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Sample records for asl perfusion mri

  1. Resting State Brain Function Analysis Using Concurrent BOLD in ASL Perfusion fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Senhua; Fang, Zhuo; Hu, Siyuan; Wang, Ze; Rao, Hengyi

    2013-01-01

    The past decade has seen astounding discoveries about resting-state brain activity patterns in normal brain as well as their alterations in brain diseases. While the vast majority of resting-state studies are based on the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI), arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion fMRI can simultaneously capture BOLD and cerebral blood flow (CBF) signals, providing a unique opportunity for assessing resting brain functions with concurrent BOLD (ccBOLD) and CBF signals. Before taking that benefit, it is necessary to validate the utility of ccBOLD signal for resting-state analysis using conventional BOLD (cvBOLD) signal acquired without ASL modulations. To address this technical issue, resting cvBOLD and ASL perfusion MRI were acquired from a large cohort (n = 89) of healthy subjects. Four widely used resting-state brain function analyses were conducted and compared between the two types of BOLD signal, including the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) seed-based functional connectivity (FC) analysis, independent component analysis (ICA), analysis of amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF), and analysis of regional homogeneity (ReHo). Consistent default mode network (DMN) as well as other resting-state networks (RSNs) were observed from cvBOLD and ccBOLD using PCC-FC analysis and ICA. ALFF from both modalities were the same for most of brain regions but were different in peripheral regions suffering from the susceptibility gradients induced signal drop. ReHo showed difference in many brain regions, likely reflecting the SNR and resolution differences between the two BOLD modalities. The DMN and auditory networks showed highest CBF values among all RSNs. These results demonstrated the feasibility of ASL perfusion MRI for assessing resting brain functions using its concurrent BOLD in addition to CBF signal, which provides a potentially useful way to maximize the utility of ASL perfusion MRI. PMID:23750275

  2. Continuous ASL (CASL) perfusion MRI with an array coil and parallel imaging at 3T.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ze; Wang, Jiongjiong; Connick, Thomas J; Wetmore, Gabriel S; Detre, John A

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of using an array coil and parallel imaging in continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) perfusion MRI. An 8-channel receive-only array head coil was used in conjunction with a surrounding detunable volume transmit coil. The signal to noise ratio (SNR), temporal stability, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and perfusion image coverage were measured from steady state CASL scans using: a standard volume coil, array coil, and array coil with 2- and 3-fold accelerated parallel imaging. Compared to the standard volume coil, the array coil provided 3 times the average SNR increase and higher temporal stability for the perfusion weighted images, even with threefold acceleration. Although perfusion images of the array coil were affected by the inhomogeneous coil sensitivities, this effect was invisible in the quantitative CBF images, which showed highly reproducible perfusion values compared to the standard volume coil. The unfolding distortions of parallel imaging were suppressed in the perfusion images by pairwise subtraction, though they sharply degraded the raw EPI images. Moreover, parallel imaging provided the potential of acquiring more slices due to the shortened acquisition time and improved coverage in brain regions with high static field inhomogeneity. Such results highlight the potential utility of array coils and parallel imaging in ASL perfusion MRI. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. MRI-based quantification of renal perfusion in mice: Improving sensitivity and stability in FAIR ASL.

    PubMed

    Gutjahr, Fabian Tobias; Günster, Stephan Michael; Kampf, Thomas; Winter, Patrick; Herold, Volker; Bauer, Wolfgang Rudolf; Jakob, Peter Michael

    2017-04-18

    The importance of the orientation of the selective inversion slice in relation to the anatomy in flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery arterial spin labeling (FAIR ASL) kidney perfusion measurements is demonstrated by comparing the standard FAIR scheme to a scheme with an improved slice selective control experiment. A FAIR ASL method is used. The selective inversion preparation slice is set perpendicular to the measurement slice to decrease the unintended labeling of arterial spins in the control experiment. A T1(*)-based quantification method compensates for the effects of the imperfect inversion on the edge of the selective inversion slice. The quantified perfusion values are compared to the standard experiment with parallel orientation of imaging and selective inversion slice. Perfusion maps acquired with the perpendicular inversion slice orientation show higher sensitivity compared to the parallel orientation. The T1(*)-based quantification method removes artifacts arising from imperfect inversion slice profiles. The stability is improved. Adjusting the labeling technique to the anatomy is of high importance. Improved sensitivity and reproducibility could be demonstrated. The proposed method provides a solution to the problem of FAIR ASL measurements of renal perfusion in coronal view. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  4. Neural Substrates Associated with Weather-Induced Mood Variability: An Exploratory Study Using ASL Perfusion fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Gillihan, Seth J.; Detre, John A.; Farah, Martha J.; Rao, Hengyi

    2013-01-01

    Daily variations in weather are known to be associated with variations in mood. However, little is known about the specific brain regions that instantiate weather-related mood changes. We used a data-driven approach and ASL perfusion fMRI to assess the neural substrates associated with weather-induced mood variability. The data-driven approach was conducted with mood ratings under various weather conditions (N = 464). Forward stepwise regression was conducted to develop a statistical model of mood as a function of weather conditions. The model results were used to calculate the mood-relevant weather index which served as the covariate in the regression analysis of the resting CBF (N = 42) measured by ASL perfusion fMRI under various weather conditions. The resting CBF activities in the left insula-prefrontal cortex and left superior parietal lobe were negatively correlated (corrected p<0.05) with the weather index, indicating that better mood-relevant weather conditions were associated with lower CBF in these regions within the brain’s emotional network. The present study represents a first step toward the investigation of the effect of natural environment on baseline human brain function, and suggests the feasibility of ASL perfusion fMRI for such study. PMID:24834022

  5. Arterial Spin Labeling - Fast Imaging with Steady-State Free Precession (ASL-FISP): A Rapid and Quantitative Perfusion Technique for High Field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ying; Goodnough, Candida L.; Erokwu, Bernadette O.; Farr, George W.; Darrah, Rebecca; Lu, Lan; Dell, Katherine M.; Yu, Xin; Flask, Chris A.

    2014-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) is a valuable non-contrast perfusion MRI technique with numerous clinical applications. Many previous ASL MRI studies have utilized either Echo-Planar Imaging (EPI) or True Fast Imaging with Steady-State Free Precession (True FISP) readouts that are prone to off-resonance artifacts on high field MRI scanners. We have developed a rapid ASL-FISP MRI acquisition for high field preclinical MRI scanners providing perfusion-weighted images with little or no artifacts in less than 2 seconds. In this initial implementation, a FAIR (Flow-Sensitive Alternating Inversion Recovery) ASL preparation was combined with a rapid, centrically-encoded FISP readout. Validation studies on healthy C57/BL6 mice provided consistent estimation of in vivo mouse brain perfusion at 7 T and 9.4 T (249±38 ml/min/100g and 241±17 ml/min/100g, respectively). The utility of this method was further demonstrated in detecting significant perfusion deficits in a C57/BL6 mouse model of ischemic stroke. Reasonable kidney perfusion estimates were also obtained for a healthy C57/BL6 mouse exhibiting differential perfusion in the renal cortex and medulla. Overall, the ASL-FISP technique provides a rapid and quantitative in vivo assessment of tissue perfusion for high field MRI scanners with minimal image artifacts. PMID:24891124

  6. Arterial spin labeling-fast imaging with steady-state free precession (ASL-FISP): a rapid and quantitative perfusion technique for high-field MRI.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Goodnough, Candida L; Erokwu, Bernadette O; Farr, George W; Darrah, Rebecca; Lu, Lan; Dell, Katherine M; Yu, Xin; Flask, Chris A

    2014-08-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a valuable non-contrast perfusion MRI technique with numerous clinical applications. Many previous ASL MRI studies have utilized either echo-planar imaging (EPI) or true fast imaging with steady-state free precession (true FISP) readouts, which are prone to off-resonance artifacts on high-field MRI scanners. We have developed a rapid ASL-FISP MRI acquisition for high-field preclinical MRI scanners providing perfusion-weighted images with little or no artifacts in less than 2 s. In this initial implementation, a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL preparation was combined with a rapid, centrically encoded FISP readout. Validation studies on healthy C57/BL6 mice provided consistent estimation of in vivo mouse brain perfusion at 7 and 9.4 T (249 ± 38 and 241 ± 17 mL/min/100 g, respectively). The utility of this method was further demonstrated in the detection of significant perfusion deficits in a C57/BL6 mouse model of ischemic stroke. Reasonable kidney perfusion estimates were also obtained for a healthy C57/BL6 mouse exhibiting differential perfusion in the renal cortex and medulla. Overall, the ASL-FISP technique provides a rapid and quantitative in vivo assessment of tissue perfusion for high-field MRI scanners with minimal image artifacts. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Longitudinal assessment of renal perfusion and oxygenation in transplant donor-recipient pairs using ASL and BOLD MRI

    PubMed Central

    Niles, David J; Artz, Nathan S; Djamali, Arjang; Sadowski, Elizabeth A; Grist, Thomas M; Fain, Sean B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess renal function in kidney transplant recipients and their respective donors over two years using arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI, and to prospectively evaluate the effect of losartan on functional MRI measures in recipients. Materials and Methods The study included 15 matched pairs of renal transplant donors and recipients. ASL and BOLD MRI of the kidneys were performed on donors prior to transplant surgery (baseline) and on both donors and recipients at 3 months, 1 year and 2 years post-transplant. After 3 months, seven of the 15 recipients were prescribed 25–50 mg/day losartan for the remainder of the study. A linear mixed-effects model was used to evaluate perfusion, R2*, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and fractional excretion of sodium (FENa) for changes across time or associated with losartan treatment. Results In donors, cortical perfusion in the remaining kidney decreased by 50 ± 19 ml/min/100g (11.8%) between baseline and 2 years (P < 0.05), while cortical R2* declined modestly by 0.7 ± 0.3 s−1 (5.6%; P < 0.05). In transplanted kidneys, cortical perfusion decreased markedly by 141 ± 21 ml/min/100g (34.2%) between baseline and 2 years (P < 0.001), while medullary R2* declined by 1.5 ± 0.8 s−1 (8.3%; P = 0.06). Single-kidney eGFR increased between baseline and 2 years by 17.7 ± 2.7 ml/min/1.73m2 (40.3%; P < 0.0001) in donors and to 14.6 ± 4.3 ml/min/1.73m2 (33.3%; P < 0.01) in recipients. Cortical perfusion at 1 and 2 years in recipients receiving 25–50 mg/day losartan was 62 ± 24 ml/min/100g higher than recipients not receiving the drug (P < 0.05). No significant effects of losartan were observed for any other markers of renal function. Conclusions The results suggest an important role for non-invasive functional monitoring with ASL and BOLD MRI in kidney transplant recipients and donors, and they indicate a potentially beneficial effect of losartan in recipients. PMID

  8. Investigation of the mechanisms mediating MDMA "Ecstasy"-induced increases in cerebro-cortical perfusion determined by btASL MRI.

    PubMed

    Rouine, J; Kelly, M E; Jennings-Murphy, C; Duffy, P; Gorman, I; Gormley, S; Kerskens, C M; Harkin, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Acute administration of the recreational drug of abuse 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; Ecstasy) has previously been shown to increase cerebro-cortical perfusion as determined by bolus-tracking arterial spin labelling (btASL) MRI. The purpose of the current study was to assess the mechanisms mediating these changes following systemic administration of MDMA to rats. Pharmacological manipulation of serotonergic, dopaminergic and nitrergic transmission was carried out to determine the mechanism of action of MDMA-induced increases in cortical perfusion using btASL MRI. Fenfluramine (10 mg/kg), like MDMA (20 mg/kg), increased cortical perfusion. Increased cortical perfusion was not obtained with the 5-HT2 receptor agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl-aminopropane hydrochloride (DOI) (1 mg/kg). Depletion of central 5-HT following systemic administration of the tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor para-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) produced effects similar to those observed with MDMA. Pre-treatment with the 5-HT receptor antagonist metergoline (4 mg/kg) or with the 5-HT reuptake inhibitor citalopram (30 mg/kg), however, failed to produce any effect alone or influence the response to MDMA. Pre-treatment with the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390 (1 mg/kg) failed to influence the changes in cortical perfusion obtained with MDMA. Treatment with the neuronal nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) (25 mg/kg) provoked no change in cerebral perfusion alone yet attenuated the MDMA-related increase in cortical perfusion. Cortical 5-HT depletion is associated with increases in perfusion although this mechanism alone does not account for MDMA-related changes. A role for NO, a key regulator of cerebrovascular perfusion, is implicated in MDMA-induced increases in cortical perfusion.

  9. Recommended implementation of arterial spin-labeled perfusion MRI for clinical applications: A consensus of the ISMRM perfusion study group and the European consortium for ASL in dementia.

    PubMed

    Alsop, David C; Detre, John A; Golay, Xavier; Günther, Matthias; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Hernandez-Garcia, Luis; Lu, Hanzhang; MacIntosh, Bradley J; Parkes, Laura M; Smits, Marion; van Osch, Matthias J P; Wang, Danny J J; Wong, Eric C; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a summary statement of recommended implementations of arterial spin labeling (ASL) for clinical applications. It is a consensus of the ISMRM Perfusion Study Group and the European ASL in Dementia consortium, both of whom met to reach this consensus in October 2012 in Amsterdam. Although ASL continues to undergo rapid technical development, we believe that current ASL methods are robust and ready to provide useful clinical information, and that a consensus statement on recommended implementations will help the clinical community to adopt a standardized approach. In this review, we describe the major considerations and trade-offs in implementing an ASL protocol and provide specific recommendations for a standard approach. Our conclusion is that as an optimal default implementation, we recommend pseudo-continuous labeling, background suppression, a segmented three-dimensional readout without vascular crushing gradients, and calculation and presentation of both label/control difference images and cerebral blood flow in absolute units using a simplified model.

  10. Assessment of cerebral blood perfusion reserve with acetazolamide using 3D spiral ASL MRI: Preliminary experience in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Hu, Houchun H; Li, Zhiqiang; Pokorney, Amber L; Chia, Jonathan M; Stefani, Niccolo; Pipe, James G; Miller, Jeffrey H

    2017-01-01

    To demonstrate the clinical feasibility of a new non-Cartesian cylindrically-distributed spiral 3D pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse sequence in pediatric patients in quantifying cerebral blood flow (CBF) response to an acetazolamide (ACZ) vasodilator challenge. MRI exams were performed on two 3 Tesla Philips Ingenia systems using 32 channel head coil arrays. After local institutional review board approval, the 3D spiral-based pCASL technique was added to a standard brain MRI exam and evaluated in 13 pediatric patients (average age: 11.7±6.4years, range: 1.4-22.2years). All patients were administered ACZ for clinically indicated reasons. Quantitative whole-brain CBF measurements were computed pre- and post-ACZ to assess cerebrovascular reserve. 3D spiral pCASL data were successfully reconstructed in all 13 cases. In 11 patients, CBF increased 2.8% to 93.2% after administration of ACZ. In the two remaining patients, CBF decreased by 2.4 to 6.0% after ACZ. The group average change in CBF due to ACZ was approximately 25.0% and individual changes were statistically significant (p<0.01) in all patients using a paired t-test analysis. CBF perfusion data were diagnostically useful in supporting conventional MR angiography and clinical findings. 3D cylindrically-distributed spiral pCASL MRI provides a robust approach to assess cerebral blood flow and reserve in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) fMRI: Advantages, Theoretical Constrains and Experimental Challenges in Neurosciences

    PubMed Central

    Borogovac, Ajna; Asllani, Iris

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is a well-established correlate of brain function and therefore an essential parameter for studying the brain at both normal and diseased states. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a noninvasive fMRI technique that uses arterial water as an endogenous tracer to measure CBF. ASL provides reliable absolute quantification of CBF with higher spatial and temporal resolution than other techniques. And yet, the routine application of ASL has been somewhat limited. In this review, we start by highlighting theoretical complexities and technical challenges of ASL fMRI for basic and clinical research. While underscoring the main advantages of ASL versus other techniques such as BOLD, we also expound on inherent challenges and confounds in ASL perfusion imaging. In closing, we expound on several exciting developments in the field that we believe will make ASL reach its full potential in neuroscience research. PMID:22966219

  12. Feasibility of ASL spinal bone marrow perfusion imaging with optimized inversion time.

    PubMed

    Xing, Dong; Zha, Yunfei; Yan, Liyong; Wang, Kejun; Gong, Wei; Lin, Hui

    2015-11-01

    To assess the correlation between flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in the measurement of spinal bone marrow (SBM) perfusion; in addition, to assess for an optimized inversion time (TI) as well as the reproducibility of SBM FAIR perfusion. The optimized TI of a FAIR SBM perfusion experiment was carried out on 14 volunteers; two adjacent vertebral bodies were selected from each volunteer to measure the change of signal intensity (ΔM) and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of FAIR perfusion MRI with five different TIs. Then, reproducibility of FAIR data from 10 volunteers was assessed by the reposition SBM FAIR experiments. Finally, FAIR and DCE-MRI were performed on 27 subjects. The correlation between the blood flow on FAIR (BFASL ) and perfusion-related parameters on DCE-MRI was evaluated. The maximum value of ΔM and SNR were 36.39 ± 12.53 and 2.38 ± 0.97, respectively; both were obtained when TI was near 1200 msec. There were no significant difference between the two successive measurements of SBM BFASL perfusion (P = 0.879), and the within-subject coefficients of variation (wCV) of the measurements was 3.28%. The BFASL showed a close correlation with K(trans) (P < 0.001) and Kep (P = 0.004), and no correlation with Ve (P = 0.082) was found. 1200 msec was the optimal TI for the SBM ASL perfusion image, which led to the maximum ΔM and a good quality perfusion image. The SBM FAIR perfusion scan protocol has good reproducibility, and as blood flow measurement on FAIR is reliable and closely related with the parameters on DCE-MRI, FAIR is feasible for measuring SBM blood flow. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Spatio-temporal TGV denoising for ASL perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Spann, Stefan M; Kazimierski, Kamil S; Aigner, Christoph S; Kraiger, Markus; Bredies, Kristian; Stollberger, Rudolf

    2017-08-15

    In arterial spin labeling (ASL) a perfusion weighted image is achieved by subtracting a label image from a control image. This perfusion weighted image has an intrinsically low signal to noise ratio and numerous measurements are required to achieve reliable image quality, especially at higher spatial resolutions. To overcome this limitation various denoising approaches have been published using the perfusion weighted image as input for denoising. In this study we propose a new spatio-temporal filtering approach based on total generalized variation (TGV) regularization which exploits the inherent information of control and label pairs simultaneously. In this way, the temporal and spatial similarities of all images are used to jointly denoise the control and label images. To assess the effect of denoising, virtual ground truth data were produced at different SNR levels. Furthermore, high-resolution in-vivo pulsed ASL data sets were acquired and processed. The results show improved image quality, quantitative accuracy and robustness against outliers compared to seven state of the art denoising approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Imaging brain fatigue from sustained mental workload: an ASL perfusion study of the time-on-task effect.

    PubMed

    Lim, Julian; Wu, Wen-Chau; Wang, Jiongjiong; Detre, John A; Dinges, David F; Rao, Hengyi

    2010-02-15

    During sustained periods of a taxing cognitive workload, humans typically display time-on-task (TOT) effects, in which performance gets steadily worse over the period of task engagement. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used in this study to investigate the neural correlates of TOT effects in a group of 15 subjects as they performed a 20-min continuous psychomotor vigilance test (PVT). Subjects displayed significant TOT effects, as seen in progressively slower reaction times and significantly increased mental fatigue ratings after the task. Perfusion data showed that the PVT activates a right lateralized fronto-parietal attentional network in addition to the basal ganglia and sensorimotor cortices. The fronto-parietal network was less active during post-task rest compared to pre-task rest, and regional CBF decrease in this network correlated with performance decline. These results demonstrate the persistent effects of cognitive fatigue in the fronto-parietal network after a period of heavy mental work and indicate the critical role of this attentional network in mediating TOT effects. Furthermore, resting regional CBF in the thalamus and right middle frontal gyrus prior to task onset was predictive of subjects' subsequent performance decline, suggesting that resting CBF quantified by ASL perfusion fMRI may be a useful indicator of performance potential and a marker of the level of fatigue in the neural attentional system.

  15. Prematurity and brain perfusion: Arterial spin labeling MRI.

    PubMed

    Tortora, Domenico; Mattei, Peter Angelo; Navarra, Riccardo; Panara, Valentina; Salomone, Rita; Rossi, Andrea; Detre, John A; Caulo, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal brain perfusion is a critical mechanism in neonatal brain injury. The aim of the present study was to compare Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) evaluated with ASL MRI in three groups of neonates: preterms without brain lesions on MRI (PN), preterms with periventricular white matter lesions (PNp) and term neonates with normal MRI (TN). The correlation between CBF and clinical outcome was explored. The institutional review board approved this prospective study and waived informed consent. The perfusion ASL data from 49 consecutive preterm neonates (PN) studied at term-equivalent age and 15 TN were evaluated. Statistically significant differences in gray matter CBF were evaluated by using a linear mixed-model analysis and Mann-Whitney U test. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relation between CBF and neuromotor outcome at 12 months. Comparison of means indicated that the CBF of the whole brain were significantly higher in PN compared to TN (P = 0.011). This difference remained significant when considering the frontal (P = 0.038), parietal (P = 0.002), temporal (P = 0.030), occipital (P = 0.041) and cerebellar (P = 0.010) gray matter. In the PN group, lower CBF in basal ganglia was associated with a worse neuromotor outcome (P = 0.012). ASL MRI demonstrated differences in brain perfusion of the basal ganglia between PN and TN. In PN, a positive correlation between CBF and neuromotor outcome was demonstrated in this area.

  16. Optimization of flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) for perfusion functional MRI of rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Fatima A; Lee, Eugene L Q; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang

    2012-11-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI provides a noninvasive method to image perfusion, and has been applied to map neural activation in the brain. Although pulsed labeling methods have been widely used in humans, continuous ASL with a dedicated neck labeling coil is still the preferred method in rodent brain functional MRI (fMRI) to maximize the sensitivity and allow multislice acquisition. However, the additional hardware is not readily available and hence its application is limited. In this study, flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) pulsed ASL was optimized for fMRI of rat brain. A practical challenge of FAIR is the suboptimal global inversion by the transmit coil of limited dimensions, which results in low effective labeling. By using a large volume transmit coil and proper positioning to optimize the body coverage, the perfusion signal was increased by 38.3% compared with positioning the brain at the isocenter. An additional 53.3% gain in signal was achieved using optimized repetition and inversion times compared with a long TR. Under electrical stimulation to the forepaws, a perfusion activation signal change of 63.7 ± 6.3% can be reliably detected in the primary somatosensory cortices using single slice or multislice echo planar imaging at 9.4 T. This demonstrates the potential of using pulsed ASL for multislice perfusion fMRI in functional and pharmacological applications in rat brain.

  17. Validation of diffuse correlation spectroscopy for muscle blood flow with concurrent arterial spin labeled perfusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guoqiang; Floyd, Thomas F.; Durduran, Turgut; Zhou, Chao; Wang, Jiongjiong; Detre, John A.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2007-02-01

    Calf blood flow was measured simultaneously in healthy human subjects (n = 7) during cuff inflation and deflation using near-infrared diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) and arterial spin labeled perfusion MRI (ASL-MRI). The DCS and ASL-MRI data exhibited highly correlated absolute and relative dynamic flow responses in each individual (p < 0.001). Peak flow variations during hyperemia were also significantly correlated, though more for relative (p = 0.003) than absolute (p = 0.016) flow. Repeated measurement variation was less than 8% for both modalities. The results provide much needed quantitative blood flow validation of the diffuse optical correlation method in humans.

  18. Hippocampal Dysfunction in Gulf War Veterans: Investigation with ASL Perfusion MR Imaging and Physostigmine Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiufeng; Spence, Jeffrey S.; Buhner, David M.; Hart, John; Cullum, C. Munro; Biggs, Melanie M.; Hester, Andrea L.; Odegard, Timothy N.; Carmack, Patrick S.; Haley, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine, with arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and physostigmine challenge, if abnormal hippocampal blood flow in ill Gulf War veterans persists 11 years after initial testing with single photon emission computed tomography and nearly 20 years after the 1991 Gulf War. Materials and Methods: The local institutional review board approved this HIPAA-compliant study. Veterans were screened for contraindications and gave written informed consent before the study. In a semiblinded retrospective protocol, veterans in three Gulf War illness groups—syndrome 1 (impaired cognition), syndrome 2 (confusion-ataxia), and syndrome 3 (central neuropathic pain)—and a control group received intravenous infusions of saline in an initial session and physostigmine in a second session, 48 hours later. Each infusion was followed by measurement of hippocampal regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with pulsed ASL. A mixed-effects linear model adjusted for age was used to test for differences in rCBF after the cholinergic challenge across the four groups. Results: Physostigmine significantly decreased hippocampal rCBF in control subjects (P < .0005) and veterans with syndrome 1 (P < .05) but significantly increased hippocampal rCBF in veterans with syndrome 2 (P < .005) and veterans with syndrome 3 (P < .002). The abnormal increase in rCBF was found to have progressed to the left hippocampus of the veterans with syndrome 2 and to both hippocampi of the veterans with syndrome 3. Conclusion: Chronic hippocampal perfusion dysfunction persists or worsens in veterans with certain Gulf War syndromes. ASL MR imaging examination of hippocampal rCBF in a cholinergic challenge experiment may be useful as a diagnostic test for this condition. © RSNA, 2011 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.11101715/-/DC1 PMID:21914840

  19. Regional and voxel-wise comparisons of blood flow measurements between dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    White, Carissa M; Pope, Whitney B; Zaw, Taryar; Qiao, Joe; Naeini, Kourosh M; Lai, Albert; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L; Wang, J J; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Ellingson, Benjamin M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the regional and voxel-wise correlation between dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in patients with brain tumors. Thirty patients with histologically verified brain tumors were evaluated in the current study. DSC-MRI was performed by first using a preload dose of gadolinium contrast, then collecting a dynamic image acquisition during a bolus of contrast, followed by posthoc contrast agent leakage correction. Pseudocontinuous ASL was collected using 30 pairs of tag and control acquisition using a 3-dimensional gradient-echo spin-echo (GRASE) acquisition. All images were registered to a high-resolution anatomical atlas. Average CBF measurements within regions of contrast-enhancement and T2 hyperintensity were evaluated between the two modalities. Additionally, voxel-wise correlation between CBF measurements obtained with DSC and ASL were assessed. Results demonstrated a positive linear correlation between DSC and ASL measurements of CBF when regional average values were compared; however, a statistically significant voxel-wise correlation was only observed in around 30-40% of patients. These results suggest DSC and ASL may provide regionally similar, but spatially different measurements of CBF.

  20. Cine-ASL: a steady-pulsed arterial spin labeling method for myocardial perfusion mapping in mice. Part I. Experimental study.

    PubMed

    Troalen, Thomas; Capron, Thibaut; Cozzone, Patrick J; Bernard, Monique; Kober, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Arterial spin labeling has been developed and used for the quantitative and completely noninvasive assessment of myocardial perfusion in vivo. Here we propose a novel arterial spin labeling method called cine-ASL, which is based on an electrocardiogram-gated steady-pulsed labeling approach combined with simultaneous readout over the cardiac cycle using cine-fast low-angle shot. This method led to shorter acquisition times than the previously used Look-Locker flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery gradient-echo technique while preserving spatial resolution and robustness with respect to cardiac motion. High resolution perfusion mapping (in-plane resolution = 195 μm × 391 μm) was carried out with both techniques at 4.7 T in a group of 14 healthy mice. Mean perfusion values were 5.0 ± 0.8 mL g(-1) min(-1) with cine-ASL and 5.9 ± 1.4 mL g(-1) min(-1) with Look-Locker flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery. In one animal, physiological stress was induced with higher anesthetic concentration to evaluate the response of both methods under vasodilation. Global myocardial perfusion increased from 5.6 to 16.0 mL g(-1) min(-1) with cine-ASL and from 6.3 to 18.7 mL g(-1) min(-1) with Look-Locker flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery. Although this original scheme requires a separate T1 measurement to be fully quantitative, it improves arterial spin labeling sensitivity while maintaining compatibility with motion constraints in cardiac MRI in small rodents.

  1. A linear mixed perfusion model for tissue partial volume correction of perfusion estimates in dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI: Impact on absolute quantification, repeatability, and agreement with pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, André; Wirestam, Ronnie; Lind, Emelie; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Knutsson, Linda

    2017-06-01

    The partial volume effect (PVE) is an important source of bias in brain perfusion measurements. The impact of tissue PVEs in perfusion measurements with dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI) has not yet been well established. The purpose of this study was to suggest a partial volume correction (PVC) approach for DSC-MRI and to study how PVC affects DSC-MRI perfusion results. A linear mixed perfusion model for DSC-MRI was derived and evaluated by way of simulations. Twenty healthy volunteers were scanned twice, including DSC-MRI, arterial spin labeling (ASL), and partial volume measurements. Two different algorithms for PVC were employed and assessed. Simulations showed that the derived model had a tendency to overestimate perfusion values in voxels with high fractions of cerebrospinal fluid. PVC reduced the tissue volume dependence of DSC-MRI perfusion values from 44.4% to 4.2% in gray matter and from 55.3% to 14.2% in white matter. One PVC method significantly improved the voxel-wise repeatability, but PVC did not improve the spatial agreement between DSC-MRI and ASL perfusion maps. Significant PVEs were found for DSC-MRI perfusion estimates, and PVC successfully reduced those effects. The findings suggest that PVC might be an important consideration for DSC-MRI applications. Magn Reson Med 77:2203-2214, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. Perfusion MRI: The Five Most Frequently Asked Clinical Questions

    PubMed Central

    Essig, Marco; Nguyen, Thanh Binh; Shiroishi, Mark S.; Saake, Marc; Provenzale, James M.; Enterline, David S.; Anzalone, Nicoletta; Dörfler, Arnd; Rovira, Àlex; Wintermark, Max; Law, Meng

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This article addresses questions that radiologists frequently ask when planning, performing, processing, and interpreting MRI perfusion studies in CNS imaging. CONCLUSION Perfusion MRI is a promising tool in assessing stroke, brain tumors, and neurodegenerative diseases. Most of the impediments that have limited the use of perfusion MRI can be overcome to allow integration of these methods into modern neuroimaging protocols. PMID:23971482

  3. Repeatability and Variability of Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Techniques in Mice: Comparison of Arterial Spin Labeling and First-pass Contrast-enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Naresh, Nivedita K.; Chen, Xiao; Moran, Eric; Tian, Yikui; French, Brent A.; Epstein, Frederick H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Preclinical imaging of myocardial blood flow (MBF) can elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease. We compared the repeatability and variability of two methods, first-pass MRI and arterial spin labeling (ASL), for imaging MBF in mice. Methods Quantitative perfusion MRI in mice was performed using both methods at rest, with a vasodilator, and one day after myocardial infarction (MI). Image quality (score of 1–5, 5 best), between-session coefficient of variability (CVbs), intra-user coefficient of variability (CVintra-user) and inter-user coefficient of variability (CVinter-user) were assessed. Acquisition time was 1–2 minutes for first-pass MRI and approximately 40 minutes for ASL. Results Image quality was higher for ASL (3.94±0.09 vs. 2.88±0.10, p<0.05). Infarct zone CVbs was lower with first-pass (17±3% vs. 46±9%, p<0.05). The stress perfusion CVintra-user was lower for ASL (3±1% vs. 14±3%, p<0.05). The stress perfusion CVinter-user was lower for ASL (4±1% vs. 17±4%, p<0.05). Conclusion For low MBF conditions such as infarct, first-pass MRI is preferred due to better repeatability and variability. At high MBF such as at vasodilation, ASL may be more suitable due to superior image quality and lower user variability. First-pass MRI has a substantial speed advantage. PMID:26190350

  4. Quantifying fluctuations of resting state networks using arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Gopal; Scheidegger, Rachel; Alsop, David C

    2015-01-01

    Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used to investigate spontaneous low-frequency signal fluctuations across brain resting state networks. However, BOLD only provides relative measures of signal fluctuations. Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) MRI holds great potential for quantitative measurements of resting state network fluctuations. This study systematically quantified signal fluctuations of the large-scale resting state networks using ASL data from 20 healthy volunteers by separating them from global signal fluctuations and fluctuations caused by residual noise. Global ASL signal fluctuation was 7.59% ± 1.47% relative to the ASL baseline perfusion. Fluctuations of seven detected resting state networks vary from 2.96% ± 0.93% to 6.71% ± 2.35%. Fluctuations of networks and residual noise were 6.05% ± 1.18% and 6.78% ± 1.16% using 4-mm resolution ASL data applied with Gaussian smoothing kernel of 6mm. However, network fluctuations were reduced by 7.77% ± 1.56% while residual noise fluctuation was markedly reduced by 39.75% ± 2.90% when smoothing kernel of 12 mm was applied to the ASL data. Therefore, global and network fluctuations are the dominant structured noise sources in ASL data. Quantitative measurements of resting state networks may enable improved noise reduction and provide insights into the function of healthy and diseased brain. PMID:26661226

  5. Improving cerebral blood flow quantification for arterial spin labeled perfusion MRI by removing residual motion artifacts and global signal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ze

    2012-12-01

    Denoising is critical to improving the quality and stability of cerebral blood flow (CBF) quantification in arterial spin labeled (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) due to the intrinsic low signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) of ASL data. Previous studies have been focused on reducing the spatial or temporal noise using standard filtering techniques, and less attention has been paid to two global nuisance effects, the residual motion artifacts and the global signal fluctuations. Since both nuisances affect the whole brain, removing them in advance should enhance the CBF quantification quality for ASL MRI. The purpose of this paper was to assess this potential benefit. Three methods were proposed to suppress each or both of the two global nuisances. Their performances for CBF quantification were validated using ASL data acquired from 13 subjects. Evaluation results showed that covarying out both global nuisances significantly improved temporal SNR and test-retest stability of CBF measurement. Although the concept of removing both nuisances is not technically novel per se, this paper clearly showed the benefits for ASL CBF quantification. Dissemination of the proposed methods in a free ASL data processing toolbox should be of interest to a broad range of ASL users.

  6. [Abnormal cerebral blood flow distributions during the post-ictal phase of febrile status epilepticus in three pediatric patients measured by arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI].

    PubMed

    Hirano, Keiko; Fukuda, Tokiko

    2016-05-01

    The ability to visualize brain perfusion is important for identifying epileptic foci. We present three pediatric cases showing asymmetrical cerebral blood flow (CBF) distributions during the post-ictal phase of febrile status epilepticus measured by arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion MRI. During the acute phase, regional CBF measurements in the areas considered including epileptic foci were higher than in the corresponding area of the contralateral hemisphere, though the exact quantitative value varied between cases. We could not identify the correct epileptogenic foci, because those ASL images were taken after the prolonged and extraordinary activation of neurons in the affected area. During the recovery phase, the differences reduced and the average regional CBF measurement was 54.6 ± 6.1 ml/100 g per minute, which was a little less than the number of previous ASL studies. ASL perfusion MRI imaging provides a method for evaluating regional CBF by using magnetically labeled arterial blood water as an endogenous tracer. With this technique, we can repeatedly evaluate both the brain structure and the level of perfusion at the same time. ASL is noninvasive and easily accessible, and therefore it could become a routine tool for assessment of perfusion in daily practice of pediatric neurology.

  7. Quantitative pixelwise myocardial perfusion maps from first-pass perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Weng, A M; Ritter, C O; Beer, M; Hahn, D; Köstler, H

    2014-07-01

    To calculate and evaluate absolute quantitative myocardial perfusion maps from rest first-pass perfusion MRI. 10 patients after revascularization of myocardial infarction underwent cardiac rest first-pass perfusion MRI. Additionally, perfusion examinations were performed in 12 healthy volunteers. Quantitative myocardial perfusion maps were calculated by using a deconvolution technique, and results were compared were the findings of a sector-based quantification. Maps were typically calculated within 3 min per slice. For the volunteers, myocardial blood flow values of the maps were 0.51 ± 0.16 ml g(-1) per minute, whereas sector-based evaluation delivered 0.52 ± 0.15 ml g(-1) per minute. A t-test revealed no statistical difference between the two sets of values. For the patients, all perfusion defects visually detected in the dynamic perfusion series could be correctly reproduced in the maps. Calculation of quantitative perfusion maps from myocardial perfusion MRI examinations is feasible. The absolute quantitative maps provide additional information on the transmurality of perfusion defects compared with the visual evaluation of the perfusion series and offer a convenient way to present perfusion MRI findings. Voxelwise analysis of myocardial perfusion helps clinicians to assess the degree of tissue damage, and the resulting maps are a good tool to present findings to patients.

  8. 1D.09: APPLICABILITY OF MEASUREMENT OF RENAL PERFUSION USING 1.5 TESLA MRI ARTERIAL SPIN LABELLING.

    PubMed

    Kistner, I; Ott, C; Jumar, A; Friedrich, S; Grosso, R; Siegl, C; Schmieder, R E; Janka, R

    2015-06-01

    Renal perfusion is a key parameter of kidney function and the decrement of renal perfusion is a marker of target organ damage caused by hypertension. Detecting these changes in renal perfusion could help to manage antihypertensive therapy and evaluate patients[Combining Acute Accent] prognosis. Measurement of renal perfusion by MRI arterial spin labelling (ASL) is a non-invasive and non-time-consuming method without the need to inject any contrast agent. This study examined reproducibility of renal perfusion measured by 1.5 Tesla MRI. Renal perfusion was measured by ASL technique using an 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. Subjects were scanned 3 times at two different days in an interval of two weeks to assess the test-retest reproducibility. Renal perfusion was automatically calculated for the cortex and medulla of the kidney by dedicated software. 14 patients were included with mean age 48.9 ± 12.7 and mean office blood pressure 132 ± 16/82 ± 10mmHg and estimated glomerular filtration rate> 60 ml/min/1.73m. The change of the mean total, cortical and medullary renal perfusion from the first examination to the second examination was 0.37 ± 13/0.62 ± 18/0.00 ± 12 ml/min/100 g kidney weight (p = 0.915/p = 0.898/p = 0.998), respectively. There was also no significant difference between the three renal perfusion measurements at one time point. For clinical trials these data indicate that to detect a 5% (10%) difference of cortical renal perfusion due to an intervention (vs placebo) only 38 (14) patients are required in face of the observed standard deviation for the change in renal perfusion. The inter and intra-session reproducibility of cortical renal perfusion assessed by MRI ASL 1.5 Tesla is excellent and small study cohorts can be used for examination of renal perfusion.

  9. Perfusion MRI: The Five Most Frequently Asked Technical Questions

    PubMed Central

    Essig, Marco; Shiroishi, Mark S.; Nguyen, Thanh Binh; Saake, Marc; Provenzale, James M.; Enterline, David; Anzalone, Nicoletta; Dörfler, Arnd; Rovira, Àlex; Wintermark, Max; Law, Meng

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This and its companion article address the 10 most frequently asked questions that radiologists face when planning, performing, processing, and interpreting different MR perfusion studies in CNS imaging. CONCLUSION Perfusion MRI is a promising tool in assessing stroke, brain tumors, and patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Most of the impediments that have limited the use of perfusion MRI can be overcome to allow integration of these methods into modern neuroimaging protocols. PMID:23255738

  10. SU-D-18C-02: Feasibility of Using a Short ASL Scan for Calibrating Cerebral Blood Flow Obtained From DSC-MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P; Chang, T; Huang, K; Yeh, C; Chien, C; Wai, Y; Lee, T; Liu, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of using a short arterial spin labeling (ASL) scan for calibrating the dynamic susceptibility contrast- (DSC-) MRI in a group of patients with internal carotid artery stenosis. Methods: Six patients with unilateral ICA stenosis enrolled in the study on a 3T clinical MRI scanner. The ASL-cerebral blood flow (-CBF) maps were calculated by averaging different number of dynamic points (N=1-45) acquired by using a Q2TIPS sequence. For DSC perfusion analysis, arterial input function was selected to derive the relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) map and the delay (Tmax) map. Patient-specific CF was calculated from the mean ASL- and DSC-CBF obtained from three different masks: (1)Tmax< 3s, (2)combined gray matter mask with mask 1, (3)mask 2 with large vessels removed. One CF value was created for each number of averages by using each of the three masks for calibrating the DSC-CBF map. The CF value of the largest number of averages (NL=45) was used to determine the acceptable range(< 10%, <15%, and <20%) of CF values corresponding to the minimally acceptable number of average (NS) for each patient. Results: Comparing DSC CBF maps corrected by CF values of NL (CBFL) in ACA, MCA and PCA territories, all masks resulted in smaller CBF on the ipsilateral side than the contralateral side of the MCA territory(p<.05). The values obtained from mask 1 were significantly different than the mask 3(p<.05). Using mask 3, the medium values of Ns were 4(<10%), 2(<15%) and 2(<20%), with the worst case scenario (maximum Ns) of 25, 4, and 4, respectively. Conclusion: This study found that reliable calibration of DSC-CBF can be achieved from a short pulsed ASL scan. We suggested use a mask based on the Tmax threshold, the inclusion of gray matter only and the exclusion of large vessels for performing the calibration.

  11. Noninvasive estimation of oxygen consumption in human calf muscle through combined NMR measurements of ASL perfusion and T₂ oxymetry.

    PubMed

    Decorte, Nicolas; Buehler, Tania; Caldas de Almeida Araujo, Ericky; Vignaud, Alexandre; Carlier, Pierre G

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of measuring muscle O2 consumption (V˙O2) noninvasively with a combination of functional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging methods, and to verify that changes in muscle V˙O2 can be detected with a temporal resolution compatible with physiological investigation and patient ease. T2-based oxymetry of arterial and venous blood was combined with the arterial-spin labeling (ASL)-based determination of muscle perfusion. These measurements were performed on 8 healthy volunteers under normoxic and hypoxic conditions in order to assess the sensitivity of measurements over a range of saturation values. Blood samples were drawn simultaneously and used to titrate blood T2 measurements versus hemoglobin O2 saturation (%HbO2) in vitro. The in vitro calibration curve of blood T2 fitted very well with the %HbO2 (r(2): 0.95). The in vivo venous T2 measurements agreed well with the in vitro measurements (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.61-0.91). Oxygen extraction at rest decreased in the calf muscles subjected to hypoxia (p = 0.031). The combination of unaltered muscle perfusion and pinched arteriovenous O2 difference (p = 0.038) pointed towards a reduced calf muscle V˙O2 during transient hypoxia (p = 0.018). The results of this pilot study confirmed that muscle O2 extraction and V˙O2 can be estimated noninvasively using a combination of functional NMR techniques. Further studies are needed to confirm the usefulness in a larger sample of volunteers and patients.

  12. Repeatability and variability of myocardial perfusion imaging techniques in mice: Comparison of arterial spin labeling and first-pass contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Naresh, Nivedita K; Chen, Xiao; Moran, Eric; Tian, Yikui; French, Brent A; Epstein, Frederick H

    2016-06-01

    Preclinical imaging of myocardial blood flow (MBF) can elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease. We compared the repeatability and variability of two methods, first-pass MRI and arterial spin labeling (ASL), for imaging MBF in mice. Quantitative perfusion MRI in mice was performed using both methods at rest, with a vasodilator, and one day after myocardial infarction. Image quality (score of 1-5; 5 best), between-session coefficient of variability (CVbs ), intra-user coefficient of variability (CVintra-user ), and inter-user coefficient of variability (CVinter-user ) were assessed. Acquisition time was 1-2 min for first-pass MRI and approximately 40 min for ASL. Image quality was higher for ASL (3.94 ± 0.09 versus 2.88 ± 0.10; P < 0.05). Infarct zone CVbs was lower with first-pass (17 ± 3% versus 46 ± 9%; P < 0.05). The stress perfusion CVintra-user was lower for ASL (3 ± 1% versus 14 ± 3%; P < 0.05). The stress perfusion CVinter-user was lower for ASL (4 ± 1% versus 17 ± 4%; P < 0.05). For low MBF conditions such as infarct, first-pass MRI is preferred due to better repeatability and variability. At high MBF such as at vasodilation, ASL may be more suitable due to superior image quality and lower user variability. First-pass MRI has a substantial speed advantage. Magn Reson Med 75:2394-2405, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Environmental heat stress enhances mental fatigue during sustained attention task performing: evidence from an ASL perfusion study.

    PubMed

    Qian, Shaowen; Li, Min; Li, Guoying; Liu, Kai; Li, Bo; Jiang, Qingjun; Li, Li; Yang, Zhen; Sun, Gang

    2015-03-01

    This study was to investigate the potential enhancing effect of heat stress on mental fatigue progression during sustained attention task using arterial spin labeling (ASL) imaging. Twenty participants underwent two thermal exposures in an environmental chamber: normothermic (NT) condition (25°C, 1h) and hyperthermic (HT) condition (50°C, 1h). After thermal exposure, they performed a twenty-minute psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) in the scanner. Behavioral analysis revealed progressively increasing subjective fatigue ratings and reaction time as PVT progressed. Moreover, heat stress caused worse performance. Perfusion imaging analyses showed significant resting-state cerebral blood flow (CBF) alterations after heat exposure. Specifically, increased CBF mainly gathered in thalamic-brainstem area while decreased CBF predominantly located in fronto-parietal areas, anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, and medial frontal cortex. More importantly, diverse CBF distributions and trend of changes between both conditions were observed as the fatigue level progressed during subsequent PVT task. Specifically, higher CBF and enhanced rising trend were presented in superior parietal lobe, precuneus, posterior cingulate cortex and anterior cingulate cortex, while lower CBF or inhibited rising trend was found in dorsolateral frontal cortex, medial frontal cortex, inferior parietal lobe and thalamic-brainstem areas. Furthermore, the decrease of post-heat resting-state CBF in fronto-parietal cortex was correlated with subsequent slower reaction time, suggesting prior disturbed resting-state CBF might be indicator of performance potential and fatigue level in following task. These findings may provide proof for such a view: heat stress has a potential fatigue-enhancing effect when individual is performing highly cognition-demanding attention task.

  14. Myocardial perfusion quantification using the T1 -based FAIR-ASL method: the influence of heart anatomy, cardiopulmonary blood flow and look-locker readout.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Thomas; Helluy, Xavier; Gutjahr, Fabian T; Winter, Patrick; Meyer, Cord B; Jakob, Peter M; Bauer, Wolfgang R; Ziener, Christian H

    2014-05-01

    The quantification of myocardial perfusion using a Look-Locker flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery- arterial spin labeling experiment is considered. Due to the anatomy of the heart, a substantial but unintended partial inversion of the inflowing blood occurs during the slice-selective inversion. Both, the partial inversion as well as the Look-Locker pulse train, influence the myocardial perfusion quantification and are addressed in this work. The mean relaxation time approximation is used to calculate the monoexponential relaxation time of the signal in perfused tissue under Look-Locker readout. The left ventricular blood serves as an approximation of the inflowing blood in the description of FAIR-ASL measurements with global and slice-selective inversion to correctly quantify the myocardial perfusion. The analysis shows that the myocardial perfusion can be overestimated if the T1 -based quantification method is not adapted respecting the Look-Locker pulse train explicitly. Additionally, it turns out that without correction for the partial inversion of the blood pool during the slice-selective inversion the myocardial perfusion is underestimated. It is shown that the Look-Locker readout as well as the nonideal slice-selective inversion experiment have a considerable influence and have to be included properly to correctly quantify myocardial perfusion. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Measurement of arterial transit time and renal blood flow using pseudocontinuous ASL MRI with multiple post-labeling delays: Feasibility, reproducibility, and variation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Won; Shim, Woo Hyun; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Oh, Jong Yeong; Kim, Jeong Kon; Jung, Hoesu; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Dongeun

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, reproducibility, and variation of renal perfusion and arterial transit time (ATT) using pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging (PCASL MRI) in healthy volunteers. PCASL MRI at 3T was performed in 25 healthy volunteers on two different occasions. The ATT and ATT-corrected renal blood flow (ATT-cRBF) were calculated at four different post-labeling delay points (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 s) and evaluated for each kidney and subject. The intraclass correlation (ICC) and Bland-Altman plot were used to assess the reproducibility of the PCASL MRI technique. The within-subject coefficient of variance was determined. Results were obtained for 46 kidneys of 23 subjects with a mean age of 38.6 ± 9.8 years and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 89.1 ± 21.2 ml/min/1.73 m(2) . Two subjects failed in the ASL MRI examination. The mean cortical and medullary ATT-cRBF for the subjects were 215 ± 65 and 81 ± 21 ml/min/100 g, respectively, and the mean cortical and medullary ATT were 1141 ± 262 and 1123 ± 245 msec, correspondingly. The ICC for the cortical ATT-cRBF was 0.927 and the within-subject coefficient of variance was 14.4%. The ICCs for the medullary ATT-cRBF and the cortical and medullary ATT were poor. The Bland-Altman plot for cortical RBF showed good agreement between the two measurements. PCASL MRI is a feasible and reproducible method for measuring renal cortical perfusion. In contrast, ATT for the renal cortex and medulla has poor reproducibility and high variation. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;46:813-819. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. Decreased Cerebral Blood Flow in Chronic Pediatric Mild TBI: An MRI Perfusion Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; West, John D.; Bailey, Jessica N.; Westfall, Daniel R.; Xiao, Hui; Arnold, Todd W.; Kersey, Patrick A.; Saykin, Andrew J.; McDonald, Brenna C.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated cerebral blood flow (CBF) in chronic pediatric mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) using arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging perfusion. mTBI patients showed lower CBF than controls in bilateral frontotemporal regions, with no between-group cognitive differences. Findings suggest ASL may be useful to assess functional abnormalities in pediatric mTBI. PMID:25649779

  17. MRI-based assessment of liver perfusion and hepatocyte injury in the murine model of acute hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Byk, Katarzyna; Jasinski, Krzysztof; Bartel, Zaneta; Jasztal, Agnieszka; Sitek, Barbara; Tomanek, Boguslaw; Chlopicki, Stefan; Skorka, Tomasz

    2016-12-01

    To assess alterations in perfusion and liver function in the concanavalin A (ConA)-induced mouse model of acute liver failure (ALF) using two magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based methods: dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) with Gd-EOB-DTPA contrast agent and arterial spin labelling (ASL). BALB/c mice were studied using a 9.4 T MRI system. The IntraGateFLASH(TM) and FAIR-EPI pulse sequences were used for optimum mouse abdomen imaging. The average perfusion values for the liver of the control and ConA group were equal to 245 ± 20 and 200 ± 32 ml/min/100 g (p = 0.008, respectively). DCE-MRI showed that the time to the peak of the image enhancement was 6.14 ± 1.07 min and 9.72 ± 1.69 min in the control and ConA group (p < 0.001, respectively), while the rate of the contrast wash-out in the control and ConA group was 0.037 ± 0.008 and 0.021 ± 0.008 min(-1) (p = 0.004, respectively). These results were consistent with hepatocyte injury in the ConA-treated mice as confirmed by histopathological staining. Both the ASL and DCE-MRI techniques represent a reliable methodology to assess alterations in liver perfusion and hepatocyte integrity in murine hepatitis.

  18. Effects on resting cerebral blood flow and functional connectivity induced by metoclopramide: a perfusion MRI study in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Seara, María A; Aznárez-Sanado, Maite; Mengual, Elisa; Irigoyen, Jaione; Heukamp, Franz; Pastor, María A

    2011-08-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The substituted benzamide, metoclopramide, is a dopamine receptor antagonist and is widely prescribed in the symptomatic treatment of nausea and vomiting, although it can cause adverse motor and non-motor side effects. The effects of metoclopramide on brain metabolism have not been investigated to date. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH To determine the effects of metoclopramide on brain function, cerebral perfusion changes after a single oral dose were assessed in healthy volunteers using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion MRI was used to measure cerebral blood flow before and after metoclopramide. Blood haemodynamics in the vertebral and internal carotid arteries were evaluated using phase-contrast MRI. KEY RESULTS Metoclopramide altered haemodynamics in the carotid arteries and the cerebral perfusion. Perfusion increased bilaterally in the putamen, consistent with antagonism of dopamine D(2) receptors by metoclopramide and possibly related to its motor side effects. In contrast, reduced perfusion was observed in the insular cortices and anterior temporal lobes. In addition, functional connectivity between the insular cortex and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was decreased. These cortical changes affecting neural circuits between high-order association areas may underlie certain neuropsychiatric conditions occasionally reported after metoclopramide administration. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The present results show the sensitivity of ASL to detect small changes in regional blood flow, closely related to brain function, after a single pharmacological challenge, highlighting the potential of this technique for human pharmacological studies. © 2011 FUNDACIÓN PARA LA INVESTIGACIÓN MÉDICA APLICADA. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Effects on resting cerebral blood flow and functional connectivity induced by metoclopramide: a perfusion MRI study in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Seara, María A; Aznárez-Sanado, Maite; Mengual, Elisa; Irigoyen, Jaione; Heukamp, Franz; Pastor, María A

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The substituted benzamide, metoclopramide, is a dopamine receptor antagonist and is widely prescribed in the symptomatic treatment of nausea and vomiting, although it can cause adverse motor and non-motor side effects. The effects of metoclopramide on brain metabolism have not been investigated to date. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH To determine the effects of metoclopramide on brain function, cerebral perfusion changes after a single oral dose were assessed in healthy volunteers using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion MRI was used to measure cerebral blood flow before and after metoclopramide. Blood haemodynamics in the vertebral and internal carotid arteries were evaluated using phase-contrast MRI. KEY RESULTS Metoclopramide altered haemodynamics in the carotid arteries and the cerebral perfusion. Perfusion increased bilaterally in the putamen, consistent with antagonism of dopamine D2 receptors by metoclopramide and possibly related to its motor side effects. In contrast, reduced perfusion was observed in the insular cortices and anterior temporal lobes. In addition, functional connectivity between the insular cortex and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was decreased. These cortical changes affecting neural circuits between high-order association areas may underlie certain neuropsychiatric conditions occasionally reported after metoclopramide administration. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The present results show the sensitivity of ASL to detect small changes in regional blood flow, closely related to brain function, after a single pharmacological challenge, highlighting the potential of this technique for human pharmacological studies. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Imaging. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-8BJP has previously published an Imaging in Pharmacology themed section, edited by A Davenport and C

  20. Large enhancement of perfusion contribution on fMRI signal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The perfusion contribution to the total functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal was investigated using a rat model with mild hypercapnia at 9.4 T, and human subjects with visual stimulation at 4 T. It was found that the total fMRI signal change could be approximated as a linear superposition of ‘true' blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD; T2/T2*) effect and the blood flow-related (T1) effect. The latter effect was significantly enhanced by using short repetition time and large radiofrequency pulse flip angle and became comparable to the ‘true' BOLD signal in response to a mild hypercapnia in the rat brain, resulting in an improved contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Bipolar diffusion gradients suppressed the intravascular signals but had no significant effect on the flow-related signal. Similar results of enhanced fMRI signal were observed in the human study. The overall results suggest that the observed flow-related signal enhancement is likely originated from perfusion, and this enhancement can improve CNR and the spatial specificity for mapping brain activity and physiology changes. The nature of mixed BOLD and perfusion-related contributions in the total fMRI signal also has implication on BOLD quantification, in particular, the BOLD calibration model commonly used to estimate the change of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen. PMID:22395206

  1. Quantitative ASL muscle perfusion imaging using a FAIR-TrueFISP technique at 3.0 T.

    PubMed

    Boss, Andreas; Martirosian, Petros; Claussen, Claus D; Schick, Fritz

    2006-02-01

    The feasibility of muscle perfusion imaging with diagnostic image quality was demonstrated using the FAIR-TrueFISP arterial spin labeling technique on a clinical 3.0 T whole-body scanner. In eight healthy volunteers (24 to 42 years old), quantitative perfusion maps of the forearm musculature were acquired before and after intense exercise. All measurements were carried out in a 3.0 T whole-body MR unit in combination with an eight-channel head coil. Pulsed arterial spin labeling and data recording were performed with an adapted FAIR-TrueFISP technique and quantitative perfusion maps were calculated on a pixel-by-pixel basis by means of the extended Bloch equations. Perfusion images with an in-plane resolution of 1 mm showed no significant distortions or blurring. Perfusion-time curves could be recorded with a temporal resolution of 6.4 s. Maximum perfusion in the musculature was found approximately 2 min after exercise, reaching values of up to 220 mL/min per 100 g of tissue with good delineation between the active muscles and the musculature not involved in the exercise. In conclusion, the TrueFISP pulsed arterial spin labeling technique allows patient-friendly assessment of muscular perfusion in a clinical whole-body scanner. 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Noninvasive stress testing of myocardial perfusion defects: head-to-head comparison of thallium-201 SPECT to MRI perfusion.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, Gabriella; Nkoulou, René; Steiner, Charles; Imperiano, Hestia; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Mach, François; Ratib, Osman; Vallee, Jean-Paul; Schindler, Thomas H

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of myocardial perfusion in the assessment of flow-limiting epicardial stenosis in a head-to-head comparison with abnormal thallium-201 ((201)TI) single photon emission tomography (SPECT) studies in patients with predominantly known coronary artery disease (CAD). Twenty-one patients (mean age 65 +/- 10 years) with reversible myocardial perfusion defects on (201)TI-SPECT images during dipyridamole-stimulated hyperemia were recruited for study purpose. Within 5 days of the (201)TI-SPECT study, myocardial perfusion was studied again with MRI during dipyridamole stimulation and at rest. Overall, (201)TI-SPECT identified 30 reversible regional perfusion defects. The sensitivity to detect hypoperfused segments was 70% (21/30) with the GRE-MRI perfusion analysis with (201)TI-SPECT as reference. When patients were subgrouped according to the extent of regional reversible perfusion defects on (201)TI-SPECT, mild- (SDS: 2-4), moderate- (SDS: 5-8), and severe- (SDS > 8) perfusion defects were also identified by GRE-MRI perfusion analysis in 75% (6/8), in 56% (9/16) and 100% (6/6), respectively. GRE-MRI first-pass stress perfusion imaging may not identify up to 30% of mild-to-moderate perfusion defects in a group of preselected patients with predominantly known CAD and abnormal (201)TI-SPECT studies.

  3. Perfusion MRI Indexes Variability in the Functional Brain Effects of Theta-Burst Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Gratton, Caterina; Lee, Taraz G.; Nomura, Emi M.; D’Esposito, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is an important tool for testing causal relationships in cognitive neuroscience research. However, the efficacy of TMS can be variable across individuals and difficult to measure. This variability is especially a challenge when TMS is applied to regions without well-characterized behavioral effects, such as in studies using TMS on multi-modal areas in intrinsic networks. Here, we examined whether perfusion fMRI recordings of Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF), a quantitative measure sensitive to slow functional changes, reliably index variability in the effects of stimulation. Twenty-seven participants each completed four combined TMS-fMRI sessions during which both resting state Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) and perfusion Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) scans were recorded. In each session after the first baseline day, continuous theta-burst TMS (TBS) was applied to one of three locations: left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (L dlPFC), left anterior insula/frontal operculum (L aI/fO), or left primary somatosensory cortex (L S1). The two frontal targets are components of intrinsic networks and L S1 was used as an experimental control. CBF changes were measured both before and after TMS on each day from a series of interleaved resting state and perfusion scans. Although TBS led to weak selective increases under the coil in CBF measurements across the group, individual subjects showed wide variability in their responses. TBS-induced changes in rCBF were related to TBS-induced changes in functional connectivity of the relevant intrinsic networks measured during separate resting-state BOLD scans. This relationship was selective: CBF and functional connectivity of these networks were not related before TBS or after TBS to the experimental control region (S1). Furthermore, subject groups with different directions of CBF change after TBS showed distinct modulations in the functional interactions of targeted networks. These results suggest

  4. Accuracy of arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) perfusion in detecting the epileptogenic zone in patients with drug-resistant neocortical epilepsy: comparison with electrophysiological data, structural MRI, SISCOM and FDG-PET.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Marcos, A; Carreño, M; Setoain, X; López-Rueda, A; Aparicio, J; Donaire, A; Bargalló, N

    2016-01-01

    Locating the epileptogenic zone (EZ) in patients with neocortical epilepsy presents major challenges. Our aim was to assess the accuracy of arterial spin labeling (ASL), an emerging non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) perfusion technique, to locate the EZ in patients with drug-resistant neocortical epilepsy. Twenty-five consecutive patients with neocortical epilepsy referred to our epilepsy unit for pre-surgical evaluation underwent a standardized assessment including video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring, structural MRI, subtraction ictal single-photon emission computed tomography co-registered to MRI (SISCOM) and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) studies. An ASL sequence was included in the MRI studies. Areas of hypoperfusion or hyperperfusion on ASL were classified into 15 anatomic-functional cortical regions; these regional cerebral blood flow maps were compared with the EZ determined by the other tests and the strength of concordance was assessed with the kappa coefficient. Of the 25 patients [16 (64%) women; mean age 32.4 (±13.8) years], 18 (72%) had lesions on structural MRI. ASL abnormalities were seen in 15 (60%) patients (nine hypoperfusion, six hyperperfusion). ASL had a very good concordance with FDG-PET (k = 0.84), a good concordance with structural MRI (k = 0.76), a moderate concordance with video-EEG monitoring (k = 0.53) and a fair concordance with SISCOM (k = 0.28). Arterial spin labeling might help to confirm the location and extent of the EZ in the pre-surgical workup of patients with drug-resistant neocortical epilepsy. © 2015 EAN.

  5. Correlation of oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI with invasive micro probe measurements in healthy mice brain.

    PubMed

    Sedlacik, Jan; Reitz, Matthias; Bolar, Divya S; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Schmidt, Nils O; Fiehler, Jens

    2015-03-01

    The non-invasive assessment of (patho-)physiological parameters such as, perfusion and oxygenation, is of great importance for the characterization of pathologies e.g., tumors, which may be helpful to better predict treatment response and potential outcome. To better understand the influence of physiological parameters on the investigated oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI methods, MRI measurements were correlated with subsequent invasive micro probe measurements during free breathing conditions of air, air+10% CO2 and 100% O2 in healthy mice brain. MRI parameters were the irreversible (R2), reversible (R2') and effective (R2*) transverse relaxation rates, venous blood oxygenation level assessed by quantitative blood oxygenation level dependent (qBOLD) method and cerebral blood flow (CBF) assessed by arterial spin labeling (ASL) using a 7 T small animal MRI scanner. One to two days after MRI, tissue perfusion and pO2 were measured by Laser-Doppler flowmetry and fluorescence quenching micro probes, respectively. The tissue pO2 values were converted to blood oxygen saturation by using the Hill equation. The animals were anesthetized by intra peritoneal injection of ketamine-xylazine-acepromazine (10-2-0.3 mg/ml · kg). Results for normal/hypercapnia/hyperoxia conditions were: R2[s(∧)-1] = 20.7/20.4/20.1, R2*[s(∧)-1] = 31.6/29.6/25.9, R2'[s-(∧)1] = 10.9/9.2/5.7, qBOLD venous blood oxygenation level = 0.43/0.51/0.56, CBF[ml · min(∧)-1 · 100 g(∧)-1] = 70.6/105.5/81.8, Laser-Doppler flowmetry[a.u.] = 89.2/120.2/90.6 and pO2[mmHg] = 6.3/32.3/46.7. All parameters were statistically significantly different with P < 0.001 between all breathing conditions. All MRI and the corresponding micro probe measurements were also statistically significantly (P ≤ 0.03) correlated with each other. However, converting the tissue pO2 to blood oxygen saturation = 0.02/0.34/0.63, showed only very limited agreement with the qBOLD venous blood oxygenation level. We found

  6. Benefits of dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI for glioma diagnosis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Ramon Francisco; Cha, Soonmee

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Glioma are the most common supra-tentorial brain tumor in the USA with an estimated annual incidence of 17,000 new cases per year. Dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced (DSC) perfusion MRI noninvasively characterizes tumor biology allowing for the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of glioma. This MRI technique utilizes the rapid changes in signal intensity caused by a rapid intravascular bolus of paramagnetic contrast agent to calculate physiologic perfusion metrics. DSC perfusion MRI has increasingly become an integrated part of glioma imaging. The specific aim of this article is to review the benefits of DSC perfusion MRI in the therapy of glioma. PMID:25438812

  7. MO-G-18C-05: Real-Time Prediction in Free-Breathing Perfusion MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Song, H; Liu, W; Ruan, D; Jung, S; Gach, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The aim is to minimize frame-wise difference errors caused by respiratory motion and eliminate the need for breath-holds in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences with long acquisitions and repeat times (TRs). The technique is being applied to perfusion MRI using arterial spin labeling (ASL). Methods: Respiratory motion prediction (RMP) using navigator echoes was implemented in ASL. A least-square method was used to extract the respiratory motion information from the 1D navigator. A generalized artificial neutral network (ANN) with three layers was developed to simultaneously predict 10 time points forward in time and correct for respiratory motion during MRI acquisition. During the training phase, the parameters of the ANN were optimized to minimize the aggregated prediction error based on acquired navigator data. During realtime prediction, the trained ANN was applied to the most recent estimated displacement trajectory to determine in real-time the amount of spatial Results: The respiratory motion information extracted from the least-square method can accurately represent the navigator profiles, with a normalized chi-square value of 0.037±0.015 across the training phase. During the 60-second training phase, the ANN successfully learned the respiratory motion pattern from the navigator training data. During real-time prediction, the ANN received displacement estimates and predicted the motion in the continuum of a 1.0 s prediction window. The ANN prediction was able to provide corrections for different respiratory states (i.e., inhalation/exhalation) during real-time scanning with a mean absolute error of < 1.8 mm. Conclusion: A new technique enabling free-breathing acquisition during MRI is being developed. A generalized ANN development has demonstrated its efficacy in predicting a continuum of motion profile for volumetric imaging based on navigator inputs. Future work will enhance the robustness of ANN and verify its effectiveness with human

  8. Functional MRI for characterization of renal perfusion impairment and edema formation due to acute kidney injury in different mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rongjun; Gutberlet, Marcel; Jang, Mi-Sun; Meier, Martin; Mengel, Michael; Hartung, Dagmar; Wacker, Frank; Rong, Song; Hueper, Katja

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to characterize acute kidney injury (AKI) in C57BL/6 (B6)- and 129/Sv (Sv)-mice by noninvasive measurement of renal perfusion and tissue edema using functional MRI. Methods Different severities of AKI were induced in B6- and Sv-mice by renal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). Unilateral clamping of the renal pedicle for 35 min (moderate AKI) or 45 min (severe AKI) was done. MRI (7-Tesla) was performed 1, 7 and 28 days after surgery using a flow alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) arterial spin labeling (ASL) sequence. Maps of perfusion and T1-relaxation time were calculated. Relative MRI-parameters of the IRI kidney compared to the contralateral not-clipped kidney were compared between AKI severities and between mouse strains using unpaired t-tests. In addition, fibrosis was assessed by Masson Trichrome and collagen IV staining. Results After moderate AKI relative perfusion impairment was significantly higher in B6- than in Sv-mice at d7 (55±7% vs. 82±8%, p<0.05) and d28 (76±7% vs. 102±3%, p<0.01). T1-values increased in the early phase after AKI in both mouse strains. T1-increase was more severe after prolonged ischemia times of 45 min compared to 35 min in both mouse strains, measured in the renal cortex and outer stripe of outer medulla. Kidney volume loss (compared to the contralateral kidney) occurred already after 7 days but proceeded markedly towards 4 weeks in severe AKI. Early renal perfusion impairment was predictive for later kidney volume loss. The progression to chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the severe AKI model was similar in both mouse strains as revealed by histology. Conclusion Quantification of renal perfusion and tissue edema by functional MRI allows characterization of strain differences upon AKI. Renal perfusion impairment was stronger in B6- compared to Sv-animals following moderate AKI. Prolonged ischemia times were associated with more severe perfusion impairment and edema formation in the early phase and

  9. Detecting static and dynamic differences between eyes-closed and eyes-open resting states using ASL and BOLD fMRI.

    PubMed

    Zou, Qihong; Yuan, Bin-Ke; Gu, Hong; Liu, Dongqiang; Wang, Danny J J; Gao, Jia-Hong; Yang, Yihong; Zang, Yu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Resting-state fMRI studies have increasingly focused on multi-contrast techniques, such as BOLD and ASL imaging. However, these techniques may reveal different aspects of brain activity (e.g., static vs. dynamic), and little is known about the similarity or disparity of these techniques in detecting resting-state brain activity. It is therefore important to assess the static and dynamic characteristics of these fMRI techniques to guide future applications. Here we acquired fMRI data while subjects were in eyes-closed (EC) and eyes-open (EO) states, using both ASL and BOLD techniques, at two research centers (NIDA and HNU). Static brain activity was calculated as voxel-wise mean cerebral blood flow (CBF) using ASL, i.e., CBF-mean, while dynamic activity was measured by the amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF) of BOLD, i.e., BOLD-ALFF, at both NIDA and HNU, and CBF, i.e., CBF-ALFF, at NIDA. We showed that mean CBF was lower under EC than EO in the primary visual cortex, while BOLD-ALFF was higher under EC in the primary somatosensory cortices extending to the primary auditory cortices and lower in the lateral occipital area. Interestingly, mean CBF and BOLD-ALFF results overlapped at the visual cortex to a very small degree. Importantly, these findings were largely replicated by the HNU dataset. State differences found by CBF-ALFF were located in the primary auditory cortices, which were generally a subset of BOLD-ALFF and showed no spatial overlap with CBF-mean. In conclusion, static brain activity measured by mean CBF and dynamic brain activity measured by BOLD- and CBF-ALFF may reflect different aspects of resting-state brain activity and a combination of ASL and BOLD may provide complementary information on the biophysical and physiological processes of the brain.

