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Sample records for asian foot-and-mouth disease

  1. Foot-and-mouth disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals. An outbreak of FMD can have a significant economic impact because of the restrictions on international trade of susceptible animals and their products with FMD-free countries. In this chapter we discuss vario...

  2. [Hand, foot and mouth disease].

    PubMed

    Barriere, H; Berger, M; Billaudel, S

    1976-11-16

    Two characteristic cases encountered in young adults led the authors to present the hand foot and mouth syndrome. They report the characteristic distribution and vesicular appearance of the lesions. The course was benign. The viral origin of the disease was more or less easily confirmed by cell culture, inoculation in new born mice and demonstration of antibodies. Usually the virus was a Coxackie A 16. However in one of the authors cases, an Echo 11 was demonstrated. The apparent rareness of the disease may be explained by lack of recognition.

  3. Foot-and-Mouth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grubman, Marvin J.; Baxt, Barry

    2004-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. The disease was initially described in the 16th century and was the first animal pathogen identified as a virus. Recent FMD outbreaks in developed countries and their significant economic impact have increased the concern of governments worldwide. This review describes the reemergence of FMD in developed countries that had been disease free for many years and the effect that this has had on disease control strategies. The etiologic agent, FMD virus (FMDV), a member of the Picornaviridae family, is examined in detail at the genetic, structural, and biochemical levels and in terms of its antigenic diversity. The virus replication cycle, including virus-receptor interactions as well as unique aspects of virus translation and shutoff of host macromolecular synthesis, is discussed. This information has been the basis for the development of improved protocols to rapidly identify disease outbreaks, to differentiate vaccinated from infected animals, and to begin to identify and test novel vaccine candidates. Furthermore, this knowledge, coupled with the ability to manipulate FMDV genomes at the molecular level, has provided the framework for examination of disease pathogenesis and the development of a more complete understanding of the virus and host factors involved. PMID:15084510

  4. Foot-and-mouth disease vaccines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of domestic and wild cloven-hoofed animals. This disease has affected most areas of the world, often causing extensive epizootics in livestock, mostly farmed cattle and swine, although sheep, goats and many wild species are also susceptible...

  5. Animal health: foot-and-mouth disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is one of the most contagious viral diseases that can affect cloven-hoofed livestock and wild animals. Outbreaks of FMD have caused devastating economic losses and the slaughter of millions of animals in many regions of the world affecting the food chain and global devel...

  6. Genomics and outbreaks: foot and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Freimanis, G L; Di Nardo, A; Bankowska, K; King, D J; Wadsworth, J; Knowles, N J; King, D P

    2016-04-01

    Foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is an animal pathogen of global economic significance. Identifying the sources of outbreaks plays an important role in disease control; however, this can be confounded by the ease with which FMDV can spread via movement of infected livestock and animal products, aerosols or fomites, e.g. contaminated persons and objects. As sequencing technologies have advanced, this review highlights the uses of viral genomic data in helping to understand the global distribution and transboundary movements of FMDV, and the role that these approaches have played in control and surveillance programmes. The recent application of next-generation sequencing platforms to address important epidemiological and evolutionary challenges is discussed with particular reference to the advent of 'omics' technologies.

  7. Foot-and-mouth disease virus L peptidase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), equine rhinitis A virus (ERAV) and bovine rhinitis B virus (BRBV) comprise the genus Aphthovirus of the Picornaviridae family. Seven genera within this family, Aphthoviruses, Cardioviruses, Erboviruses (ERBV), Kobuviruses, Senecaviruses, Sapeloviruses, and Tescho...

  8. Foot-and-mouth disease in tropical wildlife.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Aramis Augusto

    2004-10-01

    This review of foot-and-mouth disease in cloven-hoofed, free-living animals, describes the disease, the wide range of the hosts, the carrier state, and the interrelationship between disease in domestic livestock and wildlife. This information becomes even more crucial to the development of control strategies when linked to the process of pathogenesis and the epidemiology of the disease.

  9. Foot-and-mouth disease: global status and Indian perspective

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and transboundary viral disease of domesticated and wild cloven-hoofed animals. Wide prevalence of the disease in Asia and Africa associated with huge economic loss to the livestock farming and industry has increased the concern worldwide. The di...

  10. Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease Preliminarily Diagnosed as Hypochondriasis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Michael Jay; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A case in which a dental student with hand, foot, and mouth disease was told he had "medical student disease" (MSD), or hypochondriasis, is related; literature pertaining to the occurrence and treatment of MSD is reviewed, and the importance of care in approaches to both students and patients are discussed. (MSE)

  11. Foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Nick J; Wadsworth, Jemma; Reid, Scott M; Swabey, Katherine G; El-Kholy, Alaa A; Abd El-Rahman, Adel Omar; Soliman, Hatem M; Ebert, Katja; Ferris, Nigel P; Hutchings, Geoffrey H; Statham, Robert J; King, Donald P; Paton, David J

    2007-10-01

    We describe the characterization of a foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) serotype A virus responsible for recent outbreaks of disease in Egypt. Phylogenetic analysis of VP1 nucleotide sequences demonstrated a close relationship to recent FMD virus isolates from East Africa, rather than to viruses currently circulating in the Middle East.

  12. Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Serotype A in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Wadsworth, Jemma; Reid, Scott M.; Swabey, Katherine G.; El-Kholy, Alaa A.; El-Rahman, Adel Omar Abd; Soliman, Hatem M.; Ebert, Katja; Ferris, Nigel P.; Hutchings, Geoffrey H.; Statham, Robert J.; King, Donald P.; Paton, David J.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the characterization of a foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) serotype A virus responsible for recent outbreaks of disease in Egypt. Phylogenetic analysis of VP1 nucleotide sequences demonstrated a close relationship to recent FMD virus isolates from East Africa, rather than to viruses currently circulating in the Middle East. PMID:18258017

  13. Novel approaches to foot-and-mouth disease vaccine development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The need for better Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines is not new, a report from the Research Commission on FMD, authored by F. Loeffler and P. Frosch in 1897, highlighted the need for developing a vaccine against FMD and qualified this as a devastating disease causing “severe economic damage to ...

  14. Coxsackievirus A6 and hand, foot, and mouth disease, Finland.

    PubMed

    Osterback, Riikka; Vuorinen, Tytti; Linna, Mervi; Susi, Petri; Hyypiä, Timo; Waris, Matti

    2009-09-01

    During fall 2008, an outbreak of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with onychomadesis (nail shedding) as a common feature occurred in Finland. We identified an unusual enterovirus type, coxsackievirus A6 (CVA6), as the causative agent. CVA6 infections may be emerging as a new and major cause of epidemic HFMD.

  15. Coxsackievirus A6 and Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease, Finland

    PubMed Central

    Österback, Riikka; Vuorinen, Tytti; Linna, Mervi; Susi, Petri; Hyypiä, Timo

    2009-01-01

    During fall 2008, an outbreak of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with onychomadesis (nail shedding) as a common feature occurred in Finland. We identified an unusual enterovirus type, coxsackievirus A6 (CVA6), as the causative agent. CVA6 infections may be emerging as a new and major cause of epidemic HFMD. PMID:19788821

  16. The pathogenesis of Foot-and-Mouth Disease in pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The greatest segment of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) clinical research has been dedicated to elucidating pathogenesis and enhancing vaccine protection in cattle with less efforts invested in studies that are specific to pigs. However, accumulated evidence from FMD outbreaks and experimental invest...

  17. Airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease - model intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Gloster, J; Jones, A; Redington, A; Burgin, L; Sorensen, J H; Turner, R; Dillon, M; Hullinger, P; Simpson, M; Astrup, P; Garner, G; Stewart, P; D'Amours, R; Sellers, R; Paton, D

    2008-09-04

    Foot-and-mouth disease is a highly infectious vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals caused by foot-and-mouth disease virus. It spreads by direct contact between animals, by animal products (milk, meat and semen), by mechanical transfer on people or fomites and by the airborne route - with the relative importance of each mechanism depending on the particular outbreak characteristics. Over the years a number of workers have developed or adapted atmospheric dispersion models to assess the risk of foot-and-mouth disease virus spread through the air. Six of these models were compared at a workshop hosted by the Institute for Animal Health/Met Office during 2008. A number of key issues emerged from the workshop and subsequent modelling work: (1) in general all of the models predicted similar directions for 'at risk' livestock with much of the remaining differences strongly related to differences in the meteorological data used; (2) determination of an accurate sequence of events is highly important, especially if the meteorological conditions vary substantially during the virus emission period; and (3) differences in assumptions made about virus release, environmental fate, and subsequent infection can substantially modify the size and location of the downwind risk area. Close relationships have now been established between participants, which in the event of an outbreak of disease could be readily activated to supply advice or modelling support.

  18. Foot-and-mouth disease: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals including cattle, pigs, sheep and many wildlife species. It can cause enormous economic losses when incursions occur into countries which are normally disease free. In addition, it has long-term effects within countries where the disease is endemic due to reduced animal productivity and the restrictions on international trade in animal products. The disease is caused by infection with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), a picornavirus. Seven different serotypes (and numerous variants) of FMDV have been identified. Some serotypes have a restricted geographical distribution, e.g. Asia-1, whereas others, notably serotype O, occur in many different regions. There is no cross-protection between serotypes and sometimes protection conferred by vaccines even of the same serotype can be limited. Thus it is important to characterize the viruses that are circulating if vaccination is being used for disease control. This review describes current methods for the detection and characterization of FMDVs. Sequence information is increasingly being used for identifying the source of outbreaks. In addition such information can be used to understand antigenic change within virus strains. The challenges and opportunities for improving the control of the disease within endemic settings, with a focus on Eurasia, are discussed, including the role of the FAO/EuFMD/OIE Progressive Control Pathway. Better control of the disease in endemic areas reduces the risk of incursions into disease-free regions. PMID:24308718

  19. Modelling vaccination strategies against foot-and-mouth disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeling, M. J.; Woolhouse, M. E. J.; May, R. M.; Davies, G.; Grenfell, B. T.

    2003-01-01

    Vaccination has proved a powerful defence against a range of infectious diseases of humans and animals. However, its potential to control major epidemics of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in livestock is contentious. Using an individual farm-based model, we consider either national prophylactic vaccination campaigns in advance of an outbreak, or combinations of reactive vaccination and culling strategies during an epidemic. Consistent with standard epidemiological theory, mass prophylactic vaccination could reduce greatly the potential for a major epidemic, while the targeting of high-risk farms increases efficiency. Given sufficient resources and preparation, a combination of reactive vaccination and culling might control ongoing epidemics. We also explore a reactive strategy, `predictive' vaccination, which targets key spatial transmission loci and can reduce markedly the long tail that characterizes many FMD epidemics. These analyses have broader implications for the control of human and livestock infectious diseases in heterogeneous spatial landscapes.

  20. Foot-and-mouth disease virus receptors: multiple gateways to initiate infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Since its discovery over 100 years ago as the causative agent of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), research has been directed at understanding the biology of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) so as to be able to control this devastating and highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed livestock. Giv...

  1. Foot-and-mouth disease virus modulates cellular vimentin for virus survival

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), the causative agent of foot-and-mouth disease, is an Apthovirus within the Picornaviridae family. During infection with FMDV, several host cell membrane rearrangements occur to form sites of viral replication. The largest viral protein in the replication complex,...

  2. Global foot-and-mouth disease research update and gap analysis: 7 - pathogenesis and molecular biology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2014, the GFRA (Global Foot-and-mouth disease Research Alliance) conducted a gap analysis of FMD (Foot-and-Mouth Disease) research. This work has been updated and reported in a series of papers, in this article we report findings in the fields of 1) pathogenesis and 2) molecular biology. The arti...

  3. Hand, foot and mouth disease--outbreak in Romania?

    PubMed

    Chiriac, Anca; Foia, Liliana; Chiriac, Anca; Nanescu, Sonia; Filip, Florina; Solovan, C; Gorduza, E V

    2013-01-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is a viral illness usually occurring during the summer months in children younger than 5 years of age. In the North-East area of Romania the incidence is usually low, each dermatologist reporting 1-2 cases or even less per year. The diagnosis is usually based on the characteristic clinical aspect: vesicles and papules on the hands and feet and superficial oral ulcers. HFMD is typically a benign and self-limiting disease that resolves in approximately 7 days; in Asia there have been few reported severe cases that developed neurological complications and even death, while in certain areas of China this disease is a more and more serious public health problem. In the summer of 2012 in North-East Romania numerous cases of disease have been reported, some with atypical clinical manifestations and most of them with mild or moderate forms of disease. The present article is a discussion on one of these cases. The diagnosis was made based on lesions location and clinical appearance. An outbreak of HFMD should be confirmed by virology tests.

  4. Foot and mouth disease: a look from the wild side.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Genevieve V; Domenech, Joseph; Thiermann, Alex R; Karesh, William B

    2013-10-01

    We review the literature and discuss control options regarding foot and mouth disease (FMD) in wildlife around the world. There are more than 100 species of wild, feral, laboratory, or domesticated animals that have been infected naturally or experimentally with FMD virus. Apart from the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in sub-Saharan Africa, wildlife has not been demonstrated to play a significant role in the maintenance of FMD. More often, wildlife are passively infected when outbreaks of FMD occur in domestic livestock, and, in some wild ungulates, infection results in severe disease. Efforts to control FMD in wildlife may not be successful when the disease is endemic in livestock and may cause more harm to wildlife, human livelihoods, and domestic animals. Currently in sub-Saharan Africa, the complete eradication of FMD on a subcontinental scale in the near term is not possible, given the presence of FMD-infected African buffalo and the existence of weak veterinary infrastructures in some FMD-endemic countries. Therefore efforts to control the disease should be aimed at improved vaccines and improved use of vaccines, improved livestock management practices, and utilization of programs that can help in disease control such as the FMD Progressive Control Program and regulatory frameworks that facilitate trade such zonation, compartmentalization, and commodity-based trade. Though not meeting the definition of wildlife used in this review, feral domestic animals warrant a special concern with regard to FMD control.

  5. Decision-support tools for foot and mouth disease control.

    PubMed

    Morris, R S; Sanson, R L; Stern, M W; Stevenson, M; Wilesmith, J W

    2002-12-01

    Recent experience with foot and mouth disease (FMD) has shown that large and very costly epidemics can occur in countries considered extremely unlikely to experience the disease. The consequences of an introduction are much more severe than in the past and effective control is more difficult to achieve. Few countries have developed effective risk management strategies and information-based response systems to respond to these developments. The authors describe the tools which can be employed to minimise the impact of a disease incursion, using the example of FMD. To make such systems effective, the development of a national farms database in advance, including geo-referencing, is highly desirable. This greatly enhances the power of the decision-support tools, which can then be applied as soon as a serious disease incursion has been detected. These tools include procedures to detect infected farms promptly, to protect as yet uninfected farms against exposure to virus and to manage control policies. Epidemiological evaluation and prediction tools have advanced particularly rapidly and can guide the choice of control policies during an outbreak. Integrated decision-support systems offer the best method of managing FMD outbreaks to minimise the cost and size of the epidemics.

  6. Is a multivalent hand, foot, and mouth disease vaccine feasible?

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Michel; Chong, Pele

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus A infections are the primary cause of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in infants and young children. Although enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16) are the predominant causes of HFMD epidemics worldwide, EV-A71 has emerged as a major neurovirulent virus responsible for severe neurological complications and fatal outcomes. HFMD is a serious health threat and economic burden across the Asia-Pacific region. Inactivated EV-A71 vaccines have elicited protection against EV-A71 but not against CV-A16 infections in large efficacy trials. The current development of a bivalent inactivated EV-A71/CV-A16 vaccine is the next step toward that of multivalent HFMD vaccines. These vaccines should ultimately include other prevalent pathogenic coxsackieviruses A (CV-A6 and CV-A10), coxsackieviruses B (B3 and B5) and echovirus 30 that often co-circulate during HFMD epidemics and can cause severe HFMD, aseptic meningitis and acute viral myocarditis. The prospect and challenges for the development of such multivalent vaccines are discussed. PMID:26009802

  7. A practitioner's primer on foot-and-mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Musser, Jeffrey M B

    2004-04-15

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is caused by an RNA virus of the genus Aphthovirus; 7 immunologically distinct serotypes of the virus have been identified. Susceptible species are mainly domestic and wild even-toed ungulates, such as cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, bison, and deer. All body fluids of infected animals can contain the virus and are considered infective. The primary mode of transmission is animal-to-animal transmission through inhalation or ingestion of aerosols containing the virus. The virus can also be spread mechanically by contaminated organic debris and fomites and can survive for 48 hours on human oral and nasal mucosa and be spread to uninfected animals in this manner. There is a rapid progression of clinical signs after an animal becomes infected, and the virus spreads rapidly throughout a herd. Clinical signs include excessive salivation; fever; vesicles and erosions of the oral and nasal mucosa, coronary band, interdigital area, and teats; lameness; sloughing of claws; reluctance to move; anorexia; mastitis; decreased milk production; and abortion or weak newborns. In mature animals, FMD has high morbidity and low mortality rates. Infected animals can become inapparent carriers of the virus.

  8. Is a multivalent hand, foot, and mouth disease vaccine feasible?

    PubMed

    Klein, Michel; Chong, Pele

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus A infections are the primary cause of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in infants and young children. Although enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16) are the predominant causes of HFMD epidemics worldwide, EV-A71 has emerged as a major neurovirulent virus responsible for severe neurological complications and fatal outcomes. HFMD is a serious health threat and economic burden across the Asia-Pacific region. Inactivated EV-A71 vaccines have elicited protection against EV-A71 but not against CV-A16 infections in large efficacy trials. The current development of a bivalent inactivated EV-A71/CV-A16 vaccine is the next step toward that of multivalent HFMD vaccines. These vaccines should ultimately include other prevalent pathogenic coxsackieviruses A (CV-A6 and CV-A10), coxsackieviruses B (B3 and B5) and echovirus 30 that often co-circulate during HFMD epidemics and can cause severe HFMD, aseptic meningitis and acute viral myocarditis. The prospect and challenges for the development of such multivalent vaccines are discussed.

  9. Vaccination: foot-and-mouth disease experience in South America.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, I E; Malirat, V; Neitzert, E; Correa Melo, E

    2004-01-01

    Vaccination against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) constitutes an important component of the policy for its control and eradication in South America. Considering that immunization may not impair subclinical infection, it became advisable to ally to vaccination campaigns a surveillance instrument to monitor silent viral circulation. Novel approaches for the evaluation of antibodies to FMD non-capsid proteins (NCPs), developed and validated at PANAFTOSA proved valuable for assessing viral circulation in immunized populations. The extensive and coordinated application in South America of vaccination together with this serosurvey tool indicated the effectiveness of systematic vaccination to prevent FMD spread and to restrain silent viral circulation intra- and inter- herds, and gave input to an old controversy related to the real epidemiological significance, if any, of carrier animals under the vaccination conditions in South America. The fitness of NCP tests to assess viral circulation in a population supported the incorporation into the OIE code of the "free of FMD with vaccination" category as a step prior to the recognition of the "free of FMD without vaccination" category. Likewise it released the path to allow animals, vaccinated for protective purposes during emergencies, to live for the term of their productive lives.

  10. The Hampshire epidemic of foot-and-mouth disease, 1967.

    PubMed

    Sellers, R F; Forman, A J

    1973-03-01

    An analysis was made of the spread of foot-and-mouth disease during the epidemic in Hampshire in January and February 1967. To explain the pattern of spread, it had to be postulated that virus was present seven days before the first outbreak was reported. It is suggested that the disease occurred initially in pigs fed on infected meat and that the virus was subsequently disseminated from the local abattoir, where the pigs were killed, to four farms by movement of animals, slaughterhouse waste, people or vehicles, and to fifteen by the airborne route. Subsequent spread from these farms was by movement in two instances and by the airborne route in five. The source and route of infection of the last farm in the outbreak were not determined.The risk of spread through movement was associated more with carriage of infected slaughterhouse waste, movement of animals, people or vehicles carrying animals than through collection of milk, artificial insemination or movement of other types of vehicles. Outbreaks of disease among pigs gave rise to more secondary spread than outbreaks in cattle. Secondary outbreaks attributed to airborne spread occurred only in ruminants. Most airborne spread was into areas of high livestock density and cattle in the larger herds became infected. Airborne spread could be correlated with wind direction and speed but not with rain. The reduction in the number of outbreaks at the end of the epidemic could be attributed to the elimination of the largest sources of virus, the control of movements and the fact that in all instances except two the wind was blowing virus over towns and out to sea, to areas of low stock density and to areas where animals had been killed.

  11. The Epidemiology of Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Wee Ming; Bogich, Tiffany; Siegel, Karen; Jin, Jing; Chong, Elizabeth Y.; Tan, Chong Yew; Chen, Mark IC; Horby, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Context: Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is a widespread pediatric disease caused primarily by human enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) and Coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16). Objective: This study reports a systematic review of the epidemiology of HFMD in Asia. Data Sources: PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar were searched up to December 2014. Study Selection: Two reviewers independently assessed studies for epidemiologic and serologic information about prevalence and incidence of HFMD against predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Data Extraction: Two reviewers extracted answers for 8 specific research questions on HFMD epidemiology. The results are checked by 3 others. Results: HFMD is found to be seasonal in temperate Asia with a summer peak and in subtropical Asia with spring and fall peaks, but not in tropical Asia; evidence of a climatic role was identified for temperate Japan. Risk factors for HFMD include hygiene, age, gender and social contacts, but most studies were underpowered to adjust rigorously for confounding variables. Both community-level and school-level transmission have been implicated, but their relative importance for HFMD is inconclusive. Epidemiologic indices are poorly understood: No supporting quantitative evidence was found for the incubation period of EV-A71; the symptomatic rate of EV-A71/Coxsackievirus A16 infection was from 10% to 71% in 4 studies; while the basic reproduction number was between 1.1 and 5.5 in 3 studies. The uncertainty in these estimates inhibits their use for further analysis. Limitations: Diversity of study designs complicates attempts to identify features of HFMD epidemiology. Conclusions: Knowledge on HFMD remains insufficient to guide interventions such as the incorporation of an EV-A71 vaccine in pediatric vaccination schedules. Research is urgently needed to fill these gaps. PMID:27273688

  12. Introduction and history of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Mahy, B W J

    2005-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) has been recognized as a significant epidemic disease threatening the cattle industry since the sixteenth century, and in the late nineteenth century it was shown by Loeffler and Frosch to be caused by a submicroscopic, filterable transmissible agent, smaller than any known bacteria. The agent causing FMD was thus the first virus of vertebrates to be discovered, soon after the discovery of tobacco mosaic virus of plants. It was not until 1920 that a convenient animal model for the study of FMD virus was established by Waldmann and Pape, using guinea-pigs, and with the later development of in vitro cell culture systems for the virus, the chemical and physical properties of FMD virus were elucidated during the remainder of the twentieth century, culminating in 1989 with a complete description of the three-dimensional structure of the virion. FMD virus is classified as a species in the Aphthovirus genus of the family Picornaviridae. The virus is acid labile, and the genome RNA contains a characteristic tract of polyC located about 360 nucleotides from the 5' terminus. Seven main serotypes exist throughout the world, as well as numerous subtypes. The World Reference Laboratory for FMD is located at Pirbright, Surrey, UK and undertakes surveillance of FMD epidemics by serotyping as well as by genotyping isolates of the virus. A major epidemic of FMD occurred in the UK in 2001 and was caused by a virulent strain of FMD virus with origins in Asia. The advantages and some disadvantages of controlling FMD outbreaks by vaccination are discussed.

  13. Vaccination against foot-and-mouth disease I: epidemiological consequences.

    PubMed

    Backer, J A; Hagenaars, T J; Nodelijk, G; van Roermund, H J W

    2012-11-01

    An epidemic of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) can have devastating effects on animal welfare, economic revenues, the export position and society as a whole, as occurred during the 2001 FMD epidemic in the Netherlands. Following the preemptive culling of 260,000 animals during this outbreak, the Dutch government adopted emergency vaccination as preferred control policy. However, a vaccination-to-live strategy has not been applied before, posing unprecedented challenges for effectively controlling the epidemic, regaining FMD-free status and minimizing economic losses. These three topics are covered in an interdisciplinary model analysis. In this first part we evaluate whether and how emergency vaccination can be effectively applied to control FMD epidemics in the Netherlands. For this purpose we develop a stochastic individual-based model that describes FMD virus transmission between animals and between herds, taking heterogeneity between host species (cattle, sheep and pigs) into account. Our results in a densely populated livestock area with >4 farms/km(2) show that emergency ring vaccination can halt the epidemic as rapidly as preemptive ring culling, while the total number of farms to be culled is reduced by a factor of four. To achieve this reduction a larger control radius around detected farms and a corresponding adequate vaccination capacity is needed. Although sufficient for the majority of simulated epidemics with a 2 km vaccination zone, the vaccination capacity available in the Netherlands can be exhausted by pig farms that are on average ten times larger than cattle herds. Excluding pig farms from vaccination slightly increases the epidemic, but more than halves the number of animals to be vaccinated. Hobby flocks - modelled as small-sized sheep flocks - do not play a significant role in propagating the epidemic, and need not be targeted during the control phase. In a more sparsely populated livestock area in the Netherlands with about 2 farms/km(2) the

  14. Action of FAO in the control of foot and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Leforban, Yves; Gerbier, Guillaume; Rweyemamu, Mark

    2002-10-01

    This paper describes the role played by FAO in the control of foot and mouth disease. Since 1954 the FAO European Commission for the control of foot-and-mouth disease co-ordinated the regional programme for eradication of FMD in Europe. One of the major achievements of the Commission has been to prevent the introduction and spread of exotic strains of foot and mouth disease into Europe through the Balkans. FAO also supports the activities of the Foot-and-Mouth Disease World Reference Laboratory located in the Institute of Animal Health, Pirbright, UK. The Infectious Diseases/EMPRES Group of the Animal Health Service, Animal Production and Health Division of FAO, promotes a global approach to the control and eradication of transboundary animal diseases over the world. For foot and mouth disease, the strategy is based on co-ordinated regional programmes. For FAO, no sustainable progress can be achieved in FMD control over the world without addressing and supporting the control of the disease in endemic countries.

  15. Late-onset acute graft-versus-host disease mimicking hand, foot, and mouth disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahabal, Gauri; George, Leni; Bindra, Mandeep; George, Biju

    2016-01-01

    Acute skin graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) classically presents as a pruritic erythematous maculopapular rash. We describe a patient who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and presented with a hand foot and mouth disease like clinical presentation. Histopathology was suggestive of acute GVHD. This case is being reported to make dermatologists aware of this unusual presentation of GVHD. PMID:27990387

  16. Challenges of Generating and Maintaining Protective Vaccine-Induced Immune Responses for Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Nicholas A.; Lyoo, Young S.; King, Donald P.; Paton, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination can play a central role in the control of outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) by reducing both the impact of clinical disease and the extent of virus transmission between susceptible animals. Recent incursions of exotic FMD virus lineages into several East Asian countries have highlighted the difficulties of generating and maintaining an adequate immune response in vaccinated pigs. Factors that impact vaccine performance include (i) the potency, antigenic payload, and formulation of a vaccine; (ii) the antigenic match between the vaccine and the heterologous circulating field strain; and (iii) the regime (timing, frequency, and herd-level coverage) used to administer the vaccine. This review collates data from studies that have evaluated the performance of foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccines at the individual and population level in pigs and identifies research priorities that could provide new insights to improve vaccination in the future. PMID:27965966

  17. Challenges of Generating and Maintaining Protective Vaccine-Induced Immune Responses for Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Nicholas A; Lyoo, Young S; King, Donald P; Paton, David J

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination can play a central role in the control of outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) by reducing both the impact of clinical disease and the extent of virus transmission between susceptible animals. Recent incursions of exotic FMD virus lineages into several East Asian countries have highlighted the difficulties of generating and maintaining an adequate immune response in vaccinated pigs. Factors that impact vaccine performance include (i) the potency, antigenic payload, and formulation of a vaccine; (ii) the antigenic match between the vaccine and the heterologous circulating field strain; and (iii) the regime (timing, frequency, and herd-level coverage) used to administer the vaccine. This review collates data from studies that have evaluated the performance of foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccines at the individual and population level in pigs and identifies research priorities that could provide new insights to improve vaccination in the future.

  18. First Finding of Southeast Asia Topotype of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Kinmen, Taiwan, in the 2012 Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    LIN, Yeou-Liang; CHANG, Chia-Yi; PAN, Chu-Hsiang; DENG, Ming-Chung; TSAI, Hsiang-Jung; LEE, Fan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Foot-and-mouth disease virus, a member of genus Aphthovirus within the family Picornaviridae, affects cloven-hoofed animals, causing foot-and-mouth disease characterized by vesicle development. The Southeast Asia topotype, one of the topotypes within serotype O of the virus, is prevalent in some Asian countries, but had not previously been found in Taiwan. The topotype was first found in pigs in Kinmen Island, Taiwan, in 2012 and identified by nucleotide sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis. Outbreaks were reported at 4 farms, resulting in the culling of 628 pigs and 1 cattle. Pigs were the only species infected during the outbreak. The incursion of Southeast Asia topotype into Taiwan implies the expansion of the topotype in East Asia. PMID:25056674

  19. First finding of Southeast Asia topotype of foot-and-mouth disease virus in Kinmen, Taiwan, in the 2012 outbreak.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yeou-Liang; Chang, Chia-Yi; Pan, Chu-Hsiang; Deng, Ming-Chung; Tsai, Hsiang-Jung; Lee, Fan

    2014-11-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus, a member of genus Aphthovirus within the family Picornaviridae, affects cloven-hoofed animals, causing foot-and-mouth disease characterized by vesicle development. The Southeast Asia topotype, one of the topotypes within serotype O of the virus, is prevalent in some Asian countries, but had not previously been found in Taiwan. The topotype was first found in pigs in Kinmen Island, Taiwan, in 2012 and identified by nucleotide sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis. Outbreaks were reported at 4 farms, resulting in the culling of 628 pigs and 1 cattle. Pigs were the only species infected during the outbreak. The incursion of Southeast Asia topotype into Taiwan implies the expansion of the topotype in East Asia.

  20. Cloned Viral Protein Vaccine for Foot-and-Mouth Disease: Responses in Cattle and Swine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleid, Dennis G.; Yansura, Daniel; Small, Barbara; Dowbenko, Donald; Moore, Douglas M.; Grubman, Marvin J.; McKercher, Peter D.; Morgan, Donald O.; Robertson, Betty H.; Bachrach, Howard L.

    1981-12-01

    A DNA sequence coding for the immunogenic capsid protein VP3 of foot-and-mouth disease virus A12, prepared from the virion RNA, was ligated to a plasmid designed to express a chimeric protein from the Escherichia coli tryptophan promoter-operator system. When Escherichia coli transformed with this plasmid was grown in tryptophan-depleted media, approximately 17 percent of the total cellular protein was found to be an insoluble and stable chimeric protein. The purified chimeric protein competed equally on a molar basis with VP3 for specific antibodies to foot-and-mouth disease virus. When inoculated into six cattle and two swine, this protein elicited high levels of neutralizing antibody and protection against challenge with foot-and-mouth disease virus.

  1. EV71 vaccines: a first step towards multivalent hand, foot and mouth disease vaccines.

    PubMed

    Klein, Michel H

    2015-03-01

    Enterovirus A infections are the primary cause of hand, foot and mouth disease in infants and young children. Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 have emerged as neurotropic viruses responsible for severe neurological complications and a serious public health threat across the Asia-Pacific region. Formalin-inactivated EV71 vaccines have elicited protection against EV71 but not against coxsackievirus A16 infections. The development of a bivalent formalin-inactivated EV71/FI coxsackievirus A16 vaccine should be the next step towards that of multivalent hand, foot and mouth disease vaccines which should ultimately include other prevalent pathogenic coxsackieviruses and echovirus 30. This editorial summarizes the major challenges faced by the development of hand, foot and mouth disease vaccines.

  2. 9 CFR 94.1 - Regions where rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease exists; importations prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...-mouth disease exists; importations prohibited. 94.1 Section 94.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, NEWCASTLE DISEASE, HIGHLY...-mouth disease exists; importations prohibited. (a) APHIS considers rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease...

  3. 9 CFR 94.4 - Cured or cooked meat from regions where rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... where rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease exists. 94.4 Section 94.4 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, NEWCASTLE DISEASE, HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND...

  4. 9 CFR 94.4 - Cured or cooked meat from regions where rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... where rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease exists. 94.4 Section 94.4 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM...

  5. 9 CFR 94.1 - Regions where rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease exists; importations prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...-mouth disease exists; importations prohibited. 94.1 Section 94.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN...: PROHIBITED AND RESTRICTED IMPORTATIONS § 94.1 Regions where rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease exists...

  6. 9 CFR 94.1 - Regions where rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease exists; importations prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-mouth disease exists; importations prohibited. 94.1 Section 94.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN...: PROHIBITED AND RESTRICTED IMPORTATIONS § 94.1 Regions where rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease exists...

  7. Detection of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Infected Cattle Using Infrared Thermography

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly infectious viral disease of livestock that has significant economic, social and environmental impacts. One problem hampering the diagnosis, control and eradication efforts is the need for veterinarians to inspect hundreds of animals from suspected case premis...

  8. Heterogeneity in the antibody response to foot-and-mouth disease primo-vaccinated calves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is the most economically important viral disease of wild and domesticated biungulate species and presents a major constraint to international trade of livestock and their associated products. FMD vaccines are routinely used as effective control tools in large regions wor...

  9. Phylogeographic analysis of the 2000-2002 foot-and-mouth disease epidemic in Argentina

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly transmissible disease of livestock. FMD has been eradicated from many countries and the consequences of FMD epidemics are, in some cases, devastating. That was the case of Argentina in 2000-2002, where within few months, FMD virus spread throughout most of t...

  10. Differential replication of foot-and-mouth disease viruses in mice determine lethality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adult C57BL/6J mice have been used to study foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) biology. In this work, two variants of an FMDV A/Arg/01 strain exhibiting differential pathogenicity in adult mice were identified and characterized: a non-lethal virus (A01NL) caused mild signs of disease, whereas a let...

  11. Development of vaccines toward the global control and eradication of foot-and-mouth disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is one of the most economically and socially devastating diseases affecting animal agriculture throughout the world. Although mortality is low, millions of animals have been killed in efforts to rapidly control and eradicate FMD. The causing virus (FMDV) is a highly vari...

  12. Foot-and-mouth disease virus during the incubation period in pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Understanding the quantitative characteristics of a pathogen’s capability to transmit during distinct phases of infection is important to enable accurate predictions of the spread and impact of a disease outbreak. In the current investigation, the potential for transmission of foot-and-mouth disease...

  13. Understanding the mechanism of interferon-induced protection against foot-and-mouth disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infects cloven-hoofed animals and causes a highly contagious disease that rapidly spreads among many susceptible species. Vaccination with an inactivated whole virus antigen in formulation with adjuvant, or with a replication-defective human adenovirus 5 (Ad5) ab...

  14. 75 FR 1697 - Change in Disease Status of the Republic of Korea With Regard to Foot-and-Mouth Disease and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ... Foot-and-Mouth Disease and Rinderpest AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION... rinderpest and foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and the list of regions that are subject to certain import...

  15. Foot-and-mouth disease in British deer: transmission of virus to cattle, sheep and deer.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, E P; Herniman, K A; Lawman, M J; Sellers, R F

    1975-06-28

    After exposure for two hours to cattle with foot-and-mouth disease, each of the five species of deer found in the British countryside became infected. Clinical disease was typical and severe in the roe and muntjac deer, with some animals dying, less severe in the sika deer and usually subclinical in the fallow and red deer. Each species transmitted disease to its own species and to cattle and sheep. The amounts of virus present in the blood, and in oesophageal/pharyngeal samples and excreted as an aerosol during the course of the infection in the deer were similar to those recorded for the sheep and cattle in the same experiment. The fallow and sika deer commonly carried virus in the pharynx beyond 28 days after exposure; some red deer also became carriers. In epidemics of foot-and-mouth disease in the UK, it is likely that deer would have such intimate contact with farm animals as occurred in this study. The natural behavior of free-living deer in the UK suggests that, although the five species are susceptible to foot-and-mouth disease, they are unlikely to be an important factor in the maintenance and transmission of the virus during an epidemic of foot-and-mouth disease in domestic livestock.

  16. Foot and mouth disease virus non structural protein 2C interacts with Beclin1 modulating virus replication

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), the causative agent of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), is an Apthovirus within the Picornaviridae family. Replication of the virus occurs in association with replication complexes that are formed by host cell membrane rearrangements. The largest viral protein in th...

  17. Chimeric Foot-and-Mouth Disease Viruses: Evaluation of Their Efficacy as Potential Marker Vaccines in Cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous work in swine has demonstrated that full protection against Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) can be achieved following vaccination with chimeric Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV) vaccines, whereby the VP1 G-H loop has been substituted with a non-homologous alternative. If proven to be effect...

  18. Epididymitis caused by coxsackievirus A6 in association with hand, foot, and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Vuorinen, Tytti; Osterback, Riikka; Kuisma, Jani; Ylipalosaari, Pekka

    2014-12-01

    Coxsackievirus A6 (CV-A6) caused hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with a unique manifestation of epididymitis. The patient underwent operation due to suspicion of testicular torsion. Epididymitis was diagnosed by ultrasound examination. Enterovirus was detected from epididymal fluid by PCR and typed by partial sequencing of viral protein 1 as CV-A6.

  19. Mechanisms of foot-and-mouth disease virus tropism inferred from differential tissue gene expression

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-Mouth Disease virus (FMDV) has a characteristic tropism in terms of primary, secondary, and persistent infection and vesicular lesion sites. The virus targets specific tissues for primary replication. From these tissues, the virus spreads via the blood stream to a few preferred secondary in...

  20. Induction of foot-and-mouth disease virus specific cytotoxic T cell killing by vaccination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) continues to be a significant threat to the health and economic value of livestock species. This acute infection is caused by the highly contagious FMD virus which infects cloven-hoofed animals including large and small ruminants and swine. Current vaccine strategies are...

  1. Review of the global distribution of foot-and-mouth disease virus from 2007 to 2014

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus affects livestock worldwide. There are seven different serotypes, each with a diversity of topotypes, genetic lineages and strains. Some lineages have different properties that may contribute to sporadic spread beyond their recognized endemic areas. The objective o...

  2. Review of the global distribution of foot-and-mouth disease virus from 2007 to 2014

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has seven different serotypes. Within each serotype there is a diversity of genetic lineages, subtypes and strains. Some of these strains behave differently and sometimes spread beyond the endemic areas where they normally circulate. Lineages emergence and die...

  3. Global foot-and-mouth disease research update and gap analysis: 2 - epidemiology, wildlife and economics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2014, the Global Foot-and-mouth disease Research ings in the fields of (i) epidemiology, (ii) wildlife and (iii) Alliance (GFRA) conducted a gap analysis of foot-and- economics. Although the three sections, epidemiology, wildlife and economics are presented as separate entities, the fields are ...

  4. Epididymitis Caused by Coxsackievirus A6 in Association with Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Österback, Riikka; Kuisma, Jani; Ylipalosaari, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    Coxsackievirus A6 (CV-A6) caused hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with a unique manifestation of epididymitis. The patient underwent operation due to suspicion of testicular torsion. Epididymitis was diagnosed by ultrasound examination. Enterovirus was detected from epididymal fluid by PCR and typed by partial sequencing of viral protein 1 as CV-A6. PMID:25232161

  5. The foot-and-mouth disease carrier state divergence in vaccinated and non-vaccinated cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The pathogenesis of persistent foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection was investigated following simulated-natural virus exposure of 43 cattle that were either naïve or vaccinated using a recombinant, adenovirus-vectored vaccine. Although vaccinated cattle were protected against clinical dise...

  6. Impact of the 2001 Foot-and-Mouth Disease Outbreak in Britain: Implications for Rural Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Alister; Christie, Michael; Midmore, Peter

    2004-01-01

    This paper assesses the impact of the 2001 foot-and-mouth disease outbreak in terms of its implications for the discipline of rural studies. In particular, it focuses on the position of agriculture in rural economy and society, the standing of the government after its management of the outbreak, and the performance of the new devolved regional…

  7. Impact of the 2001 Foot-and-Mouth Disease Outbreak in Britain: Implications for Rural Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Alister; Christie, Michael; Midmore, Peter

    2004-01-01

    This paper assesses the impact of the 2001 foot-and-mouth disease outbreak in terms of its implications for the discipline of rural studies. In particular, it focuses on the position of agriculture in rural economy and society, the standing of the government after its management of the outbreak, and the performance of the new devolved regional…

  8. Quantitative characteristics of the foot-and-mouth disease carrier state under natural conditions in India

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The goal of the current study was to characterize serological and virological parameters of the foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) carrier state at two farms in Nainital District, Uttarakhand State in northern India. Despite previous vaccination of cattle in these herds, clinical signs of FMD occurred in ...

  9. Hand, foot, and mouth disease caused by coxsackievirus A6, Thailand, 2012.

    PubMed

    Puenpa, Jiratchaya; Chieochansin, Thaweesak; Linsuwanon, Piyada; Korkong, Sumeth; Thongkomplew, Siwanat; Vichaiwattana, Preyaporn; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Poovorawan, Yong

    2013-04-01

    In Thailand, hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is usually caused by enterovirus 71 or coxsackievirus A16. To determine the cause of a large outbreak of HFMD in Thailand during June-August 2012, we examined patient specimens. Coxsackievirus A6 was the causative agent. To improve prevention and control, causes of HFMD should be monitored.

  10. Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Serotype SAT 3 in Long-Horned Ankole Calf, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Dhikusooka, Moses Tefula; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Ayebazibwe, Chrisostom; Namatovu, Alice; Ruhweza, Simon; Siegismund, Hans Redlef; Wekesa, Sabenzia Nabalayo; Normann, Preben

    2015-01-01

    After a 16-year interval, foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype SAT 3 was isolated in 2013 from an apparently healthy long-horned Ankole calf that grazed close to buffalo in Uganda. The emergent virus strain is ≈20% different in nucleotide sequence (encoding VP1 [viral protein 1]) from its closest relatives isolated previously from buffalo in Uganda. PMID:25531186

  11. Foot-and-Mouth Disease in a small sample of experimentally infected pronghorn (Antilocapra americana)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is limited information on the pathogenesis and epidemiology of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in North American wildlife, and none concerning pronghorn (Antilocapra americana). In this experimental study, we compared the susceptibility of pronghorn to FMD virus (FMDV) strain O, with that of ...

  12. Attenuation of foot-and-mouth disease virus by engineered viral polymerase fidelity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp or 3Dpol) catalyzes viral RNA synthesis. The 3Dpol is a low fidelity enzyme incapable of proofreading which results in a high mutation frequencies that allow the virus to rapidly adapt to different environments. In this study...

  13. Global foot-and-mouth disease research update and gap analysis: 4 - diagnostics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2014, the Global Foot-And-Mouth Disease Research Alliance (GFRA) conducted a gap analysis of FMD research. Published as a series of seven papers, in this paper, we report updated findings in the field of diagnostics. The paper consists of the following four sections: 1. Research priorities identi...

  14. Global foot-and-mouth disease research update and gap analysis: 5 - biotherapeutics and disinfectants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2014, the Global Foot-and-mouth disease Research Alliance(GFRA)conducted a gap analysis of FMD research. This work has been updated and reported in a series of papers with the focus of this article being (i) biotherapeutics and (ii) disinfectants, including environmental contamination. The paper ...

  15. Global foot-and-mouth disease research update and gap analysis: 6 - immunology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2014, the Global Foot-and-mouth disease Research Alliance (GFRA) conducted a gap analysis of FMD research. This has been updated with findings reported in a series of papers. Here we present findings for FMD immunology research. The paper consists of the following four sections: 1. Research prior...

  16. Pathogenesis of virulent and attenuated foot and mouth disease virus in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The factors defining virulence of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in cattle were investigated by comparing the pathogenesis of a mutant, attenuated strain (FMDV-Mut) to the parental, virulent virus from which the mutant was derived (FMDV-WT). After simulated-natural, aerosol inoculation, both vi...

  17. Global foot-and-mouth disease research update and gap analysis: 3 - vaccines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2014, the Global Foot-and-mouth disease Research Alliance (GFRA) conducted a gap analysis of FMD research. In this paper, we report updated findings in the field of FMD vaccine research. This paper consists of the following four sections: 1) Research priorities identified in the 2010 GFRA gap ana...

  18. Phylodynamics of epidemic and asymptomatic foot-and-mouth disease in Vietnam 2010-2014

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is endemic in Vietnam, a country that plays an important role in animal trade within Southeast Asia. The large populations of buffalo, cattle and pigs (all FMDV susceptible species) in Vietnam are important components of food production and of the national livelih...

  19. Type III interferon protects swine against foot-and-mouth disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In recent years we have developed novel strategies to control foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) including the use of biotherapeutics such as interferons (IFN) delivered by a replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5). Swine can be sterilely protected after vaccination with an Ad5 that encodes po...

  20. Serotyping of foot and mouth disease virus and Pasteurella multocida from Indian gaurs (Bos gaurus), concurrently infected with foot and mouth disease and haemorrhagic septicaemia.

    PubMed

    Chandranaik, Basavegowdanadoddi Marinaik; Hegde, Raveendra; Shivashankar, Beechagondahalli Papanna; Giridhar, Papanna; Muniyellappa, Handenahally Kaverappa; Kalge, Rajeshwar; Sumathi, Benamanahalli Raju; Nithinprabhu, Kumble; Chandrashekara, Narasimhaiah; Manjunatha, Venkataramanappa; Jaisingh, Nirupama; Mayanna, Asha; Chandrakala, Gowda Kallenahalli; Kanaka, Sermaraja; Venkatesha, Mudalagiri Dasappagupta

    2015-06-01

    We report the serotyping of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) and Pasteurella multocida from Indian gaurs which were concurrently infected with foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and haemorrhagic septicaemia. Bannerghatta biological park (BBP), a national park located in the outskirts of Bengaluru city, Karnataka, India, is bordered by several villages. These villages witnessed massive outbreaks of FMD which spread rapidly to the herbivores at BBP. Post-mortem was conducted on carcasses of two Indian gaurs that died with symptoms of FMD. The salient gross findings included extensive vesicular lesions on the tongue, gums, cheeks, upper palate and hooves. Haemorrhagic tracheitis and ecchymotic haemorrhages on the heart were characteristic. The vesicular lesions of oral cavity were positive for 'O' type of FMD virus by sandwich enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA). The heart blood and spleen samples yielded growth of pure cultures of P. multocida. The isolates were typed as P. multocida type B using KTSP61 and KTT72 primers yielding specific amplicons of 620 bp. The phylogenetic analysis of the isolates was carried by sequencing of 1.4-Kbp nucleotides on the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of the isolates.

  1. Current Status and Future Prospects to Achieve Foot-and-Mouth Disease Eradication in South America.

    PubMed

    Clavijo, A; Sanchez-Vazquez, M J; Buzanovsky, L P; Martini, M; Pompei, J C; Cosivi, O

    2017-02-01

    South America has a favourable position with respect to foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) compared with other FMD-affected regions due to the elimination of endemic clinical presentation of the disease. South America has reached the final stage of control and aims to eradicate the disease in the region under the provisions of the Hemispheric Program for the Eradication of FMD 2011-2020 (PHEFA). This programme aims at bringing eradication to completion, thereby eliminating the pool of foot-and-mouth disease genotypes active in South America. This plan includes a regional political agreement that provides strategies and technical guidelines for the eradication of foot-and-mouth disease from South America. It incorporates knowledge and experience regarding the disease's history and its connection with the different production systems, animal movement and trade. The Pan American Foot and Mouth Disease Center has led the control and eradication programmes, providing the framework for designing national and subregional programmes that have led to significant progress in controlling the disease in South America. The current situation is the result of several factors, including the proper implementation of a national control programmes, good veterinary infrastructure in most countries and public-private participation in the process of eradicating the disease. Notwithstanding the favourable health status, there are significant challenges for the goal of eradication. At this stage, South American countries should enhance their surveillance strategies particularly through the use of target or risk-based surveys that contribute to increase the degree of sensitivity in the search for viral circulation in the context of absence of clinical occurrence of FMD.

  2. [Hand, foot and mouth disease--more than a harmless "childhood disease"].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is a highly contagious, world-wide distributed viral illness that affects predominantly children. It is caused by several enteroviruses, such as coxsackieviruses A6, A10, A16 and enterovirus 71. In most cases, HFMD follows a benign and self-limiting course. After an incubation period of 3 to 10 days, fever and sore throat, the first symptoms of the disease, appear. A few days later, maculopapular or vesicular eruptions form on the palms and soles as well as in the oral cavity. Since the year 2000, several large HFMD outbreaks have been reported in many Asian regions such as China, Malaysia and Vietnam. In some of these outbreaks, high incidences of severe progressive HFMD forms with some fatalities were observed. Such diseases have been caused primarily by enterovirus 71 strains and were characterized frequently by sudden onset of fever, encephalitis/meningitis and severe respiratory symptoms such as pulmonary edema. Further severe neurological and cardiac complications have also been observed during these outbreaks. Recently, some HFMD outbreaks caused by the coxsackievirus A6 have been reported in several parts of the world. These illnesses also affected adults and were characterized by more severe symptoms of "classical" HFMD. In addition, outbreaks of coxsackievirus-A6-associated HFMD in many countries were associated with onychomadesis, with the loss of nails occurring up to two months after initial symptoms. Treatment of "classical" HFMD is usually symptomatic, a generally recommended antiviral therapy does not exist. In severe HFMD cases, suitable treatment also encompasses mechanical ventilation, as well as the additional application of antiviral agents such as ribavirin. In the last years, several novel agents with good in vitro and in vivo activity against enteroviruses have been developed. A vaccine against HFMD is not yet available.

  3. The epidemiology of foot-and-mouth disease: implications for New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Sanson, R L

    1994-04-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease is an acute, highly communicable disease affecting cloven-hoofed animals, both domesticated and wild. It may well be the most contagious disease known in the animal kingdom. The key features that contribute to this include its ability to gain entry and initiate infection through a variety of sites, the small infective dose, the short incubation period, the release of virus before the onset of clinical signs, the massive quantities of virus excreted from infected animals, its ability to spread large distances due to airborne dispersal, and the persistence of the virus in the environment. These features, plus the ability of the virus to be disseminated through the movements of animals, animal products, people, and plant and equipment makes the disease very difficult to control. New Zealand has never experienced a foot-and-mouth disease epidemic, and the economic consequences of an outbreak would be disastrous, due to the eradication costs, the loss of productivity and the impact on the export of animals and animal products. The smuggling of meat products, embryos or semen into the country are perceived as the most likely ways in which the disease could be introduced. The New Zealand Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries therefore operates a two-tier system of defense against foot-and-mouth disease. The first tier involves border protection through stringent import controls to prevent the entry of infectious material. If this barrier is breached, an emergency response programme is activated, involving a stamping-out eradication strategy. This paper attempts to draw on overseas historical outbreak experiences and research findings to gain insights into the epidemiology of foot-and-mouth disease as it would relate to New Zealand.

  4. Adjuvants for foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccines: recent progress.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yimei

    2014-11-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and rapidly spreading disease of cloven-hoofed animals. In most countries, animals are immunized with inactivated whole virus vaccines to control the spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV); however, there are safety and efficacy (especially, cell-mediated immunity) concerns. Many efforts are currently devoted to the development of effective vaccines by combining the application of protective antigens together with the search for specific and targeting adjuvants that maximizes the immunogenicity with a desired immune response. In this review, we outline previous studies performed with both traditional adjuvants as well as the most promising new generation adjuvants such as ligands for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) or different cytokines, focusing mostly on their efficacy when used with FMD vaccine, and somewhat on mechanisms by which adjuvants mediate their effects.

  5. Elimination of foot-and-mouth disease in South America: lessons and challenges.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, José; Cosivi, Ottorino

    2013-08-05

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly transmissible and economically devastating disease of cloven-hoofed livestock. Although vaccines are available and have been instrumental in eliminating the disease from most of the South American animal population, viral circulation still persists in some countries and areas, posing a threat to the advances of the last 60 years by the official veterinary services with considerable support of the livestock sectors. The importance of the disease for the social and economic development of the American continent led to the establishment in 1951 of the Pan American Centre for Foot-and-Mouth Disease (PANAFTOSA), which has been providing technical cooperation to countries for the elimination of the disease. The first FMD national elimination programmes were established in South America around the 1960s and 1970s. To advance the regional elimination efforts in the 1980s, countries agreed on a Plan of Action 1988-2009 of the Hemispheric Program for the Eradication of Foot-and-Mouth Disease. The Plan of Action 1988-2009 did not reach the goal of elimination from the continent; and a new Plan of Action 2011-2020 was developed in 2010 based on the experience acquired by the countries and PANAFTOSA during the past 60 years. This plan is now being implemented; several challenges are still to be overcome to ensure the elimination of FMD from the Americas by 2020, however, the goal is achievable.

  6. Elimination of foot-and-mouth disease in South America: lessons and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo, José; Cosivi, Ottorino

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly transmissible and economically devastating disease of cloven-hoofed livestock. Although vaccines are available and have been instrumental in eliminating the disease from most of the South American animal population, viral circulation still persists in some countries and areas, posing a threat to the advances of the last 60 years by the official veterinary services with considerable support of the livestock sectors. The importance of the disease for the social and economic development of the American continent led to the establishment in 1951 of the Pan American Centre for Foot-and-Mouth Disease (PANAFTOSA), which has been providing technical cooperation to countries for the elimination of the disease. The first FMD national elimination programmes were established in South America around the 1960s and 1970s. To advance the regional elimination efforts in the 1980s, countries agreed on a Plan of Action 1988–2009 of the Hemispheric Program for the Eradication of Foot-and-Mouth Disease. The Plan of Action 1988–2009 did not reach the goal of elimination from the continent; and a new Plan of Action 2011–2020 was developed in 2010 based on the experience acquired by the countries and PANAFTOSA during the past 60 years. This plan is now being implemented; several challenges are still to be overcome to ensure the elimination of FMD from the Americas by 2020, however, the goal is achievable. PMID:23798699

  7. Airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease in Saskatchewan, Canada, 1951-1952.

    PubMed Central

    Daggupaty, S M; Sellers, R F

    1990-01-01

    Farms affected with foot-and-mouth disease during the epidemic in Saskatchewan, in 1951-1952, for which the origin of virus was not known or uncertain, were studied to determine if infection could have been introduced by the airborne route. A short-range Gaussian plume dispersion model was used to estimate the concentration of virus downwind and the dose available for individual animals. The investigation suggested that a large virus source due to infected pigs in a feedlot in January 1952 could have been responsible for airborne dispersion northwestwards downwind to farms up to 20 km distant. Subsequent spread from these farms was to neighboring farms and was influenced by the local topography of a creek. The dispersion model could be used for predicting airborne spread if foot-and-mouth disease should occur. PMID:2174297

  8. The survival of foot-and-mouth disease virus in open air conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, A. I.; Ferris, N. P.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of the Open Air Factor (OAF) and daylight on the survival of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus held as captured aerosols on spider microthreads has been investigated. Virus inactivation due to OAF was slight. Similarly, the effect of daylight on the survival of virus was not marked. The results are discussed in relation to the airborne spread of FMD virus in nature. PMID:168250

  9. Complement-Fixation Analysis of Four Subtypes of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Type A

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, C. A.; Cowan, K. M.; Hanson, R. P.

    1973-01-01

    Complement-fixation patterns were established for four subtypes of foot-and-mouth disease virus by block assays against homologous and heterologous antiserum. Inhibition of fixation by excess antigen was observed in most homologous systems but rarely in the heterologous systems. The heterologous antibody titers were, in all instances, considerably lower than those for the homologous systems. Although relatively high dilutions of antiserum may be desirable for subtyping, higher concentrations of antibody should be used for determining serological types. PMID:4356470

  10. Quantification of foot-and-mouth disease virus transmission rates using published data.

    PubMed

    Goris, Nesya E; Eblé, Phaedra L; de Jong, Mart C M; De Clercq, Kris

    2009-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease is an extremely infectious and devastating disease affecting all species of cloven-hoofed animals. To understand the epidemiology of the causative virus and predict viral transmission dynamics, quantified transmission parameters are essential to decision makers and modellers alike. However, such quantified parameters are scarcely available, and recently a series of animal experiments was set up to obtain such data experimentally. In this communication, however, we report on the use of data from an animal experiment conducted 10 years ago to quantify transmission of foot-and-mouth disease virus between non-vaccinated sheep and from sub-clinically infected sheep to in-contact pigs. This new analysis utilises a state-of-the-art Generalised Linear Model to estimate the transmission rate. From the obtained results it is concluded that meta-analysis of "old" experiments using newly developed techniques can provide useful data to replace, reduce and refine future foot-and-mouth disease transmission experiments, thereby minimising animal suffering for research purposes.

  11. The growth and persistence of foot-and-mouth disease virus in the bovine mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, R.; Mann, J. A.; Greig, A.; Chapman, W. G.; Goodridge, D.

    1971-01-01

    In animals exposed to foot-and-mouth disease virus by indirect contact, virus was recovered from the blood, milk, pharynx, vagina and rectum for variable periods of time before clinical disease was apparent. Virus instilled into the mammary gland multiplied rapidly and virus concentrations greater than 107 p.f.u./ml. were recorded within 8-32 hr., depending on the virus strain and dose inoculated. Virus multiplication was accompanied by clinical signs of mastitis but the classical signs of foot-and-mouth disease did not appear for 52-117 hr. Dissemination of virus from the mammary gland occurred within 4-24 hr. and in some animals samples taken from the pharynx, mouth, nose and vagina contained virus for periods up to 97 hr. before the appearance of vesicular lesions. Virus production in the udder declined with the appearance of virus neutralizing activity in the blood and the milk but persisted in some animals for periods of 3-7 weeks. The ability of foot-and-mouth disease virus to persist in mammary tissue was confirmed by the demonstration of virus multiplication in the udders of immune animals. PMID:4326249

  12. The growth and persistence of foot-and-mouth disease virus in the bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Burrows, R; Mann, J A; Greig, A; Chapman, W G; Goodridge, D

    1971-06-01

    In animals exposed to foot-and-mouth disease virus by indirect contact, virus was recovered from the blood, milk, pharynx, vagina and rectum for variable periods of time before clinical disease was apparent. Virus instilled into the mammary gland multiplied rapidly and virus concentrations greater than 10(7) p.f.u./ml. were recorded within 8-32 hr., depending on the virus strain and dose inoculated. Virus multiplication was accompanied by clinical signs of mastitis but the classical signs of foot-and-mouth disease did not appear for 52-117 hr. Dissemination of virus from the mammary gland occurred within 4-24 hr. and in some animals samples taken from the pharynx, mouth, nose and vagina contained virus for periods up to 97 hr. before the appearance of vesicular lesions. Virus production in the udder declined with the appearance of virus neutralizing activity in the blood and the milk but persisted in some animals for periods of 3-7 weeks. The ability of foot-and-mouth disease virus to persist in mammary tissue was confirmed by the demonstration of virus multiplication in the udders of immune animals.

  13. Investigation of disinfectants for foot-and-mouth disease in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Mi; Shim, Il-Seob; Baek, Yong-Wook; Han, Hye-Jin; Kim, Pil-Je; Choi, Kyunghee

    2013-10-01

    Disinfectants for foot-and-mouth disease were sprayed on livestock barns and roads from early February to May 2011. Although 90% of the disinfectant was concentrated on the roads, 10% was sprayed on cattle sheds and other sites where foot-and-mouth disease occurred. Since the outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease in November 2010, there has been a steady increase in disinfectant use. Consequently, its adverse environmental effects have prompted government officials to take preventive measures. The major chemical components of the disinfectants are citric acid, potassium sulfate base complex, quaternary ammonium compound, malic acid, and glutaraldehyde, ranging in amounts from tons to hundreds of tons. The exact amount of each component of the disinfectants could not be identified because the types of components used in the different commercial formulations overlapped. In this review, we obtained information on disinfectants that are widely used nationwide, including the types of major chemical components and their respective toxicities (both human and ecological). Copyright © 2013 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus gene products with antisera against bacterially synthesized fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Strebel, K.; Beck, E.; Strohmaier, K.; Schaller, H.

    1986-03-01

    Defined segments of the cloned foot-and-mouth disease virus genome corresponding to all parts of the coding region were expressed in Escherichia coli as fusions to the N-terminal part of the MS2-polymerase gene under the control of the inducible lambdaPL promoter. All constructs yielded large amounts of proteins, which were purified and used to raise sequence-specific antisera in rabbits. These antisera were used to identify the corresponding viral gene products in /sup 35/S-labeled extracts from foot-and-mouth disease virus-infected BHK cells. This allowed us to locate unequivocally all mature foot-and-mouth disease virus gene products in the nucleotide sequence, to identify precursor-product relationships, and to detect several foot-and mouth disease virus gene products not previously identified in vivo or in vitro.

  15. Hand, foot and mouth disease: spatiotemporal transmission and climate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-feng; Guo, Yan-Sha; Christakos, George; Yang, Wei-Zhong; Liao, Yi-Lan; Li, Zhong-Jie; Li, Xiao-Zhou; Lai, Sheng-Jie; Chen, Hong-Yan

    2011-04-05

    The Hand-Foot-Mouth Disease (HFMD) is the most common infectious disease in China, its total incidence being around 500,000~1,000,000 cases per year. The composite space-time disease variation is the result of underlining attribute mechanisms that could provide clues about the physiologic and demographic determinants of disease transmission and also guide the appropriate allocation of medical resources to control the disease. HFMD cases were aggregated into 1456 counties and during a period of 11 months. Suspected climate attributes to HFMD were recorded monthly at 674 stations throughout the country and subsequently interpolated within 1456 × 11 cells across space-time (same as the number of HFMD cases) using the Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) method while taking into consideration the relevant uncertainty sources. The dimensionalities of the two datasets together with the integrated dataset combining the two previous ones are very high when the topologies of the space-time relationships between cells are taken into account. Using a self-organizing map (SOM) algorithm the dataset dimensionality was effectively reduced into 2 dimensions, while the spatiotemporal attribute structure was maintained. 16 types of spatiotemporal HFMD transmission were identified, and 3-4 high spatial incidence clusters of the HFMD types were found throughout China, which are basically within the scope of the monthly climate (precipitation) types. HFMD propagates in a composite space-time domain rather than showing a purely spatial and purely temporal variation. There is a clear relationship between HFMD occurrence and climate. HFMD cases are geographically clustered and closely linked to the monthly precipitation types of the region. The occurrence of the former depends on the later.

  16. New England Foot and Mouth Disease Tabletop Exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Hullinger, P

    2008-09-30

    The Multiscale Epidemiologic/Economic Simulation and Analysis (MESA) Decision Support System (DSS) is the product of investments that began in FY05 by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate and continue today with joint funding by both DHS and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA). The DSS consists of a coupled epidemiologic/economic model, a standalone graphical user interface (GUI) that supports both model setup and post-analysis, and a Scenario Bank archive to store all content related to foreign animal disease (FAD) studies (Figure 1). The MESA epi model is an object-oriented, agent-based, stochastic, spatio-temporal simulator that parametrically models FAD outbreaks and response strategies from initial disease introduction to conclusion over local, regional, and national scales. Through its output database, the epi model couples to an economic model that calculates farm-level impacts from animal infections, responsive control strategies and loss of trade. The MESA architecture contains a variety of internal models that implement the major components of the epi simulation, including disease introduction, intra-herd spread, inter-herd spread (direct and indirect), detection, and various control strategies (movement restrictions, culling, vaccination) in a highly configurable and extensible fashion. MESA will produce both overall and daily summary statistics for the outbreak, epidemic curves, and costs associated with the outbreak. This information can be used to reconstruct and analyze the course of the outbreak. Geographical information produced by MESA can be used to produce maps and movies as visual aids to understand the distribution characteristics of a simulated outbreak.

  17. The fencing issue relative to the control of foot-and-mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Sutmoller, Paul

    2002-10-01

    Certain livestock diseases in sub-Saharan Africa, such as foot-and-mouth disease are difficult to control because of the large numbers of infected wildlife hosts. These wildlife disease reservoirs form a continuous hazard of transmittal of the diseases to domestic livestock, which limits the access of livestock products from southern Africa to international markets. The disease reservoirs are often found in border areas between countries with susceptible species and infected reservoir animals continuously crossing the border. A regional approach to disease control is probably the only way to achieve any real progress. Here we review the positive and negative attributes of fencing as a control mechanism for disease transmission.

  18. Meta-analysis on the efficacy of routine vaccination against foot and mouth disease (FMD) in China.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chang; Li, Huachun; Edwards, John; Hawkins, Chris; Robertson, Ian D

    2014-08-01

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) outbreaks have been reported in China for many years. Recently, due to the rapid economic development, the price of meat and its demand have grown quickly. This trend has resulted in an increase in the number of livestock moving from south-east Asian countries into China. Foot and mouth disease is becoming one of the most important trans-boundary animal diseases affecting the livelihood of livestock owners in China. To contribute to the long term goal to control and eradicate FMD from China, the Chinese government has adopted a series of control measures which includes compulsory routine vaccination against the disease. In this paper, the surveillance results of the routine vaccination programme were systemically reviewed. The results from 28 published papers were combined and analysed through a meta-analysis approach. The results of the meta-analysis indicated that the vaccination programme has been very successful in China with more than 70% of animals protected against serotypes Asia-1 and O. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Foot-and-mouth disease: technical and political challenges to eradication.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark T; Bennett, Anthony M; Grubman, Marvin J; Bundy, Bradley C

    2014-06-30

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly-contagious livestock disease with global socioeconomic ramifications. The disease negatively impacts both individual farmers through reduced herd viability and nations through trade restrictions of animals and animal derivatives. Vaccines for FMD prevention have existed for over 70 years, yet the disease remains enzootic in a large percentage of the globe. FMD persistence is due in part to technical limitations of historic and current vaccine technologies. There also exist many socioeconomic and political barriers to global FMD eradication. Here we highlight the barriers to eradication and discuss potential avenues toward FMD eradication.

