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Sample records for asl perfusion mri

  1. Arterial spin labeling-fast imaging with steady-state free precession (ASL-FISP): a rapid and quantitative perfusion technique for high-field MRI.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Goodnough, Candida L; Erokwu, Bernadette O; Farr, George W; Darrah, Rebecca; Lu, Lan; Dell, Katherine M; Yu, Xin; Flask, Chris A

    2014-08-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a valuable non-contrast perfusion MRI technique with numerous clinical applications. Many previous ASL MRI studies have utilized either echo-planar imaging (EPI) or true fast imaging with steady-state free precession (true FISP) readouts, which are prone to off-resonance artifacts on high-field MRI scanners. We have developed a rapid ASL-FISP MRI acquisition for high-field preclinical MRI scanners providing perfusion-weighted images with little or no artifacts in less than 2 s. In this initial implementation, a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL preparation was combined with a rapid, centrically encoded FISP readout. Validation studies on healthy C57/BL6 mice provided consistent estimation of in vivo mouse brain perfusion at 7 and 9.4 T (249 ± 38 and 241 ± 17 mL/min/100 g, respectively). The utility of this method was further demonstrated in the detection of significant perfusion deficits in a C57/BL6 mouse model of ischemic stroke. Reasonable kidney perfusion estimates were also obtained for a healthy C57/BL6 mouse exhibiting differential perfusion in the renal cortex and medulla. Overall, the ASL-FISP technique provides a rapid and quantitative in vivo assessment of tissue perfusion for high-field MRI scanners with minimal image artifacts.

  2. Optimization of flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) for perfusion functional MRI of rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Fatima A; Lee, Eugene L Q; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang

    2012-11-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI provides a noninvasive method to image perfusion, and has been applied to map neural activation in the brain. Although pulsed labeling methods have been widely used in humans, continuous ASL with a dedicated neck labeling coil is still the preferred method in rodent brain functional MRI (fMRI) to maximize the sensitivity and allow multislice acquisition. However, the additional hardware is not readily available and hence its application is limited. In this study, flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) pulsed ASL was optimized for fMRI of rat brain. A practical challenge of FAIR is the suboptimal global inversion by the transmit coil of limited dimensions, which results in low effective labeling. By using a large volume transmit coil and proper positioning to optimize the body coverage, the perfusion signal was increased by 38.3% compared with positioning the brain at the isocenter. An additional 53.3% gain in signal was achieved using optimized repetition and inversion times compared with a long TR. Under electrical stimulation to the forepaws, a perfusion activation signal change of 63.7 ± 6.3% can be reliably detected in the primary somatosensory cortices using single slice or multislice echo planar imaging at 9.4 T. This demonstrates the potential of using pulsed ASL for multislice perfusion fMRI in functional and pharmacological applications in rat brain.

  3. Regional and voxel-wise comparisons of blood flow measurements between dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    White, Carissa M; Pope, Whitney B; Zaw, Taryar; Qiao, Joe; Naeini, Kourosh M; Lai, Albert; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L; Wang, J J; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Ellingson, Benjamin M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the regional and voxel-wise correlation between dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in patients with brain tumors. Thirty patients with histologically verified brain tumors were evaluated in the current study. DSC-MRI was performed by first using a preload dose of gadolinium contrast, then collecting a dynamic image acquisition during a bolus of contrast, followed by posthoc contrast agent leakage correction. Pseudocontinuous ASL was collected using 30 pairs of tag and control acquisition using a 3-dimensional gradient-echo spin-echo (GRASE) acquisition. All images were registered to a high-resolution anatomical atlas. Average CBF measurements within regions of contrast-enhancement and T2 hyperintensity were evaluated between the two modalities. Additionally, voxel-wise correlation between CBF measurements obtained with DSC and ASL were assessed. Results demonstrated a positive linear correlation between DSC and ASL measurements of CBF when regional average values were compared; however, a statistically significant voxel-wise correlation was only observed in around 30-40% of patients. These results suggest DSC and ASL may provide regionally similar, but spatially different measurements of CBF.

  4. Patterns of postictal cerebral perfusion in idiopathic generalized epilepsy: a multi-delay multi-parametric arterial spin labelling perfusion MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangxiang; Lei, Du; Ren, Jiechuan; Zuo, Panli; Suo, Xueling; Wang, Danny J. J.; Wang, Meiyun; Zhou, Dong; Gong, Qiyong

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral haemodynamic status of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) is a very complicated process. Little attention has been paid to cerebral blood flow (CBF) alterations in IGE detected by arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, the selection of an optimal delay time is difficult for single-delay ASL. Multi-delay multi-parametric ASL perfusion MRI overcomes the limitations of single-delay ASL. We applied multi-delay multi-parametric ASL perfusion MRI to investigate the patterns of postictal cerebral perfusion in IGE patients with absence seizures. A total of 21 IGE patients with absence seizures and 24 healthy control subjects were enrolled. IGE patients exhibited prolonged arterial transit time (ATT) in the left superior temporal gyrus. The mean CBF of IGE patients was significantly increased in the left middle temporal gyrus, left parahippocampal gyrus and left fusiform gyrus. Prolonged ATT in the left superior temporal gyrus was negatively correlated with the age at onset in IGE patients. This study demonstrated that cortical dysfunction in the temporal lobe and fusiform gyrus may be related to epileptic activity in IGE patients with absence seizures. This information can play an important role in elucidating the pathophysiological mechanism of IGE from a cerebral haemodynamic perspective. PMID:27374369

  5. Physiological and psychological individual differences influence resting brain function measured by ASL perfusion.

    PubMed

    Kano, M; Coen, S J; Farmer, A D; Aziz, Q; Williams, S C R; Alsop, D C; Fukudo, S; O'Gorman, R L

    2014-09-01

    Effects of physiological and/or psychological inter-individual differences on the resting brain state have not been fully established. The present study investigated the effects of individual differences in basal autonomic tone and positive and negative personality dimensions on resting brain activity. Whole-brain resting cerebral perfusion images were acquired from 32 healthy subjects (16 males) using arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI. Neuroticism and extraversion were assessed with the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised. Resting autonomic activity was assessed using a validated measure of baseline cardiac vagal tone (CVT) in each individual. Potential associations between the perfusion data and individual CVT (27 subjects) and personality score (28 subjects) were tested at the level of voxel clusters by fitting a multiple regression model at each intracerebral voxel. Greater baseline perfusion in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and cerebellum was associated with lower CVT. At a corrected significance threshold of p < 0.01, strong positive correlations were observed between extraversion and resting brain perfusion in the right caudate, brain stem, and cingulate gyrus. Significant negative correlations between neuroticism and regional cerebral perfusion were identified in the left amygdala, bilateral insula, ACC, and orbitofrontal cortex. These results suggest that individual autonomic tone and psychological variability influence resting brain activity in brain regions, previously shown to be associated with autonomic arousal (dorsal ACC) and personality traits (amygdala, caudate, etc.) during active task processing. The resting brain state may therefore need to be taken into account when interpreting the neurobiology of individual differences in structural and functional brain activity.

  6. [Abnormal cerebral blood flow distributions during the post-ictal phase of febrile status epilepticus in three pediatric patients measured by arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI].

    PubMed

    Hirano, Keiko; Fukuda, Tokiko

    2016-05-01

    The ability to visualize brain perfusion is important for identifying epileptic foci. We present three pediatric cases showing asymmetrical cerebral blood flow (CBF) distributions during the post-ictal phase of febrile status epilepticus measured by arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion MRI. During the acute phase, regional CBF measurements in the areas considered including epileptic foci were higher than in the corresponding area of the contralateral hemisphere, though the exact quantitative value varied between cases. We could not identify the correct epileptogenic foci, because those ASL images were taken after the prolonged and extraordinary activation of neurons in the affected area. During the recovery phase, the differences reduced and the average regional CBF measurement was 54.6 ± 6.1 ml/100 g per minute, which was a little less than the number of previous ASL studies. ASL perfusion MRI imaging provides a method for evaluating regional CBF by using magnetically labeled arterial blood water as an endogenous tracer. With this technique, we can repeatedly evaluate both the brain structure and the level of perfusion at the same time. ASL is noninvasive and easily accessible, and therefore it could become a routine tool for assessment of perfusion in daily practice of pediatric neurology. PMID:27349086

  7. SU-D-18C-02: Feasibility of Using a Short ASL Scan for Calibrating Cerebral Blood Flow Obtained From DSC-MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P; Chang, T; Huang, K; Yeh, C; Chien, C; Wai, Y; Lee, T; Liu, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of using a short arterial spin labeling (ASL) scan for calibrating the dynamic susceptibility contrast- (DSC-) MRI in a group of patients with internal carotid artery stenosis. Methods: Six patients with unilateral ICA stenosis enrolled in the study on a 3T clinical MRI scanner. The ASL-cerebral blood flow (-CBF) maps were calculated by averaging different number of dynamic points (N=1-45) acquired by using a Q2TIPS sequence. For DSC perfusion analysis, arterial input function was selected to derive the relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) map and the delay (Tmax) map. Patient-specific CF was calculated from the mean ASL- and DSC-CBF obtained from three different masks: (1)Tmax< 3s, (2)combined gray matter mask with mask 1, (3)mask 2 with large vessels removed. One CF value was created for each number of averages by using each of the three masks for calibrating the DSC-CBF map. The CF value of the largest number of averages (NL=45) was used to determine the acceptable range(< 10%, <15%, and <20%) of CF values corresponding to the minimally acceptable number of average (NS) for each patient. Results: Comparing DSC CBF maps corrected by CF values of NL (CBFL) in ACA, MCA and PCA territories, all masks resulted in smaller CBF on the ipsilateral side than the contralateral side of the MCA territory(p<.05). The values obtained from mask 1 were significantly different than the mask 3(p<.05). Using mask 3, the medium values of Ns were 4(<10%), 2(<15%) and 2(<20%), with the worst case scenario (maximum Ns) of 25, 4, and 4, respectively. Conclusion: This study found that reliable calibration of DSC-CBF can be achieved from a short pulsed ASL scan. We suggested use a mask based on the Tmax threshold, the inclusion of gray matter only and the exclusion of large vessels for performing the calibration.

  8. Detection of preclinically latent hyperperfusion due to stroke-like episodes by arterial spin-labeling perfusion MRI in MELAS patients.

    PubMed

    Ikawa, Masamichi; Yoneda, Makoto; Muramatsu, Tomoko; Matsunaga, Akiko; Tsujikawa, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Kinoshita, Kazuyuki; Yamamura, Osamu; Hamano, Tadanori; Nakamoto, Yasunari; Kimura, Hirohiko

    2013-11-01

    In stroke-like episodes (SEs) of patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), the detection of preclinically latent lesions is a challenge. We report regional cerebral hyperperfusion observed on arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preclinical phase more than 3 months before the clinical onset of SEs in 3 MELAS patients. These hyperperfused areas were not detected by conventional MRI in the preclinical phase and developed into acute lesions at the clinical onset of SEs, suggesting that ASL imaging has the potential for predicting the emergence of SEs.

  9. Applications of arterial spin labeled MRI in the brain.

    PubMed

    Detre, John A; Rao, Hengyi; Wang, Danny J J; Chen, Yu Fen; Wang, Ze

    2012-05-01

    Perfusion provides oxygen and nutrients to tissues and is closely tied to tissue function while disorders of perfusion are major sources of medical morbidity and mortality. It has been almost two decades since the use of arterial spin labeling (ASL) for noninvasive perfusion imaging was first reported. While initial ASL magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies focused primarily on technological development and validation, a number of robust ASL implementations have emerged, and ASL MRI is now also available commercially on several platforms. As a result, basic science and clinical applications of ASL MRI have begun to proliferate. Although ASL MRI can be carried out in any organ, most studies to date have focused on the brain. This review covers selected research and clinical applications of ASL MRI in the brain to illustrate its potential in both neuroscience research and clinical care.

  10. Resting quantitative cerebral blood flow in schizophrenia measured by pulsed arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Pinkham, Amy; Loughead, James; Ruparel, Kosha; Wu, Wen-Chau; Overton, Eve; Gur, Raquel; Gur, Ruben

    2011-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling imaging (ASL) perfusion MRI is a relatively novel technique that can allow for quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) by using magnetically labeled arterial blood water as an endogenous tracer. Available data on resting CBF in schizophrenia primarily comes from invasive and expensive nuclear medicine techniques that are often limited to small samples and yield mixed results. The noninvasive nature of ASL offers promise for larger-scale studies. The utility of this approach was examined in 24 healthy controls and 30 patients with schizophrenia. Differences between groups in quantitative CBF were assessed, as were relationships between CBF and psychiatric symptoms. Group comparisons demonstrated greater CBF for controls in several regions including bilateral precuneus and middle frontal gyrus. Patients showed increased CBF in left putamen/superior corona radiata and right middle temporal gyrus. For patients, greater severity of negative symptoms was associated with reduced CBF in bilateral superior temporal gyrus, cingulate gyrus, and left middle frontal gyrus. Increased severity of positive symptoms was related to both higher CBF in cingulate gyrus and superior frontal gyrus and decreased CBF in precentral gyrus/middle frontal gyrus. These findings support the feasibility and utility of implementing ASL in schizophrenia research and expand upon previous results. PMID:21831608

  11. Environmental heat stress enhances mental fatigue during sustained attention task performing: evidence from an ASL perfusion study.

    PubMed

    Qian, Shaowen; Li, Min; Li, Guoying; Liu, Kai; Li, Bo; Jiang, Qingjun; Li, Li; Yang, Zhen; Sun, Gang

    2015-03-01

    This study was to investigate the potential enhancing effect of heat stress on mental fatigue progression during sustained attention task using arterial spin labeling (ASL) imaging. Twenty participants underwent two thermal exposures in an environmental chamber: normothermic (NT) condition (25°C, 1h) and hyperthermic (HT) condition (50°C, 1h). After thermal exposure, they performed a twenty-minute psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) in the scanner. Behavioral analysis revealed progressively increasing subjective fatigue ratings and reaction time as PVT progressed. Moreover, heat stress caused worse performance. Perfusion imaging analyses showed significant resting-state cerebral blood flow (CBF) alterations after heat exposure. Specifically, increased CBF mainly gathered in thalamic-brainstem area while decreased CBF predominantly located in fronto-parietal areas, anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, and medial frontal cortex. More importantly, diverse CBF distributions and trend of changes between both conditions were observed as the fatigue level progressed during subsequent PVT task. Specifically, higher CBF and enhanced rising trend were presented in superior parietal lobe, precuneus, posterior cingulate cortex and anterior cingulate cortex, while lower CBF or inhibited rising trend was found in dorsolateral frontal cortex, medial frontal cortex, inferior parietal lobe and thalamic-brainstem areas. Furthermore, the decrease of post-heat resting-state CBF in fronto-parietal cortex was correlated with subsequent slower reaction time, suggesting prior disturbed resting-state CBF might be indicator of performance potential and fatigue level in following task. These findings may provide proof for such a view: heat stress has a potential fatigue-enhancing effect when individual is performing highly cognition-demanding attention task.

  12. Automatic Characterization of Myocardial Perfusion in Contrast Enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Positano, Vincenzo; Santarelli, Maria Filomena; Landini, Luigi

    2003-12-01

    The use of contrast medium in cardiac MRI allows joining the high-resolution anatomical information provided by standard magnetic resonance with functional information obtained by means of the perfusion of contrast agent in myocardial tissues. The current approach to perfusion MRI characterization is the qualitative one, based on visual inspection of images. Moving to quantitative analysis requires extraction of numerical indices of myocardium perfusion by analysis of time/intensity curves related to the area of interest. The main problem in quantitative image sequence analysis is the heart movement, mainly due to patient respiration. We propose an automatic procedure based on image registration, segmentation of the myocardium, and extraction and analysis of time/intensity curves. The procedure requires a minimal user interaction, is robust with respect to the user input, and allows effective characterization of myocardial perfusion. The algorithm was tested on cardiac MR images acquired from voluntaries and in clinical routine.

  13. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactivity correlates with cortical perfusion parameters determined by bolus tracking arterial spin labelling (bt-ASL) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the Wistar Kyoto rat.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Shane; Rouine, Jennifer; McIntosh, Allison; Kerskens, Christian; Harkin, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Alterations in astrocyte number and function have been implicated in the pathophysiology of a number of psychiatric disorders. The development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool in the animal laboratory has enabled an investigation of the relationship between pathological and neuroimaging markers in animal models. However the physiological processes which underlie these markers and their role in mediating behavioural deficits is still poorly understood. Rodent models have provided us with important insights into physiological and cellular mechanisms which may mediate anxiety and depression-related behaviours. The Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat is a strain which endogenously expresses highly anxious and depressive-like behaviours and has previously been reported to exhibit alterations in immunoreactivity for the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in brain sub-regions relative to more stress resilient out-bred strains. Here we report that the depressive and anxiety-like behaviours exhibited by the WKY rat strain are associated with alterations in brain morphology including a decrease in hippocampal volume, coupled with reduced resting state frontal cortical perfusion as assessed by MR bolus tracking arterial spin labelling (bt-ASL) relative to the out-bred Wistar strain. Pre-limbic cortical GFAP immunoreactivity and astrocyte cell number were positively correlated with cortical blood perfusion in the WKY strain. These experiments provide a link between pathological and neuroimaging markers of aberrant astrocytic function and add validity to the WKY rat as a model for co-morbid anxiety and depression.

  14. Correlation of oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI with invasive micro probe measurements in healthy mice brain.

    PubMed

    Sedlacik, Jan; Reitz, Matthias; Bolar, Divya S; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Schmidt, Nils O; Fiehler, Jens

    2015-03-01

    The non-invasive assessment of (patho-)physiological parameters such as, perfusion and oxygenation, is of great importance for the characterization of pathologies e.g., tumors, which may be helpful to better predict treatment response and potential outcome. To better understand the influence of physiological parameters on the investigated oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI methods, MRI measurements were correlated with subsequent invasive micro probe measurements during free breathing conditions of air, air+10% CO2 and 100% O2 in healthy mice brain. MRI parameters were the irreversible (R2), reversible (R2') and effective (R2*) transverse relaxation rates, venous blood oxygenation level assessed by quantitative blood oxygenation level dependent (qBOLD) method and cerebral blood flow (CBF) assessed by arterial spin labeling (ASL) using a 7 T small animal MRI scanner. One to two days after MRI, tissue perfusion and pO2 were measured by Laser-Doppler flowmetry and fluorescence quenching micro probes, respectively. The tissue pO2 values were converted to blood oxygen saturation by using the Hill equation. The animals were anesthetized by intra peritoneal injection of ketamine-xylazine-acepromazine (10-2-0.3 mg/ml · kg). Results for normal/hypercapnia/hyperoxia conditions were: R2[s(∧)-1] = 20.7/20.4/20.1, R2*[s(∧)-1] = 31.6/29.6/25.9, R2'[s-(∧)1] = 10.9/9.2/5.7, qBOLD venous blood oxygenation level = 0.43/0.51/0.56, CBF[ml · min(∧)-1 · 100 g(∧)-1] = 70.6/105.5/81.8, Laser-Doppler flowmetry[a.u.] = 89.2/120.2/90.6 and pO2[mmHg] = 6.3/32.3/46.7. All parameters were statistically significantly different with P < 0.001 between all breathing conditions. All MRI and the corresponding micro probe measurements were also statistically significantly (P ≤ 0.03) correlated with each other. However, converting the tissue pO2 to blood oxygen saturation = 0.02/0.34/0.63, showed only very limited agreement with the qBOLD venous blood oxygenation level. We found

  15. Feasibility Study of Myocardial Perfusion and Oxygenation by Non-Contrast MRI: Comparison with PET Study in a Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    McCommis, Kyle S.; Zhang, Haosen; Herrero, Pilar; Gropler, Robert J.; Zheng, Jie

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of quantifying myocardial blood flow (MBF) and rate of myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) during pharmacologically induced stress without using a contrast agent. The former was measured by the arterial spin labeling (ASL) method and the later was obtained by measuring the oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) with the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) effect and Fick's law. The MRI results were compared with the established positron emission tomography (PET) methods. Six mongrel dogs with induced acute moderate left coronary artery stenosis were scanned using a clinical PET and a 1.5T MRI system, in the same day. Regional MBF, myocardial OEF, and MVO2 were measured with both imaging modalities. Correlation coefficients (R2) of the three myocardial indexes (MBF, OEF, and MVO2) between MRI and PET methods ranged from 0.70 to 0.93. Bland-Altman statistics demonstrated that the estimated precision of the limits of agreement between MRI and PET measurements varied from 18% (OEF), to 37% (MBF), and 45% (MVO2). The detected changes in these indexes, at rest and during dobutamine stress, were similar between two image modalities. The proposed non-contrast MRI technique is a promising method to quantitatively assess myocardial perfusion and oxygenation. PMID:17566684

  16. MO-G-18C-05: Real-Time Prediction in Free-Breathing Perfusion MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Song, H; Liu, W; Ruan, D; Jung, S; Gach, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The aim is to minimize frame-wise difference errors caused by respiratory motion and eliminate the need for breath-holds in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences with long acquisitions and repeat times (TRs). The technique is being applied to perfusion MRI using arterial spin labeling (ASL). Methods: Respiratory motion prediction (RMP) using navigator echoes was implemented in ASL. A least-square method was used to extract the respiratory motion information from the 1D navigator. A generalized artificial neutral network (ANN) with three layers was developed to simultaneously predict 10 time points forward in time and correct for respiratory motion during MRI acquisition. During the training phase, the parameters of the ANN were optimized to minimize the aggregated prediction error based on acquired navigator data. During realtime prediction, the trained ANN was applied to the most recent estimated displacement trajectory to determine in real-time the amount of spatial Results: The respiratory motion information extracted from the least-square method can accurately represent the navigator profiles, with a normalized chi-square value of 0.037±0.015 across the training phase. During the 60-second training phase, the ANN successfully learned the respiratory motion pattern from the navigator training data. During real-time prediction, the ANN received displacement estimates and predicted the motion in the continuum of a 1.0 s prediction window. The ANN prediction was able to provide corrections for different respiratory states (i.e., inhalation/exhalation) during real-time scanning with a mean absolute error of < 1.8 mm. Conclusion: A new technique enabling free-breathing acquisition during MRI is being developed. A generalized ANN development has demonstrated its efficacy in predicting a continuum of motion profile for volumetric imaging based on navigator inputs. Future work will enhance the robustness of ANN and verify its effectiveness with human

  17. Detecting static and dynamic differences between eyes-closed and eyes-open resting states using ASL and BOLD fMRI.

    PubMed

    Zou, Qihong; Yuan, Bin-Ke; Gu, Hong; Liu, Dongqiang; Wang, Danny J J; Gao, Jia-Hong; Yang, Yihong; Zang, Yu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Resting-state fMRI studies have increasingly focused on multi-contrast techniques, such as BOLD and ASL imaging. However, these techniques may reveal different aspects of brain activity (e.g., static vs. dynamic), and little is known about the similarity or disparity of these techniques in detecting resting-state brain activity. It is therefore important to assess the static and dynamic characteristics of these fMRI techniques to guide future applications. Here we acquired fMRI data while subjects were in eyes-closed (EC) and eyes-open (EO) states, using both ASL and BOLD techniques, at two research centers (NIDA and HNU). Static brain activity was calculated as voxel-wise mean cerebral blood flow (CBF) using ASL, i.e., CBF-mean, while dynamic activity was measured by the amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF) of BOLD, i.e., BOLD-ALFF, at both NIDA and HNU, and CBF, i.e., CBF-ALFF, at NIDA. We showed that mean CBF was lower under EC than EO in the primary visual cortex, while BOLD-ALFF was higher under EC in the primary somatosensory cortices extending to the primary auditory cortices and lower in the lateral occipital area. Interestingly, mean CBF and BOLD-ALFF results overlapped at the visual cortex to a very small degree. Importantly, these findings were largely replicated by the HNU dataset. State differences found by CBF-ALFF were located in the primary auditory cortices, which were generally a subset of BOLD-ALFF and showed no spatial overlap with CBF-mean. In conclusion, static brain activity measured by mean CBF and dynamic brain activity measured by BOLD- and CBF-ALFF may reflect different aspects of resting-state brain activity and a combination of ASL and BOLD may provide complementary information on the biophysical and physiological processes of the brain.

  18. Diagnostic Performance of Dual-Energy CT Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging: Direct Comparison With Cardiovascular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sung Min; Song, Meong Gun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Hwang, Hweung Kon; Feuchtner, Gudrun Maria; Min, James K.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of stress perfusion dual-energy CT (DECT) and its incremental value when used with coronary CT angiography (CTA) for identifying hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. SUBJECTS AND METHODS One hundred patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease without chronic myocardial infarction detected with coronary CTA underwent stress perfusion DECT, stress cardiovascular perfusion MRI, and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Stress perfusion DECT and cardiovascular stress perfusion MR images were used for detecting perfusion defects. Coronary CTA and ICA were evaluated in the detection of ≥ 50% coronary stenosis. The diagnostic performance of coronary CTA for detecting hemodynamically significant stenosis was assessed before and after stress perfusion DECT on a pervessel basis with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI as the reference standard. RESULTS The performance of stress perfusion DECT compared with cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI on a per-vessel basis in the detection of perfusion defects was sensitivity, 89%; specificity, 74%; positive predictive value, 73%; negative predictive value, 90%. Per segment, these values were sensitivity, 76%; specificity, 80%; positive predictive value, 63%; and negative predictive value, 88%. Compared with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI per vessel territory the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of coronary CTA were 95%, 61%, 61%, and 95%. The values for stress perfusion DECT were 92%, 72%, 68%, and 94%. The values for coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT were 88%, 79%, 73%, and 91%. The ROC AUC increased from 0.78 to 0.84 (p = 0.02) with the use of coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT compared with coronary CTA alone. CONCLUSION Stress perfusion DECT plays a complementary role in enhancing the accuracy of coronary CTA for identifying hemodynamically

  19. Tracer kinetic modelling in MRI: estimating perfusion and capillary permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sourbron, S. P.; Buckley, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    The tracer-kinetic models developed in the early 1990s for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) have since become a standard in numerous applications. At the same time, the development of MRI hardware has led to increases in image quality and temporal resolution that reveal the limitations of the early models. This in turn has stimulated an interest in the development and application of a second generation of modelling approaches. They are designed to overcome these limitations and produce additional and more accurate information on tissue status. In particular, models of the second generation enable separate estimates of perfusion and capillary permeability rather than a single parameter Ktrans that represents a combination of the two. A variety of such models has been proposed in the literature, and development in the field has been constrained by a lack of transparency regarding terminology, notations and physiological assumptions. In this review, we provide an overview of these models in a manner that is both physically intuitive and mathematically rigourous. All are derived from common first principles, using concepts and notations from general tracer-kinetic theory. Explicit links to their historical origins are included to allow for a transfer of experience obtained in other fields (PET, SPECT, CT). A classification is presented that reveals the links between all models, and with the models of the first generation. Detailed formulae for all solutions are provided to facilitate implementation. Our aim is to encourage the application of these tools to DCE-MRI by offering researchers a clearer understanding of their assumptions and requirements.

  20. Technical Pitfalls of Signal Truncation in Perfusion MRI of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelvin K; Fung, Steve H; New, Pamela Z; Wong, Stephen T C

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) is widely used in clinical settings for the radiological diagnosis of brain tumor. The signal change in brain tissue in gradient echo-based DSC PWI is much higher than in spin echo-based DSC PWI. Due to its exquisite sensitivity, gradient echo-based sequence is the preferred method for imaging of all tumors except those near the base of the skull. However, high sensitivity also comes with a dynamic range problem. It is not unusual for blood volume to increase in gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy-treated glioblastoma patients. The increase of fractional blood volume sometimes saturates the MRI signal during first-pass contrast bolus arrival and presents signal truncation artifacts of various degrees in the tumor when a significant amount of blood exists in the image pixels. It presents a hidden challenge in PWI, as this signal floor can be either close to noise level or just above and can go no lower. This signal truncation in the signal intensity time course is a significant issue that deserves attention in DSC PWI. In this paper, we demonstrate that relative cerebral blood volume and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) are underestimated due to signal truncation in DSC perfusion, in glioblastoma patients. We propose the use of second-pass tissue residue function in rCBF calculation using least-absolute-deviation deconvolution to avoid the underestimation problem. PMID:27531989

  1. Technical Pitfalls of Signal Truncation in Perfusion MRI of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kelvin K.; Fung, Steve H.; New, Pamela Z.; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) is widely used in clinical settings for the radiological diagnosis of brain tumor. The signal change in brain tissue in gradient echo-based DSC PWI is much higher than in spin echo-based DSC PWI. Due to its exquisite sensitivity, gradient echo-based sequence is the preferred method for imaging of all tumors except those near the base of the skull. However, high sensitivity also comes with a dynamic range problem. It is not unusual for blood volume to increase in gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy-treated glioblastoma patients. The increase of fractional blood volume sometimes saturates the MRI signal during first-pass contrast bolus arrival and presents signal truncation artifacts of various degrees in the tumor when a significant amount of blood exists in the image pixels. It presents a hidden challenge in PWI, as this signal floor can be either close to noise level or just above and can go no lower. This signal truncation in the signal intensity time course is a significant issue that deserves attention in DSC PWI. In this paper, we demonstrate that relative cerebral blood volume and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) are underestimated due to signal truncation in DSC perfusion, in glioblastoma patients. We propose the use of second-pass tissue residue function in rCBF calculation using least-absolute-deviation deconvolution to avoid the underestimation problem. PMID:27531989

  2. Choice of the regularization parameter for perfusion quantification with MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sourbron, S.; Luypaert, R.; Van Schuerbeek, P.; Dujardin, M.; Stadnik, T.

    2004-07-01

    Truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) is an effective method for the deconvolution of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI. Two robust methods for the selection of the truncation threshold on a pixel-by-pixel basis—generalized cross validation (GCV) and the L-curve criterion (LCC)—were optimized and compared to paradigms in the literature. GCV and LCC were found to perform optimally when applied with a smooth version of TSVD, known as standard form Tikhonov regularization (SFTR). The methods lead to improvements in the estimate of the residue function and of its maximum, and converge properly with SNR. The oscillations typically observed in the solution vanish entirely, and perfusion is more accurately estimated at small mean transit times. This results in improved image contrast and increased sensitivity to perfusion abnormalities, at the cost of 1-2 min in calculation time and hyperintense clusters in the image. Preliminary experience with clinical data suggests that the latter problem can be resolved using spatial continuity and/or hybrid thresholding methods. In the simulations GCV and LCC are equivalent in terms of performance, but GCV thresholding is faster.

  3. A study on cerebral hemodynamic analysis of moyamoya disease by using perfusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the clinical applications of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with moyamoya disease (MMD). Twenty-two patients with moyamoya disease (9 men and 13 women) with a mean age of 9.3 years (range: 4-22 years) were enrolled in this study. Perfusion MRI was performed by scanning the patients7.5 cm upward from the base of the cerebellum before their being process for post-treatment. The scan led to the acquisition of the following four map images: the cerebral blood volume (CBV), the cerebral blood flow (CBF), the mean transit time (MTT) for the contrast medium, and the time to peak (TTP) for the contrast medium. The lesions were assessed using the CBV, the CBF, the MTT and the TTP maps of perfusion MRI; the MTT and the TTP were measured in the lesion areas, as well as in the normal and the symmetric areas. Perfusion defects were recognizable in all four perfusion MRI maps, and the MTT and the TTP showed a conspicuous delay in the parts where perfusion defects were recognized. The MTT and the TTP images of perfusion MRI reflected a significant correlation between the degrees of stenosis and occlusion in the posterior cerebral artery (PCA), as well as the development of collateral vessels. The four perfusion MRI maps could be used to predict the degrees of stenosis and occlusion in the posterior circulation, as well as the development of the collateral vessels, which enabled a hemodynamic evaluation of the parts with perfusion defects. Overall, perfusion MRI is useful for the diagnosis and the treatment of moyamoya disease and can be applied to clinical practice.

  4. Functional MRI detects perfusion impairment in renal allografts with delayed graft function.

    PubMed

    Hueper, Katja; Gueler, Faikah; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Gutberlet, Marcel; Jang, Mi-Sun; Lehner, Frank; Richter, Nicolas; Hanke, Nils; Peperhove, Matti; Martirosian, Petros; Tewes, Susanne; Vo Chieu, Van Dai; Großhennig, Anika; Haller, Hermann; Wacker, Frank; Gwinner, Wilfried; Hartung, Dagmar

    2015-06-15

    Delayed graft function (DGF) after kidney transplantation is not uncommon, and it is associated with long-term allograft impairment. Our aim was to compare renal perfusion changes measured with noninvasive functional MRI in patients early after kidney transplantation to renal function and allograft histology in biopsy samples. Forty-six patients underwent MRI 4-11 days after transplantation. Contrast-free MRI renal perfusion images were acquired using an arterial spin labeling technique. Renal function was assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and renal biopsies were performed when indicated within 5 days of MRI. Twenty-six of 46 patients had DGF. Of these, nine patients had acute rejection (including borderline), and eight had other changes (e.g., tubular injury or glomerulosclerosis). Renal perfusion was significantly lower in the DGF group compared with the group with good allograft function (231 ± 15 vs. 331 ± 15 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1), P < 0.001). Living donor allografts exhibited significantly higher perfusion values compared with deceased donor allografts (P < 0.001). Renal perfusion significantly correlated with eGFR (r = 0.64, P < 0.001), resistance index (r = -0.57, P < 0.001), and cold ischemia time (r = -0.48, P < 0.01). Furthermore, renal perfusion impairment early after transplantation predicted inferior renal outcome and graft loss. In conclusion, noninvasive functional MRI detects renal perfusion impairment early after kidney transplantation in patients with DGF.

  5. Altered resting-state functional connectivity in post-traumatic stress disorder: a perfusion MRI study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baojuan; Liu, Jian; Liu, Yang; Lu, Hong-Bing; Yin, Hong

    2013-03-01

    The majority of studies on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) so far have focused on delineating patterns of activations during cognitive processes. Recently, more and more researches have started to investigate functional connectivity in PTSD subjects using BOLD-fMRI. Functional connectivity analysis has been demonstrated as a powerful approach to identify biomarkers of different brain diseases. This study aimed to detect resting-state functional connectivity abnormities in patients with PTSD using arterial spin labeling (ASL) fMRI. As a completely non-invasive technique, ASL allows quantitative estimates of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Compared with BOLD-fMRI, ASL fMRI has many advantages, including less low-frequency signal drifts, superior functional localization, etc. In the current study, ASL images were collected from 10 survivors in mining disaster with recent onset PTSD and 10 survivors without PTSD. Decreased regional CBF in the right middle temporal gyrus, lingual gyrus, and postcentral gyrus was detected in the PTSD patients. Seed-based resting-state functional connectivity analysis was performed using an area in the right middle temporal gyrus as region of interest. Compared with the non-PTSD group, the PTSD subjects demonstrated increased functional connectivity between the right middle temporal gyrus and the right superior temporal gyrus, the left middle temporal gyrus. Meanwhile, decreased functional connectivity between the right middle temporal gyrus and the right postcentral gyrus, the right superior parietal lobule was also found in the PTSD patients. This is the first study which investigated resting-state functional connectivity in PTSD using ASL images. The results may provide new insight into the neural substrates of PTSD.

  6. K-Bayes reconstruction for perfusion MRI. I: concepts and application.

    PubMed

    Kornak, John; Young, Karl; Schuff, Norbert; Du, Antao; Maudsley, Andrew A; Weiner, Michael W

    2010-06-01

    Despite the continued spread of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods in scientific studies and clinical diagnosis, MRI applications are mostly restricted to high-resolution modalities, such as structural MRI. While perfusion MRI gives complementary information on blood flow in the brain, its reduced resolution limits its power for detecting specific disease effects on perfusion patterns. This reduced resolution is compounded by artifacts such as partial volume effects, Gibbs ringing, and aliasing, which are caused by necessarily limited k-space sampling and the subsequent use of discrete Fourier transform (DFT) reconstruction. In this study, a Bayesian modeling procedure (K-Bayes) is developed for the reconstruction of perfusion MRI. The K-Bayes approach (described in detail in Part II: Modeling and Technical Development) combines a process model for the MRI signal in k-space with a Markov random field prior distribution that incorporates high-resolution segmented structural MRI information. A simulation study was performed to determine qualitative and quantitative improvements in K-Bayes reconstructed images compared with those obtained via DFT. The improvements were validated using in vivo perfusion MRI data of the human brain. The K-Bayes reconstructed images were demonstrated to provide reduced bias, increased precision, greater effect sizes, and higher resolution than those obtained using DFT.

  7. Analysis of first-pass myocardial perfusion MRI using independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milles, Julien; van der Geest, Rob J.; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.

    2006-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion MRI has emerged as a suitable imaging technique for the detection of ischemic regions of the heart. However, manual post-processing is labor intensive, seriously hampering its daily clinical use. We propose a novel, data driven analysis method based on Independent Component Analysis (ICA). By performing ICA on the complete perfusion sequence, physiologically meaningful feature images, representing events occurring during the perfusion sequence, can be factored out. Results obtained using our method are compared with results obtained using manual contouring by a medical expert. The estimated weight functions are correlated against the perfusion time-intensity curves from manual contours, yielding promising results.

  8. Can arterial spin labeling detect white matter perfusion signal?

    PubMed

    van Osch, Matthias J P; Teeuwisse, Wouter M; van Walderveen, Marianne A A; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Kies, Dennis A; van Buchem, Mark A

    2009-07-01

    Since the invention of arterial spin labeling (ASL) it has been acknowledged that ASL does not allow reliable detection of a white matter (WM) perfusion signal. However, recent developments such as pseudo-continuous labeling and background suppression have improved the quality. The goal of this research was to study the ability of these newer ASL sequences to detect WM perfusion signal. Background suppressed pseudo-continuous ASL was implemented at 3T with multislice 2D readout after 1525 ms. In five volunteers it was shown that 10 min scanning resulted in significant perfusion signal in 70% of WM voxels. Increasing the labeling and delay time did not lead to a higher percentage. In 27 normal volunteers it was found that 35 averages are necessary to detect significant WM signal, but 150 averages are needed to detect signal in the deep WM. Finally, it was shown in a patient with a cerebral arteriovenous malformation that pseudo-continuous ASL enabled the depiction of hypointense WM perfusion signal, although dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI showed that this region was merely showing delayed arrival of contrast agent than hypoperfusion. It can be concluded that, except within the deep WM, ASL is sensitive enough to detect WM perfusion signal and perfusion deficits. PMID:19365865

  9. Susceptibility-Based Analysis Of Dynamic Gadolinium Bolus Perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bonekamp, David; Barker, Peter B.; Leigh, Richard; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Li, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An algorithm is developed for the reconstruction of dynamic, gadolinium (Gd) bolus MR perfusion images of the human brain, based on quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM). Methods The method is evaluated in 5 perfusion scans obtained from 4 different patients scanned at 3T, and compared to the conventional analysis based on changes in the transverse relaxation rate ΔR2* and to theoretical predictions. QSM images were referenced to ventricular CSF for each dynamic of the perfusion sequence. Results Images of cerebral blood flow and blood volume were successfully reconstructed from the QSM-analysis, and were comparable to those reconstructed using ΔR2*. The magnitudes of the Gd-associated susceptibility effects in gray and white matter were consistent with theoretical predictions. Conclusion QSM-based analysis may have some theoretical advantages compared to ΔR2*, including a simpler relationship between signal change and Gd concentration. However, disadvantages are its much lower contrast-to-noise ratio, artifacts due to respiration and other effects, and more complicated reconstruction methods. More work is required to optimize data acquisition protocols for QSM-based perfusion imaging. PMID:24604343

  10. Cerebral perfusion alterations in epileptic patients during peri-ictal and post-ictal phase: PASL vs DSC-MRI.

    PubMed

    Pizzini, Francesca B; Farace, Paolo; Manganotti, Paolo; Zoccatelli, Giada; Bongiovanni, Luigi G; Golay, Xavier; Beltramello, Alberto; Osculati, Antonio; Bertini, Giuseppe; Fabene, Paolo F

    2013-07-01

    Non-invasive pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL) MRI is a method to study brain perfusion that does not require the administration of a contrast agent, which makes it a valuable diagnostic tool as it reduces cost and side effects. The purpose of the present study was to establish the viability of PASL as an alternative to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC-MRI) and other perfusion imaging methods in characterizing changes in perfusion patterns caused by seizures in epileptic patients. We evaluated 19 patients with PASL. Of these, the 9 affected by high-frequency seizures were observed during the peri-ictal period (within 5hours since the last seizure), while the 10 patients affected by low-frequency seizures were observed in the post-ictal period. For comparison, 17/19 patients were also evaluated with DSC-MRI and CBF/CBV. PASL imaging showed focal vascular changes, which allowed the classification of patients in three categories: 8 patients characterized by increased perfusion, 4 patients with normal perfusion and 7 patients with decreased perfusion. PASL perfusion imaging findings were comparable to those obtained by DSC-MRI. Since PASL is a) sensitive to vascular alterations induced by epileptic seizures, b) comparable to DSC-MRI for detecting perfusion asymmetries, c) potentially capable of detecting time-related perfusion changes, it can be recommended for repeated evaluations, to identify the epileptic focus, and in follow-up and/or therapy-response assessment. PMID:23623332

  11. Cerebral perfusion alterations in epileptic patients during peri-ictal and post-ictal phase: PASL vs DSC-MRI.

    PubMed

    Pizzini, Francesca B; Farace, Paolo; Manganotti, Paolo; Zoccatelli, Giada; Bongiovanni, Luigi G; Golay, Xavier; Beltramello, Alberto; Osculati, Antonio; Bertini, Giuseppe; Fabene, Paolo F

    2013-07-01

    Non-invasive pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL) MRI is a method to study brain perfusion that does not require the administration of a contrast agent, which makes it a valuable diagnostic tool as it reduces cost and side effects. The purpose of the present study was to establish the viability of PASL as an alternative to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC-MRI) and other perfusion imaging methods in characterizing changes in perfusion patterns caused by seizures in epileptic patients. We evaluated 19 patients with PASL. Of these, the 9 affected by high-frequency seizures were observed during the peri-ictal period (within 5hours since the last seizure), while the 10 patients affected by low-frequency seizures were observed in the post-ictal period. For comparison, 17/19 patients were also evaluated with DSC-MRI and CBF/CBV. PASL imaging showed focal vascular changes, which allowed the classification of patients in three categories: 8 patients characterized by increased perfusion, 4 patients with normal perfusion and 7 patients with decreased perfusion. PASL perfusion imaging findings were comparable to those obtained by DSC-MRI. Since PASL is a) sensitive to vascular alterations induced by epileptic seizures, b) comparable to DSC-MRI for detecting perfusion asymmetries, c) potentially capable of detecting time-related perfusion changes, it can be recommended for repeated evaluations, to identify the epileptic focus, and in follow-up and/or therapy-response assessment.

  12. Quantification of myocardial perfusion based on signal intensity of flow sensitized MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeykoon, Sumeda B.

    maximum percentage deviation is about 5%. Then the SI-method was used in comparison to a delayed enhanced method to qualitatively and quantitatively assess perfusion deficits in an ischemia-reperfusion (IR) mouse model. The infarcted region of the perfusion map is comparable to the hyper intense region of the delayed enhanced image of the IR mouse. The SI method also used to record a chronological comparison of perfusion on delta sarcoglycan null (DSG) mice. Perfusion of DSG and wild-type (WT) mice at ages of 12 weeks and 32 weeks were compared and percentage change of perfusion was estimated. The result shows that in DSG mice perfusion changes considerably. Finally, the SI method was implemented on a 3 Tesla Philip scanner by modifying to data acquisition method. The perfusion obtained in this is consistent with literature values but further adjustment of pulse sequence and modification of numerical solution is needed. The most important benefit of the SI method is that it reduces scan time 30%--40% and lessens motion artifacts of images compared to the T1 method. This study demonstrates that the signal intensity-based ASL method is a robust alternative to the conventional T1-method.

  13. Value of Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion MRI in the Acute Phase of Transient Global Amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Alex; Al-Zghloul, Mansour; Kerl, Hans U.; Böhme, Johannes; Mürle, Bettina; Groden, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a transitory, short-lasting neurological disorder characterized by a sudden onset of antero- and retrograde amnesia. Perfusion abnormalities in TGA have been evaluated mainly by use of positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In the present study we explore the value of dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion-weighted MRI (PWI) in TGA in the acute phase. Methods From a MRI report database we identified TGA patients who underwent MRI including PWI in the acute phase and compared these to control subjects. Quantitative perfusion maps (cerebral blood flow (CBF) and volume (CBV)) were generated and analyzed by use of Signal Processing In NMR-Software (SPIN). CBF and CBV values in subcortical brain regions were assessed by use of VOI created in FIRST, a model-based segmentation tool in the Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB) Software Library (FSL). Results Five TGA patients were included (2 men, 3 women). On PWI, no relevant perfusion alterations were found by visual inspection in TGA patients. Group comparisons for possible differences between TGA patients and control subjects showed significant lower rCBF values bilaterally in the hippocampus, in the left thalamus and globus pallidus as well as bilaterally in the putamen and the left caudate nucleus. Correspondingly, significant lower rCBV values were observed bilaterally in the hippocampus and the putamen as well as in the left caudate nucleus. Group comparisons for possible side differences in rCBF and rCBV values in TGA patients revealed a significant lower rCBV value in the left caudate nucleus. Conclusions Mere visual inspection of PWI is not sufficient for the assessment of perfusion changes in TGA in the acute phase. Group comparisons with healthy control subjects might be useful to detect subtle perfusion changes on PWI in TGA patients. However, this should be confirmed in

  14. A variable flip angle-based method for reducing blurring in 3D GRASE ASL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaoyun; Connelly, Alan; Tournier, Jacques-Donald; Calamante, Fernando

    2014-09-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) is an MRI technique to measure cerebral blood flow directly and noninvasively, and thus provides a more direct quantitative correlate of neural activity than blood-oxygen-level-dependent fMRI. A 3D gradient and spin-echo (GRASE) sequence is capable of enhancing signal-to-noise ratio, and has been shown to be a very useful readout module for ASL sequences. Nonetheless, the introduction of significant blurring in its single-shot version, due to T2 decay along the partition dimension, compromises the achievable spatial resolution, limiting the potential of this technique for whole-brain coverage. To address this issue, a method for reducing blurring based on a variable flip angle (VFA) scheme is proposed in this study for 3D GRASE ASL perfusion. Numerical simulations show that the proposed method is capable of reducing the blurring significantly compared to the standard constant flip angle approach; this result was further confirmed using in vivo data. The proposed VFA method should therefore be of significance to 3D GRASE ASL fMRI studies, since it is able to reduce blurring without sacrificing temporal resolution.

  15. The correlation of contrast-enhanced ultrasound and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis in rabbit VX2 liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhiming; Liang, Qianwen; Liang, Changhong; Zhong, Guimian

    2014-12-01

    Our objective is to explore the value of liver cancer contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis in liver cancer and the correlation between these two analysis methods. Rabbit VX2 liver cancer model was established in this study. CEUS was applied. Sono Vue was applied in rabbits by ear vein to dynamically observe and record the blood perfusion and changes in the process of VX2 liver cancer and surrounding tissue. MRI perfusion quantitative analysis was used to analyze the mean enhancement time and change law of maximal slope increasing, which were further compared with the pathological examination results. Quantitative indicators of liver cancer CEUS and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis were compared, and the correlation between them was analyzed by correlation analysis. Rabbit VX2 liver cancer model was successfully established. CEUS showed that time-intensity curve of rabbit VX2 liver cancer showed "fast in, fast out" model while MRI perfusion quantitative analysis showed that quantitative parameter MTE of tumor tissue increased and MSI decreased: the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.01). The diagnostic results of CEUS and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis were not significantly different (P > 0.05). However, the quantitative parameter of them were significantly positively correlated (P < 0.05). CEUS and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis can both dynamically monitor the liver cancer lesion and surrounding liver parenchyma, and the quantitative parameters of them are correlated. The combined application of both is of importance in early diagnosis of liver cancer.

  16. Quantitative Perfusion Analysis of First-Pass Contrast Enhancement Kinetics: Application to MRI of Myocardial Perfusion in Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Binita; Storey, Pippa; Iqbal, Sohah; Slater, James; Axel, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Perfusion analysis from first-pass contrast enhancement kinetics requires modeling tissue contrast exchange. This study presents a new approach for numerical implementation of the tissue homogeneity model, incorporating flexible distance steps along the capillary (NTHf). Methods The proposed NTHf model considers contrast exchange in fluid packets flowing along the capillary, incorporating flexible distance steps, thus allowing more efficient and stable calculations of the transit of tracer through the tissue. We prospectively studied 8 patients (62 ± 13 years old) with suspected CAD, who underwent first-pass perfusion CMR imaging at rest and stress prior to angiography. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial perfusion reserve index (MPRI) were estimated using both the NTHf and the conventional adiabatic approximation of the TH models. Coronary artery lesions detected at angiography were clinically assigned to one of three categories of stenosis severity (‘insignificant’, ‘mild to moderate’ and ‘severe’) and related to corresponding myocardial territories. Results The mean MBF (ml/g/min) at rest/stress and MPRI were 0.80 ± 0.33/1.25 ± 0.45 and 1.68 ± 0.54 in the insignificant regions, 0.74 ± 0.21/1.09 ± 0.28 and 1.54 ± 0.46 in the mild to moderate regions, and 0.79 ± 0.28/0.63 ± 0.34 and 0.85 ± 0.48 in the severe regions, respectively. The correlation coefficients of MBFs at rest/stress and MPRI between the NTHf and AATH models were r = 0.97/0.93 and r = 0.91, respectively. Conclusions The proposed NTHf model allows efficient quantitative analysis of the transit of tracer through tissue, particularly at higher flow. Results of initial application to MRI of myocardial perfusion in CAD are encouraging. PMID:27583385

  17. Interhemispheric Cerebral Blood Flow Balance during Recovery of Motor Hand Function after Ischemic Stroke—A Longitudinal MRI Study Using Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Missimer, John; Schroth, Gerhard; Hess, Christian W.; Sturzenegger, Matthias; Wang, Danny J. J.; Weder, Bruno; Federspiel, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background Unilateral ischemic stroke disrupts the well balanced interactions within bilateral cortical networks. Restitution of interhemispheric balance is thought to contribute to post-stroke recovery. Longitudinal measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes might act as surrogate marker for this process. Objective To quantify longitudinal CBF changes using arterial spin labeling MRI (ASL) and interhemispheric balance within the cortical sensorimotor network and to assess their relationship with motor hand function recovery. Methods Longitudinal CBF data were acquired in 23 patients at 3 and 9 months after cortical sensorimotor stroke and in 20 healthy controls using pulsed ASL. Recovery of grip force and manual dexterity was assessed with tasks requiring power and precision grips. Voxel-based analysis was performed to identify areas of significant CBF change. Region-of-interest analyses were used to quantify the interhemispheric balance across nodes of the cortical sensorimotor network. Results Dexterity was more affected, and recovered at a slower pace than grip force. In patients with successful recovery of dexterous hand function, CBF decreased over time in the contralesional supplementary motor area, paralimbic anterior cingulate cortex and superior precuneus, and interhemispheric balance returned to healthy control levels. In contrast, patients with poor recovery presented with sustained hypoperfusion in the sensorimotor cortices encompassing the ischemic tissue, and CBF remained lateralized to the contralesional hemisphere. Conclusions Sustained perfusion imbalance within the cortical sensorimotor network, as measured with task-unrelated ASL, is associated with poor recovery of dexterous hand function after stroke. CBF at rest might be used to monitor recovery and gain prognostic information. PMID:25191858

  18. Sub-band denoising and spline curve fitting method for hemodynamic measurement in perfusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong-Dun; Huang, Hsiao-Ling; Hsu, Yuan-Yu; Chen, Chi-Chen; Chen, Ing-Yi; Wu, Liang-Chi; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Lin, Kang-Ping

    2003-05-01

    In clinical research, non-invasive MR perfusion imaging is capable of investigating brain perfusion phenomenon via various hemodynamic measurements, such as cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and mean trasnit time (MTT). These hemodynamic parameters are useful in diagnosing brain disorders such as stroke, infarction and periinfarct ischemia by further semi-quantitative analysis. However, the accuracy of quantitative analysis is usually affected by poor signal-to-noise ratio image quality. In this paper, we propose a hemodynamic measurement method based upon sub-band denoising and spline curve fitting processes to improve image quality for better hemodynamic quantitative analysis results. Ten sets of perfusion MRI data and corresponding PET images were used to validate the performance. For quantitative comparison, we evaluate gray/white matter CBF ratio. As a result, the hemodynamic semi-quantitative analysis result of mean gray to white matter CBF ratio is 2.10 +/- 0.34. The evaluated ratio of brain tissues in perfusion MRI is comparable to PET technique is less than 1-% difference in average. Furthermore, the method features excellent noise reduction and boundary preserving in image processing, and short hemodynamic measurement time.

  19. Application of 3.0T magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling (ASL) technology in mild and moderate intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    LI, ZHONGWEI; LI, NAIKUN; QU, YANYAN; GAI, FENG; ZHANG, GUOWEI; ZHANG, GUANGHUI

    2016-01-01

    The application value of 3.0T magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling (ASL) technology in mild and moderate intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis was evaluated. A total of 58 cases of transient ischemic attack (TIA) and 60 cases of ischemic cerebral apoplexy cases were selected. The cases were analysed using a GE Healthcare Signa HDx 3.0T superconducting whole-body magnetic resonance scan within 24 h of attack. Eight-channel head phased array coils and conventional sequence were used to create T1-weighted images (T1WI), T2WI, diffusion-weighted imaging, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and ASL imaging, which were generated into ASL pseudo-color images (blue was hypoperfusion area) through post-processing in order to compare and analyze the correlation and differences between ASL and conventional imaging in terms of lesion location, size, blood perfusion situation and signal range of relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF). The results showed that, 13 TIA cases of abnormal signal in conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can also be found through ASL technology. Diameter stenosis beyond 30% in MRA can also be tested in ASL. A positive rate in ASL was significantly higher than that of conventional MRI (χ2=29.078, P<0.001) and hypoperfusion area was greatly increased (t=32.526, P<0.001). The rCBF value was positively correlated with the degree of diameter stenosis shown in MRA (r=0.524, P=0.012). Additionally, the positive rate of ASL was positively correlated with the attack times of TIA (r=0.352, P=0.027). A total of 39 cerebral apoplexy cases of abnormal signal in conventional MRI were also found through ASL technology. A positive rate in ASL was significantly higher than that of conventional MRI (χ2=7.685, P=0.006) and hypoperfusion area was greatly increased (t=9.425, P<0.001). The rCBF value was positively correlated with the degree of diameter stenosis (r=0.635, P=0.009). In conclusion, 3.0T ASL correlated with early diagnosis of TIA and mild and

  20. Brain perfusion SPECT and MRI in foetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Riikonen, R; Salonen, I; Partanen, K; Verho, S

    1999-10-01

    Six boys and five girls with a mean age of 8.6 (range 3 to 13) years with foetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) were studied by MRI and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to find specific areas of vulnerability. Morphological anomalies shown in six of 11 patients by MRI were situated both cortically and subcortically: cortical atrophy (N = 2), dilated ventricle (N = 1), corpus callosum hypoplasia (N = 1), cerebellar atrophy (N = 2), one of the latter with Arnold-Chiari malformation (N = 1). Delayed myelination of the white matter was seen in two patients. Volumetric studies of the hippocampus showed morphological left-right asymmetry in five of eight patients. However, SPECT showed mild hypoperfusion of the left hemisphere in all 10 subjects. The negative left-right index was located especially in the left parietooccipital region, i.e. in the brain areas implicated in arithmetical and logical-grammatical functions, which are known to be affected in FAS. Normal left-right dominance was also lacking in the frontal area, i.e. the brain area affected in attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Detection of these abnormalities, although they are not unique to FAS, may be helpful in the diagnosis and any attempts at rehabilitation. Diverse morphological and functional abnormalities are more frequent than has usually been believed even in less impaired children with FAS.

  1. MRI monitoring of function, perfusion and viability in microembolized moderately ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Do, Loi; Wilson, Mark W; Krug, Roland; Hetts, Steven W; Saeed, Maythem

    2015-08-01

    Assessment of microembolization after coronary interventions is clinically challenging, thus we longitudinally investigated microemboli effects on moderately ischemic myocardium using MRI and histopathology. Twenty-four pigs (8/group) were divided into: group I (no intervention), group II (45 min LAD occlusion) and group III (45 min LAD occlusion with microembolization). Cine, perfusion and delayed contrast enhanced MRI (DE-MRI), using 1.5T MRI, were used for assessment at 3 days and 5 weeks. Triphenyltetrazolium-chloride (TTC) and Masson-trichrome were used as gold standard references for macro and microscopic quantification of myocardial infarction (MI). Cine MRI showed differential increase in end systolic volume (1.3 ± 0.08 ml/kg group II and 1.6 ± 0.1 ml/kg group III) and decrease in ejection fraction (45 ± 2 and 36 ± 2%, respectively) compared with controls at 3 days (2.1 ± 0.1 ml ESV and 50 ± 1% EF, P < 0.05). At 5 weeks group III, but not II, showed persistent perfusion deficits, wall thinning in the LAD territory and compensatory hypertrophy in remote myocardium. DE-MRI MI at 3 days was significantly smaller in group II (3.3 ± 2.2 g) than III (9.8 ± 0.6 g), at 5 weeks, MI were smaller by 60% (1.3 ± 0.9 g) and 22% (7.7 ± 0.5 g), respectively. TTC MI was similar to DE-MRI in group II (1.6 ± 1.0 g) and III (9.2 ± 1.6 g), but not microscopy (2.8 ± 0.4 and 10.5 ± 1.5 g, respectively). The effects of moderate ischemia with and without microembolization on myocardium could be differentiated using multiple MRI sequences. MRI demonstrated that microemboli in moderately ischemic myocardium, but not solely ischemia, prolonged ventricular dysfunction, created perfusion deficits, poor infarct resorption and enhanced compensatory hypertrophy, while moderate ischemia alone caused minor LV changes.

  2. Contrast-enhanced CT- and MRI-based perfusion assessment for pulmonary diseases: basics and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Lee, Ho Yun; Miura, Sachiko; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of regional pulmonary perfusion as well as nodule and tumor perfusions in various pulmonary diseases are currently performed by means of nuclear medicine studies requiring radioactive macroaggregates, dual-energy computed tomography (CT), and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion CT techniques and unenhanced and dynamic first-pass contrast enhanced perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as time-resolved three-dimensional or four-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Perfusion scintigraphy, single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) and SPECT fused with CT have been established as clinically available scintigraphic methods; however, they are limited by perfusion information with poor spatial resolution and other shortcomings. Although positron emission tomography with 15O water can measure absolute pulmonary perfusion, it requires a cyclotron for generation of a tracer with an extremely short half-life (2 min), and can only be performed for academic purposes. Therefore, clinicians are concentrating their efforts on the application of CT-based and MRI-based quantitative and qualitative perfusion assessment to various pulmonary diseases. This review article covers 1) the basics of dual-energy CT and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion CT techniques, 2) the basics of time-resolved contrast-enhanced MRA and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI, and 3) clinical applications of contrast-enhanced CT- and MRI-based perfusion assessment for patients with pulmonary nodule, lung cancer, and pulmonary vascular diseases. We believe that these new techniques can be useful in routine clinical practice for not only thoracic oncology patients, but also patients with different pulmonary vascular diseases. PMID:27523813

  3. Contrast-enhanced CT- and MRI-based perfusion assessment for pulmonary diseases: basics and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Lee, Ho Yun; Miura, Sachiko; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of regional pulmonary perfusion as well as nodule and tumor perfusions in various pulmonary diseases are currently performed by means of nuclear medicine studies requiring radioactive macroaggregates, dual-energy computed tomography (CT), and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion CT techniques and unenhanced and dynamic first-pass contrast enhanced perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as time-resolved three-dimensional or four-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Perfusion scintigraphy, single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) and SPECT fused with CT have been established as clinically available scintigraphic methods; however, they are limited by perfusion information with poor spatial resolution and other shortcomings. Although positron emission tomography with 15O water can measure absolute pulmonary perfusion, it requires a cyclotron for generation of a tracer with an extremely short half-life (2 min), and can only be performed for academic purposes. Therefore, clinicians are concentrating their efforts on the application of CT-based and MRI-based quantitative and qualitative perfusion assessment to various pulmonary diseases. This review article covers 1) the basics of dual-energy CT and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion CT techniques, 2) the basics of time-resolved contrast-enhanced MRA and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI, and 3) clinical applications of contrast-enhanced CT- and MRI-based perfusion assessment for patients with pulmonary nodule, lung cancer, and pulmonary vascular diseases. We believe that these new techniques can be useful in routine clinical practice for not only thoracic oncology patients, but also patients with different pulmonary vascular diseases.

  4. Contrast-enhanced CT- and MRI-based perfusion assessment for pulmonary diseases: basics and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Lee, Ho Yun; Miura, Sachiko; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of regional pulmonary perfusion as well as nodule and tumor perfusions in various pulmonary diseases are currently performed by means of nuclear medicine studies requiring radioactive macroaggregates, dual-energy computed tomography (CT), and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion CT techniques and unenhanced and dynamic first-pass contrast enhanced perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as time-resolved three-dimensional or four-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Perfusion scintigraphy, single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) and SPECT fused with CT have been established as clinically available scintigraphic methods; however, they are limited by perfusion information with poor spatial resolution and other shortcomings. Although positron emission tomography with 15O water can measure absolute pulmonary perfusion, it requires a cyclotron for generation of a tracer with an extremely short half-life (2 min), and can only be performed for academic purposes. Therefore, clinicians are concentrating their efforts on the application of CT-based and MRI-based quantitative and qualitative perfusion assessment to various pulmonary diseases. This review article covers 1) the basics of dual-energy CT and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion CT techniques, 2) the basics of time-resolved contrast-enhanced MRA and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI, and 3) clinical applications of contrast-enhanced CT- and MRI-based perfusion assessment for patients with pulmonary nodule, lung cancer, and pulmonary vascular diseases. We believe that these new techniques can be useful in routine clinical practice for not only thoracic oncology patients, but also patients with different pulmonary vascular diseases. PMID:27523813

  5. Detection of the brain response during a cognitive task using perfusion-based event-related functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Yee, S H; Liu, H L; Hou, J; Pu, Y; Fox, P T; Gao, J H

    2000-08-01

    Event-related (ER) fMRI has evoked great interest due to the ability to depict the dynamic features of human brain function during various cognitive tasks. Thus far, all cognitive ER-fMRI studies have been based on blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast techniques. Compared with BOLD-based fMRI techniques, perfusion-based fMRI is able to localize the region of neuronal activity more accurately. This report demonstrates, for the first time, the detection of the brain response to a cognitive task using high temporal resolution perfusion-based ER-fMRI. An English verb generation task was used in this study. Results show that perfusion-based ER-fMRI accurately depicts the activation in Broca's area. Average changes in regional relative cerebral blood flow reached a maximum value of 30.7% at approximately 6.5 s after the start of stimulation and returned to 10% of the maximum value at approximately 12.8 s. Our results show that perfusion-based ER-fMRI is a useful tool for cognitive neuroscience studies, providing comparable temporal resolution and better localization of brain function than BOLD ER-fMRI. PMID:10943717

  6. Functional Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the Assessment of Myocardial Viability and Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness safety and cost-effectiveness of using functional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction. Results Functional MRI has become increasingly investigated as a noninvasive method for assessing myocardial viability and perfusion. Most patients in the published literature have mild to moderate impaired LV function. It is possible that the severity of LV dysfunction may be an important factor that can alter the diagnostic accuracy of imaging techniques. There is some evidence of comparable or better performance of functional cardiac MRI for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion compared with other imaging techniques. However limitations to most of the studies included: Functional cardiac MRI studies that assess myocardial viability and perfusion have had small sample sizes. Some studies assessed myocardial viability/perfusion in patients who had already undergone revascularization, or excluded patients with a prior MI (Schwitter et al., 2001). Lack of explicit detail of patient recruitment. Patients with LVEF >35%. Interstudy variability in post MI imaging time(including acute or chronic MI), when patients with a prior MI were included. Poor interobserver agreement (kappa statistic) in the interpretation of the results. Traditionally, 0.80 is considered “good”. Cardiac MRI measurement of myocardial perfusion to as an adjunct tool to help diagnose CAD (prior to a definitive coronary angiography) has also been examined in some studies, with methodological limitations, yielding comparable results. Many studies examining myocardial viability and perfusion report on the accuracy of imaging methods with limited data on long-term patient outcome and management. Kim et al. (2000) revealed that the transmural

  7. Repeatability of Cerebral Perfusion Using Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI in Glioblastoma Patients12

    PubMed Central

    Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Emblem, Kyrre E.; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Bjørnerud, Atle; Vangel, Mark G.; Gerstner, Elizabeth R.; Schmainda, Kathleen M.; Paynabar, Kamran; Wu, Ona; Wen, Patrick Y.; Batchelor, Tracy; Rosen, Bruce; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study evaluates the repeatability of brain perfusion using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with a variety of post-processing methods. METHODS Thirty-two patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were recruited. On a 3-T MRI using a dual-echo, gradient-echo spin-echo DSC-MRI protocol, the patients were scanned twice 1 to 5 days apart. Perfusion maps including cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were generated using two contrast agent leakage correction methods, along with testing normalization to reference tissue, and application of arterial input function (AIF). Repeatability of CBV and CBF within tumor regions and healthy tissues, identified by structural images, was assessed with intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and repeatability coefficients (RCs). Coefficients of variation (CVs) were reported for selected methods. RESULTS CBV and CBF were highly repeatable within tumor with ICC values up to 0.97. However, both CBV and CBF showed lower ICCs for healthy cortical tissues (up to 0.83), healthy gray matter (up to 0.95), and healthy white matter (WM; up to 0.93). The values of CV ranged from 6% to 10% in tumor and 3% to 11% in healthy tissues. The values of RC relative to the mean value of measurement within healthy WM ranged from 22% to 42% in tumor and 7% to 43% in healthy tissues. These percentages show how much variation in perfusion parameter, relative to that in healthy WM, we expect to observe to consider it statistically significant. We also found that normalization improved repeatability, but AIF deconvolution did not. CONCLUSIONS DSC-MRI is highly repeatable in high-grade glioma patients. PMID:26055170

  8. Automated scoring of regional lung perfusion in children from contrast enhanced 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Tobias; Eichinger, Monika; Bauman, Grzegorz; Bischoff, Arved; Puderbach, Michael; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2012-03-01

    MRI perfusion images give information about regional lung function and can be used to detect pulmonary pathologies in cystic fibrosis (CF) children. However, manual assessment of the percentage of pathologic tissue in defined lung subvolumes features large inter- and intra-observer variation, making it difficult to determine disease progression consistently. We present an automated method to calculate a regional score for this purpose. First, lungs are located based on thresholding and morphological operations. Second, statistical shape models of left and right children's lungs are initialized at the determined locations and used to precisely segment morphological images. Segmentation results are transferred to perfusion maps and employed as masks to calculate perfusion statistics. An automated threshold to determine pathologic tissue is calculated and used to determine accurate regional scores. We evaluated the method on 10 MRI images and achieved an average surface distance of less than 1.5 mm compared to manual reference segmentations. Pathologic tissue was detected correctly in 9 cases. The approach seems suitable for detecting early signs of CF and monitoring response to therapy.

  9. Myocardial Perfusion MRI Using SW-CG-HYPR in Canine with Stenotic Coronary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Lan; Kino, Aya; Lee, Daniel; Dharmakumar, Rohan; Carr, James C.; Li, Debiao

    2010-01-01

    Purpose First-pass perfusion MRI is a promising technique for detecting ischemic heart disease. However, the diagnostic value of the method is limited by the low spatial coverage, resolution, SNR, and cardiac motion related image artifacts. A combination of sliding window and CG-HYPR method has been proposed in healthy volunteer studies to reduce the acquisition window for each slice while maintaining the temporal resolution of one frame per heartbeat in myocardial perfusion MR imaging. This method allows for improved spatial coverage, resolution and SNR. Materials and Methods In this study, we use a controlled animal model to test whether the myocardial territory supplied by a stenotic coronary artery can be detected accurately by SW-CG-HYPR perfusion method under pharmacological stress. Results Results from six mongrel dogs (15–25 kg) studies demonstrate the feasibility of SW-CG-HYPR to detect regional perfusion defects. Using this method, the acquisition time per cardiac cycle was reduced by a factor of 4, and the spatial coverage was increased from 2–3 to 6 slices as compared to the conventional techniques including both turbo-FLASH and EPI. The SNR of the healthy myocardium at peak enhancement with SW-CG-HYPR (12.68±2.46) is significantly higher (p<0.01) than the turbo-FLASH (8.65±1.93) and EPI (5.48±1.24). The spatial resolution of SW-CG-HYPR images is 1.2×1.2×8.0 mm3, which is better than the turbo-FLASH (1.8×1.8×8.0 mm3) and EPI (2.0×1.8×8.0 mm3). Conclusion SW-CG-HYPR is a promising technique for myocardial perfusion MRI. This technique provides higher image quality with respect to significantly improved SNR and spatial resolution of the myocardial perfusion images, which might improve myocardial perfusion imaging in a clinical setting. PMID:20861770

  10. ASL and Bilingual Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walworth, Margaret

    1989-01-01

    Explores the use of American Sign Language (ASL) in the bilingual instruction of English as a Second Language for deaf students. Issues addressed include dominant languages, language minorities, legislative and cultural recognition of ASL as an official language, and limited English proficiency. (CB) (Adjunct ERIC Clearinghouse on Literacy…

  11. Semi-quantitative assessment of pulmonary perfusion in children using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetita, Catalin; Thong, William E.; Ou, Phalla

    2013-03-01

    This paper addresses the study of semi-quantitative assessment of pulmonary perfusion acquired from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in a study population mainly composed of children with pulmonary malformations. The automatic analysis approach proposed is based on the indicator-dilution theory introduced in 1954. First, a robust method is developed to segment the pulmonary artery and the lungs from anatomical MRI data, exploiting 2D and 3D mathematical morphology operators. Second, the time-dependent contrast signal of the lung regions is deconvolved by the arterial input function for the assessment of the local hemodynamic system parameters, ie. mean transit time, pulmonary blood volume and pulmonary blood flow. The discrete deconvolution method implements here a truncated singular value decomposition (tSVD) method. Parametric images for the entire lungs are generated as additional elements for diagnosis and quantitative follow-up. The preliminary results attest the feasibility of perfusion quantification in pulmonary DCE-MRI and open an interesting alternative to scintigraphy for this type of evaluation, to be considered at least as a preliminary decision in the diagnostic due to the large availability of the technique and to the non-invasive aspects.