  10. Diagnostic Performance of Dual-Energy CT Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging: Direct Comparison With Cardiovascular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sung Min; Song, Meong Gun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Hwang, Hweung Kon; Feuchtner, Gudrun Maria; Min, James K.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of stress perfusion dual-energy CT (DECT) and its incremental value when used with coronary CT angiography (CTA) for identifying hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. SUBJECTS AND METHODS One hundred patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease without chronic myocardial infarction detected with coronary CTA underwent stress perfusion DECT, stress cardiovascular perfusion MRI, and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Stress perfusion DECT and cardiovascular stress perfusion MR images were used for detecting perfusion defects. Coronary CTA and ICA were evaluated in the detection of ≥ 50% coronary stenosis. The diagnostic performance of coronary CTA for detecting hemodynamically significant stenosis was assessed before and after stress perfusion DECT on a pervessel basis with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI as the reference standard. RESULTS The performance of stress perfusion DECT compared with cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI on a per-vessel basis in the detection of perfusion defects was sensitivity, 89%; specificity, 74%; positive predictive value, 73%; negative predictive value, 90%. Per segment, these values were sensitivity, 76%; specificity, 80%; positive predictive value, 63%; and negative predictive value, 88%. Compared with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI per vessel territory the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of coronary CTA were 95%, 61%, 61%, and 95%. The values for stress perfusion DECT were 92%, 72%, 68%, and 94%. The values for coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT were 88%, 79%, 73%, and 91%. The ROC AUC increased from 0.78 to 0.84 (p = 0.02) with the use of coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT compared with coronary CTA alone. CONCLUSION Stress perfusion DECT plays a complementary role in enhancing the accuracy of coronary CTA for identifying hemodynamically

  11. Dynamic subcortical blood flow during male sexual activity with ecological validity: a perfusion fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, Janniko R; Farrell, Michael J; Boessen, Ruud; Denton, Derek A; Gavrilescu, Maria; Kortekaas, Rudie; Renken, Remco J; Hoogduin, Johannes M; Egan, Gary F

    2010-03-01

    This study used arterial spin labeling (ASL) fMRI to measure brain perfusion in a group of healthy men under conditions that closely resembled customary sexual behavior. Serial perfusion measures for 30 min during two self-limited periods of partnered penis stimulation, and during post-stimulatory periods, revealed novel sexual activity-related cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes, mainly in subcortical parts of the brain. Ventral pallidum rCBF was highest during the onset of penile erection, and lowest after the termination of penis stimulation. The perceived level of sexual arousal showed the strongest positive association with rCBF in the right basal forebrain. In addition, our results demonstrate that distinct subregions of the hypothalamus and cingulate cortex subserve opposite functions during human male sexual behavior. The lateral hypothalamus and anterior part of the middle cingulate cortex showed increased rCBF correlated with penile erection. By contrast, the anteroventral hypothalamus and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex exhibited rCBF changes correlated with penile detumescence after penile stimulation. Continuous rapid and high-resolution brain perfusion imaging during normal sexual activity has provided novel insights into the central mechanisms that control male sexual arousal. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Tracer kinetic modelling in MRI: estimating perfusion and capillary permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sourbron, S. P.; Buckley, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    The tracer-kinetic models developed in the early 1990s for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) have since become a standard in numerous applications. At the same time, the development of MRI hardware has led to increases in image quality and temporal resolution that reveal the limitations of the early models. This in turn has stimulated an interest in the development and application of a second generation of modelling approaches. They are designed to overcome these limitations and produce additional and more accurate information on tissue status. In particular, models of the second generation enable separate estimates of perfusion and capillary permeability rather than a single parameter Ktrans that represents a combination of the two. A variety of such models has been proposed in the literature, and development in the field has been constrained by a lack of transparency regarding terminology, notations and physiological assumptions. In this review, we provide an overview of these models in a manner that is both physically intuitive and mathematically rigourous. All are derived from common first principles, using concepts and notations from general tracer-kinetic theory. Explicit links to their historical origins are included to allow for a transfer of experience obtained in other fields (PET, SPECT, CT). A classification is presented that reveals the links between all models, and with the models of the first generation. Detailed formulae for all solutions are provided to facilitate implementation. Our aim is to encourage the application of these tools to DCE-MRI by offering researchers a clearer understanding of their assumptions and requirements.

  13. Technical Pitfalls of Signal Truncation in Perfusion MRI of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kelvin K.; Fung, Steve H.; New, Pamela Z.; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) is widely used in clinical settings for the radiological diagnosis of brain tumor. The signal change in brain tissue in gradient echo-based DSC PWI is much higher than in spin echo-based DSC PWI. Due to its exquisite sensitivity, gradient echo-based sequence is the preferred method for imaging of all tumors except those near the base of the skull. However, high sensitivity also comes with a dynamic range problem. It is not unusual for blood volume to increase in gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy-treated glioblastoma patients. The increase of fractional blood volume sometimes saturates the MRI signal during first-pass contrast bolus arrival and presents signal truncation artifacts of various degrees in the tumor when a significant amount of blood exists in the image pixels. It presents a hidden challenge in PWI, as this signal floor can be either close to noise level or just above and can go no lower. This signal truncation in the signal intensity time course is a significant issue that deserves attention in DSC PWI. In this paper, we demonstrate that relative cerebral blood volume and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) are underestimated due to signal truncation in DSC perfusion, in glioblastoma patients. We propose the use of second-pass tissue residue function in rCBF calculation using least-absolute-deviation deconvolution to avoid the underestimation problem. PMID:27531989

  14. Technical Pitfalls of Signal Truncation in Perfusion MRI of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelvin K; Fung, Steve H; New, Pamela Z; Wong, Stephen T C

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) is widely used in clinical settings for the radiological diagnosis of brain tumor. The signal change in brain tissue in gradient echo-based DSC PWI is much higher than in spin echo-based DSC PWI. Due to its exquisite sensitivity, gradient echo-based sequence is the preferred method for imaging of all tumors except those near the base of the skull. However, high sensitivity also comes with a dynamic range problem. It is not unusual for blood volume to increase in gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy-treated glioblastoma patients. The increase of fractional blood volume sometimes saturates the MRI signal during first-pass contrast bolus arrival and presents signal truncation artifacts of various degrees in the tumor when a significant amount of blood exists in the image pixels. It presents a hidden challenge in PWI, as this signal floor can be either close to noise level or just above and can go no lower. This signal truncation in the signal intensity time course is a significant issue that deserves attention in DSC PWI. In this paper, we demonstrate that relative cerebral blood volume and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) are underestimated due to signal truncation in DSC perfusion, in glioblastoma patients. We propose the use of second-pass tissue residue function in rCBF calculation using least-absolute-deviation deconvolution to avoid the underestimation problem.

  15. The Effects of Propofol on Cerebral Perfusion MRI in Children

    PubMed Central

    Harreld, Julie H.; Helton, Kathleen J.; Kaddoum, Roland N.; Reddick, Wilburn E.; Li, Yimei; Glass, John O.; Sansgiri, Rakhee; Ji, Qing; Feng, Tianshu; Parish, Mary Edna; Gajjar, Amar; Patay, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The effects of anesthesia are infrequently considered when interpreting pediatric perfusion MRI. The objectives of this study were to test for measurable differences in MR measures of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) between non-sedated and propofol-sedated children, and to identify influential factors. Methods Supratentorial cortical CBF and CBV measured by dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MRI in 37 children (1.8–18 years) treated for infratentorial brain tumors receiving propofol (IV, n=19) or no sedation (NS, n=18) were compared between groups and correlated with age, hematocrit, end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2), dose, weight, and history of radiation therapy (RT). The model most predictive of CBF and CBV was identified by multiple linear regression. Results Anterior cerebral artery (ACA) and middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory CBF were significantly lower, and MCA territory CBV greater (p=0.03), in IV than NS patients (p=0.01, 0.04). The usual trend of decreasing CBF with age was reversed with propofol in ACA and MCA territories (r=0.53, r=0.47; p<0.05). ACA and MCA CBF (r=0.59, 0.49; p<0.05) and CBV in ACA, MCA and posterior cerebral artery (PCA) territories (r=0.73, 0.80, 0.52; p<0.05) increased with weight in propofol-sedated children, with no significant additional influence from age, ETCO2, hematocrit, or RT. Conclusion In propofol-sedated children, usual age-related decreases in CBF were reversed, and increases in CBF and CBV were weight-dependent, not previously described. Weight-dependent increases in propofol clearance may diminish suppression of CBF and CBV. Prospective study is required to establish anesthetic-specific models of CBF and CBV in children. PMID:23673874

  16. A study on cerebral hemodynamic analysis of moyamoya disease by using perfusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the clinical applications of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with moyamoya disease (MMD). Twenty-two patients with moyamoya disease (9 men and 13 women) with a mean age of 9.3 years (range: 4-22 years) were enrolled in this study. Perfusion MRI was performed by scanning the patients7.5 cm upward from the base of the cerebellum before their being process for post-treatment. The scan led to the acquisition of the following four map images: the cerebral blood volume (CBV), the cerebral blood flow (CBF), the mean transit time (MTT) for the contrast medium, and the time to peak (TTP) for the contrast medium. The lesions were assessed using the CBV, the CBF, the MTT and the TTP maps of perfusion MRI; the MTT and the TTP were measured in the lesion areas, as well as in the normal and the symmetric areas. Perfusion defects were recognizable in all four perfusion MRI maps, and the MTT and the TTP showed a conspicuous delay in the parts where perfusion defects were recognized. The MTT and the TTP images of perfusion MRI reflected a significant correlation between the degrees of stenosis and occlusion in the posterior cerebral artery (PCA), as well as the development of collateral vessels. The four perfusion MRI maps could be used to predict the degrees of stenosis and occlusion in the posterior circulation, as well as the development of the collateral vessels, which enabled a hemodynamic evaluation of the parts with perfusion defects. Overall, perfusion MRI is useful for the diagnosis and the treatment of moyamoya disease and can be applied to clinical practice.

  17. Assessment of pulmonary parenchyma perfusion with FAIR in comparison with DCE-MRI--initial results.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Liu, Shi-yuan; Sun, Fei; Xiao, Xiang-sheng

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess pulmonary parenchyma perfusion with flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) in comparison with 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging in healthy volunteers and in patients with pulmonary embolism or lung cancer. Sixteen healthy volunteers and 16 patients with pulmonary embolism (5 cases) or lung cancer (11 cases) were included in this study. Firstly, the optimized inversion time of FAIR (TI) was determined in 12 healthy volunteers. Then, FAIR imaging with the optimized TI was performed followed by DCE-MRI on the other 4 healthy volunteers and 16 patients. Tagging efficiency of lung and SNR of perfusion images were calculated with different TI values. In the comparison of FAIR with DCE-MRI, the homogeneity of FAIR and DCE-MRI perfusion was assessed. In the cases of perfusion abnormality, the contrast between normal lung and perfusion defects was quantified by calculating a normalized signal intensity ratio. One thousand milliseconds was the optimal TI, which generated the highest lung tagging efficiency and second highest PBF SNR. In the volunteers, the signal intensity of perfusion images acquired with both FAIR and DCE-MRI was homogeneous. Wedged-shaped or triangle perfusion defects were visualized in five pulmonary embolisms and three lung cancer cases. There was no significant statistical difference in signal intensity ratio between FAIR and DCE-MRI (P>0.05). In the rest of eight lung cancers, all the lesions showed low perfusion against the higher perfused pulmonary parenchyma in both FAIR and DCE-MRI. Pulmonary parenchyma perfusion imaging with FAIR was feasible, consistent and could obtain similar functional information to that from DCE-MRI.

  18. Altered resting-state functional connectivity in post-traumatic stress disorder: a perfusion MRI study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baojuan; Liu, Jian; Liu, Yang; Lu, Hong-Bing; Yin, Hong

    2013-03-01

    The majority of studies on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) so far have focused on delineating patterns of activations during cognitive processes. Recently, more and more researches have started to investigate functional connectivity in PTSD subjects using BOLD-fMRI. Functional connectivity analysis has been demonstrated as a powerful approach to identify biomarkers of different brain diseases. This study aimed to detect resting-state functional connectivity abnormities in patients with PTSD using arterial spin labeling (ASL) fMRI. As a completely non-invasive technique, ASL allows quantitative estimates of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Compared with BOLD-fMRI, ASL fMRI has many advantages, including less low-frequency signal drifts, superior functional localization, etc. In the current study, ASL images were collected from 10 survivors in mining disaster with recent onset PTSD and 10 survivors without PTSD. Decreased regional CBF in the right middle temporal gyrus, lingual gyrus, and postcentral gyrus was detected in the PTSD patients. Seed-based resting-state functional connectivity analysis was performed using an area in the right middle temporal gyrus as region of interest. Compared with the non-PTSD group, the PTSD subjects demonstrated increased functional connectivity between the right middle temporal gyrus and the right superior temporal gyrus, the left middle temporal gyrus. Meanwhile, decreased functional connectivity between the right middle temporal gyrus and the right postcentral gyrus, the right superior parietal lobule was also found in the PTSD patients. This is the first study which investigated resting-state functional connectivity in PTSD using ASL images. The results may provide new insight into the neural substrates of PTSD.

  19. Support vector machine learning-based cerebral blood flow quantification for arterial spin labeling MRI.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ze

    2014-07-01

    To develop a multivariate machine learning classification-based cerebral blood flow (CBF) quantification method for arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion MRI. The label and control images of ASL MRI were separated using a machine-learning algorithm, the support vector machine (SVM). The perfusion-weighted image was subsequently extracted from the multivariate (all voxels) SVM classifier. Using the same pre-processing steps, the proposed method was compared with standard ASL CBF quantification method using synthetic data and in-vivo ASL images. As compared with the conventional univariate approach, the proposed ASL CBF quantification method significantly improved spatial signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and image appearance of ASL CBF images. the multivariate machine learning-based classification is useful for ASL CBF quantification. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Correlation analysis of dual-energy CT iodine maps with quantitative pulmonary perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Hansmann, Jan; Apfaltrer, Paul; Zoellner, Frank G; Henzler, Thomas; Meyer, Mathias; Weisser, Gerald; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Attenberger, Ulrike I

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To correlate dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) pulmonary angiography derived iodine maps with parameter maps of quantitative pulmonary perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS: Eighteen patients with pulmonary perfusion defects detected on DECT derived iodine maps were included in this prospective study and additionally underwent time-resolved contrast-enhanced pulmonary MRI [dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI]. DCE-MRI data were quantitatively analyzed using a pixel-by-pixel deconvolution analysis calculating regional pulmonary blood flow (PBF), pulmonary blood volume (PBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in visually normal lung parenchyma and perfusion defects. Perfusion parameters were correlated to mean attenuation values of normal lung and perfusion defects on DECT iodine maps. Two readers rated the concordance of perfusion defects in a visual analysis using a 5-point Likert-scale (1 = no correlation, 5 = excellent correlation). RESULTS: In visually normal pulmonary tissue mean DECT and MRI values were: 22.6 ± 8.3 Hounsfield units (HU); PBF: 58.8 ± 36.0 mL/100 mL per minute; PBV: 16.6 ± 8.5 mL; MTT: 17.1 ± 10.3 s. In areas with restricted perfusion mean DECT and MRI values were: 4.0 ± 3.9 HU; PBF: 10.3 ± 5.5 mL/100 mL per minute, PBV: 5 ± 4 mL, MTT: 21.6 ± 14.0 s. The differences between visually normal parenchyma and areas of restricted perfusion were statistically significant for PBF, PBV and DECT (P < 0.0001). No linear correlation was found between MRI perfusion parameters and attenuation values of DECT iodine maps (PBF: r = 0.35, P = 0.15; PBV: r = 0.34, P = 0.16; MTT: r = 0.41, P = 0.08). Visual analysis revealed a moderate correlation between perfusion defects on DECT iodine maps and the parameter maps of DCE-MRI (mean score 3.6, κ 0.45). CONCLUSION: There is a moderate visual but not statistically significant correlation between DECT iodine maps and perfusion parameter maps of DCE-MRI. PMID:23805370

  1. Correlation analysis of dual-energy CT iodine maps with quantitative pulmonary perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Hansmann, Jan; Apfaltrer, Paul; Zoellner, Frank G; Henzler, Thomas; Meyer, Mathias; Weisser, Gerald; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Attenberger, Ulrike I

    2013-05-28

    To correlate dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) pulmonary angiography derived iodine maps with parameter maps of quantitative pulmonary perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Eighteen patients with pulmonary perfusion defects detected on DECT derived iodine maps were included in this prospective study and additionally underwent time-resolved contrast-enhanced pulmonary MRI [dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI]. DCE-MRI data were quantitatively analyzed using a pixel-by-pixel deconvolution analysis calculating regional pulmonary blood flow (PBF), pulmonary blood volume (PBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in visually normal lung parenchyma and perfusion defects. Perfusion parameters were correlated to mean attenuation values of normal lung and perfusion defects on DECT iodine maps. Two readers rated the concordance of perfusion defects in a visual analysis using a 5-point Likert-scale (1 = no correlation, 5 = excellent correlation). In visually normal pulmonary tissue mean DECT and MRI values were: 22.6 ± 8.3 Hounsfield units (HU); PBF: 58.8 ± 36.0 mL/100 mL per minute; PBV: 16.6 ± 8.5 mL; MTT: 17.1 ± 10.3 s. In areas with restricted perfusion mean DECT and MRI values were: 4.0 ± 3.9 HU; PBF: 10.3 ± 5.5 mL/100 mL per minute, PBV: 5 ± 4 mL, MTT: 21.6 ± 14.0 s. The differences between visually normal parenchyma and areas of restricted perfusion were statistically significant for PBF, PBV and DECT (P < 0.0001). No linear correlation was found between MRI perfusion parameters and attenuation values of DECT iodine maps (PBF: r = 0.35, P = 0.15; PBV: r = 0.34, P = 0.16; MTT: r = 0.41, P = 0.08). Visual analysis revealed a moderate correlation between perfusion defects on DECT iodine maps and the parameter maps of DCE-MRI (mean score 3.6, κ 0.45). There is a moderate visual but not statistically significant correlation between DECT iodine maps and perfusion parameter maps of DCE-MRI.

  2. [Study of 3D-pcASL in differentiation of acute cerebral infarction and acute encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Mao, Chuanwan; Fu, Yuchuan; Ye, Xinjian; Wu, Aiqin; Yan, Zhihan

    2015-06-16

    To investigate the value of three-dimentional pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion imaging in differentiating acute cerebral infarction from acute encephalitis. From September 2013 to September 2014, 42 patients with actue stroke onset and 20 healthy volunteers underwent conventional brain MRI DWI and 3D-ASL Perfusion Imaging in our hospital. Only 20 patients whose lesions located in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory were enrolled in this study. Of these cases, 12 cases were diagnosed with acute cerebral infarction, 8 were diagnosed with encephalitis. First, we analyzed the imaging features of the 20 patients and 20 volunteers. Then, CBF values of the lesions in the 20 patients and the gray matter of MCA territory in the 20 volunteers were measured on 3D-pcASL images. Third, the difference of mean CBF values between patients and volunteers were analyzed. Out of 20 study group, 19 patients whose lesions presented high signal intensity on DWI images, 12 cases were acute cerebral infarction and 8 were encephalitis. All the lesions of 20 cases showed abnormal perfusion on 3D-pcASL images. 3D-pcASL has good consistency with DWI in diagnostic capabilities (χ² = 0.565, P = 0.01). On 3D-pcASL, 11 acute cerebral infarction patients presented perfusion defects or low perfusion, 1 acute cerebral infarction patients showed high perfusion, 8 encephalitis patients showed inhomogeneous perfusion. The mean value of CBF was (17 ± 6) ml · min⁻¹ · 100 g⁻¹ in 12 acute cerebral infarction patients, (136 ± 69) ml · min⁻¹ · 100 g⁻¹ in 8 encephalitis patients and (68 ± 12) ml · min⁻¹ · 100 g⁻¹ three in 20 healthy volunteers. The difference in mean value of CBF among the three groups was statistically significant (P < 0.01). Acute cerebral infarction often shows low perfusion and acute encephalitis shows high perfusion on 3D-pcASL images, which has a higher application value in diagnosis and differentiation of acute cerebral

  3. Mapping of cerebral perfusion territories using territorial arterial spin labeling: techniques and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Hartkamp, Nolan S; Petersen, Esben T; De Vis, Jill B; Bokkers, Reinoud P H; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2013-08-01

    A knowledge of the exact cerebral perfusion territory which is supplied by any artery is of great importance in the understanding and diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease. The development and optimization of territorial arterial spin labeling (T-ASL) MRI techniques in the past two decades have made it possible to visualize and determine the cerebral perfusion territories in individual patients and, more importantly, to do so without contrast agents or otherwise invasive procedures. This review provides an overview of the development of ASL techniques that aim to visualize the general cerebral perfusion territories or the territory of a specific artery of interest. The first efforts of T-ASL with pulsed, continuous and pseudo-continuous techniques are summarized and subsequent clinical studies using T-ASL are highlighted. In the healthy population, the perfusion territories of the brain-feeding arteries are highly variable. This high variability requires special consideration in specific patient groups, such as patients with cerebrovascular disease, stroke, steno-occlusive disease of the large arteries and arteriovenous malformations. In the past, catheter angiography with selective contrast injection was the only available method to visualize the cerebral perfusion territories in vivo. Several T-ASL methods, sometimes referred to as regional perfusion imaging, are now available that can easily be combined with conventional brain MRI examinations to show the relationship between the cerebral perfusion territories, vascular anatomy and brain infarcts or other pathology. Increased availability of T-ASL techniques on clinical MRI scanners will allow radiologists and other clinicians to gain further knowledge of the relationship between vasculature and patient diagnosis and prognosis. Treatment decisions, such as surgical revascularization, may, in the near future, be guided by information provided by T-ASL MRI in close correlation with structural MRI and quantitative

  4. Resolution and reproducibility of BOLD and perfusion functional MRI at 3.0 Tesla.

    PubMed

    van Gelderen, Peter; W H Wu, Carolyn; de Zwart, Jacco A; Cohen, Leonardo; Hallett, Mark; Duyn, Jeff H

    2005-09-01

    Visual and somatosensory activation studies were performed on normal subjects to compare the spatial discrimination and reproducibility between functional MRI (fMRI) methods based on blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) and perfusion contrast. To allow simultaneous measurement of BOLD and perfusion contrast, a dedicated MRI acquisition technique was developed. Repeated experiments of sensory stimulation of single digits of the right hand showed an average variability of activation amplitude of 25% for BOLD data, and a significantly lower variability of 21% for perfusion data. No significant difference in the variability of the locus of activity was observed between the BOLD and perfusion data. In somatotopy experiments, digits II and V were subjected to passive sensory stimulation. Both the BOLD and perfusion data showed substantial overlap in the activation patterns from the two digits. In a retinotopy study, two stimuli were alternated to excite different patches of V1. Again there was substantial overlap between the activation patterns from both stimuli, although the perfusion performed somewhat better than the BOLD method. Particularly for the visual studies, the overlap in activation patterns was more than expected based on the fine-scale retinotopic mapping of cortical activity, suggesting that both BOLD and perfusion contrast mechanisms contribute substantially to the point-spread function (PSF).

  5. Experimental design and the relative sensitivity of BOLD and perfusion fMRI.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, G K; Detre, J A; Zarahn, E; Alsop, D C

    2002-03-01

    This paper compares the statistical power of BOLD and arterial spin labeling perfusion fMRI for a variety of experimental designs within and across subjects. Based on theory and simulations, we predict that perfusion data are composed of independent observations in time under the null hypothesis, in contrast to BOLD data, which possess marked autocorrelation. We also present a method (sinc subtraction) of generating perfusion data from its raw source signal that minimizes the presence of oxygen-sensitive signal changes and can be used with any experimental design. Empirically, we demonstrate the absence of autocorrelation in perfusion noise, examine the shape of the hemodynamic response function for BOLD and perfusion, and obtain a measure of signal to noise for each method. This information is then used to generate a model of relative sensitivity of the BOLD and perfusion methods for within-subject experimental designs of varying temporal frequency. It is determined that perfusion fMRI provides superior sensitivity for within-subject experimental designs that concentrate their power at or below approximately 0.009 Hz (corresponding to a "blocked" experimental design of 60-s epochs). Additionally, evidence is presented that across-subject hypothesis tests may be more sensitive when conducted using perfusion imaging, despite the better within-subject signal to noise obtained in some cases with BOLD. ©2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  6. Intratumor Heterogeneity of Perfusion and Diffusion in Clear-Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma: Correlation With Tumor Cellularity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing; Kapur, Payal; Zhang, Yue; Xi, Yin; Carvo, Ingrid; Signoretti, Sabina; Dimitrov, Ivan E; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A; Margulis, Vitaly; Brugarolas, James; Madhuranthakam, Ananth J; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to noninvasively provide information about the tumor microenvironment. A correlation between arterial spin-labeled (ASL) MRI and tumor vasculature has been previously demonstrated; however, its correlation with tumor cellularity is unknown. We sought to assess intratumor heterogeneity of perfusion and diffusion in vivo in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) using MRI and to correlate these findings with tumor vascularity and cellularity at histopathology. Twenty-three ccRCC patients underwent ASL and diffusion-weighted MRI before surgery after signing an informed consent in this prospective institutional review board-approved, HIPAA (Insurance Portability and Accountability Act)-compliant study. Quantitative ASL perfusion and diffusion were measured in 2 areas within the same tumor with high and low perfusion. Microvessel density (MVD) on CD31 and CD34 immunostains and tumor cellularity in anatomically coregistered tissue samples were correlated to MRI measurements (Spearman; P < .05 statistically significant). ASL perfusion (P < .0001), CD31 MVD (P = .02), CD34 MVD (P = .04), and cellularity (P = .002) from high and low perfusion areas were significantly different across all tumors. There were positive correlations between tumor cellularity and CD31 MVD (ρ = 0.350, P = .021), CD31 and CD34 MVD (ρ = 0.838, P < .0001), ASL perfusion and cellularity (ρ = 0.406, P = .011), and ASL perfusion and CD31 MVD (ρ = 0.468, P = .003), and a negative correlation between tissue diffusion coefficient and cellularity (ρ = -0.316, P = .039). Tumor areas with high ASL perfusion exhibit higher cellularity and MVD compared to areas with low perfusion in the same tumor. A positive correlation between tumor vascularity and cellularity in ccRCC is newly reported. A negative correlation between tumor diffusion and cellularity is confirmed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Renal plasma flow (RPF) measured with multiple-inversion-time arterial spin labeling (ASL) and tracer kinetic analysis: Validation against a dynamic contrast-enhancement method

    PubMed Central

    Conlin, Christopher C.; Oesingmann, Niels; Bolster, Bradley; Huang, Yufeng; Lee, Vivian S.; Zhang, Jeff L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To propose and validate a method for accurately quantifying renal plasma flow (RPF) with arterial spin labeling (ASL). Materials and methods The proposed method employs a tracer–kinetic approach and derives perfusion from the slope of the ASL difference signal sampled at multiple inversion-times (TIs). To validate the method's accuracy, we performed a HIPAA-compliant and IRB-approved study with 15 subjects (9 male, 6 female; age range 24– 73) to compare RPF estimates obtained from ASL to those from a more established dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI method. We also investigated the impact of TI-sampling density on the accuracy of estimated RPF. Results Good agreement was found between ASL- and DCE-measured RPF, with a mean difference of 9 ± 30 ml/min and a correlation coefficient R = 0.92 when ASL signals were acquired at 16 TIs and a mean difference of 9 ± 57 ml/min and R = 0.81 when ASL signals were acquired at 5 TIs. RPF estimated from ASL signals acquired at only 2 TIs (400 and 1200 ms) showed a low correlation with DCE-measured values (R = 0.30). Conclusion The proposed ASL method is capable of measuring RPF with an accuracy that is comparable to DCE MRI. At least 5 TIs are recommended for the ASL acquisition to ensure reliability of RPF measurements. PMID:27864008

  8. Placental Perfusion In Uterine Ischemia Model as Evaluated by Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Drobyshevsky, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Background To validate DCE MRI method of placental perfusion estimation and to demonstrate application of the method in a rabbit model of fetal antenatal hypoxia-ischemia. Methods Placental perfusion was estimated by dynamic contrast imaging with bolus injection of Gd-DTPA in 3 Tesla GE magnet in a rabbit model of placental ischemia–reperfusion in rabbit dams at embryonic day 25 gestation age. Placental perfusion was measured using steepest slope method on DCE MRI before and after intermittent 40 min uterine ischemia. Antioxidants (n = 2 dams, 9 placentas imaged) or vehicle (n = 5 dams, 23 placenta imaged) were given systemically in a separate group of dams during reperfusion–reoxygenation. Placental perfusion was also measured in two dams from the antioxidant group (10 placentas) and two dams from the control group (12 placentas) by fluorescent microspheres method. Results While placental perfusion estimates between fluorescent microspheres and DCE MRI were significantly correlated (R2 = 0.85; P < 0.01), there was approximately 33% systematic underestimation by the latter technique. DCE MRI showed a significant decrease in maternal placental perfusion in reperfusion–reoxygenation phase in the saline, 0.44 ± 0.06 mL/min/g (P = 0.012, t-test), but not in the antioxidant group, 0.62 ± 0.06 mL/min/g, relative to preocclusion values (0.77 ± 0.07 and 0.84 ± 0.12 mL/min/g, correspondingly). Conclusion Underestimation of true perfusion in placenta by steepest slope DCE MRI is significant and the error appears to be systematic. PMID:25854322

  9. An Arterial Spin Labeling MRI Perfusion Study of Migraine without Aura Attacks.

    PubMed

    Gil-Gouveia, Raquel; Pinto, Joana; Figueiredo, Patricia; Vilela, Pedro Ferro; Martins, Isabel Pavão

    2017-01-01

    Studies of brain perfusion during migraine without aura attacks have inconsistent results. Arterial spin labeling MRI, a non-invasive quantitative perfusion technique, was used to prospectively study a spontaneous untreated migraine without aura attack and a headache-free period. Image analysis used FSL and MATLAB software; Group analysis used permutation methods for perfusion differences between sessions. Thirteen women (age 35.7) were scanned during an attack of an average intensity of 6.8 (on 0-10 Visual Analog Scale) and 16 h duration. No global or regional perfusion differences were identified when comparing migraine and migraine-free sessions. Our findings suggest that the painful phase of migraine without aura attacks is not associated with brain perfusion abnormalities.

  10. Brain/language relationships identified with diffusion and perfusion MRI: Clinical applications in neurology and neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Hillis, Argye E

    2005-12-01

    Diffusion and perfusion MRI have contributed to stroke management by identifying patients with tissue "at risk" for further damage in acute stroke. However, the potential usefulness of these imaging modalities, along with diffusion tensor imaging, can be expanded by using these imaging techniques with concurrent assessment of language and other cognitive skills to identify the specific cognitive deficits that are associated with diffusion and perfusion abnormalities in particular brain regions. This paper illustrates how this combined behavioral and imaging methodology can yield information that is useful for predicting specific positive effects of intervention to restore blood flow in hypoperfused regions of brain identified with perfusion MRI, and for predicting negative effects of resection of particular brain regions or fiber bundles. Such data allow decisions about neurological and neurosurgical interventions to be based on specific risks and benefits in terms of functional consequences.

  11. UMMPerfusion: an open source software tool towards quantitative MRI perfusion analysis in clinical routine.

    PubMed

    Zöllner, Frank G; Weisser, Gerald; Reich, Marcel; Kaiser, Sven; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Sourbron, Steven P; Schad, Lothar R

    2013-04-01

    To develop a generic Open Source MRI perfusion analysis tool for quantitative parameter mapping to be used in a clinical workflow and methods for quality management of perfusion data. We implemented a classic, pixel-by-pixel deconvolution approach to quantify T1-weighted contrast-enhanced dynamic MR imaging (DCE-MRI) perfusion data as an OsiriX plug-in. It features parallel computing capabilities and an automated reporting scheme for quality management. Furthermore, by our implementation design, it could be easily extendable to other perfusion algorithms. Obtained results are saved as DICOM objects and directly added to the patient study. The plug-in was evaluated on ten MR perfusion data sets of the prostate and a calibration data set by comparing obtained parametric maps (plasma flow, volume of distribution, and mean transit time) to a widely used reference implementation in IDL. For all data, parametric maps could be calculated and the plug-in worked correctly and stable. On average, a deviation of 0.032 ± 0.02 ml/100 ml/min for the plasma flow, 0.004 ± 0.0007 ml/100 ml for the volume of distribution, and 0.037 ± 0.03 s for the mean transit time between our implementation and a reference implementation was observed. By using computer hardware with eight CPU cores, calculation time could be reduced by a factor of 2.5. We developed successfully an Open Source OsiriX plug-in for T1-DCE-MRI perfusion analysis in a routine quality managed clinical environment. Using model-free deconvolution, it allows for perfusion analysis in various clinical applications. By our plug-in, information about measured physiological processes can be obtained and transferred into clinical practice.

  12. Functional Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the Assessment of Myocardial Viability and Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness safety and cost-effectiveness of using functional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction. Results Functional MRI has become increasingly investigated as a noninvasive method for assessing myocardial viability and perfusion. Most patients in the published literature have mild to moderate impaired LV function. It is possible that the severity of LV dysfunction may be an important factor that can alter the diagnostic accuracy of imaging techniques. There is some evidence of comparable or better performance of functional cardiac MRI for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion compared with other imaging techniques. However limitations to most of the studies included: Functional cardiac MRI studies that assess myocardial viability and perfusion have had small sample sizes. Some studies assessed myocardial viability/perfusion in patients who had already undergone revascularization, or excluded patients with a prior MI (Schwitter et al., 2001). Lack of explicit detail of patient recruitment. Patients with LVEF >35%. Interstudy variability in post MI imaging time(including acute or chronic MI), when patients with a prior MI were included. Poor interobserver agreement (kappa statistic) in the interpretation of the results. Traditionally, 0.80 is considered “good”. Cardiac MRI measurement of myocardial perfusion to as an adjunct tool to help diagnose CAD (prior to a definitive coronary angiography) has also been examined in some studies, with methodological limitations, yielding comparable results. Many studies examining myocardial viability and perfusion report on the accuracy of imaging methods with limited data on long-term patient outcome and management. Kim et al. (2000) revealed that the transmural

  13. Cerebral perfusion alterations in epileptic patients during peri-ictal and post-ictal phase: PASL vs DSC-MRI.

    PubMed

    Pizzini, Francesca B; Farace, Paolo; Manganotti, Paolo; Zoccatelli, Giada; Bongiovanni, Luigi G; Golay, Xavier; Beltramello, Alberto; Osculati, Antonio; Bertini, Giuseppe; Fabene, Paolo F

    2013-07-01

    Non-invasive pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL) MRI is a method to study brain perfusion that does not require the administration of a contrast agent, which makes it a valuable diagnostic tool as it reduces cost and side effects. The purpose of the present study was to establish the viability of PASL as an alternative to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC-MRI) and other perfusion imaging methods in characterizing changes in perfusion patterns caused by seizures in epileptic patients. We evaluated 19 patients with PASL. Of these, the 9 affected by high-frequency seizures were observed during the peri-ictal period (within 5hours since the last seizure), while the 10 patients affected by low-frequency seizures were observed in the post-ictal period. For comparison, 17/19 patients were also evaluated with DSC-MRI and CBF/CBV. PASL imaging showed focal vascular changes, which allowed the classification of patients in three categories: 8 patients characterized by increased perfusion, 4 patients with normal perfusion and 7 patients with decreased perfusion. PASL perfusion imaging findings were comparable to those obtained by DSC-MRI. Since PASL is a) sensitive to vascular alterations induced by epileptic seizures, b) comparable to DSC-MRI for detecting perfusion asymmetries, c) potentially capable of detecting time-related perfusion changes, it can be recommended for repeated evaluations, to identify the epileptic focus, and in follow-up and/or therapy-response assessment.

  14. Quantification of myocardial perfusion based on signal intensity of flow sensitized MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeykoon, Sumeda B.

    maximum percentage deviation is about 5%. Then the SI-method was used in comparison to a delayed enhanced method to qualitatively and quantitatively assess perfusion deficits in an ischemia-reperfusion (IR) mouse model. The infarcted region of the perfusion map is comparable to the hyper intense region of the delayed enhanced image of the IR mouse. The SI method also used to record a chronological comparison of perfusion on delta sarcoglycan null (DSG) mice. Perfusion of DSG and wild-type (WT) mice at ages of 12 weeks and 32 weeks were compared and percentage change of perfusion was estimated. The result shows that in DSG mice perfusion changes considerably. Finally, the SI method was implemented on a 3 Tesla Philip scanner by modifying to data acquisition method. The perfusion obtained in this is consistent with literature values but further adjustment of pulse sequence and modification of numerical solution is needed. The most important benefit of the SI method is that it reduces scan time 30%--40% and lessens motion artifacts of images compared to the T1 method. This study demonstrates that the signal intensity-based ASL method is a robust alternative to the conventional T1-method.

  15. Arterial Spin-Labeling MRI Can Identify the Presence and Intensity of Collateral Perfusion in Patients With Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zaharchuk, Greg; Do, Huy M.; Marks, Michael P.; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Moseley, Michael E.; Steinberg, Gary K.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Determining the presence and adequacy of collateral blood flow is important in cerebrovascular disease. Therefore, we explored whether a noninvasive imaging modality, arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI, could be used to detect the presence and intensity of collateral flow using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and stable xenon CT cerebral blood flow as gold standards for collaterals and cerebral blood flow, respectively. Methods ASL and DSA were obtained within 4 days of each other in 18 patients with Moyamoya disease. Two neurointerventionalists scored DSA images using a collateral grading scale in regions of interest corresponding to ASPECTS methodology. Two neuroradiologists similarly scored ASL images based on the presence of arterial transit artifact. Agreement of ASL and DSA consensus scores was determined, including kappa statistics. In 15 patients, additional quantitative xenon CT cerebral blood flow measurements were performed and compared with collateral grades. Results The agreement between ASL and DSA consensus readings was moderate to strong, with a weighted kappa value of 0.58 (95% confidence interval, 0.52–0.64), but there was better agreement between readers for ASL compared with DSA. Sensitivity and specificity for identifying collaterals with ASL were 0.83 (95% confidence interval, 0.77–0.88) and 0.82 (95% confidence interval, 0.76–0.87), respectively. Xenon CT cerebral blood flow increased with increasing DSA and ASL collateral grade (P<0.05). Conclusions ASL can noninvasively predict the presence and intensity of collateral flow in patients with Moyamoya disease using DSA as a gold standard. Further study of other cerebrovascular diseases, including acute ischemic stroke, is warranted. PMID:21799169

  16. A variable flip angle-based method for reducing blurring in 3D GRASE ASL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaoyun; Connelly, Alan; Tournier, Jacques-Donald; Calamante, Fernando

    2014-09-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) is an MRI technique to measure cerebral blood flow directly and noninvasively, and thus provides a more direct quantitative correlate of neural activity than blood-oxygen-level-dependent fMRI. A 3D gradient and spin-echo (GRASE) sequence is capable of enhancing signal-to-noise ratio, and has been shown to be a very useful readout module for ASL sequences. Nonetheless, the introduction of significant blurring in its single-shot version, due to T2 decay along the partition dimension, compromises the achievable spatial resolution, limiting the potential of this technique for whole-brain coverage. To address this issue, a method for reducing blurring based on a variable flip angle (VFA) scheme is proposed in this study for 3D GRASE ASL perfusion. Numerical simulations show that the proposed method is capable of reducing the blurring significantly compared to the standard constant flip angle approach; this result was further confirmed using in vivo data. The proposed VFA method should therefore be of significance to 3D GRASE ASL fMRI studies, since it is able to reduce blurring without sacrificing temporal resolution.

  17. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Perfusion Parameters as Imaging Biomarkers of Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment is the leading factor in angiogenesis. Angiogenesis can be identified by dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI (DCE MRI). Here we investigate the relationship between perfusion parameters on DCE MRI and angiogenic and prognostic factors in patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Perfusion parameters (Ktrans, kep and ve) of 81 IDC were obtained using histogram analysis. Twenty-fifth, 50th and 75th percentile values were calculated and were analyzed for association with microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and conventional prognostic factors. Correlation between MVD and ve50 was positive (r = 0.33). Ktrans50 was higher in tumors larger than 2 cm than in tumors smaller than 2 cm. In multivariate analysis, Ktrans50 was affected by tumor size and MVD with 12.8% explanation. There was significant association between Ktrans50 and tumor size and MVD. Therefore we conclude that DCE MRI perfusion parameters are potential imaging biomarkers for prediction of tumor angiogenesis and aggressiveness. PMID:28036342

  18. Quantitative Perfusion Analysis of First-Pass Contrast Enhancement Kinetics: Application to MRI of Myocardial Perfusion in Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Binita; Storey, Pippa; Iqbal, Sohah; Slater, James; Axel, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Perfusion analysis from first-pass contrast enhancement kinetics requires modeling tissue contrast exchange. This study presents a new approach for numerical implementation of the tissue homogeneity model, incorporating flexible distance steps along the capillary (NTHf). Methods The proposed NTHf model considers contrast exchange in fluid packets flowing along the capillary, incorporating flexible distance steps, thus allowing more efficient and stable calculations of the transit of tracer through the tissue. We prospectively studied 8 patients (62 ± 13 years old) with suspected CAD, who underwent first-pass perfusion CMR imaging at rest and stress prior to angiography. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial perfusion reserve index (MPRI) were estimated using both the NTHf and the conventional adiabatic approximation of the TH models. Coronary artery lesions detected at angiography were clinically assigned to one of three categories of stenosis severity (‘insignificant’, ‘mild to moderate’ and ‘severe’) and related to corresponding myocardial territories. Results The mean MBF (ml/g/min) at rest/stress and MPRI were 0.80 ± 0.33/1.25 ± 0.45 and 1.68 ± 0.54 in the insignificant regions, 0.74 ± 0.21/1.09 ± 0.28 and 1.54 ± 0.46 in the mild to moderate regions, and 0.79 ± 0.28/0.63 ± 0.34 and 0.85 ± 0.48 in the severe regions, respectively. The correlation coefficients of MBFs at rest/stress and MPRI between the NTHf and AATH models were r = 0.97/0.93 and r = 0.91, respectively. Conclusions The proposed NTHf model allows efficient quantitative analysis of the transit of tracer through tissue, particularly at higher flow. Results of initial application to MRI of myocardial perfusion in CAD are encouraging. PMID:27583385

  19. The correlation of contrast-enhanced ultrasound and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis in rabbit VX2 liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhiming; Liang, Qianwen; Liang, Changhong; Zhong, Guimian

    2014-12-01

    Our objective is to explore the value of liver cancer contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis in liver cancer and the correlation between these two analysis methods. Rabbit VX2 liver cancer model was established in this study. CEUS was applied. Sono Vue was applied in rabbits by ear vein to dynamically observe and record the blood perfusion and changes in the process of VX2 liver cancer and surrounding tissue. MRI perfusion quantitative analysis was used to analyze the mean enhancement time and change law of maximal slope increasing, which were further compared with the pathological examination results. Quantitative indicators of liver cancer CEUS and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis were compared, and the correlation between them was analyzed by correlation analysis. Rabbit VX2 liver cancer model was successfully established. CEUS showed that time-intensity curve of rabbit VX2 liver cancer showed "fast in, fast out" model while MRI perfusion quantitative analysis showed that quantitative parameter MTE of tumor tissue increased and MSI decreased: the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.01). The diagnostic results of CEUS and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis were not significantly different (P > 0.05). However, the quantitative parameter of them were significantly positively correlated (P < 0.05). CEUS and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis can both dynamically monitor the liver cancer lesion and surrounding liver parenchyma, and the quantitative parameters of them are correlated. The combined application of both is of importance in early diagnosis of liver cancer.

  20. Perfusion and pH MRI in familial hemiplegic migraine with prolonged aura.

    PubMed

    Blicher, Jakob Udby; Tietze, Anna; Donahue, Manus J; Smith, Seth A; Østergaard, Leif

    2016-03-01

    To investigate tissue flow disturbance and hypoxia during migraine aura, we studied a case of familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) using novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. A 44-year-old male was admitted with suspected stroke because of confusion and aphasia. Initial gadolinium-based perfusion MRI showed a decrease in cerebral blood flow and an increase in capillary flow disturbances within the left hemisphere. Later during the prolonged aura phase, chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI indicated a drop in pH in the affected area. The patient was diagnosed with an R908Q mutation in the ATP1A2 gene causing FHM type 2. During prolonged aura in FHM, MRI shows reduced CBF, capillary flow disturbances and a possible pH drop that could indicate tissue hypoxia. © International Headache Society 2015.

  1. Separating blood and water: Perfusion and free water elimination from diffusion MRI in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Rydhög, Anna S; Szczepankiewicz, Filip; Wirestam, Ronnie; Ahlgren, André; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Knutsson, Linda; Pasternak, Ofer

    2017-08-01

    The assessment of the free water fraction in the brain provides important information about extracellular processes such as atrophy and neuroinflammation in various clinical conditions as well as in normal development and aging. Free water estimates from diffusion MRI are assumed to account for freely diffusing water molecules in the extracellular space, but may be biased by other pools of molecules in rapid random motion, such as the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) of blood, where water molecules perfuse in the randomly oriented capillary network. The goal of this work was to separate the signal contribution of the perfusing blood from that of free-water and of other brain diffusivities. The influence of the vascular compartment on the estimation of the free water fraction and other diffusivities was investigated by simulating perfusion in diffusion MRI data. The perfusion effect in the simulations was significant, especially for the estimation of the free water fraction, and was maintained as long as low b-value data were included in the analysis. Two approaches to reduce the perfusion effect were explored in this study: (i) increasing the minimal b-value used in the fitting, and (ii) using a three-compartment model that explicitly accounts for water molecules in the capillary blood. Estimation of the model parameters while excluding low b-values reduced the perfusion effect but was highly sensitive to noise. The three-compartment model fit was more stable and additionally, provided an estimation of the volume fraction of the capillary blood compartment. The three-compartment model thus disentangles the effects of free water diffusion and perfusion, which is of major clinical importance since changes in these components in the brain may indicate different pathologies, i.e., those originating from the extracellular space, such as neuroinflammation and atrophy, and those related to the vascular space, such as vasodilation, vasoconstriction and capillary density

  2. Thyroid perfusion imaging as a diagnostic tool in Graves' disease--arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging vs. colour-coded Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Müssig, K; Schraml, C; Rietig, R; Martirosian, P; Schwenzer, N F; Claussen, C D; Häring, H-U; Schick, F; Balletshofer, B

    2012-12-01

    Though increased thyroid perfusion assessed by colour-coded Doppler ultrasound (CDUS) is characteristic of Graves' disease (GD), sometimes perfusion assessment by CDUS is not possible. In these cases, arterial spin labelling (ASL), a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique allowing non-invasive thyroid perfusion quantification, may have additional diagnostic value. We aimed to evaluate the potential of ASL-MRI for assessment of increased blood perfusion in patients with GD compared to CDUS. Thyroid perfusion was measured by CDUS (volume flow rate calculated from pulsed wave Doppler signals and vessel diameter) and ASL-MRI at 1.5 T in 7 patients with GD and 10 healthy controls. In patients with GD, average perfusion in both thyroid lobes was markedly increased compared to controls. Both techniques applied for volume related perfusion as well as absolute volume flow in thyroid feeding vessels provided similar results (all p=0.0008). Using a cut-off value of 22 ml/min for the volume flow rate assessed by CDUS in the four feeding vessels allowed discrimination between patients with GD and controls in all cases. After adjusting thyroid perfusion for the differences in organ volume, both CDUS and ASL revealed also complete discrimination between health and disease. Thyroid perfusion measurement by ASL-MRI reliably discriminate GD from normal thyroid glands. In patients in whom thyroid arteries cannot be depicted by CDUS for technical or anatomical reasons, ASL-MRI may have additional diagnostic value. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Sub-band denoising and spline curve fitting method for hemodynamic measurement in perfusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong-Dun; Huang, Hsiao-Ling; Hsu, Yuan-Yu; Chen, Chi-Chen; Chen, Ing-Yi; Wu, Liang-Chi; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Lin, Kang-Ping

    2003-05-01

    In clinical research, non-invasive MR perfusion imaging is capable of investigating brain perfusion phenomenon via various hemodynamic measurements, such as cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and mean trasnit time (MTT). These hemodynamic parameters are useful in diagnosing brain disorders such as stroke, infarction and periinfarct ischemia by further semi-quantitative analysis. However, the accuracy of quantitative analysis is usually affected by poor signal-to-noise ratio image quality. In this paper, we propose a hemodynamic measurement method based upon sub-band denoising and spline curve fitting processes to improve image quality for better hemodynamic quantitative analysis results. Ten sets of perfusion MRI data and corresponding PET images were used to validate the performance. For quantitative comparison, we evaluate gray/white matter CBF ratio. As a result, the hemodynamic semi-quantitative analysis result of mean gray to white matter CBF ratio is 2.10 +/- 0.34. The evaluated ratio of brain tissues in perfusion MRI is comparable to PET technique is less than 1-% difference in average. Furthermore, the method features excellent noise reduction and boundary preserving in image processing, and short hemodynamic measurement time.

  4. Perfusion deconvolution in DSC-MRI with dispersion-compliant bases.

    PubMed

    Pizzolato, Marco; Boutelier, Timothé; Deriche, Rachid

    2017-02-01

    Perfusion imaging of the brain via Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI (DSC-MRI) allows tissue perfusion characterization by recovering the tissue impulse response function and scalar parameters such as the cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume (CBV), and mean transit time (MTT). However, the presence of bolus dispersion causes the data to reflect macrovascular properties, in addition to tissue perfusion. In this case, when performing deconvolution of the measured arterial and tissue concentration time-curves it is only possible to recover the effective, i.e. dispersed, response function and parameters. We introduce Dispersion-Compliant Bases (DCB) to represent the response function in the presence and absence of dispersion. We perform in silico and in vivo experiments, and show that DCB deconvolution outperforms oSVD and the state-of-the-art CPI+VTF techniques in the estimation of effective perfusion parameters, regardless of the presence and amount of dispersion. We also show that DCB deconvolution can be used as a pre-processing step to improve the estimation of dispersion-free parameters computed with CPI+VTF, which employs a model of the vascular transport function to characterize dispersion. Indeed, in silico results show a reduction of relative errors up to 50% for dispersion-free CBF and MTT. Moreover, the DCB method recovers effective response functions that comply with healthy and pathological scenarios, and offers the advantage of making no assumptions about the presence, amount, and nature of dispersion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Perfusion and diffusion MRI of glioblastoma progression in a four-year prospective temozolomide clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Leimgruber, Antoine; Ostermann, Sandrine; Yeon, Eun Jo; Buff, Evelyn; Maeder, Philippe P.; Stupp, Roger; Meuli, Reto A. . E-mail: Reto.Meuli@chuv.ch

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to determine the impact of perfusion and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences on patients during treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Special emphasis has been given to these imaging technologies as tools to potentially anticipate disease progression, as progression-free survival is frequently used as a surrogate endpoint. Methods and Materials: Forty-one patients from a phase II temolozomide clinical trial were included. During follow-up, images were integrated 21 to 28 days after radiochemotherapy and every 2 months thereafter. Assessment of scans included measurement of size of lesion on T1 contrast-enhanced, T2, diffusion, and perfusion images, as well as mass effect. Classical criteria on tumor size variation and clinical parameters were used to set disease progression date. Results: A total of 311 MRI examinations were reviewed. At disease progression (32 patients), a multivariate Cox regression determined 2 significant survival parameters: T1 largest diameter (p < 0.02) and T2 size variation (p < 0.05), whereas perfusion and diffusion were not significant. Conclusion: Perfusion and diffusion techniques cannot be used to anticipate tumor progression. Decision making at disease progression is critical, and classical T1 and T2 imaging remain the gold standard. Specifically, a T1 contrast enhancement over 3 cm in largest diameter together with an increased T2 hypersignal is a marker of inferior prognosis.

  6. The diagnostic performance of perfusion MRI for differentiating glioma recurrence from pseudoprogression

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Bing; Wang, Siqi; Tu, Mengqi; Wu, Bo; Han, Ping; Xu, Haibo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The purpose of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a method for differentiating glioma recurrence from pseudoprogression. Methods: The PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Chinese Biomedical databases were searched comprehensively for relevant studies up to August 3, 2016 according to specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. The quality of the included studies was assessed according to the quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies (QUADAS-2). After performing heterogeneity and threshold effect tests, pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, and diagnostic odds ratio were calculated. Publication bias was evaluated visually by a funnel plot and quantitatively using Deek funnel plot asymmetry test. The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was calculated to demonstrate the diagnostic performance of perfusion MRI. Results: Eleven studies covering 416 patients and 418 lesions were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, and diagnostic odds ratio were 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84–0.92), 0.77 (95% CI 0.69–0.84), 3.93 (95% CI 2.83–5.46), 0.16 (95% CI 0.11–0.22), and 27.17 (95% CI 14.96–49.35), respectively. The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.8899. There was no notable publication bias. Sensitivity analysis showed that the meta-analysis results were stable and credible. Conclusion: While perfusion MRI is not the ideal diagnostic method for differentiating glioma recurrence from pseudoprogression, it could improve diagnostic accuracy. Therefore, further research on combining perfusion MRI with other imaging modalities is warranted. PMID:28296759

  7. Local perfusion and metabolic demand during exercise: a noninvasive MRI method of assessment.

    PubMed

    Richardson, R S; Haseler, L J; Nygren, A T; Bluml, S; Frank, L R

    2001-10-01

    A noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method to assess the distribution of perfusion and metabolic demand (Q/VO(2)) in exercising human skeletal muscle is described. This method combines two MRI techniques that can provide accurate multiple localized measurements of Q/VO(2) during steady-state plantar flexion exercise. The first technique, (31)P chemical shift imaging, permits the acquisition of comparable phosphorus spectra from multiple voxels simultaneously. Because phosphocreatine (PCr) depletion is directly proportional to ATP hydrolysis, its relative depletion can be used as an index of muscle O(2) uptake (VO(2)). The second MRI technique allows the measurement of both spatially and temporally resolved muscle perfusion in vivo by using arterial spin labeling. Promising validity and reliability data are presented for both MRI techniques. Initial results from the combined method provide evidence of a large variation in Q/VO(2), revealing areas of apparent under- and overperfusion for a given metabolic turnover. Analysis of these data in a similar fashion to that employed in the assessment of ventilation-to-perfusion matching in the lungs revealed a similar second moment of the perfusion distribution and PCr distribution on a log scale (log SD(Q) and log SD(PCr)) (0.47). Modeling the effect of variations in log SD(Q) and log SD(PCr) in terms of attainable VO(2), assuming no diffusion limits, indicates that the log SD(Q) and log SD(PCr) would allow only 92% of the target VO(2) to be achieved. This communication documents this novel, noninvasive method for assessing Q/VO(2), and initial data suggest that the mismatch in Q/VO(2) may play a significant role in determining O(2) transport and utilization during exercise.

  8. Distinctive Patterns of Three-Dimensional Arterial Spin-Labeled Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Subtypes of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Naoto; Okada, Kazunori; Yamagata, Shingo; Takayoshi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Shuhei

    2016-07-01

    Ischemic penumbra in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) can be evaluated using arterial spin-labeled (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We used three-dimensional ASL-MRI to examine patients with different stroke subtypes and the clinical utility of the method within 24 hours of AIS onset. The 55 male and 48 female patients (mean age, 79.0 years) underwent diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, and pulsed continuous ASL perfusion imaging to determine stroke subtype, hypoperfused ASL area, and neurological deficit severity (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale). Arterial transit artifacts, indicative of occlusive regions or collateral flow, and other stroke indices were compared. ASL hypoperfusion was detected in 3 of 9 patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA), 2 of 27 patients with lacunar infarction (LI), 19 of 31 patients with atherothrombotic infarction (AT), and 30 of 36 patients with cardiogenic embolic infarction (CE). ASL abnormalities were significantly less frequent in LI than in AT and CE, and more frequent in CE than in TIA. ASL abnormalities were more prevalent in patients with medium-to-large DWI-assessed lesions than in those with small lesions on DWI. Patients with medium-sized lesions following AT and CE had a high frequency of diffusion-perfusion mismatch. In 4 of the 5 patients who underwent intravenous thrombolytic therapy, ASL hypoperfusion and diffusion-perfusion mismatch were improved and the occluded arteries were recanalized. ASL perfusion studies may provide useful clinical information allowing diffusion-perfusion mismatch detection and treatment selection in AIS patients, depending on stroke subtype. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Contrast-enhanced CT- and MRI-based perfusion assessment for pulmonary diseases: basics and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Lee, Ho Yun; Miura, Sachiko; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of regional pulmonary perfusion as well as nodule and tumor perfusions in various pulmonary diseases are currently performed by means of nuclear medicine studies requiring radioactive macroaggregates, dual-energy computed tomography (CT), and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion CT techniques and unenhanced and dynamic first-pass contrast enhanced perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as time-resolved three-dimensional or four-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Perfusion scintigraphy, single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) and SPECT fused with CT have been established as clinically available scintigraphic methods; however, they are limited by perfusion information with poor spatial resolution and other shortcomings. Although positron emission tomography with 15O water can measure absolute pulmonary perfusion, it requires a cyclotron for generation of a tracer with an extremely short half-life (2 min), and can only be performed for academic purposes. Therefore, clinicians are concentrating their efforts on the application of CT-based and MRI-based quantitative and qualitative perfusion assessment to various pulmonary diseases. This review article covers 1) the basics of dual-energy CT and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion CT techniques, 2) the basics of time-resolved contrast-enhanced MRA and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI, and 3) clinical applications of contrast-enhanced CT- and MRI-based perfusion assessment for patients with pulmonary nodule, lung cancer, and pulmonary vascular diseases. We believe that these new techniques can be useful in routine clinical practice for not only thoracic oncology patients, but also patients with different pulmonary vascular diseases. PMID:27523813

  10. Contrast-enhanced CT- and MRI-based perfusion assessment for pulmonary diseases: basics and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Lee, Ho Yun; Miura, Sachiko; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of regional pulmonary perfusion as well as nodule and tumor perfusions in various pulmonary diseases are currently performed by means of nuclear medicine studies requiring radioactive macroaggregates, dual-energy computed tomography (CT), and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion CT techniques and unenhanced and dynamic first-pass contrast enhanced perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as time-resolved three-dimensional or four-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Perfusion scintigraphy, single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) and SPECT fused with CT have been established as clinically available scintigraphic methods; however, they are limited by perfusion information with poor spatial resolution and other shortcomings. Although positron emission tomography with 15O water can measure absolute pulmonary perfusion, it requires a cyclotron for generation of a tracer with an extremely short half-life (2 min), and can only be performed for academic purposes. Therefore, clinicians are concentrating their efforts on the application of CT-based and MRI-based quantitative and qualitative perfusion assessment to various pulmonary diseases. This review article covers 1) the basics of dual-energy CT and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion CT techniques, 2) the basics of time-resolved contrast-enhanced MRA and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI, and 3) clinical applications of contrast-enhanced CT- and MRI-based perfusion assessment for patients with pulmonary nodule, lung cancer, and pulmonary vascular diseases. We believe that these new techniques can be useful in routine clinical practice for not only thoracic oncology patients, but also patients with different pulmonary vascular diseases.

  11. Repeatability of Cerebral Perfusion Using Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI in Glioblastoma Patients12

    PubMed Central

    Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Emblem, Kyrre E.; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Bjørnerud, Atle; Vangel, Mark G.; Gerstner, Elizabeth R.; Schmainda, Kathleen M.; Paynabar, Kamran; Wu, Ona; Wen, Patrick Y.; Batchelor, Tracy; Rosen, Bruce; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study evaluates the repeatability of brain perfusion using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with a variety of post-processing methods. METHODS Thirty-two patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were recruited. On a 3-T MRI using a dual-echo, gradient-echo spin-echo DSC-MRI protocol, the patients were scanned twice 1 to 5 days apart. Perfusion maps including cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were generated using two contrast agent leakage correction methods, along with testing normalization to reference tissue, and application of arterial input function (AIF). Repeatability of CBV and CBF within tumor regions and healthy tissues, identified by structural images, was assessed with intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and repeatability coefficients (RCs). Coefficients of variation (CVs) were reported for selected methods. RESULTS CBV and CBF were highly repeatable within tumor with ICC values up to 0.97. However, both CBV and CBF showed lower ICCs for healthy cortical tissues (up to 0.83), healthy gray matter (up to 0.95), and healthy white matter (WM; up to 0.93). The values of CV ranged from 6% to 10% in tumor and 3% to 11% in healthy tissues. The values of RC relative to the mean value of measurement within healthy WM ranged from 22% to 42% in tumor and 7% to 43% in healthy tissues. These percentages show how much variation in perfusion parameter, relative to that in healthy WM, we expect to observe to consider it statistically significant. We also found that normalization improved repeatability, but AIF deconvolution did not. CONCLUSIONS DSC-MRI is highly repeatable in high-grade glioma patients. PMID:26055170

  12. Pulmonary perfusion quantification with flow-sensitive inversion recovery (FAIR) UTE MRI in small animal imaging.

    PubMed

    Tibiletti, Marta; Bianchi, Andrea; Stiller, Detlef; Rasche, Volker

    2016-12-01

    Blood perfusion in lung parenchyma is an important property for assessing lung function. In small animals, its quantitation is limited even with radioactive isotopes or dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI techniques. In this study, the feasibility flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) for the quantification of blood flow in lung parenchyma in free breathing rats at 7 T has been investigated. In order to obtain sufficient signal from the short T2 * lung parenchyma, a 2D ultra-short echo time (UTE) Look-Locker read-out has been implemented. Acquisitions were segmented to maintain acquisition time within an acceptable range. A method to perform retrospective respiratory gating (DC-SG) has been applied to investigate the impact of respiratory movement. Reproducibilities within and between sessions were estimated, and the ability of FAIR-UTE to identify the decrease of lung perfusion under hyperoxic conditions was tested. The implemented technique allowed for the visualization of lung parenchyma with excellent SNR and no respiratory artifact even in ungated acquisitions. Lung parenchyma perfusion was obtained as 32.54 ± 2.26 mL/g/min in the left lung, and 34.09 ± 2.75 mL/g/min in the right lung. Application of retrospective gating significantly but minimally changes the perfusion values, implying that respiratory gating may not be necessary with this center-our acquisition method. A decrease of 10% in lung perfusion was found between normoxic and hyperoxic conditions, proving the feasibility of the FAIR-UTE approach to quantify lung perfusion changes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Automated scoring of regional lung perfusion in children from contrast enhanced 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Tobias; Eichinger, Monika; Bauman, Grzegorz; Bischoff, Arved; Puderbach, Michael; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2012-03-01

    MRI perfusion images give information about regional lung function and can be used to detect pulmonary pathologies in cystic fibrosis (CF) children. However, manual assessment of the percentage of pathologic tissue in defined lung subvolumes features large inter- and intra-observer variation, making it difficult to determine disease progression consistently. We present an automated method to calculate a regional score for this purpose. First, lungs are located based on thresholding and morphological operations. Second, statistical shape models of left and right children's lungs are initialized at the determined locations and used to precisely segment morphological images. Segmentation results are transferred to perfusion maps and employed as masks to calculate perfusion statistics. An automated threshold to determine pathologic tissue is calculated and used to determine accurate regional scores. We evaluated the method on 10 MRI images and achieved an average surface distance of less than 1.5 mm compared to manual reference segmentations. Pathologic tissue was detected correctly in 9 cases. The approach seems suitable for detecting early signs of CF and monitoring response to therapy.

  14. Combination of Compressed Sensing and Parallel Imaging for Highly Accelerated First-Pass Cardiac Perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Otazo, Ricardo; Kim, Daniel; Axel, Leon; Sodickson, Daniel K.

    2010-01-01

    First-pass cardiac perfusion MRI is a natural candidate for compressed sensing acceleration since its representation in the combined temporal Fourier and spatial domain is sparse and the required incoherence can be effectively accomplished by k-t random undersampling. However, the required number of samples in practice (three to five times the number of sparse coefficients) limits the acceleration for compressed sensing alone. Parallel imaging may also be used to accelerate cardiac perfusion MRI, with acceleration factors ultimately limited by noise amplification. In this work, compressed sensing and parallel imaging are combined by merging the k-t SPARSE technique with SENSE reconstruction to substantially increase the acceleration rate for perfusion imaging. We also present a new theoretical framework for understanding the combination of k-t SPARSE with SENSE based on distributed compressed sensing theory. This framework, which identifies parallel imaging as a distributed multisensor implementation of compressed sensing, enables an estimate of feasible acceleration for the combined approach. We demonstrate feasibility of 8-fold acceleration in vivo with whole-heart coverage and high spatial and temporal resolution using standard coil arrays. The method is relatively insensitive to respiratory motion artifacts and presents similar temporal fidelity and image quality when compared to GRAPPA with 2-fold acceleration. PMID:20535813

  15. Semi-quantitative assessment of pulmonary perfusion in children using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetita, Catalin; Thong, William E.; Ou, Phalla

    2013-03-01

    This paper addresses the study of semi-quantitative assessment of pulmonary perfusion acquired from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in a study population mainly composed of children with pulmonary malformations. The automatic analysis approach proposed is based on the indicator-dilution theory introduced in 1954. First, a robust method is developed to segment the pulmonary artery and the lungs from anatomical MRI data, exploiting 2D and 3D mathematical morphology operators. Second, the time-dependent contrast signal of the lung regions is deconvolved by the arterial input function for the assessment of the local hemodynamic system parameters, ie. mean transit time, pulmonary blood volume and pulmonary blood flow. The discrete deconvolution method implements here a truncated singular value decomposition (tSVD) method. Parametric images for the entire lungs are generated as additional elements for diagnosis and quantitative follow-up. The preliminary results attest the feasibility of perfusion quantification in pulmonary DCE-MRI and open an interesting alternative to scintigraphy for this type of evaluation, to be considered at least as a preliminary decision in the diagnostic due to the large availability of the technique and to the non-invasive aspects.

  16. Stepwise heterogeneity analysis of breast tumors in perfusion DCE-MRI datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohajer, Mojgan; Schmid, Volker J.; Engels, Nina A.; Noel, Peter B.; Rummeny, Ernst; Englmeier, Karl-Hans

    2012-03-01

    The signal curves in perfusion dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) of cancerous breast tissue reveal valuable information about tumor angiogenesis. Pathological studies have illustrated that breast tumors consist of different subregions, especially with more homogeneous properties during their growth. Differences should be identifiable in DCEMRI signal curves if the characteristics of these sub-regions are related to the perfusion and angiogenesis. We introduce a stepwise clustering method which in a first step uses a new similarity measure. The new similarity measure (PM) compares how parallel washout phases of two curves are. To distinguish the starting point of the washout phase, a linear regression method is partially fitted to the curves. In the next step, the minimum signal value of the washout phase is normalized to zero. Finally, PM is calculated according to maximal variation among the point wise differences during washout phases. In the second step of clustering the groups of signal curves with parallel washout are clustered using Euclidean distance. The introduced method is evaluated on 15 DCE-MRI breast datasets with different types of breast tumors. The use of our new heterogeneity analysis is feasible in single patient examination and improves breast MR diagnostics.

  17. 3D pulmonary perfusion MRI with radial ultra-short echo time and spatial-temporal constrained reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Grzegorz; Johnson, Kevin M.; Bell, Laura C.; Velikina, Julia V.; Samsonov, Alexey A.; Nagle, Scott K.; Fain, Sean B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the feasibility of spatial-temporal constrained reconstruction for accelerated regional lung perfusion using highly undersampled dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) 3D radial MRI with ultra-short echo time (UTE). Methods A combined strategy was used to accelerate DCE MRI for 3D pulmonary perfusion with whole lung coverage. A highly undersampled 3D radial UTE MRI acquisition was combined with an iterative constrained reconstruction exploiting principal component analysis and wavelet soft-thresholding for dimensionality reduction in space and time. The performance of the method was evaluated using a 3D fractal-based DCE digital lung phantom. Simulated perfusion maps and contrast enhancement curves were compared to ground truth using the structural similarity index (SSIM) to determine robust threshold and regularization levels. Feasibility studies were then performed in a canine and a human subject with 3D radial UTE (TE = 0.08 ms) acquisition to assess feasibility of mapping regional 3D perfusion. Results The method was able to accurately recover perfusion maps in the phantom with a nominal isotropic spatial resolution of 1.5 mm (SSIM of 0.949). The canine and human subject studies demonstrated feasibility for providing artifact-free perfusion maps in a simple 3D breath-held acquisition. Conclusion The proposed method is promising for fast and flexible 3D pulmonary perfusion imaging. PMID:24604452

  18. Interobserver variability in the radiological assessment of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including perfusion MRI in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Kerkhof, M; Hagenbeek, R E; van der Kallen, B F W; Lycklama À Nijeholt, G J; Dirven, L; Taphoorn, M J B; Vos, M J

    2016-10-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has limited value for differentiation of true tumor progression and pseudoprogression in treated glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) may be helpful in the differentiation of these two phenomena. Here interobserver variability in routine radiological evaluation of GBM patients is assessed using MRI, including PWI. Three experienced neuroradiologists evaluated MR scans of 28 GBM patients during temozolomide chemoradiotherapy at three time points: preoperative (MR1) and postoperative (MR2) MR scan and the follow-up MR scan after three cycles of adjuvant temozolomide (MR3). Tumor size was measured both on T1 post-contrast and T2 weighted images according to the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology criteria. PW images of MR3 were evaluated by visual inspection of relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) color maps and by quantitative rCBV measurements of enhancing areas with highest rCBV. Image interpretability of PW images was also scored. Finally, the neuroradiologists gave a conclusion on tumor status, based on the interpretation of both T1 and T2 weighted images (MR1, MR2 and MR3) in combination with PWI (MR3). Interobserver agreement on visual interpretation of rCBV maps was good (κ = 0.63) but poor on quantitative rCBV measurements and on interpretability of perfusion images (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.37 and κ = 0.23, respectively). Interobserver agreement on the overall conclusion of tumor status was moderate (κ = 0.48). Interobserver agreement on the visual interpretation of PWI color maps was good. However, overall interpretation of MR scans (using both conventional and PW images) showed considerable interobserver variability. Therefore, caution should be applied when interpreting MRI results during chemoradiation therapy. © 2016 EAN.