  20. Evolutionary dynamics of foot-and-mouth disease virus O/ME-SA/Ind2001 lineage.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Saravanan; Mohapatra, Jajati K; Sharma, Gaurav K; Biswal, Jitendra K; Ranjan, Rajeev; Rout, Manoranjan; Das, Biswajit; Dash, Bana B; Sanyal, Aniket; Pattnaik, Bramhadev

    2015-08-05

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus serotype O Ind2001 lineage within the Middle East-South Asia topotype is the major cause of recent FMD incidences in India. A sub-lineage of Ind2001 caused severe outbreaks in the southern region of the country during 2013 and also reported for the first time from Libya. In this study, we conducted a detailed evolutionary analysis of Ind2001 lineage. Phylogenetic analysis of Ind2001 lineage based on maximum likelihood method revealed two major splits and three sub-lineages. The mean nucleotide substitution rate for this lineage was calculated to be 6.338×10(-3)substitutions/site/year (s/s/y), which is similar to those of PanAsian sub-lineages. Evolutionary time scale analysis indicated that the Ind2001 lineage might have originated in 1989. The sub-lineage Ind2001d that caused 2013 outbreaks seems to be relatively more divergent genetically from other Ind2001 sub-lineages. Seven codons in the VP1 region of Ind2001 were found to be under positive selection. Four out of 24 recent Ind2001 strains tested in 2D-MNT had antigenic relationship value of <0.3 with the serotype O vaccine strain indicating intra-epidemic antigenic diversity. Amino acid substitutions found in these minor variants with reference to antigenic diversity have been discussed. The dominance of antigenically homologous strains indicates absence of vaccine immunity in the majority of the affected hosts. Taken together, the evolution of Ind2001 lineage deviates from the strict molecular clock and a typical lineage evolutionary dynamics characterized by periodic emergence and re-emergence of Ind2001 and PanAsia lineage have been observed in respect of serotype O. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Design and synthesis of irreversible inhibitors of foot-and-mouth disease virus 3C protease.

    PubMed

    Roqué Rosell, Núria R; Mokhlesi, Ladan; Milton, Nicholas E; Sweeney, Trevor R; Zunszain, Patricia A; Curry, Stephen; Leatherbarrow, Robin J

    2014-01-15

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly infectious and economically devastating disease of livestock. The FMDV genome is translated as a single polypeptide precursor that is cleaved into functional proteins predominantly by the highly conserved viral 3C protease, making this enzyme an attractive target for antiviral drugs. A peptide corresponding to an optimal substrate has been modified at the C-terminus, by the addition of a warhead, to produce irreversible inhibitors that react as Michael acceptors with the enzyme active site. Further investigation highlighted key structural determinants for inhibition, with a positively charged P2 being particularly important for potency.

  2. Evaluating the transmission routes of hand, foot, and mouth disease in Guangdong, China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Limei; Lin, Hualiang; Lin, Jinyan; He, Jianfeng; Deng, Aiping; Kang, Min; Zeng, Hanri; Ma, Wenjun; Zhang, Yonghui

    2016-02-01

    Although it is an enteroviral infectious disease, recent studies suggest that respiratory transmission might play a role in the transmission of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). We evaluated the transmission modes (respiratory and fecal-oral transmission) of HFMD among children using a case-control study in Guangdong, China. Our analyses suggested that fecal-oral transmission might be the principal transmission mode of HFMD among children in the study area, and handwashing habits of the children and their parents should be emphasized to control this infection. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Extending the foot-and-mouth disease module to the control of other diseases.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, K; Goris, N

    2004-01-01

    During the recent devastating epidemics of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), bluetongue (BT), the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) and New Castle disease, more than 115 million animals were culled. The mass slaughter of animals raised serious ethical questions. These epidemics showed that the use of emergency vaccination is an essential element in disease control. During the last decade the FMD antigen banks have proved to be effective and this module should be extended. An international vaccine stock should be considered for classical swine fever and HPAI. Agreements with vaccine producers should be made easily available, with instant access to a vaccine reserve for rinderpest, peste des petits ruminants, BT, African horse sickness and Rift valley fever. These vaccines should meet international standards and should allow distinction between vaccinated and infected animals. Information should be gathered proactively on the use of vaccines for lumpy skin disease, sheep and goat pox and contagious bovine pleuropneumonia.

  4. Hypersensitivity in cattle after foot-and-mouth disease vaccination: response to hydroxpropylmethylcellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Black, L.; Menard, F. J.; Beadle, G. G.; Pay, T. W.

    1975-01-01

    Intravenous provocation (IVP) tests demonstrated that hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (MC) was able to elicit anaphylactic signs in cattle vaccinated with foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccine produced at one centre but not with similar vaccine produced at another. The former vaccine also provoked serum reagins which were demonstrated by passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) tests in goats. Reaginic sera which reacted specifically with MC were used in PCA tests to screen samples taken serially from the vaccine production lines. The reactions observed suggested that a substance with MC or similar specificity was present in the antifoaming agent routinely added to vaccines. Images Plate 1 PMID:168252

  5. Screening of Sera for Antibodies to Foot-and-Mouth Disease Viral Antigens by Radial Immunodiffusion

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, G. G.; Cowan, K. M.; McVicar, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Radial immunodiffusion procedures have been developed for testing bovine sera for the presence of antibody activity against three foot-and-mouth disease virus types and a virus infection-associated antigen. Reactions with virus antigens were obtained as early as 4 days after infection, and the virus type causing the response was identified. The procedure had the advantages of great sensitivity for the detection of antibody and the ease with which antibodies to a variety of antigens could be detected. Images PMID:4344090

  6. Protection of Cattle against Foot-and-Mouth Disease by a Synthetic Peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimarchi, Richard; Brooke, Gerald; Gale, Charles; Cracknell, Victor; Doel, Timothy; Mowat, Noel

    1986-05-01

    A chemically synthesized peptide consisting essentially of two separate regions (residues 141 to 158 and 200 to 213) of a virus coat protein (VP1) from the 01 Kaufbeuren strain of foot-and-mouth disease virus was prepared free of any carrier protein. It elicited high levels of neutralizing antibody and protected cattle against intradermolingual challenge by inoculation with infectious virus. Comparative evaluation of this peptide with a single-site peptide (residues 141 to 158) in guinea pigs suggests the importance of the VP1 carboxyl terminal residues in enhancing the protective response.

  7. Molecular epidemiology of foot-and-mouth disease virus type O.

    PubMed

    Sáiz, J C; Sobrino, F; Dopazo, J

    1993-10-01

    A phylogenetic tree based on the VPI sequences of type O foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has been derived. Direct sequencing of PCR products has been used to obtain the VP1 gene sequences of new isolates. The tree exhibits four main lineages that largely correlate with the geographical origin of isolates. The analysis supports a close relationship between European O1 field isolates and vaccine strains, with the exception of O Thalheim Aus/81 and O Wuppertal Ger/82 which were probably of non-European origin. Analysis of nucleotide substitutions indicates that synonymous mutations play a major role in FMDV evolution.

  8. A novel Enterovirus 96 circulating in China causes hand, foot, and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi; Sun, Yisuo; Ma, Jinmin; Zhou, Shuru; Fang, Wei; Ye, Jiawei; Tan, Limei; Ji, Jingkai; Luo, Dan; Li, Liqiang; Li, Jiandong; Fang, Chunxiao; Pei, Na; Shi, Shuo; Liu, Xin; Jiang, Hui; Gong, Sitang; Xu, Xun

    2017-02-07

    Enterovirus 96 (EV-96) is a recently described member of the species Enterovirus C and is associated with paralysis and myelitis. In this study, using metagenomic sequencing, we identified a new enterovirus 96 strain (EV-96-SZ/GD/CHN/2014) as the sole pathogen causing hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). A genomic comparison showed that EV-96-SZ/GD/CHN/2014 is most similar to the EV-96-05517 strain (85% identity), which has also been detected in Guangdong Province. This is the first time that metagenomic sequencing has been used to identify an EV-96 strain shown to be associated with HFMD.

  9. Impact of a foot and mouth disease crisis on post-traumatic stress symptoms in farmers.

    PubMed

    Olff, Miranda; Koeter, Maarten W J; Van Haaften, E Heleen; Kersten, Paul H; Gersons, Berthold P R

    2005-02-01

    Culling 27,000 farm animals during an epidemic of foot and mouth disease in The Netherlands in 2001 resulted in substantial psychological distress among Dutch farmers. We investigated the association of exposure to this crisis with symptoms of intrusions and avoidance as found in post-traumatic stress disorder. Survey results from the Impact of Event Scale administered to 661 Dutch dairy farmers showed that about half of those whose animals were culled suffered from severe post-traumatic distress; we conclude that such agricultural crises can have a substantial impact on mental health.

  10. Multiplexed Molecular Assays for Rapid Rule-Out of Foot-and-Mouth Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-Arani, P; Thissen, J; Olivas, J; Carillo, C; Chinn, C; Rasmussen, M; Messenger, S; Suer, L; Smith, S M; Tammero, L; Vitalis, E; Slezak, T R; Hullinger, P J; Hindson, B J; Hietala, S; Crossley, B; Mcbride, M

    2007-06-26

    A nucleic acid-based multiplexed assay was developed that combines detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) with rule-out assays for two other foreign animal diseases and four domestic animal diseases that cause vesicular or ulcerative lesions indistinguishable from FMDV infection in cattle, sheep and swine. The FMDV 'look-alike' diagnostic assay panel contains five PCR and twelve reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) signatures for a total of seventeen simultaneous PCR amplifications for seven diseases plus incorporating four internal assay controls. It was developed and optimized to amplify both DNA and RNA viruses simultaneously in a single tube and employs Luminex{trademark} liquid array technology. Assay development including selection of appropriate controls, a comparison of signature performance in single and multiplex testing against target nucleic acids, as well of limits of detection for each of the individual signatures is presented. While this assay is a prototype and by no means a comprehensive test for FMDV 'look-alike' viruses, an assay of this type is envisioned to have benefit to a laboratory network in routine surveillance and possibly for post-outbreak proof of freedom from foot-and-mouth disease.

  11. Foot-and-mouth disease: a review of the virus and the symptoms.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R F; Knudsen, R C

    2001-11-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the etiologic agent of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), which is a disease of cattle, swine, and other cloven-footed animals. FMD is characterized by the formation of vesicles on the tongue, nose, muzzle, and coronary bands of infected animals. The virus has several unique characteristics that enable it to cause one of the most economically devastating diseases in today's world. The ease with which it may be transmitted by contact and aerosol, combined with its enhanced ability to initiate infections, virtually ensures that most, if not all, animals in a herd will contract FMD. The long-term survival of FMDV in infected animals' tissues and organs, especially when refrigerated, offers an opportunity for its national and international transmission through the food chain. Multiple serotypes and numerous subtypes reduce the effectiveness and reliability of vaccines. The possible development of carriers in vaccinated animals and those that have recovered from FMD provides additional potential sources of new outbreaks. These features create a disease that can have a major economic impact on farmers and entire nations.

  12. Foot-and-mouth disease in Asiatic black bears (Ursus thibetanus).

    PubMed

    Officer, Kirsty; Lan, Nguyen Thi; Wicker, Leanne; Hoa, Nguyen Thi; Weegenaar, Annemarie; Robinson, Jill; Ryoji, Yamaguchi; Loukopoulos, Panayiotis

    2014-09-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious, debilitating, and globally significant viral disease typically affecting cloven-hoofed hosts. The diagnosis of FMD in bears in Vietnam is described. The current study describes a confirmed case of FMD in a bear species, and the clinical signs compatible with FMD in a Malayan sun bear. Thirteen Asiatic black bears (Ursus thibetanus) and 1 Malayan sun bear (Helarctos malayanus) were apparently affected. In August 2011, an adult bear became lethargic, and developed footpad vesicles. Over 15 days, 14 out of 17 bears developed similar signs; the remaining 3 co-housed bears and another 57 resident bears did not. All affected bears developed vesicles on all footpads, and most were lethargic for 24-48 hr. Nasal and oral lesions were noted in 6 and 3 cases, respectively. Within 1 month, all looked normal. Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, classified as serotype O, and isolated by virus isolation techniques. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated clustering of 3 bear isolates, in a branch distinct from other FMDV type O isolates. The outbreak likely occurred due to indirect contact with livestock, and was facilitated by the high density of captive bears. It showed that Asiatic black bears are capable of contracting FMDV and developing clinical disease, and that the virus spreads easily between bears in close contact. © 2014 The Author(s).

  13. Immunity of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Serotype Asia 1 by Sublingual Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao-tai; Liu, Yong-sheng

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals, with severe agricultural and economic losses. Here we present study using a sublingual (SL) route with the killed serotype Asia 1 FMDV vaccine. Guinea pigs were vaccinated using a commercially available vaccine formulation at the manufacturer’s recommended full, 1/4, and 1/16 antigen doses. Animals were challenged with homologous FMDV Asia1 strain at various times following vaccination. All control guinea pigs exhibited clinical disease, including fever, viremia, and lesions, specifically vesicle formation in feet. Animals vaccinated with the 1/16 and 1/4 doses were protected after challenge at days 7, 28, and 35 post vaccination. These data suggest that effective protection against foot-and-mouth disease can be achieved with 1/16 of the recommended vaccine dose using SL vaccination, indicating that the sublingual route is an attractive alternative for the administration of the FMDV vaccine. PMID:23717497

  14. Thermal inactivation of foot and mouth disease virus in extruded pet food.

    PubMed

    Gubbins, S; Forster, J; Clive, S; Schley, D; Zuber, S; Schaaff, J; Corley, D

    2016-12-01

    The risk of importing foot and mouth disease, a highly contagious viral disease of livestock, severely restricts trade and investment opportunities in many developing countries where the virus is present. This study was designed to investigate the inactivation of foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) by heat treatments used in extruded commercial pet food manufacture. If extrusion could be shown to reliably inactivate the virus, this could potentially facilitate trade for FMDV-endemic countries. The authors found that there was no detectable virus following: i) treatment of FMDVspiked meat slurry at 68°C for 300 s; ii) treatment of FMDV-spiked slurry and meal mix at 79°C for 10 or 30 s, or iii) treatment of homogenised bovine tongue epithelium, taken from an FMDV-infected animal, at 79°C for 10 s. This corresponds to an estimated 8 log10 reduction in titre (95% credible interval: 6 log10 -13 log10). Furthermore, the authors found that the pH of the slurry and meal mix was sufficient to inactivate FMDV in the absence of heat treatment. This demonstrates that heat treatments used in commercial pet food manufacture are able to substantially reduce the titre of FMDV in infected raw materials. © OIE (World Organisation for Animal Health), 2016.

  15. Serum cytokine profiles of children with human enterovirus 71-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Han, Jun; Wang, Ying; Gan, Xing; Song, Juan; Sun, Peng; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2014-08-01

    Cytokine profiles may impact the pathogenicity and severity of hand, foot, and mouth disease caused by human enterovirus (HEV) 71. In 91 severe or mild HEV 71-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease children, serum was collected between days 2 and 10 or day >10. Serum cytokines including Type 1 T helper (Th1) cytokines: interleukin (IL)-2, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), IL-12, and IL-18, Type 1 T helper (Th2) cytokines: IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, proinflammatory cytokines: IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), were assessed during the early stage and recovery. In the patients with mild illness, the peaks of IL-8 and IL-10 were observed on day 6 and that of IL-18 was on day 4. In the patients with severe illness, all cytokines spiked on day 3 and peaked on day 11. All cytokines except IL-6, IL-8, IL-18, and TNF-α were significantly correlated with immunoglobulin M levels by the end of the disease course. Cytokine profile variations between the patients with mild and severe illness may indicate prognosis and strain virulence, useful in clinical treatment of patients.

  16. Molecular characterisation of foot-and-mouth disease viruses from Pakistan, 2005-2008.

    PubMed

    Waheed, U; Parida, S; Khan, Q M; Hussain, M; Ebert, K; Wadsworth, J; Reid, S M; Hutchings, G H; Mahapatra, M; King, D P; Paton, D J; Knowles, N J

    2011-04-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), an economically important disease of cloven-hoofed animals, is endemic in Pakistan where three virus serotypes are present (O, A and Asia 1). Fifty-eight clinical samples collected between 2005 and 2008 from animals with suspected FMD in various locations in Pakistan were subjected to virus isolation on primary cell culture, antigen ELISA and real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR). Viruses were isolated from 32 of these samples and identified as FMDV type O (n = 31) or type A (n = 1). Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) genome was detected in a further 11 samples by real-time RT-PCR. Phylogenetic analyses of the VP1 nucleotide sequences showed that all of the type O viruses belonged to the MIDDLE EAST-SOUTH ASIA topotype with the majority belonging to the PanAsia-2 lineage; a single example of the older PanAsia lineage was identified. The single FMDV type A virus belonged to the ASIA topotype, but did not cluster with known strains that are currently circulating (such as Iran-05) and was not closely related to other type A viruses from the region. These findings demonstrate the widespread distribution of O-PanAsia-2 in Pakistan and the presence of undisclosed novel type A lineages in the region.

  17. Characterization of epitope-tagged foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Seago, Julian; Jackson, Terry; Doel, Claudia; Fry, Elizabeth; Stuart, David; Harmsen, Michiel M; Charleston, Bryan; Juleff, Nicholas

    2012-11-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and economically devastating disease of cloven-hoofed animals with an almost-worldwide distribution. Conventional FMD vaccines consisting of chemically inactivated viruses have aided in the eradication of FMD from Europe and remain the main tool for control in endemic countries. Although significant steps have been made to improve the quality of vaccines, such as improved methods of antigen concentration and purification, manufacturing processes are technically demanding and expensive. Consequently, there is large variation in the quality of vaccines distributed in FMD-endemic countries compared with those manufactured for emergency use in FMD-free countries. Here, we have used reverse genetics to introduce haemagglutinin (HA) and FLAG tags into the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid. HA- and FLAG-tagged FMDVs were infectious, with a plaque morphology similar to the non-tagged parental infectious copy virus and the field virus. The tagged viruses utilized integrin-mediated cell entry and retained the tag epitopes over serial passages. In addition, infectious HA- and FLAG-tagged FMDVs were readily purified from small-scale cultures using commercial antibodies. Tagged FMDV offers a feasible alternative to the current methods of vaccine concentration and purification, a potential to develop FMD vaccine conjugates and a unique tool for FMDV research.

  18. Failure of vaccination to prevent outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease.

    PubMed Central

    Woolhouse, M. E.; Haydon, D. T.; Pearson, A.; Kitching, R. P.

    1996-01-01

    Outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease persist in dairy cattle herds in Saudi Arabia despite revaccination at intervals of 4-6 months. Vaccine trials provide data on antibody responses following vaccination. Using this information we developed a mathematical model of the decay of protective antibodies with which we estimated the fraction of susceptible animals at a given time after vaccination. The model describes the data well, suggesting over 95% take with an antibody half-life of 43 days. Farm records provided data on the time course of five outbreaks. We applied a 'SLIR' epidemiological model to these data, fitting a single parameter representing disease transmission rate. The analysis provides estimates of the basic reproduction number R(0), which may exceed 70 in some cases. We conclude that the critical intervaccination interval which would provide herd immunity against FMDV is unrealistically short, especially for heterologous challenge. We suggest that it may not be possible to prevent foot-and-mouth disease outbreaks on these farms using currently available vaccines. PMID:8666082

  19. Inactivation of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus by Commercially Available Disinfectants and Cleaners.

    PubMed

    Harada, Yu; Lekcharoensuk, Porntippa; Furuta, Taro; Taniguchi, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is an animal pathogen of great concern. It is contagious to cloven-hoofed animals and affects animals in extensive areas worldwide. In general, the primary eradication strategies for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Japan are stamping out the disease and restriction of movement. It is also important to completely disinfect the infected area to prevent the spread of FMDV, including vehicles and people as well. However, there is no report on the effect of commercially available disinfectants against FMDV in a short contact time. In this study, we evaluated the virucidal effect of thirteen commercially available products, and got the following results: acidic ethanol disinfectants, alkaline cleaners and sodium hypochlorite had great effect (>3.0 log10 reduction in titer) against FMDV. On the other hand, neutral ethanol disinfectants, hand soaps, and quaternary ammonium compound sanitizers did not show great effect against FMDV. Therefore, it is presumed that acidic ethanol disinfectants are effective for human use and alkaline cleaners are effective for use in the infected environment for the control of a FMD outbreak.

  20. Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus 3C Protease Cleaves NEMO To Impair Innate Immune Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Li, Kui; Zhong, Huijuan; Fan, Jinxiu; Ouyang, Chao; Zhang, Huan; Duan, Erzhen; Luo, Rui; Zhang, Zhongming; Liu, Xiangtao; Chen, Huanchun

    2012-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease is a highly contagious viral illness of wild and domestic cloven-hoofed animals. The causative agent, foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), replicates rapidly, efficiently disseminating within the infected host and being passed on to susceptible animals via direct contact or the aerosol route. To survive in the host, FMDV has evolved to block the host interferon (IFN) response. Previously, we and others demonstrated that the leader proteinase (Lpro) of FMDV is an IFN antagonist. Here, we report that another FMDV-encoded proteinase, 3Cpro, also inhibits IFN-α/β response and the expression of IFN-stimulated genes. Acting in a proteasome- and caspase-independent manner, the 3Cpro of FMDV proteolytically cleaved nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-κB) essential modulator (NEMO), a bridging adaptor protein essential for activating both NF-κB and interferon-regulatory factor signaling pathways. 3Cpro specifically targeted NEMO at the Gln 383 residue, cleaving off the C-terminal zinc finger domain from the protein. This cleavage impaired the ability of NEMO to activate downstream IFN production and to act as a signaling adaptor of the RIG-I/MDA5 pathway. Mutations specifically disrupting the cysteine protease activity of 3Cpro abrogated NEMO cleavage and the inhibition of IFN induction. Collectively, our data identify NEMO as a substrate for FMDV 3Cpro and reveal a novel mechanism evolved by a picornavirus to counteract innate immune signaling. PMID:22718831

  1. Functional analysis of the internal translation initiation site of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, R; Luz, N; Beck, E

    1990-01-01

    Mutagenesis of the large untranslated sequence at the 5' end of the genome of foot-and-mouth disease virus revealed that a region of approximately 450 nucleotides preceding the open reading frame of the viral polyprotein is involved in the regulation of translation initiation at two internal start sites. Variations in two domains of this region reduced the translation efficiency up to 10-fold, whereas an intermediate segment seemed to be less essential. A pyrimidine-rich sequence preceding the start codon was most sensitive in that conversion of single pyrimidine residues to purines decreased the translation efficiency strongly. The data are in agreement with a recently proposed general structural model for the internal ribosome entry site of the cardiovirusaphthovirus subgroup of picornaviruses (E. V. Pilipenko, V. M. Blinov, B. K. Chernov, T. M. Dmitrieva, and V. I. Agol, Nucleic Acids Res. 17:5701-5711, 1989). They suggest, however, that this model represents only a core structure for the internal entry of ribosomes and that foot-and-mouth disease virus and other members of the picornaviruses need additional regulatory RNA elements for efficient translation initiation. Images PMID:2168956

  2. 5-fluorouracil in lethal mutagenesis of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Agudo, Rubén; Arias, Armando; Domingo, Esteban

    2009-06-01

    5-fluorouracil (FU) is a pyrimidine analogue extensively used in cancer chemotherapy. FU can be metabolized into 5-fluorouridine-triphosphate, which can be used as substrate for viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. This results in the incorporation of mutations into viral RNA. Accumulation of mutations may lead to loss of virus infectivity, in a process known as lethal mutagenesis. RNA virus pathogens are particularly difficult to control because they are highly mutable, and mutants resistant to antiviral agents are readily selected. Here, we review the basic principles of lethal mutagenesis as an antiviral approach, and the participation of FU in its development. Recent studies with foot-and-mouth disease virus indicate that FU can act both as an inhibitor and as a mutagen during foot-and-mouth disease virus replication. This dual activity renders FU an adequate drug for lethal mutagenesis. We suggest that structural and biochemical studies can contribute to the lead to new design of base or nucleoside analogues targeted specifically to viral polymerases.

  3. Inoculation of swine with foot-and-mouth disease SAP-mutant virus induces early protection against disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) leader proteinase (L^pro) cleaves itself from the viral polyprotein and cleaves the translation initiation factor eIF4G. As a result, host cell translation is inhibited, affecting the host innate immune response. We have demonstrated that L^pro is also associated ...

  4. Accuracy of Herdsmen Reporting versus Serologic Testing for Estimating Foot-and-Mouth Disease Prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Handel, Ian G.; Tanya, Vincent N.; Hamman, Saidou M.; Nfon, Charles; Bergman, Ingrid E.; Malirat, Viviana; Sorensen, Karl J.; Bronsvoort, Barend M. de C.

    2014-01-01

    Herdsman-reported disease prevalence is widely used in veterinary epidemiologic studies, especially for diseases with visible external lesions; however, the accuracy of such reports is rarely validated. Thus, we used latent class analysis in a Bayesian framework to compare sensitivity and specificity of herdsman reporting with virus neutralization testing and use of 3 nonstructural protein ELISAs for estimates of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) prevalence on the Adamawa plateau of Cameroon in 2000. Herdsman-reported estimates in this FMD-endemic area were comparable to those obtained from serologic testing. To harness to this cost-effective resource of monitoring emerging infectious diseases, we suggest that estimates of the sensitivity and specificity of herdsmen reporting should be done in parallel with serologic surveys of other animal diseases. PMID:25417556

  5. The importance of immediate destruction in epidemics of foot and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Howard, S C; Donnelly, C A

    2000-10-01

    Foot and mouth disease is still prevalent in many parts of the world, as emphasised by the recent devastating epidemic in pig farms in Taiwan. A discrete time mechanistic model has been used to describe the spread of infection in both this epidemic and the 1967 to 1968 epidemic in the UK. The force of infection and basic reproduction number are estimated and the sensitivity of these results to the distributions of both the latent and infectious periods of the disease is examined. Epidemic simulations were performed to evaluate the disease control policy whereby all herds are slaughtered on the same day as disease confirmation. These simulations showed that implementing this policy could have resulted in a dramatic reduction (of over 60 per cent) in the number of pig farms affected in the Taiwan epidemic. It is thus imperative that the necessary resources are available to implement this policy, should an outbreak occur. Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  6. Cloning of cDNA of major antigen of foot and mouth disease virus and expression in E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küpper, Hans; Keller, Walter; Kurz, Christina; Forss, Sonja; Schaller, Heinz

    1981-02-01

    Double-stranded DNA copies of the single-stranded genomic RNA of foot and mouth disease virus have been cloned into the Escherichia coli plasmid pBR322. A restriction map of the viral genome was established and aligned with the biochemical map of foot and mouth disease virus. The coding sequence for structural protein VP1, the major antigen of the virus, was identified and inserted into a plasmid vector where the expression of this sequence is under control of the phage λ PL promoter. In an appropriate host the synthesis of antigenic polypeptide can be demonstrated by radioimmunoassay.

  7. On The Use Of Models To Assess Foot-And-Mouth Disease Transmission And Control

    SciTech Connect

    Kostova-Vassilevska, T

    2004-07-12

    The 2001 outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Europe (Ferguson et al. 2001a, 2001b; Bouma et al. 2003) and concern about the possibility of an intentional introduction of a devastating foreign animal disease triggered renewed interest in both theoretical and experimental research related to FMD. Theoretical models of disease transmission, which influenced the tactical decisions of the United Kingdom (UK) government during the epidemic (Taylor 2003), resulted in large numbers of uninfected animals being slaughtered. After the epidemic, the adopted control policies were sharply criticized (Kitching 2004;, Taylor 2003). Still, the role of computationaL modeling for analyzing the scope of the epidemic and devising control strategies was recognized as substantial and necessary.

  8. Diagnostic assays developed for the control of foot-and-mouth disease in India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gaurav Kumar; Mahajan, Sonalika; Matura, Rakesh; Subramaniam, Saravanan; Ranjan, Rajeev; Biswal, Jitendra; Rout, Manoranjan; Mohapatra, Jajati Keshari; Dash, Bana Bihari; Sanyal, Aniket; Pattnaik, Bramhadev

    2015-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and economically devastating disease of livestock, primarily affecting cattle, buffalo and pigs. FMD virus serotypes O, A and Asia1 are prevalent in India and systematic efforts are on to control and eventually eradicate the disease from the country. FMD epidemiology is complex due to factors like co-circulation, extinction, emergence and re-emergence of genotypes/lineages within the three serotypes, animal movement, diverse farm practices and large number of susceptible livestock in the country. Systematic vaccination, prompt diagnosis, strict biosecurity measures, and regular monitoring of vaccinal immunity and surveillance of virus circulation are indispensible features for the effective implementation of the control measures. Availability of suitable companion diagnostic tests is very important in this endeavour. In this review, the diagnostic assays developed and validated in India and their contribution in FMD control programme is presented. PMID:26279990

  9. Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in the Maghreb and its threat to southern European countries.

    PubMed

    Kardjadj, Moustafa

    2017-02-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and transboundary viral disease of domesticated and wild cloven-hoofed animals. The present study summarizes the knowledge generated from the epidemiology, diagnosis, and surveillance of the disease in the Maghreb (2014-2015) in assessing its threat to southern European countries. Currently, two serotypes of the FMD virus (O and SAT-2) and four lineages are circulating in the Maghreb region. The introduction of serotype SAT-2 in Libya and Mauritania in 2012 and 2015 respectively sets their neighbors and subsequently south European countries at constant risk of FMD re-emergence. The potential pathways of FMD introduction to southern European countries from the Maghreb are the illegal introduction of infected animals and animal products, particularly meat or meat products carried by refugees.

  10. Capsid coding sequences of foot-and-mouth disease viruses are determinants of pathogenicity in pigs.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Louise; Jackson, Terry; Bøtner, Anette; Belsham, Graham J

    2012-05-24

    The surface exposed capsid proteins, VP1, VP2 and VP3, of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) determine its antigenicity and the ability of the virus to interact with host-cell receptors. Hence, modification of these structural proteins may alter the properties of the virus.In the present study we compared the pathogenicity of different FMDVs in young pigs. In total 32 pigs, 7-weeks-old, were exposed to virus, either by direct inoculation or through contact with inoculated pigs, using cell culture adapted (O1K B64), chimeric (O1K/A-TUR and O1K/O-UKG) or field strain (O-UKG/34/2001) viruses. The O1K B64 virus and the two chimeric viruses are identical to each other except for the capsid coding region.Animals exposed to O1K B64 did not exhibit signs of disease, while pigs exposed to each of the other viruses showed typical clinical signs of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). All pigs infected with the O1K/O-UKG chimera or the field strain (O-UKG/34/2001) developed fulminant disease. Furthermore, 3 of 4 in-contact pigs exposed to the O1K/O-UKG virus died in the acute phase of infection, likely from myocardial infection. However, in the group exposed to the O1K/A-TUR chimeric virus, only 1 pig showed symptoms of disease within the time frame of the experiment (10 days). All pigs that developed clinical disease showed a high level of viral RNA in serum and infected pigs that survived the acute phase of infection developed a serotype specific antibody response. It is concluded that the capsid coding sequences are determinants of FMDV pathogenicity in pigs.

  11. Epidemiological features of hand-foot-and-mouth disease in Shenzhen, China from 2008 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Zheng, S; Cao, C X; Cheng, J Q; Wu, Y S; Xie, X; Xu, M

    2014-08-01

    This study analysed the spatio-temporal distribution and propagation of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) in Shenzhen from 2008 to 2010. Specifically, we examined the epidemiological data, temporal distribution and spatial distribution, and then the relationship between meteorological, social factors and the number of reported HFMD cases was analysed using Spearman's rank correlation. Finally, a geographically weighted regression model was constructed for the number of reported HFMD cases in 2009. It was found that three independent variables, i.e. the number of reported HFMD cases in 2008 and, annual average temperature and precipitation, had different spatial impacts on the number of reported HFMD cases in 2009. In addition, these variables accounted for the propagation mechanism of HFMD in the centre and east of Shenzhen, where the high incidence rate areas are located. These results will be of great help in understanding the spatio-temporal distribution of HFMD and developing approaches to prevent this disease.

  12. Sero-prevalence, risk factors and distribution of foot and mouth disease in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Abdela, Nejash

    2017-05-01

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD), world's most important highly infectious and contagious trans-boundary animal diseases, is responsible for huge global losses of livestock production as well as severe impacts on international trade. This vesicular disease is caused by foot and mouth disease virus of the genus Aphthovirus, family Picornaviridae. Currently FMD is major global animal health problem and endemic in Africa including Ethiopia. This paper systematically reviewed the sero-prevalence reports, associated risk factors and distribution of FMD in Ethiopia with the main aim of making compressive document on prevalence, risk factor and distribution of the disease thus helping as a basis for designing effective control strategies. FMD is widely distributed in Ethiopia and its prevalence varies from place to place with seropositivity that ranges from 5.6% to 42.7% in cattle and from 4% to 11% in small ruminant and in 30% in ungulate wildlife. In Ethiopia endemic distributions of five of seven serotypes, namely serotypes O, A, C, SAT1 and SAT2 have been documented. The dominant serotype being reported recently is serotype O and serotype C has not been reported in the country since 1983. However, serotype C specific antibody was detected in cattle indicating that circulation of serotype C viruses in the country may have gone unnoticed. The most common risk factor associated with FMD infection in Ethiopia includes production system, geographic location, species, age of animals, contact with wildlife and season of the year, mixed animal species and Breed. Conclusively, this paper revealed as FMD is posing a major threat in different area of the country thereby causing substantial economic losses through morbidity, mortality and restriction of international trade. Thus, demanding for great attention as its occurrence is may affect the export earnings of the country thereby threaten the livelihood of farmers and economy of the country at large.

  13. Effect of foot-and-mouth disease virus on the frequency, phenotype and function of circulating dendritic cells in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a highly contagious virus that causes one of the most devastating diseases in cloven-hoofed animals. Disease symptoms in FMDV-infected animals appear within 2 to 3 days of exposure. Dendritic cells (DC) play an essential role in protective immune responses agai...

  14. 9 CFR 94.17 - Dry-cured pork products from regions where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine fever, classical swine fever, or swine vesicular disease exists. 94.17 Section 94.17 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE...

  15. 9 CFR 94.17 - Dry-cured pork products from regions where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine fever, classical swine fever, or swine vesicular disease exists. 94.17 Section 94.17 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE...

  16. 9 CFR 94.17 - Dry-cured pork products from regions where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine fever, classical swine fever, or swine vesicular disease exists. 94.17 Section 94.17 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, NEWCASTLE DISEASE, HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA, AFRICAN SWINE...

  17. Phylogeography of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Luiz Max Fagundes; Santos, Leonardo Bacelar Lima; Faria, Nuno Rodrigues; de Castro Silveira, Waldemir

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the causative agent of the most important disease of domestic cattle, foot-and-mouth disease. In Ecuador, FMDV is maintained at an endemic state, with sporadic outbreaks. To unravel the tempo and mode of FMDV spread within the country we conducted a Bayesian phylogeographic analysis using a continuous time Markov chain (CTMC) to model the diffusion of FMDV between Ecuadorian provinces. We implement this framework through Markov chain Monte Carlo available in the BEAST package to study 90 FMDV serotype O isolates from 17 provinces in the period 2002-2010. The Bayesian approach also allowed us to test hypotheses on the mechanisms of viral spread by incorporating environmental and epidemiological data in our prior distributions and perform Bayesian model selection. Our analyses suggest an intense flow of viral strains throughout the country that is possibly coupled to animal movements and ecological factors, since most of inferred viral spread routes were in Coast and Highland regions. Moreover, our results suggest that both short- and long-range spread occur within Ecuador. The province of Esmeraldas, in the border with Colombia and where most animal commerce is done, was found to be the most probable origin of the circulating strains, pointing to a transboundary behavior of FMDV in South America. These findings suggest that uncontrolled animal movements can create a favorable environment for FMDV maintenance and pose a serious threat to control programmes. Also, we show that phylogeographic modeling can be a powerful tool in unraveling the spatial dynamics of viruses and potentially in controlling the spread of these pathogens.

  18. Molecular differentiation and phylogenetic analysis of the Egyptian foot-and-mouth disease virus SAT2.

    PubMed

    El-Shehawy, Laila I; Abu-Elnaga, Hany I; Rizk, Sonia A; Abd El-Kreem, Ahmed S; Mohamed, A A; Fawzy, Hossam G

    2014-03-01

    In February 2012, a massive new foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) outbreak struck Egypt. In this work, one-step RT-PCR assays were used for in-house detection and differentiation of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in Egypt in this year using pan-serotypic and serotype-targeting sequence primers. FMDV SAT2 was the dominant virus in the examined isolates from the epidemic. The complete VP1 coding regions of two isolates were sequenced. The two isolates had 99.2 % sequence identity to most contemporary Egyptian SAT2 reference viruses, whereas they had 89.7-90.1 % identity to the SAT2/EGY/2/2012 isolate, which was collected from Alexandria, Egypt, and previously sequenced by WRLFMD. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Egypt had one topotype and two lineage of FMDV SAT2 in 2012. The Egyptian and the Palestinian 2012 strains were associated mainly with topotype VII, lineage SAT2/VII/Ghb-12, while the virus isolated from Alexandria Governorate belonged to the SAT2/VII/Alx-12 lineage. Topotype VII also comprised lineages that included strains isolated from Libya in 2012 and 2003. Furthermore, within the same topotype, the Egyptian SAT2/2012 isolates were related to strains from Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Eritrea, Cameroon and Nigeria. Nevertheless, more epidemiological work with neighboring countries is needed to prevent cross-border spread of disease and to reach a precise conclusion about the origin of the 2012 FMDV SAT2 emergency in the Middle East.

  19. Rapid Engineering of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Vaccine and Challenge Viruses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seo-Yong; Lee, Yeo-Joo; Kim, Rae-Hyung; Park, Jeong-Nam; Park, Min-Eun; Ko, Mi-Kyeong; Choi, Joo-Hyung; Chu, Jia-Qi; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Kim, Su-Mi; Tark, Dongseob; Lee, Hyang-Sim; Ko, Young-Joon; Seo, Min-Goo; Park, Jung-Won; Kim, Byounghan; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Lee, Jong-Soo; Park, Jong-Hyeon

    2017-08-15

    There are seven antigenically distinct serotypes of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), each of which has intratypic variants. In the present study, we have developed methods to efficiently generate promising vaccines against seven serotypes or subtypes. The capsid-encoding gene (P1) of the vaccine strain O1/Manisa/Turkey/69 was replaced with the amplified or synthetic genes from the O, A, Asia1, C, SAT1, SAT2, and SAT3 serotypes. Viruses of the seven serotype were rescued successfully. Each chimeric FMDV with a replacement of P1 showed serotype-specific antigenicity and varied in terms of pathogenesis in pigs and mice. Vaccination of pigs with an experimental trivalent vaccine containing the inactivated recombinants based on the main serotypes O, A, and Asia1 effectively protected them from virus challenge. This technology could be a potential strategy for a customized vaccine with challenge tools to protect against epizootic disease caused by specific serotypes or subtypes of FMDV.IMPORTANCE Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus (FMDV) causes significant economic losses. For vaccine preparation, the selection of vaccine strains was complicated by high antigenic variation. In the present study, we suggested an effective strategy to rapidly prepare and evaluate mass-produced customized vaccines against epidemic strains. The P1 gene encoding the structural proteins of the well-known vaccine virus was replaced by the synthetic or amplified genes of viruses of seven representative serotypes. These chimeric viruses generally replicated readily in cell culture and had a particle size similar to that of the original vaccine strain. Their antigenicity mirrored that of the original serotype from which their P1 gene was derived. Animal infection experiments revealed that the recombinants varied in terms of pathogenicity. This strategy will be a useful tool for rapidly generating customized FMD vaccines or challenge viruses for all serotypes, especially for FMD-free countries

  20. Foot and Mouth Disease in Livestock and Reduced Cryptosporidiosis in Humans, England and Wales

    PubMed Central

    Smerdon, William J.; Nichols, Tom; Chalmers, Rachel M.; Heine, Hilary

    2003-01-01

    During the 2001 epidemic of foot and mouth disease (FMD) in livestock in England and Wales, we discovered a corresponding decrease in laboratory reports of cryptosporidiosis in humans. Using a regression model of laboratory reports of cryptosporidiosis, we found an estimated 35% (95% confidence interval [CI] 20% to 47%) reduction in reports during the weeks spanning the period from the first and last cases of FMD. The largest reduction occurred in northwest England, where the estimated decrease was 63% (95% CI 31% to 80%). Genotyping a subgroup of human isolates suggested that the proportion of Cryptosporidium genotype 2 strain (animal and human) was lower during the weeks of the FMD epidemic in 2001 compared with the same weeks in 2000. Our observations are consistent with livestock making a substantial contribution to Cryptosporidium infection in humans in England and Wales; our findings have implications for agriculture, visitors to rural areas, water companies, and regulators. PMID:12533277

  1. Spatio-temporal point processes, partial likelihood, foot and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Diggle, Peter J

    2006-08-01

    Spatio-temporal point process data arise in many fields of application. An intuitively natural way to specify a model for a spatio-temporal point process is through its conditional intensity at location x and time t, given the history of the process up to time t. Often, this results in an analytically intractable likelihood. Likelihood-based inference then relies on Monte Carlo methods which are computationally intensive and require careful tuning to each application. A partial likelihood alternative is proposed, which is computationally straightforward and can be applied routinely. The method is applied to data from the 2001 foot and mouth epidemic in the UK, using a previously published model for the spatio-temporal spread of the disease.

  2. Detection of hand, foot and mouth disease in the yucatan peninsula of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Machain-Williams, Carlos; Dzul-Rosado, Alma R; Yeh-Gorocica, Aarón B; Rodriguez-Ruz, Katia G; Noh-Pech, Henry; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes; Salazar, Ma Isabel; Castro-Mussot, María Eugenia; Reyes-Solis, Guadalupe; Garcia-Rejon, Julián E; Puerto-Manzano, Fernando I; Blitvich, Bradley J

    2014-11-19

    We report a case of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in a 5-year-old male from Merida City in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. A clinical and physical examination revealed that the patient had symptoms typical of HFMD, including fever, fatigue, odynophagia, throat edema, hyperemia, lesions on the hands and feet, and blisters in the oral cavity. The patient fully recovered after a convalescence period of almost three weeks. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and nucleotide sequencing revealed that the etiological agent was enterovirus 71 (EV71). The sequence has greatest (90.4%) nucleotide identity to the corresponding regions of EV71 isolates from the Netherlands and Singapore. Although HFMD is presumably common in Mexico, surprisingly there are no data in the PubMed database to support this. This case report provides the first peer-reviewed evidence of HFMD in Mexico.

  3. Detection of Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Machain-Williams, Carlos; Dzul-Rosado, Alma R.; Yeh-Gorocica, Aarón B.; Rodriguez-Ruz, Katia G.; Noh-Pech, Henry; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes; Salazar, Ma. Isabel; Castro-Mussot, María Eugenia; Reyes-Solis, Guadalupe; Garcia-Rejon, Julián E.; Puerto-Manzano, Fernando I.; Blitvich, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in a 5-year-old male from Merida City in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. A clinical and physical examination revealed that the patient had symptoms typical of HFMD, including fever, fatigue, odynophagia, throat edema, hyperemia, lesions on the hands and feet, and blisters in the oral cavity. The patient fully recovered after a convalescence period of almost three weeks. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and nucleotide sequencing revealed that the etiological agent was enterovirus 71 (EV71). The sequence has greatest (90.4%) nucleotide identity to the corresponding regions of EV71 isolates from the Netherlands and Singapore. Although HFMD is presumably common in Mexico, surprisingly there are no data in the PubMed database to support this. This case report provides the first peer-reviewed evidence of HFMD in Mexico. PMID:25568757

  4. Promising MS2 mediated virus-like particle vaccine against foot-and-mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yan-mei; Zhang, Guo-guang; Huang, Xiao-jun; Chen, Liang; Chen, Hao-tai

    2015-05-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) has caused severe economic losses to millions of farmers worldwide. In this work, the coding genes of 141-160 epitope peptide (EP141-160) of VP1 were inserted into the coat protein (CP) genes of MS2 in prokaryotic expression vector, and the recombinant protein self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLP). Results showed that the CP-EP141-160 VLP had a strong immunoreaction with the FMD virus (FMDV) antigen in vitro, and also had an effective immune response in mice. Further virus challenge tests were carried out on guinea pigs and swine, high-titer neutralizing antibodies were produced and the CP-EP141-160 VLP vaccine could protect most of the animals against FMDV.

  5. VP1 sequencing protocol for foot and mouth disease virus molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Knowles, N J; Wadsworth, J; Bachanek-Bankowska, K; King, D P

    2016-12-01

    Nucleotide sequences of field strains of foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) contribute to our understanding of the distribution and evolution of viral lineages that circulate in different regions of the world. This paper outlines a practical reversetranscription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and sequencing strategy that can be used to generate RNA sequences encoding the VP1 (1D) region of FMDV. The protocol contains a panel of PCR and sequencing primers that can be selected to characterise genetically diverse isolates representing all seven FMDV serotypes. A list of sequences is also described, comprising prototype sequences for all proposed FMDV topotypes, in order to provide a framework for phylogenetic analysis. The technical details and prototype sequences provided in this paper can be employed by FMD Reference Laboratories and others in an approach to harmonise the molecular epidemiology of FMDV.

  6. Isolation of capsid proteins of foot-and-mouth disease virus by chromatofocusing.

    PubMed

    Murdin, A D; Doel, T R; Spier, R E

    1983-10-01

    A method for the isolation of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid proteins was developed. The FMDV capsid proteins VP1, VP2, VP3 and VP0 were isolated from sucrose gradient purified virus by chromatofocusing in a pH 7.4-4.0 gradient on Polybuffer exchanger PBE 94. Under the conditions used the proteins eluted in the sequence VP1, VP2, VP0 (when present) and VP3. Capsid protein VP4 did not elute and could not be isolated by this method. Protein concentration in the eluate was monitored by the use of a radiolabelled marker and recoveries of approximately 50% of the input marker could be achieved when using up to 15 mg of virus and a 30-ml column. The high capacity and relative simplicity of chromatofocusing make it a useful alternative to other methods of purifying proteins.

  7. Antiviral effects of a thiol protease inhibitor on foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Kleina, L G; Grubman, M J

    1992-01-01

    The thiol protease inhibitor E-64 specifically blocks autocatalytic activity of the leader protease of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) and interferes with cleavage of the structural protein precursor in an in vitro translation assay programmed with virion RNA. Experiments with FMDV-infected cells and E-64 or a membrane-permeable analog, E-64d, have confirmed these results and demonstrated interference in virus assembly, causing a reduction in virus yield. In addition, there is a lag in the appearance of virus-induced cellular morphologic alterations, a delay in cleavage of host cell protein p220 and in shutoff of host protein synthesis, and a decrease in viral protein and RNA synthesis. The implications of using E-64-based compounds as potential antiviral agents for FMDV are discussed. Images PMID:1331517

  8. The stability and potency of vaccines prepared from inactivated foot-and-mouth disease virus concentrates.

    PubMed

    Doel, T R; David, D J

    1984-07-01

    The stability of 146S particles in concentrates of foot-and-mouth disease virus stored at 4 degrees C was similar to that of 146S particles in a conventional virus preparation. Proteolytic degradation of VPl was not observed in the stored conventional virus preparation or inhibitor-supplemented concentrate but was observed in a supplement-free concentrate. The potencies of vaccines made from the conventional and concentrated preparations and stored in parallel at 4 degrees C appeared to decrease after 16 weeks. The vaccines made from the supplement-free concentrate and the Trasylol supplemented concentrate appeared to be at least as potent as the conventional vaccine and were clearly superior to vaccine made from ox serum supplemented concentrate.

  9. Pancreatitis in hand-foot-and-mouth disease caused by enterovirus 71

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Feng; Deng, Hui-Ling; Fu, Jia; Zhang, Yu; Wei, Jian-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Some viruses, including certain members of the enterovirus genus, have been reported to cause pancreatitis, especially Coxsackie virus. However, no case of human enterovirus 71 (EV71) associated with pancreatitis has been reported so far. We here report a case of EV71-induced hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) presenting with pancreatitis in a 2-year-old girl. This is the first report of a patient with acute pancreatitis in HFMD caused by EV71. We treated the patient conservatively with nasogastric suction, intravenous fluid and antivirals. The patient’s symptoms improved after 8 d, and recovered without complications. We conclude that EV71 can cause acute pancreatitis in HFMD, which should be considered in differential diagnosis, especially in cases of idiopathic pancreatitis. PMID:26877620

  10. The 2001 foot and mouth disease epidemic in the United Kingdom: animal welfare perspectives.

    PubMed

    Crispin, S M; Roger, P A; O'Hare, H; Binns, S H

    2002-12-01

    The management of the foot and mouth disease (FMD) epidemic which occurred in the United Kingdom (UK) in 2001 resulted in widespread animal welfare problems. These problems arose firstly because of the large numbers of animals slaughtered to bring the epidemic under control, which meant that the conditions under which animals were slaughtered and the manner in which this was carried out often breached regulations concerning welfare at slaughter. Secondly, the restrictions imposed on movements, especially animal movements, resulted in what appeared to be readily avoidable difficulties with livestock dying from, for example, food shortages and pregnant animals giving birth under unsuitable conditions. This brief review is based on the personal experiences of the authors as well as relevant observations and reports from a variety of sources.

  11. [Demographic characteristics of patients with hand-foot-and-mouth disease. Atypical cases series].

    PubMed

    Gürkm, Asuman; Acar, Mehtap; Şenel, Saliha

    2015-08-01

    Hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) is a common childhood exanthem. Various types of lesions and widespread distribution in atypical cases have been described, but data on the predilection of lesion localizations in atypical cases are insufficient. We aimed to describe the demographic features of patients with HFMD, and to characterize lesion localizations in patients with atypical eruptions treated at an outpatient dermatology clinic of a pediatric hospital, between November 2011 and August 2013.The study included 67 patients. Mean age of the patients was 34 months and there was a male predominance (60%). All the patients had eruptions on hands, feet, and mouth. Children aged <24 months had involvement of the diaper area and extremities, which was significantly higher than those aged 24-48 months and >48 months (P < 0.0001 and P= 0.011, respectively). None of the patients had serious systemic complications.

  12. Some Surface-Active Agents and Their Virucidal Effect on Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Fellowes, O. N.

    1965-01-01

    Selected cationic and anionic surface-active compounds were tested to determine their virucidal effect on the foot-and-mouth disease virus, type O, strain M11, propagated in primary calf kidney cells. The chemical inactivation of the virus was tested with 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0% concentrations of the selected compounds. Virus controls with pH adjusted to cover the expected range of the mixtures of the chemicals and virus were also tested. The absence of virus from the mixtures of chemical and virus after reaction at 28 C for 2 hr was assayed by inoculating suckling mice with the mixtures. One cationic compound, alkyl methyl isoquinilinium chloride, showed considerable antiviral activity due largely to pH effect. The use of the surface-active agents investigated in this study, in the presence of organic material, would not be recommended as virucides. PMID:4286396

  13. Pancreatitis in hand-foot-and-mouth disease caused by enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Feng; Deng, Hui-Ling; Fu, Jia; Zhang, Yu; Wei, Jian-Qiang

    2016-02-14

    Some viruses, including certain members of the enterovirus genus, have been reported to cause pancreatitis, especially Coxsackie virus. However, no case of human enterovirus 71 (EV71) associated with pancreatitis has been reported so far. We here report a case of EV71-induced hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) presenting with pancreatitis in a 2-year-old girl. This is the first report of a patient with acute pancreatitis in HFMD caused by EV71. We treated the patient conservatively with nasogastric suction, intravenous fluid and antivirals. The patient's symptoms improved after 8 d, and recovered without complications. We conclude that EV71 can cause acute pancreatitis in HFMD, which should be considered in differential diagnosis, especially in cases of idiopathic pancreatitis.

  14. Structure-based energetics of protein interfaces guides foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Kotecha, Abhay; Seago, Julian; Scott, Katherine; Burman, Alison; Loureiro, Silvia; Ren, Jingshan; Porta, Claudine; Ginn, Helen M; Jackson, Terry; Perez-Martin, Eva; Siebert, C Alistair; Paul, Guntram; Huiskonen, Juha T; Jones, Ian M; Esnouf, Robert M; Fry, Elizabeth E; Maree, Francois F; Charleston, Bryan; Stuart, David I

    2015-10-01

    Virus capsids are primed for disassembly, yet capsid integrity is key to generating a protective immune response. Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsids comprise identical pentameric protein subunits held together by tenuous noncovalent interactions and are often unstable. Chemically inactivated or recombinant empty capsids, which could form the basis of future vaccines, are even less stable than live virus. Here we devised a computational method to assess the relative stability of protein-protein interfaces and used it to design improved candidate vaccines for two poorly stable, but globally important, serotypes of FMDV: O and SAT2. We used a restrained molecular dynamics strategy to rank mutations predicted to strengthen the pentamer interfaces and applied the results to produce stabilized capsids. Structural analyses and stability assays confirmed the predictions, and vaccinated animals generated improved neutralizing-antibody responses to stabilized particles compared to parental viruses and wild-type capsids.

  15. Dynamic impacts of a catastrophic production event: the foot-and-mouth disease case.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Alexandre; Gohin, Jean; Krebs, Stephane; Rault, Arnaud

    2013-03-01

    In foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) free countries, the occurrence of an FMD outbreak is a rare event with potentially large economic losses. We explore the dynamic effects of an FMD outbreak on market variables and economic surplus taking into account the largely neglected issue of farm bankruptcy. Simulations are performed on a stylized agricultural economy, which is a net exporter before the outbreak. We find complex dynamic market effects when the farm credit market suffers from information imperfections leading to farm closure. Welfare effects are also dramatically altered. Domestic consumers may lose in the long run from an FMD outbreak because domestic supply contracts. On the other hand, farmers able to resist this event may ultimately gain. Our analysis also shows that these effects are not monotone, making any efficient policy response to this catastrophic event quite challenging. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  16. Potential of electrolyzed water for disinfection of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Bui, Vuong N; Nguyen, Khong V; Pham, Nga T; Bui, Anh N; Dao, Tung D; Nguyen, Thanh T; Nguyen, Hoa T; Trinh, Dai Q; Inui, Kenjiro; Uchiumi, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Haruko; Imai, Kunitoshi

    2017-04-05

    Acidic electrolyzed water (EW) (pH 2.6-5.8) and alkaline EW (pH 11.2-12.1) were examined as potential disinfectants against foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Using acidic EW with pH 2.6 and alkaline EW with pH >11.7, the viral titer decreased in vitro by > 4.0 log values, 2 min after the virus was mixed with EW at a 1:10 dilution. The strong virucidal effect of acidic EW (pH 2.6), but not that of alkaline EW (>11.7), seemed to depend on the chlorine level in the solution. Genetic analysis revealed that viral RNA was substantially reduced, especially by alkaline EW.

  17. Potential of electrolyzed water for disinfection of foot-and-mouth disease virus

    PubMed Central

    BUI, Vuong N.; NGUYEN, Khong V.; PHAM, Nga T.; BUI, Anh N.; DAO, Tung D.; NGUYEN, Thanh T.; NGUYEN, Hoa T.; TRINH, Dai Q.; INUI, Kenjiro; UCHIUMI, Hiroshi; OGAWA, Haruko; IMAI, Kunitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Acidic electrolyzed water (EW) (pH 2.6−5.8) and alkaline EW (pH 11.2−12.1) were examined as potential disinfectants against foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Using acidic EW with pH 2.6 and alkaline EW with pH >11.7, the viral titer decreased in vitro by > 4.0 log values, 2 min after the virus was mixed with EW at a 1:10 dilution. The strong virucidal effect of acidic EW (pH 2.6), but not that of alkaline EW (>11.7), seemed to depend on the chlorine level in the solution. Genetic analysis revealed that viral RNA was substantially reduced, especially by alkaline EW. PMID:28216545

  18. Application of monoclonal antibodies to quality control of foot-and-mouth disease vaccines.

    PubMed

    Alonso, A; Darsie, G C; Teixeira, A C; Reis, J L; Mesquita, J A

    1994-06-01

    Panels of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) produced against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus types O, A and C were selected for cell culture neutralization titre (NT), mouse protection index (MPI), trypsin sensitivity (TS) and avidity to different epitopes. The selected sets were used to assay the antigen concentration and the fit between FMDV vaccine and challenge strains. It was observed that FMD vaccines protect more than 75% of vaccinated cattle when manufactured with antigens characterized by (1) a high degree of fit with the potency control virus, and (2) mean ELISA 50% titres (T50) > 28 for O, > 18 for A and > 75 for C types, respectively, using the corresponding mAb set.

  19. Virological investigation of hand, foot, and mouth disease in a tertiary care center in South India.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, Pavithra M; Chandy, Sara; Selvaraj, Kavitha; Pulimood, Susanne; Abraham, Asha M

    2012-07-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) remains a common problem in India, yet its etiology is largely unknown as diagnosis is based on clinical characteristics. There are very few laboratory-based molecular studies on HFMD outbreaks. The aim of this study was to characterize HFMD-related isolates by molecular techniques. Between 2005 and 2008, during two documented HFMD outbreaks, 30 suspected HFMD cases presented at the Outpatient Unit of the Department of Dermatology, Christian Medical College (CMC), Vellore. Seventy-eight clinical specimens (swabs from throat, mouth, rectum, anus, buttocks, tongue, forearm, sole, and foot) were received from these patients at the Department of Clinical Virology, CMC, for routine diagnosis of hand, foot, and mouth disease. Samples from these patients were cultured in Vero and rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cell lines. Isolates producing enterovirus-like cytopathogenic effect (CPE) in cell culture were identified by a nested reverse transcription-based polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and sequenced. The nucleotide sequences were analyzed using the BioEdit sequence program. Homology searches were performed using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) algorithm. The statistical analysis was performed using Epi Info version 6.04b and Microsoft Excel 2002 (Microsoft Office XP). Of the 30 suspected HFMD cases, only 17 (57%) were laboratory confirmed and Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) was identified as the etiological agent in all these cases. Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) was identified as the virus that caused the HFMD outbreaks in Vellore between 2005 and 2008. Early confirmation of HFMD helps to initiate control measures to interrupt virus transmission. In the laboratory, classical diagnostic methods, culture and serological tests are being replaced by molecular techniques. Routine surveillance systems will help understand the epidemiology of HFMD in India.

  20. Different public health geographies of the 2001 foot and mouth disease epidemic: 'citizen' versus 'professional' epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Cathy; Convery, Ian; Mort, Maggie; Baxter, Josephine

    2006-06-01

    Recently, there have been calls for health geographers to add critical and theoretical debate to 'post-medical' geographies, whilst at the same time informing 'new' public health strategies (Soc. Sci. Med. 50(9)1273; Area 33(4) (2002) 361). In this paper we reflect on how, alongside 'professional epidemiologies', 'citizen epidemiologies' can have credibility in informing public health policy and practice. We do this by drawing on mixed method and participatory research that used a citizens' panel to articulate the health and social outcomes of the 2001 foot and mouth disease disaster. We consider the difficulties of creating dialogue between on the one hand, time-limited, discrete, theoretical, visible and by implication legitimate, 'professional' knowledge and on the other, ongoing, holistic, experiential and often hidden 'citizen' knowledge of the foot and mouth disease epidemic. Despite significant evidence that in disaster and crisis situations, people need to be actively involved in key 'recovery' decisions (see for example At Risk Natural Hazards, People's Vulnerability, and Disasters, Routledge, London; A New Species of Trouble, Norton, New York), lay accounts, which may in themselves provide valuable evidence about the impact of the disaster, are often ignored. If health geographers are to critically inform 'new' public health policy then we need to consider research approaches that give voice to citizens' understanding of health outcomes as well as those of professionals. If 'new' public health is concerned with the material character of health inequalities, with fostering 'healthy' living and working environments, the promotion of community participation and individual empowerment (Area 33(4) (2002) 361), then we argue that situated, negotiated, everyday geographies of lay epidemiologies can and should inform public health policy.

  1. Custom-engineered chimeric foot-and-mouth disease vaccine elicits protective immune responses in pigs.

    PubMed

    Blignaut, Belinda; Visser, Nico; Theron, Jacques; Rieder, Elizabeth; Maree, Francois F

    2011-04-01

    Chimeric foot-and-mouth disease viruses (FMDV) of which the antigenic properties can be readily manipulated is a potentially powerful approach in the control of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in sub-Saharan Africa. FMD vaccine application is complicated by the extensive variability of the South African Territories (SAT) type viruses, which exist as distinct genetic and antigenic variants in different geographical regions. A cross-serotype chimeric virus, vKNP/SAT2, was engineered by replacing the external capsid-encoding region (1B-1D/2A) of an infectious cDNA clone of the SAT2 vaccine strain, ZIM/7/83, with that of SAT1 virus KNP/196/91. The vKNP/SAT2 virus exhibited comparable infection kinetics, virion stability and antigenic profiles to the KNP/196/91 parental virus, thus indicating that the functions provided by the capsid can be readily exchanged between serotypes. As these qualities are necessary for vaccine manufacturing, high titres of stable chimeric virus were obtained. Chemically inactivated vaccines, formulated as double-oil-in-water emulsions, were produced from intact 146S virion particles of both the chimeric and parental viruses. Inoculation of guinea pigs with the respective vaccines induced similar antibody responses. In order to show compliance with commercial vaccine requirements, the vaccines were evaluated in a full potency test. Pigs vaccinated with the chimeric vaccine produced neutralizing antibodies and showed protection against homologous FMDV challenge, albeit not to the same extent as for the vaccine prepared from the parental virus. These results provide support that chimeric vaccines containing the external capsid of field isolates can be successfully produced and that they induce protective immune responses in FMD host species.

  2. Sequence-based prediction for vaccine strain selection and identification of antigenic variability in foot-and-mouth disease virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Identifying when past exposure to an infectious disease will protect against newly emerging strains is central to understanding the spread and the severity of epidemics, but the prediction of viral cross-protection remains an important unsolved problem. For foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) resea...

  3. Foot-and-mouth disease virus-associated abortion and vertical transmission following acute infection in cattle under natural conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and economically important viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals, including domestic as well as more than 70 wild host species. During recent FMD outbreaks in India, spontaneous abortions were reported amongst FMD-affected and asymptomatic cows. T...

  4. Early detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus from infected cattle using a dry filter air sampling system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious livestock disease of high economic impact. Early detection of FMD virus (FMDV) is fundamental for rapid outbreak control. Air sampling collection has been demonstrated as a useful technique for detection of FMDV RNA in infected animals, related to ...

  5. Suppression of Swine NK Cell Function During Acute Infection with Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infects cloven-hoofed animals and causes an economically devastating disease. This highly acute infection has multiple negative effects on the innate response, presumably contributing to the rapid spread of virus within the host. Understanding the regulation of in...

  6. Epidemiological analysis, serological prevalence, and genotypic analysis of foot-and-mouth disease in Nigeria 2008-2009

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The epidemiological situation of foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is uncertain in Nigeria, where the disease is endemic, and the majority of outbreaks are unreported. Control measures for FMD in Nigeria are not being implemented due to the absence of locally produced vaccines and an official ban ...

  7. Control of foot-and-mouth disease by using replication-defective human adenoviruses to deliver vaccines and biotherapeutics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is one of the most contagious viral diseases that can affect cloven-hoofed livestock and wild animals. Outbreaks of FMD have caused devastating economic losses and the slaughter of millions of animals in many regions of the world affecting the food chain and global devel...

  8. Poly ICLC increases the potency of a replication-defective human adenovirus vectored foot-and-mouth disease vaccine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. We have previously demonstrated that a replication-defective human adenovirus 5 vector carrying the FMDV capsid coding region of serotype A24 Cruzeiro (Ad5-CI-A24-2B) protects swine and cattle against FM...

  9. Constitutively active IRF7/IRF3 fusion protein completely protects swine against Foot-and-Mouth Disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remains one of the most devastating livestock diseases around the world. Several serotype specific vaccine formulations exist but require about 5-7 days to induce protective immunity. Our previous studies have shown that a constitutively active fusion protein of porcine ...

  10. Genome sequence of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O lineage ind-2001d collected in Vietnam in 2015

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is endemic in several countries in Asia and Africa and is considered one of the most important livestock diseases worldwide. Three serotypes of FMD virus (A, O and Asia1) contribute to endemicity in mainland Southeast Asia. In 2015, FMDV lineage Ind-2001 was detected for...