  12. Relationship between diffusion parameters derived from intravoxel incoherent motion MRI and perfusion measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of soft tissue tumors.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Simona; Stefanetti, Linda; Sperati, Francesca; Anelli, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the link between diffusion parameters measured by intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and the perfusion metrics obtained with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI in soft tissue tumors (STTs). Twenty-eight patients affected by histopathologically confirmed STT were included in a prospective study. All patients underwent both DCE MRI and IVIM DWI. The perfusion fraction f, diffusion coefficient D and perfusion-related diffusion coefficient D* were estimated using a bi-exponential function to fit the DWI data. DCE MRI was acquired with a temporal resolution of 3-5 s. Maps of the initial area under the gadolinium concentration curve (IAUGC), time to peak (TTP) and maximum slope of increase (MSI) were derived using commercial software. The relationships between the DCE MRI and IVIM DWI measurements were assessed by Spearman's test. To exclude false positive results under multiple testing, the false discovery rate (FDR) procedure was applied. The Mann-Whitney test was used to evaluate the differences between all variables in patients with non-myxoid and myxoid STT. No significant relationship was found between IVIM parameters and any DCE MRI parameters. Higher f and D*f values were found in non-myxoid tumors compared with myxoid tumors (p = 0.004 and p = 0.003, respectively). MSI was significantly higher in non-myxoid tumors than in myxoid tumors (p = 0.029). From the visual assessments of single clinical cases, both f and D*f maps were in satisfactory agreement with DCE maps in the extreme cases of an avascular mass and a highly vascularized mass, whereas, for tumors with slight vascularity or with a highly heterogeneous perfusion pattern, this association was not straightforward. Although IVIM DWI was demonstrated to be feasible in STT, our data did not support evident relationships between perfusion-related IVIM parameters and perfusion measured by DCE MRI.

  13. Analysis of dynamic cerebral contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI time-series based on unsupervised clustering methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Oliver; Meyer-Baese, Anke; Wismuller, Axel; Hurdal, Monica

    2005-03-01

    We employ unsupervised clustering techniques for the analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI time-series in patients with and without stroke. "Neural gas" network, fuzzy clustering based on deterministic annealing, self-organizing maps, and fuzzy c-means clustering enable self-organized data-driven segmentation w.r.t.fine-grained differences of signal amplitude and dynamics, thus identifying asymmetries and local abnormalities of brain perfusion. We conclude that clustering is a useful extension to conventional perfusion parameter maps.

  14. Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Imaging in MRI and CT: Theoretical Models and Current Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Handayani, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Prakken, N. H. J.; Slart, R. H. J. A.; Oudkerk, M.; Van Ooijen, P. M. A.; Vliegenthart, R.; Sijens, P. E.

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT), including higher spatial and temporal resolution, have made the prospect of performing absolute myocardial perfusion quantification possible, previously only achievable with positron emission tomography (PET). This could facilitate integration of myocardial perfusion biomarkers into the current workup for coronary artery disease (CAD), as MRI and CT systems are more widely available than PET scanners. Cardiac PET scanning remains expensive and is restricted by the requirement of a nearby cyclotron. Clinical evidence is needed to demonstrate that MRI and CT have similar accuracy for myocardial perfusion quantification as PET. However, lack of standardization of acquisition protocols and tracer kinetic model selection complicates comparison between different studies and modalities. The aim of this overview is to provide insight into the different tracer kinetic models for quantitative myocardial perfusion analysis and to address typical implementation issues in MRI and CT. We compare different models based on their theoretical derivations and present the respective consequences for MRI and CT acquisition parameters, highlighting the interplay between tracer kinetic modeling and acquisition settings. PMID:27088083

  15. Characteristics of quantitative perfusion parameters on dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in mammographically occult breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jung Kyu; Rhee, Sun Jung; Song, Jeong Yoon; Cho, Soo Hyun; Jahng, Geon-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the characteristics of quantitative per-fusion parameters obtained from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with mammographically occult (MO) breast cancers and those with mammographically visible (MV) breast cancers. Quantitative parameters (AUC, Ktrans, kep, ve, vp, and wi) from 13 MO breast cancers and 16 MV breast cancers were mapped after the DCE-MRI data were acquired. Various prog-nostic factors, including axillary nodal status, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), Ki-67, p53, E-cadherin, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) were obtained in each group. Fisher's exact test was used to compare any differences of the various prognostic factors between the two groups. The Mann- Whitney U test was applied to compare the quantitative parameters between these two groups. Finally, Spearman's correlation was used to investigate the relation-ships between perfusion indices and four factors - age, tumor size, Ki-67, and p53 - for each group. Although age, tumor size, and the prognostic factors were not statistically different between the two groups, the mean values of the quantitative parameters, except wi in the MV group, were higher than those in the MO group without statistical significance (p = 0.219). The kep value was significantly differ-ent between the two groups (p = 0.048), but the other parameters were not. In the MO group, vp with size, ve with p53, and Ktrans and vp with Ki-67 had significant correlations (p < 0.05). However, in the MV group, only kep showed significant correlation with age. The kep value was only the perfusion parameter of statistical significance between MO and MV breast cancers. PMID:27685105

  16. Cardiac function and myocardial perfusion immediately following maximal treadmill exercise inside the MRI room

    PubMed Central

    Jekic, Mihaela; Foster, Eric L; Ballinger, Michelle R; Raman, Subha V; Simonetti, Orlando P

    2008-01-01

    Treadmill exercise stress testing is an essential tool in the prevention, detection, and treatment of a broad spectrum of cardiovascular disease. After maximal exercise, cardiac images at peak stress are typically acquired using nuclear scintigraphy or echocardiography, both of which have inherent limitations. Although CMR offers superior image quality, the lack of MRI-compatible exercise and monitoring equipment has prevented the realization of treadmill exercise CMR. It is critical to commence imaging as quickly as possible after exercise to capture exercise-induced cardiac wall motion abnormalities. We modified a commercial treadmill such that it could be safely positioned inside the MRI room to minimize the distance between the treadmill and the scan table. We optimized the treadmill exercise CMR protocol in 20 healthy volunteers and successfully imaged cardiac function and myocardial perfusion at peak stress, followed by viability imaging at rest. Imaging commenced an average of 30 seconds after maximal exercise. Real-time cine of seven slices with no breath-hold and no ECG-gating was completed within 45 seconds of exercise, immediately followed by stress perfusion imaging of three short-axis slices which showed an average time to peak enhancement within 57 seconds of exercise. We observed a 3.1-fold increase in cardiac output and a myocardial perfusion reserve index of 1.9, which agree with reported values for healthy subjects at peak stress. This study successfully demonstrates in-room treadmill exercise CMR in healthy volunteers, but confirmation of feasibility in patients with heart disease is still needed. PMID:18272005

  17. Fetal Brain during a Binge Drinking Episode: A dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI fetal brain perfusion study

    PubMed Central

    Kochunov, Peter; Castro, Carlos; Davis, Duff M; Dudley, Donald; Wey, Hsiao-Ying; Purdy, David; Fox, Peter T; Simerly, Calvin; Schatten, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the effects of a single episode of maternal alcohol intoxication on fetal brain blood perfusion in three pregnant dam (baboons) at the 24th week of pregnancy, using dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI. Following the oral administration of alcohol there was a four-fold increase in the peak contrast concentrations in the fetal brain. Additionally, we observed a two-to-three fold increase in the contrast uptake and washout rates in fetal brain. The underlying mechanisms of these changes are unknown but we hypothesized these could include the alcohol-mediated changes in placental permeability and fetal cerebral blood flow. Our findings indicate that alcohol intoxication produced profound changes, which may detrimentally influence neurodevelopmental processes in the brain. PMID:20505549

  18. Challenges for non-invasive brain perfusion quantification using arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Sousa, I; Santos, N; Sanches, J; Figueiredo, P

    2011-03-29

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) sequences for perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have recently become available to be used in the clinical practice, offering a completely non-invasive technique for the quantitative evaluation of brain perfusion. Despite its great potential, ASL perfusion imaging still presents important methodological challenges before its incorporation in routine protocols. Specifically, in some pathological conditions in which the cerebrovascular dynamics is altered, the standard application of ASL may lead to measurement errors. In these cases, it would be possible to estimate perfusion, as well as arterial transit times, by collecting images at multiple time points and then fitting a mathematical model to the data. This approach can be optimized by selecting a set of optimal imaging time points and incorporating knowledge about the physiological distributions of the parameters into the model estimation procedures. In this study, we address the challenges that arise in the measurement of brain perfusion using PASL, due to variations in the arterial transit times, by estimating the errors produced using different types of acquisitions and proposing methods for minimizing such errors. We show by simulation that multiple inversion time ASL acquisitions are expected to reduce measurement errors relative to standard approaches. In data collected from a group of subjects, we further observed reduced inter-subject variability in perfusion measurements when using a multiple versus single inversion time acquisitions. Both measurement errors and variability were further reduced if optimized acquisition and analysis techniques were employed.

  19. Challenges for non-invasive brain perfusion quantification using arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Sousa, I; Santos, N; Sanches, J; Figueiredo, P

    2011-03-29

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) sequences for perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have recently become available to be used in the clinical practice, offering a completely non-invasive technique for the quantitative evaluation of brain perfusion. Despite its great potential, ASL perfusion imaging still presents important methodological challenges before its incorporation in routine protocols. Specifically, in some pathological conditions in which the cerebrovascular dynamics is altered, the standard application of ASL may lead to measurement errors. In these cases, it would be possible to estimate perfusion, as well as arterial transit times, by collecting images at multiple time points and then fitting a mathematical model to the data. This approach can be optimized by selecting a set of optimal imaging time points and incorporating knowledge about the physiological distributions of the parameters into the model estimation procedures. In this study, we address the challenges that arise in the measurement of brain perfusion using PASL, due to variations in the arterial transit times, by estimating the errors produced using different types of acquisitions and proposing methods for minimizing such errors. We show by simulation that multiple inversion time ASL acquisitions are expected to reduce measurement errors relative to standard approaches. In data collected from a group of subjects, we further observed reduced inter-subject variability in perfusion measurements when using a multiple versus single inversion time acquisitions. Both measurement errors and variability were further reduced if optimized acquisition and analysis techniques were employed. PMID:24059574

  20. A brain stress test: Cerebral perfusion during memory encoding in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Xie, Long; Dolui, Sudipto; Das, Sandhitsu R; Stockbower, Grace E; Daffner, Molly; Rao, Hengyi; Yushkevich, Paul A; Detre, John A; Wolk, David A

    2016-01-01

    Arterial spin labeled perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (ASL MRI) provides non-invasive quantification of cerebral blood flow, which can be used as a biomarker of brain function due to the tight coupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain metabolism. A growing body of literature suggests that regional CBF is altered in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we examined ASL MRI CBF in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (n = 65) and cognitively normal healthy controls (n = 62), both at rest and during performance of a memory-encoding task. As compared to rest, task-enhanced ASL MRI improved group discrimination, which supports the notion that physiologic measures during a cognitive challenge, or "stress test", may increase the ability to detect subtle functional changes in early disease stages. Further, logistic regression analysis demonstrated that ASL MRI and concomitantly acquired structural MRI provide complementary information of disease status. The current findings support the potential utility of task-enhanced ASL MRI as a biomarker in early Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27222794

  1. A brain stress test: Cerebral perfusion during memory encoding in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Xie, Long; Dolui, Sudipto; Das, Sandhitsu R; Stockbower, Grace E; Daffner, Molly; Rao, Hengyi; Yushkevich, Paul A; Detre, John A; Wolk, David A

    2016-01-01

    Arterial spin labeled perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (ASL MRI) provides non-invasive quantification of cerebral blood flow, which can be used as a biomarker of brain function due to the tight coupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain metabolism. A growing body of literature suggests that regional CBF is altered in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we examined ASL MRI CBF in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (n = 65) and cognitively normal healthy controls (n = 62), both at rest and during performance of a memory-encoding task. As compared to rest, task-enhanced ASL MRI improved group discrimination, which supports the notion that physiologic measures during a cognitive challenge, or "stress test", may increase the ability to detect subtle functional changes in early disease stages. Further, logistic regression analysis demonstrated that ASL MRI and concomitantly acquired structural MRI provide complementary information of disease status. The current findings support the potential utility of task-enhanced ASL MRI as a biomarker in early Alzheimer's disease.

  2. A brain stress test: Cerebral perfusion during memory encoding in mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Long; Dolui, Sudipto; Das, Sandhitsu R.; Stockbower, Grace E.; Daffner, Molly; Rao, Hengyi; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Detre, John A.; Wolk, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial spin labeled perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (ASL MRI) provides non-invasive quantification of cerebral blood flow, which can be used as a biomarker of brain function due to the tight coupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain metabolism. A growing body of literature suggests that regional CBF is altered in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we examined ASL MRI CBF in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (n = 65) and cognitively normal healthy controls (n = 62), both at rest and during performance of a memory-encoding task. As compared to rest, task-enhanced ASL MRI improved group discrimination, which supports the notion that physiologic measures during a cognitive challenge, or “stress test”, may increase the ability to detect subtle functional changes in early disease stages. Further, logistic regression analysis demonstrated that ASL MRI and concomitantly acquired structural MRI provide complementary information of disease status. The current findings support the potential utility of task-enhanced ASL MRI as a biomarker in early Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27222794

  3. Functional MRI and Outcome in Traumatic Coma

    PubMed Central

    Giacino, Joseph T.; Wu, Ona

    2013-01-01

    Advances in task-based functional MRI (fMRI), resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI), and arterial-spin labeled (ASL) perfusion MRI have occurred at a rapid pace in recent years. These techniques for measuring brain function have great potential to improve the accuracy of prognostication for civilian and military patients with traumatic coma. In addition, fMRI, rs-fMRI, and ASL have provided novel insights into the pathophysiology of traumatic disorders of consciousness, as well as mechanisms of recovery from coma. However, functional neuroimaging techniques have yet to achieve widespread clinical use as prognostic tests for patients with traumatic coma. Rather, a broad spectrum of methodological hurdles currently limits the feasibility of clinical implementation. In this review, we discuss the basic principles of fMRI, rs-fMRI and ASL and their potential applications as prognostic tools for patients with traumatic coma. We also discuss future strategies for overcoming the current barriers to clinical implementation. PMID:23881623

  4. Dynamic contrast enhanced T1 MRI perfusion differentiates pseudoprogression from recurrent glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Alissa A; Arevalo-Perez, Julio; Kaley, Thomas; Lyo, John; Peck, Kyung K; Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang; Young, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    Pseudoprogression may present as transient new or increasing enhancing lesions that mimic recurrent tumors in treated glioblastoma. The purpose of this study was to examine the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced T1 magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) in differentiating between pseudoprogression and tumor progression and devise a cut-off value sensitive for pseudoprogression. We retrospectively examined 37 patients with glioblastoma treated with radiation and temozolomide after surgical resection that then developed new or increasing enhancing lesion(s) indeterminate for pseudoprogression versus progression. Volumetric plasma volume (Vp) and time-dependent leakage constant (Ktrans) maps were measured for the enhancing lesion and the mean and ninetieth percentile histogram values recorded. Lesion outcome was determined by clinical follow up with pseudoprogression defined as stable disease not requiring new treatment. Statistical analysis was performed with Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Patients with pseudoprogression (n = 13) had Vp (mean) = 2.4 and Vp (90 %tile) = 3.2; and Ktrans (mean) = 3.5 and Ktrans (90 %tile) = 4.2. Patients with tumor progression (n = 24) had Vp (mean) = 5.3 and Vp (90 %tile) = 6.6; and Ktrans (mean) = 7.4 and Ktrans (90 %tile) = 9.1. Compared with tumor progression, pseudoprogression demonstrated lower Vp perfusion values (p = 0.0002) with a Vp (mean) cutoff <3.7 yielding 85% sensitivity and 79% specificity for pseudoprogression. Ktrans (mean) of >3.6 had a 69% sensitivity and 79% specificity for disease progression. DCE MRI shows lower plasma volume and time dependent leakage constant values in pseudoprogression than in tumor progression. A cut-off value with high sensitivity for pseudoprogression can be applied to aid in interpretation of DCE MRI.

  5. Dissociative Part-Dependent Resting-State Activity in Dissociative Identity Disorder: A Controlled fMRI Perfusion Study

    PubMed Central

    Schlumpf, Yolanda R.; Reinders, Antje A. T. S.; Nijenhuis, Ellert R. S.; Luechinger, Roger; van Osch, Matthias J. P.; Jäncke, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Background In accordance with the Theory of Structural Dissociation of the Personality (TSDP), studies of dissociative identity disorder (DID) have documented that two prototypical dissociative subsystems of the personality, the “Emotional Part” (EP) and the “Apparently Normal Part” (ANP), have different biopsychosocial reactions to supraliminal and subliminal trauma-related cues and that these reactions cannot be mimicked by fantasy prone healthy controls nor by actors. Methods Arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI was used to test the hypotheses that ANP and EP in DID have different perfusion patterns in response to rest instructions, and that perfusion is different in actors who were instructed to simulate ANP and EP. In a follow-up study, regional cerebral blood flow of DID patients was compared with the activation pattern of healthy non-simulating controls. Results Compared to EP, ANP showed elevated perfusion in bilateral thalamus. Compared to ANP, EP had increased perfusion in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, and motor-related areas. Perfusion patterns for simulated ANP and EP were different. Fitting their reported role-play strategies, the actors activated brain structures involved in visual mental imagery and empathizing feelings. The follow-up study demonstrated elevated perfusion in the left temporal lobe in DID patients, whereas non-simulating healthy controls had increased activity in areas which mediate the mental construction of past and future episodic events. Conclusion DID involves dissociative part-dependent resting-state differences. Compared to ANP, EP activated brain structures involved in self-referencing and sensorimotor actions more. Actors had different perfusion patterns compared to genuine ANP and EP. Comparisons of neural activity for individuals with DID and non-DID simulating controls suggest that the resting-state features of ANP and EP in DID are not due to imagination. The findings are

  6. Non-ECG-Gated Myocardial Perfusion MRI Using Continuous Magnetization-Driven Radial Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Behzad; Dharmakumar, Rohan; Arsanjani, Reza; Thomson, Louise; Merz, C. Noel Bairey; Berman, Daniel S.; Li, Debiao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Establishing a high-resolution non-ECG-gated first-pass perfusion (FPP) cardiac MRI technique may improve accessibility and diagnostic capability of FPP imaging. We propose a non-ECG-gated FPP imaging technique using continuous magnetization-driven golden-angle radial acquisition. The main purpose of this preliminary study is to evaluate whether, in the simple case of single-slice 2D imaging, adequate myocardial contrast can be obtained for accurate visualization of hypoperfused territories in the setting of myocardial ischemia. Methods A T1-weighted pulse sequence with continuous golden-angle radial sampling was developed for non-ECG-gated FPP imaging. A sliding-window scheme with no temporal acceleration was used to reconstruct 8 frames/second. Canines were imaged at 3T with and without coronary stenosis using the proposed scheme and a conventional magnetization-prepared ECG-gated FPP method. Results Our studies showed that the proposed non-ECG-gated method is capable of generating high-resolution (1.7×1.7×6 mm3) artifact-free FPP images of a single slice at high heart rates (92±21 beats/minute), while matching the performance of conventional FPP imaging in terms of hypoperfused-to-normal myocardial contrast-to-noise ratio (proposed: 5.18±0.70, conventional: 4.88±0.43). Furthermore, the detected perfusion defect areas were consistent with the conventional FPP images. Conclusion Non-ECG-gated FPP imaging using optimized continuous golden-angle radial acquisition achieves desirable image quality (i.e., adequate myocardial contrast, high spatial resolution, and minimal artifacts) in the setting of ischemia. PMID:24443160

  7. Tumor classification using perfusion volume fractions in breast DCE-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Ho; Kim, Jong Hyo; Park, Jeong Seon; Park, Sang Joon; Jung, Yun Sub; Song, Jung Joo; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2008-03-01

    This study was designed to classify contrast enhancement curves using both three-time-points (3TP) method and clustering approach at full-time points, and to introduce a novel evaluation method using perfusion volume fractions for differentiation of malignant and benign lesions. DCE-MRI was applied to 24 lesions (12 malignant, 12 benign). After region growing segmentation for each lesion, hole-filling and 3D morphological erosion and dilation were performed for extracting final lesion volume. 3TP method and k-means clustering at full-time points were applied for classifying kinetic curves into six classes. Intratumoral volume fraction for each class was calculated. ROC and linear discriminant analyses were performed with distributions of the volume fractions for each class, pairwise and whole classes, respectively. The best performance in each class showed accuracy (ACC), 84.7% (sensitivity (SE), 100%; specificity (SP), 66.7% to a single class) to 3TP method, whereas ACC, 73.6% (SE, 41.7%; SP, 100% to a single class) to k-means clustering. The best performance in pairwise classes showed ACC, 75% (SE, 83.3%; SP, 66.7% to four class pairs and SE, 58.3%; SP, 91.7% to a single class pair) to 3TP method and ACC, 75% (SE, 75%; SP, 75% to a single class pair and SE, 66.7%; SP, 83.3% to three class pairs) to k-means clustering. The performance in whole classes showed ACC, 75% (SE, 83.3%; SP, 66.7%) to 3TP method and ACC, 75% (SE, 91.7%; 58.3%) to k-means clustering. The results indicate that tumor classification using perfusion volume fractions is helpful in selecting meaningful kinetic patterns for differentiation of malignant and benign lesions, and that two different classification methods are complementary to each other.

  8. Perfusion MRI in hips with metal-on-metal and metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Anwander, H.; Cron, G. O.; Rakhra, K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Hips with metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (MoM THA) have a high rate of adverse local tissue reactions (ALTR), often associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) measures tissue perfusion with the parameter Ktrans (volume transfer constant of contrast agent). Our purpose was 1) to evaluate the feasibility of DCE-MRI in patients with THA and 2) to compare DCE-MRI in patients with MoM bearings with metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) bearings, hypothesising that the perfusion index Ktrans in hips with MoM THA is higher than in hips with MoP THA. Methods In this pilot study, 16 patients with primary THA were recruited (eight MoM, eight MoP). DCE-MRI of the hip was performed at 1.5 Tesla (T). For each patient, Ktrans was computed voxel-by-voxel in all tissue lateral to the bladder. The mean Ktrans for all voxels was then calculated. These values were compared with respect to implant type and gender, and further correlated with clinical parameters. Results There was no significant difference between the two bearing types with both genders combined. However, dividing patients by THA bearing and gender, women with MoM bearings had the highest Ktrans values, exceeding those of women with MoP bearings (0.067 min−1 versus 0.053 min−1; p-value < 0.05) and men with MoM bearings (0.067 min−1 versus 0.034 min−1; p-value < 0.001). Considering only the men, patients with MoM bearings had lower Ktrans than those with MoP bearings (0.034 min−1 versus 0.046 min−1; p < 0.05). Conclusion DCE-MRI is feasible to perform in tissues surrounding THA. Females with MoM THA show high Ktrans values in DCE-MRI, suggesting altered tissue perfusion kinematics which may reflect relatively greater inflammation. Cite this article: Dr P. E. Beaule. Perfusion MRI in hips with metal-on-metal and metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty: A pilot stud. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:73–79. DOI: 10

  9. Perfusion functional MRI reveals cerebral blood flow pattern under psychological stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiongjiong; Rao, Hengyi; Wetmore, Gabriel S.; Furlan, Patricia M.; Korczykowski, Marc; Dinges, David F.; Detre, John A.

    2005-12-01

    Despite the prevalence of stress in everyday life and its impact on happiness, health, and cognition, little is known about the neural substrate of the experience of everyday stress in humans. We use a quantitative and noninvasive neuroimaging technique, arterial spin-labeling perfusion MRI, to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes associated with mild to moderate stress induced by a mental arithmetic task with performance monitoring. Elicitation of stress was verified by self-report of stress and emotional state and measures of heart rate and salivary-cortisol level. The change in CBF induced by the stress task was positively correlated with subjective stress rating in the ventral right prefrontal cortex (RPFC) and left insula/putamen area. The ventral RPFC along with right insula/putamen and anterior cingulate showed sustained activation after task completion in subjects reporting a high stress level during arithmetic tasks. Additionally, variations of baseline CBF in the ventral RPFC and right orbitofrontal cortex were found to correlate with changes in salivary-cortisol level and heart rate caused by undergoing stress tasks. We further demonstrated that the observed right prefrontal activation could not be attributed to increased cognitive demand accompanying stress tasks and extended beyond neural pathways associated with negative emotions. Our results provide neuroimaging evidence that psychological stress induces negative emotion and vigilance and that the ventral RPFC plays a key role in the central stress response. anterior cingulate cortex | arterial spin labeling | right prefrontal cortex

  10. Perfusion functional MRI reveals cerebral blood flow pattern under psychological stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiongjiong; Rao, Hengyi; Wetmore, Gabriel S.; Furlan, Patricia M.; Korczykowski, Marc; Dinges, David F.; Detre, John A.

    2005-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of stress in everyday life and its impact on happiness, health, and cognition, little is known about the neural substrate of the experience of everyday stress in humans. We use a quantitative and noninvasive neuroimaging technique, arterial spin-labeling perfusion MRI, to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes associated with mild to moderate stress induced by a mental arithmetic task with performance monitoring. Elicitation of stress was verified by self-report of stress and emotional state and measures of heart rate and salivary-cortisol level. The change in CBF induced by the stress task was positively correlated with subjective stress rating in the ventral right prefrontal cortex (RPFC) and left insula/putamen area. The ventral RPFC along with right insula/putamen and anterior cingulate showed sustained activation after task completion in subjects reporting a high stress level during arithmetic tasks. Additionally, variations of baseline CBF in the ventral RPFC and right orbitofrontal cortex were found to correlate with changes in salivary-cortisol level and heart rate caused by undergoing stress tasks. We further demonstrated that the observed right prefrontal activation could not be attributed to increased cognitive demand accompanying stress tasks and extended beyond neural pathways associated with negative emotions. Our results provide neuroimaging evidence that psychological stress induces negative emotion and vigilance and that the ventral RPFC plays a key role in the central stress response. PMID:16306271

  11. Reproducibility of Kidney Perfusion Measurements With Arterial Spin Labeling at 1.5 Tesla MRI Combined With Semiautomatic Segmentation for Differential Cortical and Medullary Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Hammon, Matthias; Janka, Rolf; Siegl, Christian; Seuss, Hannes; Grosso, Roberto; Martirosian, Petros; Schmieder, Roland E.; Uder, Michael; Kistner, Iris

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Magnetic resonance imaging with arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a noninvasive approach to measure organ perfusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of ASL kidney perfusion measurements with semiautomatic segmentation, which allows separate quantification of cortical and medullary perfusion. The right kidneys of 14 healthy volunteers were examined 6 times on 2 occasions (3 times at each occasion). There was a 10-minute pause between each examination and a 14-day interval between the 2 occasions. Cortical, medullary, and whole kidney parenchymal perfusion was determined with customized semiautomatic segmentation software. Coefficient of variances (CVs) and intraclass correlations (ICCs) were calculated. Mean whole, cortical, and medullary kidney perfusion was 307.26 ± 25.65, 337.10 ± 34.83, and 279.61 ± 26.73 mL/min/100 g, respectively. On session 1, mean perfusion for the whole kidney, cortex, and medulla was 307.08 ± 26.91, 336.79 ± 36.54, and 279.60 ± 27.81 mL/min/100 g, respectively, and on session 2, 307.45 ± 24.65, 337.41 ± 33.48, and 279.61 ± 25.94 mL/min/100 g, respectively (P > 0.05; R2 = 0.60/0.59/0.54). For whole, cortical, and medullary kidney perfusion, the total ICC/CV were 0.97/3.43 ± 0.86%, 0.97/4.19 ± 1.33%, and 0.96/4.12 ± 1.36%, respectively. Measurements did not differ significantly and showed a very good correlation (P > 0.05; R2 = 0.75/0.76/0.65). ASL kidney measurements combined with operator-independent semiautomatic segmentation revealed high correlation and low variance of cortical, medullary, and whole kidney perfusion. PMID:26986143

  12. [A Patient with Sinking Skin Flap Syndrome who Underwent Perfusion MRI before and after Cranioplasty].

    PubMed

    Kato, Akihito; Morishima, Hiroyuki; Nagashima, Goro

    2016-09-01

    Background:Sinking skin flap syndrome(SSFS)manifests as subjective symptoms, such as headache, dizziness, and undue fatigability, in addition to neurologic symptoms, such as hemiplegia, aphasia, and perceived failure, when the skin over a bone defect sinks in the weeks or months following a decompressive craniectomy. Indeed, these symptoms can improve after a cranioplasty. Case presentation:A 58-year-old woman presented with a disturbance of consciousness. She was found to have a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured right middle cerebral artery aneurysm. She underwent a craniotomy with clipping of the affected artery and a decompressive craniectomy on the same day. Post-operatively, the disturbance of consciousness improved, but the left-sided paralysis persisted. She complained of intractable headaches, was disoriented, and a lack of spontaneity emerged as the skin over the bone defect sank. She underwent cranioplasty on the 43rd day after admission, and the symptoms resolved promptly after surgery. Rehabilitation was canceled at the onset of symptoms, but resumed after the symptoms improved. Based on perfusion MRI, the cerebral blood flow(CBF):cerebral blood volume(CBV)ratio of the affected side increased before and after surgery compared with the healthy side. A lumboperitoneal shunt was placed on the 52nd day after admission to manage the hydrocephalus. She was discharged from the hospital with higher brain dysfunction and a mild state of paralysis. Conclusion:The timing of cranioplasty in patients with SSFS has not yet been established, but surgery should be performed before symptoms appear because SSFS impairs rehabilitative efforts. PMID:27605477

  13. DCE-MRI Perfusion and Permeability Parameters as predictors of tumor response to CCRT in Patients with locally advanced NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Xiuli; Wang, Lvhua; Hui, Zhouguang; Liu, Li; Ye, Feng; Song, Ying; Tang, Yu; Men, Yu; Lambrou, Tryphon; Su, Zihua; Xu, Xiao; Ouyang, Han; Wu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    In this prospective study, 36 patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), who underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) before concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) were enrolled. Pharmacokinetic analysis was carried out after non-rigid motion registration. The perfusion parameters [including Blood Flow (BF), Blood Volume (BV), Mean Transit Time (MTT)] and permeability parameters [including endothelial transfer constant (Ktrans), reflux rate (Kep), fractional extravascular extracellular space volume (Ve), fractional plasma volume (Vp)] were calculated, and their relationship with tumor regression was evaluated. The value of these parameters on predicting responders were calculated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to find the independent variables. Tumor regression rate is negatively correlated with Ve and its standard variation Ve_SD and positively correlated with Ktrans and Kep. Significant differences between responders and non-responders existed in Ktrans, Kep, Ve, Ve_SD, MTT, BV_SD and MTT_SD (P < 0.05). ROC indicated that Ve < 0.24 gave the largest area under curve of 0.865 to predict responders. Multivariate logistic regression analysis also showed Ve was a significant predictor. Baseline perfusion and permeability parameters calculated from DCE-MRI were seen to be a viable tool for predicting the early treatment response after CCRT of NSCLC. PMID:27762331

  14. Technical aspects of MR perfusion.

    PubMed

    Sourbron, Steven

    2010-12-01

    The most common methods for measuring perfusion with MRI are arterial spin labelling (ASL), dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC-MRI), and T(1)-weighted dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE-MRI). This review focuses on the latter approach, which is by far the most common in the body and produces measures of capillary permeability as well. The aim is to present a concise but complete overview of the technical issues involved in DCE-MRI data acquisition and analysis. For details the reader is referred to the references. The presentation of the topic is essentially generic and focuses on technical aspects that are common to all DCE-MRI measurements. For organ-specific problems and illustrations, we refer to the other papers in this issue. In Section 1 "Theory" the basic quantities are defined, and the physical mechanisms are presented that provide a relation between the hemodynamic parameters and the DCE-MRI signal. Section 2 "Data acquisition" discusses the issues involved in the design of an optimal measurement protocol. Section 3 "Data analysis" summarizes the steps that need to be taken to determine the hemodynamic parameters from the measured data. PMID:20363574

  15. Multimodal functional cardiac MRI in creatine kinase-deficient mice reveals subtle abnormalities in myocardial perfusion and mechanics.

    PubMed

    Nahrendorf, Matthias; Streif, Jörg U; Hiller, Karl-Heinz; Hu, Kai; Nordbeck, Peter; Ritter, Oliver; Sosnovik, David; Bauer, Lisa; Neubauer, Stefan; Jakob, Peter M; Ertl, Georg; Spindler, Matthias; Bauer, Wolfgang R

    2006-06-01

    A decrease in the supply of ATP from the creatine kinase (CK) system is thought to contribute to the evolution of heart failure. However, previous studies on mice with a combined knockout of the mitochondrial and cytosolic CK (CK(-/-)) have not revealed overt left ventricular dysfunction. The aim of this study was to employ novel MRI techniques to measure maximal myocardial velocity (V(max)) and myocardial perfusion and thus determine whether abnormalities in the myocardial phenotype existed in CK(-/-) mice, both at baseline and 4 wk after myocardial infarction (MI). As a result, myocardial hypertrophy was seen in all CK(-/-) mice, but ejection fraction (EF) remained normal. V(max), however, was significantly reduced in the CK(-/-) mice [wild-type, 2.32 +/- 0.09 vs. CK(-/-), 1.43 +/- 0.16 cm/s, P < 0.05; and wild-type MI, 1.53 +/- 0.11 vs. CK(-/-) MI, 1.26 +/- 0.11 cm/s, P = not significant (NS), P < 0.05 vs. baseline]. Myocardial perfusion was also lower in the CK(-/-) mice (wild-type, 6.68 +/- 0.27 vs. CK(-/-), 4.12 +/- 0.63 ml/g.min, P < 0.05; and wild-type MI, 3.97 +/- 0.65 vs. CK(-/-) MI, 3.71 +/- 0.57 ml/g.min, P = NS, P < 0.05 vs. baseline), paralleled by a significantly reduced capillary density (histology). In conclusion, myocardial function in transgenic mice may appear normal when only gross indexes of performance such as EF are assessed. However, the use of a combination of novel MRI techniques to measure myocardial perfusion and mechanics allowed the abnormalities in the CK(-/-) phenotype to be detected. The myocardium in CK-deficient mice is characterized by reduced perfusion and reduced maximal contraction velocity, suggesting that the myocardial hypertrophy seen in these mice cannot fully compensate for the absence of the CK system.

  16. ASL? English? Which? Comparing Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eagney, Peggy

    1987-01-01

    Comparisons of 91 deaf children's (ages 5-15) understanding of 25 sentences presented in American Sign Language (ASL), simplified English, and standard English showed no significant differences in the children's ability to comprehend the three different forms. Findings do not support proposals to substitute ASL or simplified English for standard…

  17. Using Perfusion fMRI to Measure Continuous Changes in Neural Activity with Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Ingrid R.; Rao, Hengyi; Moore, Katherine Sledge; Wang, Jiongjiong; Detre, John A.; Aguirre, Geoffrey K.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we examine the suitability of a relatively new imaging technique, "arterial spin labeled perfusion imaging," for the study of continuous, gradual changes in neural activity. Unlike BOLD imaging, the perfusion signal is stable over long time-scales, allowing for accurate assessment of continuous performance. In addition, perfusion…

  18. Dopaminergic Therapy Modulates Cortical Perfusion in Parkinson Disease With and Without Dementia According to Arterial Spin Labeled Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Che; Chen, Pei-Chin; Huang, Yung-Cheng; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Wang, Hung-Chen; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lu, Cheng-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging analyses allow for the quantification of altered cerebral blood flow, and provide a novel means of examining the impact of dopaminergic treatments. The authors examined the cerebral perfusion differences among 17 Parkinson disease (PD) patients, 17 PD with dementia (PDD) patients, and 17 healthy controls and used ASL-MRI to assess the effects of dopaminergic therapies on perfusion in the patients. The authors demonstrated progressive widespread cortical hypoperfusion in PD and PDD and robust effects for the dopaminergic therapies. Specifically, dopaminergic medications further decreased frontal lobe and cerebellum perfusion in the PD and PDD groups, respectively. These patterns of hypoperfusion could be related to cognitive dysfunctions and disease severity. Furthermore, desensitization to dopaminergic therapies in terms of cortical perfusion was found as the disease progressed, supporting the concept that long-term therapies are associated with the therapeutic window narrowing. The highly sensitive pharmaceutical response of ASL allows clinicians and researchers to easily and effectively quantify the absolute perfusion status, which might prove helpful for therapeutic planning. PMID:26844450

  19. Dopaminergic Therapy Modulates Cortical Perfusion in Parkinson Disease With and Without Dementia According to Arterial Spin Labeled Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Che; Chen, Pei-Chin; Huang, Yung-Cheng; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Wang, Hung-Chen; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lu, Cheng-Hsien

    2016-02-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging analyses allow for the quantification of altered cerebral blood flow, and provide a novel means of examining the impact of dopaminergic treatments. The authors examined the cerebral perfusion differences among 17 Parkinson disease (PD) patients, 17 PD with dementia (PDD) patients, and 17 healthy controls and used ASL-MRI to assess the effects of dopaminergic therapies on perfusion in the patients. The authors demonstrated progressive widespread cortical hypoperfusion in PD and PDD and robust effects for the dopaminergic therapies. Specifically, dopaminergic medications further decreased frontal lobe and cerebellum perfusion in the PD and PDD groups, respectively. These patterns of hypoperfusion could be related to cognitive dysfunctions and disease severity. Furthermore, desensitization to dopaminergic therapies in terms of cortical perfusion was found as the disease progressed, supporting the concept that long-term therapies are associated with the therapeutic window narrowing. The highly sensitive pharmaceutical response of ASL allows clinicians and researchers to easily and effectively quantify the absolute perfusion status, which might prove helpful for therapeutic planning.

  20. Towards quantification of blood-flow changes during cognitive task activation using perfusion-based fMRI.

    PubMed

    Mildner, Toralf; Zysset, Stefan; Trampel, Robert; Driesel, Wolfgang; Möller, Harald E

    2005-10-01

    Multi-slice perfusion-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (p-fMRI) is demonstrated with a color-word Stroop task as an established cognitive paradigm. Continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) of the blood in the left common carotid artery was applied for all repetitions of the functional run in a quasi-continuous fashion, i.e., it was interrupted only during image acquisition. For comparison, blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) contrast was detected using conventional gradient-recalled echo (GE) echo planar imaging (EPI). Positive activations in BOLD imaging appeared in p-fMRI as negative signal changes corresponding to an enhanced transport of inverted water spins into the region of interest, i.e., increased cerebral blood flow (CBF). Regional differences between the localization of activations and the sensitivity of p-fMRI and BOLD-fMRI were observed as, for example, in the inferior frontal sulcus and in the intraparietal sulcus. Quantification of CBF changes during cognitive task activation was performed on a multi-subject basis and yielded CBF increases of the order of 20-30%.

  1. Influence of perfusion on high-intensity focused ultrasound prostate ablation: a first-pass MRI study.

    PubMed

    Wiart, Marlène; Curiel, Laura; Gelet, Albert; Lyonnet, Denis; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier

    2007-07-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the influence of regional prostate blood flow (rPBF) on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment outcome. A total of 48 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were examined by dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI prior to HIFU therapy. A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir threshold of 0.2 ng/ml was used to define the populations of responders and nonresponders. A dedicated tracer kinetic model, namely "monoexponential plus constant" (MPC) deconvolution, was implemented to provide quantitative estimates of rPBF. The results were compared with those obtained by semiquantitative (steepest slope, mean gradient) and quantitative (Fermi deconvolution) approaches. Of the four methods studied, quantitative rPBF obtained by MPC deconvolution proved the most sensitive to the perfusion changes encountered in this study. Furthermore, blood-flow values obtained with MPC deconvolution in the prostate and muscle (12 +/- 8 and 5 +/- 3 ml/min/100 g, respectively) were in good agreement with literature data. The mean pretreatment rPBF obtained with MPC deconvolution was significantly higher in nonresponders compared to responders (16 +/- 9 vs. 10 +/- 6 ml/min/100 g), suggesting a correlation between baseline perfusion and treatment outcome. The present work describes and validates the use of dynamic MRI to estimate rPBF in patients, which in the future may help to refine the conduct of HIFU therapy.

  2. Comparison of dynamic susceptibility contrast-MRI perfusion quantification methods in the presence of delay and dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maan, Bianca; Simões, Rita Lopes; Meijer, Frederick J. A.; Klaas Jan Renema, W.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2011-03-01

    The perfusion of the brain is essential to maintain brain function. Stroke is an example of a decrease in blood flow and reduced perfusion. During ischemic stroke the blood flow to tissue is hampered due to a clot inside a vessel. To investigate the recovery of stroke patients, follow up studies are necessary. MRI is the preferred imaging modality for follow up because of the absence of radiation dose concerns, contrary to CT. Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast (DSC) MRI is an imaging technique used for measuring perfusion of the brain, however, is not standard applied in the clinical routine due to lack of immediate patient benefit. Several post processing algorithms are described in the literature to obtain cerebral blood flow (CBF). The quantification of CBF relies on the deconvolution of a tracer concentration-time curve in an arterial and a tissue voxel. There are several methods to obtain this deconvolution based on singular-value decomposition (SVD). This contribution describes a comparison between the different approaches as currently there is no best practice for (all) clinical relevant situations. We investigate the influence of tracer delay, dispersion and recirculation on the performance of the methods. In the presence of negative delays, the truncated SVD approach overestimates the CBF. Block-circulant and reformulated SVD are delay-independent. Due to its delay dependent behavior, the truncated SVD approach performs worse in the presence of dispersion as well. However all SVD approaches are dependent on the amount of dispersion. Moreover, we observe that the optimal truncation parameter varies when recirculation is added to noisy data, suggesting that, in practice, these methods are not immune to tracer recirculation. Finally, applying the methods to clinical data resulted in a large variability of the CBF estimates. Block-circulant SVD will work in all situations and is the method with the highest potential.

  3. Partial volume correction of brain perfusion estimates using the inherent signal data of time-resolved arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, André; Wirestam, Ronnie; Petersen, Esben Thade; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Knutsson, Linda

    2014-09-01

    Quantitative perfusion MRI based on arterial spin labeling (ASL) is hampered by partial volume effects (PVEs), arising due to voxel signal cross-contamination between different compartments. To address this issue, several partial volume correction (PVC) methods have been presented. Most previous methods rely on segmentation of a high-resolution T1 -weighted morphological image volume that is coregistered to the low-resolution ASL data, making the result sensitive to errors in the segmentation and coregistration. In this work, we present a methodology for partial volume estimation and correction, using only low-resolution ASL data acquired with the QUASAR sequence. The methodology consists of a T1 -based segmentation method, with no spatial priors, and a modified PVC method based on linear regression. The presented approach thus avoids prior assumptions about the spatial distribution of brain compartments, while also avoiding coregistration between different image volumes. Simulations based on a digital phantom as well as in vivo measurements in 10 volunteers were used to assess the performance of the proposed segmentation approach. The simulation results indicated that QUASAR data can be used for robust partial volume estimation, and this was confirmed by the in vivo experiments. The proposed PVC method yielded probable perfusion maps, comparable to a reference method based on segmentation of a high-resolution morphological scan. Corrected gray matter (GM) perfusion was 47% higher than uncorrected values, suggesting a significant amount of PVEs in the data. Whereas the reference method failed to completely eliminate the dependence of perfusion estimates on the volume fraction, the novel approach produced GM perfusion values independent of GM volume fraction. The intra-subject coefficient of variation of corrected perfusion values was lowest for the proposed PVC method. As shown in this work, low-resolution partial volume estimation in connection with ASL perfusion

  4. Three-dimensional first-pass myocardial perfusion MRI using a stack-of-spirals acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Taehoon; Nayak, Krishna S.; Santos, Juan M.; Nishimura, Dwight G.; Hu, Bob S.; McConnell, Michael V.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) perfusion imaging is promising for the precise sizing of defects and for providing high perfusion contrast, but remains an experimental approach primarily due to the need for large-dimensional encoding, which, for traditional 3DFT imaging, requires either impractical acceleration factors or sacrifices in spatial resolution. We demonstrated the feasibility of rapid 3D CMR perfusion imaging using a stack-of-spirals acquisition accelerated by non-Cartesian k-t SENSE, which enables entire myocardial coverage with an in-plane resolution of 2.4 mm. The optimal under-sampling pattern was employed to achieve the largest separation between true and aliased signals, which is a pre-requisite for k-t SENSE reconstruction. Flip angle and saturation recovery time were chosen to ensure negligible magnetization variation during the transient data acquisition. We compared the proposed 3D perfusion method with the standard 2DFT approach by consecutively acquiring both data during each R-R interval in cardiac patients. The mean and standard deviation of the correlation coefficients between time intensity curves (TICs) of 3D vs 2DFT were 0.94 and 0.06 across seven subjects. The linear correlation between the two sets of upslope values was significant (r=0.78, P<0.05). PMID:22556062

  5. Three-dimensional MRI perfusion maps: a step beyond volumetric analysis in mental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fabene, Paolo F; Farace, Paolo; Brambilla, Paolo; Andreone, Nicola; Cerini, Roberto; Pelizza, Luisa; Versace, Amelia; Rambaldelli, Gianluca; Birbaumer, Niels; Tansella, Michele; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    A new type of magnetic resonance imaging analysis, based on fusion of three-dimensional reconstructions of time-to-peak parametric maps and high-resolution T1-weighted images, is proposed in order to evaluate the perfusion of selected volumes of interest. Because in recent years a wealth of data have suggested the crucial involvement of vascular alterations in mental diseases, we tested our new method on a restricted sample of schizophrenic patients and matched healthy controls. The perfusion of the whole brain was compared with that of the caudate nucleus by means of intrasubject analysis. As expected, owing to the encephalic vascular pattern, a significantly lower time-to-peak was observed in the caudate nucleus than in the whole brain in all healthy controls, indicating that the suggested method has enough sensitivity to detect subtle perfusion changes even in small volumes of interest. Interestingly, a less uniform pattern was observed in the schizophrenic patients. The latter finding needs to be replicated in an adequate number of subjects. In summary, the three-dimensional analysis method we propose has been shown to be a feasible tool for revealing subtle vascular changes both in normal subjects and in pathological conditions. PMID:17229290

  6. Three-dimensional MRI perfusion maps: a step beyond volumetric analysis in mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Fabene, Paolo F; Farace, Paolo; Brambilla, Paolo; Andreone, Nicola; Cerini, Roberto; Pelizza, Luisa; Versace, Amelia; Rambaldelli, Gianluca; Birbaumer, Niels; Tansella, Michele; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    A new type of magnetic resonance imaging analysis, based on fusion of three-dimensional reconstructions of time-to-peak parametric maps and high-resolution T1-weighted images, is proposed in order to evaluate the perfusion of selected volumes of interest. Because in recent years a wealth of data have suggested the crucial involvement of vascular alterations in mental diseases, we tested our new method on a restricted sample of schizophrenic patients and matched healthy controls. The perfusion of the whole brain was compared with that of the caudate nucleus by means of intrasubject analysis. As expected, owing to the encephalic vascular pattern, a significantly lower time-to-peak was observed in the caudate nucleus than in the whole brain in all healthy controls, indicating that the suggested method has enough sensitivity to detect subtle perfusion changes even in small volumes of interest. Interestingly, a less uniform pattern was observed in the schizophrenic patients. The latter finding needs to be replicated in an adequate number of subjects. In summary, the three-dimensional analysis method we propose has been shown to be a feasible tool for revealing subtle vascular changes both in normal subjects and in pathological conditions.

  7. Longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging and perfusion MRI investigation in a macaque model of neuro-AIDS: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunxia; Zhang, Xiaodong; Komery, Amelia; Li, Yingxia; Novembre, Francis J; Herndon, James G

    2011-09-01

    The Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infected macaque model exhibits neuropathological symptoms similar to those of HIV(+) patients, and is ideal for studying cognitive impairment and neuropathological sequelae of disease in repeated measurements. The aim of this study is to use Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and perfusion MRI to longitudinally access the disease development in SIV-infected monkeys under controlled conditions and to cross-validate our finding with MRI studies in HIV(+) patients. Three adult male pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina) were inoculated with the SIVsmmFGb virus. Blood was collected for enumeration of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. Serial time-sensitive high-resolution T(2)- weighted structural images, Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) maps measured with the Continuous Arterial Spin Labeling (CASL) technique, and DTI images were obtained. Animals were sacrificed after 24 weeks. Cognitive behavioral tests were also carried out at each time point. Longitudinal changes in brain volume, CBF, and DTI in selected regions were analyzed statistically. In this study, CD4+ T-cell counts were found declined significantly after SIV infection in all macaques. No significant neurological behavior and brain volume changes were observed following virus inoculation. The CBF was found reduced in the caudate, inferior parietal cortex, and the prefrontal cortex. Fractional Anisotropy (FA) values in the whole brain and several Regions of Interest (ROIs) decreased significantly. These longitudinal changes in CBF and FA are correlated with CD4+ T-cell depletion and/or CD4:CD8 ratio. The MRI findings from this pilot study agree with previous results in HIV(+) patients.

  8. Pulmonary Perfusion MRI using Interleaved Variable Density Sampling and HighlY Constrained Cartesian Reconstruction (HYCR)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kang; Schiebler, Mark L.; Francois, Christopher J.; Del Rio, A. Munoz; Cornejo, Ma. Daniela; Bell, Laura C.; Korosec, Frank R.; Brittain, Jean H.; Holmes, James H.; Nagle, Scott K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of performing single breath-hold, non-cardiac gated, ultrafast, high spatial-temporal resolution whole chest MR pulmonary perfusion imaging in humans. Materials and Methods Eight (8) subjects (5 male, 3 female) were scanned with the proposed method on a 3T clinical scanner using a 32-channel phased-array coil. Seven (88%) were healthy volunteers, and one was a patient volunteer with sarcoidosis. The peak lung enhancement phase for each subject was scored for gravitational effect, peak parenchymal enhancement and severity of artifacts by 3 cardiothoracic radiologists independently. Results All studies were successfully performed by MR technologists without any additional training. Mean parenchymal signal was very good, measuring 0.78 ± 0.13 (continuous scale, 0 = “none” → 1 = “excellent”). Mean level of motion artifacts was low, measuring 0.13 ± 0.08 (continuous scale, 0 = “none” → 1 = “severe”). Conclusion It is feasible to perform single breath-hold, non-cardiac gated, ultrafast, high spatial-temporal resolution whole chest MR pulmonary perfusion imaging in humans. PMID:23349079

  9. Semi-automated and automated glioma grading using dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI relative cerebral blood volume measurements

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, S N; Bambrough, P J; Kotsarini, C; Khandanpour, N; Hoggard, N

    2012-01-01

    Objective Despite the established role of MRI in the diagnosis of brain tumours, histopathological assessment remains the clinically used technique, especially for the glioma group. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) is a dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI parameter that has been shown to correlate to tumour grade, but assessment requires a specialist and is time consuming. We developed analysis software to determine glioma gradings from perfusion rCBV scans in a manner that is quick, easy and does not require a specialist operator. Methods MRI perfusion data from 47 patients with different histopathological grades of glioma were analysed with custom-designed software. Semi-automated analysis was performed with a specialist and non-specialist operator separately determining the maximum rCBV value corresponding to the tumour. Automated histogram analysis was performed by calculating the mean, standard deviation, median, mode, skewness and kurtosis of rCBV values. All values were compared with the histopathologically assessed tumour grade. Results A strong correlation between specialist and non-specialist observer measurements was found. Significantly different values were obtained between tumour grades using both semi-automated and automated techniques, consistent with previous results. The raw (unnormalised) data single-pixel maximum rCBV semi-automated analysis value had the strongest correlation with glioma grade. Standard deviation of the raw data had the strongest correlation of the automated analysis. Conclusion Semi-automated calculation of raw maximum rCBV value was the best indicator of tumour grade and does not require a specialist operator. Advances in knowledge Both semi-automated and automated MRI perfusion techniques provide viable non-invasive alternatives to biopsy for glioma tumour grading. PMID:23175486

  10. Structural and Perfusion Abnormalities of Brain on MRI and Technetium-99m-ECD SPECT in Children With Cerebral Palsy: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Rana, Kamer Singh; Narwal, Varun; Chauhan, Lokesh; Singh, Giriraj; Sharma, Monica; Chauhan, Suneel

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral palsy has traditionally been associated with hypoxic ischemic brain damage. This study was undertaken to demonstrate structural and perfusion brain abnormalities. Fifty-six children diagnosed clinically as having cerebral palsy were studied between 1 to 14 years of age and were subjected to 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Brain and Technetium-99m-ECD brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan. Male to female ratio was 1.8:1 with a mean age of 4.16 ± 2.274 years. Spastic cerebral palsy was the most common type, observed in 91%. Birth asphyxia was the most common etiology (69.6%). White matter changes (73.2%) such as periventricular leukomalacia and corpus callosal thinning were the most common findings on MRI. On SPECT all cases except one revealed perfusion impairments in different regions of brain. MRI is more sensitive in detecting white matter changes, whereas SPECT is better in detecting cortical and subcortical gray matter abnormalities of perfusion.

  11. Diagnostic performance of cardiac stress perfusion MRI in the detection of coronary artery disease using fractional flow reserve as the reference standard: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Desai, Ravi R; Jha, Saurabh

    2013-08-01

    OBJECTIVE. This is an analysis of pooled studies for the determination of the test characteristics of stress perfusion cardiac MRI in the diagnosis of flow-limiting obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) using fractional flow reserve (FFR) at catheter coronary angiography as the reference standard. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Traditionally, planimetric measurement of coronary stenosis at catheter coronary angiography has been considered the reference standard and has been used to verify the diagnostic characteristics of gatekeeper tests. FFR is a physiologic measure of flow limitation and is considered a more authentic reference standard in the diagnosis of CAD. The emergence of a new reference standard questions the true diagnostic accuracy of gatekeeper tests. A systematic literature review was performed for qualifying studies. The DerSimonian-Laird random effects model and a random-effects symmetric summary receiver operating characteristic curve analysis were performed. RESULTS. Twelve studies (761 patients) met the inclusion criteria. Four hundred six stenotic coronary arteries had FFR less than 0.75. Perfusion stress MRI has a sensitivity of 89.1% (95% CI, 84-93%) and specificity of 84.9% (95% CI, 76.6-91.1%) on a patient basis and a sensitivity of 87.7% (95% CI, 84.4-90.6%) and specificity of 88.6% (95% CI, 86.7-90.4%) on a coronary territory basis. CONCLUSION. Stress perfusion MRI remains an accurate test for the detection of flow-limiting stenosis when adjudicated by a physiologic reference standard.

  12. Structural and Perfusion Abnormalities of Brain on MRI and Technetium-99m-ECD SPECT in Children With Cerebral Palsy: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Rana, Kamer Singh; Narwal, Varun; Chauhan, Lokesh; Singh, Giriraj; Sharma, Monica; Chauhan, Suneel

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral palsy has traditionally been associated with hypoxic ischemic brain damage. This study was undertaken to demonstrate structural and perfusion brain abnormalities. Fifty-six children diagnosed clinically as having cerebral palsy were studied between 1 to 14 years of age and were subjected to 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Brain and Technetium-99m-ECD brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan. Male to female ratio was 1.8:1 with a mean age of 4.16 ± 2.274 years. Spastic cerebral palsy was the most common type, observed in 91%. Birth asphyxia was the most common etiology (69.6%). White matter changes (73.2%) such as periventricular leukomalacia and corpus callosal thinning were the most common findings on MRI. On SPECT all cases except one revealed perfusion impairments in different regions of brain. MRI is more sensitive in detecting white matter changes, whereas SPECT is better in detecting cortical and subcortical gray matter abnormalities of perfusion. PMID:26353878

  13. Comparative study of DSC-PWI and 3D-ASL in ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shui-xia; Yao, Yi-hao; Zhang, Shun; Zhu, Wen-jie; Tang, Xiang-yu; Qin, Yuan-yuan; Zhao, Ling-yun; Liu, Cheng-xia; Zhu, Wen-zhen

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively analyze the relationship between three dimensional arterial spin labeling (3D-ASL) and dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion weighted imaging (DSC-PWI) in ischemic stroke patients. Thirty patients with ischemic stroke were included in this study. All subjects underwent routine magnetic resonance imaging scanning, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), 3D-ASL and DSC-PWI on a 3.0T MR scanner. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn on the cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps (derived from ASL) and multi-parametric DSC perfusion maps, and then, the absolute and relative values of ASL-CBF, DSC-derived CBF, and DSC-derived mean transit time (MTT) were calculated. The relationships between ASL and DSC parameters were analyzed using Pearson's correlation analysis. Receiver operative characteristic (ROC) curves were performed to define the thresholds of relative value of ASL-CBF (rASL) that could best predict DSC-CBF reduction and MTT prolongation. Relative ASL better correlated with CBF and MTT in the anterior circulation with the Pearson correlation coefficients (R) values being 0.611 (P<0.001) and-0.610 (P<0.001) respectively. ROC curves demonstrated that when rASL ≤0.585, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for predicting ROIs with rCBF<0.9 were 92.3%, 63.6% and 76.6% respectively. When rASL ≤0.952, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for predicting ROIs rMTT>1.0 were 75.7%, 89.2% and 87.8% respectively. ASL-CBF map has better linear correlations with DSC-derived parameters (DSC-CBF and MTT) in anterior circulation in ischemic stroke patients. Additionally, when rASL is lower than 0.585, it could predict DSC-CBF decrease with moderate accuracy. If rASL values range from 0.585 to 0.952, we just speculate the prolonged MTT.

  14. Current concepts on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) perfusion-diffusion assessment in acute ischaemic stroke: a review & an update for the clinicians.

    PubMed

    Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto; Lopez-Mejia, Mariana

    2014-12-01

    Recently, several medical societies published joint statements about imaging recommendations for acute stroke and transient ischaemic attack patients. In following with these published guidelines, we considered it appropriate to present a brief, practical and updated review of the most relevant concepts on the MRI assessment of acute stroke. Basic principles of the clinical interpretation of diffusion, perfusion, and MRI angiography (as part of a global MRI protocol) are discussed with accompanying images for each sequence. Brief comments on incidence and differential diagnosis are also included, together with limitations of the techniques and levels of evidence. The purpose of this article is to present knowledge that can be applied in day-to-day clinical practice in specialized stroke units or emergency rooms to attend patients with acute ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack according to international standards. PMID:25758570

  15. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: fundamentals and application to the evaluation of the peripheral perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Yaron; Partovi, Sasan; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Amarteifio, Erick; Bäuerle, Tobias; Weber, Marc-André; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The ability to ascertain information pertaining to peripheral perfusion through the analysis of tissues’ temporal reaction to the inflow of contrast agent (CA) was first recognized in the early 1990’s. Similar to other functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques such as arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) was at first restricted to studies of the brain. Over the last two decades the spectrum of ailments, which have been studied with DCE-MRI, has been extensively broadened and has come to include pathologies of the heart notably infarction, stroke and further cerebral afflictions, a wide range of neoplasms with an emphasis on antiangiogenic treatment and early detection, as well as investigations of the peripheral vascular and musculoskeletal systems. Applications to peripheral perfusion DCE-MRI possesses an unparalleled capacity to quantitatively measure not only perfusion but also other diverse microvascular parameters such as vessel permeability and fluid volume fractions. More over the method is capable of not only assessing blood flowing through an organ, but in contrast to other noninvasive methods, the actual tissue perfusion. These unique features have recently found growing application in the study of the peripheral vascular system and most notably in the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). Review outline The first part of this review will elucidate the fundamentals of data acquisition and interpretation of DCE-MRI, two areas that often remain baffling to the clinical and investigating physician because of their complexity. The second part will discuss developments and exciting perspectives of DCE-MRI regarding the assessment of perfusion in the extremities. Emerging clinical applications of DCE-MRI will be reviewed with a special focus on investigation of physiology and pathophysiology of the microvascular and

  16. The pediatric template of brain perfusion.

    PubMed

    Avants, Brian B; Duda, Jeffrey T; Kilroy, Emily; Krasileva, Kate; Jann, Kay; Kandel, Benjamin T; Tustison, Nicholas J; Yan, Lirong; Jog, Mayank; Smith, Robert; Wang, Yi; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) captures the dynamics of brain development with multiple modalities that quantify both structure and function. These measurements may yield valuable insights into the neural patterns that mark healthy maturation or that identify early risk for psychiatric disorder. The Pediatric Template of Brain Perfusion (PTBP) is a free and public neuroimaging resource that will help accelerate the understanding of childhood brain development as seen through the lens of multiple modality neuroimaging and in relation to cognitive and environmental factors. The PTBP uses cross-sectional and longitudinal MRI to quantify cortex, white matter, resting state functional connectivity and brain perfusion, as measured by Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), in 120 children 7-18 years of age. We describe the PTBP and show, as a demonstration of validity, that global summary measurements capture the trajectories that demarcate critical turning points in brain maturation. This novel resource will allow a more detailed understanding of the network-level, structural and functional landmarks that are obtained during normal adolescent brain development. PMID:25977810

  17. The pediatric template of brain perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Avants, Brian B; Duda, Jeffrey T; Kilroy, Emily; Krasileva, Kate; Jann, Kay; Kandel, Benjamin T; Tustison, Nicholas J; Yan, Lirong; Jog, Mayank; Smith, Robert; Wang, Yi; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) captures the dynamics of brain development with multiple modalities that quantify both structure and function. These measurements may yield valuable insights into the neural patterns that mark healthy maturation or that identify early risk for psychiatric disorder. The Pediatric Template of Brain Perfusion (PTBP) is a free and public neuroimaging resource that will help accelerate the understanding of childhood brain development as seen through the lens of multiple modality neuroimaging and in relation to cognitive and environmental factors. The PTBP uses cross-sectional and longitudinal MRI to quantify cortex, white matter, resting state functional connectivity and brain perfusion, as measured by Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), in 120 children 7–18 years of age. We describe the PTBP and show, as a demonstration of validity, that global summary measurements capture the trajectories that demarcate critical turning points in brain maturation. This novel resource will allow a more detailed understanding of the network-level, structural and functional landmarks that are obtained during normal adolescent brain development. PMID:25977810

  18. Cerebral Blood Flow Alterations as Assessed by 3D ASL in Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment: A Marker for Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yawen; Cao, Wenwei; Ding, Weina; Wang, Yao; Han, Xu; Zhou, Yan; Xu, Qun; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal reductions in cortical cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been identified in subcortical vascular cognitive impairment (SVCI). However, little is known about the pattern of CBF reduction in relation with the degree of cognitive impairment. CBF measured with three-dimensional (3D) Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) helps detect functional changes in subjects with SVCI. We aimed to compare CBF maps in subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD) subjects with and without cognitive impairment and to detect the relationship of the regions of CBF reduction in the brain with the degree of cognitive impairment according to the z-score. A total of 53 subjects with SVCI and 23 matched SIVD subjects without cognitive impairment (controls), underwent a whole-brain 3D ASL MRI in the resting state. Regional CBF (rCBF) was compared voxel wise by using an analysis of variance design in a statistical parametric mapping program, with patient age and sex as covariates. Correlations were calculated between the rCBF value in the whole brain and the z-score in the 53 subjects with SVCI. Compared with the control subjects, SVCI group demonstrated diffuse decreased CBF in the brain. Significant positive correlations were determined in the rCBF values in the left hippocampus, left superior temporal pole gyrus, right superior frontal orbital lobe, right medial frontal orbital lobe, right middle temporal lobe, left thalamus and right insula with the z-scores in SVCI group. The noninvasively quantified resting CBF demonstrated altered CBF distributions in the SVCI brain. The deficit brain perfusions in the temporal and frontal lobe, hippocampus, thalamus and insula was related to the degree of cognitive impairment. Its relationship to cognition indicates the clinical relevance of this functional marker. Thus, our results provide further evidence for the mechanisms underlying the cognitive deficit in patients with SVCI.

  19. Cerebral Blood Flow Alterations as Assessed by 3D ASL in Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment: A Marker for Disease Severity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yawen; Cao, Wenwei; Ding, Weina; Wang, Yao; Han, Xu; Zhou, Yan; Xu, Qun; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal reductions in cortical cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been identified in subcortical vascular cognitive impairment (SVCI). However, little is known about the pattern of CBF reduction in relation with the degree of cognitive impairment. CBF measured with three-dimensional (3D) Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) helps detect functional changes in subjects with SVCI. We aimed to compare CBF maps in subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD) subjects with and without cognitive impairment and to detect the relationship of the regions of CBF reduction in the brain with the degree of cognitive impairment according to the z-score. A total of 53 subjects with SVCI and 23 matched SIVD subjects without cognitive impairment (controls), underwent a whole-brain 3D ASL MRI in the resting state. Regional CBF (rCBF) was compared voxel wise by using an analysis of variance design in a statistical parametric mapping program, with patient age and sex as covariates. Correlations were calculated between the rCBF value in the whole brain and the z-score in the 53 subjects with SVCI. Compared with the control subjects, SVCI group demonstrated diffuse decreased CBF in the brain. Significant positive correlations were determined in the rCBF values in the left hippocampus, left superior temporal pole gyrus, right superior frontal orbital lobe, right medial frontal orbital lobe, right middle temporal lobe, left thalamus and right insula with the z-scores in SVCI group. The noninvasively quantified resting CBF demonstrated altered CBF distributions in the SVCI brain. The deficit brain perfusions in the temporal and frontal lobe, hippocampus, thalamus and insula was related to the degree of cognitive impairment. Its relationship to cognition indicates the clinical relevance of this functional marker. Thus, our results provide further evidence for the mechanisms underlying the cognitive deficit in patients with SVCI. PMID:27630562

  20. Cerebral Blood Flow Alterations as Assessed by 3D ASL in Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment: A Marker for Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yawen; Cao, Wenwei; Ding, Weina; Wang, Yao; Han, Xu; Zhou, Yan; Xu, Qun; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal reductions in cortical cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been identified in subcortical vascular cognitive impairment (SVCI). However, little is known about the pattern of CBF reduction in relation with the degree of cognitive impairment. CBF measured with three-dimensional (3D) Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) helps detect functional changes in subjects with SVCI. We aimed to compare CBF maps in subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD) subjects with and without cognitive impairment and to detect the relationship of the regions of CBF reduction in the brain with the degree of cognitive impairment according to the z-score. A total of 53 subjects with SVCI and 23 matched SIVD subjects without cognitive impairment (controls), underwent a whole-brain 3D ASL MRI in the resting state. Regional CBF (rCBF) was compared voxel wise by using an analysis of variance design in a statistical parametric mapping program, with patient age and sex as covariates. Correlations were calculated between the rCBF value in the whole brain and the z-score in the 53 subjects with SVCI. Compared with the control subjects, SVCI group demonstrated diffuse decreased CBF in the brain. Significant positive correlations were determined in the rCBF values in the left hippocampus, left superior temporal pole gyrus, right superior frontal orbital lobe, right medial frontal orbital lobe, right middle temporal lobe, left thalamus and right insula with the z-scores in SVCI group. The noninvasively quantified resting CBF demonstrated altered CBF distributions in the SVCI brain. The deficit brain perfusions in the temporal and frontal lobe, hippocampus, thalamus and insula was related to the degree of cognitive impairment. Its relationship to cognition indicates the clinical relevance of this functional marker. Thus, our results provide further evidence for the mechanisms underlying the cognitive deficit in patients with SVCI. PMID:27630562

  1. Cerebral Blood Flow Alterations as Assessed by 3D ASL in Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment: A Marker for Disease Severity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yawen; Cao, Wenwei; Ding, Weina; Wang, Yao; Han, Xu; Zhou, Yan; Xu, Qun; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal reductions in cortical cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been identified in subcortical vascular cognitive impairment (SVCI). However, little is known about the pattern of CBF reduction in relation with the degree of cognitive impairment. CBF measured with three-dimensional (3D) Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) helps detect functional changes in subjects with SVCI. We aimed to compare CBF maps in subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD) subjects with and without cognitive impairment and to detect the relationship of the regions of CBF reduction in the brain with the degree of cognitive impairment according to the z-score. A total of 53 subjects with SVCI and 23 matched SIVD subjects without cognitive impairment (controls), underwent a whole-brain 3D ASL MRI in the resting state. Regional CBF (rCBF) was compared voxel wise by using an analysis of variance design in a statistical parametric mapping program, with patient age and sex as covariates. Correlations were calculated between the rCBF value in the whole brain and the z-score in the 53 subjects with SVCI. Compared with the control subjects, SVCI group demonstrated diffuse decreased CBF in the brain. Significant positive correlations were determined in the rCBF values in the left hippocampus, left superior temporal pole gyrus, right superior frontal orbital lobe, right medial frontal orbital lobe, right middle temporal lobe, left thalamus and right insula with the z-scores in SVCI group. The noninvasively quantified resting CBF demonstrated altered CBF distributions in the SVCI brain. The deficit brain perfusions in the temporal and frontal lobe, hippocampus, thalamus and insula was related to the degree of cognitive impairment. Its relationship to cognition indicates the clinical relevance of this functional marker. Thus, our results provide further evidence for the mechanisms underlying the cognitive deficit in patients with SVCI.

  2. Perfusion patterns in postictal 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT after coregistration with MRI in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, R; Cook, M.; Binns, D.; Desmond, P.; Kilpatrick, C.; Murrie, V.; Morris, K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess patterns of postictal cerebral blood flow in the mesial temporal lobe by coregistration of postictal 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT with MRI in patients with confirmed mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.
METHODS—Ten postictal and interictal 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT scans were coregistered with MRI in 10 patients with confirmed mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Volumetric tracings of the hippocampus and amygdala from the MRI were superimposed on the postictal and interictal SPECT. Asymmetries in hippocampal and amygdala SPECT signal were then calculated using the equation:
 % Asymmetry =100 × (right − left) / (right + left)/2.
RESULTS—In the postictal studies, quantitative measurements of amygdala SPECT intensities were greatest on the side of seizure onset in all cases, with an average % asymmetry of 11.1, range 5.2-21.9.Hippocampal intensities were greatest on the side of seizure onset in six studies, with an average % asymmetry of 9.6, range 4.7-12.0.In four scans the hippocampal intensities were less on the side of seizure onset, with an average % asymmetry of 10.2, range 5.7-15.5.There was no localising quantitative pattern in interictal studies.
CONCLUSIONS—Postictal SPECT shows distinctive perfusion patterns when coregistered with MRI, which assist in lateralisation of temporal lobe seizures. Hyperperfusion in the region of the amygdala is more consistently lateralising than hyperperfusion in the region of the hippocampus in postictal studies.