  19. Free-breathing myocardial perfusion MRI using SW-CG-HYPR and motion correction.

    PubMed

    Ge, Lan; Kino, Aya; Griswold, Mark; Carr, James C; Li, Debiao

    2010-10-01

    First-pass perfusion MRI is a promising technique to detect ischemic heart disease. Sliding window (SW) conjugate-gradient (CG) highly constrained back-projection reconstruction (HYPR) (SW-CG-HYPR) has been proposed to increase spatial coverage, spatial resolution, and SNR. However, this method is sensitive to respiratory motion and thus requires breath-hold. This work presents a non-model-based motion correction method combined with SW-CG-HYPR to perform free-breathing myocardial MR imaging. Simulation studies were first performed to show the effectiveness of the proposed motion correction method and its independence from the pattern of the respiratory motion. After that, in vivo studies were performed in six healthy volunteers. From all of the volunteer studies, the image quality score of free breathing perfusion images with motion correction (3.11 ± 0.34) is improved compared with that of images without motion correction (2.27 ± 0.32), and is comparable with that of successful breath-hold images (3.12 ± 0.38). This result was further validated by a quantitative sharpness analysis. The left ventricle and myocardium signal changes in motion corrected free-breathing perfusion images were closely correlated to those observed in breath-hold images. The correlation coefficient is 0.9764 for myocardial signals. Bland-Altman analysis confirmed the agreement between the free-breathing SW-CG-HYPR method with motion correction and the breath-hold SW-CG-HYPR. This technique may allow myocardial perfusion MRI during free breathing.

  20. Relationship between diffusion parameters derived from intravoxel incoherent motion MRI and perfusion measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of soft tissue tumors.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Simona; Stefanetti, Linda; Sperati, Francesca; Anelli, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the link between diffusion parameters measured by intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and the perfusion metrics obtained with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI in soft tissue tumors (STTs). Twenty-eight patients affected by histopathologically confirmed STT were included in a prospective study. All patients underwent both DCE MRI and IVIM DWI. The perfusion fraction f, diffusion coefficient D and perfusion-related diffusion coefficient D* were estimated using a bi-exponential function to fit the DWI data. DCE MRI was acquired with a temporal resolution of 3-5 s. Maps of the initial area under the gadolinium concentration curve (IAUGC), time to peak (TTP) and maximum slope of increase (MSI) were derived using commercial software. The relationships between the DCE MRI and IVIM DWI measurements were assessed by Spearman's test. To exclude false positive results under multiple testing, the false discovery rate (FDR) procedure was applied. The Mann-Whitney test was used to evaluate the differences between all variables in patients with non-myxoid and myxoid STT. No significant relationship was found between IVIM parameters and any DCE MRI parameters. Higher f and D*f values were found in non-myxoid tumors compared with myxoid tumors (p = 0.004 and p = 0.003, respectively). MSI was significantly higher in non-myxoid tumors than in myxoid tumors (p = 0.029). From the visual assessments of single clinical cases, both f and D*f maps were in satisfactory agreement with DCE maps in the extreme cases of an avascular mass and a highly vascularized mass, whereas, for tumors with slight vascularity or with a highly heterogeneous perfusion pattern, this association was not straightforward. Although IVIM DWI was demonstrated to be feasible in STT, our data did not support evident relationships between perfusion-related IVIM parameters and perfusion measured by DCE MRI.

  1. Postischemic hyperperfusion on arterial spin labeled perfusion MRI is linked to hemorrhagic transformation in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Songlin; Liebeskind, David S; Dua, Sumit; Wilhalme, Holly; Elashoff, David; Qiao, Xin J; Alger, Jeffry R; Sanossian, Nerses; Starkman, Sidney; Ali, Latisha K; Scalzo, Fabien; Lou, Xin; Yoo, Bryan; Saver, Jeffrey L; Salamon, Noriko; Wang, Danny JJ

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between hyperperfusion and hemorrhagic transformation (HT) in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (ASL) with background suppressed 3D GRASE was performed during routine clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on AIS patients at various time points. Arterial spin labeling cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps were visually inspected for the presence of hyperperfusion. Hemorrhagic transformation was followed during hospitalization and was graded on gradient recalled echo (GRE) scans into hemorrhagic infarction (HI) and parenchymal hematoma (PH). A total of 361 ASL scans were collected from 221 consecutive patients with middle cerebral artery stroke from May 2010 to September 2013. Hyperperfusion was more frequently detected posttreatment (odds ratio (OR)=4.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.5 to 8.9, P<0.001) and with high National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores at admission (P<0.001). There was a significant association between having hyperperfusion at any time point and HT (OR=3.5, 95% CI 2.0 to 6.3, P<0.001). There was a positive relationship between the grade of HT and time–hyperperfusion with the Spearman's rank correlation of 0.44 (P=0.003). Arterial spin labeling hyperperfusion may provide an imaging marker of HT, which may guide the management of AIS patients post tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and/or endovascular treatments. Late hyperperfusion should be given more attention to prevent high-grade HT. PMID:25564233

  2. Parkinson's disease-related perfusion and glucose metabolic brain patterns identified with PCASL-MRI and FDG-PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Teune, Laura K; Renken, Remco J; de Jong, Bauke M; Willemsen, Antoon T; van Osch, Matthias J; Roerdink, Jos B T M; Dierckx, Rudi A; Leenders, Klaus L

    2014-01-01

    Under normal conditions, the spatial distribution of resting cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose are closely related. A relatively new magnetic resonance (MR) technique, pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL), can be used to measure regional brain perfusion. We identified a Parkinson's disease (PD)-related perfusion and metabolic covariance pattern in the same patients using PCASL and FDG-PET imaging and assessed (dis)similarities in the disease-related pattern between perfusion and metabolism in PD patients. Nineteen PD patients and seventeen healthy controls underwent [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging. Of 14 PD patients and all healthy controls PCASL-MRI could be obtained. Data were analyzed using scaled subprofile model/principal component analysis (SSM/PCA). Unique Parkinson's disease-related perfusion and metabolic covariance patterns were identified using PCASL and FDG-PET in the same patients. The PD-related metabolic covariance brain pattern is in high accordance with previously reports. Also our disease-related perfusion pattern is comparable to the earlier described perfusion pattern. The most marked difference between our perfusion and metabolic patterns is the larger perfusion decrease in cortical regions including the insula. We identified PD-related perfusion and metabolic brain patterns using PCASL and FDG-PET in the same patients which were comparable with results of existing research. In this respect, PCASL appears to be a promising addition in the early diagnosis of individual parkinsonian patients.

  3. Parkinson's disease-related perfusion and glucose metabolic brain patterns identified with PCASL-MRI and FDG-PET imaging

    PubMed Central

    Teune, Laura K.; Renken, Remco J.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Willemsen, Antoon T.; van Osch, Matthias J.; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Under normal conditions, the spatial distribution of resting cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose are closely related. A relatively new magnetic resonance (MR) technique, pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL), can be used to measure regional brain perfusion. We identified a Parkinson's disease (PD)-related perfusion and metabolic covariance pattern in the same patients using PCASL and FDG-PET imaging and assessed (dis)similarities in the disease-related pattern between perfusion and metabolism in PD patients. Methods Nineteen PD patients and seventeen healthy controls underwent [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging. Of 14 PD patients and all healthy controls PCASL-MRI could be obtained. Data were analyzed using scaled subprofile model/principal component analysis (SSM/PCA). Results Unique Parkinson's disease-related perfusion and metabolic covariance patterns were identified using PCASL and FDG-PET in the same patients. The PD-related metabolic covariance brain pattern is in high accordance with previously reports. Also our disease-related perfusion pattern is comparable to the earlier described perfusion pattern. The most marked difference between our perfusion and metabolic patterns is the larger perfusion decrease in cortical regions including the insula. Conclusion We identified PD-related perfusion and metabolic brain patterns using PCASL and FDG-PET in the same patients which were comparable with results of existing research. In this respect, PCASL appears to be a promising addition in the early diagnosis of individual parkinsonian patients. PMID:25068113

  4. Clinical Applications of Contrast-Enhanced Perfusion MRI Techniques in Gliomas: Recent Advances and Current Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Heng; Tong, Haipeng; Wang, Sumei; Yang, Yizeng

    2017-01-01

    Gliomas possess complex and heterogeneous vasculatures with abnormal hemodynamics. Despite considerable advances in diagnostic and therapeutic techniques for improving tumor management and patient care in recent years, the prognosis of malignant gliomas remains dismal. Perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging techniques that could noninvasively provide superior information on vascular functionality have attracted much attention for evaluating brain tumors. However, nonconsensus imaging protocols and postprocessing analysis among different institutions impede their integration into standard-of-care imaging in clinic. And there have been very few studies providing a comprehensive evidence-based and systematic summary. This review first outlines the status of glioma theranostics and tumor-associated vascular pathology and then presents an overview of the principles of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and dynamic susceptibility contrast-MRI (DSC-MRI), with emphasis on their recent clinical applications in gliomas including tumor grading, identification of molecular characteristics, differentiation of glioma from other brain tumors, treatment response assessment, and predicting prognosis. Current challenges and future perspectives are also highlighted.

  5. Groupwise registration of cardiac perfusion MRI sequences using normalized mutual information in high dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamrouni, Sameh; Rougon, Nicolas; Pr"teux, Françoise

    2011-03-01

    In perfusion MRI (p-MRI) exams, short-axis (SA) image sequences are captured at multiple slice levels along the long-axis of the heart during the transit of a vascular contrast agent (Gd-DTPA) through the cardiac chambers and muscle. Compensating cardio-thoracic motions is a requirement for enabling computer-aided quantitative assessment of myocardial ischaemia from contrast-enhanced p-MRI sequences. The classical paradigm consists of registering each sequence frame on a reference image using some intensity-based matching criterion. In this paper, we introduce a novel unsupervised method for the spatio-temporal groupwise registration of cardiac p-MRI exams based on normalized mutual information (NMI) between high-dimensional feature distributions. Here, local contrast enhancement curves are used as a dense set of spatio-temporal features, and statistically matched through variational optimization to a target feature distribution derived from a registered reference template. The hard issue of probability density estimation in high-dimensional state spaces is bypassed by using consistent geometric entropy estimators, allowing NMI to be computed directly from feature samples. Specifically, a computationally efficient kth-nearest neighbor (kNN) estimation framework is retained, leading to closed-form expressions for the gradient flow of NMI over finite- and infinite-dimensional motion spaces. This approach is applied to the groupwise alignment of cardiac p-MRI exams using a free-form Deformation (FFD) model for cardio-thoracic motions. Experiments on simulated and natural datasets suggest its accuracy and robustness for registering p-MRI exams comprising more than 30 frames.

  6. Accelerating free breathing myocardial perfusion MRI using multi coil radial k-t SLR

    PubMed Central

    Lingala, Sajan Goud; DiBella, Edward; Adluru, Ganesh; McGann, Christopher; Jacob, Mathews

    2013-01-01

    The clinical utility of myocardial perfusion MR imaging (MPI) is often restricted by the inability of current acquisition schemes to simultaneously achieve high spatio-temporal resolution, good volume coverage, and high signal to noise ratio. Moreover, many subjects often find it difficult to hold their breath for sufficiently long durations making it difficult to obtain reliable MPI data. Accelerated acquisition of free breathing MPI data can overcome some of these challenges. Recently, an algorithm termed as k − t SLR has been proposed to accelerate dynamic MRI by exploiting sparsity and low rank properties of dynamic MRI data. The main focus of this paper is to further improve k − t SLR and demonstrate its utility in considerably accelerating free breathing MPI. We extend its previous implementation to account for multi-coil radial MPI acquisitions. We perform k − t sampling experiments to compare different radial trajectories and determine the best sampling pattern. We also introduce a novel augmented Lagrangian framework to considerably improve the algorithm's convergence rate. The proposed algorithm is validated using free breathing rest and stress radial perfusion data sets from two normal subjects and one patient with ischemia. k − t SLR was observed to provide faithful reconstructions at high acceleration levels with minimal artifacts compared to existing MPI acceleration schemes such as spatio-temporal constrained reconstruction (STCR) and k − t SPARSE/SENSE. PMID:24077063

  7. Diagnosis of pseudoprogression using MRI perfusion in patients with glioblastoma multiforme may predict improved survival

    PubMed Central

    Gahramanov, Seymur; Varallyay, Csanad; Tyson, Rose Marie; Lacy, Cynthia; Fu, Rongwei; Netto, Joao Prola; Nasseri, Morad; White, Tricia; Woltjer, Randy L; Gultekin, Sakir Humayun; Neuwelt, Edward A

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Aims This retrospective study determined the survival of glioblastoma patients with or without pseudoprogression. Methods A total of 68 patients were included. Overall survival was compared between patients showing pseudoprogression (in most cases diagnosed using perfusion MRI with ferumoxytol) and in patients without pseudoprogession. MGMT methylation status was also analyzed in the pseudoprogression cases. Results Median survival in 24 (35.3%) patients with pseudoprogression was 34.7 months (95% CI: 20.3–54.1), and 13.4 months (95% CI: 11.1–19.5) in 44 (64.7%) patients without pseudoprogression (p < 0.0001). The longest survival was a median of 54.1 months in patients with combination of pseudoprogression and (MGMT) promoter methylation. Conclusion Pseudoprogression is associated with better outcome, especially if concurring with MGMT promoter methylation. Patients never diagnosed with pseudoprogression had poor survival. This study emphasizes the importance of differentiating tumor progression and pseudoprogression using perfusion MRI. PMID:25438810

  8. Accelerating free breathing myocardial perfusion MRI using multi coil radial k - t SLR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goud Lingala, Sajan; DiBella, Edward; Adluru, Ganesh; McGann, Christopher; Jacob, Mathews

    2013-10-01

    The clinical utility of myocardial perfusion MR imaging (MPI) is often restricted by the inability of current acquisition schemes to simultaneously achieve high spatio-temporal resolution, good volume coverage, and high signal to noise ratio. Moreover, many subjects often find it difficult to hold their breath for sufficiently long durations making it difficult to obtain reliable MPI data. Accelerated acquisition of free breathing MPI data can overcome some of these challenges. Recently, an algorithm termed as k - t SLR has been proposed to accelerate dynamic MRI by exploiting sparsity and low rank properties of dynamic MRI data. The main focus of this paper is to further improve k - t SLR and demonstrate its utility in considerably accelerating free breathing MPI. We extend its previous implementation to account for multi-coil radial MPI acquisitions. We perform k - t sampling experiments to compare different radial trajectories and determine the best sampling pattern. We also introduce a novel augmented Lagrangian framework to considerably improve the algorithm’s convergence rate. The proposed algorithm is validated using free breathing rest and stress radial perfusion data sets from two normal subjects and one patient with ischemia. k - t SLR was observed to provide faithful reconstructions at high acceleration levels with minimal artifacts compared to existing MPI acceleration schemes such as spatio-temporal constrained reconstruction and k - t SPARSE/SENSE.

  9. Cardiac function and myocardial perfusion immediately following maximal treadmill exercise inside the MRI room

    PubMed Central

    Jekic, Mihaela; Foster, Eric L; Ballinger, Michelle R; Raman, Subha V; Simonetti, Orlando P

    2008-01-01

    Treadmill exercise stress testing is an essential tool in the prevention, detection, and treatment of a broad spectrum of cardiovascular disease. After maximal exercise, cardiac images at peak stress are typically acquired using nuclear scintigraphy or echocardiography, both of which have inherent limitations. Although CMR offers superior image quality, the lack of MRI-compatible exercise and monitoring equipment has prevented the realization of treadmill exercise CMR. It is critical to commence imaging as quickly as possible after exercise to capture exercise-induced cardiac wall motion abnormalities. We modified a commercial treadmill such that it could be safely positioned inside the MRI room to minimize the distance between the treadmill and the scan table. We optimized the treadmill exercise CMR protocol in 20 healthy volunteers and successfully imaged cardiac function and myocardial perfusion at peak stress, followed by viability imaging at rest. Imaging commenced an average of 30 seconds after maximal exercise. Real-time cine of seven slices with no breath-hold and no ECG-gating was completed within 45 seconds of exercise, immediately followed by stress perfusion imaging of three short-axis slices which showed an average time to peak enhancement within 57 seconds of exercise. We observed a 3.1-fold increase in cardiac output and a myocardial perfusion reserve index of 1.9, which agree with reported values for healthy subjects at peak stress. This study successfully demonstrates in-room treadmill exercise CMR in healthy volunteers, but confirmation of feasibility in patients with heart disease is still needed. PMID:18272005

  10. [An evaluation of ischemic stroke using dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion MRI].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, H; Igarashi, H; Katayama, Y; Terashi, A

    1998-04-01

    Thrombolytic therapy during the hyperacute stage is important for salvaging dying cerebral tissue. To date, however, accurate non-invasive assessment of an ischemic lesion during the hyperacute stage has not been possible. Perfusion MRI may be the key to the quick diagnosis of ischemic lesions. To assess the feasibility of dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion MRI, echo planar imaging was performed in 10 patients with ischemic stroke. The relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), mean transit time (MTT), and relative cerebral blood flow(rCBF) were measured based on moment analysis and the gamma variate method. These measurements, however, are not suitable for the detection of cerebral ischemia during the hyperacute stage. Therefore, we additionally studied the changes in a concentration curve (time-delta R* curve) of Gd-DTPA, injected into the median vein of the forearm. From the curve the SUM (delta R*) time to peak and the delta R* peak, which may be calculated quickly, were determined and were compared to rCBV, MTT, and rCBF, respectively. The rCBV and the rCBF in the ischemic regions were less than those in the contralateral healthy regions (p < 0.05), and the MTT in the ischemic regions was longer than that in the contralateral healthy regions (p < 0.05). Additionally, SUM (delta R*) and the delta R* peak in the ischemic regions were less, and the time to peak in the ischemic regions was longer than the value in the contralateral healthy regions (p < 0.05), correlating well to the rCBV, rCBF, and MTT measurements. Also, images of these parameters, depicting the ischemic lesion earlier than conventional T2 weighted images, can be easily made by using an MRI console. These results suggest that the SUM (delta R*), time to peak and the delta R* peak images calculated with dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion MRI may be one of the best techniques for the detection of cerebral ischemic lesions during the hyperacute stage.

  11. Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Imaging in MRI and CT: Theoretical Models and Current Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Handayani, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Prakken, N. H. J.; Slart, R. H. J. A.; Oudkerk, M.; Van Ooijen, P. M. A.; Vliegenthart, R.; Sijens, P. E.

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT), including higher spatial and temporal resolution, have made the prospect of performing absolute myocardial perfusion quantification possible, previously only achievable with positron emission tomography (PET). This could facilitate integration of myocardial perfusion biomarkers into the current workup for coronary artery disease (CAD), as MRI and CT systems are more widely available than PET scanners. Cardiac PET scanning remains expensive and is restricted by the requirement of a nearby cyclotron. Clinical evidence is needed to demonstrate that MRI and CT have similar accuracy for myocardial perfusion quantification as PET. However, lack of standardization of acquisition protocols and tracer kinetic model selection complicates comparison between different studies and modalities. The aim of this overview is to provide insight into the different tracer kinetic models for quantitative myocardial perfusion analysis and to address typical implementation issues in MRI and CT. We compare different models based on their theoretical derivations and present the respective consequences for MRI and CT acquisition parameters, highlighting the interplay between tracer kinetic modeling and acquisition settings. PMID:27088083

  12. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI perfusion for differentiating between melanoma and lung cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Hatzoglou, Vaios; Tisnado, Jamie; Mehta, Alpesh; Peck, Kyung K; Daras, Mariza; Omuro, Antonio M; Beal, Kathryn; Holodny, Andrei I

    2017-04-01

    Brain metastases originating from different primary sites overlap in appearance and are difficult to differentiate with conventional MRI. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI can assess tumor microvasculature and has demonstrated utility in characterizing primary brain tumors. Our aim was to evaluate the performance of plasma volume (Vp) and volume transfer coefficient (K(trans) ) derived from DCE-MRI in distinguishing between melanoma and nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) brain metastases. Forty-seven NSCLC and 23 melanoma brain metastases were retrospectively assessed with DCE-MRI. Regions of interest were manually drawn around the metastases to calculate Vpmean and Kmeantrans. The Mann-Whitney U test and receiver operating characteristic analysis (ROC) were performed to compare perfusion parameters between the two groups. The Vpmean of melanoma brain metastases (4.35, standard deviation [SD] = 1.31) was significantly higher (P = 0.03) than Vpmean of NSCLC brain metastases (2.27, SD = 0.96). The Kmeantrans values were higher in melanoma brain metastases, but the difference between the two groups was not significant (P = 0.12). Based on ROC analysis, a cut-off value of 3.02 for Vpmean (area under curve = 0.659 with SD = 0.074) distinguished between melanoma brain metastases and NSCLC brain metastases (P < 0.01) with 72% specificity. Our data show the DCE-MRI parameter Vpmean can differentiate between melanoma and NSCLC brain metastases. The ability to noninvasively predict tumor histology of brain metastases in patients with multiple malignancies can have important clinical implications.

  13. Inter-operator variability in perfusion assessment of tumors in MRI using automated AIF detection.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Edward; McShane, Teresa; Evelhoch, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    A method is presented for the calculation of perfusion parameters in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI. This method requires identification of enhancement curves for both tumor tissue and plasma. Inter-operator variability in the derived rate constant between plasma and extra-cellular extra-vascular space is assessed in both canine and human subjects using semi-automated tumor margin identification with both manual and automated arterial input function (AIF) identification. Experimental results show a median coefficient of variability (CV) for parameter measurement with manual AIF identification of 21.5% in canines and 11% in humans, with a median CV for parameter measurement with automated AIF identification of 6.7% in canines and 6% in humans.

  14. Acute baclofen diminishes resting baseline blood flow to limbic structures: A perfusion fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Teresa R.; Shin, Joshua; Jagannathan, Kanchana; Suh, Jesse J.; Detre, John A.; O’Brien, Charles P.; Childress, Anna Rose

    2012-01-01

    Background Preclinical and clinical evidence show that the GABA B agonist, baclofen is a promising treatment for addictive disorders; however, until recently its mechanism of action in the human brain was unknown. In previous work we utilized a laboratory model that included a medication versus placebo regimen to examine baclofen’s actions on brain circuitry. Perfusion fMRI [measure of cerebral blood flow (CBF)] data acquired ‘at rest’ before and on the last day of the 21-day medication regimen showed that baclofen diminished CBF bilaterally in the VS, insula and medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC). In the present study, we hypothesized that a single dose of baclofen would have effects similar to repeated dosing. Methods To test our hypothesis, in a crossover design, CBF data were acquired using pseudo continuous arterial spin labeled (pCASL) perfusion fMRI. Subjects were either un-medicated or were administered a 20 mg dose of baclofen approximately 110 min prior to scanning. Results Acute baclofen diminished mOFC, amygdala, and ventral anterior insula CBF without causing sedation (family-wise error corrected at p = 0.001). Conclusions Results demonstrate that similar to repeated dosing, an acute dose of baclofen blunts the ‘limbic’ substrate that is hyper-responsive to drugs and drug cues. Smokers often manage their craving and can remain abstinent for extended periods after quitting, however the risk of eventual relapse approaches 90%. Given that chronic medication may not be a practical solution to the long-term risk of relapse, acute baclofen may be useful on an ‘as-needed’ basis to block craving during ‘at risk’ situations. PMID:22513380

  15. A brain stress test: Cerebral perfusion during memory encoding in mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Long; Dolui, Sudipto; Das, Sandhitsu R.; Stockbower, Grace E.; Daffner, Molly; Rao, Hengyi; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Detre, John A.; Wolk, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial spin labeled perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (ASL MRI) provides non-invasive quantification of cerebral blood flow, which can be used as a biomarker of brain function due to the tight coupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain metabolism. A growing body of literature suggests that regional CBF is altered in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we examined ASL MRI CBF in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (n = 65) and cognitively normal healthy controls (n = 62), both at rest and during performance of a memory-encoding task. As compared to rest, task-enhanced ASL MRI improved group discrimination, which supports the notion that physiologic measures during a cognitive challenge, or “stress test”, may increase the ability to detect subtle functional changes in early disease stages. Further, logistic regression analysis demonstrated that ASL MRI and concomitantly acquired structural MRI provide complementary information of disease status. The current findings support the potential utility of task-enhanced ASL MRI as a biomarker in early Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27222794

  16. Lung ventilation- and perfusion-weighted Fourier decomposition magnetic resonance imaging: in vivo validation with hyperpolarized 3He and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Grzegorz; Scholz, Alexander; Rivoire, Julien; Terekhov, Maxim; Friedrich, Janet; de Oliveira, Andre; Semmler, Wolfhard; Schreiber, Laura Maria; Puderbach, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to validate ventilation-weighted (VW) and perfusion-weighted (QW) Fourier decomposition (FD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized (3)He MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion (DCE) MRI in a controlled animal experiment. Three healthy pigs were studied on 1.5-T MR scanner. For FD MRI, the VW and QW images were obtained by postprocessing of time-resolved lung image sets. DCE acquisitions were performed immediately after contrast agent injection. (3)He MRI data were acquired following the administration of hyperpolarized helium and nitrogen mixture. After baseline MR scans, pulmonary embolism was artificially produced. FD MRI and DCE MRI perfusion measurements were repeated. Subsequently, atelectasis and air trapping were induced, which followed with FD MRI and (3)He MRI ventilation measurements. Distributions of signal intensities in healthy and pathologic lung tissue were compared by statistical analysis. Images acquired using FD, (3)He, and DCE MRI in all animals before the interventional procedure showed homogeneous ventilation and perfusion. Functional defects were detected by all MRI techniques at identical anatomical locations. Signal intensity in VW and QW images was significantly lower in pathological than in healthy lung parenchyma. The study has shown usefulness of FD MRI as an alternative, noninvasive, and easily implementable technique for the assessment of acute changes in lung function. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The precision of DCE-MRI using the tissue homogeneity model with continuous formulation of the perfusion parameters.

    PubMed

    Bartoš, Michal; Jiřík, Radovan; Kratochvíla, Jiří; Standara, Michal; Starčuk, Zenon; Taxt, Torfinn

    2014-06-01

    The present trend in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is to increase the number of estimated perfusion parameters using complex pharmacokinetic models. However, less attention is given to the precision analysis of the parameter estimates. In this paper, the distributed capillary adiabatic tissue homogeneity pharmacokinetic model is extended by the bolus arrival time formulated as a free continuous parameter. With the continuous formulation of all perfusion parameters, it is possible to use standard gradient-based optimization algorithms in the approximation of the tissue concentration time sequences. This new six-parameter model is investigated by comparing Monte-Carlo simulations with theoretically derived covariance matrices. The covariance-matrix approach is extended from the usual analysis of the primary perfusion parameters of the pharmacokinetic model to the analysis of the perfusion parameters derived from the primary ones. The results indicate that the precision of the estimated perfusion parameters can be described by the covariance matrix for signal-to-noise ratio higher than~20dB. The application of the new analysis model on a real DCE-MRI data set is also presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 3D ECG- and respiratory-gated non-contrast-enhanced (CE) perfusion MRI for postoperative lung function prediction in non-small-cell lung cancer patients: A comparison with thin-section quantitative computed tomography, dynamic CE-perfusion MRI, and perfusion scan.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Seki, Shinichiro; Koyama, Hisanobu; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Takenaka, Daisuke; Kassai, Yoshimori; Yui, Masao; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2015-08-01

    To compare predictive capabilities of non-contrast-enhanced (CE)- and dynamic CE-perfusion MRIs, thin-section multidetector computed tomography (CT) (MDCT), and perfusion scan for postoperative lung function in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Sixty consecutive pathologically diagnosed NSCLC patients were included and prospectively underwent thin-section MDCT, non-CE-, and dynamic CE-perfusion MRIs and perfusion scan, and had their pre- and postoperative forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 ) measured. Postoperative percent FEV1 (po%FEV1 ) was then predicted from the fractional lung volume determined on semiquantitatively assessed non-CE- and dynamic CE-perfusion MRIs, from the functional lung volumes determined on quantitative CT, from the number of segments observed on qualitative CT, and from uptakes detected on perfusion scans within total and resected lungs. Predicted po%FEV1 s were then correlated with actual po%FEV1 s, which were %FEV1 s measured postoperatively. The limits of agreement were also determined. All predicted po%FEV1 s showed significant correlation (0.73 ≤ r ≤ 0.93, P < 0.0001) and limits of agreement with actual po%FEV1 (non-CE-perfusion MRI: 0.3 ± 10.0%, dynamic CE-perfusion MRI: 1.0 ± 10.8%, perfusion scan: 2.2 ± 14.1%, quantitative CT: 1.2 ± 9.0%, qualitative CT: 1.5 ± 10.2%). Non-CE-perfusion MRI may be able to predict postoperative lung function more accurately than qualitatively assessed MDCT and perfusion scan. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The adverse effects of reduced cerebral perfusion on cognition and brain structure in older adults with cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L; Gunstad, John; Jerskey, Beth A; Xu, Xiaomeng; Clark, Uraina S; Hassenstab, Jason; Cote, Denise M; Walsh, Edward G; Labbe, Donald R; Hoge, Richard; Cohen, Ronald A; Sweet, Lawrence H

    2013-01-01

    Background It is well established that aging and vascular processes interact to disrupt cerebral hemodynamics in older adults. However, the independent effects of cerebral perfusion on neurocognitive function among older adults remain poorly understood. We examined the associations among cerebral perfusion, cognitive function, and brain structure in older adults with varying degrees of vascular disease using perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) arterial spin labeling (ASL). Materials and methods 52 older adults underwent neuroimaging and were administered the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), and measures of attention/executive function. ASL and T1-weighted MRI were used to quantify total brain perfusion, total brain volume (TBV), and cortical thickness. Results Regression analyses showed reduced total brain perfusion was associated with poorer performance on the MMSE, RBANS total index, immediate and delayed memory composites, and Trail Making Test B. Reduced frontal lobe perfusion was associated with worse executive and memory function. A similar pattern emerged between temporal lobe perfusion and immediate memory. Regression analyses revealed that decreased total brain perfusion was associated with smaller TBV and mean cortical thickness. Regional effects of reduced total cerebral perfusion were found on temporal and parietal lobe volumes and frontal and temporal cortical thickness. Discussion Reduced cerebral perfusion is independently associated with poorer cognition, smaller TBV, and reduced cortical thickness in older adults. Conclusion Prospective studies are needed to clarify patterns of cognitive decline and brain atrophy associated with cerebral hypoperfusion. PMID:24363966

  20. Perfusion-weighted MRI to evaluate cerebral autoregulation in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hattingen, Elke; Blasel, Stella; Dettmann, Edgar; Vatter, Hartmut; Pilatus, Ulrich; Seifert, Volker; Zanella, Friedhelm E; Weidauer, Stefan

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate autoregulatory mechanisms in different vascular territories within the first week after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) by perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (PW-MRI). For this purpose, regional cerebral blood flow and volume (rCVF and rCBV) were measured in relation to different degrees of angiographically visible cerebral vasospasm (CVS). In 51 SAH patients, PW-MRI and digital subtraction angiography were performed about 5 days after onset of SAH. Regional CBF and rCBV were analysed in the territories of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA), the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and the basal ganglia of each hemisphere in relationship to the degree of CVS in the particular territory. Correlations between rCBF, rCBV and CVS were analysed. CVS was found in 22 out of 51 patients in at least one territory. In all territories, rCBV decreased with increasing degree of CVS, correlated with a decrease of rCBF. In the ACA territories, SAH patients with severe CVS had significantly lower rCBF compared to healthy subjects and to SAH patients without CVS. In the basal ganglia, rCBF and rCBV of the control group were significantly higher compared to the patients without and with moderate vasospasms. PW-MRI showed simultaneous decrease of rCBF and rCBV in patients with SAH. The fact that rCBV did not increase in territories with CVS to maintain rCBF reveals dysfunctional vascular autoregulation. Vasospasms in the microvasculature are most evident in the basal ganglia, showing decreased rCBV and rCBF even in SAH patients without CVS.

  1. Functional MRI and Outcome in Traumatic Coma

    PubMed Central

    Giacino, Joseph T.; Wu, Ona

    2013-01-01

    Advances in task-based functional MRI (fMRI), resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI), and arterial-spin labeled (ASL) perfusion MRI have occurred at a rapid pace in recent years. These techniques for measuring brain function have great potential to improve the accuracy of prognostication for civilian and military patients with traumatic coma. In addition, fMRI, rs-fMRI, and ASL have provided novel insights into the pathophysiology of traumatic disorders of consciousness, as well as mechanisms of recovery from coma. However, functional neuroimaging techniques have yet to achieve widespread clinical use as prognostic tests for patients with traumatic coma. Rather, a broad spectrum of methodological hurdles currently limits the feasibility of clinical implementation. In this review, we discuss the basic principles of fMRI, rs-fMRI and ASL and their potential applications as prognostic tools for patients with traumatic coma. We also discuss future strategies for overcoming the current barriers to clinical implementation. PMID:23881623

  2. Reproducibility of BOLD, Perfusion, and CMRO2 Measurements with Calibrated-BOLD fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Leontiev, Oleg; Buxton, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    The coupling of changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during brain activation can be characterized by an empirical index, n, defined as the ratio between fractional CBF change and fractional CMRO2 change. The combination of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging with CBF measurements from arterial spin labeling (ASL) provides a potentially powerful experimental approach for measuring n, but the reproducibility of the technique previously has not been assessed. In this study, inter-subject variance and intra-subject reproducibility of the method were determined. Block design %BOLD and %CBF responses to visual stimulation and mild hypercapnia (5% CO2) were measured, and these data were used to compute the BOLD scaling factor M, %CMRO2 change with activation, and the coupling index n. Reproducibility was determined for three approaches to defining regions-of-interest (ROIs): 1) Visual area V1 determined from prior retinotopic maps, 2) BOLD-activated voxels from a separate functional localizer, and 3) CBF–activated voxels from a separate functional localizer. For estimates of %BOLD, %CMRO2 and n, intra-subject reproducibility was found to be best for regions selected according to CBF activation. Among all fMRI measurements, estimates of n were the most robust and were substantially more stable within individual subjects (coefficient of variation, CV=7.4%) than across the subject pool (CV=36.9%). The stability of n across days, despite wider variability of CBF and CMRO2 responses, suggests that the reproducibility of blood flow changes is limited by variation in the oxidative metabolic demand. We conclude that the calibrated BOLD approach provides a highly reproducible measurement of n that can serve as a useful quantitative probe of the coupling of blood flow and energy metabolism in the brain. PMID:17208013

  3. Reproducibility of BOLD, perfusion, and CMRO2 measurements with calibrated-BOLD fMRI.

    PubMed

    Leontiev, Oleg; Buxton, Richard B

    2007-03-01

    The coupling of changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)) during brain activation can be characterized by an empirical index, n, defined as the ratio between fractional CBF change and fractional CMRO(2) change. The combination of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging with CBF measurements from arterial spin labeling (ASL) provides a potentially powerful experimental approach for measuring n, but the reproducibility of the technique previously has not been assessed. In this study, inter-subject variance and intra-subject reproducibility of the method were determined. Block design %BOLD and %CBF responses to visual stimulation and mild hypercapnia (5% CO(2)) were measured, and these data were used to compute the BOLD scaling factor M, %CMRO(2) change with activation, and the coupling index n. Reproducibility was determined for three approaches to defining regions-of-interest (ROIs): 1) Visual area V1 determined from prior retinotopic maps, 2) BOLD-activated voxels from a separate functional localizer, and 3) CBF-activated voxels from a separate functional localizer. For estimates of %BOLD, %CMRO(2) and n, intra-subject reproducibility was found to be best for regions selected according to CBF activation. Among all fMRI measurements, estimates of n were the most robust and were substantially more stable within individual subjects (coefficient of variation, CV=7.4%) than across the subject pool (CV=36.9%). The stability of n across days, despite wider variability of CBF and CMRO(2) responses, suggests that the reproducibility of blood flow changes is limited by variation in the oxidative metabolic demand. We conclude that the calibrated BOLD approach provides a highly reproducible measurement of n that can serve as a useful quantitative probe of the coupling of blood flow and energy metabolism in the brain.

  4. Non-ECG-gated myocardial perfusion MRI using continuous magnetization-driven radial sampling.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Behzad; Dharmakumar, Rohan; Arsanjani, Reza; Thomson, Louise; Bairey Merz, C Noel; Berman, Daniel S; Li, Debiao

    2014-12-01

    Establishing a high-resolution non-ECG-gated first-pass perfusion (FPP) cardiac MRI technique may improve accessibility and diagnostic capability of FPP imaging. We propose a non-ECG-gated FPP imaging technique using continuous magnetization-driven golden-angle radial acquisition. The main purpose of this preliminary study is to evaluate whether, in the simple case of single-slice two-dimensional imaging, adequate myocardial contrast can be obtained for accurate visualization of hypoperfused territories in the setting of myocardial ischemia. A T1-weighted pulse sequence with continuous golden-angle radial sampling was developed for non-ECG-gated FPP imaging. A sliding-window scheme with no temporal acceleration was used to reconstruct 8 frames/s. Canines were imaged at 3T with and without coronary stenosis using the proposed scheme and a conventional magnetization-prepared ECG-gated FPP method. Our studies showed that the proposed non-ECG-gated method is capable of generating high-resolution (1.7 × 1.7 × 6 mm(3) ) artifact-free FPP images of a single slice at high heart rates (92 ± 21 beats/min), while matching the performance of conventional FPP imaging in terms of hypoperfused-to-normal myocardial contrast-to-noise ratio (proposed: 5.18 ± 0.70, conventional: 4.88 ± 0.43). Furthermore, the detected perfusion defect areas were consistent with the conventional FPP images. Non-ECG-gated FPP imaging using optimized continuous golden-angle radial acquisition achieves desirable image quality (i.e., adequate myocardial contrast, high spatial resolution, and minimal artifacts) in the setting of ischemia. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Non-ECG-Gated Myocardial Perfusion MRI Using Continuous Magnetization-Driven Radial Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Behzad; Dharmakumar, Rohan; Arsanjani, Reza; Thomson, Louise; Merz, C. Noel Bairey; Berman, Daniel S.; Li, Debiao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Establishing a high-resolution non-ECG-gated first-pass perfusion (FPP) cardiac MRI technique may improve accessibility and diagnostic capability of FPP imaging. We propose a non-ECG-gated FPP imaging technique using continuous magnetization-driven golden-angle radial acquisition. The main purpose of this preliminary study is to evaluate whether, in the simple case of single-slice 2D imaging, adequate myocardial contrast can be obtained for accurate visualization of hypoperfused territories in the setting of myocardial ischemia. Methods A T1-weighted pulse sequence with continuous golden-angle radial sampling was developed for non-ECG-gated FPP imaging. A sliding-window scheme with no temporal acceleration was used to reconstruct 8 frames/second. Canines were imaged at 3T with and without coronary stenosis using the proposed scheme and a conventional magnetization-prepared ECG-gated FPP method. Results Our studies showed that the proposed non-ECG-gated method is capable of generating high-resolution (1.7×1.7×6 mm3) artifact-free FPP images of a single slice at high heart rates (92±21 beats/minute), while matching the performance of conventional FPP imaging in terms of hypoperfused-to-normal myocardial contrast-to-noise ratio (proposed: 5.18±0.70, conventional: 4.88±0.43). Furthermore, the detected perfusion defect areas were consistent with the conventional FPP images. Conclusion Non-ECG-gated FPP imaging using optimized continuous golden-angle radial acquisition achieves desirable image quality (i.e., adequate myocardial contrast, high spatial resolution, and minimal artifacts) in the setting of ischemia. PMID:24443160

  6. Tumor classification using perfusion volume fractions in breast DCE-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Ho; Kim, Jong Hyo; Park, Jeong Seon; Park, Sang Joon; Jung, Yun Sub; Song, Jung Joo; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2008-03-01

    This study was designed to classify contrast enhancement curves using both three-time-points (3TP) method and clustering approach at full-time points, and to introduce a novel evaluation method using perfusion volume fractions for differentiation of malignant and benign lesions. DCE-MRI was applied to 24 lesions (12 malignant, 12 benign). After region growing segmentation for each lesion, hole-filling and 3D morphological erosion and dilation were performed for extracting final lesion volume. 3TP method and k-means clustering at full-time points were applied for classifying kinetic curves into six classes. Intratumoral volume fraction for each class was calculated. ROC and linear discriminant analyses were performed with distributions of the volume fractions for each class, pairwise and whole classes, respectively. The best performance in each class showed accuracy (ACC), 84.7% (sensitivity (SE), 100%; specificity (SP), 66.7% to a single class) to 3TP method, whereas ACC, 73.6% (SE, 41.7%; SP, 100% to a single class) to k-means clustering. The best performance in pairwise classes showed ACC, 75% (SE, 83.3%; SP, 66.7% to four class pairs and SE, 58.3%; SP, 91.7% to a single class pair) to 3TP method and ACC, 75% (SE, 75%; SP, 75% to a single class pair and SE, 66.7%; SP, 83.3% to three class pairs) to k-means clustering. The performance in whole classes showed ACC, 75% (SE, 83.3%; SP, 66.7%) to 3TP method and ACC, 75% (SE, 91.7%; 58.3%) to k-means clustering. The results indicate that tumor classification using perfusion volume fractions is helpful in selecting meaningful kinetic patterns for differentiation of malignant and benign lesions, and that two different classification methods are complementary to each other.

  7. Dissociative Part-Dependent Resting-State Activity in Dissociative Identity Disorder: A Controlled fMRI Perfusion Study

    PubMed Central

    Schlumpf, Yolanda R.; Reinders, Antje A. T. S.; Nijenhuis, Ellert R. S.; Luechinger, Roger; van Osch, Matthias J. P.; Jäncke, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Background In accordance with the Theory of Structural Dissociation of the Personality (TSDP), studies of dissociative identity disorder (DID) have documented that two prototypical dissociative subsystems of the personality, the “Emotional Part” (EP) and the “Apparently Normal Part” (ANP), have different biopsychosocial reactions to supraliminal and subliminal trauma-related cues and that these reactions cannot be mimicked by fantasy prone healthy controls nor by actors. Methods Arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI was used to test the hypotheses that ANP and EP in DID have different perfusion patterns in response to rest instructions, and that perfusion is different in actors who were instructed to simulate ANP and EP. In a follow-up study, regional cerebral blood flow of DID patients was compared with the activation pattern of healthy non-simulating controls. Results Compared to EP, ANP showed elevated perfusion in bilateral thalamus. Compared to ANP, EP had increased perfusion in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, and motor-related areas. Perfusion patterns for simulated ANP and EP were different. Fitting their reported role-play strategies, the actors activated brain structures involved in visual mental imagery and empathizing feelings. The follow-up study demonstrated elevated perfusion in the left temporal lobe in DID patients, whereas non-simulating healthy controls had increased activity in areas which mediate the mental construction of past and future episodic events. Conclusion DID involves dissociative part-dependent resting-state differences. Compared to ANP, EP activated brain structures involved in self-referencing and sensorimotor actions more. Actors had different perfusion patterns compared to genuine ANP and EP. Comparisons of neural activity for individuals with DID and non-DID simulating controls suggest that the resting-state features of ANP and EP in DID are not due to imagination. The findings are

  8. Comparison of Arterial Spin Labeling and Bolus Perfusion-Weighted Imaging for Detecting Mismatch in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zaharchuk, Greg; El Mogy, Ibraheem S.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Albers, Gregory W.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) – diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) mismatch paradigm is widely used in stroke imaging studies. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an alternative perfusion method that does not require contrast. This study compares the agreement of ASL-DWI and PWI-DWI mismatch classification in stroke patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a retrospective study drawn from all 1.5T MRI studies performed in 2010 at a single institution. Inclusion criteria were: symptom onset<5 days, DWI lesion>10 ml, acquisition of both PWI and ASL. DWI and PWI-Tmax>6 sec lesion volumes were determined using automated software. Patients were classified into reperfused, matched, or mismatch groups. Two radiologists classified ASL-DWI qualitatively into the same categories, blinded to DWI-PWI. Agreement between both individual readers and methods was assessed. RESULTS 51 studies met the inclusion criteria. Seven cases were excluded (1 due to PWI susceptibility artifact, 2 due to motion, and 4 due to severe ASL borderzone sign), resulting in 44 studies for comparison. Inter-rater agreement for ASL–DWI mismatch status was high (κ =0.92, 95% CI 0.80–1.00). ASL-DWI and PWI-DWI mismatch categories agreed in 25/44 cases (57%). In the 16 of 19 discrepant cases (84%), ASL overestimated the PWI lesion size. In 34/44 cases (77%), they agreed regarding the presence of mismatch versus no mismatch. CONCLUSION Mismatch classification based on ASL and PWI agree frequently but not perfectly. ASL tends to overestimate the PWI-Tmax lesion volume. Improved ASL methodologies and/or higher field strength are necessary before ASL can be recommended for routine use in acute stroke. PMID:22539548

  9. Qualitative and semi-quantitative evaluation of myocardium perfusion with 3 T stress cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Yun, Chun-Ho; Tsai, Jui-Peng; Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Mok, Greta S P; Sun, Jing-Yi; Hung, Chung-Lieh; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Huang, Wu-Ta; Yang, Fei-Shih; Lee, Jason Jeun-Shenn; Cury, Ricardo C; Fares, Anas; Nshisso, Lemba Dina; Bezerra, Hiram G

    2015-12-07

    3 T MRI has been adopted by some centers as the primary choice for assessment of myocardial perfusion over conventional 1.5 T MRI. However, there is no data published on the potential additional value of incorporating semi-quantitative data from 3 T MRI. This study sought to determine the performance of qualitative 3 T stress magnetic resonance myocardial perfusion imaging (3 T-MRMPI) and the potential incremental benefit of using a semi-quantitative perfusion technique in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Fifty eight patients (41 men; mean age: 59 years) referred for elective diagnostic angiography underwent stress 3 T MRMPI with a 32-channel cardiac receiver coil. The MR protocol included gadolinium-enhanced stress first-pass perfusion (0.56 mg/kg, dipyridamole), rest perfusion, and delayed enhancement (DE). Visual analysis was performed in two steps. Ischemia was defined as a territory with perfusion defect at stress study but no DE or a territory with DE but additional peri-infarcted perfusion defect at stress study. Semi-quantitative analysis was calculated by using the upslope of the signal intensity-time curve during the first pass of contrast medium during dipyridamole stress and at rest. ROC analysis was used to determine the MPRI threshold that maximized sensitivity. Quantitative coronary angiography served as the reference standard with significant stenosis defined as >70 % diameter stenosis. Diagnostic performance was determined on a per-patient and per-vessel basis. Qualitative assessment had an overall sensitivity and specificity for detecting significant stenoses of 77 % and 80 %, respectively. By adding MPRI analysis, in cases with negative qualitative assessment, the overall sensitivity increased to 83 %. The impact of MPRI differed depending on the territory; with the sensitivity for detection of left circumflex (LCx) stenosis improving the most after semi-quantification analysis, (66 % versus 83 %). Pure

  10. Differentiation of recurrent spinal ependymoma from postradiation treatment necrosis through multiparametric PET-MR and perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Hojjati, Mojgan; Garg, Vasant; Badve, Chaitra A; Abboud, Salim E; Sloan, Andrew E; Wolansky, Leo J

    A 67-year-old male presented with papilledema and back pain localized to the T10 level. Initial workup revealed multifocal spinal ependymoma which was resected and treated with external beam radiotherapy. Nine years after treatment, the patient had a relapse of back pain, and MRI was inconclusive in distinguishing posttreatment radiation necrosis from recurrent tumor. We present the first described report with the utilization of multiparametric positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging and perfusion MRI to distinguish recurrent spinal ependymoma from radiation necrosis.

  11. Improved Pseudo-Continuous Arterial Spin Labeling for Mapping Brain Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Nezamzadeh, Marzieh; Matson, Gerald B.; Young, Karl; Weiner, Michael W.; Schuff, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate arterial spin labeling (ASL) methods for improved brain perfusion mapping. Previously, Pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) was developed to overcome limitations inherent with conventional continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL), but the control scan (null pulse) in the original method for pCASL perturbs the equilibrium magnetization, diminishing the ASL signal. Here, a new modification of pCASL, termed mpCASL is reported, in which the perturbation caused by the null pulse is reduced and perfusion mapping improved. Materials and Methods Improvements with mpCASL are demonstrated using numerical simulations and experiments. ASL signal intensity as well as contrast and reproducibility of in-vivo brain perfusion images were measured in four volunteers who had MRI scans at 4 Tesla and the data compared across the labeling methods. Results Perfusion maps with mpCASL showed, on average, higher ASL signal intensity and higher image contrast than those from CASL or pCASL. Furthermore, mpCASL yielded better reproducibility in repeat scans than the other methods. Conclusion The experimental results are consistent with the hypothesis that the new null pulse of mpCASL leads to improved brain perfusion images. PMID:20512895

  12. A Reduced Resolution Transit Delay Prescan for Quantitative Continuous Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Weiying; Robson, Philip M; Shankaranarayanan, Ajit; Alsop, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion MRI can suffer from artifacts and quantification errors when the time delay between labeling and arrival of labeled blood in the tissue is uncertain. This transit delay is particularly uncertain in broad clinical populations, where reduced or collateral flow may occur. Measurement of transit delay by acquisition of the ASL signal at many different time delays typically extends the imaging time and degrades the sensitivity of the resulting perfusion images. Acquisition of transit delay maps at the same spatial resolution as perfusion images may not be necessary, however, because transit delay maps tend to contain little high spatial resolution information. Here, we propose the use of a reduced spatial resolution ASL prescan for the rapid measurement of transit delay. Approaches to using the derived transit delay information to optimize and quantify higher resolution continuous ASL perfusion images are described. Results in normal volunteers demonstrate heterogeneity of transit delay across different brain regions that lead to quantification errors without the transit maps and demonstrate the feasibility of this approach to perfusion and transit delay quantification. PMID:22084006

  13. A component based noise correction method (CompCor) for BOLD and perfusion based fMRI.

    PubMed

    Behzadi, Yashar; Restom, Khaled; Liau, Joy; Liu, Thomas T

    2007-08-01

    A component based method (CompCor) for the reduction of noise in both blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) and perfusion-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data is presented. In the proposed method, significant principal components are derived from noise regions-of-interest (ROI) in which the time series data are unlikely to be modulated by neural activity. These components are then included as nuisance parameters within general linear models for BOLD and perfusion-based fMRI time series data. Two approaches for the determination of the noise ROI are considered. The first method uses high-resolution anatomical data to define a region of interest composed primarily of white matter and cerebrospinal fluid, while the second method defines a region based upon the temporal standard deviation of the time series data. With the application of CompCor, the temporal standard deviation of resting-state perfusion and BOLD data in gray matter regions was significantly reduced as compared to either no correction or the application of a previously described retrospective image based correction scheme (RETROICOR). For both functional perfusion and BOLD data, the application of CompCor significantly increased the number of activated voxels as compared to no correction. In addition, for functional BOLD data, there were significantly more activated voxels detected with CompCor as compared to RETROICOR. In comparison to RETROICOR, CompCor has the advantage of not requiring external monitoring of physiological fluctuations.

  14. Assesment of perfusion in glial tumors with arterial spin labeling; comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast method.

    PubMed

    Cebeci, H; Aydin, O; Ozturk-Isik, E; Gumus, C; Inecikli, F; Bekar, A; Kocaeli, H; Hakyemez, B

    2014-10-01

    Arterial spin labeling perfusion imaging (ASL-PI) is a non-invasive perfusion imaging method that can be used for evaluation and quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Aim of our study was to evaluating the efficiency of ASL in histopathological grade estimation of glial tumors and comparing findings with dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion imaging (DSC-PI) method. This study involved 33 patients (20 high-grade and 13 low-grade gliomas). Multiphase multislice pulsed ASL MRI sequence and a first-passage gadopentetate dimeglumine T2*-weighted gradient-echo single-shot echo-planar sequence were acquired for all the patients. For each patient, perfusion relative signal intensity (rSI), CBF and relative CBF (rCBF) on ASL-PI and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) values on DSC-PI were determined. The relative signal intensity of each tumor was determined as the maximal SI within the tumor divided by SI within symetric region in the contralateral hemisphere on ASL-PI. rCBV and rCBF were calculated by deconvolution of an arterial input function. Relative values of the lesions were obtained by dividing the values to the normal appearing symmetric region on the contralateral hemisphere. For statistical analysis, Mann-Whitney ranksum test was carried out. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was performed to assess the relationship between the rCBF-ASL, rSI-ASL, rCBV and rCBF ratios and grade of gliomas. Their cut-off values permitting best discrimination was calculated. The correlation between rCBV, rCBF, rSI-ASL and rCBF-ASL and glioma grade was assessed using Spearman correlation analysis. There was a statistically significant difference between low and high-grade tumors for all parameters. Correlation analyses revealed significant positive correlations between rCBV and rCBF-ASL (r=0.81, p<0.001). However correlation between rCBF and rCBF-ASL was weaker (r=0.64, p<0.001). Arterial spin labeling is an

  15. MRI findings in multifetal pregnancies complicated by twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence (TRAP).

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Carolina V A; Kline-Fath, Beth M; Linam, Leann E; Garcia, Maria A Calvo; Rubio, Eva I; Lim, Foong-Yen

    2011-06-01

    Twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence (TRAP) is a rare complication in multifetal monochorionic pregnancies in which a normal "pump" twin provides circulation to an abnormal acardiac co-twin, resulting in high-output cardiac dysfunction in the pump twin. To define fetal MRI findings of TRAP sequence. Fetal MR images were retrospectively reviewed in 35 pregnancies complicated by TRAP sequence. Abnormalities of the pump twin, acardiac twin, umbilical cord, placenta and amniotic fluid were reviewed. Acardiac twins were classified as: acephalus (51%), anceps (40%), amorphus (9%), acormus (0%). Common findings in acardiac twins include subcutaneous edema (77%), absent cardiac structures (86%), absent or abnormal thoracic cavity (100%), abnormal abdominal organs (100%), superior limbs absent (46%) or abnormal (51%), and inferior limbs present but abnormal (83%). There were pump twin findings of cardiac dysfunction in 43% and intracranial ischemic changes in 3%. Umbilical cord anomalies were present in 97%. Acardiac twins present with a predictable pattern of malformation with poorly developed superior structures, more normally formed inferior structures and absent or rudimentary heart. Although usually absent, abnormal heart structures can be seen and do not exclude TRAP sequence. Pump twins are commonly normal with exception of findings of cardiac dysfunction and possible brain ischemia.

  16. Perfusion functional MRI reveals cerebral blood flow pattern under psychological stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiongjiong; Rao, Hengyi; Wetmore, Gabriel S.; Furlan, Patricia M.; Korczykowski, Marc; Dinges, David F.; Detre, John A.

    2005-12-01

    Despite the prevalence of stress in everyday life and its impact on happiness, health, and cognition, little is known about the neural substrate of the experience of everyday stress in humans. We use a quantitative and noninvasive neuroimaging technique, arterial spin-labeling perfusion MRI, to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes associated with mild to moderate stress induced by a mental arithmetic task with performance monitoring. Elicitation of stress was verified by self-report of stress and emotional state and measures of heart rate and salivary-cortisol level. The change in CBF induced by the stress task was positively correlated with subjective stress rating in the ventral right prefrontal cortex (RPFC) and left insula/putamen area. The ventral RPFC along with right insula/putamen and anterior cingulate showed sustained activation after task completion in subjects reporting a high stress level during arithmetic tasks. Additionally, variations of baseline CBF in the ventral RPFC and right orbitofrontal cortex were found to correlate with changes in salivary-cortisol level and heart rate caused by undergoing stress tasks. We further demonstrated that the observed right prefrontal activation could not be attributed to increased cognitive demand accompanying stress tasks and extended beyond neural pathways associated with negative emotions. Our results provide neuroimaging evidence that psychological stress induces negative emotion and vigilance and that the ventral RPFC plays a key role in the central stress response. anterior cingulate cortex | arterial spin labeling | right prefrontal cortex

  17. Perfusion kinetics in human brain tumor with DCE-MRI derived model and CFD analysis.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, A; Bansal, A; Singh, A; Sinha, N

    2017-07-05

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death all over the world. Among the strategies that are used for cancer treatment, the effectiveness of chemotherapy is often hindered by factors such as irregular and non-uniform uptake of drugs inside tumor. Thus, accurate prediction of drug transport and deposition inside tumor is crucial for increasing the effectiveness of chemotherapeutic treatment. In this study, a computational model of human brain tumor is developed that incorporates dynamic contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data into a voxelized porous media model. The model takes into account realistic transport and perfusion kinetics parameters together with realistic heterogeneous tumor vasculature and accurate arterial input function (AIF), which makes it patient specific. The computational results for interstitial fluid pressure (IFP), interstitial fluid velocity (IFV) and tracer concentration show good agreement with the experimental results. The computational model can be extended further for predicting the deposition of chemotherapeutic drugs in tumor environment as well as selection of the best chemotherapeutic drug for a specific patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Nocardia brain abscess mimicking high-grade necrotic tumor on perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Cianfoni, Alessandro; Calandrelli, Rosalinda; De Bonis, Pasquale; Pompucci, Angelo; Lauriola, Libero; Colosimo, Cesare

    2010-08-01

    Differentiating a pyogenic cerebral abscess from a cystic brain tumor can be a challenge when using morphological and functional imaging techniques. Several studies on MRI perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) have demonstrated that enhancing abscess capsules have lower cerebral blood volume ratios (rCBV) than the enhancing rims of necrotic tumors. We report a 67-year-old male with a Nocardia cerebral abscess showing restricted diffusion in the necrotic center, but high values for rCBV in the enhancing capsule on PWI, therefore mimicking a high-grade necrotic tumor. Differential diagnosis between cerebral abscesses and necrotic tumors is greatly improved by the adjunct of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and PWI to the morphological magnetic resonance findings; yet there is still overlap. That an abscess may show increased rCBV along the capsule, therefore mimicking a hypervascular brain tumor on PWI, should be considered when attempting a radiological diagnosis of a ring-enhancing brain lesion. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Impairments in Brain Perfusion, Metabolites, Functional Connectivity, and Cognition in Severe Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis Patients: An Integrated MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Carotid artery stenosis without transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke is considered as “asymptomatic.” However, recent studies have demonstrated that these asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis (aCAS) patients had cognitive impairment in tests of executive function, psychomotor speed, and memory, indicating that “asymptomatic” carotid stenosis may not be truly asymptomatic. In this study, when 19 aCAS patients compared with 24 healthy controls, aCAS patients showed significantly poorer performance on global cognition, memory, and executive function. By utilizing an integrated MRI including pulsed arterial spin labeling (pASL) MRI, Proton MR Spectroscopy (MRS), and resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI), we also found that aCAS patients suffered decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF) mainly in the Left Frontal Gyrus and had decreased NAA/Cr ratio in the left hippocampus and decreased connectivity to the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) in the anterior part of default mode network (DMN). PMID:28255464

  20. Perfusion MRI in hips with metal-on-metal and metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Anwander, H.; Cron, G. O.; Rakhra, K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Hips with metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (MoM THA) have a high rate of adverse local tissue reactions (ALTR), often associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) measures tissue perfusion with the parameter Ktrans (volume transfer constant of contrast agent). Our purpose was 1) to evaluate the feasibility of DCE-MRI in patients with THA and 2) to compare DCE-MRI in patients with MoM bearings with metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) bearings, hypothesising that the perfusion index Ktrans in hips with MoM THA is higher than in hips with MoP THA. Methods In this pilot study, 16 patients with primary THA were recruited (eight MoM, eight MoP). DCE-MRI of the hip was performed at 1.5 Tesla (T). For each patient, Ktrans was computed voxel-by-voxel in all tissue lateral to the bladder. The mean Ktrans for all voxels was then calculated. These values were compared with respect to implant type and gender, and further correlated with clinical parameters. Results There was no significant difference between the two bearing types with both genders combined. However, dividing patients by THA bearing and gender, women with MoM bearings had the highest Ktrans values, exceeding those of women with MoP bearings (0.067 min−1 versus 0.053 min−1; p-value < 0.05) and men with MoM bearings (0.067 min−1 versus 0.034 min−1; p-value < 0.001). Considering only the men, patients with MoM bearings had lower Ktrans than those with MoP bearings (0.034 min−1 versus 0.046 min−1; p < 0.05). Conclusion DCE-MRI is feasible to perform in tissues surrounding THA. Females with MoM THA show high Ktrans values in DCE-MRI, suggesting altered tissue perfusion kinematics which may reflect relatively greater inflammation. Cite this article: Dr P. E. Beaule. Perfusion MRI in hips with metal-on-metal and metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty: A pilot stud. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:73–79. DOI: 10

  1. Reproducibility of Kidney Perfusion Measurements With Arterial Spin Labeling at 1.5 Tesla MRI Combined With Semiautomatic Segmentation for Differential Cortical and Medullary Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Hammon, Matthias; Janka, Rolf; Siegl, Christian; Seuss, Hannes; Grosso, Roberto; Martirosian, Petros; Schmieder, Roland E.; Uder, Michael; Kistner, Iris

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Magnetic resonance imaging with arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a noninvasive approach to measure organ perfusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of ASL kidney perfusion measurements with semiautomatic segmentation, which allows separate quantification of cortical and medullary perfusion. The right kidneys of 14 healthy volunteers were examined 6 times on 2 occasions (3 times at each occasion). There was a 10-minute pause between each examination and a 14-day interval between the 2 occasions. Cortical, medullary, and whole kidney parenchymal perfusion was determined with customized semiautomatic segmentation software. Coefficient of variances (CVs) and intraclass correlations (ICCs) were calculated. Mean whole, cortical, and medullary kidney perfusion was 307.26 ± 25.65, 337.10 ± 34.83, and 279.61 ± 26.73 mL/min/100 g, respectively. On session 1, mean perfusion for the whole kidney, cortex, and medulla was 307.08 ± 26.91, 336.79 ± 36.54, and 279.60 ± 27.81 mL/min/100 g, respectively, and on session 2, 307.45 ± 24.65, 337.41 ± 33.48, and 279.61 ± 25.94 mL/min/100 g, respectively (P > 0.05; R2 = 0.60/0.59/0.54). For whole, cortical, and medullary kidney perfusion, the total ICC/CV were 0.97/3.43 ± 0.86%, 0.97/4.19 ± 1.33%, and 0.96/4.12 ± 1.36%, respectively. Measurements did not differ significantly and showed a very good correlation (P > 0.05; R2 = 0.75/0.76/0.65). ASL kidney measurements combined with operator-independent semiautomatic segmentation revealed high correlation and low variance of cortical, medullary, and whole kidney perfusion. PMID:26986143

  2. The value of resting-state functional MRI in subacute ischemic stroke: comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ling; Li, Jingwei; Li, Weiping; Zhou, Fei; Wang, Fangfang; Schwarz, Christopher G; Liu, Renyuan; Zhao, Hui; Wu, Wenbo; Zhang, Xin; Li, Ming; Yu, Haiping; Zhu, Bin; Villringer, Arno; Zang, Yufeng; Zhang, Bing; Lv, Yating; Xu, Yun

    2017-01-31

    To evaluate the potential clinical value of the time-shift analysis (TSA) approach for resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) data in detecting hypoperfusion of subacute stroke patients through comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion weighted imaging (DSC-PWI). Forty patients with subacute stroke (3-14 days after neurological symptom onset) underwent MRI examination. Cohort A: 31 patients had MRA, DSC-PWI and BOLD data. Cohort B: 9 patients had BOLD and MRA data. The time delay between the BOLD time course in each voxel and the mean signal of global and contralateral hemisphere was calculated using TSA. Time to peak (TTP) was employed to detect hypoperfusion. Among cohort A, 14 patients who had intracranial large-vessel occlusion/stenosis with sparse collaterals showed hypoperfusion by both of the two approaches, one with abundant collaterals showed neither TTP nor TSA time delay. The remaining 16 patients without obvious MRA lesions showed neither TTP nor TSA time delay. Among cohort B, eight patients showed time delay areas. The TSA approach was a promising alternative to DSC-PWI for detecting hypoperfusion in subacute stroke patients who had obvious MRA lesions with sparse collaterals, those with abundant collaterals would keep intact local perfusion.

  3. The value of resting-state functional MRI in subacute ischemic stroke: comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Ling; Li, Jingwei; Li, Weiping; Zhou, Fei; Wang, Fangfang; Schwarz, Christopher G.; Liu, Renyuan; Zhao, Hui; Wu, Wenbo; Zhang, Xin; Li, Ming; Yu, Haiping; Zhu, Bin; Villringer, Arno; Zang, Yufeng; Zhang, Bing; Lv, Yating; Xu, Yun

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the potential clinical value of the time-shift analysis (TSA) approach for resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) data in detecting hypoperfusion of subacute stroke patients through comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion weighted imaging (DSC-PWI). Forty patients with subacute stroke (3–14 days after neurological symptom onset) underwent MRI examination. Cohort A: 31 patients had MRA, DSC-PWI and BOLD data. Cohort B: 9 patients had BOLD and MRA data. The time delay between the BOLD time course in each voxel and the mean signal of global and contralateral hemisphere was calculated using TSA. Time to peak (TTP) was employed to detect hypoperfusion. Among cohort A, 14 patients who had intracranial large-vessel occlusion/stenosis with sparse collaterals showed hypoperfusion by both of the two approaches, one with abundant collaterals showed neither TTP nor TSA time delay. The remaining 16 patients without obvious MRA lesions showed neither TTP nor TSA time delay. Among cohort B, eight patients showed time delay areas. The TSA approach was a promising alternative to DSC-PWI for detecting hypoperfusion in subacute stroke patients who had obvious MRA lesions with sparse collaterals, those with abundant collaterals would keep intact local perfusion. PMID:28139701

  4. Automated analysis of perfusion weighted MRI using asymmetry in vascular territories

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Neil R.; Ansari, Sameer A; Vakil, Parmede; Prabhakaran, Shyam; Carroll, Timothy J; Hurley, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the feasibility of automatic vascular territory region of interest (ROI) construction as a method for standardized quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) images. Materials and Methods An algorithm for automatic construction of vascular territory ROIs was performed on 10 healthy controls and 25 patients with perfusion abnormalities identified by retrospective chart review. The ROIs were used to quantify perfusion asymmetry for each territory, and perfusion asymmetry was compared in the two cohorts and against blinded neuroradiologist interpretation. The algorithm was additionally applied to a separate cohort of 23 prospectively enrolled patients and perfusion asymmetry was correlated against clinical variables. Results There was significantly greater perfusion asymmetry in territories graded by neuroradiologists as hypoperfused compared to those graded as normally perfused (p<.05) and compared to healthy volunteers (p<.01). An ROC analysis showed that perfusion asymmetry was sensitive and specific for identifying hypoperfusion in vascular territories (84.9% sensitivity and 90.5% specificity for a threshold asymmetry index of .829). In the prospective cohort, perfusion asymmetry was correlated with initial NIH stroke scale (NIHSS) (p<.01) and length of stay (p<.05). Conclusions Automatic construction of vascular territory ROIs and calculation of perfusion asymmetry is a feasible method for analyzing CBF images. Because the technique is rapid and minimizes bias, it can facilitate analysis of larger scale research studies. PMID:25601529

  5. Early development of arterial spin labeling to measure regional brain blood flow by MRI.

    PubMed

    Koretsky, Alan P

    2012-08-15

    Two major avenues of work converged in the late 1980's and early 1990's to give rise to brain perfusion MRI. The development of anatomical brain MRI quickly had as a major goal the generation of angiograms using tricks to label flowing blood in macroscopic vessels. These ideas were aimed at getting information about microcirculatory flow as well. Over the same time course the development of in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy had as its primary goal the assessment of tissue function and in particular, tissue energetics. For this the measurement of the delivery of water to tissue was critical for assessing tissue oxygenation and viability. The measurement of the washin/washout of "freely" diffusible tracers by spectroscopic based techniques pointed the way for quantitative approaches to measure regional blood flow by MRI. These two avenues came together in the development of arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI techniques to measure regional cerebral blood flow. The early use of ASL to measure brain activation to help verify BOLD fMRI led to a rapid development of ASL based perfusion MRI. Today development and applications of regional brain blood flow measurements with ASL continues to be a major area of activity.

  6. Arterial spin-labeling perfusion imaging of childhood meningitis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alex Mun-Ching; Yeh, Chih-Hua; Liu, Ho-Ling; Lin, Kuang-Lin; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Toh, Cheng-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is mainly used to detect complications, is ineffective in determining the neurological status of patients with meningitis. Hemodynamic change in the brain may be more indicative of the neurological status but few imaging studies have verified this. Arterial spin-labeling (ASL) perfusion, a noninvasive MR method requiring no contrast agent injection, can be used to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF). We describe three pediatric patients with meningitis, who all showed regions of increased CBF on perfusion imaging. One patient, presenting with headache and conscious disturbance, had CBF changes in the frontal, temporal, and occipital regions. The other two patients, presenting with hallucinations, memory deficits, and seizures, had CBF changes in the frontal and temporal regions. ASL perfusion imaging may be helpful in assessing patients with meningitis, demonstrating CBF changes more strongly correlating with the neurological status, and detecting active brain abnormalities.

