Bryan S. K.

    2007-01-01

    Possible relations among enculturation and acculturation to cultural values and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help were examined among 146 Asian American college students. In addition, possible relations between various dimensions of Asian values and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help were examined. As…

  16. Adherence to Asian and European American Cultural Values and Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help among Asian American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Bryan S. K.

    2007-01-01

    Possible relations among enculturation and acculturation to cultural values and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help were examined among 146 Asian American college students. In addition, possible relations between various dimensions of Asian values and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help were examined. As…

  17. Somatic symptom and related disorders in Asians and Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sandeep; Ghosh, Abhishek

    2014-02-01

    Somatic manifestation is common in the Asian population. The frequent occurrence of somatic symptom and related disorders among Asians could well be explained by an overt emphasis on 'somatic' idioms of distress on the one hand, and unacceptability and stigma attached to psychological expression of distress on the other. Assessment and diagnosis of somatoform disorders is complicated by the scarcity of cross-culturally validated instruments. Likewise, management is also based on Western literature in which psychological interventions override pharmacological treatment. DSM-5 has broadened the scope of somatoform disorders and emphasizes the concept rather than simply counting symptoms. These changes are expected to have a positive impact cross-culturally. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Asian and Hispanic Americans' cancer fatalism and colon cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jungmi; Oh, Kyeung Mi

    2013-03-01

    To explore fatalistic attributions of colon cancer development among Asian and Hispanic Americans in comparison with non-Hispanic whites; also to examine the impacts of fatalism on adherence to the colon cancer screening guideline. For the analysis, the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey data were employed. Both Asian and Hispanic Americans were more likely to make fatalistic attribution and were less likely to follow the guideline than whites. Particularly for Asians, fatalism was a significant predictor for not adhering to the guideline. These findings emphasize the need for cultural interventions to disrupt fatalistic attitudes towards colon cancer preventions.

  19. Bullying Prevention as a Social Justice Issue: Implications with Asian American Elementary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Cixin; Wang, Weimeng; Zheng, Lianzhe; Atwal, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    This study examined Asian American elementary students' experience with victimization. Data were collected from 313 fourth and fifth graders from an ethnically diverse elementary school in southern California. Most participants self-identified as Asian/Asian American and spoke an Asian language at home. Results indicated that Asian American…

  20. Cardiovascular Disease Mortality in Asian Americans (2003–2010)

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Powell O.; Frank, Ariel TH; Kapphahn, Kristopher I.; Goldstein, Benjamin A.; Eggleston, Karen; Hastings, Katherine G.; Cullen, Mark R.; Palaniappan, Latha P

    2014-01-01

    Background Asian Americans are a rapidly growing racial/ethnic group in the United States. Our current understanding of Asian-American cardiovascular disease mortality patterns is distorted by the aggregation of distinct subgroups. Objectives To examine heart disease and stroke mortality rates in Asian-American subgroups to determine racial/ethnic differences in cardiovascular disease mortality within the United States. Methods We examined heart disease and stroke mortality rates for the 6 largest Asian-American subgroups (Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese) from 2003–2010. U.S. death records were used to identify race/ethnicity and cause of death by ICD-10 coding. Using both U.S. Census and death record data, standardized mortality ratios (SMR), relative SMRs (rSMR), and proportional mortality ratios (PMR) were calculated for each sex and ethnic group relative to Non-Hispanic Whites (NHW). Results 10,442,034 death records were examined. While NHW men and women had the highest overall mortality rates, Asian Indian men and women and Filipino men had greater proportionate mortality burden from ischemic heart disease. The proportionate mortality burden of hypertensive heart disease and cerebrovascular disease, especially hemorrhagic stroke, was higher in every Asian-American subgroup compared to NHWs. Conclusions The heterogeneity in cardiovascular disease mortality patterns among diverse Asian-American subgroups calls attention to the need for more research to help direct more specific treatment and prevention efforts, in particular with hypertension and stroke, to reduce health disparities for this growing population. PMID:25500233

  1. Contribution of job satisfaction to happiness of Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Weaver, C N

    2001-08-01

    Many demographic and labor force characteristics, such as family income, educational attainment, and occupation, correlated with job satisfaction. Since Asian Americans are more like Euro-Americans than African Americans in most of these characteristics, it seems reasonable to predict that their job satisfaction would be high as for Euro-Americans rather than low as for African Americans. Yet research of Weaver and Hinson showed that the opposite is true. One explanation for this unexpected result is that Asians do not think of jobs as a source of happiness but simply as a means of earning money to underwrite other aspects of their lives, such as the well-being of their families, which are the main sources of their happiness. The hypothesis was tested that job satisfaction does not contribute to the happiness of Asian Americans in comparison to satisfaction from other domains of their lives. Analysis was conducted of the attitudes of Asian-American (n = 160), African-American (n = 602), and Euro-American (n = 6,477) workers who responded to 22 surveys drawn from 1972 to 1998, each of which was representative of the labor force of the USA. The hypothesis was supported by the finding that the partial correlation of job satisfaction and global happiness with satisfaction in seven other domains of life (marriage, financial condition, community, nonwork activities, family, health and physical condition, and friendships) held constant was significant for Euro-American women and men but not for Asian Americans or African Americans of either sex. And, the same result occurred when global happiness was regressed on job satisfaction net the effects of satisfaction in other seven domains.

  2. Asian Americans: A Case of Benighted Neglect. AAMHRC Occasional Paper No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owan, Tom

    The undercount of the Asian American population, the phenomenal rise of Asian immigrants, the projected doubling of the Asian American population by 1980, and the concentration of this population in urban areas are significant reasons for the reordering of program priorities so that Asian Americans are not excluded from Federally funded benefits…

  3. Memory as Travel in Asian American Children's Literature: Bridging Home and School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Stuart H. D.; Pataray-Ching, Jann

    2002-01-01

    Examines Asian American children's literature. Suggests that four representations of memory in Asian American children's literature (memory as recovery, as cultural change, as catharsis, and as border crossing) compose an empowering discourse for Asian and Asian American students negotiating competing cultural and economic motives in American…

  4. Asian Americans: A Case of Benighted Neglect. AAMHRC Occasional Paper No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owan, Tom

    The undercount of the Asian American population, the phenomenal rise of Asian immigrants, the projected doubling of the Asian American population by 1980, and the concentration of this population in urban areas are significant reasons for the reordering of program priorities so that Asian Americans are not excluded from Federally funded benefits…

  5. Asian American Resources: An Annotated Bibliography. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumagai, Gloria L., Comp.; And Others

    This annotated bibliography is a list of resource materials available at the Asian American Resource Center, St. Paul, Minnesota. It was compiled in order to provide information to classroom teachers and other public school personnel about Chinese, Japanese, Indochinese, Korean, Pacific Island, and Pilipino Americans. Many of the items described…

  6. Asian American dating: important factors in partner choice.

    PubMed

    Mok, T A

    1999-05-01

    The majority of research on romantic relationships has tended to focus on marriage, with relatively less attention paid to dating. This study examined the relationship between Asian American dating, both interracial and intraracial, and a variety of factors thought to be associated with dating in this population, including acculturation, ethnic identity, attractiveness, interracial dating experience, ethnicity of friends, parental influence over dating, and density. Participants were administered measures of these variables and were asked questions regarding their likelihood of dating both Asian Americans and White Americans. An interesting pattern of results emerged when the variables were put into regression equations to predict both interracial and intraracial dating. Findings are presented and implications discussed.

  7. Weighing in on the hidden Asian American obesity epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Stella S.; Kwon, Simona C.; Wyatt, Laura; Islam, Nadia; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2015-01-01

    According to national estimates, obesity prevalence is lower in Asian Americans compared to other racial/ethnic groups, but this low prevalence may be misleading for three reasons. First, a lower body mass index (BMI) cutoff as proposed by the World Health Organization may be more appropriate to use in Asian populations. However, evidence is limited to substantiate the potential costs and burden of adopting these cutoffs. Increasing BMI in Asians (as in other racial/ethnic groups) should be considered across the spectrum of BMI, with a minimum awareness of these lower cutoffs among healthcare researchers. Second, the need for disaggregated data across Asian American subgroups is illustrated by the higher obesity (and diabetes) prevalence estimates observed in South Asian Americans. Third, prevalence of obesity should be placed in the larger context of immigration and globalization through cross-national comparisons and examination of acculturation-related factors. However these types of studies and collection of salient variables are not routinely performed. Data from a metropolitan area where many Asian Americans settle is presented as a case study to illustrate these points. Clear evidence that incorporates these three considerations is necessary for program planning and resource allocation for obesity-related disparities in this rapidly growing and diverse population. PMID:25602909

  8. Immigration-Related Factors and Mental Disorders Among Asian Americans

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, David T.; Zane, Nolan; Hong, Seunghye; Chae, David H.; Gong, Fang; Gee, Gilbert C.; Walton, Emily; Sue, Stanley; Alegría, Margarita

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. We examined lifetime and 12-month rates of any depressive, anxiety, and substance abuse disorders in a national sample of Asian Americans. We focused on factors related to nativity and immigration as possible correlates of mental disorders. Methods. Data were derived from the National Latino and Asian American Study, the first national epidemiological survey of Asian Americans in the United States. Results. The relationships between immigration-related factors and mental disorders were different for men and women. Among women, nativity was strongly associated with lifetime disorders, with immigrant women having lower rates of most disorders compared with US-born women. Conversely, English proficiency was associated with mental disorders for Asian men. Asian men who spoke English proficiently generally had lower rates of lifetime and 12-month disorders compared with nonproficient speakers. Conclusions. For Asian Americans, immigration-related factors were associated with mental disorders, but in different ways for men and women. Future studies will need to examine gender as an important factor in specifying the association between immigration and mental health. PMID:17138908

  9. Depression in Asian-American and Caucasian undergraduate students.

    PubMed

    Young, Christina B; Fang, Daniel Z; Zisook, Sidney

    2010-09-01

    Depression is a serious and often under-diagnosed and undertreated mental health problem in college students which may have fatal consequences. Little is known about ethnic differences in prevalence of depression in US college campuses. This study compares depression severity in Asian-American and Caucasian undergraduate students at the University of California San Diego (UCSD). Participants completed the nine item Patient Health Questionnaire and key demographic information via an anonymous online questionnaire. Compared to Caucasians, Asian-Americans exhibited significantly elevated levels of depression. Furthermore, Korean-American students were significantly more depressed than Chinese-American, other minority Asian-American, and Caucasian students. In general, females were significantly more depressed than males. Results were upheld when level of acculturation was considered. The demographic breakdown of the student population at UCSD is not representative to that of the nation. These findings suggest that outreach to female and Asian-American undergraduate students is important and attention to Korean-American undergraduates may be especially worthwhile. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Bruce Lee vs. Fu Manchu: Kung Fu Films and Asian American Stereotypes in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farquhar, Judith; Doi, Mary L.

    1978-01-01

    Discussed in this article are numerous films which feature Asian characters and the influence these films have on stereotyped images of Asians and prevailing racist attitudes toward Asian Americans. (EB)

  11. 77 FR 54572 - President's Advisory Commission on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... Americans and Pacific Islanders AGENCY: President's Advisory Commission on Asian Americans and Pacific... the schedule and agenda of the meeting of the President's Advisory Commission on Asian Americans and... CONTACT: Shelly W. Coles, White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, 400 Maryland...

  12. Asian American Midlife Women’s Attitudes toward Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Im, Eun-Ok; Ko, Young; Hwang, Hyenam; Chee, Wonshik; Stuifbergen, Alexa; Lee, Hannah; Chee, Eunice

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To explore Asian American midlife women’s attitudes toward physical activity using a feminist perspective. Design A qualitative online forum study. Settings Internet communities/groups for midlife women and ethnic minorities. Participants A total of 17 Asian American women recruited through the internet using a convenience sampling method. Methods A six-month qualitative online forum was conducted using 17 online forum topics. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Three major themes related to Asian American midlife women’s attitudes toward physical activity were extracted from the data: keeping traditions, not a priority, and not for Asian girls. Because Asian American midlife women were busy in keeping their cultural traditions, they rarely found time for physical activity. The women gave the highest priority to their children, and physical activity was the lowest priority in their busy lives. Also, the women were rarely encouraged to participate in physical activity during their childhoods, and they perceived that their weak and small bodies were not appropriate for physical activity. Conclusions Several implications for future development of physical activity promotion programs for this specific population have been suggested based on the findings. PMID:22789126

  13. The effects of contact with Asians and Asian Americans on White American college students: attitudes, awareness of racial discrimination, and psychological adjustment.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Khanh T; Weinstein, Traci L; Nemon, Melissa; Rondeau, Sara

    2008-12-01

    On the basis of acculturation theory, explicating mutual influences between different cultural or ethnic groups coming into contact, this study focused "on the other side of acculturation" theory by examining the effects of intercultural contact with Asians and Asian Americans on the psychosocial experiences of White American college students. Participants (N = 315), undergraduates attending a public university located within the state of Massachusetts, completed a survey that assessed demographic and personal characteristics, acculturation (extent of intercultural contact with Asian people and Asian cultures), attitudes towards Asians and Asian Americans, awareness of institutional discrimination and blatant racial issues, and psychological distress. Results indicated that White American students' intercultural contact with Asians and Asian Americans contributed significant variance to the prediction of their attitudes towards this ethnic group and awareness of discrimination and racial issues, but not to psychological distress. This study provides implications for understanding mutual acculturative influences between different ethnic groups in the United States.

  14. Adaptation of Asian Students to American Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Michael W.

    The purpose of this study was to examine how Asian students at Western Michigan University (WMU) have adjusted to U.S. culture and more specifically to life at a U.S. university. I. Owie (1982) found a high degree of social alienation among foreign students at two Midwestern U.S. universities. He recommended that universities continuously evaluate…

  15. We, the Asian and Pacific Islander Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Dwight L.; And Others

    Demographic data are presented about the people who have immigrated to the United States from Asia and the Pacific Islands. Twelve figures (pie charts, bar graphs, and maps), and eight tables provide detailed, statistical information on such things as (1) distribution of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States, (2) states with the…

  16. Cultural Values, Counseling Stigma, and Intentions to Seek Counseling among Asian American College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miville, Marie L.; Constantine, Madonna G.

    2007-01-01

    The authors explored the extent to which Asian American college women's perceived stigma about counseling mediated the relationship between their adherence to Asian cultural values and intentions to seek counseling, Participants, 201 Asian American college women (age range = 18-24 years), completed measures of Asian cultural values, perceived…

  17. Organ donation and culture: a comparison of Asian American and European American beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors.

    PubMed

    Alden, D L; Cheung, A H S

    2000-02-01

    The well-known gap between organ-donor supply and demand in the United States is particularly acute for Asian Americans. Lower participation in organ donation programs by Asian Americans has been hypothesized as one explanation for this observation. This study finds that, relative to European Americans, Asian Americans hold more negative attitudes toward and participate less frequently in a large, urban organ-donor program. The study also hypothesizes and test possible reasons for subcultural differences in attitudes toward donation. Two cultural belief constructs hypothesized to more strongly predict Asian American attitudes and behaviors appear to impact both groups equally. Reasons for these results along with public policy implications and future research directions are discussed.

  18. Iris melanocyte numbers in Asian, African American, and Caucasian irides.

    PubMed

    Albert, Daniel M; Green, W Richard; Zimbric, Michele L; Lo, Cecilia; Gangnon, Ronald E; Hope, Kirsten L; Gleiser, Joel

    2003-01-01

    The anatomical basis for iris color has long been a controversial issue in ophthalmology. Recent studies demonstrated that in Caucasians, blue-eyed, gray-eyed, and hazel-eyed individuals have comparable numbers of iris melanocytes. The present investigation was carried out to compare melanocyte numbers in the irides of Asian, African American, and Caucasian brown-eyed individuals. Paraffin-embedded sections from 71 brown-colored irides were incubated with rabbit anti-cow antibody against S100a, linked with an FITC conjugate antibody, and counterstained with Evans blue. Cells were counted under a fluorescence microscope and scored as melanocytes or other cells. Cell number, density, and iris area were calculated for each specimen. Caucasian and African American irides had comparable mean total melanocyte numbers. Asian irides had fewer total melanocytes than African American (P = .042) and Caucasian (P = .001) irides and smaller total number of cells (ie, melanocytes plus other cells) than African American (P = .054) or Caucasian (P = .009) irides. There is a statistically significant smaller mean total melanocyte number and mean total cellularity in Asian irides as compared to Caucasian and African American irides. This difference appears to be due to the combination of smaller iris area and lower melanocyte density in the Asian irides. The possibility exists that this may be a factor in ethnic variations in certain ocular diseases.

  19. Iris melanocyte numbers in Asian, African American, and Caucasian irides.

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Daniel M; Green, W Richard; Zimbric, Michele L; Lo, Cecilia; Gangnon, Ronald E; Hope, Kirsten L; Gleiser, Joel

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: The anatomical basis for iris color has long been a controversial issue in ophthalmology. Recent studies demonstrated that in Caucasians, blue-eyed, gray-eyed, and hazel-eyed individuals have comparable numbers of iris melanocytes. The present investigation was carried out to compare melanocyte numbers in the irides of Asian, African American, and Caucasian brown-eyed individuals. METHODS: Paraffin-embedded sections from 71 brown-colored irides were incubated with rabbit anti-cow antibody against S100a, linked with an FITC conjugate antibody, and counterstained with Evans blue. Cells were counted under a fluorescence microscope and scored as melanocytes or other cells. Cell number, density, and iris area were calculated for each specimen. RESULTS: Caucasian and African American irides had comparable mean total melanocyte numbers. Asian irides had fewer total melanocytes than African American (P = .042) and Caucasian (P = .001) irides and smaller total number of cells (ie, melanocytes plus other cells) than African American (P = .054) or Caucasian (P = .009) irides. CONCLUSIONS: There is a statistically significant smaller mean total melanocyte number and mean total cellularity in Asian irides as compared to Caucasian and African American irides. This difference appears to be due to the combination of smaller iris area and lower melanocyte density in the Asian irides. The possibility exists that this may be a factor in ethnic variations in certain ocular diseases. PMID:14971580

  20. Association between neighborhood context and smoking prevalence among Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Kandula, Namratha R; Wen, Ming; Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Lauderdale, Diane S

    2009-05-01

    To study neighborhood-level determinants of smoking among Asian Americans, we examined 3 neighborhood factors (ethnic enclave, socioeconomics, and perceived social cohesion) and smoking prevalence in a population-based sample. We linked data from the 2003 California Health Interview Survey to tract-level data from the 2000 Census. We used multivariate logistic regression models to estimate the associations between smoking and neighborhood-level factors, independent of individual factors. Twenty-two percent of 1693 Asian men and 6% of 2174 Asian women reported current smoking. Women living in an Asian enclave were less likely to smoke (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.27; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.08, 0.88). Among men, higher levels of perceived neighborhood social cohesion were associated with lower odds of smoking (AOR = 0.74; 95% CI = 0.61, 0.91). The association between contextual factors and smoking differed for men and women. For women, living in an Asian enclave may represent cultural behavioral norms. For men, neighborhood trust and cohesiveness may buffer stress. Smoking prevention and cessation interventions among Asian Americans may be more effective if they address contextual factors.

  1. Problems With the Collection and Interpretation of Asian-American Health Data: Omission, Aggregation, and Extrapolation

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Ariel T.; Palaniappan, Latha P.

    2015-01-01

    Asian-American citizens are the fastest growing racial/ethnic group in the United States. Nevertheless, data on Asian American health are scarce, and many health disparities for this population remain unknown. Much of our knowledge of Asian American health has been determined by studies in which investigators have either grouped Asian-American subjects together or examined one subgroup alone (e.g., Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese). National health surveys that collect information on Asian-American race/ethnicity frequently omit this population in research reports. When national health data are reported for Asian-American subjects, it is often reported for the aggregated group. This aggregation may mask differences between Asian-American subgroups. When health data are reported by Asian American subgroup, it is generally reported for one subgroup alone. In the Ni-Hon-San study, investigators examined cardiovascular disease in Japanese men living in Japan (Nippon; Ni), Honolulu, Hawaii (Hon), and San Francisco, CA (San). The findings from this study are often incorrectly extrapolated to other Asian-American subgroups. Recommendations to correct the errors associated with omission, aggregation, and extrapolation include: oversampling of Asian Americans, collection and reporting of race/ ethnicity data by Asian-American subgroup, and acknowledgement of significant heterogeneity among Asian American subgroups when interpreting data. PMID:22625997

  2. A Review of Data on Asian Americans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    Cambodian, Bangladeshi, Malayan, Hmong, Hawaiian, Samoan, Tongan, Northern Mariana Islander, Guamanian, and Fijian . (20:192-193) - Although the Asian...MATHEMATICS, MEDICINE , and ACADEMIA: Jokichi Takamine (chemist, first to isolate adrenaline); Hideyo Murayama (isolated syphilis germ); Dr. An Wang (computer...Department shuttle mission in January 1985 and later died aboard Challenger in 1986); Har Gobind Khorana (1968 Nobel Prize for medicine ); Im Proum (Cambodian

  3. Equality for all? White Americans' willingness to address inequality with Asian and African Americans.

    PubMed

    Bikmen, Nida; Durkin, Kristine

    2014-10-01

    White Americans' willingness to engage in dialogues about intergroup commonalities and power inequalities with Asian and African Americans were examined in two experiments. Because Whites perceive that African Americans experience greater discrimination than do Asian Americans, we predicted that they would be more willing to engage in dialogues that would interrogate injustice and inequality with them. We also explored the role of common in-group identity (as Americans) on willingness for dialogue about inequality. In both studies, Whites were less interested in engaging in power talk with Asian Americans than with African Americans, but the difference in willingness for commonality talk was smaller. Asian Americans were perceived as experiencing lower levels of discrimination (Studies 1 and 2) and identify less with America (Study 2) both of which predicted lower willingness for power talk with them. Common in-group identity manipulations had marginal effects on willingness for power talk with African Americans and no effect on power talk with Asian Americans. Implications for improving social disparities between various groups were discussed.

  4. Asian-American Educational Achievements: A Phenomenon in Search of an Explanation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sue, Stanley; Okazaki, Sumie

    1990-01-01

    Investigates factors, including heredity and culture, contributing to exceptional Asian American academic achievement. Proposes the concept of relative functionalism, under which Asian Americans perceive and have experienced restrictions in upward mobility in occupations unrelated to education. Consequently, educational achievement assumes…

  5. 76 FR 25515 - Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ... Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, let us celebrate the millions of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders whose talents and contributions strengthen our economy, protect our security, and...

  6. Exploring the Link between Self-Construal and Distress among African American and Asian American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christopher, Michael S.; Skillman, Gemma D.

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated ethnicity, self-construal, and distress among African American and Asian American college students. African American students expressed more salient independent self-construals, whereas Asian American students expressed more salient interdependent self-construals. As hypothesized, among African American participants,…

  7. Exploring the Link between Self-Construal and Distress among African American and Asian American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christopher, Michael S.; Skillman, Gemma D.

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated ethnicity, self-construal, and distress among African American and Asian American college students. African American students expressed more salient independent self-construals, whereas Asian American students expressed more salient interdependent self-construals. As hypothesized, among African American participants,…

  8. Internalized model minority myth, Asian values, and help-seeking attitudes among Asian American students.

    PubMed

    Kim, Paul Youngbin; Lee, Donghun

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined cultural factors underlying help-seeking attitudes of Asian American college students (N = 106). Specifically, we explored internalized model minority myth as a predictor of help-seeking attitudes and tested an intrapersonal-interpersonal framework of Asian values as a mechanism by which the two are related. Results indicated that internalized model minority myth significantly predicted unfavorable help-seeking attitudes, and emotional self-control mediated this relationship. Interpersonal values and humility were nonsignificant mediators, contrary to our hypotheses. The findings suggest that the investigation of internalized model minority myth in help-seeking research is a worthwhile endeavor, and they also highlight emotional self-control as an important explanatory variable in help-seeking attitudes of Asian American college students.

  9. Health Fair Report of Asian Americans in Michigan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Janilla; Chen, Judy; Deng, Lili; Parasurama, Prasanna

    2013-09-29

    There is little information about Asian American health in Michigan. This highlights an urgent need to collect their health data to understand and help this fastest growing ethnic group live healthier lives and reduce health disparities. Data for about 300 individuals attending two major health fairs were collected to study older Chinese and Vietnamese immigrants. The analyses show that they have high prevalence rates of hypertension, high cholesterol and diabetes, even though their body mass index is relatively low. The report of these analyses is a starting point to understand the study groups. Such data can help health care providers give sound advice to their patients and allow those of us in public health to design proper health programs that may benefit them. But more data is needed to include major Asian ethnic groups and identify common health concerns among all Asian Americans.

  10. Health fair report of Asian Americans in Michigan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Janilla; Chen, Judy; Deng, Lili; Parasurama, Prasanna

    2015-02-01

    There is little information about Asian American health in Michigan. This highlights an urgent need to collect their health data to understand and help this fastest growing ethnic group live healthier lives and reduce health disparities. Data for about 300 individuals attending two major health fairs were collected to study older Chinese and Vietnamese immigrants. The analyses show that they have high prevalence rates of hypertension, high cholesterol and diabetes, even though their body mass index is relatively low. The report of these analyses is a starting point to understand the study groups. Such data can help health care providers give sound advice to their patients and allow those of us in public health to design proper health programs that may benefit them. But more data is needed to include major Asian ethnic groups and identify common health concerns among all Asian Americans.

  11. Between "What I Am" and "What I Am Not": Asians and Asian Americans in Contention and Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyon, Heekyong Teresa; Cao, Yan; Li, Huey-li

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors examine "the complex processes of identity formation among Asians in America" by means of a narrative self-inquiry that explores the formation of their own multilayered identities. They do this by telling a story of becoming Asians and/or Asian Americans. They start with Heekyong Teresa Pyon's narrative of becoming an…

  12. A 16-Year Examination of Domestic Violence among Asians and Asian Americans in the Empirical Knowledge Base: A Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yick, Alice G.; Oomen-Early, Jody

    2008-01-01

    Until recently, research studies have implied that domestic violence does not affect Asian American and immigrant communities, or even Asians abroad, because ethnicity or culture has not been addressed. In this content analysis, the authors examined trends in publications in leading scholarly journals on violence relating to Asian women and…

  13. A 16-Year Examination of Domestic Violence among Asians and Asian Americans in the Empirical Knowledge Base: A Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yick, Alice G.; Oomen-Early, Jody

    2008-01-01

    Until recently, research studies have implied that domestic violence does not affect Asian American and immigrant communities, or even Asians abroad, because ethnicity or culture has not been addressed. In this content analysis, the authors examined trends in publications in leading scholarly journals on violence relating to Asian women and…

  14. A Psychometric Revision of the European American Values Scale for Asian Americans Using the Rasch Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Sehee; Kim, Bryan S. K.; Wolfe, Maren M.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the 18-item European American Values Scale for Asian Americans (M. M. Wolfe, P. H. Yang, E. C. Wong, & D. R. Atkinson, 2001) was revised on the basis of results from a psychometric analysis using the Rasch Model (G. Rasch, 1960). The results led to the establishment of the 25-item European American Values Scale for Asian…

  15. A Psychometric Revision of the European American Values Scale for Asian Americans Using the Rasch Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Sehee; Kim, Bryan S. K.; Wolfe, Maren M.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the 18-item European American Values Scale for Asian Americans (M. M. Wolfe, P. H. Yang, E. C. Wong, & D. R. Atkinson, 2001) was revised on the basis of results from a psychometric analysis using the Rasch Model (G. Rasch, 1960). The results led to the establishment of the 25-item European American Values Scale for Asian…

  16. Issues of College Persistence between Asian and Asian Pacific American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Theresa Ling

    2004-01-01

    This article offers an exploration of the Asian Pacific American (APA) ethnic groups that show high rates of departure, and presents strategies and approaches to improving their persistence and graduation rates. A detailed examination of the APA population is presented to identify the subgroups that are underrepresented in higher education and who…

  17. Asian American Women: Stereotyping Asian Women; Chinese Immigrants; Issei--the First Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshioka, Robert B.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The first of the three parts of this article provides a brief outline of the stereotypes applied to Asian American Women and a useful backdrop on the other two parts. The second part on Chinese immigrants focuses on the strong family ties of tgis ethnic group. The third and last part concerns the quietness and modesty of the Issei--equated with…

  18. Intersections: A Professional Development Project in Multicultural and Global Education, Asian and Asian American Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Leslie, Ed.; Warner, Linda, Ed.; Grossman, David L., Ed.