 PMID:9285464

  3. WE-G-18C-09: Separating Perfusion and Diffusion Components From Diffusion Weighted MRI of Rectum Tumors Based On Intravoxel Incoherent Motion (IVIM) Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi, N; Wengler, K; Mazaheri, Y; Hunt, M; Deasy, J; Gollub, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Pseudodiffusion arises from the microcirculation of blood in the randomly oriented capillary network and contributes to the signal decay acquired using a multi-b value diffusion weighted (DW)-MRI sequence. This effect is more significant at low b-values and should be properly accounted for in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) calculations. The purpose of this study was to separate perfusion and diffusion component based on a biexponential and a segmented monoexponential model using IVIM analysis Methods. The signal attenuation is modeled as S(b) = S0[(1−f)exp(−bD) + fexp(−bD*)]. Fitting the biexponetial decay leads to the quantification of D, the true diffusion coefficient, D*, the pseudodiffusion coefficient, and f, the perfusion fraction. A nonlinear least squares fit and two segmented monoexponential models were used to derive the values for D, D*,‘and f. In the segmented approach b = 200 s/mm{sup 2} was used as the cut-off value for calculation of D. DW-MRI's of a rectum cancer patient were acquired before chemotherapy, before radiation therapy (RT), and 4 weeks into RT and were investigated as an example case. Results: Mean ADC for the tumor drawn on the DWI cases was 0.93, 1.0 and 1.13 10{sup −3}×mm{sup 2}/s before chemotherapy, before RT and 4 weeks into RT. The mean (D.10{sup −3} × mm{sup 2}/s, D* 10{sup −3} × mm{sup 2}/s, and f %) based on biexponential fit was (0.67, 18.6, and 27.2%), (0.72, 17.7, and 28.9%) and (0.83,15.1, and 30.7%) at these time points. The mean (D, D* f) based on segmented fit was (0.72, 10.5, and 12.1%), (0.72, 8.2, and 17.4%) and (.82, 8.1, 16.5%) Conclusion: ADC values are typically higher than true diffusion coefficients. For tumors with significant perfusion effect, ADC should be analyzed at higher b-values or separated from the perfusion component. Biexponential fit overestimates the perfusion fraction because of increased sensitivity to noise at low b-values.

  4. Simultaneous Myocardial Strain and Dark-Blood Perfusion Imaging Using a Displacement-Encoded MRI Pulse Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Le, Yuan; Stein, Ashley; Berry, Colin; Kellman, Peter; Bennett, Eric E.; Taylor, Joni; Lucas, Katherine; Kopace, Rael; Chefd’Hotel, Christophe; Lorenz, Christine H.; Croisille, Pierre; Wen, Han

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a displacement-encoded pulse sequence for simultaneous perfusion and strain imaging. Displacement-encoded images in 2–3 myocardial slices were repeatedly acquired using a single shot pulse sequence for 3 to 4 minutes, which covers a bolus infusion of Gd. The magnitudes of the images were T1 weighted and provided quantitative measures of perfusion, while the phase maps yielded strain measurements. In an acute coronary occlusion swine protocol (n=9), segmental perfusion measurements were validated against microsphere reference standard with a linear regression (slope 0.986, R2 = 0.765, Bland-Altman standard deviation = 0.15 ml/min/g). In a group of ST-elevation myocardial infarction(STEMI) patients (n=11), the scan success rate was 76%. Short-term contrast washout rate and perfusion are highly correlated (R2=0.72), and the pixel-wise relationship between circumferential strain and perfusion was better described with a sigmoidal Hill curve than linear functions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring strain and perfusion from a single set of images. PMID:20544714

  5. Simultaneous myocardial strain and dark-blood perfusion imaging using a displacement-encoded MRI pulse sequence.

    PubMed

    Le, Yuan; Stein, Ashley; Berry, Colin; Kellman, Peter; Bennett, Eric E; Taylor, Joni; Lucas, Katherine; Kopace, Rael; Chefd'Hotel, Christophe; Lorenz, Christine H; Croisille, Pierre; Wen, Han

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a displacement-encoded pulse sequence for simultaneous perfusion and strain imaging. Displacement-encoded images in two to three myocardial slices were repeatedly acquired using a single-shot pulse sequence for 3 to 4 min, which covers a bolus infusion of Gadolinium contrast. The magnitudes of the images were T(1) weighted and provided quantitative measures of perfusion, while the phase maps yielded strain measurements. In an acute coronary occlusion swine protocol (n = 9), segmental perfusion measurements were validated against microsphere reference standard with a linear regression (slope 0.986, R(2) = 0.765, Bland-Altman standard deviation = 0.15 mL/min/g). In a group of ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients (n = 11), the scan success rate was 76%. Short-term contrast washout rate and perfusion are highly correlated (R(2) = 0.72), and the pixelwise relationship between circumferential strain and perfusion was better described with a sigmoidal Hill curve than linear functions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring strain and perfusion from a single set of images. PMID:20544714

  6. Implementation of quantitative perfusion imaging techniques for functional brain mapping using pulsed arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Wong, E C; Buxton, R B; Frank, L R

    1997-01-01

    We describe here experimental considerations in the implementation of quantitative perfusion imaging techniques for functional MRI using pulsed arterial spin labeling. Three tagging techniques: EPISTAR, PICORE, and FAIR are found to give very similar perfusion results despite large differences in static tissue contrast. Two major sources of systematic error in the perfusion measurement are identified: the transit delay from the tagging region to the imaging slice; and the inclusion of intravascular tagged signal. A modified technique called QUIPSS II is described that decreases sensitivity to these effects by explicitly controlling the time width of the tag bolus and imaging after the bolus is entirely deposited into the slice. With appropriate saturation pulses the pulse sequence can be arranged so as to allow for simultaneous collection of perfusion and BOLD data that can be cleanly separated. Such perfusion and BOLD signals reveal differences in spatial location and dynamics that may be useful both for functional brain mapping and for study of the BOLD contrast mechanism. The implementation of multislice perfusion imaging introduces additional complications, primarily in the elimination of signal from static tissue. In pulsed ASL, this appears to be related to the slice profile of the inversion tag pulse in the presence of relaxation, rather than magnetization transfer effects as in continuous arterial spin labeling, and can be alleviated with careful adjustment of inversion pulse parameters. PMID:9430354

  7. Partial ASL extensions for stochastic programming.

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, David

    2010-03-31

    partially completed extensions for stochastic programming to the AMPL/solver interface library (ASL).modeling and experimenting with stochastic recourse problems. This software is not primarily for military applications

  8. Implementation and evaluation of a new workflow for registration and segmentation of pulmonary MRI data for regional lung perfusion assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, T.; Grunewald, K.; Schöbinger, M.; Fink, C.; Risse, F.; Kauczor, H. U.; Meinzer, H. P.; Wolf, Ivo

    2007-03-01

    Recently it has been shown that regional lung perfusion can be assessed using time-resolved contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Quantification of the perfusion images has been attempted, based on definition of small regions of interest (ROIs). Use of complete lung segmentations instead of ROIs could possibly increase quantification accuracy. Due to the low signal-to-noise ratio, automatic segmentation algorithms cannot be applied. On the other hand, manual segmentation of the lung tissue is very time consuming and can become inaccurate, as the borders of the lung to adjacent tissues are not always clearly visible. We propose a new workflow for semi-automatic segmentation of the lung from additionally acquired morphological HASTE MR images. First the lung is delineated semi-automatically in the HASTE image. Next the HASTE image is automatically registered with the perfusion images. Finally, the transformation resulting from the registration is used to align the lung segmentation from the morphological dataset with the perfusion images. We evaluated rigid, affine and locally elastic transformations, suitable optimizers and different implementations of mutual information (MI) metrics to determine the best possible registration algorithm. We located the shortcomings of the registration procedure and under which conditions automatic registration will succeed or fail. Segmentation results were evaluated using overlap and distance measures. Integration of the new workflow reduces the time needed for post-processing of the data, simplifies the perfusion quantification and reduces interobserver variability in the segmentation process. In addition, the matched morphological data set can be used to identify morphologic changes as the source for the perfusion abnormalities.

  9. Wavelet-based cluster analysis: data-driven grouping of voxel time courses with application to perfusion-weighted and pharmacological MRI of the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Whitcher, Brandon; Schwarz, Adam J; Barjat, Hervé; Smart, Sean C; Grundy, Robert I; James, Michael F

    2005-01-15

    MRI time series experiments produce a wealth of information contained in two or three spatial dimensions that evolve over time. Such experiments can, for example, localize brain response to pharmacological stimuli, but frequently the spatiotemporal characteristics of the cerebral response are unknown a priori and variable, and thus difficult to evaluate using hypothesis-based methods alone. Here we used features in the temporal dimension to group voxels with similar time courses based on a nonparametric discrete wavelet transform (DWT) representation of each time course. Applying the DWT to each voxel decomposes its temporal information into coefficients associated with both time and scale. Discarding scales in the DWT that are associated with high-frequency oscillations (noise) provided a straight-forward data reduction step and decreased the computational burden. Optimization-based clustering was then applied to the remaining wavelet coefficients in order to produce a finite number of voxel clusters. This wavelet-based cluster analysis (WCA) was evaluated using two representative classes of MRI neuroimaging experiments. In perfusion-weighted MRI, following occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAO), WCA differentiated healthy tissue and different regions within the ischemic hemisphere. Following an acute cocaine challenge, WCA localized subtle differences in the pharmacokinetic profile of the cerebral response. We conclude that WCA provides a robust method for blind analysis of time series image data.

  10. Facing contrast-enhancing gliomas: perfusion MRI in grade III and grade IV gliomas according to tumor area.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Bergsland, Niels; Berzero, Giulia; Farina, Lisa; Rognone, Elisa; Gastaldi, Matteo; Aquino, Domenico; Frati, Alessandro; Tomasello, Francesco; Ceroni, Mauro; Marchioni, Enrico; Bastianello, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Tumoral neoangiogenesis characterizes high grade gliomas. Relative Cerebral Blood Volume (rCBV), calculated with Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast (DSC) Perfusion-Weighted Imaging (PWI), allows for the estimation of vascular density over the tumor bed. The aim of the study was to characterize putative tumoral neoangiogenesis via the study of maximal rCBV with a Region of Interest (ROI) approach in three tumor areas-the contrast-enhancing area, the nonenhancing tumor, and the high perfusion area on CBV map-in patients affected by contrast-enhancing glioma (grades III and IV). Twenty-one patients were included: 15 were affected by grade IV and 6 by grade III glioma. Maximal rCBV values for each patient were averaged according to glioma grade. Although rCBV from contrast-enhancement and from nonenhancing tumor areas was higher in grade IV glioma than in grade III (5.58 and 2.68; 3.01 and 2.2, resp.), the differences were not significant. Instead, rCBV recorded in the high perfusion area on CBV map, independently of tumor compartment, was significantly higher in grade IV glioma than in grade III (7.51 versus 3.78, P = 0.036). In conclusion, neoangiogenesis encompasses different tumor compartments and CBV maps appear capable of best characterizing the degree of neovascularization. Facing contrast-enhancing brain tumors, areas of high perfusion on CBV maps should be considered as the reference areas to be targeted for glioma grading.

  11. Peri-infarct ischaemia assessed by cardiovascular MRI: comparison with quantitative perfusion single photon emission CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cochet, H; Bullier, E; Ragot, C; Gilbert, S H; Pucheu, Y; Laurent, F; Coste, P; Bordenave, L; Montaudon, M

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To develop a new method for the cardiac MR (CMR) quantification of peri-infarct ischaemia using fused perfusion and delayed–enhanced images and to evaluate this method using quantitative single photon emission CT (SPECT) imaging as a reference. Methods: 40 patients presenting with peri-infarct ischaemia on a routine stress 99mTc-SPECT imaging were recruited. Within 8 days of the SPECT study, myocardial perfusion was evaluated using stress adenosine CMR. Using fused perfusion and delayed–enhanced images, peri-infarct ischaemia was quantified as the percentage of myocardium with stress-induced perfusion defect that was adjacent to and larger than a scar. This parameter was compared with both the percent myocardium ischaemia (SD%) and the ischaemic total perfusion deficit (TPD). The diagnostic performance of CMR in detection of significant coronary artery stenosis (of ≥70%) was also determined. Results: On SPECT imaging, in addition to peri-infarct ischaemia, reversible perfusion abnormalities were detected in a remote zone in seven patients. In the 33 patients presenting with only peri-infarct ischaemia, the agreement between CMR peri-infarct ischaemia and both SD% and ischaemic TPD was excellent [intraclass coefficient of correlation (ICC) = 0.969 and ICC = 0.877, respectively]. CMR-defined peri-infarct ischaemia for the detection of a significant coronary artery stenosis showed an areas under receiver–operating characteristic curve of 0.856 (95% confidence interval, 0.680–0.939). The best cut-off value was 8.1% and allowed a 72% sensitivity, 96% specificity, 60% negative predictive value and 97% positive predictive value. Conclusion: This proof-of-concept study shows that CMR imaging has the potential as a test for quantification of peri-infarct ischaemia. Advances in knowledge: This study demonstrates the proof of concept of a commonly known intuitive idea, that is, evaluating the peri-infarct ischaemic burden by subtracting delayed

  12. The Correlations Between MRI Perfusion, Diffusion Parameters, and 18F-FDG PET Metabolic Parameters in Primary Head-and-Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Miran; Kim, Sun Yong; Lee, Su Jin; Choi, Jin Wook

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to investigate the relationships among parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET in patients with primary head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). A total of 34 patients with primary HNSCC underwent DCE-MRI, DWI, and 18F-FDG PET before treatment. The perfusion parameters (Ktrans, Ktransmax, Kep, Ve, Vp, and AUC60) from DCE-MRI and ADC (ADCmean, ADCmin) values from DWI were calculated within the manually placed ROI around the main tumor. Standardized uptake value (SUVmax, SUVmean), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and total lesion glycolysis (TLG = SUVmean × MTV) were calculated with thresholds of 3.0 SUV. The associations between parameters were evaluated by Pearson correlation analysis. Significant correlations were identified between Ktrans and Kep (r = 0.631), Ktrans and Ve (r = 0.603), Ktrans and ADCmean (r = 0.438), Ktransmax and Kep (r = 0.667), Ktransmax and Vp (r = 0.351), Ve and AUC60 (r = 0.364), Ve and ADCmean (r = 0.590), and Ve and ADCmin (r = 0.361). ADCmin was reversely correlated with TLG (r = –0.347). Tumor volume was significantly associated with Ktransmax (r = 0.348). The demonstrated relationships among parameters from DCE, DWI, and 18F-FDG PET suggest complex interactions among tumor biologic characteristics. Each diagnostic technique may provide complementary information for HNSCC. PMID:26632740

  13. Acute caffeine administration impact on working memory-related brain activation and functional connectivity in the elderly: a BOLD and perfusion MRI study.

    PubMed

    Haller, S; Rodriguez, C; Moser, D; Toma, S; Hofmeister, J; Sinanaj, I; Van De Ville, D; Giannakopoulos, P; Lovblad, K-O

    2013-10-10

    In young individuals, caffeine-mediated blockade of adenosine receptors and vasoconstriction has direct repercussions on task-related activations, changes in functional connectivity, as well as global vascular effects. To date, no study has explored the effect of caffeine on brain activation patterns during highly demanding cognitive tasks in the elderly. This prospective, placebo-controlled crossover design comprises 24 healthy elderly individuals (mean age 68.8 ± 4.0 years, 17 females) performing a 2-back working memory (WM) task in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Analyses include complimentary assessment of task-related activations (general linear model, GLM), functional connectivity (tensorial independent component analysis, TICA), and baseline perfusion (arterial spin labeling). Despite a reduction in whole-brain global perfusion (-22.7%), caffeine-enhanced task-related GLM activation in a local and distributed network is most pronounced in the bilateral striatum and to a lesser degree in the right middle and inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral insula, left superior and inferior parietal lobule as well as in the cerebellum bilaterally. TICA was significantly enhanced (+8.2%) in caffeine versus placebo in a distributed and task-relevant network including the pre-frontal cortex, the supplementary motor area, the ventral premotor cortex and the parietal cortex as well as the occipital cortex (visual stimuli) and basal ganglia. The inverse comparison of placebo versus caffeine had no significant difference. Activation strength of the task-relevant-network component correlated with response accuracy for caffeine yet not for placebo, indicating a selective cognitive effect of caffeine. The present findings suggest that acute caffeine intake enhances WM-related brain activation as well as functional connectivity of blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI in elderly individuals.

  14. MRI

    MedlinePlus

    MRI does not use ionizing radiation. No side effects from the magnetic fields and radio waves have been reported. The most common type of contrast (dye) used is gadolinium. It is very safe. Allergic reactions rarely ...

  15. Developing ASL Text in the Bilingual Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Joey; Osbrink, Rory

    2015-01-01

    Deaf students are visual learners, and technology should be part of every bilingual classroom. However, deaf students need to learn to manipulate the hardware and software that allows them to express themselves and to advance their knowledge. Students need to understand what is meant when they are referred to "ASL text" or…

  16. Features and Natural Classes in ASL Handshapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitworth, Cecily

    2011-01-01

    This article argues for the necessity of phonetic analysis in signed language linguistics and presents a case study of one analytical system being used in a preliminary attempt to identify natural classes and investigate variation in ASL handshapes. Robbin Battison (1978) first described what is now a widely accepted list of basic handshapes,…

  17. Blood Pressure is Associated With Cerebral Blood Flow Alterations in Patients With T2DM as Revealed by Perfusion Functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wenqing; Rao, Hengyi; Spaeth, Andrea M; Huang, Rong; Tian, Sai; Cai, Rongrong; Sun, Jie; Wang, Shaohua

    2015-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension are both associated with cognitive impairment and brain function abnormalities. We investigated whether abnormal cerebral blood flow (CBF) patterns exists in T2DM patients and possible relationships between aberrant CBF and cognitive performance. Furthermore, we examined the influence of hypertension on CBF alterations in T2DM patients. T2DM patients (n = 38) and non-T2DM subjects (n = 40) were recruited from clinics, hospitals, and normal community health screenings. Cerebral blood flow images were collected and analyzed using arterial spin labeling perfusion functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Regions with major CBF differences between T2DM patients and non-T2DM controls were detected via 1-way ANOVA. The interaction effects between hypertension and T2DM for CBF alterations were also examined. Correlation analyses illustrated the association between CBF values and cognitive performance and between CBF and blood pressure. Compared with non-T2DM controls, T2DM patients exhibited decreased CBF, primarily in the visual area and the default mode network (DMN); decreased CBF in these regions was correlated with cognitive performance. There was a significant interaction effect between hypertension and diabetes for CBF in the precuneus and the middle occipital gyrus. Additionally, blood pressure correlated negatively with CBF in T2DM patients.T2DM patients exhibited reduced CBF in the visual area and DMN. Hypertension may facilitate a CBF decrease in the setting of diabetes. T2DM patients may benefit from blood pressure control to maintain their brain perfusion through CBF preservation. PMID:26632913

  18. Evidence-based guideline: The role of diffusion and perfusion MRI for the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Schellinger, P.D.; Bryan, R.N.; Caplan, L.R.; Detre, J.A.; Edelman, R.R.; Jaigobin, C.; Kidwell, C.S.; Mohr, J.P.; Sloan, M.; Sorensen, A.G.; Warach, S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the evidence for the use of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) in the diagnosis of patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods: We systematically analyzed the literature from 1966 to January 2008 to address the diagnostic and prognostic value of DWI and PWI. Results and Recommendations: DWI is established as useful and should be considered more useful than noncontrast CT for the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke within 12 hours of symptom onset. DWI should be performed for the most accurate diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke (Level A); however, the sensitivity of DWI for the diagnosis of ischemic stroke in a general sample of patients with possible acute stroke is not perfect. The diagnostic accuracy of DWI in evaluating cerebral hemorrhage is outside the scope of this guideline. On the basis of Class II and III evidence, baseline DWI volumes probably predict baseline stroke severity in anterior territory stroke (Level B) but possibly do not in vertebrobasilar artery territory stroke (Level C). Baseline DWI lesion volumes probably predict (final) infarct volumes (Level B) and possibly predict early and late clinical outcome measures (Level C). Baseline PWI volumes predict to a lesser degree the baseline stroke severity compared with DWI (Level C). There is insufficient evidence to support or refute the value of PWI in diagnosing acute ischemic stroke (Level U). GLOSSARY ADC = apparent diffusion coefficient; ASPECTS = Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score; CBF = cerebral blood flow; CI = confidence interval; DWI = diffusion-weighted imaging; ICH = intracerebral hemorrhage; MR = magnetic resonance; NIHSS = National Institute of Health Stroke Scale; PWI = perfusion-weighted imaging; tPA = tissue plasminogen activator. PMID:20625171

  19. Reduction in Cerebral Perfusion after Heroin Administration: A Resting State Arterial Spin Labeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Denier, Niklaus; Gerber, Hana; Vogel, Marc; Klarhöfer, Markus; Riecher-Rossler, Anita; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A.; Lang, Undine E.; Borgwardt, Stefan; Walter, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Heroin dependence is a chronic relapsing brain disorder, characterized by the compulsion to seek and use heroin. Heroin itself has a strong potential to produce subjective experiences characterized by intense euphoria, relaxation and release from craving. The neurofunctional foundations of these perceived effects are not well known. In this study, we have used pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) in 15 heroin-dependent patients from a stable heroin-assisted treatment program to observe the steady state effects of heroin (60 min after administration). Patients were scanned in a cross-over and placebo controlled design. They received an injection of their regular dose of heroin or saline (placebo) before or after the scan. As phMRI method, we used a pulsed arterial spin labeling (ASL) sequence based on a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) spin labeling scheme combined with a single-shot 3D GRASE (gradient-spin echo) readout on a 3 Tesla scanner. Analysis was performed with Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM 8), using a general linear model for whole brain comparison between the heroin and placebo conditions. We found that compared to placebo, heroin was associated with reduced perfusion in the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), the left medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and in the insula (both hemispheres). Analysis of extracted perfusion values indicate strong effect sizes and no gender related differences. Reduced perfusion in these brain areas may indicate self- and emotional regulation effects of heroin in maintenance treatment. PMID:24039715

  20. Subjective Frequency Ratings for 432 ASL Signs

    PubMed Central

    Mayberry, Rachel I.; Hall, Matthew L.; Zvaigzne, Meghan

    2013-01-01

    Given the importance of lexical frequency for psycholinguistic research, and the lack of comprehensive frequency data for sign languages, we collected subjective estimates of lexical frequency for 432 signs in American Sign Language. Participants were 59 deaf signers who first began to acquire ASL at ages ranging from birth to 14 years with a minimum of 10 years experience. Subjective frequency estimates were made on a scale ranging from 1 = rarely see the sign to 7 = always see the sign. Mean subjective frequency ratings for individual signs did not vary in relation to age of sign language exposure (AoLE), chronological age, or length of ASL experience. Nor did AoLE show significant effects on response time for making the ratings. However, RT was highly correlated with mean frequency rating. These results suggest that the distributions of subjective lexical frequencies are consistent across signers with varying AoLE. The implications for research practice are that subjective frequency ratings from random samples of highly experienced deaf signers can provide a reasonable measures of lexical control in sign language experiments. The appendix gives the mean and median subjective frequency rating, and the median and mean log(RT) for the ASL signs for the entire sample; the supplemental material gives these measures for three AoLE groups, Native, Early, and Late. PMID:23943581

  1. Assessment of brain perfusion using parametric and factor images extracted from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Anne L.; Moody, Alan R.

    1998-07-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers a minimally invasive method of investigating brain blood flow. This paper describes two different methods of extracting quantitative and qualitative information from this data. The first approach is to generate parametric images showing blood flow, blood volume and time-to-peak activity on a pixel by pixel basis. The second approach uses factor analysis. Principal components are extracted from the data and these orthogonal factors are then rotated to give a set of oblique factors, which satisfy certain simple constraints. In most cases three factors can be identified: a background or non- enhancing factor, an early vascular factor which is strongly correlated to arterial flow, and a late vascular factor which is strongly correlated to venous flow. The parametric and factor images are complimentary in nature: the former provides quantitative information that is readily understood by the clinician, while the latter makes no a priori assumptions about the underlying physiology and also allows more subtle changes in cerebral blood flow to be assessed. The factor images may also be of great value in defining regions of interest over which to carry out a more detailed quantitative analysis. This dual approach can be readily adapted to assess perfusion in other organs such as the heart or kidneys.

  2. Can SEE-2 Children Understand ASL-Using Adults?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luetke-Stahlman, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    The study compared comprehension of American Sign Language (ASL) between 12 deaf subjects in a program using Signing Exact English (SEE-2) and 14 deaf subjects in a residential program using Signed English, Pidgin Signed English, and ASL. Students exposed to SEE-2 could comprehend ASL as well as residential school peers. (Author/DB)

  3. Theoretical considerations in measurement of time discrepancies between input and myocardial time-signal intensity curves in estimates of regional myocardial perfusion with first-pass contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Takahiro; Ishida, Masaki; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Nagata, Motonori; Sakuma, Hajime; Ichihara, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method to determine time discrepancies between input and myocardial time-signal intensity (TSI) curves for accurate estimation of myocardial perfusion with first-pass contrast-enhanced MRI. Estimation of myocardial perfusion with contrast-enhanced MRI using kinetic models requires faithful recording of contrast content in the blood and myocardium. Typically, the arterial input function (AIF) is obtained by setting a region of interest in the left ventricular cavity. However, there is a small delay between the AIF and the myocardial curves, and such time discrepancies can lead to errors in flow estimation using Patlak plot analysis. In this study, the time discrepancies between the arterial TSI curve and the myocardial tissue TSI curve were estimated based on the compartment model. In the early phase after the arrival of the contrast agent in the myocardium, the relationship between rate constant K1 and the concentrations of Gd-DTPA contrast agent in the myocardium and arterial blood (LV blood) can be described by the equation K1={dCmyo(tpeak)/dt}/Ca(tpeak), where Cmyo(t) and Ca(t) are the relative concentrations of Gd-DTPA contrast agent in the myocardium and in the LV blood, respectively, and tpeak is the time corresponding to the peak of Ca(t). In the ideal case, the time corresponding to the maximum upslope of Cmyo(t), tmax, is equal to tpeak. In practice, however, there is a small difference in the arrival times of the contrast agent into the LV and into the myocardium. This difference was estimated to correspond to the difference between tpeak and tmax. The magnitudes of such time discrepancies and the effectiveness of the correction for these time discrepancies were measured in 18 subjects who underwent myocardial perfusion MRI under rest and stress conditions. The effects of the time discrepancies could be corrected effectively in the myocardial perfusion estimates.

  4. Precision in measurements of perfusion and microvascular permeability with T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Kershaw, Lucy E; Buckley, David L

    2006-11-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is used to estimate microvascular parameters by tracer kinetics analysis. The time for the contrast agent to travel from the artery to the tissue of interest (bolus arrival time (BAT)) is an important parameter that must be measured in such studies because inaccurate estimates or neglect of BAT contribute to inaccuracy in model fitting. Furthermore, although the precision with which these parameters are estimated is very important, it is rarely reported. To address these issues, two investigations were undertaken. First, simulated data were used to validate an independent method for estimation of BAT. Second, the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneity model was fitted to experimental data acquired in prostate and muscle tissue of 22 patients with prostate cancer. A bootstrap error analysis was performed to estimate the precision of parameter estimates. The independent method of estimating BAT was found to be more accurate and precise than a model-fitting approach. Estimated precisions for parameters measured in the prostate gland were 14% for extraction fraction (median coefficient of variation), 19% for blood flow, 28% for permeability-surface area product, 35% for volume of the extravascular-extracellular space, and 36% for blood volume. Techniques to further reduce uncertainty are discussed.

  5. Perfusion MRI Derived Indices of Microvascular Shunting and Flow Control Correlate with Tumor Grade and Outcome in Patients with Cerebral Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Tietze, Anna; Mouridsen, Kim; Lassen-Ramshad, Yasmin; Østergaard, Leif

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Deficient microvascular blood flow control is thought to cause tumor hypoxia and increase resistance to therapy. In glioma patients, we tested whether perfusion-weighted MRI (PWI) based indices of microvascular flow control provide more information on tumor grade and patient outcome than does the established PWI angiogenesis marker, cerebral blood volume (CBV). Material and Methods Seventy-two glioma patients (sixty high-grade, twelve low-grade gliomas) were included. Capillary transit time heterogeneity (CTH) and the coefficient of variation (COV), its ratio to blood mean transit time, provide indices of microvascular flow control and the extent to which oxygen can be extracted by tumor tissue. The ability of these parameters and CBV to differentiate tumor grade were assessed by receiver operating characteristic curves and logistic regression. Their ability to predict time to progression and overall survival was examined by the Cox proportional-hazards regression model, and by survival curves using log-rank tests. Results The best prediction of grade (AUC = 0.876; p < 0.05) was achieved by combining knowledge of CBV and CTH in the enhancing tumor and peri-focal edema, and patients with glioblastoma multiforme were identified best by CTH (AUC = 0.763; p<0.001). CTH outperformed CBV and COV in predicting time to progression and survival in all gliomas and in a subgroup consisting of only high-grade gliomas. Conclusion Our study confirms the importance of microvascular flow control in tumor growth by demonstrating that determining CTH improves tumor grading and outcome prediction in glioma patients compared to CBV alone. PMID:25875182

  6. Advances in functional and structural imaging of the human lung using proton MRI.

    PubMed

    Miller, G Wilson; Mugler, John P; Sá, Rui C; Altes, Talissa A; Prisk, G Kim; Hopkins, Susan R

    2014-12-01

    The field of proton lung MRI is advancing on a variety of fronts. In the realm of functional imaging, it is now possible to use arterial spin labeling (ASL) and oxygen-enhanced imaging techniques to quantify regional perfusion and ventilation, respectively, in standard units of measurement. By combining these techniques into a single scan, it is also possible to quantify the local ventilation-perfusion ratio, which is the most important determinant of gas-exchange efficiency in the lung. To demonstrate potential for accurate and meaningful measurements of lung function, this technique was used to study gravitational gradients of ventilation, perfusion, and ventilation-perfusion ratio in healthy subjects, yielding quantitative results consistent with expected regional variations. Such techniques can also be applied in the time domain, providing new tools for studying temporal dynamics of lung function. Temporal ASL measurements showed increased spatial-temporal heterogeneity of pulmonary blood flow in healthy subjects exposed to hypoxia, suggesting sensitivity to active control mechanisms such as hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, and illustrating that to fully examine the factors that govern lung function it is necessary to consider temporal as well as spatial variability. Further development to increase spatial coverage and improve robustness would enhance the clinical applicability of these new functional imaging tools. In the realm of structural imaging, pulse sequence techniques such as ultrashort echo-time radial k-space acquisition, ultrafast steady-state free precession, and imaging-based diaphragm triggering can be combined to overcome the significant challenges associated with proton MRI in the lung, enabling high-quality three-dimensional imaging of the whole lung in a clinically reasonable scan time. Images of healthy and cystic fibrosis subjects using these techniques demonstrate substantial promise for non-contrast pulmonary angiography and detailed

  7. High-temporospatial-resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) wrist MRI with variable-density pseudo-random circular Cartesian undersampling (CIRCUS) acquisition: evaluation of perfusion in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Pedoia, Valentina; Heilmeier, Ursula; Ku, Eric; Su, Favian; Khanna, Sameer; Imboden, John; Graf, Jonathan; Link, Thomas; Li, Xiaojuan

    2016-01-01

    This study is to evaluate highly accelerated three-dimensional (3D) dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) wrist MRI for assessment of perfusion in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. A pseudo-random variable-density undersampling strategy, circular Cartesian undersampling (CIRCUS), was combined with k-t SPARSE-SENSE reconstruction to achieve a highly accelerated 3D DCE wrist MRI. Two healthy volunteers and 10 RA patients were studied. Two patients were on methotrexate (MTX) only (Group I) and the other eight were treated with a combination therapy of MTX and anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy (Group II). Patients were scanned at baseline and 3 month follow-up. DCE MR images were used to evaluate perfusion in synovitis and bone marrow edema pattern in the RA wrist joints. A series of perfusion parameters was derived and compared with clinical disease activity scores of 28 joints (DAS28). 3D DCE wrist MR images were obtained with a spatial resolution of 0.3 × 0.3 × 1.5 mm(3) and temporal resolution of 5 s (with an acceleration factor of 20). The derived perfusion parameters, most notably transition time (dT) of synovitis, showed significant negative correlations with DAS28-ESR (r = -0.80, p < 0.05) and DAS28-CRP (r = -0.87, p < 0.05) at baseline and also correlated significantly with treatment responses evaluated by clinical score changes between baseline and 3 month follow-up (with DAS28-ESR r = -0.79, p < 0.05, and DAS28-CRP r = -0.82, p < 0.05). Highly accelerated 3D DCE wrist MRI with improved temporospatial resolution has been achieved in RA patients and provides accurate assessment of neovascularization and perfusion in RA joints, showing promise as a potential tool for evaluating treatment responses.

  8. Perfusion Deficits and Functional Connectivity Alterations in Memory-Related Regions of Patients with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Li, Baojuan; Feng, Na; Pu, Huangsheng; Zhang, Xi; Lu, Hongbing; Yin, Hong

    2016-01-01

    To explore the potential alterations in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and functional connectivity of recent onset post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) induced by a single prolonged trauma exposure, we recruited 20 survivors experiencing the same coal mining flood disaster as the PTSD (n = 10) and non-PTSD (n = 10) group, respectively. The pulsed arterial spin labeling (ASL) images were acquired with a 3.0T MRI scanner and the partial volume (PV) effect in the images was corrected for better CBF estimation. Alterations in CBF were analyzed using both uncorrected and PV-corrected CBF maps. By using altered CBF regions as regions-of-interest, seed-based functional connectivity analysis was then performed. While only one CBF deficit in right corpus callosum of PTSD patients was detected using uncorrected CBF, three more regions (bilateral frontal lobes and right superior frontal gyrus) were identified using PV-corrected CBF. Furthermore, the regional CBF of right superior frontal gyrus exhibited significantly negative correlation with the symptom severity (r = -0.759, p = 0.018). The resting-state functional connectivity analysis revealed increased connectivity between left frontal lobe and right parietal lobe. The results indicated the symptom-specific perfusion deficits and an aberrant connectivity in memory-related regions of PTSD patients when using PV-corrected ASL data. It also suggested that PV-corrected CBF exhibits more subtle changes that may be beneficial to perfusion and connectivity analysis. PMID:27213610

  9. Perfusion Deficits and Functional Connectivity Alterations in Memory-Related Regions of Patients with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Na; Pu, Huangsheng; Zhang, Xi; Lu, Hongbing; Yin, Hong

    2016-01-01

    To explore the potential alterations in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and functional connectivity of recent onset post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) induced by a single prolonged trauma exposure, we recruited 20 survivors experiencing the same coal mining flood disaster as the PTSD (n = 10) and non-PTSD (n = 10) group, respectively. The pulsed arterial spin labeling (ASL) images were acquired with a 3.0T MRI scanner and the partial volume (PV) effect in the images was corrected for better CBF estimation. Alterations in CBF were analyzed using both uncorrected and PV-corrected CBF maps. By using altered CBF regions as regions-of-interest, seed-based functional connectivity analysis was then performed. While only one CBF deficit in right corpus callosum of PTSD patients was detected using uncorrected CBF, three more regions (bilateral frontal lobes and right superior frontal gyrus) were identified using PV-corrected CBF. Furthermore, the regional CBF of right superior frontal gyrus exhibited significantly negative correlation with the symptom severity (r = −0.759, p = 0.018). The resting-state functional connectivity analysis revealed increased connectivity between left frontal lobe and right parietal lobe. The results indicated the symptom-specific perfusion deficits and an aberrant connectivity in memory-related regions of PTSD patients when using PV-corrected ASL data. It also suggested that PV-corrected CBF exhibits more subtle changes that may be beneficial to perfusion and connectivity analysis. PMID:27213610

  10. Evidence for involvement of the insula in the psychotropic effects of THC in humans: a double-blind, randomized pharmacological MRI study.

    PubMed

    van Hell, Hendrika H; Bossong, Matthijs G; Jager, Gerry; Kristo, Gert; van Osch, Matthias J P; Zelaya, Fernando; Kahn, René S; Ramsey, Nick F

    2011-11-01

    The main reason for recreational use of cannabis is the 'high', the primary psychotropic effect of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). This psychoactive compound of cannabis induces a range of subjective, physical and mental reactions. The effect on heart rate is pronounced and complicates bloodflow-based neuroimaging of psychotropic effects of THC. In this study we investigated the effects of THC on baseline brain perfusion and activity in association with the induction of 'feeling high'. Twenty-three subjects participated in a pharmacological MRI study, where we applied arterial spin labelling (ASL) to measure perfusion, and resting-state functional MRI to assess blood oxygen level-dependent signal fluctuation as a measure of baseline brain activity. Feeling high was assessed with a visual analogue scale and was compared to the imaging measures. THC increased perfusion in the anterior cingulate cortex, superior frontal cortex, and insula, and reduced perfusion in the post-central and occipital gyrus. Baseline brain activity was altered, indicated by increased amplitude of fluctuations in resting-state functional MRI signal after THC administration in the insula, substantia nigra and cerebellum. Perfusion changes in frontal cortex were negatively correlated with ratings of feeling high, suggesting an interaction between cognitive control and subjective effects of THC. In conclusion, an acute THC challenge altered baseline brain perfusion and activity, especially in frontal brain areas involved in cognitive and emotional processes, and the insula, associated with interoceptive awareness. These changes may represent the THC-induced neurophysiological correlates of feeling high. The alterations in baseline brain perfusion and activity also have relevance for studies on task-related effects of THC on brain function. PMID:21489346

  11. Evidence for involvement of the insula in the psychotropic effects of THC in humans: a double-blind, randomized pharmacological MRI study.

    PubMed

    van Hell, Hendrika H; Bossong, Matthijs G; Jager, Gerry; Kristo, Gert; van Osch, Matthias J P; Zelaya, Fernando; Kahn, René S; Ramsey, Nick F

    2011-11-01

    The main reason for recreational use of cannabis is the 'high', the primary psychotropic effect of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). This psychoactive compound of cannabis induces a range of subjective, physical and mental reactions. The effect on heart rate is pronounced and complicates bloodflow-based neuroimaging of psychotropic effects of THC. In this study we investigated the effects of THC on baseline brain perfusion and activity in association with the induction of 'feeling high'. Twenty-three subjects participated in a pharmacological MRI study, where we applied arterial spin labelling (ASL) to measure perfusion, and resting-state functional MRI to assess blood oxygen level-dependent signal fluctuation as a measure of baseline brain activity. Feeling high was assessed with a visual analogue scale and was compared to the imaging measures. THC increased perfusion in the anterior cingulate cortex, superior frontal cortex, and insula, and reduced perfusion in the post-central and occipital gyrus. Baseline brain activity was altered, indicated by increased amplitude of fluctuations in resting-state functional MRI signal after THC administration in the insula, substantia nigra and cerebellum. Perfusion changes in frontal cortex were negatively correlated with ratings of feeling high, suggesting an interaction between cognitive control and subjective effects of THC. In conclusion, an acute THC challenge altered baseline brain perfusion and activity, especially in frontal brain areas involved in cognitive and emotional processes, and the insula, associated with interoceptive awareness. These changes may represent the THC-induced neurophysiological correlates of feeling high. The alterations in baseline brain perfusion and activity also have relevance for studies on task-related effects of THC on brain function.

  12. "Avenue ASL:" Transforming Curriculum through Design and Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Charles; Hooper, Simon; Rose, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Between 1998 and 2002, enrollment in American Sign Language (ASL) curricula at the postsecondary level has increased 433% nationally, representing the largest enrollment percentage gain of all world languages. This unprecedented demand for ASL linguistic study has created a wide range of instructional challenges, the most pervasive of which…

  13. Simultaneous perception of a spoken and a signed language: The brain basis of ASL-English code-blends.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Jill; McCullough, Stephen; Emmorey, Karen

    2015-08-01

    Code-blends (simultaneous words and signs) are a unique characteristic of bimodal bilingual communication. Using fMRI, we investigated code-blend comprehension in hearing native ASL-English bilinguals who made a semantic decision (edible?) about signs, audiovisual words, and semantically equivalent code-blends. English and ASL recruited a similar fronto-temporal network with expected modality differences: stronger activation for English in auditory regions of bilateral superior temporal cortex, and stronger activation for ASL in bilateral occipitotemporal visual regions and left parietal cortex. Code-blend comprehension elicited activity in a combination of these regions, and no cognitive control regions were additionally recruited. Furthermore, code-blends elicited reduced activation relative to ASL presented alone in bilateral prefrontal and visual extrastriate cortices, and relative to English alone in auditory association cortex. Consistent with behavioral facilitation observed during semantic decisions, the findings suggest that redundant semantic content induces more efficient neural processing in language and sensory regions during bimodal language integration. PMID:26177161

  14. Simultaneous perception of a spoken and a signed language: The brain basis of ASL-English code-blends.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Jill; McCullough, Stephen; Emmorey, Karen

    2015-08-01

    Code-blends (simultaneous words and signs) are a unique characteristic of bimodal bilingual communication. Using fMRI, we investigated code-blend comprehension in hearing native ASL-English bilinguals who made a semantic decision (edible?) about signs, audiovisual words, and semantically equivalent code-blends. English and ASL recruited a similar fronto-temporal network with expected modality differences: stronger activation for English in auditory regions of bilateral superior temporal cortex, and stronger activation for ASL in bilateral occipitotemporal visual regions and left parietal cortex. Code-blend comprehension elicited activity in a combination of these regions, and no cognitive control regions were additionally recruited. Furthermore, code-blends elicited reduced activation relative to ASL presented alone in bilateral prefrontal and visual extrastriate cortices, and relative to English alone in auditory association cortex. Consistent with behavioral facilitation observed during semantic decisions, the findings suggest that redundant semantic content induces more efficient neural processing in language and sensory regions during bimodal language integration.

  15. SU-D-18C-05: Variable Bolus Arterial Spin Labeling MRI for Accurate Cerebral Blood Flow and Arterial Transit Time Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, M; Jung, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an MRI perfusion imaging method from which quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps can be calculated. Acquisition with variable post-labeling delays (PLD) and variable TRs allows for arterial transit time (ATT) mapping and leads to more accurate CBF quantification with a scan time saving of 48%. In addition, T1 and M0 maps can be obtained without a separate scan. In order to accurately estimate ATT and T1 of brain tissue from the ASL data, variable labeling durations were invented, entitled variable-bolus ASL. Methods: All images were collected on a healthy subject with a 3T Siemens Skyra scanner. Variable-bolus Psuedo-continuous ASL (PCASL) images were collected with 7 TI times ranging 100-4300ms in increments of 700ms with TR ranging 1000-5200ms. All boluses were 1600ms when the TI allowed, otherwise the bolus duration was 100ms shorter than the TI. All TI times were interleaved to reduce sensitivity to motion. Voxel-wise T1 and M0 maps were estimated using a linear least squares fitting routine from the average singal from each TI time. Then pairwise subtraction of each label/control pair and averaging for each TI time was performed. CBF and ATT maps were created using the standard model by Buxton et al. with a nonlinear fitting routine using the T1 tissue map. Results: CBF maps insensitive to ATT were produced along with ATT maps. Both maps show patterns and averages consistent with literature. The T1 map also shows typical T1 contrast. Conclusion: It has been demonstrated that variablebolus ASL produces CBF maps free from the errors due to ATT and tissue T1 variations and provides M0, T1, and ATT maps which have potential utility. This is accomplished with a single scan in a feasible scan time (under 6 minutes) with low sensivity to motion.

  16. Brain perfusion: computed tomography and magnetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Copen, William A; Lev, Michael H; Rapalino, Otto

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral perfusion imaging provides assessment of regional microvascular hemodynamics in the living brain, enabling in vivo measurement of a variety of different hemodynamic parameters. Perfusion imaging techniques that are used in the clinical setting usually rely upon X-ray computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This chapter reviews CT- and MRI-based perfusion imaging techniques, with attention to image acquisition, clinically relevant aspects of image postprocessing, and fundamental differences between CT- and MRI-based techniques. Correlations with cerebrovascular physiology and potential clinical applications of perfusion imaging are reviewed, focusing upon the two major classes of neurologic disease in which perfusion imaging is most often performed: primary perfusion disorders (including ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, and reperfusion syndrome), and brain tumors.

  17. Changes of Cerebral Perfusion and Functional Brain Network Organization in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Lou, Wutao; Shi, Lin; Wong, Adrian; Chu, Winnie C W; Mok, Vincent C T; Wang, Defeng

    2016-08-10

    Disruptions of the functional brain network and cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been revealed in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, the neurophysiological mechanism of hypoperfusion as well as the reorganization of the intrinsic whole brain network due to the neuropathology of MCI are still unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the changes of CBF and the whole brain network organization in MCI by using a multimodal MRI approach. Resting state ASL MRI and BOLD MRI were used to evaluate disruptions of CBF and underlying functional connectivity in 27 patients with MCI and 35 cognitive normal controls (NC). The eigenvector centrality mapping (ECM) was used to assess the whole brain network reorganization in MCI, and a seed-based ECM approach was proposed to reveal the contributions of the whole brain network on the ECM alterations. Significantly decreased perfusion in the posterior parietal cortex as well as its connectivity within the default mode network and occipital cortex were found in the MCI group compared to the NC group. The ECM analysis revealed decreased EC in the middle cingulate cortex, parahippocampal gyrus, medial frontal gyrus, and increased EC in the right calcarine sulcus, superior temporal gyrus, and supplementary motor area in the MCI group. The results of this study indicate that there are deficits in cerebral blood flow and functional connectivity in the default mode network, and that sensory-processing networks might play a compensatory role to make up for the decreased connections in MCI.

  18. Changes of Cerebral Perfusion and Functional Brain Network Organization in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Lou, Wutao; Shi, Lin; Wong, Adrian; Chu, Winnie C W; Mok, Vincent C T; Wang, Defeng

    2016-08-10

    Disruptions of the functional brain network and cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been revealed in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, the neurophysiological mechanism of hypoperfusion as well as the reorganization of the intrinsic whole brain network due to the neuropathology of MCI are still unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the changes of CBF and the whole brain network organization in MCI by using a multimodal MRI approach. Resting state ASL MRI and BOLD MRI were used to evaluate disruptions of CBF and underlying functional connectivity in 27 patients with MCI and 35 cognitive normal controls (NC). The eigenvector centrality mapping (ECM) was used to assess the whole brain network reorganization in MCI, and a seed-based ECM approach was proposed to reveal the contributions of the whole brain network on the ECM alterations. Significantly decreased perfusion in the posterior parietal cortex as well as its connectivity within the default mode network and occipital cortex were found in the MCI group compared to the NC group. The ECM analysis revealed decreased EC in the middle cingulate cortex, parahippocampal gyrus, medial frontal gyrus, and increased EC in the right calcarine sulcus, superior temporal gyrus, and supplementary motor area in the MCI group. The results of this study indicate that there are deficits in cerebral blood flow and functional connectivity in the default mode network, and that sensory-processing networks might play a compensatory role to make up for the decreased connections in MCI. PMID:27567823

  19. Renal perfusion scintiscan

    MedlinePlus

    Renal perfusion scintigraphy; Radionuclide renal perfusion scan; Perfusion scintiscan - renal; Scintiscan - renal perfusion ... supply the kidneys. This is a condition called renal artery stenosis. Significant renal artery stenosis may be ...

  20. Increasing Children's ASL Classifier Production: A Multicomponent Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beal-Alvarez, Jennifer S.; Easterbrooks, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    The Authors examined classifier production during narrative retells by 10 deaf and hard of hearing students in grades 2-4 at a day school for the deaf following a 6-week intervention of repeated viewings of stories in American Sign Language (ASL) paired with scripted teacher mediation. Classifier production, documented through a…

  1. New Directions in ASL-English Bilingual Ebooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The widespread adoption of smartphones and tablet computers have enabled the rapid creation and distribution of innovative American Sign Language (ASL) and written English bilingual ebooks, aimed primarily at deaf and hard-of-hearing children. These sign-print bilingual ebooks are unique in how they take advantage of digital platforms to display…

  2. ASL Discourse Strategies: Chaining and Connecting--Explaining across Audiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinto-Pozos, David; Reynolds, Wanette

    2012-01-01

    This study takes advantage of a novel methodology--the use of a single culturally-meaningful text written in English and presented to different audiences in ASL--to examine the ways in which Deaf native signers utilize contextualization strategies in order to match the perceived linguistic and informational needs of an audience. We demonstrate,…

  3. Kinematic Signatures of Telic and Atelic Events in ASL Predicates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malaia, Evie; Wilbur, Ronnie B.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an experimental investigation of kinematics of verb sign production in American Sign Language (ASL) using motion capture data. The results confirm that event structure differences in the meaning of the verbs are reflected in the kinematic formation: for example, in the telic verbs (throw, hit), the end-point of the event is…

  4. The Impact of American Sign Language Fluency on Co-Speech Gesture Production of Hearing English/ASL Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faust, Katrina Danielle

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation describes the features of co-speech gestures of English/ASL bilinguals and addresses three main questions: 1) How do English/ASL bilinguals gesture differently than non-signers? 2) How do native ASL/English bilinguals gesture differently than non-native English/ASL bilinguals? 3) Do English/ASL bilinguals gesture differently to…

  5. Volumetric Measurement of Perfusion and Arterial Transit Delay using Hadamard Encoded Continuous Arterial Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Weiying; Shankaranarayanan, Ajit; Alsop, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Creating images of the transit delay from the labeling location to image tissue can aid the optimization and quantification of arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion measurements and may provide diagnostic information independent of perfusion. Unfortunately, measuring transit delay requires acquiring a series of images with different labeling timing that adds to the time cost and increases the noise of the ASL study. Here we implement and evaluate a proposed Hadamard encoding of labeling that speeds the imaging and improves the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficiency. Volumetric images in human volunteers confirmed the theoretical advantages of Hadamard encoding over sequential acquisition of images with multiple labeling timing. Perfusion images calculated from Hadamard encoded acquisition had reduced SNR relative to a dedicated perfusion acquisition with either assumed or separately measured transit delays, however. PMID:22618894

  6. Phonological Substitution Errors in L2 ASL Sentence Processing by Hearing M2L2 Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Joshua; Newman, Sharlene

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we aimed to investigate phonological substitution errors made by hearing second language (M2L2) learners of American Sign Language (ASL) during a sentence translation task. Learners saw sentences in ASL that were signed by either a native signer or a M2L2 learner. Learners were to simply translate the sentence from ASL to…

  7. Arterial Transit Time Mapping Obtained by Pulsed Continuous 3D ASL Imaging with Multiple Post-Label Delay Acquisitions: Comparative Study with PET-CBF in Patients with Chronic Occlusive Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsujikawa, Tetsuya; Kimura, Hirohiko; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Isozaki, Makoto; Kikuta, Ken-ichiro; Okazawa, Hidehiko

    2016-01-01

    Arterial transit time (ATT) is most crucial for measuring absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) by arterial spin labeling (ASL), a noninvasive magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion assessment technique, in patients with chronic occlusive cerebrovascular disease. We validated ASL-CBF and ASL-ATT maps calculated by pulsed continuous ASL (pCASL) with multiple post-label delay acquisitions in patients with occlusive cerebrovascular disease. Fifteen patients underwent MR scans, including pCASL, and positron emission tomography (PET) scans with 15O-water to obtain PET-CBF. MR acquisitions with different post-label delays (1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 sec) were also obtained for ATT correction. The theoretical framework of 2-compartmental model (2CM) was also used for the delay compensation. ASL-CBF and ASL-ATT were calculated based on the proposed 2CM, and the effect on the CBF values and the ATT correction characteristics were discussed. Linear regression analyses were performed both on pixel-by-pixel and region-of-interest bases in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. There were significant correlations between ASL-CBF and PET-CBF both for voxel values (r = 0.74 ± 0.08, slope: 0.87 ± 0.22, intercept: 6.1 ± 4.9) and for the MCA territorial comparison in both affected (R2 = 0.67, y = 0.83x + 6.3) and contralateral sides (R2 = 0.66, y = 0.74x + 6.3). ASL-ATTs in the affected side were significantly longer than those in the contralateral side (1.51 ± 0.41 sec and 1.12 ± 0.30 sec, respectively, p <0.0005). CBF measurement using pCASL with delay compensation was feasible and fairly accurate even in altered hemodynamic states. PMID:27275779

  8. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  9. Microfluidic perfusion culture.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Koji; Sugiura, Shinji; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic perfusion culture is a novel technique to culture animal cells in a small-scale microchamber with medium perfusion. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is the most popular material to fabricate a microfluidic perfusion culture chip. Photolithography and replica molding techniques are generally used for fabrication of a microfluidic perfusion culture chip. Pressure-driven perfusion culture system is convenient technique to carry out the perfusion culture of animal cells in a microfluidic device. Here, we describe a general theory on microfluid network design, microfabrication technique, and experimental technique for pressure-driven perfusion culture in an 8 × 8 microchamber array on a glass slide-sized microchip made out of PDMS. PMID:24297421

  10. Effects of background suppression on the sensitivity of dual-echo arterial spin labeling MRI for BOLD and CBF signal changes.

    PubMed

    Ghariq, Eidrees; Chappell, Michael A; Schmid, Sophie; Teeuwisse, Wouter M; van Osch, Matthias J P

    2014-12-01

    Dual-echo arterial spin labeling (DE-ASL) enables the simultaneous acquisition of BOLD and CBF fMRI data and is often used for calibrated BOLD and cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity measurements. DE-ASL, like all ASL techniques, suffers from a low intrinsic CBF SNR, which can be improved by suppressing the background signal via the inclusion of additional inversion pulses. However, until now this approach has been considered to be undesirable for DE-ASL, because the BOLD signal is extracted from the background signal and attenuating the background signal could decrease the sensitivity of DE-ASL scans for BOLD changes. In this study, the effect of background suppression on the sensitivity of DE-ASL MRI for BOLD and CBF signal changes with a visual stimulation paradigm was studied. Results showed that with an average background suppression level of 70% the BOLD sensitivity of DE-ASL MRI decreases slightly (15%), while the CBF sensitivity of the scans increased by almost a factor-of-two (81%). These findings support the conclusion that the gains in CBF sensitivity of DE-ASL MRI due to background suppression outweigh the slight decrease in sensitivity of these scans for BOLD changes, and thus that background suppression is highly recommended for DE-ASL.

  11. Perfusion harmonic imaging of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, Volker H.; Seidel, Guenter; Wiesmann, Martin; Meyer, Karsten; Aach, Til

    2003-05-01

    The fast visualisation of cerebral microcirculation supports diagnosis of acute cerebrovascular diseases. However, the commonly used CT/MRI-based methods are time consuming and, moreover, costly. Therefore we propose an alternative approach to brain perfusion imaging by means of ultrasonography. In spite of the low signal/noise-ratio of transcranial ultrasound and the high impedance of the skull, flow images of cerebral blood flow can be derived by capturing the kinetics of appropriate contrast agents by harmonic ultrasound image sequences. In this paper we propose three different methods for human brain perfusion imaging, each of which yielding flow images indicating the status of the patient's cerebral microcirculation by visualising local flow parameters. Bolus harmonic imaging (BHI) displays the flow kinetics of bolus injections, while replenishment (RHI) and diminution harmonic imaging (DHI) compute flow characteristics from contrast agent continuous infusions. RHI measures the contrast agents kinetics in the influx phase and DHI displays the diminution kinetics of the contrast agent acquired from the decay phase. In clinical studies, BHI- and RHI-parameter images were found to represent comprehensive and reproducible distributions of physiological cerebral blood flow. For DHI it is shown, that bubble destruction and hence perfusion phenomena principally can be displayed. Generally, perfusion harmonic imaging enables reliable and fast bedside imaging of human brain perfusion. Due to its cost efficiency it complements cerebrovascular diagnostics by established CT/MRI-based methods.

  12. Functional Imaging: CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Edwin JR; Hoffman, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Numerous imaging techniques permit evaluation of regional pulmonary function. Contrast-enhanced CT methods now allow assessment of vasculature and lung perfusion. Techniques using spirometric controlled MDCT allow for quantification of presence and distribution of parenchymal and airway pathology, Xenon gas can be employed to assess regional ventilation of the lungs and rapid bolus injections of iodinated contrast agent can provide quantitative measure of regional parenchymal perfusion. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung include gadolinium-enhanced perfusion imaging and hyperpolarized helium imaging, which can allow imaging of pulmonary ventilation and .measurement of the size of emphysematous spaces. PMID:18267192

  13. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... the test, tell your provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips An artificial heart valves Heart defibrillator ...

  14. Whole-brain perfusion imaging with balanced steady-state free precession arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Han, Paul Kyu; Ye, Jong Chul; Kim, Eung Yeop; Choi, Seung Hong; Park, Sung-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Recently, balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) readout has been proposed for arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion imaging to reduce susceptibility artifacts at a relatively high spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, the main limitation of bSSFP-ASL is the low spatial coverage. In this work, methods to increase the spatial coverage of bSSFP-ASL are proposed for distortion-free, high-resolution, whole-brain perfusion imaging. Three strategies of (i) segmentation, (ii) compressed sensing (CS) and (iii) a hybrid approach combining the two methods were tested to increase the spatial coverage of pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) with three-dimensional bSSFP readout. The spatial coverage was increased by factors of two, four and six using each of the three approaches, whilst maintaining the same total scan time (5.3 min). The number of segments and/or CS acceleration rate (R) correspondingly increased to maintain the same bSSFP readout time (1.2 s). The segmentation approach allowed whole-brain perfusion imaging for pCASL-bSSFP with no penalty in SNR and/or total scan time. The CS approach increased the spatial coverage of pCASL-bSSFP whilst maintaining the temporal resolution, with minimal impact on the image quality. The hybrid approach provided compromised effects between the two methods. Balanced SSFP-based ASL allows the acquisition of perfusion images with wide spatial coverage, high spatial resolution and SNR, and reduced susceptibility artifacts, and thus may become a good choice for clinical and neurological studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26676386

  15. Whole-brain perfusion imaging with balanced steady-state free precession arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Han, Paul Kyu; Ye, Jong Chul; Kim, Eung Yeop; Choi, Seung Hong; Park, Sung-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Recently, balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) readout has been proposed for arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion imaging to reduce susceptibility artifacts at a relatively high spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, the main limitation of bSSFP-ASL is the low spatial coverage. In this work, methods to increase the spatial coverage of bSSFP-ASL are proposed for distortion-free, high-resolution, whole-brain perfusion imaging. Three strategies of (i) segmentation, (ii) compressed sensing (CS) and (iii) a hybrid approach combining the two methods were tested to increase the spatial coverage of pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) with three-dimensional bSSFP readout. The spatial coverage was increased by factors of two, four and six using each of the three approaches, whilst maintaining the same total scan time (5.3 min). The number of segments and/or CS acceleration rate (R) correspondingly increased to maintain the same bSSFP readout time (1.2 s). The segmentation approach allowed whole-brain perfusion imaging for pCASL-bSSFP with no penalty in SNR and/or total scan time. The CS approach increased the spatial coverage of pCASL-bSSFP whilst maintaining the temporal resolution, with minimal impact on the image quality. The hybrid approach provided compromised effects between the two methods. Balanced SSFP-based ASL allows the acquisition of perfusion images with wide spatial coverage, high spatial resolution and SNR, and reduced susceptibility artifacts, and thus may become a good choice for clinical and neurological studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Polarized noble gas MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Brookeman, James R.; Mugler, John P. III; Lange, Eduard E. de; Knight-Scott, Jack; Maier, Therese; Bogorad, Paul; Driehuys, Bastiaan; Cates, Gordon; Happer, William; Daniel, Thomas M.; Truwit, Jonathon D.

    1998-01-20

    The development of convenient methods to polarize liter quantities of the noble gases helium-3 and xenon-129 has provided the opportunity for a new MRI method to visualize the internal air spaces of the human lung. These spaces are usually poorly seen with hydrogen-based MRI, because of the limited water content of the lung and the low thermal polarization of the water protons achieved in conventional magnets. In addition, xenon, which has a relatively high solubility and a sufficiently persistent polarization level in blood and biological tissue, offers the prospect of providing perfusion images of the lung, brain and other organs.

  17. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    MedlinePlus

    V/Q scan; Ventilation/perfusion scan; Lung ventilation/perfusion scan ... A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan is actually two tests. They may be done separately or together. During the perfusion scan, a health care ...

  18. Nonlinearity assessment of ASL F900 resistance thermometry bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, W.; Gam, K. S.; Yang, I.; Kim, Y. G.

    2013-09-01

    Despite the importance of resistance bridges in thermometry as fundamental instruments measuring resistance ratios of SPRTs, an accurate assessment of their nonlinearity and investigation of their behavior under various operating conditions have not been investigated much. Among various methods for nonlinearity assessment, a Hamon-type resistance network known to be RBC (resistance bridge calibrator) is widely used. However, due to finite temperature coefficients of base resistors used in the RBC, the evaluated nonlinearity of the resistance bridges under normal operating environment have been in doubt. In this work, to accurately evaluate the nonlinearity of the resistance thermometry bridge, an air medium thermostatted chamber having peak-to-peak temperature stability of around 0.1 °C was devised, and using this chamber, the nonlinearity of the resistance bridges at KRISS (two ASL F900s) was assessed. In addition to this, the behavior of the resistance bridge in terms of the nonlinearity was thoroughly investigated under different operating conditions of various gain and bandwidth combinations. The results showed that the resistance thermometry bridge marked the minimum nonlinearity of 11 ppb at 105 gain and 0.1 Hz bandwidth, and showed noticeable dependence on the gain.

  19. Sexual Health Behaviors of Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) Users

    PubMed Central

    Heiman, Erica; Haynes, Sharon; McKee, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the sexual health behaviors of Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users. Objective We sought to characterize the self-reported sexual behaviors of Deaf individuals. Methods Responses from 282 Deaf participants aged 18–64 from the greater Rochester, NY area who participated in the 2008 Deaf Health were analyzed. These data were compared with weighted data from a general population comparison group (N=1890). We looked at four sexual health-related outcomes: abstinence within the past year; number of sexual partners within the last year; condom use at last intercourse; and ever tested for HIV. We performed descriptive analyses, including stratification by gender, age, income, marital status, and educational level. Results Deaf respondents were more likely than the general population respondents to self-report two or more sexual partners in the past year (30.9% vs 10.1%) but self-reported higher condom use at last intercourse (28.0% vs 19.8%). HIV testing rates were similar between groups (47.5% vs 49.4%) but lower for certain Deaf groups: Deaf women (46.0% vs. 58.1%), lower-income Deaf (44.4% vs. 69.7%) and among less educated Deaf (31.3% vs. 57.7%) than among respondents from corresponding general population groups. Conclusion Deaf respondents self-reported higher numbers of sexual partners over the past year compared to the general population. Condom use was higher among Deaf participants. HIV was similar between groups, though HIV testing was significantly lower among lower-income, less well-educated, and female Deaf respondents. Deaf individuals have a sexual health risk profile that is distinct from that of the general population. PMID:26242551

  20. Academic Achievement of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in an ASL/English Bilingual Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrastinski, Iva; Wilbur, Ronnie B.

    2016-01-01

    There has been a scarcity of studies exploring the influence of students' American Sign Language (ASL) proficiency on their academic achievement in ASL/English bilingual programs. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ASL proficiency on reading comprehension skills and academic achievement of 85 deaf or hard-of-hearing signing…

  1. Are 2000 m asl a last frontier in hydrology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranzi, R.

    2009-04-01

    In spite of several advancements in monitoring systems in the last decades our understanding of some key hydrological processes and measurements in mountain areas still remain affected by large uncertainties. Above 2000 m asl in the Alps, and at higher altitudes in other mountain ranges, precipitation measurements with raingauges are still affected by the snow/rain partitioning uncertainties and wind-induced losses. The network density is not sufficient to capture heavy localised storms triggered by orography, which sometimes induce extreme debris flow events; today, in some cases, raingauge density at high altitudes is coarser than several decades ago, when networks were installed for designing hydropower plants. Radar measurements, which can be more effective in monitoring localised storms, are disturbed by the melting layer and ground clutter. Areal snow water equivalent estimates are still based on point measurements of snow density and depth and, over complex topography, remote sensing is helping for estimating snow cover areas only, while distributed information on vertical snow profiles is still difficult to be obtained. Also micrometeorological measurements of turbulent fluxes are sparse for logistic reasons and data spatialisation needs meteorological modelling or complex geostatistical interpolation algorithms to be effective. Runoff is difficult to be measured in winter because of freezing of streamwater. These examples show how the key components of the hydrological balance, i.e. precipitation, snow storage, evapotranspiration losses and runoff at the basin scale are difficult to be estimated with the accuracy required by several challenging scientific investigations, as those concerning adaptation of forests to climate changes and resulting feedback, or the assessment of the benefit for aquatic systems derived from new environmental flow releases in mountain creeks. Some examples from recent experiments to measure, for energy-balance studies, eddy

  2. Hepatic Perfusion Therapy.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Rahul; Gamblin, T Clark; Turaga, Kiran K

    2016-04-01

    Isolated hepatic perfusion uses the unique vascular supply of hepatic malignancies to deliver cytotoxic chemotherapy. The procedure involves vascular isolation of the liver and delivery of chemotherapy via the hepatic artery and extraction from retrohepatic vena cava. Benefits of hepatic perfusion have been observed in hepatic metastases of ocular melanoma and colorectal cancer and primary hepatocellular carcinoma. Percutaneous and prophylactic perfusions are avenues of ongoing research.

  3. Prediction of Liver Function by Using Magnetic Resonance-based Portal Venous Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yue; Wang, Hesheng; Johnson, Timothy D.; Pan, Charlie; Hussain, Hero; Balter, James M.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether liver function can be assessed globally and spatially by using volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging MRI (DCE-MRI) to potentially aid in adaptive treatment planning. Methods and Materials Seventeen patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing focal radiation therapy (RT) were enrolled in institution review board-approved prospective studies to obtain DCE-MRI (to measure regional perfusion) and indocyanine green (ICG) clearance rates (to measure overall liver function) prior to, during, and at 1 and 2 months after treatment. The volumetric distribution of portal venous perfusion in the whole liver was estimated for each scan. We assessed the correlation between mean portal venous perfusion in the nontumor volume of the liver and overall liver function measured by ICG before, during, and after RT. The dose response for regional portal venous perfusion to RT was determined using a linear mixed effects model. Results There was a significant correlation between the ICG clearance rate and mean portal venous perfusion in the functioning liver parenchyma, suggesting that portal venous perfusion could be used as a surrogate for function. Reduction in regional venous perfusion 1 month after RT was predicted by the locally accumulated biologically corrected dose at the end of RT (P<.0007). Regional portal venous perfusion measured during RT was a significant predictor for regional venous perfusion assessed 1 month after RT (P<.00001). Global hypovenous perfusion pre-RT was observed in 4 patients (3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis), 3 of whom had recovered from hypoperfusion, except in the highest dose regions, post-RT. In addition, 3 patients who had normal perfusion pre-RT had marked hypervenous perfusion or reperfusion in low-dose regions post-RT. Conclusions This study suggests that MR-based volumetric hepatic perfusion imaging may be a biomarker for spatial distribution of liver function, which

  4. Prediction of Liver Function by Using Magnetic Resonance-based Portal Venous Perfusion Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Yue; Wang Hesheng; Johnson, Timothy D.; Pan, Charlie; Hussain, Hero; Balter, James M.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether liver function can be assessed globally and spatially by using volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging MRI (DCE-MRI) to potentially aid in adaptive treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing focal radiation therapy (RT) were enrolled in institution review board-approved prospective studies to obtain DCE-MRI (to measure regional perfusion) and indocyanine green (ICG) clearance rates (to measure overall liver function) prior to, during, and at 1 and 2 months after treatment. The volumetric distribution of portal venous perfusion in the whole liver was estimated for each scan. We assessed the correlation between mean portal venous perfusion in the nontumor volume of the liver and overall liver function measured by ICG before, during, and after RT. The dose response for regional portal venous perfusion to RT was determined using a linear mixed effects model. Results: There was a significant correlation between the ICG clearance rate and mean portal venous perfusion in the functioning liver parenchyma, suggesting that portal venous perfusion could be used as a surrogate for function. Reduction in regional venous perfusion 1 month after RT was predicted by the locally accumulated biologically corrected dose at the end of RT (P<.0007). Regional portal venous perfusion measured during RT was a significant predictor for regional venous perfusion assessed 1 month after RT (P<.00001). Global hypovenous perfusion pre-RT was observed in 4 patients (3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis), 3 of whom had recovered from hypoperfusion, except in the highest dose regions, post-RT. In addition, 3 patients who had normal perfusion pre-RT had marked hypervenous perfusion or reperfusion in low-dose regions post-RT. Conclusions: This study suggests that MR-based volumetric hepatic perfusion imaging may be a biomarker for spatial distribution of liver function, which

  5. Biological Properties and Characterization of ASL50 Protein from Aged Allium sativum Bulbs.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suresh; Jitendra, Kumar; Singh, Kusum; Kapoor, Vaishali; Sinha, Mou; Xess, Immaculata; Das, Satya N; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P; Dey, Sharmistha

    2015-08-01

    Allium sativum is well known for its medicinal properties. The A. sativum lectin 50 (ASL50, 50 kDa) was isolated from aged A. sativum bulbs and purified by gel filtration chromatography on Sephacryl S-200 column. Agar well diffusion assay were used to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of ASL50 against Candida species and bacteria then minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined. The lipid A binding to ASL50 was determined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology with varying concentrations. Electron microscopic studies were done to see the mode of action of ASL50 on microbes. It exerted antimicrobial activity against clinical Candida isolates with a MIC of 10-40 μg/ml and clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with a MIC of 10-80 μg/ml. The electron microscopic study illustrates that it disrupts the cell membrane of the bacteria and cell wall of fungi. It exhibited antiproliferative activity on oral carcinoma KB cells with an IC50 of 36 μg/ml after treatment for 48 h and induces the apoptosis of cancer cells by inducing 2.5-fold higher caspase enzyme activity than untreated cells. However, it has no cytotoxic effects towards HEK 293 cells as well as human erythrocytes even at higher concentration of ASL50. Biological properties of ASL50 may have its therapeutic significance in aiding infection and cancer treatments. PMID:26043852

  6. A Case Study of Native-ASL Deaf Child's Play in an ASL/English Bilingual Preschool Classroom: Play Behaviors, Interactions, and Language Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musyoka, Millicent Malinda

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this mixed method study was to investigate the play behaviors, play interactions, and language use--within a bilingual AS L/English classroom--of a Deaf child who is a native user of American Sign Language (ASL). Play is an essential element in all children's development. Previous research suggests that there is a strong relationship…

  7. MRI and low back pain

    MedlinePlus

    Backache - MRI; Low back pain - MRI; Lumbar pain - MRI; Back strain - MRI; Lumbar radiculopathy - MRI; Herniated intervertebral disk - MRI; Prolapsed intervertebral disk - MRI; Slipped disk - MRI; Ruptured ...