  7. DCE-MRI Perfusion and Permeability Parameters as predictors of tumor response to CCRT in Patients with locally advanced NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Xiuli; Wang, Lvhua; Hui, Zhouguang; Liu, Li; Ye, Feng; Song, Ying; Tang, Yu; Men, Yu; Lambrou, Tryphon; Su, Zihua; Xu, Xiao; Ouyang, Han; Wu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    In this prospective study, 36 patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), who underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) before concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) were enrolled. Pharmacokinetic analysis was carried out after non-rigid motion registration. The perfusion parameters [including Blood Flow (BF), Blood Volume (BV), Mean Transit Time (MTT)] and permeability parameters [including endothelial transfer constant (Ktrans), reflux rate (Kep), fractional extravascular extracellular space volume (Ve), fractional plasma volume (Vp)] were calculated, and their relationship with tumor regression was evaluated. The value of these parameters on predicting responders were calculated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to find the independent variables. Tumor regression rate is negatively correlated with Ve and its standard variation Ve_SD and positively correlated with Ktrans and Kep. Significant differences between responders and non-responders existed in Ktrans, Kep, Ve, Ve_SD, MTT, BV_SD and MTT_SD (P < 0.05). ROC indicated that Ve < 0.24 gave the largest area under curve of 0.865 to predict responders. Multivariate logistic regression analysis also showed Ve was a significant predictor. Baseline perfusion and permeability parameters calculated from DCE-MRI were seen to be a viable tool for predicting the early treatment response after CCRT of NSCLC. PMID:27762331

  8. Using Perfusion fMRI to Measure Continuous Changes in Neural Activity with Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Ingrid R.; Rao, Hengyi; Moore, Katherine Sledge; Wang, Jiongjiong; Detre, John A.; Aguirre, Geoffrey K.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we examine the suitability of a relatively new imaging technique, "arterial spin labeled perfusion imaging," for the study of continuous, gradual changes in neural activity. Unlike BOLD imaging, the perfusion signal is stable over long time-scales, allowing for accurate assessment of continuous performance. In addition, perfusion…

  9. Using Perfusion fMRI to Measure Continuous Changes in Neural Activity with Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Ingrid R.; Rao, Hengyi; Moore, Katherine Sledge; Wang, Jiongjiong; Detre, John A.; Aguirre, Geoffrey K.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we examine the suitability of a relatively new imaging technique, "arterial spin labeled perfusion imaging," for the study of continuous, gradual changes in neural activity. Unlike BOLD imaging, the perfusion signal is stable over long time-scales, allowing for accurate assessment of continuous performance. In addition, perfusion…

  10. Dopaminergic Therapy Modulates Cortical Perfusion in Parkinson Disease With and Without Dementia According to Arterial Spin Labeled Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Che; Chen, Pei-Chin; Huang, Yung-Cheng; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Wang, Hung-Chen; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lu, Cheng-Hsien

    2016-02-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging analyses allow for the quantification of altered cerebral blood flow, and provide a novel means of examining the impact of dopaminergic treatments. The authors examined the cerebral perfusion differences among 17 Parkinson disease (PD) patients, 17 PD with dementia (PDD) patients, and 17 healthy controls and used ASL-MRI to assess the effects of dopaminergic therapies on perfusion in the patients. The authors demonstrated progressive widespread cortical hypoperfusion in PD and PDD and robust effects for the dopaminergic therapies. Specifically, dopaminergic medications further decreased frontal lobe and cerebellum perfusion in the PD and PDD groups, respectively. These patterns of hypoperfusion could be related to cognitive dysfunctions and disease severity. Furthermore, desensitization to dopaminergic therapies in terms of cortical perfusion was found as the disease progressed, supporting the concept that long-term therapies are associated with the therapeutic window narrowing. The highly sensitive pharmaceutical response of ASL allows clinicians and researchers to easily and effectively quantify the absolute perfusion status, which might prove helpful for therapeutic planning.

  11. Dopaminergic Therapy Modulates Cortical Perfusion in Parkinson Disease With and Without Dementia According to Arterial Spin Labeled Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Che; Chen, Pei-Chin; Huang, Yung-Cheng; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Wang, Hung-Chen; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lu, Cheng-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging analyses allow for the quantification of altered cerebral blood flow, and provide a novel means of examining the impact of dopaminergic treatments. The authors examined the cerebral perfusion differences among 17 Parkinson disease (PD) patients, 17 PD with dementia (PDD) patients, and 17 healthy controls and used ASL-MRI to assess the effects of dopaminergic therapies on perfusion in the patients. The authors demonstrated progressive widespread cortical hypoperfusion in PD and PDD and robust effects for the dopaminergic therapies. Specifically, dopaminergic medications further decreased frontal lobe and cerebellum perfusion in the PD and PDD groups, respectively. These patterns of hypoperfusion could be related to cognitive dysfunctions and disease severity. Furthermore, desensitization to dopaminergic therapies in terms of cortical perfusion was found as the disease progressed, supporting the concept that long-term therapies are associated with the therapeutic window narrowing. The highly sensitive pharmaceutical response of ASL allows clinicians and researchers to easily and effectively quantify the absolute perfusion status, which might prove helpful for therapeutic planning. PMID:26844450

  12. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI as a valuable non-invasive tool to evaluate tissue perfusion of free flaps: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Claudia; Jung, Ernst M; Prantl, Lukas

    2010-01-01

    Early detection of a compromised circulation of free flaps and an immediate revision may lead to higher rates of flap salvage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perfusion of the entire flap using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). DCE was performed in 11 patients after flap transplantation using an optimized 3D gradient echo sequence to cover the whole flap. The percentage increase of signal intensity over time was evaluated for the free flap as well as for a reference tissue. Furthermore, normalized signal increase was calculated as the ratio of signal increase within the flaps to the signal increase in the reference tissue. Signal increase in free flaps and reference tissue was compared using the Wilcoxon-test (p < 0.05), normalized signal increase in normally perfused (n = 9) and in flaps with compromised perfusion (n = 2) using Mann-Whitney-test (p < 0.05). Signal increase within normally perfused flaps was similar to the reference tissue. In flaps with compromised perfusion the increase was significantly lower than in reference tissue. Normalized signal increase in adequately perfused flaps and flaps with compromised perfusion also showed a significant difference. DCE MRI may be a valuable non-invasive tool to evaluate tissue perfusion of the complete free flap.

  13. Quantitative cerebral blood flow mapping and functional connectivity of postherpetic neuralgia pain: a perfusion fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Hao, Ying; Du, Minyi; Wang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Jue; Manor, Brad; Jiang, Xuexiang; Fang, Wenxue; Wang, Dongxin

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the effects of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) on resting-state brain activity utilizing arterial spin labeling (ASL) techniques. Features of static and dynamic cerebral blood flow (CBF) were analyzed to reflect the specific brain response to PHN pain. Eleven consecutive patients suffering from PHN and 11 age- and gender-matched control subjects underwent perfusion functional magnetic resonance imaging brain scanning during the resting state. Group comparison was conducted to detect the regions with significant changes of CBF in PHN patients. Then we chose those regions that were highly correlated with the self-reported pain intensity as "seeds" to calculate the functional connectivity of both groups. Absolute CBF values of these regions were also compared across PHN patients and control subjects. Significant increases in CBF of the patient group were observed in left striatum, right thalamus, left primary somatosensory cortex (S1), left insula, left amygdala, left primary somatomotor cortex, and left inferior parietal lobule. Significant decreases in CBF were mainly located in the frontal cortex. Regional CBF in the left caudate, left insula, left S1, and right thalamus was highly correlated with the pain intensity, and further comparison showed that the regional CBF in these regions is significantly higher in PHN groups. Functional connectivity results demonstrated that the reward circuitry involved in striatum, prefrontal cortex, amygdala, and parahippocampal gyrus and the circuitry among striatum, thalamus, and insula were highly correlated with each element in PHN patients. In addition, noninvasive brain perfusion imaging at rest may provide novel insights into the central mechanisms underlying PHN pain.

  14. 3D pulmonary perfusion MRI and MR angiography of pulmonary embolism in pigs after a single injection of a blood pool MR contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Fink, Christian; Ley, Sebastian; Puderbach, Michael; Plathow, Christian; Bock, Michael; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of contrast-enhanced 3D perfusion MRI and MR angiography (MRA) of pulmonary embolism (PE) in pigs using a single injection of the blood pool contrast Gadomer. PE was induced in five domestic pigs by injection of autologous blood thrombi. Contrast-enhanced first-pass 3D perfusion MRI (TE/TR/FA: 1.0 ms/2.2 ms/40 degrees; voxel size: 1.3 x 2.5 x 4.0 mm3; TA: 1.8 s per data set) and high-resolution 3D MRA (TE/TR/FA: 1.4 ms/3.4 ms/40 degrees; voxel size: 0.8 x 1.0 x 1.6 mm3) was performed during and after a single injection of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight of Gadomer. Image data were compared to pre-embolism Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI and post-embolism thin-section multislice CT (n = 2). SNR measurements were performed in the pulmonary arteries and lung. One animal died after induction of PE. In all other animals, perfusion MRI and MRA could be acquired after a single injection of Gadomer. At perfusion MRI, PE could be detected by typical wedge-shaped perfusion defects. While the visualization of central PE at MRA correlated well with the CT, peripheral PE were only visualized by CT. Gadomer achieved a higher peak SNR of the lungs compared to Gd-DTPA (21 +/- 8 vs. 13 +/- 3). Contrast-enhanced 3D perfusion MRI and MRA of PE can be combined using a single injection of the blood pool contrast agent Gadomer.

  15. Non-contrast-enhanced perfusion and ventilation assessment of the human lung by means of fourier decomposition in proton MRI.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Grzegorz; Puderbach, Michael; Deimling, Michael; Jellus, Vladimir; Chefd'hotel, Christophe; Dinkel, Julien; Hintze, Christian; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Schad, Lothar R

    2009-09-01

    Assessment of regional lung perfusion and ventilation has significant clinical value for the diagnosis and follow-up of pulmonary diseases. In this work a new method of non-contrast-enhanced functional lung MRI (not dependent on intravenous or inhalative contrast agents) is proposed. A two-dimensional (2D) true fast imaging with steady precession (TrueFISP) pulse sequence (TR/TE = 1.9 ms/0.8 ms, acquisition time [TA] = 112 ms/image) was implemented on a 1.5T whole-body MR scanner. The imaging protocol comprised sets of 198 lung images acquired with an imaging rate of 3.33 images/s in coronal and sagittal view. No electrocardiogram (ECG) or respiratory triggering was used. A nonrigid image registration algorithm was applied to compensate for respiratory motion. Rapid data acquisition allowed observing intensity changes in corresponding lung areas with respect to the cardiac and respiratory frequencies. After a Fourier analysis along the time domain, two spectral lines corresponding to both frequencies were used to calculate the perfusion- and ventilation-weighted images. The described method was applied in preliminary studies on volunteers and patients showing clinical relevance to obtain non-contrast-enhanced perfusion and ventilation data.

  16. Influence of perfusion on high-intensity focused ultrasound prostate ablation: a first-pass MRI study.

    PubMed

    Wiart, Marlène; Curiel, Laura; Gelet, Albert; Lyonnet, Denis; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier

    2007-07-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the influence of regional prostate blood flow (rPBF) on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment outcome. A total of 48 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were examined by dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI prior to HIFU therapy. A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir threshold of 0.2 ng/ml was used to define the populations of responders and nonresponders. A dedicated tracer kinetic model, namely "monoexponential plus constant" (MPC) deconvolution, was implemented to provide quantitative estimates of rPBF. The results were compared with those obtained by semiquantitative (steepest slope, mean gradient) and quantitative (Fermi deconvolution) approaches. Of the four methods studied, quantitative rPBF obtained by MPC deconvolution proved the most sensitive to the perfusion changes encountered in this study. Furthermore, blood-flow values obtained with MPC deconvolution in the prostate and muscle (12 +/- 8 and 5 +/- 3 ml/min/100 g, respectively) were in good agreement with literature data. The mean pretreatment rPBF obtained with MPC deconvolution was significantly higher in nonresponders compared to responders (16 +/- 9 vs. 10 +/- 6 ml/min/100 g), suggesting a correlation between baseline perfusion and treatment outcome. The present work describes and validates the use of dynamic MRI to estimate rPBF in patients, which in the future may help to refine the conduct of HIFU therapy.

  17. Comparison of dynamic susceptibility contrast-MRI perfusion quantification methods in the presence of delay and dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maan, Bianca; Simões, Rita Lopes; Meijer, Frederick J. A.; Klaas Jan Renema, W.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2011-03-01

    The perfusion of the brain is essential to maintain brain function. Stroke is an example of a decrease in blood flow and reduced perfusion. During ischemic stroke the blood flow to tissue is hampered due to a clot inside a vessel. To investigate the recovery of stroke patients, follow up studies are necessary. MRI is the preferred imaging modality for follow up because of the absence of radiation dose concerns, contrary to CT. Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast (DSC) MRI is an imaging technique used for measuring perfusion of the brain, however, is not standard applied in the clinical routine due to lack of immediate patient benefit. Several post processing algorithms are described in the literature to obtain cerebral blood flow (CBF). The quantification of CBF relies on the deconvolution of a tracer concentration-time curve in an arterial and a tissue voxel. There are several methods to obtain this deconvolution based on singular-value decomposition (SVD). This contribution describes a comparison between the different approaches as currently there is no best practice for (all) clinical relevant situations. We investigate the influence of tracer delay, dispersion and recirculation on the performance of the methods. In the presence of negative delays, the truncated SVD approach overestimates the CBF. Block-circulant and reformulated SVD are delay-independent. Due to its delay dependent behavior, the truncated SVD approach performs worse in the presence of dispersion as well. However all SVD approaches are dependent on the amount of dispersion. Moreover, we observe that the optimal truncation parameter varies when recirculation is added to noisy data, suggesting that, in practice, these methods are not immune to tracer recirculation. Finally, applying the methods to clinical data resulted in a large variability of the CBF estimates. Block-circulant SVD will work in all situations and is the method with the highest potential.

  18. A patient-specific visualization tool for comprehensive analysis of coronary CTA and perfusion MRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirisli, H. A.; Gupta, V.; Kirschbaum, S.; Neefjes, L.; van Geuns, R. J.; Mollet, N.; Lelieveldt, B. P. F.; Reiber, J. H. C.; van Walsum, T.; Niessen, W. J.

    2011-03-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance perfusion imaging (CMR) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) are widely used to assess heart disease. CMR is used to measure the global and regional myocardial function and to evaluate the presence of ischemia; CTA is used for diagnosing coronary artery disease, such as coronary stenoses. Nowadays, the hemodynamic significance of coronary artery stenoses is determined subjectively by combining information on myocardial function with assumptions on coronary artery territories. As the anatomy of coronary arteries varies greatly between individuals, we developed a patient-specific tool for relating CTA and perfusion CMR data. The anatomical and functional information extracted from CTA and CMR data are combined into a single frame of reference. Our graphical user interface provides various options for visualization. In addition to the standard perfusion Bull's Eye Plot (BEP), it is possible to overlay a 2D projection of the coronary tree on the BEP, to add a 3D coronary tree model and to add a 3D heart model. The perfusion BEP, the 3D-models and the CTA data are also interactively linked. Using the CMR and CTA data of 14 patients, our tool directly established a spatial correspondence between diseased coronary artery segments and myocardial regions with abnormal perfusion. The location of coronary stenoses and perfusion abnormalities were visualized jointly in 3D, thereby facilitating the study of the relationship between the anatomic causes of a blocked artery and the physiological effects on the myocardial perfusion. This tool is expected to improve diagnosis and therapy planning of early-stage coronary artery disease.

  19. Partial volume correction of brain perfusion estimates using the inherent signal data of time-resolved arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, André; Wirestam, Ronnie; Petersen, Esben Thade; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Knutsson, Linda

    2014-09-01

    Quantitative perfusion MRI based on arterial spin labeling (ASL) is hampered by partial volume effects (PVEs), arising due to voxel signal cross-contamination between different compartments. To address this issue, several partial volume correction (PVC) methods have been presented. Most previous methods rely on segmentation of a high-resolution T1 -weighted morphological image volume that is coregistered to the low-resolution ASL data, making the result sensitive to errors in the segmentation and coregistration. In this work, we present a methodology for partial volume estimation and correction, using only low-resolution ASL data acquired with the QUASAR sequence. The methodology consists of a T1 -based segmentation method, with no spatial priors, and a modified PVC method based on linear regression. The presented approach thus avoids prior assumptions about the spatial distribution of brain compartments, while also avoiding coregistration between different image volumes. Simulations based on a digital phantom as well as in vivo measurements in 10 volunteers were used to assess the performance of the proposed segmentation approach. The simulation results indicated that QUASAR data can be used for robust partial volume estimation, and this was confirmed by the in vivo experiments. The proposed PVC method yielded probable perfusion maps, comparable to a reference method based on segmentation of a high-resolution morphological scan. Corrected gray matter (GM) perfusion was 47% higher than uncorrected values, suggesting a significant amount of PVEs in the data. Whereas the reference method failed to completely eliminate the dependence of perfusion estimates on the volume fraction, the novel approach produced GM perfusion values independent of GM volume fraction. The intra-subject coefficient of variation of corrected perfusion values was lowest for the proposed PVC method. As shown in this work, low-resolution partial volume estimation in connection with ASL perfusion

  20. Reduced susceptibility effects in perfusion fMRI with single-shot spin-echo EPI acquisitions at 1.5 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiongjiong; Li, Lin; Roc, Anne C; Alsop, David C; Tang, Kathy; Butler, Norman S; Schnall, Mitchell D; Detre, John A

    2004-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion contrast is not based on susceptibility effects and can therefore be used to study brain function in regions of high static inhomogeneity. As a proof of concept, single-shot spin-echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) acquisition was carried out with a multislice continuous ASL (CASL) method at 1.5T. A bilateral finger tapping paradigm was used in the presence of an exogenously induced susceptibility artifact over left motor cortex. The spin-echo CASL technique was compared with a regular gradient-echo EPI sequence with the same slice thickness, as well as other imaging methods using thin slices and spin-echo acquisitions. The results demonstrate improved functional sensitivity and efficiency of the spin-echo CASL approach as compared with gradient-echo EPI techniques, and a trend of improved sensitivity as compared with spin-echo EPI approach in the brain regions affected by the susceptibility artifact. ASL images, either with or without subtraction of the control, provide a robust alternative to blood oxygenation level dependant (BOLD) methods for activation imaging in regions of high static field inhomogeneity.

  1. Brain capillary transit time heterogeneity in healthy volunteers measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced T1 -weighted perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Henrik B W; Vestergaard, Mark B; Lindberg, Ulrich; Iversen, Helle K; Cramer, Stig P

    2017-06-01

    Capillary transit time heterogeneity, measured as CTH, may set the upper limit for extraction of substances in brain tissue, e.g., oxygen. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced T1 weighted MRI (DCE-MRI) at 3 Tesla (T), in estimating CTH based on a gamma-variate model of the capillary transit time distribution. In addition, we wanted to investigate if a subtle increase of the blood-brain barrier permeability can be incorporated into the model, still allowing estimation of CTH. Twenty-three healthy subjects were scanned at 3.0T MRI system applying DCE-MRI and using a gamma-variate model to estimate CTH as well as cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and permeability of the blood-brain barrier, measured as the influx constant Ki . For proof of principle we also investigated three patients with recent thromboembolic events and a patient with a high grade brain tumor. In the healthy subjects, we found a narrow symmetric delta-like capillary transit time distribution in basal ganglia gray matter with median CTH of 0.93 s and interquartile range of 1.33 s. The corresponding residue impulse response function was compatible with the adiabatic tissue homogeneity model. In two patients with complete occlusion of the internal carotid artery and in the patient with a brain tumor CTH was increased with values up to 6 s in the affected brain tissue, with an exponential like residue impulse response function. Our results open the possibility of characterizing brain perfusion by the capillary transit time distribution using DCE-MRI, theoretically a determinant of efficient blood to brain transport of important substances. 2 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;45:1809-1820. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. Spiral Perfusion Imaging With Consecutive Echoes (SPICE™) for the Simultaneous Mapping of DSC- and DCE-MRI Parameters in Brain Tumor Patients: Theory and Initial Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Eric S.; Prah, Douglas E.; Schmainda, Kathleen M.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the perfusion imaging techniques most frequently used to probe the angiogenic character of brain neoplasms. With these methods, T1- and T2/T2*-weighted imaging sequences are used to image the distribution of gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents. However, it is well known that Gd exhibits combined T1, T2, and T2* shortening effects in tissue, and therefore, the results of both DCE- and DSC-MRI can be confounded by these opposing effects. In particular, residual susceptibility effects compete with T1 shortening, which can confound DCE-MRI parameters, whereas dipolar T1 and T2 leakage and residual susceptibility effects can confound DSC-MRI parameters. We introduce here a novel perfusion imaging acquisition and postprocessing method termed Spiral Perfusion Imaging with Consecutive Echoes (SPICE) that can be used to simultaneously acquire DCE- and DSC-MRI data, which requires only a single dose of the Gd contrast agent, does not require the collection of a precontrast T1 map for DCE-MRI processing, and eliminates the confounding contrast agent effects due to contrast extravasation. A detailed mathematical description of SPICE is provided here along with a demonstration of its utility in patients with high-grade glioma. PMID:28090589

  3. Spiral Perfusion Imaging With Consecutive Echoes (SPICE™) for the Simultaneous Mapping of DSC- and DCE-MRI Parameters in Brain Tumor Patients: Theory and Initial Feasibility.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Eric S; Prah, Douglas E; Schmainda, Kathleen M

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the perfusion imaging techniques most frequently used to probe the angiogenic character of brain neoplasms. With these methods, T1- and T2/T2*-weighted imaging sequences are used to image the distribution of gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents. However, it is well known that Gd exhibits combined T1, T2, and T2* shortening effects in tissue, and therefore, the results of both DCE- and DSC-MRI can be confounded by these opposing effects. In particular, residual susceptibility effects compete with T1 shortening, which can confound DCE-MRI parameters, whereas dipolar T1 and T2 leakage and residual susceptibility effects can confound DSC-MRI parameters. We introduce here a novel perfusion imaging acquisition and postprocessing method termed Spiral Perfusion Imaging with Consecutive Echoes (SPICE) that can be used to simultaneously acquire DCE- and DSC-MRI data, which requires only a single dose of the Gd contrast agent, does not require the collection of a precontrast T1 map for DCE-MRI processing, and eliminates the confounding contrast agent effects due to contrast extravasation. A detailed mathematical description of SPICE is provided here along with a demonstration of its utility in patients with high-grade glioma.

  4. Endovascular thrombolysis and stenting of a middle cerebral artery occlusion beyond 6 hours post-attack: special reference to the usefulness of diffusion-perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jung Yong; Han, In Bo; Chung, Sang Sup; Chung, Young Sun; Kim, Sang Heum; Yoon, Pyeong Ho

    2006-12-01

    Intra-arterial thrombolysis and percutaneous angioplasty is feasible in patients with acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion limited to 6 hours post-ictus, but there are some limitations such as reocclusion or hemorrhagic complications. In this report, we describe a stent placement in the treatment of a refractory artherothrombotic MCA occlusion beyond 6 hours of symptom onset. A 57-year-old man presented with a progressive left-sided weakness and verbal disturbance resulting from an acute thrombotic occlusion of the right MCA superimposed on severe proximal atheromatous stenosis. Diffusion-perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated the significant diffusion-perfusion mismatch. After chemical and mechanical thrombolysis of the clot, balloon angioplasty of the underlying MCA stenosis was performed 2 days post-attack, without significant angiographic improvement. Percutaneous endovascular deployment of a stent (Driver 2.5 x 12 mm, MTI, Irvine, CA) was subsequently performed, with excellent angiographic results. Follow-up diffusion-perfusion MRI showed improved perfusion in the hypoperfused area. The patient's National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score was increased from 12 to 3. Clot thrombolysis and subsequent stenting in patients with refractory proximal MCA occlusion is feasible and allows for a significant reduction in the amount of thrombolytic drug required. In selective patients with acute MCA occlusion, the therapeutic window for recanalization procedures can be safely and effectively extended beyond the 'traditional 6 hours'. Diffusion-perfusion MRI in acute MCA occlusion is important for indication of therapy.

  5. A methodology for generating normal and pathological brain perfusion SPECT images for evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods: application in epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grova, C.; Jannin, P.; Biraben, A.; Buvat, I.; Benali, H.; Bernard, A. M.; Scarabin, J. M.; Gibaud, B.

    2003-12-01

    Quantitative evaluation of brain MRI/SPECT fusion methods for normal and in particular pathological datasets is difficult, due to the frequent lack of relevant ground truth. We propose a methodology to generate MRI and SPECT datasets dedicated to the evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods and illustrate the method when dealing with ictal SPECT. The method consists in generating normal or pathological SPECT data perfectly aligned with a high-resolution 3D T1-weighted MRI using realistic Monte Carlo simulations that closely reproduce the response of a SPECT imaging system. Anatomical input data for the SPECT simulations are obtained from this 3D T1-weighted MRI, while functional input data result from an inter-individual analysis of anatomically standardized SPECT data. The method makes it possible to control the 'brain perfusion' function by proposing a theoretical model of brain perfusion from measurements performed on real SPECT images. Our method provides an absolute gold standard for assessing MRI/SPECT registration method accuracy since, by construction, the SPECT data are perfectly registered with the MRI data. The proposed methodology has been applied to create a theoretical model of normal brain perfusion and ictal brain perfusion characteristic of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. To approach realistic and unbiased perfusion models, real SPECT data were corrected for uniform attenuation, scatter and partial volume effect. An anatomic standardization was used to account for anatomic variability between subjects. Realistic simulations of normal and ictal SPECT deduced from these perfusion models are presented. The comparison of real and simulated SPECT images showed relative differences in regional activity concentration of less than 20% in most anatomical structures, for both normal and ictal data, suggesting realistic models of perfusion distributions for evaluation purposes. Inter-hemispheric asymmetry coefficients measured on simulated data were found within

  6. A methodology for generating normal and pathological brain perfusion SPECT images for evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods: application in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Grova, C; Jannin, P; Biraben, A; Buvat, I; Benali, H; Bernard, A M; Scarabin, J M; Gibaud, B

    2003-12-21

    Quantitative evaluation of brain MRI/SPECT fusion methods for normal and in particular pathological datasets is difficult, due to the frequent lack of relevant ground truth. We propose a methodology to generate MRI and SPECT datasets dedicated to the evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods and illustrate the method when dealing with ictal SPECT. The method consists in generating normal or pathological SPECT data perfectly aligned with a high-resolution 3D T1-weighted MRI using realistic Monte Carlo simulations that closely reproduce the response of a SPECT imaging system. Anatomical input data for the SPECT simulations are obtained from this 3D T1-weighted MRI, while functional input data result from an inter-individual analysis of anatomically standardized SPECT data. The method makes it possible to control the 'brain perfusion' function by proposing a theoretical model of brain perfusion from measurements performed on real SPECT images. Our method provides an absolute gold standard for assessing MRI/SPECT registration method accuracy since, by construction, the SPECT data are perfectly registered with the MRI data. The proposed methodology has been applied to create a theoretical model of normal brain perfusion and ictal brain perfusion characteristic of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. To approach realistic and unbiased perfusion models, real SPECT data were corrected for uniform attenuation, scatter and partial volume effect. An anatomic standardization was used to account for anatomic variability between subjects. Realistic simulations of normal and ictal SPECT deduced from these perfusion models are presented. The comparison of real and simulated SPECT images showed relative differences in regional activity concentration of less than 20% in most anatomical structures, for both normal and ictal data, suggesting realistic models of perfusion distributions for evaluation purposes. Inter-hemispheric asymmetry coefficients measured on simulated data were found within

  7. Perfusion MR imaging of enhancing brain tumors: Comparison of arterial spin labeling technique with dynamic susceptibility contrast technique.

    PubMed

    Soni, Neetu; Dhanota, Devender Pal S; Kumar, Sunil; Jaiswal, Awadhesh K; Srivastava, Arun K

    2017-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion is a noninvasive and repeatable method for quantitatively measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF). This study aims to compare measurements of ASL-derived CBF with dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI in the assessment of enhancing brain tumors (primary and metastatic), with an aim to use ASL as an alternative to DSC. Thirty patients with newly diagnosed brain tumors (16 meningiomas, 6 gliomas, 3 metastases, 2 cerebellopontine angle schwannoma, 1 central neurocytoma, and 2 low-grade gliomas) were examined using a 3T MR scanner. Values of CBF, regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) were determined in the tumor (T) as well as in the contralateral normal gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM). Tumor-to-GM or WM CBF, rCBF, and rCBV ratios were calculated to estimate normalized perfusion values (i.e., ASL normalized tumor blood flow [nTBF], DSC nTBF, and DSC normalized tumor blood volume [nTBV]) from the ASL and DSC techniques. ASL and DSC MRI derived perfusion parameters were compared using paired t-test and correlated using Pearson correlation coefficient. Mean values for ASL nTBF and DSC nTBF using contralateral GM as the reference point were 2.98 ± 1.67and 2.91 ± 1.43, respectively. A very strong correlation coefficient was found between ASL nTBF and DSC nTBF with contralateral GM as the reference region (r = 0.903; R2= 0.813). Mean DSC nTBF and DSC nTBV also showed strong correlation (r = 0.83; R2= 0.701). Our study results suggested that measurement of CBF from ASL possesses the potential for a noninvasive assessment of blood flow in intracranial tumors as an alternate to DSC MRI, in those patients requiring multiple follow-up imaging and in patients with impaired renal functions.

  8. Perfusion MRI as the predictive/prognostic and pharmacodynamic biomarkers in recurrent malignant glioma treated with bevacizumab: a systematic review and a time-to-event meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sang Hyun; Jung, Seung Chai; Kim, Kyung Won; Lee, Ja Youn; Choi, Yoonseok; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Ho Sung

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate the value of perfusion MRI as a predictive/prognostic biomarker and a pharmacodynamic biomarker in patients with recurrent glioma treated with a bevacizumab-based regimen. We identified thirteen literature reports that investigated dynamic susceptibility-contrast (DSC) MRI or dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI for predicting the patient outcome and analyzing the anti-angiogenic effect of bevacizumab by performing a systematic search of MEDLINE and EMBASE. The relative cerebral volume (rCBV) of DSC-MRI is currently the most common perfusion MRI parameter used as a predictive/prognostic biomarker. Pooled hazard ratios between responders and non-responders, as determined by rCBV, were 0.46 (95 % CI 0.28-0.76) for progression-free survival from five articles with a total 226 patients and 0.47 (95 % CI 0.29-0.76) for overall survival from six articles with a total 247 patients, and thus indicating that rCBV is helpful for predicting disease progression and the eventual outcome after treatment. Regarding the pharmacodynamic value of perfusion MRI parameters derived from either DSC-MRI or DCE-MRI, most perfusion MRI parameters (rCBV, Ktrans, CBVmax, Kpsmax, fpv, Ve and Kep) demonstrated a consistent decrease on the follow-up MRI after treatment, indicating that perfusion MRI may be helpful for evaluating the anti-angiogenic effect of a bevacizumab-based treatment regimen. However, the lack of standardization of imaging acquisition and analysis techniques for various perfusion MRI parameters needs to be resolved in the future. Despite these unsolved issues, the current evidence favoring the use of perfusion MRI as a predictive/prognostic or pharmacodynamic biomarker should be considered in patients with glioma treated using a bevacizumab-based regimen.

  9. Matrix pencil decomposition of time-resolved proton MRI for robust and improved assessment of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Grzegorz; Bieri, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    To present an improved and robust method of pulmonary function assessment from time-resolved proton MRI using a matrix pencil (MP) method in combination with a linear least squares analysis. Simulations of the signal time course in lung parenchyma were performed to compare the accuracy of Fourier decomposition (FD) and MP methods for the estimation of respiratory and cardiac amplitudes. Series of two-dimensional time-resolved lung images were acquired in healthy volunteers at 1.5 T using ultra-fast steady-state free precession. Qualitative lung ventilation- and perfusion-weighted images as well as a quantitative map of fractional ventilation, perfusion, and blood arrival time were calculated using the proposed MP method and compared with the contemporary FD technique. A region-of-interest analysis was performed on the quantitative data. The signal analysis performed using MP decomposition resulted in reduced variability of the estimated respiratory and cardiac amplitudes in comparison with FD for both simulated and in vivo data. MP decomposition provides an automatic, robust, and more accurate estimation of amplitudes of respiratory and cardiac signal modulations in the lung parenchyma than the contemporary FD technique. Magn Reson Med 77:336-342, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Methylphenidate modulates sustained attention and cortical activation in survivors of traumatic brain injury: A perfusion fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghoon; Whyte, John; Patel, Sunil; Europa, Eduardo; Wang, Jiongjiong; Coslett, H. Branch; Detre, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Methylphenidate (MPH), the most widely prescribed psychostimulant to treat many neuropsychiatric conditions, is reported to improve attention and speed of processing in survivors of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The neural correlate of this efficacy, however, remains unclear. Objective Using perfusion fMRI as a biomarker of regional neural activity, the current study aimed to examine the neural correlates of single-dose (0.3 mg/kg) MPH administration in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over study design. Methods Twenty-three individuals with moderate to severe TBI were tested on two occasions approximately one week apart. Perfusion fMRI scanning was carried out at rest and while participants performed cognitive tasks requiring sustained attention and working memory. Results Behaviorally, MPH significantly improved both accuracy and reaction time (RT) in the sustained attention task, but only RT in the working memory task. A trend of global reduction of cerebral blood flow by MPH was observed in all task conditions including resting. Voxel-wise whole-brain analysis revealed an interaction effect of drug by condition (MPH-placebo X task-rest) for the sustained attention task in the left posterior superior parietal cortex and parieto-occipital junction (BA 7/19). The magnitude of drug-related deactivation of this area during task performance was correlated with improvement in RT. Conclusion Suppression of activity in this area during task performance may reflect a compensatory mechanism by which MPH ameliorates attention impairments in TBI. PMID:22203319

  11. Respiratory motion prediction and prospective correction for free-breathing arterial spin-labeled perfusion MRI of the kidneys.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Ruan, Dan; Liu, Wenyang; Stenger, V Andrew; Pohmann, Rolf; Fernández-Seara, Maria A; Nair, Tejas; Jung, Sungkyu; Luo, Jingqin; Motai, Yuichi; Ma, Jingfei; Hazle, John D; Gach, H Michael

    2017-03-01

    Respiratory motion prediction using an artificial neural network (ANN) was integrated with pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) MRI to allow free-breathing perfusion measurements in the kidney. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the ANN to accurately predict the location of the kidneys during image acquisition. A pencil-beam navigator was integrated with a pCASL sequence to measure lung/diaphragm motion during ANN training and the pCASL transit delay. The ANN algorithm ran concurrently in the background to predict organ location during the 0.7-s 15-slice acquisition based on the navigator data. The predictions were supplied to the pulse sequence to prospectively adjust the axial slice acquisition to match the predicted organ location. Additional navigators were acquired immediately after the multislice acquisition to assess the performance and accuracy of the ANN. The technique was tested in eight healthy volunteers. The root-mean-square error (RMSE) and mean absolute error (MAE) for the eight volunteers were 1.91 ± 0.17 mm and 1.43 ± 0.17 mm, respectively, for the ANN. The RMSE increased with transit delay. The MAE typically increased from the first to last prediction in the image acquisition. The overshoot was 23.58% ± 3.05% using the target prediction accuracy of ± 1 mm. Respiratory motion prediction with prospective motion correction was successfully demonstrated for free-breathing perfusion MRI of the kidney. The method serves as an alternative to multiple breathholds and requires minimal effort from the patient. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  12. Modulation of resting brain cerebral blood flow by the GABA B agonist, baclofen: A longitudinal perfusion fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Teresa R.; Wang, Ze; Sciortino, Nathan; Harper, Derek; Li, Yin; Hakun, Jonathan; Kildea, Susan; Kampman, Kyle; Ehrman, Ron; Detre, John A.; O’Brien, Charles P.; Childress, Anna Rose

    2011-01-01

    Background Preclinical studies confirm that the GABA B agonist, baclofen blocks dopamine release in the reward-responsive ventral striatum (VS) and medial prefrontal cortex, and consequently, blocks drug motivated behavior. Its mechanism in humans is unknown. Here, we used continuous arterial spin labeled (CASL) perfusion fMRI to examine baclofen’s effects on blood flow in the human brain. Methods Twenty-one subjects (all smokers, 12 females) were randomized to receive either baclofen (80 mg/day; N = 10) or placebo (N = 11). A five minute quantitative perfusion fMRI resting baseline (RB) scan was acquired at two time points; prior to the dosing regimen (Time 1) and on the last day of 21 days of drug administration (Time 2). SPM2 was employed to compare changes in RB from Time 1 to 2. Results Baclofen diminished cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the VS and mOFC and increased it in the lateral OFC, a region involved in suppressing previously rewarded behavior. CBF in bilateral insula was also blunted by baclofen (T values ranged from −11.29 to 15.3 at p = 0.001, 20 contiguous voxels). CBF at Time 2 was unchanged in placebo subjects. There were no differences between groups in side effects or cigarettes smoked per day (at either time point). Conclusions Baclofen’s modulatory actions on regions involved in motivated behavior in humans are reflected in the resting state and provide insight into the underlying mechanism behind its potential to block drug-motivated behavior, in preclinical studies, and its putative effectiveness as an anti-craving/anti-relapse agent in humans. PMID:21333466

  13. On the Dark Rim Artifact in Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Myocardial Perfusion Studies

    PubMed Central

    Di Bella, E.V.R.; Parker, D.L.; Sinusas, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    A dark band or rim along parts of the subendocardial border of the left ventricle (LV) and the myocardium has been noticed in some dynamic contrast-enhanced MR perfusion studies. The artifact is thought to be due to susceptibility effects from the gadolinium bolus, motion, or resolution, or a combination of these. Here motionless ex vivo hearts in which the cavity was filled with gadolinium are used to show that dark rim artifacts can be consistent with resolution effects alone. PMID:16200553

  14. Three-dimensional MRI perfusion maps: a step beyond volumetric analysis in mental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fabene, Paolo F; Farace, Paolo; Brambilla, Paolo; Andreone, Nicola; Cerini, Roberto; Pelizza, Luisa; Versace, Amelia; Rambaldelli, Gianluca; Birbaumer, Niels; Tansella, Michele; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    A new type of magnetic resonance imaging analysis, based on fusion of three-dimensional reconstructions of time-to-peak parametric maps and high-resolution T1-weighted images, is proposed in order to evaluate the perfusion of selected volumes of interest. Because in recent years a wealth of data have suggested the crucial involvement of vascular alterations in mental diseases, we tested our new method on a restricted sample of schizophrenic patients and matched healthy controls. The perfusion of the whole brain was compared with that of the caudate nucleus by means of intrasubject analysis. As expected, owing to the encephalic vascular pattern, a significantly lower time-to-peak was observed in the caudate nucleus than in the whole brain in all healthy controls, indicating that the suggested method has enough sensitivity to detect subtle perfusion changes even in small volumes of interest. Interestingly, a less uniform pattern was observed in the schizophrenic patients. The latter finding needs to be replicated in an adequate number of subjects. In summary, the three-dimensional analysis method we propose has been shown to be a feasible tool for revealing subtle vascular changes both in normal subjects and in pathological conditions. PMID:17229290

  15. Bayesian optimization of perfusion and transit time estimation in PASL-MRI.

    PubMed

    Santos, Nuno; Sanches, João; Figueiredo, Patrícia

    2010-01-01

    Pulsed Arterial Spin Labeling (PASL) techniques potentially allow the absolute, non-invasive quantification of brain perfusion and arterial transit time. This can be achieved by fitting a kinetic model to the data acquired at a number of inversion time points (TI). The intrinsically low SNR of PASL data, together with the uncertainty in the model parameters, can hinder the estimation of the parameters of interest. Here, a two-compartment kinetic model is used to estimate perfusion and transit time, based on a Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) criterion. A priori information concerning the physiological variation of the multiple model parameters is used to guide the solution. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to compare the accuracy of our proposed Bayesian estimation method with a conventional Least Squares (LS) approach, using four different sets of TI points. Each set is obtained either with a uniform distribution or an optimal sampling strategy designed based on the same MAP criterion. We show that the estimation errors are minimized when our proposed Bayesian estimation method is employed in combination with an optimal set of sampling points. In conclusion, our results indicate that PASL perfusion and transit time measurements would benefit from a Bayesian approach for the optimization of both the sampling strategy and the estimation algorithm, whereby prior information on the parameters is used.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging arterial-spin-labelling perfusion alterations in childhood migraine with atypical aura: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Boulouis, Grégoire; Shotar, Eimad; Dangouloff-Ros, Volodia; Grévent, David; Calmon, Raphaël; Brunelle, Francis; Naggara, Olivier; Kossorotoff, Manoelle; Boddaert, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    Atypical migraine with aura can be challenging to diagnose. Arterial-spin-labelling (ASL) is able to non-invasively quantify brain perfusion. Our aim was to report cerebral blood flow (CBF) alterations using ASL, at the acute phase of atypical migraine with aura in children. Paediatric patients were retrospectively included if (1) referred for acute neurological deficit(s), (2) underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at presentation with ASL sequence, and (3) had subsequent diagnosis of migraine with aura. Neurological symptom-free controls were matched for age. Twenty-eight regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn on CBF maps for each participant/control. Ten patients were included (median age 13y, range 8-16y). Eight of 10 had multiple aura symptoms during the episode. For every patient, CBF was decreased in a brain region consistent with symptoms when MRI was performed less than 14 hours after onset (n=7 patients) and increased if the MRI was performed 17 hours or more after (n=4 MRIs). MRI-ASL appears to be a promising tool for the diagnostic workup and differentials exclusion in paediatric migraine with aura. Constant and time-consistent non-territorial CBF modifications were found in our sample providing additional insight to migraine with aura pathophysiology. The authors encourage implementing this sequence at the acute phase of unexplained paediatric neurological deficits, with or without accompanying headache. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  17. Comparison of quantitative perfusion imaging using arterial spin labeling at 1.5 and 4.0 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiongjiong; Alsop, David C; Li, Lin; Listerud, John; Gonzalez-At, Julio B; Schnall, Mitchell D; Detre, John A

    2002-08-01

    High-field arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion MRI is appealing because it provides not only increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), but also advantages in terms of labeling due to the increased relaxation time T(1) of labeled blood. In the present study, we provide a theoretical framework for the dependence of the ASL signal on the static field strength, followed by experimental validation in which a multislice pulsed ASL (PASL) technique was carried out at 4T and compared with PASL and continuous ASL (CASL) techniques at 1.5T, both in the resting state and during motor activation. The resting-state data showed an SNR ratio of 2.3:1.4:1 in the gray matter and a contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of 2.7:1.1:1 between the gray and white matter for the difference perfusion images acquired using 4T PASL, 1.5T CASL, and 1.5T PASL, respectively. However, the functional data acquired using 4T PASL did not show significantly improved sensitivity to motor cortex activation compared with the 1.5T functional data, with reduced fractional perfusion signal change and increased intersubject variability. Possible reasons for these experimental results, including susceptibility effects and physiological noise, are discussed. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Quantitative measurement of blood flow in paediatric brain tumours—a comparative study of dynamic susceptibility contrast and multi time-point arterial spin labelled MRI

    PubMed Central

    Abernethy, Laurence; Pizer, Barry; Avula, Shivaram; Parkes, Laura M

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Arterial spin-labelling (ASL) MRI uses intrinsic blood water to quantify the cerebral blood flow (CBF), removing the need for the injection of a gadolinium-based contrast agent used for conventional perfusion imaging such as dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC). Owing to the non-invasive nature of the technique, ASL is an attractive option for use in paediatric patients. This work compared DSC and multi-timepoint ASL measures of CBF in paediatric brain tumours. Methods: Patients (n = 23; 20 low-grade tumours and 3 high-grade tumours) had DSC and multi-timepoint ASL with and without vascular crushers (VC). VC removes the contribution from larger vessel blood flow. Mean perfusion metrics were extracted from control and T1-enhanced tumour regions of interest (ROIs): arterial arrival time (AAT) and CBF from the ASL images with and without VC, relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF), relative cerebral blood volume, delay time (DT) and mean transit time (MTT) from the DSC images. Results: Significant correlations existed for: AAT and DT (r = 0.77, p = 0.0002) and CBF and rCBF (r = 0.56, p = 0.02) in control ROIs for ASL-noVC. No significant correlations existed between DSC and ASL measures in the tumour region. Significant differences between control and tumour ROI were found for MTT (p < 0.001) and rCBF (p < 0.005) measures. Conclusion: Significant correlations between ASL-noVC and DSC measures in the normal brain suggest that DSC is most sensitive to macrovascular blood flow. The absence of significant correlations within the tumour ROI suggests that ASL is sensitive to different physiological mechanisms compared with DSC measures. Advances in knowledge: ASL provides information which is comparable with that of DSC in healthy tissues, but appears to reflect a different physiology in tumour tissues. PMID:26975495

  19. Multimodal MRI can identify perfusion and metabolic changes in the invasive margin of glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Young, Adam M.H.; Scotton, William J.; Ching, Jared; Mohsen, Laila A.; Boonzaier, Natalie R.; Lupson, Victoria C.; Griffiths, John R.; McLean, Mary A.; Larkin, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To use perfusion and magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy to compare the diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)‐defined invasive and noninvasive regions. Invasion of normal brain is a cardinal feature of glioblastomas (GBM) and a major cause of treatment failure. DTI can identify invasive regions. Materials and Methods In all, 50 GBM patients were imaged preoperatively at 3T with anatomic sequences, DTI, dynamic susceptibility perfusion MR (DSCI), and multivoxel spectroscopy. The DTI and DSCI data were coregistered to the spectroscopy data and regions of interest (ROIs) were made in the invasive (determined by DTI), noninvasive regions, and normal brain. Values of relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), N‐acetyl aspartate (NAA), myoinositol (mI), total choline (Cho), and glutamate + glutamine (Glx) normalized to creatine (Cr) and Cho/NAA were measured at each ROI. Results Invasive regions showed significant increases in rCBV, suggesting angiogenesis (invasive rCBV 1.64 [95% confidence interval, CI: 1.5–1.76] vs. noninvasive 1.14 [1.09–1.18]; P < 0.001), Cho/Cr (invasive 0.42 [0.38–0.46] vs. noninvasive 0.35 [0.31–0.38]; P = 0.02) and Cho/NAA (invasive 0.54 [0.41–0.68] vs. noninvasive 0.37 [0.29–0.45]; P = < 0.03), suggesting proliferation, and Glx/Cr (invasive 1.54 [1.27–1.82] vs. noninvasive 1.3 [1.13–1.47]; P = 0.028), suggesting glutamate release; and a significantly reduced NAA/Cr (invasive 0.95 [0.85–1.05] vs. noninvasive 1.19 [1.06–1.31]; P = 0.008). The mI/Cr was not different between the three ROIs (invasive 1.2 [0.99–1.41] vs. noninvasive 1.3 [1.14–1.46]; P = 0.68). In the noninvasive regions, the values were not different from normal brain. Conclusion Combining DTI to identify the invasive region with perfusion and spectroscopy, we can identify changes in invasive regions not seen in noninvasive regions. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;43:487–494. PMID:26140696

  20. Perfusion and vascular permeability: basic concepts and measurement in DCE-CT and DCE-MRI.

    PubMed

    Cuenod, C A; Balvay, D

    2013-12-01

    The microvascular network formed by the capillaries supplies the tissues and permits their function. It provides a considerable surface area for exchanges between blood and tissues. All pathological conditions cause changes in the microcirculation. These changes can be used as imaging biomarkers for the diagnosis of lesions and optimisation of treatment. Among the many imaging techniques developed to study the microcirculation, the analysis of the tissue kinetics of intravenously injected contrast agents is the most widely used, either as positive enhancement for CT, T1-weighted MRI and ultrasound - dynamic contrast-enhanced-imaging (DCE-imaging) - or negative enhancement in T2*-weighted brain MRI - dynamic susceptibility contrast-MRI (DSC-MRI) -. Acquisition involves an injection of contrast agent during the acquisition of a dynamic series of images on a zone of interest. These kinetics may be analyzed visually, to define qualitative criteria, or with software using mathematical modelling, to extract quantitative physiological parameters. The results depend on the acquisition conditions (type of imaging device, imaging mode, frequency and total duration of acquisition), the type of contrast agent, the data pre-processing (motion correction, conversion of the signal into concentration) and the data analysis method. Because of these multiple choices it is necessary to understand the physiological processes involved and understand the advantages and limits of each strategy.

  1. Resting Cerebral Blood Flow Alterations in Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury: An Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, John; Patel, Sunil; Avants, Brian; Europa, Eduardo; Wang, Jiongjiong; Slattery, John; Gee, James C.; Coslett, H. Branch; Detre, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Non-invasive measurement of resting state cerebral blood flow (CBF) may reflect alterations of brain structure and function after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, previous imaging studies of resting state brain in chronic TBI have been limited by several factors, including measurement in relative rather than absolute units, use of crude spatial registration methods, exclusion of subjects with substantial focal lesions, and exposure to ionizing radiation, which limits repeated assessments. This study aimed to overcome those obstacles by measuring absolute CBF with an arterial spin labeling perfusion fMRI technique, and using an image preprocessing protocol that is optimized for brains with mixed diffuse and focal injuries characteristic of moderate and severe TBI. Resting state CBF was quantified in 27 individuals with moderate to severe TBI in the chronic stage, and 22 demographically matched healthy controls. In addition to global CBF reductions in the TBI subjects, more prominent regional hypoperfusion was found in the posterior cingulate cortices, the thalami, and multiple locations in the frontal cortices. Diffuse injury, as assessed by tensor-based morphometry, was mainly associated with reduced CBF in the posterior cingulate cortices and the thalami, where the greatest volume losses were detected. Hypoperfusion in superior and middle frontal cortices, in contrast, was associated with focal lesions. These results suggest that structural lesions, both focal and diffuse, are the main contributors to the absolute CBF alterations seen in chronic TBI, and that CBF may serve as a tool to assess functioning neuronal volume. We also speculate that resting reductions in posterior cingulate perfusion may reflect alterations in the default-mode network, and may contribute to the attentional deficits common in TBI. PMID:20528163

  2. Simultaneous laser Doppler flowmetry and arterial spin labeling MRI for measurement of functional perfusion changes in the cortex.

    PubMed

    He, Jiabao; Devonshire, Ian M; Mayhew, John E W; Papadakis, Nikos G

    2007-02-15

    This study compares laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) for the measurement of functional changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). The two methods were applied concurrently in a paradigm of electrical whisker stimulation in the anaesthetised rat. Multi-channel LDF was used, with each channel corresponding to different fiber separation (and thus measurement depth). Continuous ASL was applied using separate imaging and labeling coils at 3 T. Careful experimental set up ensured that both techniques recorded from spatially concordant regions of the barrel cortex, where functional responses were maximal. Strong correlations were demonstrated between CBF changes measured by each LDF channel and ASL in terms of maximum response magnitude and response time-course within a 6-s-long temporal resolution imposed by ASL. Quantitatively, the measurements of the most superficial LDF channels agreed strongly with those of ASL, whereas the deeper LDF channels underestimated consistently the ASL measurement. It was thus confirmed that LDF quantifies CBF changes consistently at a superficial level, and for this case the two methods provided concordant measures of functional CBF changes, despite their essentially different physical principles and spatiotemporal characteristics.

  3. Increased cortical capillary transit time heterogeneity in Alzheimer's disease: a DSC-MRI perfusion study.

    PubMed

    Eskildsen, Simon F; Gyldensted, Louise; Nagenthiraja, Kartheeban; Nielsen, Rune B; Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Dalby, Rikke B; Frandsen, Jesper; Rodell, Anders; Gyldensted, Carsten; Jespersen, Sune N; Lund, Torben E; Mouridsen, Kim; Brændgaard, Hans; Østergaard, Leif

    2017-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau and neurotoxic Aβ in the brain parenchyma. Hypoxia caused by microvascular changes and disturbed capillary flows could stimulate this build-up of AD-specific proteins in the brain. In this study, we compared cerebral microcirculation in a cohort of AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients with that of age-matched controls, all without a history of diabetes or of hypertension for more than 2 years, using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI). Vascular flow disturbances were quantified using a parametric model and mapped to the mid-cortical surface for group-wise statistical analysis. We found widespread hypoperfusion in patients compared with controls and identified areas of increased relative capillary transit time heterogeneity (RTH), consistent with low tissue oxygen tension. Notably, RTH was positively correlated with white matter hyperintensities and positively correlated with symptom severity in the patient cohort. These correlations extended over large parts of the temporal, parietal, and frontal cortices. The results support the hypothesis of disturbed capillary flow patterns in AD and suggest that DSC-MRI may provide imaging biomarkers of impaired cerebral microcirculation in AD.

  4. Structural and Perfusion Abnormalities of Brain on MRI and Technetium-99m-ECD SPECT in Children With Cerebral Palsy: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Rana, Kamer Singh; Narwal, Varun; Chauhan, Lokesh; Singh, Giriraj; Sharma, Monica; Chauhan, Suneel

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral palsy has traditionally been associated with hypoxic ischemic brain damage. This study was undertaken to demonstrate structural and perfusion brain abnormalities. Fifty-six children diagnosed clinically as having cerebral palsy were studied between 1 to 14 years of age and were subjected to 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Brain and Technetium-99m-ECD brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan. Male to female ratio was 1.8:1 with a mean age of 4.16 ± 2.274 years. Spastic cerebral palsy was the most common type, observed in 91%. Birth asphyxia was the most common etiology (69.6%). White matter changes (73.2%) such as periventricular leukomalacia and corpus callosal thinning were the most common findings on MRI. On SPECT all cases except one revealed perfusion impairments in different regions of brain. MRI is more sensitive in detecting white matter changes, whereas SPECT is better in detecting cortical and subcortical gray matter abnormalities of perfusion. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. DCE-MRI of hepatocellular carcinoma: perfusion quantification with Tofts model versus shutter-speed model—initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Jajamovich, Guido H.; Huang, Wei; Besa, Cecilia; Li, Xin; Afzal, Aneela; Dyvorne, Hadrien A.; Taouli, Bachir

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) perfusion and flow with the fast exchange regime-allowed Shutter-Speed model (SSM) compared to the Tofts model (TM). Materials and methods In this prospective study, 25 patients with HCC underwent DCE-MRI. ROIs were placed in liver parenchyma, portal vein, aorta and HCC lesions. Signal intensities were analyzed employing dual-input TM and SSM models. ART (arterial fraction), Ktrans (contrast agent transfer rate constant from plasma to extravascular extracellular space), ve (extravascular extracellular volume fraction), kep (contrast agent intravasation rate constant), and τi (mean intracellular water molecule lifetime) were compared between liver parenchyma and HCC, and ART, Ktrans, ve and kep were compared between models using Wilcoxon tests and limits of agreement. Test–retest reproducibility was assessed in 10 patients. Results ART and ve obtained with TM; ART, ve, ke and τi obtained with SSM were significantly different between liver parenchyma and HCC (p < 0.04). Parameters showed variable reproducibility (CV range 14.7–66.5 % for both models). Liver Ktrans and ve; HCC ve and kep were significantly different when estimated with the two models (p < 0.03). Conclusion Our results show differences when computed between the TM and the SSM. However, these differences are smaller than parameter reproducibilities and may be of limited clinical significance. PMID:26646522

  6. Comparative study of DSC-PWI and 3D-ASL in ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shui-xia; Yao, Yi-hao; Zhang, Shun; Zhu, Wen-jie; Tang, Xiang-yu; Qin, Yuan-yuan; Zhao, Ling-yun; Liu, Cheng-xia; Zhu, Wen-zhen

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively analyze the relationship between three dimensional arterial spin labeling (3D-ASL) and dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion weighted imaging (DSC-PWI) in ischemic stroke patients. Thirty patients with ischemic stroke were included in this study. All subjects underwent routine magnetic resonance imaging scanning, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), 3D-ASL and DSC-PWI on a 3.0T MR scanner. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn on the cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps (derived from ASL) and multi-parametric DSC perfusion maps, and then, the absolute and relative values of ASL-CBF, DSC-derived CBF, and DSC-derived mean transit time (MTT) were calculated. The relationships between ASL and DSC parameters were analyzed using Pearson's correlation analysis. Receiver operative characteristic (ROC) curves were performed to define the thresholds of relative value of ASL-CBF (rASL) that could best predict DSC-CBF reduction and MTT prolongation. Relative ASL better correlated with CBF and MTT in the anterior circulation with the Pearson correlation coefficients (R) values being 0.611 (P<0.001) and-0.610 (P<0.001) respectively. ROC curves demonstrated that when rASL ≤0.585, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for predicting ROIs with rCBF<0.9 were 92.3%, 63.6% and 76.6% respectively. When rASL ≤0.952, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for predicting ROIs rMTT>1.0 were 75.7%, 89.2% and 87.8% respectively. ASL-CBF map has better linear correlations with DSC-derived parameters (DSC-CBF and MTT) in anterior circulation in ischemic stroke patients. Additionally, when rASL is lower than 0.585, it could predict DSC-CBF decrease with moderate accuracy. If rASL values range from 0.585 to 0.952, we just speculate the prolonged MTT.

  7. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis detected by arterial spin-labeled perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in subacute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Guan, Min; Lian, Hao-Jun; Ma, Li-Jia; Shang, Jun-Kui; He, Shuang; Ma, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Mi-Lan; Li, Zi-Yuan; Wang, Mei-Yun; Shi, Da-Peng; Zhang, Jie-Wen

    2014-10-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) was a common radiological phenomenon manifested as reduced blood flow and metabolism in the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to a supratentorial cerebral lesion. The hypoperfusion and hypometabolism in the contralateral cerebellum in CCD was traditionally detected by positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The present prospective study aimed to assess the detection of CCD in subacute stage ischemic stroke by arterial spin-labeling (ASL) perfusion technique with a 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. ASL images were obtained from 46 patients with supratentorial ischemic stroke at subacute stage. Regional cerebral blood flow values in the cerebellar hemispheres were measured on a region of interest basis. Twenty-four of 46 (52%) patients showed CCD phenomenon by ASL-MRI method, which was in line with the PET/SPECT series. Infarctions in basal ganglia areas are prone to cause CCD. With advantages in easy acquisition and no radiation, ASL-MRI seems to be an ideal tool for the detection and follow-up of CCD. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Defining a local arterial input function for perfusion MRI using independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Calamante, Fernando; Mørup, Morten; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2004-10-01

    Quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) using dynamic-susceptibility contrast MRI relies on the deconvolution of the arterial input function (AIF), which is commonly estimated from the signal changes in a major artery. However, it has been shown that the presence of bolus delay/dispersion between the artery and the tissue of interest can be a significant source of error. These effects could be minimized if a local AIF were used, although the measurement of a local AIF can be problematic. This work describes a new methodology to define a local AIF using independent component analysis (ICA). The methodology was tested on data from patients with various cerebrovascular abnormalities and compared to the conventional approach of using a global AIF. The new methodology produced higher CBF and shorter mean transit time values (compared to the global AIF case) in areas with distorted AIFs, suggesting that the effects of delay/dispersion are minimized. The minimization of these effects using the calculated local AIF should lead to a more accurate quantification of CBF, which can have important implications for diagnosis and management of patients with cerebral ischemia.

  9. First-pass myocardial perfusion MRI with reduced subendocardial dark-rim artifact using optimized Cartesian sampling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhengwei; Bi, Xiaoming; Wei, Janet; Yang, Hsin-Jung; Dharmakumar, Rohan; Arsanjani, Reza; Bairey Merz, C Noel; Li, Debiao; Sharif, Behzad

    2017-02-01

    The presence of subendocardial dark-rim artifact (DRA) remains an ongoing challenge in first-pass perfusion (FPP) cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We propose a free-breathing FPP imaging scheme with Cartesian sampling that is optimized to minimize the DRA and readily enables near-instantaneous image reconstruction. The proposed FPP method suppresses Gibbs ringing effects-a major underlying factor for the DRA-by "shaping" the underlying point spread function through a two-step process: 1) an undersampled Cartesian sampling scheme that widens the k-space coverage compared to the conventional scheme; and 2) a modified parallel-imaging scheme that incorporates optimized apodization (k-space data filtering) to suppress Gibbs-ringing effects. Healthy volunteer studies (n = 10) were performed to compare the proposed method against the conventional Cartesian technique-both using a saturation-recovery gradient-echo sequence at 3T. Furthermore, FPP imaging studies using the proposed method were performed in infarcted canines (n = 3), and in two symptomatic patients with suspected coronary microvascular dysfunction for assessment of myocardial hypoperfusion. Width of the DRA and the number of DRA-affected myocardial segments were significantly reduced in the proposed method compared to the conventional approach (width: 1.3 vs. 2.9 mm, P < 0.001; number of segments: 2.6 vs. 8.7; P < 0.0001). The number of slices with severe DRA was markedly lower for the proposed method (by 10-fold). The reader-assigned image quality scores were similar (P = 0.2), although the quantified myocardial signal-to-noise ratio was lower for the proposed method (P < 0.05). Animal studies showed that the proposed method can detect subendocardial perfusion defects and patient results were consistent with the gold-standard invasive test. The proposed free-breathing Cartesian FPP imaging method significantly reduces the prevalence of severe DRAs compared to the conventional approach

  10. Current concepts on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) perfusion-diffusion assessment in acute ischaemic stroke: a review & an update for the clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto; Lopez-Mejia, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    Recently, several medical societies published joint statements about imaging recommendations for acute stroke and transient ischaemic attack patients. In following with these published guidelines, we considered it appropriate to present a brief, practical and updated review of the most relevant concepts on the MRI assessment of acute stroke. Basic principles of the clinical interpretation of diffusion, perfusion, and MRI angiography (as part of a global MRI protocol) are discussed with accompanying images for each sequence. Brief comments on incidence and differential diagnosis are also included, together with limitations of the techniques and levels of evidence. The purpose of this article is to present knowledge that can be applied in day-to-day clinical practice in specialized stroke units or emergency rooms to attend patients with acute ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack according to international standards. PMID:25758570

  11. Cerebral Blood Flow Measurement Using fMRI and PET: A Cross-Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jean J.; Wieckowska, Marguerite; Meyer, Ernst; Pike, G. Bruce

    2008-01-01

    An important aspect of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the study of brain hemodynamics, and MR arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion imaging has gained wide acceptance as a robust and noninvasive technique. However, the cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements obtained with ASL fMRI have not been fully validated, particularly during global CBF modulations. We present a comparison of cerebral blood flow changes (ΔCBF) measured using a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL perfusion method to those obtained using H2 15O PET, which is the current gold standard for in vivo imaging of CBF. To study regional and global CBF changes, a group of 10 healthy volunteers were imaged under identical experimental conditions during presentation of 5 levels of visual stimulation and one level of hypercapnia. The CBF changes were compared using 3 types of region-of-interest (ROI) masks. FAIR measurements of CBF changes were found to be slightly lower than those measured with PET (average ΔCBF of 21.5 ± 8.2% for FAIR versus 28.2 ± 12.8% for PET at maximum stimulation intensity). Nonetheless, there was a strong correlation between measurements of the two modalities. Finally, a t-test comparison of the slopes of the linear fits of PET versus ASL ΔCBF for all 3 ROI types indicated no significant difference from unity (P > .05). PMID:18825270

  12. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: fundamentals and application to the evaluation of the peripheral perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Yaron; Partovi, Sasan; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Amarteifio, Erick; Bäuerle, Tobias; Weber, Marc-André; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The ability to ascertain information pertaining to peripheral perfusion through the analysis of tissues’ temporal reaction to the inflow of contrast agent (CA) was first recognized in the early 1990’s. Similar to other functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques such as arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) was at first restricted to studies of the brain. Over the last two decades the spectrum of ailments, which have been studied with DCE-MRI, has been extensively broadened and has come to include pathologies of the heart notably infarction, stroke and further cerebral afflictions, a wide range of neoplasms with an emphasis on antiangiogenic treatment and early detection, as well as investigations of the peripheral vascular and musculoskeletal systems. Applications to peripheral perfusion DCE-MRI possesses an unparalleled capacity to quantitatively measure not only perfusion but also other diverse microvascular parameters such as vessel permeability and fluid volume fractions. More over the method is capable of not only assessing blood flowing through an organ, but in contrast to other noninvasive methods, the actual tissue perfusion. These unique features have recently found growing application in the study of the peripheral vascular system and most notably in the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). Review outline The first part of this review will elucidate the fundamentals of data acquisition and interpretation of DCE-MRI, two areas that often remain baffling to the clinical and investigating physician because of their complexity. The second part will discuss developments and exciting perspectives of DCE-MRI regarding the assessment of perfusion in the extremities. Emerging clinical applications of DCE-MRI will be reviewed with a special focus on investigation of physiology and pathophysiology of the microvascular and

  13. Distinct cerebral perfusion patterns in FTLD and AD

    PubMed Central

    Hu, W.T.; Wang, Z.; Lee, V.M.-Y.; Trojanowski, J.Q.; Detre, J.A.; Grossman, M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We examined the utility of distinguishing between patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and Alzheimer disease (AD) using quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) imaging with arterial spin labeled (ASL) perfusion MRI. Methods: Forty-two patients with FTLD and 18 patients with AD, defined by autopsy or CSF-derived biomarkers for AD, and 23 matched controls were imaged with a continuous ASL method to quantify CBF maps covering the entire brain. Results: Patients with FTLD and AD showed distinct patterns of hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion. Compared with controls, patients with FTLD showed significant hypoperfusion in regions of the frontal lobe bilaterally, and hyperperfusion in posterior cingulate and medial parietal/precuneus regions. Compared with controls, patients with AD showed significant hypoperfusion in the medial parietal/precuneus and lateral parietal cortex, and hyperperfusion in regions of the frontal lobe. Direct comparison of patient groups showed significant inferior, medial, and dorsolateral frontal hypoperfusion in FTLD, and significant hypoperfusion in bilateral lateral temporal-parietal and medial parietal/precuneus regions in AD. Conclusions: Doubly dissociated areas of hypoperfusion in FTLD and AD are consistent with areas of significant histopathologic burden in these groups. ASL is a potentially useful biomarker for distinguishing patients with these neurodegenerative diseases. GLOSSARY Aβ42 = β-amyloid1-42; AD = Alzheimer disease; ASL = arterial spin labeling; bvFTD = behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia; cASL = continuous arterial spin labeling; CBS = corticobasal syndrome; CBF = cerebral blood flow; dACC = dorsal anterior cingulate cortex; dlPFC = dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; FDR = false detection rate; FTLD = frontotemporal lobar degeneration; GM = gray matter; iFC = inferior frontal cortex; MCI = mild cognitive impairment; MNI = Montreal Neurological Institute; mTC = middle temporal cortex; OFC

  14. Contrast enhanced MRI characterization of the perfusion territories fed by individual coronary arteries in ex-vivo porcine heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeverenyi, Nikolaus M.; Searles, Bruce; Pertsov, Arkady

    2008-03-01

    Sudden cardiac death is often caused by ventricular arrhythmias. These arrhythmias are believed to originate from the border zones where tissue was damaged by an ischemic event involving the coronary arteries. The specific mechanisms relating the geometry of these territories to the electrical behavior remains poorly understood. A major problem is the lack of detailed information describing the morphology of the affected perfusion bed. We present the first perfusion MR images of excised whole heart preparations where the irregular boundaries of perfusion territories are described. The filling pattern and final volume of the RCA perfusion territory are clearly visualized.

  15. Near-infrared spectroscopy versus magnetic resonance imaging to study brain perfusion in newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy treated with hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Wintermark, P; Hansen, A; Warfield, S K; Dukhovny, D; Soul, J S

    2014-01-15

    The measurement of brain perfusion may provide valuable information for assessment and treatment of newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). While arterial spin labeled perfusion (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides noninvasive and direct measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) values, it is logistically challenging to obtain. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) might be an alternative, as it permits noninvasive and continuous monitoring of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygenation at the bedside. The purpose of this study is to determine the correlation between measurements of brain perfusion by NIRS and by MRI in term newborns with HIE treated with hypothermia. In this prospective cohort study, ASL-MRI and NIRS performed during hypothermia were used to assess brain perfusion in these newborns. Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) values, measured from 1-2 MRI scans for each patient, were compared to mixed venous saturation values (SctO2) recorded by NIRS just before and after each MRI. Analysis included groupings into moderate versus severe HIE based on their initial background pattern of amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram. Twelve concomitant recordings were obtained of seven neonates. Strong correlation was found between SctO2 and CBF in asphyxiated newborns with severe HIE (r=0.88; p value=0.0085). Moreover, newborns with severe HIE had lower CBF (likely lower oxygen supply) and extracted less oxygen (likely lower oxygen demand or utilization) when comparing SctO2 and CBF to those with moderate HIE. NIRS is an effective bedside tool to monitor and understand brain perfusion changes in term asphyxiated newborns, which in conjunction with precise measurements of CBF obtained by MRI at particular times, may help tailor neuroprotective strategies in term newborns with HIE. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy versus Magnetic Resonance Imaging To Study Brain Perfusion in Newborns with Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy Treated with Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Wintermark, P.; Hansen, A.; Warfield, SK.; Dukhovny, D.; Soul, JS.

    2014-01-01

    Background The measurement of brain perfusion may provide valuable information for assessment and treatment of newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). While arterial spin labeled perfusion (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides noninvasive and direct measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) values, it is logistically challenging to obtain. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) might be an alternative, as it permits noninvasive and continuous monitoring of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygenation at the bedside. Objective The purpose of this study is to determine the correlation between measurements of brain perfusion by NIRS and by MRI in term newborns with HIE treated with hypothermia. Design/Methods In this prospective cohort study, ASL-MRI and NIRS performed during hypothermia were used to assess brain perfusion in these newborns. Regional cerebral blood flow values (CBF), measured from 1–2 MRI scans for each patient, were compared to mixed venous saturation values (SctO2) recorded by NIRS just before and after each MRI. Analysis included groupings into moderate versus severe HIE based on their initial background pattern of amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram. Results Twelve concomitant recordings were obtained of seven neonates. Strong correlation was found between SctO2 and CBF in asphyxiated newborns with severe HIE (r = 0.88; p value = 0.0085). Moreover, newborns with severe HIE had lower CBF (likely lower oxygen supply) and extracted less oxygen (likely lower oxygen demand or utilization) when comparing SctO2 and CBF to those with moderate HIE. Conclusions NIRS is an effective bedside tool to monitor and understand brain perfusion changes in term asphyxiated newborns, which in conjunction with precise measurements of CBF obtained by MRI at particular times, may help tailor neuroprotective strategies in term newborns with HIE. PMID:23631990

  17. The pediatric template of brain perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Avants, Brian B; Duda, Jeffrey T; Kilroy, Emily; Krasileva, Kate; Jann, Kay; Kandel, Benjamin T; Tustison, Nicholas J; Yan, Lirong; Jog, Mayank; Smith, Robert; Wang, Yi; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) captures the dynamics of brain development with multiple modalities that quantify both structure and function. These measurements may yield valuable insights into the neural patterns that mark healthy maturation or that identify early risk for psychiatric disorder. The Pediatric Template of Brain Perfusion (PTBP) is a free and public neuroimaging resource that will help accelerate the understanding of childhood brain development as seen through the lens of multiple modality neuroimaging and in relation to cognitive and environmental factors. The PTBP uses cross-sectional and longitudinal MRI to quantify cortex, white matter, resting state functional connectivity and brain perfusion, as measured by Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), in 120 children 7–18 years of age. We describe the PTBP and show, as a demonstration of validity, that global summary measurements capture the trajectories that demarcate critical turning points in brain maturation. This novel resource will allow a more detailed understanding of the network-level, structural and functional landmarks that are obtained during normal adolescent brain development. PMID:25977810

  18. The pediatric template of brain perfusion.

    PubMed

    Avants, Brian B; Duda, Jeffrey T; Kilroy, Emily; Krasileva, Kate; Jann, Kay; Kandel, Benjamin T; Tustison, Nicholas J; Yan, Lirong; Jog, Mayank; Smith, Robert; Wang, Yi; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) captures the dynamics of brain development with multiple modalities that quantify both structure and function. These measurements may yield valuable insights into the neural patterns that mark healthy maturation or that identify early risk for psychiatric disorder. The Pediatric Template of Brain Perfusion (PTBP) is a free and public neuroimaging resource that will help accelerate the understanding of childhood brain development as seen through the lens of multiple modality neuroimaging and in relation to cognitive and environmental factors. The PTBP uses cross-sectional and longitudinal MRI to quantify cortex, white matter, resting state functional connectivity and brain perfusion, as measured by Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), in 120 children 7-18 years of age. We describe the PTBP and show, as a demonstration of validity, that global summary measurements capture the trajectories that demarcate critical turning points in brain maturation. This novel resource will allow a more detailed understanding of the network-level, structural and functional landmarks that are obtained during normal adolescent brain development.