    This publication presents a sampling of the writings of participants in the Intersections Project, a professional development program to bridge gap between multicultural and global education for urban schools that involved four participating entities, each with a local project that focused on Asia and Asian Americans. The project was specifically…

  19. Asian Pacific Americans in Quincy. Community Profiles in Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Univ., Boston. Inst. for Asian American Studies.

    The Community Profiles Project uses data from the 1990 U.S. Census to describe some of the population characteristics of Asian Pacific Americans in selected Massachusetts cities and towns. The profiles include basic statistics relating to income, employment, education, and housing. This information can assist policy makers and practitioners in…

  20. Asian Americans and Pacific Peoples: A Case of Mistaken Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishikawa, Michael; And Others

    This report prepared by the California Advisory Committee for the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights is said to constitute an initial attempt to present a demographic sketch of Asian Americans and Pacific Peoples and to describe generally the areas in which they encounter significant problems. In order to destroy existing stereotypes about Asian…

  1. Washington State Asian Pacific American Organizations Resources Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Commission on Asian-American Affairs, Olympia.

    This resource directory was prepared to assist educators, the media, government officials, students, and the general public in locating accurate and up-to-date information about Asian Pacific Americans (APAs) in Washington State. It was also prepared to help APAs find the services that are available to them throughout the state. This guide lists…

  2. New Visions in Asian American Studies. Diversity, Community, Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Franklin, Ed.; And Others

    This collection of essays from the eighth national conference of the Association for Asian American Studies is organized into four sections: history and women's studies; social science; literature; and Hawaiian studies. The following papers are included: (1) "History and Women Studies" (Yung); (2) "From Old to New Plantations: Labor's Growing…

  3. Asian American Educational Goals: Racial Barriers and Cultural Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yung-Lung; Fouad, Nadya A.

    2013-01-01

    Educational success among Asian American students has often been misunderstood as an occupational development separate from any experience of racism. However, several theorists have suggested that racial barriers in occupational mobility correlate with educational pursuits. Therefore, this research aims to examine the direct effect of perceived…

  4. Bicultural Work Motivation Scale for Asian American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yung-Lung; Fouad, Nadya A.

    2016-01-01

    The bicultural work motivations of Asian Americans have not yet been comprehensively captured by contemporary vocational constructs and scales. For this study, we conducted two studies on the initial reliability and validity of the Bicultural Work Motivation Scale (BWMS) by combining qualitative and quantitative methods. First, a pilot study was…

  5. Associations among Asian Americans' Enculturation, Emotional Experiences, and Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Y. Joel; Tran, Kimberly K.; Lai, Andre

    2009-01-01

    Using a computer-based text analysis of 218 Asian Americans' writing samples, the authors found that enculturation as well as use of negative emotion and positive emotion words were associated with depressive symptoms. Enculturation was also found to moderate the relation between use of negative emotion words and cognitive--affective depressive…

  6. Enrollment Pattern of Asian American Students in Postsecondary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peng, Samuel S.

    College attendance patterns for Asian Americans and their academic persistence, choice of study, and sources of financial aid were assessed, based on results of the High School and Beyond Study, a longitudinal study of high school sophomores and seniors in 1980. Findings for the sample of 439 sophomores and 391 seniors include: 86 percent of Asian…

  7. Asian American Field Survey: Re-Analysis of Health Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ito, Karen L.; So, Alvin

    Data from the Asian American Field Survey of 1973 were examined to determine health problems, methods of seeking and paying for health services, health insurance coverage, and frequency of medical examinations among Japanese, Chinese, Filipino, Korean, and Samoan families in the United States. The analysis indicated that the Chinese reported the…

  8. Beyond Authoritarianism: A Cultural Perspective on Asian American Parenting Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Ruth K.

    A study was conducted to determine Asian American conceptualizations of parenting, focusing on socialization goals, parenting style, and parenting practices related to schooling, aspects of parental influences discussed by D. Darling and L. Steinberg (1993). It was suggested that the standard conceptualizations of parenting style, those of D.…

  9. Community Violence Exposure of Southeast Asian American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Joyce

    2008-01-01

    Southeast Asian adolescents in the United States face the daily challenge of adjusting to the American culture and their culture of origin. However, little is known about how the patterns of their bicultural adjustment influence psychological symptoms, especially when faced with other challenges such as community violence and negative life events.…

  10. Differential Patterns of Achievement among Asian-American Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alva, Sylvia Alatorre

    1993-01-01

    Using grades and standardized test scores as criteria variables, a survey determined relative effects of sociocultural variables, personality factors, and student perceptions of school and social events in explaining differential patterns of academic achievement for 89 Asian-American tenth graders. Findings are discussed in connection with the…

  11. New Visions in Asian American Studies. Diversity, Community, Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Franklin, Ed.; And Others

    This collection of essays from the eighth national conference of the Association for Asian American Studies is organized into four sections: history and women's studies; social science; literature; and Hawaiian studies. The following papers are included: (1) "History and Women Studies" (Yung); (2) "From Old to New Plantations: Labor's Growing…

  12. Predictors of Familial Acculturative Stress in Asian American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Linda G.; Zahn, Marion P.; Cano, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined the predictors of familial acculturative stress in 85 Asian American college students. Participants were primarily 1st- and 2nd-generation U.S. citizens. Results showed that perceived acculturative family conflict and family intragroup marginalization were related to higher levels of familial acculturative stress for…

  13. Asian-American Parents: Are They Really Different?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Fang; Qi, Sen

    2004-01-01

    Using the base year data of parent interviews (n=15,376) conducted by the U. S. Department of Education for the national Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-K), this study examined patterns of parenting style of Asian-American parents (n=536) in six domains. Descriptive and ANOVA analyses revealed significant differences between…

  14. Dual Minority Stress and Asian American Gay Men's Psychological Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yung-Chi; Tryon, Georgiana Shick

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the direct and additive effects of racial minority stress and sexual minority stress on the psychological well-being among a community sample of 139 Asian American gay men. Self-esteem was tested to see whether it moderated or mediated the effects of perceived dual minority stress on psychological distress. Results…

  15. Correlates of Suicidal Behavior among Asian American Outpatient Youths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Anna S.; Jernewall, Nadine M.; Zane, Nolan; Myers, Hector F.

    2002-01-01

    Medical record abstraction was conducted to identify correlates of suicidal behaviors in a sample of 285 Asian American youths. Acculturation interacted with risk factor of parent-child conflict to predict suicidality. Finding underscores the importance of culture as a context for determining the relevance of stressors for potentiating…

  16. The Eating Disorders Inventory among Asian American College Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Grace; Gray, James

    2000-01-01

    Assesses the prevalence rate of bulimic disorders among 257 female Asian Americans from 18 to 30 years old. Finds that only two of the 257 women met the classification for bulimia nervosa. Contends that the findings illustrate the need for future research among culturally different populations. (CMK)

  17. Asian American Educational Goals: Racial Barriers and Cultural Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yung-Lung; Fouad, Nadya A.

    2013-01-01

    Educational success among Asian American students has often been misunderstood as an occupational development separate from any experience of racism. However, several theorists have suggested that racial barriers in occupational mobility correlate with educational pursuits. Therefore, this research aims to examine the direct effect of perceived…

  18. Dual Minority Stress and Asian American Gay Men's Psychological Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yung-Chi; Tryon, Georgiana Shick

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the direct and additive effects of racial minority stress and sexual minority stress on the psychological well-being among a community sample of 139 Asian American gay men. Self-esteem was tested to see whether it moderated or mediated the effects of perceived dual minority stress on psychological distress. Results…

  19. Migrant Labor and the "Poverty" of Asian American Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okihiro, Gary Y.

    1988-01-01

    Scholars have failed to develop theoretical and methodological tools for understanding Asian Americans. However, the issues are not totally ignored since there is a growing number of writers, historians, and poets who are producing promising works outside of the liberal tradition. Examples of authors and enriching works are presented. (VM)

  20. Five Asian and Pacific American Perspectives on Educational Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education, Berkeley, CA.

    This is a compilation of five brief commentaries on Federal educational policy as it relates to Asian and Pacific Americans. In the first, former Congresswoman Patsy Takemoto Mink stresses the importance of organized political action in overcoming problems related to discrimination and economic and educational disadvantages. In the second paper,…

  1. Comparing Learning Environment of Resilient and Nonresilient Asian American Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Shwu-yong L.; Waxman, Hersholt C.

    Resilient Asian American students, who have shown outstanding performance and achievement in spite of adverse life conditions in urban schools, were compared with nonresilient, or marginal, students who have not done well academically. The focus was on the students' perceptions of their learning environments in mathematics. Other background…

  2. Unraveling the "Model Minority" Stereotype: Listening to Asian American Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Stacey J.

    The model minority image of Asian Americans authorizes the flat denial of racism and structures of racial dominance and silences those who are not economically successful. This book explores how young people incorporate, interpret, and make meaning of the "model minority" stereotype in the context of their lived experience in school and…

  3. Predictors of Familial Acculturative Stress in Asian American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Linda G.; Zahn, Marion P.; Cano, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined the predictors of familial acculturative stress in 85 Asian American college students. Participants were primarily 1st- and 2nd-generation U.S. citizens. Results showed that perceived acculturative family conflict and family intragroup marginalization were related to higher levels of familial acculturative stress for…

  4. Bicultural Work Motivation Scale for Asian American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yung-Lung; Fouad, Nadya A.

    2016-01-01

    The bicultural work motivations of Asian Americans have not yet been comprehensively captured by contemporary vocational constructs and scales. For this study, we conducted two studies on the initial reliability and validity of the Bicultural Work Motivation Scale (BWMS) by combining qualitative and quantitative methods. First, a pilot study was…

  5. Racial Microaggressions and Daily Well-Being among Asian Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Anthony D.; Burrow, Anthony L.; Fuller-Rowell, Thomas E.; Ja, Nicole M.; Sue, Derald Wing

    2013-01-01

    Although epidemiological studies and community surveys of Asian Americans have found that lifetime occurrences of racial discrimination are associated with increased risk for psychological morbidity, little is known about how exposure to racial discrimination is patterned in everyday life. Extrapolating from previous qualitative research (Sue,…

  6. Classroom Behaviors of Asian American Students in Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Shwu-yong L.; Waxman, Hersholt C.

    This study examines Asian American middle school students' classroom behaviors in mathematics using systematic classroom observation techniques. The study explores questions related to classroom behaviors in terms of interactions with teachers, classroom settings, activities, and manners; differences in classroom behaviors between boys and girls…

  7. [Integrating Asian-Americans into the Business Community].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthington, Robert M.

    During the past two decades the Federal Government has become involved in programs for training, education, health, business, and housing, focusing on a variety of disadvantaged groups. Few programs have been specifically aimed at or involved a significant number of Asian-Americans. This probably reflects the traditions of social responsibility…

  8. Acculturation and Smoking Behavior in Asian-American Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Grace X.; Tan, Yin; Toubbeh, Jamil I.; Su, Xuefen; Shive, Steven E.; Lan, Yajia

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between acculturation and smoking behavior was examined in four Asian-American groups that included recent immigrants and US-born Koreans, Chinese, Vietnamese and Cambodians residing in the Delaware Valley of Pennsylvania and New Jersey. The study was part of a community-based, comprehensive cross-sectional study designed to…

  9. Media exposure, internalization of the thin ideal, and body dissatisfaction: comparing Asian American and European American college females.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Mahsa; Hill, Laura G; Orrell-Valente, Joan K

    2011-09-01

    Internalization of the thin ideal mediates the media exposure-body dissatisfaction relation in young adult European American females. There is little related research on Asian Americans. We used structural equations modeling to test: (1) whether media exposure was associated with body dissatisfaction in Asian American young adult females, (2) internalization of the thin ideal mediated any such association, and (3) whether the mediational model provided equivalent fit for European American and Asian American samples. Participants were 287 college females (154 Asian Americans, 133 European Americans). Internalization of the thin ideal explained the media exposure-body dissatisfaction association equally well for both groups. Results suggest that Asian Americans may be employing unhealthy weight control behaviors, and may be prone to developing eating disorders, at rates similar to European American young adult females. Clinicians need to screen carefully for body dissatisfaction, unhealthy weight control behaviors, and eating disorders in Asian American females. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Asian Pacific Perspectives. Filipino Americans: A Portrait.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Unified School District, CA.

    These instructional materials on Filipino Americans for elementary students were developed through the K.E.Y.S. project (knowledge of English Yields Success). The contents include statistics on the Filipino American population, background information about the Philippines becoming a U.S. territory, early immigration and more recent immigration to…

  11. Asian Americans: Then, Now, and Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isser, Natalie

    This paper documents American discrimination against Chinese and Japanese groups from the 1850s through the 1940s. Social prejudice against these groups began in the late 19th century when the demand for Chinese labor in California lessened but the immigrants remained and were seen as a threat to American laborers. Japanese immigrants who were…

  12. Asian Pacific Perspectives. Filipino Americans: A Portrait.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Unified School District, CA.

    These instructional materials on Filipino Americans for elementary students were developed through the K.E.Y.S. project (knowledge of English Yields Success). The contents include statistics on the Filipino American population, background information about the Philippines becoming a U.S. territory, early immigration and more recent immigration to…

  13. Incapacitated rape and alcohol use in White and Asian American college women.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hong V; Kaysen, Debra; Dillworth, Tiara M; Brajcich, Marci; Larimer, Mary E

    2010-08-01

    This study examined the role of Asian ethnicity as a moderator of drinking outcomes associated with alcohol-related sexual assault (incapacitated rape). Participants were 5,467 Asian American and White college women. Results found the overall MANOVA for ethnicity and incapacitated rape (IR) interactions to be significant. Asian American participants with no history of IR had fewer drinking problems than White American participants with no history of IR. Asian American participants with IR histories had more drinking problems than White Americans with IR histories. Findings indicate Asian Americans who experience IR may be at increased risk for negative alcohol outcomes.

  14. Asian Americans. Contemporary Trends and Issues. Sage Focus Editions, Volume 174.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Min, Pyong Gap, Ed.

    The dramatic increase in the number and proportions of Asian American students over the last two decades has influenced the curricula and academic programs of many colleges and universities. This book provides background for the study of Asian American issues through data on sociologically important variables and issues for Asian Americans as a…

  15. 77 FR 22771 - President's Advisory Commission on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... President's Advisory Commission on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders AGENCY: U.S. Department of Education, President's Advisory Commission on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. ACTION: Notice of an... Advisory Commission on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (Commission). The notice also describes the...

  16. Disaggregating Qualitative Data from Asian American College Students in Campus Racial Climate Research and Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Museus, Samuel D.; Truong, Kimberly A.

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights the utility of disaggregating qualitative research and assessment data on Asian American college students. Given the complexity of and diversity within the Asian American population, scholars have begun to underscore the importance of disaggregating data in the empirical examination of Asian Americans, but most of those…

  17. 76 FR 11227 - President's Advisory Commission on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ... President's Advisory Commission on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders AGENCY: President's Advisory Commission on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, U.S. Department of Education. ACTION: Notice of an open... Commission on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (Commission). The notice also describes the functions of...

  18. Struggling To Be Heard: The Unmet Needs of Asian Pacific American Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pang, Valerie Ooka, Ed.; Cheng, Li-Rong Lilly, Ed.

    Essays in this volume address the neglect of Asian Pacific Americans in the United States, of their struggles for liberation, hopes, troubles, and personal identities. This collection reviews Asian Pacific American history and explores attitudes about the welfare of Asian Pacific American families. The first section provides general background…

  19. Struggling To Be Heard: The Unmet Needs of Asian Pacific American Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pang, Valerie Ooka, Ed.; Cheng, Li-Rong Lilly, Ed.

    Essays in this volume address the neglect of Asian Pacific Americans in the United States, of their struggles for liberation, hopes, troubles, and personal identities. This collection reviews Asian Pacific American history and explores attitudes about the welfare of Asian Pacific American families. The first section provides general background…

  20. Complicating the Image of Model Minority Success: A Review of Southeast Asian American Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngo, Bic; Lee, Stacey J.

    2007-01-01

    Similar to other Asian American students, Southeast Asian American students are often stereotyped by the popular press as hardworking and high-achieving model minorities. On the other hand, Southeast Asian American youth are also depicted as low-achieving high school dropouts involved in gangs. The realities of academic performance and persistence…

  1. Application to College: A Comparison of Asian American and White High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goyette, Kimberly

    This paper explores an important component of the high college enrollment of Asian American students: application to college while in high school. Using data from the 1988-1992 waves of the National Educational Longitudinal Study (NELS), rates of application to college are compared for Asian Americans and Whites and various Asian American ethnic…

  2. Psychiatric Diagnoses and Clinical Characteristics of Asian American Youth in Children's Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Ly; Arganza, Girlyn F.; Huang, Larke N.; Liao, Qinghong; Nguyen, Hoang T.; Santiago, Rolando

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the psychiatric diagnoses and clinical characteristics of the 981 Asian American children enrolled in the first phase of the Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services for Children and Their Families Program. Asian Americans were less likely than non-Asian Americans to receive diagnoses of depression and ADHD and more…

  3. Hidden Disadvantage: Asian American Unemployment and the Great Recession. EPI Issue Brief #277

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Algernon

    2010-01-01

    Nationally, Asian Americans have the lowest unemployment rate of the major racial groups. But a closer look at unemployment by educational attainment shows a more complicated picture. Asian Americans with bachelor's degrees have a higher unemployment rate than whites with comparable education, but Asian American high school dropouts are more…

  4. Asian American-white American differences in expressions of social anxiety: a replication and extension.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Sumie; Liu, Joyce F; Longworth, Sandra L; Minn, Janice Y

    2002-08-01

    This study examined whether Asian American-White American differences on a trait measure of social anxiety extend to nonverbal behavior and to reports of anxiety-related emotions during a 3-min social performance task. Forty Asian Americans and 40 White Americans completed a trait measure of social anxiety and rated their emotions before, and immediately after, a social performance task. Their videotaped behavior was coded using microlevel behavioral codes (e.g., gaze avoidance, fidgeting). Results indicated that Asian Americans reported more anxiety than White Americans on the trait measure and on the emotion rating scales but that they did not differ substantially on microlevel behavioral indexes of social anxiety. Implications of ethnic variations in the patterns of anxious responding are discussed.

  5. “HOW ASIAN AM I?” ASIAN AMERICAN YOUTH CULTURES, DRUG USE, AND ETHNIC IDENTITY CONSTRUCTION*

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Geoffrey; Moloney, Molly; Evans, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    This article analyzes the construction of ethnic identity in the narratives of 100 young Asian Americans in a dance club/rave scene. We examine how illicit drug use and other consuming practices shape their understanding of Asian American identities, finding three distinct patterns. The first presents a disjuncture between Asian American ethnicity and drug use, seeing their own consumption as exceptional. The second argues their drug consumption is a natural outgrowth of their Asian American identity, allowing them to navigate the liminal space they occupy in American society. The final group presents Asian American drug use as normalized and constructs identity through taste and lifestyle boundary markers within social contexts of the dance scenes. These three narratives share a sense of ethnicity as dynamic, provisional, and constructed, allowing us to go beyond the static, essentialist models of ethnic identity that underlie much previous research on ethnicity, immigration, and substance use. PMID:21822339

  6. Disparities in cervical cancer survival among Asian-American women.

    PubMed

    Nghiem, Van T; Davies, Kalatu R; Chan, Wenyaw; Mulla, Zuber D; Cantor, Scott B

    2016-01-01

    We compared overall survival and influencing factors between Asian-American women as a whole and by subgroup with white women with cervical cancer. Cervical cancer data were from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry; socioeconomic information was from the Area Health Resource File. We used standard tests to compare characteristics between groups; the Kaplan-Meier method with log-rank test to assess overall survival and compare it between groups; and Cox proportional hazards models to determine the effect of race and other covariates on overall survival (with and/or without age stratification). Being 3.3 years older than white women at diagnosis (P < .001), Asian-American women were more likely to be in a spousal relationship, had more progressive disease, and were better off socioeconomically. Women of Filipino, Japanese, and Korean origin had similar clinical characteristics compared to white women. Asian-American women had higher 36- and 60-month survival rates (P = .004 and P = .013, respectively), higher overall survival rates (P = .049), and longer overall survival durations after adjusting for age and other covariates (hazard ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.68-0.86). Overall survival differed across age strata between the two racial groups. With the exception of women of Japanese or Korean origin, Asian-American women grouped by geographic origin had better overall survival than white women. Although Asian-American women, except those of Japanese or Korean origin, had better overall survival than white women, their older age at cervical cancer diagnosis suggests that they have less access to screening programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Disparities in cervical cancer survival among Asian American women

    PubMed Central

    Nghiem, Van T.; Davies, Kalatu R.; Chan, Wenyaw; Mulla, Zuber D.; Cantor, Scott B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We compared overall survival and influencing factors between Asian American women as a whole and by subgroup with white women with cervical cancer. Methods Cervical cancer data were from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry; socioeconomic information was from the Area Health Resource File. We used standard tests to compare characteristics between groups; the Kaplan-Meier method with log-rank test to assess overall survival and compare it between groups; and Cox proportional hazards models to determine the effect of race and other covariates on overall survival (with/without age-stratification). Results Being 3.3 years older than white women at diagnosis (p<0.001), Asian American women were more likely to be in a spousal relationship, had more progressive disease, and were better off socioeconomically. Women of Filipino, Japanese, and Korean origin had similar clinical characteristics compared with white women. Asian American women had higher 36- and 60-month survival rates (p=0.004 and p=0.013, respectively), higher overall survival rates (p=0.049), and longer overall survival durations after adjusting for age and other covariates (hazard ratio=0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.68–0.86). Overall survival differed across age strata between the two racial groups. With the exception of women of Japanese or Korean origin, Asian American women grouped by geographic origin had better overall survival than white women. Conclusions Although Asian American women, except those of Japanese or Korean origin, had better overall survival than white women, their older age at cervical cancer diagnosis suggests that they have less access to screening programs. PMID:26552330

  8. The Impact of Racial Identity, Ethnic Identity, Asian Values, and Race-Related Stress on Asian Americans and Asian International College Students' Psychological Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwamoto, Derek Kenji; Liu, William Ming

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the direct and moderating effects of racial identity, ethnic identity, Asian values, and race-related stress on positive psychological well-being among 402 Asian American and Asian international college students. Results revealed that the racial identity statuses Internalization, Immersion-Emersion, Dissonance, Asian…

  9. The Impact of Racial Identity, Ethnic Identity, Asian Values, and Race-Related Stress on Asian Americans and Asian International College Students' Psychological Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwamoto, Derek Kenji; Liu, William Ming

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the direct and moderating effects of racial identity, ethnic identity, Asian values, and race-related stress on positive psychological well-being among 402 Asian American and Asian international college students. Results revealed that the racial identity statuses Internalization, Immersion-Emersion, Dissonance, Asian…

  10. Contributions of Black Americans, Indian Americans, Mexican Americans and Asian Americans to American History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Clara County Office of Education, San Jose, CA.

    The teacher resource guide for grades K through 12 was developed by a multi ethnic committee of educators to comply with the California Education code. "Instruction in the social sciences shall include the early history of California and a study of the role and contributions of American Negroes, American Indians, Mexicans, and other ethnic…

  11. Characteristics of gay, lesbian, and bisexual Asians, Asian Americans, and immigrants from Asia to the USA.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Douglas C; Yi, Huso

    2004-01-01

    An exploratory study of self-identified lesbian, gay, and bisexual Asians and Asian Americans surveyed respondents (60 women and 254 men) using a questionnaire in four languages from nineteen different sources in Korea, Japan, China, and the US. Respondents were compared in terms of country of residence, whether they immigrated to the US, having a same-sex lover, living with the lover, being open about their sexual orientation to the family, and age. Respondents in the US were generally more open about their sexual orientation. Openness to the family was related to other variables suggesting an affirmative lesbian, gay, or bisexual identity.

  12. Generational Status and Family Cohesion Effects on the Receipt of Mental Health Services Among Asian Americans: Findings From the National Latino and Asian American Study

    PubMed Central

    Holck, Peter; Gee, Gilbert C.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated the relative strengths of generational status and family cohesion effects on current use of mental health services (past 12 months) among Asian Americans. Methods. We conducted a secondary data analysis with data from the National Latino and Asian American Study, 2002 to 2003, restricted to Asian American respondents (n = 2087). The study's outcome was current use (past 12 months) of any mental health services. Respondents included Chinese, Filipino, Vietnamese, and other Asian Americans. Results. Multivariate analyses suggest no significant interaction exists between second- versus first-generation Asian Americans and family cohesion. The impact of generational status on mental health service use was significant for third- or later-generation Asian Americans (versus first-generation Asian Americans) and varied with family cohesion score. Conclusions. Family cohesion and generational status both affect the likelihood of Asian Americans to seek mental health services. Our findings also highlight the need for primary care and other providers to consistently screen for mental health status particularly among first-generation Asian Americans. Mental health service programs should target recent immigrants and individuals lacking a strong family support system. PMID:19910344

  13. An Annotated Bibliography: Recent Realistic Fiction and Informational Books for Young Children Portraying Asian-American and Native American Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Frances A.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of recent realistic fiction and informational books for young children portraying Asian American and Native American cultures. Lists 23 fiction and 8 informational books on Asian Americans and 19 fiction and 15 informational books on Native Americans. Lists nine books for adults. (SLD)

  14. An Annotated Bibliography: Recent Realistic Fiction and Informational Books for Young Children Portraying Asian-American and Native American Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Frances A.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of recent realistic fiction and informational books for young children portraying Asian American and Native American cultures. Lists 23 fiction and 8 informational books on Asian Americans and 19 fiction and 15 informational books on Native Americans. Lists nine books for adults. (SLD)

  15. Obesity and asian americans in the United States: systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sanggon

    2013-08-01

    Obesity is one of the most serious health problems in the world today. Asian Americans are usually less overweight and obese than African Americans and Hispanic Americans, but the rate of obesity in Asian Americans is still increasing, especially in younger generations. This research examines Asian American obesity using existing research, as a means of finding the need for greater emphasis on Asian American obesity intervention research. In this research literature review, Asian American obesity using existing research as a means of finding the need for greater emphasis on Asian American obesity intervention research is examined. A systematic review is done in order to find Asian American obesity research, due to the minimal amount of existing studies. In total, there were only nine papers which were not duplicates and which still met the criteria for inclusion, from an initial 106 papers. There is very little research on obesity in Asian Americans. Although the rate of obesity among Asian Americans is increasing, there are few related articles, projects, and surveys, and there is little information. There is a need for more specific and in-depth analysis of Asian American obesity. Asian Americans are associated with a lower waist circumference (WC) and BMI, while Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders are associated with a higher WC and BMI. Typically, Asian Americans who were born in the United States (US) tend to be overweight and more obese than those born in foreign countries. Based on this literature review, it is concluded that there is a shortage of Asian American obesity research, even though there is an evident need for particular obesity intervention programs that target Asian Americans.

