Science.gov

Sample records for asms2004 session code

  1. Feasibility and Reliability of a Coding System to Capture In-Session Group Behavior in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ladd, Benjamin O; Tomlinson, Kristin; Myers, Mark G; Anderson, Kristen G

    2016-01-01

    Limited research has explored the role of in-session behavior during motivational enhancement (ME) in group formats. The current study presents initial feasibility of assessing behavior of high school students (N = 425) attending Project Options, a voluntary secondary drug and alcohol prevention program utilizing ME techniques. Building on previous research exploring client language supporting/opposing health behavior, student group behavior was coded live at the specific utterance and global level; group leader behavior was also coded globally. Interrater reliability of the coding system was assessed, and preliminary validity of the coding system was examined by exploring associations between characteristics of group members and in-session group behavior. Initial reliability estimates were excellent for the specific behavior codes. Reliability of the global codes was mixed, with raters demonstrating good reliability on support for unhealthy behavior, opposition to unhealthy behavior, and support for healthy behavior. Reliability of the group leader codes was fair to poor. Greater percent healthy talk was associated with a lower percentage of group members reporting lifetime alcohol use. The results of the current study suggest that some in-session behavior at the group level can be coded reliably via live observation and that in-session behavior at the group level is associated with alcohol use prior to attending the program. Future research is needed to explore the utility of in-session behavior in terms of predicting future behavior at the group and individual level.

  2. Feasibility and Reliability of a Coding System to Capture In-Session Group Behavior in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, Kristin; Myers, Mark G.; Anderson, Kristen G.

    2016-01-01

    Limited research has explored the role of in-session behavior during motivational enhancement (ME) in group formats. The current study presents initial feasibility of assessing behavior of high school students (N=425) attending Project Options, a voluntary secondary drug and alcohol prevention program utilizing ME techniques. Building on previous research exploring client language supporting/opposing health behavior, student group behavior was coded live at the specific utterance and global level; group leader behavior was also coded globally. Interrater reliability of the coding system was assessed, and preliminary validity of the coding system was examined by exploring associations between characteristics of group members and in-session group behavior. Initial reliability estimates were excellent for the specific behavior codes. Reliability of the global codes was mixed, with raters demonstrating good reliability on support for unhealthy behavior, opposition to unhealthy behavior, and support for healthy behavior. Reliability of the group leader codes was fair to poor. Greater percent healthy talk was associated with a lower percentage of group members reporting lifetime alcohol use. The results of the current study suggest that some in-session behavior at the group level can be coded reliably via live observation and that in-session behavior at the group level is associated with alcohol use prior to attending the program. Future research is needed to explore the utility of in-session behavior in terms of predicting future behavior at the group and individual level. PMID:26271299

  3. A coding scheme for the evaluation of the relationship in music therapy sessions.

    PubMed

    Raglio, A; Traficante, D; Oasi, O

    2006-08-01

    This study presents a coding system for observation and monitoring of changes in the interactive behaviour between patient and therapist during music therapy sessions. The coding scheme was developed from a psychodynamic framework and mainly consists of four behavioural classes: Verbal Communication, Nonverbal Communication, Countenance, and Sonorous Musical Communication. The 15 minutes in the middle of each videotape concerning the first active music therapy session--based on the sonorous musical improvisation--were coded. Subjects were children (4 boys; 3 girls) ages 3 to 10 years (M age = 6.3), diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder, and seven therapists. The method for data collection was continuous recording, applied through The Observer Video-Pro 5.0. For the reliability indexes there was a substantial agreement between assessments by video raters.

  4. Optimizing Network-Coded Cooperative Communications via Joint Session Grouping and Relay Node Selection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Optimizing Network-Coded Cooperative Communications via Joint Session Grouping and Relay Node Selection Sushant Sharma Yi Shi Y. Thomas Hou Hanif...that for a single relay node, we can group as many sessions as we want. But, in a recent study [20], Sharma et al. showed that there exists a so-called...destination wireless network. In [20], Sharma et al. considered NC-CC with only one relay node. Their analysis showed that NC is not always good for CC, and

  5. Code-switching across brainstorming sessions: implications for the revised hierarchical model of bilingual language processing.

    PubMed

    Blot, Kevin J; Zárate, Michael A; Paulus, Paul B

    2003-01-01

    The revised hierarchical model (RHM) of bilingual language processing posits independent word form representations for the dominant language (L1) and the nondominant language (L2), facilitated translation from L2 words to L1 words, access to common concepts for L1 and L2, and stronger activation of concepts for L1 than for L2. Spanish-English and English-Spanish bilinguals brainstormed for two sessions; half switched languages (L1-L2 or L2-L1) and half stayed in the same language (L1-L1 or L2-L2) across sessions. In both sessions, L1 brainstorming resulted in more efficient idea productivity than L2 brainstorming, supporting stronger concept activation for L1, consistent with the RHM. Switching languages from L2 to L1 resulted in the most efficient idea productivity in Session 2, suggesting that switching to L1 not only permits strong concept activation, but also the activation of concepts that are relatively different than those activated by L2, inconsistent with the RHM. Switching languages increased the proportion of Session 1 ideas repeated during Session 2, despite instructions not to repeat. This finding suggests that there is activation of concepts as well as word forms in same language brainstorming and that this dual activation aids in following instructions not to repeat, consistent with the RHM. It is suggested that the RHM be re-specified to accommodate the notion that L1 and L2 access relatively different concepts.