  19. ASAP (Automatic Software for ASL Processing): A toolbox for processing Arterial Spin Labeling images.

    PubMed

    Mato Abad, Virginia; García-Polo, Pablo; O'Daly, Owen; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Zelaya, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    The method of Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) has experienced a significant rise in its application to functional imaging, since it is the only technique capable of measuring blood perfusion in a truly non-invasive manner. Currently, there are no commercial packages for processing ASL data and there is no recognized standard for normalizing ASL data to a common frame of reference. This work describes a new Automated Software for ASL Processing (ASAP) that can automatically process several ASL datasets. ASAP includes functions for all stages of image pre-processing: quantification, skull-stripping, co-registration, partial volume correction and normalization. To assess the applicability and validity of the toolbox, this work shows its application in the study of hypoperfusion in a sample of healthy subjects at risk of progressing to Alzheimer's disease. ASAP requires limited user intervention, minimizing the possibility of random and systematic errors, and produces cerebral blood flow maps that are ready for statistical group analysis. The software is easy to operate and results in excellent quality of spatial normalization. The results found in this evaluation study are consistent with previous studies that find decreased perfusion in Alzheimer's patients in similar regions and demonstrate the applicability of ASAP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging and three-dimensional arterial spin labelling perfusion imaging in the differentiation of parasellar meningioma and cavernous haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hua-Feng; Lou, Xin; Liu, Meng-Yu; Wang, Yu-Lin; Wang, Yan; Chen, Zhi-Ye; Shi, Kai-Ning; Ma, Lin

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and three-dimensional arterial spin labelling perfusion imaging (3D-ASL) in distinguishing cavernous haemangioma from parasellar meningioma, using histological data as a reference standard. Patients with parasellar meningioma or parasellar cavernous haemangioma underwent conventional T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) followed by DWI and 3D-ASL using a 3.0 Tesla MRI. The minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (minADC) from DWI and the maximal normalized cerebral blood flow (nCBF) from 3D-ASL were measured in each tumour. Diagnosis was confirmed by histology. MinADC was significantly lower and nCBF significantly higher in meningioma (n = 19) than cavernous haemangioma (n = 15). There was a significant negative correlation between minADC and nCBF (r = -0.605). DWI and 3D-ASL are useful in differentiating cavernous haemangiomas from parasellar meningiomas, particularly in situations when the appearance on conventional MRI sequences is otherwise ambiguous. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. Cerebral Blood Flow Alterations as Assessed by 3D ASL in Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment: A Marker for Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yawen; Cao, Wenwei; Ding, Weina; Wang, Yao; Han, Xu; Zhou, Yan; Xu, Qun; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal reductions in cortical cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been identified in subcortical vascular cognitive impairment (SVCI). However, little is known about the pattern of CBF reduction in relation with the degree of cognitive impairment. CBF measured with three-dimensional (3D) Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) helps detect functional changes in subjects with SVCI. We aimed to compare CBF maps in subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD) subjects with and without cognitive impairment and to detect the relationship of the regions of CBF reduction in the brain with the degree of cognitive impairment according to the z-score. A total of 53 subjects with SVCI and 23 matched SIVD subjects without cognitive impairment (controls), underwent a whole-brain 3D ASL MRI in the resting state. Regional CBF (rCBF) was compared voxel wise by using an analysis of variance design in a statistical parametric mapping program, with patient age and sex as covariates. Correlations were calculated between the rCBF value in the whole brain and the z-score in the 53 subjects with SVCI. Compared with the control subjects, SVCI group demonstrated diffuse decreased CBF in the brain. Significant positive correlations were determined in the rCBF values in the left hippocampus, left superior temporal pole gyrus, right superior frontal orbital lobe, right medial frontal orbital lobe, right middle temporal lobe, left thalamus and right insula with the z-scores in SVCI group. The noninvasively quantified resting CBF demonstrated altered CBF distributions in the SVCI brain. The deficit brain perfusions in the temporal and frontal lobe, hippocampus, thalamus and insula was related to the degree of cognitive impairment. Its relationship to cognition indicates the clinical relevance of this functional marker. Thus, our results provide further evidence for the mechanisms underlying the cognitive deficit in patients with SVCI. PMID:27630562

  2. Perfusion patterns in postictal 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT after coregistration with MRI in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, R; Cook, M.; Binns, D.; Desmond, P.; Kilpatrick, C.; Murrie, V.; Morris, K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess patterns of postictal cerebral blood flow in the mesial temporal lobe by coregistration of postictal 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT with MRI in patients with confirmed mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.
METHODS—Ten postictal and interictal 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT scans were coregistered with MRI in 10 patients with confirmed mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Volumetric tracings of the hippocampus and amygdala from the MRI were superimposed on the postictal and interictal SPECT. Asymmetries in hippocampal and amygdala SPECT signal were then calculated using the equation:
 % Asymmetry =100 × (right − left) / (right + left)/2.
RESULTS—In the postictal studies, quantitative measurements of amygdala SPECT intensities were greatest on the side of seizure onset in all cases, with an average % asymmetry of 11.1, range 5.2-21.9.Hippocampal intensities were greatest on the side of seizure onset in six studies, with an average % asymmetry of 9.6, range 4.7-12.0.In four scans the hippocampal intensities were less on the side of seizure onset, with an average % asymmetry of 10.2, range 5.7-15.5.There was no localising quantitative pattern in interictal studies.
CONCLUSIONS—Postictal SPECT shows distinctive perfusion patterns when coregistered with MRI, which assist in lateralisation of temporal lobe seizures. Hyperperfusion in the region of the amygdala is more consistently lateralising than hyperperfusion in the region of the hippocampus in postictal studies.

 PMID:9285464

  3. Alterations of the Blood-Brain Barrier and Regional Perfusion in Tumor Development: MRI Insights from a Rat C6 Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Huhndorf, Monika; Moussavi, Amir; Kramann, Nadine; Will, Olga; Hattermann, Kirsten; Stadelmann, Christine; Jansen, Olav

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Angiogenesis and anti-angiogenetic medications play an important role in progression and therapy of glioblastoma. In this context, in vivo characterization of the blood-brain-barrier and tumor vascularization may be important for individual prognosis and therapy optimization. Methods We analyzed perfusion and capillary permeability of C6-gliomas in rats at different stages of tumor-growth by contrast enhanced MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI at 7 Tesla. The analyses included maps of relative cerebral blood volume (CBV) and signal recovery derived from DSC data over a time period of up to 35 days after tumor cell injections. Results In all rats tumor progression was accompanied by temporal and spatial changes in CBV and capillary permeability. A leakage of the blood-brain barrier (slow contrast enhancement) was observed as soon as the tumor became detectable on T2-weighted images. Interestingly, areas of strong capillary permeability (fast signal enhancement) were predominantly localized in the center of the tumor. In contrast, the tumor rim was dominated by an increased CBV and showed the highest vessel density compared to the tumor center and the contralateral hemisphere as confirmed by histology. Conclusion Substantial regional differences in the tumor highlight the importance of parameter maps in contrast or in addition to region-of-interest analyses. The data vividly illustrate how MRI including contrast-enhanced and DSC-MRI may contribute to a better understanding of tumor development. PMID:28005983

  4. Simultaneous myocardial strain and dark-blood perfusion imaging using a displacement-encoded MRI pulse sequence.

    PubMed

    Le, Yuan; Stein, Ashley; Berry, Colin; Kellman, Peter; Bennett, Eric E; Taylor, Joni; Lucas, Katherine; Kopace, Rael; Chefd'Hotel, Christophe; Lorenz, Christine H; Croisille, Pierre; Wen, Han

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a displacement-encoded pulse sequence for simultaneous perfusion and strain imaging. Displacement-encoded images in two to three myocardial slices were repeatedly acquired using a single-shot pulse sequence for 3 to 4 min, which covers a bolus infusion of Gadolinium contrast. The magnitudes of the images were T(1) weighted and provided quantitative measures of perfusion, while the phase maps yielded strain measurements. In an acute coronary occlusion swine protocol (n = 9), segmental perfusion measurements were validated against microsphere reference standard with a linear regression (slope 0.986, R(2) = 0.765, Bland-Altman standard deviation = 0.15 mL/min/g). In a group of ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients (n = 11), the scan success rate was 76%. Short-term contrast washout rate and perfusion are highly correlated (R(2) = 0.72), and the pixelwise relationship between circumferential strain and perfusion was better described with a sigmoidal Hill curve than linear functions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring strain and perfusion from a single set of images.

  5. Simultaneous Myocardial Strain and Dark-Blood Perfusion Imaging Using a Displacement-Encoded MRI Pulse Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Le, Yuan; Stein, Ashley; Berry, Colin; Kellman, Peter; Bennett, Eric E.; Taylor, Joni; Lucas, Katherine; Kopace, Rael; Chefd’Hotel, Christophe; Lorenz, Christine H.; Croisille, Pierre; Wen, Han

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a displacement-encoded pulse sequence for simultaneous perfusion and strain imaging. Displacement-encoded images in 2–3 myocardial slices were repeatedly acquired using a single shot pulse sequence for 3 to 4 minutes, which covers a bolus infusion of Gd. The magnitudes of the images were T1 weighted and provided quantitative measures of perfusion, while the phase maps yielded strain measurements. In an acute coronary occlusion swine protocol (n=9), segmental perfusion measurements were validated against microsphere reference standard with a linear regression (slope 0.986, R2 = 0.765, Bland-Altman standard deviation = 0.15 ml/min/g). In a group of ST-elevation myocardial infarction(STEMI) patients (n=11), the scan success rate was 76%. Short-term contrast washout rate and perfusion are highly correlated (R2=0.72), and the pixel-wise relationship between circumferential strain and perfusion was better described with a sigmoidal Hill curve than linear functions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring strain and perfusion from a single set of images. PMID:20544714

  6. WE-G-18C-09: Separating Perfusion and Diffusion Components From Diffusion Weighted MRI of Rectum Tumors Based On Intravoxel Incoherent Motion (IVIM) Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi, N; Wengler, K; Mazaheri, Y; Hunt, M; Deasy, J; Gollub, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Pseudodiffusion arises from the microcirculation of blood in the randomly oriented capillary network and contributes to the signal decay acquired using a multi-b value diffusion weighted (DW)-MRI sequence. This effect is more significant at low b-values and should be properly accounted for in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) calculations. The purpose of this study was to separate perfusion and diffusion component based on a biexponential and a segmented monoexponential model using IVIM analysis Methods. The signal attenuation is modeled as S(b) = S0[(1−f)exp(−bD) + fexp(−bD*)]. Fitting the biexponetial decay leads to the quantification of D, the true diffusion coefficient, D*, the pseudodiffusion coefficient, and f, the perfusion fraction. A nonlinear least squares fit and two segmented monoexponential models were used to derive the values for D, D*,‘and f. In the segmented approach b = 200 s/mm{sup 2} was used as the cut-off value for calculation of D. DW-MRI's of a rectum cancer patient were acquired before chemotherapy, before radiation therapy (RT), and 4 weeks into RT and were investigated as an example case. Results: Mean ADC for the tumor drawn on the DWI cases was 0.93, 1.0 and 1.13 10{sup −3}×mm{sup 2}/s before chemotherapy, before RT and 4 weeks into RT. The mean (D.10{sup −3} × mm{sup 2}/s, D* 10{sup −3} × mm{sup 2}/s, and f %) based on biexponential fit was (0.67, 18.6, and 27.2%), (0.72, 17.7, and 28.9%) and (0.83,15.1, and 30.7%) at these time points. The mean (D, D* f) based on segmented fit was (0.72, 10.5, and 12.1%), (0.72, 8.2, and 17.4%) and (.82, 8.1, 16.5%) Conclusion: ADC values are typically higher than true diffusion coefficients. For tumors with significant perfusion effect, ADC should be analyzed at higher b-values or separated from the perfusion component. Biexponential fit overestimates the perfusion fraction because of increased sensitivity to noise at low b-values.

  7. Accelerated Dual-contrast First-pass Perfusion MRI of the Mouse Heart: Development and Application to Diet-induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Naresh, Nivedita K.; Chen, Xiao; Roy, Rene J.; Antkowiak, Patrick F.; Annex, Brian H.; Epstein, Frederick H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Gene-modified mice may be used to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying abnormal myocardial blood flow (MBF). We sought to develop a quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging technique for mice and to test the hypothesis that myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR) is reduced in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity (DIO). Methods A dual-contrast saturation-recovery sequence with ky-t undersampling and a motion-compensated compressed sensing reconstruction algorithm was developed for first-pass MRI on a small-bore 7T system. Control mice were imaged at rest and with the vasodilators ATL313 and Regadenoson (n=6 each). In addition, we imaged mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 24 weeks. Results In control mice, MBF was 5.7±0.8 ml/g/min at rest and it increased to 11.8±0.6 ml/g/min with ATL313 and to 10.4±0.3 ml/g/min with Regadenoson. In HFD mice we detected normal resting MBF (5.6±0.4 vs. 5.0±0.3 on control diet), low MBF at stress (7.7±0.4 vs. 10.4±0.3 on control diet, p<0.05), and reduced MPR (1.4±0.2 vs. 2.0±0.3 on control diet, p<0.05). Conclusions Accelerated dual-contrast first-pass MRI with motion-compensated compressed sensing provides spatiotemporal resolution suitable for measuring MBF in free-breathing mice, and detected reduced MPR in DIO mice. These techniques may be used to study molecular mechanisms that underlie abnormal myocardial perfusion. PMID:24760707

  8. Organic Nitrate Maintains Bone Marrow Blood Perfusion in Ovariectomized Female Rats: A Dynamic, Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J.; Ko, Chun Hay; Griffith, James F.; Deng, Min; Wong, Hing Lok; Gu, Tao; Huang, Yu

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of nitrate on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone marrow perfusion in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats, and also the effects of nitrate on in vitro osteoblastic activity and osteoclastic differentiation of murine monocyte/macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. Female Sprague–Dawley rats were divided into OVX + nitrate group (isosorbide-5-mononitrate, ISM, 150 mg/kg/ day b.i.d), OVX + vehicle group, and control group. Lumbar spine CT bone densitometry and perfusion MRI were performed on the rats at baseline and week 8 post-OVX. The OVX rats’ BMD decreased by 22.5% ± 5.7% at week 8 (p < 0.001); while the OVX + ISM rats’ BMD decreased by 13.1% ± 2.7% (p < 0.001). The BMD loss difference between the two groups of rats was significant (p = 0.018). The OVX rats’ lumbar vertebral perfusion MRI maximum enhancement (Emax) decreased by 10.3% ± 5.0% at week 8 (p < 0.005), while in OVX + ISM rats, the Emax increased by 5.5% ± 6.9% (p > 0.05). The proliferation of osteoblast-like UMR-106 cells increased significantly with ISM treatment at 0.78 µM to 50 μM. Treatment of UMR-106 cells with ISM also stimulated the BrdU uptake. After the RAW 264.7 cells were co-treated with osteoclastogenesis inducer RANKL and 6.25 μM ~ 100 μM of ISM for 3 days, a trend of dose-dependent increase of osteoclast number was noted. PMID:24300395

  9. Partial ASL extensions for stochastic programming.

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, David

    2010-03-31

    partially completed extensions for stochastic programming to the AMPL/solver interface library (ASL).modeling and experimenting with stochastic recourse problems. This software is not primarily for military applications

  10. Clinical investigation survival prediction in high-grade gliomas by MRI perfusion before and during early stage of RT

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Yue . E-mail: yuecao@med.umich.edu; Tsien, Christina I.; Nagesh, Vijaya; Junck, Larry; Haken, Randall ten; Ross, Brian D.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow can predict the response of high-grade gliomas to radiotherapy (RT) by taking into account spatial heterogeneity and temporal changes in perfusion. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients with high-grade gliomas underwent conformal RT, with magnetic resonance imaging perfusion before and at Weeks 1-2 and 3-4 during RT. Tumor perfusion was classified as high, medium, or low. The prognostic values of pre-RT perfusion and the changes during RT for early prediction of tumor response to RT were evaluated. Results: The fractional high-CBV tumor volume before RT and the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging tumor volume were identified as predictors for survival (p = 0.01). Changes in tumor CBV during the early treatment course also predicted for survival. Better survival was predicted by a decrease in the fractional low-CBV tumor volume at Week 1 of RT vs. before RT, a decrease in the fractional high-CBV tumor volume at Week 3 vs. Week 1 of RT, and a smaller pre-RT fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging tumor volume (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Early temporal changes during RT in heterogeneous regions of high and low perfusion in gliomas might predict for different physiologic responses to RT. This might also open the opportunity to identify tumor subvolumes that are radioresistant and might benefit from intensified RT.

  11. FAIR exempting separate T (1) measurement (FAIREST): a novel technique for online quantitative perfusion imaging and multi-contrast fMRI.

    PubMed

    Lai, S; Wang, J; Jahng, G H

    2001-01-01

    A new pulse sequence, dubbed FAIR exempting separate T(1) measurement (FAIREST) in which a slice-selective saturation recovery acquisition is added in addition to the standard FAIR (flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery) scheme, was developed for quantitative perfusion imaging and multi-contrast fMRI. The technique allows for clean separation between and thus simultaneous assessment of BOLD and perfusion effects, whereas quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) and tissue T(1) values are monitored online. Online CBF maps were obtained using the FAIREST technique and the measured CBF values were consistent with the off-line CBF maps obtained from using the FAIR technique in combination with a separate sequence for T(1) measurement. Finger tapping activation studies were carried out to demonstrate the applicability of the FAIREST technique in a typical fMRI setting for multi-contrast fMRI. The relative CBF and BOLD changes induced by finger-tapping were 75.1 +/- 18.3 and 1.8 +/- 0.4%, respectively, and the relative oxygen consumption rate change was 2.5 +/- 7.7%. The results from correlation of the T(1) maps with the activation images on a pixel-by-pixel basis show that the mean T(1) value of the CBF activation pixels is close to the T(1) of gray matter while the mean T(1) value of the BOLD activation pixels is close to the T(1) range of blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Implementation and evaluation of a new workflow for registration and segmentation of pulmonary MRI data for regional lung perfusion assessment.

    PubMed

    Böttger, T; Grunewald, K; Schöbinger, M; Fink, C; Risse, F; Kauczor, H U; Meinzer, H P; Wolf, Ivo

    2007-03-07

    Recently it has been shown that regional lung perfusion can be assessed using time-resolved contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Quantification of the perfusion images has been attempted, based on definition of small regions of interest (ROIs). Use of complete lung segmentations instead of ROIs could possibly increase quantification accuracy. Due to the low signal-to-noise ratio, automatic segmentation algorithms cannot be applied. On the other hand, manual segmentation of the lung tissue is very time consuming and can become inaccurate, as the borders of the lung to adjacent tissues are not always clearly visible. We propose a new workflow for semi-automatic segmentation of the lung from additionally acquired morphological HASTE MR images. First the lung is delineated semi-automatically in the HASTE image. Next the HASTE image is automatically registered with the perfusion images. Finally, the transformation resulting from the registration is used to align the lung segmentation from the morphological dataset with the perfusion images. We evaluated rigid, affine and locally elastic transformations, suitable optimizers and different implementations of mutual information (MI) metrics to determine the best possible registration algorithm. We located the shortcomings of the registration procedure and under which conditions automatic registration will succeed or fail. Segmentation results were evaluated using overlap and distance measures. Integration of the new workflow reduces the time needed for post-processing of the data, simplifies the perfusion quantification and reduces interobserver variability in the segmentation process. In addition, the matched morphological data set can be used to identify morphologic changes as the source for the perfusion abnormalities.

  13. Detection of Local Tumor Recurrence After Definitive Treatment of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Histogram Analysis of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced T1-Weighted Perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sang Hyun; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Choi, Young Jun; Park, Ji Eun; Sung, Yu Sub; Kim, Namkug; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the added value of histogram analysis of the ratio of initial to final 90-second time-signal intensity AUC (AUCR) for differentiating local tumor recurrence from contrast-enhancing scar on follow-up dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted perfusion MRI of patients treated for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). AUCR histogram parameters were assessed among tumor recurrence (n = 19) and contrast-enhancing scar (n = 27) at primary sites and compared using the t test. ROC analysis was used to determine the best differentiating parameters. The added value of AUCR histogram parameters was assessed when they were added to inconclusive conventional MRI results. Histogram analysis showed statistically significant differences in the 50th, 75th, and 90th percentiles of the AUCR values between the two groups (p < 0.05). The 90th percentile of the AUCR values (AUCR90) was the best predictor of local tumor recurrence (AUC, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.64-0.91) with an estimated cutoff of 1.02. AUCR90 increased sensitivity by 11.7% over that of conventional MRI alone when added to inconclusive results. Histogram analysis of AUCR can improve the diagnostic yield for local tumor recurrence during surveillance after treatment for HNSCC.

  14. Diagnostic Performance of Coronary CT Angiography, Stress Dual-Energy CT Perfusion, and Stress Perfusion Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography for Coronary Artery Disease: Comparison with Combined Invasive Coronary Angiography and Stress Perfusion Cardiac MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hyun Woo; Hwang, Hweung Kon; So, Young; Yi, Jeong Geun; Lee, Eun Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the diagnostic performance of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress dual-energy computed tomography perfusion (DE-CTP), stress perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and the combinations of CCTA with myocardial perfusion imaging (CCTA + DE-CTP and CCTA + SPECT) for identifying coronary artery stenosis that causes myocardial hypoperfusion. Combined invasive coronary angiography (ICA) and stress perfusion cardiac magnetic resonance (SP-CMR) imaging are used as the reference standard. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 25 patients with suspected coronary artery disease, who underwent CCTA, DE-CTP, SPECT, SP-CMR, and ICA. The reference standard was defined as ≥ 50% stenosis by ICA, with a corresponding myocardial hypoperfusion on SP-CMR. Results For per-vascular territory analysis, the sensitivities of CCTA, DE-CTP, SPECT, CCTA + DE-CTP, and CCTA + SPECT were 96, 96, 68, 93, and 68%, respectively, and specificities were 72, 75, 89, 85, and 94%, respectively. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUCs) were 0.84 ± 0.05, 0.85 ± 0.05, 0.79 ± 0.06, 0.89 ± 0.04, and 0.81 ± 0.06, respectively. For per-patient analysis, the sensitivities of CCTA, DE-CTP, SPECT, CCTA + DE-CTP, and CCTA + SPECT were 100, 100, 89, 100, and 83%, respectively; the specificities were 14, 43, 57, 43, and 57%, respectively; and the AUCs were 0.57 ± 0.13, 0.71 ± 0.11, 0.73 ± 0.11, 0.71 ± 0.11, and 0.70 ± 0.11, respectively. Conclusion The combination of CCTA and DE-CTP enhances specificity without a loss of sensitivity for detecting hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenosis, as defined by combined ICA and SP-CMR. PMID:28458600

  15. Diagnostic Performance of Coronary CT Angiography, Stress Dual-Energy CT Perfusion, and Stress Perfusion Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography for Coronary Artery Disease: Comparison with Combined Invasive Coronary Angiography and Stress Perfusion Cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyun Woo; Ko, Sung Min; Hwang, Hweung Kon; So, Young; Yi, Jeong Geun; Lee, Eun Jeong

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress dual-energy computed tomography perfusion (DE-CTP), stress perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and the combinations of CCTA with myocardial perfusion imaging (CCTA + DE-CTP and CCTA + SPECT) for identifying coronary artery stenosis that causes myocardial hypoperfusion. Combined invasive coronary angiography (ICA) and stress perfusion cardiac magnetic resonance (SP-CMR) imaging are used as the reference standard. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 25 patients with suspected coronary artery disease, who underwent CCTA, DE-CTP, SPECT, SP-CMR, and ICA. The reference standard was defined as ≥ 50% stenosis by ICA, with a corresponding myocardial hypoperfusion on SP-CMR. For per-vascular territory analysis, the sensitivities of CCTA, DE-CTP, SPECT, CCTA + DE-CTP, and CCTA + SPECT were 96, 96, 68, 93, and 68%, respectively, and specificities were 72, 75, 89, 85, and 94%, respectively. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUCs) were 0.84 ± 0.05, 0.85 ± 0.05, 0.79 ± 0.06, 0.89 ± 0.04, and 0.81 ± 0.06, respectively. For per-patient analysis, the sensitivities of CCTA, DE-CTP, SPECT, CCTA + DE-CTP, and CCTA + SPECT were 100, 100, 89, 100, and 83%, respectively; the specificities were 14, 43, 57, 43, and 57%, respectively; and the AUCs were 0.57 ± 0.13, 0.71 ± 0.11, 0.73 ± 0.11, 0.71 ± 0.11, and 0.70 ± 0.11, respectively. The combination of CCTA and DE-CTP enhances specificity without a loss of sensitivity for detecting hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenosis, as defined by combined ICA and SP-CMR.

  16. Insulin resistance is associated with lower arterial blood flow and reduced cortical perfusion in cognitively asymptomatic middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Hoscheidt, Siobhan M; Kellawan, J Mikhail; Berman, Sara E; Rivera-Rivera, Leonardo A; Krause, Rachel A; Oh, Jennifer M; Beeri, Michal S; Rowley, Howard A; Wieben, Oliver; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Asthana, Sanjay; Johnson, Sterling C; Schrage, William G; Bendlin, Barbara B

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is associated with poor cerebrovascular health and increased risk for dementia. Little is known about the unique effect of IR on both micro- and macrovascular flow particularly in midlife when interventions against dementia may be most effective. We examined the effect of IR as indexed by the Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) on cerebral blood flow in macro- and microvessels utilizing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) among cognitively asymptomatic middle-aged individuals. We hypothesized that higher HOMA-IR would be associated with reduced flow in macrovessels and lower cortical perfusion. One hundred and twenty cognitively asymptomatic middle-aged adults (57 ± 5 yrs) underwent fasting blood draw, phase contrast-vastly undersampled isotropic projection reconstruction (PC VIPR) MRI, and arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion. Higher HOMA-IR was associated with lower arterial blood flow, particularly within the internal carotid arteries (ICAs), and lower cerebral perfusion in several brain regions including frontal and temporal lobe regions. Higher blood flow in bilateral ICAs predicted greater cortical perfusion in individuals with lower HOMA-IR, a relationship not observed among those with higher HOMA-IR. Findings provide novel evidence for an uncoupling of macrovascular blood flow and microvascular perfusion among individuals with higher IR in midlife.

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Contrast Agent Bolus Dispersion in a Coronary Bifurcation: Impact on MRI-Based Quantification of Myocardial Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Regine; Graafen, Dirk; Weber, Stefan; Schreiber, Laura M.

    2013-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced first-pass magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with a tracer kinetic model, for example, MMID4, can be used to determine myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR). Typically, the arterial input function (AIF) required for this methodology is estimated from the left ventricle (LV). Dispersion of the contrast agent bolus might occur between the LV and the myocardial tissue. Negligence of bolus dispersion could cause an error in MBF determination. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of bolus dispersion in a simplified coronary bifurcation geometry including one healthy and one stenotic branch on the quantification of MBF and MPR. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were combined with MMID4. Different inlet boundary conditions describing pulsatile and constant flows for rest and hyperemia and differing outflow conditions have been investigated. In the bifurcation region, the increase of the dispersion was smaller than inside the straight vessels. A systematic underestimation of MBF values up to −16.1% for pulsatile flow and an overestimation of MPR up to 7.5% were found. It was shown that, under the conditions considered in this study, bolus dispersion can significantly influence the results of quantitative myocardial MR-perfusion measurements. PMID:23533541

  18. Acute caffeine administration impact on working memory-related brain activation and functional connectivity in the elderly: a BOLD and perfusion MRI study.

    PubMed

    Haller, S; Rodriguez, C; Moser, D; Toma, S; Hofmeister, J; Sinanaj, I; Van De Ville, D; Giannakopoulos, P; Lovblad, K-O

    2013-10-10

    In young individuals, caffeine-mediated blockade of adenosine receptors and vasoconstriction has direct repercussions on task-related activations, changes in functional connectivity, as well as global vascular effects. To date, no study has explored the effect of caffeine on brain activation patterns during highly demanding cognitive tasks in the elderly. This prospective, placebo-controlled crossover design comprises 24 healthy elderly individuals (mean age 68.8 ± 4.0 years, 17 females) performing a 2-back working memory (WM) task in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Analyses include complimentary assessment of task-related activations (general linear model, GLM), functional connectivity (tensorial independent component analysis, TICA), and baseline perfusion (arterial spin labeling). Despite a reduction in whole-brain global perfusion (-22.7%), caffeine-enhanced task-related GLM activation in a local and distributed network is most pronounced in the bilateral striatum and to a lesser degree in the right middle and inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral insula, left superior and inferior parietal lobule as well as in the cerebellum bilaterally. TICA was significantly enhanced (+8.2%) in caffeine versus placebo in a distributed and task-relevant network including the pre-frontal cortex, the supplementary motor area, the ventral premotor cortex and the parietal cortex as well as the occipital cortex (visual stimuli) and basal ganglia. The inverse comparison of placebo versus caffeine had no significant difference. Activation strength of the task-relevant-network component correlated with response accuracy for caffeine yet not for placebo, indicating a selective cognitive effect of caffeine. The present findings suggest that acute caffeine intake enhances WM-related brain activation as well as functional connectivity of blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI in elderly individuals.

  19. Leakage decrease detected by dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI predicts survival in recurrent glioblastoma treated with bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Hilario, A; Sepulveda, J M; Hernandez-Lain, A; Salvador, E; Koren, L; Manneh, R; Ruano, Y; Perez-Nuñez, A; Lagares, A; Ramos, A

    2017-01-01

    In glioblastoma, tumor progression appears to be triggered by expression of VEGF, a regulator of blood vessel permeability. Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that inhibits angiogenesis by clearing circulating VEGF, resulting in a decline in the contrast-enhancing tumor, which does not always correlate with treatment response. Our objectives were: (1) to evaluate whether changes in DSC perfusion MRI-derived leakage could predict survival in recurrent glioblastoma, and (2) to estimate whether leakage at baseline was related to treatment outcome. We retrospectively analyzed DSC perfusion MRI in 24 recurrent glioblastomas treated with bevacizumab as second line chemotherapy. Leakage at baseline and changes in maximum leakage between baseline and the first follow-up after treatment were selected for quantitative analysis. Survival univariate analysis was made constructing survival curves using Kaplan-Meier method and comparing subgroups by log rank probability test. Leakage reduction at 8 weeks after initiation of bevacizumab treatment had a significant influence on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Median OS and PFS were 2.4 and 2.8 months longer for patients with leakage reduction at the first follow-up. Higher leakage at baseline was associated with leakage reduction after treatment. Odds ratio of treatment response was 9 for patients with maximum leakage at baseline >5. Leakage decrease may predict OS and PFS in recurrent glioblastomas treated with bevacizumab. Leakage reduction postulates as a potential biomarker for treatment response evaluation. Leakage at baseline seems to predict response to treatment, but was not independently associated with survival.

  20. All-Systolic Non-ECG-gated Myocardial Perfusion MRI: Feasibility of Multi-Slice Continuous First-Pass Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Behzad; Arsanjani, Reza; Dharmakumar, Rohan; Bairey Merz, C. Noel; Berman, Daniel S.; Li, Debiao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop and test the feasibility of a new method for non-ECG-gated first-pass perfusion (FPP) cardiac MR capable of imaging multiple short-axis slices at the same systolic cardiac phase. Methods A magnetization-driven pulse sequence was developed for non-ECG-gated FPP imaging without saturation-recovery preparation using continuous slice-interleaved radial sampling. The image reconstruction method, dubbed TRACE, employed self-gating based on reconstruction of a real-time image-based navigator combined with reference-constrained compressed sensing. Data from ischemic animal studies (n=5) was used in a simulation framework to evaluate temporal fidelity. Healthy subjects (n=5) were studied using both the proposed and conventional method to compare the myocardial contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Patients (n=2) underwent adenosine stress studies using the proposed method. Results Temporal fidelity of the developed method was shown to be sufficient at high heart-rates. The healthy volunteers studies demonstrated normal perfusion and no artifacts. Compared to the conventional scheme, myocardial CNR for the proposed method was slightly higher (8.6±0.6 vs. 8.0±0.7). Patient studies showed stress-induced perfusion defects consistent with invasive angiography. Conclusions The presented methods and results demonstrate feasibility of the proposed approach for high-resolution non-ECG-gated FPP imaging and indicate its potential for achieving desirable image quality (high CNR, no dark-rim artifacts) with a 3-slice spatial coverage, all imaged at the same systolic phase. PMID:26052843

  1. Features and Natural Classes in ASL Handshapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitworth, Cecily

    2011-01-01

    This article argues for the necessity of phonetic analysis in signed language linguistics and presents a case study of one analytical system being used in a preliminary attempt to identify natural classes and investigate variation in ASL handshapes. Robbin Battison (1978) first described what is now a widely accepted list of basic handshapes,…

  2. Features and Natural Classes in ASL Handshapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitworth, Cecily

    2011-01-01

    This article argues for the necessity of phonetic analysis in signed language linguistics and presents a case study of one analytical system being used in a preliminary attempt to identify natural classes and investigate variation in ASL handshapes. Robbin Battison (1978) first described what is now a widely accepted list of basic handshapes,…

  3. Developing ASL Text in the Bilingual Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Joey; Osbrink, Rory

    2015-01-01

    Deaf students are visual learners, and technology should be part of every bilingual classroom. However, deaf students need to learn to manipulate the hardware and software that allows them to express themselves and to advance their knowledge. Students need to understand what is meant when they are referred to "ASL text" or…

  4. Serum HSP27 is associated with medullary perfusion in kidney allografts

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Eva; Sadowski, Elizabeth; Reese, Shannon; Vidyasagar, Aparna; Artz, Nathan; Fain, Sean; Jacobson, Lynn; Swain, William; Djamali, Arjang

    2015-01-01

    Background Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is a small HSP up-regulated in response to stress in the kidney. The relationship between HSP27 and intrarenal oxygenation in patients with native and transplant kidney disease is unknown. Methods We compared HSP27 levels, intrarenal oxygenation measured by blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) imaging using R2* values, and perfusion determined by arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), between patients with native and transplant kidney disease (n=28). Results There were no statistical differences in mean age (53.9 vs. 47.1 years), kidney function (63.6 vs. 50.7 ml/min per 1.73 m2), mean arterial blood pressure (91.6 vs. 91.1 mm Hg), hematocrit (40.6% vs. 39.3%), diuretic or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use, serum or urine levels of hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide, F2 isoprostanes and HSP27 between native and transplant kidneys. BOLD-MRI studies demonstrated comparable patterns in intrarenal oxygen bioavailability (medullary R2* 18.1 vs. 18.3/s and cortical R2* 12 vs. 11.7/s, respectively). However, medullary perfusion was significantly lower in transplant kidneys (36.4 vs. 78.7 ml/100 g per minute, p=0.0002). There was a linear relationship between serum HSP27 concentrations and medullary perfusion in kidney allografts (HSP27 concentration [ng/mL] = 0.78 + 0.09 medullary perfusion, R2=0.43, p=0.01). Conclusions Our study demonstrates that medullary perfusion is significantly lower in kidney allografts compared with native kidneys with comparable renal function. We further noted a direct association between serum HSP27 levels and medullary perfusion after transplantation. Additional studies are needed to examine the role of HSP27 as a biomarker of kidney disease progression. PMID:22383348

  5. The Impact of Carotid Artery Stenting on Cerebral Perfusion, Functional Connectivity, and Cognition in Severe Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Sun, Dong; Liu, Yumin; Mei, Bin; Li, Huagang; Zhang, Shengming; Zhang, Junjian

    2017-01-01

    Asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis can lead to not only stroke but also cognition impairment. Although it has been proven that carotid artery stenting (CAS) can reduce the risk of future strokes, the effect of CAS on cognition is conflicting. In recent years, pulsed arterial spin labeling (pASL) MRI and resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI) have been employed in cognitive impairment studies. For the present study, cognition is evaluated in severe asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis patients undergoing CAS, and the mechanisms underlying the cognitive change are explored by pASL MRI and R-fMRI. We prospectively enrolled 24 asymptomatic, severe (≥70%), unilateral internal carotid artery stenosis patients, who were expecting the intervention of CAS. Cognition assessment (including the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Beijing Version, the Minimum Mental State Examination, the Digit Symbol Test, the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, and the Verbal Memory Test) and an integrated MRI program (pASL MRI, and R-fMRI) were administered 7 days before and 3 months after CAS. 16 subjects completed the follow-up study. After stenting, significant improvement in the scores of the MMSE, the Verbal Memory test, and the delayed recall was found. No significant difference was found in the scores of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Beijing Version, the Digit Symbol Test, and the immediate recall. After CAS treatment, asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis patients showed increased perfusion in the left frontal gyrus, increased amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) in the right precentral gyrus, and increased connectivity to the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) in the right supra frontal gyrus. However, no significant correlations were found between these imaging changes and cognition assessments. Successful CAS can partly improve cognition in asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis patients. The cognition improvement may be partly attributed to the increased perfusion in the

  6. Quantification of Perfusion Changes during a Motor Task Using Arterial Spin Labeling.

    PubMed

    Vilela, P; Pimentel, M; Sousa, I; Figueiredo, P

    2011-03-29

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a non-invasive MRI technique that allows the quantitative measurement of perfusion, (regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF)). The ASL techniques use the labeling of the blood, by inverting or saturating the spins of water molecules of the blood supplying the imaged region. When reaching the capillary bed, these will be exchanged with tissue water giving rise to a perfusion-weighted signal. The subtraction of control (without label) from labeled images yields a signal difference that directly reflects the local perfusion. Being a non-invasive method, it can be repeated as many times as needed allowing the brain perfusion variation quantification associated with endogenous and exogenous stimuli. In this study, the authors have evaluated the CBF variation induced by the neural activity during a common motor task. The study was conducted on a Siemens Verio 3T system using a 12-channel head coil and a pulsed ASL Q2TIPS-PICORE sequence with a GE-EPI readout. The sequences were driven in 3D PACE mode for prospective motion correction. Fifteen healthy volunteers were studied using a simple motor task consisting in sequential thumb-digit opposition. Two different functional ASL protocols were used: #1 one perfusion scan was obtained during rest and another one during an equal period of motor task (total scan time ~8 min) (TI1 = 700 ms, TI1s = 1600 ms, TI2 =1800 ms; 91 Interleaved tag and control volumes were acquired; TR/TE = 2500/25 ms and flip angle = 90°; nine contiguous axial slices of 8 mm thickness acquired in-line with the AC-PC axis, positioned from the vertex of the brain to the top of cerebellum; FOV = 256 × 256 mm(2); matrix 64 × 64; gap between the labeling slab and the proximal 18.8 mm) and #2 a block design alternating five 25s periods of motor task with five 25s periods of rest (total scan time ~4 min) (TI1 = 700 ms, TI1s = 1600 ms, TI2 = 1800 ms; 101 interleaved tag and control volumes were acquired; TR/TE = 2500/11 ms and

  7. High Temporospatial Resolution Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE) Wrist MRI with Variable-Density Pseudo-Random CIRcular Cartesian UnderSampling (CIRCUS) Acquisition: Evaluation of Perfusion in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Pedoia, Valentina; Heilmeier, Ursula; Ku, Eric; Su, Favian; Khanna, Sameer; Imboden, John; Graf, Jonathan; Link, Thomas; Li, Xiaojuan

    2016-01-01

    This study is to evaluate highly accelerated 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) wrist MRI for assessment of perfusion in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. A pseudo-random variable-density undersampling strategy, CIRcular Cartesian UnderSampling (CIRCUS), was combined with k-t SPARSE-SENSE reconstruction to achieve a highly accelerated 3D DCE wrist MRI. Two healthy volunteers and ten RA patients were studied. Two patients were on methotrexate (MTX) only (Group I) and the other eight were treated with a combination therapy of MTX and Anti-Tumour Necrosis Factor (TNF) therapy (Group II). Patients were scanned at baseline and 3-month follow-up. DCE MR images were used to evaluate perfusion in synovitis and bone marrow edema pattern in the RA wrist joints. A series of perfusion parameters were derived and compared with clinical disease activity scores of 28 joints (DAS28). 3D DCE wrist MR images were obtained with a spatial resolution of 0.3×0.3×1.5mm3 and temporal resolution of 5 s (with an acceleration factor of 20). The derived perfusion parameters, most notably, transition time (dT) of synovitis, showed significant negative correlations with DAS28-ESR (r=-0.80, p<0.05) and DAS28-CRP (r=-0.87, p<0.05) at baseline and also correlated significantly with treatment responses evaluated by clinical score changes between baseline and 3-month follow-up (with DAS28-ESR: r=-0.79, p<0.05, and DAS28-CRP: r=-0.82, p<0.05). Highly accelerated 3D DCE wrist MRI with improved temporospatial resolution has been achieved in RA patients and provides accurate assessment of neovascularization and perfusion in RA joints, showing promise as a potential tool for evaluating treatment responses. PMID:26608949

  8. Reduction in cerebral perfusion after heroin administration: a resting state arterial spin labeling study.

    PubMed

    Denier, Niklaus; Gerber, Hana; Vogel, Marc; Klarhöfer, Markus; Riecher-Rossler, Anita; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Lang, Undine E; Borgwardt, Stefan; Walter, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Heroin dependence is a chronic relapsing brain disorder, characterized by the compulsion to seek and use heroin. Heroin itself has a strong potential to produce subjective experiences characterized by intense euphoria, relaxation and release from craving. The neurofunctional foundations of these perceived effects are not well known. In this study, we have used pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) in 15 heroin-dependent patients from a stable heroin-assisted treatment program to observe the steady state effects of heroin (60 min after administration). Patients were scanned in a cross-over and placebo controlled design. They received an injection of their regular dose of heroin or saline (placebo) before or after the scan. As phMRI method, we used a pulsed arterial spin labeling (ASL) sequence based on a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) spin labeling scheme combined with a single-shot 3D GRASE (gradient-spin echo) readout on a 3 Tesla scanner. Analysis was performed with Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM 8), using a general linear model for whole brain comparison between the heroin and placebo conditions. We found that compared to placebo, heroin was associated with reduced perfusion in the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), the left medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and in the insula (both hemispheres). Analysis of extracted perfusion values indicate strong effect sizes and no gender related differences. Reduced perfusion in these brain areas may indicate self- and emotional regulation effects of heroin in maintenance treatment.

  9. Measurement of perfusion and permeability from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in normal and pathological vertebral bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Biffar, Andreas; Sourbron, Steven; Schmidt, Gerwin; Ingrisch, Michael; Dietrich, Olaf; Reiser, Maximilian F; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea

    2010-07-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data in vertebral bone marrow (vBM) are currently analyzed with descriptive indices. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a quantitative approach, considering the tissue composition of vBM. Therefore, a measurement of the water fraction, f(wat), and the precontrast relaxation times, T(10 wat), T(10 fat), was added to the routine protocol. Signal analysis was generalized by allowing for an arbitrary fraction of fat. Plasma flow, plasma volume, extraction flow, and interstitial volume were determined from dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI data. Simulations were used to determine the sensitivity to the precontrast values and to retrospectively verify the choice of the sequence parameters. Measurements were performed in healthy vertebral bodies (n = 30) and lesions of 15 patients with vertebral fractures. Extraction flow (milliliters per 100 mL/min) provided the strongest normal/abnormal separation: mean (standard deviation) was 0.3 (0.8) in healthy vBM and 6(4) in the fractures. Neglecting the fat component and the approximated signal analysis using relative signal enhancement produced significant differences. We conclude that correcting for the fat component in the signal and parametrization by tracer-kinetic analysis is necessary to avoid misinterpretation and/or systematic errors. The quantitative analysis is equally well suited as a descriptive parameter for the differentiation between normal and abnormal vertebral bone marrow. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Quantitative Changes in Cerebral Perfusion during Urinary Urgency in Women with Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    Arya, Nisha G; Weissbart, Steven J; Xu, Sihua; Bhavsar, Rupal; Rao, Hengyi

    2017-01-01

    To quantitatively measure changes in cerebral perfusion in select regions of interest in the brain during urinary urgency in women with overactive bladder (OAB) using arterial spin labeling (ASL). Twelve women with OAB and 10 controls underwent bladder filling and rated urinary urgency (scale 0-10). ASL fMRI scans were performed (1) in the low urgency state after voiding and (2) high urgency state after drinking oral fluids. Absolute regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in select regions of interest was compared between the low and high urgency states. There were no significant differences in rCBF between the low and high urgency states in the control group. In the OAB group, rCBF (mean ± SE, ml/100 g/min) increased by 10-14% from the low to the high urgency state in the right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) (44.56 ± 0.59 versus 49.52 ± 1.49, p < 0.05), left ACC (49.29 ± 0.85 versus 54.02 ± 1.46, p < 0.05), and left insula (50.46 ± 1.72 versus 54.99 ± 1.09, p < 0.05). Whole-brain analysis identified additional areas of activation in the right insula, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and pons/midbrain area. Urinary urgency is associated with quantitative increase in cerebral perfusion in regions of the brain associated with processing emotional response to discomfort.

  11. Association of developmental venous anomalies with perfusion abnormalities on arterial spin labeling and bolus perfusion-weighted imaging.

    PubMed

    Iv, Michael; Fischbein, Nancy J; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the frequency and characteristics of developmental venous anomaly (DVA)-associated perfusion abnormalities on arterial spin labeling (ASL) and bolus perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) and discuss their potential causes. We reviewed brain MR reports to identify all DVAs reported on studies performed between 2009 and 2012. DVA location and findings on PWI and/or ASL imaging were assessed by visual inspection. Sizes of DVAs were categorized as small (<15 mm), medium (15-25 mm), and large (>25 mm). For ASL, signal in the DVA, surrounding parenchyma, or associated draining vein was recorded. For PWI, changes on hemodynamic maps (cerebral blood volume [CBV], cerebral blood flow [CBF], mean transit time [MTT], and normalized time-to-peak of the residue function [Tmax]) were evaluated. Coexisting vascular malformations in association with DVAs were also identified. Six hundred and fifty-two DVAs were identified in 632 subjects. Of these, 121 underwent both perfusion modalities, 15 only PWI, and 127 only ASL. ASL abnormalities were seen in 21/248 (8%), including signal in a draining vein (2/21, 10%), in the DVA (11/21, 52%), and in the parenchyma (8/21, 38%). On PWI, the majority of DVAs demonstrated abnormalities (108/136, 79%), typically increased CBF, CBV, MTT, and Tmax. There was no association between DVA size and presence of ASL signal (P = .836). Borderline statistical significance was found between DVA size and presence of PWI abnormality (P = .046). No relationship was found between the presence of a coexisting vascular malformation and presence of ASL (P = .468) or PWI abnormality (P = .745). Perfusion changes with DVAs are common on PWI but uncommon on ASL. PWI findings are expected based on the anatomy and physiology of DVAs and are accentuated by gradient echo acquisition. DVAs with intrinsic ASL signal or signal in draining veins may be associated with arteriovenous shunting (transitional lesions). Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of

  12. M2 occlusions as targets for endovascular therapy: comprehensive analysis of diffusion/perfusion MRI, angiography, and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Sunil A; Yoo, Bryan; Saver, Jeffrey L; Starkman, Sidney; Ali, Latisha K; Kim, Doojin; Gonzalez, Nestor R; Jahan, Reza; Tateshima, Satoshi; Duckwiler, Gary; Vinuela, Fernando; Liebeskind, David S

    2014-01-01

    Background The ideal population of patients for endovascular therapy (ET) in acute ischemic stroke remains undefined. Recent ET trials have moved towards selecting patients with proximal middle cerebral artery (MCA) or internal carotid artery occlusions, which will likely leave a gap in our understanding of the treatment outcomes of M2 occlusions. Objective and methods To examine the presentation, treatment, and outcomes of M2 compared with M1 MCA occlusions in patients undergoing ET by assessing comprehensive MRI, angiography, and clinical data. Results We found that M2 occlusions can lead to massive strokes defined by hypoperfused and infarcted volumes as well as death or moderate to severe disability in nearly 50% of patients at discharge. Compared with M1 occlusions, M2 occlusions achieved similar Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (TICI) 2b/3 recanalization rates, with significantly less hemorrhage. M2 occlusions presented with smaller infarct and hypoperfused volumes and had smaller final infarct volumes regardless of recanalization. TICI 2b/3 recanalization of M2 occlusions was associated with smaller infarct volumes compared with TICI 0–2a recanalization, as well as less infarct expansion, in patients who received IV tissue plasminogen activator as well as those that did not. Successful reperfusion of M2 occlusions was associated with improved discharge modified Rankin scale. Conclusions If suitable as targets of ET, M2 occlusions should be given the same consideration as M1 occlusions. PMID:24821842

  13. Teachers' Perceptions of the Use of ASL Phonological Instruction to Develop ASL and English Literacy in an ASL/English Bilingual Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crume, Peter Kirk

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation study seeks to understand how teachers who work in an ASL/English bilingual educational program for preschool children conceptualize and utilize phonological instruction of American Sign Language (ASL). While instruction that promotes phonological awareness of spoken English is thought to provide educational benefits to young…

  14. Teachers' Perceptions of the Use of ASL Phonological Instruction to Develop ASL and English Literacy in an ASL/English Bilingual Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crume, Peter Kirk

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation study seeks to understand how teachers who work in an ASL/English bilingual educational program for preschool children conceptualize and utilize phonological instruction of American Sign Language (ASL). While instruction that promotes phonological awareness of spoken English is thought to provide educational benefits to young…

  15. Cortical responses to amphetamine exposure studied by pCASL MRI and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic dose modeling.

    PubMed

    Nordin, Love Engström; Li, Tie-Qiang; Brogren, Jacob; Johansson, Patrik; Sjögren, Niclas; Hannesdottir, Kristin; Björk, Charlotta; Segerdahl, Märta; Wang, Danny J J; Julin, Per

    2013-03-01

    Perfusion measurement by arterial spin labeling (ASL) techniques is well suited for pharmaceutical magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) studies to investigate how drugs change the cerebral perfusion status and further, neuronal activity. Twelve healthy normal male volunteers participated in the study which was based on a double blinded design. Six subjects were randomly selected to receive a single oral dose of 20mg d-amphetamine and six were given placebo. Perfusion measurements by pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) technique were repeatedly performed at 10 different time points with a 3T clinical MRI scanner during a 10 hour period after dose together with physiologic data and blood sample collections. The dynamic changes in cerebral perfusion in response to the plasma concentration variations of d-amphetamine were analyzed at voxel-level and for regions of interest. Compared to the placebo group a 20% reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF) was observed in gray matter for the subjects that received d-amphetamine. The most significant reduction of regional CBF (rCBF) was detected in the basal ganglia, frontal region and insular cortex using voxel based analysis. A relation between d-amphetamine exposure and CBF response was found using PK/PD modeling, which predicted on average a 15% decrease of the CBF in gray matter at a plasma concentration of 30 ng/ml. In this study we have demonstrated that repeated perfusion measurements by pCASL technique was sufficiently robust to differentiate the neurological response between the groups that received d-amphetamine and placebo. Quantitative and repetitive CBF measurements can be used for PK/PD modeling of CNS drug responses in humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. No evidence of perfusion abnormalities in the basal ganglia of a patient with generalized chorea-ballism and polycythaemia vera: analysis using subtraction SPECT co-registered to MRI.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woojun; Kim, Joong-Seok; Lee, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Yeong-In; Park, Chong-Won; Chung, Yong-An

    2008-10-01

    Polycythaemia vera is a well-known cause of symptomatic chorea, however, the pathophysiology of this correlation remains unclear. We report on a patient with generalized chorea-ballism associated with polycythaemia vera, and we present the findings of 99mTc-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) SPECT done in both the choreic state and the non-choreic state. The SPECT during both the choreic and the non-choreic states did not reveal any definite perfusion changes in specific regions of the brain, as compared with 6 age-matched controls. In addition, the subtraction SPECT co-registered to MRI (SISCOM) analysis did not show any difference in cerebral blood flow during the choreic and non-choreic states. This result suggests that the basic mechanism of chorea associated with polycythaemia vera does not appear to be associated with a reduction in cerebral perfusion to a specific cerebral area, such as the basal ganglia or its thalamocortical connections.

  17. Detection of ischaemic myocardial lesions with coronary CT angiography and adenosine-stress dynamic perfusion imaging using a 128-slice dual-source CT: diagnostic performance in comparison with cardiac MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S M; Choi, J-H; Chang, S-A

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We assessed the diagnostic performance of adenosine-stress dynamic CT perfusion (ASDCTP) imaging and coronary CT angiography (CCTA) for the detection of ischaemic myocardial lesions using 128-slice dual-source CT compared with that of 1.5 T cardiac MRI. Methods: This prospective study included 33 patients (61±8 years, 82% male) with suspected coronary artery diseases who underwent ASDCTP imaging and adenosine-stress cardiac MRI. Two investigators independently evaluated ASDCTP images in correlation with significant coronary stenosis on CCTA using two different thresholds of 50% and 70% diameter stenosis. Hypoattenuated myocardial lesions on ASDCTP associated with significant coronary stenoses on CCTA were regarded as true perfusion defects. All estimates of diagnostic performance were calculated and compared with those of cardiac MRI. Results: With use of a threshold of 50% diameter stenosis on CCTA, the diagnostic estimates per-myocardial segment were as follows: sensitivity, 81% [95% confidence interval (CI): 70–92%]; specificity, 94% (95% CI: 92–96%); and accuracy 93% (95% CI: 91–95%). With use of a threshold of 70%, the diagnostic estimates were as follows: sensitivity, 48% (95% CI: 34–62%); specificity, 99% (95% CI: 98–100%); and accuracy, 94% (95% CI: 92–96%). Conclusion: Dynamic CTP using 128-slice dual-source CT enables the assessment of the physiological significance of coronary artery lesions with high diagnostic accuracy in patients with clinically suspected coronary artery disease. Advances in knowledge: Combined CCTA and ASDCTP yielded high accuracy in the detection of perfusion defects regardless of the threshold of significant coronary stenosis. PMID:24096592

  18. Enhanced task related brain activation and resting perfusion in healthy older adults after chronic blueberry supplementation.

    PubMed

    Bowtell, Joanna L; Aboo-Bakkar, Zainie; Conway, Myra; Adlam, Anna-Lynne R; Fulford, Jonathan

    2017-03-01

    Blueberries are rich in flavonoids, which possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. High flavonoid intakes attenuate age-related cognitive decline, but data from human intervention studies are sparse. We investigated whether 12 weeks of blueberry concentrate supplementation improved brain perfusion, task-related activation and cognitive function in healthy older adults. Participants were randomised to consume either 30 ml blueberry concentrate providing 387 mg anthocyanidins (5 female, 7 male; age 67.5±3.0 y; BMI, 25.9±3.3 kg.m-2) or isoenergetic placebo (8 female, 6 male; age 69.0 ±3.3 y; BMI, 27.1±.4.0 kg.m-2). Pre- and post-supplementation, participants undertook a battery of cognitive function tests and a numerical Stroop test within a 1.5T MRI scanner while functional magnetic resonance images (fMRI) were continuously acquired. Quantitative resting brain perfusion was determined using an arterial spin labelling (ASL) technique, and blood biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress were measured. Significant increases in brain activity were observed in response to blueberry supplementation relative to the placebo group within Brodmann areas 4/6/10/21/40/44/45, precuneus, anterior cingulate, and insula/thalamus (p<0.001), as well as significant improvements in grey matter perfusion in the parietal (5.0±1.8 vs -2.9±2.4 %, p=0.013) and occipital (8.0±2.6 vs -0.7±3.2 %, p=0.031) lobes. There was also evidence suggesting improvement in working memory (two back test) after blueberry versus placebo supplementation (p=0.05). Supplementation with an anthocyanin rich blueberry concentrate improved brain perfusion and activation in brain areas associated with cognitive function in healthy older adults.

  19. Salicylic acid analogues as chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI contrast agents for the assessment of brain perfusion territory and blood-brain barrier opening after intra-arterial infusion.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaolei; Walczak, Piotr; He, Xiaowei; Yang, Xing; Pearl, Monica; Bulte, Jeff Wm; Pomper, Martin G; McMahon, Michael T; Janowski, Mirosław

    2016-07-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle for drug delivery to the brain. Predicted, focal opening of the BBB through intra-arterial infusion of hyperosmolar mannitol is feasible, but there is a need to facilitate imaging techniques (e.g. MRI) to guide interventional procedures and assess the outcomes. Here, we show that salicylic acid analogues (SAA) can depict the brain territory supplied by the catheter and detect the BBB opening, through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI. Hyperosmolar SAA solutions themselves are also capable of opening the BBB, and, when multiple SAA agents were co-injected, their locoregional perfusion could be differentiated. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Perfusion CT improves diagnostic accuracy for hyperacute ischemic stroke in the 3-hour window: study of 100 patients with diffusion MRI confirmation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ke; Do, Kinh G; Ong, Phat; Shapiro, Maksim; Babb, James S; Siller, Keith A; Pramanik, Bidyut K

    2009-01-01

    Conventional noncontrast CT (NCCT) is insensitive to hyperacute cerebral infarction in the first 3 h. Our aim was to determine if CT perfusion (CTP) can improve diagnostic accuracy over NCCT for patients presenting with stroke symptoms in the 3-hour window. Consecutive patients presenting to our emergency department with symptoms of ischemic stroke <3 h old and receiving NCCT and CTP as part of their triage evaluation were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with follow-up diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) <7 days from ictus were included. Two readers rated the NCCT and CTP for evidence of acute infarct and its vascular territory. CTP selectively covered 24 mm of brain centered at the basal ganglia with low relative cerebral blood volume in a region of low cerebral blood flow or elevated time to peak as the operational definition for infarction. A third reader rated all follow-up DWI for acute infarct and its vascular territory as the reference standard. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were calculated. An exact McNemar test and generalized estimating equations from a binary logistic regression model were used to assess the difference in detection rates between modalities. A two-sided p value <0.05 was considered significant. 100 patients were included. Sixty-five (65%) patients had follow-up DWI confirmation of acute infarct. NCCT revealed 17 (26.2%) acute infarcts without false positives. CTP revealed 42 (64.6%) acute infarcts with one false positive. Of the 23 infarcts missed on CTP, 10 (43.5%) were outside the volume of coverage while the remaining 13 (56.5%) were small cortical or lacunar type infarcts (

  1. Perfusion abnormalities in hemimegalencephaly.

    PubMed

    Wintermark, P; Roulet-Perez, E; Maeder-Ingvar, M; Moessinger, A C; Gudinchet, F; Meuli, R

    2009-04-01

    Cerebrovascular changes are rarely discussed in patients with hemimegalencephaly. These alterations have previously been associated with epileptical activity. We report the case of a 36-week gestation neonate presenting with total right hemimegalencephaly, as demonstrated by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed in the first days of life. Perfusion-weighted imaging displayed a clear hypervascularization of the right hemisphere. Diffusion-tensor imaging showed an arrangement of white matter fibers concentrically around the ventricle on the right hemisphere. AngioMRI showed an obvious asymmetry in the size of the middle cerebral arteries, with the right middle cerebral artery being prominent. The baby was free of clinical seizures during his first week of life. An electroencephalogram at that time displayed an asymmetric background activity, but no electrical seizures. Perfusion anomalies in hemimegalencephaly may not necessarily be related to epileptical activity, but may be related to vessel alterations. (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  2. "Avenue ASL:" Transforming Curriculum through Design and Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Charles; Hooper, Simon; Rose, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Between 1998 and 2002, enrollment in American Sign Language (ASL) curricula at the postsecondary level has increased 433% nationally, representing the largest enrollment percentage gain of all world languages. This unprecedented demand for ASL linguistic study has created a wide range of instructional challenges, the most pervasive of which…

  3. [Take] and the ASL Verb Complex: An Autolexical Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metlay, Donald S.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation will show how linguistic description and an Autolexical account of the bound verb root [take] shed a light on the nature of complex verb constructions in American Sign Language (ASL). This is accomplished by creating a new ASL Verb Complex Model unifying all verbs into one category of VERB. This model also accounts for a variety…

  4. Bilingual Students Publish Works in ASL and English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn-Marsh, Petra M.; Horn-Marsh, Kester L.

    2009-01-01

    The Kansas State School for the Deaf (KSD) is a bilingual school where American Sign Language (ASL) and English are used equally in the classroom and dormitory as the languages of instruction and communication. As a result, KSD has been part of bilingual education training through the Center for ASL/English Bilingual Education and Research…

  5. ASL-LEX: A lexical database of American Sign Language.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Naomi K; Sehyr, Zed Sevcikova; Cohen-Goldberg, Ariel M; Emmorey, Karen

    2016-05-18

    ASL-LEX is a lexical database that catalogues information about nearly 1,000 signs in American Sign Language (ASL). It includes the following information: subjective frequency ratings from 25-31 deaf signers, iconicity ratings from 21-37 hearing non-signers, videoclip duration, sign length (onset and offset), grammatical class, and whether the sign is initialized, a fingerspelled loan sign, or a compound. Information about English translations is available for a subset of signs (e.g., alternate translations, translation consistency). In addition, phonological properties (sign type, selected fingers, flexion, major and minor location, and movement) were coded and used to generate sub-lexical frequency and neighborhood density estimates. ASL-LEX is intended for use by researchers, educators, and students who are interested in the properties of the ASL lexicon. An interactive website where the database can be browsed and downloaded is available at http://asl-lex.org .

  6. Evidence for involvement of the insula in the psychotropic effects of THC in humans: a double-blind, randomized pharmacological MRI study.

    PubMed

    van Hell, Hendrika H; Bossong, Matthijs G; Jager, Gerry; Kristo, Gert; van Osch, Matthias J P; Zelaya, Fernando; Kahn, René S; Ramsey, Nick F

    2011-11-01

    The main reason for recreational use of cannabis is the 'high', the primary psychotropic effect of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). This psychoactive compound of cannabis induces a range of subjective, physical and mental reactions. The effect on heart rate is pronounced and complicates bloodflow-based neuroimaging of psychotropic effects of THC. In this study we investigated the effects of THC on baseline brain perfusion and activity in association with the induction of 'feeling high'. Twenty-three subjects participated in a pharmacological MRI study, where we applied arterial spin labelling (ASL) to measure perfusion, and resting-state functional MRI to assess blood oxygen level-dependent signal fluctuation as a measure of baseline brain activity. Feeling high was assessed with a visual analogue scale and was compared to the imaging measures. THC increased perfusion in the anterior cingulate cortex, superior frontal cortex, and insula, and reduced perfusion in the post-central and occipital gyrus. Baseline brain activity was altered, indicated by increased amplitude of fluctuations in resting-state functional MRI signal after THC administration in the insula, substantia nigra and cerebellum. Perfusion changes in frontal cortex were negatively correlated with ratings of feeling high, suggesting an interaction between cognitive control and subjective effects of THC. In conclusion, an acute THC challenge altered baseline brain perfusion and activity, especially in frontal brain areas involved in cognitive and emotional processes, and the insula, associated with interoceptive awareness. These changes may represent the THC-induced neurophysiological correlates of feeling high. The alterations in baseline brain perfusion and activity also have relevance for studies on task-related effects of THC on brain function.

  7. Theoretical considerations in measurement of time discrepancies between input and myocardial time-signal intensity curves in estimates of regional myocardial perfusion with first-pass contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Takahiro; Ishida, Masaki; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Nagata, Motonori; Sakuma, Hajime; Ichihara, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method to determine time discrepancies between input and myocardial time-signal intensity (TSI) curves for accurate estimation of myocardial perfusion with first-pass contrast-enhanced MRI. Estimation of myocardial perfusion with contrast-enhanced MRI using kinetic models requires faithful recording of contrast content in the blood and myocardium. Typically, the arterial input function (AIF) is obtained by setting a region of interest in the left ventricular cavity. However, there is a small delay between the AIF and the myocardial curves, and such time discrepancies can lead to errors in flow estimation using Patlak plot analysis. In this study, the time discrepancies between the arterial TSI curve and the myocardial tissue TSI curve were estimated based on the compartment model. In the early phase after the arrival of the contrast agent in the myocardium, the relationship between rate constant K1 and the concentrations of Gd-DTPA contrast agent in the myocardium and arterial blood (LV blood) can be described by the equation K1={dCmyo(tpeak)/dt}/Ca(tpeak), where Cmyo(t) and Ca(t) are the relative concentrations of Gd-DTPA contrast agent in the myocardium and in the LV blood, respectively, and tpeak is the time corresponding to the peak of Ca(t). In the ideal case, the time corresponding to the maximum upslope of Cmyo(t), tmax, is equal to tpeak. In practice, however, there is a small difference in the arrival times of the contrast agent into the LV and into the myocardium. This difference was estimated to correspond to the difference between tpeak and tmax. The magnitudes of such time discrepancies and the effectiveness of the correction for these time discrepancies were measured in 18 subjects who underwent myocardial perfusion MRI under rest and stress conditions. The effects of the time discrepancies could be corrected effectively in the myocardial perfusion estimates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  8. Identification of cerebral perfusion using arterial spin labeling in patients with seizures in acute settings

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Roh-Eul; Yoon, Byung-Woo; Lee, Sang Kun; Lee, Soon-Tae; Kang, Koung Mi; Choi, Seung Hong; Kim, Ji-hoon; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Sun-Won; Han, Moon Hee

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the utility of arterial spin labeling perfusion-weighted imaging (ASL-PWI) in patients with suspected seizures in acute settings. A total of 164 patients who underwent ASL-PWI for suspected seizures in acute settings (with final diagnoses of seizure [n = 129], poststroke seizure [n = 18], and seizure mimickers [n = 17]), were included in this retrospective study. Perfusion abnormality was analyzed for: (1) pattern, (2) multifocality, and (3) atypical distribution against vascular territories. Perfusion abnormality was detected in 39% (50/129) of the seizure patients, most (94%, 47/50) being the hyperperfusion pattern. Of the patients with perfusion abnormality, multifocality or hemispheric involvement and atypical distribution against vascular territory were revealed in 46% (23/50) and 98% (49/50), respectively. In addition, seizures showed characteristic features including hyperperfusion (with or without non-territorial distribution) on ASL-PWI, thus differentiating them from poststroke seizures or seizure mimickers. In patients in whom seizure focus could be localized on both EEG and ASL-PWI, the concordance rate was 77%. The present study demonstrates that ASL-PWI can provide information regarding cerebral perfusion status in patients with seizures in acute settings and has the potential to be used as a non-invasive imaging tool to identify the cerebral perfusion in patients with seizures. PMID:28291816

  9. Arterial spin labeling at 3.0 Tesla in subacute ischemia: comparison to dynamic susceptibility perfusion.

    PubMed

    Huck, S; Kerl, H U; Al-Zghloul, M; Groden, C; Nölte, I

    2012-03-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a promising but clinically not established non-invasive method to assess cerebral perfusion. The purpose of this study was to compare perfusion imaging with pulsed ASL (pASL) to conventional dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion-weighted imaging (PWL) using commercially available equipment and postprocessing (3.0 Tesla, 32-channel head coil) in patients with subacute ischemia. The pASL and DSC-PWI techniques were compared in 15 patients with subacute ischemia (age 49-88 years, 6 females and 9 males, time from onset to scan 4-161 h). Image inhomogeneity was assessed with the non-uniformity index. Image quality, delineation of hypoperfusion and degree of hypoperfusion were rated by two readers using a 5-scale grading system. The volume of hypoperfusion was quantified planimetrically. Image quality and image inhomogeneity were superior in DSC time-to-peak (TTP) compared to pASL cerebral brain flow (CBF; both p < 0.05). The delineation of hypoperfusion was better in DSC-TTP (p < 0.05) and the hypoperfusion was graded as more severe in DSC-TTP (p < 0.05). The volume of hypoperfusion did not differ between pASL-CBF and DSC-TTP, however, in pASL-CBF five cases with small infarctions (lacunar and pontine) were false negative compared to DSC-relative CBF. The mismatch frequency was lower in pASL (13%) than in DSC-rCBF (20%) and DSC-TTP (47%). Using a commercially available sequence and a 32-channel head coil at 3.0 Tesla pASL-CBF is feasible but limited compared to DSC-PWI in the assessment of ischemic stroke. In its present form pASL has a reserve role in clinical practice for situations when gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) is contraindicated.