  11. Developing vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease and some other exotic viral diseases of livestock

    PubMed Central

    Paton, David J.; Taylor, Geraldine

    2011-01-01

    Vaccines remain the main tool for the control of livestock viral diseases that pose a serious threat to animal and occasionally human health, reduce food security, distort trade in animals and their products, and undermine agricultural development in poor countries. Globalization and climate change increase the likelihood for new patterns of emergence and spread of livestock viruses. Conventionally attenuated and killed virus products have had spectacular success, and recent examples include the global eradication of rinderpest and the control of bluetongue in the UK and northern Europe. However, in many cases, livestock vaccines could benefit from improvement in some properties (e.g. stability, speed of onset and duration of immunity, and breadth of cross-protection to different serotypes or strains) and in some cases are not available at all. Compared with human vaccines, uptake of livestock products is highly cost-sensitive and their use may also need to be compatible with post-vaccination screening methods to determine whether or not animals continue to be infected. Requirements and prospects for new or improved vaccines are described for some priority viral diseases with potential for transboundary spread, particularly for foot-and-mouth disease. PMID:21893540

  12. Developing vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease and some other exotic viral diseases of livestock.

    PubMed

    Paton, David J; Taylor, Geraldine

    2011-10-12

    Vaccines remain the main tool for the control of livestock viral diseases that pose a serious threat to animal and occasionally human health, reduce food security, distort trade in animals and their products, and undermine agricultural development in poor countries. Globalization and climate change increase the likelihood for new patterns of emergence and spread of livestock viruses. Conventionally attenuated and killed virus products have had spectacular success, and recent examples include the global eradication of rinderpest and the control of bluetongue in the UK and northern Europe. However, in many cases, livestock vaccines could benefit from improvement in some properties (e.g. stability, speed of onset and duration of immunity, and breadth of cross-protection to different serotypes or strains) and in some cases are not available at all. Compared with human vaccines, uptake of livestock products is highly cost-sensitive and their use may also need to be compatible with post-vaccination screening methods to determine whether or not animals continue to be infected. Requirements and prospects for new or improved vaccines are described for some priority viral diseases with potential for transboundary spread, particularly for foot-and-mouth disease.

  13. QS-21 enhances the early antibody response to oil adjuvant foot-and-mouth disease vaccine in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose One of the most important tools against foot-and-mouth disease, a highly contagious and variable viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals, is vaccination. However, the effectiveness of foot-and-mouth disease vaccines on slowing the spread of the disease is questionable. In contrast, high potency vaccines providing early protection may solve issues with the spread of the disease, escaping mutants, and persistency. To increase the potency of the vaccine, additives such as saponin and aluminium hydroxide are used. However, the use of saponin with an oil adjuvant is not common and is sometimes linked to toxicity. QS-21, which is less toxic than Quil A, has been presented as an alternative for use with saponin. In this study, the addition of QS-21 to a commercially available foot-and-mouth disease water-in-oil-in-water emulsion vaccine was evaluated in cattle. Materials and Methods After vaccination, serum samples were collected periodically over 3 months. Sera of the QS-21 and normal oil vaccine groups were compared via serum virus neutralization antibody titre and liquid phase blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibody titre. Results The results showed that there was a significant early antibody increase in the QS-21 group. Conclusion Strong early virus neutralizing antibody response will be useful for emergency or ring vaccinations against foot-and-mouth disease in target animals. PMID:27489804

  14. Structure-based discovery of foot-and-mouth disease inhibitors that target the 3Dpol RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV) primarily targets cloven-hoofed animals. The FMDV outbreak results in significant economic losses. There are currently no available antiviral drugs for Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) treatment, and vaccination needs at least 7 days to effectively trigger the immune...

  15. Recombinant human adenovirus-5 expressing capsid proteins of Indian vaccine strains of foot-and-mouth disease virus elicits effective antibody response in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recombinant adenovirus-5 vectored foot-and-mouth disease constructs (Ad5- FMD) were made for three Indian vaccine virus serotypes O,A and Asia 1. Constructs co-expressing foot-and- mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid and viral 3C protease sequences, were evaluated for their ability to induce a neutral...

  16. Evidence for a mouse pathogenicity locus in certain temperature-sensitive mutants of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, J Y

    1977-01-01

    Serial tissue culture passaging of three foot-and-mouth disease temperature-sensitive mutants demonstrated the stability of their temperature sensitivity and mouse avirulence characteristics. Recovery of mouse-virulent temperature-sensitive viruses after passage of the mutants in mice suggested that these were not covariant expressions of the same locus, but were under the control of different genes. PMID:197007

  17. Heparan Sulfate-Binding Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Enters Cells Via Caveolae-Mediated Endocytosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) utilizes different cell surface macromolecules to facilitate infection of cultured cells. Virus which is virulent for susceptible animals infects cells via four members of the alpha V subclass of cellular integrins. In contrast, tissue culture adaptation of some...

  18. Adaptive Responses and Asset Strategies: The Experience of Rural Micro-Firms and Foot and Mouth Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillipson, Jeremy; Bennett, Katy; Lowe, Philip; Raley, Marian

    2004-01-01

    The 2001 Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) epidemic effectively closed large parts of the UK countryside for several months. Local firms found their operations disrupted and suffered losses of trade. The individual and collective experiences of affected firms provide vivid insights into how rural businesses and the local economies they constitute…

  19. Use of replication-defective adenoviruses to develop vaccines and biotherapeutics against foot-and-mouth disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have developed a replication-defective human adenovirus (Ad5) vectored foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccine platform that with one inoculation protects both swine and cattle from subsequent challenge with homologous virus. This Ad5-FMD vaccine delivery system has undergone testing following the r...

  20. Characterization of a chimeric foot-and-mouth disease virus bearing bovine rhinitis B virus leader proteinase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our recent study has shown that bovine rhinovirus type 2 (BRV2), a new member of the Aphthovirus genus, shares many motifs and sequence similarities with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Despite low sequence conservation (36percent amino acid identity) and N- and C-terminus folding differences,...

  1. Differential gene expression in bovine cells infected with wild type and leaderless foot-and-mouth disease virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The leader proteinase (Lpro) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) plays a critical role in viral pathogenesis. Molecular studies have demonstrated that Lpro inhibits the translation of host capped mRNAs and transcription of some genes involved in the innate immune response to viral infection. Here...

  2. Stress and Stereotypes: Children's Reactions to the Outbreak of Foot and Mouth Disease in the UK in 2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nerlich, Brigitte; Hillyard, Sam; Wright, Nick

    2005-01-01

    In 2001 foot and mouth disease broke out in the UK and millions of farm animals were slaughtered in order to eradicate it. This affected farmers, town dwellers, adults and children. Based on a small sample of 56 e-mails to a children's BBC (CBBC) message board and using an ethnomethodological approach, this article explores the way in which…

  3. A partial deletion in non-structural protein 3A can attenuate foot-and-mouth disease virus in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The role of non-structural protein 3A in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) on the virulence in cattle has received significant attention. Particularly, a characteristic 10–20 amino acid deletion has been implicated as being responsible for virus attenuation in cattle: a 10 amino acid deletion in t...

  4. Genome Sequence of Coxsackievirus A6, Isolated during a Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease Outbreak in Finland in 2008

    PubMed Central

    Koskinen, Satu; Merilahti, Pirjo; Pursiheimo, Juha-Pekka; Blomqvist, Soile; Roivainen, Merja; Laiho, Asta; Susi, Petri; Waris, Matti

    2014-01-01

    Reports of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) outbreaks caused by coxsackievirus A6 have increased worldwide after the report of the first outbreak in Finland in 2008. The complete genome of the first outbreak strain from a vesicle fluid specimen was determined. PMID:25323709

  5. Genome Sequence of Coxsackievirus A6, Isolated during a Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease Outbreak in Finland in 2008.

    PubMed

    Osterback, Riikka; Koskinen, Satu; Merilahti, Pirjo; Pursiheimo, Juha-Pekka; Blomqvist, Soile; Roivainen, Merja; Laiho, Asta; Susi, Petri; Waris, Matti

    2014-10-16

    Reports of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) outbreaks caused by coxsackievirus A6 have increased worldwide after the report of the first outbreak in Finland in 2008. The complete genome of the first outbreak strain from a vesicle fluid specimen was determined. Copyright © 2014 Österback et al.

  6. Pathogenesis of primary foot-and-mouth disease virus infection in the nasopharynx of vaccinated and non-vaccinated cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A time-course pathogenesis study was performed to compare and contrast primary foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection in vaccinated and non-vaccinated cattle following simulated-natural virus exposure. FMDV genome and infectious virus were detected during the initial phase of infection from b...

  7. Infection dynamics of foot-and-mouth disease virus in cattle following intra-nasopharyngeal inoculation or contact exposure

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    For the purpose of developing an improved experimental model for studies of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection in cattle, three different experimental systems based on natural or simulated-natural virus exposure were compared under standardized experimental conditions. Antemortem infecti...

  8. An integrative analysis of foot-and-mouth disease virus carriers in Vietnam achieved through targeted surveillance and molecular epidemiology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A multidisciplinary, molecular and conventional epidemiological approach was applied to an investigation of endemic foot-and-mouth disease in Vietnam. Within the study space, it was found that 22.3 percent of sampled ruminants had previously been infected with FMD virus (FMDV) and that 2.4 percent w...

  9. Poetic Justice? Rural Policy Clashes with Rural Poetry in the 2001 Outbreak of Foot and Mouth Disease in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nerlich, Brigitte; Doring, Martin

    2005-01-01

    In 2001, the foot and mouth disease epidemic in the UK gave rise to widespread individual and community trauma and has had negative health, economic and social impacts on the people who live in affected rural areas. Many found strength by sharing their experiences with friends and relatives; others expressed their feelings in poems and art. Using…

  10. Role of Jumonji c-domain containing protein 6 (JMJD6) in infectivity of foot-and-mouth disease virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) can utilize as many as three distinct groups of receptor molecules to attach and enter a susceptible host cell. Four integrin heterodimers (alphavBeta1, alphavBeta3, alphavBeta6, and alphavBeta8) can function as the primary receptor for FMDV field strains. FMDV ...

  11. Enhanced sensitivity in detection of antiviral antibody responses using biotinylation of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Analysis of the immune response to infection of livestock by foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is most often reported as the serum antibody response to the virus. While measurement of neutralizing antibody has been sensitive and specific, measurements of the quality of the antibody response are le...

  12. Adaptive Responses and Asset Strategies: The Experience of Rural Micro-Firms and Foot and Mouth Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillipson, Jeremy; Bennett, Katy; Lowe, Philip; Raley, Marian

    2004-01-01

    The 2001 Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) epidemic effectively closed large parts of the UK countryside for several months. Local firms found their operations disrupted and suffered losses of trade. The individual and collective experiences of affected firms provide vivid insights into how rural businesses and the local economies they constitute…

  13. Foot and mouth disease virus virulence in cattle is co-determined by viral replication dynamics and route of infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Early events in the pathogenesis of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection in cattle were investigated through aerosol and intraepithelial lingual (IEL) inoculations of a cDNA-derived FMDV-A24 wild type virus (FMDV-WT) or a mutant derived from the same clone (FMDV- Mut). We had previously sho...

  14. Stress and Stereotypes: Children's Reactions to the Outbreak of Foot and Mouth Disease in the UK in 2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nerlich, Brigitte; Hillyard, Sam; Wright, Nick

    2005-01-01

    In 2001 foot and mouth disease broke out in the UK and millions of farm animals were slaughtered in order to eradicate it. This affected farmers, town dwellers, adults and children. Based on a small sample of 56 e-mails to a children's BBC (CBBC) message board and using an ethnomethodological approach, this article explores the way in which…

  15. Cell culture adaptation mutations in foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A capsid proteins: implications for receptor interactions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study we describe the adaptive changes fixed on the capsid of several foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A strains during propagation in cell monolayers. Viruses passaged extensively in three cell lines (BHK-21, LFBK and IB-RS-2), consistently gained several positively charged amino acids...

  16. Exploring the role of the lab protein of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV) during viral infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The leader (L) protein of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV) displays two forms, Lab and Lb, through initiation of translation at two in-frame AUG codons positioned 84 nucleotides apart. The short form (Lb) is the most abundant and functionally well characterized form of L. The presence of these tw...

  17. Optimization of immunohistochemical and fluorescent antibody techniques for localization of foot-and-mouth disease virus in animal tissues

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Immunohistochemical (IHC) and immunofluorescent (IF) techniques were optimized for the detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) structural and non-structural proteins in frozen and paraformaldehyde-fixed paraffin embedded (PFPE) tissues of bovine and porcine origin. Immunohistochemical local...

  18. Poetic Justice? Rural Policy Clashes with Rural Poetry in the 2001 Outbreak of Foot and Mouth Disease in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nerlich, Brigitte; Doring, Martin

    2005-01-01

    In 2001, the foot and mouth disease epidemic in the UK gave rise to widespread individual and community trauma and has had negative health, economic and social impacts on the people who live in affected rural areas. Many found strength by sharing their experiences with friends and relatives; others expressed their feelings in poems and art. Using…

  19. Foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O phylodynamics: genetic variability associated with epidemiological factors in Pakistan

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One of the most challenging aspects of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) control is the high genetic variability of the FMD virus (FMDV). In endemic settings such as the Indian subcontinent, this variability has resulted in the emergence of pandemic strains that have spread widely and caused devastating ...

  20. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus replicon particles can induce rapid protection against Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have previously shown that swine pretreated with a replication-defective human adenovirus vector (Ad5) containing the porcine type I interferon gene (poIFN-alpha/Beta) are sterilely protected when challenged one day later with Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV), but the dose required is relativ...

  1. Expression of porcine fusion protein IRF7/3(5D) efficiently controls foot-and-mouth disease virus replication

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several studies have demonstrated that administration of type I, II, or III interferons (IFN) delivered using a replication defective human adenovirus 5 (Ad5) vector is effective to control Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) in cattle and swine during experimental infections. However, high doses are requi...

  2. A colorimetric bioassay for high-througput and cost-effectively assessing anti-foot-and-mouth disease virus activity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-Mouth Disease virus (FMDV) is one of the most contagious animal viruses and has a devastating effect on livestock industries if an outbreaks occurs, especially in FMD-free countries. The virus is very sensitive to inhibition by type I interferons. Currently, a reported assay to measure FM...

  3. Moving towards the global control of foot and mouth disease: an opportunity for donors.

    PubMed

    Forman, S; Le Gall, F; Belton, D; Evans, B; François, J L; Murray, G; Sheesley, D; Vandersmissen, A; Yoshimura, S

    2009-12-01

    Livestock contributes significantly to the world economy. However, animal diseases are still a major constraint on economic growth, the reduction of poverty and food security. Among the most significant diseases is foot and mouth disease (FMD), a highly contagious, multi-species animal disease with a devastating impact on national economies and trade. Less obvious is the severe constraint that FMD places on both development and the reduction of poverty in developing countries where this disease is endemic. As a result of its global implications and the high costs that it imposes on society, FMD is an infectious disease whose control and prevention are recognised as being a global public good. Moving towards the global control of FMD should be considered a priority for donors, but will require long-term commitment from all parties, strong political will from governments and concerted financial support from donors. Areas of intervention must fall within the framework of programmes developed by international organisations, such as the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), through the FAO/OIE Global Framework for the Progressive Control of FMD and Other Transboundary Animal Diseases, as well as the disease control programmes of the regions concerned. Such a goal should specifically focus on analytical work (micro-economic impact and cost-benefit analyses of FMD at the household level and on the poor), research, surveillance networks, communication, monitoring and evaluation, and continuous strengthening of Veterinary Services.

  4. Transmission of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus during the Incubation Period in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Stenfeldt, Carolina; Pacheco, Juan M.; Brito, Barbara P.; Moreno-Torres, Karla I.; Branan, Matt A.; Delgado, Amy H.; Rodriguez, Luis L.; Arzt, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the quantitative characteristics of a pathogen’s capability to transmit during distinct phases of infection is important to enable accurate predictions of the spread and impact of a disease outbreak. In the current investigation, the potential for transmission of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) during the incubation (preclinical) period of infection was investigated in seven groups of pigs that were sequentially exposed to a group of donor pigs that were infected by simulated-natural inoculation. Contact-exposed pigs were comingled with infected donors through successive 8-h time slots spanning from 8 to 64 h post-inoculation (hpi) of the donor pigs. The transition from latent to infectious periods in the donor pigs was clearly defined by successful transmission of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) to all contact pigs that were exposed to the donors from 24 hpi and later. This onset of infectiousness occurred concurrent with detection of viremia, but approximately 24 h prior to the first appearance of clinical signs of FMD in the donors. Thus, the latent period of infection ended approximately 24 h before the end of the incubation period. There were significant differences between contact-exposed groups in the time elapsed from virus exposure to the first detection of FMDV shedding, viremia, and clinical lesions. Specifically, the onset and progression of clinical FMD were more rapid in pigs that had been exposed to the donor pigs during more advanced phases of disease, suggesting that these animals had received a higher effective challenge dose. These results demonstrate transmission and dissemination of FMD within groups of pigs during the incubation period of infection. Furthermore, these findings suggest that under current conditions, shedding of FMDV in oropharyngeal fluids is a more precise proxy for FMDV infectiousness than clinical signs of infection. These findings may impact modeling of the propagation of FMD outbreaks that initiate

  5. SAT2 foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) structurally modified for increased thermostability.

    PubMed

    Scott, Katherine A; Kotecha, Abhay; Seago, Julian; Ren, Jingshan; Fry, Elizabeth E; Stuart, David I; Charleston, Bryan; Maree, Francois F

    2017-03-15

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is notoriously unstable, particularly the O and SAT serotypes. Consequently, vaccines derived from heat-labile SAT viruses have been linked to the induction of poor duration immunity and hence require more frequent vaccinations to ensure protection. In-silico calculations predicted residue substitutions that would increase interactions at the inter-pentameric interface supporting increased stability. We assessed the stability of the 18 recombinant mutant viruses for their growth kinetics; antigenicity; plaque morphology; genetic stability; temperature, ionic and pH stability using the thermofluor and inactivation assays, in order to evaluate potential SAT2 vaccine candidates with improved stability. The most stable mutation was the single mutant S2093Y for temperature and pH stability, whilst other promising single mutants were E3198A, L2094V,S2093H and the triple mutant F2062Y-H2087M-H3143V. Although the S2093Y mutant had the greatest stability it exhibited smaller plaques; a reduced growth rate; a change in a monoclonal antibody footprint, and poor genetic stability properties compared to the wild-type virus. However, these factors affecting production can be overcome. The addition of 1M NaCl salt was found to further increase the stability of the SAT2 panel of viruses. The S2093Y and S2093H mutants were selected for future use in stabilising SAT2 vaccines.IMPORTANCE Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious acute vesicular disease in cloven-hoofed livestock and wildlife. The control of the disease by vaccination is essential, especially at livestock-wildlife interfaces. The instability of serotypes such as SAT2 affects the quality of the vaccine and therefore the duration of immunity. We have shown that by mutating residues at the capsid interface through predictive modelling we can improve the stability of SAT2 viruses. This is an important finding for the potential use of such mutants in improving the

  6. An alternate delivery system improves vaccine performance against foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV).

    PubMed

    Pandya, Mital; Pacheco, Juan M; Bishop, Elizabeth; Kenney, Mary; Milward, Francis; Doel, Timothy; Golde, William T

    2012-04-26

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals with severe agricultural and economic implications. One of the most highly infectious and contagious livestock pathogens known, the disease spreads rapidly in naïve populations making it critical to have rapidly acting vaccines. Needle inoculation of killed virus vaccine is an efficient method of swiftly vaccinating large numbers of animals, either in eradication efforts or in outbreak situations in disease free countries, although, to be efficient, this requires utilizing the same needle with multiple animals. Here we present studies using a needle free system for vaccination with killed virus vaccine, FMDV strain O1 Manisa, as a rapid and consistent delivery platform. Cattle were vaccinated using a commercially available vaccine formulation at the manufacturer's recommended dose as well as four and sixteen fold less antigen load per dose. Animals were challenged intradermalingually (IDL) with live, virulent virus, homologous strain O1 Manisa, at various times following vaccination. All non-vaccinated control cattle exhibited clinical disease, including fever, viremia and lesions, specifically vesicle formation. Cattle vaccinated with the 1/16× and 1/4× doses using the needle free device were protected when challenged at both 7 and 28 days after vaccination. These data suggest that effective protection against disease can be achieved with 1/16 of the recommended vaccine dose when delivered using the needle free, intradermal delivery system, indicating the current vaccine stockpile that can be extended by many fold using this system.

  7. Type III interferon protects swine against foot-and-mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Perez-Martin, Eva; Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Weiss, Marcelo; Sturza, Diego F; Dias, Camila C; Ramirez-Medina, Elizabeth; Grubman, Marvin J; de los Santos, Teresa

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, we have developed novel strategies to control foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), including the use of biotherapeutics such as interferons (IFN) delivered by a replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5). Swine can be sterilely protected after vaccination with an Ad5 that encodes porcine type I IFN (poIFN-α), and cattle can be similarly protected or develop significantly reduced disease when treated with an Ad5 delivering bovine type III IFN (boIFN-λ3). Here, we have evaluated the efficacy of porcine IFN-λ3 (poIFN-λ3) against FMD virus in vivo. Swine inoculated with different doses of Ad5-poIFN-λ3 were protected against disease in a dose-dependent manner. Despite the absence of systemic antiviral activity, 7 out of 10 Ad5-poIFN-λ3 inoculated animals did not develop disease or viremia, and the other 3 inoculated animals displayed delayed and milder disease by 7 days postchallenge as compared with control animals inoculated with an Ad5 control vector. While analysis of gene expression showed significant induction of IFN and IFN-stimulated genes in Ad5-poIFN-λ3-treated cultured porcine epithelial kidney cells, there was limited gene induction in peripheral blood monocytes isolated from treated swine. These results suggest that treatment with Ad5-poIFN-λ3 is an effective biotherapeutic strategy against FMD in swine.

  8. Decision-making for foot-and-mouth disease control: Objectives matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Probert, William J. M.; Shea, Katriona; Fonnesbeck, Christopher J.; Runge, Michael C.; Carpenter, Tim E.; Durr, Salome; Garner, M. Graeme; Harvey, Neil; Stevenson, Mark A.; Webb, Colleen T.; Werkman, Marleen; Tildesley, Michael J.; Ferrari, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Formal decision-analytic methods can be used to frame disease control problems, the first step of which is to define a clear and specific objective. We demonstrate the imperative of framing clearly-defined management objectives in finding optimal control actions for control of disease outbreaks. We illustrate an analysis that can be applied rapidly at the start of an outbreak when there are multiple stakeholders involved with potentially multiple objectives, and when there are also multiple disease models upon which to compare control actions. The output of our analysis frames subsequent discourse between policy-makers, modellers and other stakeholders, by highlighting areas of discord among different management objectives and also among different models used in the analysis. We illustrate this approach in the context of a hypothetical foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) outbreak in Cumbria, UK using outputs from five rigorously-studied simulation models of FMD spread. We present both relative rankings and relative performance of controls within each model and across a range of objectives. Results illustrate how control actions change across both the base metric used to measure management success and across the statistic used to rank control actions according to said metric. This work represents a first step towards reconciling the extensive modelling work on disease control problems with frameworks for structured decision making.

  9. Financial Impacts of Foot-and-Mouth Disease at Village and National Levels in Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    Nampanya, S; Khounsy, S; Abila, R; Young, J R; Bush, R D; Windsor, P A

    2016-10-01

    To assist policies on Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) control in Laos and the Mekong region, the financial impact of recent outbreaks at village and national levels was examined. Village-level impacts were derived from recent research on financial losses due to FMD per smallholder household and number of households with FMD-affected livestock in the village. National-level impacts of FMD were determined from examination of 2011-2013 FMD reported to the Lao Department of Livestock and Fisheries (DLF), with the 2011 epidemic reported separately due to the large number and size of outbreaks of FMD in that year. Estimates of the national financial impact of FMD were based on (i) total FMD financial losses at the village level and (ii) the costs of FMD responses and other related costs at the DLF, provincial and district levels where FMD was reported, but excluding the costs of revenue forgone. A Monte Carlo simulation was utilized to account for likelihood of FMD over- and under-reporting. Foot-and-mouth disease was recorded in four provinces of Phonsaly, Bokeo, Xayyabouli and Champasak in three consecutive years from 2011 to 2013. However, the FMD epidemic in 2011 was more widely distributed and involved 414 villages in 14 provinces, with thousands of cases of morbidity in cattle and buffalo and some mortalities. The estimated financial losses due to FMD in 2011 were USD 30 881(±23 176) at the village level and USD 13 512 291 at the national level based on the number of villages with FMD outbreaks reported. However, when the likelihood of FMD under-reporting was accounted for, the estimated financial losses at the national level could potentially increase to USD 102 094 464 (±52 147 261), being almost 12% of the estimated farm gate value of the national large ruminant herd. These findings confirm that FMD causes substantial financial impacts in villages and to the national economy of Laos, providing justification for sustained investments in FMD control

  10. Poverty impacts of foot-and-mouth disease and the poverty reduction implications of its control.

    PubMed

    Perry, B D; Rich, K M

    2007-02-17

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remains one of the most important livestock diseases of the world, given its highly infectious nature, its broad economic impacts on animal wellbeing and productivity, and its implications for successful access to domestic and export markets for livestock and products. The impacts of the disease vary markedly between developed and developing countries, and also within many developing countries. These differences in impact shape some markedly heterogeneous incentives for FMD control and eradication, which become of particular importance when setting priorities for poverty reduction in developing countries. Some consider that the benefits from FMD control accrue only to the better off in such societies and, as such, may not be a priority for investments targeted at poverty reduction. But is that view justified? Others see the control of FMD as a major development opportunity in a globalised environment. In this paper, Brian Perry and Karl Rich summarise the differential impacts of FMD and its control, and link these findings with the growing understanding of how the control of this globally important disease may contribute to the processes of pro-poor growth in certain countries of the developing world.

  11. A literature review and case report of hand, foot and mouth disease in an immunocompetent adult.

    PubMed

    Omaña-Cepeda, Carlos; Martínez-Valverde, Andrea; del Mar Sabater-Recolons, María; Jané-Salas, Enric; Marí-Roig, Antonio; López-López, José

    2016-03-15

    To report an uncommon case of hand, foot and mouth disease, (HFMD) in an immunocompetent adult; a highly infectious disease, characterized by the appearance of vesicles on the mouth, hands and feet, associated with coxsackieviruses and enteroviruses; including a literature review. A 23 year Caucasian male with no medical or surgical history, no allergies, was not taking any medication and smoked ten cigarettes a day, suffering from discomfort in the oral cavity; itching, burning and pain when swallowing associated with small erythematous lesions located on the hard palate, and small ulcers in tonsillar pillars and right buccal mucosa. Mild fever of 37.8 °C and general malaise. The patient reported he had had contact with a child diagnosed with HFMD. From his background and symptoms, the patient was diagnosed with HFMD. Following symptomatic treatment, the symptoms remitted in 7 days. A literature review in MEDLINE (PubMed). The inclusion criteria were for studies on humans over the last 5 years, using the keywords HFMD. We found 925 articles, which were subsequently reduced to 52 documents after applying the inclusion criteria. Maculopapular lesions were found on hands and feet. Dentists may have a key role diagnosing the disease. A surveillance system to predict future outbreaks, encourage early diagnosis, put appropriate public health measures in place and research vaccine development is vitally important in order to control the disease.

  12. First isolation and molecular characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus in Benin.

    PubMed

    Gorna, Kamila; Houndjè, Evelyne; Romey, Aurore; Relmy, Anthony; Blaise-Boisseau, Sandra; Kpodékon, Marc; Saegerman, Claude; Moutou, François; Zientara, Stephan; Bakkali Kassimi, Labib

    2014-06-25

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals. It is one of the most economically devastating diseases affecting livestock animals. In West Africa, where constant circulation of FMD virus (FMDV) is assumed, very few studies on the characterization of circulating strains have been published. This study describes the first isolation and characterization of FMDV in Benin. FMDV was isolated from 42 samples. Antigen Capture Elisa (Ag-ELISA) and VP1 coding sequence analysis revealed 33 strains of serotype O and 9 strains of serotype A. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP1 sequence revealed two different groups of type O isolates and one group of A isolates. VP1 sequence comparison with the sequences available in the GenBank database revealed a close relationship of the Benin isolates with topotype O of West Africa and with African topotype A of genotype VI. Knowledge of the recent strains circulating in Benin should contribute to better selection of vaccine strains and enable the updating of molecular epidemiology data available for West Africa in general.

  13. Transmission of Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease and Its Potential Driving Factors in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bingyi; Lau, Eric H. Y.; Wu, Peng; Cowling, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) is a common childhood disease with substantial disease burden in Asia. Mixed results were reported on the associations between HFMD incidence and meteorological factors or school holidays, while limited studies focused on their association on transmissibility. We aimed to measure the transmissibility of HFMD and to examine its potential driving factors in Hong Kong. A likelihood-based procedure was used to estimate time-dependent effective reproduction number (Rt) based on weekly number of HFMD-associated hospitalizations from 2010 to 2014. The associations of between-year effects, depletion of susceptibles, absolute humidity and school holidays with Rt were examined using linear regression. Rt usually started increasing between early spring and summer and peaked in April to May at around 1.1–1.2, followed by a slight rebound in autumn. Depletion of susceptibles and between-years effects explained most of the variances (19 and 13% respectively) in Rt. We found a negative association between depletion of susceptibles and Rt (coefficients ranged from −0.14 to −0.03 for different years), but the estimated effects of absolute humidity and school holidays were insignificant. Overall, HFMD transmission was moderate in Hong Kong and was mainly associated with depletion of susceptibles. Limited impact was suggested from meteorological factors and school holidays. PMID:27271966

  14. Spatio-Temporal Distribution and Hotspots of Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease (HFMD) in Northern Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Samphutthanon, Ratchaphon; Kumar Tripathi, Nitin; Ninsawat, Sarawut; Duboz, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease (HFMD) is an emerging viral disease, and at present, there are no antiviral drugs or vaccines available to control it. Outbreaks have persisted for the past 10 years, particularly in northern Thailand. This study aimed to elucidate the phenomenon of HFMD outbreaks from 2003 to 2012 using general statistics and spatial-temporal analysis employing a GIS-based method. The spatial analysis examined data at the village level to create a map representing the distribution pattern, mean center, standard deviation ellipse and hotspots for each outbreak. A temporal analysis was used to analyze the correlation between monthly case data and meteorological factors. The results indicate that the disease can occur at any time of the year, but appears to peak in the rainy and cold seasons. The distribution of outbreaks exhibited a clustered pattern. Most mean centers and standard deviation ellipses occurred in similar areas. The linear directional mean values of the outbreaks were oriented toward the south. When separated by season, it was found that there was a significant correlation with the direction of the southwest monsoon at the same time. An autocorrelation analysis revealed that hotspots tended to increase even when patient cases subsided. In particular, a new hotspot was found in the recent year in Mae Hong Son province. PMID:24366049

  15. Spatio-temporal distribution and hotspots of Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease (HFMD) in northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Samphutthanon, Ratchaphon; Tripathi, Nitin Kumar; Ninsawat, Sarawut; Duboz, Raphael

    2013-12-23

    Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease (HFMD) is an emerging viral disease, and at present, there are no antiviral drugs or vaccines available to control it. Outbreaks have persisted for the past 10 years, particularly in northern Thailand. This study aimed to elucidate the phenomenon of HFMD outbreaks from 2003 to 2012 using general statistics and spatial-temporal analysis employing a GIS-based method. The spatial analysis examined data at the village level to create a map representing the distribution pattern, mean center, standard deviation ellipse and hotspots for each outbreak. A temporal analysis was used to analyze the correlation between monthly case data and meteorological factors. The results indicate that the disease can occur at any time of the year, but appears to peak in the rainy and cold seasons. The distribution of outbreaks exhibited a clustered pattern. Most mean centers and standard deviation ellipses occurred in similar areas. The linear directional mean values of the outbreaks were oriented toward the south. When separated by season, it was found that there was a significant correlation with the direction of the southwest monsoon at the same time. An autocorrelation analysis revealed that hotspots tended to increase even when patient cases subsided. In particular, a new hotspot was found in the recent year in Mae Hong Son province.

  16. Control of foot and mouth disease: the experience of the Americas.

    PubMed

    Correa Melo, E; López, A

    2002-12-01

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) was first recognised in South America in 1870, almost simultaneously in the province of Buenos Aires (Argentina), in the central region of Chile, in Uruguay, in southern Brazil and coincidentally, on the northeastern coast of the United States of America. The epidemiology of the disease was unknown and no government action was taken following the initial outbreaks. This resulted in the disease spreading to other areas of Chile, as well as to Peru, Bolivia and Paraguay, reaching Venezuela and Colombia in the 1950s, and Ecuador in 1961. The entire continent was affected in the 1960s when national FMD control programmes were initiated, with the exception of Guyana, Surinam, French Guiana and Patagonia. In the 1970s, steps were taken to implement a regional control and eradication strategy in view of the impact of production and trade on the persistence of the virus. The Plan Hemisférico de Erradicación de la Fiebre Aftosa (PHEFA: Hemispheric FMD Eradication Plan), public- and private-sector policies, new diagnostic tools, the oil-adjuvanted FMD vaccine and regional strategies played a part in improving the epidemiological situation during the 1990s. A setback was encountered in 2000 and 2001, with outbreaks due to virus types A and 0 recorded in Argentina, Uruguay and Brazil.

  17. Monitoring hand, foot and mouth disease by combining search engine query data and meteorological factors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Da-Cang; Wang, Jin-Feng

    2017-09-08

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) has been recognized as a significant public health threat and poses a tremendous challenge to disease control departments. To date, the relationship between meteorological factors and HFMD has been documented, and public interest of disease has been proven to be trackable from the Internet. However, no study has explored the combination of these two factors in the monitoring of HFMD. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to develop an effective monitoring model of HFMD in Guangzhou, China by utilizing historical HFMD cases, Internet-based search engine query data and meteorological factors. To this end, a case study was conducted in Guangzhou, using a network-based generalized additive model (GAM) including all factors related to HFMD. Three other models were also constructed using some of the variables for comparison. The results suggested that the model showed the best estimating ability when considering all of the related factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of cytotoxic T lymphocyte function after foot-and-mouth disease virus infection and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Patch, Jared R; Kenney, Mary; Pacheco, Juan M; Grubman, Marvin J; Golde, William T

    2013-08-01

    The induction of neutralizing antibodies specific for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has been the central goal of vaccination efforts against this economically important disease of cloven-hoofed animals. Although these efforts have yielded much success, challenges remain, including little cross-serotype protection and inadequate duration of immunity. Commonly, viral infections are characterized by induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), yet the function of CTL in FMDV immunity is poorly defined. We developed an assay for detection of CTL specific for FMDV and reported that a modified adenovirus-vectored FMDV vaccine could induce CTL activity. This allowed us to determine whether FMDV-specific CTL responses are induced during infection and to test further whether vaccine-induced CTL could protect against challenge with FMDV. We now show the induction of antigen-specific CTL responses after infection of swine with FMDV strain A24 Cruizero. In addition, we developed a vaccination strategy that induces FMDV-specific CTL in the absence of significant neutralizing antibody. Animals vaccinated using this protocol showed delayed clinical disease and significantly suppressed viremia compared to control animals, suggesting a role for CTLs in the control of virus shedding. These results provide new insights showing induction of CTL responses to FMDV following infection or vaccination, and create the potential for improving vaccine performance by targeting cellular immunity.

  19. The economic impact of foot and mouth disease control and eradication in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Randolph, T F; Perry, B D; Benigno, C C; Santos, I J; Agbayani, A L; Coleman, P; Webb, R; Gleeson, L J

    2002-12-01

    The authors evaluate the impact of foot and mouth disease (FMD) and control of the disease in the Philippines using cost-benefit analysis. A scenario in which FMD control is maintained at recent levels with continued presence of the disease is compared to scenarios in which a publicly funded programme achieves eradication by 2005 (current policy objective), 2007 and 2010. Under varying assumptions regarding the development of exports of livestock products following eradication, estimated benefit-cost ratios for the investment in eradication range from 1.6 (2010, no exports) to 12.0 (2005, export of 5,000 tons each of low-value and high-value livestock products annually), indicating eradication to be an economically viable investment. The commercial swine sector is estimated to capture 84% of the benefits generated by the public investment in eradication, versus 4% by backyard swine producers. The implications of these results within the context of regional efforts to control FMD in South-East Asia are explored.

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Targeting the Host Antiviral Response

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Pulido, Miguel; Sáiz, Margarita

    2017-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the causative agent of an acute vesicular disease affecting pigs, cattle and other domestic, and wild animals worldwide. The aim of the host interferon (IFN) response is to limit viral replication and spread. Detection of the viral genome and products by specialized cellular sensors initiates a signaling cascade that leads to a rapid antiviral response involving the secretion of type I- and type III-IFNs and other antiviral cytokines with antiproliferative and immunomodulatory functions. During co-evolution with their hosts, viruses have acquired strategies to actively counteract host antiviral responses and the balance between innate response and viral antagonism may determine the outcome of disease and pathogenesis. FMDV proteases Lpro and 3C have been found to antagonize the host IFN response by a repertoire of mechanisms. Moreover, the putative role of other viral proteins in IFN antagonism is being recently unveiled, uncovering sophisticated immune evasion strategies different to those reported to date for other members of the Picornaviridae family. Here, we review the interplay between antiviral responses induced by FMDV infection and viral countermeasures to block them. Research on strategies used by viruses to modulate immunity will provide insights into the function of host pathways involved in defense against pathogens and will also lead to development of new therapeutic strategies to fight virus infections. PMID:28660175

  1. Modeling Estimated Personnel Needs for a Potential Foot and Mouth Disease Outbreak

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, K; Hullinger, P

    2008-01-29

    Foot and Mouth disease (FMD) is a highly infectious and contagious viral disease affecting cloven-hoofed livestock that was last detected in the United States (US) in 1929. The prevalence of FMD in other countries, as well as the current potential for this virus to be used as a form of agroterrorism, has made preparations for a potential FMD outbreak a national priority. To assist in the evaluation of national preparedness, all 50 states were surveyed via e-mail, telephone and web search to obtain emergency response plans for FMD or for foreign animal diseases in general. Information from 33 states was obtained and analyzed for estimates of personnel resources needed to respond to an outbreak. These estimates were consolidated and enhanced to create a tool that could be used by individual states to better understand the personnel that would be needed to complete various tasks over time during an outbreak response. The estimates were then coupled, post-processing, to the output from FMD outbreaks simulated in California using the Multiscale Epidemiological/Economic Simulation and Analysis (MESA) model at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to estimate the personnel resource demands, by task, over the course of an outbreak response.

  2. Economic effects of foot and mouth disease outbreaks along the cattle marketing chain in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Baluka, Sylvia Angubua

    2016-06-01

    Disease outbreaks increase the cost of animal production; reduce milk and beef yield, cattle sales, farmers' incomes, and enterprise profitability. The study assessed the economic effects of foot and mouth disease (FMD) outbreaks along the cattle marketing chain in selected study districts in Uganda. The study combined qualitative and quantitative study designs. Respondents were selected proportionally using simple random sampling from the sampling frame comprising of 224, 173, 291, and 185 farmers for Nakasongola, Nakaseke, Isingiro, and Rakai, respectively. Key informants were selected purposively. Data analysis combined descriptive, modeling, and regression analysis. Data on the socio-economic characteristics and how they influenced FMD outbreaks, cattle markets revenue losses, and the economic cost of the outbreaks were analyzed using descriptive measures including percentages, means, and frequencies. Farmers with small and medium herds incurred higher control costs, whereas large herds experienced the highest milk losses. Total income earned by the actors per month at the processing level reduced by 23%. In Isingiro, bulls and cows were salvage sold at 83% and 88% less market value, i.e., a loss of $196.1 and $1,552.9 in small and medium herds, respectively. All actors along the cattle marketing chain incur losses during FMD outbreaks, but smallholder farmers are most affected. Control and prevention of FMD should remain the responsibility of the government if Uganda is to achieve a disease-free status that is a prerequisite for free movement and operation of cattle markets throughout the year which will boost cattle marketing.

  3. Identification of foot and mouth disease risk areas using a multi-criteria analysis approach

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Gustavo Sousa e; Weber, Eliseu José; Hasenack, Heinrich; Groff, Fernando Henrique Sautter; Todeschini, Bernardo; Borba, Mauro Riegert; Medeiros, Antonio Augusto Rosa; Leotti, Vanessa Bielefeldt; Canal, Cláudio Wageck; Corbellini, Luis Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly infectious disease that affects cloven-hoofed livestock and wildlife. FMD has been a problem for decades, which has led to various measures to control, eradicate and prevent FMD by National Veterinary Services worldwide. Currently, the identification of areas that are at risk of FMD virus incursion and spread is a priority for FMD target surveillance after FMD is eradicated from a given country or region. In our study, a knowledge-driven spatial model was built to identify risk areas for FMD occurrence and to evaluate FMD surveillance performance in Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil. For this purpose, multi-criteria decision analysis was used as a tool to seek multiple and conflicting criteria to determine a preferred course of action. Thirteen South American experts analyzed 18 variables associated with FMD introduction and dissemination pathways in Rio Grande do Sul. As a result, FMD higher risk areas were identified at international borders and in the central region of the state. The final model was expressed as a raster surface. The predictive ability of the model assessed by comparing, for each cell of the raster surface, the computed model risk scores with a binary variable representing the presence or absence of an FMD outbreak in that cell during the period 1985 to 2015. Current FMD surveillance performance was assessed, and recommendations were made to improve surveillance activities in critical areas. PMID:28552973

  4. The Effects of Weather Factors on Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Weihua; Li, Xian’En; Yang, Peng; Liao, Hua; Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Quanyi

    2016-01-01

    The morbidity and mortality of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) are increasing in Beijing, China. Previous studies have indicated an association between incidents of HFMD and weather factors. However, the seasonal influence of these factors on the disease is not yet understood, and their relationship with the enterovirus 71 (EV71) and Coxsackie virus A16 (CV-A16) viruses are not well documented. We analysed 84,502 HFMD cases from 2008 to 2011 in Beijing to explore the seasonal influence of weather factors (average temperature [AT], average relative humidity [ARH], total precipitation [TP] and average wind speed [AWS]) on incidents of HFMD by using a geographically weighted regression (GWR) model. The results indicated that weather factors differ significantly in their influence on HFMD depending on the season. AT had the greatest effect among the four weather factors, and while the influence of AT and AWS was greater in the summer than in the winter, the influence of TP was positive in the summer and negative in the winter. ARH was negatively correlated with HFMD. Also, we observed more EV71-associated cases than CV-A16 but there is no convincing evidence to show significant differences between the influences of the weather factors on EV71 and CV-A16.

  5. The Effects of Weather Factors on Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease in Beijing

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Weihua; Li, Xian’en; Yang, Peng; Liao, Hua; Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Quanyi

    2016-01-01

    The morbidity and mortality of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) are increasing in Beijing, China. Previous studies have indicated an association between incidents of HFMD and weather factors. However, the seasonal influence of these factors on the disease is not yet understood, and their relationship with the enterovirus 71 (EV71) and Coxsackie virus A16 (CV-A16) viruses are not well documented. We analysed 84,502 HFMD cases from 2008 to 2011 in Beijing to explore the seasonal influence of weather factors (average temperature [AT], average relative humidity [ARH], total precipitation [TP] and average wind speed [AWS]) on incidents of HFMD by using a geographically weighted regression (GWR) model. The results indicated that weather factors differ significantly in their influence on HFMD depending on the season. AT had the greatest effect among the four weather factors, and while the influence of AT and AWS was greater in the summer than in the winter, the influence of TP was positive in the summer and negative in the winter. ARH was negatively correlated with HFMD. Also, we observed more EV71-associated cases than CV-A16 but there is no convincing evidence to show significant differences between the influences of the weather factors on EV71 and CV-A16. PMID:26755102

  6. Differential replication of Foot-and-mouth disease viruses in mice determine lethality.

    PubMed

    Cacciabue, Marco; García-Núñez, María Soledad; Delgado, Fernando; Currá, Anabella; Marrero, Rubén; Molinari, Paula; Rieder, Elizabeth; Carrillo, Elisa; Gismondi, María Inés

    2017-09-01

    Adult C57BL/6J mice have been used to study Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) biology. In this work, two variants of an FMDV A/Arg/01 strain exhibiting differential pathogenicity in adult mice were identified and characterized: a non-lethal virus (A01NL) caused mild signs of disease, whereas a lethal virus (A01L) caused death within 24-48h independently of the dose used. Both viruses caused a systemic infection with pathological changes in the exocrine pancreas. Virus A01L reached higher viral loads in plasma and organs of inoculated mice as well as increased replication in an ovine kidney cell line. Complete consensus sequences revealed 6 non-synonymous changes between A01L and A10NL genomes that might be linked to replication differences, as suggested by in silico prediction studies. Our results highlight the biological significance of discrete genomic variations and reinforce the usefulness of this animal model to study viral determinants of lethality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hand-foot-and-mouth disease: a new look at a classic viral rash.

    PubMed

    Nassef, Christopher; Ziemer, Carolyn; Morrell, Dean S

    2015-08-01

    Hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) is a common cause of viral rash in children with classic skin findings which are easily recognized by pediatricians. Recently, several atypical cutaneous manifestations of HFMD have been described. Awareness of these patterns may lead providers to appropriate diagnosis and management. This review also highlights the epidemiological patterns of more virulent strains and emerging research in disease prevention. Classic HFMD presents with tender lesions on the hands, feet, and oral mucosa. Atypical skin findings in HFMD may be seen in children with atopic dermatitis. These include 'eczema coxsackium', in which eczematous skin is superinfected with coxsackie virus, resembling herpes infection. Nail changes, such as shedding, may follow HFMD after a latency period. Enterovirus 71 is responsible for epidemic outbreaks of HFMD in Asia, with systemic manifestations and occasionally neurological sequelae. Research is underway to develop a vaccine which could curb epidemics, but for the present, supportive care and hygiene measures are the standard of care. Atypical manifestations of HFMD in children with atopic dermatitis may mimic herpetic superinfection. In a child presenting with nail changes, consider antecedent HFMD in the differential diagnosis. The mainstay of treatment for HMFD remains supportive care.

  8. Risk factors for death in children with severe hand, foot, and mouth disease in Hunan, China.

    PubMed

    Long, Lu; Gao, Li-Dong; Hu, Shi-Xiong; Luo, Kai-Wei; Chen, Zhen-Hua; Ronsmans, Carine; Zhou, Ding-Lun; Lan, Ya-Jia

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, outbreaks of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) have increased throughout East and Southeast Asia, especially in mainland China. The disease now presents as an increasingly serious public health threat in China. A case-control study was designed to examine risk factors associated with death from severe HFMD. A total of 553 severe HFMD cases were collected from the National Surveillance System. Multifactorial logistic regression was used to analyse independent associations between potential influence factors and death from severe HFMD. We found that the migrants were more likely to die from severe HFMD than the resident population (OR = 3.07, 95%CI: 1.39-8.32). Additionally, the children whose first visit was to a village-level clinic had a high risk of death from severe HFMD. Patients with EV71 infection or symptoms of convulsion, dyspnoea, cyanosis, coolness of extremities, and vomiting had an increased risk of death from severe HFMD. While breastfeeding children, having a confirmed diagnosis at the first visit to the hospital and with symptom of hyperarousal were identified as protective factors for death from severe HFMD. To reduce the mortality from severe HFMD, doctors and health care providers need to pay attention to the patients with EV71 infection or with symptoms of convulsion, dyspnoea, cyanosis, coolness of extremities, and vomiting. Health administration departments should pay more attention to the rational allocation of health resources. Furthermore, they should increase financial support and manpower in village-level health institutions.

  9. Potential revenue impact of an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Paarlberg, Philip L; Lee, John G; Seitzinger, Ann H

    2002-04-01

    To estimate potential revenue impacts of an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in the United States similar to the outbreak in the United Kingdom during 2001. Economic analysis successively incorporating quarantine and slaughter of animals, an export ban, and consumer fears about the disease were used to determine the combined impact. Secondary data for cattle, swine, lambs, poultry, and products of these animals. Data for 1999 were used to calibrate a model for the US agricultural sector. Removal of animals, similar to that observed in the United Kingdom, was introduced, along with a ban on exportation of livestock, red meat, and dairy products and a reduction and shift in consumption of red meat in the United States. The largest impacts on farm income of an FMD outbreak were from the loss of export markets and reductions in domestic demand arising from consumer fears, not from removal of infected animals. These elements could cause an estimated decrease of $14 billion (9.5%) in US farm income. Losses in gross revenue for each sector were estimated to be the following: live swine, -34%; pork, -24%; live cattle -17%; beef, -20%; milk, -16%; live lambs and sheep, -14%; lamb and sheep meat, -10%; forage, -15%; and soybean meal, -7%. Procedures to contain an outbreak of FMD to specific regions and allow maintenance of FMD-free exports and efforts to educate consumers about health risks are critical to mitigating adverse economic impacts of an FMD outbreak.

  10. Molecular investigation of foot-and-mouth disease virus in domestic bovids from Gharbia, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Elhaig, Mahmoud Mohey; Elsheery, Mohamed Nagi

    2014-12-01

    An outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) affecting cattle and water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) occurred in Egypt during 2012/2013. The present study was undertaken to determine the current strains of the FMD virus (FMDV) and the prevalence of FMD among cattle and buffalo in Gharbia, Egypt. The diagnostic sensitivity of two RT-PCR assays for the detection of FMDV was evaluated. The results revealed that SAT2 was the causative agent. The percentage of infected of animals varied with the detection method, ranging from 62.5 % by the untranslated region (UTR) RT-PCR to 75.6 % by SAT2 RT-PCR. The overall prevalence and mortality rates were 100 and 21 %, respectively. The mortality was higher in buffalo (23.3 %) than it was in cattle (17 %). A partial sequence of SAT2 was identical (90-100 %) to Egyptian isolates and was close in similarity to sequences from Sudan and Libya. In conclusion, FMD in Egypt is caused by SAT2. No other serotypes were detected. The results of this study provided the valuable data regarding the epidemiology of SAT2 in cattle and water buffalo from Egypt, which strengthens the need to change the strategies of both control and prevention that help to prevent the spread of the disease.

  11. Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease in China: Critical Community Size and Spatial Vaccination Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Van Boeckel, Thomas P.; Takahashi, Saki; Liao, Qiaohong; Xing, Weijia; Lai, Shengjie; Hsiao, Victor; Liu, Fengfeng; Zheng, Yaming; Chang, Zhaorui; Yuan, Chen; Metcalf, C. Jessica E.; Yu, Hongjie; Grenfell, Bryan T.

    2016-01-01

    Hand Foot and Mouth Disease (HFMD) constitutes a considerable burden for health care systems across China. Yet this burden displays important geographic heterogeneity that directly affects the local persistence and the dynamics of the disease, and thus the ability to control it through vaccination campaigns. Here, we use detailed geographic surveillance data and epidemic models to estimate the critical community size (CCS) of HFMD associated enterovirus serotypes CV-A16 and EV-A71 and we explore what spatial vaccination strategies may best reduce the burden of HFMD. We found CCS ranging from 336,979 (±225,866) to 722,372 (±150,562) with the lowest estimates associated with EV-A71 in the southern region of China where multiple transmission seasons have previously been identified. Our results suggest the existence of a regional immigration-recolonization dynamic driven by urban centers. If EV-A71 vaccines doses are limited, these would be optimally deployed in highly populated urban centers and in high-prevalence areas. If HFMD vaccines are included in China’s National Immunization Program in order to achieve high coverage rates (>85%), routine vaccination of newborns largely outperforms strategies in which the equivalent number of doses is equally divided between routine vaccination of newborns and pulse vaccination of the community at large. PMID:27125917

  12. Normal variation in thermal radiated temperature in cattle: implications for foot-and-mouth disease detection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Thermal imagers have been used in a number of disciplines to record animal surface temperatures and as a result detect temperature distributions and abnormalities requiring a particular course of action. Some work, with animals infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus, has suggested that the technique might be used to identify animals in the early stages of disease. In this study, images of 19 healthy cattle have been taken over an extended period to determine hoof and especially coronary band temperatures (a common site for the development of FMD lesions) and eye temperatures (as a surrogate for core body temperature) and to examine how these vary with time and ambient conditions. Results The results showed that under UK conditions an animal's hoof temperature varied from 10°C to 36°C and was primarily influenced by the ambient temperature and the animal's activity immediately prior to measurement. Eye temperatures were not affected by ambient temperature and are a useful indicator of core body temperature. Conclusions Given the variation in temperature of the hooves of normal animals under various environmental conditions the use of a single threshold hoof temperature will be at best a modest predictive indicator of early FMD, even if ambient temperature is factored into the evaluation. PMID:22104039

  13. The Effects of Weather Factors on Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weihua; Li, Xian'en; Yang, Peng; Liao, Hua; Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Quanyi

    2016-01-12

    The morbidity and mortality of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) are increasing in Beijing, China. Previous studies have indicated an association between incidents of HFMD and weather factors. However, the seasonal influence of these factors on the disease is not yet understood, and their relationship with the enterovirus 71 (EV71) and Coxsackie virus A16 (CV-A16) viruses are not well documented. We analysed 84,502 HFMD cases from 2008 to 2011 in Beijing to explore the seasonal influence of weather factors (average temperature [AT], average relative humidity [ARH], total precipitation [TP] and average wind speed [AWS]) on incidents of HFMD by using a geographically weighted regression (GWR) model. The results indicated that weather factors differ significantly in their influence on HFMD depending on the season. AT had the greatest effect among the four weather factors, and while the influence of AT and AWS was greater in the summer than in the winter, the influence of TP was positive in the summer and negative in the winter. ARH was negatively correlated with HFMD. Also, we observed more EV71-associated cases than CV-A16 but there is no convincing evidence to show significant differences between the influences of the weather factors on EV71 and CV-A16.

  14. Serological Survey of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Buffaloes (Syncerus caffer) in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Sikombe, T. K. W.; Mweene, A. S.; Muma, John; Kasanga, C.; Sinkala, Y.; Banda, F.; Mulumba, M.; Fana, E. M.; Mundia, C.; Simuunza, M.

    2015-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the serotypes of foot-and-mouth disease viruses (FMDV) circulating in African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer) from selected areas in Zambia. Sera and probang samples were collected between 2011 and 2012 and analysed for presence of antibodies against FMDV while probang samples were used to isolate the FMDV by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). Samples with CPE were further analysed using antigen ELISA. High FMD seroprevalence was observed and antibodies to all the three Southern African Territories (SAT) serotypes were detected in four study areas represented as follows: SAT2 was 72.7 percent; SAT1 was 62.6 percent; and SAT3 was 26.2 percent. Mixed infections accounted for 68.6 percent of those that were tested positive. For probang samples, CPE were observed in three of the samples, while the antigen ELISA results showed positivity and for SAT1 (n = 1) and SAT2 (n = 2). It is concluded that FMDV is highly prevalent in Zambian buffaloes which could play an important role in the epidemiology of the disease. Therefore livestock reared at interface with the game parks should be included in all routine FMDV vaccination programmes. PMID:26347208

  15. EV71 vaccine, a new tool to control outbreaks of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD).

    PubMed

    Mao, Qun-ying; Wang, Yiping; Bian, Lianlian; Xu, Miao; Liang, Zhenglun

    2016-05-01

    On December 3rd 2015, the China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) approved the first inactivated Enterovirus 71 (EV71) whole virus vaccine for preventing severe hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). As one of the few preventive vaccines for children's infectious diseases generated by the developing countries in recent years, EV71 vaccine is a blessing to children's health in China and worldwide. However, there are still a few challenges facing the worldwide use of EV71 vaccine, including the applicability against various EV71 pandemic strains in other countries, international requirements on vaccine production and quality control, standardization and harmonization on different pathogen monitoring and detecting methods, etc. In addition, the affordability of EV71 vaccine in other countries is a factor to be considered in HFMD prevention. Therefore, with EV71 vaccine commercially available, there is still a long way to go before reaching effective protection against severe HFMD after EV71 vaccines enter the market. In this paper, the bottlenecks and prospects for the wide use of EV71 vaccine after its approval are evaluated.

  16. In vitro anti-foot-and-mouth disease virus activity of magnesium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rafiei, Solmaz; Rezatofighi, Seyedeh Elham; Ardakani, Mohammad Roayaei; Madadgar, Omid

    2015-10-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is an extremely contagious viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals that can lead to huge economic losses in the livestock production. No antiviral therapies are available for treating FMD virus (FMDV) infections in animals. The antiviral effects of magnesium oxide nanoparticles (MgO NPs) on the FMDV were investigated in cell culture. The viability of the cells after MgO NP treatment was determined using the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay. The direct effects of MgO NPs on the FMDV in extracellular (virucidal assay) and also different stages of virus replication (antiviral assay) were evaluated by plaque reduction assay. The results showed that MgO NPs were safe at concentrations up to 250 µg/ml in the Razi Bovine kidney cell line. The treatments with NPs indicated that the MgO NPs exerted in vitro virucidal and antiviral activities. Plaque reduction assay revealed that MgO NPs can inhibit FMDV by more than 90% at the early stages of infection such as attachment and penetration but not after penetration. The results of this study suggested that NPs might be applied locally as an antiviral agent in early stages of infection in susceptible animals.

  17. An integrated model to predict the atmospheric spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, J. H.; Mackay, D. K.; Jensen, C. O.; Donaldson, A. I.

    2000-01-01

    The application of a computer model called Rimpuff for simulating the airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is described. Rimpuff is more sophisticated and accurate than other FMD simulation models previously described. It can be run on a desktop computer and performs analyses very quickly. It can be linked to a geographical information system and so the information generated can be integrated with geographical and demographical data for display in a format that can be easily assimilated and transmitted electronically. The system was validated using historical data from outbreaks of FMD in France and the UK in 1981, and from Denmark and the former German Democratic Republic (GDR) in 1982. A very good fit was obtained between the direction of the plumes of virus simulated by the model and the spread of disease from France to the UK in 1981. Although cattle in the UK were infected during the episode, the concentrations of airborne virus in the plumes simulated by the model were beneath the infectivity threshold for cattle. It was concluded from the analysis that the number of pigs infected in France, and therefore the source concentration of airborne virus, was probably much higher than was recorded at the time of the outbreaks. Analysis of the Denmark/GDR episode pointed to the possibility that the source of virus for the 1982 epidemic in Denmark could have been one or more unreported outbreaks involving pigs in the former GDR. PMID:10982082

  18. Injuries to staff engaged in foot-and-mouth disease eradication in Japan.

    PubMed

    Muroga, N; Yamamoto, T; Hayama, Y; Kobayashi, S; Hidano, A; Tsutsui, T

    2015-01-01

    In April 2010, a large-scale outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease, a highly infectious disease affecting cloven-hoofed animals, was reported in Miyazaki prefecture in Japan. Many staff were dispatched to the epidemic area to undertake containment measures. Various injuries were reported among the dispatched staff. To study the characteristics of injuries that occurred during containment measures and to identify the characteristics of those injured. We analysed records of injuries that occurred among staff dispatched from national organizations and prefectures other than Miyazaki prefecture. Based on these records, a qualitative analysis was conducted for veterinarians and non-veterinarian support staff as each group played a different role during the outbreak. Forty-seven veterinarians and 183 support staff were injured. The injury risk was significantly higher for support staff (13%) than for veterinarians (5%; P < 0.001). The most frequently reported injury resulted from exposure to disinfectant and the next was abrasions caused by friction from protective clothing and rubber boots. Among veterinarians, needlestick accidents were also frequently reported. Applying a less hazardous disinfectant and improving protective equipment to prevent skin abrasion may be effective in reducing the risk of these injuries among staff conducting containment measures. Reducing injuries among staff in such circumstances will assist effective control measures. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Application of mouse model for effective evaluation of foot-and-mouth disease vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seo-Yong; Ko, Mi-Kyeong; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Choi, Joo-Hyung; You, Su-Hwa; Pyo, Hyun-Mi; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Kim, Byounghan; Lee, Jong-Soo; Park, Jong-Hyeon

    2016-07-19

    Efficacy evaluation of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines has been conducted in target animals such as cows and pigs. In particular, handling FMD virus requires a high level of biosafety management and facilities to contain the virulent viruses. The lack of a laboratory animal model has resulted in inconvenience when it comes to using target animals for vaccine evaluation, bringing about increased cost, time and labor for the experiments. The FMD mouse model has been studied, but most FMD virus (FMDV) strains are not known to cause disease in adult mice. In the present study, we created a series of challenge viruses that are lethal to adult C57BL/6 mice. FMDV types O, A, and Asia1, which are related to frequent FMD outbreaks, were adapted for mice and the pathogenesis of each virus was evaluated in the mouse model. Challenge experiments after vaccination using in-house and commercial vaccines demonstrated vaccine-mediated protection in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, we propose that FMD vaccine evaluation should be carried out using mouse-adapted challenge viruses as a swift, effective efficacy test of experimental or commercial vaccines.

  20. Genetic characterization of vaccine and field strains of serotype A foot-and-mouth disease virus from India.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, J K; Pawar, S S; Tosh, C; Subramaniam, S; Palsamy, R; Sanyal, A; Hemadri, D; Pattnaik, B

    2011-01-01

    Extreme antigenic and genetic heterogeneity of serotype A foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) population has resulted in change of vaccine strains in India twice in the last decade. In such a situation, complete characterization of the vaccine strains is imperative. With regard to the frequent outbreaks of this disease, FMDV field strains are also of interest. Therefore three vaccine strains and two field strains of type A FMDV from India were completely sequenced and the obtained sequences were subjected to sequence and phylogenetic analyses. Based on the complete coding region, all the Indian strains clustered in the Asia topotype and exhibited a more than 11% nt divergence from the other Asian strains. The 5'-UTR of some Indian strains revealed block deletions of 43 and 86 nt corresponding to the pseudoknot region. Amino acids S44 in VP2 and F164 in VP1 were found to be the exclusive signatures for the Asia topotype. The vaccine strains differed at 65 aa positions in the capsid region, 13 of them antigenically critical. Variability at such positions is likely to affect the antigenic profile of these strains. Complete genome sequences of the vaccine strains presented here could serve as the reference for any comparative genomics in future.

  1. Nonlinear and Interactive Effects of Temperature and Humidity on Childhood Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease in Hefei, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinju; Cheng, Jian; Xu, Zhiwei; Zhao, Kefu; Zhao, Desheng; Xie, Mingyu; Yang, Huihui; Wen, Liying; Li, Kesheng; Su, Hong

    2016-10-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is one of the major infectious diseases among children and remains a health threat, especially among Asian countries. Many epidemiologic studies suggested significant association of air temperature and humidity with childhood HFMD; however, evidence on the temperature effects on childhood HFMD in temperate cities is limited, and the interactive effects of temperature and humidity have not been studied yet. Daily counts of HFMD in children younger than 15 years of age and daily meteorologic variables during 2010 to 2012 were obtained in Hefei, China. A distributed lag nonlinear model was applied to estimate the potential nonlinear association between temperature and childhood HFMD. The interactive effects between temperature and humidity on childhood HFMD were also investigated. Temperature rise was associated with higher risk of childhood HFMD. Within the incubation period of HFMD, temperature rise appeared to have the acute effects on childhood HFMD, and a 5°C increase of temperature at lag 0-6 days was associated with 24.8% (95% confidence interval: 11.94%-39.10%) increase of childhood HFMD. Females and children of 0-4 years of agewere more vulnerable to temperature rise. Notably, there were obvious combined effects between temperature and humidity on childhood HFMD-the risk of childhood HFMD elevated at higher temperature and humidity level. This study provides evidence that temperature and humidity may jointly affect childhood HFMD, and such interactive impact needs to be considered when evaluating the temperature-childhood HFMD relationship.

  2. The threshold effects of meteorological factors on Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) in China, 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhicheng; Zhang, Wangjian; Zhang, Dingmei; Yu, Shicheng; Hao, Yuantao

    2016-11-01

    We explored the threshold effects of meteorological factors on hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in mainland China to improve the prevention and early warning. Using HFMD surveillance and meteorological data in 2011, we identified the threshold effects of predictors on the monthly incidence of HFMD and predicted the high risk months, with classification and regression tree models (CART). The results of the classification tree showed that there was an 82.35% chance for a high risk of HFMD when the temperature was greater than 24.03 °C and the relative humidity was less than 60.9% during non-autumn seasons. According to the heatmap of high risk prediction, the HFMD incidence in most provinces was beyond the normal level during May to August. The results of regression tree showed that when the temperature was greater than 24.85 °C and the relative humidity was between 80.59% and 82.55%, the relative risk (RR) of HFMD was 3.49 relative to monthly average incidence. This study provided quantitative evidence for the threshold effects of meteorological factors on HFMD in China. The conditions of a temperature greater than 24.85 °C and a relative humidity between 80.59% and 82.55% would lead to a higher risk of HFMD.

  3. Ihalation, persistence and dispersal f foot-and-mouth disease virus by man.

    PubMed

    Sellers, R F; Donaldson, A I; Herniman, K A

    1970-12-01

    Sampling of human subjects, who had been in contact with animals infected with foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus, showed that virus could be recovered from the nose, throat, saliva and from air expelled during coughing, sneezing, talking and breathing. The amounts of virus recovered paralleled those collected with a large-volume sampler and multistage impinger and these findings confirmed that the highest recovery of airborne virus was from infected pigs followed by cattle and sheep. More virus was found in the noses of those examining infected animals than in those operating the samplers, but there was variation between the subjects. In the majority there was a 1.8 log fall in titre by 3.5 hr., but virus persisted in the nose of one subject for 28 hr. Nose blowing or washing the nostrils did not remove virus completely, nor were cloth or industrial masks completely effective in preventing inhalation of virus. It was possible to transmit virus from infected subjects to others on one occasion. No clinical cases of FMD in man resulted from exposure, nor was there any rise in antibody. Use was made of these findings in determining sites of aerosol excretion in animals, and the results are discussed in relation to FMD in man and to the spread of respiratory viruses by the airborne route.