  16. Asian Americans: A Study Guide and Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Lynn P.

    One in a series of four, this volume deals with the themes of identity, conflict, and integration/nationalism with a focus on Chinese and Japanese immigrants and their descendants in mainland America. Hawaiian Americans are treated incidentally. Each volume in the series can serve in itself as a text or guide for the student or teacher of a…

  17. Asian-American Education: Prospects and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Clara C., Ed.; Chi, Marilyn Mei-Ying, Ed.

    This book provides teachers with information about the educational needs of Cambodian, Chinese, Filipino, Hmong, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese-American children in U.S. public schools. For each group, there are two chapters: one sociocultural and one linguistic. Each documents the unique characteristics of each ethnic group and provides…

  18. Asian-American Education: Prospects and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Clara C., Ed.; Chi, Marilyn Mei-Ying, Ed.

    This book provides teachers with information about the educational needs of Cambodian, Chinese, Filipino, Hmong, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese-American children in U.S. public schools. For each group, there are two chapters: one sociocultural and one linguistic. Each documents the unique characteristics of each ethnic group and provides…

  19. How To Avoid Dead End in Your Career: An Asian American Perspective, and Library Services for the Asian American Community. Papers of the 1987 Program of the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (San Francisco, California, June 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karkhanis, Sharad, Ed.

    Three of the four papers in this collection focus on reasons why many Asian Americans end up in dead-end jobs and suggest ways of avoiding this situation. In "Views of an Educator," Nasser Sharify provides insights from an educators' perspective about finding and maintaining a successful career, and recommends that Asian-Americans pursue careers…

  20. A 16-year examination of domestic violence among Asians and Asian Americans in the empirical knowledge base: a content analysis.

    PubMed

    Yick, Alice G; Oomen-Early, Jody

    2008-08-01

    Until recently, research studies have implied that domestic violence does not affect Asian American and immigrant communities, or even Asians abroad, because ethnicity or culture has not been addressed. In this content analysis, the authors examined trends in publications in leading scholarly journals on violence relating to Asian women and domestic violence. A coding schema was developed, with two raters coding the data with high interrater reliability. Sixty articles were published over the 16 years studied, most atheoretical and focusing on individual levels of analysis. The terms used in discussing domestic violence reflected a feminist perspective. Three quarters of the studies were empirical, with most guided by logical positivism using quantitative designs. Most targeted specific Asian subgroups (almost a third focused on Asian Indians) rather than categorizing Asians as a general ethnic category. The concept of "Asian culture" was most often assessed by discussing Asian family structure. Future research is discussed in light of the findings.

  1. Psychotic disorders in Asian Americans and DSM-5.

    PubMed

    Pandurangi, Anand K

    2014-02-01

    The DSM-5 lists 13 psychotic disorders and introduces modest but significant changes in their diagnosis. Asian Americans bring unique issues to the assessment, diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. They may exhibit greater prevalence of culturally influenced psychosis-like experiences that may or may not constitute a pathological condition such as psychosis risk syndrome or attenuated psychosis. Acute psychotic disorders with good prognosis may be more prevalent in Asians and may sometimes be misdiagnosed as schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Catatonic disorders are also more prevalent in Asians, and are likely to receive more appropriate labeling with DSM-5. The expanded cultural formulation in DSM-5 is a progressive step but its benefits might be limited by lack of culturally trained clinicians and/or limited time for assessment. There is a dearth of systematic data on psychotic disorders in Asian Americans and it is hoped that the DSM-5 will stimulate this much needed research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Gender, ethnic identity, and environmental concern in Asian Americans and European Americans

    Treesearch

    Shawn M. Burn; Patricia L. Winter; Brittany Hori; N Clayton. Silver

    2012-01-01

    There are relatively few articles in sociology and psychology on gender, ethnicity, and the environment, yet ethnic and gender neutral approaches to sustainability may be incomplete. We studied gender, ethnicity, and environmental concern with an internet sample of Asian American women (n=157) and men (n=69), and European American women (n=222) and men (n=99)....

  3. An Empirical Examination of Inter-Ethnic Stereotypes: Comparing Asian American and African American Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Jackie; Carr-Ruffino, Norma; Ivancevich, John M.; Lownes-Jackson, Millicent

    2003-01-01

    Undergraduates (n=127) read career histories (including photographs) of fictitious employees in a 2x2x2 design depicting job type (engineer/human resources), ethnicity (Asian or African American), and gender, with the same qualifications and performance information. African-American males were rated most negatively on work characteristics;…

  4. Exposure to Community Violence and Adolescents' Internalizing Behaviors among African American and Asian American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Wan-Yi

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to community violence can seriously threaten healthy adolescent development. This longitudinal study examines the relationship between exposure to violence in the community and the internalizing behaviors of Asian American and African American adolescents. Data analyzed was from 901 adolescents (57.9% female and 42.1% male, and 84.7%…

  5. Parenting within Cultural Context: Comparisons between African-American and Asian-American Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Fang; Qi, Sen

    2005-01-01

    Using the sub-samples drawn from the National Early Childhood Longitudinal Study: Kindergarten (ECLS-K) database, this study examines similarities and differences between African-American and Asian-American parents in their parenting practice (i.e., parental involvement at home, expectations of child, emotional expressiveness, school involvement,…

  6. Normative Changes in Ethnic and American Identities and Links with Adjustment among Asian American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiang, Lisa; Witkow, Melissa R.; Champagne, Mariette C.

    2013-01-01

    Identity development is a highly salient task for adolescents, especially those from immigrant backgrounds, yet longitudinal research that tracks simultaneous change in ethnic identity and American identity over time has been limited. With a focus on 177 Asian American adolescents recruited from an emerging immigrant community, in the current…

  7. An Empirical Examination of Inter-Ethnic Stereotypes: Comparing Asian American and African American Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Jackie; Carr-Ruffino, Norma; Ivancevich, John M.; Lownes-Jackson, Millicent

    2003-01-01

    Undergraduates (n=127) read career histories (including photographs) of fictitious employees in a 2x2x2 design depicting job type (engineer/human resources), ethnicity (Asian or African American), and gender, with the same qualifications and performance information. African-American males were rated most negatively on work characteristics;…

  8. A Model Minority? The Misrepresentation and Underrepresentation of Asian Pacific Americans in Introductory American Government Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takeda, Okiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Asian Pacific Americans are a racial group that is often viewed in stereotypes, most notably, as a "model minority"--a view that this group is naturally hardworking and successful unlike "other" racial and ethnic groups. Quite often, they are also neglected as U.S. citizens, whose presence and influence in American politics are…

  9. Constructivism and Career Decision Self-Efficacy for Asian Americans and African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grier-Reed, Tabitha; Ganuza, Zoila M.

    2011-01-01

    Career development that adequately addresses the needs of multicultural students is important. The authors explored whether a constructivist career course might be a viable mechanism for improving career decision self-efficacy for 81 Asian American and African American college students. Results indicated significant increases in all 5 elements of…

  10. A Model Minority? The Misrepresentation and Underrepresentation of Asian Pacific Americans in Introductory American Government Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takeda, Okiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Asian Pacific Americans are a racial group that is often viewed in stereotypes, most notably, as a "model minority"--a view that this group is naturally hardworking and successful unlike "other" racial and ethnic groups. Quite often, they are also neglected as U.S. citizens, whose presence and influence in American politics are…

  11. Normative Changes in Ethnic and American Identities and Links with Adjustment among Asian American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiang, Lisa; Witkow, Melissa R.; Champagne, Mariette C.

    2013-01-01

    Identity development is a highly salient task for adolescents, especially those from immigrant backgrounds, yet longitudinal research that tracks simultaneous change in ethnic identity and American identity over time has been limited. With a focus on 177 Asian American adolescents recruited from an emerging immigrant community, in the current…

  12. Atypical Antipsychotic Usage Among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

    PubMed Central

    Goebert, Deborah; Else, Iwalani; Carlton, Barry; Matsu, Courtenay; Guerrero, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown significant ethnic differences in prescribing patterns of two or more antipsychotics. This study examined changes in atypical and typical antipsychotic prescriptions among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Five hundred consecutive charts were reviewed for antipsychotics at the time of admission and discharge from each of two inpatient psychiatric facilities in Hawai‘i. Multiple antipsychotic prescription rates were 9% at intake and 6% at discharge. For the ethnic groups studied, there were no statistically significant differences by patient ethnicity regarding antipsychotics at intake (χ2 = 29.2, df = 21, P = .110) or discharge (χ2 = 20.5, df = 24, P = .667). There were no significant differences in prescription and polypharmacy patterns among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders ethnic groups in this study. PMID:25285256

  13. Developmental Contexts and Mental Disorders Among Asian Americans

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, David T.; Hong, Seunghye; Gile, Krista; Alegría, Margarita

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we use age of immigration as a proxy for the developmental context for understanding the association between immigration experiences and mental health. Generation defines the context under which immigrants arrive in the United States. We drew data from the National Latino and Asian American Study (N = 2,095), the first ever study conducted on the mental health of a national sample of Asian Americans. Our findings reveal that age of immigration is linked to lifetime and 12-month rates of psychiatric disorder: Immigrants who arrive earlier in life are more likely to have both lifetime and 12-month disorders. U.S. born and immigrants who arrive as children are much more likely to have a mental disorder in their lifetimes than other immigrant generations. PMID:20150976

  14. Desi Women on the Forty Acres: Exploring Intergenerational Issues and Identity Development of South Asian American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruzicka, Smita Sundaresan

    2011-01-01

    South Asian Americans are one of the fastest growing sub-groups within the Asian American population in the United States today. Between 1960 and 1990, the South Asian American population witnessed an increase of approximately 900% (Leonard, 1997). This increase in population also corresponds with the increase in South Asian American students…

  15. Desi Women on the Forty Acres: Exploring Intergenerational Issues and Identity Development of South Asian American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruzicka, Smita Sundaresan

    2011-01-01

    South Asian Americans are one of the fastest growing sub-groups within the Asian American population in the United States today. Between 1960 and 1990, the South Asian American population witnessed an increase of approximately 900% (Leonard, 1997). This increase in population also corresponds with the increase in South Asian American students…

  16. Acculturation and weight change in Asian-American children: Evidence from the ECLS-K:2011

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Despite relatively low rates of overweight and obesity among Asian-American children, disparities exist based on acculturation, socioeconomic status, and Asian ethnicity. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between acculturation and weight change in Asian-American children. Seco...

  17. Asians in the Ivory Tower: Dilemmas of Racial Inequality in American Higher Education. Multicultural Education Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teranishi, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Highly respected scholar Robert Teranishi draws on his vast research to present this timely and compelling examination of the experience of Asian Americans in higher education. "Asians in the Ivory Tower" explores why and how Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) are important to our nation's higher education priorities and places the…

  18. Asian Indian American Students: Attitudinal Motivation to Seek Mental Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nair, Rejitha; Harman, Marsha J.; Kordinak, S. Thomas; Bruce, A. Jerry

    2007-01-01

    Help seeking attitudes and acculturation of Asian Indian Americans were examined in a sample consisted of 69 Asian Indian American students. Participants completed a demographic questionnaire, the Suinn-Lew Asian Self-Identity Acculturation Scale and the Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help Scale. There were no significant…

  19. Trends in Asian American racial/ethnic intermarriage: a comparison of 1980 and 1990 census data.

    PubMed

    Lee, S M; Fernandez, M

    1998-01-01

    "In this paper, we use data from the 1990 [U.S.] census to compare patterns of Asian American intermarriage with those reported by Lee and Yamanaka (1990).... Our main findings show that: (i) the overall outmarriage rate has declined; (ii) Asian American inter-ethnic marriages (that is, marriages between two Asian Americans of different Asian ethnicities) have increased; and (iii) social distance, measured by an Index of Intermarriage Distance, between Asian Americans and other racial and ethnic groups has widened. We conclude by discussing some implications of the findings for the role of racial and ethnic intermarriage as an indicator of intergroup relations."

  20. Asian Pacific American Medical Students: Beyond the 'golden stethoscope'

    PubMed

    Li, B U.K.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE PAPER: The purpose of this paper is to present a keynote address given in 1995 immediately prior to the formal inauguration of the Asian Pacific American Medical Student Association (APAMSA) in New York. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Asian Pacific American (APA) medical students have increased ten­fold as a percentage of the entering class from 1975­1995 to its current level of 18.2%. The recent history of the APA medical student movement is traced from its inception in regional conferences in 1993 to the formation of a national electronic mail bulletin board ("AAMSnet") in 1994, and its culmination in the first national conference and inauguration of the Asian Pacific AMerican Medical Student Association (APAMSA) at New York University in 1995. CONCLUSIONS: Although the "golden stethoscope" image is used to represent the pinnacle for APA students entering the medical profession, beneath the image lie difficult challenges specific to APAs including those of family and culture, academic performance, professional acceptance, and community responsibility. The potential of the APAMSA organization to address local, regional, and national APA health issues is explored.

  1. What are Asian-American youth consuming? A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Diep, Cassandra S; Foster, Margaret J; McKyer, E Lisako J; Goodson, Patricia; Guidry, Jeffrey J; Liew, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Numerous studies have explored dietary practices among children, but there are limited studies on children of Asian background in the US. This review had three aims: (a) review literature regarding Asian-American youth's dietary behaviors, (b) critically evaluate the methodological quality of such research, and (c) provide recommendations for future nutrition-related research on Asian-American youth. The authors conducted a systematic literature review through MEDLINE (EBSCO), CINAHL Plus with Full Text (EBSCO), and Embase (Ovid); extracted descriptive data; and evaluated methodological quality. Thirteen articles were included. Major findings included: (a) frequent consumption of milk, fruit, meat, unenriched white rice, vegetables, and high-fat and high-sugar items among Asian-American children and (b) acculturation's influences on diet, resulting in Asian-American youth consuming diets characterized by both Asian and American foods. Findings from this review may inform education and promotion programs and services for Asian Americans in the US.

  2. Binge drinking and alcohol-related problems among U.S.-born Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Derek; Takamatsu, Stephanie; Castellanos, Jeanett

    2012-07-01

    Binge drinking (five drinks or more in a 2-h sitting for men or four or more drinks in a 2-h sitting for women) and alcohol-related problems are a growing problem among Asian American young adults. The current study examines the sociocultural (i.e., generational status and ethnic identity) determinants of binge drinking and alcohol-related problems across U.S.-born, young-adult, Asian American ethnic groups. Data were collected from 1,575 Asian American undergraduates from a public university in Southern California. Chinese Americans consisted of the largest Asian ethnicity in the study, followed by Vietnamese, Filipino, Korean, South Asian, Japanese, Multi-Asian, and "other Asian American." Participants completed a web-based assessment of binge drinking, alcohol-related problems, ethnic identity, descriptive norms (i.e., perceived peer drinking norms), and demographic information. An analysis of variance was used to determine potential gender and ethnic differences in binge drinking and alcohol-related problems. Negative binomial regression was selected to examine the relationship between the predictors and outcomes in our model. There were no gender differences between Asian American men and women in regards to binge drinking; however, men reported more alcohol-related problems. Japanese Americans reported the highest number of binge-drinking episodes and alcohol-related problems, followed by Filipino and Multi-Asian Americans (e.g., Chinese and Korean). Living off-campus; higher scores in descriptive norms; Greek status; and belonging to the ethnic groups Japanese, Filipino, Multi-Asian, Korean, and South Asian increased the risk of engaging in binge drinking. Quantity of alcohol consumed, Greek status, gender, Filipino, South Asian, other Asian, and lower ethnic identity scores were related to alcohol-related problems. Using one of the largest samples collected to date on sociocultural determinants and drinking among U.S.-born Asian American young adults, the

  3. Social Anxiety and Mental Health Service Use Among Asian American High School Students.

    PubMed

    Brice, Chad; Masia Warner, Carrie; Okazaki, Sumie; Ma, Pei-Wen Winnie; Sanchez, Amanda; Esseling, Petra; Lynch, Chelsea

    2015-10-01

    Asian American adults endorse more symptoms of social anxiety (SA) on self-report measures than European Americans, but demonstrate lower prevalence rates of SA disorder in epidemiological studies. These divergent results create ambiguity concerning the mental health needs of Asian Americans. The present study is the first to investigate this issue in adolescents through assessment of self-reported SA in Asian American high school students. Parent and self-ratings of impairment related to SA and self-reported mental health service use for SA were also measured. Asian American students endorsed a greater number of SA symptoms and scored in the clinical range more frequently than other ethnic groups. Also, Asian American and Latino students endorsed more school impairment related to SA than other ethnic groups. No differences in parent-reported impairment or service utilization were identified. Implications for future research and treatment for SA among Asian American adolescents are discussed.

  4. Social anxiety and mental health service use among Asian American high school students

    PubMed Central

    Brice, Chad; Warner, Carrie Masia; Okazaki, Sumie; Ma, Pei-Wen Winnie; Sanchez, Amanda; Esseling, Petra; Lynch, Chelsea

    2014-01-01

    Asian American adults endorse more symptoms of social anxiety (SA) on self-report measures than European Americans, but demonstrate lower prevalence rates of social anxiety disorder in epidemiological studies. These divergent results create ambiguity concerning the mental health needs of Asian Americans. The present study is the first to investigate this issue in adolescents through assessment of self-reported SA in Asian American high school students. Parent and self-ratings of impairment related to SA and self-reported mental health service use for SA were also measured. Asian American students endorsed a greater number of SA symptoms and scored in the clinical range more frequently than other ethnic groups. Also, Asian American and Latino students endorsed more school impairment related to SA than other ethnic groups. No differences in parent-reported impairment or service utilization were identified. Implications for future research and treatment for SA among Asian American adolescents are discussed. PMID:25300193

  5. Asian values and perceptions of intergenerational family conflict among Asian American students.

    PubMed

    Tsai-Chae, Amy H; Nagata, Donna K

    2008-07-01

    This investigation explores the perceptions of intergenerational family conflict among 93 Asian American college students from immigrant families in relation to reported discrepancies in Asian values with their parents, behavioral acculturation, gender, and ethnicity (Chinese and Korean). The study is unique in its examination of parent gender and specific dimensions of Asian values as predictors of perceived parent-child conflict. The findings indicated that as discrepancies in Asian values with either parent increased, reports of parent-child conflict also increased. Values discrepancies, but not behavioral acculturation, were significantly associated with perceived family conflicts. Independent hierarchical regression models revealed a significant association between conflict ratings and values discrepancies with mothers on the dimension of Conforming to Family Norms, and with fathers on the dimension of Education/Career Issues. However, interaction effects within a combined model to test beta coefficients differences between parents were not significant. Results also suggest that intergenerational conflict may be associated with discrepancy on Respecting Elders. Implications and limitations of these findings are discussed. Copyright (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Participation of Asian-American women in cancer treatment research: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tung T; Somkin, Carol P; Ma, Yifei; Fung, Lei-Chun; Nguyen, Thoa

    2005-01-01

    Few Asian-American women participate in cancer treatment trials. In a pilot study to assess barriers to participation, we mailed surveys to 132 oncologists and interviewed 19 Asian-American women with cancer from Northern California. Forty-four oncologists responded. They reported as barriers language problems, lack of culturally relevant cancer information, and complex protocols. Most stated that they informed Asian-American women about treatment trials. Only four women interviewed knew about trials. Other patient-identified barriers were fear of side effects, language problems, competing needs, and fear of experimentation. Family decision making was a barrier for both oncologists and patients. Compared to non-Asian oncologists, more Asian oncologists have referred Asian-American women to industry trials and identified barriers similar to patients' reports. Our findings indicate that Asian-American women need to be informed about cancer treatment trials, linguistic barriers should be addressed, and future research should evaluate cultural barriers such as family decision making.

  7. The East Asian Jet Stream and Asian-Pacific-American Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Song; Lau, K.-M.; Kim, K.-M.

    2000-01-01

    The upper-tropospheric westerly jet stream over subtropical East Asia and western Pacific, often referred to as East Asian Jet (EAJ), is an important atmospheric circulation system in the Asian-Pacific-American (APA) region during winter. It is characterized by variabilities on a wide range of time scales and exerts a strong impact on the weather and climate of the region. On the synoptic scale, the jet stream is closely linked to many phenomena such as cyclogenesis, frontogenesis, blocking, storm track activity, and the development of other atmospheric disturbances. On the seasonal time scale, the variation of the EAJ determines many characteristics of the seasonal transition of the atmospheric circulation especially over East Asia. The variabilities of the EAJ on these time scales have been relatively well documented. It has also been understood since decades ago that the interannual. variability of the EAJ is associated with many climate signals in the APA region. These signals include the persistent anomalies of the East Asian winter monsoon and the changes in diabatic heating and in the Hadley circulation. However, many questions remain for the year-to-year variabilities of the EAJ and their relation to the APA climate. For example, what is the relationship between the EAJ and El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO)? Will the EAJ and ENSO play different roles in modulating the APA climate? How is the jet stream linked to the non-ENSO-related sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies and to the Pacific/North American (PNA) teleconnection pattern?

  8. Implicit bicultural identity among Mexican American and Asian American college students.

    PubMed

    Devos, Thierry

    2006-07-01

    Contemporary research on ethnic identity, acculturation, and cultural orientation suggests that, at least under some circumstances, individuals can successfully internalize or identify with more than one culture. Previous research on multicultural identity has relied almost exclusively on self-report measures. Using the Implicit Association Test (IAT), the present research examined to what extent Mexican American and Asian American college students identified with American culture and with their culture of origin. Results indicated that Mexican American and Asian American participants strongly and equally identified with both cultures. The present research provides firm evidence for a bicultural identity through assessments of thoughts that cannot be consciously controlled. Patterns of bicultural identification obtained on implicit measures were not the product of deliberate responses to normative demands or conscious attempts to convey a particular self-image.

  9. Differences between white Americans and Asian Americans for social responsibility, individual right and intentions regarding organ donation.

    PubMed

    Hee Sun Park; Yoon Sook Shin; Yun, Doshik

    2009-07-01

    This study examined factors affecting intention to enroll in an organ donor registry and intention to talk to family about organ donation. Participants indicated their views about maintaining body integrity as an individual right and donating organs as a social responsibility. Results showed that the influence of social responsibility on intention to enroll was stronger for white Americans than for Asian Americans. Individual right was negatively associated with intention to enroll among Asian Americans, but not among white Americans. Social responsibility was significant for intention to talk among both white Americans and Asian Americans, but individual right was not significant.

  10. The effects of being born in the United States on the job satisfaction of Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Weaver, C N

    2000-08-01

    Analysis of the responses of Asian American (n = 178), African American (n = 1,026), and European American (n = 8,118) full-time workers to 21 nationwide surveys representative of the U.S. labor force from 1972 through 1996 showed the job satisfaction of Asian Americans compared to that of the other two groups was affected by whether subjects were born in the United States. In addition, there were no gender differences in job satisfaction among African Americans and European Americans who were and were not born in the U.S., but there were such differences among Asian Americans.

  11. Association between asthma and obesity among immigrant Asian Americans, California Health Interview Survey, 2001-2011.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Benjamin J; Scroggins, Christy M; Becerra, Monideepa B

    2014-11-26

    Our objective was to study the comorbidity of asthma and obesity among foreign-born Asian Americans, by subgroups. Public data from the California Health Interview Survey, 2001-2011, were analyzed by using independent logistic regressions, yielding the association between asthma and obesity (Asian and standard cutoffs for body mass index [BMIs]) of 19,841 Asian American immigrant respondents. Chinese, Filipino, South Asian, and Japanese immigrants had a positive association between lifetime asthma and obesity, whereas among Korean immigrants, a positive association was found between lifetime asthma and overweight status (standard BMI cutoffs). Routine screening for this comorbidity is warranted among immigrant Asian Americans.

  12. The Impact of Racial Identity, Ethnic Identity, Asian Values and Race-Related Stress on Asian Americans and Asian International College Students’ Psychological Well-Being

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Derek Kenji; Liu, William Ming

    2010-01-01

    The current study investigated the direct and moderating effects of racial identity, ethnic identity, Asian values, and race-related stress on positive psychological well-being among 402 Asian American and Asian international college students. Results revealed that the racial identity statuses Internalization, Immersion-Emersion, Dissonance, Asian values and Ethnic Identity Affirmation and Belonging were significant predictors of well-being. Asian values, Dissonance and Conformity were found to moderate the relationship between race-related stress on well-being. Specifically, individuals in low race-related stress conditions who had low Asian values, high Conformity and low Dissonance attitudes started high on well being but decreased as race-related stress increased. These findings underscore the importance of how racial identity statuses, Asian values and ethnic identity jointly and uniquely explain and moderate the effects of race-related stress on positive well-being. Implications for future research and clinical practice are discussed. PMID:20396592

  13. The impact of racial identity, ethnic identity, asian values and race-related stress on Asian Americans and Asian international college students' psychological well-being.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Derek Kenji; Liu, William Ming

    2010-01-01

    The current study investigated the direct and moderating effects of racial identity, ethnic identity, Asian values, and race-related stress on positive psychological well-being among 402 Asian American and Asian international college students. Results revealed that the racial identity statuses Internalization, Immersion-Emersion, Dissonance, Asian values and Ethnic Identity Affirmation and Belonging were significant predictors of well-being. Asian values, Dissonance and Conformity were found to moderate the relationship between race-related stress on well-being. Specifically, individuals in low race-related stress conditions who had low Asian values, high Conformity and low Dissonance attitudes started high on well being but decreased as race-related stress increased. These findings underscore the importance of how racial identity statuses, Asian values and ethnic identity jointly and uniquely explain and moderate the effects of race-related stress on positive well-being. Implications for future research and clinical practice are discussed.

  14. Place of origin and violent disagreement among Asian American families: analysis across five States.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jong-Yi; Probst, Janice C; Moore, Charity G; Martin, Amy B; Bennett, Kevin J

    2011-08-01

    We examined the prevalence of and factors associated with violent and heated disagreements in the Asian American families, with an emphasis on place of birth differences between parent and child. Data were obtained from the 2003 National Survey of Children's Health, limited to five states with the highest concentration of Asian-Americans (n = 793). Multivariable analysis used generalized logistic regression models with a three-level outcome, violent and heated disagreement versus calm discussion. Violent disagreements were reported in 13.7% of Asian-American homes and 9.9% of white homes. Differential parent-child place of birth was associated with increased odds for heated disagreement in Asian-American families. Parenting stress increased the likelihood of violent disagreements in both Asian-American and white families. Asian-American families are not immune to potential family violence. Reducing parenting stress and intervening in culturally appropriate ways to reduce generation differences should be violence prevention priorities.