  10. Arterial Spin Labeling Blood Flow MRI: Its Role in the Early Characterization of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alsop, David C.; Dai, Weiying; Grossman, Murray; Detre, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) enables the noninvasive, quantitative imaging of cerebral blood flow using standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment. Because it requires no contrast injection, ASL can add resting functional information to MRI studies measuring atrophy and signs of ischemic injury. Key features of ASL technology that may affect studies in Alzheimer’s disease are described. The existing literature describing ASL blood flow imaging applied to Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia is reviewed, and the potential role of ASL in treatment and prevention studies of early Alzheimer’s disease is discussed. PMID:20413865

  11. Quantitative Changes in Cerebral Perfusion during Urinary Urgency in Women with Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Weissbart, Steven J.; Xu, Sihua; Bhavsar, Rupal; Rao, Hengyi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To quantitatively measure changes in cerebral perfusion in select regions of interest in the brain during urinary urgency in women with overactive bladder (OAB) using arterial spin labeling (ASL). Methods Twelve women with OAB and 10 controls underwent bladder filling and rated urinary urgency (scale 0–10). ASL fMRI scans were performed (1) in the low urgency state after voiding and (2) high urgency state after drinking oral fluids. Absolute regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in select regions of interest was compared between the low and high urgency states. Results There were no significant differences in rCBF between the low and high urgency states in the control group. In the OAB group, rCBF (mean ± SE, ml/100 g/min) increased by 10–14% from the low to the high urgency state in the right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) (44.56 ± 0.59 versus 49.52 ± 1.49, p < 0.05), left ACC (49.29 ± 0.85 versus 54.02 ± 1.46, p < 0.05), and left insula (50.46 ± 1.72 versus 54.99 ± 1.09, p < 0.05). Whole-brain analysis identified additional areas of activation in the right insula, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and pons/midbrain area. Conclusions Urinary urgency is associated with quantitative increase in cerebral perfusion in regions of the brain associated with processing emotional response to discomfort. PMID:28904950

  12. Longitudinal Assessment of Renal Perfusion and Oxygenation in Transplant Donor-Recipient Pairs Using Arterial Spin Labeling and Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Niles, David J; Artz, Nathan S; Djamali, Arjang; Sadowski, Elizabeth A; Grist, Thomas M; Fain, Sean B

    2016-02-01

    The aims of this study were to assess renal function in kidney transplant recipients and their respective donors over 2 years using arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to prospectively evaluate the effect of losartan on functional MRI measures in recipients. The study included 15 matched pairs of renal transplant donors and recipients. Arterial spin labeling and BOLD MRI of the kidneys were performed on donors before transplant surgery (baseline) and on both donors and recipients at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after transplant. After 3 months, 7 of the 15 recipients were prescribed 25 to 50 mg/d losartan for the remainder of the study. A linear mixed-effects model was used to evaluate perfusion, R2*, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and fractional excretion of sodium for changes across time or associated with losartan treatment. In donors, cortical perfusion in the remaining kidney decreased by 50 ± 19 mL/min per 100 g (11.8%) between baseline and 2 years (P < 0.05), while cortical R2* declined modestly by 0.7 ± 0.3 s-1 (5.6%; P < 0.05). In transplanted kidneys, cortical perfusion decreased markedly by 141 ± 21 mL/min per 100 g (34.2%) between baseline and 2 years (P < 0.001), while medullary R2* declined by 1.5 ± 0.8 s-1 (8.3%; P = 0.06). Single-kidney estimated glomerular filtration rate increased between baseline and 2 years by 17.7 ± 2.7 mL/min per 1.73 m (40.3%; P < 0.0001) in donors and to 14.6 ± 4.3 mL/min per 1.73 m (33.3%; P < 0.01) in recipients. Cortical perfusion at 1 and 2 years in recipients receiving 25 to 50 mg/d losartan was 62 ± 24 mL/min per 100 g higher than recipients not receiving the drug (P < 0.05). No significant effects of losartan were observed for any other markers of renal function. The results suggest an important role for noninvasive functional monitoring with ASL and BOLD MRI in kidney transplant recipients and donors, and they indicate a potentially

  13. Impact of a Single Bout of Aerobic Exercise on Regional Brain Perfusion and Activation Responses in Healthy Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    MacIntosh, Bradley J.; Crane, David E.; Sage, Michael D.; Rajab, A. Saeed; Donahue, Manus J.; McIlroy, William E.; Middleton, Laura E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Despite the generally accepted view that aerobic exercise can have positive effects on brain health, few studies have measured brain responses to exercise over a short time span. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact within one hour of a single bout of exercise on brain perfusion and neuronal activation. Methods Healthy adults (n = 16; age range: 20–35 yrs) were scanned using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) before and after 20 minutes of exercise at 70% of their age-predicted maximal heart rate. Pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pcASL) was used to measure absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) prior to exercise (pre) and at 10 min (post-10) and 40 min (post-40) post-exercise. Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) was performed pre and post-exercise to characterize activation differences related to a go/no-go reaction time task. Results Compared to pre-exercise levels, grey matter CBF was 11% (±9%) lower at post-10 (P<0.0004) and not different at post-40 (P = 0.12), while global WM CBF was increased at both time points post-exercise (P<0.0006). Regionally, the hippocampus and insula showed a decrease in perfusion in ROI-analysis at post-10 (P<0.005, FDR corrected), whereas voxel-wise analysis identified elevated perfusion in the left medial postcentral gyrus at post-40 compared to pre (pcorrected = 0.05). BOLD activations were consistent between sessions, however, the left parietal operculum showed reduced BOLD activation after exercise. Conclusion This study provides preliminary evidence of regionalized brain effects associated with a single bout of aerobic exercise. The observed acute cerebrovascular responses may provide some insight into the brain’s ability to change in relation to chronic interventions. PMID:24416356

  14. Simultaneous perception of a spoken and a signed language: The brain basis of ASL-English code-blends.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Jill; McCullough, Stephen; Emmorey, Karen

    2015-08-01

    Code-blends (simultaneous words and signs) are a unique characteristic of bimodal bilingual communication. Using fMRI, we investigated code-blend comprehension in hearing native ASL-English bilinguals who made a semantic decision (edible?) about signs, audiovisual words, and semantically equivalent code-blends. English and ASL recruited a similar fronto-temporal network with expected modality differences: stronger activation for English in auditory regions of bilateral superior temporal cortex, and stronger activation for ASL in bilateral occipitotemporal visual regions and left parietal cortex. Code-blend comprehension elicited activity in a combination of these regions, and no cognitive control regions were additionally recruited. Furthermore, code-blends elicited reduced activation relative to ASL presented alone in bilateral prefrontal and visual extrastriate cortices, and relative to English alone in auditory association cortex. Consistent with behavioral facilitation observed during semantic decisions, the findings suggest that redundant semantic content induces more efficient neural processing in language and sensory regions during bimodal language integration.

  15. Negative predictive value of normal adenosine-stress cardiac MRI in the assessment of coronary artery disease and correlation with semiquantitative perfusion analysis.

    PubMed

    Pilz, Guenter; Eierle, Susanne; Heer, Tobias; Klos, Markus; Ali, Eman; Scheck, Roland; Wild, Michael; Bernhardt, Peter; Hoefling, Berthold

    2010-09-01

    To prospectively determine the negative predictive value of normal adenosine stress cardiac MR (CMR) in routine patients referred for evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD), predominantly with intermediate to high pretest risk. Consecutive patients referred for coronary angiography were examined in a 1.5 Tesla whole-body scanner before catheterization. A total of 158 patients with normal CMR on qualitative assessment were included, and semiquantitative perfusion analysis was performed. Significant CAD was regarded as luminal narrowing of >or=70% in coronary angiography. In the 158 study patients, negative predictive value of normal adenosine-stress CMR for significant CAD was 96.2% (for stenosis >or=90%: 98.1%). True-negative and false-negative patients were comparable regarding clinical presentation, risk factors, and CMR findings. Semiquantitative perfusion analysis gave significantly prolonged arrival time index and peak time index in the false-negative group. Using cutoff values >1.8 for arrival time index or >1.2 for peak time index, the CMR negative predictive value increased to 98.7% (for stenosis >or=90%: to 100%). The very high negative predictive value for CAD supports CMR-based decision making for the indication to coronary angiography. Semiquantitative perfusion analysis seems promising to identify the small group of CAD patients not detectable by qualitative CMR assessment.

  16. Use of 3D DCE-MRI for the estimation of renal perfusion and glomerular filtration rate: an intrasubject comparison of FLASH and KWIC with a comprehensive framework for evaluation.

    PubMed

    Eikefjord, Eli; Andersen, Erling; Hodneland, Erlend; Zöllner, Frank; Lundervold, Arvid; Svarstad, Einar; Rørvik, Jarle

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to compare two 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI measurement techniques for MR renography, a radial k-space weighted image contrast (KWIC) sequence and a cartesian FLASH sequence, in terms of intrasubject differences in estimates of renal functional parameters and image quality characteristics. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Ten healthy volunteers underwent repeated breath-hold KWIC and FLASH sequence examinations with temporal resolutions of 2.5 and 2.8 seconds, respectively. A two-compartment model was used to estimate MRI-derived perfusion parameters and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The latter was compared with the iohexol GFR and the estimated GFR. Image quality was assessed using a visual grading characteristic analysis of relevant image quality criteria and signal-to-noise ratio calculations. RESULTS. Perfusion estimates from FLASH were closer to literature reference values than were the KWIC sequences. In relation to the iohexol GFR (mean [± SD], 103 ± 11 mL/min/1.73 m(2)), KWIC produced significant underestimations and larger bias in GFR values (mean, 70 ± 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2); bias = -33.2 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) compared with the FLASH GFR (110 ± 29 mL/min/1.73 m(2); bias = 6.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2)). KWIC was statistically significantly (p < 0.005) more impaired by artifacts than was FLASH (AUC = 0.18). The average signal-enhancement ratio (delta ratio) in the cortex was significantly lower for KWIC (delta ratio = 0.99) than for FLASH (delta ratio = 1.40). Other visually graded image quality characteristics and signal-to-noise ratio measurements were not statistically significantly different. CONCLUSION. Using the same postprocessing scheme and pharmacokinetic model, FLASH produced more accurate perfusion and filtration parameters than did KWIC compared with clinical reference methods. Our data suggest an apparent relationship between image quality characteristics and the degree of stability in the numeric model

  17. The effect of supine exercise on the distribution of regional pulmonary blood flow measured using proton MRI

    PubMed Central

    Hall, E. T.; Sá, R. C.; Holverda, S.; Arai, T. J.; Dubowitz, D. J.; Theilmann, R. J.; Prisk, G. K.

    2013-01-01

    The Zone model of pulmonary perfusion predicts that exercise reduces perfusion heterogeneity because increased vascular pressure redistributes flow to gravitationally nondependent lung, and causes dilation and recruitment of blood vessels. However, during exercise in animals, perfusion heterogeneity as measured by the relative dispersion (RD, SD/mean) is not significantly decreased. We evaluated the effect of exercise on pulmonary perfusion in six healthy supine humans using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Data were acquired at rest, while exercising (∼27% of maximal oxygen consumption) using a MRI-compatible ergometer, and in recovery. Images were acquired in most of the right lung in the sagittal plane at functional residual capacity, using a 1.5-T MR scanner equipped with a torso coil. Perfusion was measured using arterial spin labeling (ASL-FAIRER) and regional proton density using a fast multiecho gradient-echo sequence. Perfusion images were corrected for coil-based signal heterogeneity, large conduit vessels removed and quantified (in ml·min−1·ml−1) (perfusion), and also normalized for density and quantified (in ml·min−1·g−1) (density-normalized perfusion, DNP) accounting for tissue redistribution. DNP increased during exercise (11.1 ± 3.5 rest, 18.8 ± 2.3 exercise, 13.2 ± 2.2 recovery, ml·min−1·g−1, P < 0.0001), and the increase was largest in nondependent lung (110 ± 61% increase in nondependent, 63 ± 35% in mid, 70 ± 33% in dependent, P < 0.005). The RD of perfusion decreased with exercise (0.93 ± 0.21 rest, 0.73 ± 0.13 exercise, 0.94 ± 0.18 recovery, P < 0.005). The RD of DNP showed a similar trend (0.82 ± 0.14 rest, 0.75 ± 0.09 exercise, 0.81 ± 0.10 recovery, P = 0.13). In conclusion, in contrast to animal studies, in supine humans, mild exercise decreased perfusion heterogeneity, consistent with Zone model predictions. PMID:24356515

  18. SU-D-18C-05: Variable Bolus Arterial Spin Labeling MRI for Accurate Cerebral Blood Flow and Arterial Transit Time Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, M; Jung, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an MRI perfusion imaging method from which quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps can be calculated. Acquisition with variable post-labeling delays (PLD) and variable TRs allows for arterial transit time (ATT) mapping and leads to more accurate CBF quantification with a scan time saving of 48%. In addition, T1 and M0 maps can be obtained without a separate scan. In order to accurately estimate ATT and T1 of brain tissue from the ASL data, variable labeling durations were invented, entitled variable-bolus ASL. Methods: All images were collected on a healthy subject with a 3T Siemens Skyra scanner. Variable-bolus Psuedo-continuous ASL (PCASL) images were collected with 7 TI times ranging 100-4300ms in increments of 700ms with TR ranging 1000-5200ms. All boluses were 1600ms when the TI allowed, otherwise the bolus duration was 100ms shorter than the TI. All TI times were interleaved to reduce sensitivity to motion. Voxel-wise T1 and M0 maps were estimated using a linear least squares fitting routine from the average singal from each TI time. Then pairwise subtraction of each label/control pair and averaging for each TI time was performed. CBF and ATT maps were created using the standard model by Buxton et al. with a nonlinear fitting routine using the T1 tissue map. Results: CBF maps insensitive to ATT were produced along with ATT maps. Both maps show patterns and averages consistent with literature. The T1 map also shows typical T1 contrast. Conclusion: It has been demonstrated that variablebolus ASL produces CBF maps free from the errors due to ATT and tissue T1 variations and provides M0, T1, and ATT maps which have potential utility. This is accomplished with a single scan in a feasible scan time (under 6 minutes) with low sensivity to motion.

  19. Brain perfusion: computed tomography and magnetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Copen, William A; Lev, Michael H; Rapalino, Otto

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral perfusion imaging provides assessment of regional microvascular hemodynamics in the living brain, enabling in vivo measurement of a variety of different hemodynamic parameters. Perfusion imaging techniques that are used in the clinical setting usually rely upon X-ray computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This chapter reviews CT- and MRI-based perfusion imaging techniques, with attention to image acquisition, clinically relevant aspects of image postprocessing, and fundamental differences between CT- and MRI-based techniques. Correlations with cerebrovascular physiology and potential clinical applications of perfusion imaging are reviewed, focusing upon the two major classes of neurologic disease in which perfusion imaging is most often performed: primary perfusion disorders (including ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, and reperfusion syndrome), and brain tumors. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Arterial Spin-Labeled Perfusion Combined with Segmentation Techniques to Evaluate Cerebral Blood Flow in White and Gray Matter of Children with Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Helton, Kathleen J.; Paydar, Amir; Glass, John; Weirich, Eric M.; Hankins, Jane; Li, Chin-Shang; Smeltzer, Matthew P.; Wang, Winfred C.; Ware, Russell E.; Ogg, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Changes in cerebral perfusion are an important feature of the pathophysiology of sickle cell anemia (SCA); cerebrovascular ischemia occurs frequently and leads to neurocognitive deficits, silent infarcts, and overt stroke. Non-invasive MRI methods to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) by arterial spin labeling (ASL) afford new opportunities to characterize disease- and therapy-induced changes in cerebral hemodynamics in patients with SCA. Recent studies have documented elevated gray matter (GM) CBF in untreated children with SCA, but no measurements of white matter (WM) CBF have been reported. Procedures Pulsed ASL with automated brain image segmentation-classification techniques were used to determine the CBF in GM, WM, and abnormal white matter (ABWM) of 21 children with SCA, 18 of whom were receiving hydroxyurea therapy. Results GM and WM CBF were highly associated (R2 =.76, p< 0.0001) and the GM to WM CBF ratio was 1.6 (95% confidence interval: 1.43-1.83). Global GM CBF in our treated cohort was 87 ± 24 mL/min/100 g, a value lower than previously reported in untreated patients with SCA. CBF was elevated in normal appearing WM (43 ± 14 mL/min/100 g) but decreased in ABWM (6 ± 12 mL/min/100 g), compared to published normal pediatric controls. Hemispheric asymmetry in CBF was noted in most patients. Conclusions These perfusion measurements suggest that hydroxyurea may normalize GM CBF in children with SCA, but altered perfusion in WM may persist. This novel combined approach for CBF quantification will facilitate prospective studies of cerebral vasculopathy in SCA, particularly regarding the effects of treatments such as hydroxyurea. PMID:18937311

  1. New Directions in ASL-English Bilingual Ebooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The widespread adoption of smartphones and tablet computers have enabled the rapid creation and distribution of innovative American Sign Language (ASL) and written English bilingual ebooks, aimed primarily at deaf and hard-of-hearing children. These sign-print bilingual ebooks are unique in how they take advantage of digital platforms to display…

  2. ASL Discourse Strategies: Chaining and Connecting--Explaining across Audiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinto-Pozos, David; Reynolds, Wanette

    2012-01-01

    This study takes advantage of a novel methodology--the use of a single culturally-meaningful text written in English and presented to different audiences in ASL--to examine the ways in which Deaf native signers utilize contextualization strategies in order to match the perceived linguistic and informational needs of an audience. We demonstrate,…

  3. ASL Nominal Constructions Involving Signs That Resemble Pronouns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan, Vivion Smith

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines six different types of noun phrases that commonly occur in American Sign Language. These noun phrases all include at least a head noun and one of four signs resembling a pronoun. Videos of natural ASL discourses are gathered, multiple instances of the six types of noun phrases are identified, and their meanings are…

  4. Increasing Children's ASL Classifier Production: A Multicomponent Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beal-Alvarez, Jennifer S.; Easterbrooks, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    The Authors examined classifier production during narrative retells by 10 deaf and hard of hearing students in grades 2-4 at a day school for the deaf following a 6-week intervention of repeated viewings of stories in American Sign Language (ASL) paired with scripted teacher mediation. Classifier production, documented through a…

  5. Kinematic Signatures of Telic and Atelic Events in ASL Predicates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malaia, Evie; Wilbur, Ronnie B.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an experimental investigation of kinematics of verb sign production in American Sign Language (ASL) using motion capture data. The results confirm that event structure differences in the meaning of the verbs are reflected in the kinematic formation: for example, in the telic verbs (throw, hit), the end-point of the event is…

  6. Kinematic Signatures of Telic and Atelic Events in ASL Predicates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malaia, Evie; Wilbur, Ronnie B.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an experimental investigation of kinematics of verb sign production in American Sign Language (ASL) using motion capture data. The results confirm that event structure differences in the meaning of the verbs are reflected in the kinematic formation: for example, in the telic verbs (throw, hit), the end-point of the event is…

  7. Increasing Children's ASL Classifier Production: A Multicomponent Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beal-Alvarez, Jennifer S.; Easterbrooks, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    The Authors examined classifier production during narrative retells by 10 deaf and hard of hearing students in grades 2-4 at a day school for the deaf following a 6-week intervention of repeated viewings of stories in American Sign Language (ASL) paired with scripted teacher mediation. Classifier production, documented through a…

  8. New Directions in ASL-English Bilingual Ebooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The widespread adoption of smartphones and tablet computers have enabled the rapid creation and distribution of innovative American Sign Language (ASL) and written English bilingual ebooks, aimed primarily at deaf and hard-of-hearing children. These sign-print bilingual ebooks are unique in how they take advantage of digital platforms to display…

  9. Cerebral Blood Volume Analysis in Glioblastomas Using Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast-Enhanced Perfusion MRI: A Comparison of Manual and Semiautomatic Segmentation Methods

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Seung Chai; Choi, Seung Hong; Yeom, Jeong A.; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Ryoo, Inseon; Kim, Soo Chin; Shin, Hwaseon; Lee, A. Leum; Yun, Tae Jin; Park, Chul-Kee; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Sung-Hye

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare the reproducibilities of manual and semiautomatic segmentation method for the measurement of normalized cerebral blood volume (nCBV) using dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced (DSC) perfusion MR imaging in glioblastomas. Materials and Methods Twenty-two patients (11 male, 11 female; 27 tumors) with histologically confirmed glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) were examined with conventional MR imaging and DSC imaging at 3T before surgery or biopsy. Then nCBV (means and standard deviations) in each mass was measured using two DSC MR perfusion analysis methods including manual and semiautomatic segmentation method, in which contrast-enhanced (CE)-T1WI and T2WI were used as structural imaging. Intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility were assessed according to each perfusion analysis method or each structural imaging. Interclass correlation coefficient (ICC), Bland-Altman plot, and coefficient of variation (CV) were used to evaluate reproducibility. Results Intraobserver reproducibilities on CE-T1WI and T2WI were ICC of 0.74–0.89 and CV of 20.39–36.83% in manual segmentation method, and ICC of 0.95–0.99 and CV of 8.53–16.19% in semiautomatic segmentation method, repectively. Interobserver reproducibilites on CE-T1WI and T2WI were ICC of 0.86–0.94 and CV of 19.67–35.15% in manual segmentation method, and ICC of 0.74–1.0 and CV of 5.48–49.38% in semiautomatic segmentation method, respectively. Bland-Altman plots showed a good correlation with ICC or CV in each method. The semiautomatic segmentation method showed higher intraobserver and interobserver reproducibilities at CE-T1WI-based study than other methods. Conclusion The best reproducibility was found using the semiautomatic segmentation method based on CE-T1WI for structural imaging in the measurement of the nCBV of glioblastomas. PMID:23950891

  10. Using online glossing lessons for accelerated instruction in ASL for preservice deaf education majors.

    PubMed

    Buisson, Gerald J

    2007-01-01

    Teachers of deaf and hard of hearing students must serve as language models for their students. However, preservice deaf education teachers typically have at most only four semesters of American Sign Language (ASL) training. How can their limited ASL instructional time be used to increase their proficiency? Studies involving deaf and hard of hearing students have revealed that glosses (written equivalents of ASL sentences) can serve as "bridges" between ASL and English. The study investigated whether glossing instruction can facilitate hearing students' learning of ASL. A Web site was developed in which ASL glossing rules were explained and glossing exercises provided. Posttest scores showed the experimental group improving from 39% to 71% on ASL grammar knowledge. These findings indicate that online glossing lessons may provide the means to obtain ASL skills more readily, thus preparing deaf education teachers to serve as ASL language models.

  11. Temporal Feature Extraction from DCE-MRI to Identify Poorly Perfused Subvolumes of Tumors Related to Outcomes of Radiation Therapy in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    You, Daekeun; Aryal, Madhava; Samuels, Stuart E.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Cao, Yue

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to develop an automated model to extract temporal features from DCE-MRI in head-and-neck (HN) cancers to localize significant tumor subvolumes having low blood volume (LBV) for predicting local and regional failure after chemoradiation therapy. Temporal features were extracted from time-intensity curves to build classification model for differentiating voxels with LBV from those with high BV. Support vector machine (SVM) classification was trained on the extracted features for voxel classification. Subvolumes with LBV were then assembled from the classified voxels with LBV. The model was trained and validated on independent datasets created from 456 873 DCE curves. The resultant subvolumes were compared to ones derived by a 2-step method via pharmacokinetic modeling of blood volume, and evaluated for classification accuracy and volumetric similarity by DSC. The proposed model achieved an average voxel-level classification accuracy and DSC of 82% and 0.72, respectively. Also, the model showed tolerance on different acquisition parameters of DCE-MRI. The model could be directly used for outcome prediction and therapy assessment in radiation therapy of HN cancers, or even supporting boost target definition in adaptive clinical trials with further validation. The model is fully automatable, extendable, and scalable to extract temporal features of DCE-MRI in other tumors. PMID:28111634

  12. Arterial spin labeling MRI is able to detect early hemodynamic changes in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Mora-Gutiérrez, José María; Garcia-Fernandez, Nuria; Slon Roblero, M Fernanda; Páramo, Jose A; Escalada, F Javier; Wang, Danny Jj; Benito, Alberto; Fernández-Seara, María A

    2017-04-06

    To investigate whether arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI could detect renal hemodynamic impairment in diabetes mellitus (DM) along different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Three Tesla (3T) ASL-MRI was performed to evaluate renal blood flow (RBF) in 91 subjects (46 healthy volunteers and 45 type 2 diabetic patients). Patients were classified according to their estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) as group I (eGFR > 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) ), group II (60 ≥ eGFR>30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) ), or group III (eGFR ≤ 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) ), to determine differences depending on renal function. Studies were performed at 3T using a 12-channel flexible body array combined with the spine array coil as receiver. A 28% reduction in cortical RBF was seen in diabetics in comparison with healthy controls (185.79 [54.60] versus 258.83 [37.96] mL/min/100 g, P < 3 × 10(-6) ). Differences were also seen between controls and diabetic patients despite normal eGFR and absence of overt albuminuria (RBF [mL/min/100 g]: controls=258.83 [37.96], group I=208.89 [58.83], P = 0.0018; eGFR [mL/min/1.73 m(2) ]: controls = 95.50 [12.60], group I = 82.00 [20.76], P > 0.05; albumin-creatinine ratio [mg/g]: controls = 3.50 [4.45], group I = 17.50 [21.20], P > 0.05). A marked decrease in RBF was noted a long with progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN) through the five stages of CKD (χ(2)  = 43.58; P = 1.85 × 10(-9) ). Strong correlation (r = 0.62; P = 4 × 10(-10) ) was obtained between RBF and GFR estimated by cystatin C. ASL-MRI is able to quantify early renal perfusion impairment in DM, as well as changes according to different CKD stages of DN. In addition, we demonstrated a correlation of RBF quantified by ASL and GFR estimated by cystatin C. 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Whole brain perfusion measurements using arterial spin labeling with multiband acquisition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae; Shin, Wanyong; Zhao, Tiejun; Beall, Erik B; Lowe, Mark J; Bae, Kyongtae T

    2013-12-01

    The multiband (MB) excitation and reconstruction technique was both developed and evaluated for accelerated data acquisition of arterial spin labeling (ASL) to cover whole brain perfusion maps. MB excitation was incorporated into a pulsed ASL (PASL) technique and compared with conventional single-band excitation PASL from healthy subjects, using a 32-channel head receiver coil at 3 T. The MB de-aliasing performance and effectiveness in perfusion measurement were measured with varying MB acceleration factors and gaps between MB excitations. The MB PASL perfusion maps were in good agreement with the conventional single-band PASL maps at matched slices. The imaging coverage could be effectively extended with the MB technique by a factor up to 5. A gap as small as 3 cm between MB excitations resulted in a comparable ASL signal loss and temporal-signal-to-noise ratio with single-band PASL. The MB ASL technique is an effective method to evaluate whole brain perfusion because it minimizes the temporal spread of labeled spins across slices, resulting in more accurate perfusion measurements. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. [Evaluation by statistical brain perfusion SPECT analysis on MRI findings, kana pick-out test and Mini-Mental State Examination results in patients with forgetfulness].

    PubMed

    Nakatsuka, Hiroki; Matsubara, Ichirou; Ohtani, Haruhiko

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT) study was to determine the abnormality of the regional cerebral blood flow(rCBF) using a three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection (3 D-SSP) in 18 patients who were referred to the hospital because of forgetfulness. Two intergroup comparison by 3 D-SSP analysis was conducted based on MRI, kana pick-out test and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) results. Of the MRI findings, in the brain atrophy group, rCBF was decreased in the posterior cingulate gyrus, medial temporal structure and parieto-temporal association cortex; these rCBF-decreased areas are similar to the Alzheimer disease pattern. In the group where the MMSE was normal but the kana pick-out test was abnormal, rCBF was decreased in the posterior cingulate gyrus and cinguloparietal transitional area. In the group where both the MMSE and kana pick-out test were abnormal, rCBF was decreased in the parieto-temporal association cortex, temporal cortex and medial temporal structure. These results suggest that 3 D-SSP analysis of the SPECT with MMSE and the kana pick-out test provides the possibility of early diagnosis of initial stage of Alzheimer's disease.

  15. The Impact of American Sign Language Fluency on Co-Speech Gesture Production of Hearing English/ASL Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faust, Katrina Danielle

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation describes the features of co-speech gestures of English/ASL bilinguals and addresses three main questions: 1) How do English/ASL bilinguals gesture differently than non-signers? 2) How do native ASL/English bilinguals gesture differently than non-native English/ASL bilinguals? 3) Do English/ASL bilinguals gesture differently to…

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Ventilation and Perfusion in the Lung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, Gordon Kim (Inventor); Hopkins, Susan Roberta (Inventor); Buxton, Richard Bruce (Inventor); Pereira De Sa, Rui Carlos (Inventor); Theilmann, Rebecca Jean (Inventor); Cronin, Matthew Vincent (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Methods, devices, and systems are disclosed for implementing a fully quantitative non-injectable contrast proton MRI technique to measure spatial ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) matching and spatial distribution of ventilation and perfusion. In one aspect, a method using MRI to characterize ventilation and perfusion in a lung includes acquiring an MR image of the lung having MR data in a voxel and obtaining a breathing frequency parameter, determining a water density value, a specific ventilation value, and a perfusion value in at least one voxel of the MR image based on the MR data and using the water density value to determine an air content value, and determining a ventilation-perfusion ratio value that is the product of the specific ventilation value, the air content value, the inverse of the perfusion value, and the breathing frequency.

  17. Phonological Substitution Errors in L2 ASL Sentence Processing by Hearing M2L2 Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Joshua; Newman, Sharlene

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we aimed to investigate phonological substitution errors made by hearing second language (M2L2) learners of American Sign Language (ASL) during a sentence translation task. Learners saw sentences in ASL that were signed by either a native signer or a M2L2 learner. Learners were to simply translate the sentence from ASL to…

  18. Phonological Substitution Errors in L2 ASL Sentence Processing by Hearing M2L2 Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Joshua; Newman, Sharlene

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we aimed to investigate phonological substitution errors made by hearing second language (M2L2) learners of American Sign Language (ASL) during a sentence translation task. Learners saw sentences in ASL that were signed by either a native signer or a M2L2 learner. Learners were to simply translate the sentence from ASL to…

  19. Comparison of (18)F-FET PET and perfusion-weighted MRI for glioma grading: a hybrid PET/MR study.

    PubMed

    Verger, Antoine; Filss, Christian P; Lohmann, Philipp; Stoffels, Gabriele; Sabel, Michael; Wittsack, Hans J; Kops, Elena Rota; Galldiks, Norbert; Fink, Gereon R; Shah, Nadim J; Langen, Karl-Josef

    2017-08-22

    Both perfusion-weighted MR imaging (PWI) and O-(2-(18)F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine PET ((18)F-FET) provide grading information in cerebral gliomas. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of (18)F-FET PET and PWI for tumor grading in a series of patients with newly diagnosed, untreated gliomas using an integrated PET/MR scanner. Seventy-two patients with untreated gliomas [22 low-grade gliomas (LGG), and 50 high-grade gliomas (HGG)] were investigated with (18)F-FET PET and PWI using a hybrid PET/MR scanner. After visual inspection of PET and PWI maps (rCBV, rCBF, MTT), volumes of interest (VOIs) with a diameter of 16 mm were centered upon the maximum of abnormality in the tumor area in each modality and the contralateral unaffected hemisphere. Mean and maximum tumor-to-brain ratios (TBRmean, TBRmax) were calculated. In addition, Time-to-Peak (TTP) and slopes of time-activity curves were calculated for (18)F-FET PET. Diagnostic accuracies of (18)F-FET PET and PWI for differentiating low-grade glioma (LGG) from high-grade glioma (HGG) were evaluated by receiver operating characteristic analyses (area under the curve; AUC). The diagnostic accuracy of (18)F-FET PET and PWI to discriminate LGG from HGG was similar with highest AUC values for TBRmean and TBRmax of (18)F-FET PET uptake (0.80, 0.83) and for TBRmean and TBRmax of rCBV (0.80, 0.81). In case of increased signal in the tumor area with both methods (n = 32), local hot-spots were incongruent in 25 patients (78%) with a mean distance of 10.6 ± 9.5 mm. Dynamic FET PET and combination of different parameters did not further improve diagnostic accuracy. Both (18)F-FET PET and PWI discriminate LGG from HGG with similar diagnostic performance. Regional abnormalities in the tumor area are usually not congruent indicating that tumor grading by (18)F-FET PET and PWI is based on different pathophysiological phenomena.

  20. Error estimation for perfusion parameters obtained using the two-compartment exchange model in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luypaert, R.; Sourbron, S.; Makkat, S.; de Mey, J.

    2010-11-01

    In theory, the application of the two-compartment exchange model (2CXM) to data from a dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI exam allows the estimation of the plasma flow, plasma volume, extraction flow and extravascular-extracellular volume. The aim of this paper was to explore whether simulations based on the 2CXM could provide useful information on the trustworthiness of the results. The deviations from the input values of the haemodynamic quantities were estimated for a 'reference tissue' with a clear bi-phasic response and four 'limit tissues' with more challenging 2CXM fitting properties. The impact of the instrumental factors sampling step (Ts), acquisition window (Tacq) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was investigated. Each factor was varied separately, while keeping the other ones at a value above concern. Measurement guidelines to ensure that all deviations fell within a predefined range (±20%) could not be derived, but simulations for fixed Ts and Tacq were found to provide a practical tool for studying the error behaviour to be expected from a given experimental set-up and for comparing measurement protocols. At the level of an individual DCE exam, a bootstrap version of the simulation approach was shown to lead to a useful estimate of the errors on the fitted parameters.

  1. Performance of simultaneous high temporal resolution quantitative perfusion imaging of bladder tumors and conventional multi-phase urography using a novel free-breathing continuously acquired radial compressed-sensing MRI sequence.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Nainesh; Ream, Justin M; Zhang, Hoi Cheung; Block, Kai Tobias; Chandarana, Hersh; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the feasibility of high temporal resolution quantitative perfusion imaging of bladder tumors performed simultaneously with conventional multi-phase MR urography (MRU) using a novel free-breathing continuously acquired radial MRI sequence with compressed-sensing reconstruction. 22 patients with bladder lesions underwent MRU using GRASP (Golden-angle RAdial Sparse Parallel) acquisition. Multi-phase contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic GRASP was performed during free-breathing (1.4×1.4×3.0mm(3) voxel size; 3:44min acquisition). Two dynamic datasets were retrospectively reconstructed by combining different numbers of sequentially acquired spokes into each dynamic frame: 110 spokes per frame for 25-s temporal resolution (serving as conventional MRU for clinical interpretation) and 8 spokes per frame for 1.7-s resolution. Using 1.7-s resolution images, ROIs were placed within bladder lesions and normal bladder wall, a femoral artery arterial input function was generated, and the Generalized Kinetic Model was applied. Biopsy/cystectomy demonstrated 16 bladder tumors (13 stage≥T2, 3 stage≤T1) and 6 benign lesions. All lesions were well visualized using 25-s clinical multi-phase images. Using 1.7-s resolution images, K(trans) was significantly higher in tumors (0.38±0.24) than normal bladder (0.12±0.02=8, p<0.001) or benign lesions (0.15±0.04, p=0.033). Ratio between K(trans) of lesions and normal bladder was nearly double for tumors than benign lesions (4.3±3.4 vs. 2.2±1.6), and K(trans) was nearly double in stage≥T2 than stage≤T1 tumors (0.44±0.24 vs. 0.24±0.24), although these did not approach significance (p=0.180-0.209), possibly related to small sample size. GRASP allows simultaneous quantitative high temporal resolution perfusion of bladder lesions during clinical MRU examinations using only one contrast injection and without additional scan time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Coordination of Mesoscale Meteorological Research between ASL and European Groups

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-06

    mesometeorology workshop held at the Ris)National Labpratory, RosKilde, Denmark, 12th-15th May, 1987, 2 Panel Meetings ( RisO , 14th-15th May, 1987 and PSL, NMSU...recent years and .nere are a substantial number of well tested models that have significant advantages over SIGMET. At the Panel meeting in RISO , 12-14...the considerable amount of work put into SIGMET development since its last full meeting at RISO in 1987 had been largely fruitless. ASL appeared to be

  3. Stroke mimic: Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging of a patient with ictal paralysis.

    PubMed

    Sanghvi, D; Goyal, C; Mani, J

    2016-01-01

    We present an uncommon case of clinically diagnosed window period stroke subsequently recognised on diffusion - perfusion MRI as ictal paralysis due to focal inhibitory seizures or negative motor seizures. This case highlights the importance of MRI with perfusion imaging in establishing the diagnosis of stroke mimics and avoiding unnecessary thrombolysis.

  4. Stroke mimic: Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging of a patient with ictal paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Sanghvi, D; Goyal, C; Mani, J

    2016-01-01

    We present an uncommon case of clinically diagnosed window period stroke subsequently recognised on diffusion – perfusion MRI as ictal paralysis due to focal inhibitory seizures or negative motor seizures. This case highlights the importance of MRI with perfusion imaging in establishing the diagnosis of stroke mimics and avoiding unnecessary thrombolysis. PMID:27763486

  5. Kinematic signatures of telic and atelic events in ASL predicates.

    PubMed

    Malaia, Evie; Wilbur, Ronnie B

    2012-09-01

    This article presents an experimental investigation of kinematics of verb sign production in American Sign Language (ASL) using motion capture data. The results confirm that event structure differences in the meaning of the verbs are reflected in the kinematic formation: for example, in the telic verbs (THROW, HIT), the end-point of the event is marked in the verb sign movement by significantly greater deceleration, as compared to atelic verbs (SWIM, TRAVEL). This end-point marker is highly robust regardless of position of the verb in the sentence (medial vs. final), although other prominent kinematic measures, including sign duration and peak speed of dominant hand motion within the sign, are affected by prosodic processes such as Phrase Final Lengthening. The study provides the first kinematic confirmation that event structure is expressed in movement profiles of ASL verbs, up to now only supported by apparent perceptual distinctions. The findings raise further questions about the psychology of event representation both in human languages and in the human mind.

  6. [CT perfusion for assessment of brain stem ischemic lesions].

    PubMed

    Saifullina, E I; Iksanova, G R

    2007-01-01

    Modern neurovisualization modalities - CT and MRI with cerebral circulation assessment was used for diagnosis of cerebrovascular disturbances in patients admitted to the Emergency Care Hospital of Ufa. CT and MRI perfusion methods appeared to be highly effective both in diagnosis and treatment efficacy monitoring of acute stroke.

  7. Signal changes on magnetic resonance perfusion images with arterial spin labeling after carotid endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shimogawa, Takafumi; Morioka, Takato; Sayama, Tetsuro; Haga, Sei; Akiyama, Tomoaki; Murao, Kei; Kanazawa, Yuka; Furuta, Yoshihiko; Sakata, Ayumi; Arakawa, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cerebral hyperperfusion after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is defined as an increase in ipsilateral cerebral blood flow (CBF). Practically, however, prompt and precise assessment of cerebral hyperperfusion is difficult because of limitations in the methodology of CBF measurement during the perioperative period. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a completely noninvasive and repeatable magnetic resonance perfusion imaging technique that uses magnetically-labelled blood water as an endogenous tracer. To clarify the usefulness of ASL in the management of cerebral hyperperfusion, we investigated signal changes by ASL with a single 1.5-s post-labeling delay on visual inspection. Methods: Thirty-two consecutive patients who underwent CEA were enrolled in this retrospective study. Results: On postoperative day 1, 22 (68.8%) and 4 (12.5%) patients exhibited increased ASL signals bilaterally (Group A) and on the operated side (Group B), respectively. Follow-up ASL showed improvement in these findings. Six (18.8%) patients showed no change (Group C). There was no apparent correlation between ASL signals on postoperative day 1 and the preoperative hemodynamic state, including the cerebrovascular reserve (P = 0.2062). Three (9.4%) patients developed cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (two in Group A and one in Group B). Coincidence in the localization of increased ASL signals and electroencephalographic abnormalities was noted in these patients. Conclusion: Visual analysis of ASL with a single post-labeling delay overestimates CBF and cannot identify patients at risk of cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome probably because of the strong effect of the shortened arterial transit time immediately after CEA. However, ASL may be used as for screening. PMID:28144479

  8. [Three-dimensional Pseudo-continuous Arterial Spin Label Non-contrast Enhanced Perfusion Imaging of Head and Neck Tumors with High-field MR System].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Duan, Miao; Zhou, Hai-long; Shi, Kai-ning; Sun, Zhao-yong; Bai, Chun-mei; Jia, Ning; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Xing-ming; Hu, Ke; Zhang, Zhu-hua; Jin, Zheng-yu

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of three-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin label (3D pCASL) non-contrast enhanced perfusion imaging applied to head and neck tumors in high-field MR and detect the effects of different postlabeling delay (PLD) time on image quality and the reliability of repeated measurements of tumor blood flow (BF) in different 3D pCASL groups. In this prospective study,all the 25 patients received neck 3D pCASL non-contrast enhanced perfusion examinations in a 3.0 T MR system by using an 8-channel head and neck joint coil. Conventional T1-weighted (TIWI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) were performed firstly. Finally,three 3D pCASL with different PLD time [ASL1(PLD1=1525 ms),ASL2 (PLD2=2025 ms), ASL3(PLD3=2525 ms)] were acquired. Patients' perfusion-weighted images acquired from different 3D pCASL sequences underwent the analysis of signal to noise ratio (SNR) and contrast noise ratio (CNR) for tumors. Two observers performed the qualitative assessments on spiral artifacts and vascular artifacts of perfusion-weighted images from different 3D pCASL sequences. Blood flow (BF) of tumors from different 3D pCASL sequences were measured by the two observers respectively for the first time and by observer 2 for the second time. Seventeen enrolled patients (age:50.1 ± 12.7 years,M/F=10:7) with histopathologic. underwent the evaluation of image quality and measurements of BF values. The SNRs and CNRs of ASL1,ASL2, and ASL3 showed a descending trendency. SNRs (P=0.011) and CNRs (P=0.009) of ASL1 were significant higher than those of ASL3. There was no significant difference of scores of spiral artifacts among the three ASL groups (P=0.932). The scores of vascular artifacts of ASL1,ASL2,and ASL3 showed a descending trendency,also. And scores of ASL1 was significant higher than that of ASL3(P=0.000). The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of intre-and intraobserver were high (ICC>0.9). Although the BF values of ASL1,ASL2, and ASL3 showed an

  9. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of luxury perfusion of the optic nerve head in anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yovel, Oren S; Katz, Miriam; Leiba, Hana

    2012-09-01

    A 49-year-old woman with painless reduction in visual acuity in her left eye was found to have nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). Fluorescein angiography revealed optic disc capillary leakage consistent with "luxury perfusion." Contrast-enhanced FLAIR magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed marked enhancement of the left optic disc. Resolution of the optic disc edema and the MRI abnormalities followed a similar time course. This report appears unique in documenting the MRI findings of luxury perfusion in NAION.

  11. Whole-brain perfusion imaging with balanced steady-state free precession arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Han, Paul Kyu; Ye, Jong Chul; Kim, Eung Yeop; Choi, Seung Hong; Park, Sung-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Recently, balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) readout has been proposed for arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion imaging to reduce susceptibility artifacts at a relatively high spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, the main limitation of bSSFP-ASL is the low spatial coverage. In this work, methods to increase the spatial coverage of bSSFP-ASL are proposed for distortion-free, high-resolution, whole-brain perfusion imaging. Three strategies of (i) segmentation, (ii) compressed sensing (CS) and (iii) a hybrid approach combining the two methods were tested to increase the spatial coverage of pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) with three-dimensional bSSFP readout. The spatial coverage was increased by factors of two, four and six using each of the three approaches, whilst maintaining the same total scan time (5.3 min). The number of segments and/or CS acceleration rate (R) correspondingly increased to maintain the same bSSFP readout time (1.2 s). The segmentation approach allowed whole-brain perfusion imaging for pCASL-bSSFP with no penalty in SNR and/or total scan time. The CS approach increased the spatial coverage of pCASL-bSSFP whilst maintaining the temporal resolution, with minimal impact on the image quality. The hybrid approach provided compromised effects between the two methods. Balanced SSFP-based ASL allows the acquisition of perfusion images with wide spatial coverage, high spatial resolution and SNR, and reduced susceptibility artifacts, and thus may become a good choice for clinical and neurological studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Imaging of myocardial perfusion with magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Barkhausen, Jörg; Hunold, Peter; Jochims, Markus; Debatin, Jörg F

    2004-06-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is currently the leading cause of death in developed nations. Reflecting the complexity of cardiac function and morphology, noninvasive diagnosis of CAD represents a major challenge for medical imaging. Although coronary artery stenoses can be depicted with magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) techniques, its functional or hemodynamic impact frequently remains elusive. Therefore, there is growing interest in other, target organ-specific parameters such as myocardial function at stress and first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging to assess myocardial blood flow. This review explores the pathophysiologic background, recent technical developments, and current clinical status of first-pass MR imaging (MRI) of myocardial perfusion.

  13. Multiparametric computer-aided differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia using structural and advanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Bron, Esther E; Smits, Marion; Papma, Janne M; Steketee, Rebecca M E; Meijboom, Rozanna; de Groot, Marius; van Swieten, John C; Niessen, Wiro J; Klein, Stefan

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the added diagnostic value of arterial spin labelling (ASL) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to structural MRI for computer-aided classification of Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and controls. This retrospective study used MRI data from 24 early-onset AD and 33 early-onset FTD patients and 34 controls (CN). Classification was based on voxel-wise feature maps derived from structural MRI, ASL, and DTI. Support vector machines (SVMs) were trained to classify AD versus CN (AD-CN), FTD-CN, AD-FTD, and AD-FTD-CN (multi-class). Classification performance was assessed by the area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve (AUC) and accuracy. Using SVM significance maps, we analysed contributions of brain regions. Combining ASL and DTI with structural MRI resulted in higher classification performance for differential diagnosis of AD and FTD (AUC = 84%; p = 0.05) than using structural MRI by itself (AUC = 72%). The performance of ASL and DTI themselves did not improve over structural MRI. The classifications were driven by different brain regions for ASL and DTI than for structural MRI, suggesting complementary information. ASL and DTI are promising additions to structural MRI for classification of early-onset AD, early-onset FTD, and controls, and may improve the computer-aided differential diagnosis on a single-subject level. • Multiparametric MRI is promising for computer-aided diagnosis of early-onset AD and FTD. • Diagnosis is driven by different brain regions when using different MRI methods. • Combining structural MRI, ASL, and DTI may improve differential diagnosis of dementia.

  14. Functional Imaging: CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Edwin JR; Hoffman, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Numerous imaging techniques permit evaluation of regional pulmonary function. Contrast-enhanced CT methods now allow assessment of vasculature and lung perfusion. Techniques using spirometric controlled MDCT allow for quantification of presence and distribution of parenchymal and airway pathology, Xenon gas can be employed to assess regional ventilation of the lungs and rapid bolus injections of iodinated contrast agent can provide quantitative measure of regional parenchymal perfusion. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung include gadolinium-enhanced perfusion imaging and hyperpolarized helium imaging, which can allow imaging of pulmonary ventilation and .measurement of the size of emphysematous spaces. PMID:18267192

  15. Using Online Glossing Lessons for Accelerated Instruction in ASL for Preservice Deaf Education Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buisson, Gerald J.

    2007-01-01

    Teachers of deaf and hard of hearing students must serve as language models for their students. However, preservice deaf education teachers typically have at most only four semesters of American Sign Language (ASL) training. How can their limited ASL instructional time be used to increase their proficiency? Studies involving deaf and hard of…

  16. Supporting Deaf and Hard of Hearing Preschool Students' Emerging ASL Skills: A Bilingual Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchiner, Julie; Gough, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Helping young deaf and hard of hearing children explore ASL and English is one of the important jobs with which the preschool teachers who work with those children are tasked. Learning ASL and English, the children will become bilingual, fluent in the two languages they will use throughout their lives. Working with two languages requires planning.…

  17. A Curriculum for ASL: Empowering Students by Giving Them Ownership of Their Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzig, Melissa P.

    2017-01-01

    In response to the need for deaf and hard of hearing students to facilitate literacy in American Sign Language (ASL) and to put as much focus on developing students' ASL skills as they usually do on developing their English skills, Melissa Herzig has created a curriculum entitled "Creating the Narrative Stories: The Development of the…

  18. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... the test, tell your provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips An artificial heart valves Heart defibrillator ...

  19. The Use of ASL to Support the Development of English and Literacy.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, R B

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review research dealing with the use of ASL in teaching English and literacy. I review some of the literature (and direct readers to additional sources) that indicates that early learning of ASL need not create concerns for future development of English structure, speech, or other cognitive skills. I also suggest ways in which ASL can contribute directly to developing more of the highlevel skills needed for fluent reading and writing. The global benefit of learning ASL as a first language is that it creates a standard bilingual situation in which teachers and learners can take advantage of one language to assist in acquiring the other and in the transfer of general knowledge. As part of this discussion, I compare English and ASL as natural languages for similarities and differences.

  20. Measurement of Cerebral Perfusion Territories Using Arterial Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Fernando F.; Tannús, Alberto; Silva, Afonso C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to assess the perfusion territories of major cerebral arteries can be a valuable asset to the diagnosis of a number of cerebrovascular diseases. Recently, several arterial spin labeling (ASL) techniques have been proposed to obtain the cerebral perfusion territories of individual arteries according to three different approaches: (1) using a dedicated labeling RF coil; (2) applying selective inversion of spatially confined areas; or (3) employing multi-dimensional RF pulses. Methods that use a separate labeling RF coil have high SNR, low RF power deposition and unrestricted 3-dimensional coverage, but are mostly limited to separation of the left and right circulation, and do require extra hardware, which may limit their implementation in clinical systems. Alternatively, methods that utilize selective inversion have higher flexibility of implementation and higher arterial selectivity, but suffer from imaging artifacts resulting from interference between the labeling slab and the volume of interest. The goal of the present review is to provide the reader with a critical survey of the different ASL approaches proposed to date to obtain cerebral perfusion territories, by discussing the relative advantages and disadvantages of each technique, so as to serve as a guiding resource towards future refinements of this promising methodology. PMID:17503440

  1. Functional MRI for radiotherapy of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jenghwa; Narayana, Ashwatha

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we review the applications of functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for target delineation and critical organ avoidance for brain radiotherapy. In this article we distinguish functional MRI from brain functional MRI (fMRI). Functional MRI includes magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), perfusion MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and brain fMRI. These functional MRI modalities can provide unique metabolic, pathological and physiological information that are not available in anatomic MRI and can potentially improve the treatment outcomes of brain tumors. For example, both choline (Cho) to N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and Cho to creatine (Cr) ratios from MRSI increase with increasing tumor malignancy and can be used to grade gliomas. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) measurements from dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (DSC MRI) are superior to conventional contrast-enhanced MRI in predicting tumor biology and may be even superior to pathologic assessment in predicting patient clinical outcomes. Brain fMRI can help identify and avoid functionally critical areas when constructing treatment plans for brain radiotherapy. In the past, functional MRI measurements have not been routinely used in a clinical arena due to the experimental nature of these imaging modalities. As these methods become more commonly used and effective image co-registration algorithms become available, integration of functional MRI into the treatment process of brain radiotherapy now appears to be clinically feasible, at least in major medical centers.

  2. Accuracy and feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D MR imaging in the assessment of lung perfusion: comparison with Tc-99 MAA perfusion scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, E; Akkoclu, A; Degirmenci, B; Cooper, R A; Sengun, B; Gulcu, A; Osma, E; Ucan, E S

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate findings of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and perfusion scintigraphy in cases where there was a suspicion of abnormal pulmonary vasculature, and to evaluate the usefulness of MRI in the detection of perfusion deficits of the lung. In all, 17 patients with suspected abnormality of the pulmonary vasculature underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. T1-weighted 3D fast-field echo pulse sequences were obtained (TR/TE 3.3/1.58 ms; flip angle 30 degrees; slice thickness 12 to 15 mm). The dynamic study was acquired in the coronal plane following administration of 0.1 mmol/kg gadopentetate dimeglumine. A total of 8 to 10 sections repeated 20 to 25 times at intervals of 1s were performed. Perfusion lung scintigraphy was carried out a maximum of 48 h before the MR examination in all cases. Two radiologists, who were blinded to the clinical data and results of other imaging methods, reviewed all coronal sections. MR perfusion images were independently assessed in terms of segmental or lobar perfusion defects in the 85 lobes of the 17 individuals, and the findings were compared with the results of scintigraphy. Of the 17 patients, 8 were found to have pulmonary emboli, 2 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with emphysema, 2 bullous emphysema, 2 Takayasu arteritis and 1 had a hypoplastic pulmonary artery. Pulmonary perfusion was completely normal in 2 cases. In 35 lobes, perfusion defects were detected using both methods, in 4 with MR alone and in 9 only with scintigraphy. There was good agreement between MRI and scintigraphy findings (kappa=0.695). Pulmonary perfusion MRI is a new alternative to scintigraphy in the evaluation of pulmonary perfusion for various lung disorders. In addition, this technique allows measurement and quantification of pulmonary perfusion abnormalities.

  3. Sexual Health Behaviors of Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) Users

    PubMed Central

    Heiman, Erica; Haynes, Sharon; McKee, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the sexual health behaviors of Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users. Objective We sought to characterize the self-reported sexual behaviors of Deaf individuals. Methods Responses from 282 Deaf participants aged 18–64 from the greater Rochester, NY area who participated in the 2008 Deaf Health were analyzed. These data were compared with weighted data from a general population comparison group (N=1890). We looked at four sexual health-related outcomes: abstinence within the past year; number of sexual partners within the last year; condom use at last intercourse; and ever tested for HIV. We performed descriptive analyses, including stratification by gender, age, income, marital status, and educational level. Results Deaf respondents were more likely than the general population respondents to self-report two or more sexual partners in the past year (30.9% vs 10.1%) but self-reported higher condom use at last intercourse (28.0% vs 19.8%). HIV testing rates were similar between groups (47.5% vs 49.4%) but lower for certain Deaf groups: Deaf women (46.0% vs. 58.1%), lower-income Deaf (44.4% vs. 69.7%) and among less educated Deaf (31.3% vs. 57.7%) than among respondents from corresponding general population groups. Conclusion Deaf respondents self-reported higher numbers of sexual partners over the past year compared to the general population. Condom use was higher among Deaf participants. HIV was similar between groups, though HIV testing was significantly lower among lower-income, less well-educated, and female Deaf respondents. Deaf individuals have a sexual health risk profile that is distinct from that of the general population. PMID:26242551

  4. Sexual health behaviors of Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users.

    PubMed

    Heiman, Erica; Haynes, Sharon; McKee, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Little is known about the sexual health behaviors of Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users. We sought to characterize the self-reported sexual behaviors of Deaf individuals. Responses from 282 Deaf participants aged 18-64 from the greater Rochester, NY area who participated in the 2008 Deaf Health were analyzed. These data were compared with weighted data from a general population comparison group (N = 1890). We looked at four sexual health-related outcomes: abstinence within the past year; number of sexual partners within the last year; condom use at last intercourse; and ever tested for HIV. We performed descriptive analyses, including stratification by gender, age, income, marital status, and educational level. Deaf respondents were more likely than the general population respondents to self-report two or more sexual partners in the past year (30.9% vs 10.1%) but self-reported higher condom use at last intercourse (28.0% vs 19.8%). HIV testing rates were similar between groups (47.5% vs 49.4%) but lower for certain Deaf groups: Deaf women (46.0% vs 58.1%), lower-income Deaf (44.4% vs 69.7%) and among less educated Deaf (31.3% vs 57.7%) than among respondents from corresponding general population groups. Deaf respondents self-reported higher numbers of sexual partners over the past year compared to the general population. Condom use was higher among Deaf participants. HIV was similar between groups, though HIV testing was significantly lower among lower income, less well-educated, and female Deaf respondents. Deaf individuals have a sexual health risk profile that is distinct from that of the general population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Perfusion-weighted MR imaging in persistent hemiplegic migraine.

    PubMed

    Mourand, Isabelle; Menjot de Champfleur, Nicolas; Carra-Dallière, Clarisse; Le Bars, Emmanuelle; Roubertie, Agathe; Bonafé, Alain; Thouvenot, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Hemiplegic migraine is a rare type of migraine that has an aura characterized by the presence of motor weakness, which may occasionally last up to several days, and then resolve without sequela. Pathogenesis of migraine remains unclear and, recently, perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) has provided a non-invasive method to study hemodynamic changes during acute attacks. Two female patients were admitted in our hospital suffering from prolonged hemiparesis. In both cases, they underwent MRI examination using a 1.5 T magnet including axial diffusion-weighted and perfusion sequences. From each perfusion MRI acquisition two regions of interest were delineated on each hemisphere and, the index of flow, cerebral blood volume, mean transit time, and time to peak were recorded and asymmetry indices from each perfusion parameter were calculated. Perfusion alterations were detected during the attacks. In one case, we observed, after 3 h of left hemiparesia, hypoperfusion of the right hemisphere. In the other case, who presented a familial hemiplegic migraine attack, on the third day of a persistent aura consisting of right hemiplegia and aphasia, PWI revealed hyperperfusion of the left hemisphere. Asymmetry indices for temporal parameters (mean transit time and time to peak) were the most sensitive. These findings resolved spontaneously after the attacks without any permanent sequel or signs of cerebral ischemia on follow-up MRI. PWI should be indicated for patients with migraine attacks accompanied by auras to assess the sequential changes in cerebral perfusion and to better understand its pathogenesis.

  6. Comparison of computed tomography perfusion and magnetic resonance imaging perfusion-diffusion mismatch in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Bruce C V; Christensen, Søren; Levi, Christopher R; Desmond, Patricia M; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Davis, Stephen M; Parsons, Mark W

    2012-10-01

    Perfusion imaging has the potential to select patients most likely to respond to thrombolysis. We tested the correspondence of computed tomography perfusion (CTP)-derived mismatch with contemporaneous perfusion-diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Acute ischemic stroke patients 3 to 6 hours after onset had CTP and perfusion-diffusion MRI within 1 hour, before thrombolysis. Relative cerebral blood flow (relCBF) and time to peak of the deconvolved tissue residue function (Tmax) were calculated. The diffusion lesion (diffusion-weighted imaging) was registered to the CTP slabs and manually outlined to its maximal visual extent. Volumetric accuracy of CT-relCBF infarct core (compared with diffusion-weighted imaging) was tested. To reduce false-positive low CBF regions, relCBF core was restricted to voxels within a relative time-to-peak (relTTP) >4 seconds for lesion region of interest. The MR-Tmax >6 seconds perfusion lesion was automatically segmented and registered to CTP. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis determined the optimal CT-Tmax threshold to match MR-Tmax >6 seconds. Agreement of these CT parameters with MR perfusion-diffusion mismatch in coregistered slabs was assessed (mismatch ratio >1.2, absolute mismatch >10 mL, infarct core <70 mL). In analysis of 49 patients (mean onset to CT, 213 minutes; mean CT to MR, 31 minutes), constraining relCBF <31% within the automated relTTP perfusion lesion region of interest reduced the median magnitude of volumetric error (vs diffusion-weighted imaging) from 47.5 mL to 15.8 mL (P<0.001). The optimal CT-Tmax threshold to match MR-Tmax >6 seconds was 6.2 seconds (95% confidence interval, 5.6-7.3 seconds; sensitivity, 91%; specificity, 70%; area under the curve, 0.87). Using CT-Tmax >6 seconds "penumbra" and relTTP-constrained relCBF "core," CT-based and MRI-based mismatch status was concordant in 90% (kappa=0.80). Quantitative CTP mismatch classification using relCBF and Tmax is similar to perfusion

  7. 3D GRASE PROPELLER: Improved Image Acquisition Technique for Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Huan; Hoge, W. Scott; Hamilton, Craig A.; Günther, Matthias; Kraft, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a non-invasive technique that can quantitatively measure cerebral blood flow (CBF). While traditionally ASL employs 2D EPI or spiral acquisition trajectories, single-shot 3D GRASE is gaining popularity in ASL due to inherent SNR advantage and spatial coverage. However, a major limitation of 3D GRASE is through-plane blurring caused by T2 decay. A novel technique combining 3D GRASE and a PROPELLER trajectory (3DGP) is presented to minimize through-plane blurring without sacrificing perfusion sensitivity or increasing total scan time. Full brain perfusion images were acquired at a 3×3×5mm3 nominal voxel size with Q2TIPS-FAIR as the ASL preparation sequence. Data from 5 healthy subjects was acquired on a GE 1.5T scanner in less than 4 minutes per subject. While showing good agreement in CBF quantification with 3D GRASE, 3DGP demonstrated reduced through-plane blurring, improved anatomical details, high repeatability and robustness against motion, making it suitable for routine clinical use. PMID:21254211

  8. Perfusion of surgical cavity wall enhancement in early post-treatment MR imaging may stratify the time-to-progression in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Eun; Ryu, Kyoung Hwa; Kim, Ho Sung; Kim, Hyo Won; Shim, Woo Hyun; Jung, Seung Chai; Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, Sang Joon; Kim, Jeong Hoon

    2017-01-01

    To determine if perfusion in surgical cavity wall enhancement (SCWE) obtained in early post-treatment MR imaging can stratify time-to-progression (TTP) in glioblastoma. This study enrolled 60 glioblastoma patients with more than 5-mm-thick SCWEs as detected on contrast-enhanced MR imaging after concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Two independent readers categorized the shape and perfusion state of SCWEs as nodular or non-nodular and as having positive or negative perfusion compared with the contralateral grey matter on arterial spin labeling (ASL). The perfusion fraction on ASL within the contrast-enhancing lesion was calculated. The independent predictability of TTP was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards modelling. The perfusion fraction was higher in the non-progression group, significantly for reader 2 (P = 0.03) and borderline significantly for reader 1 (P = 0.08). A positive perfusion state and (P = 0.02) a higher perfusion fraction of the SCWE were found to become an independent predictor of longer TTP (P = 0.001 for reader 1 and P < 0.001 for reader 2). The contrast enhancement pattern did not become a TTP predictor. Assessment of perfusion in early post-treatment MR imaging can stratify TTP in patients with glioblastoma for adjuvant temozolomide therapy. Positive perfusion in SCWEs can become a predictor of a longer TTP.

  9. Perfusion of surgical cavity wall enhancement in early post-treatment MR imaging may stratify the time-to-progression in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Won; Shim, Woo Hyun; Jung, Seung Chai; Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, Sang Joon; Kim, Jeong Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine if perfusion in surgical cavity wall enhancement (SCWE) obtained in early post-treatment MR imaging can stratify time-to-progression (TTP) in glioblastoma. Materials and methods This study enrolled 60 glioblastoma patients with more than 5-mm-thick SCWEs as detected on contrast-enhanced MR imaging after concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Two independent readers categorized the shape and perfusion state of SCWEs as nodular or non-nodular and as having positive or negative perfusion compared with the contralateral grey matter on arterial spin labeling (ASL). The perfusion fraction on ASL within the contrast-enhancing lesion was calculated. The independent predictability of TTP was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards modelling. Results The perfusion fraction was higher in the non-progression group, significantly for reader 2 (P = 0.03) and borderline significantly for reader 1 (P = 0.08). A positive perfusion state and (P = 0.02) a higher perfusion fraction of the SCWE were found to become an independent predictor of longer TTP (P = 0.001 for reader 1 and P < 0.001 for reader 2). The contrast enhancement pattern did not become a TTP predictor. Conclusion Assessment of perfusion in early post-treatment MR imaging can stratify TTP in patients with glioblastoma for adjuvant temozolomide therapy. Positive perfusion in SCWEs can become a predictor of a longer TTP. PMID:28732091

  10. Academic Achievement of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in an ASL/English Bilingual Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrastinski, Iva; Wilbur, Ronnie B.

    2016-01-01

    There has been a scarcity of studies exploring the influence of students' American Sign Language (ASL) proficiency on their academic achievement in ASL/English bilingual programs. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ASL proficiency on reading comprehension skills and academic achievement of 85 deaf or hard-of-hearing signing…

  11. Academic Achievement of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in an ASL/English Bilingual Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrastinski, Iva; Wilbur, Ronnie B.

    2016-01-01

    There has been a scarcity of studies exploring the influence of students' American Sign Language (ASL) proficiency on their academic achievement in ASL/English bilingual programs. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ASL proficiency on reading comprehension skills and academic achievement of 85 deaf or hard-of-hearing signing…

  12. Multimodal MRI of experimental stroke

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Timothy Q

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death and the leading cause of long-term disability in the United States. Brain imaging data from experimental stroke models and stroke patients have shown that there is often a gradual progression of potentially reversible ischemic injury toward infarction. Reestablishing tissue perfusion and/or treating with neuroprotective drugs in a timely fashion are expected to salvage some ischemic tissues. Diffusion-weighted imaging based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in which contrast is based on water motion can detect ischemic injury within minutes after onsets, whereas computed tomography and other imaging modalities fail to detect stroke injury for at least a few hours. Along with quantitative perfusion imaging, the perfusion-diffusion mismatch which approximates the ischemic penumbra could be imaged non-invasively. This review describes recent progresses in the development and application of multimodal MRI and image analysis techniques to study ischemic tissue at risk in experimental stroke in rats. PMID:24323751

  13. Arterial spin labeling versus BOLD in direct challenge and drug-task interaction pharmacological fMRI.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Stephanie B; Koller, Jonathan M; Campbell, Meghan C; Black, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    A carefully controlled study allowed us to compare the sensitivity of ASL (arterial spin labeling) and BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) fMRI for detecting the effects of the adenosine A2a antagonist tozadenant in Parkinson disease. The study compared the effect of drug directly or the interaction of the drug with a cognitive task. Only ASL detected the direct effect of tozadenant. BOLD was more sensitive to the cognitive task, which (unlike most drugs) allows on-off comparisons over short periods of time. Neither ASL nor BOLD could detect a cognitive-pharmacological interaction. These results are consistent with the known relative advantages of each fMRI method, and suggest that for drug development, directly imaging pharmacodynamic effects with ASL may have advantages over cognitive-pharmacological interaction BOLD, which has hitherto been the more common approach to pharmacological fMRI.

  14. Evaluation of head and neck tumors with functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Jacobus F.A.; Parra, Carlos; Lu, Yonggang; Shukla-Dave, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Synopsys Head and neck (HN) cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) based diffusion and perfusion techniques enable the non-invasive assessment of tumor biology and physiology, which supplement information obtained from standard structural scans. Diffusion and perfusion MRI techniques provide novel biomarkers that can aid the monitoring pre-, during, and post-treatment stages to improve patient selection for therapeutic strategies, provide evidence for change of therapy regime, and evaluation of treatment response. This review discusses pertinent aspects of the role of diffusion and perfusion MRI and computational analysis methods in studying HN cancer. PMID:26613878

  15. The efficacy of ASL/ENGLISH bilingual education: considering public schools.

    PubMed

    DeLana, Melissa; Gentry, Mary Anne; Andrews, Jean

    2007-01-01

    The study investigated the efficacy and viability of American Sign Language (ASL)/English bilingual education for public schools serving deaf and hard of hearing children. Prior research related to ASL/English bilingual education is reviewed. Quantitative data related to the reading comprehension achievement of 25 deaf and hard of hearing students that were collected for the study are analyzed. The subjects' school program is described in depth. Overall performance of the sample is discussed. A description of high and low gainers is included. A statistically significant correlation between years of ASL usage and reading achievement is identified. Implications for the implementation of ASL/English bilingual methodology are reviewed, and suggestions for future research are offered.

  16. Reversible changes in diffusion- and perfusion-based imaging in cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ning; Wong, Andrew K; Lipinski, Lindsay J; Mokin, Maxim; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2016-02-01

    Diffusion- and perfusion-based imaging studies are regularly used in patients with ischemic stroke. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rare cause of stroke and is primarily treated by systemic anticoagulation. Endovascular intervention can be considered in cases of failed medical therapy, yet the prognostic value of diffusion- and perfusion-based imaging for CVST has not been clearly established. We present a patient with CVST whose abnormal findings on MRI and CT perfusion images were largely reversed after endovascular treatment.

  17. Association of frontal gray matter volume and cerebral perfusion in heroin addiction: a multimodal neuroimaging study.

    PubMed

    Denier, Niklaus; Schmidt, André; Gerber, Hana; Schmid, Otto; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Huber, Christian G; Lang, Undine E; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Walter, Marc; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Structure and function are closely related in the healthy human brain. In patients with chronic heroin exposure, brain imaging studies have identified long-lasting changes in gray matter (GM) volume. More recently, we showed that acute application of heroin in dependent patients results in hypoperfusion of fronto-temporal areas compared with the placebo condition. However, the relationship between structural and cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in heroin addiction has not yet been investigated. Moreover, it is not known whether there is any interaction between the chronic structural changes and the short and long-term effects on perfusion caused by heroin. Using a double-blind, within-subject design, heroin or placebo (saline) was administered to 14 heroin-dependent patients from a stable heroin-assisted treatment program, in order to observe acute short-term effects. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) was used to calculate perfusion quantification maps in both treatment conditions, while Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) was conducted to calculate regional GM density. VBM and ASL data were used to calculate homologous correlation fields by Biological Parametric Mapping (BPM) and a whole-brain Pearson r correlation. We correlated each perfusion condition (heroin and placebo) separately with a VBM sample that was identical for the two treatment conditions. It was assumed that heroin-associated perfusion is manifested in short-term effects, while placebo-associated perfusion is more related to long-term effects. In order to restrict our analyses to fronto-temporal regions, we used an explicit mask for our analyses. Correlation analyses revealed a significant positive correlation in frontal areas between GM and both perfusion conditions (heroin and placebo). Heroin-associated perfusion was also negatively correlated with GM in the inferior temporal gyrus on both hemispheres. These findings indicate that, in heroin-dependent patients, low GM volume is positively associated with

  18. Biological Properties and Characterization of ASL50 Protein from Aged Allium sativum Bulbs.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suresh; Jitendra, Kumar; Singh, Kusum; Kapoor, Vaishali; Sinha, Mou; Xess, Immaculata; Das, Satya N; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P; Dey, Sharmistha

    2015-08-01

    Allium sativum is well known for its medicinal properties. The A. sativum lectin 50 (ASL50, 50 kDa) was isolated from aged A. sativum bulbs and purified by gel filtration chromatography on Sephacryl S-200 column. Agar well diffusion assay were used to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of ASL50 against Candida species and bacteria then minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined. The lipid A binding to ASL50 was determined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology with varying concentrations. Electron microscopic studies were done to see the mode of action of ASL50 on microbes. It exerted antimicrobial activity against clinical Candida isolates with a MIC of 10-40 μg/ml and clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with a MIC of 10-80 μg/ml. The electron microscopic study illustrates that it disrupts the cell membrane of the bacteria and cell wall of fungi. It exhibited antiproliferative activity on oral carcinoma KB cells with an IC50 of 36 μg/ml after treatment for 48 h and induces the apoptosis of cancer cells by inducing 2.5-fold higher caspase enzyme activity than untreated cells. However, it has no cytotoxic effects towards HEK 293 cells as well as human erythrocytes even at higher concentration of ASL50. Biological properties of ASL50 may have its therapeutic significance in aiding infection and cancer treatments.