  4. Engineering Foot-and-Mouth Disease Viruses with Improved Growth Properties for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Haixue; Guo, Jianhong; Jin, Ye; Yang, Fan; He, Jijun; Lv, Lv; Zhang, Kesan; Wu, Qiong; Liu, Xiangtao; Cai, Xuepeng

    2013-01-01

    Background No licensed vaccine is currently available against serotype A foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in China, despite the isolation of A/WH/CHA/09 in 2009, partly because this strain does not replicate well in baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells. Methodology/Principal Findings A novel plasmid-based reverse genetics system was used to construct a chimeric strain by replacing the P1 gene in the vaccine strain O/CHA/99 with that from the epidemic stain A/WH/CHA/09. The chimeric virus displayed growth kinetics similar to those of O/CHA/99 and was selected for use as a candidate vaccine strain after 12 passages in BHK cells. Cattle were vaccinated with the inactivated vaccine and humoral immune responses were induced in most of the animals on day 7. A challenge infection with A/WH/CHA/09 on day 28 indicated that the group given a 4-µg dose was fully protected and neither developed viremia nor seroconverted to a 3ABC antigen. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate that the chimeric virus not only propagates well in BHK cells and has excellent antigenic matching against serotype A FMD, but is also a potential marker vaccine to distinguish infection from vaccination. These results suggest that reverse genetics technology is a useful tool for engineering vaccines for the prevention and control of FMD. PMID:23372840

  5. Inhalation, persistence and dispersal of foot-and-mouth disease virus by man

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, R. F.; Donaldson, A. I.; Herniman, K. A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Sampling of human subjects, who had been in contact with animals infected with foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus, showed that virus could be recovered from the nose, throat, saliva and from air expelled during coughing, sneezing, talking and breathing. The amounts of virus recovered paralleled those collected with a large-volume sampler and multistage impinger and these findings confirmed that the highest recovery of airborne virus was from infected pigs followed by cattle and sheep. More virus was found in the noses of those examining infected animals than in those operating the samplers, but there was variation between the subjects. In the majority there was a 1·8 log fall in titre by 3·5 hr., but virus persisted in the nose of one subject for 28 hr. Nose blowing or washing the nostrils did not remove virus completely, nor were cloth or industrial masks completely effective in preventing inhalation of virus. It was possible to transmit virus from infected subjects to others on one occasion. No clinical cases of FMD in man resulted from exposure, nor was there any rise in antibody. Use was made of these findings in determining sites of aerosol excretion in animals, and the results are discussed in relation to FMD in man and to the spread of respiratory viruses by the airborne route. PMID:4321595

  6. Anti-foot-and-mouth disease virus effects of Chinese herbal kombucha in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fu, Naifang; Wu, Juncai; Lv, Lv; He, Jijun; Jiang, Shengjun

    2015-01-01

    The foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is sensitive to acids and can be inactivated by exposure to low pH conditions. Spraying animals at risk of infection with suspensions of acid-forming microorganisms has been identified as a potential strategy for preventing FMD. Kombucha is one of the most strongly acid-forming symbiotic probiotics and could thus be an effective agent with which to implement this strategy. Moreover, certain Chinese herbal extracts are known to have broad-spectrum antiviral effects. Chinese herbal kombucha can be prepared by fermenting Chinese herbal extracts with a kombucha culture. Previous studies demonstrated that Chinese herbal kombucha prepared in this way efficiently inhibits FMDV replication in vitro. To assess the inhibitory effects of Chinese herbal kombucha against FMDV in vitro, swine challenged by intramuscular injection with 1000 SID50 of swine FMDV serotype O strain O/China/99 after treatment with Chinese herbal kombucha were partially protected against infection, as demonstrated by a lack of clinical symptoms and qRT-PCR analysis. In a large scale field trial, spraying cattle in an FMD outbreak zone with kombucha protected against infection. Chinese herbal kombucha may be a useful probiotic agent for managing FMD outbreaks.

  7. Economic costs of the foot and mouth disease outbreak in the United Kingdom in 2001.

    PubMed

    Thompson, D; Muriel, P; Russell, D; Osborne, P; Bromley, A; Rowland, M; Creigh-Tyte, S; Brown, C

    2002-12-01

    The authors present estimates of the economic costs to agriculture and industries affected by tourism of the outbreak of foot and mouth disease (FMD) in the United Kingdom (UK) in 2001. The losses to agriculture and the food chain amount to about Pound Sterling3.1 billion. The majority of the costs to agriculture have been met by the Government through compensation for slaughter and disposal as well as clean-up costs. Nonetheless, agricultural producers will have suffered losses, estimated at Pound Sterling355 million, which represents about 20% of the estimated total income from farming in 2001. Based on data from surveys of tourism, businesses directly affected by tourist expenditure are estimated to have lost a similar total amount (between Pound Sterling2.7 and Pound Sterling3.2 billion) as a result of reduced numbers of people visiting the countryside. The industries which supply agriculture, the food industries and tourist-related businesses will also have suffered losses. However, the overall costs to the UK economy are substantially less than the sum of these components, as much of the expenditure by tourists was not lost, but merely displaced to other sectors of the economy. Overall, the net effect of FMD is estimated to have reduced the gross domestic product in the UK by less than 0.2% in 2001.

  8. Immunogenicity of foot-and-mouth disease virus structural polyprotein P1 expressed in transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Shen, Qin; Jiang, Yunbo; Song, Yunfeng; Fang, Liurong; Xiao, Shaobo; Chen, Huanchun

    2012-04-01

    Transgenic plants have become developed as bioreactors for producing heterologous proteins and may even form edible vaccines. In the present study, a transgenic rice expressing the capsid precursor polypeptide (P1) gene of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), under the control of a dual cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV 35S) promoter, was generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Southern blot, northern blot, western blot, and ELISA analyses confirmed that the P1 gene was integrated into the transgenic rice and the protein was expressed specifically in the leaves at levels of 0.6-1.3 μg/mg of total soluble protein. After intraperitoneal immunization of mice with crude protein extracts from transgenic rice plants, FMDV-specific neutralizing antibodies were detected. The immunized mice could clear virus from their sera after FMDV challenge. In addition, FMDV-specific mucosal immune responses were detected in mice after oral immunization with protein extracts from transgenic rice plants. Partial virus clearance was obtained after FMDV challenge. These results indicate the potential of using a transgenic rice-based expression system as an alternative bioreactor for FMDV subunit vaccines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Changing epidemiology of hand, foot, and mouth disease in Hong Kong, 2001-2009.

    PubMed

    Ma, Edmond; Lam, Terence; Chan, K C; Wong, Christine; Chuang, S K

    2010-11-01

    We report the surveillance findings of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) collected from a general practitioner-based sentinel surveillance system and outbreaks reported by institutions and a laboratory-based enterovirus surveillance system in Hong Kong from 2001 to 2009. A seasonal peak was detected in the warmer months (May-July), along with a smaller winter peak (October-December) from 2006 onwards. The number of older children (>5 years) infected increased from 25.4% in 2001 to 33.0% in 2009 (P=0.01, Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test). Laboratory surveillance detected a cyclical high enterovirus 71 activity every 3 to 4 years. This activity was associated with a higher average hospitalization rate for HFMD patients in the outbreaks reported in the corresponding year, although the difference was only marginally significant (P=0.09, linear regression test). The changing epidemiology of HFMD warrants continuous surveillance in order to guide preventive public-health actions.

  10. Analysis of neutralizing epitopes on foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Pfaff, E; Thiel, H J; Beck, E; Strohmaier, K; Schaller, H

    1988-01-01

    For the investigation of the antigenic determinant structure of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against complete virus were characterized by Western blot (immunoblot), enzyme immunoassay, and competition experiments with a synthetic peptide, isolated coat protein VP1, and viral particles as antigens. Two of the four MAbs reacted with each of these antigens, while the other two MAbs recognized only complete viral particles and reacted only very poorly with the peptide. The four MAbs showed different neutralization patterns with a panel of 11 different FMDV strains. cDNA-derived VP1 protein sequences of the different strains were compared to find correlations between the primary structure of the protein and the ability of virus to be neutralized. Based on this analysis, it appears that the first two MAbs recognized overlapping sequential epitopes in the known antigenic site represented by the peptide, whereas the two other MAbs recognized conformational epitopes. These conclusions were supported and extended by structural analyses of FMDV mutants resistant to neutralization by an MAb specific for a conformational epitope. These results demonstrate that no amino acid exchanges had occurred in the primary antigenic site of VP1 but instead in the other coat proteins VP2 and VP3, which by themselves do not induce neutralizing antibodies. Images PMID:2835507

  11. Molecular Characterization of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Viruses Collected in Tanzania Between 1967 and 2009.

    PubMed

    Kasanga, C J; Wadsworth, J; Mpelumbe-Ngeleja, C A R; Sallu, R; Kivaria, F; Wambura, P N; Yongolo, M G S; Rweyemamu, M M; Knowles, N J; King, D P

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the molecular characterization of foot-and-mouth disease viruses (FMDV) recovered from outbreaks in Tanzania that occurred between 1967 and 2009. A total of 44 FMDV isolates, containing representatives of serotypes O, A, SAT 1 and SAT 2 from 13 regions of Tanzania, were selected from the FAO World Reference Laboratory for FMD (WRLFMD) virus collection. VP1 nucleotide sequences were determined for RT-PCR amplicons, and phylogenetic reconstructions were determined by maximum likelihood and neighbour-joining methods. These analyses showed that Tanzanian type O viruses fell into the EAST AFRICA 2 (EA-2) topotype, type A viruses fell into the AFRICA topotype (genotype I), type SAT 1 viruses into topotype I and type SAT 2 viruses into topotype IV. Taken together, these findings reveal that serotypes O, A, SAT 1 and SAT 2 that caused FMD outbreaks in Tanzania were genetically related to lineages and topotypes occurring in the East African region. The close genetic relationship of viruses in Tanzania to those from other countries suggests that animal movements can contribute to virus dispersal in sub-Saharan Africa. This is the first molecular description of viruses circulating in Tanzania and highlights the need for further sampling of representative viruses from the region so as to elucidate the complex epidemiology of FMD in Tanzania and sub-Saharan Africa.

  12. A Case-control Study on Risk Factors for Severe Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dingmei; Li, Ruolin; Zhang, Wangjian; Li, Guowei; Ma, Zhanzhong; Chen, Xiashi; Du, Zhicheng; Li, Zhiyuan; Guo, Pi; Lin, Zhuochen; Lu, Jiahai; Hao, Yuantao

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify potential risk factors for severe hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). In this case-control study, 459 severe HFMD patients and 246 mild HFMD patients from Guangdong province and Henan province, China were included. Data comprising demographic characteristics, clinical symptoms and signs, laboratory findings and other factors were collected. Univariate analysis revealed 30 factors associated with severe cases. Further multivariate analysis indicated four independent risk factors: fatigue (p < 0.01, odd ratio [OR] = 204.7), the use of glucocorticoids (p = 0.03, OR = 10.44), the use of dehydrant drugs (p < 0.01, OR = 73.7) and maculopapular rash (p < 0.01, OR = 84.4); and one independent protective factor: herpes or ulcers in mouth (p = 0.01, OR = 0.02). However, more systematic research and validation are needed to understand the underlying risk factors for severe HFMD. PMID:28084311

  13. Emergence and Distribution of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Serotype A and O in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Nandi, S P; Rahman, M Z; Momtaz, S; Sultana, M; Hossain, M A

    2015-06-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is endemic in Bangladesh and is predominantly due to FMDV serotype O. In 2012, FMD outbreaks were identified in five different districts of Bangladesh. Of 56 symptomatic cattle epithelial tissue samples, diagnostic PCR assay based on 5'-URT detected 38 FMDV infections. Viral genotyping targeting VP1-encoding region confirmed emergence of two distinct serotypes, A and O with an abundance of serotype A in Chittagong and Gazipur districts and serotype O in Pabna and Faridpur. Only single lineage of both A and O was retrieved from samples of five different regions. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of VP1 sequences revealed that serotype O sequences were closely related to the Ind 2001 sublineage of Middle East-South Asia (ME-SA) topotype that was previously circulating in Bangladesh, and serotype A sequences belonging to the genotype VII that was dominant in India during the last decade. The results suggest that extensive cross-border animal movement from neighbouring countries is the most likely source of FMDV serotypes in Bangladesh.

  14. Foot-and-mouth disease virus low-fidelity polymerase mutants are attenuated.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaochun; Wang, Haiwei; Zeng, Jianxiong; Li, Chen; Zhou, Guohui; Yang, Decheng; Yu, Li

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that RNA viruses can be attenuated by either increased or decreased viral polymerase replication fidelity. Although foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) high-fidelity RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) variants with an attenuated phenotype have been isolated using mutagens, no FMDV mutant with a low-fidelity polymerase has been documented to date. Here, we describe the generation of several FMDV RdRp mutants using site-directed mutagenesis via a reverse genetic system. Mutation frequency assays confirmed that five rescued FMDV RdRp mutant populations had lower replication fidelity than the wild-type virus population, which allowed us to assess the effects of the change in replication fidelity on the virus phenotype. These low-fidelity FMDV RdRp mutants showed increased sensitivity to ribavirin or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment without a loss of growth capacity in cell cultures. In addition, decreased fitness and attenuated virulence were observed for the RdRp mutants with lower fidelity. Importantly, based on a quantitative analysis for fidelity and virulence, we concluded that lower replication fidelity is associated with a more attenuated virus phenotype. These results further contribute to our understanding of the replication fidelity of polymerases of RNA viruses and its relationship to virulence attenuation.

  15. Engineering foot-and-mouth disease viruses with improved growth properties for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haixue; Guo, Jianhong; Jin, Ye; Yang, Fan; He, Jijun; Lv, Lv; Zhang, Kesan; Wu, Qiong; Liu, Xiangtao; Cai, Xuepeng

    2013-01-01

    No licensed vaccine is currently available against serotype A foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in China, despite the isolation of A/WH/CHA/09 in 2009, partly because this strain does not replicate well in baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells. A novel plasmid-based reverse genetics system was used to construct a chimeric strain by replacing the P1 gene in the vaccine strain O/CHA/99 with that from the epidemic stain A/WH/CHA/09. The chimeric virus displayed growth kinetics similar to those of O/CHA/99 and was selected for use as a candidate vaccine strain after 12 passages in BHK cells. Cattle were vaccinated with the inactivated vaccine and humoral immune responses were induced in most of the animals on day 7. A challenge infection with A/WH/CHA/09 on day 28 indicated that the group given a 4-µg dose was fully protected and neither developed viremia nor seroconverted to a 3ABC antigen. Our data demonstrate that the chimeric virus not only propagates well in BHK cells and has excellent antigenic matching against serotype A FMD, but is also a potential marker vaccine to distinguish infection from vaccination. These results suggest that reverse genetics technology is a useful tool for engineering vaccines for the prevention and control of FMD.

  16. Phylodynamic reconstruction of O CATHAY topotype foot-and-mouth disease virus epidemics in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Di Nardo, Antonello; Knowles, Nick J; Wadsworth, Jemma; Haydon, Daniel T; King, Donald P

    2014-08-24

    Reconstructing the evolutionary history, demographic signal and dispersal processes from viral genome sequences contributes to our understanding of the epidemiological dynamics underlying epizootic events. In this study, a Bayesian phylogenetic framework was used to explore the phylodynamics and spatio-temporal dispersion of the O CATHAY topotype of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) that caused epidemics in the Philippines between 1994 and 2005. Sequences of the FMDV genome encoding the VP1 showed that the O CATHAY FMD epizootic in the Philippines resulted from a single introduction and was characterised by three main transmission hubs in Rizal, Bulacan and Manila Provinces. From a wider regional perspective, phylogenetic reconstruction of all available O CATHAY VP1 nucleotide sequences identified three distinct sub-lineages associated with country-based clusters originating in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR), the Philippines and Taiwan. The root of this phylogenetic tree was located in Hong Kong SAR, representing the most likely source for the introduction of this lineage into the Philippines and Taiwan. The reconstructed O CATHAY phylodynamics revealed three chronologically distinct evolutionary phases, culminating in a reduction in viral diversity over the final 10 years. The analysis suggests that viruses from the O CATHAY topotype have been continually maintained within swine industries close to Hong Kong SAR, following the extinction of virus lineages from the Philippines and the reduced number of FMD cases in Taiwan.

  17. Quantitative characteristics of the foot-and-mouth disease carrier state under natural conditions in India.

    PubMed

    Hayer, S S; Ranjan, R; Biswal, J K; Subramaniam, S; Mohapatra, J K; Sharma, G K; Rout, M; Dash, B B; Das, B; Prusty, B R; Sharma, A K; Stenfeldt, C; Perez, A; Rodriguez, L L; Pattnaik, B; VanderWaal, K; Arzt, J

    2017-03-02

    The goal of this study was to characterize the properties and duration of the foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) carrier state and associated serological responses subsequent to vaccination and naturally occurring infection at two farms in northern India. Despite previous vaccination of cattle in these herds, clinical signs of FMD occurred in October 2013 within a subset of animals at the farms containing juvenile-yearling heifers and steers (Farm A) and adult dairy cattle (Farm B). Subsequent to the outbreak, FMD virus (FMDV) asymptomatic carriers were identified in both herds by seroreactivity to FMDV non-structural proteins and detection of FMDV genomic RNA in oropharyngeal fluid. Carriers' seroreactivity and FMDV genome detection status were subsequently monitored monthly for 23 months. The mean extinction time of the carrier state was 13.1 ± 0.2 months, with extinction having occurred significantly faster amongst adult dairy cattle at Farm B compared to younger animals at Farm A. The rate of decrease in the proportion of carrier animals was calculated to be 0.07 per month. Seroprevalence against FMDV non-structural proteins decreased over the course of the study period, but was found to increase transiently following repeated vaccinations. These data provide novel insights into viral and host factors associated with the FMDV carrier state under natural conditions. The findings reported herein may be relevant to field veterinarians and governmental regulatory entities engaged in FMD response and control measures.

  18. Inactivation of foot-and-mouth disease virus by citric acid and sodium carbonate with deicers.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jang-Kwan; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; You, Su-Hwa; Kim, Su-Mi; Tark, Dongseob; Lee, Hyang-Sim; Ko, Young-Joon; Seo, Min-Goo; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Byounghan

    2015-11-01

    Three out of five outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) since 2010 in the Republic of Korea have occurred in the winter. At the freezing temperatures, it was impossible to spray disinfectant on the surfaces of vehicles, roads, and farm premises because the disinfectant would be frozen shortly after discharge and the surfaces of the roads or machines would become slippery in cold weather. In this study, we added chemical deicers (ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, sodium chloride, calcium chloride, ethyl alcohol, and commercial windshield washer fluid) to keep disinfectants (0.2% citric acid and 4% sodium carbonate) from freezing, and we tested their virucidal efficacies under simulated cold temperatures in a tube. The 0.2% citric acid could reduce the virus titer 4 logs at -20°C with all the deicers. On the other hand, 4% sodium carbonate showed little virucidal activity at -20°C within 30 min, although it resisted being frozen with the function of the deicers. In conclusion, for the winter season, we may recommend the use of citric acid (>0.2%) diluted in 30% ethyl alcohol or 25% sodium chloride solvent, depending on its purpose.

  19. Brazilian foot and mouth disease status and meat exportation to the European Union.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Luiz Felipe Ramos; de Melo, Cristiano Barros; Seixas, Luiza; McManus, Concepta

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to define the differences between the Brazilian states that export and do not export meat to the European Union (EU) and to identify the variables that are important to meet the export requirements. Infrastructure and computerization of the control of animal transit in Brazil that impact on regional health status were evaluated and linked to other variables such as status for foot and mouth disease (FMD) and qualification to export meat to EU. Variables related to transit control of bovines implemented by the state agencies of animal health and inspection in each Brazilian state were evaluated. Using a discriminant analysis, four variables were selected that explained the variation between Brazilian states that were "free" and "not free" of FMD while another four were selected to explain the variation between the zones "approved" and "not approved" to export meat to the EU, including number of official veterinarians, total transit of bovines and buffaloes, total number of animal transit certificates issued for bovine and buffaloes at the state or zone level, and total number of municipalities in the state or zone. It was possible to correctly discriminate between "free" and "not free" FMD states or zones. Variables related to animal transit are important in assessing the state for the classification of animal health situation and for EU approval for the exportation of meat.

  20. The threshold effects of meteorological factors on Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) in China, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhicheng; Zhang, Wangjian; Zhang, Dingmei; Yu, Shicheng; Hao, Yuantao

    2016-01-01

    We explored the threshold effects of meteorological factors on hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in mainland China to improve the prevention and early warning. Using HFMD surveillance and meteorological data in 2011, we identified the threshold effects of predictors on the monthly incidence of HFMD and predicted the high risk months, with classification and regression tree models (CART). The results of the classification tree showed that there was an 82.35% chance for a high risk of HFMD when the temperature was greater than 24.03 °C and the relative humidity was less than 60.9% during non-autumn seasons. According to the heatmap of high risk prediction, the HFMD incidence in most provinces was beyond the normal level during May to August. The results of regression tree showed that when the temperature was greater than 24.85 °C and the relative humidity was between 80.59% and 82.55%, the relative risk (RR) of HFMD was 3.49 relative to monthly average incidence. This study provided quantitative evidence for the threshold effects of meteorological factors on HFMD in China. The conditions of a temperature greater than 24.85 °C and a relative humidity between 80.59% and 82.55% would lead to a higher risk of HFMD. PMID:27848955

  1. Hand-Washing: The Main Strategy for Avoiding Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dingmei; Li, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Wangjian; Guo, Pi; Ma, Zhanzhong; Chen, Qian; Du, Shaokun; Peng, Jing; Deng, Yu; Hao, Yuantao

    2016-01-01

    Epidemics of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) among children have caused concern in China since 2007. We have conducted a retrospective study to investigate risk factors associated with HFMD. In this non-matching case-control study, 99 HFMD patients and 126 control from Guangdong Province were enlisted as participants. Data comprising demographic, socio-economic, clinical and behavior factors were collected from children’s parents through face-to-face interviews by trained interviewers using a standardized questionnaire. Results of the primary logistic regression analyses revealed that age, history of cold food consumption, hand-washing routines, and airing out bedding were significantly associated with HFMD cases. Results of further multivariate analysis indicated that older age (OR = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.34–0.56) and hand-washing before meals (OR = 0.3, 95% CI: 0.13–0.70) are protective factors, whereas airing out bedding more than thrice a month (OR = 4.55, 95% CI: 1.19–17.37) was associated with increased risk for HFMD. Therefore, hand-washing should be recommended to prevent HFMD, and the potential threat of airing out bedding should be carefully considered. However, further studies are needed to examine other possible risk factors. PMID:27322307

  2. Enhanced immune response with foot and mouth disease virus VP1 and interleukin-1 fusion genes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Hyeon; Kim, Sun Jin; Oem, Jae Ku; Lee, Kwang Nyeong; Kim, Yong Joo; Kye, Soo Jeong; Park, Jee Yong; Joo, Yi Seok

    2006-09-01

    The capsid of the foot and mouth disease (FMD) virus carries the epitopes that are critical for inducing the immune response. In an attempt to enhance the specific immune response, plasmid DNA was constructed to express VP1/interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha) and precursor capsid (P1) in combination with 2A (P1-2A)/IL-1alpha under the control of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) immediateearly promoter and intron. After DNA transfection into MA104 (monkey kidney) cells, Western blotting and an immunofluorescence assay were used to confirm the expression of VP1 or P1-2A and IL-1alpha. Mice were inoculated with the encoding plasmids via the intradermal route, and the IgG1 and IgG2a levels were used to determine the immune responses. These results show that although the immunized groups did not carry a high level of neutralizing antibodies, the plasmids encoding the VP1/ IL-1alpha, and P1-2A /IL-1alpha fused genes were effective in inducing an enhanced immune response.

  3. Anti-foot-and-mouth disease virus effects of Chinese herbal kombucha in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Naifang; Wu, Juncai; Lv, Lv; He, Jijun; Jiang, Shengjun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is sensitive to acids and can be inactivated by exposure to low pH conditions. Spraying animals at risk of infection with suspensions of acid-forming microorganisms has been identified as a potential strategy for preventing FMD. Kombucha is one of the most strongly acid-forming symbiotic probiotics and could thus be an effective agent with which to implement this strategy. Moreover, certain Chinese herbal extracts are known to have broad-spectrum antiviral effects. Chinese herbal kombucha can be prepared by fermenting Chinese herbal extracts with a kombucha culture. Previous studies demonstrated that Chinese herbal kombucha prepared in this way efficiently inhibits FMDV replication in vitro. To assess the inhibitory effects of Chinese herbal kombucha against FMDV in vitro, swine challenged by intramuscular injection with 1000 SID50 of swine FMDV serotype O strain O/China/99 after treatment with Chinese herbal kombucha were partially protected against infection, as demonstrated by a lack of clinical symptoms and qRT-PCR analysis. In a large scale field trial, spraying cattle in an FMD outbreak zone with kombucha protected against infection. Chinese herbal kombucha may be a useful probiotic agent for managing FMD outbreaks. PMID:26691487

  4. Favipiravir can evoke lethal mutagenesis and extinction of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    de Avila, Ana Isabel; Moreno, Elena; Perales, Celia; Domingo, Esteban

    2017-03-17

    Antiviral agents are increasingly considered an option for veterinary medicine. An understanding of their mechanism of activity is important to plan their administration either as monotherapy or in combination with other agents. Previous studies have shown that the broad spectrum antiviral agent favipiravir (T-705) and its derivatives T-1105 and T-1106 are efficient inhibitors of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) replication in cell culture and in vivo. However, no mechanism for their activity against FMDV has been proposed. In the present study we show that favipiravir (T-705) can act as a lethal mutagen for FMDV in cell culture. Evidence includes virus extinction associated with increase in mutation frequency in the mutant spectrum of 860 residues of the 3D (polymerase)-coding region, and a decrease of specific infectivity while the consensus nucleotide sequence of the region analyzed remained invariant. The mutational spectrum evoked by favipiravir differs from that observed with other viruses in that no predominant transition type is observed, indicating that a movement towards A,U- or G,C-rich regions of sequence space is not a prerequisite for virus extinction. We discuss prospects for the use of favipiravir to assist in the control of FMDV, and its possible broader use in veterinary medicine as an extension of its current status as antiviral agent for human influenza virus.

  5. Degradation of foot-and-mouth disease virus during composting of infected pig carcasses

    PubMed Central

    Guan, J.; Chan, M.; Grenier, C.; Brooks, B.W.; Spencer, J.L.; Kranendonk, C.; Copps, J.; Clavijo, A.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the inactivation and degradation of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus during composting of infected pig carcasses as measured by virus isolation in tissue culture and by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR). Three FMD-infected pig carcasses were composted in a mixture of chicken manure and wood shavings in a biocontainment level 3 facility. Compost temperatures had reached 50°C and 70°C by days 10 and 19, respectively. Under these conditions, FMD virus was inactivated in specimens in compost by day 10 and the viral RNA was degraded in skin and internal organ tissues by day 21. In comparison, at ambient temperatures close to 20°C, FMD virus survived to day 10 in the skin tissue specimen from the pig that had the highest initial level of viral RNA in its tissues and the viral RNA persisted to day 21. Similarly, beta-actin mRNA, tested as a PCR control, persisted to day 21 in specimens held at ambient temperatures, but it was degraded in the remnants of tissues recovered from compost on day 21. Results from this study provide evidence that composting could be used for safe disposal of pig carcasses infected with FMD virus. PMID:20357957

  6. Determinants of the Transmission Variation of Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jijun; Li, Xinmin

    2016-01-01

    Severe outbreaks of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) have occurred in China for decades. Our understanding of the HFMD transmission process and its determinants is still limited. In this paper, factors that affect the local variation of HFMD transmission process were studied. Three classes of factors, including meteorological, demographic and public health intervention factors, were carefully selected and their effects on HFMD transmission were investigated with Pearson's correlation coefficient and multiple linear regression models. The determining factors for the variation of HFMD transmission were different for the southeastern and the northwestern regions of China. In the northwest, fadeouts occurred yearly, and the average age at infection and the fadeout were negatively correlated with the population density. In the southeast, HFMD transmission was governed by the combined effects of the birth rate, the relative humidity and the interaction of the Health System Performance and the log of the population density. When the Health System Performance was low, HFMD transmission increased with the population density, but when the Health System Performance was high, the better health performance counteracted the transmission increase due to the higher population density.

  7. Hand-Washing: The Main Strategy for Avoiding Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingmei; Li, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Wangjian; Guo, Pi; Ma, Zhanzhong; Chen, Qian; Du, Shaokun; Peng, Jing; Deng, Yu; Hao, Yuantao

    2016-06-18

    Epidemics of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) among children have caused concern in China since 2007. We have conducted a retrospective study to investigate risk factors associated with HFMD. In this non-matching case-control study, 99 HFMD patients and 126 control from Guangdong Province were enlisted as participants. Data comprising demographic, socio-economic, clinical and behavior factors were collected from children's parents through face-to-face interviews by trained interviewers using a standardized questionnaire. Results of the primary logistic regression analyses revealed that age, history of cold food consumption, hand-washing routines, and airing out bedding were significantly associated with HFMD cases. Results of further multivariate analysis indicated that older age (OR = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.34-0.56) and hand-washing before meals (OR = 0.3, 95% CI: 0.13-0.70) are protective factors, whereas airing out bedding more than thrice a month (OR = 4.55, 95% CI: 1.19-17.37) was associated with increased risk for HFMD. Therefore, hand-washing should be recommended to prevent HFMD, and the potential threat of airing out bedding should be carefully considered. However, further studies are needed to examine other possible risk factors.

  8. Inhibition of the foot-and-mouth disease virus subgenomic replicon by RNA aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Sophie; Lear, Zoe; Herod, Morgan R.; Ryan, Martin; Rowlands, David J.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously documented the inhibitory activity of RNA aptamers to the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of foot-and-mouth disease virus (3Dpol). Here we report their modification and use with a subgenomic replicon incorporating GFP (pGFP-PAC replicon), allowing replication to be monitored and quantified in real-time. GFP expression in transfected BHK-21 cells reached a maximum at approximately 8 h post-transfection, at which time change in morphology of the cells was consistent with a virus-induced cytopathic effect. However, transfection of replicon-bearing cells with a 3Dpol aptamer RNA resulted in inhibition of GFP expression and maintenance of normal cell morphology, whereas a control aptamer RNA had little effect. The inhibition was correlated with a reduction in 3Dpol (detected by immunoblotting) and shown to be dose dependent. The 3Dpol aptamers appeared to be more effective than 2′-C-methylcytidine (2′CMC). Aptamers to components of the replication complex are therefore useful molecular tools for studying viral replication and also have potential as diagnostic molecules in the future. PMID:25096816

  9. Comparative study of codon substitution patterns in foot-and-mouth disease virus (serotype O)

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Insung; Bae, Se-Eun

    2011-01-01

    We compared genetic variations in the VP1 gene of foot-and-mouth disease viruses (FMDVs) isolated since 2000 from various region of the world. We analyzed relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) and phylogenetic relationship between geographical regions, and calculated the genetic substitution patterns between Korean isolate and those from other countries. We calculated the ratios of synonymously substituted codons (SSC) to all observed substitutions and developed a new analytical parameter, EMC (the ratio of exact matching codons within each synonymous substitution group) to investigate more detailed substitution patterns within each synonymous codon group. We observed that FMDVs showed distinct RSCU patterns according to phylogenetic relationships in the same serotype (serotype O). Moreover, while the SSC and EMC values of FMDVs decreased according to phylogenetic distance, G + C composition at the third codon position was strictly conserved. Although there was little variation among the SSC values of 18 amino acids, more dynamic differences were observed in EMC values. The EMC values of 4- and 6-fold degenerate amino acids showed significantly lower values while most 2-fold degenerate amino acids showed no significant difference. Our findings suggest that different EMC patterns among the 18 amino acids might be an important factor in determining the direction of evolution in FMDV. PMID:21825834

  10. Prospect and challenges for the development of multivalent vaccines against hand, foot and mouth diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Chyi; Chow, Yen-Hung; Chong, Pele; Klein, Michel

    2014-10-29

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71), an emerging neurotropic virus and coxsackieviruses (CV) are the major causative agents of hand, foot and mouth diseases (HFMD). These viruses have become a serious public health threat in the Asia Pacific region. Formalin-inactivated EV71 (FI-EV71) vaccines have been developed, evaluated in human clinical trials and were found to elicit full protection against EV71. Their failure to prevent CVA16 infections could compromise the acceptability of monovalent EV71 vaccines. Bivalent FI-EV71/FI-CVA16 vaccines have been found to elicit strong neutralizing antibody responses against both viruses in animal models but did not protect against CVA6 and CVA10 viral infections in cell culture neutralization assay. In this review, we discuss the critical bottlenecks in the development of multivalent HFMD vaccines, including the selection of vaccine strains, animal models to assess vaccine potency, the definition of end-points for efficacy trials, and the need for improved manufacturing processes to produce affordable vaccines.

  11. Determinants of the Transmission Variation of Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinmin

    2016-01-01

    Severe outbreaks of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) have occurred in China for decades. Our understanding of the HFMD transmission process and its determinants is still limited. In this paper, factors that affect the local variation of HFMD transmission process were studied. Three classes of factors, including meteorological, demographic and public health intervention factors, were carefully selected and their effects on HFMD transmission were investigated with Pearson’s correlation coefficient and multiple linear regression models. The determining factors for the variation of HFMD transmission were different for the southeastern and the northwestern regions of China. In the northwest, fadeouts occurred yearly, and the average age at infection and the fadeout were negatively correlated with the population density. In the southeast, HFMD transmission was governed by the combined effects of the birth rate, the relative humidity and the interaction of the Health System Performance and the log of the population density. When the Health System Performance was low, HFMD transmission increased with the population density, but when the Health System Performance was high, the better health performance counteracted the transmission increase due to the higher population density. PMID:27701445

  12. Foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase: structural insights into the mechanism of intermolecular cleavage.

    PubMed

    Steinberger, Jutta; Grishkovskaya, Irina; Cencic, Regina; Juliano, Luiz; Juliano, Maria A; Skern, Tim

    2014-11-01

    Translation of foot-and-mouth disease virus RNA initiates at one of two start codons leading to the synthesis of two forms of leader proteinase L(pro) (Lab(pro) and Lb(pro)). These forms free themselves from the viral polyprotein by intra- and intermolecular self-processing and subsequently cleave the cellular eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4 G. During infection, Lb(pro) removes six residues from its own C-terminus, generating sLb(pro). We present the structure of sLb(pro) bound to the inhibitor E64-R-P-NH2, illustrating how sLb(pro) can cleave between Lys/Gly and Gly/Arg pairs. In intermolecular cleavage on polyprotein substrates, Lb(pro) was unaffected by P1 or P1' substitutions and processed a substrate containing nine eIF4GI cleavage site residues whereas sLb(pro) failed to cleave the eIF4GI containing substrate and cleaved appreciably more slowly on mutated substrates. Introduction of 70 eIF4GI residues bearing the Lb(pro) binding site restored cleavage. These data imply that Lb(pro) and sLb(pro) may have different functions in infected cells.

  13. Molecular epidemiological investigation of foot-and-mouth disease virus in Korea in 2000.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jin-Ho; Sohn, Hyun-Joo; Choi, Kang-Seuk; Kwon, Byung-Jun; Ko, Young-Joon; An, Dong-Jun; Cha, Sang-Ho; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Jeong, Woo-Seog; Park, Jee-Yong; Choi, Cheong-Up; Kweon, Chang-Hee; Song, Jae-Young; Kim, Jong-Yeom; An, Soo-Hwan; Kim, Soon-Jae; Joo, Yi-Seok

    2003-01-01

    The genetic relatedness of 7 Korean type O field strains of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in clinical specimens collected from 5 different geographic locations in 2000 was investigated. The sequence of 162 nucleotides (nt 478-639) at the 3' end of the 1D (VP1) genes was determined from amplified cDNA fragments, and subjected to the analysis for the sequence identity/divergence and phylogenetic relationship. The overall nucleotide sequence divergence among the 7 field strains was 0 to 3.8%, suggesting that they are closely related to each other. Phylogenetic analysis with the known Middle East-South Asia (ME-SA) topotype strains showed that the 7 Korean field strains formed two distinct clusters within the same lineage of the ME-SA topotype strains. Cluster 1 consisted of the strains of the primary foci of infection (Paju and Hongseong), and closely related to the strains prevailed in the Far East. Cluster 2 comprised those of subsequently affected regions (Boryeong, Yongin, and Chungju), and was further diverged from the Cluster 1. The result of phylogenetic analysis indicated that the Korean strains may have evolved from a common ancestor of the Pan Asia strains, and that at least 2 phylogenetically clustered variants within the same lineage were prevalent during the epidemic. The potential origin and sources of the virus introduction to Korea were discussed.

  14. Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Persists in the Light Zone of Germinal Centres

    PubMed Central

    Juleff, Nicholas; Windsor, Miriam; Reid, Elizabeth; Seago, Julian; Zhang, Zhidong; Monaghan, Paul; Morrison, Ivan W.; Charleston, Bryan

    2008-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is one of the most contagious viruses of animals and is recognised as the most important constraint to international trade in animals and animal products. Two fundamental problems remain to be understood before more effective control measures can be put in place. These problems are the FMDV “carrier state” and the short duration of immunity after vaccination which contrasts with prolonged immunity after natural infection. Here we show by laser capture microdissection in combination with quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemical analysis and corroborate by in situ hybridization that FMDV locates rapidly to, and is maintained in, the light zone of germinal centres following primary infection of naïve cattle. We propose that maintenance of non-replicating FMDV in these sites represents a source of persisting infectious virus and also contributes to the generation of long-lasting antibody responses against neutralising epitopes of the virus. PMID:18941503

  15. Feasibility of depopulation of a large feedlot during a foot-and-mouth disease outbreak.

    PubMed

    McReynolds, Sara W; Sanderson, Michael W

    2014-02-01

    To examine the feasibility of depopulation of a large feedlot during a foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) outbreak in the United States. Delphi survey followed by facilitated discussion. 27 experts, including veterinary toxicologists and pharmacologists, animal welfare experts, feedlot managers, and consulting veterinarians. 4 veterinary pharmacologists, 5 veterinary toxicologists, 4 animal welfare experts, 26 consulting veterinarians, and 8 feedlot managers were invited to participate in a Delphi survey to identify methods for depopulation of a large feedlot during an FMD outbreak. A facilitated discussion that included 1 pharmacologist, 1 toxicologist, 1 animal welfare expert, 2 consulting veterinarians, and 2 feedlot managers was held to review the survey results. 27 of 47 invited experts participated in the Delphi survey. Survey consensus was that, although several toxic agents would effectively cause acute death in a large number of animals, all of them had substantial animal welfare concerns. Pentobarbital sodium administered IV was considered the most effective pharmacological agent for euthanasia, and xylazine was considered the most effective sedative. Animal welfare concerns following administration of a euthanasia solution IV or a penetrating captive bolt were minimal; however, both veterinarians and feedlot managers felt that use of a captive bolt would be inefficient for depopulation. Veterinarians were extremely concerned about public perception, human safety, and timely depopulation of a large feedlot during an FMD outbreak. Depopulation of a large feedlot during an FMD outbreak would be difficult to complete in a humane and timely fashion.

  16. Reducing animal experimentation in foot-and-mouth disease vaccine potency tests.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Richard; Cox, Sarah; Smitsaart, Eliana; Beascoechea, Claudia Perez; Haas, Bernd; Maradei, Eduardo; Haydon, Daniel T; Barnett, Paul

    2011-07-26

    The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Terrestrial Manual and the European Pharmacopoeia (EP) still prescribe live challenge experiments for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) immunogenicity and vaccine potency tests. However, the EP allows for other validated tests for the latter, and specifically in vitro tests if a "satisfactory pass level" has been determined; serological replacements are also currently in use in South America. Much research has therefore focused on validating both ex vivo and in vitro tests to replace live challenge. However, insufficient attention has been given to the sensitivity and specificity of the "gold standard"in vivo test being replaced, despite this information being critical to determining what should be required of its replacement. This paper aims to redress this imbalance by examining the current live challenge tests and their associated statistics and determining the confidence that we can have in them, thereby setting a standard for candidate replacements. It determines that the statistics associated with the current EP PD(50) test are inappropriate given our domain knowledge, but that the OIE test statistics are satisfactory. However, it has also identified a new set of live animal challenge test regimes that provide similar sensitivity and specificity to all of the currently used OIE tests using fewer animals (16 including controls), and can also provide further savings in live animal experiments in exchange for small reductions in sensitivity and specificity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamics and control of foot-and-mouth disease in endemic countries: a pair approximation model.

    PubMed

    Ringa, N; Bauch, C T

    2014-09-21

    Previous mathematical models of spatial farm-to-farm transmission of foot and mouth disease (FMD) have explored the impacts of control measures such as culling and vaccination during a single outbreak in a country normally free of FMD. As a result, these models do not include factors that are relevant to countries where FMD is endemic in some regions, like long-term waning natural and vaccine immunity, use of prophylactic vaccination and disease re-importations. These factors may have implications for disease dynamics and control, yet few models have been developed for FMD-endemic settings. Here we develop and study an SEIRV (susceptible-exposed-infectious-recovered-vaccinated) pair approximation model of FMD. We focus on long term dynamics by exploring characteristics of repeated outbreaks of FMD and their dependence on disease re-importation, loss of natural immunity, and vaccine waning. We find that the effectiveness of ring and prophylactic vaccination strongly depends on duration of natural immunity, rate of vaccine waning, and disease re-introduction rate. However, the number and magnitude of FMD outbreaks are generally more sensitive to the duration of natural immunity than the duration of vaccine immunity. If loss of natural immunity and/or vaccine waning happen rapidly, then multiple epidemic outbreaks result, making it difficult to eliminate the disease. Prophylactic vaccination is more effective than ring vaccination, at the same per capita vaccination rate. Finally, more frequent disease re-importation causes a higher cumulative number of infections, although a lower average epidemic peak. Our analysis demonstrates significant differences between dynamics in FMD-free settings versus FMD-endemic settings, and that dynamics in FMD-endemic settings can vary widely depending on factors such as the duration of natural and vaccine immunity and the rate of disease re-importations. We conclude that more mathematical models tailored to FMD-endemic countries

  18. Modelling foot-and-mouth disease transmission in a wild pig-domestic cattle ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Ward, M P; Garner, M G; Cowled, B D

    2015-01-01

    To use simulation modelling to predict the potential spread and to explore control options for a foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) incursion in a mixed wild pig-domestic cattle ecosystem in northern Australia. Based on aerial surveys, expert opinion and published data, the wild pig and grazing cattle distributions were simulated. A susceptible-infected-resistant disease-spread model was coded and parameterised according to published literature and expert opinion. A baseline scenario was simulated in which infection was introduced via wild pigs, with transmission from pigs to cattle and no disease control. Assumptions regarding disease transmission were investigated via sensitivity analyses. Predicted size and length of outbreaks were compared for different control strategies based on movement standstill, surveillance and depopulation. In most of the simulations, FMD outbreaks were predicted to be ongoing after 6 months, with more cattle herds infected than wild pig herds (median 907 vs. 22, respectively). Assuming only pig-to-pig transmission, the infection routinely died out. In contrast, assuming cattle-to-cattle, cattle-to-pig or pig-to-cattle transmission resulted in FMD establishing and spreading in more than 75% of simulations. A control strategy targeting wild pigs only was not predicted to be successful. Control based on cattle only was successful in eradicating the disease. However, control targeting both pigs and cattle resulted in smaller outbreaks. If FMD is controlled in cattle in the modelled ecosystem, it is likely to be self-limiting in wild pigs. However, to eradicate disease as quickly as possible, both wild pigs and cattle should be targeted for control. © 2015 Australian Veterinary Association.

  19. Engineering viable foot-and-mouth disease viruses with increased thermostability as a step in the development of improved vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Roberto; Luna, Eva; Rincón, Verónica; Mateu, Mauricio G

    2008-12-01

    We have rationally engineered foot-and-mouth disease virus to increase its stability against thermal dissociation into subunits without disrupting the many biological functions needed for its infectivity. Amino acid side chains located near the capsid intersubunit interfaces and either predicted or found to be dispensable for infectivity were replaced by others that could establish new disulfide bonds or electrostatic interactions between subunits. Two engineered viruses were normally infectious, genetically stable, and antigenically indistinguishable from the natural virus but showed substantially increased stability against irreversible dissociation. Electrostatic interactions mediated this stabilizing effect. For foot-and-mouth disease virus and other viruses, some evidence had suggested that an increase in virion stability could be linked to an impairment of infectivity. The results of the present study show, in fact, that virion thermostability against dissociation into subunits may not be selectively constrained by functional requirements for infectivity. The thermostable viruses obtained, and others similarly engineered, could be used for the production, using current procedures, of foot-and-mouth disease vaccines that are less dependent on a faultless cold chain. In addition, introduction of those stabilizing mutations in empty (nucleic acid-free) capsids could facilitate the production of infection-risk-free vaccines against the disease, one of the economically most important animal diseases worldwide.

  20. Vaccination against Foot-And-Mouth Disease: Do Initial Conditions Affect Its Benefit?

    PubMed Central

    Porphyre, Thibaud; Auty, Harriet K.; Tildesley, Michael J.; Gunn, George J.; Woolhouse, Mark E. J.

    2013-01-01

    When facing incursion of a major livestock infectious disease, the decision to implement a vaccination programme is made at the national level. To make this decision, governments must consider whether the benefits of vaccination are sufficient to outweigh potential additional costs, including further trade restrictions that may be imposed due to the implementation of vaccination. However, little consensus exists on the factors triggering its implementation on the field. This work explores the effect of several triggers in the implementation of a reactive vaccination-to-live policy when facing epidemics of foot-and-mouth disease. In particular, we tested whether changes in the location of the incursion and the delay of implementation would affect the epidemiological benefit of such a policy in the context of Scotland. To reach this goal, we used a spatial, premises-based model that has been extensively used to investigate the effectiveness of mitigation procedures in Great Britain. The results show that the decision to vaccinate, or not, is not straightforward and strongly depends on the underlying local structure of the population-at-risk. With regards to disease incursion preparedness, simply identifying areas of highest population density may not capture all complexities that may influence the spread of disease as well as the benefit of implementing vaccination. However, if a decision to vaccinate is made, we show that delaying its implementation in the field may markedly reduce its benefit. This work provides guidelines to support policy makers in their decision to implement, or not, a vaccination-to-live policy when facing epidemics of infectious livestock disease. PMID:24204895

  1. SAT2 foot and mouth disease (FMD) outbreak in a mixed farm in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Byom, Ahmed M

    2015-01-01

    A dairy farm keeping Holstein cattle and buffaloes in the Menoufia Governorate was investigated during and after the last Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) outbreak in Egypt (starting February 2012) to determine the impact of the outbreak on animals as well as to assess some factors that might have helped to spread the disease in the investigated farm. All animals were vaccinated against FMD with the locally produced bivalent vaccine containing O1 and A/Egy/2006 strains two months before the onset of the outbreak. Laboratory examination of the samples collected from diseased and dead animals' revealed detection of a newly emerged serotype of FMD (SAT2). Although, all buffaloes (8/8) in the herd were infected (100%), none of them died, while lactating Holstein cattle showed varying morbidity rates along the period of the outbreak with peak rates in March followed by April, May and June. Crud mortality and case fatality rates among cattle peaked during April 2012 to reach 9.3 and 21.7%, respectively. Calves were the most affected animals with the highest morbidities and mortalities. The high prevalence of the disease among all animal categories in the investigated farm is attributed to the lack of previous immunity through vaccination against the new serotype of the virus. In addition, the hygienic and biosecurity measures in the farm were unsatisfactory with respect to prevention of introduction and spread of the disease between the farm units. The prevalent weather conditions during the outbreak might have played a role in spread of the FMDv, especially ambient temperature, humidity and wind movement.

  2. Data-Driven Models of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Dynamics: A Review.

    PubMed

    Pomeroy, L W; Bansal, S; Tildesley, M; Moreno-Torres, K I; Moritz, M; Xiao, N; Carpenter, T E; Garabed, R B

    2015-11-18

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) threatens animal health and leads to considerable economic losses worldwide. Progress towards minimizing both veterinary and financial impact of the disease will be made with targeted disease control policies. To move towards targeted control, specific targets and detailed control strategies must be defined. One approach for identifying targets is to use mathematical and simulation models quantified with accurate and fine-scale data to design and evaluate alternative control policies. Nevertheless, published models of FMDV vary in modelling techniques and resolution of data incorporated. In order to determine which models and data sources contain enough detail to represent realistic control policy alternatives, we performed a systematic literature review of all FMDV dynamical models that use host data, disease data or both data types. For the purpose of evaluating modelling methodology, we classified models by control strategy represented, resolution of models and data, and location modelled. We found that modelling methodology has been well developed to the point where multiple methods are available to represent detailed and contact-specific transmission and targeted control. However, detailed host and disease data needed to quantify these models are only available from a few outbreaks. To address existing challenges in data collection, novel data sources should be considered and integrated into models of FMDV transmission and control. We suggest modelling multiple endemic areas to advance local control and global control and better understand FMDV transmission dynamics. With incorporation of additional data, models can assist with both the design of targeted control and identification of transmission drivers across geographic boundaries.

  3. [Comparative testing of the quality of foot-and-mouth disease vaccines prepared with different virus inactivators].

    PubMed

    Dilovski, M; Tekerlekov, P

    1983-01-01

    Formalin, glycidaldehyde, and the binary ethyleneimine were tested under laboratory conditions as inactivators of the foot-and-mouth disease virus along with the possibility of using them in the process of vaccine production. Data is presented on the comparative testing for innocuity and immunogenicity for sheep of F. M. D. vaccines produced with such inactivators. Results showed the advantages of the binary ethyleneimine as against formalin and glycidaldehyde as an inactivator of the F. M. D. virus.

  4. Temporal assessment of seroconversion in response to inactivated foot-and-mouth disease vaccine in Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx).

    PubMed

    Kilgallon, C P; Bailey, T A; O'Donovan, D; Wernery, U; Alexandersen, S

    2008-12-13

    Ten male Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) were vaccinated with a commercially available standard aqueous foot-and-mouth-disease vaccine containing aluminium hydroxide as an adjuvant, and their antibody titres against serotypes O and A were measured using solid-phase blocking elisa and the virus neutralisation test. Mean elisa antibody titres greater than 1.45 log(10) were recorded for serotype A, but low elisa titres were recorded for serotype 0; low titres were recorded by VNT for both serotypes.

  5. Host microRNA-203a is antagonistic to the progression of foot-and-mouth disease virus infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sam68 was previously shown to be a critical host factor for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) replication. MicroRNA (miR)-203a is a potent regulator of Sam68 expression both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we showed transfection of miR-203a-3p and miR-203a-5p mimics separately and in combination in a ...

  6. Evidence of recombination in a new isolate of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype Asia 1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Oem, Jae-Ku; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Su-Mi; Lee, Seo-Yong; Tserendorj, Sh; Sodnomdarjaa, R; Joo, Yi-Seok; Kim, Heebal

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequence of VP1 revealed that a new isolate of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype Asia 1 identified in Mongolia in 2005 was related to Chinese and Russian strains isolated during the same year. In this study, these strains were defined as East Asian strains having a common geographical origin, and the complete genomic sequence of the Mongolian strain (As1/MOG/05) was determined and compared to other strains of serotype Asia 1. As1/MOG/05 showed 100% identity with an East Asian strain from China (As1/Qinghai/CHA/05) in terms of its VP1 nucleotide sequence. However, the Mongolian strain has a four-amino acid extension in 3D that is missing from all other strains of serotype Asia 1, and which is not due to an insertion. A full genomic scan revealed that the Mongolian strain is closer to the East Asian strain As1/JS/CHA/05 than to all other strains of serotype Asia 1 in nearly all genomic regions. Within the narrow region of low similarity between the two sequences, As1/JS/CHA/05 was found to have a mosaic structure with a partial 2C fragment supposedly transferred from Hong Kong strain As1/HNK/CHA/05. The genomic mosaicism and extension detected in non-structural protein-coding regions in this study may be used to trace the origins and evolution of problematic strains of serotype Asia 1 that have arisen in East Asia since 2005.

  7. Global Foot-and-Mouth Disease Research Update and Gap Analysis: 7 - Pathogenesis and Molecular Biology.

    PubMed

    Robinson, L; Knight-Jones, T J D; Charleston, B; Rodriguez, L L; Gay, C G; Sumption, K J; Vosloo, W

    2016-06-01

    We assessed research knowledge gaps in the fields of FMDV (foot-and-mouth disease virus) pathogenesis and molecular biology by performing a literature review (2011-15) and collecting research updates (2014) from 33 institutes from across the world. Findings were used to identify priority areas for future research. There have been important advances in FMDV pathogenesis; FMDV remains in lymph nodes of many recovered animals that otherwise do not appear persistently infected, even in species previously not associated with the carrier state. Whether virus retention helps maintain host immunity and/or virus survival is not known. Studies of FMDV pathogenesis in wildlife have provided insights into disease epidemiology, in endemic and epidemic settings. Many aspects of FMDV infection and virus entry remain unknown; however, at the cellular level, we know that expression level and availability of integrins (that permit viral entry), rate of clearance of infected cells and strength of anti-viral type I IFN (interferon) response are key determinants of tissue tropism. Extending findings to improved understanding of transmission requires a standardized approach and adoption of natural routes of infection during experimental study. There has been recognition of the importance of autophagosomes for FMDV entry into the cytoplasm following cell surface receptor binding, and that distinct internal cellular membranes are exploited for viral replication and immune evasion. New roles for viral proteins in blocking type I IFN production and downstream signalling have been identified facilitating research in anti-viral therapeutics. We know more about how infection affects cell protein expression, and research into molecular determinants of capsid stability has aided the development of stable vaccines. We have an expanding knowledge of viral and host molecular determinates of virulence and infectiousness, and of how phylogenetics may be used to estimate vaccine match and strain

  8. Economic effects of foot and mouth disease outbreaks along the cattle marketing chain in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Baluka, Sylvia Angubua

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Disease outbreaks increase the cost of animal production; reduce milk and beef yield, cattle sales, farmers’ incomes, and enterprise profitability. The study assessed the economic effects of foot and mouth disease (FMD) outbreaks along the cattle marketing chain in selected study districts in Uganda. Materials and Methods: The study combined qualitative and quantitative study designs. Respondents were selected proportionally using simple random sampling from the sampling frame comprising of 224, 173, 291, and 185 farmers for Nakasongola, Nakaseke, Isingiro, and Rakai, respectively. Key informants were selected purposively. Data analysis combined descriptive, modeling, and regression analysis. Data on the socio-economic characteristics and how they influenced FMD outbreaks, cattle markets revenue losses, and the economic cost of the outbreaks were analyzed using descriptive measures including percentages, means, and frequencies. Results: Farmers with small and medium herds incurred higher control costs, whereas large herds experienced the highest milk losses. Total income earned by the actors per month at the processing level reduced by 23%. In Isingiro, bulls and cows were salvage sold at 83% and 88% less market value, i.e., a loss of $196.1 and $1,552.9 in small and medium herds, respectively. Conclusion: All actors along the cattle marketing chain incur losses during FMD outbreaks, but smallholder farmers are most affected. Control and prevention of FMD should remain the responsibility of the government if Uganda is to achieve a disease-free status that is a prerequisite for free movement and operation of cattle markets throughout the year which will boost cattle marketing. PMID:27397974

  9. Study on the epidemiology of foot and mouth disease in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Ayelet, G; Gelaye, E; Negussie, H; Asmare, K

    2012-12-01

    This study was designed to describe the status of foot and mouth disease (FMD) in Ethiopia, through analysis of FMD outbreak reports and the detection of antibodies, to address the possibility of establishing a disease-free zone. Serum samples collected from cattle between 2003 and 2006 for the serosurveillance of rinderpest were used for this study. The records of the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development from 2002 to 2006 indicate that FMD outbreaks occurred each year in Ethiopia during this period, with the highest number in 2004, when 134 outbreaks took place. The highest rates were from the North Shoa zones of both the Oromia and Amhara regions. The serum samples were tested using the 3ABC enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit, to identify antibodies against FMD. From a total of 4,465 sera, 10.5% (n = 467) tested positive. The highest seroprevalence was detected in samples from the Eastern zone of Rgray with 41.5%; followed by the Guji zone of Oromia and Yeka district of the city of Addis Ababa, with 32.7% and 30%, respectively. Antibodies specific to FMD virus were not detected in Gambella or Benishangul. The effects of cattle, sheep and goat density, both separately and together, were analysed with a spatial regression model, but did not have a significant effect on seroprevalence. This indicates that other factors, such as farming systems and livestock movement, play a significant role in the occurrence of FMD. Based on these study findings, it might be appropriate to establish disease-free zones in Gambella and Benishangul.

  10. Global Foot-and-Mouth Disease Research Update and Gap Analysis: 3 - Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Robinson, L; Knight-Jones, T J D; Charleston, B; Rodriguez, L L; Gay, C G; Sumption, K J; Vosloo, W

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed research knowledge gaps in the field of FMDV (foot-and-mouth disease virus) vaccines. The study took the form of a literature review (2011-15) combined with research updates collected in 2014 from 33 institutes from across the world. Findings were used to identify priority areas for future FMD vaccine research. Vaccines play a vital role in FMD control, used both to limit the spread of the virus during epidemics in FMD-free countries and as the mainstay of disease management in endemic regions, particularly where sanitary controls are difficult to apply. Improvements in the performance or cost-effectiveness of FMD vaccines will allow more widespread and efficient disease control. FMD vaccines have changed little in recent decades, typically produced by inactivation of whole virus, the quantity and stability of the intact viral capsids in the final preparation being key for immunogenicity. However, these are exciting times and several promising novel FMD vaccine candidates have recently been developed. This includes the first FMD vaccine licensed for manufacture and use in the USA; this adenovirus-vectored FMD vaccine causes in vivo expression of viral capsids in vaccinated animals. Another promising vaccine candidate comprises stabilized empty FMDV capsids produced in vitro in a baculovirus expression system. Recombinant technologies are also being developed to improve otherwise conventionally produced inactivated vaccines, for example, by creating a chimeric vaccine virus to increase capsid stability and by inserting sequences into the vaccine virus for desired antigen expression. Other important areas of ongoing research include enhanced adjuvants, vaccine quality control procedures and predicting vaccine protection from immune correlates, thus reducing dependency on animal challenge studies. Globally, the degree of independent vaccine evaluation is highly variable, and this is essential for vaccine quality. Previously neglected, the

  11. Enteroviruses isolated from herpangina and hand-foot-and-mouth disease in Korean children

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) and herpangina are commonly prevalent illness in young children. They are similarly characterized by lesions on the skin and oral mucosa. Both diseases are associated with various enterovirus serotypes. In this study, enteroviruses from patients with these diseases in Korea in 2009 were isolated and analyzed. Demographic data for patients with HFMD and herpangina were compared and all enterovirus isolates were amplified in the VP1 region by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. Among the enterovirus isolates, prevalent agents were coxsackievirus A16 in HFMD and coxsackievirus A5 in herpangina. More prevalent months for HFMD were June (69.2%) and May (11.5%), and June (40.0%) and July (24.0%) for herpangina. Age prevalence of HFMD patients with enterovirus infection was 1 year (23.1%), 4 years (19.2%), and over 5 years (19.2%). However, the dominant age group of herpangina patients with enterovirus infection was 1 year (48.0%) followed by 2 years (28.0%). Comparison of pairwise VP1 nucleotide sequence alignment of all isolates within the same serotypes revealed high intra-type variation of CVA2 isolates (84.6–99.3% nucleotide identity). HFMD and herpangina showed differences in demographic data and serotypes of isolated enteroviruses, but there was no notable difference in amino acid sequences by clinical syndromes in multiple comparison of the partial VP1 gene sequence. PMID:22985487

  12. FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE IN A SMALL SAMPLE OF EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED PRONGHORN (ANTILOCAPRA AMERICANA).

    PubMed

    Rhyan, Jack; McCollum, Matthew; Gidlewski, Thomas; Shalev, Moshe; Ward, Gordon; Donahue, Brenda; Arzt, Jonathan; Stenfeldt, Carolina; Mohamed, Fawzi; Nol, Pauline; Deng, Ming; Metwally, Samia; McKenna, Thomas; Salman, Mo

    2016-10-01

    There is limited information on the pathogenesis and epidemiology of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in North American wildlife and none concerning pronghorn ( Antilocapra americana ). In an experimental study of 13 pronghorn and six steers ( Bos taurus ), we compared the susceptibility of pronghorn to FMD virus (FMDV) strain O, with that of cattle ( Bos taurus ). We also determined the potential for intra- and interspecies transmission of FMDV strain O in pronghorn and cattle, assessed the application of conventional laboratory tests in their suitability to detect FMDV infection in pronghorn, and evaluated the potential role of pronghorn as efficient long-term carriers of FMDV. After acclimation to containment at Plum Island Animal Disease Center, two pronghorn and one steer were each infected by intraepithelial tongue inoculation with 10,000 bovine tongue infective doses of FMDV, strain O1 Manisa. Inoculated animals were housed with contact animals. When contact-exposed animals developed fever they were placed in rooms with previously unexposed animals. All inoculated and exposed cattle and pronghorn developed clinical disease typical of FMD. Pronghorn developed severe foot lesions and mild to moderate oral lesions, primarily on the tongue. Duration of clinical signs in both species was 2-3 wk with foot abnormalities evident to the end of the study (51 d postexposure). Other lesions included pancreatitis, myositis of the tongue, and secondary lesions including pleuritis, pneumonia, decubital ulcers, and tenosynovitis. Virus transmission occurred between pronghorn, from cattle to pronghorn, and from pronghorn to cattle. Conventional laboratory tests detected virus and antibodies against nonstructural and structural FMDV proteins in pronghorn and cattle. Virus was present in some animals for 1 wk but was not detectable by virus isolation or PCR at 3 wk postinfection or afterward.

  13. Retrospective evaluation of foot-and-mouth disease vaccine effectiveness in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Knight-Jones, T J D; Bulut, A N; Gubbins, S; Stärk, K D C; Pfeiffer, D U; Sumption, K J; Paton, D J

    2014-04-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is present in much of Turkey and its control is largely based on vaccination. The arrival of the FMD Asia-1 serotype in Turkey in 2011 caused particular concern, spreading rapidly westwards across the country towards the FMD free European Union. With no prior natural immunity, control of spread would rely heavily on vaccination. Unlike human vaccines, field protection is rarely evaluated directly for FMD vaccines. Between September 2011 and July 2012 we performed four retrospective outbreak investigations to assess the vaccine effectiveness (VE) of FMD Asia-1 vaccines in Turkey. Vaccine effectiveness is defined as the reduction in risk in vaccinated compared to unvaccinated individuals with similar virus exposure in the field. The four investigations included 12 villages and 1230 cattle >4 months of age. One investigation assessed the FMD Asia-1 Shamir vaccine, the other three evaluated the recently introduced FMD Asia-1 TUR 11 vaccine made using a field isolate of the FMD Asia-1 Sindh-08 lineage that had recently entered Turkey. After adjustment for confounding, the TUR 11 vaccine provided moderate protection against both clinical disease VE=69% [95% CI: 50%-81%] and infection VE=63% [95% CI: 29%-81%]. However, protection was variable with some herds with high vaccine coverage still experiencing high disease incidence. Some of this variability will be the result of the variation in virus challenge and immunity that occurs under field conditions. In the outbreak investigated there was no evidence that the Asia-1 Shamir vaccine provided adequate protection against clinical FMD with an incidence of 89% in single vaccinated cattle and 69% in those vaccinated two to five times. Based on these effectiveness estimates, vaccination alone is unlikely to produce the high levels of herd immunity needed to control FMD without additional control measures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Retrospective evaluation of foot-and-mouth disease vaccine effectiveness in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Knight-Jones, T.J.D.; Bulut, A.N.; Gubbins, S.; Stärk, K.D.C.; Pfeiffer, D.U.; Sumption, K.J.; Paton, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is present in much of Turkey and its control is largely based on vaccination. The arrival of the FMD Asia-1 serotype in Turkey in 2011 caused particular concern, spreading rapidly westwards across the country towards the FMD free European Union. With no prior natural immunity, control of spread would rely heavily on vaccination. Unlike human vaccines, field protection is rarely evaluated directly for FMD vaccines. Between September 2011 and July 2012 we performed four retrospective outbreak investigations to assess the vaccine effectiveness (VE) of FMD Asia-1 vaccines in Turkey. Vaccine effectiveness is defined as the reduction in risk in vaccinated compared to unvaccinated individuals with similar virus exposure in the field. The four investigations included 12 villages and 1230 cattle >4 months of age. One investigation assessed the FMD Asia-1 Shamir vaccine, the other three evaluated the recently introduced FMD Asia-1 TUR 11 vaccine made using a field isolate of the FMD Asia-1 Sindh-08 lineage that had recently entered Turkey. After adjustment for confounding, the TUR 11 vaccine provided moderate protection against both clinical disease VE = 69% [95% CI: 50%–81%] and infection VE = 63% [95% CI: 29%–81%]. However, protection was variable with some herds with high vaccine coverage still experiencing high disease incidence. Some of this variability will be the result of the variation in virus challenge and immunity that occurs under field conditions. In the outbreak investigated there was no evidence that the Asia-1 Shamir vaccine provided adequate protection against clinical FMD with an incidence of 89% in single vaccinated cattle and 69% in those vaccinated two to five times. Based on these effectiveness estimates, vaccination alone is unlikely to produce the high levels of herd immunity needed to control FMD without additional control measures. PMID:24530150

  15. Evaluation of Multiplexed Foot-and-Mouth Disease Nonstructural Protein Antibody Assay Against Standardized Bovine Serum Panel

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, J; Parida, S; Clavijo, A

    2007-05-14

    Liquid array technology has previously been used to show proof-of-principle of a multiplexed non structural protein serological assay to differentiate foot-and-mouth infected and vaccinated animals. The current multiplexed assay consists of synthetically produced peptide signatures 3A, 3B and 3D and recombinant protein signature 3ABC in combination with four controls. To determine diagnostic specificity of each signature in the multiplex, the assay was evaluated against a naive population (n = 104) and a vaccinated population (n = 94). Subsequently, the multiplexed assay was assessed using a panel of bovine sera generated by the World Reference Laboratory for foot-and-mouth disease in Pirbright, UK. This sera panel has been used to assess the performance of other singleplex ELISA-based non-structural protein antibody assays. The 3ABC signature in the multiplexed assay showed comparative performance to a commercially available non-structural protein 3ABC ELISA (Cedi test{reg_sign}) and additional information pertaining to the relative diagnostic sensitivity of each signature in the multiplex is acquired in one experiment. The encouraging results of the evaluation of the multiplexed assay against a panel of diagnostically relevant samples promotes further assay development and optimization to generate an assay for routine use in foot-and-mouth disease surveillance.