  15. Asian Americans' family cohesion and suicide ideation: moderating and mediating effects.

    PubMed

    Joel Wong, Y; Uhm, Soo Yun; Li, Peiwei

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between family cohesion and suicide ideation in a national, adult community sample of Asian Americans (N=2072). The data for this study were drawn from the National Latino and Asian American Study, the first national epidemiological study of Asian Americans' mental health. The results indicate that family cohesion was negatively related to suicide ideation. In addition, English language proficiency moderated the relationship between family cohesion and suicide ideation. Family cohesion was related to lower odds of suicide ideation among low English proficiency Asian Americans. In contrast, family cohesion was not significantly related to suicide ideation among high English proficiency Asian Americans. Further, the findings are consistent with a model in which the relationship between family cohesion and suicide ideation was partially mediated by psychological distress. Practical implications for addressing suicide ideation among Asian Americans are discussed.

  16. American Heart Association's Ideal Cardiovascular Health Metrics in Under-Represented Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Freda; Zhang, Guo; Davey, Adam; Tan, Yin; Ma, Grace X

    2016-12-01

    The American Heart Association's ideal cardiovascular health score is based on 7 cardiovascular health metrics to measure progress toward their Impact Goal of reducing cardiovascular disease by 20 % before 2020. This study applied this construct to assess cardiovascular health in a sample of Asian Americans. Convenience sampling methods were used to enroll self-identified Asian American's over the age of 18 years who were attending community health fairs across the greater Philadelphia and urban areas of New Jersey. The heart health metrics of tobacco use, body mass index, physical activity, diet, blood pressure, and glucose were measured. In the greater sample (N = 541), 82 % were female, the mean age was 65.1 (SD = 15.5) years, 45 % were Vietnamese, 38 % were Chinese and 17 % were Korean. Prevalence of ideal heart health for the metrics of tobacco use (95 %) was high. Only 19.4 % achieved ideal levels of physical activity, 35.1 % for BMI, 28.9 % for glucose and 66 % for blood pressure. Dietary intake was ideal for 20.7 % of the sample. More years since migration and Korean race trended toward having a higher prevalence of poor health in some metrics. Most Asian Americans are not achieving ideal cardiovascular health for several of the metrics evaluated, with those residing in the United States for more than 13 years and Korean Americans being higher-risk groups. Targeted community based intervention approaches to improving and monitoring heart health in Asian American, and Asian American subgroups, are needed.

  17. Differences in somatic mutation landscape of hepatocellular carcinoma in Asian American and European American populations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qiang; Yan, Li; Liu, Biao; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Wang, Jianmin; Liu, Song

    2016-01-01

    The incidence rate of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is higher in populations of Asian ancestry than European ancestry (EA). We sought to investigate HCC mutational differences between the two populations, which may reflect differences in the prevalence of etiological factors. We compared HCC somatic mutations in patients of self-reported Asian American and EA from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), and assessed associations of tumor mutations with established HCC risk factors. Although the average mutation burden was similar, TP53 and RB1 were mutated at a much higher frequency in Asian Americans than in EAs (TP53: 43% vs. 21%; RB1: 19% vs. 2%). Three putative oncogenic genes, including TRPM3, SAGE1, and ADAMTS7, were mutated exclusively in Asians. In addition, VEGF binding pathway, a druggable target by tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as sorafenib, was mutated at a higher frequency among Asians (13% vs. 2%); while the negative regulation of IL17 production, involved in inflammation and autoimmunity, was mutated only in EAs (12% vs. 0). Accounting for HCC risk factors had little impact on any of the mutational differences. In conclusion, we demonstrated here mutational differences in important cancer genes and pathways between Asian and European ancestries. These differences may have implications for the prevention and treatment of HCC. PMID:27246981

  18. Ethnic Differences in Suicidal Ideation and its Correlates among South Asian American Emerging Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Robert; Cheref, Soumia; Miranda, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Prior research on suicidal ideation and its correlates among South Asian American individuals has been limited. Given that South Asian American individuals are a burgeoning ethnic subgroup in the United States population, research regarding these factors is necessary to inform culturally competent suicide screening, prevention, and intervention among this increasingly prominent group. We examined depressive symptoms, hopelessness, and suicidal ideation among a sample of 204 undergraduate South Asian American (96 Bangladeshi American, 67 Asian Indian, and 41 Pakistani American) emerging adult students (66% female), ages 18 to 24 (M = 18.52, SD = 0.93). Participants completed measures of hopelessness, depressive symptoms, and suicidal ideation. Bangladeshi American ethnicity was associated with significantly lower levels of suicidal ideation than Asian Indian ethnicity. There was a non-significant trend for Pakistani American ethnicity to be associated with lower levels of suicidal ideation than Asian Indian ethnicity. Additionally, Bangladeshi American ethnicity and Pakistani American ethnicity each interacted with hopelessness, such that hopelessness was associated with lower levels of suicidal ideation among these groups than among their Asian Indian peers. Being of Asian Indian ethnicity may deleteriously influence vulnerability to suicidal ideation, while being of other South Asian American ethnicities may buffer against suicidal ideation, both independently and in interaction with hopelessness. Such contingencies should be considered during suicide screening, prevention, and intervention. PMID:27525054

  19. Asian and Pacific Islander American Poverty: The Working Poor and the Jobless Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toji, Dean S.; Johnson, James H.

    1992-01-01

    Assesses the incidence of Asian-American and Pacific Islander-American poverty, and offers a theoretical explanation for its existence. It is argued that poverty of Americans of Asian and Pacific Island descent is best understood in the context of the linkage of labor migration and U.S. labor market segmentation. (SLD)

  20. Asian American Educational Attainment and Earning Power in Post-Racial America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covarrubias, Alejandro; Liou, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    This policy brief contextualizes the most recent data on mobility of Asian American students within the K to Ph.D. educational system in the new, so-called, colorblind post-racial America. Achievement data on Asian Americans are often presented in the same breath with Whites when compared to the academic achievement of African American, and…

  1. Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (Is There Such An Ethnic Group?).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ignacio, Lemuel F.

    This introductory book on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders is written by a Pilipino American who writes with a personal point of view. The book begins with a discussion of the history of Pilipino immigration into the U.S. It describes an Asian American community in San Francisco. The growth and development of the Pilipino Organizing Committee…

  2. Asian and Pacific Islander American Poverty: The Working Poor and the Jobless Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toji, Dean S.; Johnson, James H.

    1992-01-01

    Assesses the incidence of Asian-American and Pacific Islander-American poverty, and offers a theoretical explanation for its existence. It is argued that poverty of Americans of Asian and Pacific Island descent is best understood in the context of the linkage of labor migration and U.S. labor market segmentation. (SLD)

  3. Cultural Orientation in Asian American Adolescents: Variation by Age and Ethnic Density

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ying, Yu-Wen; Han, Meekyung; Wong, Sandra L.

    2008-01-01

    The study assessed variation in cultural orientation among Asian American adolescents by age and ethnic density in the community. A total of 128 students at a public high school in Oakland, California, participated in the study. Of these early and middle adolescents, 86 were Chinese American and 42 were Southeast Asian American. They completed the…

  4. Comparing Asian- and Anglo-American Students' Motivation and Perceptions of the Learning Environment in Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Shwu-yong L.; Waxman, Hersholt C.

    A study was done to compare Asian American and Anglo American students' attitudes toward motivation, learning environment, academic self-concept, involvement, affiliation, and parent involvement in the learning of mathematics. Survey data of 1,200 Asian- and 1,200 Anglo-American middle school students were collected. A stratified sampling…

  5. Predictors of Quality of Life in Cancer Survivors: White and Asian American Women

    PubMed Central

    Im, Eun-Ok; Rendell, Marjorie O.; Chang, Sun Ju; Chee, Eunice

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the pathways through which multiple contextual factors influence the quality of life in Asian American and White women living with cancer. This is a secondary analysis of the data from 95 Asian American women and 113 White women. The data were analyzed using hierarchical multiple regression analyses and structural equation modeling. Multiple factors explained higher percent of total variances of the quality of life scores in Whites compared with that in Asian Americans. PMID:26052175

  6. Body Mass Index and Risk of Death in Asian Americans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sophia; Kitahara, Cari M.; Moore, Steven C.; Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Bernstein, Leslie; Chang, Ellen T.; Flint, Alan J.; Freedman, D. Michal; Gaziano, J. Michael; Hoover, Robert N.; Linet, Martha S.; Purdue, Mark; Robien, Kim; Schairer, Catherine; Sesso, Howard D.; White, Emily; Willcox, Bradley J.; Thun, Michael J.; Hartge, Patricia; Willett, Walter C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated the association between body mass index (BMI) and mortality among Asian Americans. Methods. We pooled data from prospective cohort studies with 20 672 Asian American adults with no baseline cancer or heart disease history. We estimated hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) with Cox proportional hazards models. Results. A high, but not low, BMI was associated with increased risk of total mortality among individuals aged 35 to 69 years. The BMI was not related to total mortality among individuals aged 70 years and older. With a BMI 22.5 to < 25 as the reference category among never-smokers aged 35 to 69 years, the hazard ratios for total mortality were 0.83 (95% CI = 0.47, 1.47) for BMI 15 to < 18.5; 0.91 (95% CI = 0.62, 1.32) for BMI 18.5 to < 20; 1.08 (95% CI = 0.86, 1.36) for BMI 20 to < 22.5; 1.14 (95% CI = 0.90, 1.44) for BMI 25 to < 27.5; 1.13 (95% CI = 0.79, 1.62) for BMI 27.5 to < 30; 1.82 (95% CI = 1.25, 2.64) for BMI 30 to < 35; and 2.09 (95% CI = 1.06, 4.11) for BMI 35 to 50. Higher BMI was also related to increased cardiovascular disease and cancer mortality. Conclusions. High BMI is associated with increased mortality risk among Asian Americans. PMID:24432919

  7. Explanatory style, family expressiveness, and self-esteem among Asian American and European American college students.

    PubMed

    Kao, E M; Nagata, D K; Peterson, C

    1997-08-01

    Fifty-nine Asian American and 40 European American college students completed questionnaires measuring explanatory style, family expressiveness, and self-esteem. In both groups, a global explanatory style correlated with low self-esteem, but only among European Americans was an internal style associated with low self-esteem. The two groups differed in reported styles of family expressiveness, with Asian Americans indicating more emotional restraint. The participants who reported more negative submissiveness had a more global explanatory style, whereas those who reported more positive dominance had a less global explanatory style. An additional measure developed to assess attribution to collectivities did not distinguish the two groups. Results were discussed in terms of the cross-cultural generality of the learned helplessness reformulation.

  8. American Heart Association’s Ideal Cardiovascular Health Metrics in Under-Represented Asian Americans

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Freda; Zhang, Guo; Davey, Adam; Tan, Yin; Ma, Grace X.

    2016-01-01

    The American Heart Association’s ideal cardiovascular health score is based on 7 cardiovascular health metrics to measure progress toward their Impact Goal of reducing cardiovascular disease by 20 % before 2020. This study applied this construct to assess cardiovascular health in a sample of Asian Americans. Convenience sampling methods were used to enroll self-identified Asian American’s over the age of 18 years who were attending community health fairs across the greater Philadelphia and urban areas of New Jersey. The heart health metrics of tobacco use, body mass index, physical activity, diet, blood pressure, and glucose were measured. In the greater sample (N = 541), 82 % were female, the mean age was 65.1 (SD = 15.5) years, 45 % were Vietnamese, 38 % were Chinese and 17 % were Korean. Prevalence of ideal heart health for the metrics of tobacco use (95 %) was high. Only 19.4 % achieved ideal levels of physical activity, 35.1 % for BMI, 28.9 % for glucose and 66 % for blood pressure. Dietary intake was ideal for 20.7 % of the sample. More years since migration and Korean race trended toward having a higher prevalence of poor health in some metrics. Most Asian Americans are not achieving ideal cardiovascular health for several of the metrics evaluated, with those residing in the United States for more than 13 years and Korean Americans being higher-risk groups. Targeted community based intervention approaches to improving and monitoring heart health in Asian American, and Asian American subgroups, are needed. PMID:27363824

  9. Use of specialty mental health services by Asian Americans with psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Le Meyer, Oanh; Zane, Nolan; Cho, Young Il; Takeuchi, David T

    2009-10-01

    Research suggests that Asian Americans underutilize mental health services but an understanding of the multiple factors involved in utilization has not been examined in a nationally representative sample. The current study analyzed data from the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS) and examined 368 individuals with disorders to understand utilization and what factors were related to the utilization of specialty mental health services. Significant underutilization was found for Asian Americans; moreover, underutilization was especially acute among Asian American immigrants. For U.S.-born Asian Americans, use of primary care services was significantly associated with use of mental health services, but for foreign-born Asian Americans, use of primary care services was unrelated to mental health services use. For both U.S.-born and foreign-born Asian Americans, use of alternative services appeared to significantly affect whether Asian Americans with disorders utilize mental health services, but the nature of the influence varied depending on the individual's level of English-language proficiency. These findings revealed that a major mental health disparity, the underutilization of mental health services by Asian Americans, was nuanced by use of other health-related services and immigration-related factors.

  10. Conflict management styles of Asian and Asian American nurses: implications for the nurse manager.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu; Davidhizar, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    Foreign nurses and American nurses who are culturally diverse make up an increasing number of the US nursing workforce. Of foreign nurses, Asians constitute the largest number. Conflict is an inevitable aspect of human relations in health care settings. Nurses and other health team members with diverse cultural background bring to the workplace different conflict behaviors that directly impact the outcomes of conflicts. It is essential for health care team members and managers to be cognizant of different conflict behaviors as well as different conflict management styles so that strategies can be designed to build a culturally diverse health care team that is able to effectively achieve group and organizational objectives.

  11. Underage drinking among Asian American and Pacific Islander adolescents.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Stephanie T; Hishinuma, Earl S; Goebert, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the prevalence of alcohol abuse and dependence rates among four major ethnic groups of Hawai'i and examined the relationship among risk factors, protective factors, and demographic variables related to underage drinking. A total of 196 students were administered the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children, the American Drug and Alcohol Survey, and the Prevention Planning Survey. Drinking rates for Native Hawaiian students were significantly higher than those for Japanese and Caucasian students. Multiple logistic regression models accounted for 49% of the variance for any alcohol use. Ethnic group differences were found when data were disaggregated for Asian and Pacific Islander students.

  12. Internet Recruitment of Asian American Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Im, Eun-Ok; Lee, Yaelim; Ji, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Jingwen; Kim, Sangmi; Chee, Eunice; Chee, Wonshik; Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Nishigaki, Masakazu; Yeo, Seon Ae; Shapira, Marilyn; Mao, Jun James

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify practical issues in Internet recruitment of racial/ethnic minorities by analyzing an Internet intervention study conducted with Asian American breast cancer survivors, and to propose directions for recruitment of racial/ethnic minorities for future Internet research. Six practical issues were identified: (a) a relatively fewer number of Internet communities/groups; (b) hindrances in establishing authenticity; (c) difficulties in gaining entrée from the webmasters or website owners of Internet communities/groups; (d) the necessity of racially/ethnically matched research team members; (e) flexibility required in recruitment strategies; and (f) strategies to overcome the low response rate. PMID:27490884

  13. The NHLBI workshop on Hypertension in Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, and Asian/Pacific Islander Americans.

    PubMed Central

    Havas, S; Fujimoto, W; Close, N; McCarter, R; Keller, J; Sherwin, R

    1996-01-01

    In June 1994, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute held a workshop entitled "Epidemiology of Hypertension in Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, and Asian/Pacific Islander Americans." The studies that served as the basis for the workshop along with a summary of two workshop panel discussions are being published as a supplement by Public Health Reports. In this article, the authors present graphs that compare results across these studies with data for non-Hispanic whites, blacks, and Hispanics from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The graphs indicate differences in mean blood pressure levels within and among these three population groups; such differences are also apparent in comparisons of these groups with the U.S. white and black populations. Although they appear modest, these differences are sufficient to result in increased mortality rates in populations with higher levels of hypertension. Environmental influences appear to underlie most of these differences. In all of these populations, blood pressure control rates are poor. Based on these studies, hypertension prevention and control programs should be undertaken. Special emphasis should be placed on the underserved minority populations that were the focus of the workshop. PMID:8837635

  14. Depression and Relational Health in Asian American and European American College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Terese J.; Chan, Pauline; Liang, Belle

    2014-01-01

    Research consistently demonstrates elevated rates of depression among college-aged women, yet evidence of racial differences in depression among this population are poorly understood. Moreover, the correlates of depression among Asian American women are also understudied. In this exploratory analysis, we examined mean differences in depression…

  15. Experiences of Discrimination among African American, Asian American, and Latino Adolescents in an Urban High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbloom, Susan Rakosi; Way, Niobe

    2004-01-01

    Interviews and participant observation are used to describe how ethnic minority students in an urban high school experience discrimination. The findings suggest critical variations among students that contributed to a hostile school environment. Asian American students discussed physical and verbal harassment by peers, while Black and Latino…

  16. Depression and Relational Health in Asian American and European American College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Terese J.; Chan, Pauline; Liang, Belle

    2014-01-01

    Research consistently demonstrates elevated rates of depression among college-aged women, yet evidence of racial differences in depression among this population are poorly understood. Moreover, the correlates of depression among Asian American women are also understudied. In this exploratory analysis, we examined mean differences in depression…

  17. Comparing Social Anxiety Between Asian Americans and European Americans: An Examination of Measurement Invariance.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Alexander; Xu, Yiyuan; Cicero, David C

    2016-06-29

    There have been over 30 studies and two meta-analyses comparing social anxiety between Asian Americans and European Americans. However, few have investigated the invariance of social anxiety measures that would make these comparisons appropriate. In the current study, we systematically examined psychometric properties and configural, metric, and scalar invariance of five social anxiety measures and four short forms that have been used more than once to compare Asian Americans (n = 232) and European Americans (n = 193). We found that four (i.e., SPS-6, SIAS-6, SPS, and SPAI-18) of the nine scales were scalar invariant, three scales (i.e., SIAS, SPAI, and B-FNES) only achieved configural invariance, and two scales (i.e., FNES and SADS) failed to achieve configural invariance. Latent mean comparisons based on the scalar invariant measures revealed higher social anxiety scores for Asian Americans than European Americans. The findings are discussed with regard to the issues and challenges when comparing social anxiety among different cultural and ethnic groups.

  18. The Psychological and Cultural Aspects of Political Participation of Asian Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jo, Moon H.

    While Asians in the United States continue to experience the discriminatory barriers that other minorities face, the myth that Asian Americans are a well-adjusted model minority has resulted in public neglect of the problems of this group. To a significant extent, the myth arises from the fact that Chinese, Japanese, and other Asian groups have…

  19. The Psychological and Cultural Aspects of Political Participation of Asian Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jo, Moon H.

    While Asians in the United States continue to experience the discriminatory barriers that other minorities face, the myth that Asian Americans are a well-adjusted model minority has resulted in public neglect of the problems of this group. To a significant extent, the myth arises from the fact that Chinese, Japanese, and other Asian groups have…

  20. Off Limits to Asian Americans? Predicting the Pursuit of Higher Education Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gin, Deborah Hearn-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Asian/Pacific Islanders (APIs) in the U.S. have experienced an increase in population, and higher education faculty, rates over the past two decades. However, a parallel increase among API higher education administrators is absent. To explore this disparity, this study surveyed all 180 Asian/Asian North American (AANA) faculty in graduate schools…

  1. Not Asian, Black or White? Reflections on South Asian American Racial Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibria, Nazli

    1996-01-01

    Examines the race ambiguity of South Asians and the risk of being socially ignored and marginalized, including that of the pan-Asian movement. It argues that recent participation of second-generation South Asians in protesting anti-Asian hate crimes and discrimination in higher education bespeak the possibilities of a pan-Asian grouping that is…

  2. Not Asian, Black or White? Reflections on South Asian American Racial Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibria, Nazli

    1996-01-01

    Examines the race ambiguity of South Asians and the risk of being socially ignored and marginalized, including that of the pan-Asian movement. It argues that recent participation of second-generation South Asians in protesting anti-Asian hate crimes and discrimination in higher education bespeak the possibilities of a pan-Asian grouping that is…

  3. Comparing American, European and Asian practice guidelines for aortic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Maria; Pascual, Isaac; Hernandez-Vaquero, Daniel; Moris, Cesar

    2017-01-01

    The aortic disease comprises a group of different pathologies of high prevalence, seriousness and ever changing by the medical and surgical investigations. Therefore cardiovascular scientific societies in USA, Europe and Asia have created Task Force on practice guidelines (PG) to develop, update and revise PG for aortic diseases. These documents issue recommendations on the diagnosis and management of different aortic diseases. The three societies agree on the recommendations about diagnostic tests and on the value of computed tomography and magnetic resonance as the main tools for the diagnosis and follow-up of aortic disease. Concerning to acute aortic syndromes (AAS), American and European GPs recognize intramural hematoma (IMH) as a type of AAS with surgery indication; however Asian guidelines consider IMH a pathological process different from AAS and indicate medical treatment. In thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA), all express the need for an adequate control of cardiovascular risk factors, emphasizing strict control of blood pressure, smoking cessation and recommend the use of beta-blockers and statins. The threshold for asymptomatic repair is 5.5 cm in European and American and 6 cm for Asian PG, with lower thresholds in Marfan and bicuspid aortic valve (BAV). As regards the abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), the PGs recognize the adequate control of cardiovascular risk factors, but there are differences in class of recommendation on statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or beta-blockers to prevent progression of AAA. For intervention, the threshold diameter in asymptomatic is 5.5 cm but can be reduced to 5 cm in women as recommended by Asian PG. Moreover the specific diseases such as Marfan, BAV, pregnancy or atherosclerosis aortic present specific recommendations with small differences between PGs. In conclusion, PGs are interesting and appropriate documents at present. They issue recommendations based on evidence that help the clinician and

  4. Validating the Riverside Acculturation Stress Inventory with Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew J; Kim, Jungeun; Benet-Martínez, Verónica

    2011-06-01

    An emerging body of empirical research highlights the impact of acculturative stress in the lives of culturally diverse populations. Therefore, to facilitate future research in this area, we conducted 3 studies to examine the psychometric properties of the Riverside Acculturation Stress Inventory (RASI; Benet-Martínez & Haritatos, 2005) and its 5 subscales in a total sample of 793 self-identified Asian American participants. The reliability and validity of RASI scores and the hypothesized 1-factor higher order model (with 1st-order factors Language Skills, Work Challenges, Intercultural Relations, Discrimination, and Cultural Isolation) of the RASI were examined in Study 1. The RASI higher order structure and score validity and reliability were examined across different generational groups in Study 2. The stability of RASI scores over a 3-week period was examined in Study 3. Overall, findings from these studies support the hypothesized structure of the RASI and indicate that this brief instrument provides reliable and valid acculturative stress scores. In addition, results suggest that RASI items are interpreted in an equivalent manner across different generations of Asian American individuals. Implications for research and assessment are discussed.

  5. Differences in Rates of Glaucoma Among Asian Americans Compared With Other Races and Among Individuals of Different Asian Ethnicities

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Joshua D.; Kim, Denise S.; Niziol, Leslie M.; Talwar, Nidhi; Nan, Bin; Musch, David C.; Richards, Julia E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the incidence and prevalence rates of different glaucoma types among Asian Americans, contrast glaucoma incidence and prevalence rates for Asian Americans with other races, and evaluate the hazard of developing glaucoma among different Asian ethnicities and other races. Design Retrospective longitudinal cohort study Participants 2,259,061 beneficiaries aged ≥40 enrolled in a large, national managed-care network in the United States (US) in 2001–2007 Methods Incidence and prevalence rates of open-angle glaucoma (OAG), narrow-angle glaucoma (NAG), and normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) were determined for the beneficiaries and stratified by race and Asian ethnicity. Cox regression analyses determined the hazard of developing OAG, NAG, and NTG for Asian Americans compared with other races and among different Asian ethnicities, with adjustment for confounding factors. Main Outcome Measures Multivariable hazard of OAG, NAG, and NTG among different races and Asian ethnicities. Results The OAG prevalence rate for Asian Americans of 6.52% was similar to that of Latinos (6.40%) and higher than that of non-Hispanic whites (5.59%). The NAG and NTG prevalence rates (3.01% and 0.73%, respectively) were considerably higher among Asian Americans compared with each of the other races. After adjustment for confounding factors, Asian Americans had a 51% increased hazard of OAG (Hazard ratio (HR)=1.51 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.42–1.60), a 123% increased hazard of NAG (HR=2.23 (95% CI 2.07–2.41), and a 159% increased hazard of NTG (HR=2.59 (95% CI 2.22–3.02) compared with non-Hispanic whites. Vietnamese Americans (HR=3.78, (95% CI 3.19–4.48), Pakistani Americans (HR=2.45, 95% CI 1.50–4.01) and Chinese Americans (HR=2.31, 95% CI 2.06–2.59) had considerably higher hazards of NAG while Japanese Americans (HR=4.37, 95% CI 3.24–5.89) had a substantially higher hazard of NTG, compared with non–Asian Americans. Conclusions Given the rapid rise in the

  6. The relationship between momentary emotions and well-being across European Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunsoo; Chentsova-Dutton, Yulia E

    2017-09-01

    Cultural differences in the emphasis on positive and negative emotions suggest that the impact of these emotions on well-being may differ across cultural contexts. The present study utilised a momentary sampling method to capture average momentary emotional experiences. We found that for participants from cultural contexts that foster positive emotions (European Americans and Hispanic Americans), average momentary positive emotions predicted well-being better than average momentary negative emotions. In contrast, average momentary negative emotions were more strongly associated with well-being measures for Asian Americans, the group from a cultural context that emphasises monitoring of negative emotions. Furthermore, we found that acculturation to American culture moderated the association between average momentary positive emotions and well-being for Asian Americans. These findings suggest the importance of culture in studying the impact of daily emotional experiences on well-being.

  7. A mediation model of professional psychological help seeking for suicide ideation among Asian American and white American college students.

    PubMed

    Wong, Joel; Brownson, Chris; Rutkowski, Leslie; Nguyen, Chi P; Becker, Marty Swanbrow

    2014-01-01

    This study examined professional psychological help seeking among 1,045 white American and Asian American students from 70 U.S. colleges and universities who had seriously considered attempting suicide. The authors found that Asian American college students had lower rates of professional psychological help seeking for their suicide ideation than White American college students. Guided by social network perspectives on professional psychological help seeking, the authors also tested mediators of this racial disparity. Relative to white Americans, Asian Americans were advised by fewer people (especially fewer family members) to seek professional help, which was, in turn, associated with lower rates of professional psychological help seeking for suicide ideation. These findings underscore the importance of gatekeeping as a suicide prevention strategy for Asian American college students.