  8. Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Comprehensive Update on Principles and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ka-Loh; Ostergaard, Leif; Calamante, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Perfusion is a fundamental biological function that refers to the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissue by means of blood flow. Perfusion MRI is sensitive to microvasculature and has been applied in a wide variety of clinical applications, including the classification of tumors, identification of stroke regions, and characterization of other diseases. Perfusion MRI techniques are classified with or without using an exogenous contrast agent. Bolus methods, with injections of a contrast agent, provide better sensitivity with higher spatial resolution, and are therefore more widely used in clinical applications. However, arterial spin-labeling methods provide a unique opportunity to measure cerebral blood flow without requiring an exogenous contrast agent and have better accuracy for quantification. Importantly, MRI-based perfusion measurements are minimally invasive overall, and do not use any radiation and radioisotopes. In this review, we describe the principles and techniques of perfusion MRI. This review summarizes comprehensive updated knowledge on the physical principles and techniques of perfusion MRI. PMID:25246817

  9. Tumor Metabolism and Perfusion in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Pretreatment Multimodality Imaging With {sup 1}H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Jacobus F.A.; Schoeder, Heiko; Lee, Nancy Y.; Stambuk, Hilda E.; Wang Ya; Fury, Matthew G.; Patel, Senehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shah, Jatin P.; Koutcher, Jason A.; Shukla-Dave, Amita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), and {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]FDG PET) of nodal metastases in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) for assessment of tumor biology. Additionally, pretreatment multimodality imaging was evaluated for its efficacy in predicting short-term response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Metastatic neck nodes were imaged with {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET in 16 patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC, before treatment. Short-term patient radiological response was evaluated at 3 to 4 months. Correlations among {sup 1}H-MRS (choline concentration relative to water [Cho/W]), DCE-MRI (volume transfer constant [K{sup trans}]; volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space [v{sub e}]; and redistribution rate constant [k{sub ep}]), and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET (standard uptake value [SUV] and total lesion glycolysis [TLG]) were calculated using nonparametric Spearman rank correlation. To predict short-term responses, logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between Cho/W and TLG ({rho} = 0.599; p = 0.031). Cho/W correlated negatively with heterogeneity measures of standard deviation std(v{sub e}) ({rho} = -0.691; p = 0.004) and std(k{sub ep}) ({rho} = -0.704; p = 0.003). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) values correlated strongly with MRI tumor volume ({rho} = 0.643; p = 0.007). Logistic regression indicated that std(K{sup trans}) and SUVmean were significant predictors of short-term response (p < 0.07). Conclusion: Pretreatment multimodality imaging using {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET is feasible in HNSCC patients with nodal metastases. Additionally, combined DCE-MRI and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET parameters were predictive of short-term response to treatment.

  10. Human brain: reliability and reproducibility of pulsed arterial spin-labeling perfusion MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Jahng, Geon-Ho; Song, Enmin; Zhu, Xiao-Ping; Matson, Gerald B; Weiner, Michael W; Schuff, Norbert

    2005-03-01

    The Committee of Human Research of the University of California San Francisco approved this study, and all volunteers provided written informed consent. The goal of this study was to prospectively determine the global and regional reliability and reproducibility of noninvasive brain perfusion measurements obtained with different pulsed arterial spin-labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging methods and to determine the extent to which within-subject variability and random noise limit reliability and reproducibility. Thirteen healthy volunteers were examined twice within 2 hours. The pulsed ASL methods compared in this study differ mainly with regard to magnetization transfer and eddy current effects. There were two main results: (a) Pulsed ASL MR imaging consistently had high measurement reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients greater than 0.75) and reproducibility (coefficients of variation less than 8.5%), and (b) random noise rather than within-subject variability limited reliability and reproducibility. It was concluded that low signal-to-noise ratios substantially limit the reliability and reproducibility of perfusion measurements.

  11. Measuring blood delivery to solitary pulmonary nodules using perfusion magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zhifeng; Shen, Li; Gao, Ling; Ford, James C.; Makedon, Fillia S.; Pearlman, Justin D.

    2006-03-01

    With perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI), perfusion describes the amount of blood passing through a block of tissue in a certain period of time. In pMRI, the tissue having more blood passing through will show higher intensity value as more contrast-labeled blood arrives. Perfusion reflects the delivery of essential nutrients to a block of tissue, and is an important parameter for the tissue status. Considering solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN), perfusion differences between malignant and benign nodules have been studied by different techniques. Much effort has been put into its characterization. In this paper, we proposed and implemented extraction of the SPN time intensity profile to measure blood delivery to solitary pulmonary nodules, describing their perfusion effects. In this method, a SPN time intensity profile is created based on intensity values of the solitary pulmonary nodule in lung pMRI images over time. This method has two steps: nodule tracking and profile clustering. Nodule tracking aligns the solitary pulmonary nodule in pMRI images taken at different time points, dealing with nodule movement resulted from breathing and body movement. Profile clustering implements segmentation of the nodule region and extraction of the time intensity profile of a solitary pulmonary nodule. SPN time intensity profiles reflect patterns of blood delivery to solitary pulmonary nodules, giving us a description of perfusion effect and indirect evidence of tumor angiogenesis. Analysis on SPN time intensity profiles will help the diagnosis of malignant nodules for early lung cancer detection.

  12. Effects of Varying Rate of Signing on ASL Manual Signs and Nonmanual Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilbur, Ronnie B.

    2009-01-01

    Spoken languages are characterized by flexible, multivariate prosodic systems. As a natural language, American Sign Language (ASL), and other sign languages (SLs), are also expected to be characterized in the same way. Artificially created signing systems for classroom use, such as signed English, serve as a contrast to natural sign languages. The…

  13. Family-Centered Practices and American Sign Language (ASL): Challenges and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, Belinda J.; Blanchard, Sheresa Boone; Kemmery, Megan A.; Appenzeller, Margo; Parker, Samuel D.

    2014-01-01

    Families with children who are deaf face many important decisions, especially the mode(s) of communication their children will use. The purpose of this focus group study was to better understand the experiences and recommendations of families who chose American Sign Language (ASL) as their primary mode of communication and to identify strategies…

  14. The Sign "Institute" and Its Derivatives: A Family of Culturally Important ASL Signs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalsky, Jilly; Meier, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    The sign "institute" is the source of a family of ASL signs that are used to refer to residential schools for deaf children and to other institutions. The members of the "institute" sign family--although initialized--are well-established within the Deaf community and, importantly, are used to refer to highly-valued aspects of Deaf culture. This is…

  15. Black Deaf Individuals' Reading Skills: Influence of ASL, Culture, Family Characteristics, Reading Experience, and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Candace; Clark, M. Diane; Musyoka, Millicent M.; Anderson, Melissa L.; Gilbert, Gizelle L.; Agyen, Selina; Hauser, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research on the reading abilities of Deaf individuals from various cultural groups suggests that Black Deaf and Hispanic Deaf individuals lag behind their White Deaf peers. The present study compared the reading skills of Black Deaf and White Deaf individuals, investigating the influence of American Sign Language (ASL), culture, family…

  16. ASL Handshape Stories, Word Recognition and Signing Deaf Readers: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gietz, Merrilee R.

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of using American Sign Language (ASL) handshape stories to teach word recognition in whole stories using a descriptive case study approach was explored. Four profoundly deaf children ages 7 to 8, enrolled in a self-contained deaf education classroom in a public school in the south participated in the story time five-week…

  17. [Ischemic heart disease (myocardial perfusion and viability): techniques and results].

    PubMed

    Croisille, P

    2004-10-01

    Over the last two decades, the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease have made tremendous progress, in particular with the help of the development of non-invasive methodologies for assessing myocardial perfusion and viability. Clinically, nuclear medicine techniques (particularly SPECT imaging) have predominated. With the recent technical developments allowing for a combined assessment of perfusion and irreversible damage with late enhancement imaging, MRI will now play a major role in the assessment of ischemic heart disease. PMID:15507837

  18. Impact of neonate haematocrit variability on the longitudinal relaxation time of blood: Implications for arterial spin labelling MRI

    PubMed Central

    De Vis, J.B.; Hendrikse, J.; Groenendaal, F.; de Vries, L.S.; Kersbergen, K.J.; Benders, M.J.N.L.; Petersen, E.T.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose The longitudinal relaxation time of blood (T1b) is influenced by haematocrit (Hct) which is known to vary in neonates. The purpose of this study was threefold: to obtain T1b values in neonates, to investigate how the T1b influences quantitative arterial spin labelling (ASL), and to evaluate if known relationships between T1b and haematocrit (Hct) hold true when Hct is measured by means of a point-of-care device. Materials and methods One hundred and four neonates with 120 MR scan sessions (3 T) were included. The T1b was obtained from a T1 inversion recovery sequence. T1b-induced changes in ASL cerebral blood flow estimates were evaluated. The Hct was obtained by means of a point-of-care device. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate the relation between Hct and MRI-derived R1 of blood (the inverse of the T1b). Results Mean T1b was 1.85 s (sd 0.2 s). The mean T1b in preterm neonates was 1.77 s, 1.89 s in preterm neonates scanned at term-equivalent age (TEA) and 1.81 s in diseased neonates. The T1b in the TEA was significantly different from the T1b in the preterm (p < 0.05). The change in perfusion induced by the T1b was −11% (sd 9.1%, p < 0.001). The relation between arterial-drawn Hct and R1b was R1b = 0.80 × Hct + 0.22, which falls within the confidence interval of the previously established relationships, whereas capillary-drawn Hct did not correlate with R1b. Conclusion We demonstrated a wide variability of the T1b in neonates and the implications it could have in methods relying on the actual T1b as for instance ASL. It was concluded that arterial-drawn Hct values obtained from a point-of-care device can be used to infer the T1b whereas our data did not support the use of capillary-drawn Hct for T1b correction. PMID:24818078

  19. MRI Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from torn ...

  20. When Is a Pidgin Not a Pidgin? An Alternate Analysis of the ASL-English Contact Situation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cokely, Dennis

    1983-01-01

    Recent sociolinguistic research is used to show that the American Sign Language (ASL)-English contact situation does not result in the emergence of a pidgin as supposed. Variation along the ASL-English continuum can be accounted for by interplay of foreigner talk, judgments of proficiency, and learners' attempts to master the target language.…

  1. Academic Achievement of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in an ASL/English Bilingual Program.

    PubMed

    Hrastinski, Iva; Wilbur, Ronnie B

    2016-04-01

    There has been a scarcity of studies exploring the influence of students' American Sign Language (ASL) proficiency on their academic achievement in ASL/English bilingual programs. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ASL proficiency on reading comprehension skills and academic achievement of 85 deaf or hard-of-hearing signing students. Two subgroups, differing in ASL proficiency, were compared on the Northwest Evaluation Association Measures of Academic Progress and the reading comprehension subtest of the Stanford Achievement Test, 10th edition. Findings suggested that students highly proficient in ASL outperformed their less proficient peers in nationally standardized measures of reading comprehension, English language use, and mathematics. Moreover, a regression model consisting of 5 predictors including variables regarding education, hearing devices, and secondary disabilities as well as ASL proficiency and home language showed that ASL proficiency was the single variable significantly predicting results on all outcome measures. This study calls for a paradigm shift in thinking about deaf education by focusing on characteristics shared among successful deaf signing readers, specifically ASL fluency. PMID:26864688

  2. Bilingual Processing of ASL-English Code-Blends: The Consequences of Accessing Two Lexical Representations Simultaneously

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmorey, Karen; Petrich, Jennifer A. F.; Gollan, Tamar H.

    2012-01-01

    Bilinguals who are fluent in American Sign Language (ASL) and English often produce "code-blends"--simultaneously articulating a sign and a word while conversing with other ASL-English bilinguals. To investigate the cognitive mechanisms underlying code-blend processing, we compared picture-naming times (Experiment 1) and semantic categorization…

  3. Myocardial perfusion imaging with dual energy CT.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kwang Nam; De Cecco, Carlo N; Caruso, Damiano; Tesche, Christian; Spandorfer, Adam; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Schoepf, U Joseph

    2016-10-01

    Dual-energy CT (DECT) enables simultaneous use of two different tube voltages, thus different x-ray absorption characteristics are acquired in the same anatomic location with two different X-ray spectra. The various DECT techniques allow material decomposition and mapping of the iodine distribution within the myocardium. Static dual-energy myocardial perfusion imaging (sCTMPI) using pharmacological stress agents demonstrate myocardial ischemia by single snapshot images of myocardial iodine distribution. sCTMPI gives incremental values to coronary artery stenosis detected on coronary CT angiography (CCTA) by showing consequent reversible or fixed myocardial perfusion defects. The comprehensive acquisition of CCTA and sCTMPI offers extensive morphological and functional evaluation of coronary artery disease. Recent studies have revealed that dual-energy sCTMPI shows promising diagnostic accuracy for the detection of hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease compared to single-photon emission computed tomography, invasive coronary angiography, and cardiac MRI. The aim of this review is to present currently available DECT techniques for static myocardial perfusion imaging and recent clinical applications and ongoing investigations.

  4. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Reeb, Jeremie; Cypel, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    Lung transplantation is an established life-saving therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease. Unfortunately, greater success in lung transplantation is hindered by a shortage of lung donors and the relatively poor early-, mid-, and long-term outcomes associated with severe primary graft dysfunction. Ex vivo lung perfusion has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for a more accurate lung assessment and improvement in lung quality. This review outlines the: (i) rationale behind the method; (ii) techniques and protocols; (iii) Toronto ex vivo lung perfusion method; (iv) devices available; and (v) clinical experience worldwide. We also highlight the potential of ex vivo lung perfusion in leading a new era of lung preservation. PMID:26700566

  5. Isolated lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Cypel, Marcelo; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-01-01

    Isolated lung perfusion (ILP) has been historically used as a method to study basic lung physiologic concepts using animal models. More recently, ILP has been applied in lung transplantation and thoracic oncology. In lung transplantation, ILP has been used to assess physiological integrity of donor lungs after the organ is removed from the donor. This procedure is called Ex vivo Lung Perfusion (EVLP), and it has also been proposed as a method for active treatment and repair of injured unsuitable donor organs ex vivo. In oncology, ILP is an attractive method to deliver high dose chemotherapy to treat pulmonary metastatic disease. Since the lung vasculature is isolated in vivo, this technique is called in vivo lung perfusion (IVLP). This review will focus on the rationale, technical aspects, experimental and clinical experience of EVLP and IVLP. A perspective on the future use of these techniques is described. PMID:22202033

  6. Brain perfusion in polysubstance users: Relationship to substance and tobacco use, cognition, and self-regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Donna E.; Durazzo, Timothy C.; Mon, Anderson; Schmidt, Thomas P.; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Brain perfusion is altered in both alcohol dependence and stimulant dependence. Although most substance users also abuse/depend on alcohol concurrently (polysubstance users; PSU), rigorous perfusion research in PSU is limited. Also, the relationships of perfusion abnormalities with cognition, impulsivity or decision making are not well known. Methods Arterial spin labeling MRI and neuropsychological measures assessed perfusion levels and neurocognition in 20 alcohol dependent individuals with comorbid stimulant dependence (PSU), 26 individuals dependent on alcohol only (ALC), and 31 light/non-drinking controls (LD). The patient groups included smokers and non-smokers. Results ALC had lower perfusion than LD in subcortical and cortical brain regions including the brain reward/executive oversight system (BREOS). Contrary to our hypothesis, regional perfusion was generally not lower in PSU than ALC. However, smoking PSU had lower perfusion than smoking ALC in several regions, including BREOS. Lower BREOS perfusion related to greater drinking severity in smoking substance users and to greater smoking severity in smoking ALC. Lower regional perfusion in ALC and PSU correlated with worse performance in different cognitive domains; smoking status affected perfusion-cognition relationships in ALC only. Lower BREOS perfusion in both substance using groups related to higher impulsivity. Conclusion Although regional perfusion was not decreased in PSU as a group, the combination of cigarette smoking and polysubstance use is strongly related to hypoperfusion in important cortical and subcortical regions. As lower perfusion relates to greater smoking severity, worse cognition and higher impulsivity, smoking cessation is warranted for treatment-seeking PSU and ALC. PMID:25772434

  7. Perfusion deficits and functional connectivity alterations in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Baojuan; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Linchuan; Li, Liang; Lu, Hongbing

    2016-03-01

    To explore the alteration in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and functional connectivity between survivors with recent onset post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and without PTSD, survived from the same coal mine flood disaster. In this study, a processing pipeline using arterial spin labeling (ASL) sequence was proposed. Considering low spatial resolution of ASL sequence, a linear regression method was firstly used to correct the partial volume (PV) effect for better CBF estimation. Then the alterations of CBF between two groups were analyzed using both uncorrected and PV-corrected CBF maps. Based on altered CBF regions detected from the CBF analysis as seed regions, the functional connectivity abnormities in PTSD patients was investigated. The CBF analysis using PV-corrected maps indicates CBF deficits in the bilateral frontal lobe, right superior frontal gyrus and right corpus callosum of PTSD patients, while only right corpus callosum was identified in uncorrected CBF analysis. Furthermore, the regional CBF of the right superior frontal gyrus exhibits significantly negative correlation with the symptom severity in PTSD patients. The resting-state functional connectivity indicates increased connectivity between left frontal lobe and right parietal lobe. These results indicate that PV-corrected CBF exhibits more subtle perfusion changes and may benefit further perfusion and connectivity analysis. The symptom-specific perfusion deficits and aberrant connectivity in above memory-related regions may be putative biomarkers for recent onset PTSD induced by a single prolonged trauma exposure and help predict the severity of PTSD.

  8. Cerebral perfusion in children with Alice in Wonderland syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Y T; Chiu, N C; Shen, E Y; Ho, C S; Wu, M C

    1998-08-01

    Alice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS) is characterized by visual hallucinations and bizarre perceptual distortions. Technetium-99m hexamethylpropyleneamine tomography (SPECT) brain scans were performed in four patients during the acute stage of AIWS. Two patients were demonstrated to have Epstein-Barr virus infections. One had abnormal (EEG) findings. The visual-evoked potential, cranial CT, and MRI findings were negative. The decreased cerebral perfusion areas in all patients were near the visual tract and visual cortex. All involved some regions of the temporal lobe. In most patients with AIWS, the EEG, CT, and MRI are unable to determine the precise pathologic areas. However, a SPECT brain scan may demonstrate abnormal perfusion areas and explain the clinical presentations. PMID:9744628

  9. Perfusion and thallium single photon emission computed tomography in herpes simplex encephalitis.

    PubMed

    De Deyn, P P; Van den Broucke, P W; Pickut, B A; Appel, B; Crols, R; Cras, P; Martin, J J

    1998-04-15

    This is the first report on 201thallium-single photon emission computed tomography (201Tl-SPECT) brain scan of a patient with herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). The presented 201Tl-SPECT observations are correlated with 99mtechnetium hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (99mTc-HMPAO) perfusion SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. Brain 99mTc-HMPAO perfusion SPECT reveals a hyperperfusion in the right temporal lobe with extension to the parietal lobe and a hypoperfusion in the ipsilateral occipital lobe. 201Tl-SPECT shows a fixation in the right temporal lobe coinciding with the gadolinium enhancement on MRI. The right occipital lesion shown by gadolinium captation on MRI and hypoperfusion on 99mTc-HMPAO perfusion SPECT was not evident on the 201Tl SPECT. These findings could illustrate that the lesions might be different pathophysiologically.

  10. Measurement of the flavour-specific CP-violating asymmetry asls in Bs0 decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Baesso, C.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chen, P.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dogaru, M.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furcas, S.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garosi, P.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorbounov, P.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hicks, E.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luisier, J.; Luo, H.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marconi, U.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martins Tostes, D.; Martynov, A.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Maurice, E.; Mazurov, A.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palczewski, T.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrick, G. N.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Phan, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Roberts, D. A.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Sannino, M.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schaack, P.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shatalov, P.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Urner, D.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Van Dijk, M.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Young, R.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-01-01

    The CP-violating asymmetry asls is studied using semileptonic decays of Bs0 and Bbars0 mesons produced in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV at the LHC, exploiting a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb. The reconstructed final states are Ds±μ∓, with the Ds± particle decaying in the ϕπ± mode. The Ds±μ∓ yields are summed over Bbars0 and Bs0 initial states, and integrated with respect to decay time. Data-driven methods are used to measure efficiency ratios. We obtain asls=(-0.06±0.50±0.36)%, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.

  11. Black deaf individuals' reading skills: influence of ASL, culture, family characteristics, reading experience, and education.

    PubMed

    Myers, Candace; Clark, M Diane; Musyoka, Millicent M; Anderson, Melissa L; Gilbert, Gizelle L; Agyen, Selina; Hauser, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    Previous research on the reading abilities of Deaf individuals from various cultural groups suggests that Black Deaf and Hispanic Deaf individuals lag behind their White Deaf peers. The present study compared the reading skills of Black Deaf and White Deaf individuals, investigating the influence of American Sign Language (ASL), culture, family characteristics, reading experience, and education. (The descriptor Black is used throughout the present article, as Black Deaf individuals prefer this term to African American. For purposes of parallel construction, the term White is used instead of European American.) It was found that Black Deaf study participants scored lower on measures of both reading and ASL. These findings provide implications for possible interventions at the primary, secondary, and college levels of education. PMID:21305979

  12. Codeswitching techniques: evidence-based instructional practices for the ASL/English bilingual classroom.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Jean F; Rusher, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    The authors present a perspective on emerging bilingual deaf students who are exposed to, learning, and developing two languages--American Sign Language (ASL) and English (spoken English, manually coded English, and English reading and writing). The authors suggest that though deaf children may lack proficiency or fluency in either language during early language-learning development, they still engage in codeswitching activities, in which they go back and forth between signing and English to communicate. The authors then provide a second meaning of codeswitching--as a purpose-driven instructional technique in which the teacher strategically changes from ASL to English print for purposes of vocabulary and reading comprehension. The results of four studies are examined that suggest that certain codeswitching strategies support English vocabulary learning and reading comprehension. These instructional strategies are couched in a five-pronged approach to furthering the development of bilingual education for deaf students.

  13. Black deaf individuals' reading skills: influence of ASL, culture, family characteristics, reading experience, and education.

    PubMed

    Myers, Candace; Clark, M Diane; Musyoka, Millicent M; Anderson, Melissa L; Gilbert, Gizelle L; Agyen, Selina; Hauser, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    Previous research on the reading abilities of Deaf individuals from various cultural groups suggests that Black Deaf and Hispanic Deaf individuals lag behind their White Deaf peers. The present study compared the reading skills of Black Deaf and White Deaf individuals, investigating the influence of American Sign Language (ASL), culture, family characteristics, reading experience, and education. (The descriptor Black is used throughout the present article, as Black Deaf individuals prefer this term to African American. For purposes of parallel construction, the term White is used instead of European American.) It was found that Black Deaf study participants scored lower on measures of both reading and ASL. These findings provide implications for possible interventions at the primary, secondary, and college levels of education.

  14. Kinetic assessment of manganese using magnetic resonance imaging in the dually perfused human placenta in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.K.; Mattison, D.R.; Panigel, M.; Ceckler, T.; Bryant, R.; Thomford, P.

    1987-10-01

    The transfer and distribution of paramagnetic manganese was investigated in the dually perfused human placenta in vitro (using 10, 20, 100 ..mu..M Mn with and without /sup 54/Mn) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and conventional radiochemical techniques. The human placenta concentrated /sup 54/Mn rapidly during the first 15 min of perfusion and by 4 hr was four times greater than the concentrations of Mn in the maternal perfusate, while the concentration of Mn in the fetal perfusate was 25% of the maternal perfusate levels. Within placentae, 45% of the /sup 54/Mn was free in the 100,000g supernatant, with 45% in the 1000g pellet. The magnetic field dependence of proton nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time (T/sub 1/) in placental tissue supports this Mn binding. Mn primarily affected the MRI partial saturation rather than spin-echo images of the human placenta, which provided for the separation of perfusate contributions from those produced by Mn. The washout of the Mn from the placenta was slow compared with its uptake, as determined by MRI. Thus, Mn was concentrated by the human placenta, but transfer of Mn across the placenta was limited in either direction. These studies also illustrate the opportunity for studies of human placental function using magnetic resonance imaging as a noninvasive biomarker.

  15. Arterial Perfusion Imaging–Defined Subvolume of Intrahepatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hesheng; Farjam, Reza; Feng, Mary; Hussain, Hero; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Cao, Yue

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To assess whether an increase in a subvolume of intrahepatic tumor with elevated arterial perfusion during radiation therapy (RT) predicts tumor progression after RT. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with unresectable intrahepatic cancers undergoing RT were enrolled in a prospective, institutional review board–approved study. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) was performed before RT (pre-RT), after delivering ∼60% of the planned dose (mid-RT) and 1 month after completion of RT to quantify hepatic arterial perfusion. The arterial perfusions of the tumors at pre-RT were clustered into low-normal and elevated perfusion by a fuzzy clustering-based method, and the tumor subvolumes with elevated arterial perfusion were extracted from the hepatic arterial perfusion images. The percentage changes in the tumor subvolumes and means of arterial perfusion over the tumors from pre-RT to mid-RT were evaluated for predicting tumor progression post-RT. Results: Of the 24 tumors, 6 tumors in 5 patients progressed 5 to 21 months after RT completion. Neither tumor volumes nor means of tumor arterial perfusion at pre-RT were predictive of treatment outcome. The mean arterial perfusion over the tumors increased significantly at mid-RT in progressive tumors compared with the responsive tumors (P=.006). From pre-RT to mid-RT, the responsive tumors had a decrease in the tumor subvolumes with elevated arterial perfusion (median, −14%; range, −75% to 65%), whereas the progressive tumors had an increase of the subvolumes (median, 57%; range, −7% to 165%) (P=.003). Receiver operating characteristic analysis of the percentage change in the subvolume for predicting tumor progression post-RT had an area under the curve of 0.90. Conclusion: The increase in the subvolume of the intrahepatic tumor with elevated arterial perfusion during RT has the potential to be a predictor for tumor progression post-RT. The tumor subvolume could be a radiation

  16. Arterial Perfusion Imaging-Defined Subvolume of Intrahepatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hesheng; Farjam, Reza; Feng, Mary; Hussain, Hero; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Cao, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess whether an increase in a subvolume of intrahepatic tumor with elevated arterial perfusion during radiation therapy (RT) predicts tumor progression post RT. Methods and Materials Twenty patients with unresectable intrahepatic cancers undergoing RT were enrolled in a prospective IRB-approved study. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) were performed prior to RT (pre-RT), after delivering ~60% of the planned dose (mid-RT) and one month after completion of RT to quantify hepatic arterial perfusion. The arterial perfusions of the tumors at pre-RT were clustered into low-normal and elevated perfusion by a fuzzy clustering-based method, and the tumor subvolumes with elevated arterial perfusion were extracted from the hepatic arterial perfusion images. The percentage changes in the tumor subvolumes and means of arterial perfusion over the tumors from pre-RT to mid-RT were evaluated for predicting tumor progression post-RT. Results Of the 24 tumors, 6 tumors in 5 patients progressed 5–21 months after RT completion. Neither tumor volumes nor means of tumor arterial perfusion at pre-RT were predictive of treatment outcome. The mean arterial perfusion over the tumors increased significantly at mid-RT in progressive tumors comparing to the responsive ones (p=0.006). From pre-RT to mid-RT, the responsive tumors had a decrease in the tumor subvolumes with elevated arterial perfusion (median: −14%, range: −75% – 65%), while the progressing tumors had an increase of the subvolumes (median: 57%, range: −7% – 165%) (p=0.003). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of the percentage change in the subvolume for predicting tumor progression post-RT had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.90. Conclusion The increase in the subvolume of the intrahepatic tumor with elevated arterial perfusion during RT has the potential to be a predictor for tumor progression post-RT. The tumor subvolume could be a radiation boost candidate

  17. Liver response to hemorrhagic shock and subsequent resuscitation: MRI analysis.

    PubMed

    Matot, Idit; Cohen, Keren; Pappo, Orit; Barash, Hila; Abramovitch, Rinat

    2008-01-01

    The liver is a target for injury in low flow states. Markers of liver injury are either invasive or not rapidly responding. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may offer a noninvasive alternative to evaluate liver injury due to reduced perfusion. Recently, we reported an MRI method (functional MRI [fMRI]) that enables us to follow liver perfusion by changing the enrichment of inspired gas (air, air-5% carbon dioxide, 95% oxygen-5% carbon dioxide). Rats were subjected to hemorrhagic shock (HS) (bleeding to a MAP of 25 mmHg) and randomized to no resuscitation or resuscitation with Ringer lactate (RL) or adrenaline infusion targeted to a MAP of 50 mmHg or baseline. Significantly decreased fMRI responses to hyperoxia and hypercapnia were observed immediately after HS. Liver enzymes levels, liver histology, and apoptosis assessments were normal immediately after hemorrhage, however, showed significant changes after 6 h. Functional MRI revealed that adrenaline, but not RL infusion, significantly (P < 0.01) improved liver perfusion. Similarly, liver injury, as assessed by liver enzyme levels, liver histology, and apoptosis, was attenuated to a greater extent with adrenaline resuscitation. No significant differences in liver perfusion and injury were noted between resuscitation to low (50 mmHg) versus high (baseline) MAP. This study shows that fMRI enables early assessment of changes in liver perfusion, resulting in liver injury or recovery, and therefore, it may be considered as a noninvasive, rapidly responding tool for following liver outcome subsequent to hemorrhage and resuscitation. Using fMRI, we showed that adrenaline may be preferable to RL as an initial measure to attenuate liver injury after HS.

  18. Gauging MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herron, Ison; Goodman, Jeremy

    2009-11-01

    Axisymmetric stability of viscous resistive magnetized Couette flow is re-examined, with emphasis on flows that would be hydrodynamically stable according to Rayleigh's criterion: opposing gradients of angular velocity and specific angular momentum. A uniform axial magnetic field permeates the fluid. In this regime, magnetorotational instability (MRI) may occur. It is proved that MRI is suppressed, in fact no instability at all occurs, with insulating boundary conditions, when the magnetic resistivity is sufficiently large. This shows conclusively that small magnetic dissipation is a feature of this instability for all magnetic Prandtl numbers. A criterion is provided for the onset of MRI.

  19. Musculoskeletal MRI.

    PubMed

    Sage, Jaime E; Gavin, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    MRI has the unique ability to detect abnormal fluid content, and is therefore unparalleled in its role of detection, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment planning and follow-up evaluation of musculoskeletal disease. MRI in companion animals should be considered in the following circumstances: a definitive diagnosis cannot be made on radiographs; a patient is nonresponsive to medical or surgical therapy; prognostic information is desired; assessing surgical margins and traumatic and/or infectious joint and bone disease; ruling out subtle developmental or early aggressive bone lesions. The MRI features of common disorders affecting the shoulder, elbow, stifle, carpal, and tarsal joints are included in this chapter.

  20. Perfusion Bioreactor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1990-01-01

    Perfusion bioreactor module, self-contained, closed-loop cell-culture system that operates in microgravity or on Earth. Equipment supports growth or long-term maintenance of cultures of human or other fragile cells for experiments in basic cell biology or process technology. Designed to support proliferation (initially at exponential rates of growth) of cells in complex growth medium and to maintain confluent cells in defined medium under conditions optimized to permit or encourage selected functions of cells, including secretion of products of cells into medium.

  1. Recognition of American Sign Language (ASL) Classifiers in a Planetarium Using a Head-Mounted Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintz, Eric G.; Jones, Michael; Lawler, Jeannette; Bench, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    A traditional accommodation for the deaf or hard-of-hearing in a planetarium show is some type of captioning system or a signer on the floor. Both of these have significant drawbacks given the nature of a planetarium show. Young audience members who are deaf likely don't have the reading skills needed to make a captioning system effective. A signer on the floor requires light which can then splash onto the dome. We have examined the potential of using a Head-Mounted Display (HMD) to provide an American Sign Language (ASL) translation. Our preliminary test used a canned planetarium show with a pre-recorded sound track. Since many astronomical objects don't have official ASL signs, the signer had to use classifiers to describe the different objects. Since these are not official signs, these classifiers provided a way to test to see if students were picking up the information using the HMD.We will present results that demonstrate that the use of HMDs is at least as effective as projecting a signer on the dome. This also showed that the HMD could provide the necessary accommodation for students for whom captioning was ineffective. We will also discuss the current effort to provide a live signer without the light splash effect and our early results on teaching effectiveness with HMDs.This work is partially supported by funding from the National Science Foundation grant IIS-1124548 and the Sorenson Foundation.

  2. Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan? A lung ventilation/perfusion scan, or VQ scan, is a ... that measures air and blood flow in your lungs. A VQ scan most often is used to ...

  3. Ex-vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Van Raemdonck, Dirk; Neyrinck, Arne; Cypel, Marcelo; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2015-06-01

    This review outlines the new and promising technique of ex vivo lung perfusion and its clinical potential to increase the number of transplantable lungs and to improve the early and late outcome after transplantation. The rationale, the experimental background, the technique and protocols, and available devices for ex vivo lung perfusion are discussed. The current clinical experience worldwide and ongoing clinical trials are reviewed.

  4. Quantitative MRI Measures in SIV-Infected Macaque Brains.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Chunxia

    2013-01-01

    Multiple MRI modalities including Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), perfusion MRI, in vivo MR Spectroscopy (MRS), volumetric MRI, contrast-enhanced MRI, and functional MRI have demonstrated abnormalities of the structural and functional integrity as well as neurochemical alterations of the HIV-infected central nervous system (CNS). MRI has been proposed as a robust imaging approach for the characterization of the stage of progression in HIV infection. However, the interpretation of the MRI findings of HIV patients is complicated by the fact that these clinical studies cannot readily be controlled. Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infected macaques exhibit neuropathological symptoms similar to those of HIV patients, and are an important model for studying the course of CNS infection, cognitive impairment, and neuropathology of HIV disease as well as treatment efficacy. MRI of non-human primates (NHPs) is of limited benefit on most clinical scanners operating at or below 1.5 Tesla because this low field strength does not produce high-quality images of the relatively small NHP brain. Contemporary high field MRI (3T or more) for clinical use provides impressive sensitivity for magnetic resonance signal detection and is now accessible in many imaging centers and hospitals, facilitating the use of various MRI techniques in NHP studies. In this article, several high field MRI techniques and applications in macaque models of neuroAIDS are reviewed and the relation between quantitative MRI measures and blood T-cell alterations is discussed. PMID:24244892

  5. Altered Cerebral Perfusion in Executive, Affective, and Motor Networks During Adolescent Depression

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tiffany C.; Wu, Jing; Shin, David D.; Liu, Thomas T.; Tapert, Susan F.; Yang, Guang; Connolly, Colm G.; Frank, Guido K.W.; Max, Jeffrey E.; Wolkowitz, Owen; Eisendrath, Stuart; Hoeft, Fumiko; Banerjee, Dipavo; Hood, Korey; Hendren, Robert L.; Paulus, Martin P.; Simmons, Alan N.; Yang, Tony T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective While substantial literature has reported regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) abnormalities in adults with depression, these studies commonly necessitated the injection of radioisotopes into subjects. The recent development of arterial spin labeling (ASL), however, allows for noninvasive measurements of rCBF. Currently, no published ASL studies have examined cerebral perfusion in adolescents with depression. Thus, the aim of the present study was to examine baseline cerebral perfusion in adolescent depression using a newly developed ASL technique: pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL). Method 25 medication-naive adolescents (ages 13–17 years) diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 26 well-matched controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging. Baseline rCBF was measured via a novel PCASL method that optimizes tagging efficiency. Results Voxel-based whole brain analyses revealed significant frontal, limbic, paralimbic, and cingulate hypoperfusion in the group with depression (p<0.05, corrected). Hyperperfusion was also observed within the subcallosal cingulate, putamen, and fusiform gyrus (p<0.05, corrected). Similarly, region-of-interest analyses revealed amygdalar and insular hypoperfusion in the group with depression, as well as hyperperfusion in the putamen and superior insula (p<0.05, corrected). Conclusions Adolescents with depression and healthy adolescents appear to differ on rCBF in executive, affective, and motor networks. Dysfunction in these regions may contribute to the cognitive, emotional, and psychomotor symptoms commonly present in adolescent depression. These findings point to possible biomarkers for adolescent depression that could inform early interventions and treatments and establishes a methodology for using PCASL to noninvasively measure rCBF in clinical and healthy adolescent populations. PMID:24074474

  6. Modelling Brain Temperature and Perfusion for Cerebral Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blowers, Stephen; Valluri, Prashant; Marshall, Ian; Andrews, Peter; Harris, Bridget; Thrippleton, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Brain temperature relies heavily on two aspects: i) blood perfusion and porous heat transport through tissue and ii) blood flow and heat transfer through embedded arterial and venous vasculature. Moreover brain temperature cannot be measured directly unless highly invasive surgical procedures are used. A 3D two-phase fluid-porous model for mapping flow and temperature in brain is presented with arterial and venous vessels extracted from MRI scans. Heat generation through metabolism is also included. The model is robust and reveals flow and temperature maps in unprecedented 3D detail. However, the Karmen-Kozeny parameters of the porous (tissue) phase need to be optimised for expected perfusion profiles. In order to optimise the K-K parameters a reduced order two-phase model is developed where 1D vessels are created with a tree generation algorithm embedded inside a 3D porous domain. Results reveal that blood perfusion is a strong function of the porosity distribution in the tissue. We present a qualitative comparison between the simulated perfusion maps and those obtained clinically. We also present results studying the effect of scalp cooling on core brain temperature and preliminary results agree with those observed clinically.

  7. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Machuca, Tiago N; Cypel, Marcelo

    2014-08-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  8. Ex vivo lung perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Machuca, Tiago N.

    2014-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  9. Teachers' perceptions of promoting sign language phonological awareness in an ASL/English bilingual program.

    PubMed

    Crume, Peter K

    2013-10-01

    The National Reading Panel emphasizes that spoken language phonological awareness (PA) developed at home and school can lead to improvements in reading performance in young children. However, research indicates that many deaf children are good readers even though they have limited spoken language PA. Is it possible that some deaf students benefit from teachers who promote sign language PA instead? The purpose of this qualitative study is to examine teachers' beliefs and instructional practices related to sign language PA. A thematic analysis is conducted on 10 participant interviews at an ASL/English bilingual school for the deaf to understand their views and instructional practices. The findings reveal that the participants had strong beliefs in developing students' structural knowledge of signs and used a variety of instructional strategies to build students' knowledge of sign structures in order to promote their language and literacy skills.

  10. The Action-Sentence Compatibility Effect in ASL: the role of semantics vs. perception*

    PubMed Central

    SECORA, KRISTEN; EMMOREY, KAREN

    2015-01-01

    Embodied theories of cognition propose that humans use sensorimotor systems in processing language. The Action-Sentence Compatibility Effect (ACE) refers to the finding that motor responses are facilitated after comprehending sentences that imply movement in the same direction. In sign languages there is a potential conflict between sensorimotor systems and linguistic semantics: movement away from the signer is perceived as motion toward the comprehender. We examined whether perceptual processing of sign movement or verb semantics modulate the ACE. Deaf ASL signers performed a semantic judgment task while viewing signed sentences expressing toward or away motion. We found a significant congruency effect relative to the verb’s semantics rather than to the perceived motion. This result indicates that (a) the motor system is involved in the comprehension of a visual–manual language, and (b) motor simulations for sign language are modulated by verb semantics rather than by the perceived visual motion of the hands. PMID:26052352

  11. Portable MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  12. [Extracorporeal perfusion of the sheep rumen].

    PubMed

    Leng, L; Bajo, M; Várady, J; Szányiová, M

    1977-06-01

    We constructed a modified perfusion apparatus and elaborated a method of extracorporal perfusion of the rumen of sheep. As perfusates we used the bovine plasma diluted in a ratio of 1:1 of an isotonic sodium chloride (NaCl) solution and the whole autologous blood. Transaminases GOT and GPT, ammonia and pH were determined in the perfusate. The different perfusions were evaluated according to previously determined perfusion conditions and criteria. A subject for discussion is the question of suitability of the parameters under examination for judging the state of the perfused organ. The described method is suitable for the study of metabolical processes in the rumen wal.

  13. Distributed perfusion educational model: a shift in perfusion economic realities.

    PubMed

    Austin, Jon W; Evans, Edward L; Hoerr, Harry R

    2005-12-01

    In recent years, a steady decline in the number of perfusion education programs in the United States has been noted. At the same time, there has been a parallel decline in the number of students graduated from perfusion educational programs in the United States. Also, as noted by several authors, there has been an increase in demand for perfusion graduates. The decline in programs and graduates has also been noted in anesthesia and surgical residency programs. The shift is caused by a combination of economic and clinical factors. First, decreased reimbursement has led to reallocation of hospital resources. Second, the original enthusiasm for beating heart coronary artery bypass surgery was grossly overestimated and has led to further reallocation of hospital resources and denigration of cardiopulmonary bypass. This paper describes two models of perfusion education programs: serial perfusion education model (SPEM) and the distributed perfusion education model (DPEM). Arguments are presented that the SPEM has some serious limitations and challenges for long-term economic survival. The authors feel the DPEM along with dependence on tuition funding can survive the current clinical and economic conditions and allow the profession to adapt to changes in scope of practice. PMID:16524152

  14. Comparison of Myocardial Perfusion Estimates From Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Four Quantitative Analysis Methods

    PubMed Central

    Pack, Nathan A.; DiBella, Edward V. R.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI has been used to quantify myocardial perfusion in recent years. Published results have varied widely, possibly depending on the method used to analyze the dynamic perfusion data. Here, four quantitative analysis methods (two-compartment modeling, Fermi function modeling, model-independent analysis, and Patlak plot analysis) were implemented and compared for quantifying myocardial perfusion. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data were acquired in 20 human subjects at rest with low-dose (0.019 ± 0.005 mmol/kg) bolus injections of gadolinium. Fourteen of these subjects were also imaged at adenosine stress (0.021 ± 0.005 mmol/kg). Aggregate rest perfusion estimates were not significantly different between all four analysis methods. At stress, perfusion estimates were not significantly different between two-compartment modeling, model-independent analysis, and Patlak plot analysis. Stress estimates from the Fermi model were significantly higher (~20%) than the other three methods. Myocardial perfusion reserve values were not significantly different between all four methods. Model-independent analysis resulted in the lowest model curve-fit errors. When more than just the first pass of data was analyzed, perfusion estimates from two-compartment modeling and model-independent analysis did not change significantly, unlike results from Fermi function modeling. PMID:20577976

  15. Acute effects of alcohol on brain perfusion monitored with arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging in young adults.

    PubMed

    Marxen, Michael; Gan, Gabriela; Schwarz, Daniel; Mennigen, Eva; Pilhatsch, Maximilian; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Guenther, Matthias; Smolka, Michael N

    2014-03-01

    While a number of studies have established that moderate doses of alcohol increase brain perfusion, the time course of such an increase as a function of breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) has not yet been investigated, and studies differ about regional effects. Using arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated (1) the time course of the perfusion increase during a 15-minute linear increase of BrAC up to 0.6 g/kg followed by a steady exposure of 100 minutes, (2) the regional distribution, (3) a potential gender effect, and (4) the temporal stability of perfusion effects. In 48 young adults who participated in the Dresden longitudinal study on alcohol effects in young adults, we observed (1) a 7% increase of global perfusion as compared with placebo and that perfusion and BrAC are tightly coupled in time, (2) that the increase reaches significance in most regions of the brain, (3) that the effect is stronger in women than in men, and (4) that an acute tolerance effect is not observable on the time scale of 2 hours. Larger studies are needed to investigate the origin and the consequences of the effect, as well as the correlates of inter-subject variations.

  16. Ex-vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Van Raemdonck, Dirk; Neyrinck, Arne; Cypel, Marcelo; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2015-06-01

    This review outlines the new and promising technique of ex vivo lung perfusion and its clinical potential to increase the number of transplantable lungs and to improve the early and late outcome after transplantation. The rationale, the experimental background, the technique and protocols, and available devices for ex vivo lung perfusion are discussed. The current clinical experience worldwide and ongoing clinical trials are reviewed. PMID:24629039

  17. Hydrostatic determinants of cerebral perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, E.M.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    We examined the cerebral blood flow response to alterations in perfusion pressure mediated through decreases in mean arterial pressure, increases in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, and increases in jugular venous (JV) pressure in 42 pentobarbital anesthetized dogs. Each of these three pressures was independently controlled. Cerebral perfusion pressure was defined as mean arterial pressure minus JV or CSF pressure, depending on which was greater. Mean hemispheric blood flow was measured with the radiolabeled microsphere technique. Despite 30-mm Hg reductions in mean arterial pressure or increases in CSF or JV pressure, CBF did not change as long as the perfusion pressure remained greater than approximately 60 mm Hg. However, whenever perfusion pressure was reduced to an average of 48 mm Hg, cerebral blood flow decreased 27% to 33%. These results demonstrate the capacity of the cerebral vascular bed to respond similarly to changes in the perfusion pressure gradient obtained by decreasing mean arterial pressure, increasing JV pressure or increasing CSF pressure, and thereby support the above definition of cerebral perfusion pressure.

  18. Changes of renal blood flow after ESWL: assessment by ASL MR imaging, contrast enhanced MR imaging, and renal resistive index.

    PubMed

    Abd Ellah, Mohamed; Kremser, Christian; Pallwein, Leo; Aigner, Friedrich; Schocke, Michael; Peschel, Reinhard; Pedross, Florian; Pinggera, Germar-Michael; Wolf, Christian; Alsharkawy, Mostafa A M; Jaschke, Werner; Frauscher, Ferdinand

    2010-10-01

    The annual incidence of stone formation is increased in the industrialised world. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy is a non-invasive effective treatment of upper urinary tract stones. This study is aimed to evaluate changes of renal blood flow in patients undergoing extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) by arterial spin labeling (ASL) MR imaging, contrast enhanced dynamic MR imaging, and renal resistive index (RI). Thirteen patients with nephrolithiasis were examined using MR imaging and Doppler ultrasound 12h before and 12h after ESWL. ASL sequence was done for both kidneys and followed by contrast enhanced MR imaging. In addition RI Doppler ultrasound measurements were performed. A significant increase in RI (p<0.001) was found in both treated and untreated kidneys. ASL MR imaging also showed significant changes in both kidneys (p<0.001). Contrast enhanced dynamic MR imaging did not show significant changes in the kidneys. ESWL causes changes in RI and ASL MR imaging, which seem to reflect changes in renal blood flow.

  19. Vocabulary Use by Low, Moderate, and High ASL-Proficient Writers Compared to Hearing ESL and Monolingual Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, Jenny L.; Morgan, Dianne; DiGello, Elizabeth; Wiles, Jill; Rivers, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    The written English vocabulary of 72 deaf elementary school students of various proficiency levels in American Sign Language (ASL) was compared with the performance of 60 hearing English-as-a-second-language (ESL) speakers and 61 hearing monolingual speakers of English, all of similar age. Students were asked to retell "The Tortoise and the Hare"…

  20. Neural Dissociation in the Production of Lexical versus Classifier Signs in ASL: Distinct Patterns of Hemispheric Asymmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickok, Gregory; Pickell, Herbert; Klima, Edward; Bellugi, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    We examine the hemispheric organization for the production of two classes of ASL signs, lexical signs and classifier signs. Previous work has found strong left hemisphere dominance for the production of lexical signs, but several authors have speculated that classifier signs may involve the right hemisphere to a greater degree because they can…

  1. The Development of Antonym Knowledge in American Sign Language (ASL) and Its Relationship to Reading Comprehension in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novogrodsky, Rama; Caldwell-Harris, Catherine; Fish, Sarah; Hoffmeister, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    It is unknown if the developmental path of antonym knowledge in deaf children increases continuously with age and correlates with reading comprehension, as it does in hearing children. In the current study we tested 564 students aged 4-18 on a receptive multiple-choice American Sign Language (ASL) antonym test. A subgroup of 138 students aged 7-18…

  2. Multiparametric-MRI in diagnosis of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ghai, Sangeet; Haider, Masoom A.

    2015-01-01

    Multiparametric-magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) has shown promising results in diagnosis, localization, risk stratification and staging of clinically significant prostate cancer. It has also opened up opportunities for focal treatment of prostate cancer. Combinations of T2-weighted imaging, diffusion imaging, perfusion (dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging) and spectroscopic imaging have been used in mp-MRI assessment of prostate cancer, but T2 morphologic assessment and functional assessment by diffusion imaging remains the mainstay for prostate cancer diagnosis on mp-MRI. Because assessment on mp-MRI can be subjective, use of the newly developed standardized reporting Prostate Imaging and Reporting Archiving Data System scoring system and education of specialist radiologists are essential for accurate interpretation. This review focuses on the present status of mp-MRI in prostate cancer and its evolving role in the management of prostate cancer. PMID:26166962

  3. Synergistic Effects of Hemoglobin and Tumor Perfusion on Tumor Control and Survival in Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, Nina A. Wang, Jian Z.; Zhang Dongqing; Montebello, Joseph F.; Grecula, John C.; Lo, Simon S.; Fowler, Jeffery M.; Yuh, William T.C.

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: The tumor oxygenation status is likely influenced by two major factors: local tumor blood supply (tumor perfusion) and its systemic oxygen carrier, hemoglobin (Hgb). Each has been independently shown to affect the radiotherapy (RT) outcome in cervical cancer. This study assessed the effect of local tumor perfusion, systemic Hgb levels, and their combination on the treatment outcome in cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients with cervical cancer, Stage IB2-IVA, who were treated with RT/chemotherapy, underwent serial dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) before RT, at 20-22 Gy, and at 45-50 Gy. The DCE-MRI perfusion parameters, mean and lowest 10th percentile of the signal intensity distribution in the tumor pixels, and the Hgb levels, including pre-RT, nadir, and mean Hgb (average of weekly Hgb during RT), were correlated with local control and disease-specific survival. The median follow-up was 4.6 years. Results: Local recurrence predominated in the group with both a low mean Hgb (<11.2 g/dL) and low perfusion (lowest 10th percentile of signal intensity <2.0 at 20-22 Gy), with a 5-year local control rate of 60% vs. 90% for all other groups (p = .001) and a disease-specific survival rate of 41% vs. 72% (p = .008), respectively. In the group with both high mean Hgb and high perfusion, the 5-year local control rate and disease-specific survival rate was 100% and 78%, respectively. Conclusion: These results suggest that the compounded effects of Hgb level and tumor perfusion during RT influence the radioresponsiveness and survival in cervical cancer patients. The outcome was worst when both were impaired. The management of Hgb may be particularly important in patients with low tumor perfusion.

  4. Correlation of magnetic resonance signal characteristics and perfusion parameters assessed by volume perfusion computed tomography in hepatocellular carcinoma: Impact on lesion characterization

    PubMed Central

    Grözinger, Gerd; Bitzer, Michael; Syha, Roland; Ketelsen, Dominik; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Lauer, Ulrich; Horger, Marius

    2016-01-01

    AIM To find out if magnetic resonance (MR)-signal characteristics of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) correlate with perfusion parameters assessed by volume perfusion computed tomography (VPCT). METHODS From October 2009 to January 2014, 26 (mean age, 69.3 years) patients with 36 HCC lesions who underwent both VPCT and MR liver imaging were analysed. We compared signal intensity in the T1w- and T2w-images and wash-in/wash-out kinetics on post-contrast MR images with mean values of blood flow (BF, mL/100 mL per minute), blood volume (BV, mL/100 mL), k-trans (mL/100 mL per minute), arterial liver perfusion (mL/100 mL per minute), portal venous perfusion and hepatic perfusion index (HPI, %) obtained by VPCT. Signal intensity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was classified hyper/iso/hypointense compared with surrounding liver parenchyma. RESULTS Signal intensity on native T1w- and T2w-images was hyper/iso/hypo in 4/16/16 and 21/14/1 lesions, respectively. Wash-in and wash-out contrast kinetics were found on MRI in 33 of 36 lesions (91.7%) and 25 of 36 lesions (69.4%), respectively. The latter was observed significantly more often in higher graded lesions (P < 0.005). HPI was 94.7% ± 6.5%. There was no significant relationship between lesion’s MR-signal intensity, MR signal combinations, size and any of the VPCT-perfusion parameters. However HPI was constantly high in all HCC lesions. CONCLUSION VPCT parameters add limited value to MR-lesion characterization. However in HCC lesions with atypical MR signal characteristics HPI can add a parameter to ensure HCC diagnosis. PMID:27551338

  5. New Literacies, Multiple Literacies, Unlimited Literacies: What Now, What Next, Where to? A Response to "Blue Listerine, Parochialism and ASL Literacy"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Peter V.

    2006-01-01

    This article is a response to "Blue Listerine, Parochialism, and ASL Literacy" (Czubek, 2006). The author presents his views on the concepts of literacy and the new and multiple literacies. In addition, the merits of print literacy and other types of literacies are discussed. Although the author agrees that there is an American Sign Language (ASL)…

  6. Battlefield MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is the best method for non-invasive imaging of soft tissue anatomy, saving countless lives each year. It is regarded as the gold standard for diagnosis of mild to moderate traumatic brain injuries. Furthermore, conventional MRI relies on very high, fixed strength magnetic fields (> 1.5 T) with parts-per-million homogeneity, which requires very large and expensive magnets.

  7. An unsupervised approach for measuring myocardial perfusion in MR image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Discher, Antoine; Rougon, Nicolas; Preteux, Francoise

    2005-08-01

    Quantitatively assessing myocardial perfusion is a key issue for the diagnosis, therapeutic planning and patient follow-up of cardio-vascular diseases. To this end, perfusion MRI (p-MRI) has emerged as a valuable clinical investigation tool thanks to its ability of dynamically imaging the first pass of a contrast bolus in the framework of stress/rest exams. However, reliable techniques for automatically computing regional first pass curves from 2D short-axis cardiac p-MRI sequences remain to be elaborated. We address this problem and develop an unsupervised four-step approach comprising: (i) a coarse spatio-temporal segmentation step, allowing to automatically detect a region of interest for the heart over the whole sequence, and to select a reference frame with maximal myocardium contrast; (ii) a model-based variational segmentation step of the reference frame, yielding a bi-ventricular partition of the heart into left ventricle, right ventricle and myocardium components; (iii) a respiratory/cardiac motion artifacts compensation step using a novel region-driven intensity-based non rigid registration technique, allowing to elastically propagate the reference bi-ventricular segmentation over the whole sequence; (iv) a measurement step, delivering first-pass curves over each region of a segmental model of the myocardium. The performance of this approach is assessed over a database of 15 normal and pathological subjects, and compared with perfusion measurements delivered by a MRI manufacturer software package based on manual delineations by a medical expert.

  8. Sign Perception and Recognition in Non-Native Signers of ASL.

    PubMed

    Morford, Jill P; Carlson, Martina L

    2011-01-01

    Past research has established that delayed first language exposure is associated with comprehension difficulties in non-native signers of American Sign Language (ASL) relative to native signers. The goal of the current study was to investigate potential explanations of this disparity: do non-native signers have difficulty with all aspects of comprehension, or are their comprehension difficulties restricted to some aspects of processing? We compared the performance of deaf non-native, hearing L2, and deaf native signers on a handshape and location monitoring and a sign recognition task. The results indicate that deaf non-native signers are as rapid and accurate on the monitoring task as native signers, with differences in the pattern of relative performance across handshape and location parameters. By contrast, non-native signers differ significantly from native signers during sign recognition. Hearing L2 signers, who performed almost as well as the two groups of deaf signers on the monitoring task, resembled the deaf native signers more than the deaf non-native signers on the sign recognition task. The combined results indicate that delayed exposure to a signed language leads to an overreliance on handshape during sign recognition. PMID:21686080

  9. Cortical Perfusion in Alcohol Dependent Individuals During Short-term Abstinence: Relationships to Resumption of Hazardous Drinking Following Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Durazzo, Timothy C.; Gazdzinski, Stefan; Mon, Anderson; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.

    2010-01-01

    Relapse to hazardous levels of alcohol consumption following treatment for an alcohol use disorders is common. Investigation of the neurobiological correlates of resumption of hazardous drinking is necessary to clarify the mechanisms contributing to relapse. Fifty-seven treatment-seeking alcohol dependent participants (ALC) completed arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI of the frontal and parietal gray matter (GM) at 7 ± 3 days of abstinence (baseline). ALC participants were restudied after 35 ± 11 days of abstinence (assessment point 2: AP2). Twenty-eight non-smoking, light drinking controls (nsLD) from the community were studied with perfusion MRI. ALC Participants were followed over 12-months after baseline study and were classified as Abstainers (no alcohol consumption; n = 19) and Resumers (any alcohol consumption; n = 38) at follow-up. Cross-sectional and longitudinal perfusion was compared in Abstainers, Resumers and nsLD. At baseline Resumers demonstrated significantly lower frontal and parietal GM perfusion than nsLD and Abstainers. Abstainers and nsLD were not different on frontal or parietal GM perfusion. No significant longitudinal perfusion changes were observed in Abstainers and Resumers. At AP2, Resumers showed significantly lower frontal GM perfusion than nsLD and Abstainers, while no group differences were observed for parietal GM. Abstainers and nsLD were not different on frontal GM perfusion. The significantly decreased frontal GM perfusion in Resumers compared to both Abstainers and nsLD across the assessment interval suggests premorbid and/or acquired neurobiological abnormalities of the frontal GM in Resumers. PMID:20682188

  10. Pattern of brain blood perfusion in tinnitus patients using technetium-99m SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudian, Saeid; Farhadi, Mohammad; Gholami, Saeid; Saddadi, Fariba; Karimian, Ali Reza; Mirzaei, Mohammad; Ghoreyshi, Esmaeel; Ahmadizadeh, Majid; Lenarz, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Tinnitus is associated with an increased activity in central auditory system as demonstrated by neuroimaging studies. Brain perfusion scanning using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was done to understand the pattern of brain blood perfusion of tinnitus subjects and find the areas which are mostly abnormal in these patients. Materials and Methods: A number of 122 patients with tinnitus were enrolled to this cross-sectional study. They underwent SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain, and the images were fused to find the regions with abnormal perfusion. Results: SPECT scan results were abnormal in 101 patients (83%). Most patients had bilateral abnormal perfusion (N = 65, 53.3%), and most subjects had abnormality in middle-temporal gyrus (N = 83, 68%) and temporoparietal cortex (N = 46, 37.7%). Patients with multifocal involvement had the least mean age than other 2 groups (patients with no abnormality and unifocal abnormality) (P value = 0.045). Conclusions: Brain blood perfusion pattern differs in patient with tinnitus than others. These patients have brain perfusion abnormality, mostly in auditory gyrus (middle temporal) and associative cortex (temporoparietal cortex). Multifocal abnormalities might be due to more cognitive and emotional brain centers involvement due to tinnitus or more stress and anxiety of tinnitus in the young patients. PMID:23267375

  11. Injury and repair in perinatal brain injury: Insights from non-invasive MR perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Wintermark, Pia

    2015-03-01

    Injury to the developing brain remains an important complication in critically ill newborns, placing them at risk for future neurodevelopment impairments. Abnormal brain perfusion is often a key mechanism underlying neonatal brain injury. A better understanding of how alternations in brain perfusion can affect normal brain development will permit the development of therapeutic strategies that prevent and/or minimize brain injury and improve the neurodevelopmental outcome of these high-risk newborns. Recently, non-invasive MR perfusion imaging of the brain has been successfully applied to the neonatal brain, which is known to be smaller and have lower brain perfusion compared to older children and adults. This article will present an overview of the potential role of non-invasive perfusion imaging by MRI to study maturation, injury, and repair in perinatal brain injury and demonstrate why this perfusion sequence is an important addition to current neonatal imaging protocols, which already include different sequences to assess the anatomy and metabolism of the neonatal brain.

  12. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration inversely correlates with basal perfusion in human occipital lobe.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Manus J; Rane, Swati; Hussey, Erin; Mason, Emily; Pradhan, Subechhya; Waddell, Kevin W; Ally, Brandon A

    2014-03-01

    Commonly used neuroimaging approaches in humans exploit hemodynamic or metabolic indicators of brain function. However, fundamental gaps remain in our ability to relate such hemo-metabolic reactivity to neurotransmission, with recent reports providing paradoxical information regarding the relationship among basal perfusion, functional imaging contrast, and neurotransmission in awake humans. Here, sequential magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measurements of the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA+macromolecules normalized by the complex N-acetyl aspartate-N-acetyl aspartyl glutamic acid: [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG]), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of perfusion, fractional gray-matter volume, and arterial arrival time (AAT) are recorded in human visual cortex from a controlled cohort of young adult male volunteers with neurocognitive battery-confirmed comparable cognitive capacity (3 T; n=16; age=23±3 years). Regression analyses reveal an inverse correlation between [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG] and perfusion (R=-0.46; P=0.037), yet no relationship between AAT and [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG] (R=-0.12; P=0.33). Perfusion measurements that do not control for AAT variations reveal reduced correlations between [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG] and perfusion (R=-0.13; P=0.32). These findings largely reconcile contradictory reports between perfusion and inhibitory tone, and underscore the physiologic origins of the growing literature relating functional imaging signals, hemodynamics, and neurotransmission.

  13. Cerebral perfusion imaging with bolus harmonic imaging (Honorable Mention Poster Award)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kier, Christian; Toth, Daniel; Meyer-Wiethe, Karsten; Schindler, Angela; Cangur, Hakan; Seidel, Gunter; Aach, Til

    2005-04-01

    Fast visualisation of cerebral microcirculation supports diagnosis of acute stroke. However, the commonly used CT/MRI-based methods are time consuming, costly and not applicable to every patient. The bolus perfusion harmonic imaging (BHI) method is an ultrasound imaging technique which makes use of the fact, that ultrasound contrast agents unlike biological tissues resonate at harmonic frequencies. Exploiting this effect, the contrast between perfused and non-perfused areas can be improved. Thus, BHI overcomes the low signal-to-noise ratio of transcranial ultrasound and the high impedance of the skull. By analysing image sequences, visualising the qualitative characteristics of an US contrast agent bolus injection becomes possible. The analysis consists of calculating four perfusion-related parameters, Local Peak Intensity, Time To Peak, Area Under Curve, and Average Rising, from the time/intensity curve and providing them as colour-coded images. For calculating these parameters the fundamental assumption is that image intensity corresponds to contrast agent concentration which in turn shows the perfusion of the corresponding brain region. In a clinical study on patients suffering from acute ischemic stroke it is shown that some of the parameters correlate significantly to the infarction area. Thus, BHI becomes a less time-consuming and inexpensive bedside method for diagnosis of cerebral perfusion deficits.

  14. Imaging of the myocardium using (18)F-FDG-PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Ferda, Jiří; Hromádka, Milan; Baxa, Jan

    2016-10-01

    The introduction of the integrated hybrid PET/MRI equipment creates the possibility to perform PET and MRI simultaneously. Depending on the clinical question, the metabolic conversion to glycolytic activity or beta-oxidation is performed before the application of FDG. Since FDG aids to evaluate the energetic metabolism of the myocytes and myocardial MRI reaches the imaging capabilities of perfusion and tissue characterization in the daily routine, FDG-PET/MRI looks to be a promising method of PET/MRI exploitation in cardiac imaging. When myocardial FDG uptake should be evaluated in association with the perfusion distribution, the cross-evaluation of FDG accumulation distribution and perfusion distribution pattern is necessary. The different scenarios may be used in the assessment of myocardium, the conversion to glycolytic activity is used in the imaging of the viable myocardium, but the glycolytic activity suppression might be used in the indications of the identification of injured myocardium by ischemia or inflammation. FDG-PET/MRI might aid to answer the clinical tasks according to the structure, current function and possibilities to improve the function in ischemic heart disease or to display the extent or activity of myocardial inflammation in sarcoidosis. The tight coupling between metabolism, perfusion and contractile function offers an opportunity for the simultaneous assessment of cardiac performance using one imaging modality. PMID:27470994

  15. Imaging of the myocardium using (18)F-FDG-PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Ferda, Jiří; Hromádka, Milan; Baxa, Jan

    2016-10-01

    The introduction of the integrated hybrid PET/MRI equipment creates the possibility to perform PET and MRI simultaneously. Depending on the clinical question, the metabolic conversion to glycolytic activity or beta-oxidation is performed before the application of FDG. Since FDG aids to evaluate the energetic metabolism of the myocytes and myocardial MRI reaches the imaging capabilities of perfusion and tissue characterization in the daily routine, FDG-PET/MRI looks to be a promising method of PET/MRI exploitation in cardiac imaging. When myocardial FDG uptake should be evaluated in association with the perfusion distribution, the cross-evaluation of FDG accumulation distribution and perfusion distribution pattern is necessary. The different scenarios may be used in the assessment of myocardium, the conversion to glycolytic activity is used in the imaging of the viable myocardium, but the glycolytic activity suppression might be used in the indications of the identification of injured myocardium by ischemia or inflammation. FDG-PET/MRI might aid to answer the clinical tasks according to the structure, current function and possibilities to improve the function in ischemic heart disease or to display the extent or activity of myocardial inflammation in sarcoidosis. The tight coupling between metabolism, perfusion and contractile function offers an opportunity for the simultaneous assessment of cardiac performance using one imaging modality.

  16. MRI of the lung: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Wielpütz, Mark; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung is technically challenging due to the low proton density and fast signal decay of the lung parenchyma itself. Additional challenges consist of tissue loss, hyperinflation, and hypoxic hypoperfusion, e.g., in emphysema, a so-called "minus-pathology". However, pathological changes resulting in an increase of tissue ("plus-pathology"), such as atelectases, nodules, infiltrates, mucus, or pleural effusion, are easily depicted with high diagnostic accuracy. Although MRI is inferior or at best equal to multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) for the detection of subtle morphological features, MRI now offers an increasing spectrum of functional imaging techniques such as perfusion assessment and measurement of ventilation and respiratory mechanics that are superior to what is possible with MDCT. Without putting patients at risk with ionizing radiation, repeated examinations allow for the evaluation of the course of lung disease and monitoring of the therapeutic response through quantitative imaging, providing a level of functional detail that cannot be obtained by any other single imaging modality. As such, MRI will likely be used for clinical applications beyond morphological imaging for many lung diseases. In this article, we review the technical aspects and protocol suggestions for chest MRI and discuss the role of MRI in the evaluation of nodules and masses, airway disease, respiratory mechanics, ventilation, perfusion and hemodynamics, and pulmonary vasculature. PMID:22434450

  17. Decomposing cerebral blood flow MRI into functional and structural components: A non-local approach based on prediction

    PubMed Central

    Kandel, Benjamin M.; Wang, Danny JJ; Detre, John A.; Gee, James C.; Avants, Brian B.

    2014-01-01

    We present RIPMMARC (Rotation Invariant Patch-based Multi-Modality Analysis aRChitecture), a flexible and widely applicable method for extracting information unique to a given modality from a multi-modal data set. We use RIPMMARC to improve interpretation of arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion images by removing the component of perfusion that is predicted by the underlying anatomy. Using patch-based, rotation invariant descriptors derived from the anatomical image, we learn a predictive relationship between local neuroanatomical structure and the corresponding perfusion image. This relation allows us to produce an image of perfusion that would be predicted given only the underlying anatomy and a residual image that represents perfusion information that cannot be predicted by anatomical features. Our learned structural features are significantly better at predicting brain perfusion than tissue probability maps, which are the input to standard partial volume correction techniques. Studies in test-retest data show that both the anatomically predicted and residual perfusion signal are highly replicable for a given subject. In a pediatric population, both the raw perfusion and structurally predicted images are tightly linked to age throughout adolescence throughout the brain. Interestingly, the residual perfusion also shows a strong correlation with age in select regions including the hippocampi (corr= 0.38, p-value < 10−6), precuneus (corr= −0.44, p < 10−5), and combined default mode network regions (corr= −0.45, p < 10−8) that is independent of global anatomy-perfusion trends. This finding suggests that there is a regionally heterogeneous pattern of functional specialization that is distinct from that of cortical structural development. PMID:25449745

  18. Pelvis MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    MRI - pelvis; MRI - hips; Pelvic MRI with prostate probe; Magnetic resonance imaging - pelvis ... care provider if you are afraid of close spaces (have claustrophobia). You may be given a medicine ...

  19. Breast MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    MRI - breast; Magnetic resonance imaging - breast; Breast cancer - MRI; Breast cancer screening - MRI ... the same breast or the other breast after breast cancer has been diagnosed Distinguish between scar tissue and ...

  20. Origins of intersubject variability of blood oxygenation level dependent and arterial spin labeling fMRI: implications for quantification of brain activity.

    PubMed

    Gaxiola-Valdez, Ismael; Goodyear, Bradley G

    2012-12-01

    Accurate localization of brain activity using blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been challenged because of the large BOLD signal within distal veins. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) techniques offer greater sensitivity to the microvasculature but possess low temporal resolution and limited brain coverage. In this study, we show that the physiological origins of BOLD and ASL depend on whether percent change or statistical significance is being considered. For BOLD and ASL fMRI data collected during a simple unilateral hand movement task, we found that in the area of the contralateral motor cortex the centre of gravity (CoG) of the intersubject coefficient of variation (CV) of BOLD fMRI was near the brain surface for percent change in signal, whereas the CoG of the intersubject CV for Z-score was in close proximity of sites of brain activity for both BOLD and ASL. These findings suggest that intersubject variability of BOLD percent change is vascular in origin, whereas the origin of inter-subject variability of Z-score is neuronal for both BOLD and ASL. For longer duration tasks (12 s or greater), however, there was a significant correlation between BOLD and ASL percent change, which was not evident for short duration tasks (6 s). These findings suggest that analyses directly comparing percent change in BOLD signal between pre-defined regions of interest using short duration stimuli, as for example in event-related designs, may be heavily weighted by large-vessel responses rather than neuronal responses.

  1. Dependence of Brain Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Perfusion Parameters on the Cardiac Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Federau, Christian; Hagmann, Patric; Maeder, Philippe; Müller, Markus; Meuli, Reto; Stuber, Matthias; O’Brien, Kieran

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of microvascular perfusion with Intravoxel Incoherent Motion (IVIM) MRI is gaining interest. Yet, the physiological influences on the IVIM perfusion parameters (“pseudo-diffusion” coefficient D*, perfusion fraction f, and flow related parameter fD*) remain insufficiently characterized. In this article, we hypothesize that D* and fD*, which depend on blood speed, should vary during the cardiac cycle. We extended the IVIM model to include time dependence of D* = D*(t), and demonstrate in the healthy human brain that both parameters D* and fD* are significantly larger during systole than diastole, while the diffusion coefficient D and f do not vary significantly. The results non-invasively demonstrate the pulsatility of the brain’s microvasculature. PMID:24023649

  2. Technetium-99m HM-PAO-SPECT study of regional cerebral perfusion in early Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Perani, D.; Di Piero, V.; Vallar, G.; Cappa, S.; Messa, C.; Bottini, G.; Berti, A.; Passafiume, D.; Scarlato, G.; Gerundini, P.