  16. Tracking the Antigenic Evolution of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Sasmita; Lukhwareni, Azwidowi; Esterhuysen, Jan J.; Harvey, William T.; Blignaut, Belinda; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Parida, Satya; Paton, David J.; Mahapatra, Mana

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying and predicting the antigenic characteristics of a virus is something of a holy grail for infectious disease research because of its central importance to the emergence of new strains, the severity of outbreaks, and vaccine selection. However, these characteristics are defined by a complex interplay of viral and host factors so that phylogenetic measures of viral similarity are often poorly correlated to antigenic relationships. Here, we generate antigenic phylogenies that track the phenotypic evolution of two serotypes of foot-and-mouth disease virus by combining host serology and viral sequence data to identify sites that are critical to their antigenic evolution. For serotype SAT1, we validate our antigenic phylogeny against monoclonal antibody escape mutants, which match all of the predicted antigenic sites. For serotype O, we validate it against known sites where available, and otherwise directly evaluate the impact on antigenic phenotype of substitutions in predicted sites using reverse genetics and serology. We also highlight a critical and poorly understood problem for vaccine selection by revealing qualitative differences between assays that are often used interchangeably to determine antigenic match between field viruses and vaccine strains. Our approach provides a tool to identify naturally occurring antigenic substitutions, allowing us to track the genetic diversification and associated antigenic evolution of the virus. Despite the hugely important role vaccines have played in enhancing human and animal health, vaccinology remains a conspicuously empirical science. This study advances the field by providing guidance for tuning vaccine strains via site-directed mutagenesis through this high-resolution tracking of antigenic evolution of the virus between rare major shifts in phenotype. PMID:27448206

  17. Construction and characterization of 3A-epitope-tagged foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xueqing; Li, Pinghua; Sun, Pu; Bai, Xingwen; Bao, Huifang; Lu, Zengjun; Fu, Yuanfang; Cao, Yimei; Li, Dong; Chen, Yingli; Qiao, Zilin; Liu, Zaixin

    2015-04-01

    Nonstructural protein 3A of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a partially conserved protein of 153 amino acids (aa) in most FMDVs examined to date. Specific deletion in the FMDV 3A protein has been associated with the inability of FMDV to grow in primary bovine cells and cause disease in cattle. However, the aa residues playing key roles in these processes are poorly understood. In this study, we constructed epitope-tagged FMDVs containing an 8 aa FLAG epitope, a 9 aa haemagglutinin (HA) epitope, and a 10 aa c-Myc epitope to substitute residues 94-101, 93-101, and 93-102 of 3A protein, respectively, using a recently developed O/SEA/Mya-98 FMDV infectious cDNA clone. Immunofluorescence assay (IFA), Western blot and sequence analysis showed that the epitope-tagged viruses stably maintained and expressed the foreign epitopes even after 10 serial passages in BHK-21 cells. The epitope-tagged viruses displayed growth properties and plaque phenotypes similar to those of the parental virus in BHK-21 cells. However, the epitope-tagged viruses exhibited lower growth rates and smaller plaque size phenotypes than those of the parental virus in primary fetal bovine kidney (FBK) cells, but similar growth properties and plaque phenotypes to those of the recombinant viruses harboring 93-102 deletion in 3A. These results demonstrate that the decreased ability of FMDV to replicate in primary bovine cells was not associated with the length of 3A, and the genetic determinant thought to play key role in decreased ability to replicate in primary bovine cells could be reduced from 93-102 residues to 8 aa residues at positions 94-101 in 3A protein.

  18. Hand-foot-and-mouth disease and weather factors in Guangzhou, southern China.

    PubMed

    Li, T; Yang, Z; DI, B; Wang, M

    2014-08-01

    Hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) is becoming one of the common airborne and contact transmission diseases in Guangzhou, southern China, leading public health authorities to be concerned about its increased incidence. In this study, we aimed to examine the effect of weather patterns on the incidence of HFMD in the subtropical city of Guangzhou for the period 2009-2012, and assist public health prevention and control measures. A negative binomial multivariable regression was used to identify the relationship between meteorological variables and HFMD. During the study period, a total of 166,770 HFMD-confirmed cases were reported, of which 11 died, yielding a fatality rate of 0·66/10,000. Annual incidence rates from 2009 to 2012 were 132·44, 311·40, 402·76, and 468·59/100,000 respectively. Each 1°C rise in temperature corresponded to an increase of 9·38% (95% CI 8·17-10·51) in the weekly number of HFMD cases, while a 1 hPa rise in atmospheric pressure corresponded to a decrease in the number of cases by 6·80% (95% CI -6·99 to -6·65), having an opposite effect. Similarly, a 1% rise in relative humidity corresponded to an increase of 0·67% or 0·51%, a 1 m/h rise in wind velocity corresponded to an increase of 4·01% or 2·65%, and a 1 day addition in the number of windy days corresponded to an increase of 24·73% or 25·87%, in the weekly number of HFMD cases, depending on the variables considered in the model. Our findings revealed that the epidemic status of HFMD in Guangzhou is characterized by high morbidity but low fatality. Weather factors had a significant influence on occurrence and transmission of HFMD.

  19. Foot-and-mouth Disease Transmission in Africa: Implications for Control, a Review.

    PubMed

    Tekleghiorghis, T; Moormann, R J M; Weerdmeester, K; Dekker, A

    2016-04-01

    In Africa, for the control of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), more information is needed on the spread of the disease at local, regional and inter-regional level. The aim of this review is to identify the role that animal husbandry, trade and wildlife have on the transmission of FMD and to provide a scientific basis for different FMD control measures in Africa. Review of literature, published reports and databases shows that there is more long distance spread of FMD virus serotypes within North, West, Central and East Africa than in southern Africa. In North, West, Central and East Africa migratory animal husbandry systems often related with search for grazing and water as well as trade are practiced to a greater extent than in southern Africa. In southern Africa, the role of African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is more extensively studied than in the other parts of Africa, but based on the densities of African buffalo in Central and East Africa, one would assume that buffalo should also play a role in the epidemiology of FMD in this part of Africa. More sampling of buffalo is necessary in West, Central and East Africa. The genetic analysis of virus strains has proven to be valuable to increase our understanding in the spread of FMD in Africa. This review shows that there is a difference in FMD occurrence between southern Africa and the rest of the continent; this distinction is most likely based on differences in animal husbandry and trade systems. Insufficient data on FMD in wildlife outside southern Africa is limiting our understanding on the role wildlife plays in the transmission of FMD in the other buffalo inhabited areas of Africa. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Global Foot-and-Mouth Disease Research Update and Gap Analysis: 2 - Epidemiology, Wildlife and Economics.

    PubMed

    Knight-Jones, T J D; Robinson, L; Charleston, B; Rodriguez, L L; Gay, C G; Sumption, K J; Vosloo, W

    2016-06-01

    We assessed knowledge gaps in foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) research, and in this study, we consider (i) epidemiology, (ii) wildlife and (iii) economics. The study took the form of a literature review (2011-2015) combined with research updates collected in 2014 from 33 institutes from across the world. Findings were used to identify priority areas for future FMD research. During 2011-2015, modelling studies were dominant in the broad field of epidemiology; however, continued efforts are required to develop robust models for use during outbreaks in FMD-free countries, linking epidemiologic and economics models. More guidance is needed for both the evaluation and the setting of targets for vaccine coverage, population immunity and vaccine field efficacy. Similarly, methods for seroprevalence studies need to be improved to obtain more meaningful outputs that allow comparison across studies. To inform control programmes in endemic countries, field trials assessing the effectiveness of vaccination in extensive smallholder systems should be performed to determine whether FMD can be controlled with quality vaccines in settings where implementing effective biosecurity is challenging. Studies need to go beyond measuring only vaccine effects and should extend our knowledge of the impact of FMD and increase our understanding of how to maximize farmer participation in disease control. Where wildlife reservoirs of virus exist, particularly African Buffalo, we need to better understand when and under what circumstances transmission to domestic animals occurs in order to manage this risk appropriately, considering the impact of control measures on livelihoods and wildlife. For settings where FMD eradication is unfeasible, further ground testing of commodity-based trade is recommended. A thorough review of global FMD control programmes, covering successes and failures, would be extremely valuable and could be used to guide other control programmes.

  1. Antiviral activity of Paulownia tomentosa against enterovirus 71 of hand, foot, and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ping; Chen, Changmai; Hu, Yanan; Zhan, Zixuan; Pan, Wei; Li, Rongrong; Li, Erguang; Ge, Hui-Ming; Yang, Guang

    2015-01-01

    The bark, leaves, and flowers of Paulownia trees have been used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat infectious and inflammatory diseases. We investigated the antiviral effects of Paulownia tomentosa flowers, an herbal medicine used in some provinces of P. R. China for the treatment of skin rashes and blisters. Dried flowers of P. tomentosa were extracted with methanol and tested for antiviral activity against enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CAV16), the predominant etiologic agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease in P. R. China. The extract inhibited EV71 infection, although no effect was detected against CAV16 infection. Bioactivity-guided fractionation was performed to identify apigenin as an active component of the flowers. The EC50 value for apigenin to block EV71 infection was 11.0 µM, with a selectivity index of approximately 9.3. Although it is a common dietary flavonoid, only apigenin, and not similar compounds like naringenin and quercetin, were active against EV71 infection. As an RNA virus, the genome of EV71 has an internal ribosome entry site that interacts with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) and regulates viral translation. Cross-linking followed by immunoprecipitation and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that EV71 RNA was associated with hnRNPs A1 and A2. Apigenin treatment disrupted this association, indicating that apigenin suppressed EV71 replication through a novel mechanism by targeting the trans-acting factors. This study therefore validates the effects of Paulownia against EV71 infection. It also yielded mechanistic insights on apigenin as an active compound for the antiviral activity of P. tomentosa against EV71 infection.

  2. Investigation of foot-and-mouth disease outbreaks in the Mbala and Kazungula districts of Zambia.

    PubMed

    Banda, Frank; Kasanga, Christopher J; Sallu, Raphael; Sinkala, Yona; Sinkombe, Tingiya W; Mulumba, Misheck; Rweyemamu, Mark M; Wambura, Philemon N

    2014-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is an acute, highly contagious viral infection of domestic and wild cloven-hoofed animals. It is known to be endemic in Zambia, with periodic outbreaks occurring in different geographical areas of the country. This study was conducted to investigate the presence of FMD virus (FMDV) in reported FMD-suspected cases in cattle from the Kazungula and Mbala districts of Zambia. Sixty epithelial tissues or oesophageal-pharyngeal (OP) scrapings (probang samples) were collected from Mbala (n = 51) and Kazungula (n = 9) and examined for FMDV. The FMDV viral RNA and serotypes were examined by realtime reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and antigen Enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. Twenty-two samples (36.7%) were positive for the FMDV genome by qRT-PCR with Cycle threshold (Ct) values ranging from 13 to 31. The FMDV-positive samples from epithelial tissues showed relatively higher Ct values compared to those obtained from OP scrapings, irrespective of geographical location. Forty percent (40%; n = 4) of epithelial tissues from Mbala were serotyped into SAT 2 serotype by antigen ELISA. Kazungula samples were serotyped into SAT 1. These findings indicated that Mbala and Kazungula districts had FMD outbreaks in 2012 that were ascribed to at least FMDV serotype SAT 2 and SAT 1 field strains. Furthermore, regular interaction between buffalos from the Mosi-o Tunya Park and domestic animals from surrounding areas could contribute to the occurrence of regular FMD outbreaks in Kazungula, whilst the uncontrolled animal movements across borders between Mbala and Nsumbawanga could be responsible for disease outbreaks in Mbala. In-depth molecular biological studies, including sequencing and phylogeny of the viruses, should be conducted to elucidate the complex epidemiology of FMD in Zambia, thereby providing valuable information needed for the rational control strategy of FMD in Zambia and neighbouring countries.

  3. Review: Evaluation of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Control Using Fault Tree Analysis.

    PubMed

    Isoda, N; Kadohira, M; Sekiguchi, S; Schuppers, M; Stärk, K D C

    2015-06-01

    An outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) causes huge economic losses and animal welfare problems. Although much can be learnt from past FMD outbreaks, several countries are not satisfied with their degree of contingency planning and aiming at more assurance that their control measures will be effective. The purpose of the present article was to develop a generic fault tree framework for the control of an FMD outbreak as a basis for systematic improvement and refinement of control activities and general preparedness. Fault trees are typically used in engineering to document pathways that can lead to an undesired event, that is, ineffective FMD control. The fault tree method allows risk managers to identify immature parts of the control system and to analyse the events or steps that will most probably delay rapid and effective disease control during a real outbreak. The present developed fault tree is generic and can be tailored to fit the specific needs of countries. For instance, the specific fault tree for the 2001 FMD outbreak in the UK was refined based on control weaknesses discussed in peer-reviewed articles. Furthermore, the specific fault tree based on the 2001 outbreak was applied to the subsequent FMD outbreak in 2007 to assess the refinement of control measures following the earlier, major outbreak. The FMD fault tree can assist risk managers to develop more refined and adequate control activities against FMD outbreaks and to find optimum strategies for rapid control. Further application using the current tree will be one of the basic measures for FMD control worldwide.

  4. The Epidemiology of Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease in Asia: A Systematic Review and Analysis.

    PubMed

    Koh, Wee Ming; Bogich, Tiffany; Siegel, Karen; Jin, Jing; Chong, Elizabeth Y; Tan, Chong Yew; Chen, Mark Ic; Horby, Peter; Cook, Alex R

    2016-10-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is a widespread pediatric disease caused primarily by human enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) and Coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16). This study reports a systematic review of the epidemiology of HFMD in Asia. PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar were searched up to December 2014. Two reviewers independently assessed studies for epidemiologic and serologic information about prevalence and incidence of HFMD against predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Two reviewers extracted answers for 8 specific research questions on HFMD epidemiology. The results are checked by 3 others. HFMD is found to be seasonal in temperate Asia with a summer peak and in subtropical Asia with spring and fall peaks, but not in tropical Asia; evidence of a climatic role was identified for temperate Japan. Risk factors for HFMD include hygiene, age, gender and social contacts, but most studies were underpowered to adjust rigorously for confounding variables. Both community-level and school-level transmission have been implicated, but their relative importance for HFMD is inconclusive. Epidemiologic indices are poorly understood: No supporting quantitative evidence was found for the incubation period of EV-A71; the symptomatic rate of EV-A71/Coxsackievirus A16 infection was from 10% to 71% in 4 studies; while the basic reproduction number was between 1.1 and 5.5 in 3 studies. The uncertainty in these estimates inhibits their use for further analysis. Diversity of study designs complicates attempts to identify features of HFMD epidemiology. Knowledge on HFMD remains insufficient to guide interventions such as the incorporation of an EV-A71 vaccine in pediatric vaccination schedules. Research is urgently needed to fill these gaps.

  5. Global Foot-and-Mouth Disease Research Update and Gap Analysis: 5 - Biotherapeutics and Disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Robinson, L; Knight-Jones, T J D; Charleston, B; Rodriguez, L L; Gay, C G; Sumption, K J; Vosloo, W

    2016-06-01

    We assessed knowledge gaps in foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) research. Findings are reported in a series of papers, and in this article, we consider biotherapeutics and disinfectants. The study took the form of a literature review (2011-2015) combined with research updates collected in 2014 from 33 institutes from across the world. Findings were used to identify priority areas for future FMD research. While vaccines will remain the key immunological intervention used against FMD virus (FMDV) for the foreseeable future, it takes a few days for the immune system to respond to vaccination. In an outbreak situation, protection could potentially be provided during this period by the application of rapid, short-acting biotherapeutics, aiming either to stimulate a non-specific antiviral state in the animal or to specifically inhibit a part of the viral life cycle. Certain antiviral cytokines have been shown to promote rapid protection against FMD; however, the effects of different immune-modulators appear to vary across species in ways and for reasons that are not yet understood. Major barriers to the effective incorporation of biotherapeutics into control strategies are cost, limited understanding of their effect on subsequent immune responses to vaccines and uncertainty about their potential impact if used for disease containment. Recent research has highlighted the importance of environmental contamination in FMDV transmission. Effective disinfectants for FMDV have long been available, but research is being conducted to further develop methods for quantitatively evaluating their performance under field, or near-field, conditions. During outbreaks in South Korea in 2010 there was public concern about potential environmental contamination after the mass use of disinfectant and mass burial of culled stock; this should be considered during outbreak contingency planning. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. The Foot-and-Mouth Disease Carrier State Divergence in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Eschbaumer, Michael; Rekant, Steven I.; Pacheco, Juan M.; Smoliga, George R.; Hartwig, Ethan J.; Rodriguez, Luis L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The pathogenesis of persistent foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection was investigated in 46 cattle that were either naive or had been vaccinated using a recombinant, adenovirus-vectored vaccine 2 weeks before challenge. The prevalence of FMDV persistence was similar in both groups (62% in vaccinated cattle, 67% in nonvaccinated cattle), despite vaccinated cattle having been protected from clinical disease. Analysis of antemortem infection dynamics demonstrated that the subclinical divergence between FMDV carriers and animals that cleared the infection had occurred by 10 days postinfection (dpi) in vaccinated cattle and by 21 dpi in nonvaccinated animals. The anatomic distribution of virus in subclinically infected, vaccinated cattle was restricted to the pharynx throughout both the early and the persistent phases of infection. In nonvaccinated cattle, systemically disseminated virus was cleared from peripheral sites by 10 dpi, while virus selectively persisted within the nasopharynx of a subset of animals. The quantities of viral RNA shed in oropharyngeal fluid during FMDV persistence were similar in vaccinated and nonvaccinated cattle. FMDV structural and nonstructural proteins were localized to follicle-associated epithelium of the dorsal soft palate and dorsal nasopharynx in persistently infected cattle. Host transcriptome analysis of tissue samples processed by laser capture microdissection indicated suppression of antiviral host factors (interferon regulatory factor 7, CXCL10 [gamma interferon-inducible protein 10], gamma interferon, and lambda interferon) in association with persistent FMDV. In contrast, during the transitional phase of infection, the level of expression of IFN-λ mRNA was higher in follicle-associated epithelium of animals that had cleared the infection. This work provides novel insights into the intricate mechanisms of FMDV persistence and contributes to further understanding of this critical aspect of FMDV pathogenesis

  7. The Foot-and-Mouth Disease Carrier State Divergence in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Stenfeldt, Carolina; Eschbaumer, Michael; Rekant, Steven I; Pacheco, Juan M; Smoliga, George R; Hartwig, Ethan J; Rodriguez, Luis L; Arzt, Jonathan

    2016-07-15

    The pathogenesis of persistent foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection was investigated in 46 cattle that were either naive or had been vaccinated using a recombinant, adenovirus-vectored vaccine 2 weeks before challenge. The prevalence of FMDV persistence was similar in both groups (62% in vaccinated cattle, 67% in nonvaccinated cattle), despite vaccinated cattle having been protected from clinical disease. Analysis of antemortem infection dynamics demonstrated that the subclinical divergence between FMDV carriers and animals that cleared the infection had occurred by 10 days postinfection (dpi) in vaccinated cattle and by 21 dpi in nonvaccinated animals. The anatomic distribution of virus in subclinically infected, vaccinated cattle was restricted to the pharynx throughout both the early and the persistent phases of infection. In nonvaccinated cattle, systemically disseminated virus was cleared from peripheral sites by 10 dpi, while virus selectively persisted within the nasopharynx of a subset of animals. The quantities of viral RNA shed in oropharyngeal fluid during FMDV persistence were similar in vaccinated and nonvaccinated cattle. FMDV structural and nonstructural proteins were localized to follicle-associated epithelium of the dorsal soft palate and dorsal nasopharynx in persistently infected cattle. Host transcriptome analysis of tissue samples processed by laser capture microdissection indicated suppression of antiviral host factors (interferon regulatory factor 7, CXCL10 [gamma interferon-inducible protein 10], gamma interferon, and lambda interferon) in association with persistent FMDV. In contrast, during the transitional phase of infection, the level of expression of IFN-λ mRNA was higher in follicle-associated epithelium of animals that had cleared the infection. This work provides novel insights into the intricate mechanisms of FMDV persistence and contributes to further understanding of this critical aspect of FMDV pathogenesis. The

  8. Requirements for improved vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease epidemics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Inactivated foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines are currently used worldwide. With the emergence of various FMD virus serotypes and subtypes, vaccines must become more suitable for field-based uses under the current circumstances in terms of the fast and proper selection of vaccine strains, an extended vaccine development period for new viruses, protecting against the risk of virus leakage during vaccine manufacture, counteracting the delayed onset of immune response, counteracting shorter durations of immunity, and the accurate serological differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals and multiple vaccination. The quality of vaccines should then be improved to effectively control FMD outbreaks and minimize the problems that can arise among livestock after vaccinations. Vaccine improvement should be based on using attenuated virus strains with high levels of safety. Moreover, when vaccines are urgently required for newly spread field strains, the seed viruses for new vaccines should be developed for only a short period. Improved vaccines should offer superior immunization to all susceptible animals including cattle and swine. In addition, they should have highly protective effects without persistent infection. In this way, if vaccines are developed using new methods such as reverse genetics or vector vaccine technology, in which live viruses can be easily made by replacing specific protective antigens, even a single vaccination is likely to generate highly protective effects with an extended duration of immunity, and the safety and stability of the vaccines will be assured. We therefore reviewed the current FMD vaccines and their adjuvants, and evaluated if they provide superior immunization to all susceptible animals including cattle and swine. PMID:23596585

  9. Characteristics of leachate in Foot and Mouth Disease Carcass Disposal using Molecular Biology Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, E. J.; Kim, B. J.; Wi, D. W.; Choi, N. C.; Lee, S. J.; Min, J. E.; Park, C. Y.

    2012-04-01

    The Leachate from Foot and Mouth Disease(FMD) carcass disposal by is one of the types of high-concentration contaminated wastewater with the greatest environmental impact. This is due to its pollutants: nitrate nitrogen (NO3--N) and pathogenic microorganisms. Satisfactory treatment of leachate is not an easy task for its high concentrations of nitrate nitrogen and pathogenic microorganisms. Therefore suitable FMD leachate treatment processes should be adopted to improve treatment performance and to reduce overall running costs. The objective of this study was to determine the leachate characteristics through environmental analysis and molecular biology method (bacteria identification and Polymerase Chain Reaction) using FMD leachate samples for optimal FMD leachate treatment processes. The Sixteen FMD leachate samples was obtained from carcass disposal regions in Korea. Results of environmental analysis showed that pH and Eh was observed from 5.57 to 7.40, -134~358mV. This data was exhibited typical early carcass disposal (Neutral pH and Reducing Environment by abundant organic matter). TOC and nitrate nitrogen high concentrations in FMD leachate showed a large variability from 2.3 to 38,730 mg/L(mean - 6,821.93mg/L) and 0.335 ~231.998mg/L(mean - 37.46mg/L), respectively. The result of bacteria identification was observed Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas putida, Acinetobacter ursingii, Aeromonas hydrophila, Serratia liquefaciens, Brevundimonas naejangsanensis, Serratia liquefaciens, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter ursingii. The results of Polymerase Chain Reaction(PCR) using EzTaxon server data revealed Pseudoclavibacter helvolus, Pseudochrobactrum saccharolyticum, Corynebacterium callunae, Paenibacillus lautus, Paenibacillus sp., Bacillus arvi, Brevundimonas bullata, Acinetobacter ursingii, Lysinibacillus sphaericus, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus sphaericus, Bacillus psychrodurans, Pseudomonas sp.

  10. Risk factors for foot-and-mouth disease in Tanzania, 2001-2006.

    PubMed

    Allepuz, A; Stevenson, M; Kivaria, F; Berkvens, D; Casal, J; Picado, A

    2015-04-01

    We developed a model to quantify the effect of factors influencing the spatio-temporal distribution of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Tanzania. The land area of Tanzania was divided into a regular grid of 20 km × 20 km cells and separate grids constructed for each of the 12-month periods between 2001 and 2006. For each year, a cell was classified as either FMD positive or negative dependent on an outbreak being recorded in any settlement within the cell boundaries. A Bayesian mixed-effects spatial model was developed to assess the association between the risk of FMD occurrence and distance to main roads, railway lines, wildlife parks, international borders and cattle density. Increases in the distance to main roads decreased the risk of FMD every year from 2001 to 2006 (ORs ranged from 0.43 to 0.97). Increases in the distance to railway lines and international borders were, in general, associated with a decreased risk of FMD (ORs ranged from 0.85 to 0.99). Increases in the distance from a national park decreased the risk of FMD in 2001 (OR 0.80; 95% CI 0.68-0.93) but had the opposite effect in 2004 (OR 1.06; 95% CI 1.01-1.12). Cattle population density was, in general, positively associated with the risk of FMD (ORs ranged from 1.01 to 1.30). The spatial distribution of high-risk areas was variable and corresponded to endemic (2001, 2002 and 2005) and epidemic (2003, 2004 and 2006) phases. Roads played a dominant role in both epidemiological situations; we hypothesize that roads are the main driver of FMD expansion in Tanzania. Our results suggest that FMD occurrence in Tanzania is more related to animal movement and human activity via communication networks than transboundary movements or contact with wildlife. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Evaluating vaccination strategies to control foot-and-mouth disease: a model comparison study.

    PubMed

    Roche, S E; Garner, M G; Sanson, R L; Cook, C; Birch, C; Backer, J A; Dube, C; Patyk, K A; Stevenson, M A; Yu, Z D; Rawdon, T G; Gauntlett, F

    2015-04-01

    Simulation models can offer valuable insights into the effectiveness of different control strategies and act as important decision support tools when comparing and evaluating outbreak scenarios and control strategies. An international modelling study was performed to compare a range of vaccination strategies in the control of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). Modelling groups from five countries (Australia, New Zealand, USA, UK, The Netherlands) participated in the study. Vaccination is increasingly being recognized as a potentially important tool in the control of FMD, although there is considerable uncertainty as to how and when it should be used. We sought to compare model outputs and assess the effectiveness of different vaccination strategies in the control of FMD. Using a standardized outbreak scenario based on data from an FMD exercise in the UK in 2010, the study showed general agreement between respective models in terms of the effectiveness of vaccination. Under the scenario assumptions, all models demonstrated that vaccination with 'stamping-out' of infected premises led to a significant reduction in predicted epidemic size and duration compared to the 'stamping-out' strategy alone. For all models there were advantages in vaccinating cattle-only rather than all species, using 3-km vaccination rings immediately around infected premises, and starting vaccination earlier in the control programme. This study has shown that certain vaccination strategies are robust even to substantial differences in model configurations. This result should increase end-user confidence in conclusions drawn from model outputs. These results can be used to support and develop effective policies for FMD control.

  12. Cyclical Patterns of Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease Caused by Enterovirus A71 in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    NikNadia, NMN; Sam, I-Ching; Rampal, Sanjay; WanNorAmalina, WMZ; NurAtifah, Ghazali; Verasahib, Khebir; Ong, Chia Ching; MohdAdib, MohdAidinniza; Chan, Yoke Fun

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) is an important emerging pathogen causing large epidemics of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in children. In Malaysia, since the first EV-A71 epidemic in 1997, recurrent cyclical epidemics have occurred every 2–3 years for reasons that remain unclear. We hypothesize that this cyclical pattern is due to changes in population immunity in children (measured as seroprevalence). Neutralizing antibody titers against EV-A71 were measured in 2,141 residual serum samples collected from children ≤12 years old between 1995 and 2012 to determine the seroprevalence of EV-A71. Reported national HFMD incidence was highest in children <2 years, and decreased with age; in support of this, EV-A71 seroprevalence was significantly associated with age, indicating greater susceptibility in younger children. EV-A71 epidemics are also characterized by peaks of increased genetic diversity, often with genotype changes. Cross-sectional time series analysis was used to model the association between EV-A71 epidemic periods and EV-A71 seroprevalence adjusting for age and climatic variables (temperature, rainfall, rain days and ultraviolet radiance). A 10% increase in absolute monthly EV-A71 seroprevalence was associated with a 45% higher odds of an epidemic (adjusted odds ratio, aOR1.45; 95% CI 1.24–1.69; P<0.001). Every 10% decrease in seroprevalence between preceding and current months was associated with a 16% higher odds of an epidemic (aOR = 1.16; CI 1.01–1.34 P<0.034). In summary, the 2–3 year cyclical pattern of EV-A71 epidemics in Malaysia is mainly due to the fall of population immunity accompanying the accumulation of susceptible children between epidemics. This study will impact the future planning, timing and target populations for vaccine programs. PMID:27010319

  13. Cyclical Patterns of Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease Caused by Enterovirus A71 in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    NikNadia, Nmn; Sam, I-Ching; Rampal, Sanjay; WanNorAmalina, Wmz; NurAtifah, Ghazali; Verasahib, Khebir; Ong, Chia Ching; MohdAdib, MohdAidinniza; Chan, Yoke Fun

    2016-03-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) is an important emerging pathogen causing large epidemics of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in children. In Malaysia, since the first EV-A71 epidemic in 1997, recurrent cyclical epidemics have occurred every 2-3 years for reasons that remain unclear. We hypothesize that this cyclical pattern is due to changes in population immunity in children (measured as seroprevalence). Neutralizing antibody titers against EV-A71 were measured in 2,141 residual serum samples collected from children ≤12 years old between 1995 and 2012 to determine the seroprevalence of EV-A71. Reported national HFMD incidence was highest in children <2 years, and decreased with age; in support of this, EV-A71 seroprevalence was significantly associated with age, indicating greater susceptibility in younger children. EV-A71 epidemics are also characterized by peaks of increased genetic diversity, often with genotype changes. Cross-sectional time series analysis was used to model the association between EV-A71 epidemic periods and EV-A71 seroprevalence adjusting for age and climatic variables (temperature, rainfall, rain days and ultraviolet radiance). A 10% increase in absolute monthly EV-A71 seroprevalence was associated with a 45% higher odds of an epidemic (adjusted odds ratio, aOR1.45; 95% CI 1.24-1.69; P<0.001). Every 10% decrease in seroprevalence between preceding and current months was associated with a 16% higher odds of an epidemic (aOR = 1.16; CI 1.01-1.34 P<0.034). In summary, the 2-3 year cyclical pattern of EV-A71 epidemics in Malaysia is mainly due to the fall of population immunity accompanying the accumulation of susceptible children between epidemics. This study will impact the future planning, timing and target populations for vaccine programs.

  14. The evaluation of hypersensitivity tests in cattle after foot-and-mouth disease vaccination.

    PubMed Central

    Black, L.; Pay, T. W.

    1975-01-01

    The response to passive cutaneous anaphylaxis, dermal hypersensitivity and intravenous provocation tests has been compared in 30, 40, 31 and 24 cattle injected with foot-and-mouth disease vaccine 0, 1, 2 and 3 times respectively, using vaccine components and other substances as test materials. Reaginic antibodies demonstrated by passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in goats, were directed against BHK 21 cell extracts (20), hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (3) and an unidentified vaccine component (3), and distributed in 0, 5, 19 and 75 per cent of the cattle vaccinated 0, 1, 2 and 3 times. None of the animals showed clinical signs of allergy after vaccination. When BHK 21 cell extract was injected intradermally a significant correlation was noted between the development of large weals and the presence of reagins although the size of the weals was not correlated with the reagin titres. In the case of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose a similar trend was evident. The majority of cattle with large dermal weals possessed reagins but the number of reactions was too small for statistical evaluation. Dermal reactions to sodium penicillin, sodium carboxymethylcellulose, saponin and whole vaccine occurred in both unvaccinated and vaccinated cattle but BHK 21 cell lysate and normal bovine serum provoked weals which increased in frequency according to the number of vaccinations experienced. Intravenous hydroxypropylmethylcellulose elicited a response in all the animals previously injected with certain batches of vaccine but cell extract intravenously produced a clinical response in half the tested animals which was uncorrelated with the results of the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis or dermal hypersensitivity tests. Images Plate 1 PMID:1054725

  15. A Lagrangian particle model to predict the airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, D.; Reiczigel, J.; Rubel, F.

    Airborne spread of bioaerosols in the boundary layer over a complex terrain is simulated using a Lagrangian particle model, and applied to modelling the airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus. Two case studies are made with study domains located in a hilly region in the northwest of the Styrian capital Graz, the second largest town in Austria. Mountainous terrain as well as inhomogeneous and time varying meteorological conditions prevent from application of so far used Gaussian dispersion models, while the proposed model can handle these realistically. In the model, trajectories of several thousands of particles are computed and the distribution of virus concentration near the ground is calculated. This allows to assess risk of infection areas with respect to animal species of interest, such as cattle, swine or sheep. Meteorological input data like wind field and other variables necessary to compute turbulence were taken from the new pre-operational version of the non-hydrostatic numerical weather prediction model LMK ( Lokal-Modell-Kürzestfrist) running at the German weather service DWD ( Deutscher Wetterdienst). The LMK model provides meteorological parameters with a spatial resolution of about 2.8 km. To account for the spatial resolution of 400 m used by the Lagrangian particle model, the initial wind field is interpolated upon the finer grid by a mass consistent interpolation method. Case studies depict a significant influence of local wind systems on the spread of virus. Higher virus concentrations at the upwind side of the hills and marginal concentrations in the lee are well observable, as well as canalization effects by valleys. The study demonstrates that the Lagrangian particle model is an appropriate tool for risk assessment of airborne spread of virus by taking into account the realistic orographic and meteorological conditions.

  16. [Immune response against foot-and-mouth disease virus in cattle: effect of vaccination].

    PubMed

    Braun, M; Sigal, L; Mundo, S; Ramayo, L; Jar, A M; Gómez, G; Fontanals, A; Mazzuca, G O

    1989-01-01

    Foot and Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV) is one of the most feared animal virus and vaccination still has to be used in many countries. In previous reports, using a murine model, we studied the cellular basis of immune responses against FMDV and were able to show that they are atypical. In cattle, although complete protection may be attained after only one dose of killed virus vaccine, very little is known about protection against FMDV, except for antibody responses, but practically nothing concerning the cellular basis of their immune response. Moreover, since neutralizing titers do not always correlate with protection, the potency of vaccines in controlled by viral challenge. Our aim is to study cellular immune responses against FMDV, and to search for a correlate to protection. As a first step, 55 virgin cattle from a non endemic area (Patagonia) were divided into three groups: C: non immunized controls; HS: immunized with saponine containing vaccine; and EO: with oil emulsified vaccine. After vaccination, they were carried to an endemic area (Buenos Aires), where they were challenged with live FMDV. Animals were bled immediately before and 7 days after challenge, and their white blood cells and lymphocyte subpopulations were counted. All animals showed a marked neutropenia and eosinophilia, significantly higher in HS than in EO and C groups; both parameters were significantly better in the 2nd assay. Total lymphocyte counts were normal. Lymphocyte subpopulations were assessed by immunofluorescence using monoclonal antibodies: their proportions were normal and did not change during illness in group C. Several factors could have induced the observed eosinophilia and neutropenia: parasites, stress, saponine, others.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. An atypical winter outbreak of hand, foot, and mouth disease associated with human enterovirus 71, 2010

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To analyze the epidemiological characteristics and pathogenic molecular characteristics of an hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) outbreak caused by enterovirus 71 in Linyi City, Shandong Province, China during November 30 to December 28, 2010. Methods One hundred and seventy three stool specimens and 40 throat samples were collected from 173 hospitalized cases. Epidemiologic and clinical investigations, laboratory testing, and genetic analyses were performed to identify the causal pathogen of the outbreak. Results Among the 173 cases reported in December 2010, the male–female ratio was 1.88: 1; 23 cases (13.3%) were severe. The majority of patients were children aged < 5 years (95.4%). Some patients developed respiratory symptoms including runny nose (38.2%), cough (20.2%), and sore throat (14.5%). One hundred and thirty eight EV71 positive cases were identified based on real time reverse-transcription PCR detection and 107 isolates were sequenced with the VP1 region. Phylogenetic analysis of full-length VP1 sequences of 107 Linyi EV71 isolates showed that they belonged to the C4a cluster of the C4 subgenotype and were divided into 3 lineages (Lineage I, II and III). The two amino acid substitutions (Gly and Gln for Glu) at position 145 within the VP1 region are more likely to appear in EV71 isolates from severe cases (52.2%) than those recovered from mild cases (8.3%). Conclusion This outbreak of HMFD was caused by EV71 in an atypical winter. EV71 strains associated with this outbreak represented three separate chains of transmission. Substitution at amino acid position 145 of the VP1 region of EV71 might be an important virulence marker for severe cases. These findings suggest that continued surveillance for EV71 variants has the potential to greatly impact HFMD prevention and control. PMID:24589030

  18. Aerosol transmission of foot-and-mouth disease virus Asia-1 under experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Colenutt, C; Gonzales, J L; Paton, D J; Gloster, J; Nelson, N; Sanders, C

    2016-06-30

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) control measures rely on understanding of virus transmission mechanisms. Direct contact between naïve and infected animals or spread by contaminated fomites is prevented by quarantines and rigorous decontamination procedures during outbreaks. Transmission of FMDV by aerosol may not be prevented by these control measures and this route of transmission may allow infection of animals at distance from the infection source. Understanding the potential for aerosol spread of specific FMDV strains is important for informing control strategies in an outbreak. Here, the potential for transmission of an FMDV Asia 1 strain between pigs and cattle by indirect aerosol exposure was evaluated in an experimental setting. Four naïve calves were exposed to aerosols emitted from three infected pigs in an adjacent room for a 10h period. Direct contact between pigs and cattle and fomite transfer between rooms was prevented. Viral titres in aerosols emitted by the infected pigs were measured to estimate the dose that calves were exposed to. One of the calves developed clinical signs of FMD, whilst there was serological evidence for spread to cattle by aerosol transmission in the remaining three calves. This highlights the possibility that this FMDV Asia 1 strain could be spread by aerosol transmission given appropriate environmental conditions should an outbreak occur in pigs. Our estimates suggest the exposure dose required for aerosol transmission was higher than has been previously quantified for other serotypes, implying that aerosols are less likely to play a significant role in transmission and spread of this FMDV strain.

  19. Molecular epidemiology of foot-and-mouth disease virus type A in South America.

    PubMed

    Malirat, Viviana; Bergmann, Ingrid Evelyn; de Mendonça Campos, Renata; Conde, Florangel; Quiroga, José Luis; Villamil, Mariluz; Salgado, Gustavo; Ortiz, Salomón

    2012-07-06

    A databank of 78 VP(1) complete sequences of type A foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) from South American isolates was constructed. Forty-nine samples corresponded to FMDV that circulated between the years 1999-2008, mainly in Venezuela, where most type A outbreaks have occurred lately and twenty-nine to strains historically relevant for the continent. The phylogenetic analysis showed that all South American FMDV belonged to the Euro-SA topotype. Sixteen subgenotypes could be identified, based on a 15% nucleotide divergence cut-off criterion: eight are extinguished, three were active until the year 2002 and the remaining five circulated in Venezuela during the years 2001-2007, illustrating the potential for FMDV diversification under appropriate selective pressure. The last emergencies reported in already-free areas of Colombia in 2004 and 2008 were closely related to isolates acting in Venzuela. Evidence of positive selection over codon 170, within the immunogenic site 4 of VP1 protein, was recorded. A codon deletion in amino acid position 142, within the G-H loop, was found in some isolates within subgenotypes 14, 15 and 16. Conversely amino acid deletion 197 was restricted to all isolates within a particular genetic cluster. The present work is the first comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of FMDV type A in South America, filling a gap of knowledge with respect to both, historical and acting viruses. The results provided evidence that supports the ecosystem dynamics in the region, and also served as an input to establish genetic links of emergencies in already-declared free areas, highlighting the need for strengthening control activities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The serological response against foot and mouth disease virus elicited by repeated vaccination of dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Elnekave, Ehud; Dekker, Aldo; Eble, Phaedra; van Hemert-Kluitenberg, Froukje; Gelman, Boris; Storm, Nick; Klement, Eyal

    2016-09-22

    In Israel, cattle are annually vaccinated against foot and mouth disease (FMD). If infections with FMD virus occur in dairy farms it mainly involves heifers and calves, while older dairy cows seldom become infected. We hypothesized that this difference in susceptibility between adult cows and the young heifers and calves is due to stronger and more stable immune response elicited by multiple vaccinations. In order to test this hypothesis, 99 dairy cattle, divided into six groups according to number of prior vaccinations, were annually vaccinated with a trivalent vaccine (A, O and Asia-1) and followed during two consecutive years. In total 988 sera were sampled at 11 time points. Virus neutralization tests (VNT) were performed in order to determine the neutralizing antibody titers (NAT) against the vaccine homologous serotypes: O-4625, O-Manisa, Asia-1-Shamir and the heterologous serotype A-Turkey-20/2006. A similar NAT pattern was observed to all serotypes and therefore statistical analysis was restricted to O-4625 serotype. In the 'high vaccination' groups (cows that were vaccinated at least four times before the study), high NAT were found on the beginning of the trial and no or only a mild increase of NAT was observed following further vaccinations. Additionally, in the 'high vaccination' groups, the percentage of cows that had a NAT higher than 2.0 (log10) by the end of the 1st year was significantly higher than in the 'low vaccination' groups (cows vaccinated only three times or less before the study). We conclude that starting from the 5th vaccination, the NAT increase following vaccination is mild and NAT are persistent, suggesting reduction of the frequency of routine vaccination after multiple vaccinations is possible.

  1. Impact of foot-and-mouth disease on pork and chicken prices in Central Luzon, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Abao, Lary Nel B; Kono, Hiroichi; Gunarathne, Anoma; Promentilla, Rolando R; Gaerlan, Manolita Z

    2014-03-01

    Central Luzon is the number one pig-producing region in the Philippines and was affected by Foot-and-Mouth disease (FMD) in 1995. In this paper, the impact of FMD on the Central Luzon meat market from 1995 to 1999 was examined. Employing the error correction model (ECM) and historical decomposition, the impact of FMD on the Central Luzon pork and chicken meat market was quantified. The following findings were observed: (a) pig farm and pork wholesale prices dropped 11.8% and 15.7%, respectively, after the initial FMD outbreaks in January, 1995; (b) in February, 1995, chicken farm and wholesale prices declined by 21.1% and 14.2%, respectively (while chicken retail prices also went down by 10.5%); (c) the margins of pig and chicken traders were also adversely affected at some point; and (d) FMD caused changes of dynamic interdependence among prices by meat type at different levels of the meat supply chain. This study makes several contributions to the literature on the impact of FMD outbreaks. This study is the first that simultaneously investigates the impact of FMD outbreaks on meat prices, price margins along the supply chain, and price interdependence in the meat system in Central Luzon, Philippines. Also, the Philippine pork industry is dominated by backyard farmers rather than the predominantly large commercial pig farmers existing in developed countries. Secondly, it yielded the novel finding of price decline in both pig and chicken prices as a result of the FMD outbreaks. And lastly, the study showed that the profit margins of the pig traders, pork traders, chicken traders and chicken meat traders were also negatively affected by the FMD outbreaks in January 1995. However, over the long term, the price margins of pork traders were more severely affected in contrast to that of the other traders' profits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of Climatic Factors on Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease in South Korea, 2010-2013

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bryan Inho; Ki, Hyunok; Park, Sunhee; Cho, Eunhi

    2016-01-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) causes characteristic blisters and sores mainly in infants and children, and has been monitored in South Korea through sentinel surveillance since 2009. We described the patterns of HFMD occurrence and analyzed the effect of climatic factors on national HFMD incidence. Weekly clinically diagnosed HFMD case rates (per 1,000 outpatients) in sentinel sites and weekly climatic factors, such as average temperature, relative humidity, duration of sunshine, precipitation, and wind speed from 2010 to 2013, were used in this study. A generalized additive model with smoothing splines and climatic variables with time lags of up to 2 weeks were considered in the modeling process. To account for long-term trends and seasonality, we controlled for each year and their corresponding weeks. The autocorrelation issue was also adjusted by using autocorrelation variables. At an average temperature below 18°C, the HFMD rate increased by 10.3% for every 1°C rise in average temperature (95% confidence interval (CI): 8.4, 12.3%). We also saw a 6.6% increase in HFMD rate (95% CI: 3.6, 9.7%) with every 1% increase in relative humidity under 65%, with a 1.5% decrease in HFMD rate observed (95% CI: 0.4, 2.7%) with each 1% humidity increase above 65%. Modeling results have shown that average temperature and relative humidity are related to HFMD rate. Additional research on the environmental risk factors of HFMD transmission is required to understand the underlying mechanism between climatic factors and HFMD incidence. PMID:27285850

  3. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Replicon Particles Can Induce Rapid Protection against Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Dias, Camila C. A.; Moraes, Mauro P.; Weiss, Marcelo; Perez-Martin, Eva; Owens, Gary; Custer, Max; Kamrud, Kurt; de los Santos, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that delivery of the porcine type I interferon gene (poIFN-α/β) with a replication-defective human adenovirus vector (adenovirus 5 [Ad5]) can sterilely protect swine challenged with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 1 day later. However, the need of relatively high doses of Ad5 limits the applicability of such a control strategy in the livestock industry. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) empty replicon particles (VRPs) can induce rapid protection of mice against either homologous or, in some cases, heterologous virus challenge. As an alternative approach to induce rapid protection against FMDV, we have examined the ability of VRPs containing either the gene for green fluorescent protein (VRP-GFP) or poIFN-α (VRP-poIFN-α) to block FMDV replication in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment of swine or bovine cell lines with either VRP significantly inhibited subsequent infection with FMDV as early as 6 h after treatment and for at least 120 h posttreatment. Furthermore, mice pretreated with either 107 or 108 infectious units of VRP-GFP and challenged with a lethal dose of FMDV 24 h later were protected from death. Protection was induced as early as 6 h after treatment and lasted for at least 48 h and correlated with induction of an antiviral response and production of IFN-α. By 6 h after treatment several genes were upregulated, and the number of genes and the level of induction increased at 24 h. Finally, we demonstrated that the chemokine IP-10, which is induced by IFN-α and VRP-GFP, is directly involved in protection against FMDV. PMID:23468490

  4. Global Foot-and-Mouth Disease Research Update and Gap Analysis: 4 - Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Knight-Jones, T J D; Robinson, L; Charleston, B; Rodriguez, L L; Gay, C G; Sumption, K J; Vosloo, W

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed knowledge gaps in foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) research in the field of diagnostics. The study took the form of a literature review (2011-15) combined with research updates collected in 2014 from 33 institutes from around the world. Findings were used to identify priority areas for future FMD research. Molecular and genetic technologies, including sequencing, are developing at an increasing rate both in terms of capability and affordability. These advances potentiate progress in many other fields of research, from vaccine development to epidemiology. The development of RT-LAMP represents an important breakthrough allowing greater use and access to molecular diagnostics. It is now possible to determine virus serotype using PCR, although only for certain virus pools, continued progress is needed to cover the global spectrum of FMD viruses. Progress has also been made in the development of pen-side rapid diagnostics, some with the ability to determine serotype. However, further advances in pen-side serotype or strain determination would benefit both FMD-free countries and endemic countries with limited access to well-resourced laboratories. Novel sampling methods that show promise include air sampling and baited ropes, the latter may aid sampling in wildlife and swine. Studies of infrared thermography for the early detection of FMD have not been encouraging, although investigations are ongoing. Multiplex tests have been developed that are able to simultaneously screen for multiple pathogens with similar clinical signs. Crucial for assessing FMDV freedom, tests exist to detect animals that have been infected with FMDV regardless of vaccination status; however, limitations exist, particularly when testing previously vaccinated animals. Novel vaccines are being developed with complementary DIVA tests for this purpose. Research is also needed to improve the current imprecise approaches to FMD vaccine matching. The development of simple, affordable

  5. Market Impact of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Control Strategies: A UK Case Study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Siyi; Patton, Myles; Davis, John

    2017-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) poses a serious threat to the agricultural sector due to its highly contagious nature. Outbreaks of FMD can lead to substantial disruptions to livestock markets due to loss of production and access to international markets. In a previously FMD-free country, the use of vaccination to augment control of an FMD outbreak is increasingly being recognized as an alternative control strategy to direct slaughtering [stamping-out (SO)]. The choice of control strategy has implications on production, trade, and hence prices of the sector. Specific choice of eradication strategies depends on their costs and benefits. Economic impact assessments are often based on benefit-cost framework, which provide detailed information on the changes in profit for a farm or budget implications for a government (1). However, this framework cannot capture price effects caused by changes in production due to culling of animals; access to international markets; and consumers' reaction. These three impacts combine to affect equilibrium within commodity markets (2). This paper provides assessment of sectoral level impacts of the eradication choices of FMD outbreaks, which are typically not available from benefit-cost framework, in the context of the UK. The FAPRI-UK model, a partial equilibrium model of the agricultural sector, is utilized to investigate market outcomes of different control strategies (namely SO and vaccinate-to-die) in the case of FMD outbreaks. The outputs from the simulations of the EXODIS epidemiological model (number of animals culled/vaccinated and duration of outbreak) are used as inputs within the economic model to capture the overall price impact of the animal destruction, export ban, and consumers' response.

  6. A role for endoplasmic reticulum exit sites in foot-and-mouth disease virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Midgley, Rebecca; Moffat, Katy; Berryman, Stephen; Hawes, Philippa; Simpson, Jennifer; Fullen, Daniel; Stephens, David. J.; Burman, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Picornaviruses replicate their genomes in association with cellular membranes. While enteroviruses are believed to utilize membranes of the early secretory pathway, the origin of the membranes used by foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) for replication are unknown. Secretory-vesicle traffic through the early secretory pathway is mediated by the sequential acquisition of two distinct membrane coat complexes, COPII and COPI, and requires the coordinated actions of Sar1, Arf1 and Rab proteins. Sar1 is essential for generating COPII vesicles at endoplasmic reticulum (ER) exit sites (ERESs), while Arf1 and Rab1 are required for subsequent vesicle transport by COPI vesicles. In the present study, we have provided evidence that FMDV requires pre-Golgi membranes of the early secretory pathway for infection. Small interfering RNA depletion of Sar1 or expression of a dominant-negative (DN) mutant of Sar1a inhibited FMDV infection. In contrast, a dominant-active mutant of Sar1a, which allowed COPII vesicle formation but inhibited the secretory pathway by stabilizing COPII coats, caused major disruption to the ER–Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) but did not inhibit infection. Treatment of cells with brefeldin A, or expression of DN mutants of Arf1 and Rab1a, disrupted the Golgi and enhanced FMDV infection. These results show that reagents that block the early secretory pathway at ERESs have an inhibitory effect on FMDV infection, while reagents that block the early secretory pathway immediately after ER exit but before the ERGIC and Golgi make infection more favourable. Together, these observations argue for a role for Sar1 in FMDV infection and that initial virus replication takes place on membranes that are formed at ERESs. PMID:23963534

  7. Venezuelan equine encephalitis replicon particles can induce rapid protection against foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Dias, Camila C A; Moraes, Mauro P; Weiss, Marcelo; Perez-Martin, Eva; Owens, Gary; Custer, Max; Kamrud, Kurt; de los Santos, Teresa; Grubman, Marvin J

    2013-05-01

    We have previously shown that delivery of the porcine type I interferon gene (poIFN-α/β) with a replication-defective human adenovirus vector (adenovirus 5 [Ad5]) can sterilely protect swine challenged with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 1 day later. However, the need of relatively high doses of Ad5 limits the applicability of such a control strategy in the livestock industry. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) empty replicon particles (VRPs) can induce rapid protection of mice against either homologous or, in some cases, heterologous virus challenge. As an alternative approach to induce rapid protection against FMDV, we have examined the ability of VRPs containing either the gene for green fluorescent protein (VRP-GFP) or poIFN-α (VRP-poIFN-α) to block FMDV replication in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment of swine or bovine cell lines with either VRP significantly inhibited subsequent infection with FMDV as early as 6 h after treatment and for at least 120 h posttreatment. Furthermore, mice pretreated with either 10(7) or 10(8) infectious units of VRP-GFP and challenged with a lethal dose of FMDV 24 h later were protected from death. Protection was induced as early as 6 h after treatment and lasted for at least 48 h and correlated with induction of an antiviral response and production of IFN-α. By 6 h after treatment several genes were upregulated, and the number of genes and the level of induction increased at 24 h. Finally, we demonstrated that the chemokine IP-10, which is induced by IFN-α and VRP-GFP, is directly involved in protection against FMDV.

  8. Viroporin Activity of the Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Non-Structural 2B Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shi-Qi; Sun, De-Hui; Fung, To Sing; Wei, Yan-Quan; Han, Shi-Chong; Yao, Xue-Ping; Cao, Sui-Zhong; Liu, Ding Xiang; Liu, Xiang-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Viroporins are a family of low-molecular-weight hydrophobic transmembrane proteins that are encoded by various animal viruses. Viroporins form transmembrane pores in host cells via oligomerization, thereby destroying cellular homeostasis and inducing cytopathy for virus replication and virion release. Among the Picornaviridae family of viruses, the 2B protein encoded by enteroviruses is well understood, whereas the viroporin activity of the 2B protein encoded by the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has not yet been described. An analysis of the FMDV 2B protein domains by computer-aided programs conducted in this study revealed that this protein may contain two transmembrane regions. Further biochemical, biophysical and functional studies revealed that the protein possesses a number of features typical of a viroporin when it is overexpressed in bacterial and mammalian cells as well as in FMDV-infected cells. The protein was found to be mainly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), with both the N- and C-terminal domains stretched into the cytosol. It exhibited cytotoxicity in Escherichia coli, which attenuated 2B protein expression. The release of virions from cells infected with FMDV was inhibited by amantadine, a viroporin inhibitor. The 2B protein monomers interacted with each other to form both intracellular and extracellular oligomers. The Ca2+ concentration in the cells increased, and the integrity of the cytoplasmic membrane was disrupted in cells that expressed the 2B protein. Moreover, the 2B protein induced intense autophagy in host cells. All of the results of this study demonstrate that the FMDV 2B protein has properties that are also found in other viroporins and may be involved in the infection mechanism of FMDV. PMID:25946195

  9. Estimation of the transmission of foot-and-mouth disease virus from infected sheep to cattle.

    PubMed

    Bravo de Rueda, Carla; de Jong, Mart C M; Eblé, Phaedra L; Dekker, Aldo

    2014-05-27

    The quantitative role of sheep in the transmission of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is not well known. To estimate the role of sheep in the transmission of FMDV, a direct contact transmission experiment with 10 groups of animals each consisting of 2 infected lambs and 1 contact calf was performed. Secretions and excretions (oral swabs, blood, urine, faeces and probang samples) from all animals were tested for the presence of FMDV by virus isolation (VI) and/or RT-PCR. Serum was tested for the presence of antibodies against FMDV. To estimate FMDV transmission, the VI, RT-PCR and serology results were used. The partial reproduction ratio R0p i.e. the average number of new infections caused by one infected sheep introduced into a population of susceptible cattle, was estimated using either data of the whole infection chain of the experimental epidemics (the transient state method) or the final sizes of the experimental epidemics (the final size method). Using the transient state method, R0p was estimated as 1.0 (95% CI 0.2 - 6.0) using virus isolation results and 1.4 (95% CI 0.3 - 8.0) using RT-PCR results. Using the final size method, R0p was estimated as 0.9 (95% CI 0.2 - 3.0). Finally, R0p was compared to the R0's obtained in previous transmission studies with sheep or cattle only. This comparison showed that the infectivity of sheep is lower than that of cattle and that sheep and cattle are similarly susceptible to FMD. These results indicate that in a mixed population of sheep and cattle, sheep play a more limited role in the transmission of FMDV than cattle.

  10. Importance of foot and mouth disease vaccine purity in interpreting serological surveys.

    PubMed

    Smitsaart, E; Espinoza, A M; Maradei, E; Cosentino, B; Guinzburg, M; Madonni, G; Cadenazzi, G; Bottini, R; Filippi, J; Bergmann, I

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the degree of purity achieved in conventional vaccines against the foot and mouth disease virus in Argentina interferes with the interpretation of seroepidemiological surveys for confirming the absence of viral activity, which are performed to support the recognition of free zones practising vaccination. The evaluation of 168 vaccine series due to be marketed in Argentina (2006-2012) and subjected to official control testing in cattle, as well as repeated vaccination of cattle and other species using vaccines with high antigen concentrations, demonstrated that they did not induce antibodies to non-structural proteins (NSPs). The results show clearly that vaccines with satisfactory potency do not induce a response to NSPs, even by forcing the immune response through more concentrated doses with multiple valences and revaccination protocols at shorter irtervals than in vaccination campaigns. These results confirm that the vaccines used in routine vaccination programmes have a degree of antigen purification consistent with the needs observed on the basis of sampling for serological surveillance. Moreover, serological surveys conducted in 2006-2011 by Argentina's official Veterinary Services--the National Health and Agrifood Quality Service (SENASA)--on more than 23,000 sera per year from cattle included in the vaccination programme, in order to confirm the absence of virus circulation, revealed an average 0.05% of reactive results, consistent with the specificity of the tests. In conclusion, the vaccines produced by conventional methods and with proven potencythat are available in Argentina are sufficiently purified to ensure thatthey do not interfere with the interpretation of sampling for serological surveillance performed to support the recognition of FMD-free zones practising vaccination.

  11. Randomised field trial to evaluate serological response after foot-and-mouth disease vaccination in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Knight-Jones, T.J.D.; Bulut, A.N.; Gubbins, S.; Stärk, K.D.C.; Pfeiffer, D.U.; Sumption, K.J.; Paton, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite years of biannual mass vaccination of cattle, foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remains uncontrolled in Anatolian Turkey. To evaluate protection after mass vaccination we measured post-vaccination antibodies in a cohort of cattle (serotypes O, A and Asia-1). To obtain results reflecting typical field protection, participants were randomly sampled from across Central and Western Turkey after routine vaccination. Giving two-doses one month apart is recommended when cattle are first vaccinated against FMD. However, due to cost and logistics, this is not routinely performed in Turkey, and elsewhere. Nested within the cohort, we conducted a randomised trial comparing post-vaccination antibodies after a single-dose versus a two-dose primary vaccination course. Four to five months after vaccination, only a third of single-vaccinated cattle had antibody levels above a threshold associated with protection. A third never reached this threshold, even at peak response one month after vaccination. It was not until animals had received three vaccine doses in their lifetime, vaccinating every six months, that most (64% to 86% depending on serotype) maintained antibody levels above this threshold. By this time cattle would be >20 months old with almost half the population below this age. Consequently, many vaccinated animals will be unprotected for much of the year. Compared to a single-dose, a primary vaccination course of two-doses greatly improved the level and duration of immunity. We concluded that the FMD vaccination programme in Anatolian Turkey did not produce the high levels of immunity required. Higher potency vaccines are now used throughout Turkey, with a two-dose primary course in certain areas. Monitoring post-vaccination serology is an important component of evaluation for FMD vaccination programmes. However, consideration must be given to which antigens are present in the test, the vaccine and the field virus. Differences between these antigens affect the

  12. Randomised field trial to evaluate serological response after foot-and-mouth disease vaccination in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Knight-Jones, T J D; Bulut, A N; Gubbins, S; Stärk, K D C; Pfeiffer, D U; Sumption, K J; Paton, D J

    2015-02-04

    Despite years of biannual mass vaccination of cattle, foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remains uncontrolled in Anatolian Turkey. To evaluate protection after mass vaccination we measured post-vaccination antibodies in a cohort of cattle (serotypes O, A and Asia-1). To obtain results reflecting typical field protection, participants were randomly sampled from across Central and Western Turkey after routine vaccination. Giving two-doses one month apart is recommended when cattle are first vaccinated against FMD. However, due to cost and logistics, this is not routinely performed in Turkey, and elsewhere. Nested within the cohort, we conducted a randomised trial comparing post-vaccination antibodies after a single-dose versus a two-dose primary vaccination course. Four to five months after vaccination, only a third of single-vaccinated cattle had antibody levels above a threshold associated with protection. A third never reached this threshold, even at peak response one month after vaccination. It was not until animals had received three vaccine doses in their lifetime, vaccinating every six months, that most (64% to 86% depending on serotype) maintained antibody levels above this threshold. By this time cattle would be >20 months old with almost half the population below this age. Consequently, many vaccinated animals will be unprotected for much of the year. Compared to a single-dose, a primary vaccination course of two-doses greatly improved the level and duration of immunity. We concluded that the FMD vaccination programme in Anatolian Turkey did not produce the high levels of immunity required. Higher potency vaccines are now used throughout Turkey, with a two-dose primary course in certain areas. Monitoring post-vaccination serology is an important component of evaluation for FMD vaccination programmes. However, consideration must be given to which antigens are present in the test, the vaccine and the field virus. Differences between these antigens affect the

  13. Purification of foot-and-mouth disease virus by heparin as ligand for certain strains.

    PubMed

    Du, Ping; Sun, Shiqi; Dong, Jinjie; Zhi, Xiaoying; Chang, Yanyan; Teng, Zhidong; Guo, Huichen; Liu, Zaixin

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this project was to develop an easily operable and scalable process for the recovery and purification of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) from cell culture. Heparin resins HipTrap Heparin HP and AF-Heparin HC-650 were utilized to purify FMDV O/HN/CHA/93. Results showed that the purity of AF-Heparin HC-650 was ideal. Then, the O/HN/CHA/93, O/Tibet/CHA/99, Asia I/HN/06, and A/CHA/HB/2009 strains were purified by AF-Heparin HC-650. Their affinity/virus recoveries were approximately 51.2%/45.8%, 71.5%/70.9%, 96.4%/73.5, and 59.5%/42.1%, respectively. During a stepwise elution strategy, the viral particles were mainly eluted at 300mM ionic strength peaks. The heparin affinity chromatography process removed more than 94% of cellular and medium proteins. Anion exchange resin Capto Q captured four FMD virus particles; 40% of binding proteins and 80%-90% of viral particles were eluted at 450mM NaCl. Moreover, ionic strength varied from 30 to 450mM had no effect on the immunity to FMDV. The results revealed that heparin sulfate may be the main receptor for CHA/99 strain attachment-susceptible cells. Heparin affinity chromatography can reach perfect results, especially when used as a ligand of the virus. Anion exchange is useful only as previous step for further purification. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Estimation of the transmission of foot-and-mouth disease virus from infected sheep to cattle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative role of sheep in the transmission of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is not well known. To estimate the role of sheep in the transmission of FMDV, a direct contact transmission experiment with 10 groups of animals each consisting of 2 infected lambs and 1 contact calf was performed. Secretions and excretions (oral swabs, blood, urine, faeces and probang samples) from all animals were tested for the presence of FMDV by virus isolation (VI) and/or RT-PCR. Serum was tested for the presence of antibodies against FMDV. To estimate FMDV transmission, the VI, RT-PCR and serology results were used. The partial reproduction ratio R0p i.e. the average number of new infections caused by one infected sheep introduced into a population of susceptible cattle, was estimated using either data of the whole infection chain of the experimental epidemics (the transient state method) or the final sizes of the experimental epidemics (the final size method). Using the transient state method, R0p was estimated as 1.0 (95% CI 0.2 - 6.0) using virus isolation results and 1.4 (95% CI 0.3 - 8.0) using RT-PCR results. Using the final size method, R0p was estimated as 0.9 (95% CI 0.2 - 3.0). Finally, R0p was compared to the R0’s obtained in previous transmission studies with sheep or cattle only. This comparison showed that the infectivity of sheep is lower than that of cattle and that sheep and cattle are similarly susceptible to FMD. These results indicate that in a mixed population of sheep and cattle, sheep play a more limited role in the transmission of FMDV than cattle. PMID:24886222

  15. Electrical Resistivity Monitoring for Leachate Distribution at Two Foot-and-Mouth- Disease (FMD) Burial Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Kaown, D.; Lee, K.; Leem, K.; Ko, K.