  8. Psychiatric distress among Asian and European American survivors of the 1994 Northridge earthquake.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Madhur; Pole, Nnamdi

    2008-08-01

    Relatively few studies focus on the psychological effects of trauma exposure on Asian Americans. This article presents secondary analyses of a random survey of 118 Asian American and 762 European American survivors of the 1994 Northridge, California earthquake. Asian American participants reported more psychiatric distress and were more than twice as likely to meet caseness criteria on the Brief Symptom Inventory. Ethnic differences remained after accounting for group differences in age, immigrant status, and exposure to the earthquake. Moreover, moderator analyses showed that Asian Americans were not more sensitive to these risk factors but that ethnic differences were explained by the interaction of ethnicity and having a foreign born parent. Though more work needs to be done to understand the basis of these differences, these findings challenge model minority myths about Asian American people and draw attention to their potential need for greater mental health resources following a natural disaster.

  9. Profiles of Asian American students with LD at initial referral, assessment, and placement in special education.

    PubMed

    Poon-McBrayer, K F; García, S B

    2000-01-01

    Alhough Asian American students are underrepresented in special education, recent studies have highlighted concerns about the cultural and linguistic appropriateness of the identification and placement process. This study examined the characteristics of Asian American elementary students with learning disabilities (LD) in a school district in the Southwest that was selected because it served the largest number of Asian American students with LD in the state. Due to the small numbers of students served, the sample included all Asian American students with LD in Grades K to 5 (N = 26). Variables of interest included students' demographic characteristics, factors associated with referral, assessment practices and student profiles, and instructional recommendations for special education services. The results suggest that the experiences of Asian American students with LD are similar to those of Mexican American students with LD reported in earlier studies. These findings also reflect the challenges faced by educators in providing appropriate educational services for language minority students.

  10. Personal gambling expectancies among Asian American and White American college students.

    PubMed

    Chan, Alan Ka Ki; Zane, Nolan; Wong, Gloria M; Song, Anna V

    2015-03-01

    Many college students are involved in gambling behavior as a recreational activity. Their involvement could potentially develop into problem gambling, an issue of increasing concern to student health. At the same time, evidence suggests that Asian Americans are overrepresented amongst problem gamblers in this age period. Research on factors related to initiation and development of problem gambling in college students is necessary to inform the development of effective and culturally-sensitive prevention efforts against gambling. The relationships between personal gambling expectancies at two levels of specificity (two general and six specific types of expectancies) and college student gambling at two levels of behavior (initiation and problems) were examined in a sample of 813 Asian American and White American college students. The study aimed to address (a) whether expectancies explained ethnic differences in gambling, (b) ethnic similarities and differences in the pattern of relationships between expectancies and gambling, and (c) whether expectancies that emerged in both ethnic groups have a greater risk or protective effect for one group than another. Results showed that Asian American students reported more problem gambling than White American students, but expectancies did not account for this group difference. Risk and protective factors for initiation were relatively similar between groups, but different patterns of risk emerged for each group for problem gambling. Implications for college primary prevention and harm reduction programs are discussed.

  11. Personal Gambling Expectancies among Asian American and White American College Students

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Alan Ka Ki; Zane, Nolan; Wong, Gloria; Song, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Many college students are involved in gambling behavior as a recreational activity. Their involvement could potentially develop into problem gambling, an issue of increasing concern to student health. At the same time, evidence suggests that Asian Americans are overrepresented amongst problem gamblers in this age period. Research on factors related to initiation and development of problem gambling in college students is necessary to inform the development of effective and culturally-sensitive prevention efforts against gambling. The relationships between personal gambling expectancies at two levels of specificity (two general and six specific types of expectancies) and college student gambling at two levels of behavior (initiation and problems) were examined in a sample of 813 Asian American and White American college students. The study aimed to address (a) whether expectancies explained ethnic differences in gambling, (b) ethnic similarities and differences in the pattern of relationships between expectancies and gambling, and (c) whether expectancies that emerged in both ethnic groups have a greater risk or protective effect for one group than another. Results showed that Asian American students reported more problem gambling than White American students, but expectancies did not account for this group difference. Risk and protective factors for initiation were relatively similar between groups, but different patterns of risk emerged for each group for problem gambling. Implications for college primary prevention and harm reduction programs are discussed. PMID:23832755

  12. Anger Suppression, Interdependent Self-Construal, and Depression among Asian American and European American College Students

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Rebecca Y. M.; Park, Irene J. K.

    2010-01-01

    The present study tested a theoretical model of emotion regulation (Yap, Sheeber, & Allen, 2007) in a sample of Asian American and European American college students (N = 365). Specifically, the mediating role of anger suppression in the effect of temperament and family processes on depressive symptoms was tested across race and levels of interdependent self-construal (a culturally based self orientation emphasizing connectedness with others). Next, the moderation of the suppression—depression relation was tested by race and interdependent self-construal. Results indicated that the hypothesized model fit well across Asian American and European American students as well as those with high vs. low levels of interdependent self-construal. Anger suppression was a significant mediator of the hypothesized indirect effects on depressive symptoms. Moreover, race and interdependent self-construal moderated the suppression—depression link, such that Asian American status and a stronger interdependent self-construal attenuated the relation between anger suppression and depressive symptoms. Understanding both universal and culture-specific aspects of emotion regulation in the development of depressive symptoms will be essential for sound theory, future research, and effective prevention and intervention efforts across diverse populations. PMID:21058815

  13. Ready or Not: The Academic College Readiness of Southeast Asian Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Her, Chia S.

    2014-01-01

    The educational experiences of Southeast Asian Americans, particularly Cambodian Americans, Hmong Americans, Laotian Americans, and Vietnamese Americans, are characterized by numerous challenges, which can be attributed to their migration history, socioeconomic status, and English proficiency. By the end of 11th grade, a high percentage of…

  14. Ready or Not: The Academic College Readiness of Southeast Asian Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Her, Chia S.

    2014-01-01

    The educational experiences of Southeast Asian Americans, particularly Cambodian Americans, Hmong Americans, Laotian Americans, and Vietnamese Americans, are characterized by numerous challenges, which can be attributed to their migration history, socioeconomic status, and English proficiency. By the end of 11th grade, a high percentage of…

  15. Perceived racial/ethnic discrimination and antisocial behaviors among Asian American college students: testing the moderating roles of ethnic and American identity.

    PubMed

    Park, Irene J K; Schwartz, Seth J; Lee, Richard M; Kim, May; Rodriguez, Liliana

    2013-04-01

    The present study tested the moderating roles of ethnic identity and American identity on the association between perceived racial/ethnic discrimination and antisocial behaviors among Asian American college students. Using data from the Multi-Site University Study of Identity and Culture (MUSIC) collaborative, the sample included 1,362 East Asian and South Asian American college students. Perceived discrimination was significantly associated with antisocial behaviors for both East Asians and South Asians. Ethnic identity was not a significant moderator of the discrimination-antisocial behavior link, but American identity exacerbated the association between perceived discrimination and antisocial behaviors for both East Asians and South Asians. Interestingly, the explanatory power of the regression model was greater for South Asians than for East Asians in predicting antisocial behaviors. The importance of attending to American identity as a potential source of risk for Asian American college students exposed to racial/ethnic discrimination is discussed.

  16. Leading Causes of Death among Asian American Subgroups (2003–2011)

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Katherine G.; Jose, Powell O.; Kapphahn, Kristopher I.; Frank, Ariel T. H.; Goldstein, Benjamin A.; Thompson, Caroline A.; Eggleston, Karen; Cullen, Mark R.; Palaniappan, Latha P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Our current understanding of Asian American mortality patterns has been distorted by the historical aggregation of diverse Asian subgroups on death certificates, masking important differences in the leading causes of death across subgroups. In this analysis, we aim to fill an important knowledge gap in Asian American health by reporting leading causes of mortality by disaggregated Asian American subgroups. Methods and Findings We examined national mortality records for the six largest Asian subgroups (Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese) and non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs) from 2003-2011, and ranked the leading causes of death. We calculated all-cause and cause-specific age-adjusted rates, temporal trends with annual percent changes, and rate ratios by race/ethnicity and sex. Rankings revealed that as an aggregated group, cancer was the leading cause of death for Asian Americans. When disaggregated, there was notable heterogeneity. Among women, cancer was the leading cause of death for every group except Asian Indians. In men, cancer was the leading cause of death among Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese men, while heart disease was the leading cause of death among Asian Indians, Filipino and Japanese men. The proportion of death due to heart disease for Asian Indian males was nearly double that of cancer (31% vs. 18%). Temporal trends showed increased mortality of cancer and diabetes in Asian Indians and Vietnamese; increased stroke mortality in Asian Indians; increased suicide mortality in Koreans; and increased mortality from Alzheimer’s disease for all racial/ethnic groups from 2003-2011. All-cause rate ratios revealed that overall mortality is lower in Asian Americans compared to NHWs. Conclusions Our findings show heterogeneity in the leading causes of death among Asian American subgroups. Additional research should focus on culturally competent and cost-effective approaches to prevent and treat specific diseases among these

  17. Leading Causes of Death among Asian American Subgroups (2003-2011).

    PubMed

    Hastings, Katherine G; Jose, Powell O; Kapphahn, Kristopher I; Frank, Ariel T H; Goldstein, Benjamin A; Thompson, Caroline A; Eggleston, Karen; Cullen, Mark R; Palaniappan, Latha P

    2015-01-01

    Our current understanding of Asian American mortality patterns has been distorted by the historical aggregation of diverse Asian subgroups on death certificates, masking important differences in the leading causes of death across subgroups. In this analysis, we aim to fill an important knowledge gap in Asian American health by reporting leading causes of mortality by disaggregated Asian American subgroups. We examined national mortality records for the six largest Asian subgroups (Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese) and non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs) from 2003-2011, and ranked the leading causes of death. We calculated all-cause and cause-specific age-adjusted rates, temporal trends with annual percent changes, and rate ratios by race/ethnicity and sex. Rankings revealed that as an aggregated group, cancer was the leading cause of death for Asian Americans. When disaggregated, there was notable heterogeneity. Among women, cancer was the leading cause of death for every group except Asian Indians. In men, cancer was the leading cause of death among Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese men, while heart disease was the leading cause of death among Asian Indians, Filipino and Japanese men. The proportion of death due to heart disease for Asian Indian males was nearly double that of cancer (31% vs. 18%). Temporal trends showed increased mortality of cancer and diabetes in Asian Indians and Vietnamese; increased stroke mortality in Asian Indians; increased suicide mortality in Koreans; and increased mortality from Alzheimer's disease for all racial/ethnic groups from 2003-2011. All-cause rate ratios revealed that overall mortality is lower in Asian Americans compared to NHWs. Our findings show heterogeneity in the leading causes of death among Asian American subgroups. Additional research should focus on culturally competent and cost-effective approaches to prevent and treat specific diseases among these growing diverse populations.

  18. 75 FR 24363 - Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... common struggles throughout their histories in America--including efforts to overcome racial, social, and... May 2010, as Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. I call upon all Americans ] to learn...

  19. Health Care Access Among Asian American Subgroups: The Role of Residential Segregation.

    PubMed

    Carreon, Daisy C; Baumeister, Sebastian E

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have examined differences in health care access across Asian American ethnicities and none have considered the effects of residential segregation. The segregation of Asians by neighborhood has been steadily increasing over the past few decades due in part to the settlement patterns of immigrants. Data from the 2009 National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (n = 746) were used. We examined differences in yearly medical checkups between Asian subgroups as well as among foreign-born and US-born Asians. Results showed that immigrant Filipinos and Vietnamese were less likely to get a checkup compared with foreign-born Chinese. The effect of Asian subgroup was modified by the percentage of Asians in a census tract (p < 0.01). Koreans and other Asians had a higher probability of getting a checkup when living in a predominately Asian neighborhood. For Chinese and Vietnamese residential concentration of Asians had a stronger inverse association with having a yearly checkup.

  20. Taking Stock and Moving Forward: Research on Asian American Child Development.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Vivian; Kiang, Lisa; Mistry, Jayanthi; Mistry, Rashmita S; Wang, Yijie; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu

    2016-07-01

    With this Special Section, the Asian Caucus of the Society for Research in Child Development seeks to promote a more inclusive, expanded, and holistic developmental science that can account for the diversity of developmental trajectories among Asian Americans. The articles elucidate, in turn, historical, conceptual, and methodological issues in studying Asian American child development. Although the articles foreground Asian Americans, the ideas should help advance theoretical and empirical work for other racial and ethnic groups, thereby contributing to a more valid understanding of child development. © 2016 The Authors. Child Development © 2016 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  1. Wintertime East Asian Jet Stream and its Association with the Asian-Pacific-American Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Song; Lau, K.-M.; Kim, K.-M.

    1999-01-01

    The wintertime upper-tropospheric westerly jet stream over subtropical East Asia and western Pacific, often referred to as East Asian Jet (EAJ), is an important atmospheric circulation system in the Asian-Pacific-American (APA) region. It is characterized by variabilities on a wide range of time scales and exerts a strong impact on the weather and climate of the region. On the synoptic scale, the jet is closely linked to many phenomena such as cyclogenesis, frontogenesis, blocking, storm track activity, and the development of other atmospheric disturbances. On the seasonal time scale, the variation of the EAJ determines many characteristics of the seasonal transition of the atmospheric circulation over Asia. The variabilities of the jet on these time scales have been relatively well documented (e.g., Yeh et al. 1959, Palmen and Newton 1969; Zeng 1979). It has also been understood that the inter-annual variability of the EAJ is associated with many climate signals in the APA region. These signals include the persistent anomalies of the East Asian winter monsoon and the changes in diabatic heating and in the Hadley circulation (Bjerknes 1966; Chang and Lau 1980; Huang and Gambo 1982; Kang and Held 1986; Tao and Chen 1987; Lau et al. 1988; Yang and Webster 1990; Ding 1992; Webster and Yang 1992; Dong et al. 1999). However, many questions remain for the year-to-year variabilities of the jet and their relation to the APA climate. For example, what is the relationship between the EAJ and El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO)? Will the jet and ENSO play different roles in modulating the APA climate? How is the jet linked to North Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) and the Pacific/North American (PNA) teleconnection pattern? In this study, we address several issues related to the wintertime EAJ with a focus on interannual time scales. We will examine the association between the jet core and ENSO, which has always been overshadowed by the relationship between ENSO and the

  2. Racial identity and reflected appraisals as influences on Asian Americans' racial adjustment.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, A N; Helms, J E

    2001-08-01

    J. E. Helms's (1990) racial identity psychodiagnostic model was used to examine the contribution of racial identity schemas and reflected appraisals to the development of healthy racial adjustment of Asian American university students (N = 188). Racial adjustment was operationally defined as collective self-esteem and awareness of anti-Asian racism. Multiple regression analyses suggested that racial identity schemas and reflected appraisals were significantly predictive of Asian Americans' racial adjustment. Implications for counseling and future research are discussed.

  3. Predictors of Asian American Adolescents' Suicide Attempts: A Latent Class Regression Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Y. Joel; Maffini, Cara S.

    2011-01-01

    Although suicide-related outcomes among Asian American adolescents are a serious public health problem in the United States, research in this area has been relatively sparse. To address this gap in the empirical literature, this study examined subgroups of Asian American adolescents for whom family, school, and peer relationships exerted…

  4. "I Am More than What I Look Alike": Asian American Women in Public School Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Jia; Peters-Hawkins, April L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Little research exists that examines the leadership experiences of Asian American women in public schools. This study sought to understand the meanings Asian American women school administrators have constructed out of their professional lives given the intersection of gender, race-ethnicity, and leadership. Research Method/Approach: Data…

  5. Health Disparities and Relational Well-Being between Multi- and Mono-Ethnic Asian Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Focusing on Hawaii, a state with 21.3% of the population being multi-racial according to the 2010 U.S. Census, this study aims to examine the existence and nature of health disparities between mono- and multi-ethnic Asian Americans and the importance of Relational Well-Being in affecting the health of Asian Americans. A series of ordinary least…

  6. Symptoms of Anxiety and Associated Risk and Protective Factors in Young Asian American Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Keng-Yen; Cheng, Sabrina; Calzada, Esther; Brotman, Laurie Miller

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety is one of the most prevalent mental health problems in young children but there has been a dearth of studies focusing on Asian American children. This study examines the patterns and the predictors of childhood anxiety and related symptoms in young children in a diverse Asian American (ASA) sample (n = 101). Findings indicate that ASA…

  7. Asian American as a Political-Racial Identity: Implications for Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philip, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I consider the emergence of the term Asian American as a political and racial identifier in the United States in the 1960s and 1970s and survey the meanings that are associated with the term today. Through the analysis of in-depth interviews, I examine how Asian American prospective teachers, who were enrolled in a master's and…

  8. Beyond Black and White: How White, Male, College Students See Their Asian American Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabrera, Nolan L.

    2014-01-01

    This research is a cross-site analysis of how white, male, college students see their Asian American peers. Semi-structured interviews with 43 white males were conducted at two universities that differed substantially in their representation of Asian American students. The interviews were theoretically framed by Critical Whiteness Studies and Bobo…

  9. The State of Higher Education in California: Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, Pacific Islanders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valliani, Nadia; Byrd, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Approximately, 6.3 million Asian Americans and 347,501 Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander (NHPIs) live in California. The Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander community is one that is both significant in size and in diversity. It also represents the fastest growing racial/ethnic group in the state. Ensuring their access to and…

  10. The Academic Success of East Asian American Youth: The Role of Shadow Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byun, Soo-yong; Park, Hyunjoon

    2012-01-01

    Using data from the Education Longitudinal Study, this study assessed the relevance of shadow education to the high academic performance of East Asian American students by examining how East Asian American students differed from other racial/ethnic students in the prevalence, purpose, and effects of using the two forms--commercial test preparation…

  11. Use of Specialty Mental Health Services by Asian Americans with Psychiatric Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Meyer, Oanh; Zane, Nolan; Cho, Young Il; Takeuchi, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Research suggests that Asian Americans underutilize mental health services but an understanding of the multiple factors involved in utilization has not been examined in a nationally representative sample. The current study analyzed data from the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS) and examined 368 individuals with disorders to…

  12. The Utility of "Race" and "Ethnicity" in the Multidimensional Identities of Asian American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston-Guerrero, Marc P.; Pizzolato, Jane Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    In a qualitative study we examined the constructs "race" and "ethnicity" and their relative importance in the multidimensional identities of 52 Asian American undergraduates across 2 universities. Findings suggest these constructs are useful for Asian American students' identity claims and that multiple contextual influences…

  13. An Exploratory Study of Undergraduates' Attitudes toward Affirmative Action Policies for Asian Americans in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartlep, Nicholas Daniel; Lowinger, Robert Jay

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study examined white undergraduate students' (a) racial attitudes towards Asian Americans, (b) principled policy attitudes toward affirmative action, and (c) self-interest in relation to their support for college-based affirmative action policies for Asian Americans at a Midwestern university. A sample (n = 264, 28% male, 72%…

  14. Racial Politics and the Invisibility of Asian Americans in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osajima, Keith

    1995-01-01

    Examines institutional and political practices that give rise to concerns that Asian Americans are an invisible minority in higher education. Data from interviews with Asian American students at 12 colleges suggest that the problem of their invisibility in higher education is changing for the better, though institutional neglect is still…

  15. "I Am More than What I Look Alike": Asian American Women in Public School Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Jia; Peters-Hawkins, April L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Little research exists that examines the leadership experiences of Asian American women in public schools. This study sought to understand the meanings Asian American women school administrators have constructed out of their professional lives given the intersection of gender, race-ethnicity, and leadership. Research Method/Approach: Data…

  16. Exploring Hybrid Identities: South Asian American Women Pursue a Career in Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Amita Roy

    2013-01-01

    This study explores how second-generation South Asian American women negotiated their hybrid identities to pursue a career in teaching. Many South Asian Americans have not pursued a career in teaching because of various external and internal factors that have influenced their sense of identity, academic achievement, and professional career path…

  17. Acculturation, Enculturation, and Asian American College Students' Mental Health and Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Matthew J.; Yang, Minji; Hui, Kayi; Choi, Na-Yeun; Lim, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we tested a theoretically and empirically derived partially indirect effects acculturation and enculturation model of Asian American college students' mental health and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help. Latent variable path analysis with 296 self-identified Asian American college students supported the…

  18. Racial Identity and Reflected Appraisals as Influences on Asian Americans' Racial Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Alvin N.; Helms, Janet E.

    2001-01-01

    The racial adjustment of Asian American university students (N=188) was assessed to examine the importance of race in their lives. Both racial identity status and reflected appraisals were significantly related to collective self-esteem as one measure of Asian American racial adjustment. Discusses the importance of the counselor's awareness of…

  19. Causal Attributions for College Success and Failure: An American-Asian Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Wenfan; Gaier, Eugene L.

    This study compared possible causal attributions for college success and failure in American and Asian students via a sample of 358 undergraduate students who were administered the Multi-Dimensional-Multi-Attribution Causality Scale (MMCS). American, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Southeast Asian subjects reported a higher average of perceived…

  20. Parent-to-Child Aggression among Asian American Parents: Culture, Context, and Vulnerability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Anna S.; Takeuchi, David T.; Alegria, Margarita

    2006-01-01

    We examined correlates of lifetime parent-to-child aggression in a representative sample of 1,293 Asian American parents. Correlates examined included nativity, indicators of acculturation, socioeconomic status, family climate, and stressors associated with minority status. Results revealed that Asian Americans of Chinese descent and those who…

  1. The Continuing Significance of Racism in the Lives of Asian American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Museus, Samuel D.; Park, Julie J.

    2015-01-01

    Asian Americans are one of the most misunderstood populations in higher education, and more research on this population is warranted. In this investigation, authors sought to understand the range of ways that Asian American students experience racism on a daily basis in college. They analyzed data from 46 individual, face-to-face qualitative…

  2. Wives' Relative Income Production and Household Male Dominance: Examining Violence among Asian American Enduring Couples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Grace H.; Tucker, M. Belinda; Takeuchi, David

    2008-01-01

    This study integrates relative resource theory and cultural perspectives on husband-to-wife authority to examine male-to-female physical violence reported by Asian American wives in the National Latino and Asian American Survey. Findings indicated that the association between marital violence and male household dominance is complicated by women's…

  3. A Social Cognitive Examination of East Asian American Career Development: Contextual Factors Influencing Career Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Despite their educational and economic achievements in the United States, Asian Americans continue to be occupationally segregated in the labor force. Asian Americans are overrepresented in mathematics, engineering and biological sciences while underrepresented in field such as education, humanities, social and behavioral sciences (Bureau of Labor…

  4. Therapist Multicultural Competence, Asian American Participants' Cultural Values, and Counseling Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shihwe; Kim, Bryan S. K.

    2010-01-01

    Asian Americans drop out of mental health treatment at a high rate. This problem could be addressed by enhancing therapists' multicultural competence and by examining clients' cultural attitudes that may affect the counseling process. In the present study, we used a video analogue design with a sample of 113 Asian American college students to…

  5. Wives' Relative Income Production and Household Male Dominance: Examining Violence among Asian American Enduring Couples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Grace H.; Tucker, M. Belinda; Takeuchi, David

    2008-01-01

    This study integrates relative resource theory and cultural perspectives on husband-to-wife authority to examine male-to-female physical violence reported by Asian American wives in the National Latino and Asian American Survey. Findings indicated that the association between marital violence and male household dominance is complicated by women's…

  6. Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Immunizations among Asian American College Students: Infection, Exposure, and Immunity Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Haeok; Kiang, Peter; Watanabe, Paul; Halon, Patricia; Shi, Ling; Church, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, exposure, and immunity among Asian American college students as a basis for evaluating HBV screening and vaccination policy. Participants and Methods: Self-identified Asian American college students aged 18 years or older were examined. Serological tests of HBV surface…

  7. Asian American College Students' Mathematics Success and the Model Minority Stereotype

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jo, Lydia

    2012-01-01

    The often aggregated reports of academic excellence of Asian American students as a whole, compared to students from other ethnic groups offers compelling evidence that Asian Americans are more academically successful than their ethnic counterparts, particularly in the area of mathematics. These comparative data have generated many topics of…

  8. Majority to Minority: The Adjustment of Asian American Hawai'i Residents at Predominantly White Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souza, Cheri Y. H.

    2015-01-01

    Within the United States, the model minority myth has contributed to empirically unsubstantiated misconceptions about Asian American college students. Although there is considerable research on college student adjustment and its role in persistence, literature focusing on the Asian American experience is lacking. Furthermore, the experience of…

  9. Health Disparities and Relational Well-Being between Multi- and Mono-Ethnic Asian Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Focusing on Hawaii, a state with 21.3% of the population being multi-racial according to the 2010 U.S. Census, this study aims to examine the existence and nature of health disparities between mono- and multi-ethnic Asian Americans and the importance of Relational Well-Being in affecting the health of Asian Americans. A series of ordinary least…

  10. Marital Patterns and Use of Mother Tongue at Home among Native-Born Asian Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Chigon; Min, Pyong Gap

    2010-01-01

    This article examines marital patterns and use of mother tongue at home among native-born Asian Americans using the 2005-2007 American Community Survey 3-Year Public Use Microdata Sample. There are variations in mother-tongue use across Asian ethnic groups, but variations among different types of marriage are even greater. Those who marry within…

  11. An Exploratory Study of Undergraduates' Attitudes toward Affirmative Action Policies for Asian Americans in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartlep, Nicholas Daniel; Lowinger, Robert Jay

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study examined white undergraduate students' (a) racial attitudes towards Asian Americans, (b) principled policy attitudes toward affirmative action, and (c) self-interest in relation to their support for college-based affirmative action policies for Asian Americans at a Midwestern university. A sample (n = 264, 28% male, 72%…

  12. Common Ground. Perspectives on Affirmative Action...and Its Impact on Asian Pacific Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lew, Gena A., Ed.

    This collection of policy papers is intended to educate and inform business and community leaders, policymakers, the Asian Pacific community, and the general public about the complex issues and far-reaching implications of the affirmative action debate on Asian Pacific Americans as well as all Americans. Essays are grouped into sections on…

  13. Cultural Community Connection and College Success: An Examination of Southeast Asian American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Museus, Samuel D.; Shiroma, Kiana; Dizon, Jude Paul

    2016-01-01

    Low rates of college success continue to be a persisting problem in the United States, particularly among Southeast Asian Americans and other populations of color. The purpose of the current inquiry was to understand how cultural community connections influence the success of Southeast Asian American college students. Qualitative methods were…

  14. The Continuing Significance of Racism in the Lives of Asian American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Museus, Samuel D.; Park, Julie J.

    2015-01-01

    Asian Americans are one of the most misunderstood populations in higher education, and more research on this population is warranted. In this investigation, authors sought to understand the range of ways that Asian American students experience racism on a daily basis in college. They analyzed data from 46 individual, face-to-face qualitative…

  15. Psychosocial aspects of type 1 diabetes in Latino- and Asian-American youth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Latino and Asian-Americans represent the fastest growing immigrant populations in the U.S. We aimed to review the current knowledge on the psychosocial factors that influence type 1 diabetes (T1D) care, education, and outcomes in Latino and Asian-American youth immigrants in the U.S., as well as cul...