    1988-09-01

    Regional cerebral perfusion was evaluated by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using technetium-99m hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime ((/sup 99m/Tc)HM-PAO) in sixteen patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in early clinical phase and in 16 healthy elderly controls. In all patients transmission computed tomography (TCT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) did not show focal brain abnormalities. Relative to normal subjects, AD patients showed significant reductions in cortical/cerebellar activity ratio: cortical perfusion was globally depressed with the largest reductions in frontal and posterior temporo-parietal cortices. Asymmetries of relative perfusion between cerebral hemispheres were also demonstrated when language was affected or visuospatial functions were unevenly impaired. In patients with early AD, SPECT provides functional information to be compared with clinical and psychometric data.

  3. Real-time processing of ASL signs: Delayed first language acquisition affects organization of the mental lexicon.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Amy M; Borovsky, Arielle; Hatrak, Marla; Mayberry, Rachel I

    2015-07-01

    Sign language comprehension requires visual attention to the linguistic signal and visual attention to referents in the surrounding world, whereas these processes are divided between the auditory and visual modalities for spoken language comprehension. Additionally, the age-onset of first language acquisition and the quality and quantity of linguistic input for deaf individuals is highly heterogeneous, which is rarely the case for hearing learners of spoken languages. Little is known about how these modality and developmental factors affect real-time lexical processing. In this study, we ask how these factors impact real-time recognition of American Sign Language (ASL) signs using a novel adaptation of the visual world paradigm in deaf adults who learned sign from birth (Experiment 1), and in deaf adults who were late-learners of ASL (Experiment 2). Results revealed that although both groups of signers demonstrated rapid, incremental processing of ASL signs, only native signers demonstrated early and robust activation of sublexical features of signs during real-time recognition. Our findings suggest that the organization of the mental lexicon into units of both form and meaning is a product of infant language learning and not the sensory and motor modality through which the linguistic signal is sent and received. PMID:25528091

  4. Real-time processing of ASL signs: Delayed first language acquisition affects organization of the mental lexicon.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Amy M; Borovsky, Arielle; Hatrak, Marla; Mayberry, Rachel I

    2015-07-01

    Sign language comprehension requires visual attention to the linguistic signal and visual attention to referents in the surrounding world, whereas these processes are divided between the auditory and visual modalities for spoken language comprehension. Additionally, the age-onset of first language acquisition and the quality and quantity of linguistic input for deaf individuals is highly heterogeneous, which is rarely the case for hearing learners of spoken languages. Little is known about how these modality and developmental factors affect real-time lexical processing. In this study, we ask how these factors impact real-time recognition of American Sign Language (ASL) signs using a novel adaptation of the visual world paradigm in deaf adults who learned sign from birth (Experiment 1), and in deaf adults who were late-learners of ASL (Experiment 2). Results revealed that although both groups of signers demonstrated rapid, incremental processing of ASL signs, only native signers demonstrated early and robust activation of sublexical features of signs during real-time recognition. Our findings suggest that the organization of the mental lexicon into units of both form and meaning is a product of infant language learning and not the sensory and motor modality through which the linguistic signal is sent and received.

  5. Artificial tissues in perfusion culture.

    PubMed

    Sittinger, M; Schultz, O; Keyszer, G; Minuth, W W; Burmester, G R

    1997-01-01

    In the stagnant environment of traditional culture dishes it is difficult to generate long term experiments or artificial tissues from human cells. For this reason a perfusion culture system with a stable supply of nutrients was developed. Human chondrocytes were seeded three-dimensionally in resorbable polymer fleeces. The cell-polymer tissues were then mounted in newly developed containers (W.W. Minuth et al, Biotechniques, 1996) and continuously perfused by fresh medium for 40 days. Samples from the effluate were analyzed daily, and the pH of the medium and glucose concentration remained stable during this period. The lactid acid concentration increased from 0.17 mg/ml to 0.35 mg/ml, which was influenced by the degradation of the resorbable polymer fibers used as three dimensional support material for the cells. This perfusion system proved to be reliable especially in long term cultures. Any components in the culture medium of the cells could be monitored without disturbances as caused by manual medium replacement. These results suggest the described perfusion culture system to be a valuable and convenient tool for many applications in tissue engineering, especially in the generation of artificial connective tissue.

  6. Developing a tissue perfusion sensor.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S L R; Parker, K H; O'Hare, D

    2007-01-01

    The development of a electrochemical tissue perfusion sensor is presented. The sensor is a platinum/platinum ring-disc microelectrode that relies on the principle of collector-generator to monitor mass transport within its vicinity. Tissue perfusion is a mass transport mechanism that describes the movement of respiratory gases, nutrients and metabolites in tissue. The sensor's capability of detecting perfusion at the cellular level in a continuous fashion is unique. This sensor will provide insight into the way nutrients and metabolites are transported in tissue especially in cases were perfusion is low such as in wounds or ischemic tissue. We present experimental work for the development and testing of the sensors in vitro. Experimental flow recordings in free steam solutions as well as the flow through tissue-like media are shown. Tests on post operative human tissue are also presented. The sensor's feature such as the continuous recoding capacities, spatial resolution and the measurement range from ml/min to microl/min are highlighted. PMID:18002549

  7. Usefulness of MRI to demonstrate the mechanisms of myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with myocardial bridge.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Vivien; Botnar, Rene; Croisille, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    We present a case of symptomatic primary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) associated with myocardial bridging of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery and suspected ischemia that could be related either to LAD artery compression or to microvascular perfusion abnormalities. MRI demonstrated the morphological appearance of myocardial hypertrophy, and coronary MR angiography evidenced the myocardial bridge and its functional consequences with stress MR perfusion. In conclusion, as a non-invasive comprehensive imaging technique, MRI should be considered in identifying the mechanisms of myocardial ischemia in HCM with myocardial bridge. PMID:16888385

  8. Voxel-Wise Perfusion Assessment in Cerebral White Matter with PCASL at 3T; Is It Possible and How Long Does It Take?

    PubMed Central

    Skurdal, Mikjel Johannes; Bjørnerud, Atle; van Osch, Matthias J. P.; Nordhøy, Wibeke; Lagopoulos, Jim; Groote, Inge Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To establish whether reliable voxel-wise assessment of perfusion in cerebral white matter (WM) is possible using arterial spin labeling (ASL) at 3T in a cohort of healthy subjects. Materials and Methods Pseudo-continuous ASL (PCASL) with background suppression (BS) optimized for WM measurements was performed at 3T in eight healthy male volunteers aged 25–41. Four different labeling schemes were evaluated by varying the labeling duration (LD) and post-labeling delay (PLD). Eight slices with voxel dimension 3.75x3.75x5 mm3 were acquired from the anterosuperior aspect of the brain, and 400 image/control pairs were collected for each run. Rigid head immobilization was applied using individually fitted thermoplastic masks. For each voxel in the resulting ASL time series, the time needed to reach a 95% significance level for the ASL signal to be higher than zero (paired t-test), was estimated. Results The four protocols detected between 88% and 95% (after Bonferroni correction: 75% and 88%) of WM voxels at 95% significance level. In the most efficient sequence, 80% was reached after 5 min and 95% after 53 min (after Bonferroni correction 40% and 88% respectively). For all protocols, the fraction of significant WM voxels increased in an asymptotic fashion with increasing scan time. A small subgroup of voxels was shown to not benefit at all from prolonged measurement. Conclusion Acquisition of a significant ASL signal from a majority of WM voxels is possible within clinically acceptable scan times, whereas full coverage needs prohibitively long scan times, as a result of the asymptotic trajectory. PMID:26267661

  9. Does machine perfusion decrease ischemia reperfusion injury?

    PubMed

    Bon, D; Delpech, P-O; Chatauret, N; Hauet, T; Badet, L; Barrou, B

    2014-06-01

    In 1990's, use of machine perfusion for organ preservation has been abandoned because of improvement of preservation solutions, efficient without perfusion, easy to use and cheaper. Since the last 15 years, a renewed interest for machine perfusion emerged based on studies performed on preclinical model and seems to make consensus in case of expanded criteria donors or deceased after cardiac death donations. We present relevant studies highlighted the efficiency of preservation with hypothermic machine perfusion compared to static cold storage. Machines for organ preservation being in constant evolution, we also summarized recent developments included direct oxygenation of the perfusat. Machine perfusion technology also enables organ reconditioning during the last hours of preservation through a short period of perfusion on hypothermia, subnormothermia or normothermia. We present significant or low advantages for machine perfusion against ischemia reperfusion injuries regarding at least one primary parameter: risk of DFG, organ function or graft survival.

  10. Sodium efflux from perfused giant algal cells.

    PubMed

    Clint, G M; Macrobbie, E A

    1987-06-01

    Internodal cells of the giant alga Chara corallina were perfused internally to replace the native cytoplasm, tonoplast and vacuole with artificial cytoplasm. Sodium efflux from perfused cells, measured by including (22)Na in the perfusion media, was increased by increasing the internal sodium concentration and by decreasing the external pH, and was inhibited by external application of the renal diuretic amiloride. The sodium efflux was markedly ATP-dependent, with a 50-fold decrease in efflux observed after perfusion with media lacking ATP. Efflux in the presence of ATP was reduced by 33% by inclusion of 10 μM N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide in the perfusion medium. The membrane potential of the perfused cells approximated that of intact cells from the same culture. It is suggested that sodium efflux in perfused Chara cells proceeds via a secondary antiporter with protons, regulated by ATP in a catalytic role and with the proton motive force acting as the energy source.

  11. The effective connectivity of the seizure onset zone and ictal perfusion changes in amygdala kindled rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Cleeren, Evy; Premereur, Elsie; Casteels, Cindy; Goffin, Karolien; Janssen, Peter; Van Paesschen, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are network-level phenomena. Hence, epilepsy may be regarded as a circuit-level disorder that cannot be understood outside this context. Better insight into the effective connectivity of the seizure onset zone and the manner in which seizure activity spreads could lead to specifically-tailored therapies for epilepsy. We applied the electrical amygdala kindling model in two rhesus monkeys until these animals displayed consistent stage IV seizures. At this stage, we investigated the effective connectivity of the amygdala by means of electrical microstimulation during fMRI (EM-fMRI). In addition, we imaged changes in perfusion during a seizure using ictal SPECT perfusion imaging. The spatial overlap between the connectivity network and the ictal perfusion network was assessed both at the regional level, by calculating Dice coefficients using anatomically defined regions of interest, and at the voxel level. The kindled amygdala was extensively connected to bilateral cortical and subcortical structures, which in many cases were connected multisynaptically to the amygdala. At the regional level, the spatial extents of many of these fMRI activations and deactivations corresponded to the respective increases and decreases in perfusion imaged during a stage IV seizure. At the voxel level, however, some regions showed residual seizure-specific activity (not overlapping with the EM-fMRI activations) or fMRI-specific activation (not overlapping with the ictal SPECT activations), indicating that frequently, only a part of a region anatomically connected to the seizure onset zone participated in seizure propagation. Thus, EM-fMRI in the amygdala of electrically-kindled monkeys reveals widespread areas that are often connected multisynaptically to the seizure focus. Seizure activity appears to spread, to a large extent, via these connected areas.

  12. The effective connectivity of the seizure onset zone and ictal perfusion changes in amygdala kindled rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Cleeren, Evy; Premereur, Elsie; Casteels, Cindy; Goffin, Karolien; Janssen, Peter; Van Paesschen, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are network-level phenomena. Hence, epilepsy may be regarded as a circuit-level disorder that cannot be understood outside this context. Better insight into the effective connectivity of the seizure onset zone and the manner in which seizure activity spreads could lead to specifically-tailored therapies for epilepsy. We applied the electrical amygdala kindling model in two rhesus monkeys until these animals displayed consistent stage IV seizures. At this stage, we investigated the effective connectivity of the amygdala by means of electrical microstimulation during fMRI (EM-fMRI). In addition, we imaged changes in perfusion during a seizure using ictal SPECT perfusion imaging. The spatial overlap between the connectivity network and the ictal perfusion network was assessed both at the regional level, by calculating Dice coefficients using anatomically defined regions of interest, and at the voxel level. The kindled amygdala was extensively connected to bilateral cortical and subcortical structures, which in many cases were connected multisynaptically to the amygdala. At the regional level, the spatial extents of many of these fMRI activations and deactivations corresponded to the respective increases and decreases in perfusion imaged during a stage IV seizure. At the voxel level, however, some regions showed residual seizure-specific activity (not overlapping with the EM-fMRI activations) or fMRI-specific activation (not overlapping with the ictal SPECT activations), indicating that frequently, only a part of a region anatomically connected to the seizure onset zone participated in seizure propagation. Thus, EM-fMRI in the amygdala of electrically-kindled monkeys reveals widespread areas that are often connected multisynaptically to the seizure focus. Seizure activity appears to spread, to a large extent, via these connected areas. PMID:27489773

  13. Automatic quantitative analysis of cardiac MR perfusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breeuwer, Marcel M.; Spreeuwers, Luuk J.; Quist, Marcel J.

    2001-07-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique for imaging cardiovascular diseases. The introduction of cardiovascular MRI into clinical practice is however hampered by the lack of efficient and accurate image analysis methods. This paper focuses on the evaluation of blood perfusion in the myocardium (the heart muscle) from MR images, using contrast-enhanced ECG-triggered MRI. We have developed an automatic quantitative analysis method, which works as follows. First, image registration is used to compensate for translation and rotation of the myocardium over time. Next, the boundaries of the myocardium are detected and for each position within the myocardium a time-intensity profile is constructed. The time interval during which the contrast agent passes for the first time through the left ventricle and the myocardium is detected and various parameters are measured from the time-intensity profiles in this interval. The measured parameters are visualized as color overlays on the original images. Analysis results are stored, so that they can later on be compared for different stress levels of the heart. The method is described in detail in this paper and preliminary validation results are presented.

  14. Comparison Between Perfusion Computed Tomography and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kierkels, Roel G.J.; Backes, Walter H.; Janssen, Marco H.M.; Buijsen, Jeroen; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Lambin, Philippe; Lammering, Guido; Oellers, Michel C.; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To compare pretreatment scans with perfusion computed tomography (pCT) vs. dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in rectal tumors. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients diagnosed with rectal cancer were included in this prospective study. All patients underwent both pCT and DCE-MRI. Imaging was performed on a dedicated 40-slice CT-positron emission tomography system and a 3-T MRI system. Dynamic contrast enhancement was measured in tumor tissue and the external iliac artery. Tumor perfusion was quantified in terms of pharmacokinetic parameters: transfer constant K{sup trans}, fractional extravascular-extracellular space v{sub e}, and fractional plasma volume v{sub p}. Pharmacokinetic parameter values and their heterogeneity (by 80% quantile value) were compared between pCT and DCE-MRI. Results: Tumor K{sup trans} values correlated significantly for the voxel-by-voxel-derived median (Kendall's tau correlation, tau = 0.81, p < 0.001) and 80% quantile (tau = 0.54, p = 0.04), as well as for the averaged uptake (tau = 0.58, p = 0.03). However, no significant correlations were found for v{sub e} and v{sub p} derived from the voxel-by-voxel-derived median and 80% quantile and derived from the averaged uptake curves. Conclusions: This study demonstrated for the first time that pCT provides K{sup trans} values comparable to those of DCE-MRI. However, no correlation was found for the v{sub e} and v{sub p} parameters between CT and MRI. Computed tomography can serve as an alternative modality to MRI for the in vivo evaluation of tumor angiogenesis in terms of the transfer constant K{sup trans}.

  15. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-08-01

    In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed.

  16. 20 years of surface ozone measurements at El Tololo, Chile (2200 m asl)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard Anet, Julien; Steinbacher, Martin; Emmenegger, Lukas; Buchmann, Brigitte

    2016-04-01

    Globally consistent in situ-observations of high precision and known quality are one key element in understanding global climate change and effects of human activity on the Earth's atmosphere. The spatial coverage of available data strongly depends on the species of interest and varies highly around the globe. In case of surface ozone (O3), the observational network is particularly sparse in Africa, Asia, and South America. The southern hemispheric pristine GAW-regional station "El Tololo", located in the foothills of the Chilean Andes (30.17° S, 70.80° W, 2220 m asl), has been equipped with an ozone photometer in 1995 and has since then been measuring tropospheric ozone permanently. However, these measurements were neither entirely systematically processed nor quality-controlled until recently. This situation was drastically improved in 2015 the framework of the Capacity Building and Twinning for Climate Observing Systems (CATCOS) project (www.meteoswiss.ch/catcos). Empa, in coordination with the local operator, Dirección Meteorológica de Chile (DMC), and the University of Santiago, revised the entire surface ozone measurements. The unique 20-year-long ozone data-set has been made publicly available on the World Data Centre for Greenhouse Gases (WDCGG, Japan) in mid-2015 and represents an exceptional piece of information on the southern hemispheric surface ozone distribution. In contrary to northern hemispheric stations, the positive trend in the measurements of tropospheric ozone at "El Tololo" did not level off in the recent past. More specifically, "El Tololo" shows a steady positive trend of 0.7 ppb/decade in agreement with other stations on the Southern hemisphere. However, the seasonal cycle differs strongly in behaviour, as maximum values in ozone do not peak in austral winter, but in austral spring - most probably due to stratospheric influence. We also find that the spring maximum has a retrograding tendency of around 5 days per decade. A combined

  17. MRI findings in aphasic status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Manuel; Munuera, Josep; Sueiras, Maria; Rovira, Rosa; Alvarez-Sabín, José; Rovira, Alex

    2008-08-01

    Ictal-MRI studies including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), and MR-angiography (MRA) in patients with aphasic status epilepticus (ASE) are lacking. In this report, we aim to describe the consequences of the ASE on DWIs and its impact on cerebral circulation. We retrospectively studied eight patients with ASE confirmed by ictal-EEG, who underwent ictal-MRI shortly after well-documented onset (mean time delay 3 h). ASE consisted in fluctuating aphasia, mostly associated with other subtle contralateral neurological signs such as hemiparesia, hemianopia, or slight clonic jerks. In MRI, six patients showed cortical temporoparietal hyperintensity in DWI and four of them had also ipsilateral pulvinar lesions. Five patients showed close spatial hyperperfusion areas matching the DWI lesions and an enhanced blow flow in the middle cerebral artery. Parenchymal lesions and hemodynamic abnormalities were not associated with seizure duration or severity in any case. The resolution of DWI lesions at follow-up MRI depended on the length of the MRIs interval. In patients with ASE, lesions on DWI in the temporo-parietal cortex and pulvinar nucleus combined with local hyperperfusion can be observed, even when they appear distant from the epileptic focus or the language areas. PMID:18522643

  18. Metabolic imaging of acute and chronic infarction in the perfused rat heart using hyperpolarised [1-13C]pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Ball, Daniel R; Cruickshank, Rachel; Carr, Carolyn A; Stuckey, Daniel J; Lee, Philip; Clarke, Kieran; Tyler, Damian J

    2013-11-01

    Hyperpolarised (13)C MRI can be used to generate metabolic images of the heart in vivo. However, there have been no similar studies performed in the isolated perfused heart. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a method for the creation of (13)C metabolite maps of the perfused rat heart and to demonstrate the technique in a study of acute and chronic myocardial infarction. Male Wistar rat hearts were isolated, perfused and imaged before and after occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery, creating an acute infarct group. In addition, a chronic infarct group was generated from hearts which had their LAD coronary artery occluded in vivo. Four weeks later, hearts were excised, perfused and imaged to generate metabolic maps of infused pyruvate and its metabolites lactate and bicarbonate. Myocardial perfusion and energetics were assessed by first-pass perfusion imaging and (31)P MRS, respectively. In both acute and chronically infarcted hearts, perfusion was reduced to the infarct region, as revealed by reduced gadolinium influx and lower signal intensity in the hyperpolarised pyruvate images. In the acute infarct region, there were significant alterations in the lactate (increased) and bicarbonate (decreased) signal ratios. In the chronically infarcted region, there was a significant reduction in both bicarbonate and lactate signals. (31)P-derived energetics revealed a significant decrease between control and chronic infarcted hearts. Significant decreases in contractile function between control and both acute and chronic infracted hearts were also seen. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that hyperpolarised pyruvate can detect reduced perfusion in the rat heart following both acute and chronic infarction. Changes in lactate and bicarbonate ratios indicate increased anaerobic metabolism in the acute infarct, which is not observed in the chronic infarct. Thus, this study has successfully demonstrated a novel imaging approach to assess

  19. Ultrasound perfusion signal processing for tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, MinWoo; Abbey, Craig K.; Insana, Michael F.

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced blood perfusion in a tissue mass is an indication of neo-vascularity and a sign of a potential malignancy. Ultrasonic pulsed-Doppler imaging is a preferred modality for noninvasive monitoring of blood flow. However, the weak blood echoes and disorganized slow flow make it difficult to detect perfusion using standard methods without the expense and risk of contrast enhancement. Our research measures the efficiency of conventional power-Doppler (PD) methods at discriminating flow states by comparing measurement performance to that of an ideal discriminator. ROC analysis applied to the experimental results shows that power Doppler methods are just 30-50 % efficient at perfusion flows less than 1ml/min, suggesting an opportunity to improve perfusion assessment through signal processing. A new perfusion estimator is proposed by extending the statistical discriminator approach. We show that 2-D perfusion color imaging may be enhanced using this approach.

  20. Usefulness of cardiac MRI in the prognosis and follow-up of ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, A; Pons-Lladó, G

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool that makes it possible to evaluate patients with cardiovascular disease; in addition to infarction and alterations in myocardial perfusion, cardiac MRI is useful for evaluating other phenomena such as microvascular obstruction and ischemia. The main prognostic factors in cardiac MRI are ventricular dysfunction, necrosis in late enhancement sequences, and ischemia in stress sequences. In acute myocardial infarction, cardiac MRI can evaluate the peri-infarct zone and quantify the size of the infarct. Furthermore, cardiac MRI's ability to detect and evaluate microvascular obstruction makes it a fundamental tool for establishing the prognosis of ischemic heart disease. In patients with chronic ischemic heart disease, cardiac MRI can detect ischemia induced by pharmacological stress and can diagnose infarcts that can be missed on other techniques. PMID:25648795

  1. Usefulness of cardiac MRI in the prognosis and follow-up of ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, A; Pons-Lladó, G

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool that makes it possible to evaluate patients with cardiovascular disease; in addition to infarction and alterations in myocardial perfusion, cardiac MRI is useful for evaluating other phenomena such as microvascular obstruction and ischemia. The main prognostic factors in cardiac MRI are ventricular dysfunction, necrosis in late enhancement sequences, and ischemia in stress sequences. In acute myocardial infarction, cardiac MRI can evaluate the peri-infarct zone and quantify the size of the infarct. Furthermore, cardiac MRI's ability to detect and evaluate microvascular obstruction makes it a fundamental tool for establishing the prognosis of ischemic heart disease. In patients with chronic ischemic heart disease, cardiac MRI can detect ischemia induced by pharmacological stress and can diagnose infarcts that can be missed on other techniques.

  2. Perfusion patterns of ischemic stroke on computed tomography perfusion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Longting; Bivard, Andrew; Parsons, Mark W

    2013-09-01

    CT perfusion (CTP) has been applied increasingly in research of ischemic stroke. However, in clinical practice, it is still a relatively new technology. For neurologists and radiologists, the challenge is to interpret CTP results properly in the context of the clinical presentation. In this article, we will illustrate common CTP patterns in acute ischemic stroke using a case-based approach. The aim is to get clinicians more familiar with the information provided by CTP with a view towards inspiring them to incorporate CTP in their routine imaging workup of acute stroke patients.

  3. Is the femoral head dead or alive before surgery of slipped capital femoral epiphysis? Interest of perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Edouard, Chambenois; Raphaël, Vialle; Hubert, Ducou Le Pointe

    2014-01-01

    Background The most common complication of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head. Surgical treatments including reduction of the femoral head are considered as a risk factor for avascular necrosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) into the surgical decision-making sequence. Methods Eighteen children with 19 slipped capital femoral epiphysis were retrospectively included. SFCE was unstable in nine cases and stable in ten cases. The slip angle was higher than 60° in 14 cases. Perfusion MRI with dynamic gadolinium-enhanced subtraction sequences were done in all the cases before and after surgical treatment. Results On nineteen hips, eight were devascularized before surgery. All were unstable. After surgery, six on eight had a complete revascularization, one had a focal necrosis and one remained devascularized. A postoperative devascularization with normal preoperative MRI was noted once. On nineteen hips, a total of three avascular necrosis occurred. Conclusion Perfusion MRI is useful to assess preoperative and postoperative vascular status in SFCE. Preoperative devascularization could improve or stay equal after surgical treatment. Persistent devascularization could be responsible for avascular necrosis of the femoral head. PMID:25983464

  4. Clinical Decision Making With Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Patients With Known or Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cremer, Paul; Hachamovitch, Rory; Tamarappoo, Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) to diagnose coronary artery disease (CAD) is best performed in patients with intermediate pretest likelihood of disease; unfortunately, pretest likelihood is often overestimated, resulting in the inappropriate use of perfusion imaging. A good functional capacity often predicts low risk, and MPI for diagnosing CAD should be reserved for individuals with poor exercise capacity, abnormal resting electrocardiography, or an intermediate or high probability of CAD. With respect to anatomy-based testing, coronary CT angiography has a good negative predictive value, but stenosis severity correlates poorly with ischemia. Therefore decision making with respect to revascularization may be limited when a purely noninvasive anatomical test is used. Regarding perfusion imaging, the diagnostic accuracies of SPECT, PET, and cardiac magnetic resonance are similar, though fewer studies are available with cardiac magnetic resonance. PET coronary flow reserve may offer a negative predictive value sufficiently high to exclude severe CAD such that patients with mild to moderate reversible perfusion defects can forego invasive angiography. In addition, combined anatomical and perfusion-based imaging may eventually offer a definitive evaluation for diagnosing CAD, even in higher risk patients. Any remarkable findings on single-photon emission computed tomography and PET MPI studies are valuable for prognostication. Furthermore, assessment of myocardial blood flow with PET is particularly powerful for prognostication as it reflects the end result of many processes that lead to atherosclerosis. Decision making with respect to revascularization is limited for cardiac MRI and PET MPI. In contrast, retrospective radionuclide studies have identified an ischemic threshold, but randomized trials are needed. In patients with at least moderately reduced left ventricular systolic function, viable myocardium as assessed by PET or MRI, appears to identify patients

  5. MRI in multiple myeloma: a pictorial review of diagnostic and post-treatment findings.

    PubMed

    Dutoit, Julie C; Verstraete, Koenraad L

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly being used in the diagnostic work-up of patients with multiple myeloma. Since 2014, MRI findings are included in the new diagnostic criteria proposed by the International Myeloma Working Group. Patients with smouldering myeloma presenting with more than one unequivocal focal lesion in the bone marrow on MRI are considered having symptomatic myeloma requiring treatment, regardless of the presence of lytic bone lesions. However, bone marrow evaluation with MRI offers more than only morphological information regarding the detection of focal lesions in patients with MM. The overall performance of MRI is enhanced by applying dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and diffusion weighted imaging sequences, providing additional functional information on bone marrow vascularization and cellularity.This pictorial review provides an overview of the most important imaging findings in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, smouldering myeloma and multiple myeloma, by performing a 'total' MRI investigation with implications for the diagnosis, staging and response assessment. Main message • Conventional MRI diagnoses multiple myeloma by assessing the infiltration pattern. • Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI diagnoses multiple myeloma by assessing vascularization and perfusion. • Diffusion weighted imaging evaluates bone marrow composition and cellularity in multiple myeloma. • Combined morphological and functional MRI provides optimal bone marrow assessment for staging. • Combined morphological and functional MRI is of considerable value in treatment follow-up. PMID:27164915

  6. [MRI and CT-scan in presumed benign ovarian tumors].

    PubMed

    Thomassin-Naggara, I; Bazot, M

    2013-12-01

    Radiological examinations are required for the assessment of complex or indeterminate ovarian masses, mainly using MRI and CT-scan. MRI provides better tissue characterization than Doppler ultrasound or CT-scan (LE2). Pelvic MRI is recommended in case of an indeterminate or complex ovarian ultrasonographic mass (grade B). The protocol of a pelvic MRI should include morphological T1 and T2 sequences (grade B). In case of solid portion, perfusion and diffusion sequences are recommended (grade C). In case of doubt about the diagnosis of ovarian origin, pelvic MRI is preferred over the CT-scan (grade C). MRI is the technique of choice for the difference between functional and organic ovarian lesion diagnosis (grade C). It can be useful in case of clinical diagnostic uncertainty between polycystic ovary syndrome and ovarian hyperstimulation and multilocular ovarian tumor syndrome (grade C). No MRI classification for ovarian masses is currently validated. The establishment of a presumption of risk of malignancy is required in a MRI report of adnexal mass with if possible a guidance on the histological diagnosis. In the absence of clinical or sonographic diagnosis, pelvic CT-scan is recommended in the context of acute painful pelvic mass in non-pregnant patients (grade C). It specifies the anomalies and allows the differential diagnosis with digestive and urinary diseases (LE4). Given the lack of data in the literature, the precautionary principle must be applied to the realization of a pelvic MRI in a pregnant patient. A risk-benefit balance should be evaluated case by case by the clinician and the radiologist and information should be given to the patient. In an emergency situation during pregnancy, pelvic MRI is an alternative to CT-scan for the exploration of acute pelvic pain in case of uncertain sonographic diagnosis (grade C).

  7. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed. PMID:23942635

  8. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Raja, Waseem K; Wang, Rebecca Y; Stinson, Jordan A; Glettig, Dean L; Burke, Kelly A; Kaplan, David L

    2015-08-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogenesis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight. PMID:25843606

  9. Sumatriptan and cerebral perfusion in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Scott, A K; Grimes, S; Ng, K; Critchley, M; Breckenridge, A M; Thomson, C; Pilgrim, A J

    1992-04-01

    1. The effect of sumatriptan on regional cerebral perfusion was studied in healthy volunteers. 2. Intravenous sumatriptan (2 mg) had no detectable effect on regional cerebral perfusion as measured using a SPECT system with 99technetiumm labelled hexemethylpropyleneamineoxime. 3. Sumatriptan had no effect on pulse, blood pressure or ECG indices. 4. All six volunteers experienced minor adverse effects during the intravenous infusion.

  10. Personality factors correlate with regional cerebral perfusion.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, R L; Kumari, V; Williams, S C R; Zelaya, F O; Connor, S E J; Alsop, D C; Gray, J A

    2006-06-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence pointing to a neurobiological basis of personality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biological bases of the major dimensions of Eysenck's and Cloninger's models of personality using a noninvasive magnetic resonance perfusion imaging technique in 30 young, healthy subjects. An unbiased voxel-based analysis was used to identify regions where the regional perfusion demonstrated significant correlation with any of the personality dimensions. Highly significant positive correlations emerged between extraversion and perfusion in the basal ganglia, thalamus, inferior frontal gyrus and cerebellum and between novelty seeking and perfusion in the cerebellum, cuneus and thalamus. Strong negative correlations emerged between psychoticism and perfusion in the basal ganglia and thalamus and between harm avoidance and perfusion in the cerebellar vermis, cuneus and inferior frontal gyrus. These observations suggest that personality traits are strongly associated with resting cerebral perfusion in a variety of cortical and subcortical regions and provide further evidence for the hypothesized neurobiological basis of personality. These results may also have important implications for functional neuroimaging studies, which typically rely on the modulation of cerebral hemodynamics for detection of task-induced activation since personality effects may influence the intersubject variability for both task-related activity and resting cerebral perfusion. This technique also offers a novel approach for the exploration of the neurobiological correlates of human personality.

  11. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Rosalyn D.; Raja, Waseem K.; Wang, Rebecca Y.; Stinson, Jordan A.; Glettig, Dean L.; Burke, Kelly A.; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogensis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight. PMID:25843606

  12. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Raja, Waseem K; Wang, Rebecca Y; Stinson, Jordan A; Glettig, Dean L; Burke, Kelly A; Kaplan, David L

    2015-08-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogenesis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight.

  13. Getting an MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help White House Lunch Recipes Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) A A A en español Obtención de una resonancia magnética, RM (video) An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed ...

  14. [Assessing myocardial perfusion with positron emission tomography].

    PubMed

    vom Dahl, J

    2001-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) of the heart has gained widespread scientific and clinical acceptance with regard to two indications: 1) The detection of perfusion abnormalities by qualitative and semiquantitative analyses of perfusion images at rest and during physical or pharmacological stress using well-validated perfusion tracers, such as N-13 ammonia, Rb-82 rubidium chloride, or O-15 labeled water. 2) Viability imaging of myocardial regions with reduced contractility by combining perfusion measurements with substrate metabolism as assessed from F-18 deoxyglucose utilization. This overview summarizes the use of PET as a perfusion imaging method. With a sensitivity > 90% in combination with high specificity, PET is today the best-validated available nuclear imaging technique for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). The short half-life of the perfusion tracers in combination with highly sophisticated hard- and software enables rapid PET studies with high patient throughput. The high diagnostic accuracy and the methological advantages as compared to conventional scintigraphy allows one to use PET perfusion imaging to detect subtle changes in the perfusion reserve for the detection of CAD in high risk but asymptomatic patients as well as in patients with proven CAD undergoing various treatment forms such as risk factor reduction or coronary revascularization. In patients following orthotopic heart transplantation, evolving transplant vasculopathy can be detected at an early stage. Quantitative PET imaging at rest allows for detection of myocardial viability since cellular survival is based on maintenance of a minimal perfusion and structural changes correlate to the degree of perfusion reduction. Furthermore, quantitative assessment of the myocardial perfusion reserve detects the magnitude and competence of collaterals in regions with occluded epicardial collaterals and, thus, imaging of several coronary distribution territories in one noninvasive

  15. Mastication induces long-term increases in blood perfusion of the trigeminal principal nucleus.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, A; Manara, R; Conforti, R; Paccone, A; Secondulfo, C; Lorusso, L; Sbordone, L; Di Salle, F; Monda, M; Tedeschi, G; Esposito, F

    2015-12-17

    Understanding mechanisms for vessel tone regulation within the trigeminal nuclei is of great interest because some headache syndromes are due to dysregulation of such mechanisms. Previous experiments on animal models suggest that mastication may alter neuron metabolism and blood supply in these nuclei. To investigate this hypothesis in humans, arterial spin-labeling magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to measure blood perfusion within the principal trigeminal nucleus (Vp) and in the dorsolateral-midbrain (DM, including the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus) in healthy volunteers, before and immediately after a mastication exercise consisting of chewing a gum on one side of the mouth for 1 h at 1 bite/s. The side preference for masticating was evaluated with a chewing test and the volume of the masseter muscle was measured on T1-weighted MRI scans. The results demonstrated that the mastication exercise caused a perfusion increase within the Vp, but not in the DM. This change was correlated to the preference score for the side where the exercise took place. Moreover, the basal Vp perfusion was correlated to the masseter volume. These results indicate that the local vascular tone of the trigeminal nuclei can be constitutively altered by the chewing practice and by strong or sustained chewing. PMID:26477983

  16. Interrelations of muscle functional MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI and (31) P-MRS in exercised lower back muscles.

    PubMed

    Hiepe, Patrick; Gussew, Alexander; Rzanny, Reinhard; Anders, Christoph; Walther, Mario; Scholle, Hans-Christoph; Reichenbach, Jürgen R

    2014-08-01

    Exercise-induced changes of transverse proton relaxation time (T2 ), tissue perfusion and metabolic turnover were investigated in the lower back muscles of volunteers by applying muscle functional MRI (mfMRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) before and after as well as dynamic (31) P-MRS during the exercise. Inner (M. multifidus, MF) and outer lower back muscles (M. erector spinae, ES) were examined in 14 healthy young men performing a sustained isometric trunk-extension. Significant phosphocreatine (PCr) depletions ranging from 30% (ES) to 34% (MF) and Pi accumulations between 95% (left ES) and 120%-140% (MF muscles and right ES) were observed during the exercise, which were accompanied by significantly decreased pH values in all muscles (∆pH ≈ -0.05). Baseline T2 values were similar across all investigated muscles (approximately 27 ms at 3 T), but revealed right-left asymmetric increases (T2 ,inc ) after the exercise (right ES/MF: T2 ,inc  = 11.8/9.7%; left ES/MF: T2 ,inc  = 4.6/8.9%). Analyzed muscles also showed load-induced increases in molecular diffusion D (p = .007) and perfusion fraction f (p = .002). The latter parameter was significantly higher in the MF than in the ES muscles both at rest and post exercise. Changes in PCr (p = .03), diffusion (p < .01) and perfusion (p = .03) were strongly associated with T2,inc , and linear mixed model analysis revealed that changes in PCr and perfusion both affect T2,inc (p < .001). These findings support previous assumptions that T2 changes are not only an intra-cellular phenomenon resulting from metabolic stress but are also affected by increased perfusion in loaded muscles.

  17. Evaluation of perfusion-related and true diffusion in vertebral bone marrow: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Naoki; Miyati, Tosiaki; Kasai, Harumasa; Arai, Nobuyuki; Kawano, Makoto; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Gabata, Toshifumi; Matsui, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Our aim in this study was to obtain noninvasively more detailed information on perfusion and diffusion in vertebral bone marrow. We analyzed two diffusion components using a biexponential function. Eleven healthy volunteers were examined. By a 1.5-T MRI, we performed single-shot diffusion magnetic resonance imaging to acquire diffusion-weighted images (DWIs) with multiple b values. We determined perfusion-related diffusion and true diffusion coefficients (D* and D), the fraction of the perfusion-related diffusion component (F), and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the lumbar vertebral body. Then, we compared these diffusion parameters with the bone mineral density (BMD) obtained with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Moreover, the fat fraction (FF) of the bone marrow was calculated by use of double gradient-echo images with and without spectral adiabatic inversion recovery in the same subject. The BMD showed a significant positive correlation with D*, whereas there was no significant correlation between the other diffusion parameters and BMD. There was a negative correlation between the D or ADC and FF, although no correlation was found between D* or F and FF. Diffusion analysis with a biexponential function made it possible to obtain detailed information on bone perfusion and diffusion in healthy young volunteers.

  18. The Shiny Cowbird, Molothrus bonariensis (Gmelin, 1789) (Aves: Icteridae), at 2,800 m asl in Quito, Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, C. Miguel; Carrión, Juan Manuel; Jarrín-E, Rubén D.; Poveda, Cristian; de Vries, Tjitte

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The Shiny Cowbird, Molothrus bonariensis Gmelin, 1789, is a brood parasite of hundreds of small-bodied birds that is native to South American lowlands. Within the last 100 years this species has been expanding its range throughout the Caribbean, towards North America, but has rarely been seen above 2,000 m asl. New information Here, we present records of Shiny Cowbirds in Quito, a city located 2,800 m above sea level that harbors a bird community typical of the Andean valleys. We found two juvenile individuals parasitizing two different pairs of Rufous-collared Sparrow (Zonotrichia capensis Müller, 1776). This report constitutes an altitudinal range expansion of reproductive populations of ca. 500m, which may have beenprompted by anthropogenic disturbance. PMID:27226760

  19. MRI evaluation and safety in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Tocchio, Shannon; Kline-Fath, Beth; Kanal, Emanuel; Schmithorst, Vincent J; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of the developing brain has dramatically increased over the last decade. Faster acquisitions and the development of advanced MRI sequences, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), perfusion imaging, functional MR imaging (fMRI), and susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), as well as the use of higher magnetic field strengths has made MRI an invaluable tool for detailed evaluation of the developing brain. This article will provide an overview of the use and challenges associated with 1.5-T and 3-T static magnetic fields for evaluation of the developing brain. This review will also summarize the advantages, clinical challenges, and safety concerns specifically related to MRI in the fetus and newborn, including the implications of increased magnetic field strength, logistics related to transporting and monitoring of neonates during scanning, and sedation considerations, and a discussion of current technologies such as MRI conditional neonatal incubators and dedicated small-foot print neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) scanners. PMID:25743582

  20. MRI Evaluation and Safety in the Developing Brain

    PubMed Central

    Tocchio, Shannon; Kline-Fath, Beth; Kanal, Emanuel; Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of the developing brain has dramatically increased over the last decade. Faster acquisitions and the development of advanced MRI sequences such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), perfusion imaging, functional MR imaging (fMRI), and susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI), as well as the use of higher magnetic field strengths has made MRI an invaluable tool for detailed evaluation of the developing brain. This article will provide an overview of the use and challenges associated with 1.5T and 3T static magnetic fields for evaluation of the developing brain. This review will also summarize the advantages, clinical challenges and safety concerns specifically related to MRI in the fetus and newborn, including the implications of increased magnetic field strength, logistics related to transporting and monitoring of neonates during scanning, sedation considerations and a discussion of current technologies such as MRI-conditional neonatal incubators and dedicated small-foot print neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) scanners. PMID:25743582

  1. Fetal MRI: A Technical Update with Educational Aspirations

    PubMed Central

    Gholipour, Ali; Estroff, Judith A.; Barnewolt, Carol E.; Robertson, Richard L.; Grant, P. Ellen; Gagoski, Borjan; Warfield, Simon K.; Afacan, Onur; Connolly, Susan A.; Neil, Jeffrey J.; Wolfberg, Adam; Mulkern, Robert V.

    2015-01-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations have become well-established procedures at many institutions and can serve as useful adjuncts to ultrasound (US) exams when diagnostic doubts remain after US. Due to fetal motion, however, fetal MRI exams are challenging and require the MR scanner to be used in a somewhat different mode than that employed for more routine clinical studies. Herein we review the techniques most commonly used, and those that are available, for fetal MRI with an emphasis on the physics of the techniques and how to deploy them to improve success rates for fetal MRI exams. By far the most common technique employed is single-shot T2-weighted imaging due to its excellent tissue contrast and relative immunity to fetal motion. Despite the significant challenges involved, however, many of the other techniques commonly employed in conventional neuro- and body MRI such as T1 and T2*-weighted imaging, diffusion and perfusion weighted imaging, as well as spectroscopic methods remain of interest for fetal MR applications. An effort to understand the strengths and limitations of these basic methods within the context of fetal MRI is made in order to optimize their use and facilitate implementation of technical improvements for the further development of fetal MR imaging, both in acquisition and post-processing strategies. PMID:26225129

  2. New literacies, multiple literacies, unlimited literacies: what now, what next, where to? A response to blue listerine, parochialism and ASL literacy.

    PubMed

    Paul, Peter V

    2006-01-01

    This article is a response to Blue Listerine, Parochialism, and ASL Literacy (Czubek, 2006). The author presents his views on the concepts of literacy and the new and multiple literacies. In addition, the merits of print literacy and other types of literacies are discussed. Although the author agrees that there is an American Sign Language (ASL) literacy, he maintains that there should be a distinction between conversational "literacy" forms (speech and sign) and secondary literacy forms (reading and writing). It might be that cognitive skills associated with print literacy and, possibly, other captured literacy forms, are necessary for a technological, scientific-driven society such as that which exists in the United States.

  3. Respiratory tract exacerbations revisited: ventilation, inflammation, perfusion, and structure (VIPS) monitoring to redefine treatment.

    PubMed

    Tiddens, Harm A W M; Stick, Stephen M; Wild, Jim M; Ciet, Pierluigi; Parker, Geoffrey J M; Koch, Armin; Vogel-Claussen, Jens

    2015-10-01

    For cystic fibrosis (CF) patients older than 6 years there are convincing data that suggest respiratory tract exacerbations (RTE) play an important role in the progressive loss of functional lung tissue. There is a poor understanding of the pathobiology of RTE and whether specific treatment of RTE reduces lung damage in the long term. In addition, there are limited tools available to measure the various components of CF lung disease and responses to therapy. Therefore, in order to better understand the impact of RTE on CF lung disease we need to develop sensitive measures to characterize RTE and responses to treatment; and improve our understanding of structure-function changes during treatment of RTE. In this paper we review our current knowledge of the impact of RTE on the progression of lung disease and identify strategies to improve our understanding of the pathobiology of RTE. By improving our knowledge regarding RTE in CF we will be better positioned to develop approaches to treatment that are individualized and that can prevent permanent structural damage. We suggest the development of a ventilation, perfusion, inflammation and structure (VIPS)-MRI suite that supplies the clinician with data on ventilation, inflammation, perfusion, and structure in one MRI session. VIPS-MRI could be an important step to better understand the factors that contribute to and limit treatment efficacy of RTE. PMID:26335955

  4. Respiratory tract exacerbations revisited: ventilation, inflammation, perfusion, and structure (VIPS) monitoring to redefine treatment.

    PubMed

    Tiddens, Harm A W M; Stick, Stephen M; Wild, Jim M; Ciet, Pierluigi; Parker, Geoffrey J M; Koch, Armin; Vogel-Claussen, Jens

    2015-10-01

    For cystic fibrosis (CF) patients older than 6 years there are convincing data that suggest respiratory tract exacerbations (RTE) play an important role in the progressive loss of functional lung tissue. There is a poor understanding of the pathobiology of RTE and whether specific treatment of RTE reduces lung damage in the long term. In addition, there are limited tools available to measure the various components of CF lung disease and responses to therapy. Therefore, in order to better understand the impact of RTE on CF lung disease we need to develop sensitive measures to characterize RTE and responses to treatment; and improve our understanding of structure-function changes during treatment of RTE. In this paper we review our current knowledge of the impact of RTE on the progression of lung disease and identify strategies to improve our understanding of the pathobiology of RTE. By improving our knowledge regarding RTE in CF we will be better positioned to develop approaches to treatment that are individualized and that can prevent permanent structural damage. We suggest the development of a ventilation, perfusion, inflammation and structure (VIPS)-MRI suite that supplies the clinician with data on ventilation, inflammation, perfusion, and structure in one MRI session. VIPS-MRI could be an important step to better understand the factors that contribute to and limit treatment efficacy of RTE.

  5. Characterization of bone perfusion by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography in the Dunkin-Hartley guinea pig model of advanced osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Dyke, Jonathan P; Synan, Michael; Ezell, Paula; Ballon, Douglas; Racine, Jennifer; Aaron, Roy K

    2015-03-01

    This study characterizes changes in subchondral bone circulation in OA and examines relationships to bone structure and cartilage degeneration in Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs. We have used dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and PET, with pharmacokinetic modeling, to characterize subchondral bone perfusion. Assessments are made of perfusion kinetics and vascular permeability by MRI, and blood volume and flow, and radionuclide incorporation into bone, by PET. These parameters are compared to cartilage lesion severity and bone histomorphometry. Assessments of intraosseous thrombi are made morphologically. Prolonged signal enhancement during the clearance phase of MRI correlated with OA severity and suggested venous stasis. Vascular permeability was not increased indicating that transvascular migration of contrast agent was not responsible for signal enhancement. Intraosseous thrombi were not observed. Decreased perfusion associated with severe OA was confirmed by PET and was associated with reduced radionuclide incorporation and osteoporosis. MRI and PET can be used to characterize kinetic parameters of circulation in OA and correlate them with subchondral bone metabolism of interest to the pathophysiology of OA. The significance of these observations may lie in alterations induced in the expression of cytokines by OA osteoblasts that are related to bone remodeling and cartilage breakdown.

  6. Characterization of Bone Perfusion by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Positron Emission Tomography in the Dunkin-Hartley Guinea Pig Model of Advanced Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Dyke, Jonathan P.; Synan, Michael; Ezell, Paula; Ballon, Douglas; Racine, Jennifer; Aaron, Roy K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study characterizes changes in subchondral bone circulation in OA and examines relationships to bone structure and cartilage degeneration in Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs. Methods We have used dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and PET, with pharmacokinetic modeling, to characterize subchondral bone perfusion. Assessments are made of perfusion kinetics and vascular permeability by MRI, and blood volume and flow, and radionuclide incorporation into bone, by PET. These parameters are compared to cartilage lesion severity and bone histomorphometry. Assessments of intraosseous thrombi are made morphologically. Results Prolonged signal enhancement during the clearance phase of MRI correlated with OA severity and suggested venous stasis. Vascular permeability was not increased indicating that transvascular migration of contrast agent was not responsible for signal enhancement. Intraosseous thrombi were not observed. Decreased perfusion associated with severe OA was confirmed by PET and was associated with reduced radionuclide incorporation and osteoporosis. Discussion MRI and PET can be used to characterize kinetic parameters of circulation in OA and correlate them with subchondral bone metabolism of interest to the pathophysiology of OA. The significance of these observations may lie in alterations induced in the expression of cytokines by OA osteoblasts that are related to bone remodeling and cartilage breakdown. PMID:25410523

  7. Principles of Antegrade Cerebral Perfusion During Arch Reconstruction in Newborns/Infants

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Charles D.; Andropoulos, Dean B.

    2008-01-01

    Antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) is a cardiopulmonary bypass technique that uses special cannulation procedures to perfuse only the brain during neonatal and infant aortic arch reconstruction. It is used in lieu of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA), and thus has the theoretical advantage of protecting the brain from hypoxic ischemic injury. Despite this, recent comparative studies have demonstrated no difference in neurodevelopmental outcomes with ACP vs. DHCA for neonatal arch repair. This article presents animal and human data demonstrating that ACP flows less than 30 ml/kg/min are inadequate for many patients, and may be the explanation for lack of outcome difference vs. DHCA. A technique for ACP, its physiologic basis, and a neuromonitoring strategy are presented, and then the results of an outcome study are reviewed demonstrating that with ACP technique at higher flows of 50–80 ml/kg/min guided by neuromonitoring, periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) is eliminated on postoperative brain MRI after neonatal cardiac surgery. PMID:18396227

  8. Cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Olson, Elizabeth S

    2016-07-01

    The flow of viscous fluid in the cochlea induces shear forces, which could provide benefit in clinical practice, for example to guide cochlear implant insertion or produce static pressure to the cochlear partition or wall. From a research standpoint, studying the effects of a viscous fluid in the cochlea provides data for better understanding cochlear fluid mechanics. However, cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid may damage the cochlea. In this work we studied the physiological and anatomical effects of perfusing the cochlea with a viscous fluid. Gerbil cochleae were perfused at a rate of 2.4 μL/min with artificial perilymph (AP) and sodium hyaluronate (Healon, HA) in four different concentrations (0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%). The different HA concentrations were applied either sequentially in the same cochlea or individually in different cochleae. The perfusion fluid entered from the round window and was withdrawn from basal scala vestibuli, in order to perfuse the entire perilymphatic space. Compound action potentials (CAP) were measured after each perfusion. After perfusion with increasing concentrations of HA in the order of increasing viscosity, the CAP thresholds generally increased. The threshold elevation after AP and 0.0625% HA perfusion was small or almost zero, and the 0.125% HA was a borderline case, while the higher concentrations significantly elevated CAP thresholds. Histology of the cochleae perfused with the 0.0625% HA showed an intact Reissner's membrane (RM), while in cochleae perfused with 0.125% and 0.25% HA RM was torn. Thus, the CAP threshold elevation was likely due to the broken RM, likely caused by the shear stress produced by the flow of the viscous fluid. Our results and analysis indicate that the cochlea can sustain, without a significant CAP threshold shift, up to a 1.5 Pa shear stress. Beside these finding, in the 0.125% and 0.25% HA perfusion cases, a temporary CAP threshold shift was observed, perhaps due to the presence and

  9. Cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Olson, Elizabeth S

    2016-07-01

    The flow of viscous fluid in the cochlea induces shear forces, which could provide benefit in clinical practice, for example to guide cochlear implant insertion or produce static pressure to the cochlear partition or wall. From a research standpoint, studying the effects of a viscous fluid in the cochlea provides data for better understanding cochlear fluid mechanics. However, cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid may damage the cochlea. In this work we studied the physiological and anatomical effects of perfusing the cochlea with a viscous fluid. Gerbil cochleae were perfused at a rate of 2.4 μL/min with artificial perilymph (AP) and sodium hyaluronate (Healon, HA) in four different concentrations (0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%). The different HA concentrations were applied either sequentially in the same cochlea or individually in different cochleae. The perfusion fluid entered from the round window and was withdrawn from basal scala vestibuli, in order to perfuse the entire perilymphatic space. Compound action potentials (CAP) were measured after each perfusion. After perfusion with increasing concentrations of HA in the order of increasing viscosity, the CAP thresholds generally increased. The threshold elevation after AP and 0.0625% HA perfusion was small or almost zero, and the 0.125% HA was a borderline case, while the higher concentrations significantly elevated CAP thresholds. Histology of the cochleae perfused with the 0.0625% HA showed an intact Reissner's membrane (RM), while in cochleae perfused with 0.125% and 0.25% HA RM was torn. Thus, the CAP threshold elevation was likely due to the broken RM, likely caused by the shear stress produced by the flow of the viscous fluid. Our results and analysis indicate that the cochlea can sustain, without a significant CAP threshold shift, up to a 1.5 Pa shear stress. Beside these finding, in the 0.125% and 0.25% HA perfusion cases, a temporary CAP threshold shift was observed, perhaps due to the presence and

  10. Temperature controlled machine perfusion system for liver.

    PubMed

    Obara, H; Matsuno, N; Shigeta, T; Hirano, T; Enosawa, S; Mizunuma, H

    2013-06-01

    Organ preservation using machine perfusion is an effective method compared with conventional preservation techniques using static cold storage. A newly developed MP preservation system to control perfusate temperatures from hypothermic to subnormothermic conditions is introduced. This system is useful not only for liver preservation, but also for evaluation of graft viability for recovery. This novel method has been proposed for preservation of porcine liver grafts. An innovative preservation system is especially important to obtain viable organs from extended criteria or donation after cardiac death donors. In this study, we introduce a new machine perfusion preservation system (NES-01) to evaluate graft viability for recovery of liver functions, using porcine grafts.

  11. Is the Cerebellum the Optimal Reference Region for Intensity Normalization of Perfusion MR Studies in Early Alzheimer’s Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Lacalle-Aurioles, María; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Guzmán-De-Villoria, Juan Adán; Cruz-Orduña, Isabel; Olazarán, Javier; Mateos-Pérez, José María; Martino, María Elena; Desco, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum is the region most commonly used as a reference when normalizing the intensity of perfusion images acquired using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) studies. In addition, the cerebellum provides unbiased estimations with nuclear medicine techniques. However, no reports confirm the cerebellum as an optimal reference region in MRI studies or evaluate the consequences of using different normalization regions. In this study, we address the effect of using the cerebellum, whole-brain white matter, and whole-brain cortical gray matter in the normalization of cerebral blood flow (CBF) parametric maps by comparing patients with stable mild cognitive impairment (MCI), patients with AD and healthy controls. According to our results, normalization by whole-brain cortical gray matter enables more sensitive detection of perfusion abnormalities in AD patients and reveals a larger number of affected regions than data normalized by the cerebellum or whole-brain white matter. Therefore, the cerebellum is not the most valid reference region in MRI studies for early stages of AD. After normalization by whole-brain cortical gray matter, we found a significant decrease in CBF in both parietal lobes and an increase in CBF in the right medial temporal lobe. We found no differences in perfusion between patients with stable MCI and healthy controls either before or after normalization. PMID:24386081

  12. Is the cerebellum the optimal reference region for intensity normalization of perfusion MR studies in early Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Lacalle-Aurioles, María; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Guzmán-De-Villoria, Juan Adán; Cruz-Orduña, Isabel; Olazarán, Javier; Mateos-Pérez, José María; Martino, María Elena; Desco, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum is the region most commonly used as a reference when normalizing the intensity of perfusion images acquired using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) studies. In addition, the cerebellum provides unbiased estimations with nuclear medicine techniques. However, no reports confirm the cerebellum as an optimal reference region in MRI studies or evaluate the consequences of using different normalization regions. In this study, we address the effect of using the cerebellum, whole-brain white matter, and whole-brain cortical gray matter in the normalization of cerebral blood flow (CBF) parametric maps by comparing patients with stable mild cognitive impairment (MCI), patients with AD and healthy controls. According to our results, normalization by whole-brain cortical gray matter enables more sensitive detection of perfusion abnormalities in AD patients and reveals a larger number of affected regions than data normalized by the cerebellum or whole-brain white matter. Therefore, the cerebellum is not the most valid reference region in MRI studies for early stages of AD. After normalization by whole-brain cortical gray matter, we found a significant decrease in CBF in both parietal lobes and an increase in CBF in the right medial temporal lobe. We found no differences in perfusion between patients with stable MCI and healthy controls either before or after normalization.

  13. Non-invasive functional imaging of Cerebral Blood Volume with Vascular-Space-Occupancy (VASO) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hanzhang; Hua, Jun; van Zijl, Peter C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) based on changes in cerebral blood volume (CBV) can directly probe vasodilatation and vasoconstriction during brain activation or physiologic challenges, and can provide important insights into the mechanism of Blood-Oxygenation-Level-Dependent (BOLD) signal changes. At present, the most widely used CBV fMRI technique in humans is called Vascular-Space-Occupancy (VASO) MRI and this article provides a technical review of this method. VASO MRI utilizes T1 differences between blood and tissue to distinguish these two compartments within a voxel and uses blood-nulling inversion recovery sequence to yield an MR signal proportional to 1-CBV. As such, vasodilatation will result in a VASO signal decrease and vasoconstriction will have the reverse effect. The VASO technique can be performed dynamically with a temporal resolution comparable to several other fMRI methods such as BOLD or Arterial-Spin-Labeling (ASL), and is particularly powerful when conducted in conjunction with these complementary techniques. The pulse sequence and imaging parameters of VASO can be optimized such that the signal change is predominantly of CBV origin, but careful considerations should be taken to minimize other contributions, such as those from the BOLD effect, CBF, and CSF. Sensitivity of the VASO technique remains to be the primary disadvantage when compared to BOLD, but this technique is increasingly demonstrating utility in neuroscientific and clinical applications. PMID:23355392

  14. Vascular autorescaling of fMRI (VasA fMRI) improves sensitivity of population studies: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kazan, Samira M.; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Callaghan, Martina F.; Flandin, Guillaume; Huber, Laurentius; Leech, Robert; Kennerley, Aneurin; Windischberger, Christian; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal is widely used for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of brain function in health and disease. The statistical power of fMRI group studies is significantly hampered by high inter-subject variance due to differences in baseline vascular physiology. Several methods have been proposed to account for physiological vascularization differences between subjects and hence improve the sensitivity in group studies. However, these methods require the acquisition of additional reference scans (such as a full resting-state fMRI session or ASL-based calibrated BOLD). We present a vascular autorescaling (VasA) method, which does not require any additional reference scans. VasA is based on the observation that slow oscillations (< 0.1 Hz) in arterial blood CO2 levels occur naturally due to changes in respiration patterns. These oscillations yield fMRI signal changes whose amplitudes reflect the blood oxygenation levels and underlying local vascularization and vascular responsivity. VasA estimates proxies of the amplitude of these CO2-driven oscillations directly from the residuals of task-related fMRI data without the need for reference scans. The estimates are used to scale the amplitude of task-related fMRI responses, to account for vascular differences. The VasA maps compared well to cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) maps and cerebral blood volume maps based on vascular space occupancy (VASO) measurements in four volunteers, speaking to the physiological vascular basis of VasA. VasA was validated in a wide variety of tasks in 138 volunteers. VasA increased t-scores by up to 30% in specific brain areas such as the visual cortex. The number of activated voxels was increased by up to 200% in brain areas such as the orbital frontal cortex while still controlling the nominal false-positive rate. VasA fMRI outperformed previously proposed rescaling approaches based on resting-state fMRI data and can be readily applied to

  15. Microcirculation Perfusion Monitor on the Back of the Health Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanqi; Li, Xiaomei; Zhou, Dan; Wang, Kang; Liu, Yangyang; Guo, Yi; Qiu, Shuang; Zhai, Tianchen; Liu, Shuang; Liu, Jingjing; Ming, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To observe the dermal microcirculation blood perfusion characterization of meridians channels (acupoints). Methods. 20 healthy human subjects were monitored using Pericam Perfusion Speckle Imager (PSI) for the changes in dermal microcirculation blood perfusion on governor meridian and other respective dermal regions as a control. Result. The microcirculation blood perfusion on Governor Meridian is higher than its control area. Conclusion. The dermal microcirculation blood perfusion on certain parts of Governor Meridian of healthy human subjects showed specifics. PMID:24371463

  16. Luminal distension as a possible consequence of experimental intestinal perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Wingate, David; Hyams, Ashley; Phillips, Sidney

    1974-01-01

    In an experimental jejunal perfusion study, distress in healthy subjects occurred during eight out of 16 perfusions in which intestinal secretion was provoked. Calculation demonstrates the volumetric consequences of inadequate recovery of secretory perfusates, and analysis of the perfusion studies shows that distress was significantly associated with poor recovery of the perfusate. These observations are pertinent to increasing interest in the phenomenon of intestinal fluid secretion. PMID:4435588

  17. MRI brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Sarah

    2013-11-01

    General practitioners (GPs) are expected to be allowed to request MRI scans for adults for selected clinically appropriate indications from November 2013 as part of the expansion of Medicare-funded MRI services announced by the Federal Government in 2011. This article aims to give a brief overview of MRI brain imaging relevant to GPs, which will facilitate explanation of scan findings and management planning with their patients. Basic imaging techniques, common findings and terminology are presented using some illustrative case examples.

  18. Ex vivo lung perfusion and reconditioning.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Cypel, Marcelo; Massad, Ehab; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2011-01-01

    Normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion can act as a platform for the evaluation and repair of donor lungs. An acellular hyperosmolar solution is perfused anterograde through the donor lungs at 40% of the estimated cardiac output. Following oxygenation of the perfusate by the lung, it passes through a hollow fiber oxygenator supplied with a hypoxic gas mixture to remove oxygen and to maintain physiological carbon dioxide levels. Flow through a heat exchanger to maintain normothermia and a leukocyte filter to remove demarginated leukocytes completes the circuit. Lung function can be measured by the difference in PO2 between the perfusate postlung and postmembrane and by physiological parameters. Utilization of this method of ex vivo donor lung evaluation should reduce concerns of primary graft dysfunction and increase utilization rates of donor lungs. PMID:24412979

  19. Noninvasive methods of measuring bone blood perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Dyke, J.P.; Aaron, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of bone blood flow and perfusion characteristics in a noninvasive and serial manner would be advantageous in assessing revascularization after trauma and the possible risk of avascular necrosis. Many disease states, including osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and bone neoplasms, result in disturbed bone perfusion. A causal link between bone perfusion and remodeling has shown its importance in sustained healing and regrowth following injury. Measurement of perfusion and permeability within the bone was performed with small and macromolecular contrast media, using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in models of osteoarthritis and the femoral head. Bone blood flow and remodeling was estimated using 18F-Fluoride positron emission tomography in fracture healing and osteoarthritis. Multimodality assessment of bone blood flow, permeability, and remodeling by using noninvasive imaging techniques may provide information essential in monitoring subsequent rates of healing and response to treatment as well as identifying candidates for additional therapeutic or surgical interventions. PMID:20392223

  20. Bubble dynamics in perfused tissue undergoing decompression.

    PubMed

    Meisel, S; Nir, A; Kerem, D

    1981-02-01

    A mathematical model describing bubble dynamics in a perfused tissue undergoing decompression is presented, taking into account physical expansion and inward diffusion from surrounding supersaturated tissue as growth promoting factors and tissue gas elimination by perfusion, tissue elasticity, surface tension and inherent unsaturation as resolving driving forces. The expected behavior after a step reduction of pressure of a bubble initially existing in the tissue, displaying both growth and resolution has been demonstrated. A strong perfusion-dependence of bubble resolution time at low perfusion rates is apparent. The model can account for various exposure pressures and saturation fractions of any inert gas-tissue combination for which a set of physical and physiological parameters is available.

  1. An Exploratory Study Into the Role of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging or Perfusion Computed Tomography for Detection of Intratumoral Hypoxia in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Newbold, Kate Castellano, Isabel; Charles-Edwards, Elizabeth; Mears, Dorothy; Sohaib, Aslam; Leach, Martin; Rhys-Evans, Peter; Clarke, Peter; Fisher, Cyril; Harrington, Kevin; Nutting, Christopher

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: Hypoxia in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC) is well established and known to cause radiation resistance and treatment failure in the management of HNC. This study examines the role of parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and perfusion computed tomography (CT) as surrogate markers of intratumoral hypoxia, defined by using the exogenous marker of hypoxia pimonidazole and the endogenous marker carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9). Methods and Materials: Patients with HNC underwent preoperative DCE-MRI, perfusion CT, and pimonidazole infusion. Imaging parameters were correlated with pimonidazole and CA9 staining. The strength of correlations was tested by using a two-tailed Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Results: Twenty-three regions of interest were analyzed from the 7 patients who completed the DCE-MRI studies. A number of statistically significant correlations were seen between DCE-MRI parameters (volume transfer between blood plasma and extracellular extravascular space [EES], volume of EES, rate constant between EES and blood plasma, time at arrival of contrast inflow, time to peak, average gradient, and time to onset) and areas with a pimonidazole score of 4. In the case of CA9 staining, only a weak correlation was shown with wash-in rate. There were no significant correlations between perfusion CT parameters and pimonidazole staining or CA9 expression. Conclusion: Intratumoral hypoxia in patients with HNC may be predicted by using DCE-MRI; however, perfusion CT requires further investigation.

  2. Vicarious Audiovisual Learning in Perfusion Education

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Thomas E.; Holt, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Perfusion technology is a mechanical and visual science traditionally taught with didactic instruction combined with clinical experience. It is difficult to provide perfusion students the opportunity to experience difficult clinical situations, set up complex perfusion equipment, or observe corrective measures taken during catastrophic events because of patient safety concerns. Although high fidelity simulators offer exciting opportunities for future perfusion training, we explore the use of a less costly low fidelity form of simulation instruction, vicarious audiovisual learning. Two low fidelity modes of instruction; description with text and a vicarious, first person audiovisual production depicting the same content were compared. Students (n = 37) sampled from five North American perfusion schools were prospectively randomized to one of two online learning modules, text or video. These modules described the setup and operation of the MAQUET ROTAFLOW standalone centrifugal console and pump. Using a 10 question multiple-choice test, students were assessed immediately after viewing the module (test #1) and then again 2 weeks later (test #2) to determine cognition and recall of the module content. In addition, students completed a questionnaire assessing the learning preferences of today’s perfusion student. Mean test scores from test #1 for video learners (n = 18) were significantly higher (88.89%) than for text learners (n = 19) (74.74%), (p < .05). The same was true for test #2 where video learners (n = 10) had an average score of 77% while text learners (n = 9) scored 60% (p < .05). Survey results indicated video learners were more satisfied with their learning module than text learners. Vicarious audiovisual learning modules may be an efficacious, low cost means of delivering perfusion training on subjects such as equipment setup and operation. Video learning appears to improve cognition and retention of learned content and may play an important

  3. Pancreas transplants: Evaluation using perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuni, C.C.; du Cret, R.P.; Boudreau, R.J.

    1989-07-01

    To determine the value of scintigraphic perfusion studies in evaluating pancreas transplant patients, we reviewed 56 of these studies in 22 patients who had 27 transplants. Seventeen patients underwent two or more studies. The perfusion studies were performed with 20 mCi (740 MBq) of 99mTc-DTPA injected as a bolus followed by eight to 16 serial 2-sec images and a 500,000-count immediate static image. Images were evaluated for (1) the time and intensity of pancreatic peak radioactivity relative to the time and intensity of the iliac arterial peak; (2) relative pancreatic to iliac arterial intensity on the static image; and (3) size, homogeneity, and definition of the pancreas. Clinical diagnoses at the time of scintigraphy of normal function (n = 36), rejection (n = 13), pancreatitis (n = 6), or arterial thrombosis (n = 1) were based on insulin requirement, urine amylase, serum glucose, serum amylase, response to therapy, cultures, CT, MR, sonography, scintigraphy with 67Ga or 111In-WBCs, percutaneous drainage results, angiography, surgery, and pathologic examination of resected transplants. Three 99mTc-DTPA perfusion studies showed no pancreatic perfusion, four showed decreasing perfusion on serial studies, and five showed progressive loss of definition of the pancreas on serial studies. Of the three patients with no detectable perfusion, one had a normally functioning transplant, one had arterial thrombosis with transplant infarction, and one had severe rejection with minimal function. Decreasing perfusion was associated with rejection in three patients and pancreatitis in one. Decreasing definition was seen in four patients with rejection and one with pancreatitis. We conclude that perfusion scintigraphy is useful, primarily when performed serially, although nonspecific for evaluating pancreas transplants.

  4. Improved exercise myocardial perfusion during lidoflazine therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, W.; Narahara, K.A.; Park, J.

    1983-11-01

    Lidoflazine is a synthetic drug with calcium-channel blocking effects. In a study of 6 patients with severe classic angina pectoris, single-blind administration of lidoflazine was associated with improved myocardial perfusion during exercise as determined by thallium-201 stress scintigraphy. These studies demonstrate that lidoflazine therapy is associated with relief of angina, an increased physical work capacity, and improved regional myocardial perfusion during exercise.

  5. Perfusion visualization and analysis for pulmonary embolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Michael S.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Naidich, David P.; Novak, Carol L.

    2005-04-01

    Given the nature of pulmonary embolism (PE), timely and accurate diagnosis is critical. Contrast enhanced high-resolution CT images allow physicians to accurately identify segmental and sub-segmental emboli. However, it is also important to assess the effect of such emboli on the blood flow in the lungs. Expanding upon previous research, we propose a method for 3D visualization of lung perfusion. The proposed method allows users to examine perfusion throughout the entire lung volume at a single glance, with areas of diminished perfusion highlighted so that they are visible independent of the viewing location. This may be particularly valuable for better accuracy in assessing the extent of hemodynamic alterations resulting from pulmonary emboli. The method also facilitates user interaction and may help identify small peripheral sub-segmental emboli otherwise overlooked. 19 patients referred for possible PE were evaluated by CT following the administration of IV contrast media. An experienced thoracic radiologist assessed the 19 datasets with 17 diagnosed as being positive for PE with multiple emboli. Since anomalies in lung perfusion due to PE can alter the distribution of parenchymal densities, we analyzed features collected from histograms of the computed perfusion maps and demonstrate their potential usefulness as a preliminary test to suggest the presence of PE. These histogram features also offer the possibility of distinguishing distinct patterns associated with chronic PE and may even be useful for further characterization of changes in perfusion or overall density resulting from associated conditions such as pneumonia or diffuse lung disease.