    2011-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to provide the basic information on leachate distribution with time changes through the electrical resistivity monitoring for a certain period of time in the Foot-and-Mouth-Disease (FMD) burial facilities which is needed to prevent further soil and groundwater contamination and to build an effective plan for stabilization of the burial site. In this study, dipole-dipoles surveys were carried out around two FMD burial sites in Iceon-si, Gyeonggi-do. The FMD burial facility installed at Daewall-myeon is consists of one block but, at Yul-myeon, it is divided into 2 blocks named A and B blocks. Dipole-Dipole surveys with 8 lines at Yul-myeon and 3 lines at Daewall-myeon were carried out. The observed leachate distribution along survey lines was not clearly evident as time passes at Daewall-myeon site, but, at Yul-myeon site, the leachate distribution around the survey lines showed a decrease of resistivity around the burial facility. At and around A and B blocks of Yul-myeon site, interpretations of the survey data show low resistivity zones below 10 Ωm from a depth 3 m to 10 m and such low resistivity zones of the A block are thicker than the B block by about 5~10 m. From the geochemical data and resistivity survey at two FMD burial sites, it is inferred that the groundwater within a 50-meter radius around burial facilities of the Yul-myeon site are contaminated by leachate. The general resistivity distribution around the burial site is seemed affected by the leachate with high electrical conductivity. The detail distribution patterns can be explained by local distributions of soil and weathered rocks and associated leachate flow. This subject is supported by Brain Korea 21 and Korea Ministry of Environment as 'The GAIA Project (173-092-009)'.

  16. Bovine Genome-wide Association Study for Genetic Elements to Resist the Infection of Foot-and-mouth Disease in the Field

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bo-Young; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Lee, Taeheon; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Su-Mi; Lee, Hyang-Sim; Chung, Dong-Su; Shim, Hang-Sub; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Kim, Heebal

    2015-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease affecting cloven-hoofed animals and causes severe economic loss and devastating effect on international trade of animal or animal products. Since FMD outbreaks have recently occurred in some Asian countries, it is important to understand the relationship between diverse immunogenomic structures of host animals and the immunity to foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). We performed genome wide association study based on high-density bovine single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip for identifying FMD resistant loci in Holstein cattle. Among 624532 SNP after quality control, we found that 11 SNPs on 3 chromosomes (chr17, 22, and 15) were significantly associated with the trait at the p.adjust <0.05 after PERMORY test. Most significantly associated SNPs were located on chromosome 17, around the genes Myosin XVIIIB and Seizure related 6 homolog (mouse)-like, which were associated with lung cancer. Based on the known function of the genes nearby the significant SNPs, the FMD resistant animals might have ability to improve their innate immune response to FMDV infection. PMID:25557811

  17. Foot-and-mouth disease in feral swine: susceptibility and transmission.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, F; Swafford, S; Petrowski, H; Bracht, A; Schmit, B; Fabian, A; Pacheco, J M; Hartwig, E; Berninger, M; Carrillo, C; Mayr, G; Moran, K; Kavanaugh, D; Leibrecht, H; White, W; Metwally, S

    2011-08-01

    Experimental studies of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in feral swine are limited, and data for clinical manifestations and disease transmissibility are lacking. In this report, feral and domestic swine were experimentally infected with FMDV (A24-Cruzeiro), and susceptibility and virus transmission were studied. Feral swine were proved to be highly susceptible to A-24 Cruzeiro FMD virus by intradermal inoculation and by contact with infected domestic and feral swine. Typical clinical signs in feral swine included transient fever, lameness and vesicular lesions in the coronary bands, heel bulbs, tip of the tongue and snout. Domestic swine exhibited clinical signs of the disease within 24 h after contact with feral swine, whereas feral swine did not show clinical signs of FMD until 48 h after contact with infected domestic and feral swine. Clinical scores of feral and domestic swine were comparable. However, feral swine exhibited a higher tolerance for the disease, and their thicker, darker skin made vesicular lesions difficult to detect. Virus titration of oral swabs showed that both feral and domestic swine shed similar amounts of virus, with levels peaking between 2 to 4 dpi/dpc (days post-inoculation/days post-contact). FMDV RNA was intermittently detectable in the oral swabs by real-time RT-PCR of both feral and domestic swine between 1 and 8 dpi/dpc and in some instances until 14 dpi/12 dpc. Both feral and domestic swine seroconverted 6-8 dpi/dpc as measured by 3ABC antibody ELISA and VIAA assays. FMDV RNA levels in animal room air filters were similar in feral and domestic swine animal rooms, and were last detected at 22 dpi, while none were detectable at 28 or 35 dpi. The FMDV RNA persisted in domestic and feral swine tonsils up to 33-36 dpi/dpc, whereas virus isolation was negative. Results from this study will help understand the role feral swine may play in sustaining an FMD outbreak, and may be utilized in guiding surveillance, epidemiologic and economic

  18. Resource Estimations in Contingency Planning for Foot-and-Mouth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boklund, Anette; Mortensen, Sten; Johansen, Maren H.; Halasa, Tariq

    2017-01-01

    Preparedness planning for a veterinary crisis is important to be fast and effective in the eradication of disease. For countries with a large export of animals and animal products, each extra day in an epidemic will cost millions of Euros due to the closure of export markets. This is important for the Danish husbandry industry, especially the swine industry, which had an export of €4.4 billion in 2012. The purposes of this project were to (1) develop an iterative tool with the aim of estimating the resources needed during an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Denmark, (2) identify areas, which can delay the control of the disease. The tool developed should easily be updated, when knowledge is gained from other veterinary crises or during an outbreak of FMD. The stochastic simulation model DTU-DADS was used to simulate spread of FMD in Denmark. For each task occurring during an epidemic of FMD, the time and personnel needed per herd was estimated by a working group with expertise in contingency and crisis management. By combining this information, an iterative model was created to calculate the needed personnel on a daily basis during the epidemic. The needed personnel was predicted to peak within the first week with a requirement of approximately 123 (65–175) veterinarians, 33 (23–64) technicians, and 36 (26–49) administrative staff on day 2, while the personnel needed in the Danish Emergency Management Agency (responsible for the hygiene barrier and initial cleaning and disinfection of the farm) was predicted to be 174 (58–464), mostly recruits. The time needed for surveillance visits was predicted to be the most influential factor in the calculations. Based on results from a stochastic simulation model, it was possible to create an iterative model to estimate the requirements for personnel during an FMD outbreak in Denmark. The model can easily be adjusted, when new information on resources appears from management of other crisis or from new

  19. Risk factors for foot and mouth disease outbreaks in grazing beef cattle herds.

    PubMed

    Elnekave, E; Zamir, L; Hamd, F; Even Tov, B; Klement, E

    2015-06-15

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is considered one of the most important diseases of cattle. Recurrence of FMD outbreaks in Israel is common, even though routine vaccination of livestock is mandatory and control measures are applied during the outbreaks. Grazing beef herds are occasionally involved in these outbreaks and play an important role in disseminating the disease, due to the large efflux of animals from these herds to feedlots. Nevertheless, the risk factors for the occurrence of FMD among these herds have never been investigated. In 2011, Israel faced a large scale outbreak of serotype O FMD virus, which strongly affected beef cattle. We conducted a case-control study of 44 beef cattle herds grazing in the Golan Heights in order to determine the risk factors for FMDV infection. Data were analyzed using a generalized estimation equation (GEE) with a logit link function. Multivariable analysis was conducted for factors with p-value lower than 0.1 in the univariable analysis. The presence of calves under 6 months of age was found as a significant risk factor for FMDV infection in the univariable analysis (odds ratio (OR)=5.95, confidence intervals of 95% (CI95%)=1.59-22.29, p=0.008). This was also the only variable that remained statistically significant in the multivariable analysis. Herds in which more than 6 months between vaccination of adults and exposure had elapsed were in higher risk, albeit not statistically significant, for the occurrence of FMDV infection (OR=3.29, CI95%=0.83-12.99, p=0.089). The higher probability of infection in herds, which included young calves may be a result of their higher susceptibility due to administration of only one or no vaccine prior to the outbreak. The results of the study thus support increasing the frequency of vaccination of both cows and calves in grazing beef herds. Intensifying surveillance where young calves are abundant may also prove efficient for early detection of infected herds and for mitigating outbreaks

  20. Cost-benefit analysis of foot and mouth disease control in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Jemberu, Wudu T; Mourits, Monique; Rushton, Jonathan; Hogeveen, Henk

    2016-09-15

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) occurs endemically in Ethiopia. Quantitative insights on its national economic impact and on the costs and benefits of control options are, however, lacking to support decision making in its control. The objectives of this study were, therefore, to estimate the annual costs of FMD in cattle production systems of Ethiopia, and to conduct an ex ante cost-benefit analysis of potential control alternatives. The annual costs of FMD were assessed based on production losses, export losses and control costs. The total annual costs of FMD under the current status quo of no official control program were estimated at 1354 (90% CR: 864-2042) million birr. The major cost (94%) was due to production losses. The costs and benefits of three potential control strategies: 1) ring vaccination (reactive vaccination around outbreak area supported by animal movement restrictions, 2) targeted vaccination (annual preventive vaccination in high risk areas plus ring vaccination in the rest of the country), and 3) preventive mass vaccination (annual preventive vaccination of the whole national cattle population) were compared with the baseline scenario of no official control program. Experts were elicited to estimate the influence of each of the control strategies on outbreak incidence and number of cases per outbreak. Based on these estimates, the incidence of the disease was simulated stochastically for 10 years. Preventive mass vaccination was epidemiologically the most efficient control strategy by reducing the national outbreak incidence below 5% with a median time interval of 3 years, followed by targeted vaccination strategy with a corresponding median time interval of 5 years. On average, all evaluated control strategies resulted in positive net present values. The ranges in the net present values were, however, very wide, including negative values. The targeted vaccination strategy was the most economic strategy with a median benefit cost ratio of 4

  1. Development of vaccines toward the global control and eradication of foot-and-mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Luis L; Gay, Cyril G

    2011-03-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is one of the most economically and socially devastating diseases affecting animal agriculture throughout the world. Although mortality is usually low in adult animals, millions of animals have been killed in efforts to rapidly control and eradicate FMD. The causing virus, FMD virus (FMDV), is a highly variable RNA virus occurring in seven serotypes (A, O, C, Asia 1, Sat 1, Sat 2 and Sat 3) and a large number of subtypes. FMDV is one of the most infectious agents known, affecting cloven-hoofed animals with significant variations in infectivity and virus transmission. Although inactivated FMD vaccines have been available for decades, there is little or no cross-protection across serotypes and subtypes, requiring vaccines that are matched to circulating field strains. Current inactivated vaccines require growth of virulent virus, posing a threat of escape from manufacturing sites, have limited shelf life and require re-vaccination every 4-12 months. These vaccines have aided in the eradication of FMD from Europe and the control of clinical disease in many parts of the world, albeit at a very high cost. However, FMDV persists in endemic regions impacting millions of people dependent on livestock for food and their livelihood. Usually associated with developing countries that lack the resources to control it, FMD is a global problem and the World Organization for Animal Health and the United Nations' Food Agriculture Organization have called for its global control and eradication. One of the main limitations to FMDV eradication is the lack of vaccines designed for this purpose, vaccines that not only protect against clinical signs but that can actually prevent infection and effectively interrupt the natural transmission cycle. These vaccines should be safely and inexpensively produced, be easy to deliver, and also be capable of inducing lifelong immunity against multiple serotypes and subtypes. Furthermore, there is a need for better

  2. Herd Immunity Against Foot-and-Mouth Disease Under Different Vaccination Practices in India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, G K; Mahajan, S; Matura, R; Biswal, J K; Ranjan, R; Subramaniam, S; Misri, J; Bambal, R G; Pattnaik, B

    2016-02-26

    A systematic vaccination programme is ongoing in India to control the three prevailing serotypes (A, O, Asia1) of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus. Under the programme, more than 120 million bovine (term bovine applicable to both cattle and buffalo in this study) population of 221 of the 666 districts in the country are being bi-annually vaccinated with trivalent vaccine since 2010. Although clinical disease has reduced in these districts because of the systematic vaccinations, an abrupt increase in the number of FMD cases was recorded in 2013. Hence, a longitudinal field study was conducted in the year 2014 to estimate the serological herd immunity level in bovines, the impact of systematic vaccinations and field efficacy of the vaccines used. Serum samples (n = 115 963) collected from 295 districts of the 18 states of the country were analysed to estimate antibody titres against structural proteins of the three serotypes. The efficacy of the vaccine was demonstrated in the control group (group-D) where animals of the group were identified by ear tags for the purpose of repeated sampling after vaccination. Progressive building of the herd immunity in the field after systematic vaccination was demonstrated. The mean antibody titre against the serotypes O, A and Asia1 was estimated as log10 1.93 (95% CI 1.92-1.93), 2.02 (2.02-2.02) and 2.02 (2.02-2.02), respectively, in the states covered under the control programme. However, in other states herd immunity was significantly low [mean titre log10 1.68 (95% CI 1.67-1.69), 1.77 (1.76-1.78) and 1.85 (1.84-1.86) against the three serotypes]. Inverse relationship between the herd immunity and FMD incidences was observed the states following different vaccination practices. The study helped in demarcation of FMD risk zones in the country with low herd immunity. Estimation of herd immunity kinetics in the field helped in refining the vaccination schedule under the control programme.

  3. Circadian rhythm disruption was observed in hand, foot, and mouth disease patients.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Jiang, Zhou; Xiao, Guoguang; Cheng, Suting; Wen, Yang; Wan, Chaomin

    2015-03-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with central nerve system complications may rapidly progress to fulminated cardiorespiratory failure, with higher mortality and worse prognosis. It has been reported that circadian rhythms of heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate are useful in predicting prognosis of severe cardiovascular and neurological diseases. The present study aims to investigate the characteristics of the circadian rhythms of HR, respiratory rate, and temperature in HFMD patients with neurological complications. Hospitalized HFMD patients including 33 common cases (common group), 61 severe cases (severe group), and 9 critical cases (critical group) were contrasted retrospectively. Their HR, respiratory rate, and temperatures were measured every 4 hours during the first 48-hour in the hospital. Data were analyzed with the least-squares fit of a 24-hour cosine function by the single cosinor and population-mean cosinor method. Results of population-mean cosinor analysis demonstrated that the circadian rhythm of HR, respiratory rate, and temperature was present in the common and severe group, but absent in the critical group. The midline-estimating statistic of rhythm (MESOR) (P = 0.016) and acrophase (P < 0.01) of temperature and respiratory rate were significantly different among 3 groups. But no statistical difference of amplitude in temperature and respiratory rate was observed among the 3 groups (P = 0.14). MESOR value of HR (P < 0.001) was significantly different in 3 groups. However, amplitude and acrophase revealed no statistical difference in circadian characteristics of HR among 3 groups. Compared with the common group, the MESOR of temperature and respiratory rate was significantly higher, and acrophase of temperature and respiratory rate was 2 hours ahead in the severe group, critical HFMD patients lost their population-circadian rhythm of temperature, HR, and respiratory rate. The high values of temperature and respiratory rate for

  4. Foot and mouth disease risk assessment in Mongolia--local expertise to support national policy.

    PubMed

    Wieland, B; Batsukh, B; Enktuvshin, S; Odontsetseg, N; Schuppers, M

    2015-06-01

    To address weaknesses in the current foot and mouth disease (FMD) control system and to inform the formulation of a national control strategy, Mongolia conducted two separate risk assessments, one for the Eastern region which in the past has seen re-current introductions of infection, and one for the Western region, where freedom from disease had been demonstrated over several years until FMD was re-introduced in 2013. The risk assessment was conducted in three stages: first local experts developed entry, exposure and consequence pathways during separate workshops in both regions, then data was collected, compiled and analysed, and finally, during a second workshop local experts provided risk estimations for both regions and identified recommendations for risk management. Risk estimates for each pathway were individually recorded, which ensured that views of all experts were equally represented in the risk estimation and which allowed assessing possible impact of different factors related to the background of participating local experts on risk estimates. Entry risk pathways with highest risk estimates were related to livestock movements and in the consequence assessment due to direct contacts. Uncertainty, for which disagreement between participants acted as a proxy, was high in entry pathways and in the assessment of effectiveness of control measures. The risk assessment was conducted with local experts who had no previous risk assessment experience. Through their involvement in the whole process however, they assumed a high level of ownership and despite lively discussions for some risk pathways, a high level of agreement was achieved and credible results were communicated to decision makers. Especially valuable were the derived recommendations. Through the risk assessment the local experts gained a thorough understanding of the FMD risk which resulted in sensible and realistic recommendations, which, if implemented, can lead to a sustainable strengthening of

  5. Phylodynamics of Enterovirus A71-Associated Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease in Viet Nam

    PubMed Central

    Kühnert, Denise; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Lin, Xudong; Simenauer, Ari; Akopov, Asmik; Das, Suman R.; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Shrivastava, Susmita; Ngoc, Nghiem My; Uyen, Le Thi Tam; Tuyen, Nguyen Thi Kim; Thanh, Tran Tan; Hang, Vu Thi Ty; Qui, Phan Tu; Hung, Nguyen Thanh; Khanh, Truong Huu; Thinh, Le Quoc; Nhan, Le Nguyen Thanh; Van, Hoang Minh Tu; Viet, Do Chau; Tuan, Ha Manh; Viet, Ho Lu; Hien, Tran Tinh; Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh; Thwaites, Guy; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Stadler, Tanja; Wentworth, David E.; Holmes, Edward C.; Van Doorn, H. Rogier

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) is a major cause of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) and is particularly prevalent in parts of Southeast Asia, affecting thousands of children and infants each year. Revealing the evolutionary and epidemiological dynamics of EV-A71 through time and space is central to understanding its outbreak potential. We generated the full genome sequences of 200 EV-A71 strains sampled from various locations in Viet Nam between 2011 and 2013 and used these sequence data to determine the evolutionary history and phylodynamics of EV-A71 in Viet Nam, providing estimates of the effective reproduction number (Re) of the infection through time. In addition, we described the phylogeography of EV-A71 throughout Southeast Asia, documenting patterns of viral gene flow. Accordingly, our analysis reveals that a rapid genogroup switch from C4 to B5 likely took place during 2012 in Viet Nam. We show that the Re of subgenogroup C4 decreased during the time frame of sampling, whereas that of B5 increased and remained >1 at the end of 2013, corresponding to a rise in B5 prevalence. Our study reveals that the subgenogroup B5 virus that emerged into Viet Nam is closely related to variants that were responsible for large epidemics in Malaysia and Taiwan and therefore extends our knowledge regarding its associated area of endemicity. Subgenogroup B5 evidently has the potential to cause more widespread outbreaks across Southeast Asia. IMPORTANCE EV-A71 is one of many viruses that cause HFMD, a common syndrome that largely affects infants and children. HFMD usually causes only mild illness with no long-term consequences. Occasionally, however, severe infection may arise, especially in very young children, causing neurological complications and even death. EV-A71 is highly contagious and is associated with the most severe HFMD cases, with large and frequent epidemics of the virus recorded worldwide. Although major advances have been made in the development of a

  6. Prevalence and risk factors for foot and mouth disease infection in cattle in Israel.

    PubMed

    Elnekave, Ehud; van Maanen, Kees; Shilo, Hila; Gelman, Boris; Storm, Nick; Abed El Khaliq, Mohamad; Sharir, Beni; Berke, Olaf; Klement, Eyal

    2016-08-01

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease with major economic consequences. In Israel, FMD epidemics recur almost every year and mostly affect cattle. The highest number of outbreaks occurs among beef cattle farms, followed by feedlot farms and dairy farms. We performed several cross-sectional serological studies in Israel during 2006-2014, aimed to reveal if the virus is endemic among cattle and to determine the sero-prevalence of antibodies directed against non-structural proteins (NSP) of FMD virus. Additionally we aimed to determine the risk factors for such sero-positivity. A risk based sampling was performed and the presence of anti-NSP antibodies was estimated using the PrioCHECK(®) ELISA kit. Beef cattle showed the highest sero-prevalence (13.2%, CI95%=10.8-15.8%). Higher FMD sero-prevalence in beef cattle sampled in 2014 was associated with previous FMD outbreaks in the farm and with age (adult cows versus calves (p<0.05)). Sero-prevalence in feedlot calves was significantly lower with only one sero-positive calf out of 256 (0.4%, CI95%=0-2.2%). Sero-prevalence among dairy cattle was 2.7% (CI95%=2-3.6%) with location of up to 3km from FMD outbreaks in multiple farms and location of up to 5km from the nearest border standing out as significant (p<0.05) risk factors for sero-positivity. The extremely low sero-prevalence of FMD in feedlot cattle and the significant association of infection in beef cattle with previous outbreaks suggest absence of virus circulation between these two populations during the study period, although previous data show that during outbreaks such transmission can occur. Low sero-prevalence in dairy cattle located in areas adjacent to previous FMD outbreaks may be attributed to intense routine vaccination and stringent control measures that were applied during outbreaks such as emergency vaccination and strict quarantine. Early detection of FMD outbreaks among grazing beef herds as well as the implementation

  7. Early Decision Indicators for Foot-and-Mouth Disease Outbreaks in Non-Endemic Countries

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Michael G.; East, Iain J.; Stevenson, Mark A.; Sanson, Robert L.; Rawdon, Thomas G.; Bradhurst, Richard A.; Roche, Sharon E.; Van Ha, Pham; Kompas, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Disease managers face many challenges when deciding on the most effective control strategy to manage an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). Decisions have to be made under conditions of uncertainty and where the situation is continually evolving. In addition, resources for control are often limited. A modeling study was carried out to identify characteristics measurable during the early phase of a FMD outbreak that might be useful as predictors of the total number of infected places, outbreak duration, and the total area under control (AUC). The study involved two modeling platforms in two countries (Australia and New Zealand) and encompassed a large number of incursion scenarios. Linear regression, classification and regression tree, and boosted regression tree analyses were used to quantify the predictive value of a set of parameters on three outcome variables of interest: the total number of infected places, outbreak duration, and the total AUC. The number of infected premises (IPs), number of pending culls, AUC, estimated dissemination ratio, and cattle density around the index herd at days 7, 14, and 21 following first detection were associated with each of the outcome variables. Regression models for the size of the AUC had the highest predictive value (R2 = 0.51–0.9) followed by the number of IPs (R2 = 0.3–0.75) and outbreak duration (R2 = 0.28–0.57). Predictability improved at later time points in the outbreak. Predictive regression models using various cut-points at day 14 to define small and large outbreaks had positive predictive values of 0.85–0.98 and negative predictive values of 0.52–0.91, with 79–97% of outbreaks correctly classified. On the strict assumption that each of the simulation models used in this study provide a realistic indication of the spread of FMD in animal populations. Our conclusion is that relatively simple metrics available early in a control program can be used to indicate the likely magnitude of an FMD

  8. Dendrimeric peptides can confer protection against foot-and-mouth disease virus in cattle.

    PubMed

    Soria, Ivana; Quattrocchi, Valeria; Langellotti, Cecilia; Gammella, Mariela; Digiacomo, Sebastian; Garcia de la Torre, Beatriz; Andreu, David; Montoya, Maria; Sobrino, Francisco; Blanco, Esther; Zamorano, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious disease in cloven-hoofed animals. A synthetic vaccine candidate consisting of dendrimeric peptides harbouring two copies of a B-epitope [VP1(136-154)] linked to a T-cell epitope [3A(21-35)] of FMDV confers protection to type O FMDV challenge in pigs. Herein we show in cattle that novel dendrimeric peptides bearing a T-cell epitope [VP1(21-40] and two or four copies of a B-cell epitope [VP1(135-160)] from type O1 Campos FMDV (termed B2T and B4T, respectively) elicited FMDV specific immune responses to similar levels to a commercial vaccine. Animals were challenged with FMDV and 100% of vaccinated cattle with B2T or B4T were protected to podal generalization. Moreover, bovines immunized with B4T were completely protected (with no clinical signs) against FMDV challenge after three vaccine doses, which was associated with titers of viral neutralizing antibodies in serum higher than those of B2T group (p< 0.05) and levels of opsonic antibodies similar to those of animals immunized with one dose of FMDV commercial vaccine. Bovines vaccinated with both dendrimeric peptides presented high levels of IgG1 anti FMDV in sera and in mucosa. When IgA in nasal secretions was measured, 20% or 40% of the animals in B2T or B4T groups respectively, showed anti-FMDV IgA titers. In addition, B2T and B4T peptides evoked similar consistent T cell responses, being recognized in vitro by lymphocytes from most of the immunized cattle in the proliferation assay, and from all animals in the IFN-γ production assay. Taken together, these results support the potential of dendrimers B2T or B4T in cattle as a highly valuable, cost-effective FMDV candidate vaccine with DIVA potential.

  9. Farmers' Intentions to Implement Foot and Mouth Disease Control Measures in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Jemberu, Wudu T; Mourits, M C M; Hogeveen, H

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore farmers' intentions to implement foot and mouth disease (FMD) control in Ethiopia, and to identify perceptions about the disease and its control measures that influence these intentions using the Health Belief Model (HBM) framework. Data were collected using questionnaires from 293 farmers in three different production systems. The influence of perceptions on the intentions to implement control measures were analyzed using binary logistic regression. The effect of socio-demographic and husbandry variables on perceptions that were found to significantly influence the intentions were analyzed using ordinal logistic regression. Almost all farmers (99%) intended to implement FMD vaccination free of charge. The majority of farmers in the pastoral (94%) and market oriented (92%) systems also had the intention to implement vaccination with charge but only 42% of the crop-livestock mixed farmers had the intention to do so. Only 2% of pastoral and 18% of crop-livestock mixed farmers had the intention to implement herd isolation and animal movement restriction continuously. These proportions increased to 11% for pastoral and 50% for crop-livestock mixed farmers when the measure is applied only during an outbreak. The majority of farmers in the market oriented system (>80%) had the intention to implement herd isolation and animal movement restriction measure, both continuously and during an outbreak. Among the HBM perception constructs, perceived barrier was found to be the only significant predictor of the intention to implement vaccination. Perceived susceptibility, perceived benefit and perceived barrier were the significant predictors of the intention for herd isolation and animal movement restriction measure. In turn, the predicting perceived barrier on vaccination control varied significantly with the production system and the age of farmers. The significant HBM perception predictors on herd isolation and animal movement

  10. Is Hiding Foot and Mouth Disease Sensitive Behavior for Farmers? A Survey Study in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Gunarathne, Anoma; Kubota, Satoko; Kumarawadu, Pradeep; Karunagoda, Kamal; Kon, Hiroichi

    2016-01-01

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) has a long history in Sri Lanka and was found to be endemic in various parts of the country and constitutes a constant threat to farmers. In Sri Lanka, currently there is no regular, nationwide vaccination programme devised to control FMD. Therefore, improving farmers’ knowledge regarding distinguishing FMD from other diseases and ensuring prompt reporting of any suspicion of FMD as well as restricting movement of animals are critical activities for an effective FMD response effort. Therefore, the main purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between farmers’ knowledge levels and their behaviors to establish a strategy to control FMD. In our study, item count technique was applied to estimate the number of farmers that under-report and sell FMD-infected animals, although to do so is prohibited by law. The following findings were observed: about 63% of farmers have very poor knowledge of routes of FMD transmission; ‘under-reporting’ was found to be a sensitive behavior and nearly 23% of the farmers were reluctant to report FMD-infected animals; and ‘selling FMD-infected animals’ is a sensitive behavior among high-level knowledge group while it is a non-sensitive behavior among the low-level knowledge group. If farmers would understand the importance of prompt reporting, they may report any suspected cases of FMD to veterinary officials. However, even if farmers report honestly, they do not want to cull FMD-infected animals. Thus, education programs should be conducted not only on FMD introduction and transmission, but also its impact. Furthermore, consumers may criticize the farmers for culling their infected animals. Hence, not only farmers, but also consumers need to be educated on the economic impact of FMD and the importance of controlling an outbreak. If farmers have a high knowledge of FMD transmission, they consider selling FMD-infected animals as a sensitive behavior. Therefore, severe punishment should

  11. Phylodynamics of Enterovirus A71-Associated Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease in Viet Nam.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, Jemma L; Tan, Le Van; Kühnert, Denise; Halpin, Rebecca A; Lin, Xudong; Simenauer, Ari; Akopov, Asmik; Das, Suman R; Stockwell, Timothy B; Shrivastava, Susmita; Ngoc, Nghiem My; Uyen, Le Thi Tam; Tuyen, Nguyen Thi Kim; Thanh, Tran Tan; Hang, Vu Thi Ty; Qui, Phan Tu; Hung, Nguyen Thanh; Khanh, Truong Huu; Thinh, Le Quoc; Nhan, Le Nguyen Thanh; Van, Hoang Minh Tu; Viet, Do Chau; Tuan, Ha Manh; Viet, Ho Lu; Hien, Tran Tinh; Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh; Thwaites, Guy; Grenfell, Bryan T; Stadler, Tanja; Wentworth, David E; Holmes, Edward C; Van Doorn, H Rogier

    2015-09-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) is a major cause of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) and is particularly prevalent in parts of Southeast Asia, affecting thousands of children and infants each year. Revealing the evolutionary and epidemiological dynamics of EV-A71 through time and space is central to understanding its outbreak potential. We generated the full genome sequences of 200 EV-A71 strains sampled from various locations in Viet Nam between 2011 and 2013 and used these sequence data to determine the evolutionary history and phylodynamics of EV-A71 in Viet Nam, providing estimates of the effective reproduction number (Re) of the infection through time. In addition, we described the phylogeography of EV-A71 throughout Southeast Asia, documenting patterns of viral gene flow. Accordingly, our analysis reveals that a rapid genogroup switch from C4 to B5 likely took place during 2012 in Viet Nam. We show that the Re of subgenogroup C4 decreased during the time frame of sampling, whereas that of B5 increased and remained >1 at the end of 2013, corresponding to a rise in B5 prevalence. Our study reveals that the subgenogroup B5 virus that emerged into Viet Nam is closely related to variants that were responsible for large epidemics in Malaysia and Taiwan and therefore extends our knowledge regarding its associated area of endemicity. Subgenogroup B5 evidently has the potential to cause more widespread outbreaks across Southeast Asia. EV-A71 is one of many viruses that cause HFMD, a common syndrome that largely affects infants and children. HFMD usually causes only mild illness with no long-term consequences. Occasionally, however, severe infection may arise, especially in very young children, causing neurological complications and even death. EV-A71 is highly contagious and is associated with the most severe HFMD cases, with large and frequent epidemics of the virus recorded worldwide. Although major advances have been made in the development of a potential EV-A71

  12. Foot-and-Mouth disease control using vaccination: the Dutch experience in 2001.

    PubMed

    Pluimers, F H

    2004-01-01

    A first case of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) was confirmed on a farm in Oene on 21 March 2001. The Dutch eradication strategy for the area which is densely populated with susceptible animals was immediately applied: stamping out the infected herd and pre-emptive culling of all susceptible animals on farms within a radius of 1 km around an infected farm. If the organisation was unable to cull infected herds within 24 hours after detection and the neighbouring farms within four days, emergency ring vaccination would be applied. By 26 March it was clear that capacity problems prevented the required rapid culling and therefore the decision to apply emergency vaccination was taken. On 28 March vaccination of all susceptible animals was started in 2 km zones around infected farms. In the area where the first outbreak occurred, by 1 April 11 farms were found to be infected. Tracing the links between these infections was difficult, the farms being at a greater distance than 4 km from each other and fear increased that the disease could not be contained in this area. It was therefore decided to vaccinate a larger area: "Vaccination area Noord Veluwe". Suppressive vaccination was chosen. This implied that all vaccinated animals should be killed and destroyed. Vaccination rapidly reduced the number of new infections. In total 26 farms became infected with FMD. The last affected farm was confirmed on 22 April 2001. The last vaccinated animal was culled on 25 May 2001. EU rules also gave the option of choosing protective vaccination. The consequence was that only vaccinated cattle could stay alive. The status 'FMD-free without vaccination' however would then be recovered 12 months after the last outbreak. This consequence was too damaging to the export interests of the country. The killing of healthy vaccinated animals became the predominant factor in the discussion of farmers, politicians and the general public. The need for adjustments in the FMD eradication strategy and in

  13. Genotypes of the Enterovirus Causing Hand Foot and Mouth Disease in Shanghai, China, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Xu, Menghua; Su, Liyun; Cao, Lingfeng; Zhong, Huaqing; Dong, Niuniu; Dong, Zuoquan; Xu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic HFMD (hand foot and mouth disease, HFMD) cases and outbreaks caused by etiologic agents other than EV71 and CA16 have increased globally. We conducted this study to investigate the prevalence and genetic characteristics of enteroviruses, especially the non-EV71 and non-CA16 enteroviruses, causing HFMD in Shanghai. Clinical specimens were collected from patients with a diagnosis of HFMD. A partial length of VP1 was amplified with RT-PCR and subjected to direct sequencing. Phylogenetic analyses were performed using MEGA 5.0. The ages of the HFMD cases ranged from 3 to 96 months, and the male/female ratio was 1.41. The median hospital stay was 2.96 days. Up to 18.0% of patients had neurologic system complications such as encephalitis, meningoencephalitis or meningitis. Of the 480 samples, 417 were positive for enterovirus (86.9%) with RT-PCR. A total of 13 enterovirus genotypes were identified. The most frequent genotypes were CA6 (31.9%), EV71 (30.6%), CA16 (8.8%) and CA10 (7.5%). Infections with CA6, EV71, CA16 and CA10 were prevalent throughout the years of study, while the proportion of CA6 notably increased from Sep. 2012 to Dec. 2013. Phylogenetic analyses showed that EV71 strains belonged to the C4a subgenogroup and CA16 was identified as B1b subgenogroup. The CA6 strains were assigned to genogroup F, whereas the CA10 strains were assigned to genogroup D. Patients infected with CA6 were typically younger, had a shorter hospital stay and had a lower incidence of neurologic system complications when compared to patients infected with EV71. Our study demonstrates that the enterovirus genotypes causing HFMD were diversified, and there was an increasing prevalence of the non-EV71 and non-CA16 enteroviruses from 2012 to 2013. CA6 was the most predominant pathogen causing HFMD from Sep. 2012 to Dec. 2013, and it often caused relatively mild HFMD symptoms. Most severe HFMD cases were associated with EV71 infection.

  14. Structure of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Mutant Polymerases with Reduced Sensitivity to Ribavirin▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer-Orta, Cristina; Sierra, Macarena; Agudo, Rubén; de la Higuera, Ignacio; Arias, Armando; Pérez-Luque, Rosa; Escarmís, Cristina; Domingo, Esteban; Verdaguer, Nuria

    2010-01-01

    Passage of poliovirus (PV) or foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in the presence of ribavirin (R) selected for viruses with decreased sensitivity to R, which included different mutations in their polymerase (3D): G64S located in the finger subdomain in the case of PV and M296I located within loop β9-α11 at the active site in the case of FMDV. To investigate why disparate substitutions were selected in two closely related 3Ds, we constructed FMDVs with a 3D that included either G62S (the equivalent replacement in FMDV of PV G64S), M296I, or both substitutions. G62S, but not M296I, inflicts upon FMDV a strong selective disadvantage which is partially compensated for by the substitution M296I. The corresponding mutant polymerases, 3D(G62S), 3D(M296I), and 3D(G62S-M296I), were analyzed functionally and structurally. G62S in 3D impairs RNA-binding, polymerization, and R monophosphate incorporation activities. The X-ray structures of the 3D(G62S)-RNA, 3D(M296I)-RNA, and 3D(G62S-M296I)-RNA complexes show that although the two positions are separated by 13.1 Å, the loops where the replacements reside are tightly connected through an extensive network of interactions that reach the polymerase active site. In particular, G62S seems to restrict the flexibility of loop β9-α11 and, as a consequence, the flexibility of the active site and its ability to bind the RNA template. Thus, a localized change in the finger subdomain of 3D may affect the catalytic domain. The results provide a structural interpretation of why different amino acid substitutions were selected to confer R resistance in closely related viruses and reveal a complex network of intra-3D interactions that can affect the recognition of both the RNA template and incoming nucleotide. PMID:20392853

  15. Short Term Effects of Weather on Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hii, Yien Ling; Rocklöv, Joacim; Ng, Nawi

    2011-01-01

    Background Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) outbreaks leading to clinical and fatal complications have increased since late 1990s; especially in the Asia Pacific Region. Outbreaks of HFMD peaks in the warmer season of the year, but the underlying factors for this annual pattern and the reasons to the recent upsurge trend have not yet been established. This study analyzed the effect of short-term changes in weather on the incidence of HFMD in Singapore. Methods The relative risks between weekly HFMD cases and temperature and rainfall were estimated for the period 2001–2008 using time series Poisson regression models allowing for over-dispersion. Smoothing was used to allow non-linear relationship between weather and weekly HFMD cases, and to adjust for seasonality and long-term time trend. Additionally, autocorrelation was controlled and weather was allowed to have a lagged effect on HFMD incidence up to 2 weeks. Results Weekly temperature and rainfall showed statistically significant association with HFMD incidence at time lag of 1–2 weeks. Every 1°C increases in maximum temperature above 32°C elevated the risk of HFMD incidence by 36% (95% CI = 1.341–1.389). Simultaneously, one mm increase of weekly cumulative rainfall below 75 mm increased the risk of HFMD by 0.3% (CI = 1.002–1.003). While above 75 mm the effect was opposite and each mm increases of rainfall decreased the incidence by 0.5% (CI = 0.995–0.996). We also found that a difference between minimum and maximum temperature greater than 7°C elevated the risk of HFMD by 41% (CI = 1.388–1.439). Conclusion Our findings suggest a strong association between HFMD and weather. However, the exact reason for the association is yet to be studied. Information on maximum temperature above 32°C and moderate rainfall precede HFMD incidence could help to control and curb the up-surging trend of HFMD. PMID:21347303

  16. Foot-and-Mouth Disease in Red Deer - Experimental Infection and Test Methods Performance.

    PubMed

    Kittelberger, R; Nfon, C; Swekla, K; Zhang, Z; Hole, K; Bittner, H; Salo, T; Goolia, M; Embury-Hyatt, C; Bueno, R; Hannah, M; Swainsbury, R; O'Sullivan, C; Spence, R; Clough, R; McFadden, A; Rawdon, T; Alexandersen, S

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a number of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) test methods for use in red deer. Ten animals were intranasally inoculated with the FMD virus (FMDV) O UKG 11/2001, monitored for clinical signs, and samples taken regularly (blood, serum, oral swabs, nasal swabs, probang samples and lesion swabs, if present) over a 4-week period. Only one animal, deer 1103, developed clinical signs (lesions under the tongue and at the coronary band of the right hind hoof). It tested positive by 3D and IRES real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) in various swabs, lesion materials and serum. In a non-structural protein (NSP) in-house ELISA (NSP-ELISA-IH), one commercial ELISA (NSP-ELISA-PR) and a commercial antibody NSP pen side test, only deer 1103 showed positive results from day post-inoculation (dpi) 14 onwards. Two other NSP-ELISAs detected anti-NSP serum antibodies with lower sensitivity. It also showed rising antibody levels in the virus neutralization test (VNT), the in-house SPO-ELISA-IH and the commercial SPO-ELISA-PR at dpi 9, and in another two commercial SPO-ELISAs at dpi 12 (SPO-ELISA-IV) and dpi 19 (SPO-ELISA-IZ), respectively. Six of the red deer that had been rRT-PCR and antibody negative were re-inoculated intramuscularly with the same O-serotype FMDV at dpi 14. None of these animals became rRT-PCR or NSP-ELISA positive, but all six animals became positive in the VNT, the in-house SPO-ELISA-IH and the commercial SPO-ELISA-PR. Two other commercial SPO-ELISAs were less sensitive or failed to detect animals as positive. The rRT-PCRs and the four most sensitive commercial ELISAs that had been used for the experimentally inoculated deer were further evaluated for diagnostic specificity (DSP) using 950 serum samples and 200 nasal swabs from non-infected animals. DSPs were 100% for the rRT-PCRs and between 99.8 and 100% for the ELISAs.

  17. Foot-and-mouth disease: a review of intranasal infection of cattle, sheep and pigs.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Robert; Gloster, John

    2008-08-01

    In an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) it is important to identify animals at risk from airborne virus. Investigations have been carried out over the years to determine the dose required to infect cattle, sheep and pigs by the intranasal route. This paper reviews the results of investigations for animals which have been infected by instillation or spraying a virus suspension into the nostrils or by exposure to affected animals through a mask or by indirect contact. The lowest doses were found by use of a mask. With virus from affected pigs given through a mask, doses of 18 infectious units (IU) in cattle and 8 IU in sheep were found to cause infection and give rise to lesions. Overall, cattle required the least amount of virus followed by sheep. Pigs required a dose of 22 IU to cause infection and a dose of 125 IU to give rise to lesions. In many experiments pigs failed to become infected. With all three species the dose varied with the individual animal and the virus strain. For modelling previous outbreaks and in real time, a dose of 8 IU or 10 and 50% infectious doses (ID50) could be used where cattle and sheep were involved. Experience in the field, combined with the results from experiments involving natural infection, indicate that pigs are not readily infected by the intranasal route. However, for modelling purposes a dose of about 25 IU should be used with care. Investigations are needed to determine doses for virus strains currently in circulation around the world. In addition, the nature of the aerosol droplets needs to be analysed to determine how the respective amounts of infective and non-infective virus particles, host components and, in later emissions, the presence of antibody affect the survival in air and ability to infect the respiratory tract. Further work is also required to correlate laboratory and field findings through incorporation of the doses into modelling the virus concentration downwind in order that those responsible for

  18. Prevalence and risk factors for foot and mouth disease infection in small ruminants in Israel.

    PubMed

    Elnekave, Ehud; van Maanen, Kees; Shilo, Hila; Gelman, Boris; Storm, Nick; Berdenstain, Svetlane; Berke, Olaf; Klement, Eyal

    2016-03-01

    During the last decade, 27% of the foot and mouth disease (FMD) outbreaks in Israel affected small ruminant (SR) farms. FMD outbreaks reoccur in Israel despite vaccination of all livestock and application of control measures. We performed a cross-sectional serological study, aimed at estimating the prevalence of FMD infection in SR in Israel and the possible risk factors for infection. Overall, 2305 samples of adult sheep (n=1948) and goats (n=357) were collected during 2011-14 in two separate surveys. One survey was based on random sampling of intensive management system farms and the other was originally aimed at the detection of Brucella melitensis at extensive and semi-intensive management system farms. Sera were tested by NS blocking ELISA (PrioCHECK(®)). The serological prevalence of antibodies against non structural proteins (NSP) of FMD virus was estimated at 3.7% (95% confidence interval (CI95%)=3.0% -4.5%). Additionally, a significantly lower infection prevalence (p value=0.049) of 1.0% (CI95%=0.1%-3.6%) was found in a small sample (197 sera) of young SR, collected during 2012. The positive samples from adult SR were scattered all over Israel, though two significant infection clusters were found by the spatial scan statistic. Occurrence of an outbreak on a non-SR farm within 5km distance was associated with a fifteen times increase in the risk of FMD infection of SR in the univariable analysis. Yet, this variable was not included in the multivariable analysis due to collinearities with the other independent variables. Multivariable logistic regression modeling found significantly negative associations (P value<0.05) of grazing and being in a herd larger than 500 animals with risk of infection. Grazing herds and herds larger than 500 animals, both represent farms that are intensively or semi-intensively managed. Higher maintenance of bio-safety, fewer introductions of new animals and higher vaccination compliance in these farms may explain their lower

  19. Seroprevalence of Foot-and-Mouth Disease in Susceptible Wildlife in Israel.

    PubMed

    Elnekave, Ehud; King, Roni; van Maanen, Kees; Shilo, Hila; Gelman, Boris; Storm, Nick; Klement, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) epidemics recur in Israel almost every year. Wild even-toed ungulates are seldom affected during these epidemics. The seroprevalence of FMD in wild ungulates during 2000 and 2005-2013 was estimated using anti-non-structural proteins ELISA. Overall, 209 samples were tested, comprising sera of 120 wild boar (Sus scrofa lybicus), 64 mountain gazelles (Gazella gazella gazella), 6 water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis), and 19 Persian fallow deer (Dama dama mesopotamica). None of the tested animals presented clinical signs of FMD during blood collection. Sixteen samples [7.7% (95% confidence interval (CI95%) = 4.4-12.1%)] were found to be seropositive. Fifteen out of 120 samples (12.5%) from wild boar were seropositive, compared with only 1 out of 89 samples (1.1%) from all other species combined (Fisher's exact test: p = 0.003). Most of the positive samples obtained from wild boar [13/15 (86.7%)] were collected during 2007, and analysis was restricted to that year and species only. The seroprevalence of FMD in this species during 2007 was estimated at 54.2% (CI95% = 32.8-74.5%; n = 24). A significant infection cluster, comprising nine seropositive samples collected in three different locations, was identified in the north-eastern part of Israel. These findings indicate that wild boar was affected during the 2007 FMD epidemic, even though wild boar presenting FMD typical clinical signs were not observed during that year. The actual role of wild boar in the spread of FMD virus in this epidemic, however, could not be determined. The negligible seroprevalence of FMD found for all other surveillance years indicates that ongoing circulation of FMD among wildlife in Israel is unlikely. It is concluded that while the role of wildlife species in the dynamics of FMD in Israel is usually limited, there might be occasions, in which wildlife plays a part in the spread of the virus.

  20. Effects of vaccination against foot-and-mouth disease virus on reproductive performance of beef cows.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, L C L; Cooke, R F; Marques, R S; Fernandes, H J; Fernandes, C E; Stelato, R; Franco, G L; Lemos, R A A

    2016-01-01

    This study compared reproductive performance of cows vaccinated against the foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus before timed AI or during early pregnancy (Exp. 1), as well as rectal temperature (RT) and plasma concentrations of the acute-phase protein haptoglobin in cattle vaccinated or not against the FMD virus (Exp. 2). Cattle utilized in Exp. 1 and 2 originated from herds with no historical occurrences of FMD and that received vaccination against the FMD virus biannually. In Exp. 1, 604 lactating, multiparous, nonpregnant Nelore cows were randomly assigned on d -31 of the experiment to receive 1) vaccination against the FMD virus on d ≥ 31 (VACPRE; = 291) and 2) vaccination against FMD virus on d 30 (VACGEST; = 313). From d -11 to 0, all cows were assigned to an estrus synchronization + timed AI (d 0) protocol. Pregnancy status to AI was verified on d 30 and 90 via transrectal ultrasonography. A treatment × day interaction was detected ( < 0.01) for pregnancy rates to AI, which were similar ( = 0.17) between VACPRE and VACGEST on d 30 (61.8% vs. 56.2%, respectively; SEM = 2.8) but greater ( < 0.01) for VACPRE on d 90 (59.4% vs. 46.9%, respectively; SEM = 2.8). Pregnancy loss from d 30 to 90 was greater ( < 0.01) in VACGEST compared with VACPRE (16.5% vs. 3.9%, respectively; SEM = 2.2). In Exp. 2, 40 pregnant Nelore females (20 nulliparous and 20 multiparous cows; BCS = 4.73 ± 0.12) were ranked by parity and assigned to receive (VAC; = 20) or not receive (NOVAC; = 20) vaccination against the FMD virus. Blood samples were collected and RT was recorded before (h 0) and 24, 72, 120, and 168 h after treatment administration. Treatment × day interactions were detected ( < 0.01) for RT and plasma haptoglobin. The RT was greater ( < 0.01) in VAC compared with NOVAC at 24 h after treatment administration and was similar ( ≥ 0.31) between treatments at all other sampling hours. Plasma haptoglobin concentration was similar ( = 0.98) between VAC and NOVAC before

  1. Recombinant Adeno-Vaccine Expressing Enterovirus 71-Like Particles against Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Yueh-Liang; Lin, Yi-Wen; Shao, Hsiao-Yun; Yu, Shu-Ling; Wu, Shang-Rung; Lin, Hsiao-Yu; Liu, Chia-Chyi; Huang, Chieh; Chong, Pele; Chow, Yen-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackieviruses (CV) are the major causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). There is not currently a vaccine available against HFMD, even though a newly developed formalin-inactivated EV71 (FI-EV71) vaccine has been tested in clinical trial and has shown efficacy against EV71. We have designed and genetically engineered a recombinant adenovirus Ad-EVVLP with the EV71 P1 and 3CD genes inserted into the E1/E3-deleted adenoviral genome. Ad-EVVLP were produced in HEK-293A cells. In addition to Ad-EVVLP particles, virus-like particles (VLPs) formed from the physical association of EV71 capsid proteins, VP0, VP1, and VP3 expressed from P1 gene products. They were digested by 3CD protease and confirmed to be produced by Ad-EVVLP-producing cells, as determined using transmission electron microscopy and western blotting. Mouse immunogenicity studies showed that Ad-EVVLP-immunized antisera neutralized the EV71 B4 and C2 genotypes. Activation of VLP-specific CD4+ and CD8+/IFN-γ T cells associated with Th1/Th2-balanced IFN-ɣ, IL-17, IL-4, and IL-13 was induced; in contrast, FI-EV71 induced only Th2-mediated neutralizing antibody against EV71 and low VLP-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. The antiviral immunity against EV71 was clearly demonstrated in mice vaccinated with Ad-EVVLP in a hSCARB2 transgenic (hSCARB2-Tg) mouse challenge model. Ad-EVVLP-vaccinated mice were 100% protected and demonstrated reduced viral load in both the CNS and muscle tissues. Ad-EVVLP successfully induced anti-CVA16 immunities. Although antisera had no neutralizing activity against CVA16, the 3C-specific CD4+ and CD8+/IFN-γ T cells were identified, which could mediate protection against CVA16 challenge. FI-EV71 did not induce 3C-mediated immunity and had no efficacy against the CVA16 challenge. These results suggest that Ad-EVVLP can enhance neutralizing antibody and protective cellular immune responses to prevent EV71 infection and cellular immune

  2. Vaccination against foot-and-mouth disease II: Regaining FMD-free status.

    PubMed

    Backer, J A; Engel, B; Dekker, A; van Roermund, H J W

    2012-11-01

    An epidemic of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) can have devastating effects on animal welfare, economic revenues, the export position and society as a whole. The preferred control strategy in the Netherlands has recently changed to vaccination-to-live, but - not have been applied before - this poses unprecedented challenges for effectively controlling an epidemic, regaining FMD-free status and minimizing economic losses. These three topics are addressed in an interdisciplinary model analysis. In this second part we evaluate whether vaccination-to-live poses a higher risk for regaining FMD-free status than non-vaccination strategies and whether the final screening can be improved to reduce this risk. The FMD transmission model that was developed in the first part, predicted the prevalence of infected animals in undetected herds for 1000 hypothetical epidemics per control strategy. These results serve as input for the final screening model that was developed in this part. It calculates the expected number of undetected infected herds and animals per epidemic after final screening, as well as the number of herds and animals to be tested. Our results show that vaccination strategies yield a larger number of undetected infected animals in the whole country per epidemic before final screening than preemptive culling (median values and 5-95% interval): 8 (0-42) animals for 1 km preemptive culling, 50 (7-148) for 2 km vaccination and 35 (6-99) for 5 km vaccination. But the final screening reduced these to comparably low numbers: 1.0 (0-9.1) for 1 km preemptive culling, 3.5 (0.3-15) for 2 km vaccination and 2.1 (0.3-9.4) for 5 km vaccination. Undetected infected animals were mainly found in non-vaccinated sheep herds and vaccinated cattle and sheep herds. As a consequence, testing more non-vaccinated cattle and pig herds will not reduce the expected number of undetected infected animals after the final screening by much, while the required testing resources drastically

  3. Review of the status and control of foot and mouth disease in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Vosloo, W; Bastos, A D S; Sangare, O; Hargreaves, S K; Thomson, G R

    2002-12-01

    Six of the seven serotypes of foot and mouth disease (FMD) virus (i.e. all but Asia 1) are prevalent in Africa although there are marked regional differences in distribution. Three of these serotypes are unique to Africa, namely the three South African Territories (SAT) serotypes. Serotype C may also now be confined to Africa because it has not been reported elsewhere recently. In southern Africa at least, the SAT serotypes have an intimate and probably ancient association with African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) that is instrumental in their maintenance. Within each of the six prevalent serotypes, with the possible exception of C, there are a number of different lineages with more or less defined distributions (i.e. topotypes) that in some cases are sufficiently immunologically different from one another to require specific vaccines to ensure efficient control. This immunological diversity in prevalent serotypes and topotypes, in addition to uncontrolled animal movement in most parts of the continent, render FMD difficult to control in present circumstances. This fact, together with poorly developed intercontinental trade in animals and animal products has resulted in the control of FMD being afforded a low priority in most parts of the continent, although the northern and southern regions of the continent are an exception. As a consequence, eradication of FMD from Africa as a whole is not a prospect within the foreseeable future. In southern Africa, the use of fencing and other means to strictly control the movement of wildlife and livestock as well as judicious application of vaccine has resulted in countries of the region being able to access beef and other livestock markets in Europe and elsewhere in the developed world. Significant marketing of livestock and livestock products from Africa outside the continent is unlikely to be achieved unless similar approaches can be developed for other regions of Africa. This will result in continuing under-exploitation of a

  4. Genotypes of the Enterovirus Causing Hand Foot and Mouth Disease in Shanghai, China, 2012-2013

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Menghua; Su, Liyun; Cao, Lingfeng; Zhong, Huaqing; Dong, Niuniu; Dong, Zuoquan; Xu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic HFMD (hand foot and mouth disease, HFMD) cases and outbreaks caused by etiologic agents other than EV71 and CA16 have increased globally. We conducted this study to investigate the prevalence and genetic characteristics of enteroviruses, especially the non-EV71 and non-CA16 enteroviruses, causing HFMD in Shanghai. Clinical specimens were collected from patients with a diagnosis of HFMD. A partial length of VP1 was amplified with RT-PCR and subjected to direct sequencing. Phylogenetic analyses were performed using MEGA 5.0. The ages of the HFMD cases ranged from 3 to 96 months, and the male/female ratio was 1.41. The median hospital stay was 2.96 days. Up to 18.0% of patients had neurologic system complications such as encephalitis, meningoencephalitis or meningitis. Of the 480 samples, 417 were positive for enterovirus (86.9%) with RT-PCR. A total of 13 enterovirus genotypes were identified. The most frequent genotypes were CA6 (31.9%), EV71 (30.6%), CA16 (8.8%) and CA10 (7.5%). Infections with CA6, EV71, CA16 and CA10 were prevalent throughout the years of study, while the proportion of CA6 notably increased from Sep. 2012 to Dec. 2013. Phylogenetic analyses showed that EV71 strains belonged to the C4a subgenogroup and CA16 was identified as B1b subgenogroup. The CA6 strains were assigned to genogroup F, whereas the CA10 strains were assigned to genogroup D. Patients infected with CA6 were typically younger, had a shorter hospital stay and had a lower incidence of neurologic system complications when compared to patients infected with EV71. Our study demonstrates that the enterovirus genotypes causing HFMD were diversified, and there was an increasing prevalence of the non-EV71 and non-CA16 enteroviruses from 2012 to 2013. CA6 was the most predominant pathogen causing HFMD from Sep. 2012 to Dec. 2013, and it often caused relatively mild HFMD symptoms. Most severe HFMD cases were associated with EV71 infection. PMID:26398767

  5. Risk factors of severe hand, foot and mouth disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yirong; Wang, Shuiping; Zhang, Lijie; Guo, Zhinan; Huang, Zhaohui; Tu, Chunyu; Zhu, Bao-Ping

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, outbreaks of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) have increased, and more and more severe cases have appeared. We conducted a meta-analysis to generate large-scale evidence on the risk factors of severe HFMD. PubMed, Elsevier Science Direct, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Wanfang (Chinese) were searched to identify relevant articles. All analyses were performed using Stata 11.0. We conducted a meta-analysis of 19 separate studies. Duration of fever ≥ 3 days (odds ratio (OR) 10.09, 95% confidence interval (CI) 6.22-16.35), body temperature ≥ 37.5°C (OR 4.91, 95% CI 1.26-19.18), lethargy (OR 7.75, 95% CI 3.78-15.89), hyperglycemia (OR 2.77, 95% CI 2.06-3.71), vomiting (OR 8.83, 95% CI 1.05-74.57), increased neutrophil count (weighted mean difference (WMD) 0.61, 95% CI 0.52-0.70), enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection (OR 5.13, 95% CI 3.11- 8.46), young age (WMD - 0.44, 95% CI - 0.69 to -0.19), and home care (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.26-2.17) were significantly related to the risk of severe HFMD. We also found that a confirmed diagnosis at first visit to hospital significantly decreased the risk of severe HFMD (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.09-0.99). We did not find an association between oral rash (OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.82-1.39), increased leukocyte count (WMD 0.51, 95% CI - 0.05-1.06), male sex (OR 1.06, 95% CI 0.91-1.24), or living in a rural area (OR 1.39, 95% CI 0.95-2.02) and the risk of severe HFMD. Duration of fever ≥ 3 days, body temperature ≥ 37.5°C, lethargy, hyperglycemia, vomiting, increased neutrophil count, EV71 infection, and young age are risk factors for severe HFMD. A confirmed diagnosis at first visit to hospital can significantly decrease the risk of severe HFMD.

  6. Exposure of in vitro-produced bovine embryos to foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Marguant-Le Guienne, B; Rémond, M; Cosquer, R; Humblot, P; Kaiser, C; Lebreton, F; Crucière, C; Guerin, B; Laporte, J; Thibier, M

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) interacts with in vitro produced (IVP) bovine embryos. One milliliter of a suspension of FMDV (2 x 10(7) TCID50/mL) was added to several batches of these embryos 7 d after in vitro fertilization, by which time they had either developed to the morula/blastocyst stage (n = 256) or degenerated (n = 260). Six experiments were performed in which developed or degenerated batches of embryos were incubated with FMDV for periods of 1 h (3), 2 h (2) or 4h (1). After this, the embryos were washed 10 times according to the International Embryo Transfer Society (IETS), then pooled and ground up to form a suspension, and assayed on cell cultures for FMDV. The cell cultures were observed daily for cytopathic effects for 3 d post exposure. In addition to the cell culture method, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to assay for the presence of the virus in the washing fluids. Assays for FMDV were also conducted on the first and second wash and on the pooled sample constituting the eight, ninth and tenth wash. With the exception of the second wash from a batch of embryos exposed to FMDV for 2 h, all samples of the first and second wash produced FMDV cytopathic effects, but none occurred with the pooled samples of the 8th, 9th and 10th wash. FMDV was also isolated from all but 1 of the batches of embryos after 1 h of incubation, from 1 of 4 batches after 2 h of incubation and from all batches after 4 h incubation. By contrast, the presence of virus could not be demonstrated by PCR based on the technique used here. These results show that 7 d old IVP bovine embryos can retain FMDV after washing, unlike in vivo-derived embryos, which do not appear to carry risks of FMDV transmission when washed according to IETS recommendations. Stricter controls are, therefore, necessary when using IVP embryos from cattle in a non-FMD-free zone in domestic or international trade.

  7. Effect of different culture systems on the production of foot and mouth disease trivalent vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Amr Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study aims to determine the effect of the stationary rawx, roller, and the suspension cell culture systems on the total virus yield infectivity and antigenicity. Materials and Methods: Three serotypes of foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) (serotype A, O and SAT-2) were inoculated separately into baby hamster kidney-21 cell line in rawx, roller, and suspension cultivation systems using multiplicity of infection (1:100). Samples were taken from the total virus yield from each system at 15, 18, 21, and 24 h post-inoculation. Testing the total virus yield infectivity through virus titration and antigenicity through estimation of complement fixing titer and 146S content and evaluation of the potency of the vaccine prepared from the different cultivation systems were done. Results: The results showed that the FMDV titer of serotype A, O, and SAT-2 obtained from the roller cultivation system showed the highest level followed by suspension cultivation system then the rawx cultivation system. The FMDV titer showed its highest level at 21 h post-inoculation in all the cultivation systems and then decline at 24 h post-inoculation. The antigenicity reached its highest value content at 18 h post-inoculation either by complement fixation test or by quantifying the 146S intact virion. Montanide ISA 206 oil inactivated trivalent vaccines were prepared from the tested serotypes (A Iran O5. O Panasia and SAT-2/EGY/2012) harvested at 18 h post-inoculation from the 3 culture systems. The results of tracing the antibody response showed that the mean antibody response from the roller cultivation system start its protective antibody titer earlier at 2 weeks post-vaccination (WPV) than the vaccine prepared from the other two cultivation system and the immune protection period lasts longer for 36 WPV for the roller cultivation system vaccine than the other two cultivation systems. Conclusion: The best cultivation system used for the production of FMD vaccine regarding its

  8. Seroprevalence of Foot-and-Mouth Disease in Susceptible Wildlife in Israel

    PubMed Central

    Elnekave, Ehud; King, Roni; van Maanen, Kees; Shilo, Hila; Gelman, Boris; Storm, Nick; Klement, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) epidemics recur in Israel almost every year. Wild even-toed ungulates are seldom affected during these epidemics. The seroprevalence of FMD in wild ungulates during 2000 and 2005–2013 was estimated using anti-non-structural proteins ELISA. Overall, 209 samples were tested, comprising sera of 120 wild boar (Sus scrofa lybicus), 64 mountain gazelles (Gazella gazella gazella), 6 water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis), and 19 Persian fallow deer (Dama dama mesopotamica). None of the tested animals presented clinical signs of FMD during blood collection. Sixteen samples [7.7% (95% confidence interval (CI95%) = 4.4–12.1%)] were found to be seropositive. Fifteen out of 120 samples (12.5%) from wild boar were seropositive, compared with only 1 out of 89 samples (1.1%) from all other species combined (Fisher’s exact test: p = 0.003). Most of the positive samples obtained from wild boar [13/15 (86.7%)] were collected during 2007, and analysis was restricted to that year and species only. The seroprevalence of FMD in this species during 2007 was estimated at 54.2% (CI95% = 32.8–74.5%; n = 24). A significant infection cluster, comprising nine seropositive samples collected in three different locations, was identified in the north-eastern part of Israel. These findings indicate that wild boar was affected during the 2007 FMD epidemic, even though wild boar presenting FMD typical clinical signs were not observed during that year. The actual role of wild boar in the spread of FMD virus in this epidemic, however, could not be determined. The negligible seroprevalence of FMD found for all other surveillance years indicates that ongoing circulation of FMD among wildlife in Israel is unlikely. It is concluded that while the role of wildlife species in the dynamics of FMD in Israel is usually limited, there might be occasions, in which wildlife plays a part in the spread of the virus. PMID:27200364

  9. Identification and antigenic site analysis of foot-and-mouth disease virus from pigs and cattle in Korea.

    PubMed

    Oem, Jae Ku; Lee, Kwang Nyeong; Cho, In Soo; Kye, Soo Jeong; Park, Jee Yong; Park, Jong Hyeon; Kim, Yong Joo; Joo, Yi Seok; Song, Hee Jong

    2005-06-01

    From May to June 2002, a total of 16 foot-and mouth disease (FMD) outbreaks due to the serotype O virus, Pan Asia strain, were recorded in Korea. The viruses were identified by antigen ELISA, RT-PCR and sequence analysis. The overall nucleotide sequence divergence of the VP1 region among the 4 isolates in 2002 was 0 to 1.4%, but between O/SKR/2002 and O/SKR/2000 isolates was 1.9-4.9%. Phylogenetic analysis with the some known strains from East Asian countries showed that the 4 Korean isolates in 2002 formed one distinct cluster, which different from clusters of Korean isolates in 2000, with in the same lineage of the ME-SA topotype strains. Deduced amino acid sequences around neutralizable antigenic site on VP1 site of O/SKR/2002 isolates were aligned and compared with other strains. At the antigenic site 1, the replacements of the critical amino acid residues at position 144 from V to L and at position 152 from A to T were observed in O/SKR/2002 viruses. For antigenic site 2 and 4, there were not significant variations in general. At the antigenic site 3, the substitutions of amino acid residues were present at positions 54 and 56 in O/SKR/2002 isolates and an alternative residue I at position 54 are observed only at the sequence of O/SKR/AS/2002 (cow) virus. And the substitution (L-->P) of significant residue at position 144 was detected at the amino acid sequence of the O/SKR/2002 (cow) virus.

  10. Molecular epidemiology of enterovirus 71, coxsackievirus A16 and A6 associated with hand, foot and mouth disease in Spain.

    PubMed

    Cabrerizo, M; Tarragó, D; Muñoz-Almagro, C; Del Amo, E; Domínguez-Gil, M; Eiros, J M; López-Miragaya, I; Pérez, C; Reina, J; Otero, A; González, I; Echevarría, J E; Trallero, G

    2014-03-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is a childhood illness frequently caused by genotypes belonging to the enterovirus A species, including coxsackievirus (CV)-A16 and enterovirus (EV)-71. Between 2010 and 2012, several outbreaks and sporadic cases of HFMD occurred in different regions of Spain. The objective of the present study was to describe the enterovirus epidemiology associated with HFMD in the country. A total of 80 patients with HFMD or atypical rash were included. Detection and typing of the enteroviruses were performed directly in clinical samples using molecular methods. Enteroviruses were detected in 53 of the patients (66%). CV-A6 was the most frequent genotype, followed by CV-A16 and EV-71, but other minority types were also identified. Interestingly, during almost all of 2010, CV-A16 was the only causative agent of HFMD but by the end of the year and during 2011, CV-A6 became predominant, while CV-A16 was not detected. In 2012, however, both CV-A6 and CV-A16 circulated. EV-71 was associated with HFMD symptoms only in three cases during 2012. All Spanish CV-A6 sequences segregated into one major genetic cluster together with other European and Asian strains isolated between 2008 and 2011, most forming a particular clade. Spanish EV-71 strains belonged to subgenogroup C2, as did most of the European sequences circulated. In conclusion, the recent increase of HFMD cases in Spain and other European countries has been due to a larger incidence of circulating species A enteroviruses, mainly CV-A6 and CV-A16, and the emergence of new genetic variants of these viruses.