  16. Understanding the Influence of Model Minority Stereotypes on Asian American Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assalone, Amanda E.; Fann, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Contrary to the model minority myth that portrays Asian Americans as academic all-stars overrepresented in elite 4-year institutions, nearly half of all Asian American college students do, in fact, attend community colleges, and many experience myriad challenges. This exploratory study utilized a qualitative analysis and investigated how model…

  17. Asian American Actors in Film, Television and Theater, An Ethnographic Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joann

    2001-01-01

    Examined how Asian American actors coped with the constraints of being minorities in an industry where physical appearance is crucial to success. Respondents' narratives reflected such coping strategies as not confronting issues of race, rationalizing that things are much better now for Asian American actors than in previous years, and believing…

  18. Asian Americans: America's Fastest Growing Minority Group. Population Trends and Public Policy. Number 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hare, William P.; Felt, Judy C.

    Newly available statistical data from the March 1990 Supplement of the Current Population Survey (CPS) indicates that Asians and Pacific Islanders were the fastest growing minority group in the United States during the 1980s. While the size of the Asian American population trails behind the Hispanic American and Black populations, changes in…

  19. Religiosity and substance use among Asian American college students: moderated effects of race and acculturation

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Jeremy W.; Emery, Rebecca L.; Karyadi, Kenny A.; Patock-Peckham, Julie A.; King, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Religiosity is a well-established protective factor against substance use among Caucasians, but limited research has examined its role among Asian Americans. The purposes of this study were (1) to examine whether the associations between religiosity and substance use outcomes differed across Caucasians and Asian Americans, and (2) to test whether acculturation moderated the associations between religiosity and substance use outcomes among Asian Americans. Method We utilized a large and diverse cross-sectional sample of 839 college students to test whether race moderated the associations between religiosity and substance use outcomes (Study 1). We then replicated and extended our findings in a separate college sample of 340 Asian Americans, and examined the moderating role of acculturation on the associations between religiosity and substance use outcomes (Study 2). Results Controlling for age, gender, and paternal education, religiosity was protective against alcohol use, alcohol problems, and marijuana use among Caucasians but was unrelated to these outcomes among Asian Americans in Study 1. In Study 2, religiosity was protective against alcohol problems only at high levels of acculturation. Moreover, religiosity was protective against marijuana use at both high and mean levels of acculturation, but not at low levels of acculturation. Conclusions The protective effects of religiosity on alcohol use and problems varied across Caucasian and Asian American college students, and religiosity protected against alcohol problems and marijuana use only among more acculturated Asian Americans. These findings underscore the need to examine culturally-specific correlates of substance use outcomes among Asian Americans. PMID:23182409

  20. The Cultural Integration of Asian American Professional Women: Issues of Identity and Communication Behavior. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamauchi, Joanne Sanae

    The purpose of this study was to examine the communication behavior of Asian American women who held nontraditional, male-dominated jobs. Two hundred and eighty seven Asian American women of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Philippino descent in both traditional and nontraditional occupations were interviewed in Washington, D.C. and San Francisco.…

  1. Are Dimensions of Parenting Differentially Linked to Substance Use Across Caucasian and Asian American College Students?

    PubMed

    Luk, Jeremy W; Patock-Peckham, Julie A; King, Kevin M

    2015-01-01

    Parental warmth and autonomy granting are commonly thought of as protective factors against substance use among Caucasians. However, limited research has examined whether associations between parenting dimensions and substance use outcomes are the same or different among Asian Americans. A final analytic sample of 839 college students was used to test whether race (Caucasian vs. Asian American) moderated the relations between parenting dimensions and substance use outcomes across Caucasians and Asian Americans. We utilized the Parental Bonding Instrument (Parker, Tupling, & Brown, 1979) to measure maternal and paternal warmth, encouragement of behavioral freedom, and denial of psychological autonomy. Multivariate regression models controlling for covariates including age, gender, and paternal education indicated four significant parenting by race interactions on alcohol problems and/or marijuana use. Specifically, maternal warmth was inversely associated with both alcohol problems and marijuana use among Caucasians but not among Asian Americans. Both maternal and paternal denial of psychological autonomy were positively associated with alcohol problems among Caucasians but not among Asian Americans. Consistent with emerging cross-cultural research, the associations between parenting dimensions and substance use behaviors observed in Caucasian populations may not be readily generalized to Asian Americans. These findings highlight the importance of considering different parenting dimensions in understanding substance use etiology among Asian Americans. Future research should use longitudinal data to replicate these findings across development and seek to identify other parenting dimensions that may be more relevant for Asian American youth.

  2. Managing Family Conflict over Career Decisions: The Experience of Asian Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Pei-Wen Winnie; Desai, Uttara; George, Login S.; San Filippo, Alyssa A.; Varon, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    Conflict over career decisions is a main source of intergenerational conflict among Asian American families. This qualitative study explored the topic using consensual qualitative research methodology in a sample of eight Asian Americans. Results indicated that participants experienced feelings of guilt and indebtedness due to conflicting values,…

  3. The Utility of "Race" and "Ethnicity" in the Multidimensional Identities of Asian American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston-Guerrero, Marc P.; Pizzolato, Jane Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    In a qualitative study we examined the constructs "race" and "ethnicity" and their relative importance in the multidimensional identities of 52 Asian American undergraduates across 2 universities. Findings suggest these constructs are useful for Asian American students' identity claims and that multiple contextual influences…

  4. Majority to Minority: The Adjustment of Asian American Hawai'i Residents at Predominantly White Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souza, Cheri Y. H.

    2015-01-01

    Within the United States, the model minority myth has contributed to empirically unsubstantiated misconceptions about Asian American college students. Although there is considerable research on college student adjustment and its role in persistence, literature focusing on the Asian American experience is lacking. Furthermore, the experience of…

  5. Ethnic and Sexual Identity Development of Asian-American Lesbian and Gay Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Y. Barry; Katayama, Motoni

    1998-01-01

    Ethnic and sexual identity development and the interaction of the two identities among Asian-American lesbian and gay adolescents are discussed. Counseling implications are addressed. A theory of parallel and interactive processes of ethnic and social development among Asian-American lesbian and gay adolescents is proposed. Research in the area is…

  6. Symptoms of Anxiety and Associated Risk and Protective Factors in Young Asian American Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Keng-Yen; Cheng, Sabrina; Calzada, Esther; Brotman, Laurie Miller

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety is one of the most prevalent mental health problems in young children but there has been a dearth of studies focusing on Asian American children. This study examines the patterns and the predictors of childhood anxiety and related symptoms in young children in a diverse Asian American (ASA) sample (n = 101). Findings indicate that ASA…

  7. Cultural Differences in Psychological Distress between Asian and Caucasian American College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, David; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined possible cultural differences in psychological distress between 50 Asian-American and 48 Caucasian-American college students using the Brief Symptom Inventory. Found significant differences between the two groups on six of the nine symptom scales. Asians scored significantly higher than Caucasians on obsessive compulsiveness,…

  8. Do Asian American Faculty Face a Glass Ceiling in Higher Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sharon M.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated the glass ceiling hypothesis in relation to Asian American faculty using data from the 1993 National Study of Post-Secondary Faculty for 1,019 Asian American faculty members. Data limitations prevent concluding that such faculty do or do not face a glass ceiling; however, baseline findings for future research are established. (SLD)

  9. Cultural Community Connection and College Success: An Examination of Southeast Asian American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Museus, Samuel D.; Shiroma, Kiana; Dizon, Jude Paul

    2016-01-01

    Low rates of college success continue to be a persisting problem in the United States, particularly among Southeast Asian Americans and other populations of color. The purpose of the current inquiry was to understand how cultural community connections influence the success of Southeast Asian American college students. Qualitative methods were…

  10. Have Asian American Men Achieved Labor Market Parity with White Men?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, ChangHwan; Sakamoto, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    We use the 2003 National Survey of College Graduates to investigate earnings differentials between white and Asian American men. We extend prior literature by disaggregating Asian Americans by their immigration status in relation to the U.S. educational system, and by accounting for the effects of field of study and college type. Net of the latter…

  11. Asian American Teachers: Do They Impact the Curriculum? Are There Support Systems for Them?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramanathan, Hema

    2006-01-01

    Emerging literature on Asian Americans shows that perceptions about the community are often at odds with reality. Asian Americans desire to be "normal," to fit in. Whether it is to be accepted as "honorary Whites" so as not to remain "forever foreigners," or to get by in a racist society by staying quiet and behaving so that nobody would bother…

  12. Underrepresented and Overlooked: A Review of Asian American Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooc, North; Yang, Man

    2017-01-01

    Thirty years after the Council for Exceptional Children's first symposium on Asian American youth with disabilities, this study synthesizes research on the key experiences of this population and their families. Results show that most studies focused on the views of Asian American parents, especially their perceptions of and attitudes toward…

  13. The Relevance of Asian Americans & Pacific Islanders in the College Completion Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on Asian American and Pacific Islander Research in Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The National Commission on Asian American and Pacific Islander Research in Education (CARE), consisting of a national commission, research advisory group, and research team at New York University, aims to provoke thoughtful and actionable discussions about the mobility and educational opportunities for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs)…

  14. Asian American College Students' Mathematics Success and the Model Minority Stereotype

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jo, Lydia

    2012-01-01

    The often aggregated reports of academic excellence of Asian American students as a whole, compared to students from other ethnic groups offers compelling evidence that Asian Americans are more academically successful than their ethnic counterparts, particularly in the area of mathematics. These comparative data have generated many topics of…

  15. Managing Family Conflict over Career Decisions: The Experience of Asian Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Pei-Wen Winnie; Desai, Uttara; George, Login S.; San Filippo, Alyssa A.; Varon, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    Conflict over career decisions is a main source of intergenerational conflict among Asian American families. This qualitative study explored the topic using consensual qualitative research methodology in a sample of eight Asian Americans. Results indicated that participants experienced feelings of guilt and indebtedness due to conflicting values,…

  16. Perspectives of First Generation Asian American Parents towards Children with Disabilities and Their Educational Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Quynh; Hughes, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this descriptive study was to examine the perspectives of first generation Asian American parents of children with disabilities regarding causes, meaning of disabilities, level of educational involvement and self-advocacy in their children's special education school programs. Using convenience sampling, 18 Asian American parents from…

  17. A Social Cognitive Examination of East Asian American Career Development: Contextual Factors Influencing Career Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Despite their educational and economic achievements in the United States, Asian Americans continue to be occupationally segregated in the labor force. Asian Americans are overrepresented in mathematics, engineering and biological sciences while underrepresented in field such as education, humanities, social and behavioral sciences (Bureau of Labor…

  18. From "Yellow Peril" to "Model Minority": The Transition of Asian Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharyya, Srilata

    This paper investigates factors influencing the emergence of a new ethnic identity for Asian Americans, replete with academic achievement and professional success. While Asian Americans were once considered "unassimilable heathens," they have been transformed from "cruel, enemy aliens" to "industrious, quiet, law-abiding…

  19. Asian American as a Political-Racial Identity: Implications for Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philip, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I consider the emergence of the term Asian American as a political and racial identifier in the United States in the 1960s and 1970s and survey the meanings that are associated with the term today. Through the analysis of in-depth interviews, I examine how Asian American prospective teachers, who were enrolled in a master's and…

  20. Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Immunizations among Asian American College Students: Infection, Exposure, and Immunity Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Haeok; Kiang, Peter; Watanabe, Paul; Halon, Patricia; Shi, Ling; Church, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, exposure, and immunity among Asian American college students as a basis for evaluating HBV screening and vaccination policy. Participants and Methods: Self-identified Asian American college students aged 18 years or older were examined. Serological tests of HBV surface…

  1. The Self-Concept of Bilingual Asian-American Children. Professional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inn, Kalei

    Existing research knowledge concerning the self-concept of Asian American children, particularly in relation to bilingual education, is explored in this paper. The significance of the literature review is considered to rest on the assumption that Asian Americans' physical characteristics, language, and cultural orientation make their self-concept…

  2. Evidence of Concurrent Validity of SII Scores for Asian American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Jo-Ida C.; Lee, W. Vanessa

    2007-01-01

    The validity of scores on the Strong Interest Inventory (SII) for Asian American college students has not been thoroughly investigated. This study examined the evidence of validity of the SII Occupational Scale scores for predicting college major choices of Asian American women and men and White women and men. The sample included 186 female and…

  3. Beyond Black and White: How White, Male, College Students See Their Asian American Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabrera, Nolan L.

    2014-01-01

    This research is a cross-site analysis of how white, male, college students see their Asian American peers. Semi-structured interviews with 43 white males were conducted at two universities that differed substantially in their representation of Asian American students. The interviews were theoretically framed by Critical Whiteness Studies and Bobo…

  4. Acculturation, Enculturation, and Asian American College Students' Mental Health and Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Matthew J.; Yang, Minji; Hui, Kayi; Choi, Na-Yeun; Lim, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we tested a theoretically and empirically derived partially indirect effects acculturation and enculturation model of Asian American college students' mental health and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help. Latent variable path analysis with 296 self-identified Asian American college students supported the…

  5. Silence Speaks Volumes: Parental Sexual Communication among Asian American Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Janna L.; Ward, L. Monique

    2007-01-01

    Although parents greatly influence children's early understandings of sexuality, little is known about how sexual communication transpires in Asian American families. Accordingly, the authors examined the amount and type of parental sexual communication recalled by 165 Asian American college students. Parents were perceived as providing very…

  6. Getting the message: media images and stereotypes and their effect on Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Mok, T A

    1998-01-01

    Mass media sources such as television and movies arguably offer up little in the way of positive Asian/Asian American images or role models. This article contends that the media do not often portray the diversity that is inherent within the Asian American culture and that such a paucity of Asian images may greatly affect perceptions Asian Americans may hold both of their own racial group and of the larger society. This article examines both media images of Asians and Asian Americans and autobiographical information from Asian American literature to illustrate the potentially detrimental effects of being a person of color in a society that emphasizes a monoracial standard of beauty. Information gleaned from first-hand accounts from Asian Americans often points to the media as a potent source of information as to how attractiveness is defined and measured. This article concludes with a discussion of some brief case examples and ethical imperatives for mental health workers in terms of both self-awareness and education as well as considerations for culturally sensitive therapy.

  7. Experiences and perspectives of African American, Latina/o, Asian American, and European American psychology graduate students: A national study.

    PubMed

    Maton, Kenneth I; Wimms, Harriette E; Grant, Sheila K; Wittig, Michele A; Rogers, Margaret R; Vasquez, Melba J T

    2011-01-01

    A national, Web-based survey of 1,219 African American, Latina/o, Asian American, and European American psychology graduate students revealed both similarities and differences in experiences and perspectives. Mentoring was found to be the strongest predictor of satisfaction across groups. Academic supports and barriers, along with perceptions of diversity within the academic environment, were also important predictors of satisfaction. Students of color perceived less fairness of representation of their ethnic group within psychology than European American students, and a greater linkage between aspects of the graduate school experience and their ethnicity. Limitations of the study and implications for future research and action are discussed.

  8. Substance Use among Asian American Adolescents: Perceptions of Use and Preferences for Prevention Programming

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Lin; Barnes-Ceeney, Kevin; Lee, Rebecca A.; Tao, John

    2011-01-01

    Rarely has substance use prevention programming targeted Asian American adolescents. Using a focus group methodology, we explored perceptions of substance use and preferences for prevention programming among 31 Asian American adolescents in New York City. Participants considered substance use common in the community. Factors contributing to substance use among Asian American adolescents (e.g., peer pressure, pressure to achieve, family factors, and community influence) were identified, and the need for prevention programs tailored for the Asian American community was highlighted. Participants discussed preferred program content, delivery settings, and recruitment and retention strategies. Despite the favorable attitude for family-based prevention programming, participants raised potential issues concerning the feasibility of such a program. Study findings facilitate understanding of Asian American adolescents’ substance use behavior and shed light on prevention program development for this underserved population. PMID:21919640

  9. Gender, Family, and Community Correlates of Mental Health in South Asian Americans

    PubMed Central

    Masood, Nausheen; Okazaki, Sumie; Takeuchi, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Nationally representative data from the National Latino and Asian American Study (Alegría et al., 2004) was used to examine both disorder prevalence rates and correlates of distress for the South Asian American subgroup (n = 164). South Asian Americans generally appeared to have lower or comparable rates of lifetime and 12-month mood and anxiety disorders when compared with the overall Asian American sample. A multiple-regression model fitted to predict recent psychological distress, with 12-month diagnosis as a covariate, found gender differences. For women, lack of extended family support was related to higher levels of distress, whereas for men, greater conflict with family culture, and a lower community social position (but higher U.S. social position) predicted higher distress scores. Findings suggest that mental health services consider a broad framework of psychological functioning for South Asian Americans that reflect their gendered, familial, and sociopolitical realities. PMID:19594255

  10. Role of Federal Policy in Building Research Infrastructure Among Emerging Minorities: The Asian American Experience

    PubMed Central

    Trinh-Shevrin, Chau; Ro, Marguerite; Tseng, Winston; Islam, Nadia Shilpi; Rey, Mariano J.; Kwon, Simona C.

    2012-01-01

    Problem Considerable progress in Asian American health research has occurred over the last two decades. However, greater and sustained federal support is needed for reducing health disparities in Asian American communities. Purpose of the Article This paper reviews federal policies that support infrastructure to conduct minority health research and highlights one model for strengthening research capacity and infrastructure in Asian American communities. Key Points Research center infrastructures can play a significant role in addressing pipeline/workforce challenges, fostering campus–community research collaborations, engaging communities in health, disseminating evidence-based strategies and health information, and policy development. Conclusion Research centers provide the capacity needed for academic institutions and communities to work together synergistically in achieving the goal to reduce health disparities in the Asian American community. Policies that support the development of concentrated and targeted research for Asian Americans must continue so that these centers will reach their full potential. PMID:22643792

  11. Identifying vulnerable Asian Americans under Health Care Reform: working in small businesses and health care coverage.

    PubMed

    Cook, Won Kim; Tseng, Winston; Ko Chin, Kathy; John, Iyanrick; Chung, Corina

    2014-11-01

    Working in small businesses has been identified as a key factor for low coverage rates in immigrant communities. In this study, we identify specific cultural and socioeconomic predictors of Asian Americans who work in small businesses to identify subgroups at a greater disadvantage than others in obtaining health insurance. Logistic regression models were fitted using a sample of 3,819 Asian American small business owners and employers extracted from pooled 2005–2012 California Health Interview Survey data. We found that individuals with low income levels, Korean Americans, U.S.-born South Asian and Southeast Asian (other than Vietnamese) Americans, immigrants without citizenship (particularly those lacking a green card), and individuals with limited English proficiency had higher odds of lacking coverage. The odds of being uninsured did not differ between small business owners and employees. Based upon these key findings, we propose several strategies to expand coverage for Asian Americans working in small businesses and their most vulnerable subgroups.

  12. Gender, family, and community correlates of mental health in South Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Masood, Nausheen; Okazaki, Sumie; Takeuchi, David T

    2009-07-01

    Nationally representative data from the National Latino and Asian American Study (Alegría et al., 2004) was used to examine both disorder prevalence rates and correlates of distress for the South Asian American subgroup (n = 164). South Asian Americans generally appeared to have lower or comparable rates of lifetime and 12-month mood and anxiety disorders when compared with the overall Asian American sample. A multiple-regression model fitted to predict recent psychological distress, with 12-month diagnosis as a covariate, found gender differences. For women, lack of extended family support was related to higher levels of distress, whereas for men, greater conflict with family culture, and a lower community social position (but higher U.S. social position) predicted higher distress scores. Findings suggest that mental health services consider a broad framework of psychological functioning for South Asian Americans that reflect their gendered, familial, and sociopolitical realities.

  13. Influencing and adjusting in daily emotional situations: a comparison of European and Asian American action styles.

    PubMed

    Boiger, Michael; Mesquita, Batja; Tsai, Annie Y; Markus, Hazel

    2012-01-01

    Emotions are for action, but action styles in emotional episodes may vary across cultural contexts. Based on culturally different models of agency, we expected that those who engage in European-American contexts will use more influence in emotional situations, while those who engage in East-Asian contexts will use more adjustment. European-American (N=60) and Asian-American (N=44) college students reported their action style during emotional episodes four times a day during a week. Asian Americans adjusted more than European Americans, whereas both used influence to a similar extent. These cultural differences in action style varied across types of emotion experienced. Moreover, influencing was associated with life satisfaction for European Americans, but not for Asian Americans.

  14. Selected Statistics on the Status of Asian-American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Pauline; Cabezas, Amado

    1977-01-01

    Taken from a paper on "The Economic and Employment Status of Asian Women in America" by Pauline Fong and Amado Cabezas of ASIAN, Inc., this brief analysis of statistics on Asian women indicates that highly educated Asian women do not have higher incomes or better jobs than many of those with less education.

  15. [Coalition for Asian American Children and Families Fact Sheets: A Series To Promote Better Understanding of the Health and Human Services Needs of Asian American Children and Youth in New York City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coalition for Asian American Children and Families, New York, NY.

    This series of four fact sheets addresses the health and human service needs of Asian American children living in New York City. The first fact sheet, "Snapshots of New York City: An Overview of Asian American Families," discusses the diversity of the Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) population in New York, examining AAPI…

  16. The Racialized Experiences of Asian American and Pacific Islander Students: An Examination of Campus Racial Climate at the University of California, Los Angeles. iCount: A Data Quality Movement for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Bach Mai Dolly; Nguyen, Mike Hoa; Chan, Jason; Teranishi, Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the National Commission on Asian American and Pacific Islander Research in Education (CARE) launched iCount: A Data Quality Movement for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in Higher Education, a collaborative effort with the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (WHIAAPI) and with generous support from the…

  17. Community violence exposure of Southeast Asian American adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ho, Joyce

    2008-01-01

    Southeast Asian adolescents in the United States face the daily challenge of adjusting to the American culture and their culture of origin. However, little is known about how the patterns of their bicultural adjustment influence psychological symptoms, especially when faced with other challenges such as community violence and negative life events. Additionally, the overrepresentation of Southeast Asian youth in the mental health and juvenile justice systems also necessitates a deeper understanding of the adjustment of this group of adolescents. Data from a sample of 80 Vietnamese and Cambodian adolescents who were between 13 and 18 years old revealed high rates of community violence witnessing and victimization, and a moderate level of negative life events. All of these stressors were related to higher externalizing and trauma-related symptoms, but only violence victimization and negative life events were related to higher internalizing symptoms. There was an additive effect of higher bicultural orientation related to lower externalizing and traumatic-stress symptoms in the face of stress and violence exposure, but no moderation effects were found.

  18. Primary care physicians' cancer screening recommendation practices and perceptions of cancer risk of Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Harry T; Ma, Grace X; Gold, Robert S; Atkinson, Nancy L; Wang, Min Qi

    2013-01-01

    Asian Americans experience disproportionate incidence and mortality rates of certain cancers, compared to other racial/ethnic groups. Primary care physicians are a critical source for cancer screening recommendations and play a significant role in increasing cancer screening of their patients. This study assessed primary care physicians' perceptions of cancer risk in Asians and screening recommendation practices. Primary care physicians practicing in New Jersey and New York City (n=100) completed a 30-question survey on medical practice characteristics, Asian patient communication, cancer screening guidelines, and Asian cancer risk. Liver cancer and stomach cancer were perceived as higher cancer risks among Asian Americans than among the general population, and breast and prostate cancer were perceived as lower risks. Physicians are integral public health liaisons who can be both influential and resourceful toward educating Asian Americans about specific cancer awareness and screening information.