  6. DCE-MRI in hepatocellular carcinoma-clinical and therapeutic image biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bang-Bin; Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) enables tumor vascular physiology to be assessed. Within the tumor tissue, contrast agents (gadolinium chelates) extravasate from intravascular into the extravascular extracellular space (EES), which results in a signal increase on T1-weighted MRI. The rate of contrast agents extravasation to EES in the tumor tissue is determined by vessel leakiness and blood flow. Thus, the signal measured on DCE-MRI represents a combination of permeability and perfusion. The semi-quantitative analysis is based on the calculation of heuristic parameters that can be extracted from signal intensity-time curves. These enhancing curves can also be deconvoluted by mathematical modeling to extract quantitative parameters that may reflect tumor perfusion, vascular volume, vessel permeability and angiogenesis. Because hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a hypervascular tumor, many emerging therapies focused on the inhibition of angiogenesis. DCE-MRI combined with a pharmacokinetic model allows us to produce highly reproducible and reliable parametric maps of quantitative parameters in HCC. Successful therapies change quantitative parameters of DCE-MRI, which may be used as early indicators of tumor response to anti-angiogenesis agents that modulate tumor vasculature. In the setting of clinical trials, DCE-MRI may provide relevant clinical information on the pharmacodynamic and biologic effects of novel drugs, monitor treatment response and predict survival outcome in HCC patients. PMID:24695624

  7. The destabilization of the Pilatte hut (2577 m a.s.l. - Ecrins massif, France), a paraglacial process?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanel, Ludovic; Dubois, Laurent; Fabre, Sébastien; Duvillard, Pierre-Allain; Deline, Philip

    2015-04-01

    The Pilatte hut is located at 2572 m a.s.l. at Saint-Christophe-en-Oisans (south of the Ecrins Massif, France), at a 3-hours-walk from La Bérarde hamlet. Its capacity is 120 beds for hikers and climbers who are engaged in the ascent of Les Bans (3669 m a.s.l.). Built on a rocky ledge on the right side of the Pilatte Glacier (A = 2.64 km2; L = 2.6 km), it currently dominates the glacier by about 150 m. This relief results from the retreat of the glacier since the end of the Little Ice Age, as the till around the hut was deposited during this stage. The glacier has lost about 1.8 km in length during the same period. A first wooden hut was built in 1925 and presently serves as a winter refuge. In 1954, the growth of mountain activities led to the construction of a larger hut made of cemented stones. An extension to the west made of reinforced concrete was built in 1994. But in the late 1980s, severe damages to the 1954 part of the building were already recognized: vertical cracks lining the north and south facades, ,subsidence (c. 10 cm downstream) of the ground floor, cracked interior walls. Currently, the evolution of the instability is monitored by several methods: - since 2003, cracks in the building are surveyed by 25 Saugnac gauges, while an outside fracture in the rock is surveyed by a simple extensometer; - since 2009, 8 strain gauges allow to annually measure displacements along the main fractures that delimit the unstable rock mass; - a high-resolution topographic data set acquired by terrestrial laser scanning from the surface of the glacier in July 2014 has completed the monitoring. The acting process is a translational slide of a rock mass with a volume of about 300 000 m3, initiated by the glacier shrinkage. Therefore, it has to be considered as a paraglacial process. Even if the slide velocity is presently decreasing, a demolition project of the hut is under consideration in favor of a new building on the right side of the valley, 800 m downstream the

  8. Combination of dynamic (11)C-PIB PET and structural MRI improves diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linwen; Fu, Liping; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Jinming; Zhang, Xiaojun; Xu, Baixuan; Tian, Jiahe; Fan, Yong

    2015-08-30

    Structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) is an established technique for measuring brain atrophy, and dynamic positron emission tomography with (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B ((11)C-PIB PET) has the potential to provide both perfusion and amyloid deposition information. It remains unclear, however, how to better combine perfusion, amyloid deposition and morphological information extracted from dynamic (11)C-PIB PET and sMRI with the goal of improving the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We adopted a linear sparse support vector machine to build classifiers for distinguishing AD and MCI subjects from cognitively normal (CN) subjects based on different combinations of regional measures extracted from imaging data, including perfusion and amyloid deposition information extracted from early and late frames of (11)C-PIB separately, and gray matter volumetric information extracted from sMRI data. The experimental results demonstrated that the classifier built upon the combination of imaging measures extracted from early and late frames of (11)C-PIB as well as sMRI achieved the highest classification accuracy in both classification studies of AD (100%) and MCI (85%), indicating that multimodality information could aid in the diagnosis of AD and MCI. PMID:26095348

  9. HIFU Therapy Compared with Other Thermal Ablation Methods in a Perfused Organ Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenne, Jürgen W.; Risse, Frank; Häcker, Axel; Peters, Kristina; Siegler, Peter; Divkovic, Gabriela Wilzbach; Huber, Peter E.

    2007-05-01

    Therapy with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to be both safe and clinically practical in a growing number of patient studies for a variety of different target organs. Especially in cancer therapy there are comparable ablation methods like radio frequency (RFA) or laser (LITT) ablation, which are clinically more accepted. In an ongoing study we compare HIFU with RF- and laser ablation under MRI guidance in a perfused organ model. All evaluated techniques were appropriate to induce defined and localized ablation necrosis in the renal cortex. Our HIFU system and the laser system were completely MRI compatible. The tested RF- system showed local needle artefacts and disturbed the MR images during operation. The ablation rate of HIFU using a spot scanning technique was clearly lower compared to the other ablation techniques. However, advanced HIFU scanning methods might overcome this limitation. In addition HIFU is the only complete non-invasive ablation technique.

  10. MRI-based quantification of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in a canine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiahui; Fan, Zheng; Kornegay, Joe N.; Styner, Martin A.

    2011-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive and fatal X-linked disease caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has shown potential to provide non-invasive and objective biomarkers for monitoring disease progression and therapeutic effect in DMD. In this paper, we propose a semi-automated scheme to quantify MRI features of golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD), a canine model of DMD. Our method was applied to a natural history data set and a hydrodynamic limb perfusion data set. The scheme is composed of three modules: pre-processing, muscle segmentation, and feature analysis. The pre-processing module includes: calculation of T2 maps, spatial registration of T2 weighted (T2WI) images, T2 weighted fat suppressed (T2FS) images, and T2 maps, and intensity calibration of T2WI and T2FS images. We then manually segment six pelvic limb muscles. For each of the segmented muscles, we finally automatically measure volume and intensity statistics of the T2FS images and T2 maps. For the natural history study, our results showed that four of six muscles in affected dogs had smaller volumes and all had higher mean intensities in T2 maps as compared to normal dogs. For the perfusion study, the muscle volumes and mean intensities in T2FS were increased in the post-perfusion MRI scans as compared to pre-perfusion MRI scans, as predicted. We conclude that our scheme successfully performs quantitative analysis of muscle MRI features of GRMD.

  11. SU-E-I-36: A KWIC and Dirty Look at Dose Savings and Perfusion Metrics in Simulated CT Neuro Perfusion Exams

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, J; Martin, T; Young, S; McNitt-Gray, M; Wang, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: CT neuro perfusion scans are one of the highest dose exams. Methods to reduce dose include decreasing the number of projections acquired per gantry rotation, however conventional reconstruction of such scans leads to sampling artifacts. In this study we investigated a projection view-sharing reconstruction algorithm used in dynamic MRI – “K-space Weighted Image Contrast” (KWIC) – applied to simulated perfusion exams and evaluated dose savings and impacts on perfusion metrics. Methods: A FORBILD head phantom containing simulated time-varying objects was developed and a set of parallel-beam CT projection data was created. The simulated scans were 60 seconds long, 1152 projections per turn, with a rotation time of one second. No noise was simulated. 5mm, 10mm, and 50mm objects were modeled in the brain. A baseline, “full dose” simulation used all projections and reduced dose cases were simulated by downsampling the number of projections per turn from 1152 to 576 (50% dose), 288 (25% dose), and 144 (12.5% dose). KWIC was further evaluated at 72 projections per rotation (6.25%). One image per second was reconstructed using filtered backprojection (FBP) and KWIC. KWIC reconstructions utilized view cores of 36, 72, 144, and 288 views and 16, 8, 4, and 2 subapertures respectively. From the reconstructed images, time-to-peak (TTP), cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the FWHM of the perfusion curve were calculated and compared against reference values from the full-dose FBP data. Results: TTP, CBF, and the FWHM were unaffected by dose reduction (to 12.5%) and reconstruction method, however image quality was improved when using KWIC. Conclusion: This pilot study suggests that KWIC preserves image quality and perfusion metrics when under-sampling projections and that the unique contrast weighting of KWIC could provided substantial dose-savings for perfusion CT scans. Evaluation of KWIC in clinical CT data will be performed in the near future. R01 EB014922, NCI

  12. CEST MRI reporter genes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanshu; Bulte, Jeff W M; Gilad, Assaf A

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, several reporter genes have been developed that can serve as a beacon for non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we provide a brief summary of recent advances in MRI reporter gene technology, as well as detailed "hands-on" protocols for cloning, expression, and imaging of reporter genes based on chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST).

  13. Effects of Steroid Hormones on Sex Differences in Cerebral Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Ghisleni, Carmen; Bollmann, Steffen; Biason-Lauber, Anna; Poil, Simon-Shlomo; Brandeis, Daniel; Martin, Ernst; Michels, Lars; Hersberger, Martin; Suckling, John; Klaver, Peter; O'Gorman, Ruth L

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in the brain appear to play an important role in the prevalence and progression of various neuropsychiatric disorders, but to date little is known about the cerebral mechanisms underlying these differences. One widely reported finding is that women demonstrate higher cerebral perfusion than men, but the underlying cause of this difference in perfusion is not known. This study investigated the putative role of steroid hormones such as oestradiol, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) as underlying factors influencing cerebral perfusion. We acquired arterial spin labelling perfusion images of 36 healthy adult subjects (16 men, 20 women). Analyses on average whole brain perfusion levels included a multiple regression analysis to test for the relative impact of each hormone on the global perfusion. Additionally, voxel-based analyses were performed to investigate the sex difference in regional perfusion as well as the correlations between local perfusion and serum oestradiol, testosterone, and DHEAS concentrations. Our results replicated the known sex difference in perfusion, with women showing significantly higher global and regional perfusion. For the global perfusion, DHEAS was the only significant predictor amongst the steroid hormones, showing a strong negative correlation with cerebral perfusion. The voxel-based analyses revealed modest sex-dependent correlations between local perfusion and testosterone, in addition to a strong modulatory effect of DHEAS in cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions. We conclude that DHEAS in particular may play an important role as an underlying factor driving the difference in cerebral perfusion between men and women.

  14. Molecular hydrogen observations at the high mountain station of Mt. Cimone (2165 m a.s.l.), Northern Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maione, M.; Arduini, J.; Uguccioni, F.; Graziosi, F.; Giostra, U.; Furlani, F.; Bonasoni, P.; Cristofanelli, P.

    2009-04-01

    Since hydrogen will certainly play an important role in the energy supply chain of the coming decades, it is important to prevent consequences deriving from unbalanced source-sink processes deriving from a possible increase of molecular hydrogen emissions. In fact, higher atmospheric hydrogen levels lead to an increased lifetime of a greenhouse gas like methane and to an increase of stratospheric water vapour, resulting in a stratospheric cooling. The EU-FP6 Project EuroHydros has been established with the aim of i) developing a European Network for observations of molecular hydrogen and carbon monoxide; ii) putting in place a new and consistent calibration scale for molecular hydrogen; iii) improving the understanding of hydrogen in the global background atmosphere and of the impact of European emissions on the present day atmosphere. In this frame, continuous measurements of molecular hydrogen and carbon monoxide have been started since January 2007 at the Atmospheric Research Station "O.Vittori" at Monte Cimone, Northern Apennines, Italy (44°11' N, 10°42' E) at the altitude of 2165 m asl, using a custom made gas-chromatograph equipped with an RGD detector - Trace Analytical RGA-2. The instrument is running continuously. Results since obtained since January 2007 will be shown, highlighting correlation patterns between H2 and CO, with a focus on selected episodes. Also, the seasonal and short time variability of molecular hydrogen will be reported.

  15. Radionuclide cerebral perfusion imaging: Normal pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, S.J.; Stritzke, P.; Losonczy, M.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Holan, V.; DaCosta, M.; Muzinic, M.

    1991-12-31

    Regional cerebral perfusion imaging using a new class of {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I labeled compounds which traverse the blood brain barrier and SPECT imaging technology provides an opportunity to assess this physiologic phenomenon during normal cerebral function and as a manifestation of disease in the central nervous system disease. These applications pose a challenge to the nuclear medicine physician for several reasons: (a) the complex and somewhat unfamiliar functional anatomy, (b) the marked regional differences in regional cerebral perfusion at rest, (c) the lack of understanding of the effect of variations in ambient conditions on regional cerebral perfusion. The difficulties in interpretation are augmented by the display itself. There is frequently no difficulty in differentiating between gray and white matter. However, the frequently used {open_quotes}hot body{close_quotes} color maps, introduce a good deal of contrast, producing displays with apparent interruption in regional cortical perfusion whereas black and white displays provide minimal contrast in the regional cortical activity. The authors sought to define how much variation in regional cerebral perfusion is {open_quotes}allowed{close_quotes} under controlled conditions, to establish a basis to interpret if changes in the environment, psychological interventions, or disease states are accompanied by a measurable change. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Schizophrenia patients differentiation based on MR vascular perfusion and volumetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanier, A. B.; Joskowicz, L.; Moshel, S.; Israeli, D.

    2015-03-01

    Candecomp/Parafac Decomposition (CPD) has emerged as a framework for modeling N-way arrays (higher-order matrices). CPD is naturally well suited for the analysis of data sets comprised of observations of a function of multiple discrete indices. In this study we evaluate the prospects of using CPD for modeling MRI brain properties (i.e. brain volume and gray-level) for schizophrenia diagnosis. Taking into account that 3D imaging data consists of millions of pixels per patient, the diagnosis of a schizophrenia patient based on pixel analysis constitutes a methodological challenge (e.g. multiple comparison problem). We show that the CPD could potentially be used as a dimensionality redaction method and as a discriminator between schizophrenia patients and match control, using the gradient of pre- and post Gd-T1-weighted MRI data, which is strongly correlated with cerebral blood perfusion. Our approach was tested on 68 MRI scans: 40 first-episode schizophrenia patients and 28 matched controls. The CPD subject's scores exhibit statistically significant result (P < 0.001). In the context of diagnosing schizophrenia with MRI, the results suggest that the CPD could potentially be used to discriminate between schizophrenia patients and matched control. In addition, the CPD model suggests for brain regions that might exhibit abnormalities in schizophrenia patients for future research.

  17. [Absorption of amino acids from the perfused ovine rumen].

    PubMed

    L' Leng; Tomás, J; Várady, J; Szányiová, M

    1978-06-01

    The experiments with extracoroporeal perfusion of sheep rumen were performed [Leng et al., 1977]. Bovine plasma, diluted in a 1:1ratio with an isotonic solution of sodium chloride, was used for four perfusions, and autologous blood was used for two perfusions in the course of 150 minutes. After 60 minutes perfusion 20 g enzymatic casein hydrolyzate were applied to the rumen. The levels of free amino acids in the perfusate were recorded after 60 minutes' perfusion [the first phase of perfusion] and at the end of the experiment [the second phase]. The levels of lysine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid increased after perfusions with bovine plasma during the first phase, the levels of glutamic acid, phenylalanine, and in one case of alanine, increased after perfusions with autologus blood. Simultaneously the level of valine decreased after perfusions with bovine plasma, and after perfusions with blood the levels of arginine and valine, and/or lysine, dropped. During the second phase of perfusion, the levels of all the observed amino acids except methionine [bovine plasma], and/or orginine and methionine [blood] rose in the perfusate. The experiments showed that the level of amino acids in the rumen content presented a decisive factor affecting amino acid absorption from the rumen into the blood. Transformation of the amino acids during their passage through the remen wall may be assumed, and glutamic acid is one of the chief products of this process.

  18. Histological Confirmation and Biological Significance of Cartilage Canals Demonstrated Using High Field MRI in Swine at Predilection Sites of Osteochondrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Ferenc; Nissi, Mikko J.; Zhang, Jinjin; Benson, Michael; Schmitter, Sebastian; Ellermann, Jutta M.; Carlson, Cathy S.

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage canal vessels in epiphyseal cartilage have a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of osteochondrosis/osteochondritis dissecans. The present study aimed to validate high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods to visualize these vessels in young pigs. Osteochondral samples from the distal femur and distal humerus (predilection sites of osteochondrosis) of piglets were imaged post-mortem: (1) using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) in an MRI scanner, followed by histological evaluation; and (2) after barium perfusion using μCT, followed by clearing techniques. In addition, both stifle joints of a 25-day-old piglet were imaged in vivo using SWI and gadolinium enhanced T1-weighted MRI, after which distal femoral samples were harvested and evaluated using μCT and histology. Histological sections were compared to corresponding MRI slices, and three-dimensional visualizations of vessels identified using MRI were compared to those obtained using μCT and to the cleared specimens. Vessels contained in cartilage canals were identified using MRI, both ex vivo and in vivo; their locations matched those observed in the histological sections, μCT images, and cleared specimens of barium-perfused tissues. The ability to visualize cartilage canal blood vessels by MRI, without using a contrast agent, will allow future longitudinal studies to evaluate their role in developmental orthopedic disease. PMID:23939946

  19. Visualization and quantification of whole rat heart laminar structure using high-spatial resolution contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Stephen H; Benoist, David; Benson, Alan P; White, Ed; Tanner, Steven F; Holden, Arun V; Dobrzynski, Halina; Bernus, Olivier; Radjenovic, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown by histology that cardiac myocytes are organized into laminae and this structure is important in function, both influencing the spread of electrical activation and enabling myocardial thickening in systole by laminar sliding. We have carried out high-spatial resolution three-dimensional MRI of the ventricular myolaminae of the entire volume of the isolated rat heart after contrast perfusion [dimeglumine gadopentate (Gd-DTPA)]. Four ex vivo rat hearts were perfused with Gd-DTPA and fixative and high-spatial resolution MRI was performed on a 9.4T MRI system. After MRI, cryosectioning followed by histology was performed. Images from MRI and histology were aligned, described, and quantitatively compared. In the three-dimensional MR images we directly show the presence of laminae and demonstrate that these are highly branching and are absent from much of the subepicardium. We visualized these MRI volumes to demonstrate laminar architecture and quantitatively demonstrated that the structural features observed are similar to those imaged in histology. We showed qualitatively and quantitatively that laminar architecture is similar in the four hearts. MRI can be used to image the laminar architecture of ex vivo hearts in three dimensions, and the images produced are qualitatively and quantitatively comparable with histology. We have demonstrated in the rat that: 1) laminar architecture is consistent between hearts; 2) myolaminae are absent from much of the subepicardium; and 3) although localized orthotropy is present throughout the myocardium, tracked myolaminae are branching structures and do not have a discrete identity.

  20. [Technical novelties, latest diagnostic options in the MRI and CT diagnostics of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Jederán, Éva; Gõdény, Mária

    2015-09-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic options of colorectal cancer (CRC) have changed over the past decade. Imaging plays a major role, thus the use of scanning methods is recommended by guidelines. Accurate staging, evaluation of treatment efficacy and identification of residual and recurrent tumors are required for the modern management of colorectal cancer. If adequate technical background is provided, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gives the information upon which therapeutic options may be determined. High-resolution MRI scans can be interpreted as maps providing functional and molecular information. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) has shown promising results regarding the determination of tumor volume and evaluation of treatment efficacy. Perfusion dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (P-DCE-MRI) is the subject of research in the early assessment of treatment efficacy. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is a procedure utilizing biochemical analysis. Its application in CRC is under investigation. Clinical effectiveness of PET-MRI (hardware-based combination of MRI and positron emission tomography) is also being studied. Diagnostic value of computed tomographic colonography (CTC) has been proven in the detection of CRC as well as of polyps. PMID:26339907

  1. [Technical novelties, latest diagnostic options in the MRI and CT diagnostics of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Jederán, Éva; Gõdény, Mária

    2015-09-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic options of colorectal cancer (CRC) have changed over the past decade. Imaging plays a major role, thus the use of scanning methods is recommended by guidelines. Accurate staging, evaluation of treatment efficacy and identification of residual and recurrent tumors are required for the modern management of colorectal cancer. If adequate technical background is provided, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gives the information upon which therapeutic options may be determined. High-resolution MRI scans can be interpreted as maps providing functional and molecular information. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) has shown promising results regarding the determination of tumor volume and evaluation of treatment efficacy. Perfusion dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (P-DCE-MRI) is the subject of research in the early assessment of treatment efficacy. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is a procedure utilizing biochemical analysis. Its application in CRC is under investigation. Clinical effectiveness of PET-MRI (hardware-based combination of MRI and positron emission tomography) is also being studied. Diagnostic value of computed tomographic colonography (CTC) has been proven in the detection of CRC as well as of polyps.

  2. Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion Study in the Patients with Subacute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Che-Ming; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Chen, Chi-Jen; Chen, David Yen-Ting; Yan, Feng-Xian; Chiu, Wen-Ta

    2016-01-01

    Background This study uses a MRI technique, three-dimension pulse continuous arterial spin labeling (3D-PCASL), to measure the patient’s cerebral blood flow (CBF) at the subacute stage of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) in order to analyze the relationship between cerebral blood flow and neurocognitive deficits. Objective To provide the relationship between cortical CBF and neuropsychological dysfunction for the subacute MTBI patients. Methods After MTBI, perfusion MR imaging technique (3D-PCASL) measures the CBF of MTBI patients (n = 23) within 1 month and that of normal controls (n = 22) to determine the quantity and location of perfusion defect. The correlation between CBF abnormalities and cognitive deficits was elucidated by combining the results of the neuropsychological tests of the patients. Result We observed a substantial reduction in CBF in the bilateral frontal and left occipital cortex as compared with the normal persons. In addition, there were correlation between post concussive symptoms (including dizziness and simulator sickness) and CBF in the hypoperfused areas. The more severe symptom was correlated with higher CBF in bilateral frontal and left occipital lobes. Conclusion First, this study determined that despite no significant abnormality detected on conventional CT and MRI studies, hypoperfusion was observed in MTBI group using 3D-PCASL technique in subacute stage, which suggested that this approach may increase sensitivity to MTBI. Second, the correlation between CBF and the severity of post concussive symptoms suggested that changes in cerebral hemodynamics may play a role in pathophysiology underlies the symptoms. PMID:26871696

  3. Cardiac tissue engineering using perfusion bioreactor systems

    PubMed Central

    Radisic, Milica; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Wang, Yadong; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    This protocol describes tissue engineering of synchronously contractile cardiac constructs by culturing cardiac cell populations on porous scaffolds (in some cases with an array of channels) and bioreactors with perfusion of culture medium (in some cases supplemented with an oxygen carrier). The overall approach is ‘biomimetic’ in nature as it tends to provide in vivo-like oxygen supply to cultured cells and thereby overcome inherent limitations of diffusional transport in conventional culture systems. In order to mimic the capillary network, cells are cultured on channeled elastomer scaffolds that are perfused with culture medium that can contain oxygen carriers. The overall protocol takes 2–4 weeks, including assembly of the perfusion systems, preparation of scaffolds, cell seeding and cultivation, and on-line and end-point assessment methods. This model is well suited for a wide range of cardiac tissue engineering applications, including the use of human stem cells, and high-fidelity models for biological research. PMID:18388955

  4. Diffusion–Perfusion Mismatch: An Opportunity for Improvement in Cortical Function

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Melissa; Ramadan, Amanda; Hillis, Argye E.; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Leigh, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Objective: There has been controversy over whether diffusion–perfusion mismatch provides a biomarker for the ischemic penumbra. In the context of clinical stroke trials, regions of the diffusion–perfusion mismatch that do not progress to infarct in the absence of reperfusion are considered to represent “benign oligemia.” However, at least in some cases (particularly large vessel stenosis), some of this hypoperfused tissue may remain dysfunctional for a prolonged period without progressing to infarct and may recover function if eventually reperfused. We hypothesized that patients with persistent diffusion–perfusion mismatch using a hypoperfusion threshold of 4–5.9 s delay on time-to-peak (TTP) maps at least sometimes have persistent cognitive deficits relative to those who show some reperfusion of this hypoperfused tissue. Methods: We tested this hypothesis in 38 patients with acute ischemic stroke who had simple cognitive tests (naming or line cancelation) and MRI with diffusion and perfusion imaging within 24 h of onset and again within 10 days, most of whom had large vessel stenosis or occlusion. Results: A persistent perfusion deficit of 4–5.9 s delay in TTP on follow up MRI was associated with a persistent cognitive deficit at that time point (p < 0.001). When we evaluated only patients who did not have infarct growth (n = 14), persistent hypoperfusion (persistent mismatch) was associated with a lack of cognitive improvement compared with those who had reperfused. The initial volume of hypoperfusion did not correlate with the later infarct volume (progression to infarct), but change in volume of hypoperfusion correlated with change in cognitive performance (p = 0.0001). Moreover, multivariable regression showed that the change in volume of hypoperfused tissue of 4–5.9 s delay (p = 0.002), and change in volume of ischemic tissue on diffusion weighted imaging (p = 0.02) were independently associated with change in

  5. Evaluation of ischemic heart disease and viability by cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Mona

    2014-01-01

    In ischemic heart disease, cardiac MRI, besides being the gold standard for evaluation of quantitative ventricular function, enables evaluation of myocardial wall thickness, T2-weighted imaging for myocardial edema and infarct quantification and transmurality. Delayed hyperenhancement sequences are highly predictive of scar formation, being associated with myocyte necrosis. The extent and transmurality of delayed hyperenhancement has prognostic implications and is inversely proportional to the degree of functional recovery after acute myocardial infarction. A greater transmural extent of infarction (eg, hyperenhancement involving >50% of the wall thickness) can predict regions that are less likely to improve in function after therapy. The ultimate focus of MRI in ischemic heart disease is in diagnosis, quantification of myocardium at risk, salvageable myocardium, perfusion defects and differentiation of viable myocardium from non viable myocardium to enable prognostication.

  6. ["Initiative" in primary care: survey on hypertension prevalence and definition of cardiovascular risk profile in ASL 3 of Lagonegro (PZ)].

    PubMed

    Damiani, G; De Fino, M; Federico, B; Trani, F; Pennelli, S; Ricciardi, G

    2006-01-01

    The objective of our study was to estimate the prevalence of not-diagnosed hypertension and to determine 10-year risk of coronary heart disease in a random sample of individuals in ASL 3 of Lagonegro (PZ). The sample was based on the whole population assisted by 21 General Practitioners. All General Practitioners filled a form for each patient containing social-demographic, anthropometric and clinical data. The study included only patients aged 35 to 74 years, without a previous diagnosis of myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure and that were not taking antihypertensive drugs (N=335). The directly standardized prevalence of prehypertension was 0.54 (IC95%: 0.47-0.59) and that of hypertension was 0.33 (IC95%: 0.28-0.38). The prevalence of both, prehypertension and hypertension was higher in males than in females, as well as in old compared to young adults. Cardiovascular risk factors as Body Mass Index (BMI), diabetes, a family history of dyslipidemia and diabetes were more frequent among prehypertensive and hypertensive individuals, than in normotensive ones. We also estimated the risk of an acute coronary event in patients whit blood pressure higher than 140/90 mmHg. The calculation, carried out through Framingham algorithm, showed that 1 out of 10 hypertensive subject had a 10-years risk of developing coronary heart disease and that males had a higher risk compared to females. Our study highlights the fundamental role of General Practitioners may play in earlier diagnosis prehypertension and hypertension in the general population, thus adopting practices oriented to healthy promotion and prevention.

  7. Perfusion safety: new initiatives and enduring principles.

    PubMed

    Kurusz, M

    2011-09-01

    Perfusion safety has been studied and discussed extensively for decades. Many initiatives occurred through efforts of professional organizations to achieve recognition, establish accreditation and certification, promote consensus practice guidelines, and develop peer-reviewed journals as sources for dissemination of clinical information. Newer initiatives have their basis in other disciplines and include systems approach, Quality Assurance/Quality Improvement processes, error recognition, evidence-based methodologies, registries, equipment automation, simulation, and the Internet. Use of previously established resources such as written protocols, checklists, safety devices, and enhanced communication skills has persisted to the present in promoting perfusion safety and has reduced current complication rates to negligible levels.

  8. Tissue Necrosis Monitoring for HIFU Ablation with T1 Contrast MRI Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, San-Chao; Yao, Ching; Kuo, Ih-Yuan; Tsai, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Hsu

    2011-09-01

    In MR-guided HIFU ablation, MTC (Magnetization Transfer Contrast) or perfusion imaging is usually used after ablation to evaluate the ablated area based on the thermally induced necrosis contrast. In our MR-guided HIFU ablation study, a T1 contrast MRI scan sequence has been used to distinguish between necrotic and non-necrotic tissue. The ablation of porcine meat in-vitro and in-vivo pig leg muscle show that the necrotic area of T1 contrast MRI image coincides with the photographs of sliced specimen. The sequence is considerably easier to apply than MTC or perfusion imaging, while giving good necrosis contrast. In addition, no injection of contrast agent is needed, allowing multiple scans to be applied throughout the entire ablation procedure.

  9. Dobutamine-tagged MRI for inotropic reserve assessment in severe CAD: relationship with PET findings.

    PubMed

    Mazzadi, Alejandro N; Janier, Marc F; Brossier, Benjamin; André-Fouët, Xavier; McFadden, Eugene; Revel, Didier; Croisille, Pierre

    2004-05-01

    The impact of blood flow reductions on the intramyocardial inotropic reserve has not yet been established in coronary artery disease (CAD). We therefore evaluated in severe CAD the relationship between positron emission tomography (PET) patterns of perfusion and glucose uptake and the corresponding tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tagged MRI) values of midmyocardial strains under low-dose dobutamine. Eighteen patients underwent tagged MRI (at rest, with dobutamine) and H2(15)O/18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET. Regional midmyocardial circumferential shortening (Ecc) and PET patterns (normal, match viable, mismatch viable, and infarcted) were assessed in three tagged MRI/PET short-axis slices. Regional Ecc at rest correlated with both perfusion (r = 0.49) and glucose uptake (r = 0.58). The presence of the inotropic reserve was similar in normal, match viable, and infarcted (approximately 40% of regions vs. 52% in mismatch viable, P < 0.05), but the extent of the increase after dobutamine was lower in infarcted regions (P = 0.06). Within each PET pattern, regions were grouped according to their Ecc values at rest into three categories (high, intermediate, and low contractile performance). In mismatch viable (hibernation), the inotropic reserve was similar among the three categories, but in the other PET patterns the presence and extent of the inotropic reserve was higher in those regions with lowest Ecc (without significant differences in perfusion). In severe CAD, the presence of the inotropic reserve assessed by midmyocardial changes under dobutamine does not relate to resting perfusion. At a similar level of perfusion, the presence of the inotropic reserve is inversely related to contractile performance at rest, but our results suggest that it may not be true for hibernating myocardium. PMID:14726299

  10. Perfusion weighted imaging and its application in stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Enzhong; Tian, Jie; Han, Ying; Wang, Huifang; Li, Xingfeng; Zhu, Fuping

    2003-05-01

    To study the technique and application of perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) in the diagnosis and medical treatment of acute stroke, 25 patients were examined by 1.5 T or 1.0 T MRI scanner. The Data analysis was done with "3D Med System" developed by our Lab to process the data and obtain apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map, cerebral blood volume (CBV) map, cerebral blood flow (CBF) map as well as mean transit time (MTT) map. In accute stage of stroke, normal or slightly hypointensity in T1-, hyperintensity in T2- and diffusion-weighted images were seen in the cerebral infarction areas. There were hypointensity in CBV map, CBF map and ADC map; and hyperintensity in MTT map that means this infarct area could be saved. If the hyperintensity area in MTT map was larger than the area in diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), the larger part was called penumbra and could be cured by an appropriate thrombolyitic or other therapy. The CBV, CBF and MTT maps are very important in the diagnosis and medical treatment of acute especially hyperacute stroke. Comparing with DWI, we can easily know the situation of penumbra and the effect of curvative therapy. Besides, we can also make a differential diagnosis with this method.

  11. Effects of laser acupuncture on blood perfusion rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-ju; Zeng, Chang-chun; Liu, Han-ping; Liu, Song-hao; Liu, Liang-gang

    2006-09-01

    Based on Pennes equation, the influences of the intensity and the impulse frequency of laser acupuncture on the point tissues' blood flow perfusion rate are discussed. We find that the blood perfusion rate of point tissue increases with the intensity of laser acupuncture increasing. After impulse laser acupuncture the point tissue blood perfusion rate increase little, but after continuum laser acupuncture the point tissues blood perfusion rate increase much.

  12. [Design of the Rolling Type Nasal Feeding Perfusion Apparatus].

    PubMed

    Yu, Dong; Yang, Yonghuan; Hu, Huiqin; Luo, Hongjun; Feng, Yunhao; Hao, Xiali

    2015-09-01

    At present, the existing problem in nasal feeding perfusion apparatus is laborious and instability. Designing the rolling type perfusion apparatus by using a roller pump, the problem is solved. Compared with the traditional perfusion apparatus, the advantage lies in liquid carrying only need once and simulating human swallowing process. Through testing and verification, the apparatus can be used in nasal feeding perfusion for elderly or patients.

  13. Heterogeneity of myocardial edema in isolated pig hearts after perfusion with different types of cardioprotective solutions.

    PubMed

    Vahl, C F; Albers, J; Makabe, M H; Meinzer, H P; Ilg, M; Fu, X; Szabo, G; Mühling, J; Hagl, S

    1998-10-01

    The extent and distribution of myocardial edema induced by perfusion with cardioprotective solutions is of great interest. Domestic pig hearts (n = 12) were perfused in situ after aortic cross clamping either with Bretschneider's cardioplegic solution (HTK, 4 degrees C, n = 3), with a heparinized Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 30 mmol/L 2,3 Butanedionemonoxime (BDM, 4 degrees C, n = 3) or with heparinized pig blood (HPB, 24 degrees C, n = 3). After a three-hours storage period, magnetic resonance tomography (MRI) was carried out. The acquired T1-weighted data were used for the subsequent three-dimensional reconstruction based on the "Heidelberg ray-tracing technique". The small myocardial tissue blocks (n = 216) were excised from these hearts for dry weight measurements for 9 preselected regions in duplicate including ventricular papillary muscle, ventricular free wall, ventricular septum, apex, and atrial tissue. In control hearts (n = 3), dry weight was measured immediately after explantation (no MRI). The results of dry-weight measurements and three dimensional visualization were compared. Dry-weight measurements revealed that considerable myocardial edema is induced by any of the experimental procedures. The effects were most pronounced after BDM perfusion. Regardless how the edema was induced, there were significant differences of the water content within the heart: the water content in the heads of the papillary muscles and in the interventricular septum was always smaller than that of the free left- and right-ventricular walls. The heterogeneity of myocardial edema and its spatial distribution pattern could be qualitatively visualized. The experimental data (biophysical data and 3D visualization) clearly show a heterogeneity of myocardial edema induced by different types of cardioprotective solutions. As the presence of myocardial edema represents one of the crucial events in the pathophysiology of myocardial dysfunction occurring during myocardial

  14. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging) scan of the leg uses strong magnets to create pictures of the leg. This may ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  15. Shoulder MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging test that uses energy from powerful magnets and to create pictures of the shoulder area. ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed in the room ...

  16. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... some MRI exams, intravenous (IV) drugs, such as gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are used to change the contrast of the MR image. Gadolinium-based contrast agents are rare earth metals that ...

  17. MRI of the Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a supplemental tool to breast screening with mammography or ultrasound. It may be used to screen ... following diagnosis, or further evaluate abnormalities seen on mammography. Breast MRI does not use ionizing radiation, and ...

  18. Abdominal MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - abdomen; NMR - abdomen; Magnetic resonance imaging - abdomen; MRI of the abdomen ... used to look at: Blood flow in the abdomen Blood vessels in the abdomen The cause of ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  20. Lumbar MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... may need a lumbar MRI if you have: Low back pain that does not get better after treatment Leg ... spine Injury or trauma to the lower spine Low back pain and a history or signs of cancer Multiple ...

  1. Knee MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... have been no reported side effects from the magnetic fields and radio waves. The most common type of ... health care provider before the test. The strong magnetic fields created during an MRI can cause heart pacemakers ...

  2. Cervical MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... have been no reported side effects from the magnetic fields and radio waves. The most common type of ... tell your provider before the test. The strong magnetic fields created during an MRI can cause heart pacemakers ...

  3. Arm MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... have been no reported side effects from the magnetic fields and radio waves. The most common type of ... tell your provider before the test The strong magnetic fields created during an MRI can cause heart pacemakers ...

  4. Molecular fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Bartelle, Benjamin B.; Barandov, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of brain function depends on understanding the dynamics of diverse neural signaling processes over large tissue volumes in intact animals and humans. Most existing approaches to measuring brain signaling suffer from limited tissue penetration, poor resolution, or lack of specificity for well-defined neural events. Here we discuss a new brain activity mapping method that overcomes some of these problems by combining MRI with contrast agents sensitive to neural signaling. The goal of this “molecular fMRI” approach is to permit noninvasive whole-brain neuroimaging with specificity and resolution approaching current optical neuroimaging methods. In this article, we describe the context and need for molecular fMRI as well as the state of the technology today. We explain how major types of MRI probes work and how they can be sensitized to neurobiological processes, such as neurotransmitter release, calcium signaling, and gene expression changes. We comment both on past work in the field and on challenges and promising avenues for future development. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Brain researchers currently have a choice between measuring neural activity using cellular-level recording techniques, such as electrophysiology and optical imaging, or whole-brain imaging methods, such as fMRI. Cellular level methods are precise but only address a small portion of mammalian brains; on the other hand, whole-brain neuroimaging techniques provide very little specificity for neural pathways or signaling components of interest. The molecular fMRI techniques we discuss have particular potential to combine the specificity of cellular-level measurements with the noninvasive whole-brain coverage of fMRI. On the other hand, molecular fMRI is only just getting off the ground. This article aims to offer a snapshot of the status and future prospects for development of molecular fMRI techniques. PMID:27076413

  5. Intravascular contrast agent-enhanced MRI measuring contrast clearance and tumor blood volume and the effects of vascular modifiers in an experimental tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Bentzen, Lise . E-mail: lise@oncology.dk; Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter; Nielsen, Thomas; Overgaard, Jens; Bjornerud, Atle; Briley-Saebo, Karen; Horsman, Michael R.; Ostergaard, Leif

    2005-03-15

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility of using the MRI blood pool agent NC100150 for evaluation of tumor blood volume (TBV) estimates by both dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and susceptibility contrast MRI assays in an experimental tumor. Contrast agent clearance (K{sup trans}; depends on perfusion and permeability) from the DCE-MRI time curves was estimated, and changes in TBV and K{sup trans} were measured after administration of two drugs that reduce perfusion by different mechanisms. Methods and materials: The DCE-MRI experiments were simulated with expected physiologic values for the C3H mouse mammary carcinoma. The C3H tumor was examined by DCE-MRI and susceptibility contrast MRI with NC100150 (NC100150 Injection, Clariscan; Amersham Health, Oslo, Norway) after treatment with either hydralazine or combretastatin (Oxigene, Boston, MA). Results: Simulations showed that reliable estimates of changes in TBV and K{sup trans} could be performed with DCE-MRI. Hydralazine was shown to reduce TBV as measured by both assays and to reduce K{sup trans}. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI also suggested that TBV and K{sup trans} were reduced in combretastatin-treated tumors, and the TBV reduction was confirmed by susceptibility contrast MRI. Data suggested the drug to affect mainly the total TBV, whereas microvessels as such seemed less altered. Conclusion: The study supports the use of the combined DCE-MRI and susceptibility contrast MRI assay with a blood pool agent in characterizing tumors and their response to treatment.

  6. Investigating the physiology of brain activation with MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxton, Richard B.; Uludag, Kamil; Dubowitz, David J.

    2004-04-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become a powerful tool for investigating the working human brain based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect on the MR signal. However, despite the widespread use of fMRI techniques for mapping brain activation, the basic physiological mechanisms underlying the observed signal changes are still poorly understood. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) techniques, which measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the BOLD effect simultaneously, provide a useful tool for investigating these physiological questions. In this paper, recent results of studies manipulating the baseline CBF both pharmacologically and physiologically will be discussed. These data are consistent with a feed-forward mechanism of neurovascular coupling, and suggest that the CBF change itself may be a more robust reflection of neural activity changes than the BOLD effect. Consistent with these data, a new thermodynamic hypothesis is proposed for the physiological function of CBF regulation: maintenance of the [O2]/[CO2] concentration ratio at the mitochondria in order to preserve the free energy available from oxidative metabolism. A kinetic model based on this hypothesis provides a reasonable quantitative description of the CBF changes associated with neural activity and altered blood gases (CO2 and O2).

  7. An alternative method for neonatal cerebro-myocardial perfusion.

    PubMed

    Luciani, Giovanni Battista; De Rita, Fabrizio; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro

    2012-05-01

    Several techniques have already been described for selective cerebral perfusion during repair of aortic arch pathology in children. One method combining cerebral with myocardial perfusion has also been proposed. A novel technique is reported here for selective and independent cerebro-myocardial perfusion for neonatal and infant arch surgery. Technical aspects and potential advantages are discussed.

  8. Role of hypothermic machine perfusion in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Andrea; Dutkowski, Philipp

    2015-06-01

    Machine liver perfusion has significantly evolved during the last ten years to optimize extended criteria liver grafts and to address the worldwide organ shortage. This review gives an overview on available ex vivo and in vivo data on hypothermic machine liver perfusion. We discuss also possible protective pathways and show most recent clinical applications of hypothermic machine liver perfusion in human.

  9. Optogenetic Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peter; Fang, Zhongnan; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the functional connectivity of precise neural circuits across the entire intact brain can be achieved through optogenetic functional magnetic resonance imaging (ofMRI), which is a novel technique that combines the relatively high spatial resolution of high-field fMRI with the precision of optogenetic stimulation. Fiber optics that enable delivery of specific wavelengths of light deep into the brain in vivo are implanted into regions of interest in order to specifically stimulate targeted cell types that have been genetically induced to express light-sensitive trans-membrane conductance channels, called opsins. fMRI is used to provide a non-invasive method of determining the brain's global dynamic response to optogenetic stimulation of specific neural circuits through measurement of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal, which provides an indirect measurement of neuronal activity. This protocol describes the construction of fiber optic implants, the implantation surgeries, the imaging with photostimulation and the data analysis required to successfully perform ofMRI. In summary, the precise stimulation and whole-brain monitoring ability of ofMRI are crucial factors in making ofMRI a powerful tool for the study of the connectomics of the brain in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:27167840

  10. Safety and Feasibility of High-pressure Transvenous Limb Perfusion With 0.9% Saline in Human Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zheng; Kocis, Keith; Valley, Robert; Howard, James F; Chopra, Manisha; An, Hongyu; Lin, Weili; Muenzer, Joseph; Powers, William

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated safety and feasibility of the transvenous limb perfusion gene delivery method in muscular dystrophy. A dose escalation study of single limb perfusion with 0.9% saline starting with 5% of limb volume was carried out in adults with muscular dystrophies under intravenous analgesia/anesthesia. Cardiac, vascular, renal, muscle, and nerve functions were monitored. A tourniquet was placed above the knee with inflated pressure of 310 mm Hg. Infusion was carried out with a clinically approved infuser via an intravenous catheter inserted in the saphenous vein with a goal infusion rate of 80 ml/minute. Infusion volume was escalated stepwise to 20% limb volume in seven subjects. No subject complained of any post procedure pain other than due to needle punctures. Safety warning boundaries were exceeded only for transient depression of limb tissue oximetry and transient elevation of muscle compartment pressures; these were not associated with nerve, muscle, or vascular damage. Muscle magnetic resonant imaging (MRI) demonstrated fluid accumulation in muscles of the perfused lower extremity. High-pressure retrograde transvenous limb perfusion with saline up to 20% of limb volume at above infusion parameters is safe and feasible in adult human muscular dystrophy. This study will serve as a basis for future gene transfer clinical trials. PMID:21772257

  11. Asynchronicity of facial blood perfusion in migraine.

    PubMed

    Zaproudina, Nina; Teplov, Victor; Nippolainen, Ervin; Lipponen, Jukka A; Kamshilin, Alexei A; Närhi, Matti; Karjalainen, Pasi A; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical changes in blood perfusion and asynchronous blood supply to head tissues likely contribute to migraine pathophysiology. Imaging was widely used in order to understand hemodynamic variations in migraine. However, mapping of blood pulsations in the face of migraineurs has not been performed so far. We used the Blood Pulsation Imaging (BPI) technique, which was recently developed in our group, to establish whether 2D-imaging of blood pulsations parameters can reveal new biomarkers of migraine. BPI characteristics were measured in migraineurs during the attack-free interval and compared to healthy subjects with and without a family history of migraine. We found a novel phenomenon of transverse waves of facial blood perfusion in migraineurs in contrast to healthy subjects who showed synchronous blood delivery to both sides of the face. Moreover, the amplitude of blood pulsations was symmetrically distributed over the face of healthy subjects, but asymmetrically in migraineurs and subjects with a family history of migraine. In the migraine patients we found a remarkable correlation between the side of unilateral headache and the direction of the blood perfusion wave. Our data suggest that migraine is associated with lateralization of blood perfusion and asynchronous blood pulsations in the facial area, which could be due to essential dysfunction of the autonomic vascular control in the face. These findings may further enhance our understanding of migraine pathophysiology and suggest new easily available biomarkers of this pathology. PMID:24324592

  12. Simplified prototyping of perfusable polystyrene microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Reginald; Ahn, Byungwook; R. Myers, David; Qiu, Yongzhi; Sakurai, Yumiko; Moot, Robert; Mihevc, Emma; Trent Spencer, H.; Doering, Christopher; A. Lam, Wilbur

    2014-01-01

    Cell culture in microfluidic systems has primarily been conducted in devices comprised of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) or other elastomers. As polystyrene (PS) is the most characterized and commonly used substrate material for cell culture, microfluidic cell culture would ideally be conducted in PS-based microsystems that also enable tight control of perfusion and hydrodynamic conditions, which are especially important for culture of vascular cell types. Here, we report a simple method to prototype perfusable PS microfluidics for endothelial cell culture under flow that can be fabricated using standard lithography and wet laboratory equipment to enable stable perfusion at shear stresses up to 300 dyn/cm2 and pumping pressures up to 26 kPa for at least 100 h. This technique can also be extended to fabricate perfusable hybrid PS-PDMS microfluidics of which one application is for increased efficiency of viral transduction in non-adherent suspension cells by leveraging the high surface area to volume ratio of microfluidics and adhesion molecules that are optimized for PS substrates. These biologically compatible microfluidic devices can be made more accessible to biological-based laboratories through the outsourcing of lithography to various available microfluidic foundries. PMID:25379106

  13. Nuclear cardiology: Myocardial perfusion and function

    SciTech Connect

    Seldin, D.W. )

    1991-08-01

    Myocardial perfusion studies continue to be a major focus of research, with new investigations of the relationship of exercise-redistribution thallium imaging to diagnosis, prognosis, and case management. The redistribution phenomenon, which seemed to be fairly well understood a few years ago, is now recognized to be much more complex than originally thought, and various strategies have been proposed to clarify the meaning of persistent defects. Pharmacologic intervention with dipyridamole and adenosine has become available as an alternative to exercise, and comparisons with exercise imaging and catheterization results have been described. Thallium itself is no longer the sole single-photon perfusion radiopharmaceutical; two new technetium agents are now widely available. In addition to perfusion studies, advances in the study of ventricular function have been made, including reports of studies performed in conjunction with technetium perfusion studies, new insights into cardiac physiology, and the prognostic and case-management information that function studies provide. Finally, work has continued with monoclonal antibodies for the identification of areas of myocyte necrosis. 41 references.

  14. Comparing Normothermic Machine Perfusion Preservation With Different Perfusates on Porcine Livers From Donors After Circulatory Death.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Nassar, A; Farias, K; Buccini, L; Mangino, M J; Baldwin, W; Bennett, A; O'Rourke, C; Iuppa, G; Soliman, B G; Urcuyo-Llanes, D; Okamoto, T; Uso, T D; Fung, J; Abu-Elmagd, K; Miller, C; Quintini, C

    2016-03-01

    The utilization of normothermic machine perfusion (NMP) may be an effective strategy to resuscitate livers from donation after circulatory death (DCD). There is no consensus regarding the efficacy of different perfusates on graft and bile duct viability. The aim of this study was to compare, in an NMP porcine DCD model, the preservation potential of three different perfusates. Twenty porcine livers with 60 min of warm ischemia were separated into four preservation groups: cold storage (CS), NMP with Steen solution (Steen; XVIVO Perfusion Inc., Denver, CO), Steen plus red blood cells (RBCs), or whole blood (WB). All livers were preserved for 10 h and reperfused to simulate transplantation for 24 h. During preservation, the NMP with Steen group presented the highest hepatocellular injury. At reperfusion, the CS group had the lowest bile production and the worst hepatocellular injury compared with all other groups, followed by NMP with Steen; the Steen plus RBC and WB groups presented the best functional and hepatocellular injury outcomes, with WB livers showing lower aspartate aminotransferase release and a trend toward better results for most parameters. Based on our results, a perfusate that contains an oxygen carrier is most effective in a model of NMP porcine DCD livers compared with Steen solution. Specifically, WB-perfused livers showed a trend toward better outcomes compared with Steen plus RBCs. PMID:26663737

  15. Influence of the cardiac cycle on time-intensity curves using multislice dynamic magnetic resonance perfusion.

    PubMed

    Nchimi, Alain; Mancini, Isabelle; Broussaud, Thomas K Y

    2014-10-01

    Flow and pressure variations cause potential changes in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal intensity across the cardiac cycle. Nevertheless, cardiac dynamic contrast-enhanced (perfusion) MRI is performed and analyzed regardless of the cardiac phase. We investigate whether the cardiac phase impacts myocardial and left ventricle (LV) cavity time intensity curves (TICs) at rest and during vasodilatation. Fifteen healthy volunteers (seven females, eight males; mean age: 32.5 ± 9.3 years; age range: 19-49 years) were included in this prospective study. They underwent four separate short-axis multislice (apical, mid and basal) LV perfusion MRI, with different electrocardiogram-triggering during normal vasotone and adenosine-stress. TIC parameters were extracted from the myocardium and the LV cavity. General linear mixed model analyses were used to evaluate their variability according to vasotone, cardiac phase and slice-position. Maximal enhancement and normalized Steepest slopes were higher at stress than at rest (p values <0.001). A similar trend towards higher inflow was shown on systole versus diastole in the LV cavity and diastole versus systole in the myocardium (p < 0.05).These TIC parameters were slice-position dependent, as the inflow decreased from the base to the apex in the LV, and peaked on the mid-slice for the myocardium. There are significant variability of both the LV and the myocardial TICs, with respect to the cardiac cycle phase and the slice position where imaging actually takes place. These appeal to measurement standardization for a better intra- and inter-study reproducibility.

  16. Transport of mineral dust to Nepal Climate Observatory - Pyramid (5079 m a.s.l., South Himalayas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchi, Rocco; Cristofanelli, Paolo; Marinoni, Angela; Calzolari, Francescopiero; Decesari, Stefano; Laj, Paolo; Vuillermoz, Elisa; Sprenger, Michael; Bonasoni, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    Desert dust is one of the greatest sources of natural aerosol in atmosphere, representing about 37% of the total (natural and anthropogenic) emission of atmospheric primary aerosols. Mineral dust can impact climate through many complex processes, i.e. by scattering and absorbing solar and infrared radiation and by affecting the variability of cloud aerosol optical properties. Moreover, mineral dust can also affect the concentrations of other climate-altering species (e.g. surface ozone) in troposphere. South Asia is a region frequently affected by major dust transport from Africa and Asia. In particular, these "dust clouds" can reach the Himalayas also mixed with the heavy anthropogenic pollution present within the so-called Asian Brown Cloud. With the purpose to define the frequency of long-range mineral dust transport towards the Himalayan range and to evaluate their influence on the atmospheric aerosol background level, in this work we analyse the first 2-year (from March 2006 to February 2008) of coarse (Dp > 1 micron) aerosol number concentration observed at the WMO - GAW station "Nepal Climate Observatory - Pyramid" (NCO-P, 5079 m a.s.l., Nepal). This measurement station, part of UNEP-ABC and EV-K2-CNR SHARE projects, is not far from the Everest Base Camp and the observation here conducted can be considered representative for the South-Eastern slope of the Himalayan range. During the investigated period we detect more than 80 days/year as possibly affected by mineral dust transport. As deduced by the NCO-P measurements, these events significantly influenced the seasonal variation of coarse aerosol number concentration as well as the number and volumetric aerosol size distribution over South Himalayas. Due to the combination of the large-scale westerly circulation and the higher frequency of dust out-breaks, the majority of the identified events occurred during the pre-monsoon season. Although of lesser intensity and frequency, a significant amount of dust

  17. Is there more valuable information in PWI datasets for a voxel-wise acute ischemic stroke tissue outcome prediction than what is represented by typical perfusion maps?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkert, Nils Daniel; Siemonsen, Susanne; Dalski, Michael; Verleger, Tobias; Kemmling, Andre; Fiehler, Jens

    2014-03-01

    The acute ischemic stroke is a leading cause for death and disability in the industry nations. In case of a present acute ischemic stroke, the prediction of the future tissue outcome is of high interest for the clinicians as it can be used to support therapy decision making. Within this context, it has already been shown that the voxel-wise multi-parametric tissue outcome prediction leads to more promising results compared to single channel perfusion map thresholding. Most previously published multi-parametric predictions employ information from perfusion maps derived from perfusion-weighted MRI together with other image sequences such as diffusion-weighted MRI. However, it remains unclear if the typically calculated perfusion maps used for this purpose really include all valuable information from the PWI dataset for an optimal tissue outcome prediction. To investigate this problem in more detail, two different methods to predict tissue outcome using a k-nearest-neighbor approach were developed in this work and evaluated based on 18 datasets of acute stroke patients with known tissue outcome. The first method integrates apparent diffusion coefficient and perfusion parameter (Tmax, MTT, CBV, CBF) information for the voxel-wise prediction, while the second method employs also apparent diffusion coefficient information but the complete perfusion information in terms of the voxel-wise residue functions instead of the perfusion parameter maps for the voxel-wise prediction. Overall, the comparison of the results of the two prediction methods for the 18 patients using a leave-one-out cross validation revealed no considerable differences. Quantitatively, the parameter-based prediction of tissue outcome led to a mean Dice coefficient of 0.474, while the prediction using the residue functions led to a mean Dice coefficient of 0.461. Thus, it may be concluded from the results of this study that the perfusion parameter maps typically derived from PWI datasets include all

  18. Early MRI changes in glioblastoma in the period between surgery and adjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Farace, Paolo; Amelio, Dante; Ricciardi, Giuseppe K; Zoccatelli, Giada; Magon, Stefano; Pizzini, Francesca; Alessandrini, Franco; Sbarbati, Andrea; Amichetti, Maurizio; Beltramello, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the increase in MRI contrast enhancement (CE) occurring in glioblastoma during the period between surgery and initiation of chemo-radiotherapy, thirty-seven patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were analyzed by early post-operative magnetic resonance (EPMR) imaging within three days of surgery and by pre-adjuvant magnetic resonance (PAMR) examination before adjuvant therapy. Areas of new CE were investigated by use of EPMR diffusion-weighted imaging and PAMR perfusion imaging (by arterial spin-labeling). PAMR was acquired, on average, 29.9 days later than EPMR (range 20-37 days). During this period an increased area of CE was observed for 17/37 patients. For 3/17 patients these regions were confined to areas of reduced EPMR diffusion, suggesting postsurgical infarct. For the other 14/17 patients, these areas suggested progression. For 11/17 patients the co-occurrence of hyperperfusion in PAMR perfusion suggested progression. PAMR perfusion and EPMR diffusion did not give consistent results for 3/17 patients for whom small new areas of CE were observed, presumably because of the poor spatial resolution of perfusion imaging. Before initiation of adjuvant therapy, areas of new CE of resected glioblastomas are frequently observed. Most of these suggest tumor progression, according to EPMR diffusion and PAMR perfusion criteria. PMID:23264191

  19. Estimation of contrast agent bolus arrival delays for improved reproducibility of liver DCE MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, Manil D.; Bainbridge, Alan; Atkinson, David; Punwani, Shonit; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P.; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Taylor, Stuart A.

    2016-10-01

    Delays between contrast agent (CA) arrival at the site of vascular input function (VIF) sampling and the tissue of interest affect dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI pharmacokinetic modelling. We investigate effects of altering VIF CA bolus arrival delays on liver DCE MRI perfusion parameters, propose an alternative approach to estimating delays and evaluate reproducibility. Thirteen healthy volunteers (28.7  ±  1.9 years, seven males) underwent liver DCE MRI using dual-input single compartment modelling, with reproducibility (n  =  9) measured at 7 days. Effects of VIF CA bolus arrival delays were assessed for arterial and portal venous input functions. Delays were pre-estimated using linear regression, with restricted free modelling around the pre-estimated delay. Perfusion parameters and 7 days reproducibility were compared using this method, freely modelled delays and no delays using one-way ANOVA. Reproducibility was assessed using Bland-Altman analysis of agreement. Maximum percent change relative to parameters obtained using zero delays, were  -31% for portal venous (PV) perfusion, +43% for total liver blood flow (TLBF), +3247% for hepatic arterial (HA) fraction, +150% for mean transit time and  -10% for distribution volume. Differences were demonstrated between the 3 methods for PV perfusion (p  =  0.0085) and HA fraction (p  <  0.0001), but not other parameters. Improved mean differences and Bland-Altman 95% Limits-of-Agreement for reproducibility of PV perfusion (9.3 ml/min/100 g, ±506.1 ml/min/100 g) and TLBF (43.8 ml/min/100 g, ±586.7 ml/min/100 g) were demonstrated using pre-estimated delays with constrained free modelling. CA bolus arrival delays cause profound differences in liver DCE MRI quantification. Pre-estimation of delays with constrained free modelling improved 7 days reproducibility of perfusion parameters in volunteers.

  20. Calibrated MRI to evaluate cerebral hemodynamics in patients with an internal carotid artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    De Vis, Jill B; Petersen, Esben T; Bhogal, Alex; Hartkamp, Nolan S; Klijn, Catharina JM; Kappelle, L J; Hendrikse, J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether calibrated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can identify regional variances in cerebral hemodynamics caused by vascular disease. For this, arterial spin labeling (ASL)/blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI was performed in 11 patients (65±7 years) and 14 controls (66±4 years). Cerebral blood flow (CBF), ASL cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR), BOLD CVR, oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) were evaluated. The CBF was 34±5 and 36±11 mL/100 g per minute in the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory of the patients and the controls. Arterial spin labeling CVR was 44±20 and 53±10% per 10 mm Hg ▵EtCO2 in patients and controls. The BOLD CVR was lower in the patients compared with the controls (1.3±0.8 versus 2.2±0.4% per 10 mm Hg ▵EtCO2, P<0.01). The OEF was 41±8% and 38±6%, and the CMRO2 was 116±39 and 111±40 μmol/100 g per minute in the patients and the controls. The BOLD CVR was lower in the ipsilateral than in the contralateral MCA territory of the patients (1.2±0.6 versus 1.6±0.5% per 10 mmHg ▵EtCO2, P<0.01). Analysis was hampered in three patients due to delayed arrival time. Thus, regional hemodynamic impairment was identified with calibrated MRI. Delayed arrival artifacts limited the interpretation of the images in some patients. PMID:25712500

  1. Luminal perfusion of isolated gastric glands.

    PubMed

    Waisbren, S J; Geibel, J; Boron, W F; Modlin, I M

    1994-04-01

    We have extended to rabbit gastric glands the technique for perfusing single isolated renal tubules. We isolated glands by hand dissection and used concentric glass pipettes to hold them and perfuse their lumina. Parietal cells (PCs), which tended to be located toward the gland opening, were identified by their pyramidal shape, large size, and autofluorescence. Chief cells (CCs) were identified by their round shape and smaller size. In some experiments, we perfused the lumen with hydroxypyrenetrisulfonate, a pH-sensitive fluorophore, at pH 7.4 and used digital image processing to monitor luminal pH (pH1). Solutions were buffered with N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid to pH 7.4 at 37 degrees C. With fast perfusion, we found no evidence of decreased pH1, even with stimulation by 10 microM carbachol. With slow perfusion, pH1 often fell below the dye's sensitive range (pH < 5), especially at low perfusate buffering power. In other experiments, we loaded cells with the pH-sensitive dye 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein and monitored intracellular pH (pHi) in multiple individual PCs and CCs in a single gland. Mean pHi was 7.21 +/- 0.02 (n = 136 cells) for PCs and 7.27 +/- 0.03 (n = 103) for CCs. To examine the response to decreased pH1 and basolateral pH (pHb), we lowered pHb to 6.4 or lowered pH1 to 3.4 or 1.4. Lowering pHb to 6.4 for approximately 1 min caused pHi to fall reversibly by 0.39 +/- 0.05 (n = 53) in PCs and 0.58 +/- 0.03 (n = 50) in CCs. Lowering pH1 to 3.4 or 1.4 caused no significant pHi changes in PCs (n = 38 and 82) or in CCs (n = 44 and 77). Carbachol did not affect the response to changes in pH1 or pHb. We conclude that the apical surfaces of PCs and CCs are unusually resistant to extreme pH gradients.

  2. Irradiation-Dependent Effects on Tumor Perfusion and Endogenous and Exogenous Hypoxia Markers in an A549 Xenograft Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Haenze, Joerg; Kamlah, Florentine; Eul, Bastian G.; Lang, Nico; Keil, Boris; Heverhagen, Johannes T.; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; An Hanxiang; Rose, Frank

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Hypoxia is a major determinant of tumor radiosensitivity, and microenvironmental changes in response to ionizing radiation (IR) are often heterogenous. We analyzed IR-dependent changes in hypoxia and perfusion in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma xenografts. Materials and Methods: Immunohistological analysis of two exogenously added chemical hypoxic markers, pimonidazole and CCI-103F, and of the endogenous marker Glut-1 was performed time dependently after IR. Tumor vessels and apoptosis were analyzed using CD31 and caspase-3 antibodies. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and fluorescent beads (Hoechst 33342) were used to monitor vascular perfusion. Results: CCI-103F signals measuring the fraction of hypoxic areas after IR were significantly decreased by approximately 50% when compared with pimonidazole signals, representing the fraction of hypoxic areas from the same tumors before IR. Interestingly, Glut-1 signals were significantly decreased at early time point (6.5 h) after IR returning to the initial levels at 30.5 h. Vascular density showed no difference between irradiated and control groups, whereas apoptosis was significantly induced at 10.5 h post-IR. DCE-MRI indicated increased perfusion 1 h post-IR. Conclusions: The discrepancy between the hypoxic fractions of CCI-103F and Glut-1 forces us to consider the possibility that both markers reflect different metabolic alterations of tumor microenvironment. The reliability of endogenous markers such as Glut-1 to measure reoxygenation in irradiated tumors needs further consideration. Monitoring tumor microvascular response to IR by DCE-MRI and measuring tumor volume alterations should be encouraged.

  3. MRI of the brain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) of the brain creates a detailed image of the complex structures in the brain. An MRI can give a three-dimensional depiction of the brain, making location of problems such ...

  4. Ten Years of Black Carbon Measurements in the North Atlantic at the Pico Mountain Observatory, Azores (2225m asl)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Fialho, P. J.; Mazzoleni, L. R.; Olsen, S. C.; Owen, R. C.; Helmig, D.; Hueber, J.; Dziobak, M.; Kramer, L. J.; Mazzoleni, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Pico Mountain Observatory is located in the summit caldera of the Pico mountain, an inactive volcano on the Pico Island in the Azores, Portugal (38.47°N, 28.40°W, Altitude 2225m asl). The Azores are often impacted by polluted outflows from the North American continent and local sources have been shown to have a negligible influence at the observatory. The value of the station stems from the fact that this is the only permanent mountaintop monitoring station in the North Atlantic that is typically located above the marine boundary layer (average MBL heights are below 1200 m and rarely exceed 1300 m) and often receives air characteristic of the lower free troposphere. Measurements of black carbon (BC) mass have been carried out at the station since 2001, mostly in the summer seasons. Here we discuss the BC decadal dataset (2001-2011) collected at the site by using a seven-wavelength AE31 Magee Aethalometer. Measured BC mass and computed Angstrom exponent (AE) values were analysed to study seasonal and diurnal variations. There was a large day-to-day variability in the BC values due to varied meteorological conditions that resulted in different diurnal patterns for different months. The daily mean BC at this location ranged between 0 and ~430 ngm-3, with the most frequently occurring value in the range 0-100 ngm-3. The overall mean for the 10 year period is ~24 ngm-3, with a coefficient of variation of 150%. The BC values exhibited a consistent annual trend being low in winter months and high in summer months, barring year to year variations. To differentiate between BC and other absorbing particles, we analyzed the wavelength dependence of aerosol absorption coefficient and determined a best-fit exponent i.e., the Ångström exponent, for the whole dataset. Visible Ångström exponent (AE: 470-520-590-660 nm) values ranged between 0 and 3.5, with most frequently occurring values in the range 0.85 to 1.25. By making use of the aethalometer light attenuation

  5. Imaging of drug effects in perfused liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammann, Marc; Mahlke, Christine; Kessler, Manfred D.

    2002-06-01

    Various medications affect the systemic circulation and organ oxygenation causing dilatation or constriction of blood vessels. Imminent liver failure can be generated by reduced perfusion of different origins. In this case hepatic vasodilatation would be a therapeutical approach for improving patient's condition. Our examinations have been performed in perfused rat liver using spectrometric methods. Two defined areas of the liver were measured punctually. We compared the influence of Tetramethylpyrazine and Glyceroltrinitrate on hemoglobin oxygenation (HbO2) and concentration (Hb-conc.) in rat liver after application of Norepinephrine, which caused a mid decrease in hemoglobin oxygenation of 47,9 %. Both increased the HbO2, but differed from each other in manner of time and extent. Tetramethylpyrazine indicated a longer effect than Glyceroltrinitrate. Furthermore, HbO2 and Hb-conc. showed a conversed relation. From the shape of the absorption spectra it is possible to derive the oxygenation of hemoglobin.

  6. The evolution of perfusion education in America.

    PubMed

    Toomasian, John M; Searles, Bruce; Kurusz, Mark

    2003-07-01

    Clinical cardiopulmonary perfusion has evolved significantly during its 50 years. The science, technology and educational processes related to cardiopulmonary bypass have undergone continual change and metamorphosis. Perfusionists were initially trained on the job or in the laboratory, but with the advent of myocardial revascularization and the explosion in cardiac surgery, the need for formal educational training programs became apparent. The American Society of Extracorporeal Technology began the arduous processes of credentialing and developing certification guidelines that have continued under the American Board of Cardiovascular Perfusion. Licensure has also been adopted in many states during the past 10 years where nearly 50% of all perfusionists are covered by some legislative act. One additonal challenge has been developing minimal standards in which perfusionists practice. The initial standards included the use of a checklist and have evolved to monitoring and recording the significant events and parameters of each clinical procedure. The education of perfusionists will continue to be a challenge related primarily to reduced fiscal resources, the applicant pool and the ever-changing demands for extracorporeal circulation services. According to demographic and census information, it is expected the overall number of cardiovascular interventions will increase dramatically towards the latter end of the current decade in the US. The question arises as to what role perfusionists will play, as treatment strategies continue to change. If the number of education programs and new graduates continue to decline, the total number of perfusionists will decline, especially as many senior perfusionists leave the field or retire. It may be difficult to predict the total number of cardiovascular interventions that will be required in the next several years. However, if the total number of cardiovascular interventions that require perfusion services increase as a function

  7. Inhomogeneity of pulmonary perfusion during sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. Kim; Guy, Harold J. B.; Elliott, Ann R.; West, John B.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the inhomogeneity of pulmonary perfusion in man were studied by performing hyperventilation-breathhold single-breath measurements before, during and after 9 days of continuous exposure to microgravity. In microgravity the indicators of inhomogeneity of perfusion, especially the size of cardiogenic oscillations in expired CO2 and the height of phase 4, were both markedly reduced. Cardiogenic oscillations were reduced to approximately 60 of their preflight standing size, while the height of phase 4 was between 0 and -8% (a terminal fall became a small terminal rise) of preflights standing. The terminal change in CO2 was nearly abolished in microgravity indicating more uniformity of blood flow between lung units that close at the end of expiration and units that remain open. This may result from the disappearance of gravity-dependent topographical inequality of blood flow. The residual cardiographic oscillations in expired CO2 imply a persisting inhomogeneity of perfusion in the absence of gravity at a level larger than acinar.

  8. Noncontact blood perfusion mapping in clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakovlev, Dmitry; Dwyer, Vincent; Hu, Sijung; Silberschmidt, Vadim

    2016-04-01

    Non-contact imaging photoplethysmography (iPPG) to detect pulsatile blood microcirculation in tissue has been selected as a successor to low spatial resolution and slow scanning blood perfusion techniques currently employed by clinicians. The proposed iPPG system employs a novel illumination source constructed of multiple high power LEDs with narrow spectral emission, which are temporally modulated and synchronised with a high performance sCMOS sensor. To ensure spectrum stability and prevent thermal wavelength drift due to junction temperature variations, each LED features a custom-designed thermal management system to effectively dissipate generated heat and auto-adjust current flow. The use of a multi-wavelength approach has resulted in simultaneous microvascular perfusion monitoring at various tissue depths, which is an added benefit for specific clinical applications. A synchronous detection algorithm to extract weak photoplethysmographic pulse-waveforms demonstrated robustness and high efficiency when applied to even small regions of 5 mm2. The experimental results showed evidences that the proposed system could achieve noticeable accuracy in blood perfusion monitoring by creating complex amplitude and phase maps for the tissue under examination.

  9. Perfusion computed tomography in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Das, Chandan J; Thingujam, Usha; Panda, Ananya; Sharma, Sanjay; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Various imaging modalities are available for the diagnosis, staging and response evaluation of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). While contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) is used as the standard of imaging for size, morphological evaluation and response assessment in RCC, a new functional imaging technique like perfusion CT (pCT), goes down to the molecular level and provides new perspectives in imaging of RCC. pCT depicts regional tumor perfusion and vascular permeability which are indirect parameters of tumor angiogenesis and thereby provides vital information regarding tumor microenvironment. Also response evaluation using pCT may predate the size criteria used in Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, as changes in the perfusion occurs earlier following tissue kinase inhibitors before any actual change in size. This may potentially help in predicting prognosis, better selection of therapy and more accurate and better response evaluation in patients with RCC. This article describes the techniques and role of pCT in staging and response assessment in patients with RCCs. PMID:26217456

  10. CT perfusion: principles, applications, and problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ting-Yim

    2004-10-01

    The fast scanning speed of current slip-ring CT scanners has enabled the development of perfusion imaging techniques with intravenous injection of contrast medium. In a typical CT perfusion study, contrast medium is injected and rapid scanning at a frequency of 1-2 Hz is used to monitor the first circulation of the injected contrast medium through a 1-2 cm thick slab of tissue. From the acquired time-series of CT images, arteries can be identified within the tissue slab to derive the arterial contrast concentration curve, Ca(t) while each individual voxel produces a tissue residue curve, Q(t) for the corresponding tissue region. Deconvolution between the measured Ca(t) and Q(t) leads to the determination of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in brain studies. In this presentation, an important application of CT perfusion in acute stroke studies - the identification of the ischemic penumbra via the CBF/CBV mismatch and factors affecting the quantitative accuracy of deconvolution, including partial volume averaging, arterial delay and dispersion are discussed.