  11. Best practices to prevent transmission and control outbreaks of hand, foot, and mouth disease in childcare facilities: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chan, J Hy; Law, C K; Hamblion, E; Fung, H; Rudge, J

    2017-04-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease continues to cause seasonal epidemics in the Asia-Pacific Region. Since the current Enterovirus 71 vaccines do not provide cross-protection for all Enterovirus species that cause hand, foot, and mouth disease, there is an urgent need to identify appropriate detection tools and best practice to prevent its transmission and to effectively control its outbreaks. This systematic review aimed to identify characteristics of outbreak and assess the impact and effectiveness of detection tools and public health preventive measures to interrupt transmission. The findings will be used to recommend policy on the most effective responses and interventions in Hong Kong to effectively minimise and contain the spread of the disease within childcare facilities. We searched the following databases for primary studies written in Chinese or English: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Global Health, WHO Western Pacific Region Index Medicus database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure Databases, and Chinese Scientific Journals Database. Studies conducted during or retrospective to outbreaks of hand, foot, and mouth disease caused by Enterovirus 71 from 1980 to 2012 within childcare facilities and with a study population of 0 to 6 years old were included. Sixteen studies conducted on outbreaks in China showed that hand, foot, and mouth disease spread rapidly within the facility, with an outbreak length of 4 to 46 days, especially in those with delayed notification (after 24 hours) of clustered outbreak (with five or more cases discovered within the facility) to the local Center for Disease Control and Prevention and delayed implementation of a control response. The number of classes affected ranged from 1 to 13, and the attack rate for children ranged from 0.97% to 28.18%. Communication between key stakeholders about outbreak confirmation, risk assessment, and surveillance should be improved. Effective communication facilitates timely notification (within 24 hours) of

  12. Protection induced by a commercial bivalent vaccine against Foot-and-Mouth Disease 2010 field virus from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Duque, Hernando; Naranjo, Jose; Carrillo, Consuelo; Burbano, Alexandra; Vargas, Javier; Pauszek, Lisa; Olesen, Ian; Sanchez-Vazquez, Manuel J; Cosivi, Ottorino; Allende, Rossana M

    2016-07-29

    Foot-and-Mouth Disease serotype O circulated endemically in Ecuador for many years, with an upsurge occurring in 2009. This manuscript describes retrospectively in vitro and in vivo laboratory studies to predict the field effectiveness of a commercial FMD vaccine to protect against the field strain, and explains the key actions and epidemiological strategies followed by the country to control the disease. The results established that the use of a good quality oil vaccine, manufactured with strains that were isolated long ago: O1 Campos Br/58 and A24 Cruzeiro Br/55; combined with the correct epidemiological strategies, are useful to control field strains when used in periodic biannual vaccination campaigns.

  13. Identification of a novel cell culture adaptation site on the capsid of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Kyle; Fowler, Veronica L; Barnett, Paul V; Gold, Sarah; Wadsworth, Jemma; Knowles, Nick J; Jackson, Terry

    2015-09-01

    Vaccination remains the most effective tool for control of foot-and-mouth disease both in endemic countries and as an emergency preparedness for new outbreaks. Foot-and-mouth disease vaccines are chemically inactivated virus preparations and the production of new vaccines is critically dependent upon cell culture adaptation of field viruses, which can prove problematic. A major driver of cell culture adaptation is receptor availability. Field isolates of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) use RGD-dependent integrins as receptors, whereas cell culture adaptation often selects for variants with altered receptor preferences. Previously, two independent sites on the capsid have been identified where mutations are associated with improved cell culture growth. One is a shallow depression formed by the three major structural proteins (VP1-VP3) where mutations create a heparan sulphate (HS)-binding site (the canonical HS-binding site). The other involves residues of VP1 and is located at the fivefold symmetry axis. For some viruses, changes at this site result in HS binding; for others, the receptors are unknown. Here, we report the identification of a novel site on VP2 where mutations resulted in an expanded cell tropism of a vaccine variant of A/IRN/87 (called A - ). Furthermore, we show that introducing the same mutations into a different type A field virus (A/TUR/2/2006) resulted in the same expanded cell culture tropism as the A/IRN/87 A -  vaccine variant. These observations add to the evidence for multiple cell attachment mechanisms for FMDV and may be useful for vaccine manufacture when cell culture adaptation proves difficult.

  14. The foot and mouth disease network in the southern cone of South America: an example of regional governance.

    PubMed

    Corrales Irrazábal, H A

    2012-08-01

    The fact that foot and mouth disease is highly contagious, easily spread and of major commercial importance makes it a redoubtable challenge for animal health in South American countries and the world over. A number of factors impact directly on the effectiveness of national programmes to eradicate foot and mouth disease. Therefore, in order to meet the challenges posed by today's globalised world, it is of the utmost importance that national level eradication programmes be considered state policies and that they be the subject of broad political agreement at the highest level and consolidated as regional programmes between national Veterinary Services. The programmes, agreements and technical cooperation projects established jointly by Member Countries of the Southern Common Market (MERCOSUR) were a key factor in building management capacity to control foot and mouth disease in the area. Another key factor has been a partnership with one of the most sensitive sectors--the private production sector. Its active and responsible participation in operational functions has done much to strengthen and ensure the competitive development of South American countries and consolidate their role as global beef exporters. However, to prevent further outbreaks it is essential to maintain and reinforce the structure of national programmes and to have strong and highly trained Veterinary Services and sufficient funding to ensure efficient and sustainable plans. These plans must enable Veterinary Services, by means of good governance, to implement effective measures in the areas of animal health and international trade in animals and animal products/by-products, thereby achieving rapid and more equitable social and economic development.

  15. Effect of the nucleotides surrounding the start codon on the translation of foot-and-mouth disease virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Ma, X X; Feng, Y P; Gu, Y X; Zhou, J H; Ma, Z R

    2016-06-01

    As for the alternative AUGs in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), nucleotide bias of the context flanking the AUG(2nd) could be used as a strong signal to initiate translation. To determine the role of the specific nucleotide context, dicistronic reporter constructs were engineered to contain different versions of nucleotide context linking between internal ribosome entry site (IRES) and downstream gene. The results indicate that under FMDV IRES-dependent mechanism, the nucleotide contexts flanking start codon can influence the translation initiation efficiencies. The most optimal sequences for both start codons have proved to be UUU AUG(1st) AAC and AAG AUG(2nd) GAA.

  16. Dietary germanium biotite supplementation enhances the induction of antibody responses to foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-A; Jung, Bock-Gie; Jung, Myunghwan; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Yoo, Han Sang

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the potential ability of germanium biotite (GB) to stimulate the production of antibodies specific for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). To this aim, we measured the total FMDV-specific antibody responses and IgM production after vaccination against FMD both experimentally and in the field. GB supplementation with FMDV vaccination stimulated the production of anti-FMDV antibodies, and effectively increased IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. These results suggest that GB may be a novel alternative feed supplement that can serve as a boosting agent and an immunostimulator for increasing the efficacy of FMDV vaccination in pigs. PMID:24690605

  17. Dietary germanium biotite supplementation enhances the induction of antibody responses to foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine in pigs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-A; Jung, Bock-Gie; Jung, Myunghwan; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Yoo, Han Sang; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the potential ability of germanium biotite (GB) to stimulate the production of antibodies specific for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). To this aim, we measured the total FMDV-specific antibody responses and IgM production after vaccination against FMD both experimentally and in the field. GB supplementation with FMDV vaccination stimulated the production of anti-FMDV antibodies, and effectively increased IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. These results suggest that GB may be a novel alternative feed supplement that can serve as a boosting agent and an immunostimulator for increasing the efficacy of FMDV vaccination in pigs.

  18. Development of a peptide based latex agglutination assay for serotype identification of foot and mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Dilpreet; Kaur, Gurpreet; Chandra, Mudit; Saxena, Hari M; Dwivedi, Padam N

    2013-02-01

    Out of 200 serum samples collected from cattle (142) and buffaloes (58) of various ages and sexand subjected to latex agglutination test (LAT) using serotype specific peptides (O, A, Asia 1) and also with peptide for non-structural protein 2B (NSP-2B), 114 (70%) samples were positive against FMDV type 'O', 102 (51%) against serotype 'A' and 104 (52%) against serotype 'Asia 1'. With NSP-2B peptide a total of 71 (35.5%) samples were positive. The results suggest that LAT could be used for the diagnosis of foot and mouth disease virus as it is easy, cheap and effective test.

  19. Genome Sequences of SAT 2 Foot-and-Mouth Disease Viruses from Egypt and Palestinian Autonomous Territories (Gaza Strip)

    PubMed Central

    Valdazo-González, Begoña; Knowles, Nick J.; Hammond, Jef

    2012-01-01

    Two foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) genome sequences have been determined for isolates collected from recent field outbreaks in North Africa (Egypt) and the Middle East (Palestinian Autonomous Territories). These data represent the first examples of complete genomic sequences for the FMDV SAT 2 topotype VII, which is thought to be endemic in countries immediately to the south of the Sahara desert. Further studies are now urgently required to provide insights into the epidemiological links between these outbreaks and to define the pathogenicity of this emerging lineage. PMID:22843860

  20. Genome sequences of SAT 2 foot-and-mouth disease viruses from Egypt and Palestinian Autonomous Territories (Gaza Strip).

    PubMed

    Valdazo-González, Begoña; Knowles, Nick J; Hammond, Jef; King, Donald P

    2012-08-01

    Two foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) genome sequences have been determined for isolates collected from recent field outbreaks in North Africa (Egypt) and the Middle East (Palestinian Autonomous Territories). These data represent the first examples of complete genomic sequences for the FMDV SAT 2 topotype VII, which is thought to be endemic in countries immediately to the south of the Sahara desert. Further studies are now urgently required to provide insights into the epidemiological links between these outbreaks and to define the pathogenicity of this emerging lineage.

  1. Atypical hand, foot, and mouth disease associated with coxsackievirus A6 infection, Edinburgh, United Kingdom, January to February 2014.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, C; Gaunt, E; Simmonds, P; Broomfield, D; Nwafor, N; Wellington, L; Templeton, K; Willocks, L; Schofield, O; Harvala, H

    2014-03-27

    In January to February 2014, 16 hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) cases were identified in Edinburgh, United Kingdom. All presented with atypical features, with most (n=13) resembling eczema herpeticum or chickenpox. Coxsackievirus A6 (CV-A6) was identified in all the typed cases (n=11). As atypical forms of HFMD associated with CV-A6 are likely to emerge throughout Europe, clinicians should be alert to unusual clinical presentations of HFMD and virologists aware of effective diagnostic testing and enterovirus typing methods.

  2. Aspects of the persistence of foot-and-mouth disease virus in animals--the carrier problem.

    PubMed

    Alexandersen, Soren; Zhang, Zhidong; Donaldson, Alex I

    2002-08-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a member of the Aphthovirus genus in the Picornaviridae family. Seven distinct serotypes, each including a wide range of variants, have been defined. FMD, affects wild and domesticated ruminants and pigs, is difficult to control and is the major constraint to international trade in livestock and animal products. After the acute stage of infection, FMDV may cause a prolonged, asymptomatic but persistent infection in ruminants. Also, vaccinated or naturally immune animals subsequently exposed to live virus may become persistently infected (the so-called carriers), a situation which can result in export embargoes if vaccination is included in a country's control policy.

  3. Scavenger receptor b2 as a receptor for hand, foot, and mouth disease and severe neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Yamayoshi, Seiya; Fujii, Ken; Koike, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). Infection with EV71 is occasionally associated with severe neurological diseases such as acute encephalitis, acute flaccid paralysis, and cardiopulmonary failure. Because cellular receptors for viruses play an important role in cell, tissue, and species tropism, it is important to identify and characterize the receptor molecule. Recently, cellular receptors and host factors that stimulate EV71 infection have been identified. Several lines of evidence suggest that scavenger receptor class B, member 2 (SCARB2) plays critical roles in efficient EV71 infection and the development of disease in humans. In this review, we will summarize the findings of recent studies on EV71 infection and on the roles of SCARB2.

  4. Time series analysis of reported cases of hand, foot, and mouth disease from 2010 to 2013 in Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Banghua; Sumi, Ayako; Toyoda, Shin'ichi; Hu, Quan; Zhou, Dunjin; Mise, Keiji; Zhao, Junchan; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2015-11-03

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is an infectious disease caused by a group of enteroviruses, including Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) and Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71). In recent decades, Asian countries have experienced frequent and widespread HFMD outbreaks, with deaths predominantly among children. In several Asian countries, epidemics usually peak in the late spring/early summer, with a second small peak in late autumn/early winter. We investigated the possible underlying association between the seasonality of HFMD epidemics and meteorological variables, which could improve our ability to predict HFMD epidemics. We used a time series analysis composed of a spectral analysis based on the maximum entropy method (MEM) in the frequency domain and the nonlinear least squares method in the time domain. The time series analysis was applied to three kinds of monthly time series data collected in Wuhan, China, where high-quality surveillance data for HFMD have been collected: (i) reported cases of HFMD, (ii) reported cases of EV-A71 and CVA16 detected in HFMD patients, and (iii) meteorological variables. In the power spectral densities for HFMD and EV-A71, the dominant spectral lines were observed at frequency positions corresponding to 1-year and 6-month cycles. The optimum least squares fitting (LSF) curves calculated for the 1-year and 6-month cycles reproduced the bimodal cycles that were clearly observed in the HFMD and EV-A71 data. The peak months on the LSF curves for the HFMD data were consistent with those for the EV-A71 data. The risk of infection was relatively high at 10 °C ≤ t < 15 °C (t, temperature [°C]) and 15 °C ≤ t < 20 °C, and peaked at 20 °C ≤ t < 25 °C. In this study, the HFMD infections occurring in Wuhan showed two seasonal peaks, in summer (June) and winter (November or December). The results obtained with a time series analysis suggest that the bimodal seasonal peaks in HFMD epidemics are attributable to EV-A71 epidemics

  5. Foot and mouth disease (FMD) virus: quantification of whole virus particles during the vaccine manufacturing process by size exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Spitteler, Marcelo A; Fernández, Ignacio; Schabes, Erika; Krimer, Alejandro; Régulier, Emmanuel G; Guinzburg, Mariela; Smitsaart, Eliana; Levy, M Susana

    2011-09-22

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly infectious viral disease that affects cattle, sheep, goats and swine causing severe economic losses worldwide. The efficacy of inactivated vaccines is critically dependent on the integrity of foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) particles. The recommended method to quantify the active ingredient of vaccines is the 140S quantitative sucrose density gradient analysis. This method has been an immensely valuable tool over the past three decades but it is highly operator dependent and difficult to automate. We developed a method to quantify FMDV particles during the vaccine manufacturing process that is based on separation of components by size-exclusion chromatography and measurement of virus by absorption at 254nm. The method is linear in the 5-70μg/mL range, it is applicable to different FMDV strains, and has a good correlation with the 140S test. The proposed method uses standard chromatographic media and it is amenable to automation. The method has potential as a process analytical technology and for control of final product by manufacturers, international vaccine banks and regulatory agencies.

  6. Bioinformatics and Molecular Analysis of the Evolutionary Relationship between Bovine Rhinitis A Viruses and Foot-And-Mouth Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Rai, Devendra K; Lawrence, Paul; Pauszek, Steve J; Piccone, Maria E; Knowles, Nick J; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Bovine rhinitis viruses (BRVs) cause mild respiratory disease of cattle. In this study, a near full-length genome sequence of a virus named RS3X (formerly classified as bovine rhinovirus type 1), isolated from infected cattle from the UK in the 1960s, was obtained and analyzed. Compared to other closely related Aphthoviruses, major differences were detected in the leader protease (L(pro)), P1, 2B, and 3A proteins. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that RS3X was a member of the species bovine rhinitis A virus (BRAV). Using different codon-based and branch-site selection models for Aphthoviruses, including BRAV RS3X and foot-and-mouth disease virus, we observed no clear evidence for genomic regions undergoing positive selection. However, within each of the BRV species, multiple sites under positive selection were detected. The results also suggest that the probability (determined by Recombination Detection Program) for recombination events between BRVs and other Aphthoviruses, including foot-and-mouth disease virus was not significant. In contrast, within BRVs, the probability of recombination increases. The data reported here provide genetic information to assist in the identification of diagnostic signatures and research tools for BRAV.

  7. Simple and rapid lateral-flow assay for the detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Oem, Jae Ku; Ferris, Nigel P; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Joo, Yi-Seok; Hyun, Bang-Hun; Park, Jong-Hyeon

    2009-11-01

    A simple lateral-flow assay (LFA) based on a monoclonal antibody (MAb 70-17) was developed for the detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) under nonlaboratory conditions. The LFA was evaluated with epithelial suspensions (n = 704) prepared from current and historical field samples which had been submitted to the Pirbright Laboratory (United Kingdom) and from negative samples (n = 100) collected from naïve animals in Korea. Four FMDV serotypes (type O, A, Asia 1, and C) were detected in the LFA, but not the remaining three FMDV serotypes (SAT 1, SAT 2, and SAT 3). The diagnostic sensitivity of the LFA for FMDV types O, A, C, and Asia 1 was similar, at approximately 87.3%, to that of 87.7% obtained with antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Ag-ELISA). The diagnostic specificity of the LFA was 98.8%, compared to 100% for the Ag-ELISA. These results demonstrate that the LFA using the FMDV MAb 70-17 to detect FMDV is a supportive method for taking rapid measurements at the site of a suspected foot-and-mouth disease outbreak in Asia before diagnosing the disease in the laboratory, thereby offering the possibility of implementing control procedures more rapidly.

  8. Bioinformatics and Molecular Analysis of the Evolutionary Relationship between Bovine Rhinitis A Viruses and Foot-And-Mouth Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Devendra K.; Lawrence, Paul; Pauszek, Steve J.; Piccone, Maria E.; Knowles, Nick J.; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Bovine rhinitis viruses (BRVs) cause mild respiratory disease of cattle. In this study, a near full-length genome sequence of a virus named RS3X (formerly classified as bovine rhinovirus type 1), isolated from infected cattle from the UK in the 1960s, was obtained and analyzed. Compared to other closely related Aphthoviruses, major differences were detected in the leader protease (Lpro), P1, 2B, and 3A proteins. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that RS3X was a member of the species bovine rhinitis A virus (BRAV). Using different codon-based and branch-site selection models for Aphthoviruses, including BRAV RS3X and foot-and-mouth disease virus, we observed no clear evidence for genomic regions undergoing positive selection. However, within each of the BRV species, multiple sites under positive selection were detected. The results also suggest that the probability (determined by Recombination Detection Program) for recombination events between BRVs and other Aphthoviruses, including foot-and-mouth disease virus was not significant. In contrast, within BRVs, the probability of recombination increases. The data reported here provide genetic information to assist in the identification of diagnostic signatures and research tools for BRAV. PMID:27081310

  9. Psychosocial effects of the 2001 UK foot and mouth disease epidemic in a rural population: qualitative diary based study

    PubMed Central

    Mort, Maggie; Convery, Ian; Baxter, Josephine; Bailey, Cathy

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To understand the health and social consequences of the 2001 foot and mouth disease epidemic for a rural population. Design Longitudinal qualitative analysis. Setting North Cumbria, the worst affected area in Britain. Sample Purposive sample of 54 respondents divided in six demographically balanced rural occupational and population groups. Main outcome measures 3071 weekly diaries contributed over 18 months; 72 semistructured interviews (with the 54 diarists and 18 others); 12 group discussions with diarists Results The disease epidemic was a human tragedy, not just an animal one. Respondents' reports showed that life after the foot and mouth disease epidemic was accompanied by distress, feelings of bereavement, fear of a new disaster, loss of trust in authority and systems of control, and the undermining of the value of local knowledge. Distress was experienced across diverse groups well beyond the farming community. Many of these effects continued to feature in the diaries throughout the 18 month period. Conclusions The use of a rural citizens' panel allowed data capture from a wide spectrum of the rural population and showed that a greater number of workers and residents had traumatic experiences than has previously been reported. Recommendations for future disaster management include joint service reviews of what counts as a disaster, regular NHS and voluntary sector sharing of intelligence, debriefing and peer support for front line workers, increased community involvement in disposal site or disaster management, and wider, more flexible access to regeneration funding and rural health outreach work. PMID:16214809

  10. Recovery of viral RNA and infectious foot-and-mouth disease virus from positive lateral-flow devices.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Veronica L; Bankowski, Bartlomiej M; Armson, Bryony; Di Nardo, Antonello; Valdazo-Gonzalez, Begoña; Reid, Scott M; Barnett, Paul V; Wadsworth, Jemma; Ferris, Nigel P; Mioulet, Valérie; King, Donald P

    2014-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease Virus (FMDV) is an economically important, highly contagious picornavirus that affects both wild and domesticated cloven hooved animals. In developing countries, the effective laboratory diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is often hindered by inadequate sample preservation due to difficulties in the transportation and storage of clinical material. These factors can compromise the ability to detect and characterise FMD virus in countries where the disease is endemic. Furthermore, the high cost of sending infectious virus material and the biosecurity risk it presents emphasises the need for a thermo-stable, non-infectious mode of transporting diagnostic samples. This paper investigates the potential of using FMDV lateral-flow devices (LFDs) for dry transportation of clinical samples for subsequent nucleic acid amplification, sequencing and recovery of infectious virus by electroporation. FMDV positive samples (epithelial suspensions and cell culture isolates) representing four FMDV serotypes were applied to antigen LFDs: after which it was possible to recover viral RNA that could be detected using real-time RT-PCR. Using this nucleic acid, it was also possible to recover VP1 sequences and also successfully utilise protocols for amplification of complete FMD virus genomes. It was not possible to recover infectious FMDV directly from the LFDs, however following electroporation into BHK-21 cells and subsequent cell passage, infectious virus could be recovered. Therefore, these results support the use of the antigen LFD for the dry, non-hazardous transportation of samples from FMD endemic countries to international reference laboratories.

  11. [Application of R-based multiple seasonal ARIMA model, in predicting the incidence of hand, foot and mouth disease in Shaanxi province].

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Zhu, N; Qiu, L; Wang, J J; Wang, W H

    2016-08-10

    To apply the ' auto-regressive integrated moving average product seasonal model' in predicting the number of hand, foot and mouth disease in Shaanxi province. In Shaanxi province, the trend of hand, foot and mouth disease was analyzed and tested, under the use of R software, between January 2009 and June 2015. Multiple seasonal ARIMA model was then fitted under time series to predict the number of hand, foot and mouth disease in 2016 and 2017. Seasonal effect was seen in hand, foot and mouth disease in Shaanxi province. A multiple seasonal ARIMA (2,1,0)×(1,1,0)12 was established, with the equation as (1 -B)(1 -B12)Ln (Xt) =((1-1.000B)/(1-0.532B-0.363B(2))*(1-0.644B12-0.454B12(2)))*Epsilont. The mean of absolute error and the relative error were 531.535 and 0.114, respectively when compared to the simulated number of patients from Jun to Dec in 2015. RESULTS under the prediction of multiple seasonal ARIMA model showed that the numbers of patients in both 2016 and 2017 were similar to that of 2015 in Shaanxi province. Multiple seasonal ARIMA (2,1,0)×(1,1,0)12 model could be used to successfully predict the incidence of hand, foot and mouth disease in Shaanxi province.

  12. Tongue Epithelium Cells from shRNA Mediated Transgenic Goat Show High Resistance to Foot and Mouth Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenting; Wang, Kejun; Kang, Shimeng; Deng, Shoulong; Han, Hongbing; Lian, Ling; Lian, Zhengxing

    2015-12-16

    Foot and mouth disease induced by foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is severe threat to cloven-hoofed domestic animals. The gene 3Dpol in FMDV genome encodes the viral RNA polymerase, a vital element for FMDV replication. In this study, a conserved 3D-7414shRNA targeting FMDV-3Dpol gene was designed and injected into pronuclear embryos to produce the transgenic goats. Sixty-one goats were produced, of which, seven goats positively integrated 3D-7414shRNA. Loss of function assay demonstrated that siRNA effectively knockdown 3Dpol gene in skin epithelium cells of transgenic goats. Subsequently, the tongue epithelium cells from transgenic and non-transgenic goats were infected with FMDV O/YS/CHA/05 strain. A significant decrease of virus titres and virus copy number was observed in cells of transgenic goats compared with that of non-transgenic goats, which indicated that 3D-7414siRNA inhibited FMDV replication by interfering FMDV-3Dpol gene. Furthermore, we found that expression of TLR7, RIG-I and TRAF6 was lower in FMDV infected cells from transgenic goats compared to that from non-transgenic goats, which might result from lower virus copy number in transgenic goats' cells. In conclusion, we successfully produced transgenic goats highly expressing 3D-7414siRNA targeting 3Dpol gene, and the tongue epithelium cells from the transgenic goats showed effective resistance to FMDV.

  13. Infection Dynamics of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Cattle Following Intranasopharyngeal Inoculation or Contact Exposure.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, J M; Stenfeldt, C; Rodriguez, L L; Arzt, J

    2016-11-01

    For the purpose of developing an improved experimental model for studies of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection in cattle, three different experimental systems based on natural or simulated natural virus exposure were compared under standardized experimental conditions. Ante-mortem infection dynamics were characterized in cattle exposed to FMDV through a novel, simulated natural intranasopharyngeal (INP) inoculation system or through standardized and controlled systems of within- or between-species direct contact exposure (cattle-to-cattle or pig-to-cattle). All three systems were efficient in causing synchronous, generalized foot-and-mouth disease in cattle exposed to one of three different strains of FMDV representing serotypes O, A and Asia1. There was more within-group variation in the timing of clinical infection following natural and simulated natural virus exposure systems when compared with the conventionally used system of needle inoculation (intraepithelial lingual inoculation). However, the three optimized exposure systems described herein have the advantage of closely simulating field conditions by utilizing natural routes of primary infection, thereby facilitating engagement of mucosal host defence mechanisms. Overall, it is concluded that INP inoculation and standardized systems of direct contact exposure provide effective alternatives to conventional (needle) inoculation systems for studies in which it is desirable to simulate the natural biology of FMDV infection. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Efficacy of synthetic peptide candidate vaccines against serotype-A foot-and-mouth disease virus in cattle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongwang; Pan, Li; Ding, Yaozhong; Zhou, Peng; Lv, Jianliang; Chen, Haotai; Fang, Yuzhen; Liu, Xinsheng; Chang, Huiyun; Zhang, Jie; Shao, Junjun; Lin, Tong; Zhao, Furong; Zhang, Yongguang; Wang, Yonglu

    2015-02-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remains a major threat to livestock worldwide, especially in developing countries. To improve the efficacy of vaccination against FMD, various types of vaccines have been developed, including synthetic peptide vaccines. We designed three synthetic peptide vaccines, 59 to 87 aa in size, based on immunogenic epitopes in the VP1, 3A, and 3D proteins of the A/HuBWH/CHA/2009 strain of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), corresponding to amino acid positions 129 to 169 of VP1, 21 to 35 of 3A, and 346 to 370 of 3D. The efficacies of the vaccines were evaluated in cattle and guinea pigs challenged with serotype-A FMDV. All of the vaccines elicited the production of virus-neutralizing antibodies. The PB peptide, which contained sequences corresponding to positions 129 to 169 of V P1 and 346 to 370 of 3D, demonstrated the highest levels of immunogenicity and immunoprotection against FMDV. Two doses of 50 μg of the synthetic PB peptide vaccine provided 100% protection against FMDV infection in guinea pigs, and a single dose of 100 μg provided 60% protection in cattle. These findings provide empirical data for facilitating the development of synthetic peptide vaccines against FMD.

  15. Detection of genome, antigen, and antibodies in oral fluids from pigs infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus

    PubMed Central

    Senthilkumaran, Chandrika; Yang, Ming; Bittner, Hilary; Ambagala, Aruna; Lung, Oliver; Zimmerman, Jeffrey; Giménez-Lirola, Luis G.; Nfon, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Virus nucleic acids and antibody response to pathogens can be measured using swine oral fluids (OFs). Detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) genome in swine OFs has previously been demonstrated. Virus isolation and viral antigen detection are additional confirmatory assays for diagnosing FMDV, but these methods have not been evaluated using swine OF. The objectives of this study were to further validate the molecular detection of FMDV in oral fluids, evaluate antigen detection and FMDV isolation from swine OFs, and develop an assay for isotypic anti-FMDV antibody detection in OFs. Ribonucleic acid (RNA) from FMDV was detected in OFs from experimentally infected pigs by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) from 1 day post-infection (dpi) to 21 dpi. Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) was isolated from OFs at 1 to 5 dpi. Additionally, FMDV antigens were detected in OFs from 1 to 6 dpi using a lateral flow immunochromatographic strip test (LFIST), which is a rapid pen-side test, and from 2 to 3 dpi using a double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS ELISA). Furthermore, FMDV-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) was detected in OFs using an isotype-specific indirect ELISA starting at dpi 14. These results further demonstrated the potential use of oral fluids for detecting FMDV genome, live virus, and viral antigens, as well as for quantifying mucosal IgA antibody response. PMID:28408775

  16. Foot-and-mouth disease virus 3C protease mutant L127P: Implications for FMD vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Puckette, Michael; Clark, Benjamin A; Smith, Justin D; Turecek, Traci; Martel, Erica; Gabbert, Lindsay; Pisano, Melia; Hurtle, William; Pacheco, Juan M; Barrera, José; Neilan, John G; Rasmussen, Max

    2017-09-06

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) afflicts livestock in more than 80 countries limiting food production and global trade. Production of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines requires cytosolic expression of the FMDV 3C protease to cleave the P1 polyprotein into mature capsid proteins, but the FMDV 3C protease is toxic to host cells. To identify less toxic isoforms of the FMDV 3C protease, we screened 3C mutants for increased transgene output over wild-type 3C using a Gaussia luciferase reporter system. The novel point-mutation 3C(L127P) increased yields of recombinant FMDV subunit proteins in mammalian and bacterial cells expressing P1-3C transgenes and retained the ability to process P1 polyproteins from multiple FMDV serotypes. The 3C(L127P) mutant produced crystalline-arrays of FMDV virus-like particles in mammalian and bacterial cells, potentially providing a practical method of rapid, inexpensive FMD vaccine production in bacteria.Importance: The mutant FMDV 3C protease L127P significantly increased yields of recombinant FMDV subunit antigens and produced virus-like particles in mammalian and bacterial cells. The L127P mutation provides a novel advancement for economical FMD vaccine production. Copyright © 2017 Puckette et al.

  17. Chimeric foot-and-mouth disease viruses: evaluation of their efficacy as potential marker vaccines in cattle.

    PubMed

    Fowler, V L; Paton, D J; Rieder, E; Barnett, P V

    2008-04-07

    Previous work in pigs, has demonstrated that full protection against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) can be achieved following vaccination with chimeric foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccines, in which the VP1 G-H loop had been substituted with that from another serotype. If proven to be effective in other economically important species such as cattle, such vaccine constructs could be trialed as potential marker vaccines. Here, we determine if G-H loop chimera FMDV vaccines can: (i) protect cattle from virus challenge and (ii) induce an antibody response that would enable the identification of infection, regardless of vaccination status. Inactivated, oil adjuvanated, chimeric vaccine constructs, based on the backbone sequence of the A(12)119 serotype virus, fully protected cattle from challenge 21 days post-vaccination. Differentiation assays developed for use in this study were able to identify sub-clinical infection, which in one vaccinated animal, persisted beyond day 32 post-challenge. This paper emphasises the importance of epitopes outside of the VP1 G-H loop for protective immunity in cattle, and demonstrates that chimeric FMDV vaccines could prove to be useful marker vaccines for the future.

  18. Tongue Epithelium Cells from shRNA Mediated Transgenic Goat Show High Resistance to Foot and Mouth Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenting; Wang, Kejun; Kang, Shimeng; Deng, Shoulong; Han, Hongbing; Lian, Ling; Lian, Zhengxing

    2015-01-01

    Foot and mouth disease induced by foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is severe threat to cloven-hoofed domestic animals. The gene 3Dpol in FMDV genome encodes the viral RNA polymerase, a vital element for FMDV replication. In this study, a conserved 3D-7414shRNA targeting FMDV-3Dpol gene was designed and injected into pronuclear embryos to produce the transgenic goats. Sixty-one goats were produced, of which, seven goats positively integrated 3D-7414shRNA. Loss of function assay demonstrated that siRNA effectively knockdown 3Dpol gene in skin epithelium cells of transgenic goats. Subsequently, the tongue epithelium cells from transgenic and non-transgenic goats were infected with FMDV O/YS/CHA/05 strain. A significant decrease of virus titres and virus copy number was observed in cells of transgenic goats compared with that of non-transgenic goats, which indicated that 3D-7414siRNA inhibited FMDV replication by interfering FMDV-3Dpol gene. Furthermore, we found that expression of TLR7, RIG-I and TRAF6 was lower in FMDV infected cells from transgenic goats compared to that from non-transgenic goats, which might result from lower virus copy number in transgenic goats’ cells. In conclusion, we successfully produced transgenic goats highly expressing 3D-7414siRNA targeting 3Dpol gene, and the tongue epithelium cells from the transgenic goats showed effective resistance to FMDV. PMID:26671568

  19. Re-assessing the likelihood of airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease at the start of the 1967-1968 UK foot-and-mouth disease epidemic.

    PubMed Central

    Gloster, J.; Freshwater, A.; Sellers, R. F.; Alexandersen, S.

    2005-01-01

    The likelihood of airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease at the start of the 1967-1968 epidemic is re-assessed in the light of current understanding of airborne disease spread. The findings strongly confirm those made at the time that airborne virus was the most likely cause of the rapid early development of the disease out to 60 km from the source. This conclusion is reached following a detailed epidemiological, meteorological and modelling study using original records and current modelling techniques. The role played by 'lee waves' as the mechanism for the spread is investigated. It is thought that they played little part in influencing the development of the epidemic. A number of lessons learned from the work are drawn, identifying the need for further research on the quantity and characteristics of airborne virus. The results are also used to illustrate what advice would have been available to disease controllers if the outbreak had occurred in 2004. PMID:16181495

  20. Synonymous Deoptimization of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Causes Attenuation In Vivo while Inducing a Strong Neutralizing Antibody Response

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Medina, Gisselle N.; Ramirez-Medina, Elizabeth; Velazquez-Salinas, Lauro; Koster, Marla; Grubman, Marvin J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Codon bias deoptimization has been previously used to successfully attenuate human pathogens, including poliovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and influenza virus. We have applied a similar technology to deoptimize the capsid-coding region (P1) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Despite the introduction of 489 nucleotide changes (19%), synonymous deoptimization of the P1 region rendered a viable FMDV progeny. The resulting strain was stable and reached cell culture titers similar to those obtained for wild-type (WT) virus, but at reduced specific infectivity. Studies in mice showed that 100% of animals inoculated with the FMDV A12 P1 deoptimized mutant (A12-P1 deopt) survived, even when the animals were infected at doses 100 times higher than the dose required to cause death by WT virus. All mice inoculated with the A12-P1 deopt mutant developed a strong antibody response and were protected against subsequent lethal challenge with WT virus at 21 days postinoculation. Remarkably, the vaccine safety margin was at least 1,000-fold higher for A12-P1 deopt than for WT virus. Similar patterns of attenuation were observed in swine, in which animals inoculated with A12-P1 deopt virus did not develop clinical disease until doses reached 1,000 to 10,000 times the dose required to cause severe disease in 2 days with WT A12. Consistently, high levels of antibody titers were induced, even at the lowest dose tested. These results highlight the potential use of synonymous codon pair deoptimization as a strategy to safely attenuate FMDV and further develop live attenuated vaccine candidates to control such a feared livestock disease. IMPORTANCE Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is one of the most feared viral diseases that can affect livestock. Although this disease appeared to be contained in developed nations by the end of the last century, recent outbreaks in Europe, Japan, Taiwan, South Korea, etc., have demonstrated that infection can spread rapidly, causing

  1. [Does emergency vaccination make sense as a supporting element in control of foot-and-mouth disease in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Hadorn, D; Dürr, S; Thür, B; Schwermer, H; Clemenz, C; Bruckner, L; Perler, L; Jemmi, T

    2013-07-01

    The outbreak of foot and mouth disease (FMD) in Great Britain in 2001 let to discussions and especially emergency vaccination was deemed as an alternative to the culling of vast numbers of healthy animals. The project emergency vaccination for FMD in Switzerland was conducted to compare the effectiveness of conventional control strategies during a FMD outbreak alone and with ring vaccination of 3 km and 10 km, respectively. The results of this project showed that emergency vaccination conducted at the beginning of an epidemic was not favorable compared to conventional disease control strategy in Switzerland. In case of an advanced FMD epidemic, a 10 km ring vaccination could support the disease control in a positive way. However, the goal of emergency vaccination to save animal live can hardly be achieved due to actual legal basis and the consequent restriction measures within vaccination zones which will lead to welfare culling.

  2. A Brief Review on Diagnosis of Foot-and-Mouth Disease of Livestock: Conventional to Molecular Tools

    PubMed Central

    Longjam, Neeta; Deb, Rajib; Sarmah, A. K.; Tayo, Tilling; Awachat, V. B.; Saxena, V. K.

    2011-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is one of the highly contagious diseases of domestic animals. Effective control of this disease needs sensitive, specific, and quick diagnostic tools at each tier of control strategy. In this paper we have outlined various diagnostic approaches from old to new generation in a nutshell. Presently FMD diagnosis is being carried out using techniques such as Virus Isolation (VI), Sandwich-ELISA (S-ELISA), Liquid-Phase Blocking ELISA (LPBE), Multiplex-PCR (m-PCR), and indirect ELISA (DIVA), and real time-PCR can be used for detection of antibody against nonstructural proteins. Nucleotide sequencing for serotyping, microarray as well as recombinant antigen-based detection, biosensor, phage display, and nucleic-acid-based diagnostic are on the way for rapid and specific detection of FMDV. Various pen side tests, namely, lateral flow, RT-LAMP, Immunostrip tests, and so forth. are also developed for detection of the virus in field condition. PMID:21776357

  3. The possible role that buffalo played in the recent outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Vosloo, Wilna; Boshoff, Karin; Dwarka, Rahana; Bastos, Armanda

    2002-10-01

    African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) act as maintenance hosts for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in southern Africa. A single buffalo can become infected with all three of the endemic serotypes of FMD virus (SAT-1, SAT-2, and SAT-3) and pose a threat of infection to other susceptible cloven-hoofed animals. The floods of 2000 in southern Africa damaged the Kruger National Park (KNP) game fence extensively, and there were several accounts of buffalo that had escaped from the park. The VP1 gene, which codes for the major antigenic determinant of the FMD virus, was used to determine phylogenetic relationships between virus isolates obtained from the outbreaks and those previously obtained from buffalo in the KNP. These results demonstrate that buffalo were most probably the source of the outbreaks, indicating that disease control using fencing as well as vaccination is extremely important to ensure that FMD does not become established in domestic livestock.

  4. Description of recent foot and mouth disease outbreaks in nonendemic areas: exploring the relationship between early detection and epidemic size.

    PubMed

    McLaws, Melissa; Ribble, Carl

    2007-10-01

    The objective of this investigation was to describe the detection of foot and mouth disease (FMD) outbreaks in nonendemic areas, and to consider how events early in an epidemic influence the epidemic's course. We identified 24 epidemics that occurred between 1992 and 2003 in areas officially considered free of FMD. We obtained information about these epidemics from many sources, including the scientific literature, the grey (non peer-reviewed) literature, and individuals involved with the outbreaks. While most of the epidemics consisted of fewer than 150 infected premises, there were 4 extremely large epidemics, each consisting of more than 2000 infected premises. There was no direct relationship between the time to detection and either the total number of infected premises or the number of animals killed for disease control purposes. We believe that the movement of infected animals through markets was the most critical factor that contributed to the unusual magnitude of the very large epidemics.

  5. Detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus RNA by reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao-tai; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Yong-sheng; Liu, Xiang-tao

    2011-11-09

    A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was developed for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) RNA. The amplification was able to finish in 45 min under isothermal condition at 64°C by employing a set of four primers targeting FMDV 2B. The assay showed higher sensitivity than RT-PCR. No cross reactivity was observed from other RNA viruses including classical swine fever virus, swine vesicular disease, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, Japanese encephalitis virus. Furthermore, the assay correctly detected 84 FMDV positive samples but not 65 FMDV negative specimens. The result indicated the potential usefulness of the technique as a simple and rapid procedure for the detection of FMDV infection.

  6. Unilateral acute maculopathy associated with adult onset hand, foot and mouth disease: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Bhan, Kanchan; Balaggan, Kam; Lee, Richard Wj; Pavesio, Carlos E; Addison, Peter Kf

    2015-01-01

    Acute maculopathy is a rare condition of unknown aetiology and Coxsackie virus is known to be associated with this macular chorioretinitis. We report a case of acute unilateral maculopathy in a 35-year-old woman with concurrent hand foot and mouth disease. Furthermore, we display multimodal imaging (colour fundus photographs, autofluorescence, spectral domain ocular coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography) charting the course of the disease. The source of the virus was thought to be the patient's child. Empirical treatment with oral corticosteroids was commenced and the inflammation resolved, leaving a residual macular scar. We present this case combined with the review of literature of adult onset Coxsackie-virus-associated retinitis. This case reiterates the fact that Coxsackie virus is an uncommon but important consideration in the differential diagnosis of chorioretinitis and posterior uveitis with atypical retinopathy.

  7. Experimental transmission of foot-and-mouth disease among Indian buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and from buffalo to cattle.

    PubMed

    Maroudam, V; Nagendrakumar, S B; Madhanmohan, M; Santhakumar, P; Thiagarajan, D; Srinivasan, V A

    2008-01-01

    Indian buffalo and cattle were infected experimentally with a serotype O strain of foot-and-mouth disease virus of buffalo origin. Whereas intradermolingual inoculation of buffalo produced largely sub-clinical infection, inoculation in the dental pad produced vesicles in the mouth and on the feet. A buffalo infected via the dental pad transmitted infection to cattle and buffalo by direct contact with them for 24h. The contact-exposed buffalo developed (1) delayed-onset clinical signs, and (2) shedding of virus from the nose, commencing before the appearance of vesicles and continuing until the experiment was terminated 10 weeks after exposure. The covert nature of the disease in Indian buffalo, coupled with the prolonged shedding of virus, suggests that this species represents a host of epidemiological importance.

  8. Effects of Meteorological Parameters and PM10 on the Incidence of Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease in Children in China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ruixue; Bian, Guolin; He, Tianfeng; Chen, Lv; Xu, Guozhang

    2016-01-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a globally-prevalent infectious disease. However, few data are available on prevention measures for HFMD. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the impacts of temperature, humidity, and air pollution, particularly levels of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter 10 micrometers (PM10), on the incidence of HFMD in a city in Eastern China. Daily morbidity, meteorological, and air pollution data for Ningbo City were collected for the period from January 2012 to December 2014. A total of 86,695 HFMD cases were enrolled in this study. We used a distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM) with Poisson distribution to analyze the nonlinear lag effects of daily mean temperature, daily humidity, and found significant relationships with the incidence of HFMD; in contrast, PM10 level showed no relationship to the incidence of HFMD. Our findings will facilitate the development of effective preventive measures and early forecasting of HFMD outbreaks. PMID:27171104

  9. Description of recent foot and mouth disease outbreaks in nonendemic areas: Exploring the relationship between early detection and epidemic size

    PubMed Central

    McLaws, Melissa; Ribble, Carl

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to describe the detection of foot and mouth disease (FMD) outbreaks in nonendemic areas, and to consider how events early in an epidemic influence the epidemic’s course. We identified 24 epidemics that occurred between 1992 and 2003 in areas officially considered free of FMD. We obtained information about these epidemics from many sources, including the scientific literature, the grey (non peer-reviewed) literature, and individuals involved with the outbreaks. While most of the epidemics consisted of fewer than 150 infected premises, there were 4 extremely large epidemics, each consisting of more than 2000 infected premises. There was no direct relationship between the time to detection and either the total number of infected premises or the number of animals killed for disease control purposes. We believe that the movement of infected animals through markets was the most critical factor that contributed to the unusual magnitude of the very large epidemics. PMID:17987967

  10. Systemic foot-and-mouth disease vaccination in cattle promotes specific antibody secreting cells at the respiratory tract and triggers local anamnestic-compatible responses upon aerosol infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease affecting biungulate species. Commercial vaccines, formulated with inactivated whole FMD virus (FMDV) particles, are regularly used worldwide in regions recognized as free from the disease. Here, we studied the generation of antibody ...

  11. Repeated exposure to 5D9, an inhibitor of 3D polymerase, effectively limits the replication of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in host cells.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of livestock caused by a highly variable RNA virus that has seven serotypes and more than sixty subtypes. Both prophylactic and post-infection means of controlling the disease outbreak, including universally applicable vaccines and emergenc...

  12. Differential Persistence of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in African Buffalo Is Related to Virus Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Maree, Francois; de Klerk-Lorist, Lin-Mari; Gubbins, Simon; Zhang, Fuquan; Seago, Julian; Pérez-Martín, Eva; Reid, Liz; Scott, Katherine; van Schalkwyk, Louis; Bengis, Roy; Juleff, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus (FMDV) circulates as multiple serotypes and strains in many regions of endemicity. In particular, the three Southern African Territories (SAT) serotypes are maintained effectively in their wildlife reservoir, the African buffalo, and individuals may harbor multiple SAT serotypes for extended periods in the pharyngeal region. However, the exact site and mechanism for persistence remain unclear. FMD in buffaloes offers a unique opportunity to study FMDV persistence, as transmission from carrier ruminants has convincingly been demonstrated for only this species. Following coinfection of naive African buffaloes with isolates of three SAT serotypes from field buffaloes, palatine tonsil swabs were the sample of choice for recovering infectious FMDV up to 400 days postinfection (dpi). Postmortem examination identified infectious virus for up to 185 dpi and viral genomes for up to 400 dpi in lymphoid tissues of the head and neck, focused mainly in germinal centers. Interestingly, viral persistence in vivo was not homogenous, and the SAT-1 isolate persisted longer than the SAT-2 and SAT-3 isolates. Coinfection and passage of these SAT isolates in goat and buffalo cell lines demonstrated a direct correlation between persistence and cell-killing capacity. These data suggest that FMDV persistence occurs in the germinal centers of lymphoid tissue but that the duration of persistence is related to virus replication and cell-killing capacity. IMPORTANCE Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious acute vesicular disease in domestic livestock and wildlife species. African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer) are the primary carrier hosts of FMDV in African savannah ecosystems, where the disease is endemic. We have shown that the virus persists for up to 400 days in buffaloes and that there is competition between viruses during mixed infections. There was similar competition in cell culture: viruses that killed cells quickly

  13. Review of the foot and mouth disease situation in North Africa and the risk of introducing the disease into Europe.

    PubMed

    Bouguedour, R; Ripani, A

    2016-12-01

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals, including cattle, pigs, sheep, goats, and certain wildlife species. The disease can cause massive economic losses when introduced into countries that were free from the infection, generating negative effects due to reduced animal productivity and restrictions on international livestock trade. Following 15 years of FMD absence, Tunisia and Algeria experienced an incursion of the disease in 2014. The epidemiological situation and disease control measures in operation for FMD in the North African region are not homogeneous. The FMD virus detected in Tunisia and Algeria during the epidemic in 2014 showed 99% identity with a strain isolated in Libya in 2013. Morocco was not affected by the 2014 epidemic but it started a preventive vaccination campaign for cattle in August of that year. The relatively short distance between the North African continent and southern Europe may facilitate the introduction of pathogens, including FMD virus. The history of infectious diseases demonstrates that the Mediterranean Sea is not a sufficient barrier to viral infections. Considering the geography and the FMD situation in North African countries, strong and coordinated intervention strategies are required, including economic, political and disease control aspects, to prevent the spread of FMD to other countries in North Africa or to other regions, e.g. southern Europe. Regional platforms such as the Mediterranean Animal Health Network (REMESA) could play a crucial role in coordinating and managing animal health crises, such as the 2014 FMD epidemic.

  14. Evolutionary analysis of serotype A foot-and-mouth disease viruses circulating in Pakistan and Afghanistan during 2002-2009.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Syed M; Ferrari, Giancarlo; Ahmed, Safia; Normann, Preben; Curry, Stephen; Belsham, Graham J

    2011-12-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is endemic in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Three different serotypes of the virus, namely O, A and Asia-1, are responsible for the outbreaks of this disease in these countries. In the present study, the nucleotide-coding sequences for the VP1 capsid protein (69 samples) or for all four capsid proteins (P1, seven representative samples) of the serotype A FMD viruses circulating in Pakistan and Afghanistan were determined. Phylogenetic analysis of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) VP1-coding sequences from these countries collected between 2002 and 2009 revealed the presence of at least four lineages within two distinct genotypes, all belonging to the Asia topotype, within serotype A. The predominant lineage observed was A-Iran05 but three other lineages (a new one is named here A-Pak09) were also identified. The A-Iran05 lineage is still evolving as revealed by the presence of seven distinct variants, the dominant being the A-Iran05AFG-07 and A-Iran05BAR-08 sublineages. The rate of evolution of the A-Iran05 lineage was found to be about 1.2×10(-2) substitutions per nucleotide per year. This high rate of change is consistent with the rapid appearance of new variants of FMDV serotype A in the region. The A22/Iraq FMDV vaccine is antigenically distinct from the A-Iran05BAR-08 viruses. Mapping of the amino acid changes between the capsid proteins of the A22/Iraq vaccine strain and the A-Iran05BAR-08 viruses onto the A22/Iraq capsid structure identified candidate amino acid substitutions, exposed on the virus surface, which may explain this antigenic difference.

  15. Immunoprotective mechanisms in swine within the "grey zone" in antibody response after immunization with foot-and-mouth disease vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liu; Feng, Xia; Jin, Ye; Ma, Junwu; Cai, Hu; Zhang, Xiaoxia

    2016-07-15

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals caused by the FMD virus (FMDV). Vaccination represents one approach for limiting the effects of FMD. The level of protection in vaccinated animals after challenge with foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is closely related to the antibody titer, which can be classified into three zones: a "white zone", a "grey zone", and a "black zone". The aim of the present study was to clarify the immunoprotective mechanisms operating in the grey zone, in which vaccinated animals have intermediate antibody titers, making it difficult to predict the level of protection. Thirty-three pigs were used to analyze the distribution of lymphocyte subpopulations in whole blood and the expression levels of 40 cytokines before vaccination and challenge. The antibody titer in pigs in the grey zone ranged from 1:6-1:45. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte subpopulations, expression levels of Th1 cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin (IL)-12, IL-15, IL-18, and monocyte interferon gamma inducing factor (MIG), and of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), IL-1α, transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α), and TWEAK R varied between protected and unprotected animals. The results of this study suggest that the cellular immune response is the key factor responsible for immunoprotection in vaccinated animals with antibody titers within the grey zone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Non-capsid proteins to identify foot-and-mouth disease viral circulation in cattle irrespective of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, I E; Malirat, V; Neitzert, E

    2005-12-01

    The ability of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) to establish subclinical and even persistent infection, the so called carrier state, imposes the need to reliably demonstrate absence of viral circulation, to monitor the progress of control measures, either during eradication programs or after reintroduction of virus in free areas. This demonstration becomes critical in immunized populations, because of the concern that silent viral circulation could be hidden by immunization. This concern originates from the fact that vaccination against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) protects against clinical disease, but not necessarily against subclinical infection or establishment of the carrier state in cattle. A novel approach, developed and validated at PANAFTOSA during the 1990s, based on an immunoenzymatic system for detection of antibodies against non-capsid proteins (NCP) has proven valuable for monitoring viral circulation within and between herds, irrespective of the vaccination status. Antibodies against NCP are induced during infection but, in principle, not upon vaccination. The validation of this system led to its international recognition as the OIE index test. The fitness of this serosurvey tool to assess viral circulation in systematically vaccinated populations was demonstrated through its extensive application in most regions in South America. The experience attained in these regions supported the incorporation of the "free of FMD with vaccination" provisions into the OIE code. Likewise, it opened the way to alternatives to the "stamping out" policy. The results gave input to an old controversy related to the real epidemiological significance, if any, of carrier animals under the vaccination conditions in South America, and supported the development of recommendations and guidelines that are being implemented for serosurveys that go with control measures in vaccinated populations.

  17. Beyond policy networks: policy framing and the politics of expertise in the 2001 Foot and Mouth Disease crisis.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Katy; Lowe, Philip; Donaldson, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    For the past decade, the policy community/issue network typology of pressure group interaction has been used to explain policy outcomes and the policy-making process. To re-examine the validity of this typology, the paper focuses on the UK government's response to the 2001 Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) crisis, and in particular the decision to pursue contiguous culling rather than vaccination to overcome the epidemic. Rather than illustrating the emergence of an issue network in agricultural policy, the decision-making process of the FMD outbreak demonstrates continuity with prior crises. In addition, the politicization of scientific expertise is identified as an emerging trend in crisis management. Policy framing is used to explain the impetus behind the contiguous cull decision, concluding that the legacy of previous policy choices conditioned the crisis response to a far greater degree than contemporaneous pressure group action.

  18. The effect of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccination on virus transmission and the significance for the field.

    PubMed

    Orsel, Karin; Bouma, Annemarie

    2009-10-01

    Vaccination against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) might be one of the control measures used during an FMD epidemic depending on the local epidemiological situation, the status of the country, and the opinion of policy makers. A sound decision on vaccination can be made only if there is sufficient scientific knowledge on the effectiveness of vaccination in eliminating the virus from the population. An important question is whether a single vaccination applied as an emergency vaccine can contribute to the control of an epidemic. This paper presents the results of transmission experiments on vaccine efficacy in groups of cattle, pigs, and sheep and concludes that vaccination seemed to be effective in cattle and sheep, but was less effective in pigs. The possible implications for application to field conditions are discussed.

  19. Use of ethnoveterinary remedies in the management of foot and mouth disease lesions in a diary herd.

    PubMed

    Gakuya, D W; Mulei, C M; Wekesa, S B

    2011-01-01

    An outbreak of Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) affecting 95 (57.2%) out of 166 cattle occurred in a medium-scale dairy farm in Kikuyu district, Kenya. Ethnoveterinary remedies of natural Soda ash solution (97% sodium bicarbonate), honey and finger millet flour were used to manage the FMD lesions. The lesions were washed with soda ash solution to remove the necrotic tissue after which raw honey and finger millet flour were applied to the cleaned lesions. The lesions were examined daily and those with necrotic material washed again with the Soda ash solution. Honey and finger millet flour were applied daily for three days. There was rapid healing of the lesions with the animals resuming feeding after three days. The fast healing of the lesions vindicates the use of these cheap, locally available and easy to apply products in the management of FMD lesions. However, more studies are needed to evaluate further their potencies.

  20. The Fecal Virome of Children with Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease that Tested PCR Negative for Pathogenic Enteroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Linsuwanon, Piyada; Poovorawan, Yong; Li, Linlin; Deng, Xutao; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Delwart, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) affects infant and young children. A viral metagenomic approach was used to identify the eukaryotic viruses in fecal samples from 29 Thai children with clinical diagnosis of HFMD collected during the 2012 outbreak. These children had previously tested negative by PCR for enterovirus 71 and coxsackievirus A16 and A6. Deep sequencing revealed nine virus families: Picornaviridae, Astroviridae, Parvoviridae, Caliciviridae, Paramyxoviridae, Adenoviridae, Reoviridae, Picobirnaviridae, and Polyomaviridae. The highest number of viral sequences belonged to human rhinovirus C, astrovirus-MLB2, and coxsackievirus A21. Our study provides an overview of virus community and highlights a broad diversity of viruses found in feces from children with HFMD. PMID:26288145

  1. The leader proteinase of foot-and-mouth disease virus: structure-function relationships in a proteolytic virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Steinberger, Jutta; Skern, Tim

    2014-10-01

    The leader proteinase (Lpro) of the foot-and-mouth disease virus inhibits the host innate immune response by at least three different mechanisms. The most well-characterised of these is the prevention of the synthesis of cytokines such as interferons immediately after infection, brought about by specific proteolytic cleavage of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4G. This prevents the recruitment of capped cellular mRNA; however, the viral RNA can be translated under these conditions. The two other mechanisms are the induction of NF-κB cleavage and the deubiquitination of immune signalling molecules. This review focuses on the structure-function relationships in Lpro responsible for these widely divergent activities.

  2. Predictions for the timing and use of culling or vaccination during a foot-and-mouth disease epidemic.

    PubMed

    Hutber, A M; Kitching, R P; Pilipcinec, E

    2006-08-01

    First-fortnight incidence (FFI) is a modelling parameter that can be used to predict both the prevalence and duration of a foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) epidemic at regional and national levels. With an indication of how long an epidemic may last by the end of week two, it becomes possible to estimate whether vaccination would be economically viable from the start of an epidemic. Where FFI indicates that an epidemic is unlikely to last for as long as an export ban on agricultural produce, it may be inappropriate to implement a policy of 'vaccination to live'. Alternatively where FFI indicates that an epidemic will equal or exceed the ban length, then the benefits of vaccination should be considered at an early stage, during or after the first fortnight. Since blanket vaccination of the national or regional herds and flocks would be both costly and heighten the risk of producing carrier animals, targetting vaccination through risk assessment becomes useful.

  3. Quantitative estimates of the risk of new outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease as a result of burning pyres.

    PubMed

    Jones, R; Kelly, L; French, N; England, T; Livesey, C; Wooldridge, M

    2004-02-07

    The risk of dispersing foot-and-mouth disease virus into the atmosphere, and spreading it to susceptible holdings as a result of burning large numbers of carcases together on open pyres, has been estimated for six selected pyres burned during the 2001 outbreak in the UK. The probability of an animal or holding becoming infected was dependent on the estimated level of exposure to the virus predicted from the concentrations of virus calculated by the Met Office, Bracknell. In general, the probability of infection per animal and per holding decreased as their distance from the pyre increased. In the case of two of the pyres, a holding under the pyre plumes became infected on a date consistent with when the pyre was lit. However, by calculating their estimated probability of infection from the pyres it was concluded that it was unlikely that in either case the pyre was the source of infection.

  4. Potential risk associated with animal culling and disposal during the foot-and-mouth disease epidemic in Japan in 2010.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Yoko; Kimura, Yoshinari; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Kobayashi, Sota; Tsutsui, Toshiyuki

    2015-10-01

    The large-scale foot-and-mouth (FMD) outbreak in 2010 in Japan presented logistical challenges in conducting animal culling and disposal. During the epidemic, culling of animals on infected farms was delayed owing to the difficulties in finding suitable burial sites. In this study, a retrospective matched case-control study was conducted to investigate the potential transmission risk associated with carcass disposal by considering the geographical relationship between farms and burial sites. The results showed that burial sites and transportation routes used for carcass disposal were not significant infection sources to the neighboring farms. However, infectious farms within 500 m, particularly, pig infected farms, posed a significant transmission risk to the neighboring farms. Implementation of strict bio-security measures during carcass disposal operation is essential to reduce the risk of disease transmission to neighboring farms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluating the efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour against foot-and-mouth disease virus within a BSL4 biosafety facility.

    PubMed

    Petit, B M; Almeida, F C; Uchiyama, T R; Lopes, F O C; Tino, K H; Chewins, J

    2017-10-01

    An evaluation was made of the efficacy of 35% hydrogen peroxide vapour (HPV) against foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in a biosafety facility. Biological indicators (BIs) were produced using three serotypes of FMDV, all with a titre of ≥10(6) TCID50 per ml. Fifteen BIs of each serotype were distributed across five locations, throughout a 30-m(3) airlock chamber, producing a total of 45 BIs. Thirty-five percent HPV was generated and applied using a Bioquell vaporization module located in the centre of the chamber. After a dwell period of 40 min, the HPV was removed via the enclosures air handling system and the BIs were collected. The surfaces of the BIs were recovered into Glasgow's modified Eagle's medium (GMEM), cultivated in BHK21 Cl13 cell culture and analysed for evidence of cytopathic effect (CPE). No CPE was detected in any BI sample. Positive controls showed CPE. The experimentation shows that FMDV is susceptible to HPV decontamination and presents a potential alternative to formaldehyde. Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is an important pathogen in terms of biosafety due to its infectious nature and wide range of host animals, such as cattle, sheep, goats and pigs. Outbreaks of FMDV can have a severe impact on livestock production, causing morbidity, mortality, reduced yields and trade embargoes. Laboratories studying FMDV must possess BSL4 robust bio-decontamination methods to prevent inadvertent release. Formaldehyde has been the primary agent for environmental decontamination, but its designation as a human carcinogen has led to a search for alternatives. This study shows 35% hydrogen peroxide vapour has the potential to be a rapid, effective, residue-free alternative. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. The position of the Dutch Farmers' Union on lessons learned and future prevention and control of foot and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Cuijpers, M P; Osinga, K J

    2002-12-01

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) has devastated animal husbandry in The Netherlands frequently in the past and still constitutes a threat. The use of vaccination reduced the number of outbreaks in The Netherlands in the 20th Century. However, the desire of some member states of the European Community not to use vaccination led to a new strategy based on stamping-out of infected and contagious farms and to strict transportation regulations. In 2001, this proved very disruptive to the wider rural economy, such as the recreational and tourism sectors. The policy also caused severe animal welfare problems and psychological problems among farmers and their families. This raised questions about the wider, and not only veterinary or agricultural, implications of control strategies of foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV). The technology seems to be in place for a return to the use of protective vaccination against FMDV during an outbreak, provided the Office International des Epizooties (OIE: World organisation for animal health) and European Commission (EC) receive data that substantiate the reliability of differentiating tests such as the 3ABC enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for use in individual animals. Research is in progress but may not be able to produce these data until 2003 or 2004. High potency vaccines should be used to elicit sufficient immunity within three to four days. During an FMD crisis, farmers should be assisted to find markets for products from areas affected by FMDV. The human dimension of any FMD outbreak must be dealt with sufficiently in any contingency plan.

  7. Reconstructing geographical movements and host species transitions of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype SAT 2.

    PubMed

    Hall, Matthew D; Knowles, Nick J; Wadsworth, Jemma; Rambaut, Andrew; Woolhouse, Mark E J

    2013-10-22

    Of the three foot-and-mouth-disease virus SAT serotypes mainly confined to sub-Saharan Africa, SAT 2 is the strain most often recorded in domestic animals and has caused outbreaks in North Africa and the Middle East six times in the last 25 years, with three apparently separate events occurring in 2012. This study updates the picture of SAT 2 phylogenetics by using all available sequences for the VP1 section of the genome available at the time of writing and uses phylogeographic methods to trace the origin of all outbreaks occurring north of the Sahara since 1990 and identify patterns of spread among countries of endemicity. Transitions between different host species are also enumerated. Outbreaks in North Africa appear to have origins in countries immediately south of the Sahara, whereas those in the Middle East are more often from East Africa. The results of the analysis of spread within sub-Saharan Africa are consistent with it being driven by relatively short-distance movements of animals across national borders, and the analysis of host species transitions supports the role of the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) as an important natural reservoir. Foot-and-mouth disease virus is a livestock pathogen of major economic importance, with seven distinct serotypes occurring globally. The SAT 2 serotype, endemic in sub-Saharan Africa, has caused a number of outbreaks in North Africa and the Middle East during the last decades, including three separate incidents in 2012. A comprehensive analysis of all available RNA sequences for SAT 2 has not been published for some years. In this work, we performed this analysis using all previously published sequences and 49 newly determined examples. We also used phylogenetic methods to infer the source country for all outbreaks occurring outside sub-Saharan Africa since 1990 and to reconstruct the spread of viral lineages between countries where it is endemic and movements between different host species.

  8. The pathogenesis of foot-and-mouth disease II; viral pathways in swine, small ruminants, and wildlife, myotropism, chronic syndromes, and molecular virus-host interactions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Investigation of the pathogenesis of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) has focused on study of the disease in cattle with less emphasis on pigs, small ruminants, and wildlife. “Atypical” FMD-associated syndromes such as myocarditis, reproductive losses, and chronic heat-intolerance have also received lit...

  9. Disinfection of foot-and-mouth disease and African swine fever viruses with citric acid and sodium hypochlorite on birch wood carriers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transboundary animal disease viruses such as foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) and African swine fever virus (ASFV) are highly contagious and cause severe morbidity and mortality in livestock. Proper disinfection during an outbreak can help prevent virus spread and will shorten the time for contam...

  10. Screwworms, Cochliomyia hominivorax, reared for mass release do not carry and spread foot-and-mouth disease virus and classical swine fever virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transporting live screwworms Cochliomyia hominivorax Coquerel for developing new strains from countries where foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and classical swine fever (CSF) are endemic, to the mass rearing facilities in Mexico and Panama may introduce these exotic diseases. This study was conducted to...

  11. Sero-prevalence of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in large ruminants at peri urban dairy farms near Islamabad, Pakistan

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is an important, endemic, trans-boundary viral disease affecting livestock in Pakistan and associated with high economic losses. This survey was conducted to estimate sero-prevalence of FMD in large ruminants from peri-urban dairy farms near Islamabad. Serum samples were...

  12. Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) with a stable FLAG epitope in the VP1 G-H loop as a new tool for studying FMDV pathogenesis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study, we generated a recombinant foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) particle derived from A24 Cruzeiro with a FLAG tag (DYKDDDDK) substitution in the hypervariable antigenic site of the G-H loop of the VP1 capsid protein in an effort to expand the immunogenicity of the virus particle and t...

  13. Persistent foot-and-mouth disease virus infection in the nasopharynx of cattle: tissue-specific distribution and local cytokine expression

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tissues obtained post-mortem from cattle persistently infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) were analyzed to characterize the tissue-specific localization of FMDV and partial transcriptome profiles for selected immunoregulatory cytokines. Analysis of 28 distinct anatomic sites from 21 st...