  19. Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Tobacco Use Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjea, Arnab; Wackowski, Olivia A.; Lee, Youn Ok; Delnevo, Cristine D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To provide a national depiction of Asian American (AA) and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (NHPI) tobacco use and highlight considerations for targeted interventions. Methods We analyzed data from the 2009-2010 National Adult Tobacco Survey for subgroup differences in prevalence and consumption of various tobacco products. Results Use varies considerably by ethnic subgroups for cigarette smoking (including menthol) and other forms of tobacco. Despite being lighter, less frequent, and seemingly less dependent smokers, AANHPIs had similar quit ratios as non-AANHPIs. Conclusions AA and NHPI disparities in tobacco use may be due to underutilization of cessation resources, including those for non-cigarette tobacco products, and lack of availability of culturally-appropriate resources. Community-based and regulatory approaches should be employed to reduce use of all tobacco products, especially among high prevalence subgroups. PMID:24636032

  20. Using appropriate body mass index cut points for overweight and obesity among Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Jih, Jane; Mukherjea, Arnab; Vittinghoff, Eric; Nguyen, Tung T; Tsoh, Janice Y; Fukuoka, Yoshimi; Bender, Melinda S; Tseng, Winston; Kanaya, Alka M

    2014-08-01

    Asian Americans have low prevalence of overweight/obesity based on standard BMI cut points yet have higher rates of diabetes. We examined the prevalence of overweight/obesity, using lower BMI cut points recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for Asians, and diabetes in Asian American subgroups in California. Secondary analysis of the 2009 adult California Health Interview Survey (n=45,946) of non-Hispanic Whites (NHW), African Americans, Hispanics and Asians (Vietnamese, Chinese, Korean, Filipino, South Asian and Japanese). WHO Asian BMI cut points (overweight=23-27.5kg/m(2); obese≥27.5kg/m(2)) were used for Asian subgroups. Standard BMI cut points (overweight=25-29.9kg/m(2); obese≥30kg/m(2)) were applied for other groups. Among Asian subgroups, overweight/obesity was highest among Filipinos (78.6%), which was higher than NHWs (p<0.001) but similar to African Americans and Hispanics. Compared to NHW, diabetes prevalence was higher for Vietnamese, Koreans, Filipinos and South Asians with BMI=23-24.9kg/m(2) and Koreans, Filipinos and Japanese with BMI=27.5-29.9kg/m(2), the ranges WHO recommends as overweight or obese for Asians but not for other groups. Filipinos should be a priority population for overweight/obesity screening. Filipinos, Vietnamese, Korean, South Asians and Japanese have higher diabetes prevalence at lower BMI cut points. WHO Asian BMI cut points may have clinical utility to identify at-risk Asian Americans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Using appropriate body mass index cut points for overweight and obesity among Asian Americans

    PubMed Central

    Jih, Jane; Mukherjea, Arnab; Vittinghoff, Eric; Nguyen, Tung T.; Tsoh, Janice Y.; Fukuoka, Yoshimi; Bender, Melinda S.; Tseng, Winston; Kanaya, Alka M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Asian Americans have low prevalence of overweight/obesity based on standard BMI cut points yet have higher rates of diabetes. We examined the prevalence of overweight/obesity, using lower BMI cut points recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for Asians, and diabetes in Asian American subgroups in California. Method Secondary analysis of the 2009 adult California Health Interview Survey (n = 45,946) of non-Hispanic Whites (NHW), African Americans, Hispanics and Asians (Vietnamese, Chinese, Korean, Filipino, South Asian and Japanese). WHO Asian BMI cut points (overweight = 23–27.5 kg/m2; obese ≥ 27.5 kg/m2) were used for Asian subgroups. Standard BMI cut points (overweight = 25–29.9 kg/m2; obese ≥ 30 kg/m2) were applied for other groups. Results Among Asian subgroups, overweight/obesity was highest among Filipinos (78.6%), which was higher than NHWs (p < 0.001) but similar to African Americans and Hispanics. Compared to NHW, diabetes prevalence was higher for Vietnamese, Koreans, Filipinos and South Asians with BMI = 23–24.9 kg/m2 and Koreans, Filipinos and Japanese with BMI = 27.5–29.9 kg/m2, the ranges WHO recommends as overweight or obese for Asians but not for other groups. Conclusions Filipinos should be a priority population for overweight/obesity screening. Filipinos, Vietnamese, Korean, South Asians and Japanese have higher diabetes prevalence at lower BMI cut points. WHO Asian BMI cut points may have clinical utility to identify at-risk Asian Americans. PMID:24736092

  2. Interest Convergence or Divergence? A Critical Race Analysis of Asian Americans, Meritocracy, and Critical Mass in the Affirmative Action Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Julie J.; Liu, Amy

    2014-01-01

    We use the Critical Race Theory frameworks of interest convergence and divergence to critique the anti-affirmative action movement's co-option of Asian Americans. Past discussions of affirmative action and Asian Americans mainly concentrate on how Asian Americans are affected by affirmative action, whether positively or negatively. We demonstrate…

  3. Wrestling with Expectations: An Examination of How Asian American College Students Negotiate Personal, Parental, and Societal Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samura, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    This research draws on a broader study that situates Asian American college students within larger sociohistorical and political contexts. I examined Asian American college students' experiences and what it means to be "Asian American" in and through these experiences. Two types of expectations emerged from the data: students' internal…

  4. Wrestling with Expectations: An Examination of How Asian American College Students Negotiate Personal, Parental, and Societal Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samura, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    This research draws on a broader study that situates Asian American college students within larger sociohistorical and political contexts. I examined Asian American college students' experiences and what it means to be "Asian American" in and through these experiences. Two types of expectations emerged from the data: students' internal…

  5. Evaluation of a Health Professionals' Training Program to Conduct Research in New York City's Asian American Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Pao San Lucy; Sim, Shao-Chee; Pong, Perry; Islam, Nadia; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau; Li, Shijian; Tsang, Thomas; Rey, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    Background: Because health disparities among Asian Americans are understudied, a partnership program between the Charles B. Wang Community Health Center and the Center for the Study of Asian American Health was created to increase awareness and interest in Asian American research. Purpose: To evaluate the process, outcome, and impact of a health…

  6. Interest Convergence or Divergence? A Critical Race Analysis of Asian Americans, Meritocracy, and Critical Mass in the Affirmative Action Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Julie J.; Liu, Amy

    2014-01-01

    We use the Critical Race Theory frameworks of interest convergence and divergence to critique the anti-affirmative action movement's co-option of Asian Americans. Past discussions of affirmative action and Asian Americans mainly concentrate on how Asian Americans are affected by affirmative action, whether positively or negatively. We demonstrate…

  7. ASIAN AMERICAN-WHITE DIFFERENCES IN THE EFFECT OF MOTHERHOOD ON CAREER OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    Greenman, Emily

    2014-01-01

    U.S.-born Asian Americans are unique among American minority groups in that they lack earnings disadvantages relative to Whites with similar education levels. Controlling for education and age, there is little difference in the earnings of U.S.-born Asian and White men, but Asian women have higher earnings than comparable White women. Using data from SESTAT, this study tests the hypothesis that Asian American women’s high earnings may result from adjusting their labor supply less than White women in response to parenthood, leading to greater work experience over time. Findings show that Asian American women are less likely than White women reduce labor supply in response to parenthood, and that their resulting greater work experience explains their high rate of earnings growth. PMID:25580053

  8. Culturally-Competent Treatments for Asian Americans: The Relevance of Mindfulness and Acceptance-Based Psychotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Nagayama Hall, Gordon C.; Hong, Janie J.; Zane, Nolan W. S.; Meyer, Oanh L.

    2011-01-01

    The development of effective treatments for Asian Americans is important because treatment disparities continue to exist for this population. Because of their theoretical grounding in East Asian philosophies, mindfulness and acceptance-based psychotherapies appear to constitute promising ways to provide culturally responsive mental health care to Asian Americans. However, in practice these approaches often reflect conceptions of mental health that are more consistent with Western world views. We review points of intersection and divergence between Western-based mindfulness and acceptance psychotherapies and Asian American cultural values. We then propose a culturally syntonic approach that accentuates certain components of mindfulness and acceptance psychotherapies and adapts other components of these approaches to be more consistent with Asian American cultural values. PMID:22065893

  9. Lay theory of race affects and moderates Asian Americans' responses toward American culture.

    PubMed

    No, Sun; Hong, Ying-yi; Liao, Hsin-Ya; Lee, Kyoungmi; Wood, Dustin; Chao, Melody Manchi

    2008-10-01

    People may hold different understandings of race that might affect how they respond to the culture of groups deemed to be racially distinct. The present research tests how this process is moderated by the minority individual's lay theory of race. An essentialist lay theory of race (i.e., that race reflects deep-seated, inalterable essence and is indicative of traits and ability) would orient racial minorities to rigidly adhere to their ethnic culture, whereas a social constructionist lay theory of race (i.e., that race is socially constructed, malleable, and arbitrary) would orient racial minorities to identify and cognitively assimilate toward the majority culture. To test these predictions, the authors conducted 4 studies with Asian American participants. The first 2 studies examine the effect of one's lay theory of race on perceived racial differences and identification with American culture. The last 2 studies tested the moderating effect of lay theory of race on identification and assimilation toward the majority American culture after this culture had been primed. The results generally supported the prediction that the social constructionist theory was associated with more perceived similarity between Asians and Americans and more consistent identification and assimilation toward American culture, compared with the essentialist theory.

  10. An integrative review of relationships between discrimination and Asian American health.

    PubMed

    Nadimpalli, Sarah B; Hutchinson, M Katherine

    2012-06-01

    Many ethnic minorities in the United States experience disproportionate rates of adverse health outcomes or health disparities. Factors such as socioeconomic status do not fully explain how these disparities are generated and maintained. Research has demonstrated that chronic experiences of discrimination are harmful to the health of African Americans and Latinos. However, there is a dearth of research examining Asian Americans' experiences with discrimination and health disparities. The purpose of this integrative review was to summarize the current literature examining discrimination and the mental and physical health of Asian Americans. Combinations of search terms related to discrimination, health, and Asian Americans were used to search five electronic databases. Inclusion criteria were primary research studies, published in English between 1980 and 2011, Asian American adults, and discrimination examined in relationship to a physical or mental health outcome. The search initially yielded 489 results; 14 quantitative studies met inclusion criteria. Quantitative studies in this review revealed several significant associations between discrimination and health outcomes in Asian Americans. Discrimination was significantly associated with depressive symptoms in seven studies. Three studies found associations between discrimination and physical health, including cardiovascular disease, respiratory conditions, obesity, and diabetes. Although the literature was limited by self-reported data, cross-sectional designs, and inconsistent definitions and measurement of discrimination, the findings suggest that discrimination is a significant contributor to poorer health and health disparities for Asian Americans. The findings clearly demonstrate the need for further nursing research in this area to inform evidence-based practice and social policy. Patient care providers can recognize discrimination as a significant stressor or purveyor of illness and explore ways to

  11. Further evidence for the cultural norm hypothesis: positive emotion in depressed and control European American and Asian American women.

    PubMed

    Chentsova-Dutton, Yulia E; Tsai, Jeanne L; Gotlib, Ian H

    2010-04-01

    How does culture shape the effects of depression on emotion? A previous study showed that depression dampened negative emotional responses in European Americans, but increased these responses in Asian Americans (Chentsova-Dutton et al., 2007). These findings support the cultural norm hypothesis, which predicts that depression reduces individuals' abilities to react in culturally ideal ways (i.e., disrupting European Americans' abilities to express emotions openly and Asian Americans' abilities to moderate emotions). In the present study, we examined the generalizability of this hypothesis to positive emotion. We measured the emotional reactivity of 35 European Americans (17 depressed) and 31 Asian Americans (15 depressed) to an amusing film. Consistent with the cultural norm hypothesis, European Americans who were depressed showed dampened emotional reactivity (i.e., fewer smiles, less intense reports of positive emotion, lower cardiac activation) compared to control European Americans, whereas Asian Americans who were depressed showed similar (for smiles and reports of positive emotion), and even greater (for higher cardiac activation) emotional reactivity compared to control Asian Americans. These findings suggest that the cultural norm hypothesis generalizes to positive emotion. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Teaching about Asian Pacific Americans: Effectiveness Activities, Strategies, and Assignments for Classrooms and Communities. Critical Perspectives on Asian Pacific Americans #15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Edith Wen-Chu, Ed.; Omatsu, Glenn, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    The legitimization of Asian American Studies as an academic discipline has led to the publication of new research, policy reports, and creative writing. Despite the plethora of new scholarship, many significant findings and critical ideas have failed to effectively reach college and high school students or the general American public. "Teaching…

  13. Teaching about Asian Pacific Americans: Effectiveness Activities, Strategies, and Assignments for Classrooms and Communities. Critical Perspectives on Asian Pacific Americans #15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Edith Wen-Chu, Ed.; Omatsu, Glenn, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    The legitimization of Asian American Studies as an academic discipline has led to the publication of new research, policy reports, and creative writing. Despite the plethora of new scholarship, many significant findings and critical ideas have failed to effectively reach college and high school students or the general American public. "Teaching…

  14. Social Capital and Smoking Among Asian American Men: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Delva, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined how different dimensions of social capital (i.e., family and friend connections, neighborhood and family cohesion, family conflict) were associated with smoking behavior among a nationally representative sample of Asian American men and whether the associations varied by ethnic group. Methods. The sample consisted of 998 adult Asian American men who participated in the National Latino and Asian American Survey from 2002 to 2003. We conducted weighted multivariate logistic regressions on data for the sample and for each of 4 ethnic subgroups (Chinese, Vietnamese, Filipino, and Other). Results. Vietnamese American men had the highest prevalence of current smoking; Chinese American men, the lowest. After controlling for sociodemographics, socioeconomic status, acculturation, and perceived discrimination, neighborhood cohesion was inversely associated with smoking among Asian American men, and family and friend connections and family cohesion were not. An exception was family cohesion, which was associated with increased odds of smoking among Filipino American men. Conclusions. The relationship between social capital and smoking among Asian American men varied according to specific dimensions of social capital and was ethnicity specific. These findings highlight the need for smoking prevention and cessation interventions to take into consideration the heterogeneity that exists among Asian Americans. PMID:22401511

  15. Risk of cancer in Asian Americans: a Kaiser Permanente cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tran, H Nicole; Li, Yan; Udaltsova, Natalia; Armstrong, Mary Anne; Friedman, Gary D; Klatsky, Arthur L

    2016-10-01

    To supplement published cohort data about incident cancer in Asian Americans (Asians) including risk of specific Asian ethnic groups. A cohort study in 124,193 persons (13,344 Asians) with baseline examination data in 1978-1985 used Cox proportional hazards models with seven covariates to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Through 2012 cancer was diagnosed in 18,687 persons including 1,522 Asians. Compared to Whites, the HR (CIs) for any cancer in Asians was 0.8 (0.7-0.9, p < 0.001). Lower Asian risk was stronger for men (HR = 0.7, p < 0.001) than for women (HR = 0.9, p = 0.003). Lower Asian vs. White risks with p < 0.05 were found for cancers of the upper airway digestive area, hematologic malignancies, melanoma, and cancers of the prostate, bladder, and brain. Melanoma contributed substantially to lower Asian risk, especially in women. HRs for specific Asian groups versus Whites follow: Chinese = 0.9 (p < 0.001), Japanese = 0.9 (p = 0.01), Filipinos = 0.8 (p < 0.001), South Asians = 0.5 (p < 0.001), and Other Asians = 0.7 (p = 0.006). Both South Asian men and women had lower risk than Whites, and South Asians had lower risk than any other racial/ethnic group. Asians had lower cancer risk than Whites, due to lower risk of several cancer types. Each Asian ethnic group had lower risk than Whites with South Asians at the lowest risk.

  16. Help-Seeking Intentions among Asian American and White American Students in Psychological Distress: Application of the Health Belief Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin E.; Zane, Nolan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Underutilization of needed mental health services continues to be the major mental health disparity affecting Asian Americans (Sue, Cheng, Saad, & Chu, 2012). The goal of the study was to apply a social psychological theoretical framework—the Health Belief Model (Rosenstock, 1966)—to understand potential reasons why Asian Americans underutilize mental health services relative to White Americans. Method Using a cross-sectional online questionnaire, this study examined how perceived severity of symptoms, perceived susceptibility to mental health problems, perceived benefits of treatment, and perceived barriers to treatment influenced intentions to seek help among a sample of 395 Asian American and 261 White American students experiencing elevated levels of psychological distress. Results Analyses using structural equation modeling indicated that Asian Americans in distress had relatively lower intentions to seek help compared to White Americans. Perceived benefits partially accounted for differences in help-seeking intentions. Although Asian Americans perceived greater barriers to help-seeking than White Americans, it did not significantly explain racial/ethnic differences in help-seeking intentions. Perceived severity and barriers were related to help-seeking intentions in both groups. Conclusions Outreach efforts that particularly emphasize the benefits of seeking mental health services may be a particularly promising approach to address underutilization. These findings have implications in help-seeking promotion and outreach. PMID:26098454

  17. Strategies for Working with Asian Americans in Mental Health: Community Members' Policy Perspectives and Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Weng, Suzie S; Spaulding-Givens, Jennifer

    2017-01-04

    This qualitative study used snowball sampling of individuals known to provide informal assistance to Asian American community members with their mental health problems in a locality in the South where there has been an exponential increase of the Asian American population. The major themes found include: (1) the existence of cultural, language, knowledge, and transportation barriers and the importance of policy in addressing them; (2) the impact of the model minority myth and the need for inclusive policymaking; and (3) the unique service and policy needs of immigrants. Findings demonstrate the importance and value of including diverse Asian American individuals in mental health policymaking efforts.

  18. Drug use and suicidality among Asian American women who are children of immigrants.

    PubMed

    Hahm, Hyeouk Chris; Jang, Jisun; Vu, Cecilia; Alexander, L Melissa; Driscoll, Kelsie E; Lundgren, Lena

    2013-12-01

    This study investigates the association between drug use and lifetime suicidal behaviors among Asian American women (n = 720) residing throughout Massachusetts, using data collected from 2010 to 2011. Logistic regression models identified that a history of hard drug use alone or in combination with soft drug use has a significant association with both suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among Asian American women, adjusting for demographic covariates, history of psychiatric diagnosis, and family communication. These findings highlight the importance of addressing hard drug use when designing suicide prevention programs for Asian American women.

  19. Asian Versus Non-Asian Outcomes in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A North American Population-based Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Sarah N; Ho, Cheryl; Laskin, Janessa; Zhai, Yongliang; Mak, Paul; Wu, Jonn

    2016-12-01

    The effect of ethnicity on nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) outcomes is unclear. This retrospective analysis examines survival and the impact of concurrent chemoradiation (chemoRT) among Asian and non-Asian patients. Subjects included 380 consecutive patients with NPC treated at a Canadian institution from 2000 to 2009. Five-year Kaplan-Meier progression-free survival (PFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) were compared between Asian (n=279) and non-Asian (n=101) subjects. Multivariable analysis was performed using Cox regression modeling. Two-variable interaction terms with concurrent chemoRT were used to examine whether concurrent chemoRT conferred different effects among subgroups. Asian subjects presented with earlier stage (P=0.005), were younger, had better performance status, and were less likely smokers (all P<0.001). Survival among Asian versus non-Asian subjects with stage I/II NPC were: PFS 68% versus 59% (P=0.04), DSS 87% versus 77% (P=0.08), and OS 84% versus 74% (P=0.003). Corresponding rates with stage III/IVA/IVB disease were PFS 49% versus 42% (P=0.12), DSS 72% versus 46% (P=0.001), and OS 70% versus 44% (P<0.001). On multivariable analysis, Asian ethnicity, age below 65 years, ECOG performance status 0-1, early stage, staging MRI use, and concurrent chemoRT were associated with improved DSS and OS (P<0.05). On testing interactions with concurrent chemoRT, Asian versus non-Asian ethnicity was significant (hazard ratio 3.9), suggesting that concurrent chemoRT conferred more benefit among non-Asian compared with Asian subjects. In this population-based study, Asian ethnicity was associated with improved DSS and OS. Concurrent chemoRT conferred more benefit among non-Asian compared with Asian subjects.

  20. Cancer incidence among Asian American populations in the United States, 2009-2011

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hongbin; Pinheiro, Paulo S.; Xu, Jianbo; Amei, Amei

    2017-01-01

    Cancer incidence disparities exist among specific Asian American populations. However, the existing reports exclude data from large metropoles like Chicago, Houston, and New York. Moreover, incidence rates by subgroup have been underestimated due to the exclusion of Asians with unknown subgroup. Cancer incidence data for 2009 to 2011 for eight states accounting for 68% of the Asian American population were analyzed. Race for cases with unknown subgroup was imputed using stratified proportion models by sex, age, cancer site, and geographic regions. Age-standardized incidence rates were calculated for 17 cancer sites for the six largest Asian subgroups. Our analysis comprised 90,709 Asian and 1,327,727 non-Hispanic white cancer cases. Asian Americans had significantly lower overall cancer incidence rates than non-Hispanic whites (336.5 per 100,000 and 541.9 for men, 299.6 and 449.3 for women, respectively). Among specific Asian subgroups, Filipino men (377.4) and Japanese women (342.7) had the highest overall incidence rates while South Asian men (297.7) and Korean women (275.9) had the lowest. In comparison to non-Hispanic whites and other Asian subgroups, significantly higher risks were observed for colorectal cancer among Japanese, stomach cancer among Koreans, nasopharyngeal cancer among Chinese, thyroid cancer among Filipinos, and liver cancer among Vietnamese. South Asians had remarkably low lung cancer risk. Overall, Asian Americans have a lower cancer risk than non-Hispanic whites, except for nasopharyngeal, liver and stomach cancers. The unique portrayal of cancer incidence patterns among specific Asian subgroups in this study provides a new baseline for future cancer surveillance research and health policy. PMID:26661680

  1. Nativity, US Length of Residence, and BMI Among Diverse Asian American Ethnic Groups.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Lisa G; Sanchez-Vaznaugh, Emma V; Sánchez, Brisa N

    2015-10-01

    Little is known about body mass index (BMI) patterns by nativity and length of US residence among Asian American ethnic groups. We used linear regression to examine the association of BMI with nativity and length of residence across six ethnic groups (Filipinos, Japanese, Chinese, Koreans, South Asians, and Vietnamese) using data from the California Health Interview Study. There was significant heterogeneity in the nativity/length of residence patterns in unadjusted BMI across ethnic groups (p < 0.001). In fully adjusted models, heterogeneity was attenuated (p = 0.05) with BMI among all US-born ethnic groups significantly higher than BMI for immigrants with the exception of South Asians. Longer US residence was positively associated with BMI among all groups, though only significant among Filipinos and Koreans. Programs targeting Asian Americans should take into consideration BMI patterns by nativity and US length of residence among diverse Asian American ethnic groups.

  2. Temporal Trends in Colorectal Cancer Screening among Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Fedewa, Stacey A; Sauer, Ann Goding; Siegel, Rebecca L; Smith, Robert A; Torre, Lindsey A; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2016-06-01

    Asian Americans (AA) are less likely to be screened for colorectal cancer compared with non-Hispanic Whites (NHW), with a widening disparity for some AA subgroups in the early 2000s. Whether these patterns have continued in more recent years is unknown. We examined temporal trends in colorectal cancer screening among AA overall compared with NHWs and by AA subgroup (Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino, South Asian, Vietnamese) using data from the 2003, 2005, 2007, and 2009 California Health Interview Surveys. Unadjusted (PR) and adjusted (aPR) prevalence ratios for colorectal cancer screening, accounting for sociodemographic, health care, and acculturation factors, were calculated for respondents ages 50 to 75 years (NHW n = 60,125; AA n = 6,630). Between 2003 and 2009, colorectal cancer screening prevalence increased from 43.3% to 64.6% in AA (P ≤ 0.001) and from 58.1% to 71.4% in NHW (P ≤ 0.001). Unadjusted colorectal cancer screening was significantly lower among AA compared with NHW in 2003 [PR = 0.74; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.68-0.82], 2005 (PR = 0.78; 95% CI, 0.72-0.84), 2007 (PR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.85-0.96), and 2009 (PR = 0.90; 95% CI, 0.84-0.97), though disparities narrowed over time. After adjustment, there were no significant differences in colorectal cancer screening between the two groups, except in 2003. In subgroup analyses, between 2003 and 2009, colorectal cancer screening significantly increased by 22% in Japanese, 56% in Chinese, 47% in Filipino, and 94% in Koreans. In our study of California residents, colorectal cancer screening disparities between AA and NHW narrowed, but were not eliminated and screening prevalence among AA remains below nationwide goals, including the Healthy People 2020 goal of increasing colorectal cancer screening prevalence to 70.5%. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(6); 995-1000. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Social and clinically-relevant cardiovascular risk factors in Asian Americans adults: NHANES 2011-2014.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Sandra E; Mustafa, Mehnaz; Pentakota, Sri Ram; Kim, Soyeon; Hastings, Katherine G; Amadi, Chioma; Palaniappan, Latha

    2017-02-17

    Little evidence exists examining cardiovascular risk factors among Asian Americans and how social determinants such as nativity status and education pattern risk in the United States (U.S.) context. We used the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which purposely oversampled Asian Americans from 2011 to 2014, and examined prevalence of Type II diabetes, smoking and obesity for Asian Americans (n=1363) and non-Latino Whites (n=4121). We classified Asian Americans as U.S. or foreign-born and by years in the U.S. Obesity status was based on standard body mass index (BMI) cut points of ≥30kg/m(2) and Asian-specific cut points (BMI≥25kg/m(2)) that may be more clinically relevant for this population. We fit separate logistic regression models for each outcome using complex survey design methods and tested for the joint effect of race, nativity and education on each outcome. Diabetes and obesity prevalence (applying Asian-specific BMI cut points) were higher among Asian Americans when compared to non-Latino Whites but smoking prevalence was lower. These patterns remained in fully adjusted models and showed small increases with longer duration in the U.S. Joint effects models showed higher odds of prevalent Type II diabetes and obesity (Asian-specific) for foreign-born Asians, regardless of years in the U.S. and slightly higher risk for lowe ducation, when compared to non-Latino Whites with high education. Smoking models showed significant interaction effects between race and education for non-Latino Whites only. Our study supports the premise that social as well as clinical factors should be considered when developing health initiatives for Asian Americans.

  4. Are Asian American women at higher risk of severe perineal lacerations?

    PubMed

    Quist-Nelson, Johanna; Hua Parker, Meiling; Berghella, Vincenzo; Biba Nijjar, J

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate whether Asian race is an independent risk factor for severe perineal lacerations. We performed a nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study examining the relationship between Asian race and severe perineal lacerations (third and fourth degree). The data were collected from the 2012 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project National Inpatient Sample (HCUP-NIS). Characteristics of Asian American women were compared with those of non-Asian women. The primary outcome of interest was severe perineal lacerations. Multivariable logistic regression was used to refine the associations between Asian race and severe perineal lacerations while adjusting for confounding effects. Results were compared with previously published data using a pooled odds ratio. 2,270,044 Women with singleton vaginal deliveries were identified, and 120,452 (5.3%) were Asian. After adjusting for confounders, Asian women were more likely to experience severe perineal lacerations than any other racial group (3.5% versus 6.3%, adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.50, 99% CI 1.29-1.74, p < 0.0001). Analysis of literature indicated that Asian American women are 74% more likely to experience severe perineal lacerations (aOR 1.74, 99% CI 1.72-1.76, p < 0.0001) than non-Asians. Asian race is an independent risk factor for severe perineal lacerations in the United States.

  5. Commonalities and Diversities among Asian Americans for Considerations in Special Education and Related Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Esther Kau-To

    The paper examines diversities and commonalities among Asian Americans and draws implications relative to special education service for Asian minorities. The first section focuses on diversities and complexities in this group with subsections on origin, sociocultural background prior to migration, immigration and settlement history, degree and…

  6. Predictors of Nonattendance of Intake Appointments among Five Asian American Client Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akutsu, Phillip D.; Tsuru, Garyn K.; Chu, Joyce P.

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship of demographic, clinical, and service program factors with preintake attrition rates, or the nonattendance of intake appointments, among 5 Asian American groups at an ethnic-specific program. The results show that younger age, earlier appointment, Asian language match with the prescreening interviewer, and…

  7. The Treatment of Asian Americans in U.S. History Textbooks Published 1994-1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harada, Violet H.

    This study analyzes the treatment of Asian Americans in a group of selected high school U.S. history textbooks published between 1994 and 1996. Using a content analysis technique, nine of the textbooks most widely used in Hawaii were evaluated in terms of Asian groups represented, events and personalities identified, and multicultural concepts…

  8. Voices from Little Asia: "Blue Dragon" Teens Reflect on Their Experiences as Asian Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowart, Melinda F.; Wilhelm, Ron W.; Cowart, Ronald E.

    1998-01-01

    Outlines the response of public agencies to the Asian immigrant community in Dallas, Texas, and problems that exist for these immigrants. Relates the story of the creation of the "Blue Dragons" Explorer Post that provides social support and service opportunities for Asian-American teens. Includes suggestions for educators from "Blue…

  9. The Economic Status of Americans of Asian Descent: An Clearinghouse Publication 95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duleep, Harriet Orcutt; And Others

    This report addresses the issues of whether discrimination adversely affects the economic status of Asian Americans today, and whether this group's relative economic status has improved over time. The study separately examines the economic status of the following six largest Asian groups in America: (1) Chinese; (2) Filipinos; (3) Japanese; (4)…

  10. Another Look at the Melting Pot: Perceptions of Asian-American Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minatoya, Lydia Yuriko; Sedlacek, William E.

    1981-01-01

    Asian-American undergraduates (N=139) responded to a questionnaire covering demographic information and attitudes toward education, family, interracial contact, and racial discrimination. Findings suggested the continuing importance of Asian values even though respondents had little contact with members of their racial groups. (Author/RC)

  11. Identity Issues in Asian-American Children's and Adolescent Literature (1999-2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yi-chen

    2009-01-01

    Published research suggests that literature should transmit ethnic and societal values as well as reassure one's own confidence and self-respect. This study provides a model for examining Asian-American children's and adolescent literature critically from the perspective of identity issues. It examines fifteen award-winning Asian-American…

  12. Do Asian Americans Benefit from Race-Blind College Admissions Policies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, OiYan A.

    2017-01-01

    Opponents of affirmative action in the Fisher Supreme Court case claim that race-conscious admissions policies discriminate against Asian American applicants and impose a "higher bar" in college admissions than for other students. In their amicus brief supporting the plaintiff in the Fisher case, 80-20 states that, "Asian American…

  13. Voices from Little Asia: "Blue Dragon" Teens Reflect on Their Experiences as Asian Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowart, Melinda F.; Wilhelm, Ron W.; Cowart, Ronald E.