  11. Regulation of skeletal muscle perfusion during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delp, M. D.; Laughlin, M. H.

    1998-01-01

    For exercise to be sustained, it is essential that adequate blood flow be provided to skeletal muscle. The local vascular control mechanisms involved in regulating muscle perfusion during exercise include metabolic control, endothelium-mediated control, propagated responses, myogenic control, and the muscle pump. The primary determinant of muscle perfusion during sustained exercise is the metabolic rate of the muscle. Metabolites from contracting muscle diffuse to resistance arterioles and act directly to induce vasodilation, or indirectly to inhibit noradrenaline release from sympathetic nerve endings and oppose alpha-adrenoreceptor-mediated vasoconstriction. The vascular endothelium also releases vasodilator substances (e.g., prostacyclin and nitric oxide) that are prominent in establishing basal vascular tone, but these substances do not appear to contribute to the exercise hyperemia in muscle. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells may also be involved in propagating vasodilator signals along arterioles to parent and daughter vessels. Myogenic autoregulation does not appear to be involved in the exercise hyperemia in muscle, but the rhythmic propulsion of blood from skeletal muscle veins facilitates venous return to the heart and muscle perfusion. It appears that the primary determinants of sustained exercise hyperemia in skeletal muscle are metabolic vasodilation and increased vascular conductance via the muscle pump. Additionally, sympathetic neural control is important in regulating muscle blood flow during exercise.

  12. MRI in decompression illness.

    PubMed

    Hierholzer, J; Tempka, A; Stroszczynski, C; Amodio, F; Hosten, N; Haas, J; Felix, R

    2000-05-01

    We report a case of decompression illness in which the patient developed paraparesis during scuba diving after rapid ascent. MRI of the spine revealed a focal intramedullary lesion consistent with the symptoms. The pathophysiological and radiological aspects of spinal decompression illness are discussed.

  13. Voxel-based evidence of perfusion normalization in glioblastoma patients included in a phase I-II trial of radiotherapy/tipifarnib combination.

    PubMed

    Ken, Soléakhéna; Deviers, Alexandra; Filleron, Thomas; Catalaa, Isabelle; Lotterie, Jean-Albert; Khalifa, Jonathan; Lubrano, Vincent; Berry, Isabelle; Péran, Patrice; Celsis, Pierre; Moyal, Elizabeth Cohen-Jonathan; Laprie, Anne

    2015-09-01

    We previously showed that the farnesyl transferase inihibitor, Tipifarnib induced vascularization normalization, oxygenation and radiosensitization in a pre-clinical glioblastoma (GBM) model. The aim of this study was to assess by dynamic-susceptibility-contrast MRI (DSC-MRI) the effect of radiotherapy (RT) and Tipifarnib combination on tumor perfusion in GBM patients. Eighteen patients with newly diagnosed GBM, enrolled in a phase I-II clinical trial associating RT with Tipifarnib, underwent anatomical MR imaging and DSC-MRI before (M0) and two months after treatment (M2). Anatomic volumes of interest (VOIs) were delineated according to contrast-enhanced and hyper-intense signal areas on T1-Gd and T2 images, respectively. Perfusion variations between M0 and M2 were assessed with median relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) inside these VOIs. Another voxel by voxel analysis of CBV values classified 405,117 tumor voxels into High_, Normal_ and Low_CBVTUMOR according to the distribution of CBV in the contralateral normal tissue. These three categories of CBVTUMOR voxels were color-coded over anatomical MRI. Variations of median rCBV were significantly different for two groups of patients (P < 0.013): rCBV decreased when initial rCBV was ≥ 1.0 (Group_rCBV_M0 > 1) and rCBV increased when initial rCBV was < 1.0 (Group_rCBV_M0 < 1). Mapping of color-coded voxels provided additional spatial and quantitative information about tumor perfusion: Group_rCBV_M0 > 1 presented a significant decrease of High_CBVTUMOR volume (P = 0.015) simultaneously with a significant increase of Normal_CBVTUMOR volume (P = 0.009) after treatment. Group_rCBV_M0 < 1 presented a decrease of Low_CBVTUMOR volume with an increase of Normal_ and High_CBV TUMOR volume after treatment. Pre and post-treatment CBV measurements with DSC-MRI characterized tumor perfusion evolution in GBM patients treated with RT combined to Tipifarnib; showing variations in favour of tumor perfusion

  14. PCA-based groupwise image registration for quantitative MRI.

    PubMed

    Huizinga, W; Poot, D H J; Guyader, J-M; Klaassen, R; Coolen, B F; van Kranenburg, M; van Geuns, R J M; Uitterdijk, A; Polfliet, M; Vandemeulebroucke, J; Leemans, A; Niessen, W J; Klein, S

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) is a technique for estimating quantitative tissue properties, such as the T1 and T2 relaxation times, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and various perfusion measures. This estimation is achieved by acquiring multiple images with different acquisition parameters (or at multiple time points after injection of a contrast agent) and by fitting a qMRI signal model to the image intensities. Image registration is often necessary to compensate for misalignments due to subject motion and/or geometric distortions caused by the acquisition. However, large differences in image appearance make accurate image registration challenging. In this work, we propose a groupwise image registration method for compensating misalignment in qMRI. The groupwise formulation of the method eliminates the requirement of choosing a reference image, thus avoiding a registration bias. The method minimizes a cost function that is based on principal component analysis (PCA), exploiting the fact that intensity changes in qMRI can be described by a low-dimensional signal model, but not requiring knowledge on the specific acquisition model. The method was evaluated on 4D CT data of the lungs, and both real and synthetic images of five different qMRI applications: T1 mapping in a porcine heart, combined T1 and T2 mapping in carotid arteries, ADC mapping in the abdomen, diffusion tensor mapping in the brain, and dynamic contrast-enhanced mapping in the abdomen. Each application is based on a different acquisition model. The method is compared to a mutual information-based pairwise registration method and four other state-of-the-art groupwise registration methods. Registration accuracy is evaluated in terms of the precision of the estimated qMRI parameters, overlap of segmented structures, distance between corresponding landmarks, and smoothness of the deformation. In all qMRI applications the proposed method performed better than or equally well as

  15. PCA-based groupwise image registration for quantitative MRI.

    PubMed

    Huizinga, W; Poot, D H J; Guyader, J-M; Klaassen, R; Coolen, B F; van Kranenburg, M; van Geuns, R J M; Uitterdijk, A; Polfliet, M; Vandemeulebroucke, J; Leemans, A; Niessen, W J; Klein, S

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) is a technique for estimating quantitative tissue properties, such as the T1 and T2 relaxation times, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and various perfusion measures. This estimation is achieved by acquiring multiple images with different acquisition parameters (or at multiple time points after injection of a contrast agent) and by fitting a qMRI signal model to the image intensities. Image registration is often necessary to compensate for misalignments due to subject motion and/or geometric distortions caused by the acquisition. However, large differences in image appearance make accurate image registration challenging. In this work, we propose a groupwise image registration method for compensating misalignment in qMRI. The groupwise formulation of the method eliminates the requirement of choosing a reference image, thus avoiding a registration bias. The method minimizes a cost function that is based on principal component analysis (PCA), exploiting the fact that intensity changes in qMRI can be described by a low-dimensional signal model, but not requiring knowledge on the specific acquisition model. The method was evaluated on 4D CT data of the lungs, and both real and synthetic images of five different qMRI applications: T1 mapping in a porcine heart, combined T1 and T2 mapping in carotid arteries, ADC mapping in the abdomen, diffusion tensor mapping in the brain, and dynamic contrast-enhanced mapping in the abdomen. Each application is based on a different acquisition model. The method is compared to a mutual information-based pairwise registration method and four other state-of-the-art groupwise registration methods. Registration accuracy is evaluated in terms of the precision of the estimated qMRI parameters, overlap of segmented structures, distance between corresponding landmarks, and smoothness of the deformation. In all qMRI applications the proposed method performed better than or equally well as

  16. A direct comparison of the sensitivity of CT and MR cardiac perfusion using a myocardial perfusion phantom

    PubMed Central

    Otton, James; Morton, Geraint; Schuster, Andreas; Bigalke, Boris; Marano, Riccardo; Olivotti, Luca; Nagel, Eike; Chiribiri, Amedeo

    2013-01-01

    Background Direct comparison of CT and magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion techniques has been limited and in vivo assessment is affected by physiological variability, timing of image acquisition, and parameter selection. Objective We precisely compared high-resolution k-t SENSE MR cardiac perfusion at 3 T with single-phase CT perfusion (CTP) under identical imaging conditions. Methods We used a customized MR imaging and CT compatible dynamic myocardial perfusion phantom to represent the human circulation. CT perfusion studies were performed with a Philips iCT (256 slice) CT, with isotropic resolution of 0.6 mm3. MR perfusion was performed with k-t SENSE acceleration at 3 T and spatial resolution of 1.2 × 1.2 × 10 mm. The image contrast between normal and underperfused myocardial compartments was quantified at various perfusion and photon energy settings. Noise estimates were based on published clinical data. Results Contrast by CTP highly depends on photon energy and also timing of imaging within the myocardial perfusion upslope. For an identical myocardial perfusion deficit, the native image contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) generated by CT and MR are similar. If slice averaging is used, the CNR of a perfusion deficit is expected to be greater for CTP than MR perfusion (MRP). Perfect timing during single time point CTP imaging is difficult to achieve, and CNR by CT decreases by 24%–31% two seconds from the optimal imaging time point. Although single-phase CT perfusion offers higher spatial resolution, MRP allows multiple time point sampling and quantitative analysis. Conclusion The ability of CTP and current optimal MRP techniques to detect simulated myocardial perfusion deficits is similar. PMID:23622506

  17. Towards robust deconvolution of low-dose perfusion CT: Sparse perfusion deconvolution using online dictionary learning

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ruogu; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is an important functional imaging modality in the evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases, particularly in acute stroke and vasospasm. However, the post-processed parametric maps of blood flow tend to be noisy, especially in low-dose CTP, due to the noisy contrast enhancement profile and the oscillatory nature of the results generated by the current computational methods. In this paper, we propose a robust sparse perfusion deconvolution method (SPD) to estimate cerebral blood flow in CTP performed at low radiation dose. We first build a dictionary from high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation on the low-dose CTP data. Our method is validated on clinical data of patients with normal and pathological CBF maps. The results show that we achieve superior performance than existing methods, and potentially improve the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissue in the brain. PMID:23542422

  18. Effects of variable blast pressures on blood flow and oxygen saturation in rat brain as evidenced using MRI.

    PubMed

    Bir, Cynthia; Vandevord, Pamela; Shen, Yimin; Raza, Waqar; Haacke, E Mark

    2012-05-01

    It has been recognized that primary blast waves may result in neurotrauma in soldiers in theater. A new type of contrast used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), has been developed that is based on the different susceptibility levels in diverse tissues and can detect decreases in cerebral blood flow (CBF) using inferred oxygen saturation changes in tissue. In addition, a continuous arterial spin-labeled (ASL) MRI sequence was used as a direct measure of regional CBF within the brain tissue. Animals were subjected to whole-body blast exposures of various overpressures within a gas-driven shock tube. When exposed to low levels of overpressure, most rats demonstrated no obvious changes between pre- and postexposure in the conventional MR images. CBF changes measured by SWI and ASL were significantly higher for the overpressure exposed groups as compared to the sham group and tended to increase with pressure increases at the highest two pressures. In the hippocampus, all blast animals had a reduction in the CBF consistently in the range of 0-27%. In summary, low levels of primary blast pressure exposure demonstrated a significant physiologic effect to the brain up to 72 h postexposure. PMID:22285875

  19. Role of CT Perfusion in Monitoring and Prediction of Response to Therapy of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Preda, Lorenzo; Moscatelli, Marco Elvio Manlio; Cossu Rocca, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This review aims to summarize the technique and clinical applications of CT perfusion (CTp) of head and neck cancer. The most common pathologic type (90%) of head and neck cancer is squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC): its diagnostic workup relies on CT and MRI, as they provide an accurate staging for the disease by determining tumour volume, assessing its extension, and detecting of lymph node metastases. Compared with conventional CT and MRI, CTp allows for obtaining measures of tumour vascular physiology and functional behaviour, and it has been demonstrated to be a feasible and useful tool in predicting local outcomes in patients undergoing radiation therapy and chemotherapy and may help monitor both treatments. PMID:25140324

  20. Non Tumor Perfusion Changes Following Stereotactic Radiosurgery to Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Jakubovic, Raphael; Sahgal, Arjun; Ruschin, Mark; Pejović-Milić, Ana; Milwid, Rachael; Aviv, Richard I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate early perfusion changes in normal tissue following stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: Nineteen patients harboring twenty-two brain metastases treated with SRS were imaged with dynamic susceptibility magnetic resonance imaging (DSC MRI) at baseline, 1 week and 1 month post SRS. Relative cerebral blood volume and flow (rCBV and rCBF) ratios were evaluated outside of tumor within a combined region of interest (ROI) and separately within gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) ROIs. Three-dimensional dose distribution from each SRS plan was divided into six regions: (1) <2 Gy; (2) 2-5 Gy; (3) 5-10 Gy; (4) 10-12 Gy; (5) 12-16 Gy; and (6) >16 Gy. rCBV and rCBF ratio differences between baseline, 1 week and 1 month were compared. Best linear fit plots quantified normal tissue dose-dependency. Results: Significant rCBV ratio increases were present between baseline and 1 month for all ROIs and dose ranges except for WM ROI receiving <2 Gy. rCBV ratio for all ROIs was maximally increased from baseline to 1 month with the greatest changes occurring within the 5-10 Gy dose range (53.1%). rCBF ratio was maximally increased from baseline to 1 month for all ROIs within the 5-10 Gy dose range (33.9-45.0%). Both rCBV and rCBF ratios were most elevated within GM ROIs. A weak, positive but not significant association between dose, rCBV and rCBF ratio was demonstrated. Progressive rCBV and rCBF ratio increased with dose up to 10 Gy at 1 month. Conclusion: Normal tissue response following SRS can be characterized by dose, tissue, and time specific increases in rCBV and rCBF ratio. PMID:26269612

  1. A Phantom Tissue System for the Calibration of Perfusion Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Mudaliar, Ashvinikumar V.; Ellis, Brent E.; Ricketts, Patricia L.; Lanz, Otto I.; Scott, Elaine P.; Diller, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    A convenient method for testing and calibrating surface perfusion sensors has been developed. A phantom tissue model is used to simulate the nondirectional blood flow of tissue perfusion. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was constructed in Fluent® to design the phantom tissue and validate the experimental results. The phantom perfusion system was used with a perfusion sensor based on clearance of thermal energy. A heat flux gage measures the heat flux response of tissue when a thermal event (convective cooling) is applied. The blood perfusion and contact resistance are estimated by a parameter estimation code. From the experimental and analytical results, it was concluded that the probe displayed good measurement repeatability and sensitivity. The experimental perfusion measurements in the tissue were in good agreement with those of the CFD models and demonstrated the value of the phantom tissue system. PMID:19045509

  2. Developing a benchmarking process in perfusion: a report of the Perfusion Downunder Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Baker, Robert A; Newland, Richard F; Fenton, Carmel; McDonald, Michael; Willcox, Timothy W; Merry, Alan F

    2012-03-01

    Improving and understanding clinical practice is an appropriate goal for the perfusion community. The Perfusion Downunder Collaboration has established a multi-center perfusion focused database aimed at achieving these goals through the development of quantitative quality indicators for clinical improvement through benchmarking. Data were collected using the Perfusion Downunder Collaboration database from procedures performed in eight Australian and New Zealand cardiac centers between March 2007 and February 2011. At the Perfusion Downunder Meeting in 2010, it was agreed by consensus, to report quality indicators (QI) for glucose level, arterial outlet temperature, and pCOz management during cardiopulmonary bypass. The values chosen for each QI were: blood glucose > or =4 mmol/L and < or =10 mmol/L; arterial outlet temperature < or = 37 degrees C; and arterial blood gas pCO2 > or =35 and < or =45 mmHg. The QI data were used to derive benchmarks using the Achievable Benchmark of Care (ABC) methodology to identify the incidence of QIs at the best performing centers. Five thousand four hundred and sixty-five procedures were evaluated to derive QI and benchmark data. The incidence of the blood glucose QI ranged from 37-96% of procedures, with a benchmark value of 90%. The arterial outlet temperature QI occurred in 16-98% of procedures with the benchmark of 94%; while the arterial pCO2 QI occurred in 21-91%, with the benchmark value of 80%. We have derived QIs and benchmark calculations for the management of several key aspects of cardiopulmonary bypass to provide a platform for improving the quality of perfusion practice.

  3. Effect of vasodilators on pulmonary perfusion defects in asthma using sequential Kr-81m perfusion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ertle, A.R.; Tashkin, D.P.; Webber, M.M.; Soffer, M.J.; Frank, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    The investigation was undertaken to determine if vasodilator agents may enhance the diagnostic utility of perfusion lung imaging (Q) by normalizing regional perfusion abnormalities in bronchospastic patients. The effect of oxygen (02), nitroglycerine (NTG), hydralazine (H), and nifedipine (N) on regional lung perfusion defects was studied in 6 mild to severe asthmatics (ages defects was studied in 6 mild to severe asthmatics (ages 31-72yrs) using sequential Kr-81m imaging which permits repetitive imaging due to very low radiation dose and 13 sec T-1/2. Each patient was studied once weekly for 3 wks. Baseline Q scans were obtained using 10mCi of I.V. Kr-81m. the best view showing perfusion defects was used for subsequent images. At each visits, 30% 02 by ventimask was given for 20 min followed by a repeat Q scan. Subsequently, on separate visits, subjects were given either 1 dose of sublingual (sl)N 20 mg or 2 doses (1 hr between) of s1 NTG 1/150gr or po H 25mg according to a random-order crossover design. Q scans were obtained 2 min after NTG, 60 min after H, and 30 and 60 min after N. 30% 02 was given again for 20 min, and a final scan was obtained. Scan were reviewed by 2 observers and showed relatively fixed defects in 4 pts improvement in defects in 3 pts with NTG, 1 with N, 1 with H, and 2 with 02 alone. Additive effects of 02 and N or NTG were seen in 2 pts. These preliminary results suggest that vasodilators and 02 may improve regional perfusion in patients with bronchospastic disease and that this effect may be additive. These medications may thus improve the specificity of perfusion lung scanning in the diagnostic evaluation of pulmonary embolism.

  4. A method of thymic perfusion and its evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ekwueme, O.

    1973-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a method of isolated ex vivo perfusion of the rabbit thymus using diluted autologous blood is described. The data indicate that the viability of the preparation is maintained at a satisfactory level during the period of perfusion. These results suggest that the isolated perfused thymus would be a useful new approach to studies of thymus function. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:4747584

  5. Scintigraphic perfusion patterns in patients with diffuse lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, G.E.; Sullivan, D.C.; Gottschalk, A.; Putman, C.E.

    1982-04-01

    Perfusion scintigrams of 55 patients with radiographic evidence of diffuse lung disease were reviewed. Thirty-nine had acute and/or chronic changes caused by congestive heart failure, and 16 had diffuse reticulonodular disease. A normal or near-normal perfusion pattern was seen in 40/55 (73%), and this finding was equally common in the two groups. The authors conclude that perfusion scintigraphy is useful in excluding pulmonary embolism in patients with radiographic evidence of diffuse, symmetrical lung disease.

  6. Perfusion Scintigraphy and Patient Selection for Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Divay; Lipson, David A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Hansen-Flaschen, John; Sciurba, Frank C.; DeCamp, Malcolm M.; Reilly, John J.; Washko, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: It is unclear if lung perfusion can predict response to lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). Objectives: To study the role of perfusion scintigraphy in patient selection for LVRS. Methods: We performed an intention-to-treat analysis of 1,045 of 1,218 patients enrolled in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial who were non–high risk for LVRS and had complete perfusion scintigraphy results at baseline. The median follow-up was 6.0 years. Patients were classified as having upper or non–upper lobe–predominant emphysema on visual examination of the chest computed tomography and high or low exercise capacity on cardiopulmonary exercise testing at baseline. Low upper zone perfusion was defined as less than 20% of total lung perfusion distributed to the upper third of both lungs as measured on perfusion scintigraphy. Measurements and Main Results: Among 284 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema and low exercise capacity at baseline, the 202 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS versus medical management (risk ratio [RR], 0.56; P = 0.008) unlike the remaining 82 with high perfusion where mortality was unchanged (RR, 0.97; P = 0.62). Similarly, among 404 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema and high exercise capacity, the 278 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS (RR, 0.70; P = 0.02) unlike the remaining 126 with high perfusion (RR, 1.05; P = 1.00). Among the 357 patients with non–upper lobe–predominant emphysema (75 with low and 282 with high exercise capacity) there was no improvement in survival with LVRS and measurement of upper zone perfusion did not contribute new prognostic information. Conclusions: Compared with optimal medical management, LVRS reduces mortality in patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema when there is low rather than high perfusion to the upper lung. PMID:20538961

  7. Measurement of continuous distributions of ventilation-perfusion ratios - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, P. D.; Saltzman, H. A.; West, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    The resolution of the technique considered is sufficient to describe smooth distributions containing blood flow to unventilated regions (shunt), ventilation to unperfused regions (dead space), and up to three additional modes over the range of finite ventilation-perfusion ratios. In particular, areas whose ventilation-perfusion ratios are low can be separated from unventilated regions and those whose ventilation-perfusion ratios are high can similarly be distinguished from unperfused areas.

  8. Central Nervous System Lymphoma in a 3-Year-Old Male Suffering from a Severe Juvenile Xanthogranuloma – the Usefulness of Perfusion Weighted Imaging and Diffusion Weighted Imaging in the Diagnostics of Pediatric Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Neska-Matuszewska, Małgorzata; Zimny, Anna; Kałwak, Krzysztof; Sąsiadek, Marek J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Primary Central Nervous System Lymphomas (PCNSLs) are rare, malignant brain tumors derived from lymphocytes B. Juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG) is a non-Langerhans histiocytic cell disorder in children which mostly affects the skin. Rare fatalities have been reported in extracutaneous manifestation. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a method of choice in the diagnostics of all neoplastic CNS lesions. Perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) allow for more detailed analysis of brain tumors including the rate of neoangiogenesis and cellularity. We presented a pediatric patient suffering from JXG with CNS involvement and the role of brain MRI including DWI and PWI in the evaluation of brain focal lesions. Case Report A 3-year-old male with severe JXG underwent two stem cell transplantations with a development of neurological complications. The patient underwent emergency CT and MRI which revealed a non-specific enhancing focal brain lesion. In DWI it showed restricted diffusion while PWI revealed low values of rCBV and the signal intensity curve returning above the baseline level. Advanced MRI techniques such as DWI and PWI suggested PCNSL. Stereotactic biopsy confirmed PCNSL due to Ebstein-Barr virus reactivation. Conclusions The use of advanced MRI sequences is important to differentiate brain lesions in pediatric patients. The use of PWI and DWI facilitated the diagnosis of PCNSL. It is important to remember that PCNSLs show a very typical pattern of changes visualized with MRI such as: usually strong homogenous enhancement, restricted diffusion and low perfusion. PMID:25624957

  9. Oxygen-Enhanced MRI Accurately Identifies, Quantifies, and Maps Tumor Hypoxia in Preclinical Cancer Models.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, James P B; Boult, Jessica K R; Jamin, Yann; Babur, Muhammad; Finegan, Katherine G; Williams, Kaye J; Little, Ross A; Jackson, Alan; Parker, Geoff J M; Reynolds, Andrew R; Waterton, John C; Robinson, Simon P

    2016-02-15

    There is a clinical need for noninvasive biomarkers of tumor hypoxia for prognostic and predictive studies, radiotherapy planning, and therapy monitoring. Oxygen-enhanced MRI (OE-MRI) is an emerging imaging technique for quantifying the spatial distribution and extent of tumor oxygen delivery in vivo. In OE-MRI, the longitudinal relaxation rate of protons (ΔR1) changes in proportion to the concentration of molecular oxygen dissolved in plasma or interstitial tissue fluid. Therefore, well-oxygenated tissues show positive ΔR1. We hypothesized that the fraction of tumor tissue refractory to oxygen challenge (lack of positive ΔR1, termed "Oxy-R fraction") would be a robust biomarker of hypoxia in models with varying vascular and hypoxic features. Here, we demonstrate that OE-MRI signals are accurate, precise, and sensitive to changes in tumor pO2 in highly vascular 786-0 renal cancer xenografts. Furthermore, we show that Oxy-R fraction can quantify the hypoxic fraction in multiple models with differing hypoxic and vascular phenotypes, when used in combination with measurements of tumor perfusion. Finally, Oxy-R fraction can detect dynamic changes in hypoxia induced by the vasomodulator agent hydralazine. In contrast, more conventional biomarkers of hypoxia (derived from blood oxygenation-level dependent MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI) did not relate to tumor hypoxia consistently. Our results show that the Oxy-R fraction accurately quantifies tumor hypoxia noninvasively and is immediately translatable to the clinic.

  10. Diffusion MRI/NMR magnetization equations with relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Dilip; Daniel, Simon

    2012-10-01

    Bloch-Torrey diffusion magnetization equation ignores relaxation effects of magnetization. Relaxation times are important in any diffusion magnetization studies of perfusion in tissues(Brain and heart specially). Bloch-Torrey equation cannot therefore describe diffusion magnetization in a real-life situation where relaxation effects play a key role, characteristics of tissues under examination. This paper describes derivations of two equations for each of the y and z component diffusion NMR/MRI magnetization (separately) in a rotating frame of reference, where rf B1 field is applied along x direction and bias magnetic field(Bo) is along z direction. The two equations are expected to further advance the science & technology of Diffusion MRI(DMRI) and diffusion functional MRI(DFMRI). These two techniques are becoming increasingly important in the study and treatment of neurological disorders, especially for the management of patients with acute stroke. It is rapidly becoming a standard for white matter disorders, as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can reveal abnormalities in white matter fibre structure and provide models of brain connectivity.

  11. PET/MRI assessment of the infarcted mouse heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonincontri, Guido; Methner, Carmen; Krieg, Thomas; Hawkes, Robert C.; Adrian Carpenter, T.; Sawiak, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure originating from myocardial infarction (MI) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Mouse models of ischaemia and reperfusion injury (I/R) are used to study the effects of novel treatment strategies targeting MI, however staging disease and treatment efficacy is a challenge. Damage and recovery can be assessed on the cellular, tissue or whole-organ scale but these are rarely measured in concert. Here, for the first time, we present data showing measures of injury in infarcted mice using complementary techniques for multi-modal characterisation of the heart. We use in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess heart function with cine-MRI, hindered perfusion with late gadolinium enhancement imaging and muscular function with displacement encoded with stimulated echoes (DENSE) MRI. These measures are followed by positron emission tomography (PET) with 18-F-fluorodeoxyglucose to assess cellular metabolism. We demonstrate a protocol combining each of these measures for the same animal in the same imaging session and compare how the different markers can be used to quantify cardiac recovery on different scales following injury.

  12. Extracorporeal Free Flap Perfusion in Case of Prolonged Ischemia Time

    PubMed Central

    Präbst, K.; Beier, J. P.; Meyer, A.; Horch, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: In free flap surgery, a clinically established concept still has to be found for the reduction of ischemia-related cell damage in the case of prolonged ischemia. Although promising results using extracorporeal free flap perfusion in the laboratory have been published in the past, until now this concept has not yet paved its way into clinical routine. This might be due to the complexity of perfusion systems and a lack of standardized tools. Here, we want to present the results of the first extracorporeal free flap perfusion in a clinical setting using a simple approach without the application of a complex perfusion machinery. PMID:27200244

  13. Effect of Defocused CO2 Laser on Equine Tissue Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Bergh, A; Nyman, G; Lundeberg, T; Drevemo, S

    2006-01-01

    Treatment with defocused CO2 laser can have a therapeutic effect on equine injuries, but the mechanisms involved are unclear. A recent study has shown that laser causes an increase in equine superficial tissue temperature, which may result in an increase in blood perfusion and a stimulating effect on tissue regeneration. However, no studies have described the effects on equine tissue perfusion. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of defocused CO2 laser on blood perfusion and to correlate it with temperature in skin and underlying muscle in anaesthetized horses. Differences between clipped and unclipped haircoat were also assessed. Eight horses and two controls received CO2 laser treatment (91 J/cm2) in a randomised order, on a clipped and unclipped area of the hamstring muscles, respectively. The significant increase in clipped skin perfusion and temperature was on average 146.3 ± 33.4 perfusion units (334%) and 5.5 ± 1.5°C, respectively. The significant increase in perfusion and temperature in unclipped skin were 80.6 ± 20.4 perfusion units (264%) and 4.8 ± 1.4°C. No significant changes were seen in muscle perfusion or temperature. In conclusion, treatment with defocused CO2 laser causes a significant increase in skin perfusion, which is correlated to an increase in skin temperature. PMID:16722304

  14. Radionuclide Tracers for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging and Blood Flow Quantification.

    PubMed

    deKemp, Robert A; Renaud, Jennifer M; Klein, Ran; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2016-02-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging is performed most commonly using Tc-99m-sestamibi or tetrofosmin SPECT as well as Rb-82-rubidium or N-13-ammonia PET. Diseased-to-normal tissue contrast is determined by the tracer retention fraction, which decreases nonlinearly with flow. Reduced tissue perfusion results in reduced tracer retention, but the severity of perfusion defects is typically underestimated by 20% to 40%. Compared to SPECT, retention of the PET tracers is more linearly related to flow, and therefore, the perfusion defects are measured more accurately using N-13-ammonia or Rb-82. PMID:26590778

  15. Ex Situ Normothermic Machine Perfusion of Donor Livers.

    PubMed

    Karimian, Negin; Matton, Alix P M; Westerkamp, Andrie C; Burlage, Laura C; Op den Dries, Sanna; Leuvenink, Henri G D; Lisman, Ton; Uygun, Korkut; Markmann, James F; Porte, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to conventional static cold preservation (0-4 °C), ex situ machine perfusion may provide better preservation of donor livers. Continuous perfusion of organs provides the opportunity to improve organ quality and allows ex situ viability assessment of donor livers prior to transplantation. This video article provides a step by step protocol for ex situ normothermic machine perfusion (37 °C) of human donor livers using a device that provides a pressure and temperature controlled pulsatile perfusion of the hepatic artery and continuous perfusion of the portal vein. The perfusion fluid is oxygenated by two hollow fiber membrane oxygenators and the temperature can be regulated between 10 °C and 37 °C. During perfusion, the metabolic activity of the liver as well as the degree of injury can be assessed by biochemical analysis of samples taken from the perfusion fluid. Machine perfusion is a very promising tool to increase the number of livers that are suitable for transplantation.

  16. New imaging technology: measurement of myocardial perfusion by contrast echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. N.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging has long been a goal for the non-invasive echocardiographic assessment of the heart. However, many factors at play in perfusion imaging have made this goal elusive. Harmonic imaging and triggered imaging with newer contrast agents have made myocardial perfusion imaging potentially practical in the very near future. The application of indicator dilution theory to the coronary circulation and bubble contrast agents is fraught with complexities and sources of error. Therefore, quantification of myocardial perfusion by non-invasive echocardiographic imaging requires further investigation in order to make this technique clinically viable.

  17. An fMRI study of perception and action in deaf signers.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kayoko; Rogalsky, Corianne; O'Grady, Lucinda; Hanaumi, Leila; Bellugi, Ursula; Corina, David; Hickok, Gregory

    2016-02-01

    Since the discovery of mirror neurons, there has been a great deal of interest in understanding the relationship between perception and action, and the role of the human mirror system in language comprehension and production. Two questions have dominated research. One concerns the role of Broca's area in speech perception. The other concerns the role of the motor system more broadly in understanding action-related language. The current study investigates both of these questions in a way that bridges research on language with research on manual actions. We studied the neural basis of observing and executing American Sign Language (ASL) object and action signs. In an fMRI experiment, deaf signers produced signs depicting actions and objects as well as observed/comprehended signs of actions and objects. Different patterns of activation were found for observation and execution although with overlap in Broca's area, providing prima facie support for the claim that the motor system participates in language perception. In contrast, we found no evidence that action related signs differentially involved the motor system compared to object related signs. These findings are discussed in the context of lesion studies of sign language execution and observation. In this broader context, we conclude that the activation in Broca's area during ASL observation is not causally related to sign language understanding. PMID:26796716

  18. Acceleration-selective arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Sophie; Ghariq, Eidrees; Teeuwisse, Wouter M; Webb, Andrew; van Osch, Matthias J P

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a new arterial spin labeling (ASL) method with spatially nonselective labeling is introduced, based on the acceleration of flowing spins, which is able to image brain perfusion with minimal contamination from venous signal. This method is termed acceleration-selective ASL (AccASL) and resembles velocity-selective ASL (VSASL), with the difference that AccASL is able to discriminate between arterial and venous components in a single preparation module due to the higher acceleration on the arterial side of the microvasculature, whereas VSASL cannot make this distinction unless a second labeling module is used. A difference between AccASL and VSASL is that AccASL is mainly cerebral blood volume weighted, whereas VSASL is cerebral blood flow weighted. AccASL exploits the principles of acceleration-encoded magnetic resonance angiography by using motion-sensitizing gradients in a T2 -preparation module. This method is demonstrated in healthy volunteers for a range of cutoff accelerations. Additionally, AccASL is compared with VSASL and pseudo-continuous ASL, and its feasibility in functional MRI is demonstrated. Compared with VSASL with a single labeling module, a strong and significant reduction in venous label is observed. The resulting signal-to-noise ratio is comparable to pseudo-continuous ASL and robust activation of the visual cortex is observed.

  19. Eosinophilic granuloma: MRI manifestations.

    PubMed

    Beltran, J; Aparisi, F; Bonmati, L M; Rosenberg, Z S; Present, D; Steiner, G C

    1993-01-01

    The appearance on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 16 cases of pathologically proven eosinophilic granuloma were reviewed retrospectively and correlated with the radiographic appearance of the lesion. The most common MR appearance (ten cases) was a focal lesion, surrounded by an extensive, ill-defined bone marrow and soft tissue reaction with low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, considered to represent bone marrow and soft tissue edema (the flare phenomenon). The MRI manifestations of eosinophilic granuloma, especially during the early stages, are nonspecific, and may stimulate an aggressive lesion such as osteomyelitis or Ewings sarcoma, or other benign bone tumors such as osteoid osteoma or chondroblastoma. PMID:8480200

  20. MRI of the penis.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, A

    2012-11-01

    MRI of the penis is an expensive test that is not always superior to clinical examination or ultrasound. However, it shows many of the important structures, and in particular the combination of tumescence from intracavernosal alprostadil, and high-resolution T(2) sequences show the glans, corpora and the tunica albuginea well. In this paper we summarise the radiological anatomy and discuss the indications for MRI. For penile cancer, it may be useful in cases where the local stage is not apparent clinically. In priapism, it is an emerging technique for assessing corporal viability, and in fracture it can in most cases make the diagnosis and locate the injury. In some cases of penile fibrosis and Peyronie's disease, it may aid surgical planning, and in complex pelvic fracture may replace or augment conventional urethrography. It is an excellent investigation for the malfunctioning penile prosthesis.

  1. Effectiveness of CT Computed Tomography Perfusion in Diagnostics of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Menzilcioglu, Mehmet Sait; Mete, Ahmet; Ünverdi, Zeyni

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Stroke is the third most common death reason after the cardiovascular disorders and cancer. Cerebral ischemia is a pathology that stems from a decrease in cerebral perfusion. Computed Tomography Perfusion (CTP) is an additional method to the conventional Computed Tomography (CT) that could be performed by using developed softwares, in a short period of time and with a low risk of complications. CTP not only allows early detection of cerebral ischemia but also gives valuable information on the ischemic penumbra which are very important in early diagnosis and treatment. Acute Ischemic Stroke (AIS) can be cured by trombolytic treapy within 3–6 hours after symptom onset. Since rapid screening and accurate diagnosis increase the success of the treatment, the role of neuroradiology in acute ischemia diagnostics and treatment has become more important. Our aim was to define CT skills in early diagnosis of AIS, to define its contribution to patient’s diagnosis and treatment and to define its importance regarding patient’s prognosis. Material/Methods We included 42 patients that presented to the emergency service and neurology outpatient clinic with the symptoms of acute cerebral incidence. Results In our study, we found that Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) is 90.91% sensitive and 100% specific in examining ischemia. Conclusions Tissue hemodynamic data, especially sensitivity and specificity rates, which cannot be acquired by conventional CT and MRI methods, can be acquired by the CTP method. PMID:26740827

  2. Cerebral Perfusion is Associated with White Matter Hyperintensities in Older Adults with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Brickman, Adam M.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Garcia, Sarah L.; Narkhede, Atul; Griffith, Erica Y; Raz, Naftali; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Colbert, Lisa H.; Josephson, Richard; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is common in heart failure (HF) and believed to be the result of cerebral hypoperfusion and subsequent brain changes including white matter hyperintensities (WMH). The current study examined the association between cerebral blood flow and WMH in HF patients and the relationship of WMH to cognitive impairment. Sixty-nine patients with HF completed the mini mental state examination (MMSE), echocardiogram, transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) for cerebral blood flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Multivariable hierarchical regression analyses controlling for medical and demographic characteristics as well as intracranial volume showed reduced cerebral blood flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery was associated with greater WMH (β = −.34, p = .02). Follow up regression analyses adjusting for the same medical and demographic factors in addition to cerebral perfusion also revealed marginal significance between increased WMH and poorer performance on the MMSE (β = −.26, p = .05). This study suggests that reduced cerebral perfusion is associated with greater WMH in older adults with HF. Our findings support the widely proposed mechanism of cognitive impairment in HF patients and prospective studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:23517434

  3. Superconducting magnets for MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.E.

    1984-08-01

    Three types of magnets are currently used to provide the background field required for magnet resonance imaging (MRI). (i) Permanent magnets produce fields of up to 0.3 T in volumes sufficient for imaging the head or up to 0.15 T for whole body imaging. Cost and simplicity of operation are advantages, but relatively low field, weight (up to 100 tonnes) and, to a small extent, instability are limitations. (ii) Water-cooled magnets provide fields of up to 0.25 T in volumes suitable for whole body imaging, but at the expense of power (up to 150 kW for 0.25 T) and water-cooling. Thermal stability of the field requires the maintenance of constant temperature through periods both of use and of quiescence. (iii) Because of the limitations imposed by permanent and resistive magnets, particularly on field strength, the superconducting magnet is now most widely used to provide background fields of up to 2 T for whole body MRI. It requires very low operating power and that only for refrigeration. Because of the constant low temperature, 4.2 K, at which its stressed structure operates, its field is stable. The following review deals principally with superconducting magnets for MRI. However, the sections on field analysis apply to all types of magnet and the description of the source terms of circular coils and of the principals of design of solenoids apply equally to resistive solenoidal magnets.

  4. Caffeine attenuates practice effects in word stem completion as measured by fMRI BOLD signal.

    PubMed

    Bendlin, Barbara B; Trouard, Theodore P; Ryan, Lee

    2007-07-01

    Caffeine ingestion results in increased brain cell metabolism (Nehlig et al. [1992] Brain Res Brain Res Rev 17:139-170) and decreased cerebral blood flow (Field et al. [2003] Radiology 227:129-135; Mulderink et al. [2002] Neuroimage 15:37-44). The current study investigated the effect of caffeine in a word stem completion task using only novel word stems (no repeated stimuli). Resting perfusion was measured with arterial spin labeled perfusion MRI, along with blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal before and after ingestion of regular coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and water. Based on previous research (Laurienti et al. [2002] Neuroimage 17:751-757; Mulderink et al. [2002] Neuroimage 15:37-44), we hypothesized that caffeine would result in increased BOLD signal intensity and extent of BOLD activation. As expected, caffeine resulted in a significant decrease in cerebral perfusion. However, both the control and caffeine groups showed an increase in BOLD signal amplitude across two sets of novel word stems. Additionally, the control group showed a 50% reduction in the extent of BOLD activation, while the caffeine group showed no change in activation extent. Neither group showed changes in BOLD baseline signal over time, which had been suggested to mediate caffeine-related BOLD signal changes. The results suggest that caffeine may attenuate general task practice effects that have been described in recent functional MRI studies of word stem completion (Buckner et al. [2000] Brain 123:620-640).

  5. Estimation of Cerebral Blood Flow From Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI Using A Tissue Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimony, Joshua S.; Lee, John J.; Bretthorst, G. Larry

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral perfusion measurements are of great clinical and research interest. Positron emission tomography (PET) is considered the gold standard for cerebral perfusion measurement, but is not widely available and entails exposure of the subject to radioactivity. Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI methods are becoming more widely available on the newest generation of MRI scanners. The standard analysis methods of this data have significant disadvantages that include the use of a single, difficult to measure, arterial input function for the entire brain and the need to perform a numerical deconvolution on the logarithm of noisy data. These methods are not yet fully validated and remain qualitative in nature. Using a modification of the standard tracer kinetic principles we implemented a tissue perfusion model that has several advantages over standard methods. The model parameters were estimated using Bayes probability theory in a group of patients with varying degrees of hemodynamic impairment and were found to provide additional physiologic information that was not available using standard techniques.

  6. Automated detection of arterial input function in DSC perfusion MRI in a stroke rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, M.-Y.; Lee, T.-H.; Yang, S.-T.; Kuo, H.-H.; Chyi, T.-K.; Liu, H.-L.

    2009-05-01

    Quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) estimation requires deconvolution of the tissue concentration time curves with an arterial input function (AIF). However, image-based determination of AIF in rodent is challenged due to limited spatial resolution. We evaluated the feasibility of quantitative analysis using automated AIF detection and compared the results with commonly applied semi-quantitative analysis. Permanent occlusion of bilateral or unilateral common carotid artery was used to induce cerebral ischemia in rats. The image using dynamic susceptibility contrast method was performed on a 3-T magnetic resonance scanner with a spin-echo echo-planar-image sequence (TR/TE = 700/80 ms, FOV = 41 mm, matrix = 64, 3 slices, SW = 2 mm), starting from 7 s prior to contrast injection (1.2 ml/kg) at four different time points. For quantitative analysis, CBF was calculated by the AIF which was obtained from 10 voxels with greatest contrast enhancement after deconvolution. For semi-quantitative analysis, relative CBF was estimated by the integral divided by the first moment of the relaxivity time curves. We observed if the AIFs obtained in the three different ROIs (whole brain, hemisphere without lesion and hemisphere with lesion) were similar, the CBF ratios (lesion/normal) between quantitative and semi-quantitative analyses might have a similar trend at different operative time points. If the AIFs were different, the CBF ratios might be different. We concluded that using local maximum one can define proper AIF without knowing the anatomical location of arteries in a stroke rat model.

  7. [New opportunities, MRI biomarkers in the evaluation of head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Gődény, Mária; Léránt, Gergely

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has developed rapidly during the past few years and, according to the needs of therapy, has opened new perspectives in oncologic imaging with better and better realization of the latest technological advances. After the introduction of "organ preservation" protocols the role of imaging has become more important. New therapeutic methods (improvement in radiation therapy and chemotherapy) need better tumor characterization and prognostic information along with the most accurate anatomical information. Multiparametric anatomical and functional MR imaging (MM-MRI) using high magnetic field strength (3 Tesla) are useful in determining tumor-specific MRI biomarkers and in evaluating the changes in these parameters during therapy to provide early assessment of the therapeutic response. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) provides information at the cellular level about cell density and the integrity of the plasma membrane. DW-MRI shows potential in improving the detection of cancer due to its high specificity and high negative predictive value. Quantification is performed using an apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), the values are independent of the magnetic field strength. In the latest publications the accuracy of DW-MRI has been reported around 90% for the differentiation between malignant versus benign tumor using an ADC cut-off mean value of 0.700-1.200 10(-3) mm(2)/s units, but no common threshold ADC value exists in clinical routine for the differentiation of malignant and benign tissues. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), as a marker of angiogenesis, provides information about vascularization at the tissue level. Angiogenetic alterations cause changes in the parameters of vascular physiology (perfusion, blood volume, capillary permeability) and thus alter the contrast enhancement observed on contrast MRI. High-grade and/or advanced stage tumors are associated with increased blood volume, increased permeability and increased

  8. Intraoperative MRI and functional mapping.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Thomas; Szelenyi, Andrea; Senft, Christian; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Sandalcioglu, I Erol; Sure, Ulrich; Nimsky, Christopher; Seifert, Volker

    2011-01-01

    The integration of functional and anatomical data into neuronavigation is an established standard of care in many neurosurgical departments. Yet, this method has limitations as in most cases the data are acquired prior to surgery. Due to brain-shift the accurate presentation of functional as well as anatomical structures declines in the course of surgery. In consequence, the acquisition of information during surgery about the brain's current functional state is of specific interest. The advancement of imaging technologies (e.g. fMRI, MEG, Intraoperative Optical Intrinsic Signal Imaging--IOIS) and neurophysiological techniques and the advent of intraoperative MRI all had a major impact on neurosurgery. The combination of modalities such as neurophysiology and intraoperative MRI (ioMRI), as well as the acquisition of functional MRI during surgery (ifMRI) are in the focus of this work. Especially the technical aspects and safety issues are elucidated.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Perfusion Imaging in the Study of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillis, Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a brief review of various uses of magnetic resonance perfusion imaging in the investigation of brain/language relationships. The reviewed studies illustrate how perfusion imaging can reveal areas of brain where dysfunction due to low blood flow is associated with specific language deficits, and where restoration of blood flow…

  10. Tissue-specific sparse deconvolution for brain CT perfusion.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ruogu; Jiang, Haodi; Huang, Junzhou

    2015-12-01

    Enhancing perfusion maps in low-dose computed tomography perfusion (CTP) for cerebrovascular disease diagnosis is a challenging task, especially for low-contrast tissue categories where infarct core and ischemic penumbra usually occur. Sparse perfusion deconvolution has been recently proposed to effectively improve the image quality and diagnostic accuracy of low-dose perfusion CT by extracting the complementary information from the high-dose perfusion maps to restore the low-dose using a joint spatio-temporal model. However the low-contrast tissue classes where infarct core and ischemic penumbra are likely to occur in cerebral perfusion CT tend to be over-smoothed, leading to loss of essential biomarkers. In this paper, we propose a tissue-specific sparse deconvolution approach to preserve the subtle perfusion information in the low-contrast tissue classes. We first build tissue-specific dictionaries from segmentations of high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning, and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation for block-wise tissue segments on the low-dose CTP data. Extensive validation on clinical datasets of patients with cerebrovascular disease demonstrates the superior performance of our proposed method compared to state-of-art, and potentially improve diagnostic accuracy by increasing the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissues in the brain. PMID:26055434

  11. Tissue-specific sparse deconvolution for brain CT perfusion.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ruogu; Jiang, Haodi; Huang, Junzhou

    2015-12-01

    Enhancing perfusion maps in low-dose computed tomography perfusion (CTP) for cerebrovascular disease diagnosis is a challenging task, especially for low-contrast tissue categories where infarct core and ischemic penumbra usually occur. Sparse perfusion deconvolution has been recently proposed to effectively improve the image quality and diagnostic accuracy of low-dose perfusion CT by extracting the complementary information from the high-dose perfusion maps to restore the low-dose using a joint spatio-temporal model. However the low-contrast tissue classes where infarct core and ischemic penumbra are likely to occur in cerebral perfusion CT tend to be over-smoothed, leading to loss of essential biomarkers. In this paper, we propose a tissue-specific sparse deconvolution approach to preserve the subtle perfusion information in the low-contrast tissue classes. We first build tissue-specific dictionaries from segmentations of high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning, and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation for block-wise tissue segments on the low-dose CTP data. Extensive validation on clinical datasets of patients with cerebrovascular disease demonstrates the superior performance of our proposed method compared to state-of-art, and potentially improve diagnostic accuracy by increasing the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissues in the brain.

  12. Perfusion Electronic Record Documentation Using Epic Systems Software.

    PubMed

    Riley, Jeffrey B; Justison, George A

    2015-12-01

    The authors comment on Steffens and Gunser's article describing the University of Wisconsin adoption of the Epic anesthesia record to include perfusion information from the cardiopulmonary bypass patient experience. We highlight the current-day lessons and the valuable quality and safety principles the Wisconsin-Epic model anesthesia-perfusion record provides.

  13. Motion compensation of ultrasonic perfusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Sebastian; Nylund, Kim; Gilja, Odd H.; Tönnies, Klaus D.

    2012-03-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is a rapid and inexpensive medical imaging technique to assess tissue perfusion with a high temporal resolution. It is composed of a sequence with ultrasound brightness values and a contrast sequence acquired simultaneously. However, the image acquisition is disturbed by various motion influences. Registration is needed to obtain reliable information of spatial correspondence and to analyze perfusion characteristics over time. We present an approach to register an ultrasonography sequence by using a feature label map. This label map is generated from the b-mode data sequence by a Markov-Random-Field (MRF) based analysis, where each location is assigned to one of the user-defined regions according to its statistical parameters. The MRF reduces the chance that outliers are represented in the label map and provides stable feature labels over the time frames. A registration consisting of rigid and non-rigid transformations is determined consecutively using the generated label map of the respective frames for similarity calculation. For evaluation, the standard deviation within specific regions in intestinal CEUS images has been measured before and after registration resulting in an average decrease of 8.6 %. Additionally, this technique has proven to be more robust against noise influence compared to similarity calculation based on image intensities only. The latter leads only to 7.6 % decrease of the standard deviation.

  14. Sodium MRI: Methods and applications

    PubMed Central

    Madelin, Guillaume; Lee, Jae-Seung; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Jerschow, Alexej

    2014-01-01

    Sodium NMR spectroscopy and MRI have become popular in recent years through the increased availability of high-field MRI scanners, advanced scanner hardware and improved methodology. Sodium MRI is being evaluated for stroke and tumor detection, for breast cancer studies, and for the assessment of osteoarthritis and muscle and kidney functions, to name just a few. In this article, we aim to present an up-to-date review of the theoretical background, the methodology, the challenges and limitations, and current and potential new applications of sodium MRI. PMID:24815363

  15. A constant temperature perfusion system for myocardial energetics.

    PubMed

    Niesler, R A; Axon, D W; Eggert, M A

    1981-11-01

    A constant temperature perfusion system employing four heat exchangers has been developed in which perfusion fluid is heated from room temperature to 37 +/- 10 -4 degrees C for precision heat flow measurements on isolated working rat hearts. The temperature characteristics have been established and mathematical expressions developed to identify and quantify spurious thermal events. The system is a refinement of existing perfusion systems for metabolic and mechanical investigations which meets the complete requirements of myocardial energetics. It can also be used for experiments which include high precision temperature measurements on isolated working hearts or for thermal investigations on other isolated perfused organs where a highly stabilised temperature base line is required over perfusion flows from 0-100 cm3 min -1. PMID:7323145

  16. Hepatic perfusion abnormalities during CT angiography: Detection and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeny, P.C.; Marks, W.M.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-seven perfusion abnormalities were detected in 17 of 50 patients who underwent computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the liver. All but one of the perfusion abnormalities occurred in patients with primary or metastatic liver tumors. Perfusion abnormalities were lobar in nine cases, segmental in 11, and subsegmental in seven; 14 were hypoperfusion and 13 were hyperperfusion abnormalities. The causes for the abnormalities included nonperfusion of a replaced hepatic artery (n = 11), cirrhosis and nodular regeneration (n = 3), altered hepatic hemodynamics (e.g., siphoning, laminar flow) caused by tumor (n = 7), contrast media washout from a nonperfused vessel (n = 1), compression of adjacent hepatic parenchyma (n = 1), and unknown (n = 4). Differentiation of perfusion abnormalities from tumor usually can be made by comparing the morphology of the known tumor with the suspected perfusion abnormality, changes of each on delayed CTA scans, and review of initial angiograms and other imaging studies.

  17. Nifedipine and thallium-201 myocardial perfusion in progressive systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kahan, A.; Devaux, J.Y.; Amor, B.; Menkes, C.J.; Weber, S.; Nitenberg, A.; Venot, A.; Guerin, F.; Degeorges, M.; Roucayrol, J.C.

    1986-05-29

    Heart disease in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis may be due in part to myocardial ischemia caused by a disturbance of the coronary microcirculation. To determine whether abnormalities of myocardial perfusion in this disorder are potentially reversible, we evaluated the effect of the coronary vasodilator nifedipine on myocardial perfusion assessed by thallium-201 scanning in 20 patients. Thallium-201 single-photon-emission computerized tomography was performed under control conditions and 90 minutes after 20 mg of oral nifedipine. The mean (+/- SD) number of left ventricular segments with perfusion defects decreased from 5.3 +/- 2.0 to 3.3 +/- 2.2 after nifedipine (P = 0.0003). Perfusion abnormalities were quantified by a perfusion score (0 to 2.0) assigned to each left ventricular segment and by a global perfusion score (0 to 18) for the entire left ventricle. The mean perfusion score in segments with resting defects increased from 0.97 +/- 0.24 to 1.26 +/- 0.44 after nifedipine (P less than 0.00001). The mean global perfusion score increased from 11.2 +/- 1.7 to 12.8 +/- 2.4 after nifedipine (P = 0.003). The global perfusion score increased by at least 2.0 in 10 patients and decreased by at least 2.0 in only 1. These observations reveal short-term improvement in thallium-201 myocardial perfusion with nifedipine in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis. The results are consistent with a potentially reversible abnormality of coronary vasomotion in this disorder, but the long-term therapeutic effects of nifedipine remain to be determined.

  18. CW blue laser emission by second harmonic generation of 900-nm oscillation of Nd-doped strontium and lanthanum aluminate (ASL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varona, C.; Loiseau, P.; Aka, G.; Ferrand, B.; Lupei, V.

    2006-04-01

    Nd-doped strontium and lanthanum (ASL) crystals Sr 1-xLa x-yNd yMg xAl 12-xO 19 (0.05 <= x <= 0.5; y = 0.05) were grown by Czochralski pulling technique. Up to 1.67W of 900nm IR output laser power for an absorbed power of 2.53W was obtained under Ti:sapphire pumping at 792nm. Intracavity second harmonic generation experiments led to 320mW of blue laser power at 450nm with a 10mm-long BiB 3O 6 nonlinear crystal. Other nonlinear crystals were also evaluated such as LBO.

  19. Pieces-of-parts for supervoxel segmentation with global context: Application to DCE-MRI tumour delineation.

    PubMed

    Irving, Benjamin; Franklin, James M; Papież, Bartłomiej W; Anderson, Ewan M; Sharma, Ricky A; Gleeson, Fergus V; Brady, Sir Michael; Schnabel, Julia A

    2016-08-01

    Rectal tumour segmentation in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) is a challenging task, and an automated and consistent method would be highly desirable to improve the modelling and prediction of patient outcomes from tissue contrast enhancement characteristics - particularly in routine clinical practice. A framework is developed to automate DCE-MRI tumour segmentation, by introducing: perfusion-supervoxels to over-segment and classify DCE-MRI volumes using the dynamic contrast enhancement characteristics; and the pieces-of-parts graphical model, which adds global (anatomic) constraints that further refine the supervoxel components that comprise the tumour. The framework was evaluated on 23 DCE-MRI scans of patients with rectal adenocarcinomas, and achieved a voxelwise area-under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.97 compared to expert delineations. Creating a binary tumour segmentation, 21 of the 23 cases were segmented correctly with a median Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 0.63, which is close to the inter-rater variability of this challenging task. A second study is also included to demonstrate the method's generalisability and achieved a DSC of 0.71. The framework achieves promising results for the underexplored area of rectal tumour segmentation in DCE-MRI, and the methods have potential to be applied to other DCE-MRI and supervoxel segmentation problems.

  20. Optimized time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS) in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy in small animal tumor models.

    PubMed

    Haeck, Joost; Bol, Karin; Bison, Sander; van Tiel, Sandra; Koelewijn, Stuart; de Jong, Marion; Veenland, Jifke; Bernsen, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Anti-tumor efficacy of targeted peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) relies on several factors, including functional tumor vasculature. Little is known about the effect of PRRT on tumor vasculature. With dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI, functional vasculature is imaged and quantified using contrast agents. In small animals DCE-MRI is a challenging application. We optimized a clinical sequence for fast hemodynamic acquisitions, time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS), to obtain DCE-MRI images at both high spatial and high temporal resolution in mice and rats. Using TRICKS, functional vasculature was measured prior to PRRT and longitudinally to investigate the effect of treatment on tumor vascular characteristics. Nude mice bearing H69 tumor xenografts and rats bearing syngeneic CA20948 tumors were used to study perfusion following PRRT administration with (177) lutetium octreotate. Both semi-quantitative and quantitative parameters were calculated. Treatment efficacy was measured by tumor-size reduction. Optimized TRICKS enabled MRI at 0.032 mm(3) voxel size with a temporal resolution of less than 5 s and large volume coverage, a substantial improvement over routine pre-clinical DCE-MRI studies. Tumor response to therapy was reflected in changes in tumor perfusion/permeability parameters. The H69 tumor model showed pronounced changes in DCE-derived parameters following PRRT. The rat CA20948 tumor model showed more heterogeneity in both treatment outcome and perfusion parameters. TRICKS enabled the acquisition of DCE-MRI at both high temporal resolution (Tres ) and spatial resolutions relevant for small animal tumor models. With the high Tres enabled by TRICKS, accurate pharmacokinetic data modeling was feasible. DCE-MRI parameters revealed changes over time and showed a clear relationship between tumor size and Ktrans . PMID:25995102

  1. Optimized time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS) in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy in small animal tumor models.

    PubMed

    Haeck, Joost; Bol, Karin; Bison, Sander; van Tiel, Sandra; Koelewijn, Stuart; de Jong, Marion; Veenland, Jifke; Bernsen, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Anti-tumor efficacy of targeted peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) relies on several factors, including functional tumor vasculature. Little is known about the effect of PRRT on tumor vasculature. With dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI, functional vasculature is imaged and quantified using contrast agents. In small animals DCE-MRI is a challenging application. We optimized a clinical sequence for fast hemodynamic acquisitions, time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS), to obtain DCE-MRI images at both high spatial and high temporal resolution in mice and rats. Using TRICKS, functional vasculature was measured prior to PRRT and longitudinally to investigate the effect of treatment on tumor vascular characteristics. Nude mice bearing H69 tumor xenografts and rats bearing syngeneic CA20948 tumors were used to study perfusion following PRRT administration with (177) lutetium octreotate. Both semi-quantitative and quantitative parameters were calculated. Treatment efficacy was measured by tumor-size reduction. Optimized TRICKS enabled MRI at 0.032 mm(3) voxel size with a temporal resolution of less than 5 s and large volume coverage, a substantial improvement over routine pre-clinical DCE-MRI studies. Tumor response to therapy was reflected in changes in tumor perfusion/permeability parameters. The H69 tumor model showed pronounced changes in DCE-derived parameters following PRRT. The rat CA20948 tumor model showed more heterogeneity in both treatment outcome and perfusion parameters. TRICKS enabled the acquisition of DCE-MRI at both high temporal resolution (Tres ) and spatial resolutions relevant for small animal tumor models. With the high Tres enabled by TRICKS, accurate pharmacokinetic data modeling was feasible. DCE-MRI parameters revealed changes over time and showed a clear relationship between tumor size and Ktrans .

  2. The Effects of Methylene Blue on Autophagy and Apoptosis in MRI-Defined Normal Tissue, Ischemic Penumbra and Ischemic Core

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhao; Watts, Lora Talley; Huang, Shiliang; Shen, Qiang; Rodriguez, Pavel; Chen, Chunhua; Zhou, Changman; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2015-01-01

    Methylene blue (MB) USP, which has energy-enhancing and antioxidant properties, is currently used to treat methemoglobinemia and cyanide poisoning in humans. We recently showed that MB administration reduces infarct volume and behavioral deficits in rat models of ischemic stroke and traumatic brain injury. This study reports the underlying molecular mechanisms of MB neuroprotection following transient ischemic stroke in rats. Rats were subjected to transient (60-mins) ischemic stroke. Multimodal MRI during the acute phase and at 24hrs were used to define three regions of interest (ROIs): i) the perfusion-diffusion mismatch salvaged by reperfusion, ii) the perfusion-diffusion mismatch not salvaged by reperfusion, and iii) the ischemic core. The tissues from these ROIs were extracted for western blot analyses of autophagic and apoptotic markers. The major findings were: 1) MB treatment reduced infarct volume and behavioral deficits, 2) MB improved cerebral blood flow to the perfusion-diffusion mismatch tissue after reperfusion and minimized harmful hyperperfusion 24hrs after stroke, 3) MB inhibited apoptosis and enhanced autophagy in the perfusion-diffusion mismatch, 4) MB inhibited apoptotic signaling cascades (p53-Bax-Bcl2-Caspase3), and 5) MB enhanced autophagic signaling cascades (p53-AMPK-TSC2-mTOR). MB induced neuroprotection, at least in part, by enhancing autophagy and reducing apoptosis in the perfusion-diffusion mismatch tissue following ischemic stroke. PMID:26121129

  3. Gradient echo MRI

    PubMed Central

    Copenhaver, B R.; Shin, J; Warach, S; Butman, J A.; Saver, J L.; Kidwell, C S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have demonstrated that gradient echo (GRE) MRI sequences are as accurate as CT for the detection of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in the context of acute stroke. However, many physicians who currently read acute stroke imaging studies may be unfamiliar with interpretation of GRE images. Methods: An NIH Web-based training program was developed including a pretest, tutorial, and posttest. Physicians involved in the care of acute stroke patients were encouraged to participate. The tutorial covered acute, chronic, and mimic hemorrhages as they appear on CT, diffusion-weighted imaging, and GRE sequences. Ability of users to identify ICH presence, type, and age on GRE was compared from the pretest to posttest timepoint. Results: A total of 104 users completed the tutorial. Specialties represented included general radiology (42%), general neurology (16%), neuroradiology (15%), stroke neurology (14%), emergency medicine (1%), and other (12%). Median overall score improved pretest to posttest from 66.7% to 83.3%, p < 0.001. Improvement by category was as follows: acute ICH, 66.7%–100%, p < 0.001; chronic ICH, 33.3%–66.7%, p < 0.001; ICH negatives/mimics, 100%–100%, p = 0.787. Sensitivity for identification of acute hemorrhage improved from 68.2% to 96.4%. Conclusions: Physicians involved in acute stroke care achieved significant improvement in gradient echo (GRE) hemorrhage interpretation after completing the NIH GRE MRI tutorial. This indicates that a Web-based tutorial may be a viable option for the widespread education of physicians to achieve an acceptable level of diagnostic accuracy at reading GRE MRI, thus enabling confident acute stroke treatment decisions. GLOSSARY AHA/ASA = American Heart Association/American Stroke Association; CME = continuing medical education; DWI = diffusion-weighted imaging; GRE = gradient echo; ICH = intracerebral hemorrhage; tPA = tissue plasminogen activator. PMID:19414724

  4. Snow accumulation variability at altitude of 7010 m a.s.l. in Muztag Ata Mountain in Pamir Plateau during 1958-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Keqin; Xu, Baiqin; Wu, Guanjian

    2015-12-01

    Precipitation over high mountain is significant for glacier development and river runoff in arid Tarim Basin in the northwest China. However, a coherent perspective of precipitation variability at high-altitude in Tarim Basin has not been presented until now. Here, a 41-m ice core at altitude of 7010 m a.s.l. was drilled and gotten to determine annual snow accumulation rates at Muztag Ata Mountain in the headwater of Tarim River in Pamir Plateau during summer 2003. Using strong seasonally variation of oxygen isotope and β-radioactivity reference layers, the core was dated reliably back to 1958 and resulted in a 45-year record between 1958 and 2002. The mean annual snow accumulation was about 605 mm water equivalent, which is almost 10 times than precipitation in piedmont with elevation below 3000 m a.s.l. The snow accumulation is characterized by high values in 1960s and early 1970s, followed by a drop in the middle 1970s and a recent decreasing trend. Further analysis suggests the upstream zonal flow variation as the major mechanism linking the regional snow accumulation fluctuation to macroscale circulation conditions. During the high snow accumulation years, the westerly winds between 30 and 50°N from the Mediterranean Sea to Pamir Plateau are weakened. The decreased upstream westerly winds generate anomalous cyclonic flows in the Pamir Plateau, which results in an enhanced advection of moisture from the tropics to the vicinity of Muztag Ata Mountain and is thus consistent with enhanced snow accumulation at the core site. During the low snow accumulation years, the above processes are reversed. On the basis of this high-altitude snow accumulation and temperature, a linear regression model is established to simulate annual mass balance in Muztag Ata region. Results reveal that snow accumulation conditions largely determine the annual mass-balance, which has stronger impaction on Tarim River runoff.

  5. Misinterpretation of ischaemic infarct location in relationship to the cerebrovascular territories

    PubMed Central

    Hartkamp, Nolan S; Hendrikse, J; De Cocker, Laurens J L; de Borst, Gert Jan; Kappelle, L Jaap; Bokkers, Reinoud P H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cerebral perfusion territories are known to vary widely among individuals. This may lead to misinterpretation of the symptomatic artery in patients with ischaemic stroke to a wrong assumption of the underlying aetiology being thromboembolic or hypoperfusion. The aim of the present study was to investigate such potential misinterpretation with territorial arterial spin labelling (T-ASL) by correlating infarct location with imaging of the perfusion territory of the carotid arteries or basilar artery. Materials and methods 223 patients with subacute stroke underwent MRI including structural imaging scans to determine infarct location, time-of-flight MR angiography (MRA) to determine the morphology of the circle of Willis and T-ASL to identify the perfusion territories of the internal carotid arteries, and basilar artery. Infarct location and the perfusion territory of its feeding artery were classified with standard MRI and MRA according to a perfusion atlas, and were compared to the classification made according to T-ASL. Results A total of 149 infarctions were detected in 87 of 223 patients. 15 out of 149 (10%) infarcts were erroneously attributed to a single perfusion territory; these infarcts were partly located in the originally determined perfusion territory but proved to be localised in the border zone with the adjacent perfusion territory instead. 12 out of 149 (8%) infarcts were misclassified with standard assessments and were not located in the original perfusion territory. Conclusions T-ASL with territorial perfusion imaging may provide important additional information for classifying the symptomatic brain-feeding artery when compared to expert evaluation with MRI and MRA. PMID:27466359

  6. Occupational exposure in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mcrobbie, D W

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews occupational exposure in clinical MRI; it specifically considers units of exposure, basic physical interactions, health effects, guideline limits, dosimetry, results of exposure surveys, calculation of induced fields and the status of the European Physical Agents Directive. Electromagnetic field exposure in MRI from the static field B0, imaging gradients and radiofrequency transmission fields induces electric fields and currents in tissue, which are responsible for various acute sensory effects. The underlying theory and its application to the formulation of incident and induced field limits are presented. The recent International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Bundesministerium für Arbeit und Soziales and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers limits for incident field exposure are interpreted in a manner applicable to MRI. Field measurements show that exposure from movement within the B0 fringe field can exceed ICNIRP reference levels within 0.5 m of the bore entrance. Rate of change of field dB/dt from the imaging gradients is unlikely to exceed the new limits, although incident field limits can be exceeded for radiofrequency (RF) exposure within 0.2–0.5 m of the bore entrance. Dosimetric surveys of routine clinical practice show that staff are exposed to peak values of 42±24% of B0, with time-averaged exposures of 5.2±2.8 mT for magnets in the range 0.6–4 T. Exposure to time-varying fields arising from movement within the B0 fringe resulted in peak dB/dt of approximately 2 T s−1. Modelling of induced electric fields from the imaging gradients shows that ICNIRP-induced field limits are unlikely to be exceeded in most situations; however, movement through the static field may still present a problem. The likely application of the limits is discussed with respect to the reformulation of the European Union (EU) directive and its possible implications for MRI. PMID:22457400

  7. Nanoformulations for molecular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Chuqiao; Louie, Angelique Y.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale contrast agents have shown the ability to increase the detection sensitivity of MRI by several orders of magnitude, endowing this traditionally macroscopic modality with the ability to observe unique molecular signatures. Herein, we describe three types of nanoparticulate contrast agents: iron oxide nanoparticles, gadolinium-based nanoparticles, and bio-essential manganese, cobalt, nickel, and copper ion-containing nanoformulations. Some of these agents have been approved for clinical use, but more are still under development for medical imaging. The advantages and disadvantages of each nanoformulation, in terms of intrinsic magnetism, ease of synthesis, and biodistribution, etc. are discussed. PMID:22488901

  8. Visualization and quantification of whole rat heart laminar structure using high-spatial resolution contrast-enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Benoist, David; Benson, Alan P.; White, Ed; Tanner, Steven F.; Holden, Arun V.; Dobrzynski, Halina; Bernus, Olivier; Radjenovic, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown by histology that cardiac myocytes are organized into laminae and this structure is important in function, both influencing the spread of electrical activation and enabling myocardial thickening in systole by laminar sliding. We have carried out high-spatial resolution three-dimensional MRI of the ventricular myolaminae of the entire volume of the isolated rat heart after contrast perfusion [dimeglumine gadopentate (Gd-DTPA)]. Four ex vivo rat hearts were perfused with Gd-DTPA and fixative and high-spatial resolution MRI was performed on a 9.4T MRI system. After MRI, cryosectioning followed by histology was performed. Images from MRI and histology were aligned, described, and quantitatively compared. In the three-dimensional MR images we directly show the presence of laminae and demonstrate that these are highly branching and are absent from much of the subepicardium. We visualized these MRI volumes to demonstrate laminar architecture and quantitatively demonstrated that the structural features observed are similar to those imaged in histology. We showed qualitatively and quantitatively that laminar architecture is similar in the four hearts. MRI can be used to image the laminar architecture of ex vivo hearts in three dimensions, and the images produced are qualitatively and quantitatively comparable with histology. We have demonstrated in the rat that: 1) laminar architecture is consistent between hearts; 2) myolaminae are absent from much of the subepicardium; and 3) although localized orthotropy is present throughout the myocardium, tracked myolaminae are branching structures and do not have a discrete identity. PMID:22021329

  9. Perfusion status of the stroke-like lesion at the hyperacute stage in MELAS.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hsu-Ling; Chen, Yen-Kung; Chen, Wei-Hung; Wang, Han-Cheng; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Lien, Li-Ming; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2013-02-01

    Hypoperfusion on single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the stroke-like lesion (SLL) at the hyperacute stage of mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is considered to be a supportive evidence of the mitochondrial angiopathy theory. Our objectives were to examine whether other neuroimages, especially transcranial color-coded sonography (TCCS), done at the hyperacute stage of stroke-like episode (SLE) is consistent with hypoperfusion of the SLL. We reviewed the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), SPECT, cerebral angiography, and TCCS of a patient with MELAS syndrome, all of which were performed at the hyperacute stage of one SLE. MRI on the 1st day post SLE showed right temporoparietal lesion with vasogenic edema. SPECT on the 2nd day showed focal decreased uptake of technetium-99m hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime ((99m)Tc-HMPAO) in the same region, but cerebral angiography and TCCS on the 3rd day showed increased regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and distal arteriole dilation in the same region. TCCS can delineate increased rCBF of the SLL at the hyperacute stage of SLE. We propose that the discrepancy between the decreased (99m)Tc-HMPAO uptake and increased rCBF might be caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. The phenomenon of "hypoperfusion" on SPECT might be caused by cell dysfunction but not decreased rCBF. We suggest that SPECT can be complemented by angiography and TCCS in future studies to delineate the perfusion status of SLLs.