  19. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging in neuro-oncology

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, James; Thompson, Gerard; Mills, Samantha

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have seen the development of techniques that allow quantitative imaging of a number of anatomical and physiological descriptors. These techniques have been increasingly applied to cancer imaging where they can provide some insight into tumour microvascular structure and physiology. This review details technical approaches and application of quantitative MRI, focusing particularly on perfusion imaging and its role in neuro-oncology. PMID:18980870

  20. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging in neuro-oncology.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alan; O'Connor, James; Thompson, Gerard; Mills, Samantha

    2008-10-13

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have seen the development of techniques that allow quantitative imaging of a number of anatomical and physiological descriptors. These techniques have been increasingly applied to cancer imaging where they can provide some insight into tumour microvascular structure and physiology. This review details technical approaches and application of quantitative MRI, focusing particularly on perfusion imaging and its role in neuro-oncology.

  1. A Case Study of Native-ASL Deaf Child's Play in an ASL/English Bilingual Preschool Classroom: Play Behaviors, Interactions, and Language Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musyoka, Millicent Malinda

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this mixed method study was to investigate the play behaviors, play interactions, and language use--within a bilingual AS L/English classroom--of a Deaf child who is a native user of American Sign Language (ASL). Play is an essential element in all children's development. Previous research suggests that there is a strong relationship…

  2. Prediction of Liver Function by Using Magnetic Resonance-based Portal Venous Perfusion Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Yue; Wang Hesheng; Johnson, Timothy D.; Pan, Charlie; Hussain, Hero; Balter, James M.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether liver function can be assessed globally and spatially by using volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging MRI (DCE-MRI) to potentially aid in adaptive treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing focal radiation therapy (RT) were enrolled in institution review board-approved prospective studies to obtain DCE-MRI (to measure regional perfusion) and indocyanine green (ICG) clearance rates (to measure overall liver function) prior to, during, and at 1 and 2 months after treatment. The volumetric distribution of portal venous perfusion in the whole liver was estimated for each scan. We assessed the correlation between mean portal venous perfusion in the nontumor volume of the liver and overall liver function measured by ICG before, during, and after RT. The dose response for regional portal venous perfusion to RT was determined using a linear mixed effects model. Results: There was a significant correlation between the ICG clearance rate and mean portal venous perfusion in the functioning liver parenchyma, suggesting that portal venous perfusion could be used as a surrogate for function. Reduction in regional venous perfusion 1 month after RT was predicted by the locally accumulated biologically corrected dose at the end of RT (P<.0007). Regional portal venous perfusion measured during RT was a significant predictor for regional venous perfusion assessed 1 month after RT (P<.00001). Global hypovenous perfusion pre-RT was observed in 4 patients (3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis), 3 of whom had recovered from hypoperfusion, except in the highest dose regions, post-RT. In addition, 3 patients who had normal perfusion pre-RT had marked hypervenous perfusion or reperfusion in low-dose regions post-RT. Conclusions: This study suggests that MR-based volumetric hepatic perfusion imaging may be a biomarker for spatial distribution of liver function, which

  3. Prediction of Liver Function by Using Magnetic Resonance-based Portal Venous Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yue; Wang, Hesheng; Johnson, Timothy D.; Pan, Charlie; Hussain, Hero; Balter, James M.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether liver function can be assessed globally and spatially by using volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging MRI (DCE-MRI) to potentially aid in adaptive treatment planning. Methods and Materials Seventeen patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing focal radiation therapy (RT) were enrolled in institution review board-approved prospective studies to obtain DCE-MRI (to measure regional perfusion) and indocyanine green (ICG) clearance rates (to measure overall liver function) prior to, during, and at 1 and 2 months after treatment. The volumetric distribution of portal venous perfusion in the whole liver was estimated for each scan. We assessed the correlation between mean portal venous perfusion in the nontumor volume of the liver and overall liver function measured by ICG before, during, and after RT. The dose response for regional portal venous perfusion to RT was determined using a linear mixed effects model. Results There was a significant correlation between the ICG clearance rate and mean portal venous perfusion in the functioning liver parenchyma, suggesting that portal venous perfusion could be used as a surrogate for function. Reduction in regional venous perfusion 1 month after RT was predicted by the locally accumulated biologically corrected dose at the end of RT (P<.0007). Regional portal venous perfusion measured during RT was a significant predictor for regional venous perfusion assessed 1 month after RT (P<.00001). Global hypovenous perfusion pre-RT was observed in 4 patients (3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis), 3 of whom had recovered from hypoperfusion, except in the highest dose regions, post-RT. In addition, 3 patients who had normal perfusion pre-RT had marked hypervenous perfusion or reperfusion in low-dose regions post-RT. Conclusions This study suggests that MR-based volumetric hepatic perfusion imaging may be a biomarker for spatial distribution of liver function, which

  4. Unenhanced and Contrast-Enhanced MR Angiography and Perfusion Imaging for Suspected Pulmonary Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Kishida, Yuji; Seki, Shinichiro; Karabulut, Nevzat

    2017-03-01

    This article discusses the basics of unenhanced MR angiography (MRA) and MR venography (MRV), time-resolved contrast-enhanced (CE) MRA and dynamic first-pass CE perfusion MRI, and unenhanced and CE MRV, in addition to assessing the clinical relevance of these techniques for evaluating patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism and deep venous thrombosis. Since the 1990s, the efficacy of MRA or MRV and dynamic perfusion MRI for patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism and deep venous thrombosis has been evaluated. On the basis of the results of single-center trials, comprehensive MRI protocols, including pulmonary unenhanced and CE MRA, perfusion MRI, and MRV, promise to be safe and time effective for assessing patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism, although future multicenter trials are required to assess the real clinical value of MRI.

  5. Identifying the perfusion deficit in acute stroke with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yating; Margulies, Daniel S; Cameron Craddock, R; Long, Xiangyu; Winter, Benjamin; Gierhake, Daniel; Endres, Matthias; Villringer, Kersten; Fiebach, Jochen; Villringer, Arno

    2013-01-01

    Temporal delay in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals may be sensitive to perfusion deficits in acute stroke. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) was added to a standard stroke MRI protocol. We calculated the time delay between the BOLD signal at each voxel and the whole-brain signal using time-lagged correlation and compared the results to mean transit time derived using bolus tracking. In all 11 patients, areas exhibiting significant delay in BOLD signal corresponded to areas of hypoperfusion identified by contrast-based perfusion MRI. Time delay analysis of rsfMRI provides information comparable to that of conventional perfusion MRI without the need for contrast agents. Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  6. Assessment of differential pulmonary blood flow using perfusion magnetic resonance imaging: comparison with radionuclide perfusion scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Francesco; Fink, Christian; Risse, Frank; Tuengerthal, Siegfried; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2006-08-01

    We sought to assess the agreement between lung perfusion ratios calculated from pulmonary perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and those calculated from radionuclide (RN) perfusion scintigraphy. A retrospective analysis of MR and RN perfusion scans was conducted in 23 patients (mean age, 60 +/- 14 years) with different lung diseases (lung cancer = 15, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease = 4, cystic fibrosis = 2, and mesothelioma = 2). Pulmonary perfusion was assessed by a time-resolved contrast-enhanced 3D gradient-echo pulse sequence using parallel imaging and view sharing (TR = 1.9 milliseconds; TE = 0.8 milliseconds; parallel imaging acceleration factor = 2; partition thickness = 4 mm; matrix = 256 x 96; in-plane spatial resolution = 1.87 x 3.75 mm; scan time for each 3D dataset = 1.5 seconds), using gadolinium-based contrast agents (injection flow rate = 5 mL/s, dose = 0.1 mmol/kg of body weight). The peak concentration (PC) of the contrast agent bolus, the pulmonary blood flow (PBF), and blood volume (PBV) were computed from the signal-time curves of the lung. Left-to-right ratios of pulmonary perfusion were calculated from the MR parameters and RN counts. The agreement between these ratios was assessed for side prevalence (sign test) and quantitatively (Deming-regression). MR and RN ratios agreed on side prevalence in 21 patients (91%) with PC, in 20 (87%) with PBF, and in 17 (74%) with PBV. The MR estimations of left-to-right perfusion ratios correlated significantly with those of RN perfusion scans (P < 0.01). The correlation was higher using PC (r = 0.67) and PBF (r = 0.66) than using PBV (r = 0.50). The MR ratios computed from PBF showed the highest accuracy, followed by those from PC and PBV. Independently from the MR parameter used, in some patients the quantitative difference between the MR and RN ratios was not negligible. Pulmonary perfusion MRI can be used to assess the differential blood flow of the lung. Further studies in a larger group

  7. Coupling between resting cerebral perfusion and EEG.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, R L; Poil, S-S; Brandeis, D; Klaver, P; Bollmann, S; Ghisleni, C; Lüchinger, R; Martin, E; Shankaranarayanan, A; Alsop, D C; Michels, L

    2013-07-01

    While several studies have investigated interactions between the electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging BOLD signal fluctuations, less is known about the associations between EEG oscillations and baseline brain haemodynamics, and few studies have examined the link between EEG power outside the alpha band and baseline perfusion. Here we compare whole-brain arterial spin labelling perfusion MRI and EEG in a group of healthy adults (n = 16, ten females, median age: 27 years, range 21-48) during an eyes closed rest condition. Correlations emerged between perfusion and global average EEG power in low (delta: 2-4 Hz and theta: 4-7 Hz), middle (alpha: 8-13 Hz), and high (beta: 13-30 Hz and gamma: 30-45 Hz) frequency bands in both cortical and sub-cortical regions. The correlations were predominately positive in middle and high-frequency bands, and negative in delta. In addition, central alpha frequency positively correlated with perfusion in a network of brain regions associated with the modulation of attention and preparedness for external input, and central theta frequency correlated negatively with a widespread network of cortical regions. These results indicate that the coupling between average EEG power/frequency and local cerebral blood flow varies in a frequency specific manner. Our results are consistent with longstanding concepts that decreasing EEG frequencies which in general map onto decreasing levels of activation.

  8. Who's on First? Investigating the referential hierarchy in simple native ASL narratives.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Anne Therese; Mayberry, Rachel I

    2016-09-01

    Discussions of reference tracking in spoken languages often invoke some version of a referential hierarchy. In this paper, we asked whether this hierarchy applies equally well to reference tracking in a visual language, American Sign Language, or whether modality differences influence its structure. Expanding the results of previous studies, this study looked at ASL referential devices beyond nouns, pronouns, and zero anaphora. We elicited four simple narratives from eight native ASL signers, and examined how the signers tracked reference throughout their stories. We found that ASL signers follow general principles of the referential hierarchy proposed for spoken languages by using nouns for referent introductions, and zero anaphora for referent maintenance. However, we also found significant differences such as the absence of pronouns in the narratives, despite their existence in ASL, and differential use of verbal and constructed action zero anaphora. Moreover, we found that native signers' use of classifiers varied with discourse status in a way that deviated from our expectations derived from the referential hierarchy for spoken languages. On this basis, we propose a tentative hierarchy of referential expressions for ASL that incorporates modality specific referential devices.

  9. Abdominal perfusion computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis.

  10. Abdominal Perfusion Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M. Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis. PMID:25610249

  11. Rest perfusion abnormalities in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: correlation with myocardial fibrosis and risk factors for sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Chiribiri, A; Leuzzi, S; Conte, M R; Bongioanni, S; Bratis, K; Olivotti, L; De Rosa, C; Lardone, E; Di Donna, P; Villa, A D M; Cesarani, F; Nagel, E; Gaita, F; Bonamini, R

    2015-05-01

    To measure the prevalence of abnormal rest perfusion in a population of consecutive patients with known hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) referred for cardiovascular MRI (CMR), and to assess any associations between abnormal rest perfusion and the presence, pattern, and severity of myocardial scar and the presence of risk factors for sudden death. Eighty consecutive patients with known HCM referred for CMR underwent functional imaging, rest first-pass perfusion, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). Thirty percent of the patients had abnormal rest perfusion, all of them corresponding to areas of mid-myocardial LGE and to a higher degree of segmental hypertrophy. Rest perfusion abnormalities correlated with more extensive and confluent LGE. The subgroup of patients with myocardial fibrosis and rest perfusion abnormalities (fibrosis+/perfusion+) had more than twice the incidence of episodes of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia on Holter monitoring in comparison to patients with myocardial fibrosis and normal rest perfusion (fibrosis+/perfusion-) and patients with no fibrosis and normal rest perfusion (fibrosis-/perfusion-). First-pass perfusion CMR identifies abnormal rest perfusion in a significant proportion of patients with HCM. These abnormalities are associated with the presence and distribution of myocardial scar and the degree of hypertrophy. Rest perfusion abnormalities identify patients with increased incidence of episodes of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia on Holter monitoring, independently from the presence of myocardial fibrosis. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Comprehensive Update on Principles and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ka-Loh; Ostergaard, Leif; Calamante, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Perfusion is a fundamental biological function that refers to the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissue by means of blood flow. Perfusion MRI is sensitive to microvasculature and has been applied in a wide variety of clinical applications, including the classification of tumors, identification of stroke regions, and characterization of other diseases. Perfusion MRI techniques are classified with or without using an exogenous contrast agent. Bolus methods, with injections of a contrast agent, provide better sensitivity with higher spatial resolution, and are therefore more widely used in clinical applications. However, arterial spin-labeling methods provide a unique opportunity to measure cerebral blood flow without requiring an exogenous contrast agent and have better accuracy for quantification. Importantly, MRI-based perfusion measurements are minimally invasive overall, and do not use any radiation and radioisotopes. In this review, we describe the principles and techniques of perfusion MRI. This review summarizes comprehensive updated knowledge on the physical principles and techniques of perfusion MRI. PMID:25246817

  13. Initial experience of dual-energy lung perfusion CT using a dual-source CT system in children.

    PubMed

    Goo, Hyun Woo

    2010-09-01

    Initial experience of dual-source dual-energy (DE) lung perfusion CT in children is described. In addition to traditional identification of pulmonary emboli, the assessment of lung perfusion is technically feasible with dual-source DE CT in children with acceptable radiation dose. This article describes how to perform dual-source DE lung perfusion CT in children, including the optimization of intravenous injection method and CT dose parameters. How to produce weighted-average CT images for the assessment of pulmonary emboli and colour-coded perfusion maps for the assessment of regional lung perfusion is also detailed. Lung perfusion status can then be evaluated on perfusion maps by means of either qualitative or quantitative analysis. Potential advantages and disadvantages of this emerging CT technique compared to lung perfusion scintigraphy and cardiac MRI are discussed.

  14. Dutch perfusion incident survey.

    PubMed

    Groenenberg, Ingrid; Weerwind, Patrick W; Everts, Peter A M; Maessen, Jos G

    2010-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass procedures remain complex, involving many potential risks. Therefore, a nationwide retrospective study was conducted to gain insight into the number of incidents and accidents in Dutch adult perfusion practice. An anonymous postal survey (85 questions about hardware, disposables, fluids and medication, air emboli, anticoagulation, practice, and safety measures) was sent to all Dutch perfusionists involved in adult cardiovascular perfusion during 2006 and 2007. To guarantee complete anonymity, respondents were asked to return the survey to a notary who discarded personal information. The net response rate was 72% and covered 23,500 perfusions. Individual respondents performed 240 ± 103 perfusions during the 2-year study period and had 13.8 ± 8.7 years of practical experience. The incident rate was 1 per 15.6 perfusions and the adverse event rate was 1 per 1,236 perfusions. The three most reported incidents were: (1) persistent inability to raise the activated coagulation time above 400s during perfusion (184 incidents); (2) an allergic or anaphylactic reaction to drugs, fluids, or blood products (114 incidents); and (3) clotting formation in the extracorporeal circuit (74 incidents). Furthermore, pre-bypass safety measures showed no statistically significant association with the reported incidents. In comparison with data from the recent literature, the reported number of incidents is high. Nevertheless, the adverse outcome rate is well matched to other published surveys. The relatively high response rate conveys the impression that the Dutch perfusionist is vigilant and willing to report incidents. Hence, a web-based Dutch perfusion incident registration system is recommended.

  15. Effect of Cysteamine on Mutant ASL Proteins with Cysteine for Arginine Substitutions.

    PubMed

    Inauen, Corinne; Rüfenacht, Véronique; Pandey, Amit V; Hu, Liyan; Blom, Henk; Nuoffer, Jean-Marc; Häberle, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Cysteamine is used to treat cystinosis via the modification of cysteine residues substituting arginine in mutant proteins. We investigated the effect of cysteamine on mutant argininosuccinate lyase (ASL), the second most common defect in the urea cycle. In an established mammalian expression system, 293T cell lysates were produced after transfection with all known cysteine for arginine mutations in the ASL gene (p.Arg94Cys, p.Arg95Cys, p.Arg168Cys, p.Arg379Cys, and p.Arg385Cys), allowing testing of the effect of cysteamine over 48 h in the culture medium as well as for 1 h immediately prior to the enzyme assay. Cysteamine at low concentrations showed no effect on 293T cell viability, ASL protein expression, or ASL activity when applied during cell culture. However, incubation of transfected cells with 0.05 mM cysteamine immediately before the enzyme assay resulted in increased ASL activity of p.Arg94Cys, p.Arg379Cys, and p.Arg385Cys by 64, 20, and 197 %, respectively, and this result was significant (p < 0.01). Cell lysates carrying p.Arg385Cys and treated with cysteamine recover enzyme activity that is similar to the untreated designed mutation p.Arg385Lys, providing circumstantial evidence for the assumed cysteamine-induced change of a cysteine to a lysine analogue. Since 12 % of all known genotypes in ASL deficiency are affected by a cysteine for arginine mutation, we conclude that the potential of cysteamine or of related substances as remedy for this disease should be investigated further.

  16. Tumor Metabolism and Perfusion in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Pretreatment Multimodality Imaging With {sup 1}H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Jacobus F.A.; Schoeder, Heiko; Lee, Nancy Y.; Stambuk, Hilda E.; Wang Ya; Fury, Matthew G.; Patel, Senehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shah, Jatin P.; Koutcher, Jason A.; Shukla-Dave, Amita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), and {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]FDG PET) of nodal metastases in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) for assessment of tumor biology. Additionally, pretreatment multimodality imaging was evaluated for its efficacy in predicting short-term response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Metastatic neck nodes were imaged with {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET in 16 patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC, before treatment. Short-term patient radiological response was evaluated at 3 to 4 months. Correlations among {sup 1}H-MRS (choline concentration relative to water [Cho/W]), DCE-MRI (volume transfer constant [K{sup trans}]; volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space [v{sub e}]; and redistribution rate constant [k{sub ep}]), and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET (standard uptake value [SUV] and total lesion glycolysis [TLG]) were calculated using nonparametric Spearman rank correlation. To predict short-term responses, logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between Cho/W and TLG ({rho} = 0.599; p = 0.031). Cho/W correlated negatively with heterogeneity measures of standard deviation std(v{sub e}) ({rho} = -0.691; p = 0.004) and std(k{sub ep}) ({rho} = -0.704; p = 0.003). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) values correlated strongly with MRI tumor volume ({rho} = 0.643; p = 0.007). Logistic regression indicated that std(K{sup trans}) and SUVmean were significant predictors of short-term response (p < 0.07). Conclusion: Pretreatment multimodality imaging using {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET is feasible in HNSCC patients with nodal metastases. Additionally, combined DCE-MRI and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET parameters were predictive of short-term response to treatment.

  17. Quantitative, dynamic and noninvasive determination of skeletal muscle perfusion in mouse leg by NMR arterial spin-labeled imaging.

    PubMed

    Bertoldi, Didier; Loureiro de Sousa, Paulo; Fromes, Yves; Wary, Claire; Carlier, Pierre G

    2008-11-01

    Because mouse may relatively easily be genetically tailored to develop equivalent of human muscular diseases or to present controlled alterations of mechanisms involved in vasoregulation, it has become the prevalent species to explore such questions. However, the very small size of the animals represents a serious limitation when evaluating the functional consequences of these genetic manipulations. In this context, the recourse to arterial spin labeling (ASL) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods in which arterial water spins act as an endogenous and freely diffusible tracer of perfusion is tempting but challenging. This article shows that despite the small size of the animal, mouse muscle perfusion may be measured, at rest and in conditions of reactive hyperemia, using saturation inversion recovery sequence, a pulsed ASL variant, combined with NMR imaging. Baseline perfusion values in the mouse leg were 17+/-11 ml.min(-1).100 g(-1) (n=11) and were comparable to microsphere data from the literature. Under ischemia, leg perfusion was 1.2+/-9.3 ml.min(-1).100 g(-1) (n=11). The difference observed between basal and ischemic measurements was statistically different (P=.0001). The temporal pattern of hyperemia in mouse muscle was coherent with previously published measurements in humans and in rats. The mean peak perfusion was 62+/-24 ml.min(-1).100 g(-1) (n=6) occurring 48+/-27 s after the end of occlusion. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the ability of ASL combined to NMR imaging to quantify skeletal muscle perfusion in mice legs, both at rest and dynamically.

  18. Optimization of simultaneous multislice EPI for concurrent functional perfusion and BOLD signal measurements at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Poser, Benedikt A; Huber, Laurentius; Pfeuffer, Josef; Uludağ, Kâmil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To overcome limitations of previous ultra‐high‐field arterial spin labeling (ASL) techniques concerning temporal resolution and brain coverage by utilizing the simultaneous multi‐slice (SMS) approach. Methods An optimized, flow‐alternating inversion recovery quantitative imaging of perfusion using a single subtraction II scheme was developed that tackles the challenges of 7 tesla (T) ASL. The implementation of tailored labeling radiofrequency pulses reduced the effect of transmit field ( B1+) inhomogeneities. The proposed approach utilizes an SMS echo‐planar imaging (EPI) readout to efficiently achieve large brain coverage. Results A pulsed ASL (PASL) technique with large brain coverage is described and optimized that can be applied at temporal resolutions below 2.5 s, similar to those achievable at 1.5 and 3T magnetic field strength. The influences of within‐ and through‐slice acceleration factors and reconstruction parameters on perfusion and blood‐oxygenation‐level‐dependent (BOLD)‐signal image and temporal signal‐to‐noise ratio (SNR) are presented. The proposed approach yielded twice the brain coverage as compared to conventional PASL at 7T, without notable loss in image quality. Conclusion The presented SMS EPI PASL at 7T overcomes current limitations in SNR, temporal resolution, and spatial coverage for functional perfusion and BOLD signal as well as baseline perfusion measurements. Magn Reson Med 78:121–129, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID:27465273

  19. ASL Handshape Stories, Word Recognition and Signing Deaf Readers: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gietz, Merrilee R.

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of using American Sign Language (ASL) handshape stories to teach word recognition in whole stories using a descriptive case study approach was explored. Four profoundly deaf children ages 7 to 8, enrolled in a self-contained deaf education classroom in a public school in the south participated in the story time five-week…

  20. ASL Handshape Stories, Word Recognition and Signing Deaf Readers: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gietz, Merrilee R.

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of using American Sign Language (ASL) handshape stories to teach word recognition in whole stories using a descriptive case study approach was explored. Four profoundly deaf children ages 7 to 8, enrolled in a self-contained deaf education classroom in a public school in the south participated in the story time five-week…

  1. Mentorship: Mutual Benefits for ASL Students and Gifted Students (Part 1)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buisson, Gerald J.; Salgo, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Postsecondary American Sign Language (ASL) students are capable of teaching short lessons related to sign language and Deaf culture to gifted students in elementary school. College students who work as "interest-area mentors" benefit gifted students while building their own academic discipline and professional skills. In Part 1 of a 2-part series…

  2. Family-Centered Practices and American Sign Language (ASL): Challenges and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, Belinda J.; Blanchard, Sheresa Boone; Kemmery, Megan A.; Appenzeller, Margo; Parker, Samuel D.

    2014-01-01

    Families with children who are deaf face many important decisions, especially the mode(s) of communication their children will use. The purpose of this focus group study was to better understand the experiences and recommendations of families who chose American Sign Language (ASL) as their primary mode of communication and to identify strategies…

  3. Black Deaf Individuals' Reading Skills: Influence of ASL, Culture, Family Characteristics, Reading Experience, and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Candace; Clark, M. Diane; Musyoka, Millicent M.; Anderson, Melissa L.; Gilbert, Gizelle L.; Agyen, Selina; Hauser, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research on the reading abilities of Deaf individuals from various cultural groups suggests that Black Deaf and Hispanic Deaf individuals lag behind their White Deaf peers. The present study compared the reading skills of Black Deaf and White Deaf individuals, investigating the influence of American Sign Language (ASL), culture, family…

  4. Mentorship: Mutual Benefits for ASL Students and Gifted Students (Part 1)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buisson, Gerald J.; Salgo, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Postsecondary American Sign Language (ASL) students are capable of teaching short lessons related to sign language and Deaf culture to gifted students in elementary school. College students who work as "interest-area mentors" benefit gifted students while building their own academic discipline and professional skills. In Part 1 of a 2-part series…

  5. The Sign "Institute" and Its Derivatives: A Family of Culturally Important ASL Signs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalsky, Jilly; Meier, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    The sign "institute" is the source of a family of ASL signs that are used to refer to residential schools for deaf children and to other institutions. The members of the "institute" sign family--although initialized--are well-established within the Deaf community and, importantly, are used to refer to highly-valued aspects of Deaf culture. This is…

  6. Family-Centered Practices and American Sign Language (ASL): Challenges and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, Belinda J.; Blanchard, Sheresa Boone; Kemmery, Megan A.; Appenzeller, Margo; Parker, Samuel D.

    2014-01-01

    Families with children who are deaf face many important decisions, especially the mode(s) of communication their children will use. The purpose of this focus group study was to better understand the experiences and recommendations of families who chose American Sign Language (ASL) as their primary mode of communication and to identify strategies…

  7. Learning to Look: The Acquisition of Eye Gaze Agreement during the Production of ASL Verbs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Robin L.; Emmorey, Karen; Kluender, Robert

    2009-01-01

    In American Sign Language (ASL), native signers use eye gaze to mark agreement (Thompson, Emmorey and Kluender, 2006). Such agreement is unique (it is articulated with the eyes) and complex (it occurs with only two out of three verb types, and marks verbal arguments according to a noun phrase accessibility hierarchy). In a language production…

  8. Translation Challenges and Strategies: The ASL Translation of a Computer-Based, Psychiatric Diagnostic Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montoya, Louise A.; Egnatovitch, Reginald; Eckhardt, Elizabeth; Goldstein, Marjorie; Goldstein, Richard A.; Steinberg, Annie G.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the translation goals, challenges, strategies, and solutions employed in the development of a computer-based, self administered, psychiatric diagnostic instrument, the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for the Deaf (D-DIS-IV) in American Sign Language (ASL) with English captions. The article analyzes the impact of the…

  9. Black Deaf Individuals' Reading Skills: Influence of ASL, Culture, Family Characteristics, Reading Experience, and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Candace; Clark, M. Diane; Musyoka, Millicent M.; Anderson, Melissa L.; Gilbert, Gizelle L.; Agyen, Selina; Hauser, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research on the reading abilities of Deaf individuals from various cultural groups suggests that Black Deaf and Hispanic Deaf individuals lag behind their White Deaf peers. The present study compared the reading skills of Black Deaf and White Deaf individuals, investigating the influence of American Sign Language (ASL), culture, family…

  10. The Sign "Institute" and Its Derivatives: A Family of Culturally Important ASL Signs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalsky, Jilly; Meier, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    The sign "institute" is the source of a family of ASL signs that are used to refer to residential schools for deaf children and to other institutions. The members of the "institute" sign family--although initialized--are well-established within the Deaf community and, importantly, are used to refer to highly-valued aspects of Deaf culture. This is…

  11. Quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Tsui, B M; Frey, E C; LaCroix, K J; Lalush, D S; McCartney, W H; King, M A; Gullberg, G T

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the clinical application of attenuation compensation to myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with the promise that accurate quantitative images can be obtained to improve clinical diagnoses. The different attenuation compensation methods that are available create confusion and some misconceptions. Also, attenuation-compensated images reveal other image-degrading effects including collimator-detector blurring and scatter that are not apparent in uncompensated images. This article presents basic concepts of the major factors that degrade the quality and quantitative accuracy of myocardial perfusion SPECT images, and includes a discussion of the various image reconstruction and compensation methods and misconceptions and pitfalls in implementation. The differences between the various compensation methods and their performance are demonstrated. Particular emphasis is directed to an approach that promises to provide quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT images by accurately compensating for the 3-dimensional (3-D) attenuation, collimator-detector response, and scatter effects. With advances in the computer hardware and optimized implementation techniques, quantitatively accurate and high-quality myocardial perfusion SPECT images can be obtained in clinically acceptable processing time. Examples from simulation, phantom, and patient studies are used to demonstrate the various aspects of the investigation. We conclude that quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT, which holds great promise to improve clinical diagnosis, is an achievable goal in the near future.

  12. Diffusion, Perfusion, and Histopathologic Characteristics of Desmoplastic Infantile Ganglioglioma

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chang Y; Gener, Melissa; Bonnin, Jose; Kralik, Stephen F

    2016-01-01

    We present a case series of a rare tumor, the desmoplastic infantile ganglioglioma (DIG) with MRI diffusion and perfusion imaging quantification as well as histopathologic characterization. Four cases with pathologically-proven DIG had diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and two of the four had dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging. All four tumors demonstrate DWI findings compatible with low-grade pediatric tumors. For the two cases with perfusion imaging, a higher relative cerebral blood volume was associated with higher proliferation index on histopathology for one of the cases. Our results are discussed in conjunction with a literature review. PMID:27761184

  13. Measuring blood delivery to solitary pulmonary nodules using perfusion magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zhifeng; Shen, Li; Gao, Ling; Ford, James C.; Makedon, Fillia S.; Pearlman, Justin D.

    2006-03-01

    With perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI), perfusion describes the amount of blood passing through a block of tissue in a certain period of time. In pMRI, the tissue having more blood passing through will show higher intensity value as more contrast-labeled blood arrives. Perfusion reflects the delivery of essential nutrients to a block of tissue, and is an important parameter for the tissue status. Considering solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN), perfusion differences between malignant and benign nodules have been studied by different techniques. Much effort has been put into its characterization. In this paper, we proposed and implemented extraction of the SPN time intensity profile to measure blood delivery to solitary pulmonary nodules, describing their perfusion effects. In this method, a SPN time intensity profile is created based on intensity values of the solitary pulmonary nodule in lung pMRI images over time. This method has two steps: nodule tracking and profile clustering. Nodule tracking aligns the solitary pulmonary nodule in pMRI images taken at different time points, dealing with nodule movement resulted from breathing and body movement. Profile clustering implements segmentation of the nodule region and extraction of the time intensity profile of a solitary pulmonary nodule. SPN time intensity profiles reflect patterns of blood delivery to solitary pulmonary nodules, giving us a description of perfusion effect and indirect evidence of tumor angiogenesis. Analysis on SPN time intensity profiles will help the diagnosis of malignant nodules for early lung cancer detection.

  14. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Reeb, Jeremie; Cypel, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    Lung transplantation is an established life-saving therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease. Unfortunately, greater success in lung transplantation is hindered by a shortage of lung donors and the relatively poor early-, mid-, and long-term outcomes associated with severe primary graft dysfunction. Ex vivo lung perfusion has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for a more accurate lung assessment and improvement in lung quality. This review outlines the: (i) rationale behind the method; (ii) techniques and protocols; (iii) Toronto ex vivo lung perfusion method; (iv) devices available; and (v) clinical experience worldwide. We also highlight the potential of ex vivo lung perfusion in leading a new era of lung preservation.

  15. Bilingual Processing of ASL-English Code-Blends: The Consequences of Accessing Two Lexical Representations Simultaneously

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmorey, Karen; Petrich, Jennifer A. F.; Gollan, Tamar H.

    2012-01-01

    Bilinguals who are fluent in American Sign Language (ASL) and English often produce "code-blends"--simultaneously articulating a sign and a word while conversing with other ASL-English bilinguals. To investigate the cognitive mechanisms underlying code-blend processing, we compared picture-naming times (Experiment 1) and semantic categorization…

  16. Bilingual Processing of ASL-English Code-Blends: The Consequences of Accessing Two Lexical Representations Simultaneously

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmorey, Karen; Petrich, Jennifer A. F.; Gollan, Tamar H.

    2012-01-01

    Bilinguals who are fluent in American Sign Language (ASL) and English often produce "code-blends"--simultaneously articulating a sign and a word while conversing with other ASL-English bilinguals. To investigate the cognitive mechanisms underlying code-blend processing, we compared picture-naming times (Experiment 1) and semantic categorization…

  17. Academic Achievement of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in an ASL/English Bilingual Program.

    PubMed

    Hrastinski, Iva; Wilbur, Ronnie B

    2016-04-01

    There has been a scarcity of studies exploring the influence of students' American Sign Language (ASL) proficiency on their academic achievement in ASL/English bilingual programs. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ASL proficiency on reading comprehension skills and academic achievement of 85 deaf or hard-of-hearing signing students. Two subgroups, differing in ASL proficiency, were compared on the Northwest Evaluation Association Measures of Academic Progress and the reading comprehension subtest of the Stanford Achievement Test, 10th edition. Findings suggested that students highly proficient in ASL outperformed their less proficient peers in nationally standardized measures of reading comprehension, English language use, and mathematics. Moreover, a regression model consisting of 5 predictors including variables regarding education, hearing devices, and secondary disabilities as well as ASL proficiency and home language showed that ASL proficiency was the single variable significantly predicting results on all outcome measures. This study calls for a paradigm shift in thinking about deaf education by focusing on characteristics shared among successful deaf signing readers, specifically ASL fluency.

  18. Academic Achievement of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in an ASL/English Bilingual Program

    PubMed Central

    Wilbur, Ronnie B.

    2016-01-01

    There has been a scarcity of studies exploring the influence of students’ American Sign Language (ASL) proficiency on their academic achievement in ASL/English bilingual programs. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ASL proficiency on reading comprehension skills and academic achievement of 85 deaf or hard-of-hearing signing students. Two subgroups, differing in ASL proficiency, were compared on the Northwest Evaluation Association Measures of Academic Progress and the reading comprehension subtest of the Stanford Achievement Test, 10th edition. Findings suggested that students highly proficient in ASL outperformed their less proficient peers in nationally standardized measures of reading comprehension, English language use, and mathematics. Moreover, a regression model consisting of 5 predictors including variables regarding education, hearing devices, and secondary disabilities as well as ASL proficiency and home language showed that ASL proficiency was the single variable significantly predicting results on all outcome measures. This study calls for a paradigm shift in thinking about deaf education by focusing on characteristics shared among successful deaf signing readers, specifically ASL fluency. PMID:26864688

  19. [Portable peristaltic perfusion pumps].

    PubMed

    Magallón Pedrera, I; Soto Torres, I

    1999-11-01

    Portable peristaltic perfusion pumps allow one to administer pharmaceuticals in hospitals as well as in primary health care centers and furthermore these pumps present multiple advantages for patients and their families since they make it possible to carry out treatment in a patient's home while at the same time lowering the costs involved. The authors analyze the most out standing aspects of portable peristaltic perfusion pumps along with their characteristics, installation, programming, and how to turn them on; in addition, the authors list the maintenance care which these pumps require.

  20. Fractal analysis in radiological and nuclear medicine perfusion imaging: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Michallek, Florian; Dewey, Marc

    2014-01-01

    To provide an overview of recent research in fractal analysis of tissue perfusion imaging, using standard radiological and nuclear medicine imaging techniques including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and to discuss implications for different fields of application. A systematic review of fractal analysis for tissue perfusion imaging was performed by searching the databases MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE (via Ovid) and ISI Web of Science. Thirty-seven eligible studies were identified. Fractal analysis was performed on perfusion imaging of tumours, lung, myocardium, kidney, skeletal muscle and cerebral diseases. Clinically, different aspects of tumour perfusion and cerebral diseases were successfully evaluated including detection and classification. In physiological settings, it was shown that perfusion under different conditions and in various organs can be properly described using fractal analysis. Fractal analysis is a suitable method for quantifying heterogeneity from radiological and nuclear medicine perfusion images under a variety of conditions and in different organs. Further research is required to exploit physiologically proven fractal behaviour in the clinical setting. • Fractal analysis of perfusion images can be successfully performed. • Tumour, pulmonary, myocardial, renal, skeletal muscle and cerebral perfusion have already been examined. • Clinical applications of fractal analysis include tumour and brain perfusion assessment. • Fractal analysis is a suitable method for quantifying perfusion heterogeneity. • Fractal analysis requires further research concerning the development of clinical applications.

  1. Quantitative measurement of tissue perfusion and diffusion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chenevert, T L; Pipe, J G; Williams, D M; Brunberg, J A

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging techniques designed for sensitivity to microscopic motions of water diffusion and blood flow in the capillary network are also exceptionally sensitive to bulk motion properties of the tissue, which may lead to contrast artifact and large quantitative errors. The magnitude of bulk motion error that exists in human brain perfusion/diffusion imaging and the inability of cardiac gating to adequately control this motion are demonstrated by direct measurement of phase stability of voxels localized in the brain. Two methods are introduced to reduce bulk motion phase error. The first, a postprocessing phase correction algorithm, reduces coarse phase error but is inadequate by itself for quantitative perfusion/diffusion MRI. The second method employs orthogonal slice selection gradients to define a column of tissue in the object, from which echoes may be combined in a phase-insensitive manner to measure more reliably the targeted signal attenuation. Applying this acquisition technique and a simplistic model of perfusion and diffusion signal attenuations yields an estimated perfusion fraction of 3.4 +/- 1.1% and diffusion coefficient of 1.1 +/- 0.2 x 10(-5) cm2/s in the white matter of one normal volunteer. Successful separation of perfusion and diffusion effects by this technique is supported in a dynamic study of calf muscle. Periods of normal blood flow, low flow, and reactive hyperemia are clearly distinguished in the quantitative perfusion results, whereas measured diffusion remained nearly constant.

  2. Perfusion patterns in migraine with aura.

    PubMed

    Förster, Alex; Wenz, Holger; Kerl, Hans U; Brockmann, Marc A; Groden, Christoph

    2014-10-01

    Migraine with aura is a common neurological disorder, and differentiation from transient ischemic attack or stroke based on clinical symptoms may be difficult. From an MRI report database we identified 33 patients with migraine with aura and compared these to 33 age-matched ischemic stroke patients regarding perfusion patterns on perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI)-derived maps: time to peak (TTP), mean transit time (MTT), and cerebral blood flow and volume (CBF, CBV). In 18/33 (54.5%) patients with migraine with aura, TTP showed areas of hypoperfusion, most of these not limited to the territory of a specific artery but affecting two or more vascular territories. In patients with migraine with aura, TTP (1.09 ± 0.05 vs. 1.47 ± 0.40, p < 0.001) and MTT ratios (1.01 ± 0.10 vs. 1.19 ± 0.21, p = 0.003) were significantly lower compared to patients with ischemic stroke. In contrast to this, CBF and CBV ratios did not differ significantly between both groups. Migraine aura is usually associated with a perfusion deficit not limited to a specific vascular territory, and only a moderate increase of TTP. Thus, hypoperfusion restricted to a single vascular territory in combination with a marked increase of TTP or MTT may be regarded as atypical for migraine aura and suggestive of acute ischemic stroke. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Evaluation of MR perfusion abnormalities in organophosphorus poisoning and its correlation with SPECT.

    PubMed

    Bhanu, K Uday; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Vyas, Sameer; Singh, Paramjeet; Prabhakar, Anuj; Mittal, B R; Bhalla, Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Acute organophosphate (OP) pesticide poisoning causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Many imaging modalities, such as computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the brain, have been used for quantitative assessment of the acute brain insult caused by acute OP poisoning. Perfusion defects on SPECT in acutely poisoned patients with OPs have been described, however, MR perfusion abnormalities have not been described in the literature. MR perfusion Imaging has the advantage of having higher spatial resolution, no radiation, and better availability. In this prospective study, 20 patients who ingested OP compounds were included. All the patients underwent brain SPECT on a dual head SPECT gamma camera and MRI brain on a 1.5T MR system. Neurocognitive tests were performed for all patients. SPECT showed perfusion defects in 7 patients and total number of perfusion defects were 29. On MR perfusion, based on the cut-off values of normalized cerebral blood volume (nCBV) ratios and normalized cerebral blood flow (nCBF) ratios, the total number of patients showing perfusion defects were 6 and 8; and the total number of perfusion defects were 29 and 45, respectively. There was significant difference of the nCBV ratios and nCBF ratios between the control group (n = 20) and positive patients group (n = 6 and n = 8, respectively) (P > 0.05). All the defects seen on SPECT were well appreciated on nCBF maps (MRI perfusion) suggestive of 100% correlation. MR perfusion imaging can be used as an effective modality for evaluation in acute OP poisoning.

  4. Arterial spin labeling for motor activation mapping at 3T with a 32-channel coil: reproducibility and spatial accuracy in comparison with BOLD fMRI.

    PubMed

    Raoult, Hélène; Petr, Jan; Bannier, Elise; Stamm, Aymeric; Gauvrit, Jean-Yves; Barillot, Christian; Ferré, Jean-Christophe

    2011-09-01

    Functional arterial spin labeling (fASL) is an innovative biomarker of neuronal activation that allows direct and absolute quantification of activation-related CBF and is less sensitive to venous contamination than BOLD fMRI. This study evaluated fASL for motor activation mapping in comparison with BOLD fMRI in terms of involved anatomical area localization, intra-individual reproducibility of location, quantification of neuronal activation, and spatial accuracy. Imaging was performed at 3T with a 32-channel coil and dedicated post-processing tools were used. Twelve healthy right-handed subjects underwent fASL and BOLD fMRI while performing a right hand motor activation task. Three sessions were performed 7days apart in similar physiological conditions. Our results showed an activation in the left primary hand motor area for all 36 sessions in both fASL and BOLD fMRI. The individual functional maps for fASL demonstrated activation in ipsilateral secondary motor areas more often than the BOLD fMRI maps. This finding was corroborated by the group maps. In terms of activation location, fASL reproducibility was comparable to BOLD fMRI, with a distance between activated volumes of 2.1mm and an overlap ratio for activated volumes of 0.76, over the 3 sessions. In terms of activation quantification, fASL reproducibility was higher, although not significantly, with a CVintra of 11.6% and an ICC value of 0.75. Functional ASL detected smaller activation volumes than BOLD fMRI but the areas had a high degree of co-localization. In terms of spatial accuracy in detecting activation in the hand motor area, fASL had a higher specificity (43.5%) and a higher positive predictive value (69.8%) than BOLD fMRI while maintaining high sensitivity (90.7%). The high intra-individual reproducibility and spatial accuracy of fASL revealed in the present study will subsequently be applied to pathological subjects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Perfusion deficits and functional connectivity alterations in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Baojuan; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Linchuan; Li, Liang; Lu, Hongbing

    2016-03-01

    To explore the alteration in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and functional connectivity between survivors with recent onset post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and without PTSD, survived from the same coal mine flood disaster. In this study, a processing pipeline using arterial spin labeling (ASL) sequence was proposed. Considering low spatial resolution of ASL sequence, a linear regression method was firstly used to correct the partial volume (PV) effect for better CBF estimation. Then the alterations of CBF between two groups were analyzed using both uncorrected and PV-corrected CBF maps. Based on altered CBF regions detected from the CBF analysis as seed regions, the functional connectivity abnormities in PTSD patients was investigated. The CBF analysis using PV-corrected maps indicates CBF deficits in the bilateral frontal lobe, right superior frontal gyrus and right corpus callosum of PTSD patients, while only right corpus callosum was identified in uncorrected CBF analysis. Furthermore, the regional CBF of the right superior frontal gyrus exhibits significantly negative correlation with the symptom severity in PTSD patients. The resting-state functional connectivity indicates increased connectivity between left frontal lobe and right parietal lobe. These results indicate that PV-corrected CBF exhibits more subtle perfusion changes and may benefit further perfusion and connectivity analysis. The symptom-specific perfusion deficits and aberrant connectivity in above memory-related regions may be putative biomarkers for recent onset PTSD induced by a single prolonged trauma exposure and help predict the severity of PTSD.

  6. Distribution of perfusion.

    PubMed

    Glenny, Robb; Robertson, H Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Local driving pressures and resistances within the pulmonary vascular tree determine the distribution of perfusion in the lung. Unlike other organs, these local determinants are significantly influenced by regional hydrostatic and alveolar pressures. Those effects on blood flow distribution are further magnified by the large vertical height of the human lung and the relatively low intravascular pressures in the pulmonary circulation. While the distribution of perfusion is largely due to passive determinants such as vascular geometry and hydrostatic pressures, active mechanisms such as vasoconstriction induced by local hypoxia can also redistribute blood flow. This chapter reviews the determinants of regional lung perfusion with a focus on vascular tree geometry, vertical gradients induced by gravity, the interactions between vascular and surrounding alveolar pressures, and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. While each of these determinants of perfusion distribution can be examined in isolation, the distribution of blood flow is dynamically determined and each component interacts with the others so that a change in one region of the lung influences the distribution of blood flow in other lung regions. © 2011 American Physiological Society.

  7. Three-dimensional tumor perfusion reconstruction using fractal interpolation functions.

    PubMed

    Craciunescu, O I; Das, S K; Poulson, J M; Samulski, T V

    2001-04-01

    It has been shown that the perfusion of blood in tumor tissue can be approximated using the relative perfusion index determined from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI) of the tumor blood pool. Also, it was concluded in a previous report that the blood perfusion in a two-dimensional (2-D) tumor vessel network has a fractal structure and that the evolution of the perfusion front can be characterized using invasion percolation. In this paper, the three-dimensional (3-D) tumor perfusion is reconstructed from the 2-D slices using the method of fractal interpolation functions (FIF), i.e., the piecewise self-affine fractal interpolation model (PSAFIM) and the piecewise hidden variable fractal interpolation model (PHVFIM). The fractal models are compared to classical interpolation techniques (linear, spline, polynomial) by means of determining the 2-D fractal dimension of the reconstructed slices. Using FIFs instead of classical interpolation techniques better conserves the fractal-like structure of the perfusion data. Among the two FIF methods, PHVFIM conserves the 3-D fractality better due to the cross correlation that exists between the data in the 2-D slices and the data along the reconstructed direction. The 3-D structures resulting from PHVFIM have a fractal dimension within 3%-5% of the one reported in literature for 3-D percolation. It is, thus, concluded that the reconstructed 3-D perfusion has a percolation-like scaling. As the perfusion term from bio-heat equation is possibly better described by reconstruction via fractal interpolation, a more suitable computation of the temperature field induced during hyperthermia treatments is expected.

  8. TOPICAL REVIEW: The measurement of diffusion and perfusion in biological systems using magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David L.; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Pell, Gaby S.; Calamante, Fernando; Ordidge, Roger J.

    2000-08-01

    The aim of this review is to describe two recent developments in the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the study of biological systems: diffusion and perfusion MRI. Diffusion MRI measures the molecular mobility of water in tissue, while perfusion MRI measures the rate at which blood is delivered to tissue. Therefore, both these techniques measure quantities which have direct physiological relevance. It is shown that diffusion in biological systems is a complex phenomenon, influenced directly by tissue microstructure, and that its measurement can provide a large amount of information about the organization of this structure in normal and diseased tissue. Perfusion reflects the delivery of essential nutrients to tissue, and so is directly related to its status. The concepts behind the techniques are explained, and the theoretical models that are used to convert MRI data to quantitative physical parameters are outlined. Examples of current applications of diffusion and perfusion MRI are given. In particular, the use of the techniques to study the pathophysiology of cerebral ischaemia/stroke is described. It is hoped that the biophysical insights provided by this approach will help to define the mechanisms of cell damage and allow evaluation of therapies aimed at reducing this damage.

  9. The measurement of diffusion and perfusion in biological systems using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D L; Lythgoe, M F; Pell, G S; Calamante, F; Ordidge, R J

    2000-08-01

    The aim of this review is to describe two recent developments in the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the study of biological systems: diffusion and perfusion MRI. Diffusion MRI measures the molecular mobility of water in tissue, while perfusion MRI measures the rate at which blood is delivered to tissue. Therefore, both these techniques measure quantities which have direct physiological relevance. It is shown that diffusion in biological systems is a complex phenomenon, influenced directly by tissue microstructure, and that its measurement can provide a large amount of information about the organization of this structure in normal and diseased tissue. Perfusion reflects the delivery of essential nutrients to tissue, and so is directly related to its status. The concepts behind the techniques are explained, and the theoretical models that are used to convert MRI data to quantitative physical parameters are outlined. Examples of current applications of diffusion and perfusion MRI are given. In particular, the use of the techniques to study the pathophysiology of cerebral ischaemia/stroke is described. It is hoped that the biophysical insights provided by this approach will help to define the mechanisms of cell damage and allow evaluation of therapies aimed at reducing this damage.

  10. Codeswitching techniques: evidence-based instructional practices for the ASL/English bilingual classroom.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Jean F; Rusher, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    The authors present a perspective on emerging bilingual deaf students who are exposed to, learning, and developing two languages--American Sign Language (ASL) and English (spoken English, manually coded English, and English reading and writing). The authors suggest that though deaf children may lack proficiency or fluency in either language during early language-learning development, they still engage in codeswitching activities, in which they go back and forth between signing and English to communicate. The authors then provide a second meaning of codeswitching--as a purpose-driven instructional technique in which the teacher strategically changes from ASL to English print for purposes of vocabulary and reading comprehension. The results of four studies are examined that suggest that certain codeswitching strategies support English vocabulary learning and reading comprehension. These instructional strategies are couched in a five-pronged approach to furthering the development of bilingual education for deaf students.

  11. Acceleration Term at ASL FRING as a Tool to Improve Space VLBI Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, L.; Likhachev, S.; Girin, I.; Ladygin, V.

    2009-08-01

    Astro Space Locator (ASL) a new postcorrelation software has been created recently in Astro Space Center (ASC), Russia. This software is created specifically for space VLBI project such as Radioastron and VSOP. The delay for the ground based VLBI traditionally comprised of two terms: initial delay and its rate of change in time. For space VLBI, taking into account the third term (acceleration) can be required because the satellite orbit may not be known with such a high accuracy as rotation of the Earth. The ASL software solves for all three parameters: delay, fringe rate, and acceleration. In this paper we test this algorithm and demonstrate the advantage of taking into account the acceleration term.

  12. Black deaf individuals' reading skills: influence of ASL, culture, family characteristics, reading experience, and education.

    PubMed

    Myers, Candace; Clark, M Diane; Musyoka, Millicent M; Anderson, Melissa L; Gilbert, Gizelle L; Agyen, Selina; Hauser, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    Previous research on the reading abilities of Deaf individuals from various cultural groups suggests that Black Deaf and Hispanic Deaf individuals lag behind their White Deaf peers. The present study compared the reading skills of Black Deaf and White Deaf individuals, investigating the influence of American Sign Language (ASL), culture, family characteristics, reading experience, and education. (The descriptor Black is used throughout the present article, as Black Deaf individuals prefer this term to African American. For purposes of parallel construction, the term White is used instead of European American.) It was found that Black Deaf study participants scored lower on measures of both reading and ASL. These findings provide implications for possible interventions at the primary, secondary, and college levels of education.

  13. Mutation of the rice ASL2 gene encoding plastid ribosomal protein L21 causes chloroplast developmental defects and seedling death.

    PubMed

    Lin, D; Jiang, Q; Zheng, K; Chen, S; Zhou, H; Gong, X; Xu, J; Teng, S; Dong, Y

    2015-05-01

    The plastid ribosome proteins (PRPs) play important roles in plastid protein biosynthesis, chloroplast differentiation and early chloroplast development. However, the specialised functions of individual protein components of the chloroplast ribosome in rice (Oryza sativa) remain unresolved. In this paper, we identified a novel rice PRP mutant named asl2 (Albino seedling lethality 2) exhibiting an albino, seedling death phenotype. In asl2 mutants, the alteration of leaf colour was associated with chlorophyll (Chl) content and abnormal chloroplast development. Through map-based cloning and complementation, the mutated ASL2 gene was isolated and found to encode the chloroplast 50S ribosome protein L21 (RPL21c), a component of the chloroplast ribosome large subunit, which was localised in chloroplasts. ASL2 was expressed at a higher level in the plumule and leaves, implying its tissue-specific expression. Additionally, the expression of ASL2 was regulated by light. The transcript levels of the majority of genes for Chl biosynthesis, photosynthesis and chloroplast development were strongly affected in asl2 mutants. Collectively, the absence of functional ASL2 caused chloroplast developmental defects and seedling death. This report establishes the important role of RPL21c in chloroplast development in rice. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  14. Cerebral perfusion in children with Alice in Wonderland syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Y T; Chiu, N C; Shen, E Y; Ho, C S; Wu, M C

    1998-08-01

    Alice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS) is characterized by visual hallucinations and bizarre perceptual distortions. Technetium-99m hexamethylpropyleneamine tomography (SPECT) brain scans were performed in four patients during the acute stage of AIWS. Two patients were demonstrated to have Epstein-Barr virus infections. One had abnormal (EEG) findings. The visual-evoked potential, cranial CT, and MRI findings were negative. The decreased cerebral perfusion areas in all patients were near the visual tract and visual cortex. All involved some regions of the temporal lobe. In most patients with AIWS, the EEG, CT, and MRI are unable to determine the precise pathologic areas. However, a SPECT brain scan may demonstrate abnormal perfusion areas and explain the clinical presentations.

  15. An Actively Decoupled Dual Transceiver Coil System for Continuous ASL at 7 T

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Randall B.; Woo, Myung-Kyun; Oh, Se-Hong; Dolui, Sudipto; Zhao, Tiejun; Kim, Young-Bo; Detre, John A.; Cho, Zang-Hee; Lee, Jongho

    2016-01-01

    7 T arterial spin labeling (ASL) faces major challenges including the increased specific absorption rate (SAR) and increased B0 and B1 inhomogeneity. This work describes the design and implementation of a dual-coil system that allows for continuous ASL (CASL) at 7 T. This system consisted of an actively detunable eight-channel transceiver head coil, and a three-channel transceiver labeling coil. Four experiments were performed in 5 healthy subjects: (i) to demonstrate that active detuning during ASL labeling reduces magnetization transfer; (ii) to measure the B1 profile at the labeling plane; (iii) to quantify B0 off-resonance at the labeling plane; and (iv) to collect in vivo CASL data. The magnetization transfer ratio in the head coil was reduced to 0.0 ± 0.2% by active detuning during labeling. The measured B1 profiles in all 5 subjects were sufficient to satisfy the flow-driven adiabatic inversion necessary for CASL, however the actual labeling efficiency was significantly impacted by B0 off-resonance at the labeling plane. The measured CASL percent signal change in gray matter (0.94% ± 0.10%) corresponds with the low labeling efficiency predicted by the B0 off-resonance. This work demonstrates progress in the technical implementation of 7 T CASL, and reinforces the need for improved B0 homogeneity at the labeling plane. PMID:27695192

  16. Three-dimensional whole-brain perfusion quantification using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling MRI at multiple post-labeling delays: accounting for both arterial transit time and impulse response function.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qin; Huang, Alan J; Hua, Jun; Desmond, John E; Stevens, Robert D; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2014-02-01

    Measurement of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) with whole-brain coverage is challenging in terms of both acquisition and quantitative analysis. In order to fit arterial spin labeling-based perfusion kinetic curves, an empirical three-parameter model which characterizes the effective impulse response function (IRF) is introduced, which allows the determination of CBF, the arterial transit time (ATT) and T(1,eff). The accuracy and precision of the proposed model were compared with those of more complicated models with four or five parameters through Monte Carlo simulations. Pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling images were acquired on a clinical 3-T scanner in 10 normal volunteers using a three-dimensional multi-shot gradient and spin echo scheme at multiple post-labeling delays to sample the kinetic curves. Voxel-wise fitting was performed using the three-parameter model and other models that contain two, four or five unknown parameters. For the two-parameter model, T(1,eff) values close to tissue and blood were assumed separately. Standard statistical analysis was conducted to compare these fitting models in various brain regions. The fitted results indicated that: (i) the estimated CBF values using the two-parameter model show appreciable dependence on the assumed T(1,eff) values; (ii) the proposed three-parameter model achieves the optimal balance between the goodness of fit and model complexity when compared among the models with explicit IRF fitting; (iii) both the two-parameter model using fixed blood T1 values for T(1,eff) and the three-parameter model provide reasonable fitting results. Using the proposed three-parameter model, the estimated CBF (46 ± 14 mL/100 g/min) and ATT (1.4 ± 0.3 s) values averaged from different brain regions are close to the literature reports; the estimated T(1,eff) values (1.9 ± 0.4 s) are higher than the tissue T1 values, possibly reflecting a contribution from the microvascular arterial blood compartment.

  17. Arterial Perfusion Imaging-Defined Subvolume of Intrahepatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hesheng; Farjam, Reza; Feng, Mary; Hussain, Hero; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Cao, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess whether an increase in a subvolume of intrahepatic tumor with elevated arterial perfusion during radiation therapy (RT) predicts tumor progression post RT. Methods and Materials Twenty patients with unresectable intrahepatic cancers undergoing RT were enrolled in a prospective IRB-approved study. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) were performed prior to RT (pre-RT), after delivering ~60% of the planned dose (mid-RT) and one month after completion of RT to quantify hepatic arterial perfusion. The arterial perfusions of the tumors at pre-RT were clustered into low-normal and elevated perfusion by a fuzzy clustering-based method, and the tumor subvolumes with elevated arterial perfusion were extracted from the hepatic arterial perfusion images. The percentage changes in the tumor subvolumes and means of arterial perfusion over the tumors from pre-RT to mid-RT were evaluated for predicting tumor progression post-RT. Results Of the 24 tumors, 6 tumors in 5 patients progressed 5–21 months after RT completion. Neither tumor volumes nor means of tumor arterial perfusion at pre-RT were predictive of treatment outcome. The mean arterial perfusion over the tumors increased significantly at mid-RT in progressive tumors comparing to the responsive ones (p=0.006). From pre-RT to mid-RT, the responsive tumors had a decrease in the tumor subvolumes with elevated arterial perfusion (median: −14%, range: −75% – 65%), while the progressing tumors had an increase of the subvolumes (median: 57%, range: −7% – 165%) (p=0.003). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of the percentage change in the subvolume for predicting tumor progression post-RT had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.90. Conclusion The increase in the subvolume of the intrahepatic tumor with elevated arterial perfusion during RT has the potential to be a predictor for tumor progression post-RT. The tumor subvolume could be a radiation boost candidate

  18. Validation of the hypercapnic calibrated fMRI method using DOT-fMRI fusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Meryem A.; Evans, Karleyton C.; Selb, Juliette; Huppert, Theodore J.; Boas, David A.; Gagnon, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Calibrated functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is a widely used method to investigate brain function in terms of physiological quantities such as the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2). The first and one of the most common methods of fMRI calibration is hypercapnic calibration. This is achieved via simultaneous measures of blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) and the arterial spin labeling (ASL) signals during a functional task that evokes regional changes in CMRO2. A subsequent acquisition is then required during which the subject inhales carbon dioxide for short periods of time. A calibration constant, typically labeled M, is then estimated from the hypercapnic data and is subsequently used together with the BOLD-ASL recordings to compute evoked changes in CMRO2 during the functional task. The computation of M assumes a constant CMRO2 during the CO2 inhalation, an assumption that has been questioned since the origin of calibrated fMRI. In this study we used Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) together with BOLD and ASL – an alternative calibration method that does not require any gas manipulation and therefore no constant CMRO2 assumption - to cross-validate the estimation of M obtained from a traditional hypercapnic calibration. We found a high correlation between the M values (R=0.87, p<0.01) estimated using these two approaches. The findings serve to validate the hypercapnic fMRI calibration technique and suggest that the inter-subject variability routinely obtained for M is reproducible with an alternative method and might therefore reflect inter-subject physiological variability. PMID:25196509

  19. Kinetic assessment of manganese using magnetic resonance imaging in the dually perfused human placenta in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.K.; Mattison, D.R.; Panigel, M.; Ceckler, T.; Bryant, R.; Thomford, P.

    1987-10-01

    The transfer and distribution of paramagnetic manganese was investigated in the dually perfused human placenta in vitro (using 10, 20, 100 ..mu..M Mn with and without /sup 54/Mn) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and conventional radiochemical techniques. The human placenta concentrated /sup 54/Mn rapidly during the first 15 min of perfusion and by 4 hr was four times greater than the concentrations of Mn in the maternal perfusate, while the concentration of Mn in the fetal perfusate was 25% of the maternal perfusate levels. Within placentae, 45% of the /sup 54/Mn was free in the 100,000g supernatant, with 45% in the 1000g pellet. The magnetic field dependence of proton nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time (T/sub 1/) in placental tissue supports this Mn binding. Mn primarily affected the MRI partial saturation rather than spin-echo images of the human placenta, which provided for the separation of perfusate contributions from those produced by Mn. The washout of the Mn from the placenta was slow compared with its uptake, as determined by MRI. Thus, Mn was concentrated by the human placenta, but transfer of Mn across the placenta was limited in either direction. These studies also illustrate the opportunity for studies of human placental function using magnetic resonance imaging as a noninvasive biomarker.

  20. Ventilation and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Grzegorz; Eichinger, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Summary A close interaction between the respiratory pump, pulmonary parenchyma and blood circulation is essential for a normal lung function. Many pulmonary diseases present, especially in their initial phase, a variable regional impairment of ventilation and perfusion. In the last decades various techniques have been established to measure the lung function. Besides the global pulmonary function tests (PFTs) imaging techniques gained increasing importance to detect local variations in lung function, especially for ventilation and perfusion assessment. Imaging modalities allow for a deeper regional insight into pathophysiological processes and enable improved planning of invasive procedures. In contrast to computed tomography (CT) and the nuclear medicine techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as a radiation free imaging modality gained increasing importance since the early 1990 for the assessment of pulmonary function. The major inherent problems of lung tissue, namely the low proton density and the pulmonary and cardiac motion, were overcome in the last years by a constant progress in MR technology. Some MR techniques are still under development, a process which is driven by scientific questions regarding the physiology and pathophysiology of pulmonary diseases, as well as by the need for fast and robust clinically applicable imaging techniques as safe therapy monitoring tools. MRI can be considered a promising ionizing-free alternative to techniques like CT or nuclear medicine techniques for the evaluation of lung function. The goal of this article is to provide an overview on selected MRI techniques for the assessment of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion. PMID:22802864

  1. Assessment of myocardial perfusion and viability from routine contrast-enhanced 16-detector-row computed tomography of the heart: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Konstantin; Sanz, Javier; Poon, Michael; Wintersperger, Bernd J; Ohnesorge, Bernd; Rius, Teresa; Fayad, Zahi A; Reiser, Maximilian F; Becker, Christoph R

    2005-05-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of 16-detector-row computed tomography (16DCT) of the heart in the assessment of myocardial perfusion and viability in comparison to stress perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (SP-MRI) and delayed-enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI). A number of 30 patients underwent both 16DCT and MRI of the heart. Contrast-enhanced 16DCT data sets were reviewed for areas of myocardium with reduced attenuation. Both CT and MRI data were examined by independent reviewers for the presence of myocardial perfusion defects or myocardial infarctions (MI). Volumetric analysis of the hypoperfusion areas in CT and the infarct sizes in DE-MRI were performed. According to MRI, myocardial infarctions were detected in 11 of 30 cases, and perfusion defects not corresponding to an MI were detected in six of 30 patients. CTA was able to detect ten of 11 MI correctly (sensitivity 91%, specificity 79%, accuracy 83%), and detected three of six hypoperfusions correctly (sensitivity 50%, specificity 92%, accuracy 79%). Assessing the volume of perfusion defects correlating to history of MI on the CT images, a systematic underestimation of the true infarct size as compared to the results of DE-MRI was found (P<0.01). Routine, contrast-enhanced 16-detector row CT of the heart can detect chronic myocardial infarctions in the majority of cases, but ischemic perfusion defects are not reliably detected under resting conditions.

  2. Qualitative Perfusion Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Lacks Sensitivity in Detecting Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Colvin-Adams, Monica; Petros, Salam; Raveendran, Ganesh; Missov, Emil; Medina, Eduardo; Wilson, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is a major complication after heart transplantation, requiring frequent surveillance angiography. Though cardiac angiography is the gold standard, it is insensitive in detecting transplant vasculopathy and invasive. Perfusion MRI provides a noninvasive alternative and possibly a useful modality for studying CAV. We sought to compare the accuracy of qualitative perfusion MRI to coronary angiography in detecting CAV. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed in 68 heart transplant recipients who had simultaneous surveillance cardiac MRI and coronary angiogram and who underwent transplantation between 2000 and 2007. We compared results of qualitative MRI to those of the cardiac angiogram. Sensitivity and specificity of MR were calculated. Results Sixty-eight patients underwent both cardiac MRI and coronary angiogram. 73.5% were male; mean age was 45.37 ± 14 years. Mean duration of heart transplantation was 7.9 ± 5.2 years. The mean ejection fraction was 55% in the patients without CAV and 57.4% in those with CAV. There were 48 normal and 24 abnormal MRI studies. The overall sensitivity was 41% and specificity was 74%. Conclusions Qualitative assessment of perfusion cardiac MR has low sensitivity and moderate specificity for detecting CAV. The sensitivity of MRI was slightly improved with severity of disease.

  3. Simultaneous PET/MR imaging of the brain: feasibility of cerebral blood flow measurements with FAIR-TrueFISP arterial spin labeling MRI.

    PubMed

    Stegger, Lars; Martirosian, Petros; Schwenzer, Nina; Bisdas, Sotirios; Kolb, Armin; Pfannenberg, Christina; Claussen, Claus D; Pichler, Bernd; Schick, Fritz; Boss, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) with simultaneous data acquisition promises a comprehensive evaluation of cerebral pathophysiology on a molecular, anatomical, and functional level. Considering the necessary changes to the MR scanner design the feasibility of arterial spin labeling (ASL) is unclear. To evaluate whether cerebral blood flow imaging with ASL is feasible using a prototype PET/MRI device. ASL imaging of the brain with Flow-sensitive Alternating Inversion Recovery (FAIR) spin preparation and true fast imaging in steady precession (TrueFISP) data readout was performed in eight healthy volunteers sequentially on a prototype PET/MRI and a stand-alone MR scanner with 128 × 128 and 192 × 192 matrix sizes. Cerebral blood flow values for gray matter, signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios, and relative signal change were compared. Additionally, the feasibility of ASL as part of a clinical hybrid PET/MRI protocol was demonstrated in five patients with intracerebral tumors. Blood flow maps showed good delineation of gray and white matter with no discernible artifacts. The mean blood flow values of the eight volunteers on the PET/MR system were 51 ± 9 and 51 ± 7 mL/100 g/min for the 128 × 128 and 192 × 192 matrices (stand-alone MR, 57 ± 2 and 55 ± 5, not significant). The value for signal-to-noise (SNR) was significantly higher for the PET/MRI system using the 192 × 192 matrix size (P < 0.01), the relative signal change (δS) was significantly lower for the 192 × 192 matrix size (P = 0.02). ASL imaging as part of a clinical hybrid PET/MRI protocol could successfully be accomplished in all patients in diagnostic image quality. ASL brain imaging is feasible with a prototype hybrid PET/MRI scanner, thus adding to the value of this novel imaging technique.

  4. Quantification of liver perfusion using multidelay pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xinlei; Qian, Tianyi; Fernandez-Seara, Maria A; Smith, Robert X; Li, Kuncheng; Ying, Kui; Sung, Kyunghyun; Wang, Danny J J

    2016-05-01

    To develop a free-breathing multidelay pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) technique for quantitative measurement of liver perfusion of the hepatic artery and portal vein, respectively. A navigator-gated pCASL sequence with balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) readout was developed and applied on five healthy young volunteers at 3T. Two labeling schemes were performed with the labeling plane applied on the descending aorta above the liver, and perpendicular to the portal vein before its entry to liver to label the hepatic artery and portal vein, respectively. For each labeling scheme, pCASL scans were performed at five or six postlabeling delays between 200 and 2000 msec or 2500 msec with an interval of 400 or 500 msec. Multidelay pCASL images were processed offline with nonrigid motion correction, outlier removal, and fitted for estimation of liver perfusion and transit time. Estimated liver perfusion of the hepatic artery and hepatic portal vein were 21.8 ± 1.9 and 95.1 ± 8.9 mL/100g/min, with the corresponding transit time of 1227.3 ± 355.5 and 667.2 ± 85.0 msec, respectively. The estimated liver perfusion and transit time without motion correction were less reliable with greater residual variance compared to those processed with motion correction (P < 0.05). The liver perfusion measurement using multidelay pCASL showed good correspondence with values noted in the literature. The capability to noninvasively and selectively label the hepatic artery and portal vein is a unique strength of pCASL as compared to other liver perfusion imaging techniques, such as computed tomography perfusion and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Perfusion Based Cell Culture Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiskanen, A.; Emnéus, J.; Dufva, M.

    Performing cell culture in miniaturized perfusion chambers gives possibilities to experiment with cells under near in vivo like conditions. In contrast to traditional batch cultures, miniaturized perfusion systems provide precise control of medium composition, long term unattended cultures and tissue like structuring of the cultures. However, as this chapter illustrates, many issues remain to be identified regarding perfusion cell culture such as design, material choice and how to use these systems before they will be widespread amongst biomedical researchers.

  6. Bilingual processing of ASL-English code-blends: The consequences of accessing two lexical representations simultaneously

    PubMed Central

    Emmorey, Karen; Petrich, Jennifer; Gollan, Tamar H.