  14. Analysis of sat type foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid proteins: influence of receptor usage on the properties of virus particles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The viral mechanism involved in foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) tissue tropism, host range and the events during viral entry into susceptible cells is not well understood. Using infectious cDNA clones of the three South African Territories (SAT) type viruses prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa, the biologi...

  15. A Conserved Domain in the Leader Proteinase of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus is Required for Proper Sub-Cellular Localization and Function

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The leader proteinase (Lpro) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is involved in antagonizing the innate immune response by blocking the expression of interferon (IFN) protein and by reducing the immediate-early induction of IFN beta mRNA and IFN stimulated genes. In addition to its role in shutti...

  16. Introduction of tag epitopes in the inter-AUG region of foot and mouth disease virus: effect on the L protein

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) initiates translation from two in–frame AUG codons producing two forms of the leader (L) proteinase, termed Lab (starting at the first AUG) and Lb (starting at second AUG). In a previous study, we have demonstrated that acDNA-derived mutant FMDV (A24-L1123) conta...

  17. Role of the Region Located Between the Two AUG Initiation Codons in the Pathogenesis of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Translation of the viral polyprotein in picornavirus initiates at an AUG located immediately after the IRES in the 5’UTR. In the case of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) there are two functional AUGs in this region separated by 84 nucleotides. The role of this region in the viral life cycle has r...

  18. Infection with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) induces a natural killer (NK) cell response in cattle that is lacking following vaccination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a role in innate antiviral immunity by directly lysing virus-infected cells and producing antiviral cytokines such as interferon gamma (IFNgamma). We developed a system for characterizing the bovine NK response to foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), which causes a dis...

  19. Synonymous deoptimization of the foot-and-mouth disease virus P1 coding region causes attenuation in vivo while inducing a strong neutralizing antibody response

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Codon bias deoptimization has been previously used to successfully attenuate human pathogens including polio, respiratory syncytial and influenza viruses. We have applied a similar technology to deoptimize the capsid coding region (P1 region) of the cDNA infectious clone of foot-and-mouth disease vi...

  20. Detection of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus RNA and capsid protein in lymphoid tissues of convalescent pigs does not indicate existence of a carrier state

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A systematic study was performed to investigate the potential of pigs to maintain persistent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV) infection. Infectious virus could not be recovered from sera, oral, nasal- or oropharyngeal fluids obtained after resolution of clinical infection with FMDV serotypes A, O...

  1. Interaction of foot-and-mouth disease virus non-structural protein 3A with host protein DCTN3 is important for viral virulence in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Non-structural protein 3A of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a partially conserved protein of 153 amino acids in most FMDVs examined to date. The role of 3A in virus growth and virulence within the natural host is not well understood. Using a yeast two-hybrid approach, we identified cellular ...

  2. Redistribution of demethylated RNA helicase A during foot-and-mouth disease virus infection: role of jumonji C-domain containing protein 6 in RHA demethylation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We previously reported that RNA Helicase A (RHA) re-localized from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infected cells, coincident with a reduction in methylation of arginine residues in the RHA C-terminus. To further define the mechanism of RHA demethylation in FMDV-...

  3. Multiple efficacy studies of an adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A24 subunit vaccine in cattle using direct homologous challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The safety and efficacy of an experimental, replication-deficient, human adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype A24 Cruzeiro capsid-based subunit vaccine (AdtA24) was examined in eight independent cattle studies. AdtA24 non-adjuvanted vaccine was administered intramuscularl...

  4. Innate Immune Defenses Induced by CpG do not Promote Vaccine-Induced Protection Against Foot-and-Mouth Disease in Pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Emergency vaccination as part of the control strategies against Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) epidemics has the potential not only to limit the spread of the virus but also to reduce large-scale culling of affected herds. With the aim to reduce the time between vaccination and the onset of immunity, ...

  5. Analysis of SAT type foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid proteins and the identification of putative amino acid residues in virus stability

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) initiates infection by adhering to integrin receptors on target cells, followed by cell entry and disassembly of the virion through acidification within endosomes. Mild heating of the virions also leads to irreversible dissociation into pentamers, a characteristic...

  6. Serotype diversity of foot-and-mouth-disease virus in livestock without history of vaccination in the far north region of Cameroon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Little information is available about the natural cycle of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in the absence of control measures such as vaccination. Cameroon presents a unique opportunity for epidemiological studies because FMD vaccination is not practiced. We carried out a prospective study including se...

  7. Role of the Arg56 of the structural protein VP3 of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 01 campos in virus virulence

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is an extremely infectious and antigenically diverse picornavirus that causes high incidences of morbidity within naive livestock populations. Several reports indicate that FMDV O1 subtype strains undergo antigenic variation under diverse growth conditions. Of par...

  8. Domain disruptions of individual 3B proteins for foot-and-mouth disease virus do not alter growth in cell culture nor virulence in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Picornavirus RNA replication is initiated by a small viral protein primer, 3B (also known as VPg), that is covalently linked to the 5’RNA of the viral genome. In contrast to other picornaviruses that encode a single copy of 3B, foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) encodes three copies of 3B that are ...

  9. Predicting antigenic sites on the foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid of the South African Territories (SAT) types using virus neutralization data

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) outer capsid proteins 1B, 1C and 1D contribute to the virus serotype distribution and antigenic variants that exist within each of the seven serotypes. This study presents a phylogenetic, genetic and antigenic analysis of the South African Territories (SAT) seroty...

  10. Early events in the pathogenesis of foot-and-mouth disease in pigs; identification of oropharyngeal tonsils as sites of primary and sustained viral replication

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A time-course study was performed to elucidate the early events of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection in pigs subsequent to simulated natural inoculation. The earliest detectable event was primary infection in the lingual and paraepiglotic tonsils at 6 hours post inoculation (hpi) charact...

  11. Neutralizing Antibody Response in Bovine Serum and Nasal and Salivary Secretions After Immunization with Live or Inactivated Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Felipe; Ohlbaum, Adela; Contreras, Guillermo

    1973-01-01

    Calves develop nasal and salivary neutralizing antibodies against foot-and-mouth disease virus after nasal inoculation with live virus. Nasal and salivary antibody was not detected after exposure to inactive virus. Serum antibodies were induced by live and inactive virus given subcutaneously. Passively acquired antibodies were detected as long as 7 months after birth. PMID:4353542

  12. Morphologic and phenotypic characteristics of myocarditis in two pigs infected by foot-and mouth disease virus strains of serotypes O or A

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Myocarditis is often cited as the cause of fatalities associated with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection; however the pathogenesis of FMDV-associated myocarditis has not been described in detail. The current report describes substantial quantities of FMDV in association with a marked mono...

  13. Foot-and-mouth disease virus 5’-terminal S fragment is required for replication and modulation of the innate immune response in host cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) contains a 5’ untranslated region (5’UTR) with multiple structural domains that regulate viral genome replication, translation, and virus-host interactions. At its 5’terminus, the S fragment of over 360 bp is predicted to form a stable stem-loop that is separ...

  14. Combination of Adt-O1MANISA AND Ad5-boIFN induces early protective immunity against foot-and-mouth diseases in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth-disease (FMD) remains one of the most important economic concerns for the agricultural industry worldwide. Although vaccination with a commercially available inactivated whole virus formulation, or a recently developed replication-defective human adenovirus 5 vector-based subunit vacc...

  15. Adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease vaccine confers early and full protection against FMDV O1 Manisa in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A human adenovirus (Ad5) vectored foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) sero-type O1-Manisa subunit vaccine (Ad5-O1Man) was engineered to deliver FMDV O1-Manisa empty capsids. Swine inoculated with Ad5-O1Man developed an FMDV-specific neutralizing antibody response as compared to animals inoculated wi...

  16. Transcriptomic analysis of persistent infection with foot-and-mouth disease virus in cattle suggests impairment of cell-mediated immunity in the nasopharynx

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In order to investigate the mechanisms of persistent foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection in cattle, transcriptome alterations associated with the FMDV carrier state were characterized using a bovine whole-transcriptome microarray. Eighteen cattle (8 vaccinated with a recombinant FMDV A vac...

  17. Early detection and visualization of human adenovirus serotype 5-viral vectors carrying foot-and-mouth disease virus or luciferase transgenes in cell lines and bovine tissues

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recombinant replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vaccines containing capsid-coding regions from foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) have been demonstrated to induce effective immune responses and provide homologous protective immunity against FMDV in cattle. However, basic mechanisms ...

  18. Antigenic and immunogenic spectrum of foot-and-mouth disease vaccine strain O1 Campos against representative viruses of topotypes that circulated in Asia over the past decade.

    PubMed

    Galdo Novo, S; Malirat, V; Maradei, E D; Espinoza, A M; Smitsaart, E; Pedemonte, A R; Mattion, N; Bergmann, I E

    2017-04-25

    Identifying vaccine strains to control outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease virus that could spread to new regions is essential for contingency plans. This is the first report on the antigenic/immunogenic relationships of the South American O1/Campos vaccine strain with representative isolates of the three currently active Asian type O topotypes. Virus neutralization tests using O1/Campos post-vaccination sera derived from cattle and pigs predicted for both species acceptable cross-protection, even after single vaccination, established by r1 values and by expectancy of protection using monovalent or polyvalent vaccines. The results indicate that effective oil vaccines containing the O1/Campos strain can be used against Asian isolates, expanding the scope of O1/Campos strain included in vaccine banks to control emergencies caused by Asian viruses, even on single-dose vaccination, and to cover the need of effective vaccines in Asia during systematic vaccination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Differential Persistence of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in African Buffalo Is Related to Virus Virulence.

    PubMed

    Maree, Francois; de Klerk-Lorist, Lin-Mari; Gubbins, Simon; Zhang, Fuquan; Seago, Julian; Pérez-Martín, Eva; Reid, Liz; Scott, Katherine; van Schalkwyk, Louis; Bengis, Roy; Charleston, Bryan; Juleff, Nicholas

    2016-05-15

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus (FMDV) circulates as multiple serotypes and strains in many regions of endemicity. In particular, the three Southern African Territories (SAT) serotypes are maintained effectively in their wildlife reservoir, the African buffalo, and individuals may harbor multiple SAT serotypes for extended periods in the pharyngeal region. However, the exact site and mechanism for persistence remain unclear. FMD in buffaloes offers a unique opportunity to study FMDV persistence, as transmission from carrier ruminants has convincingly been demonstrated for only this species. Following coinfection of naive African buffaloes with isolates of three SAT serotypes from field buffaloes, palatine tonsil swabs were the sample of choice for recovering infectious FMDV up to 400 days postinfection (dpi). Postmortem examination identified infectious virus for up to 185 dpi and viral genomes for up to 400 dpi in lymphoid tissues of the head and neck, focused mainly in germinal centers. Interestingly, viral persistence in vivo was not homogenous, and the SAT-1 isolate persisted longer than the SAT-2 and SAT-3 isolates. Coinfection and passage of these SAT isolates in goat and buffalo cell lines demonstrated a direct correlation between persistence and cell-killing capacity. These data suggest that FMDV persistence occurs in the germinal centers of lymphoid tissue but that the duration of persistence is related to virus replication and cell-killing capacity. Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious acute vesicular disease in domestic livestock and wildlife species. African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer) are the primary carrier hosts of FMDV in African savannah ecosystems, where the disease is endemic. We have shown that the virus persists for up to 400 days in buffaloes and that there is competition between viruses during mixed infections. There was similar competition in cell culture: viruses that killed cells quickly persisted more

  20. Epidemiological simulation modeling and spatial analysis for foot-and-mouth disease control strategies: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Premashthira, Sith; Salman, Mo D; Hill, Ashley E; Reich, Robin M; Wagner, Bruce A

    2011-12-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is one of the most serious transboundary, contagious viral diseases of cloven-hoofed livestock, because it can spread rapidly with high morbidity rates when introduced into disease-free herds or areas. Epidemiological simulation modeling can be developed to study the hypothetical spread of FMD and to evaluate potential disease control strategies that can be implemented to decrease the impact of an outbreak or to eradicate the virus from an area. Spatial analysis, a study of the distributions of events in space, can be applied to an area to investigate the spread of animal disease. Hypothetical FMD outbreaks can be spatially analyzed to evaluate the effect of the event under different control strategies. The main objective of this paper is to review FMD-related articles on FMD epidemiology, epidemiological simulation modeling and spatial analysis with the focus on disease control. This review will contribute to the development of models used to simulate FMD outbreaks under various control strategies, and to the application of spatial analysis to assess the outcome of FMD spread and its control.

  1. STUDIES ON THE PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF THE VIRUS OF FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE : II. CATAPHORESIS AND FILTRATION.

    PubMed

    Olitsky, P K; Boëz, L

    1927-03-31

    Cataphoresis experiments show that the virus of foot-and-mouth disease carries, under ordinary conditions, an electropositive charge. Its isoelectric range is at the high point of pH = about 8. Although cultivable bacteria are, as a rule, electronegative, yet certain protozoa, such as trypanosomes and spirochetes are also electropositive. In respect to charge, then, the virus is different from ordinary bacteria, but there is nothing in this finding to indicate an inanimate character of the incitant. A knowledge of the charge, however, aids in the interpretation of certain filtration phenomena, and indirectly in delimiting the size of the virus. In addition, it serves to explain its remarkable resistance to certain chemicals-a subject to be dealt with in the next paper of this series. Finally, cataphoresis indicates the possible separation of the virus from protein particles. Filtration experiments were made with different types of filters: Seitz, Berkefeld V and N, and Chamberland, of practically all sizes, collodion membranes, and Bechhold's ultrafilter. The results confirm the electropositive charge of the virus, as well as the minuteness of its size. Filtration was effected through the Seitz, Berkefeld, and Chamberland filters. In regard to the latter, the active agent passed through the L 11 only when its charge was shifted to negative: under ordinary conditions, carrying an electropositive charge, it failed to traverse this more dense wall, and was completely adsorbed in the oppositely charged barrier. Filtrations through electronegative collodion membranes, prepared in different ways and of varying thicknesses, resulted, as a rule, in failure, unless the thinnest and most permeable membranes were employed. But in these, the complication of microscopic holes was to be considered. Hence this method was regarded as impracticable. Success, however, was obtained with Bechhold's ultrafilter membranes of the most permeable type, and with these it was possible to

  2. The role of African buffalos (syncerus caffer) in the maintenance of foot-and-mouth disease in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To study the role of African buffalos (Syncerus caffer) in the maintenance of foot-and-mouth disease in Uganda, serum samples were collected from 207 African buffalos, 21 impalas (Aepyceros melampus), 1 giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis), 1 common eland (Taurotragus oryx), 7 hartebeests (Alcelaphus buselaphus) and 5 waterbucks (Kobus ellipsiprymnus) from four major National Parks in Uganda between 2005 and 2008. Serum samples were screened to detect antibodies against foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) non-structural proteins (NSP) using the Ceditest® FMDV NS ELISA. Solid Phase Blocking ELISAs (SPBE) were used to determine the serotype-specificity of antibodies against the seven serotypes of FMDV among the positive samples. Virus isolation and sequencing were undertaken to identify circulating viruses and determine relatedness between them. Results Among the buffalo samples tested, 85% (95% CI = 80-90%) were positive for antibodies against FMDV non-structural proteins while one hartebeest sample out of seven (14.3%; 95% CI = -11.6-40.2%) was the only positive from 35 other wildlife samples from a variety of different species. In the buffalo, high serotype-specific antibody titres (≥ 80) were found against serotypes O (7/27 samples), SAT 1 (23/29 samples), SAT 2 (18/32 samples) and SAT 3 (16/30 samples). Among the samples titrated for antibodies against the four serotypes O, SAT 1, SAT 2 and SAT 3, 17/22 (77%; CI = 59.4-94.6%) had high titres against at least two serotypes. FMDV isolates of serotypes SAT 1 (1 sample) and SAT 2 (2 samples) were obtained from buffalo probang samples collected in Queen Elizabeth National Park (QENP) in 2007. Sequence analysis and comparison of VP1 coding sequences showed that the SAT 1 isolate belonged to topotype IV while the SAT 2 isolates belonged to different lineages within the East African topotype X. Conclusions Consistent detection of high antibody titres in buffalos supports the view that African buffalos play an

  3. Neuro-Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease: Finding in 412 Patients and Prognostic Features.

    PubMed

    Lian, Zhou-Yang; Li, He-Hong; Zhang, Bin; Dong, Yu-Hao; Deng, Wu-Xu; Liu, Jing; Luo, Xiao-Ning; Huang, Biao; Liang, Chang-Hong; Zhang, Shui-Xing

    2017-04-21

    The aims of this study were to describe the neuroimaging findings in hand, foot, and mouth disease and determine those who may provide prognosis. Magnetic resonance imaging scans in 412 severe hand, foot, and mouth disease between 2009 and 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. The patients who had the neurological signs were followed for 6 months to 1 year. According to the good or poor prognosis, 2 groups were categorized. The incidence of lesions in different sites between the 2 groups was compared, and multivariate analysis was used to look for risk factors. The major sites of involvement for all patients with percentages were the medulla oblongata (16.1%), spinal anterior nerve roots (12.4%), thoracic segments (11.1%), brain or spinal meninges (8.3%), and so on. There were 347 patients (84.2%) with good prognosis and 65 (15.8%) with poor prognosis in the follow-up. There was a significantly higher rate of lesions involving the cerebral white substance, thalamus, medulla oblongata, pons, midbrain, and spinal cord in the group with poor prognosis. Multivariate analysis showed 2 independent risk factors associated with poor prognosis: lesions located in the medulla oblongata (P < 0.015) and spinal cord (P < 0.001) on magnetic resonance imaging; the latter was the most significant prognostic factor (odds ratio, 29.11; P < 0.001). We found that the distribution patterns for all patients mainly involved the medulla oblongata, spinal anterior nerve roots, thoracic segments, and brain or spinal meninges. Our findings suggested that patients with lesions located in the medulla oblongata and spinal cord may be closely monitored for early intervention and meticulous management. For children with the symptom of nervous system, they are strongly recommended for magnetic resonance examination.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download

  4. 75 FR 65431 - Change in Disease Status of Japan Because of Foot-and-Mouth Disease

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 94 Change in Disease Status of Japan Because of... certain animals, meat, and other animal products by removing Japan from the list of regions considered to... has been confirmed in Japan. This action restricts the importation of ruminants and swine and the...

  5. Atmospheric Spread of Foot-and-mouth Disease During The Early Phase of The Uk Epidemic 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørensen, J. H.; Mikkelsen, T.; Astrup, P.; Alexandersen, S.; Donaldson, A. I.

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease in cloven-hoofed domesticated and wild animals. The highly contagious nature of FMD is a reflection of the wide range of species which are susceptible, the enormous quantities of virus liberated by infected animals, the range of excretions and secretions which can be infectious, the stability of the virus in the environment, the multiplicity of routes of infection and the very small doses of virus that can initiate infection in susceptible hosts. One of the routes for the spread of the disease is the atmospheric dispersion of virus exhaled by infected animals. Such spread can be rapid and extensive, and it is known in certain circumstances to have occurred over a distance of several hundred kilometres. For the FMD epidemic in UK in 2001, atmospheric dispersion models were applied in real time in order to describe the atmospheric dispersion of virus for the larger outbreaks of the disease. The operational value of such modelling is first of all to identify risk zones, which is helpful to the emergency management. The paper addresses the modelling techniques and presents results related with the epidemic in UK in 2001.

  6. The impact of seasonal variability in wildlife populations on the predicted spread of foot and mouth disease

    PubMed Central

    Highfield, Linda D.; Ward, Michael P.; Laffan, Shawn W.; Norby, Bo; Wagner, Gale

    2009-01-01

    Modeling potential disease spread in wildlife populations is important for predicting, responding to and recovering from a foreign animal disease incursion such as foot and mouth disease (FMD). We conducted a series of simulation experiments to determine how seasonal estimates of the spatial distribution of white-tailed deer impact the predicted magnitude and distribution of potential FMD outbreaks. Outbreaks were simulated in a study area comprising two distinct ecoregions in South Texas, USA, using a susceptible-latent-infectious-resistant geographic automata model (Sirca). Seasonal deer distributions were estimated by spatial autoregressive lag models and the normalized difference vegetation index. Significant (P < 0.0001) differences in both the median predicted number of deer infected and number of herds infected were found both between seasons and between ecoregions. Larger outbreaks occurred in winter within the higher deer-density ecoregion, whereas larger outbreaks occurred in summer and fall within the lower deer-density ecoregion. Results of this simulation study suggest that the outcome of an FMD incursion in a population of wildlife would depend on the density of the population infected and when during the year the incursion occurs. It is likely that such effects would be seen for FMD incursions in other regions and countries, and for other diseases, in cases in which a potential wildlife reservoir exists. Study findings indicate that the design of a mitigation strategy needs to take into account population and seasonal characteristics. PMID:19134466

  7. Spatial and temporal distribution of foot-and-mouth disease virus in the lake zone of Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Genchwere, Joseph M; Kasanga, Christopher J

    2014-04-23

    This study was conducted to determine the spatiotemporal distribution of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus (FMDV) serotypes and evaluate the awareness of livestock keepers about FMD in Tanzania. An observational prospective study involving serological analysis, FMDV antigen detection and questionnaire survey was carried out in the lake zone of Tanzania. Seroprevalence of antibodies to the nonstructural protein 3ABC of FMDV and serotype-specific antigen detection were investigated by using SVANOVIR® FMDV 3ABC-Ab ELISA and indirect-sandwich ELISA (sELISA), respectively, whilst a structured questionnaire was used to evaluate the awareness of livestock keepers about FMD. During the period of 2010-2011, both serum and tissue (foot-and-mouth epithelia) samples were collected from cattle suspected of FMD in 13 districts of the four regions of the lake zone. A total of 107 (80.5%) out of 133 tested serum samples were seropositive to nonstructural protein 3ABC, with at least one sample being positive from all 10 districts screened. Fifteen (53.6%) out of 28 tissue epithelial samples collected from FMD cases in eight districts during the course of this study were positive to serotype O FMDV antigen. Of these eight districts, serotype O FMDV antigens were detected from seven districts and no other serotypes were recovered from animal samples screened. Questionnaire surveys in six districts indicated that livestock keepers in the lake zone were aware of the clinical manifestations (26/29 = 90.0%) and economic impact (23/29 = 79.0%) of FMD in the region. The questionnaire data showed that FMD outbreaks often occurred after rainy seasons (22/29 = 75.9%), with the highest peaks predominantly occurring just after the long rains in May and June, and at the end of the short rains in November and December of each year. The spatial distribution of the FMD cases suggested that serotype O virus exposure was the only widespread cause of the 2010-2011 outbreaks in the lake zone.

  8. Genetic characterization and molecular epidemiology of foot-and-mouth disease viruses isolated from Afghanistan in 2003-2005.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Kate R; Knowles, Nick J; Davies, Paul R; Midgley, Rebecca J; Valarcher, Jean-Francois; Raoufi, Abdul Quader; McKenna, Thomas S; Hurtle, William; Burans, James P; Martin, Barbara M; Rodriguez, Luis L; Beckham, Tammy R

    2008-04-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) isolates collected from various geographic locations in Afghanistan between 2003 and 2005 were genetically characterized, and their phylogeny was reconstructed utilizing nucleotide sequences of the complete VP1 coding region. Three serotypes of FMDV (types A, O, and Asia 1) were identified as causing clinical disease in Afghanistan during this period. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the type A viruses were most closely related to isolates collected in Iran during 2002-2004. This is the first published report of serotype A in Afghanistan since 1975, therefore indicating the need for inclusion of serotype A in vaccine formulations that will be used to control disease outbreaks in this country. Serotype O virus isolates were closely related to PanAsia strains, including those that originated from Bhutan and Nepal during 2003-2004. The Asia 1 viruses, collected along the northern and eastern borders of Afghanistan, were most closely related to FMDV isolates collected in Pakistan during 2003 and 2004. Data obtained from this study provide valuable information on the FMDV serotypes circulating in Afghanistan and their genetic relationship with strains causing FMD in neighboring countries.

  9. Seasonal modeling of hand, foot, and mouth disease as a function of meteorological variations in Chongqing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pin; Zhao, Han; You, Fangxin; Zhou, Hailong; Goggins, William B.

    2017-02-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is an enterovirus-induced infectious disease, mainly affecting children under 5 years old. Outbreaks of HFMD in recent years indicate the disease interacts with both the weather and season. This study aimed to investigate the seasonal association between HFMD and weather variation in Chongqing, China. Generalized additive models and distributed lag non-linear models based on a maximum lag of 14 days, with negative binomial distribution assumed to account for overdispersion, were constructed to model the association between reporting HFMD cases from 2009 to 2014 and daily mean temperature, relative humidity, total rainfall and sun duration, adjusting for trend, season, and day of the week. The year-round temperature and relative humidity, rainfall in summer, and sun duration in winter were all significantly associated with HFMD. An inverted-U relationship was found between mean temperature and HFMD above 19 °C in summer, with a maximum morbidity at 27 °C, while the risk increased linearly with the temperature in winter. A hockey-stick association was found for relative humidity in summer with increasing risks over 60%. Heavy rainfall, relative to no rain, was found to be associated with reduced HFMD risk in summer and 2 h of sunshine could decrease the risk by 21% in winter. The present study showed meteorological variables were differentially associated with HFMD incidence in two seasons. Short-term weather variation surveillance and forecasting could be employed as an early indicator for potential HFMD outbreaks.

  10. Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease in Hong Kong: A Time-Series Analysis on Its Relationship with Weather.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pin; Goggins, William B; Chan, Emily Y Y

    2016-01-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is an emerging enterovirus-induced infectious disease for which the environmental risk factors promoting disease circulation remain inconclusive. This study aims to quantify the association of daily weather variation with hospitalizations for HFMD in Hong Kong, a subtropical city in China. A time series of daily counts of HFMD public hospital admissions from 2008 through 2011 in Hong Kong was regressed on daily mean temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, solar radiation and total rainfall, using a combination of negative binomial generalized additive models and distributed lag non-linear models, adjusting for trend, season, and day of week. There was a positive association between temperature and HFMD, with increasing trends from 8 to 20°C and above 25°C with a plateau in between. A hockey-stick relationship of relative humidity with HFMD was found, with markedly increasing risks over 80%. Moderate rainfall and stronger wind and solar radiation were also found to be associated with more admissions. The present study provides quantitative evidence that short-term meteorological variations could be used as early indicators for potential HFMD outbreaks. Climate change is likely to lead to a substantial increase in severe HFMD cases in this subtropical city in the absence of further interventions.

  11. Evaluation of a combinatorial RNAi lentivirus vector targeting foot-and-mouth disease virus in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIAOXI; ZHENG, HAIXUE; XU, MINJUN; ZHOU, YU; LI, XIANGPING; YANG, FAN; LIU, QINGYOU; SHI, DESHUN

    2015-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals, which leads to serious economical losses. FMDV is not adequately controlled by vaccination or biosecurity measures. To generate genetically modified FMDV-resistant animals, a combinatorial expression cassette producing three short hairpin (sh) RNAs was constructed using the lentivirus (LV) vector, LV-3shRNA. The three shRNAs were expressed under the regulation of DNA polymerase III promoters from a buffalo and a bovine source, with one targeted to the non-structural protein 3B, and the other two targeted to the viral polymerase protein 3D of FMDV, respectively. The role of LV-3shRNA in the inhibition of the replication of FMDV was determined in BHK-21 cells and in suckling mice. The results revealed that LV-3shRNA reduced viral growth 3-fold (24 h post-infection) when the cells were challenged with 107-times the tissue culture infective dose (TCID50)/ml of O serotype FMDV. The suckling mice pretreated with LV-3shRNA were completely protected on administration of 5-times the dose of FMDV otherwise sufficient to kill 50% of the experimental animals (LD50). These results demonstrated that the LV-mediated dual expression of three FMDV-specific shRNAs provided a novel strategy towards combating FMDV, which facilitates the permanent introduction of novel disease-resistance traits into the buffalo and bovine genomes in the future. PMID:26323462

  12. Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease in Hong Kong: A Time-Series Analysis on Its Relationship with Weather

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pin; Goggins, William B.; Chan, Emily Y. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is an emerging enterovirus-induced infectious disease for which the environmental risk factors promoting disease circulation remain inconclusive. This study aims to quantify the association of daily weather variation with hospitalizations for HFMD in Hong Kong, a subtropical city in China. Methods A time series of daily counts of HFMD public hospital admissions from 2008 through 2011 in Hong Kong was regressed on daily mean temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, solar radiation and total rainfall, using a combination of negative binomial generalized additive models and distributed lag non-linear models, adjusting for trend, season, and day of week. Results There was a positive association between temperature and HFMD, with increasing trends from 8 to 20°C and above 25°C with a plateau in between. A hockey-stick relationship of relative humidity with HFMD was found, with markedly increasing risks over 80%. Moderate rainfall and stronger wind and solar radiation were also found to be associated with more admissions. Conclusions The present study provides quantitative evidence that short-term meteorological variations could be used as early indicators for potential HFMD outbreaks. Climate change is likely to lead to a substantial increase in severe HFMD cases in this subtropical city in the absence of further interventions. PMID:27532865

  13. A portable reverse transcription recombinase polymerase amplification assay for rapid detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Abd El Wahed, Ahmed; El-Deeb, Ayman; El-Tholoth, Mohamed; Abd El Kader, Hanaa; Ahmed, Abeer; Hassan, Sayed; Hoffmann, Bernd; Haas, Bernd; Shalaby, Mohamed A; Hufert, Frank T; Weidmann, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a trans-boundary viral disease of livestock, which causes huge economic losses and constitutes a serious infectious threat for livestock farming worldwide. Early diagnosis of FMD helps to diminish its impact by adequate outbreak management. In this study, we describe the development of a real-time reverse transcription recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA) assay for the detection of FMD virus (FMDV). The FMDV RT-RPA design targeted the 3D gene of FMDV and a 260 nt molecular RNA standard was used for assay validation. The RT-RPA assay was fast (4-10 minutes) and the analytical sensitivity was determined at 1436 RNA molecules detected by probit regression analysis. The FMDV RT-RPA assay detected RNA prepared from all seven FMDV serotypes but did not detect classical swine fever virus or swine vesicular disease virus. The FMDV RT-RPA assay was used in the field during the recent FMD outbreak in Egypt. In clinical samples, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and RT-RPA showed a diagnostic sensitivity of 100% and 98%, respectively. In conclusion, FMDV RT-RPA was quicker and much easier to handle in the field than real-time RT-PCR. Thus RT-RPA could be easily implemented to perform diagnostics at quarantine stations or farms for rapid spot-of-infection detection.

  14. Seasonal modeling of hand, foot, and mouth disease as a function of meteorological variations in Chongqing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pin; Zhao, Han; You, Fangxin; Zhou, Hailong; Goggins, William B.

    2017-08-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is an enterovirus-induced infectious disease, mainly affecting children under 5 years old. Outbreaks of HFMD in recent years indicate the disease interacts with both the weather and season. This study aimed to investigate the seasonal association between HFMD and weather variation in Chongqing, China. Generalized additive models and distributed lag non-linear models based on a maximum lag of 14 days, with negative binomial distribution assumed to account for overdispersion, were constructed to model the association between reporting HFMD cases from 2009 to 2014 and daily mean temperature, relative humidity, total rainfall and sun duration, adjusting for trend, season, and day of the week. The year-round temperature and relative humidity, rainfall in summer, and sun duration in winter were all significantly associated with HFMD. An inverted-U relationship was found between mean temperature and HFMD above 19 °C in summer, with a maximum morbidity at 27 °C, while the risk increased linearly with the temperature in winter. A hockey-stick association was found for relative humidity in summer with increasing risks over 60%. Heavy rainfall, relative to no rain, was found to be associated with reduced HFMD risk in summer and 2 h of sunshine could decrease the risk by 21% in winter. The present study showed meteorological variables were differentially associated with HFMD incidence in two seasons. Short-term weather variation surveillance and forecasting could be employed as an early indicator for potential HFMD outbreaks.

  15. A Portable Reverse Transcription Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for Rapid Detection of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Abd El Wahed, Ahmed; El-Deeb, Ayman; El-Tholoth, Mohamed; Abd El Kader, Hanaa; Ahmed, Abeer; Hassan, Sayed; Hoffmann, Bernd; Haas, Bernd; Shalaby, Mohamed A.; Hufert, Frank T.; Weidmann, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a trans-boundary viral disease of livestock, which causes huge economic losses and constitutes a serious infectious threat for livestock farming worldwide. Early diagnosis of FMD helps to diminish its impact by adequate outbreak management. In this study, we describe the development of a real-time reverse transcription recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA) assay for the detection of FMD virus (FMDV). The FMDV RT-RPA design targeted the 3D gene of FMDV and a 260 nt molecular RNA standard was used for assay validation. The RT-RPA assay was fast (4–10 minutes) and the analytical sensitivity was determined at 1436 RNA molecules detected by probit regression analysis. The FMDV RT-RPA assay detected RNA prepared from all seven FMDV serotypes but did not detect classical swine fever virus or swine vesicular disease virus. The FMDV RT-RPA assay was used in the field during the recent FMD outbreak in Egypt. In clinical samples, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and RT-RPA showed a diagnostic sensitivity of 100% and 98%, respectively. In conclusion, FMDV RT-RPA was quicker and much easier to handle in the field than real-time RT-PCR. Thus RT-RPA could be easily implemented to perform diagnostics at quarantine stations or farms for rapid spot-of-infection detection. PMID:23977101

  16. Evolutionary analysis of structural protein gene VP1 of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype Asia 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingxun; Liu, Xinsheng; Fang, Yuzhen; Pan, Li; Lv, Jianliang; Zhang, Zhongwang; Zhou, Peng; Ding, Yaozhong; Chen, Haotai; Shao, Junjun; Zhao, Furong; Lin, Tong; Chang, Huiyun; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Yonglu; Zhang, Yongguang

    2015-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype Asia 1 was mostly endemic in Asia and then was responsible for economically important viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals, but the study on its selection and evolutionary process is comparatively rare. In this study, we characterized 377 isolates from Asia collected up until 2012, including four vaccine strains. Maximum likelihood analysis suggested that the strains circulating in Asia were classified into 8 different groups (groups I-VIII) or were unclassified (viruses collected before 2000). On the basis of divergence time analyses, we infer that the TMRCA of Asia 1 virus existed approximately 86.29 years ago. The result suggested that the virus had a high mutation rate (5.745 × 10(-3) substitutions/site/year) in comparison to the other serotypes of FMDV VP1 gene. Furthermore, the structural protein VP1 was under lower selection pressure and the positive selection occurred at many sites, and four codons (positions 141, 146, 151, and 169) were located in known critical antigenic residues. The remaining sites were not located in known functional regions and were moderately conserved, and the reason for supporting all sites under positive selection remains to be elucidated because the power of these analyses was largely unknown.

  17. Foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O phylodynamics: genetic variability associated with epidemiological factors in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Brito, B P; Perez, A M; Jamal, S M; Belsham, G J; Pauszek, S J; Ahmed, Z; Rodriguez, L L

    2013-12-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) control is the high genetic variability of the FMD virus (FMDV). In endemic settings such as the Indian subcontinent, this variability has resulted in the emergence of pandemic strains that have spread widely and caused devastating outbreaks in disease-free areas. In countries trying to control and eradicate FMD using vaccination strategies, the constantly evolving and wide diversity of field FMDV strains is an obstacle for identifying vaccine strains that are successful in conferring protection against infection with field viruses. Consequently, quantitative knowledge on the factors that are associated with variability of the FMDV is prerequisite for preventing and controlling FMD in the Indian subcontinent. A hierarchical linear model was used to assess the association between time, space, host species and the genetic variability of serotype O FMDV using viruses collected in Pakistan from 2005 to 2011. Significant (P<0.05) amino acid and nucleotide variations were associated with spatial distance, but not with differences in host species, which is consistent with the frequent multi-species infection of this serotype O FMDV. Results from this study will contribute to the understanding of FMDV variability and to the design of FMD control strategies in Pakistan. Viruses sequenced here also provide the earliest reported isolate from the Pan Asia II(ANT-10) sublineage, which has caused several outbreaks in the Middle East and spread into Europe (Bulgaria) and Africa (Libya).

  18. Immunoreactivity and trypsin sensitivity of recombinant virus-like particles of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Basagoudanavar, S H; Hosamani, M; Tamil, R P; Sreenivasa, B P; Chandrasekhar, B K; Venkataramanan, R

    2015-03-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is an important infection affecting the health and productivity of cloven-hoofed livestock. Development of improved vaccines and diagnostic reagents is being explored to facilitate the disease control. There is an emerging interest in virus-like particles (VLPs), as their constituent structural proteins are the major immunogens. The VLPs are similar to natural virus particles but lack viral nucleic acid. The objective of the present study was to express the VLPs of FMD virus (FMDV) serotype Asia-1 (IND 63/72), using baculovirus system and characterize them for antigenic structure. The VLPs expressed in insect cells showed immunoreactivity similar to inactivated cell culture FMDV. Further they possess similar sensitivity to trypsin as the inactivated cell culture FMDV, suggesting that trypsin-sensitive antigenic sites could be similarly arranged. Our findings suggest that the FMD VLPs have similar antigenic conformational feature like the wild type virus, thus supporting their utility in development of non-infectious FMD vaccines and/or diagnostic assays.

  19. Epidemiologic Features of Enterovirus 71-Associated Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease from 2009 to 2013 in Zhejiang, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhifang; Lv, Huakun; Zhu, Wenming; Mo, Zhe; Mao, Guangming; Wang, Xiaofeng; Lou, Xiaoming; Chen, Yongdi

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) usually causes hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) with severe clinical symptoms and even deaths in China. There is no efficient antiviral drug to protect against severe EV71-associated HFMD, making the development of EV71 vaccines therefore a priority. However, the potential target subject population(s) to be immunized with EV71 vaccine are not well understood. In this study, we characterized the epidemiology regarding EV71-associated HFMD on the basis of provincial-level surveillance. We extracted data on EV71-associated HFMD from the National Notifiable Disease Reporting System in Zhejiang Province, China between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2013 (n = 7650). The higher incidence rate of EV71 cases occurred in those children aged 12–23 months, with boys being predominant. Interestingly, different peaks activities of EV71 infection was observed in different calendar year, with one peak in 2009 and 2013 and two peaks in 2010–2012. However, EV71 infection seemed to predominately occur in warm season and a distinguished cyclic peak that seemed to be of about 12 months. Children aged 12–23 months are thus identified as an important target population for public health intervention, for example, it is recommended that these key subjects immunized with EV71 vaccine. In addition, an enhanced surveillance system for EV71-associated with HFMD needs to focus on generic and phylogenetic analysis. PMID:28042848

  20. Clinical and Etiological Characteristics of Atypical Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease in Children from Chongqing, China: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiang; Zhang, Zhen-Zhen; Yang, Zhen-Hua; Zhu, Chao-Min; Hu, Yun-Ge; Liu, Quan-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) is a disease that had similar manifestations to chickenpox, impetigo, and measles, which is easy to misdiagnose and subsequently causes delayed therapy and subsequent epidemic. To date, no study has been conducted to report the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of atypical HFMD. Methods. 64 children with atypical HFMD out of 887 HFMD children were recruited, stool was collected, and viral VP1 was detected. Results. The atypical HFMD accounted for 7.2% of total HFMD in the same period (64/887) and there were two peaks in its prevalence in nonepidemic seasons. Ten children (15.6%) had manifestations of neurologic involvement, of whom 4 (6.3%) were diagnosed with severe HFMD and 1 with critically severe HFMD, but all recovered smoothly. Onychomadesis and desquamation were found in 14 patients (21.9%) and 15 patients (23.4%), respectively. The most common pathogen was coxsackievirus A6 (CV-A6) which accounted for 67.2%, followed by nontypable enterovirus (26.6%), enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) (4.7%), and coxsackievirus A16 (A16) (1.5%). Conclusions. Atypical HFMD has seasonal prevalence. The manifestations of neurologic involvement in atypical HFMD are mild and usually have a good prognosis. CV-A6 is a major pathogen causing atypical HFMD, but not a major pathogen in Chongqing, China. PMID:26693489

  1. Poly ICLC increases the potency of a replication-defective human adenovirus vectored foot-and-mouth disease vaccine.

    PubMed

    Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Dias, Camila C; Moraes, Mauro P; Weiss, Marcelo; Perez-Martin, Eva; Salazar, Andres M; Grubman, Marvin J; de los Santos, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. We have previously demonstrated that a replication-defective human adenovirus 5 vector carrying the FMDV capsid coding region of serotype A24 Cruzeiro (Ad5-CI-A24-2B) protects swine and cattle against FMDV challenge by 7 days post-vaccination. However, since relatively large amounts of Ad5-CI-A24-2B are required to induce protection this strategy could be costly for livestock production. Poly ICLC is a synthetic double stranded RNA that activates multiple innate and adaptive immune pathways. In this study, we have tested for the first time, the adjuvant effect of poly ICLC in combination with Ad5-CI-A24-2B in swine. We found that the combination resulted in a reduction of the vaccine protective dose by 80-fold. Interestingly, the lowest dose of Ad5-CI-A24-2B plus 1mg of poly ICLC protected animals against challenge even in the absence of detectable FMDV-specific neutralizing antibodies at the time of challenge.

  2. Pan-serotypic detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus by RT linear-after-the-exponential PCR.

    PubMed

    Reid, Scott M; Pierce, Kenneth E; Mistry, Rohit; Bharya, Sukvinder; Dukes, Juliet P; Volpe, Carmelo; Wangh, Lawrence J; King, Donald P

    2010-10-01

    A reverse transcription Linear-After-The-Exponential polymerase chain reaction (RT LATE-PCR) assay was evaluated for detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). This pan-serotypic assay targets highly conserved sequences within the 3D (RNA polymerase) region of the FMDV genome, and uses end-point hybridisation analysis of a single mismatch-tolerant low temperature probe to confirm the identity of the amplicons. An Armored RNA served as an internal control to validate virus negative results. The ability of the assay to identify FMDV was directly compared to a real-time RT-PCR assay routinely used by reference laboratories. The analytical sensitivity of the RT LATE-PCR assay was 10 genomic copies and the dynamic range of the test was identical to real-time RT-PCR based on decimal dilutions of an FMDV-positive sample. This pan-serotypic assay was able to detect FMDV in a broad range of clinical samples collected from field cases of FMD (n = 121), while samples of other viruses causing vesicular disease in livestock and genetic relatives of FMDV were negative. In addition to the laboratory-based utility of this diagnostic test, the RT LATE-PCR assay format has potential application for use in a portable ("point-of-care") device designed to achieve rapid detection of FMDV in the field.

  3. Quantitative single dilution liquid phase blocking ELISA for sero-monitoring of foot-and-mouth disease in India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gaurav Kumar; Mahajan, Sonalika; Matura, Rakesh; Subramaniam, Saravanan; Mohapatra, Jajati K; Pattnaik, Bramhadev

    2015-05-01

    Three of the seven serotypes of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus are prevailing in India. A massive vaccination campaign is on to control and eradicate the disease from the country. However, FMD vaccines provide short term immunity, hence regular assessment of antibody level in the vaccinated herds is indispensible for the success of the control programme. The antibodies are quantitatively estimated, either by virus neutralization test or by end-point dilution liquid-phase-blocking ELISA (LPBE). Millions of cattle and buffalo in the country are now systematically vaccinated, and thousands of serum samples are routinely screened in the country for estimation of herd immunity against FMDV serotypes O, A and Asia1. Testing such a large number of serum samples within limited a period of time by the conventional end point dilution method of LPBE requires lots of man power, and biological reagents. A more economical high throughput single dilution LPBE (SdLPBE) assay was optimized and validated for quantitative estimation of antibody levels against the three FMD virus serotypes. The assay was thoroughly validated against LPBE method before adopting it for country-wide use. The biological reagents used in the assay were prepared in thermo-stable form to enable transportation to the field level FMD diagnostic laboratories. Copyright © 2015 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Foot and mouth disease in Zambia: spatial and temporal distributions of outbreaks, assessment of clusters and implications for control.

    PubMed

    Sinkala, Yona; Simuunza, Martin; Muma, John B; Pfeiffer, Dirk U; Kasanga, Christopher J; Mweene, Aaron

    2014-04-23

    Zambia has been experiencing low livestock productivity as well as trade restrictions owing to the occurrence of foot and mouth disease (FMD), but little is known about the epidemiology of the disease in these endemic settings. The fundamental questions relate to the spatio-temporal distribution of FMD cases and what determines their occurrence. A retrospective review of FMD cases in Zambia from 1981 to 2012 was conducted using geographical information systems and the SaTScan software package. Information was collected from peer-reviewed journal articles, conference proceedings, laboratory reports, unpublished scientific reports and grey literature. A space-time permutation probability model using a varying time window of one year was used to scan for areas with high infection rates. The spatial scan statistic detected a significant purely spatial cluster around the Mbala-Isoka area between 2009 and 2012, with secondary clusters in Sesheke-Kazungula in 2007 and 2008, the Kafue flats in 2004 and 2005 and Livingstone in 2012. This study provides evidence of the existence of statistically significant FMD clusters and an increase in occurrence in Zambia between 2004 and 2012. The identified clusters agree with areas known to be at high risk of FMD. The FMD virus transmission dynamics and the heterogeneous variability in risk within these locations may need further investigation.

  5. The B Cell Response to Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Cattle following Sequential Vaccination with Multiple Serotypes.

    PubMed

    Grant, Clare F J; Carr, B Veronica; Kotecha, Abhay; van den Born, Erwin; Stuart, David I; Hammond, John A; Charleston, Bryan

    2017-05-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a highly contagious viral disease. Antibodies are pivotal in providing protection against FMDV infection. Serological protection against one FMDV serotype does not confer interserotype protection. However, some historical data have shown that interserotype protection can be induced following sequential FMDV challenge with multiple FMDV serotypes. In this study, we have investigated the kinetics of the FMDV-specific antibody-secreting cell (ASC) response following homologous and heterologous inactivated FMDV vaccination regimes. We have demonstrated that the kinetics of the B cell response are similar for all four FMDV serotypes tested following a homologous FMDV vaccination regime. When a heterologous vaccination regime was used with the sequential inoculation of three different inactivated FMDV serotypes (O, A, and Asia1 serotypes) a B cell response to FMDV SAT1 and serotype C was induced. The studies also revealed that the local lymphoid tissue had detectable FMDV-specific ASCs in the absence of circulating FMDV-specific ASCs, indicating the presence of short-lived ASCs, a hallmark of a T-independent 2 (TI-2) antigenic response to inactivated FMDV capsid.IMPORTANCE We have demonstrated the development of intraserotype response following a sequential vaccination regime of four different FMDV serotypes. We have found indication of short-lived ASCs in the local lymphoid tissue, further evidence of a TI-2 response to FMDV. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. A partial deletion in non-structural protein 3A can attenuate foot-and-mouth disease virus in cattle.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Juan M; Gladue, Douglas P; Holinka, Lauren G; Arzt, Jonathan; Bishop, Elizabeth; Smoliga, George; Pauszek, Steve J; Bracht, Alexa J; O'Donnell, Vivian; Fernandez-Sainz, Ignacio; Fletcher, Paige; Piccone, Maria E; Rodriguez, Luis L; Borca, Manuel V

    2013-11-01

    The role of non-structural protein 3A of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) on the virulence in cattle has received significant attention. Particularly, a characteristic 10-20 amino acid deletion has been implicated as responsible for virus attenuation in cattle: a 10 amino acid deletion in the naturally occurring, porcinophilic FMDV O1 Taiwanese strain, and an approximately 20 amino acid deletion found in egg-adapted derivatives of FMDV serotypes O1 and C3. Previous reports using chimeric viruses linked the presence of these deletions to an attenuated phenotype in cattle although results were not conclusive. We report here the construction of a FMDV O1Campos variant differing exclusively from the highly virulent parental virus in a 20 amino acid deletion between 3A residues 87-106, and its characterization in vitro and in vivo. We describe a direct link between a deletion in the FMDV 3A protein and disease attenuation in cattle. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. An appraisal on the occurrence of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotypes in cattle and buffaloes, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Abubakar, Muhammad; Khan, Ehtisham-ul-Haq; Arshed, Muhammad Javed; Gonzales, Jose; Ferrari, Giancarlo; Hussain, Manzoor; Ali, Qurban

    2015-06-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a livestock disease that has serious economic repercussions. Here, we report the laboratory results for samples from suspected outbreaks that were sent for confirmation of FMD in Pakistan. From January 2010 to December 2011, 132 suspected outbreaks were investigated, and samples from 58 out of the 76 outbreaks sent to the National Veterinary Laboratory (NVL) were positive. The highest proportion of positives were of serotype O (65.52 %), followed by serotype A (24.14 %) and serotype Asia-1 (10.35 %), whereas amongst the samples sent to the World Reference Laboratory, Pirbright, UK (WRL), samples from 48 out of 56 outbreaks were confirmed to be FMD positive, with the following serotypes identified: O (56.25 %), Asia-1 (37.50 %) and A (6.25 %). The outbreaks affected cattle, buffalo and mixed (cattle and buffalo) herds at rates of 91, 70 and 76 %, respectively. The trend of positive outbreaks was higher in the months of winter and late spring (November to April). Although the serotype O isolates and some of the serotype A isolates from the field samples resembled the vaccine strains (r-value ≥ 0.3), this was not the case for the Asia-1 isolates. These results help to improve our understanding of the occurrence and distribution of FMD in cattle and buffaloes in Pakistan and to provide baseline information for the FMD progressive control program in the country.

  8. Identification and isolation of foot-and-mouth disease virus from primary suspect cases in Korea in 2000.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jin-Ho; Sohn, Hyun-Joo; Choi, Kang-Seuk; Kwon, Byung-Jun; Choi, Cheong-Up; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Hwang, Eui-Kyung; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Jong-Yeom; Choi, Sang-Ho; Kim, Ok-Kyung

    2003-01-01

    The Republic of Korea had been free from foot and mouth disease (FMD) since 1934, until a recent outbreak in 2000. From March to April 2000, a total of 15 FMD outbreaks due to the serotype O virus were recorded. Coincidental outbreaks of FMD in cattle or pigs by the serotype O virus were reported in the region, including Taiwan, China, Japan, Russia and Mongolia. In this report, the results of emergency investigations of FMD cases on a dairy farm located approximately 5-km from the demilitarized zone in Korea are described. The causative agent of the disease was identified as the FMD virus O by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays using primers derived from the 3D polymerase, internal ribosome entry site (IRES), 1D/2B regions, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for antigen detection and typing. Sequence data of the partial 1D/2B region obtained from vesicular fluid showed close similarity (98% sequence identity) to the Kinmen isolate of the FMD virus O in Taiwan. The causative virus was isolated using black goat fetal lung cells following propagation in unweaned mice.

  9. Identification of health risks of hand, foot and mouth disease in China using the geographical detector technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jixia; Wang, Jinfeng; Bo, Yanchen; Xu, Chengdong; Hu, Maogui; Huang, Dacang

    2014-03-21

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is a common infectious disease, causing thousands of deaths among children in China over the past two decades. Environmental risk factors such as meteorological factors, population factors and economic factors may affect the incidence of HFMD. In the current paper, we used a novel model-geographical detector technique to analyze the effect of these factors on the incidence of HFMD in China. We collected HFMD cases from 2,309 counties during May 2008 in China. The monthly cumulative incidence of HFMD was calculated for children aged 0-9 years. Potential risk factors included meteorological factors, economic factors, and population density factors. Four geographical detectors (risk detector, factor detector, ecological detector, and interaction detector) were used to analyze the effects of some potential risk factors on the incidence of HFMD in China. We found that tertiary industry and children exert more influence than first industry and middle school students on the incidence of HFMD. The interactive effect of any two risk factors increases the hazard for HFMD transmission.

  10. Evading the host immune response: how foot-and-mouth disease virus has become an effective pathogen.

    PubMed

    Grubman, Marvin J; Moraes, Mauro Pires; Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Pena, Lindomar; de los Santos, Teresa

    2008-06-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes an economically devastating disease of cloven-hoofed animals. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms FMDV has evolved to counteract the host innate and adaptive immune responses and the role of viral proteins in this process. The viral leader proteinase, L pro, limits the host innate response by inhibiting the induction of interferon beta (IFN beta) mRNA and blocking host cell translation. A second viral proteinase, 3C pro, may affect host cell transcription because it cleaves histone H3. Viral protein 2B in conjunction with 2C or their precursor 2BC inhibits protein trafficking through the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. A decrease in surface expression of major histocompatibility class I molecules during FMDV infection suggests that 2B, 2C and/or 2BC may be involved in delaying the initiation of the host adaptive immune response and also adversely affect the secretion of induced signaling molecules. FMDV also causes a transient lymphopenia in swine, but the mechanism involved is not understood nor have any viral protein(s) been implicated. Furthermore, the interaction of FMDV with various cells in the immune system including lymphocytes and dendritic cells and the possible role of apoptosis and autophagy in these interactions are discussed.

  11. Economic Impacts of Potential Foot and Mouth Disease Agro-terrorism in the United States: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A; Rose, Adam; Bumsoo, Lee

    2013-01-01

    The foot and mouth disease (FMD) virus has high agro-terrorism potential because it is contagious, can be easily transmitted via inanimate objects and can be spread by wind. An outbreak of FMD in developed countries results in massive slaughtering of animals (for disease control) and disruptions in meat supply chains and trade, with potentially large economic losses. Although the United States has been FMD-free since 1929, the potential of FMD as a deliberate terrorist weapon calls for estimates of the physical and economic damage that could result from an outbreak. This paper estimates the economic impacts of three alternative scenarios of potential FMD attacks using a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model of the US economy. The three scenarios range from a small outbreak successfully contained within a state to a large multi-state attack resulting in slaughtering of 30 percent of the national livestock. Overall, the value of total output losses in our simulations range between $37 billion (0.15% of 2006 baseline economic output) and $228 billion (0.92%). Major impacts stem from the supply constraint on livestock due to massive animal slaughtering. As expected, the economic losses are heavily concentrated in agriculture and food manufacturing sectors, with losses ranging from $23 billion to $61 billion in the two industries.

  12. Early protection in sheep against intratypic heterologous challenge with serotype O foot-and-mouth disease virus using high-potency, emergency vaccine.

    PubMed

    Horsington, Jacquelyn; Zhang, Zhidong; Bittner, Hilary; Hole, Kate; Singanallur, Nagendrakumar B; Alexandersen, Soren; Vosloo, Wilna

    2015-01-09

    In 2009-2011, spread of a serotype O foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) belonging to the South East Asia topotype led to the culling of over 3.5 million cattle and pigs in Japan and Korea. The O1 Manisa vaccine (belonging to the Middle East-South Asian topotype) was used at high potency in Korea to limit the expansion of the outbreak. However, no data are available on the spread of this virus or the efficacy of the O1 Manisa vaccine against this virus in sheep. In this study, the early protection afforded with a high potency (>6 PD50) FMD O1 Manisa vaccine against challenge with the O/SKR/2010 virus was tested in sheep. Sheep (n=8) were vaccinated 4 days prior to continuous direct-contact challenge with donor sheep. Donor sheep were infected with FMDV O/SKR/2010 by coronary band inoculation 24h prior to contact with the vaccinated animals, or unvaccinated controls (n=4). Three of the four control sheep became infected, two clinically. All eight O1 Manisa vaccinated sheep were protected from clinical disease. None had detectable antibodies to FMDV non-structural proteins (3ABC), no virus was isolated from nasal swabs, saliva or oro-pharyngeal fluid and none became carriers. Using this model of challenge, sheep were protected against infection as early as 4 days post vaccination.

  13. Characterization of enterovirus 71 infection and associated outbreak of Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease in Shawo of China in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Michelle Y.; Liu, Jin; Lai, Weijian; Luo, Jun; Liu, Yingle; Vu, Gia-Phong; Yang, Zhu; Trang, Phong; Li, Hongjian; Wu, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Infection of enterovirus 71 (EV71) and associated hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) are recognized as emerging public health issues worldwide. Hundreds of thousands of children are annually infected with EV71 and develop HFMD in China alone. Studies of EV71 infection are critical to the treatment and prevention of the associated HFMD outbreaks. In this report, we studied an outbreak of 105 HFMD cases in Shawo Township of China between September to October 2012. More than 90% of cases were children younger than 9 years old, with over 50% of cases aged 3–6 years old. Laboratory studies detected a high prevalence of EV71 and suggested EV71 as the most common enterovirus causing HFMD in Shawo. Sequencing analysis showed that the EV71 strains from Shawo belong to the C4 subgenotype, and are phylogenetically more related to those from the distant city of Nanchang than those from the nearby city of Wuhan with distinct variations. More girls were found to be associated with EV71 in Shawo whereas more boys were associated with EV71 in Wuhan and Nanchang. Our studies further the understanding of the molecular epidemiological features of HFMD and infection by enteroviruses in China. PMID:27941929

  14. A Laboratory Evaluation of Medicinal Herbs Used in China for the Treatment of Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoqing; Wang, Chunyang; Xu, Lanfang; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Wei; Yang, Guang; Tan, Ren Xiang; Li, Erguang; Jin, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) are the causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). During recent epidemics of HFMD in China, medicinal herbals and preparations containing herbal extracts have demonstrated therapeutic efficacy with relative safety profiles. There have been no microbiological studies to validate their usefulness for HFMD. We selected 12 commonly used herbs for HFMD from government recommended guidelines as well as published reports and tested for their antiviral activity and anti-inflammatory activity. A water extract of Houttuynia cordata Thunb. (HCT) inhibited EV71 infection significantly and was marginally active against CVA16 infection. The IC50 (concentration to have 50% inhibitory effect) values of HCT against a Fuyang strain and a BrCr strain of EV71 were determined at 8.9 μg/mL and 20.6 μg/mL, respectively. Mentha haplocalyx Briq. (MHB) water extract was active against CVA16, with an IC50 value of 70.3 μg/mL. The extract did not exhibit activity against EV71 infection. Although the majority of the extracts showed no activity against viral infection, several extracts demonstrated activity in blocking proinflammatory response by viral infection. This study therefore validates the effectiveness of Chinese herbs for HFMD since some formulations containing the correct combination of the herbs can block viral replication as well as proinflammatory response of HFMD. PMID:23554831

  15. Occurrence of Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease Pathogens in Domestic Sewage and Secondary Effluent in Xi’an, China

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zheng; Wang, Xiaochang; Zhang, Chongmiao; Miura, Takayuki; Sano, Daisuke; Funamizu, Naoyuki; Okabe, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), caused by a group of enteric viruses such as Enterovirus 71 (EV71), Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) and Coxsackievirus A10 (CVA10), is heavily epidemic in East Asia. This research focused on investigating the occurrence of HFMD pathogens in domestic sewage and secondary effluent before disinfection in a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Xi’an, the largest megacity in northwest China. In order to simultaneously detect all three HFMD pathogens, a semi-nested RT-PCR assay was constructed with a newly designed primer set targeting conservative gene regions from the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) to VP2. As a result, 86% of raw sewage samples and 29% of the secondary effluent samples were positive for the HFMD viral gene, indicating that HFMD pathogens were highly prevalent in domestic wastewater and that they could also persist, even with lower probability, in the secondary effluent before disinfection. Of the three HFMD pathogens, CVA10 was positive in 48% of the total samples, while the occurrences of CVA16 and EV71 were 12% and 2%, respectively. It could thus be stated that CVA10 is the main HFMD pathogen prevailing in the study area, at least during the investigation period. High genetic diversity in the conservative gene region among the same serotype of the HFMD pathogen was identified by phylogenetic analysis, implying that this HFMD pathogen replicates frequently among the population excreting the domestic sewage. PMID:22446307

  16. The Epidemiological Study of Coxsackievirus A6 revealing Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease Epidemic patterns in Guangdong, China

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hanri; Lu, Jing; Zheng, Huanying; Yi, Lina; Guo, Xue; Liu, Leng; Rutherford, Shannon; Sun, Limei; Tan, Xiaohua; Li, Hui; Ke, Changwen; Lin, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EVA71) and Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) are regarded as the two major causative pathogens in hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) epidemics. However, CVA6, previously largely ignored, became the predominant pathogen in China in 2013. In this study, we describe the epidemiological trendsofCVA6 during the annual HFMD outbreaks from 2008 to 2013 in Guangdong, China. The study results show that CVA6 has been one of three major causative agents of HFMD epidemics since 2009. The periodic rotation and dominance of the three pathogens, EVA71, CVA16 and CVA6, may have contributed to the continuously increasing HFMD epidemics. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis of the VP1 gene shows that major circulating CVA6 strains collected from 2009 to 2013 are distinct from the earlier strains collected before 2009. In conclusion, the discovery from this research investigating epidemiological trends of CVA6 from 2008 to 2013 explains the possible pattern of the continuous HFMD epidemic in China. The etiological change pattern also highlights the need for improvement for pathogen surveillance and vaccine strategies for HFMD control in China. PMID:25993899

  17. Molecular epidemiology of the enteroviruses associated with hand, foot and mouth disease/herpangina in Dongguan, China, 2015.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qi; Xie, Mingyu; Zhang, Yinghong; Liu, Qian; Li, Wenrui; Li, Siping; Ma, Qiang; Lu, Xiaomei; Zhong, Baimao

    2016-12-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) are the etiological agents involved in most cases of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) and herpangina (HA). Information on the epidemiology profiles of EVs in China is very limited, as the present surveillance system of China focuses on CAV16 and EV71, and no published data are available in Dongguan. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of EVs among patients with HFMD and HA in Dongguan, China, during 2015. A total of 271 clinical stool specimens that were clinically determined to be positive for enteroviruses were genotyped by semi-nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the VP1 genes of EVs. The results showed that a total of 14 enterovirus genotypes were identified among HFMD and HA patients in this study. CVA6 was the most common genotype for HFMD, and CVA2 accounted for the majority of HA cases in this study. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis showed that all of the CVA6 and CVA2 strains identified in our study displayed a close genetic relationship to strains identified in other cities in China. This study also demonstrates that there are associations between particular causative enterovirus genotypes and some clinical symptoms, which may provide useful information for improving case prevention, diagnosis and treatment of HFMD and HA.

  18. Foot-and-mouth disease virus non-structural protein 3A inhibits the interferon-β signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Lei, Caoqi; Xu, Zhisheng; Yang, Fan; Liu, Huanan; Zhu, Zixiang; Li, Shu; Liu, Xiangtao; Shu, Hongbing; Zheng, Haixue

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the etiological agent of FMD, which affects cloven-hoofed animals. The pathophysiology of FMDV has not been fully understood and the evasion of host innate immune system is still unclear. Here, the FMDV non-structural protein 3A was identified as a negative regulator of virus-triggered IFN-β signaling pathway. Overexpression of the FMDV 3A inhibited Sendai virus-triggered activation of IRF3 and the expressions of RIG-I/MDA5. Transient transfection and co-immunoprecipitation experiments suggested that FMDV 3A interacts with RIG-I, MDA5 and VISA, which is dependent on the N-terminal 51 amino acids of 3A. Furthermore, 3A also inhibited the expressions of RIG-I, MDA5, and VISA by disrupting their mRNA levels. These results demonstrated that 3A inhibits the RLR-mediated IFN-β induction and uncovered a novel mechanism by which the FMDV 3A protein evades the host innate immune system. PMID:26883855

  19. Chitosan can stop or postpone the death of the suckling mice challenged with foot-and-mouth disease virus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In the study, a method called "hardening in liquid phase" for preparing chitosan granules with glutaraldehyde as crosslinker and Tween 80 as surfactant and paraffin liquid as dispersant was established. The chitosan granules were light yellow and insoluble in water or oil, but they swelled in acid solution and narrowed in neutral or alkaline solution. Furthermore, some of characteristics of the chitosan granules were revealed. (a) Stability: Their shapes were stable at pH 7.0 and pH 8.0 and -30°C~120°C. The shelf life is at least one year in vitro at room temperature. (b) Safety: Some experiments of their lethal effect to suckling mice and pathogenicity to mature mice proved the chitosan granules were harmless. (c) Antiviral activity: Some suckling mice injected with chitosan granules were still alive or delayed death compared with control group when they challenged with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Such anti-FMDV capacity could maintain 1 week and was the strongest on the third day. PMID:20540780

  20. Assessment using ELISA of the herd immunity levels induced in cattle by foot-and-mouth disease oil vaccines.

    PubMed

    Smitsaart, E N; Zanelli, M; Rivera, I; Fondevila, N; Compaired, D; Maradei, E; Bianchi, T; O'Donnell, V; Schudel, A A

    1998-01-01

    The development of a liquid-phase blocking sandwich ELISA (LPBE) to measure antibodies (Ab) produced in cattle with the O, A and C foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) types of commercial vaccines used in Argentina is described. The test was specific: 99% of naïve cattle sera (n = 130) gave titres below log10 = 1.2, and none had a titre above log10 = 1.5. Comparative studies with serum neutralization test (SNT) using sera from cattle which received one or more vaccine doses is reported. The overall rank correlation coefficient (Spearman's rho, rs) between SNT and LPBE were highly significant (rs > 0.67, P < 0.0001) for all vaccine strains. LBPE Ab titres on sera collected 90 days post vaccination were compared with results of cattle protection tests by applying a logistic regression. The minimum Ab titres at which 85% and 75% of the cattle were protected for each FMDV type were determined in order to interpret field Ab data in terms of protection. Application of this method allows large scale serological examinations to monitor antibody levels in vaccinated animals as an indirect indicator of the FMD control program status in the field. Its use in the evaluation of commercial batches of FMD vaccine is discussed.