  10. Caffeine intake inverts the effect of adenosine on myocardial perfusion during stress as measured by T1 mapping.

    PubMed

    Kuijpers, Dirkjan; Prakken, Niek H; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; van Dijkman, Paul R M; van der Harst, Pim; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2016-10-01

    Caffeine intake before adenosine stress myocardial perfusion imaging may cause false negative findings. We hypothesized that the antagonistic effect of caffeine can be measured by T1 relaxation times in rest and adenosine stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR), as T1 mapping techniques are sensitive to changes in myocardial blood volume. We prospectively analyzed 105 consecutive patients with adenosine stress perfusion CMR on a 1.5-T MRI system. Rest and stress T1 mapping was performed using Modified Look-Locker Inversion recovery. T1 reactivity was defined as difference in T1rest and T1stress (∆T1). Fifteen patients drank coffee within 4 h of CMR (<4H caffeine group), and 10 patients had coffee the day before (>8H caffeine group). Comparison was made to patients without self-reported coffee intake: 50 with normal CMR (control group), 18 with myocardial ischemia, and 12 with myocardial infarction. The national review board approved the study; all patients gave written informed consent. The <4H caffeine group showed inverted ∆T1 of -7.8 % (T1rest 975 ± 42 ms, T1stress 898 ± 51 ms, p < 0.0005). The >8H caffeine group showed reduced T1 reactivity (1.8 %; T1rest 979 ms, T1stress 997 ms) compared to the controls (4.3 %; T1rest 977 ± 40 ms, T1stress 1018 ± 40 ms), p < 0.0005. Ischemic and infarcted myocardium showed minimal T1 reactivity (0.2 and 0.3 %, respectively). Caffeine intake inverts the adenosine effect during stress perfusion CMR as measured by T1 mapping. T1 reactivity can assess the adequacy of adenosine-induced stress in perfusion CMR. PMID:27473274

  11. Predicting radiotherapy-induced cardiac perfusion defects

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Shiva K.; Baydush, Alan H.; Zhou Sumin; Miften, Moyed; Yu Xiaoli; Craciunescu, Oana; Oldham, Mark; Light, Kim; Wong, Terence; Blazing, Michael; Borges-Neto, Salvador; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to compare the efficacy of mathematical models in predicting the occurrence of radiotherapy-induced left ventricular perfusion defects assessed using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The basis of this study is data from 73 left-sided breast/chestwall patients treated with tangential photon fields. The mathematical models compared were three commonly used parametric models [Lyman normal tissue complication probability (LNTCP), relative serialty (RS), generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD)] and a nonparametric model (Linear discriminant analysis--LDA). Data used by the models were the left ventricular dose--volume histograms, or SPECT-based dose-function histograms, and the presence/absence of SPECT perfusion defects 6 months postradiation therapy (21 patients developed defects). For the parametric models, maximum likelihood estimation and F-tests were used to fit the model parameters. The nonparametric LDA model step-wise selected features (volumes/function above dose levels) using a method based on receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis to best separate the groups with and without defects. Optimistic (upper bound) and pessimistic (lower bound) estimates of each model's predictive capability were generated using ROC curves. A higher area under the ROC curve indicates a more accurate model (a model that is always accurate has area=1). The areas under these curves for different models were used to statistically test for differences between them. Pessimistic estimates of areas under the ROC curve using dose-volume histogram/dose-function histogram inputs, in order of increasing prediction accuracy, were LNTCP (0.79/0.75), RS (0.80/0.77), gEUD (0.81/0.78), and LDA (0.84/0.86). Only the LDA model benefited from SPECT-based regional functional information. In general, the LDA model was statistically superior to the parametric models. The LDA model selected as features the left ventricular volumes above

  12. The absolute CBF response to activation is preserved during elevated perfusion: Implications for neurovascular coupling measures.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Joseph R; Driver, Ian D; Bright, Molly G; Murphy, Kevin

    2016-01-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques in which the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) response to a neural stimulus are measured, can be used to estimate the fractional increase in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) that accompanies evoked neural activity. A measure of neurovascular coupling is obtained from the ratio of fractional CBF and CMRO2 responses, defined as n, with the implicit assumption that relative rather than absolute changes in CBF and CMRO2 adequately characterise the flow-metabolism response to neural activity. The coupling parameter n is important in terms of its effect on the BOLD response, and as potential insight into the flow-metabolism relationship in both normal and pathological brain function. In 10 healthy human subjects, BOLD and CBF responses were measured to test the effect of baseline perfusion (modulated by a hypercapnia challenge) on the coupling parameter n during graded visual stimulation. A dual-echo pulsed arterial spin labelling (PASL) sequence provided absolute quantification of CBF in baseline and active states as well as relative BOLD signal changes, which were used to estimate CMRO2 responses to the graded visual stimulus. The absolute CBF response to the visual stimuli were constant across different baseline CBF levels, meaning the fractional CBF responses were reduced at the hyperperfused baseline state. For the graded visual stimuli, values of n were significantly reduced during hypercapnia induced hyperperfusion. Assuming the evoked neural responses to the visual stimuli are the same for both baseline CBF states, this result has implications for fMRI studies that aim to measure neurovascular coupling using relative changes in CBF. The coupling parameter n is sensitive to baseline CBF, which would confound its interpretation in fMRI studies where there may be significant differences in baseline perfusion between groups. The absolute change in

  13. Hyperoxia and Functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Bulte, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen plays a fundamental role in functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI). Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) imaging is the foundation stone of all FMRI and is still the essential workhorse of the vast majority of FMRI procedures. Hemoglobin may provide the magnetic properties that allow the technique to work, but it is oxygen that allows the contrast to effectively be switched on or off, and it is oxygen that we are interested in tracking in order to observe the oxygen metabolism changes. In general the changes in venous oxygen saturation are observed in order to infer changes in the correlated mechanisms, which can include changes in cerebral blood flow, metabolism, and the fraction of inspired oxygen. By independently manipulating the fraction of inspired oxygen it is possible to alter the amount of dissolved oxygen in the plasma, the venous saturation, or even the blood flow. The effects that these changes have on the observed MRI signal can be either a help or a hindrance depending on how well the changes induced are understood. The administration of supplemental inspired oxygen is in a unique position to provide a flexible, noninvasive, inexpensive, patient-friendly addition to the MRI toolkit to enable investigations to look beyond statistics and regions of interest, and actually produce calibrated, targeted measurements of blood flow, metabolism or pathology. PMID:27343097

  14. Hydrogels for Engineering of Perfusable Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Zheng, Huaiyuan; Poh, Patrina S. P.; Machens, Hans-Günther; Schilling, Arndt F.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels are commonly used biomaterials for tissue engineering. With their high-water content, good biocompatibility and biodegradability they resemble the natural extracellular environment and have been widely used as scaffolds for 3D cell culture and studies of cell biology. The possible size of such hydrogel constructs with embedded cells is limited by the cellular demand for oxygen and nutrients. For the fabrication of large and complex tissue constructs, vascular structures become necessary within the hydrogels to supply the encapsulated cells. In this review, we discuss the types of hydrogels that are currently used for the fabrication of constructs with embedded vascular networks, the key properties of hydrogels needed for this purpose and current techniques to engineer perfusable vascular structures into these hydrogels. We then discuss directions for future research aimed at engineering of vascularized tissue for implantation. PMID:26184185

  15. Perfused human organs versus Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.

    PubMed

    Leung, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    Novel drugs have to go through mandatory pre-clinical testing before they can be approved for use in clinical trials. In essence, it is a form of bench-to-bedside (N2B) translational medicine, but the wastage rate of target candidates is immensely high. Effects seen in vitro often do not translate to in vivo human settings. The search is on for better models closer to human physiology to be used in pre-clinical drug screening. The Ex Vivo Metrics system has been introduced where a human organ is harvested and revitalized in a controlled environment suitable for testing of both drug efficacy and potential toxicity. This commentary expresses the author's views regarding this technology of perfused human organs. PMID:19166591

  16. Perfused human organs versus Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.

    PubMed

    Leung, Lawrence

    2009-01-23

    Novel drugs have to go through mandatory pre-clinical testing before they can be approved for use in clinical trials. In essence, it is a form of bench-to-bedside (N2B) translational medicine, but the wastage rate of target candidates is immensely high. Effects seen in vitro often do not translate to in vivo human settings. The search is on for better models closer to human physiology to be used in pre-clinical drug screening. The Ex Vivo Metrics system has been introduced where a human organ is harvested and revitalized in a controlled environment suitable for testing of both drug efficacy and potential toxicity. This commentary expresses the author's views regarding this technology of perfused human organs.

  17. Hydrogels for Engineering of Perfusable Vascular Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Zheng, Huaiyuan; Poh, Patrina S P; Machens, Hans-Günther; Schilling, Arndt F

    2015-07-14

    Hydrogels are commonly used biomaterials for tissue engineering. With their high-water content, good biocompatibility and biodegradability they resemble the natural extracellular environment and have been widely used as scaffolds for 3D cell culture and studies of cell biology. The possible size of such hydrogel constructs with embedded cells is limited by the cellular demand for oxygen and nutrients. For the fabrication of large and complex tissue constructs, vascular structures become necessary within the hydrogels to supply the encapsulated cells. In this review, we discuss the types of hydrogels that are currently used for the fabrication of constructs with embedded vascular networks, the key properties of hydrogels needed for this purpose and current techniques to engineer perfusable vascular structures into these hydrogels. We then discuss directions for future research aimed at engineering of vascularized tissue for implantation.

  18. Measuring perfusion with light (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Sanne M. A.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2016-03-01

    There is no gold standard test for perfusion evaluation in surgery. Optical Imaging techniques are able to image tissue at high resolution and in real-time. Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging, Optical Coherence Tomography, Sidestream Darkfield and Incident Darkfield all use the interaction of light with tissue to create an image. To test their feasibility and explore validity in a controlled setting, we created a phantom with the optical properties of tissue and microvascular channels of 30-400 micrometer. With a Hamilton Syringe Pump we mimicked blood flow velocities of 0-20 mm/sec. Images of all different modalities at different blood flow velocities were compared in terms of imaging depth, resoluation and hemodynamic parameters.

  19. Low dose CT perfusion using k-means clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisana, Francesco; Henzler, Thomas; Schönberg, Stefan; Klotz, Ernst; Schmidt, Bernhard; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We aim at improving low dose CT perfusion functional parameters maps and CT images quality, preserving quantitative information. In a dynamic CT perfusion dataset, each voxel is measured T times, where T is the number of acquired time points. In this sense, we can think about a voxel as a point in a T-dimensional space, where the coordinates of the voxels would be the values of its time attenuation curve (TAC). Starting from this idea, a k-means algorithm was designed to group voxels in K classes. A modified guided time-intensity profile similarity (gTIPS) filter was implemented and applied only for those voxels belonging to the same class. The approach was tested on a digital brain perfusion phantom as well as on clinical brain and body perfusion datasets, and compared to the original TIPS implementation. The TIPS filter showed the highest CNR improvement, but lowest spatial resolution. gTIPS proved to have the best combination of spatial resolution and CNR improvement for CT images, while k-gTIPS was superior to both gTIPS and TIPS in terms of perfusion maps image quality. We demonstrate k-means clustering analysis can be applied to denoise dynamic CT perfusion data and to improve functional maps. Beside the promising results, this approach has the major benefit of being independent from the perfusion model employed for functional parameters calculation. No similar approaches were found in literature.

  20. Distal coronary artery perfusion during percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Anderson, H V; Leimgruber, P P; Roubin, G S; Nelson, D L; Gruentzig, A R

    1985-10-01

    Perfusion of the coronary artery distal to an occluding angioplasty balloon was performed in 34 patients undergoing coronary angioplasty (PTCA). A randomized crossover study was employed using two exogenous substances as perfusates: lactated Ringer's solution (LR) and a fluorocarbon emulsion (FL), Fluosol-DA 20%. Both substances are electrolyte solutions, but the FL will dissolve more oxygen than the LR. During two attempted coronary artery occlusions of 90 seconds each, we perfused through the central lumen (guidewire channel) of the PTCA catheter at 60 ml/min. With FL perfusion the mean time to onset of angina after occlusion was delayed (41 +/- 21 vs 33 +/- 16 seconds, mean +/- SD; p less than 0.05), the mean duration of angina was shortened (77 +/- 58 vs 92 +/- 70 seconds, p less than 0.05), and the rise in the ST segment of the ECG was reduced (0.15 +/- 0.24 vs 0.2 +/- 0.23 mV, p less than 0.001) when compared to LR perfusion. Balloon occlusion time was able to be extended with FL perfusion (71 +/- 22 vs 59 +/- 22 seconds p less than 0.001). These results indicate that perfusion of the distal coronary artery is possible during PTCA and can reduce ischemia during a prolonged balloon occlusion time. PMID:2931968

  1. Ex vivo lung perfusion in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Luis Gustavo; Braga, Karina Andrighetti de Oliveira; Nepomuceno, Natalia Aparecida; Fernandes, Lucas Matos; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the use of ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) clinically to prepare donor lungs for transplantation. Methods: A prospective study involving EVLP for the reconditioning of extended-criteria donor lungs, the criteria for which include aspects such as a PaO2/FiO2 ratio < 300 mmHg. Between February of 2013 and February of 2014, the lungs of five donors were submitted to EVLP for up to 4 h each. During EVLP, respiratory mechanics were continuously evaluated. Once every hour during the procedure, samples of the perfusate were collected and the function of the lungs was evaluated. Results: The mean PaO2 of the recovered lungs was 262.9 ± 119.7 mmHg at baseline, compared with 357.0 ± 108.5 mmHg after 3 h of EVLP. The mean oxygenation capacity of the lungs improved slightly over the first 3 h of EVLP-246.1 ± 35.1, 257.9 ± 48.9, and 288.8 ± 120.5 mmHg after 1, 2, and 3 h, respectively-without significant differences among the time points (p = 0.508). The mean static compliance was 63.0 ± 18.7 mmHg, 75.6 ± 25.4 mmHg, and 70.4 ± 28.0 mmHg after 1, 2, and 3 h, respectively, with a significant improvement from hour 1 to hour 2 (p = 0.029) but not from hour 2 to hour 3 (p = 0.059). Pulmonary vascular resistance remained stable during EVLP, with no differences among time points (p = 0.284). Conclusions: Although the lungs evaluated remained under physiological conditions, the EVLP protocol did not effectively improve lung function, thus precluding transplantation. PMID:27167429

  2. CT Perfusion of the Liver: Principles and Applications in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se Hyung; Kamaya, Aya

    2014-01-01

    With the introduction of molecularly targeted chemotherapeutics, there is an increasing need for defining new response criteria for therapeutic success because use of morphologic imaging alone may not fully assess tumor response. Computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging of the liver provides functional information about the microcirculation of normal parenchyma and focal liver lesions and is a promising technique for assessing the efficacy of various anticancer treatments. CT perfusion also shows promising results for diagnosing primary or metastatic tumors, for predicting early response to anticancer treatments, and for monitoring tumor recurrence after therapy. Many of the limitations of early CT perfusion studies performed in the liver, such as limited coverage, motion artifacts, and high radiation dose of CT, are being addressed by recent technical advances. These include a wide area detector with or without volumetric spiral or shuttle modes, motion correction algorithms, and new CT reconstruction technologies such as iterative algorithms. Although several issues related to perfusion imaging—such as paucity of large multicenter trials, limited accessibility of perfusion software, and lack of standardization in methods—remain unsolved, CT perfusion has now reached technical maturity, allowing for its use in assessing tumor vascularity in larger-scale prospective clinical trials. In this review, basic principles, current acquisition protocols, and pharmacokinetic models used for CT perfusion imaging of the liver are described. Various oncologic applications of CT perfusion of the liver are discussed and current challenges, as well as possible solutions, for CT perfusion are presented. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:25058132

  3. Perfusion-related stimuli for compensatory lung growth following pneumonectomy.

    PubMed

    Dane, D Merrill; Yilmaz, Cuneyt; Gyawali, Dipendra; Iyer, Roshni; Ravikumar, Priya; Estrera, Aaron S; Hsia, Connie C W

    2016-07-01

    Following pneumonectomy (PNX), two separate mechanical forces act on the remaining lung: parenchymal stress caused by lung expansion, and microvascular distension and shear caused by increased perfusion. We previously showed that parenchymal stress and strain explain approximately one-half of overall compensation; the remainder was presumptively attributed to perfusion-related factors. In this study, we directly tested the hypothesis that perturbation of regional pulmonary perfusion modulates post-PNX lung growth. Adult canines underwent banding of the pulmonary artery (PAB) to the left caudal (LCa) lobe, which caused a reduction in basal perfusion to LCa lobe without preventing the subsequent increase in its perfusion following right PNX while simultaneously exaggerating the post-PNX increase in perfusion to the unbanded lobes, thereby creating differential perfusion changes between banded and unbanded lobes. Control animals underwent sham pulmonary artery banding followed by right PNX. Pulmonary function, regional pulmonary perfusion, and high-resolution computed tomography of the chest were analyzed pre-PNX and 3-mo post-PNX. Terminally, the remaining lobes were fixed for detailed morphometric analysis. Results were compared with corresponding lobes in two control (Sham banding and normal unoperated) groups. PAB impaired the indices of post-PNX extravascular alveolar tissue growth by up to 50% in all remaining lobes. PAB enhanced the expected post-PNX increase in alveolar capillary formation, measured by the prevalence of double-capillary profiles, in both unbanded and banded lobes. We conclude that perfusion distribution provides major stimuli for post-PNX compensatory lung growth independent of the stimuli provided by lung expansion and parenchymal stress and strain.

  4. Low-rank and Sparse Matrix Decomposition for Accelerated Dynamic MRI with Separation of Background and Dynamic Components

    PubMed Central

    Otazo, Ricardo; Candès, Emmanuel; Sodickson, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To apply the low-rank plus sparse (L+S) matrix decomposition model to reconstruct undersampled dynamic MRI as a superposition of background and dynamic components in various problems of clinical interest. Theory and Methods The L+S model is natural to represent dynamic MRI data. Incoherence between k−t space (acquisition) and the singular vectors of L and the sparse domain of S is required to reconstruct undersampled data. Incoherence between L and S is required for robust separation of background and dynamic components. Multicoil L+S reconstruction is formulated using a convex optimization approach, where the nuclear-norm is used to enforce low-rank in L and the l1-norm to enforce sparsity in S. Feasibility of the L+S reconstruction was tested in several dynamic MRI experiments with true acceleration including cardiac perfusion, cardiac cine, time-resolved angiography, abdominal and breast perfusion using Cartesian and radial sampling. Results The L+S model increased compressibility of dynamic MRI data and thus enabled high acceleration factors. The inherent background separation improved background suppression performance compared to conventional data subtraction, which is sensitive to motion. Conclusion The high acceleration and background separation enabled by L+S promises to enhance spatial and temporal resolution and to enable background suppression without the need of subtraction or modeling. PMID:24760724

  5. Deep Vein Thrombosis Presenting on Pulmonary Ventilation and Perfusion Scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Itani, Malak; Fair, Joanna; Hillman, Zachary; Behnia, Fatemeh; Elojeimy, Saeed

    2016-10-01

    A 52-year-old woman presenting with dyspnea was referred for a ventilation and perfusion scan (VQ). VQ images (with Tc-DTPA [diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid aerosol] and Tc-MAA [macroaggregated albumin]) initially appeared normal; however, count rates on perfusion images were similar to ventilation images, implying little Tc-MAA had reached the lungs. Spot images of the injected extremity demonstrated focal Tc-MAA accumulation worrisome for a venous thrombus, subsequently confirmed by Doppler ultrasound. Careful attention to relative radiotracer count rates on VQ scans is crucial to ensure diagnostic utility. In addition, abnormal low perfusion radiotracer counts may unveil other pathology with important clinical implications. PMID:27556796

  6. Colour perfusion imaging: a new application of computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Miles, K A; Hayball, M; Dixon, A K

    1991-03-16

    We describe a new application for imaging with computed tomography (CT) in which a quantifiable map of tissue perfusion is created and displayed by means of a colour scale. A rapid sequence of images is acquired without table movement immediately after a bolus intravenous injection of radiographic contrast medium. The rate of enhancement in each pixel within the chosen slice can then be used to determine perfusion. The technique provides a quantifiable display of regional perfusion combined with the high spatial resolution afforded by CT.

  7. Perfusion Estimated With Rapid Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Correlates Inversely With Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression and Pimonidazole Staining in Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, Stephanie B.; Betts, Guy; Bonington, Suzanne C.; Homer, Jarrod J.; Slevin, Nick J.; Kershaw, Lucy E.; Valentine, Helen; West, Catharine M.L.; Buckley, David L.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze, in a pilot study, rapidly acquired dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI data with a general two-compartment exchange tracer kinetic model and correlate parameters obtained with measurements of hypoxia and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Eight patients were scanned before surgery. The DCE-MRI data were acquired with 1.5-s temporal resolution and analyzed using the two-compartment exchange tracer kinetic model to obtain estimates of parameters including perfusion and permeability surface area. Twelve to 16 h before surgery, patients received an intravenous injection of pimonidazole. Samples taken during surgery were used to determine the level of pimonidazole staining using immunohistochemistry and VEGF expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Correlations between the biological and imaging data were examined. Results: Of the seven tumors fully analyzed, those that were poorly perfused tended to have high levels of pimonidazole staining (r = -0.79, p = 0.03) and VEGF expression (r = -0.82, p = 0.02). Tumors with low permeability surface area also tended to have high levels of hypoxia (r = -0.75, p = 0.05). Hypoxic tumors also expressed higher levels of VEGF (r = 0.82, p = 0.02). Conclusions: Estimates of perfusion obtained with rapid DCE-MRI data in patients with head-and-neck cancer correlate inversely with pimonidazole staining and VEGF expression.

  8. 3D Pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling in routine clinical practice: A review of clinically significant artifacts.

    PubMed

    Amukotuwa, Shalini A; Yu, Caroline; Zaharchuk, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a completely noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) perfusion method for quantitatively measuring cerebral blood flow utilizing magnetically labeled arterial water. Advances in the technique have enabled the major MRI vendors to make the sequence available to the clinical neuroimaging community. Consequently, ASL is being increasingly incorporated into the routine neuroimaging protocol. Although a variety of ASL techniques are available, the ISMRM Perfusion Study Group and the European ASL in Dementia Consortium have released consensus guidelines recommending standardized implementation of 3D pseudocontinuous ASL with background suppression. The purpose of this review, aimed at the large number of neuroimaging clinicians who have either no or limited experience with this 3D pseudocontinuous ASL, is to discuss the common and clinically significant artifacts that may be encountered with this technique. While some of these artifacts hinder accurate interpretation of studies, either by degrading the images or mimicking pathology, there are other artifacts that are of clinical utility, because they increase the conspicuity of pathology. Cognizance of these artifacts will help the physician interpreting ASL to avoid potential diagnostic pitfalls, and increase their level of comfort with the technique.

  9. 7-T MRI in Cerebrovascular Diseases: Challenges to Overcome and Initial Results.

    PubMed

    Harteveld, Anita A; van der Kolk, Anja G; Zwanenburg, Jaco J M; Luijten, Peter R; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in the investigation of cerebrovascular diseases. Compared with computed tomography (CT) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA), its advantages in diagnosing cerebrovascular pathology include its superior tissue contrast, its ability to visualize blood vessels without the use of a contrast agent, and its use of magnetic fields and radiofrequency pulses instead of ionizing radiation. In recent years, ultrahigh field MRI at 7 tesla (7 T) has shown promise in the diagnosis of many cerebrovascular diseases. The increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR; 2.3x and 4.7x increase compared with 3 and 1.5 T, respectively) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) at this higher field strength can be exploited to obtain a higher spatial resolution and higher lesion conspicuousness, enabling assessment of smaller brain structures and lesions. Cerebrovascular diseases can be assessed at different tissue levels; for instance, changes of the arteries feeding the brain can be visualized to determine the cause of ischemic stroke, regional changes in brain perfusion can be mapped to predict outcome after revascularization, and tissue damage, including old and recent ischemic infarcts, can be evaluated as a marker of ischemic burden. For the purpose of this review, we will discriminate 3 levels of assessment of cerebrovascular diseases using MRI: Pipes, Perfusion, and Parenchyma (3 Ps). The term Pipes refers to the brain-feeding arteries from the heart and aortic arch, upwards to the carotid arteries, vertebral arteries, circle of Willis, and smaller intracranial arterial branches. Perfusion is the amount of blood arriving at the brain tissue level, and includes the vascular reserve and perfusion territories. Parenchyma refers to the acute and chronic burden of brain tissue damage, which includes larger infarcts, smaller microinfarcts, and small vessel disease manifestations such as white matter lesions, lacunar infarcts, and microbleeds

  10. Application of Arterial Spin Labelling in the Assessment of Ocular Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Pontré, B.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial spin labelling (ASL) is a noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modality, capable of measuring blood perfusion without the use of a contrast agent. While ASL implementation for imaging the brain and monitoring cerebral blood flow has been reviewed in depth, the technique is yet to be widely used for ocular tissue imaging. The human retina is a very thin but highly stratified structure and it is also situated close to the surface of the body which is not ideal for MR imaging. Hence, the application of MR imaging and ASL in particular has been very challenging for ocular tissues and retina. That is despite the fact that almost all of retinal pathologies are accompanied by blood perfusion irregularities. In this review article, we have focused on the technical aspects of the ASL and their implications for its optimum adaptation for retinal blood perfusion monitoring. Retinal blood perfusion has been assessed through qualitative or invasive quantitative methods but the prospect of imaging flow using ASL would increase monitoring and assessment of retinal pathologies. The review provides details of ASL application in human ocular blood flow assessment. PMID:27066501

  11. Magnetostimulation in MRI.

    PubMed

    Irnich, W; Schmitt, F

    1995-05-01

    In national and international bodies, there is active discussion of appropriate safety regulations of levels of magnetic field strength in MRI. Present limits are usually expressed in terms of the switching rate dB/dt, but the validity of this is open to debate. Application of the fundamental law of electrostimulation is well-established, both on theoretical and experimental grounds. Application of this law, in combination with Maxwell's law, yields a very simple equation that we call the fundamental law of magnetostimulation. This law has the hyperbolic form of a strength-duration curve and allows an estimation of the lowest possible value of the magnetic flux density capable of stimulating nerves and muscles. Calculations prove that the threshold for heart excitation is much higher than those for nerve and muscle stimulations. Experimental results from us and other authors confirm the correctness of the derived laws for magnetostimulation. In light of these findings, proposed safety limits should be reconsidered. PMID:7596265

  12. In-vivo quantitative evaluation of perfusion zones and perfusion gradient in the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Cyr, Michel; Lakhiani, Chrisovalantis; Cheng, Angela; Mangum, Michael; Liang, Jinyang; Teotia, Sumeet; Livingston, Edward H.; Zuzak, Karel J.

    2013-03-01

    The selection of well-vascularized tissue during DIEP flap harvest remains controversial. While several studies have elucidated cross-midline perfusion, further characterization of perfusion to the ipsilateral hemiabdomen is necessary for minimizing rates of fat necrosis or partial fat necrosis in bilateral DIEP flaps. Eighteen patients (29 flaps) underwent DIEP flap harvest using a prospectively designed protocol. Perforators were marked and imaged with a novel system for quantitatively measuring tissue oxygenation, the Digital Light Hyperspectral Imager. Images were then analyzed to determine if perforator selection influenced ipsilateral flap perfusion. Flaps based on a single lateral row perforator (SLRP) were found to have a higher level of hemoglobin oxygenation in Zone I (mean %HbO2 = 76.1) compared to single medial row perforator (SMRP) flaps (%HbO2 = 71.6). Perfusion of Zone III relative to Zone I was similar between SLRP and SMRP flaps (97.4% vs. 97.9%, respectively). These differences were not statistically significant (p>0.05). Perfusion to the lateral edge of the flap was slightly greater for SLRP flaps compared SMRP flaps (92.1% vs. 89.5%, respectively). SMRP flaps had superior perfusion travelling inferiorly compared to SLRP flaps (88.8% vs. 83.9%, respectively). Overall, it was observed that flaps were better perfused in the lateral direction than inferiorly. Significant differences in perfusion gradients directed inferiorly or laterally were observed, and perforator selection influenced perfusion in the most distal or inferior aspects of the flap. This suggests broader clinical implications for flap design that merit further investigation.

  13. Preclinical Feasibility of a Technology Framework for MRI-guided Iliac Angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Rube, Martin A.; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Fabiola; Cox, Benjamin F.; Holbrook, Andrew B.; Houston, J. Graeme; White, Richard D.; McLeod, Helen; Fatahi, Mahsa; Melzer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Interventional MRI has significant potential for image guidance of iliac angioplasty and related vascular procedures. A technology framework with in-room image display, control, communication and MRI-guided intervention techniques was designed and tested for its potential to provide safe, fast and efficient MRI-guided angioplasty of the iliac arteries. Methods A 1.5T MRI scanner was adapted for interactive imaging during endovascular procedures using new or modified interventional devices such as guidewires and catheters. A perfused vascular phantom was used for testing. Pre-, intra- and post-procedural visualization and measurement of vascular morphology and flow was implemented. A detailed analysis of X-Ray fluoroscopic angiography workflow was conducted and applied. Two interventional radiologists and one physician in training performed 39 procedures. All procedures were timed and analyzed. Results MRI-guided iliac angioplasty procedures were successfully performed with progressive adaptation of techniques and workflow. The workflow, setup and protocol enabled a reduction in table time for a dedicated MRI-guided procedure to 6 min 33 s with a mean procedure time of 9 min 2 s, comparable to the mean procedure time of 8 min 42 s for the standard X-Ray guided procedure. Conclusions MRI-guided iliac vascular interventions were found to be feasible and practical using this framework and optimized workflow. In particular the real-time flow analysis was found to be helpful for pre- and post-interventional assessments. Design optimization of the catheters and in vivo experiments are required before clinical evaluation. PMID:25102933

  14. A novel anthropomorphic flow phantom for the quantitative evaluation of prostate DCE-MRI acquisition techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Silvin P.; Browne, Jacinta E.; Meaney, James F.; Smith, David S.; Fagan, Andrew J.

    2016-10-01

    A novel anthropomorphic flow phantom device has been developed, which can be used for quantitatively assessing the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners to accurately measure signal/concentration time-intensity curves (CTCs) associated with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. Modelling of the complex pharmacokinetics of contrast agents as they perfuse through the tumour capillary network has shown great promise for cancer diagnosis and therapy monitoring. However, clinical adoption has been hindered by methodological problems, resulting in a lack of consensus regarding the most appropriate acquisition and modelling methodology to use and a consequent wide discrepancy in published data. A heretofore overlooked source of such discrepancy may arise from measurement errors of tumour CTCs deriving from the imaging pulse sequence itself, while the effects on the fidelity of CTC measurement of using rapidly-accelerated sequences such as parallel imaging and compressed sensing remain unknown. The present work aimed to investigate these features by developing a test device in which ‘ground truth’ CTCs were generated and presented to the MRI scanner for measurement, thereby allowing for an assessment of the DCE-MRI protocol to accurately measure this curve shape. The device comprised a four-pump flow system wherein CTCs derived from prior patient prostate data were produced in measurement chambers placed within the imaged volume. The ground truth was determined as the mean of repeat measurements using an MRI-independent, custom-built optical imaging system. In DCE-MRI experiments, significant discrepancies between the ground truth and measured CTCs were found for both tumorous and healthy tissue-mimicking curve shapes. Pharmacokinetic modelling revealed errors in measured K trans, v e and k ep values of up to 42%, 31%, and 50% respectively, following a simple variation of the parallel imaging factor and number of signal averages in the acquisition

  15. Practical Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Small Animal Models of Cancer: Data Acquisition, Data Analysis, and Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Stephanie L.; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Loveless, Mary E.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) consists of the continuous acquisition of images before, during, and after the injection of a contrast agent. DCE-MRI allows for noninvasive evaluation of tumor parameters related to vascular perfusion and permeability and tissue volume fractions, and is frequently employed in both preclinical and clinical investigations. However, the experimental and analytical subtleties of the technique are not frequently discussed in the literature, nor are its relationships to other commonly used quantitative imaging techniques. This review aims to provide practical information on the development, implementation, and validation of a DCE-MRI study in the context of a preclinical study (though we do frequently refer to clinical studies that are related to these topics). PMID:23105959

  16. fMRI adaptation revisited.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Jonas; Solomon, Samuel G; Kohn, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Adaptation has been widely used in functional magnetic imaging (fMRI) studies to infer neuronal response properties in human cortex. fMRI adaptation has been criticized because of the complex relationship between fMRI adaptation effects and the multiple neuronal effects that could underlie them. Many of the longstanding concerns about fMRI adaptation have received empirical support from neurophysiological studies over the last decade. We review these studies here, and also consider neuroimaging studies that have investigated how fMRI adaptation effects are influenced by high-level perceptual processes. The results of these studies further emphasize the need to interpret fMRI adaptation results with caution, but they also provide helpful guidance for more accurate interpretation and better experimental design. In addition, we argue that rather than being used as a proxy for measurements of neuronal stimulus selectivity, fMRI adaptation may be most useful for studying population-level adaptation effects across cortical processing hierarchies.

  17. MRI of plants and foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van As, Henk; van Duynhoven, John

    2013-04-01

    The importance and prospects for MRI as applied to intact plants and to foods are presented in view of one of humanity's most pressing concerns, the sustainable and healthy feeding of a worldwide increasing population. Intact plants and foods have in common that their functionality is determined by complex multiple length scale architectures. Intact plants have an additional level of complexity since they are living systems which critically depend on transport and signalling processes between and within tissues and organs. The combination of recent cutting-edge technical advances and integration of MRI accessible parameters has the perspective to contribute to breakthroughs in understanding complex regulatory plant performance mechanisms. In food science and technology MRI allows for quantitative multi-length scale structural assessment of food systems, non-invasive monitoring of heat and mass transport during shelf-life and processing, and for a unique view on food properties under shear. These MRI applications are powerful enablers of rationally (re)designed food formulations and processes. Limitations and bottlenecks of the present plant and food MRI methods are mainly related to short T2 values and susceptibility artefacts originating from small air spaces in tissues/materials. We envisage cross-fertilisation of solutions to overcome these hurdles in MRI applications in plants and foods. For both application areas we witness a development where MRI is moving from highly specialised equipment to mobile and downscaled versions to be used by a broad user base in the field, greenhouse, food laboratory or factory.

  18. The Role of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in a Child with Sport-Induced Avascular Necrosis of the Scaphoid: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Koc, Baris Beytullah; Schotanus, Martijn; Jong, Bob; Tilman, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) of the scaphoid in children is very rare and there is currently no consensus when conservative or operative treatment is indicated. A 10-year-old boy, practicing karate, presented with acute pain in his left wrist after falling on the outstretched hand. Imaging showed a scaphoid waist fracture with signs of an ongoing AVN. The diagnosis of AVN was confirmed with signal loss of the scaphoid on MRI T1. A dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed for further assessment of the proximal pole vascularity and treatment planning. As dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI showed fair perfusion of the proximal pole, an adequate healing potential with conservative treatment was estimated. We achieved union and good function with cast immobilization for fourteen weeks. This case study showed dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI to be a valuable tool in assessing whether conservative or operative treatment is indicated to achieve union and good functional outcome. PMID:27529045

  19. Hemangioma of the tongue demonstrating a perfusion blood pool mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Groshar, D.; Israel, O.; Robinson, E.

    1986-02-01

    Perfusion blood pool mismatch using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells (RBCs) in a hemangioma of the tongue is described. The method is useful in the evaluation of size of the residual blood pool after irradiation of the tumor.

  20. Perfusion computed tomography to assist decision making for stroke thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Bivard, Andrew; Levi, Christopher; Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh; McElduff, Patrick; Miteff, Ferdi; Spratt, Neil J; Bateman, Grant; Donnan, Geoffrey; Davis, Stephen; Parsons, Mark

    2015-07-01

    The use of perfusion imaging to guide selection of patients for stroke thrombolysis remains controversial because of lack of supportive phase three clinical trial evidence. We aimed to measure the outcomes for patients treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) at a comprehensive stroke care facility where perfusion computed tomography was routinely used for thrombolysis eligibility decision assistance. Our overall hypothesis was that patients with 'target' mismatch on perfusion computed tomography would have improved outcomes with rtPA. This was a prospective cohort study of consecutive ischaemic stroke patients who fulfilled standard clinical/non-contrast computed tomography eligibility criteria for treatment with intravenous rtPA, but for whom perfusion computed tomography was used to guide the final treatment decision. The 'real-time' perfusion computed tomography assessments were qualitative; a large perfusion computed tomography ischaemic core, or lack of significant perfusion lesion-core mismatch were considered relative exclusion criteria for thrombolysis. Specific volumetric perfusion computed tomography criteria were not used for the treatment decision. The primary analysis compared 3-month modified Rankin Scale in treated versus untreated patients after 'off-line' (post-treatment) quantitative volumetric perfusion computed tomography eligibility assessment based on presence or absence of 'target' perfusion lesion-core mismatch (mismatch ratio >1.8 and volume >15 ml, core <70 ml). In a second analysis, we compared outcomes of the perfusion computed tomography-selected rtPA-treated patients to an Australian historical cohort of non-contrast computed tomography-selected rtPA-treated patients. Of 635 patients with acute ischaemic stroke eligible for rtPA by standard criteria, thrombolysis was given to 366 patients, with 269 excluded based on visual real-time perfusion computed tomography assessment. After off-line quantitative

  1. Metabolism of 7-ethyoxycoumarin by Isolated Perfused Rainbow Trout Livers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolated trout livers were perfused using methods designed to preserve tissue viability and function. Liver performance was evaluated by measuring O2 consumption, vascular resistance, K+ leakage, glucose flux, lactate flux, alanine aminotransferase leakage, and metabolic clearanc...

  2. Multislice CT brain image registration for perfusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhong Min; Pohlman, Scott; Chandra, Shalabh

    2002-04-01

    During the last several years perfusion CT techniques have been developed as an effective technique for clinically evaluating cerebral hemodynamics. Perfusion CT techniques are capable of measurings functional parameters such as tissue perfusion, blood flow, blood volume, and mean transit time and are commonly used to evaluate stroke patients. However, the quality of functional images of the brain frequently suffers from patient head motion. Because the time window for an effective treatment of stroke patient is narrow, a fast motion correction is required. The purpose of the paper is to present a fast and accurate registration technique for motion correction of multi-slice CT and to demonstrate the effects of the registration on perfusion calculation.

  3. Neuroimaging of pediatric brain tumors: from basic to advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    PubMed

    Panigrahy, Ashok; Blüml, Stefan

    2009-11-01

    In this review, the basic magnetic resonance concepts used in the imaging approach of a pediatric brain tumor are described with respect to different factors including understanding the significance of the patient's age. Also discussed are other factors directly related to the magnetic resonance scan itself including evaluating the location of the tumor, determining if the lesion is extra-axial or intra-axial, and evaluating the contrast characteristics of the lesion. Of note, there are key imaging features of pediatric brain tumors, which can give information about the cellularity of the lesion, which can then be confirmed with advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. The second part of this review will provide an overview of the major advanced MRI techniques used in pediatric imaging, particularly, magnetic resonance diffusion, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and magnetic resonance perfusion. The last part of the review will provide more specific information about the use of advanced magnetic resonance techniques in the evaluation of pediatric brain tumors.

  4. Perfusion Electronic Record Documentation Using Epic Systems Software.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Thomas G; Gunser, John M; Saviello, George M

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the design and use of Epic Systems software for documentation of perfusion activities as part of the patient electronic medical record. The University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics adapted the Anesthesia software module and developed an integrated perfusion/anesthesia record for the documentation of cardiac and non-cardiac surgical procedures. This project involved multiple committees, approvals, and training to successfully implement. This article will describe our documentation options, concepts, design, challenges, training, and implementation during our initial experience.

  5. Perfusion of nonventilated lung: failure of hypoxic vasoconstriction

    SciTech Connect

    Sostman, H.D.; Neumann, R.D.; Gottschalk, A.; Greenspan, R.H.

    1983-07-01

    Alveolar hypoxia is a well established cause of regional vasoconstriction such that nonventilated segments are not perfused. The paradoxical situation of retained perfusion of nonventilated lung has seldom been discussed. Three clinical examples are illustrated. In each case coexistent chronic obstructive lung disease may have contributed to this unexpected finding by reducing pulmonary vascular capacity such that blood flow diversion from hypoxic segments was not possible.

  6. Evaluation of Microvascular Perfusion and Resuscitation after Severe Injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yann-Leei L; Simmons, Jon D; Gillespie, Mark N; Alvarez, Diego F; Gonzalez, Richard P; Brevard, Sidney B; Frotan, Mohammad A; Schneider, Andrew M; Richards, William O

    2015-12-01

    Achieving adequate perfusion is a key goal of treatment in severe trauma; however, tissue perfusion has classically been measured by indirect means. Direct visualization of capillary flow has been applied in sepsis, but application of this technology to the trauma population has been limited. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the efficacy of standard indirect measures of perfusion to direct imaging of the sublingual microcirculatory flow during trauma resuscitation. Patients with injury severity scores >15 were serially examined using a handheld sidestream dark-field video microscope. In addition, measurements were also made from healthy volunteers. The De Backer score, a morphometric capillary density score, and total vessel density (TVD) as cumulative vessel area within the image, were calculated using Automated Vascular Analysis (AVA3.0) software. These indices were compared against clinical and laboratory parameters of organ function and systemic metabolic status as well as mortality. Twenty severely injured patients had lower TVD (X = 14.6 ± 0.22 vs 17.66 ± 0.51) and De Backer scores (X = 9.62 ± 0.16 vs 11.55 ± 0.37) compared with healthy controls. These scores best correlated with serum lactate (TVD R(2) = 0.525, De Backer R(2) = 0.576, P < 0.05). Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation, pH, bicarbonate, base deficit, hematocrit, and coagulation parameters correlated poorly with both TVD and De Backer score. Direct measurement of sublingual microvascular perfusion is technically feasible in trauma patients, and seems to provide real-time assessment of microcirculatory perfusion. This study suggests that in severe trauma, many indirect measurements of perfusion do not correlate with microvascular perfusion. However, visualized perfusion deficiencies do reflect a shift toward anaerobic metabolism. PMID:26736167

  7. SU-E-J-120: Comparing 4D CT Computed Ventilation to Lung Function Measured with Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, B; Chen, Q

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To correlate ventilation parameters computed from 4D CT to ventilation, profusion, and gas exchange measured with hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI for a set of lung cancer patients. Methods: Hyperpolarized Xe-129 MRI lung scans were acquired for lung cancer patients, before and after radiation therapy, measuring ventilation, perfusion, and gas exchange. In the standard clinical workflow, these patients also received 4D CT scans before treatment. Ventilation was computed from 4D CT using deformable image registration (DIR). All phases of the 4D CT scan were registered using a B-spline deformable registration. Ventilation at the voxel level was then computed for each phase based on a Jacobian volume expansion metric, yielding phase sorted ventilation images. Ventilation based upon 4D CT and Xe-129 MRI were co-registered, allowing qualitative visual comparison and qualitative comparison via the Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: Analysis shows a weak correlation between hyperpolarized Xe-129 MRI and 4D CT DIR ventilation, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.17 to 0.22. Further work will refine the DIR parameters to optimize the correlation. The weak correlation could be due to the limitations of 4D CT, registration algorithms, or the Xe-129 MRI imaging. Continued development will refine parameters to optimize correlation. Conclusion: Current analysis yields a minimal correlation between 4D CT DIR and Xe-129 MRI ventilation. Funding provided by the 2014 George Amorino Pilot Grant in Radiation Oncology at the University of Virginia.

  8. Transepithelial transport of glutathione in isolated perfused small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, T.M.; Jones, D.P.

    1986-03-01

    Uptake of GSH was studied in isolated perfused segment of jejunum in the adult rat. Krebs-Henseleit buffer was infused through the superior mesenteric artery and fractions were collected from the portal vein. The maintenance of vascular and epithelial integrity was established by lack of transfer of /sup 14/C-inulin or /sup 14/C-polyethylene glycol from the lumen to the perfusate. (glycine-2-/sup 3/H)GSH was introduced in the lumen and perfusate fractions collected every min. With 1 mM GSH and 10 mM Gly in the lumen, transport into the perfusate was 220 nmol/min. Analysis by HPLC showed that 80% was at the intact tripeptide, GSH. No cysteinylgylcine was detected in the perfusate. Pretreatment of the segment with 0.25 mM acivicin and 1 mM buthionine sulfoximine had no significant effect on GSH transport rate, thus showing that degradation and resynthesis of GSH did not contribute to the appearance of GSH in the perfusate. GSH transport was inhibited 50% by replacing lumenal NaCl with choline Cl. Addition of 10 mM ..gamma..-Clu-Glu or 10 mM ophthalmic acid decreased the rat of transport by 60-70%. These results establish that transepithelial transport of intact GSH occurs in rat small intestine. This may allow utilization of dietary GSH or reutilization of biliary GSH. In addition, the results suggest that oral GSH may be of therapeutic benefit.

  9. A pump-free membrane-controlled perfusion microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    Goral, Vasiliy N; Tran, Elizabeth; Yuen, Po Ki

    2015-09-01

    In this article, we present a microfluidic platform for passive fluid pumping for pump-free perfusion cell culture, cell-based assay, and chemical applications. By adapting the passive membrane-controlled pumping principle from the previously developed perfusion microplate, which utilizes a combination of hydrostatic pressure generated by different liquid levels in the wells and fluid wicking through narrow strips of a porous membrane connecting the wells to generate fluid flow, a series of pump-free membrane-controlled perfusion microfluidic devices was developed and their use for pump-free perfusion cell culture and cell-based assays was demonstrated. Each pump-free membrane-controlled perfusion microfluidic device comprises at least three basic components: an open well for generating fluid flow, a micron-sized deep chamber/channel for cell culture or for fluid connection, and a wettable porous membrane for controlling the fluid flow. Each component is fluidically connected either by the porous membrane or by the micron-sized deep chamber/channel. By adapting and incorporating the passive membrane-controlled pumping principle into microfluidic devices, all the benefits of microfluidic technologies, such as small sample volumes, fast and efficient fluid exchanges, and fluid properties at the micro-scale, can be fully taken advantage of with this pump-free membrane-controlled perfusion microfluidic platform.

  10. Goal-directed-perfusion in neonatal aortic arch surgery

    PubMed Central

    Purbojo, Ariawan; Muench, Frank; Juengert, Joerg; Rueffer, André

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of mortality and morbidity in congenital cardiac surgery has always been and remains a major target for the complete team involved. As operative techniques are more and more standardized and refined, surgical risk and associated complication rates have constantly been reduced to an acceptable level but are both still present. Aortic arch surgery in neonates seems to be of particular interest, because perfusion techniques differ widely among institutions and an ideal form of a so called “total body perfusion (TBP)” is somewhat difficult to achieve. Thus concepts of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA), regional cerebral perfusion (RCP/with cardioplegic cardiac arrest or on the perfused beating heart) and TBP exist in parallel and all carry an individual risk for organ damage related to perfusion management, chosen core temperature and time on bypass. Patient safety relies more and more on adequate end organ perfusion on cardiopulmonary bypass, especially sensitive organs like the brain, heart, kidney, liver and the gut, whereby on adequate tissue protection, temperature management and oxygen delivery should be visualized and monitored. PMID:27709094

  11. Fast nonlinear regression method for CT brain perfusion analysis.

    PubMed

    Bennink, Edwin; Oosterbroek, Jaap; Kudo, Kohsuke; Viergever, Max A; Velthuis, Birgitta K; de Jong, Hugo W A M

    2016-04-01

    Although computed tomography (CT) perfusion (CTP) imaging enables rapid diagnosis and prognosis of ischemic stroke, current CTP analysis methods have several shortcomings. We propose a fast nonlinear regression method with a box-shaped model (boxNLR) that has important advantages over the current state-of-the-art method, block-circulant singular value decomposition (bSVD). These advantages include improved robustness to attenuation curve truncation, extensibility, and unified estimation of perfusion parameters. The method is compared with bSVD and with a commercial SVD-based method. The three methods were quantitatively evaluated by means of a digital perfusion phantom, described by Kudo et al. and qualitatively with the aid of 50 clinical CTP scans. All three methods yielded high Pearson correlation coefficients ([Formula: see text]) with the ground truth in the phantom. The boxNLR perfusion maps of the clinical scans showed higher correlation with bSVD than the perfusion maps from the commercial method. Furthermore, it was shown that boxNLR estimates are robust to noise, truncation, and tracer delay. The proposed method provides a fast and reliable way of estimating perfusion parameters from CTP scans. This suggests it could be a viable alternative to current commercial and academic methods. PMID:27413770

  12. CT Perfusion Characteristics Identify Metastatic Sites in Liver.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Hobbs, Brian P; Ng, Chaan S

    2015-01-01

    Tissue perfusion plays a critical role in oncology because growth and migration of cancerous cells require proliferation of new blood vessels through the process of tumor angiogenesis. Computed tomography (CT) perfusion is an emerging functional imaging modality that measures tissue perfusion through dynamic CT scanning following intravenous administration of contrast medium. This noninvasive technique provides a quantitative basis for assessing tumor angiogenesis. CT perfusion has been utilized on a variety of organs including lung, prostate, liver, and brain, with promising results in cancer diagnosis, disease prognostication, prediction, and treatment monitoring. In this paper, we focus on assessing the extent to which CT perfusion characteristics can be used to discriminate liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumors from normal liver tissues. The neuroendocrine liver metastases were analyzed by distributed parameter modeling to yield tissue blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), permeability (PS), and hepatic arterial fraction (HAF), for tumor and normal liver. The result reveals the potential of CT perfusion as a tool for constructing biomarkers from features of the hepatic vasculature for guiding cancer detection, prognostication, and treatment selection.

  13. Tagged MRI and PET in severe CAD: discrepancy between preoperative inotropic reserve and intramyocardial functional outcome after revascularization.

    PubMed

    Mazzadi, Alejandro N; Janier, Marc F; Brossier, Benjamin; André-Fouët, Xavier; Revel, Didier; Croisille, Pierre

    2004-11-01

    In severe coronary artery disease (CAD), it has been shown that intramyocardial inotropic reserve as assessed with tagged magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is uniformly distributed among positron emission tomography (PET) patterns reflecting normal or concomitant reductions in perfusion and glucose metabolism. This preliminary study aimed to delineate the relationship between preoperative values of intramyocardial inotropic reserve (in different PET patterns of perfusion and glucose uptake) and intramyocardial functional outcome after surgical revascularization in severe CAD. Twelve patients underwent preoperative tagged MRI (baseline, 10 microg.kg(-1).min(-1) of dobutamine), H2 15O/[18F]fluorodeoxyglucose PET imaging, and postoperative resting tagged MRI. Regional midmyocardial circumferential shortening (Ecc, in %) and PET patterns (normal, match viable, mismatch viable, and infarcted) were assessed in three tagged MRI/PET short-axis slices. Ecc at baseline ranged from 12 +/- 6 to 8 +/- 5 and 4 +/- 4% in normal, match-viable, and infarcted regions, respectively (P <0.05) and was 8 +/- 5% in mismatch-viable regions. Of the 429 regions studied, 187 showed preoperative inotropic reserve with dobutamine, but 238 showed postoperative functional improvement. Postoperative functional improvement was less common in infarcted regions (41 vs. approximately 60% in the other PET patterns), but the extent of improvement was similar among PET patterns (approximately 6%). Postoperative functional improvement occurred in 53% of all (normal, match viable, and mismatch viable) regions without inotropic reserve. In severe CAD, revascularization affords greater intramyocardial functional benefit than expected from the evaluation of intramyocardial inotropic reserve with low-dose dobutamine. Postoperative functional improvement in PET-viable regions without inotropic reserve suggests that factors other than regionally enhanced perfusion contribute to such functional improvement. PMID

  14. Multi-Parametric Assessment of Vascular Function in Peripheral Artery Disease: Dynamic Measurement of Skeletal Muscle Perfusion, BOLD Signal, and Venous Oxygen Saturation

    PubMed Central

    Englund, Erin K.; Langham, Michael C.; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Fanning, Molly; Wehrli, Felix W.; Mohler, Emile R.; Floyd, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Endothelial dysfunction present in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) may be better understood by measuring the temporal dynamics of blood flow and oxygen saturation during reactive hyperemia than by conventional static measurements. Methods and Results Perfusion, Intravascular Venous Oxygen saturation, and T2* (PIVOT), a recently developed MRI technique, was used to measure the response to an ischemia-reperfusion paradigm in ninety-six patients with PAD of varying severity, and ten healthy controls. Perfusion, venous oxygen saturation (SvO2), and T2* were each quantified in the calf at two second temporal resolution, yielding a dynamic time course for each variable. Compared to healthy controls, patients had a blunted and delayed hyperemic response. Moreover, patients with lower ankle-brachial index had: 1) a more delayed reactive hyperemia response time, manifesting as an increase in time to peak perfusion in the gastrocnemius, soleus, and peroneus muscles, and in the anterior compartment; 2) an increase in the time to peak T2* measured in the soleus muscle; and 3) a prolongation of the posterior tibial vein SvO2 washout time. Intra- and inter-session repeatability was also assessed. Results indicated that time to peak perfusion and time to peak T2* were the most reliable extracted time course metrics. Conclusions Perfusion, dynamic SvO2, and T2* response times following induced ischemia are highly correlated with PAD disease severity. Combined imaging of peripheral microvascular blood flow and dynamics of oxygen saturation with PIVOT may be a useful tool to investigate the pathophysiology of PAD. PMID:25873722

  15. Comparison of 2 techniques for regional antibiotic delivery to the equine forelimb: intraosseous perfusion vs. intravenous perfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Butt, T D; Bailey, J V; Dowling, P M; Fretz, P B

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the synovial fluid concentrations and pharmacokinetics of amikacin in the equine limb distal to the carpus following intraosseous and intravenous regional perfusion. The front limbs of 6 horses were randomly assigned to either intraosseous or intravenous perfusion. A tourniquet was placed distal to each carpus and the limb perfused with 500 mg of amikacin. Systemic blood samples and synovial fluid samples were collected over 70 min from the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint, metacarpophalangeal joint, and digital flexor sheath. The tourniquet was removed following the 30 min sample collection. The mean peak amikacin concentration for the DIP joint was significantly higher with intravenous perfusion. There were no significant differences in time to peak concentration or elimination half-life between methods at each synovial structure. Each technique produced mean peak concentrations ranging from 5 to 50 times that of recommended peak serum concentrations for therapeutic efficacy. PMID:11519271

  16. Unsupervised nonlinear dimensionality reduction machine learning methods applied to multiparametric MRI in cerebral ischemia: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, Vishwa S.; Jacobs, Jeremy R.; Jacobs, Michael A.

    2014-03-01

    The evaluation and treatment of acute cerebral ischemia requires a technique that can determine the total area of tissue at risk for infarction using diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. Typical MRI data sets consist of T1- and T2-weighted imaging (T1WI, T2WI) along with advanced MRI parameters of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) methods. Each of these parameters has distinct radiological-pathological meaning. For example, DWI interrogates the movement of water in the tissue and PWI gives an estimate of the blood flow, both are critical measures during the evolution of stroke. In order to integrate these data and give an estimate of the tissue at risk or damaged; we have developed advanced machine learning methods based on unsupervised non-linear dimensionality reduction (NLDR) techniques. NLDR methods are a class of algorithms that uses mathematically defined manifolds for statistical sampling of multidimensional classes to generate a discrimination rule of guaranteed statistical accuracy and they can generate a two- or three-dimensional map, which represents the prominent structures of the data and provides an embedded image of meaningful low-dimensional structures hidden in their high-dimensional observations. In this manuscript, we develop NLDR methods on high dimensional MRI data sets of preclinical animals and clinical patients with stroke. On analyzing the performance of these methods, we observed that there was a high of similarity between multiparametric embedded images from NLDR methods and the ADC map and perfusion map. It was also observed that embedded scattergram of abnormal (infarcted or at risk) tissue can be visualized and provides a mechanism for automatic methods to delineate potential stroke volumes and early tissue at risk.

  17. Metalloprotein-based MRI probes

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yuri; Jasanoff, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Metalloproteins have long been recognized as key determinants of endogenous contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of biological subjects. More recently, both natural and engineered metalloproteins have been harnessed as biotechnological tools to probe gene expression, enzyme activity, and analyte concentrations by MRI. Metalloprotein MRI probes are paramagnetic and function by analogous mechanisms to conventional gadolinium or iron oxide-based MRI contrast agents. Compared with synthetic agents, metalloproteins typically offer worse sensitivity, but the possibilities of using protein engineering and targeted gene expression approaches in conjunction with metalloprotein contrast agents are powerful and sometimes definitive strengths. This review summarizes theoretical and practical aspects of metalloprotein-based contrast agents, and discusses progress in the exploitation of these proteins for molecular imaging applications. PMID:23376346

  18. Metalloprotein-based MRI probes.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yuri; Jasanoff, Alan

    2013-04-17

    Metalloproteins have long been recognized as key determinants of endogenous contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of biological subjects. More recently, both natural and engineered metalloproteins have been harnessed as biotechnological tools to probe gene expression, enzyme activity, and analyte concentrations by MRI. Metalloprotein MRI probes are paramagnetic and function by analogous mechanisms to conventional gadolinium or iron oxide-based MRI contrast agents. Compared with synthetic agents, metalloproteins typically offer worse sensitivity, but the possibilities of using protein engineering and targeted gene expression approaches in conjunction with metalloprotein contrast agents are powerful and sometimes definitive strengths. This review summarizes theoretical and practical aspects of metalloprotein-based contrast agents, and discusses progress in the exploitation of these proteins for molecular imaging applications.

  19. Integrating evidence-based perfusion into practices: the International Consortium for Evidence-Based Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Likosky, Donald S

    2006-12-01

    There is surmounting pressure for clinicians domestically and abroad not only to practice evidence-based perfusion, but also to supplement practice with documentation thereof. In this editorial, I shall describe an international initiative aimed at embracing this dictum from patients, regulatory bodies, and payers. "Research is the only hope that the future will be different than the past"- Daniel Mintz, MD "Practical men who believe themselves to be quite exempt from any intellectual influences are usually the slaves of some defunct economist.... It is ideas not vested interests which are dangerous for good or evil."-John Maynard Keynes.

  20. MRI and intraocular tamponade media.

    PubMed

    Manfrè, L; Fabbri, G; Avitabile, T; Biondi, P; Reibaldi, A; Pero, G

    1993-01-01

    Thirteen patients who underwent surgery for retinal detachment and injection of intraocular tamponade media (silicone oil, fluorosilicone oil, or perfluorocarbon liquid) underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), using spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted images. The ophthalmic tamponade media showed different signal intensity, according to their chemical structure. Unlike ophthalmoscopy or ultrasonography, MRI showed no oil-related artefact, making possible recognition of recurrent retinal detachment.

  1. Experimental evidence of biomass burning as a source of atmospheric 137Cs, puy de Dôme (1465 m a.s.l.), France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourcier, L.; Sellegri, K.; Masson, O.; Zangrando, R.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.; Pichon, J.-M.; Boulon, J.; Laj, P.

    2010-06-01

    The presence of cesium-137 ( 137Cs) in the environment is mainly due to past nuclear tests and accidental reactor releases. Due to the half-life of 137Cs (30.2 y), amounts of this radionuclide releases are in fact still detectable in soils, and at trace levels in the vegetation and the atmosphere. Since the middle of the 1990's, the presence of 137Cs in the atmosphere has long been attributed to the resuspension of terrestrial dust. Recently, modelling studies have demonstrated that an additional and possibly dominant source of this anthropogenic radionuclide is biomass burning. Here, we report the variations of atmospheric 137Cs activity levels over a 2-year period at the puy de Dôme (1465 m a.s.l.), France in combination with measurements of the aerosol chemical composition, in particular with indicators for biomass burning (levoglucosan and potassium) and soil dust (calcium). Temporal co-variations of these chemical compounds in addition to back-trajectories are used to identify common source emissions. Significant correlation is found between these compounds. Hence, we experimentally confirm the modelling study highlighting the fact that the atmospheric 137Cs is partly released by biomass burning. In addition, we observed that the correlations between the 137Cs concentrations and levoglucosan and biomass burning K + differ according to the season. This is in agreement with the temporal evolution of levoglucosan concentration, which has maxima in winter and minima in summer.

  2. Altitude-dependent wet, dry and occult nitrogen deposition in an Alpine region (Achenldrch, Austria, 920 m - 1758 m a.s.l.).

    PubMed

    Kalina, Michael F; Stopper, Silke; Zambo, Elisabeth; Puxbaum, Hans

    2002-01-01

    From November 1995 to October 1996 and from October 1997 to September 1998, samples of wet precipitation, cloud water as well as of reactive gases and particulate matter, were collected at three elevational levels (920 m, 1,280 m and 1,758 m a.s.l.) in Achenkirch, Austria. The samples were analysed for ammonium and nitrate in wet precipitation and in cloud water, for ammonia, nitric acid and nitrogen dioxide in the gas phase and for particulate ammonium and particulate nitrate in aerosol. Total nitrogen deposition was calculated combining measured concentrations in wet, dry and occult depositions with the corresponding deposition fluxes. Two multilayer deposition models were used for the calculation of dry and occult deposition. The total nitrogen input in 1995/96 was estimated to be 29 kg N ha(-1)a(-1) at the Christlumkopf station (1,758 m), 20 kg N ha(-1)a(-1) at the Christlumalm station (1,280 m) and 28 kg N ha(-1)a(-1) at the Talboden station (930 m). Respective data for the 1997/98 observation period were 31 kg N ha(-1)a(-1) at the Christlumkopf station (1,758 m) and 18 kg N ha(-1)a(-1) at the Mülhleggerköpfl station (920 m). Critical Loads of nitrogen for coniferous forests were exceeded significantly near-source regions represented by areas of intense agricultural use and at high elevation sites.

  3. Kinematics and thermal conditions in the permafrost-affected rockwalls of the Aiguille du Midi (3842 m a.s.l., Mont Blanc massif, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanel, Ludovic; Grangier, Germain; Weber, Samuel; Beutel, Jan; Magnin, Florence; Gruber, Stefan; Deline, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Processes that control climate-dependent rockfall from permafrost-affected rock slopes are still poorly understood. In this study, we present the results of a Wireless Sensor Network, integrated within the Swiss project PermaSense and developed in 2012, to measure rock temperature and geotechnical parameters in the steep rockwalls of the Aiguille du Midi (AdM, 3842 m a.s.l., Mont Blanc massif, France). Accessible year round by cable car, the AdM comprises two main peaks: (i) the Piton Nord with the cable car arrival station, where 4 crack-meters are placed on four major fractures, and (ii) the Piton Central with many touristic infrastructure, equipped with three 10-m-deep boreholes with 15 temperatures sensors since 2009, and where 2 crack-meters are installed along a major fracture. Three major kinematic regimes are observed: (i) opening of clefts when the rock temperature becomes positive, followed by closing during the cold period, (ii) summer opening continued by a winter opening, and (iii) closing during the warm period followed by opening in winter.

  4. Xueshuantong improves cerebral blood perfusion in elderly patients with lacunar infarction.

    PubMed

    Gui, Qifeng; Yang, Yunmei; Ying, Shihong; Zhang, Minming

    2013-03-25

    A total of 64 patients with acute lacunar infarction were enrolled within 24 hours of onset. The patients received conventional therapy (antiplatelet drugs and hypolipidemic drugs) alone or conventional therapy plus 450 mg Xueshuantong once a day. The main ingredient of the Xueshuantong lyophilized powder used for injection was Panax notoginseng saponins. Assessments were made at admission and at discharge using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, the Activity of Daily Living and the Mini-Mental State Examination. Additionally, the relative cerebral blood flow, relative cerebral blood volume and relative mean transit time in the region of interest were calculated within 24 hours after the onset of lacunar infarction, using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance perfusion imaging technology. Patients underwent a follow-up MRI scan after 4 weeks of treatment. There was an improvement in the Activity of Daily Living scores and a greater reduction in the scores on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale in the treatment group than in the control group. However, the Mini-Mental State Examination scores showed no significant differences after 4 weeks of treatment. Compared with the control group, the relative cerebral blood flow at discharge had increased and showed a greater improvement in the treatment group. Furthermore, there was a reduction in the relative mean transit time at discharge and the value was lower in the treatment group than in the control group. The experimental findings indicate that Xueshuantong treatment improves neurological deficits in elderly patients with lacunar infarction, and the mechanism may be related to increased cerebral perfusion.

  5. Altered resting perfusion and functional connectivity of default mode network in youth with autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jann, Kay; Hernandez, Leanna M; Beck-Pancer, Devora; McCarron, Rosemary; Smith, Robert X; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuroimaging studies can shed light on the neurobiological underpinnings of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Studies of the resting brain have shown both altered baseline metabolism from PET/SPECT and altered functional connectivity (FC) of intrinsic brain networks based on resting-state fMRI. To date, however, no study has investigated these two physiological parameters of resting brain function jointly, or explored the relationship between these measures and ASD symptom severity. Methods Here, we used pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling with 3D background-suppressed GRASE to assess resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and FC in 17 youth with ASD and 22 matched typically developing (TD) children. Results A pattern of altered resting perfusion was found in ASD versus TD children including frontotemporal hyperperfusion and hypoperfusion in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. We found increased local FC in the anterior module of the default mode network (DMN) accompanied by decreased CBF in the same area. In our cohort, both alterations were associated with greater social impairments as assessed with the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS-total T scores). While FC was correlated with CBF in TD children, this association between FC and baseline perfusion was disrupted in children with ASD. Furthermore, there was reduced long-range FC between anterior and posterior modules of the DMN in children with ASD. Conclusion Taken together, the findings of this study – the first to jointly assess resting CBF and FC in ASD – highlight new avenues for identifying novel imaging markers of ASD symptomatology. PMID:26445698

  6. Myocardial perfusion echocardiography and coronary microvascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Barletta, Giuseppe; Del Bene, Maria Riccarda

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of coronary syndromes has evolved in the last two decades out of the obstructive atherosclerosis of epicardial coronary arteries paradigm to include anatomo-functional abnormalities of coronary microcirculation. No current diagnostic technique allows direct visualization of coronary microcirculation, but functional assessments of this circulation are possible. This represents a challenge in cardiology. Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) was a breakthrough in echocardiography several years ago that claimed the capability to detect myocardial perfusion abnormalities and quantify coronary blood flow. Research demonstrated that the integration of quantitative MCE and fractional flow reserve improved the definition of ischemic burden and the relative contribution of collaterals in non-critical coronary stenosis. MCE identified no-reflow and low-flow within and around myocardial infarction, respectively, and predicted the potential functional recovery of stunned myocardium using appropriate interventions. MCE exhibited diagnostic performances that were comparable to positron emission tomography in microvascular reserve and microvascular dysfunction in angina patients. Overall, MCE improved echocardiographic evaluations of ischemic heart disease in daily clinical practice, but the approval of regulatory authorities is lacking. PMID:26730291

  7. New Trends in Radionuclide Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Guang-Uei; Wang, Yuh-Feng; Su, Hung-Yi; Hsieh, Te-Chun; Ko, Chi-Lun; Yen, Ruoh-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been widely used clinically as one of the major functional imaging modalities for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) for decades. Ample evidence has supported the use of MPI as a useful and important tool in the diagnosis, risk stratification and treatment planning for CAD. Although popular in the United States, MPI has become the most frequently used imaging modality among all nuclear medicine tests in Taiwan. However, it should be acknowledged that MPI SPECT does have its limitations. These include false-positive results due to certain artifacts, false-negative due to balanced ischemia, complexity and adverse reaction arising from current pharmacological stressors, time consuming nature of the imaging procedure, no blood flow quantitation and relatively high radiation exposure. The purpose of this article was to review the recent trends in nuclear cardiology, including the utilization of positron emission tomography (PET) for MPI, new stressor, new SPECT camera with higher resolution and higher sensitivity, dynamic SPECT protocol for blood flow quantitation, new software of phase analysis for evaluation of LV dyssynchrony, and measures utilized for reducing radiation exposure of MPI. PMID:27122946

  8. Myocardial perfusion assessment with contrast echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desco, Manuel; Ledesma-Carbayo, Maria J.; Santos, Andres; Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel A.; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Malpica, Norberto; Antoranz, Jose C.; Garcia-Barreno, Pedro

    2001-05-01

    Assessment of intramyocardial perfusion by contrast echocardiography is a promising new technique that allows to obtain quantitative parameters for the assessment of ischemic disease. In this work, a new methodology and a software prototype developed for this task are presented. It has been validated with Coherent Contrast Imaging (CCI) images acquired with an Acuson Sequoia scanner. Contrast (Optison microbubbles) is injected continuously during the scan. 150 images are acquired using low mechanical index U/S pulses. A burst of high mechanical index pulses is used to destroy bubbles, thus allowing to detect the contrast wash-in. The stud is performed in two conditions: rest and pharmacologically induced stress. The software developed allows to visualized the study (cine) and to select several ROIs within the heart wall. The position of these ROIs along the cardiac cycle is automatically corrected on the basis of the gradient field, and they can also be manually corrected in case the automatic procedure fails. Time curves are analyzed according to a parametric model that incorporates both contrast inflow rate and cyclic variations. Preliminary clinical results on 80 patients have allowed us to identify normal and pathological patterns and to establish the correlation of qu