    1998-01-01

    Outlines the response of public agencies to the Asian immigrant community in Dallas, Texas, and problems that exist for these immigrants. Relates the story of the creation of the "Blue Dragons" Explorer Post that provides social support and service opportunities for Asian-American teens. Includes suggestions for educators from "Blue…

  14. Identity Issues in Asian-American Children's and Adolescent Literature (1999-2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yi-chen

    2009-01-01

    Published research suggests that literature should transmit ethnic and societal values as well as reassure one's own confidence and self-respect. This study provides a model for examining Asian-American children's and adolescent literature critically from the perspective of identity issues. It examines fifteen award-winning Asian-American…

  15. Comparative Experience Factors among Black, Asian, and Hispanic Americans: Coalitions or Conflicts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Talmadge

    1992-01-01

    Compares the culture, sociology, politics, and economics of African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans in the United States. Describes increased racial-ethnic national pluralism, the increased possibility of conflict between groups, and the need for dialogue and work toward coalition among these groups. (JB)

  16. Asian American Network for Cancer Awareness, Research, and Training's legacy. The first 5 years.

    PubMed

    Chen, Moon S; Shinagawa, Susan M; Bal, Dileep G; Bastani, Roshan; Chow, Edward A; Ho, Reginald C S; Jones, Lovell; McPhee, Stephen J; Senie, Ruby; Taylor, Vicky; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Stewart, Susan; Koh, Howard K; Li, Frederick P

    2006-10-15

    The Asian American Network for Cancer Awareness, Research, and Training (AANCART) is the first special populations network for Asian Americans on a national basis and includes collaborating organizations from Boston, New York, Houston, Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Hawaii, and Sacramento (where it is headquartered at the University of California, Davis). NCI funding of AANCART in 2000 brought together investigators and leaders from 9 cities across 6 states to establish an infrastructure for addressing cancer awareness, research, and training. Since 2000, AANCART has conducted needs assessments, held community awareness activities and trainings, trained trainees, sponsored National Asian American Cancer Control Academies, and produced presentations, publications, and grants. All specific aims have been attained, including the establishment of an infrastructure to promote Asian American cancer awareness, research, and training in 4 targeted regions; the establishment of partnerships to promote accrual to clinical trials, training, and pilot studies; and the formulation and successful implementation of grant-funded research to reduce the cancer burden among Asian Americans. AANCART's first 5 years have increased cancer awareness, trained special populations scientists, and advanced the field of Asian American cancer control research. Cancer 2006. (c) 2006 American Cancer Society.

  17. Molecular epidemiology of American/Asian genotype DENV-2 in Peru.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Cristhopher D; Forshey, Brett M; Juarez, Diana S; Guevara, Carolina; Leguia, Mariana; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Halsey, Eric S

    2013-08-01

    During the past decade, countries in South America have reported dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) associated with American/Asian genotype of dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2). DENV-2 strains have been associated with large outbreaks of dengue fever and DHF in numerous regions of Peru since the mid-1990s, but studies to address the origins, distribution, and genetic diversity of DENV-2 strains have been limited. To address this knowledge gap, we sequenced the envelope gene region of DENV-2 isolates from Peru, Ecuador, Paraguay, and Bolivia. Sequences were aligned and compared to a global sample of DENV-2 viruses. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the circulation of two DENV-2 genotypes in Peru: American (prior to 2001) and American/Asian (2000 to present). American/Asian genotype variants can be classified into two lineages, and these were introduced into Peru from the north (Ecuador, Colombia, and/or Venezuela) and the east (Brazil and Bolivia). American/Asian lineage II replaced lineage I after 2009. We estimate the time to the most recent common ancestor for American/Asian DENV-2 genotype in the Americas was in 1980, and 1984 and 1989 for lineages I and II, respectively. In light of evidence for increased virulence of lineage II of American/Asian DENV-2, our results support the need for continuous monitoring for the emergence of new DENV genotypes that may be associated with severe disease. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Entry risk into the juvenile justice system: African American, American Indian, Asian American, European American, and Hispanic children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Vazsonyi, Alexander T; Chen, Pan

    2010-06-01

    Findings on disproportionate minority contact remain mixed. Few empirical studies have examined to what extent entry risk into juvenile justice varies across ethnic/racial groups, and to what extent childhood aggressive behaviors foretell later deviance and entry risk. In the current study, we sought to address these shortcomings by implementing a survival analysis on a representative sample of youth followed from age 8 to 18. The sample included N = 2,754 lower to lower-middle SES youth from five different ethnic/racial groups (African American, American Indian, Asian American, European American, and Hispanic youth), part of a large-scale violence prevention effort. Aggressive behaviors were rated by teachers during elementary school, entry risk into juvenile justice was measured by official data, while SES was based on census data. Developmental entry risk into the juvenile justice system peaked at age 14 and subsequently declined. No differences were found across the four racial groups; however, Hispanic youth were at elevated risk (by 73%). Only childhood physical aggressive behavior increased entry risk (by 87%); this was above and beyond a 'simple' maturational liability we found and net any effects by sex, race/ethnicity, and SES. Some evidence suggested disproportionate minority contact, but only for Hispanic youth. Entry risk was invariant by race, but differed for males versus females and for youth from relatively higher socioeconomic status (SES) strata compared to youth from lower ones. Intervention efforts should target physically aggressive children during the elementary school years; however, some of the evidence also suggests that there exists a 'maturational liability' developmentally over time, between the ages of 8 and 18, independent of any of the focal predictors tested.

  19. The Asian-American and Pacific Islander population and the American Cancer Society initiative.

    PubMed

    Vance, Ralph

    2005-12-15

    The American Cancer Society (ACS) Nationwide Asian-American/Pacific Islander (AAPI) Initiative is a continuing collaboration between the ACS and other organizations and community groups. With a view to incorporating access to quality treatment as an over-arching principal, the objectives of the AAPI Initiative are to provide strategic oversight to the ACS for outreach to AAPI populations and to develop a nationwide plan for the purpose of making ACS programs and services available to these populations. After a series of meetings in 2002, including a joint meeting between the Asian American Network for Cancer Awareness, Research, and Training (AANCART) and the ACS, the first ACS Nationwide AAPI Council meeting was held in early 2003. The goals and objectives of this initiative are 1) to develop a plan for delivery of ACS programs and services to the AAPI population, 2) to develop a program for collaboration with organizations that can help the ACS reach its objectives, 3) to develop an advocacy program that enables the ACS to reach its objectives, and 4) to develop an income-development program to both reach and maintain these objectives. The ACS-AANCART collaboration is a great example of the type of collaboration that will make not only the ACS but also the cancer community as a whole successful in eradicating cancer as a major public health problem.

  20. Listeners' cognitive and affective reactions to English speakers with standard American English and Asian Accents.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, Megumi; Stone-Romero, Eugene F; Walter, Jennifer N

    2007-02-01

    Using a 2 (speaker accent: standard American, Asian) x 2 (speakers' sex: male, female) between-subjects design, the present study examined the effects of accent and sex on listeners' cognitive and affective reactions towards speakers with standard American English accents and Asian accents. 70 female and 27 male college students (M = 21.8 yr., SD = 4.7) listened to the audio recording of a monologue by one of the speakers in the early 20s who differed in accent and sex. Standard American English was operationalized as nonaccented English, typical of the western part of the USA, and Vietnamese-accented English was used as an exemplar of Asian-accented English. Results showed that relative to standard American-accented English speakers, Asian-accented English speakers were perceived as poorer communicators who were less potent, less threatening, and more concerned about others. These cognitive reactions to Asian-accented English speakers include (a) the general stereotype associated with an accent, status and solidarity, as well as (b) the stereotype unique to Asians as an ethnic group, being concerned for others and poorer communicators. Analysis also showed that speakers with an Asian accent evoked more negative affect and required more attention from listeners than did speakers with a standard American English accent. Implications of the study are discussed.

  1. An Integrated Conceptual Framework for the Development of Asian American Children and Youth.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Jayanthi; Li, Jin; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Tseng, Vivian; Tirrell, Jonathan; Kiang, Lisa; Mistry, Rashmita; Wang, Yijie

    2016-07-01

    The diversity of circumstances and developmental outcomes among Asian American children and youth poses a challenge for scholars interested in Asian American child development. This article addresses the challenge by offering an integrated conceptual framework based on three broad questions: (a) What are theory-predicated specifications of contexts that are pertinent for the development of Asian American children? (b) What are the domains of development and socialization that are particularly relevant? (c) How can culture as meaning-making processes be integrated in conceptualizations of development? The heuristic value of the conceptual model is illustrated by research on Asian American children and youth that examines the interconnected nature of specific features of context, pertinent aspects of development, and interpretive processes.

  2. Toward Wholesome Nurture: Challenges in the Religious Education of Asian North American Female Christians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Greer Anne Wenh-In

    1996-01-01

    Considers the special religious needs of Asian North American female Christians. Questions the effectiveness of programs and resources designed for mainstream Christians. Addresses specific areas of cultural images, interreligious self-dialogs and the impact of role models. (MJP)

  3. How much information? East Asian and North American cultural products and information search performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaitang; Masuda, Takahiko; Ito, Kenichi; Rashid, Marghalara

    2012-12-01

    Literature in cultural psychology suggests that compared with North Americans, East Asians prefer context-rich cultural products (e.g., paintings and photographs). The present article further examines the preferred amount of information in cultural products produced by East Asians and North Americans (Study 1: Society for Personality and Social Psychology conference posters; Study 2: government and university portal pages). The authors found that East Asians produced more information-rich products than did North Americans. Study 3 further examined people's information search speed when identifying target objects on mock webpages containing large amounts of information. The results indicated that East Asians were faster than North Americans in dealing with information on mock webpages with large amounts of information. Finally, the authors found that there were cultural differences as well as similarities in functional and aesthetic preferences regarding styles of information presentation. The interplay between cultural products and skills for accommodating to the cultural products is discussed.

  4. Contemporary American Success Stories. Famous People of Asian Ancestry. Volume I. A Mitchell Lane Multicultural Biography Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marvis, Barbara J.

    As part of a five-volume series this volume presents biographical sketches of persons of Asian American heritage who have made contributions to American life. Asian Americans have often been subjected to racial and ethnic prejudice, as have other easily identifiable groups of Americans. The series, written at a reading level of grades 5 to 6, but…

  5. Contemporary American Success Stories. Famous People of Asian Ancestry. Volume II. A Mitchell Lane Multicultural Biography Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marvis, Barbara J.

    As part of a five-volume series this volume presents biographical sketches of persons of Asian American heritage who have made contributions to American life. Asian Americans have often been subjected to racial and ethnic prejudice as have other easily identifiable groups of Americans. The series, written at a reading level of grades 5 to 6, but…

  6. Contemporary American Success Stories. Famous People of Asian Ancestry. Volume II. A Mitchell Lane Multicultural Biography Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marvis, Barbara J.

    As part of a five-volume series this volume presents biographical sketches of persons of Asian American heritage who have made contributions to American life. Asian Americans have often been subjected to racial and ethnic prejudice as have other easily identifiable groups of Americans. The series, written at a reading level of grades 5 to 6, but…

  7. Normative changes in ethnic and American identities and links with adjustment among Asian American adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kiang, Lisa; Witkow, Melissa R; Champagne, Mariette C

    2013-09-01

    Identity development is a highly salient task for adolescents, especially those from immigrant backgrounds, yet longitudinal research that tracks simultaneous change in ethnic identity and American identity over time has been limited. With a focus on 177 Asian American adolescents recruited from an emerging immigrant community, in the current study, we used hierarchical linear modeling and found that ethnic identity tends to remain fairly stable across the 4 years of high school, whereas American identity increases over time. When ethnic identity and American identity were examined simultaneously, consistent with existing research, ethnic identity was positively associated with positive relationships, high self-esteem, academic motivation, and lower levels of depression over time. Although American identity was not significantly associated with depression, positive links with relationships, self-esteem, and academic motivation were found. Both identities were interactively associated with academic motivation. Acculturative implications and the importance of considering the dual construction of ethnic identity and American identity in light of adolescent adjustment are discussed.

  8. Asian-Americans, Addictions, and Barriers to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tsuang, John

    2007-01-01

    Asian-American Pacific Islanders (AAPI) are one of the fastest growing minority groups in America. Due to model minority stereotypes and a lack of empirical data, AAPI have been thought to have lower than expected rates of substance use disorders and behavioral addictions. Recent data demonstrated that this conception is not true for all AAPI subgroups. As an example, rates of alcohol use disorders remain close to that of non-AAPI populations, even among AAPI that experience the flushing syndrome thought to protect from alcoholism. Another example of emerging data shows that methamphetamine dependence is particularly high (approximately 10%) among the Pacific Islander population, which is a startling figure. One behavioral addiction gaining more attention among AAPI is pathological gambling. Recent community surveys have shown that pathological gambling rates among AAPI vary but can be strikingly high. Despite the growing body of evidence that shows that addictive disorders in AAPI are significant and are not absent, there remain many barriers to treatment. These barriers include cultural values, individual factors, and practical issues. This article will review current epidemiological rates of addictive disorders among AAPI, will describe the current treatment barriers that face this population, and will provide practical solutions to breaking down these barriers. PMID:20428303

  9. Risk Factors for Childhood Obesity among Asian Americans: A Systematic Review of Literature and Recommendations for Health Care Research.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wenhua; Diep, Cassandra S; McKyer, Lisako J

    2015-05-01

    Childhood obesity has become an epidemic across all racial/ethnic groups in the U.S., including Asian Americans. With different cultures, beliefs, and lifestyles, Asian Americans may face unique sets of risk factors for childhood obesity. This review critically assesses and summarizes the literature on risk factors for childhood obesity among Asian Americans. Among the 14 studies identified, five (35.7%) used national or state-level data, seven (50%) targeted Chinese Americans, and two (14.3%) focused on Hmong Americans. Multiple risk factors for childhood obesity among Asian Americans were reported, including acculturation, generational status, and family functioning. Limitations of the literature included use of small samples, scarcity of ethnically specific data for Asian American subgroups, shortage of qualitative studies, and lack of theoretical foundation. More disaggregated studies are needed to examine the important variability that may exist in risk factors for childhood obesity among Asian American subgroups.

  10. Gestational weight gain and perinatal outcomes of subgroups of Asian-American women, Texas, 2009.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsiu-Rong; Walker, Lorraine O; Brown, Adama; Lee, Ju-Young

    2015-01-01

    Asian-American subgroups are heterogeneous, but few studies had addressed differences on gestational weight gain (GWG) and perinatal outcomes related to GWG among this growing and diverse population. The purposes of this study were to examine whether Asian-American women are at higher risk of inadequate or excessive GWG and adverse perinatal outcomes than non-Hispanic White (NH-White) women, and to compare those risks among Asian-American subgroups. This retrospective study included all singleton births to NH-Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnam, and NH-White women documented in 2009 Texas birth certificate data (N = 150,674). Data were analyzed using the χ(2) test, t test, multinomial logistic regression, and binary logistic regression. Chinese women were the reference group in the comparisons among Asian subgroups. Asian women had a higher risk of inadequate GWG and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) than NH-White women. No difference in the odds of excessive GWG was found among Asian subgroups, although Japanese women had the highest risk of inadequate GWG. After adjusting for confounders, Korean women had the lowest risk of GDM (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 0.49), whereas Filipino women and Asian Indian had the highest risks of gestational hypertension (AOR, 2.01 and 1.61), cesarean birth (AOR, 1.44 and 1.39), and low birth weight (AOR, 1.94 and 2.51) compared with Chinese women. These results support the heterogeneity of GWG and perinatal outcomes among Asian-American subgroups. The risks of adverse perinatal outcomes should be carefully evaluated separately among Asian-American subpopulations. Copyright © 2015 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Religiosity and substance use among Asian American college students: moderated effects of race and acculturation.

    PubMed

    Luk, Jeremy W; Emery, Rebecca L; Karyadi, Kenny A; Patock-Peckham, Julie A; King, Kevin M

    2013-06-01

    Religiosity is a well-established protective factor against substance use among Caucasians, but limited research has examined its role among Asian Americans. The purposes of this study were (1) to examine whether the associations between religiosity and substance use outcomes differed across Caucasians and Asian Americans, and (2) to test whether acculturation moderated the associations between religiosity and substance use outcomes among Asian Americans. We utilized a large and diverse cross-sectional sample of 839 college students to test whether race moderated the associations between religiosity and substance use outcomes (Study 1). We then replicated and extended our findings in a separate college sample of 340 Asian Americans, and examined the moderating role of acculturation on the associations between religiosity and substance use outcomes (Study 2). Controlling for age, gender, and paternal education, religiosity was protective against alcohol use, alcohol problems, and marijuana use among Caucasians but was unrelated to these outcomes among Asian Americans in Study 1. In Study 2, religiosity was protective against alcohol problems only at high levels of acculturation. Moreover, religiosity was protective against marijuana use at both high and mean levels of acculturation, but not at low levels of acculturation. The protective effects of religiosity on alcohol use and problems varied across Caucasian and Asian American college students, and religiosity protected against alcohol problems and marijuana use only among more acculturated Asian Americans. These findings underscore the need to examine culturally-specific correlates of substance use outcomes among Asian Americans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Emotion Socialization and Ethnicity: An Examination of Practices and Outcomes in African American, Asian American, and Latin American Families

    PubMed Central

    Morelen, Diana; Thomassin, Kristel

    2013-01-01

    The current review paper summarizes the literature on parental emotion socialization in ethnically diverse families in the United States. Models of emotion socialization have been primarily developed using samples of European American parents and children. As such, current categorizations of “adaptive” and “maladaptive” emotion socialization practices may not be applicable to individuals from different ethnic backgrounds. The review examines current models of emotion socialization, with particular attention paid to the demographic breakdown of the studies used to develop these models. Additionally, the review highlights studies examining emotion socialization practices in African American, Asian American, and Latin American families. The review is synthesized with summarizing themes of similarities and differences across ethnic groups, and implications for culturally sensitive research and practice are discussed. PMID:23766738

  13. Emotion socialization and ethnicity: an examination of practices and outcomes in African American, Asian American, and Latin American families.

    PubMed

    Morelen, Diana; Thomassin, Kristel

    2013-06-01

    The current review paper summarizes the literature on parental emotion socialization in ethnically diverse families in the United States. Models of emotion socialization have been primarily developed using samples of European American parents and children. As such, current categorizations of "adaptive" and "maladaptive" emotion socialization practices may not be applicable to individuals from different ethnic backgrounds. The review examines current models of emotion socialization, with particular attention paid to the demographic breakdown of the studies used to develop these models. Additionally, the review highlights studies examining emotion socialization practices in African American, Asian American, and Latin American families. The review is synthesized with summarizing themes of similarities and differences across ethnic groups, and implications for culturally sensitive research and practice are discussed.

  14. A symptom profile of depression among Asian Americans: is there evidence for differential item functioning of depressive symptoms?

    PubMed

    Kalibatseva, Z; Leong, F T L; Ham, E H

    2014-09-01

    Theoretical and clinical publications suggest the existence of cultural differences in the expression and experience of depression. Measurement non-equivalence remains a potential methodological explanation for the lower prevalence of depression among Asian Americans compared to European Americans. This study compared DSM-IV depressive symptoms among Asian Americans and European Americans using secondary data analysis of the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (CPES). The Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) was used for the assessment of depressive symptoms. Of the entire sample, 310 Asian Americans and 1974 European Americans reported depressive symptoms and were included in the analyses. Measurement variance was examined with an item response theory differential item functioning (IRT DIF) analysis. χ2 analyses indicated that, compared to Asian Americans, European American participants more frequently endorsed affective symptoms such as 'feeling depressed', 'feeling discouraged' and 'cried more often'. The IRT analysis detected DIF for four out of the 15 depression symptom items. At equal levels of depression, Asian Americans endorsed feeling worthless and appetite changes more easily than European Americans, and European Americans endorsed feeling nervous and crying more often than Asian Americans. Asian Americans did not seem to over-report somatic symptoms; however, European Americans seemed to report more affective symptoms than Asian Americans. The results suggest that there was measurement variance in a few of the depression items.

  15. Misogyny, Acculturation, and Ethnic Identity: Relation to Rape-Supportive Attitudes in Asian American College Men

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Kelly H.; Stephens, Kari A.; Lindgren, Kristen P.; George, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Asian Americans have been understudied with respect to sexuality and rape and its contributory factors. Some attitudinal research has shown that Asian American college males tend to hold more rape-supportive beliefs than their White counterparts. Generally, this research treats ethnicity as a proxy for culture rather than examining specific facets of culture per se. The current study incorporated measures of misogynistic beliefs, acculturation, and ethnic identity to investigate these ethnic differences in rape-supportive attitudes. White (n = 222) and Asian American (n = 155) college men read an acquaintance rape vignette and evaluated it on four judgments: how much they blamed the perpetrator and the victim, how credible they viewed the victim’s refusal, and to what degree they defined the event as rape. Consistent with previous research, Asian American men made more rape-supportive judgments than Whites. This relationship was partially mediated by misogynistic beliefs for all judgments except the extent to which they defined the vignette as rape. Among Asian Americans, acculturation was negatively associated with all four rape vignette judgments above and beyond generational status, and ethnic identity was positively associated with two of the four judgments above and beyond acculturation and generational status. These findings suggest that cultural constructs are relevant to understanding rape-supportive attitudes among Asian American men, and may be useful for promoting culturally enhanced theoretical models of rape and sexual assault prevention efforts, as well as a deeper understanding of cultural influences on sexuality. PMID:21290256

  16. Misogyny, acculturation, and ethnic identity: relation to rape-supportive attitudes in Asian American college men.

    PubMed

    Koo, Kelly H; Stephens, Kari A; Lindgren, Kristen P; George, William H

    2012-08-01

    Asian Americans have been understudied with respect to sexuality and rape and its contributory factors. Some attitudinal research has shown that Asian American college males tend to hold more rape-supportive beliefs than their White counterparts. Generally, this research treats ethnicity as a proxy for culture rather than examining specific facets of culture per se. The current study incorporated measures of misogynistic beliefs, acculturation, and ethnic identity to investigate these ethnic differences in rape-supportive attitudes. White (n = 222) and Asian American (n = 155) college men read an acquaintance rape vignette and evaluated it on four judgments: how much they blamed the perpetrator and the victim, how credible they viewed the victim's refusal, and to what degree they defined the event as rape. Consistent with previous research, Asian American men made more rape-supportive judgments than Whites. This relationship was partially mediated by misogynistic beliefs for all judgments except the extent to which they defined the vignette as rape. Among Asian Americans, acculturation was negatively associated with all four rape vignette judgments above and beyond generational status, and ethnic identity was positively associated with two of the four judgments above and beyond acculturation and generational status. These findings suggest that cultural constructs are relevant to understanding rape-supportive attitudes among Asian American men, and may be useful for promoting culturally enhanced theoretical models of rape and sexual assault prevention efforts, as well as a deeper understanding of cultural influences on sexuality.

  17. U.S. Mental Health Policy: Addressing the Neglect of Asian Americans

    PubMed Central

    Nagayama Hall, Gordon C.; Yee, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    Although Asian Americans are proportionally the fastest-growing ethnic group in the United States, federal mental health policies have neglected their special needs. U.S. federal mental health policy has shifted in the past 50 years from an emphasis on increasing accessibility to treatment to improving the quality of care and focusing on the brain as the basis of mental illness. However, the mental health needs of Asian Americans have been a relatively low priority. Myths about Asian Americans that have led to the general neglect of their mental health needs are that they: (a) are a small group; (b) are a successful group and do not experience problems; and (c) do not experience mental health disparities. Nevertheless, Asian Americans are a significant proportion of the population which experiences acculturative stress and discrimination that are often associated with psychopathology. However, Asian Americans who experience psychopathology are less likely than other groups to use mental health services. Political efforts must be made to get Asian Americans into positions of leadership and power in which they can make decisions about mental health policy priorities. PMID:24490000

  18. Perceived discrimination and psychological distress among Asian Americans: does education matter?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Hong, Seunghye

    2013-10-01

    Using data from the National Latino and Asian American Study, this work examines if and how perceived everyday discrimination is associated with psychological distress among Asian Americans and whether this association varies by important structural factors as education and place of education. Findings reveal that perception of discrimination is associated with increased levels of psychological distress. Most importantly, education moderates the discrimination-distress association such that the detrimental effect of discrimination is stronger for Asian Americans with college or more levels of education than for Asian Americans with less than college levels of education. Place of education further conditions the moderating effect of education: The foreign-educated Asian Americans with higher levels of education are affected most negatively by discrimination compared to others. This study highlights (1) the significant joint role of education and place of education in conditioning the relationship between perceived discrimination and psychological distress, and (2) unique features of education in improving our understanding of Asian Americans' mental health.

  19. Health risk behaviors among five Asian American subgroups in California: identifying intervention priorities.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Annette E; Crespi, Catherine M; Alano, Ryan E; Sudan, Madhuri; Bastani, Roshan

    2012-10-01

    This analysis assessed the prevalence of excess body weight, physical inactivity and alcohol and tobacco use in Asian American subgroups. Using 2005 California Health Interview Survey data, we estimated the prevalence of body mass index (BMI) categories using both standard and World Health Organization-proposed Asian-specific categories, physical inactivity, and alcohol and tobacco use for Chinese (n = 1,285), Japanese (n = 421), Korean (n = 620), Filipino (n = 659) and Vietnamese (n = 480) Americans in California. About 80% of Japanese and Filipino American men and 70% of Korean American men were "increased/high risk" by Asian-specific BMI categories. Most Asian American subgroups were more likely to walk for transportation than non-Hispanic whites, but less likely to report other physical activities. Highest smoking and binge drinking prevalences were among Korean, Vietnamese and Filipino American men and Japanese and Korean American women. These results suggest risk profiles for each Asian American subgroup to consider when setting priorities for health promotion programs.

  20. Leadership perceptions as a function of race-occupation fit: the case of Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Sy, Thomas; Shore, Lynn M; Strauss, Judy; Shore, Ted H; Tram, Susanna; Whiteley, Paul; Ikeda-Muromachi, Kristine

    2010-09-01

    On the basis of the connectionist model of leadership, we examined perceptions of leadership as a function of the contextual factors of race (Asian American, Caucasian American) and occupation (engineering, sales) in 3 experiments (1 student sample and 2 industry samples). Race and occupation exhibited differential effects for within- and between-race comparisons. With regard to within-race comparisons, leadership perceptions of Asian Americans were higher when race-occupation was a good fit (engineer position) than when race-occupation was a poor fit (sales position) for the two industry samples. With regard to between-race comparisons, leadership perceptions of Asian Americans were low relative to those of Caucasian Americans. Additionally, when race-occupation was a good fit for Asian Americans, such individuals were evaluated higher on perceptions of technical competence than were Caucasian Americans, whereas they were evaluated lower when race-occupation was a poor fit. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that race affects leadership perceptions through the activation of prototypic leadership attributes (i.e., implicit leadership theories). Implications for the findings are discussed in terms of the connectionist model of leadership and leadership opportunities for Asian Americans. Copyright 2010 APA, all rights reserved