    2012-01-01

    Bilinguals who are fluent in American Sign Language (ASL) and English often produce code-blends - simultaneously articulating a sign and a word while conversing with other ASL-English bilinguals. To investigate the cognitive mechanisms underlying code-blend processing, we compared picture-naming times (Experiment 1) and semantic categorization times (Experiment 2) for code-blends versus ASL signs and English words produced alone. In production, code-blending did not slow lexical retrieval for ASL and actually facilitated access to low-frequency signs. However, code-blending delayed speech production because bimodal bilinguals synchronized English and ASL lexical onsets. In comprehension, code-blending speeded access to both languages. Bimodal bilinguals’ ability to produce code-blends without any cost to ASL implies that the language system either has (or can develop) a mechanism for switching off competition to allow simultaneous production of close competitors. Code-blend facilitation effects during comprehension likely reflect cross-linguistic (and cross-modal) integration at the phonological and/or semantic levels. The absence of any consistent processing costs for code-blending illustrates a surprising limitation on dual-task costs and may explain why bimodal bilinguals code-blend more often than they code-switch. PMID:22773886

  7. Hepatic arterial spin labelling MRI: an initial evaluation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ramasawmy, R; Campbell-Washburn, A E; Wells, J A; Johnson, S P; Pedley, R B; Walker-Samuel, S; Lythgoe, M F

    2015-01-01

    The development of strategies to combat hepatic disease and augment tissue regeneration has created a need for methods to assess regional liver function. Liver perfusion imaging has the potential to fulfil this need, across a range of hepatic diseases, alongside the assessment of therapeutic response. In this study, the feasibility of hepatic arterial spin labelling (HASL) was assessed for the first time in mice at 9.4 T, its variability and repeatability were evaluated, and it was applied to a model of colorectal liver metastasis. Data were acquired using flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery-arterial spin labelling (FAIR-ASL) with a Look–Locker readout, and analysed using retrospective respiratory gating and a T1-based quantification. This study shows that preclinical HASL is feasible and exhibits good repeatability and reproducibility. Mean estimated liver perfusion was 2.2 ± 0.8 mL/g/min (mean ± standard error, n = 10), which agrees well with previous measurements using invasive approaches. Estimates of the variation gave a within-session coefficient of variation (CVWS) of 7%, a between-session coefficient of variation (CVBS) of 9% and a between-animal coefficient of variation (CVA) of 15%. The within-session Bland–Altman repeatability coefficient (RCWS) was 18% and the between-session repeatability coefficient (RCBS) was 29%. Finally, the HASL method was applied to a mouse model of liver metastasis, in which significantly lower mean perfusion (1.1 ± 0.5 mL/g/min, n = 6) was measured within the tumours, as seen by fluorescence histology. These data indicate that precise and accurate liver perfusion estimates can be achieved using ASL techniques, and provide a platform for future studies investigating hepatic perfusion in mouse models of disease. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25522098

  8. MobileASL: intelligibility of sign language video over mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Cavender, Anna; Vanam, Rahul; Barney, Dane K; Ladner, Richard E; Riskin, Eve A

    2008-01-01

    For Deaf people, access to the mobile telephone network in the United States is currently limited to text messaging, forcing communication in English as opposed to American Sign Language (ASL), the preferred language. Because ASL is a visual language, mobile video phones have the potential to give Deaf people access to real-time mobile communication in their preferred language. However, even today's best video compression techniques can not yield intelligible ASL at limited cell phone network bandwidths. Motivated by this constraint, we conducted one focus group and two user studies with members of the Deaf Community to determine the intelligibility effects of video compression techniques that exploit the visual nature of sign language. Inspired by eye tracking results that show high resolution foveal vision is maintained around the face, we studied region-of-interest encodings (where the face is encoded at higher quality) as well as reduced frame rates (where fewer, better quality, frames are displayed every second). At all bit rates studied here, participants preferred moderate quality increases in the face region, sacrificing quality in other regions. They also preferred slightly lower frame rates because they yield better quality frames for a fixed bit rate. The limited processing power of cell phones is a serious concern because a real-time video encoder and decoder will be needed. Choosing less complex settings for the encoder can reduce encoding time, but will affect video quality. We studied the intelligibility effects of this tradeoff and found that we can significantly speed up encoding time without severely affecting intelligibility. These results show promise for real-time access to the current low-bandwidth cell phone network through sign-language-specific encoding techniques.

  9. Tumor Vessel Compression Hinders Perfusion of Ultrasonographic Contrast Agents1

    PubMed Central

    Galiè, Mirco; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Montani, Maura; Amici, Augusto; Calderan, Laura; Marzola, Pasquina; Benati, Donatella; Merigo, Flavia; Marchini, Cristina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is an advanced approach to in vivo assessment of tumor vascularity and is being increasingly adopted in clinical oncology. It is based on 1- to 10 µm-sized gas microbubbles, which can cross the capillary beds of the lungs and are effective echo enhancers. It is known that high cell density, high transendothelial fluid exchange, and poorly functioning lymphatic circulation all provoke solid stress, which compresses vessels and drastically reduces tumor blood flow. Given their size, we supposed that the perfusion of microbubbles is affected by anatomic features of tumor vessels more than are contrast agents traditionally used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Here, we compared dynamic information obtained from CEUS and DCE-MRI on two experimental tumor models exhibiting notable differences in vessel anatomy. We found that tumors with small, flattened vessels show a much higher resistance to microbubble perfusion than to MRI contrast agents, and appear scarcely vascularized at CEUS examination, despite vessel volume adequate for normal function. Thus, whereas CEUS alone could induce incorrect diagnosis when tumors have small or collapsed vessels, integrated analysis using CEUS and DCE-MRI allows in vivo identification of tumors with a vascular profile frequently associated with malignant phenotypes. PMID:15967105

  10. Visual assessment of perfusion-diffusion mismatch is inadequate to select patients for thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Bruce C V; Christensen, Søren; Foster, Sarah J; Desmond, Patricia M; Parsons, Mark W; Butcher, Kenneth S; Barber, P Alan; Levi, Christopher R; Bladin, Christopher F; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Davis, Stephen M

    2010-01-01

    For MR perfusion-diffusion mismatch to be clinically useful as a means of selecting patients for thrombolysis, it needs to occur in real time at the MRI console. Visual mismatch assessment has been used clinically and in trials but has not been systematically validated. We compared the accuracy of visually rating console-generated images with offline volumetric measurements using data from the Echoplanar Imaging Thrombolytic Evaluation Trial (EPITHET). Perfusion time-to-peak (TTP) and diffusion-weighted images (DWI) (as generated by commercial MRI console software) and T(max) perfusion maps (which required offline calculation) were visually rated. Perfusion-diffusion mismatch, defined as a ratio of perfusion:diffusion lesion volume of >1.2, was independently scored by 1 expert and 2 inexperienced raters blinded to calculated volumes and clinical information. Visual mismatch was compared with region-of-interest-based volumetric calculation, which was used as the gold standard. Volumetric calculation demonstrated perfusion-diffusion mismatch in 85/99 patients. Visual TTP-DWI mismatch was correctly classified by the experienced rater in 82% of the cases (sensitivity: 0.86; specificity: 0.54) compared to 73% for the inexperienced raters (sensitivity: 0.75; specificity: 0.57). The interrater reliability for TTP-DWI mismatch was moderate (kappa = 0.50). Visual T(max)-DWI mismatch performed better (agreement - 93 and 87%, sensitivity - 95 and 88%, specificity - 77 and 82% for the experienced and inexperienced raters, respectively). The assessment of visual TTP-DWI mismatch at the MRI console is insufficiently reliable for use in clinical trials. Differences in perfusion analysis technique and visual inaccuracies combine to make visual TTP-DWI mismatch substantially different to volumetric T(max)-DWI mismatch. Automated software that applies perfusion thresholds may improve the reproducibility of real-time mismatch assessment. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Perfusion Bioreactor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1990-01-01

    Perfusion bioreactor module, self-contained, closed-loop cell-culture system that operates in microgravity or on Earth. Equipment supports growth or long-term maintenance of cultures of human or other fragile cells for experiments in basic cell biology or process technology. Designed to support proliferation (initially at exponential rates of growth) of cells in complex growth medium and to maintain confluent cells in defined medium under conditions optimized to permit or encourage selected functions of cells, including secretion of products of cells into medium.

  12. Dynamic contrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted perfusion MRI (DSC-MRI) in a glioma model of the rat brain using a conventional receive-only surface coil with a inner diameter of 47 mm at a clinical 1.5 T scanner.

    PubMed

    Ulmer, Stephan; Reeh, Matthias; Krause, Joerg; Herdegen, Thomas; Heldt-Feindt, Janka; Jansen, Olav; Rohr, Axel

    2008-07-30

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in animal models is usually performed in expensive dedicated small bore animal scanners of limited availability. In the present study a standard clinical 1.5 T MR scanner was used for morphometric and dynamic contrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted MR imaging (DSC-MRI) of a glioma model of the rat brain. Ten male Wistar rats were examined with coronal T2-weighted, and T1-weighted images (matrix 128 x 128, FOV 64 mm) after implantation of an intracerebral tumor xenografts (C6) using a conventional surface coil. For DSC-MRI a T2*-weighted sequence (TR/TE=30/14 ms, matrix 64 x 64, FOV 90 mm; slice thickness of 1.5mm) was performed. Regions of interest were defined within the tumor and the non-affected contralateral hemisphere and the mean transit time (MTT) was determined. Tumor dimensions in MR predicted well its real size as proven by histology. The MTT of contrast agent passing through the brain was significantly decelerated in the tumor compared to the unaffected hemisphere (p<0.001, paired t-test), which is most likely due to the leakage of contrast agent through the disrupted blood brain barrier. This setup offers advanced MR imaging of small animals without the need for dedicated animal scanners or dedicated custom-made coils.

  13. Recognition of American Sign Language (ASL) Classifiers in a Planetarium Using a Head-Mounted Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintz, Eric G.; Jones, Michael; Lawler, Jeannette; Bench, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    A traditional accommodation for the deaf or hard-of-hearing in a planetarium show is some type of captioning system or a signer on the floor. Both of these have significant drawbacks given the nature of a planetarium show. Young audience members who are deaf likely don't have the reading skills needed to make a captioning system effective. A signer on the floor requires light which can then splash onto the dome. We have examined the potential of using a Head-Mounted Display (HMD) to provide an American Sign Language (ASL) translation. Our preliminary test used a canned planetarium show with a pre-recorded sound track. Since many astronomical objects don't have official ASL signs, the signer had to use classifiers to describe the different objects. Since these are not official signs, these classifiers provided a way to test to see if students were picking up the information using the HMD.We will present results that demonstrate that the use of HMDs is at least as effective as projecting a signer on the dome. This also showed that the HMD could provide the necessary accommodation for students for whom captioning was ineffective. We will also discuss the current effort to provide a live signer without the light splash effect and our early results on teaching effectiveness with HMDs.This work is partially supported by funding from the National Science Foundation grant IIS-1124548 and the Sorenson Foundation.

  14. Sola ASL in Spectralite strikes the perfect balance between cosmetics and optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machol, Steven; Modglin, Luan

    1991-12-01

    The most rapidly growing segment of the ophthalmic lens market is the 'thin and light' segment. A major force for this growth has been the consumer, who wants thinner, lighter and better looking eyewear. In fact, the consumer demand for thin and light lenses increased by over 44% last year. There are essentially three options that allow thinner, lighter and flatter (more cosmetically appealing) lenses. These include: (1) a higher index material (higher than standard CR-39 registered or glass), (2) an aspheric design, or (3) a combination of both. However, current high index materials have certain properties that can affect the optical performance and ease of processing of spectacle lenses. Also, most current aspheric designs benefit only hyperopes, which represent about 30% of the spectacle lens wearers. Sola's ASL aspheric single vision lens in Spectralite combines a patented new high-index material with a specially flattened and aspheric design. This unique combination optimizes the traditional thin, light, and cosmetic benefits of high index while achieving optical performance comparable to CR-39. And, unlike other aspheric lenses, ASL in Spectralite is available in both plus and minus prescriptions, allowing you to meet the needs of more patients than ever before.

  15. Directionality in ASL-English interpreting: Accuracy and articulation quality in L1 and L2

    PubMed Central

    Nicodemus, Brenda; Emmorey, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Among spoken language interpreters, a long-standing question regarding directionality is whether interpretations are better when working into one’s native language (L1) or into one’s ‘active’ non-native language (L2). In contrast to studies that support working into L1, signed language interpreters report a preference for working into L2. Accordingly, we investigated whether signed language interpreters actually perform better when interpreting into their L2 (American Sign Language) or into their L1 (English). Interpretations by 30 interpreters (15 novice, 15 expert), delivered under experimental conditions, were assessed on accuracy (semantic content) and articulation quality (flow, speed, and prosody). For both measures, novices scored significantly better when interpreting into English (L1); experts were equally accurate, and showed similar articulation quality, in both directions. The results for the novice interpreters support the hypothesis that the difficulty of L2 production drives interpreting performance in relation to directionality. Findings also indicate a disconnect between direction preference and interpreting performance. Novices’ perception of their ASL production ability may be distorted because they can default to fingerspelling and transcoding. Weakness in self-monitoring of signing may also lead novices to overrate their ASL skills. Interpreter educators should stress misperceptions of signing proficiency that arise from available, but inappropriate, strategies. PMID:28855844

  16. Harmonic analysis of perfusion pumps.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, F Carroll; Donovan, F M; Townsley, Mary I

    2003-12-01

    The controversy over the use of nonpulsatile versus pulsatile pumps for maintenance of normal organ function during ex vivo perfusion has continued for many years, but resolution has been limited by lack of a congruent mathematical definition of pulsatility. We hypothesized that the waveform frequency and amplitude, as well as the underlying mean distending pressure are all key parameters controlling vascular function. Using discrete Fourier Analysis, our data demonstrate the complexity of the pulmonary arterial pressure waveform in vivo and the failure of commonly available perfusion pumps to mimic in vivo dynamics. In addition, our data show that the key harmonic signatures are intrinsic to the perfusion pumps, are similar for flow and pressure waveforms, and are unchanged by characteristics of the downstream perfusion circuit or perfusate viscosity.

  17. Quantifying Cerebellum Grey Matter and White Matter Perfusion Using Pulsed Arterial Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiufeng; Sarkar, Subhendra N.; Purdy, David E.; Briggs, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate quantification of cerebellum cerebral blood flow (CBF), studies were performed to systematically optimize arterial spin labeling (ASL) parameters for measuring cerebellum perfusion, segment cerebellum to obtain separate CBF values for grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM), and compare FAIR ASST to PICORE. Cerebellum GM and WM CBF were measured with optimized ASL parameters using FAIR ASST and PICORE in five subjects. Influence of volume averaging in voxels on cerebellar grey and white matter boundaries was minimized by high-probability threshold masks. Cerebellar CBF values determined by FAIR ASST were 43.8 ± 5.1 mL/100 g/min for GM and 27.6 ± 4.5 mL/100 g/min for WM. Quantitative perfusion studies indicated that CBF in cerebellum GM is 1.6 times greater than that in cerebellum WM. Compared to PICORE, FAIR ASST produced similar CBF estimations but less subtraction error and lower temporal, spatial, and intersubject variability. These are important advantages for detecting group and/or condition differences in CBF values. PMID:24949416

  18. Towards the identification of multi-parametric quantitative MRI biomarkers in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Rapacchi, Stanislas; Smith, Robert X; Wang, Yi; Yan, Lirong; Sigalov, Victor; Krasileva, Kate E; Karpouzas, George; Plotnik, Adam; Sayre, James; Hernandez, Elizabeth; Verma, Ajay; Burkly, Linda; Wisniacki, Nicolas; Torrington, Jaime; He, Xiang; Hu, Peng; Chiao, Ping-Chun; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-11-01

    To identify potential biomarkers of the renal impairment in lupus nephritis using a multi-parametric renal quantitative MRI (qMRI) protocol including diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD), arterial spin labeling (ASL) and T1rho MRI between a cohort of healthy volunteers and lupus nephritis (LN) patients. The renal qMRI protocol was performed twice with repositioning in between on 10 LN patients and 10 matched controls at 1.5 T. Navigator-gated and breath-hold acquisitions followed by non-rigid image registration were used to control respiratory motion. The repeatability of the 4 MRI modalities was evaluated with the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and within-subject coefficient of variation (wsCV). Unpaired t-test and stepwise logistic regression were carried out to evaluate qMRI parameters between the LN and control groups. The reproducibility of the 4 qMRI modalities ranged from moderate to good (ICC=0.4-0.91, wsCV≤12%) with a few exceptions. T1rho MRI and ASL renal blood flow (RBF) demonstrated significant differences between the LN and control groups. Stepwise logistic regression yielded only one significant parameter (medullar T1rho) in differentiating LN from control groups with 95% accuracy. A reasonable degree of test-retest repeatability and accuracy of a multi-parametric renal qMRI protocol has been demonstrated in healthy volunteers and LN subjects. T1rho and ASL RBF are promising imaging biomarkers of LN. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Health Information National Trends Survey in American Sign Language (HINTS-ASL): Protocol for the Cultural Adaptation and Linguistic Validation of a National Survey.

    PubMed

    Kushalnagar, Poorna; Harris, Raychelle; Paludneviciene, Raylene; Hoglind, TraciAnn

    2017-09-13

    The Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) collects nationally representative data about the American's public use of health-related information. This survey is available in English and Spanish, but not in American Sign Language (ASL). Thus, the exclusion of ASL users from these national health information survey studies has led to a significant gap in knowledge of Internet usage for health information access in this underserved and understudied population. The objectives of this study are (1) to culturally adapt and linguistically translate the HINTS items to ASL (HINTS-ASL); and (2) to gather information about deaf people's health information seeking behaviors across technology-mediated platforms. We modified the standard procedures developed at the US National Center for Health Statistics Cognitive Survey Laboratory to culturally adapt and translate HINTS items to ASL. Cognitive interviews were conducted to assess clarity and delivery of these HINTS-ASL items. Final ASL video items were uploaded to a protected online survey website. The HINTS-ASL online survey has been administered to over 1350 deaf adults (ages 18 to 90 and up) who use ASL. Data collection is ongoing and includes deaf adult signers across the United States. Some items from HINTS item bank required cultural adaptation for use with deaf people who use accessible services or technology. A separate item bank for deaf-related experiences was created, reflecting deaf-specific technology such as sharing health-related ASL videos through social network sites and using video remote interpreting services in health settings. After data collection is complete, we will conduct a series of analyses on deaf people's health information seeking behaviors across technology-mediated platforms. HINTS-ASL is an accessible health information national trends survey, which includes a culturally appropriate set of items that are relevant to the experiences of deaf people who use ASL. The final HINTS-ASL

  20. Altered Cerebral Perfusion in Executive, Affective, and Motor Networks During Adolescent Depression

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tiffany C.; Wu, Jing; Shin, David D.; Liu, Thomas T.; Tapert, Susan F.; Yang, Guang; Connolly, Colm G.; Frank, Guido K.W.; Max, Jeffrey E.; Wolkowitz, Owen; Eisendrath, Stuart; Hoeft, Fumiko; Banerjee, Dipavo; Hood, Korey; Hendren, Robert L.; Paulus, Martin P.; Simmons, Alan N.; Yang, Tony T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective While substantial literature has reported regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) abnormalities in adults with depression, these studies commonly necessitated the injection of radioisotopes into subjects. The recent development of arterial spin labeling (ASL), however, allows for noninvasive measurements of rCBF. Currently, no published ASL studies have examined cerebral perfusion in adolescents with depression. Thus, the aim of the present study was to examine baseline cerebral perfusion in adolescent depression using a newly developed ASL technique: pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL). Method 25 medication-naive adolescents (ages 13–17 years) diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 26 well-matched controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging. Baseline rCBF was measured via a novel PCASL method that optimizes tagging efficiency. Results Voxel-based whole brain analyses revealed significant frontal, limbic, paralimbic, and cingulate hypoperfusion in the group with depression (p<0.05, corrected). Hyperperfusion was also observed within the subcallosal cingulate, putamen, and fusiform gyrus (p<0.05, corrected). Similarly, region-of-interest analyses revealed amygdalar and insular hypoperfusion in the group with depression, as well as hyperperfusion in the putamen and superior insula (p<0.05, corrected). Conclusions Adolescents with depression and healthy adolescents appear to differ on rCBF in executive, affective, and motor networks. Dysfunction in these regions may contribute to the cognitive, emotional, and psychomotor symptoms commonly present in adolescent depression. These findings point to possible biomarkers for adolescent depression that could inform early interventions and treatments and establishes a methodology for using PCASL to noninvasively measure rCBF in clinical and healthy adolescent populations. PMID:24074474

  1. MRI assessment of local acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Weber-Donat, G; Amabile, J-C; Lahutte-Auboin, M; Potet, J; Baccialone, J; Bey, E; Teriitehau, C; Laroche, P

    2012-12-01

    To describe local acute radiation syndrome and its radiological imaging characteristics. We performed a retrospective study of patients who had suffered skin and deeper radiation damage who were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We compared the clinical findings, C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and MRI results. A total of 22 MRI examinations were performed between 2005 and 2010 in 7 patients; 6 patients had increased CRP levels and MRI abnormalities. They were treated by surgery and local cellular therapy. One patient had no CRP or MRI abnormalities, and had a spontaneous good outcome. Eighteen abnormal MR examinations demonstrated high STIR signal and/or abnormal enhancement in the dermis and muscle tissues. Three MRI examinations demonstrated skeletal abnormalities, consistent with radionecrosis. The four normal MRI examinations were associated only with minor clinical manifestations such as pain and pigmentation disorders. MRI seems to be a useful and promising imaging investigation in radiation burns management i.e. initial lesion evaluation, treatment evaluation and complication diagnosis. MRI findings correlated perfectly with clinical stage and no false negative examinations were obtained. In particular, the association between normal MRI and low CRP level seems to be related to good outcome without specific treatment. Local acute radiation syndrome (radioepidermitis) mainly affects the skin and superficial tissues. MRI findings correspond with clinical stage (with a strong negative predictive value). MRI outperformed X-ray examination for the diagnosis of bone radionecrosis. Diffusion-weighted imaging shows low ADC in bone and soft tissue necrosis. Perfusion sequence allows assessment of tissue microcirculation impairment.

  2. Vocabulary Use by Low, Moderate, and High ASL-Proficient Writers Compared to Hearing ESL and Monolingual Speakers.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Jenny L; Morgan, Dianne; DiGello, Elizabeth; Wiles, Jill; Rivers, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    The written English vocabulary of 72 deaf elementary school students of various proficiency levels in American Sign Language (ASL) was compared with the performance of 60 hearing English-as-a-second-language (ESL) speakers and 61 hearing monolingual speakers of English, all of similar age. Students were asked to retell "The Tortoise and the Hare" story (previously viewed on video) in a writing activity. Writing samples were later scored for total number of words, use of words known to be highly frequent in children's writing, redundancy in writing, and use of English function words. All deaf writers showed significantly lower use of function words as compared to their hearing peers. Low-ASL-proficient students demonstrated a highly formulaic writing style, drawing mostly on high-frequency words and repetitive use of a limited range of function words. The moderate- and high-ASL-proficient deaf students' writing was not formulaic and incorporated novel, low-frequency vocabulary to communicate their thoughts. The moderate- and high-ASL students' performance revealed a departure from findings one might expect based on previous studies with deaf writers and their vocabulary use. The writing of the deaf writers also differed from the writing of hearing ESL speakers. Implications for deaf education and literacy instruction are discussed, with special attention to the fact that ASL-proficient, deaf second-language learners of English may be approaching English vocabulary acquisition in ways that are different from hearing ESL learners.

  3. Functional lung imaging using hyperpolarized gas MRI.

    PubMed

    Fain, Sean B; Korosec, Frank R; Holmes, James H; O'Halloran, Rafael; Sorkness, Ronald L; Grist, Thomas M

    2007-05-01

    The noninvasive assessment of lung function using imaging is increasingly of interest for the study of lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Hyperpolarized gas MRI (HP MRI) has demonstrated the ability to detect changes in ventilation, perfusion, and lung microstructure that appear to be associated with both normal lung development and disease progression. The physical characteristics of HP gases and their application to MRI are presented with an emphasis on current applications. Clinical investigations using HP MRI to study asthma, COPD, cystic fibrosis, pediatric chronic lung disease, and lung transplant are reviewed. Recent advances in polarization, pulse sequence development for imaging with Xe-129, and prototype low magnetic field systems dedicated to lung imaging are highlighted as areas of future development for this rapidly evolving technology.

  4. Ex vivo lung perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Machuca, Tiago N.

    2014-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  5. Modelling Brain Temperature and Perfusion for Cerebral Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blowers, Stephen; Valluri, Prashant; Marshall, Ian; Andrews, Peter; Harris, Bridget; Thrippleton, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Brain temperature relies heavily on two aspects: i) blood perfusion and porous heat transport through tissue and ii) blood flow and heat transfer through embedded arterial and venous vasculature. Moreover brain temperature cannot be measured directly unless highly invasive surgical procedures are used. A 3D two-phase fluid-porous model for mapping flow and temperature in brain is presented with arterial and venous vessels extracted from MRI scans. Heat generation through metabolism is also included. The model is robust and reveals flow and temperature maps in unprecedented 3D detail. However, the Karmen-Kozeny parameters of the porous (tissue) phase need to be optimised for expected perfusion profiles. In order to optimise the K-K parameters a reduced order two-phase model is developed where 1D vessels are created with a tree generation algorithm embedded inside a 3D porous domain. Results reveal that blood perfusion is a strong function of the porosity distribution in the tissue. We present a qualitative comparison between the simulated perfusion maps and those obtained clinically. We also present results studying the effect of scalp cooling on core brain temperature and preliminary results agree with those observed clinically.

  6. Intrahemispheric Perfusion in Chronic Stroke-Induced Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Walenski, Matthew; Chen, YuFen; Caplan, David; Rapp, Brenda; Grunewald, Kristin; Nunez, Mia; Zinbarg, Richard; Parrish, Todd B.

    2017-01-01

    Stroke-induced alterations in cerebral blood flow (perfusion) may contribute to functional language impairments and recovery in chronic aphasia. Using MRI, we examined perfusion in the right and left hemispheres of 35 aphasic and 16 healthy control participants. Across 76 regions (38 per hemisphere), no significant between-subjects differences were found in the left, whereas blood flow in the right was increased in the aphasic compared to the control participants. Region-of-interest (ROI) analyses showed a varied pattern of hypo- and hyperperfused regions across hemispheres in the aphasic participants; however, there were no significant correlations between perfusion values and language abilities in these regions. These patterns may reflect autoregulatory changes in blood flow following stroke and/or increases in general cognitive effort, rather than maladaptive language processing. We also examined blood flow in perilesional tissue, finding the greatest hypoperfusion close to the lesion (within 0–6 mm), with greater hypoperfusion in this region compared to more distal regions. In addition, hypoperfusion in this region was significantly correlated with language impairment. These findings underscore the need to consider cerebral perfusion as a factor contributing to language deficits in chronic aphasia as well as recovery of language function. PMID:28357141

  7. Knee MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  8. Shoulder MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  9. Shoulder MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the shoulder uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radio waves redirect alignment of hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ...

  10. Knee MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the knee uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radio waves redirect alignment of hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ...

  11. The search for neuroimaging biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease with advanced MRI techniques.

    PubMed

    Li, Tie-Qiang; Wahlund, Lars-Olof

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this review is to examine the recent literature on using advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques for finding neuroimaging biomarkers that are sensitive to the detection of risks for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since structural MRI techniques, such as brain structural volumetry and voxel-based morphometry (VBM), have been widely used for AD studies and extensively reviewed, we will only briefly touch on the topics of volumetry and morphometry. The focus of the current review is about the more recent developments in the search for AD neuroimaging biomarkers with functional MRI (fMRI), resting-state functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), arterial spin-labeling (ASL), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS).

  12. Perfusion measurement in acute pancreatitis using dynamic perfusion MDCT.

    PubMed

    Bize, Pierre E; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Christoph D; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2006-01-01

    Our objective was to determine whether MDCT with perfusion imaging could help in assessing the severity of acute pancreatitis in the initial phase of the disease. One hundred six patients with abdominal pain were prospectively enrolled in this study. Patients were separated into two groups: P1 (severe) and P2 (mild) acute pancreatitis. Mean perfusion value was 24.8 mL/100 mL/min in the P1 group and 50.5 mL/100 mL/min in the P2 group (p = 0.0016, significant). Our preliminary data suggest that pancreatic perfusion measurement using MDCT with perfusion imaging could help in assessing the severity of acute pancreatitis.

  13. Cerebral-Body Perfusion Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    compared to the 0.5g curve) fall in flow. Fig. 9b, showing the 5g case, strongly suggests a possible, so-called, " luxury perfusion ", in which natural...as the luxury perfusion situation which bypasses the flow with the nutrients it carries (through newly opened collaterals) and result in a "blackout...89-0054 CEREBRAL-BODY PERFUSION MODEL S. Sorek’, J. Bear2, and M., Feinsod3 in Collaboration with K. Allen4, L. Bunt5 and S. Ben-IHaiM6 July 1990

  14. MRI renaissance.

    PubMed

    Hensley, S

    1997-12-01

    A few years ago, magnetic resonance imaging was healthcare's version of a foreign sports car-flashy, expensive and impractical. Now, after years in the doldrums, sales of MRI systems are roaring back. An aging fleet of MRI scanners due for replacement and a hearty increase in doctors' use of the versatile imaging tools are combining to fuel the surge in demand, vendors and customers say.

  15. The gestures ASL signers use tell us when they are ready to learn math.

    PubMed

    Goldin-Meadow, Susan; Shield, Aaron; Lenzen, Daniel; Herzig, Melissa; Padden, Carol

    2012-06-01

    The manual gestures that hearing children produce when explaining their answers to math problems predict whether they will profit from instruction in those problems. We ask here whether gesture plays a similar role in deaf children, whose primary communication system is in the manual modality. Forty ASL-signing deaf children explained their solutions to math problems and were then given instruction in those problems. Children who produced many gestures conveying different information from their signs (gesture-sign mismatches) were more likely to succeed after instruction than children who produced few, suggesting that mismatch can occur within-modality, and paving the way for using gesture-based teaching strategies with deaf learners. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Action-Sentence Compatibility Effect in ASL: the role of semantics vs. perception*

    PubMed Central

    SECORA, KRISTEN; EMMOREY, KAREN

    2015-01-01

    Embodied theories of cognition propose that humans use sensorimotor systems in processing language. The Action-Sentence Compatibility Effect (ACE) refers to the finding that motor responses are facilitated after comprehending sentences that imply movement in the same direction. In sign languages there is a potential conflict between sensorimotor systems and linguistic semantics: movement away from the signer is perceived as motion toward the comprehender. We examined whether perceptual processing of sign movement or verb semantics modulate the ACE. Deaf ASL signers performed a semantic judgment task while viewing signed sentences expressing toward or away motion. We found a significant congruency effect relative to the verb’s semantics rather than to the perceived motion. This result indicates that (a) the motor system is involved in the comprehension of a visual–manual language, and (b) motor simulations for sign language are modulated by verb semantics rather than by the perceived visual motion of the hands. PMID:26052352

  17. Teachers' perceptions of promoting sign language phonological awareness in an ASL/English bilingual program.

    PubMed

    Crume, Peter K

    2013-10-01

    The National Reading Panel emphasizes that spoken language phonological awareness (PA) developed at home and school can lead to improvements in reading performance in young children. However, research indicates that many deaf children are good readers even though they have limited spoken language PA. Is it possible that some deaf students benefit from teachers who promote sign language PA instead? The purpose of this qualitative study is to examine teachers' beliefs and instructional practices related to sign language PA. A thematic analysis is conducted on 10 participant interviews at an ASL/English bilingual school for the deaf to understand their views and instructional practices. The findings reveal that the participants had strong beliefs in developing students' structural knowledge of signs and used a variety of instructional strategies to build students' knowledge of sign structures in order to promote their language and literacy skills.

  18. Distributed Perfusion Educational Model: A Shift in Perfusion Economic Realities

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Jon W.; Evans, Edward L.; Hoerr, Harry R.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: In recent years, a steady decline in the number of perfusion education programs in the United States has been noted. At the same time, there has been a parallel decline in the number of students graduated from perfusion educational programs in the United States. Also, as noted by several authors, there has been an increase in demand for perfusion graduates. The decline in programs and graduates has also been noted in anesthesia and surgical residency programs. The shift is caused by a combination of economic and clinical factors. First, decreased reimbursement has led to reallocation of hospital resources. Second, the original enthusiasm for beating heart coronary artery bypass surgery was grossly overestimated and has led to further reallocation of hospital resources and denigration of cardiopulmonary bypass. This paper describes two models of perfusion education programs: serial perfusion education model (SPEM) and the distributed perfusion education model (DPEM). Arguments are presented that the SPEM has some serious limitations and challenges for long-term economic survival. The authors feel the DPEM along with dependence on tuition funding can survive the current clinical and economic conditions and allow the profession to adapt to changes in scope of practice. PMID:16524152

  19. A New Coronary Model for MRI Perfusion Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    heart. The first results are obtained for low and high input flows in a normal heart. The last one is a simulation of an ischemic heart behavior. The...sectional area of the vessel. And, we assume that the resistance R to flow is given approximately by the Poiseuille law. The compliance C of a...description of the blood flow is used. The compartments taken into account are the arteries, capillaries, lymphatic and venous systems, extravascular

  20. Localized Spatio-Temporal Constraints for Accelerated CMR Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Akçakaya, Mehmet; Basha, Tamer A.; Pflugi, Silvio; Foppa, Murilo; Kissinger, Kraig V.; Hauser, Thomas H.; Nezafat, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate an image reconstruction technique for cardiac MRI (CMR)perfusion that utilizes localized spatio-temporal constraints. Methods CMR perfusion plays an important role in detecting myocardial ischemia in patients with coronary artery disease. Breath-hold k-t based image acceleration techniques are typically used in CMR perfusion for superior spatial/temporal resolution, and improved coverage. In this study, we propose a novel compressed sensing based image reconstruction technique for CMR perfusion, with applicability to free-breathing examinations. This technique uses local spatio-temporal constraints by regularizing image patches across a small number of dynamics. The technique is compared to conventional dynamic-by-dynamic reconstruction, and sparsity regularization using a temporal principal-component (pc) basis, as well as zerofilled data in multi-slice 2D and 3D CMR perfusion. Qualitative image scores are used (1=poor, 4=excellent) to evaluate the technique in 3D perfusion in 10 patients and 5 healthy subjects. On 4 healthy subjects, the proposed technique was also compared to a breath-hold multi-slice 2D acquisition with parallel imaging in terms of signal intensity curves. Results The proposed technique results in images that are superior in terms of spatial and temporal blurring compared to the other techniques, even in free-breathing datasets. The image scores indicate a significant improvement compared to other techniques in 3D perfusion (2.8±0.5 vs. 2.3±0.5 for x-pc regularization, 1.7±0.5 for dynamic-by-dynamic, 1.1±0.2 for zerofilled). Signal intensity curves indicate similar dynamics of uptake between the proposed method with a 3D acquisition and the breath-hold multi-slice 2D acquisition with parallel imaging. Conclusion The proposed reconstruction utilizes sparsity regularization based on localized information in both spatial and temporal domains for highly-accelerated CMR perfusion with potential utility in free

  1. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan involves two nuclear scan tests to measure breathing (ventilation) and circulation ( ... In: Mettler FA, Guiberteau MJ, eds. Essentials of Nuclear Medicine Imaging . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  2. WE-B-BRD-00: MRI for Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    The use of MRI in radiation therapy is rapidly increasing. Applications vary from the MRI simulator, to the MRI fused with CT, and to the integrated MRI+RT system. Compared with the standard MRI QA, a broader scope of QA features has to be defined in order to maximize the benefits of using MRI in radiation therapy. These QA features include geometric fidelity, image registration, motion management, cross-system alignment, and hardware interference. Advanced MRI techniques require a specific type of QA, as they are being widely used in radiation therapy planning, dose calculations, post-implant dosimetry, and prognoses. A vigorous and adaptive QA program is crucial to defining the responsibility of the entire radiation therapy group and detecting deviations from the performance of high-quality treatment. As a drastic departure from CT simulation, MRI simulation requires changes in the work flow of treatment planning and image guidance. MRI guided radiotherapy platforms are being developed and commercialized to take the advantage of the advance in knowledge, technology and clinical experience. This symposium will from an educational perspective discuss the scope and specific issues related to MRI guided radiotherapy. Learning Objectives: Understand the difference between a standard and a radiotherapy-specific MRI QA program. Understand the effects of MRI artifacts (geometric distortion and motion) on radiotherapy. Understand advanced MRI techniques (ultrashort echo, fast MRI including dynamic MRI and 4DMRI, diffusion, perfusion, and MRS) and related QA. Understand the methods to prepare MRI for treatment planning (electron density assignment, multimodality image registration, segmentation and motion management). Current status of MRI guided treatment platforms. Dr. Jihong Wang has a research grant with Elekta-MRL project. Dr. Ke Sheng receives research grants from Varian Medical systems.

  3. Acute effects of alcohol on brain perfusion monitored with arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging in young adults.

    PubMed

    Marxen, Michael; Gan, Gabriela; Schwarz, Daniel; Mennigen, Eva; Pilhatsch, Maximilian; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Guenther, Matthias; Smolka, Michael N

    2014-03-01

    While a number of studies have established that moderate doses of alcohol increase brain perfusion, the time course of such an increase as a function of breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) has not yet been investigated, and studies differ about regional effects. Using arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated (1) the time course of the perfusion increase during a 15-minute linear increase of BrAC up to 0.6 g/kg followed by a steady exposure of 100 minutes, (2) the regional distribution, (3) a potential gender effect, and (4) the temporal stability of perfusion effects. In 48 young adults who participated in the Dresden longitudinal study on alcohol effects in young adults, we observed (1) a 7% increase of global perfusion as compared with placebo and that perfusion and BrAC are tightly coupled in time, (2) that the increase reaches significance in most regions of the brain, (3) that the effect is stronger in women than in men, and (4) that an acute tolerance effect is not observable on the time scale of 2 hours. Larger studies are needed to investigate the origin and the consequences of the effect, as well as the correlates of inter-subject variations.

  4. Influence of pulmonary regurgitation inequality on differential perfusion of the lungs in tetralogy of Fallot after repair: a phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and perfusion scintigraphy study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Ting; Huang, Yi-Luan; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Huang, Ju-Tung; Peng, Nan-Jing; Pan, Jun-Yen; Huang, Jer-Shyung; Yang, Tsung-Lung

    2007-05-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of pulmonary regurgitation inequality on differential perfusion of the lungs in tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) after repair. Asymmetry of lung perfusion is one of the best predictors of outcome in TOF after repair. A recent phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) study found prominent regurgitation inequality between the bilateral pulmonary arteries in TOF after repair. Forty-three TOF post-repair patients (median age = 51 months, 31 men) received PC-MRI and 99mTc-labeled macroaggregates of albumin perfusion scintigraphy (PS) in the same day. We took PC-MRI measurements of forward flow volume (FFV), backward flow volume (BFV), and net flow volume (NFV) (NFV = FFV - BFV) and regurgitation fraction (RF) (RF = BFV/FFV) at the left and right pulmonary arteries (LPA and RPA). The differential perfusion of the left lung (L%) (L% = left lung/left + right lung) as calculated by NFV ratio, by FFV ratio of PC-MRI, and by PS were compared. The discrepancy between L% by NFV versus L% by PS was affected by the severity of RF of LPA (r = -0.51, p = 0.001); agreement between L% by NFV versus L% by PS was good (intraclass correlation coefficient [Ri] = 0.87) if RF of LPA <0.4 (n = 23) but downgraded (Ri = 0.51) and underestimated the L% (median of error = -14%, range = -25.3% to 5.5%) if RF of LPA > or =0.4 (n = 20). In contrast, agreement between L% by FFV versus L% by PS was high and unaffected by RF of LPA (Ri = 0.94, 0.92, respectively). While integrating PC-MRI of pulmonary artery as a comprehensive MRI evaluation of TOF after repair, conventional NFV ratio method tended to underestimate the left lung perfusion and may lead to unnecessary intervention. The FFV ratio method should be used for precise assessment of differential lung perfusion.

  5. Optimisation of pulsed and pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling MRI techniques: A phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusoff, Norain; Zukhi, Jihan; Rusli, Awatif; Zainon, Rafidah

    2017-05-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) MRI is a non-invasive technique using a freely diffusible intrinsic tracer. The main objective of this study is to evaluate two different techniques of ASL MRI; pulsed ASL (PASL) and pseudo-continuous ASL (PCASL) in obtaining the best signal by manipulating the different imaging parameters. We used a fabricated Perspex flow phantom that is magnetically susceptible. The phantom has a straight tube that mimics carotid artery in adult patients and a U-shaped tube with 75% stenosis. We used a mixture of 60:40 distilled water and glycerol respectively as a substitute to blood. The fabricated phantom was scanned with 1.5T and 3T MRI Scanner using PCASL technique and PASL respectively. Two main imaging parameters were studied which were the field of view (FOV) and slice thickness (ST) to obtain the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the region of interests. The 1.5 T PCASL technique gave SNR values of (13, 22, 30.1) for ST (5, 7, 9 mm) and FOV 240. When higher FOV = 320 was selected, the SNR values were (26.8, 15, 37) for different ST (5, 7, 9 mm). The 3.0 T PASL technique gave the SNR values of (9, 9.3, 11) for ST (5, 7, 9mm) and FOV 240mm. In the higher FOV = 320 mm, we obtained SNR values of (15.2, 17.5, 37.2) for ST (5, 7, 9 mm). As a conclusion, the images quality which can be measured by SNR value is affected by types of ASL and also different parameters.

  6. Nifedipine increases fetoplacental perfusion.

    PubMed

    Karahanoglu, Ertugrul; Altinboga, Orhan; Akpinar, Funda; Demirdag, Erhan; Ozdemirci, Safak; Akyol, Aysegul; Yalvac, Serdar

    2017-01-01

    Our aim is to evaluate the effect of nifedipine on fetoplacental hemodynamic parameters. A retrospective study was conducted at a tertiary center with 30 patients for whom nifedipine treatment was used as a tocolytic therapy for preterm labor. Initiation of this treatment was at 31.6±2.5 weeks of gestation. We combined the pulse Doppler imaging parameters with grayscale imaging via the Bernoulli theorem, which is called the "continuity equation", to get the fetoplacental perfusion (FPP). Evaluated parameters were the resistance index (RI), the pulsatility index (PI), systole/diastole ratios (S/D), the velocity-time integral of the umbilical artery (VTI), the radius of the umbilical artery, the peak systolic velocity and the mean pressure gradient in the umbilical artery. From these parameters, the FPP was acquired. We found that the RI, the PI and the S/D ratio did not change after treatment with nifedipine. The mean pressure gradient, the VTI and the peak systolic velocity increased after treatment with nifedipine. Nifedipine increases FPP from 166±73.81 beat.cm3/min to 220±83.3 beat.cm3/min. Although nifedipine had no effect on the PI, the RI or the S/D, it increased the mean pressure gradient, the VTI and FPP.

  7. CAD of myocardial perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Corstiaan J.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2007-03-01

    Our purpose is in the automated evaluation of the physiological relevance of lesions in coronary angiograms. We aim to extract as much as possible quantitative information about the physiological condition of the heart from standard angiographic image sequences. Coronary angiography is still the gold standard for evaluating and diagnosing coronary abnormalities as it is able to locate precisely the coronary artery lesions. The dimensions of the stenosis can be assessed nowadays successfully with image processing based Quantitative Coronary Angiography (QCA) techniques. Our purpose is to assess the clinical relevance of the pertinent stenosis. We therefore analyze the myocardial perfusion as revealed in standard angiographic image sequences. In a Region-of-Interest (ROI) on the angiogram (without an overlaying major blood vessel) the contrast is measured as a function of time (the so-called time-density curve). The required hyperemic state of exercise is induced artificially by the injection of a vasodilator drug e.g. papaverine. In order to minimize motion artifacts we select based on the recorded ECG signal end-diastolic images in both a basal and a hyperemic run in the same projection to position the ROI. We present the development of the algorithms together with results of a small study of 20 patients which have been catheterized following the standard protocol.

  8. Comparison of Myocardial Perfusion Estimates From Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Four Quantitative Analysis Methods

    PubMed Central

    Pack, Nathan A.; DiBella, Edward V. R.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI has been used to quantify myocardial perfusion in recent years. Published results have varied widely, possibly depending on the method used to analyze the dynamic perfusion data. Here, four quantitative analysis methods (two-compartment modeling, Fermi function modeling, model-independent analysis, and Patlak plot analysis) were implemented and compared for quantifying myocardial perfusion. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data were acquired in 20 human subjects at rest with low-dose (0.019 ± 0.005 mmol/kg) bolus injections of gadolinium. Fourteen of these subjects were also imaged at adenosine stress (0.021 ± 0.005 mmol/kg). Aggregate rest perfusion estimates were not significantly different between all four analysis methods. At stress, perfusion estimates were not significantly different between two-compartment modeling, model-independent analysis, and Patlak plot analysis. Stress estimates from the Fermi model were significantly higher (~20%) than the other three methods. Myocardial perfusion reserve values were not significantly different between all four methods. Model-independent analysis resulted in the lowest model curve-fit errors. When more than just the first pass of data was analyzed, perfusion estimates from two-compartment modeling and model-independent analysis did not change significantly, unlike results from Fermi function modeling. PMID:20577976

  9. Computed tomography perfusion imaging in spectacular shrinking deficit.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivien H; John, Sayona; Mohammad, Yousef; Prabhakaran, Shyam

    2012-02-01

    Spectacular shrinking deficit (SSD) is characterized by abrupt onset of a major hemispheric stroke syndrome, followed by dramatic and rapid improvement. We retrospectively identified patients with SSD diagnosed at our institution between December 1, 2007, and June 30, 2009. We reviewed computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging to determine perfusion defect as a measure of initial ischemic penumbra, and magnetic resonance imaging diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to determine the final infarct core. Among the 472 consecutive ischemic stroke patients, 126 (27%) presented with major hemispheric ischemic stroke syndrome, defined as National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (NIHSS) ≥8 in the territory of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) or internal carotid artery (ICA). Out of these patients, we identified 8 SSD patients with available CTP data. In these 8 patients, the mean time to dramatic recovery was 3.4 hours (range, 0.75-7 hours), and the mean time from onset to CTP was 12.7 hours (range, 3-30 hours). All 8 patients had perfusion abnormalities in portions of the MCA territory (partial MCA territory in 5 patients and complete MCA territory in 3 patients). The mean time from onset to MRI DWI was 15.5 hours (range, 7.9-34 hours). Restricted diffusion was present in all patients in the corresponding MCA distribution. Vascular imaging revealed MCA occlusion in 2 patients. Cervical vascular imaging revealed carotid occlusion in 2 patients and high-grade carotid stenosis in 2 patients. The stroke mechanisms were cardioembolism in 2 patients, large artery in 4 patients, and unknown in 2 patients. Four patients had repeat CTP imaging available that demonstrated eventual resolution of the perfusion defect. SSD is associated with a "shrinking" clinical syndrome and a "shrinking" perfusion pattern on CTP that lags behind clinical recovery. CTP imaging corroborates that a larger territory is at risk in SSD and contributes to better understanding of SSD.

  10. Portable MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  11. Neural Dissociation in the Production of Lexical versus Classifier Signs in ASL: Distinct Patterns of Hemispheric Asymmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickok, Gregory; Pickell, Herbert; Klima, Edward; Bellugi, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    We examine the hemispheric organization for the production of two classes of ASL signs, lexical signs and classifier signs. Previous work has found strong left hemisphere dominance for the production of lexical signs, but several authors have speculated that classifier signs may involve the right hemisphere to a greater degree because they can…

  12. The Development of Antonym Knowledge in American Sign Language (ASL) and Its Relationship to Reading Comprehension in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novogrodsky, Rama; Caldwell-Harris, Catherine; Fish, Sarah; Hoffmeister, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    It is unknown if the developmental path of antonym knowledge in deaf children increases continuously with age and correlates with reading comprehension, as it does in hearing children. In the current study we tested 564 students aged 4-18 on a receptive multiple-choice American Sign Language (ASL) antonym test. A subgroup of 138 students aged 7-18…

  13. Where to Look for American Sign Language (ASL) Sublexical Structure in the Visual World: Reply to Salverda (2016)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Amy M.; Borovsky, Arielle; Hatrak, Marla; Mayberry, Rachel I.

    2016-01-01

    In this reply to Salverda (2016), we address a critique of the claims made in our recent study of real-time processing of American Sign Language (ASL) signs using a novel visual world eye-tracking paradigm (Lieberman, Borovsky, Hatrak, & Mayberry, 2015). Salverda asserts that our data do not support our conclusion that native signers and…

  14. Neural Dissociation in the Production of Lexical versus Classifier Signs in ASL: Distinct Patterns of Hemispheric Asymmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickok, Gregory; Pickell, Herbert; Klima, Edward; Bellugi, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    We examine the hemispheric organization for the production of two classes of ASL signs, lexical signs and classifier signs. Previous work has found strong left hemisphere dominance for the production of lexical signs, but several authors have speculated that classifier signs may involve the right hemisphere to a greater degree because they can…

  15. Changes of renal blood flow after ESWL: assessment by ASL MR imaging, contrast enhanced MR imaging, and renal resistive index.

    PubMed

    Abd Ellah, Mohamed; Kremser, Christian; Pallwein, Leo; Aigner, Friedrich; Schocke, Michael; Peschel, Reinhard; Pedross, Florian; Pinggera, Germar-Michael; Wolf, Christian; Alsharkawy, Mostafa A M; Jaschke, Werner; Frauscher, Ferdinand

    2010-10-01

    The annual incidence of stone formation is increased in the industrialised world. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy is a non-invasive effective treatment of upper urinary tract stones. This study is aimed to evaluate changes of renal blood flow in patients undergoing extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) by arterial spin labeling (ASL) MR imaging, contrast enhanced dynamic MR imaging, and renal resistive index (RI). Thirteen patients with nephrolithiasis were examined using MR imaging and Doppler ultrasound 12h before and 12h after ESWL. ASL sequence was done for both kidneys and followed by contrast enhanced MR imaging. In addition RI Doppler ultrasound measurements were performed. A significant increase in RI (p<0.001) was found in both treated and untreated kidneys. ASL MR imaging also showed significant changes in both kidneys (p<0.001). Contrast enhanced dynamic MR imaging did not show significant changes in the kidneys. ESWL causes changes in RI and ASL MR imaging, which seem to reflect changes in renal blood flow.

  16. Vocabulary Use by Low, Moderate, and High ASL-Proficient Writers Compared to Hearing ESL and Monolingual Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, Jenny L.; Morgan, Dianne; DiGello, Elizabeth; Wiles, Jill; Rivers, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    The written English vocabulary of 72 deaf elementary school students of various proficiency levels in American Sign Language (ASL) was compared with the performance of 60 hearing English-as-a-second-language (ESL) speakers and 61 hearing monolingual speakers of English, all of similar age. Students were asked to retell "The Tortoise and the Hare"…

  17. The Development of Antonym Knowledge in American Sign Language (ASL) and Its Relationship to Reading Comprehension in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novogrodsky, Rama; Caldwell-Harris, Catherine; Fish, Sarah; Hoffmeister, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    It is unknown if the developmental path of antonym knowledge in deaf children increases continuously with age and correlates with reading comprehension, as it does in hearing children. In the current study we tested 564 students aged 4-18 on a receptive multiple-choice American Sign Language (ASL) antonym test. A subgroup of 138 students aged 7-18…

  18. Where to Look for American Sign Language (ASL) Sublexical Structure in the Visual World: Reply to Salverda (2016)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Amy M.; Borovsky, Arielle; Hatrak, Marla; Mayberry, Rachel I.

    2016-01-01

    In this reply to Salverda (2016), we address a critique of the claims made in our recent study of real-time processing of American Sign Language (ASL) signs using a novel visual world eye-tracking paradigm (Lieberman, Borovsky, Hatrak, & Mayberry, 2015). Salverda asserts that our data do not support our conclusion that native signers and…

  19. Estimating the sample size required to detect an arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance imaging perfusion abnormality in voxel-wise group analyses.

    PubMed

    Mersov, Anna M; Crane, David E; Chappell, Michael A; Black, Sandra E; MacIntosh, Bradley J

    2015-04-30

    Voxel-based analyses are pervasive across the range of neuroimaging techniques. In the case of perfusion imaging using arterial spin labelling (ASL), a low signal-to-noise technique, there is a tradeoff between the contrast-to-noise required to detect a perfusion abnormality and its spatial localisation. In exploratory studies, the use of an a priori region of interest (ROI), which has the benefit of averaging multiple voxels, may not be justified. Thus the question considered in this study pertains to the sample size that is required to detect a voxel-level perfusion difference between groups and two algorithms are considered. Empirical 3T ASL data were acquired from 25 older adults and simulations were performed based on the group template cerebral blood flow (CBF) images. General linear model (GLM) and permutation-based algorithms were tested for their ability to detect a predefined hypoperfused ROI. Simulation parameters included: inter and intra-subject variability, degree of hypoperfusion and sample size. The true positive rate was used as a measure of sensitivity. For a modest group perfusion difference, i.e., 10%, 37 participants per group were required when using the permutation-based algorithm, whereas 20 participants were required for the GLM-based algorithm. This study advances the perfusion power calculation literature by considering a voxel-wise analysis with correction for multiple comparison. The sample size requirement to detect group differences decreased exponentially in proportion to increased degree of hypoperfusion. In addition, sensitivity to detect a perfusion abnormality was influenced by the choice of algorithm. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Calf muscle perfusion as measured with magnetic resonance imaging to assess peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Gerd; Bismuth, Jean; Nambi, Vijay; Ballantyne, Christie M; Taylor, Addison A; Lumsden, Alan B; Morrisett, Joel D; Shah, Dipan J

    2016-11-01

    We hypothesized that skeletal muscle perfusion is impaired in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) patients compared to healthy controls and that perfusion patterns exhibit marked differences across five leg muscle compartments including the anterior muscle group (AM), lateral muscle group (LM), deep posterior muscle group (DM), soleus (SM), and the gastrocnemius muscle (GM). A total of 40 individuals (26 PAD patients and 14 healthy controls) underwent contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) utilizing a reactive hyperemia protocol. Muscle perfusion maps were developed for AM, LM, DM, SM, and GM. Perfusion maps were analyzed over the course of 2 min, starting at local pre-contrast arrival, to study early-to-intermediate gadolinium enhancement. PAD patients had a higher fraction of hypointense voxels at pre-contrast arrival for all five muscle compartments compared with healthy controls (p < 0.0005). Among PAD patients, the fraction of hypointense voxels of the AM, LM, and GM were inversely correlated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR; r = -0.509, p = 0.008; r = -0.441, p = 0.024; and r = -0.431, p = 0.028, respectively). CE-MRI-based skeletal leg muscle perfusion is markedly reduced in PAD patients compared with healthy controls and shows heterogeneous patterns across calf muscle compartments.

  1. [Test-retest reliability of 3D spiral fast-spin-echo pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling for cerebral perfusion imaging of subcortical gray matter in healthy adults].

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng-Qi; Chen, Zhi-Ye; Ma, Lin

    2017-09-20

    To evaluate the test-retest reliability of 3D spiral fast-spin-echo (FSE) pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (3D pc-ASL) for cerebral perfusion imaging of the subcortical gray matter in healthy adults in resting state. 3D spiral FSE ASL and 3D T1-weighted fast spoiled gradient recalled echo (3D T1-FSPGR) sequences were used for cerebral perfusion imaging in 8 healthy adult subjects, and a repeat imaging examination was performed after one week. The subcortical gray matter structures including the putamen, globus pallidus, caudate nucleus, thalamus, amygdala and hippocampus were segmented on the brain structural 3D images to generate the cerebral blood flow (CBF) map. The CBF value was extracted based on the segmented images and the CBF maps. The reliability and reproducibility of the measurements were evaluated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plot. The mean ICC value of the subcortical gray matter structures was 0.88∓0.04 (range, 0.80-0.93). The Bland-Altman plot analysis demonstrated that the differences between the two measurements at all the points corresponding to the subcortical gray matter structures were within 95% CI of the limits of agreement. 3D spiral FSE pseudo-continuous ASL is a reliable method for assessing the perfusion of the cerebral subcortical gray matter structures.

  2. Chest MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... as the contrast dye is injected. The MRI machine is a large, tunnel-like machine that has a table. You will lie still ... table, and the table will slide into the machine. You will hear loud humming, tapping, and buzzing ...

  3. Cardiac MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... as the contrast dye is injected. The MRI machine is a large, tunnel-like machine that has a table. You will lie still ... table and the table will slide into the machine. You will hear loud humming, tapping, and buzzing ...

  4. Interictal diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging features of cats with familial spontaneous epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Shunta; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Hamamoto, Yuji; Yu, Yoshihiko; Kuwabara, Takayuki; Fujiwara-Igarashi, Aki; Fujita, Michio

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the usefulness of diffusion and perfusion MRI of the cerebrum in cats with familial spontaneous epilepsy (FSECs) and identify microstructural and functional deficit zones in affected cats. ANIMALS 19 FSECs and 12 healthy cats. PROCEDURES Diffusion-weighted, diffusion tensor, and perfusion-weighted MRI of the cerebrum were performed during interictal periods in FSECs. Imaging findings were compared between FSECs and control cats. Diffusion (apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy) and perfusion (relative cerebral blood volume [rCBV], relative cerebral blood flow [rCBF], and mean transit time) variables were measured bilaterally in the hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus, parietal cortex gray matter, and subcortical white matter. Asymmetry of these variables in each region was also evaluated and compared between FSECs and control cats. RESULTS The apparent diffusion coefficient of the total amygdala of FSECs was significantly higher, compared with that of control cats. The fractional anisotropy of the right side and total hippocampus of FSECs was significantly lower, compared with that of control cats. The left and right sides and total hippocampal rCBV and rCBF were significantly lower in FSECs than in control cats. The rCBV and rCBF of the parietal cortex gray matter in FSECs were significantly lower than in control cats. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In FSECs, diffusion and perfusion MRI detected microstructural changes and hypoperfusion (lowered function) in the cerebrum during interictal periods from that of healthy cats. These findings indicated that diffusion and perfusion MRI may be useful for noninvasive evaluation of epileptogenic foci in cats.

  5. Synergistic Effects of Hemoglobin and Tumor Perfusion on Tumor Control and Survival in Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, Nina A. Wang, Jian Z.; Zhang Dongqing; Montebello, Joseph F.; Grecula, John C.; Lo, Simon S.; Fowler, Jeffery M.; Yuh, William T.C.

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: The tumor oxygenation status is likely influenced by two major factors: local tumor blood supply (tumor perfusion) and its systemic oxygen carrier, hemoglobin (Hgb). Each has been independently shown to affect the radiotherapy (RT) outcome in cervical cancer. This study assessed the effect of local tumor perfusion, systemic Hgb levels, and their combination on the treatment outcome in cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients with cervical cancer, Stage IB2-IVA, who were treated with RT/chemotherapy, underwent serial dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) before RT, at 20-22 Gy, and at 45-50 Gy. The DCE-MRI perfusion parameters, mean and lowest 10th percentile of the signal intensity distribution in the tumor pixels, and the Hgb levels, including pre-RT, nadir, and mean Hgb (average of weekly Hgb during RT), were correlated with local control and disease-specific survival. The median follow-up was 4.6 years. Results: Local recurrence predominated in the group with both a low mean Hgb (<11.2 g/dL) and low perfusion (lowest 10th percentile of signal intensity <2.0 at 20-22 Gy), with a 5-year local control rate of 60% vs. 90% for all other groups (p = .001) and a disease-specific survival rate of 41% vs. 72% (p = .008), respectively. In the group with both high mean Hgb and high perfusion, the 5-year local control rate and disease-specific survival rate was 100% and 78%, respectively. Conclusion: These results suggest that the compounded effects of Hgb level and tumor perfusion during RT influence the radioresponsiveness and survival in cervical cancer patients. The outcome was worst when both were impaired. The management of Hgb may be particularly important in patients with low tumor perfusion.

  6. Effects of Varying Rate of Signing on ASL Manual Signs and Nonmanual Markers

    PubMed Central

    Wilbur, Ronnie B.

    2009-01-01

    Spoken languages are characterized by flexible, multivariate prosodic systems. As a natural language, American Sign Language (ASL), and other sign languages (SLs), are also expected to be characterized in the same way. Artificially created signing systems for classroom use, such as signed English, serve as a contrast to natural sign languages. The present article explores the effects of changes in signing rate on signs, pauses, and, unlike previous studies, a variety of nonmanual markers. Rate was a main effect on the duration of signs, the number of pauses and pause duration, the duration of brow raises, the duration of licensed lowered brows, the number and duration of blinks, all of which decreased with increased signing rate. This indicates that signers produced their different signing rates without making dramatic changes in the number of signs, but instead by varying the sign duration, in accordance with previous observations (Grosjean, 1978, 1979). These results can be brought to bear on three different issues: (1) the difference between grammatical nonmanuals and non-grammatical nonmanuals; (2) the fact that nonmanuals in general are not just a modality effect; and (3) the use of some nonmanuals as pragmatically determined as opposed to overt morphophonological markers reflecting the semantic–syntax–pragmatic interfaces. PMID:19624032

  7. Sign Perception and Recognition in Non-Native Signers of ASL

    PubMed Central

    Morford, Jill P.; Carlson, Martina L.

    2011-01-01

    Past research has established that delayed first language exposure is associated with comprehension difficulties in non-native signers of American Sign Language (ASL) relative to native signers. The goal of the current study was to investigate potential explanations of this disparity: do non-native signers have difficulty with all aspects of comprehension, or are their comprehension difficulties restricted to some aspects of processing? We compared the performance of deaf non-native, hearing L2, and deaf native signers on a handshape and location monitoring and a sign recognition task. The results indicate that deaf non-native signers are as rapid and accurate on the monitoring task as native signers, with differences in the pattern of relative performance across handshape and location parameters. By contrast, non-native signers differ significantly from native signers during sign recognition. Hearing L2 signers, who performed almost as well as the two groups of deaf signers on the monitoring task, resembled the deaf native signers more than the deaf non-native signers on the sign recognition task. The combined results indicate that delayed exposure to a signed language leads to an overreliance on handshape during sign recognition. PMID:21686080

  8. Anaerobic sulfatase maturase AslB from Escherichia coli activates human recombinant iduronate-2-sulfate sulfatase (IDS) and N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS).

    PubMed

    Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos Javier; Tolosa-Díaz, Andrés Dario; Pimentel, Luisa Natalia; Bonilla, Yahir Andres; Rodríguez-López, Alexander; Espejo-Mojica, Angela J; Patiño, Juan D; Sánchez, Oscar F; Gonzalez-Santos, Janneth

    2017-11-15

    Maturation of type I sulfatases requires the conversion of the cysteine (Cys) or serine (Ser) present in the active site to formylglycine (FGly). This activation represents a limiting step during the production of recombinant sulfatases in bacteria and eukaryotic hosts. AslB, YdeM and YidF have been proposed to participate in the activation of sulfatases in Escherichia coli. In this study, we combined in-silico and experimental approaches to study the interaction between Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) AslB and human sulfatases, more specifically iduronate-2-sulfate sulfatase (IDS) and N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). In-silico results show that AslB has a higher affinity for the residual motif of GALNS (-9.4kcalmol(-1)), Cys- and Ser-type, than for the one of IDS (-8.0kcalmol(-1)). However, the distance between the AslB active residue and the target motif favors the interaction with IDS (4.4Å) more than with GALNS (5.5Å). Experimental observations supported in-silico results where the co-expression of AslB with GALNS Cys- and Ser-type presented an activity increment of 2.0- and 1.5-fold compared to the control cultures, lacking overexpressed AslB. Similarly, IDS activity was increased in 4.6-fold when co-expressed with AslB. The higher sulfatase activity of AslB-IDS suggests that the distance between the AslB active residue and the motif target is a key parameter for the in-silico search of potential sulfatase activators. In conclusion, our results suggest that AslB is involve in the maturation of heterologous human sulfatases in E. coli BL21(DE3), and that it can have important implications in the production of recombinant sulfatases for therapeutic purposes and research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. An unsupervised approach for measuring myocardial perfusion in MR image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Discher, Antoine; Rougon, Nicolas; Preteux, Francoise

    2005-08-01

    Quantitatively assessing myocardial perfusion is a key issue for the diagnosis, therapeutic planning and patient follow-up of cardio-vascular diseases. To this end, perfusion MRI (p-MRI) has emerged as a valuable clinical investigation tool thanks to its ability of dynamically imaging the first pass of a contrast bolus in the framework of stress/rest exams. However, reliable techniques for automatically computing regional first pass curves from 2D short-axis cardiac p-MRI sequences remain to be elaborated. We address this problem and develop an unsupervised four-step approach comprising: (i) a coarse spatio-temporal segmentation step, allowing to automatically detect a region of interest for the heart over the whole sequence, and to select a reference frame with maximal myocardium contrast; (ii) a model-based variational segmentation step of the reference frame, yielding a bi-ventricular partition of the heart into left ventricle, right ventricle and myocardium components; (iii) a respiratory/cardiac motion artifacts compensation step using a novel region-driven intensity-based non rigid registration technique, allowing to elastically propagate the reference bi-ventricular segmentation over the whole sequence; (iv) a measurement step, delivering first-pass curves over each region of a segmental model of the myocardium. The performance of this approach is assessed over a database of 15 normal and pathological subjects, and compared with perfusion measurements delivered by a MRI manufacturer software package based on manual delineations by a medical expert.

  10. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging of resting-state cerebral blood flow in preclinical Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Robert C; Grön, Georg; Sambataro, Fabio; Vasic, Nenad; Wolf, Nadine D; Thomann, Philipp A; Saft, Carsten; Landwehrmeyer, G Bernhard; Orth, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain could be a powerful tool for discovering early biomarkers in clinically presymptomatic carriers of the Huntington's disease gene mutation (preHD). The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity of resting-state perfusion MRI in preHD and to identify neural changes, which could serve as biomarkers for future clinical trials. Differences in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 18 preHD and 18 controls were assessed with a novel MRI method based on perfusion images obtained with continuous arterial spin labeling. High-resolution structural data were collected to test for changes of brain volume. Compared with controls, preHD individuals showed decreased rCBF in medial and lateral prefrontal regions and increased rCBF in the precuneus. PreHD near to symptom onset additionally showed decreased rCBF in the putamen and increased rCBF in the hippocampus. Network analyses revealed an abnormal lateral prefrontal pattern in preHD far and near to motor onset. These data suggest early changes of frontostriatal baseline perfusion in preHD independent of substantial reductions of gray matter volume. This study also shows the feasibility of detecting neural changes in preHD with a robust MRI technique that would be suitable for longitudinal multisite application. PMID:21559028

  11. Relationship between caffeine-induced changes in resting cerebral perfusion and blood oxygenation level-dependent signal.

    PubMed

    Laurienti, Paul J; Field, Aaron S; Burdette, Jonathan H; Maldjian, Joseph A; Yen, Yi-Fen; Moody, Dixon M

    2003-09-01

    Recent interest has emerged in the use of pharmacologic methods to maximize blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity changes in functional MR imaging (fMRI). Adenosine antagonists, such as caffeine and theophylline, have been identified as potential agents for this purpose. The present study was designed to determine whether caffeine-induced decreases in cerebral perfusion result in enhanced BOLD responses to visual and auditory stimuli. MR imaging was used to measure resting cerebral perfusion and stimulus-induced BOLD signal intensity changes in 19 patients. We evaluated the relationship between resting cerebral perfusion and the magnitude of BOLD signal intensity induced by visual and auditory stimulation under caffeine and placebo conditions. The data showed that changes in resting cerebral perfusion produced by caffeine are not a consistent predictor of BOLD signal intensity magnitude. Although all cerebral perfusion was reduced in all study participants in response to caffeine, only 47% of the participants experienced BOLD signal intensity increase. This finding was independent of the participants' usual caffeine consumption. The data presented herein show that the relationship between resting cerebral perfusion and the magnitude of BOLD signal intensity is complex. It is not possible to consistently enhance BOLD signal intensity magnitude by decreasing resting perfusion with caffeine. Future studies aimed at evaluating the relationship between perfusion and BOLD signal intensity changes should seek a means to selectively modulate known components of the neural and vascular responses independently.

  12. Viable neurons with luxury perfusion in hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Wong, C Y; Luciano, M G; MacIntyre, W J; Brunken, R C; Hahn, J F; Go, R T

    1997-09-01

    A woman with hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis had functional imaging of cerebral perfusion and metabolism to demonstrate the effects of endoscopic third ventriculostomy--a new form of internal surgical shunting. Technetium-99m-ECD SPECT and 18F-FDG PET showed regional luxury perfusion at the left frontal region. Three months after a successful third ventriculostomy, a repeated imaging of cerebral perfusion and metabolism showed resolution of luxury perfusion and global improvement of both perfusion and metabolism. This concurred with postoperative clinical improvement. The paired imaging of cerebral perfusion and metabolism provides more information than just imaging perfusion or metabolism. Thus, the detection of perfusion and metabolism mismatch may open a new window of opportunity for surgical intervention.

  13. Cerebral perfusion imaging with bolus harmonic imaging (Honorable Mention Poster Award)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kier, Christian; Toth, Daniel; Meyer-Wiethe, Karsten; Schindler, Angela; Cangur, Hakan; Seidel, Gunter; Aach, Til

    2005-04-01

    Fast visualisation of cerebral microcirculation supports diagnosis of acute stroke. However, the commonly used CT/MRI-based methods are time consuming, costly and not applicable to every patient. The bolus perfusion harmonic imaging (BHI) method is an ultrasound imaging technique which makes use of the fact, that ultrasound contrast agents unlike biological tissues resonate at harmonic frequencies. Exploiting this effect, the contrast between perfused and non-perfused areas can be improved. Thus, BHI overcomes the low signal-to-noise ratio of transcranial ultrasound and the high impedance of the skull. By analysing image sequences, visualising the qualitative characteristics of an US contrast agent bolus injection becomes possible. The analysis consists of calculating four perfusion-related parameters, Local Peak Intensity, Time To Peak, Area Under Curve, and Average Rising, from the time/intensity curve and providing them as colour-coded images. For calculating these parameters the fundamental assumption is that image intensity corresponds to contrast agent concentration which in turn shows the perfusion of the corresponding brain region. In a clinical study on patients suffering from acute ischemic stroke it is shown that some of the parameters correlate significantly to the infarction area. Thus, BHI becomes a less time-consuming and inexpensive bedside method for diagnosis of cerebral perfusion deficits.

  14. Pattern of brain blood perfusion in tinnitus patients using technetium-99m SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudian, Saeid; Farhadi, Mohammad; Gholami, Saeid; Saddadi, Fariba; Karimian, Ali Reza; Mirzaei, Mohammad; Ghoreyshi, Esmaeel; Ahmadizadeh, Majid; Lenarz, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Tinnitus is associated with an increased activity in central auditory system as demonstrated by neuroimaging studies. Brain perfusion scanning using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was done to understand the pattern of brain blood perfusion of tinnitus subjects and find the areas wh