  6. Coding into the Great Unknown: Analyzing Instant Messaging Session Transcripts to Identify User Behaviors and Measure Quality of Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maximiek, Sarah; Rushton, Erin; Brown, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    After one year of providing virtual reference service through an instant messaging (IM) service, Binghamton University (BU) Libraries, under the purview of its Digital Reference Committee (DRC), undertook a study of collected session transcripts. The goals of this work were to determine who was using the IM service and why; if staffing for the…

  7. Coding into the Great Unknown: Analyzing Instant Messaging Session Transcripts to Identify User Behaviors and Measure Quality of Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maximiek, Sarah; Rushton, Erin; Brown, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    After one year of providing virtual reference service through an instant messaging (IM) service, Binghamton University (BU) Libraries, under the purview of its Digital Reference Committee (DRC), undertook a study of collected session transcripts. The goals of this work were to determine who was using the IM service and why; if staffing for the…

  8. Selected Mississippi Library Laws: From the Mississippi Code of 1972 current through the 1995 Regular Session of the Mississippi Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Library Commission, Jackson.

    This document is a compilation of selected laws of the state of Mississippi that pertain to or impact libraries. Excerpts from the Mississippi state constitution, from the Mississippi Code of 1972, and from relevant amendments are all included. Coverage of the statutes extends to issues such as: (1) legal holidays; (2) liability; (3) zoning; (4)…

  9. Panel Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIS Mid-Year Meeting, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Lists the speakers and summarizes the issues addressed for 12 panel sessions on topics related to networking, including libraries and national networks, federal national resources and energy programs, multimedia issues, telecommuting, remote image serving, accessing the Internet, library automation, scientific information, applications of Z39.50,…

  10. Twenty-fifth water reactor safety information meeting: Proceedings. Volume 1: Plenary sessions; Pressure vessel research; BWR strainer blockage and other generic safety issues; Environmentally assisted degradation of LWR components; Update on severe accident code improvements and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Monteleone, S.

    1998-03-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the conference. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Japan, Norway, and Russia. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. This volume contains the following information: (1) plenary sessions; (2) pressure vessel research; (3) BWR strainer blockage and other generic safety issues; (4) environmentally assisted degradation of LWR components; and (5) update on severe accident code improvements and applications. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  11. Poster Session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Poster Session, the discussion focuses on the following topics: Development of correlative measures for the assessment of attention and memory; Biodynamical Responses of the Crewmember Head/Neck System During Emergence Ejection; Fecundation in the Sky, a Ten Years Old Experiment in Microgravity; A Modified Botex Incubator as a Transport System For Developing Crickets into Space; Chromosomal Aberrations in Peripheral Lymphocytes of Cosmonauts and Astronauts after Space Flights; Method for Establishing Long term Bone Marrow; Cultures Under Microgravity Conditions Reproduction Under Simulated Weightlessness --Mammalian in vivo Experiments Under Suspension; Towards Human Movement Analysis Without the Use of Markers; Habitability Requirements For a Cogent Mars Mission; The Saucer Concept for Space Habitats; New Way In Modeling the Growth of the Organism; The Fractionation of Hydrogen and Oxygen Stable Isotopes By Life Support Systems of Space Station "MIR"; and Effect of Space Flight on Neutrophil Function.

  12. Session 2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    identified tryptic peptides due to the high acetonitrile concentration in the HILIC mobile phase. Since HILIC mode LC-MS shows orthogonal selectivity to RPLC mode LC-MS, it is useful as a complementary tool to increase proteome coverage in proteomics studies. 4.2 NeuCode Mouse and One Hour Proteomes Alexander S. Hebert1, Anna E. Merrill1, Alicia L. Richards1, Matthew E. MacGilvray1, Nicholas W. Kwiecien1, Christopher M. Rose1, Derek J. Bailey1, Joel C. Bradley2, William W. Wood2, Marwan ElMasri2, Michael S. Westphall1, Audrey P. Gasch1, Joshua J. Coon1 1University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA; 2Cambridge Isotope Laboratories, Andover, MA, USA Modern biological and medicinal researchers increasingly rely on large-scale technologies for the comparative analysis of proteomes. To satisfy this growing demand, maturing proteomic methods must achieve high-throughput, quantitative analyses of near-complete proteomes. Here we describe two efforts in this vein. The first is the identification of ∼4,000 yeast proteins, a comprehensive yeast proteome, from just over an hour of analysis time. We achieved this expedited proteome characterization through improved sample preparation, chromatographic separations, and by using a new Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer equipped with a mass filter, a collision cell, a high-field Orbitrap analyzer, and, finally, a dual cell linear ion trap analyzer (Q-OT-qIT, Orbitrap Fusion). The second is a quantitative approach that blends the accuracy of SILAC with the impressive throughput of isobaric tagging methods. The strategy – neutron encoding (NeuCode) – relies on the mass defect of atoms and their isotopes and harnesses the exceptional resolving power of modern FT-MS systems to selectively reveal or conceal quantitative information when desired. Recently, a new Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer comprised of a mass filter, a collision cell, a high-field Orbitrap analyzer, and a dual cell linear ion trap analyzer was introduced (Q

  13. H.R. 432: A Bill to amend chapter 601 of title 49, United States Code, to improve natural gas and hazardous liquid pipeline safety, in response to the natural gas pipeline accident in Edison, New Jersey, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This document contains H.R. 432, A Bill to amend chapter 601 of title 49, United States Code, to improve natural gas and hazardous liquid pipeline safety, in response to the natural gas pipeline accident in Edison, New Jersey, and for other purposes. This Bill was introduced in the House of Representatives, 104th Congress, First Session, January 5, 1995.

  14. The "Session Libre".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, J. T.

    At the Institut Universitaire de Technologie in Nancy, France, most English language teaching has been organized on a mixed extensive/intensive pattern. As a result of certain negative effects of the established "session intensive," another methodology was tried, called "session libre." This session involved several techniques:…

  15. A Radical Poster Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Paul A., Jr.; Camp, Cameron J.

    1987-01-01

    Presents the use of a poster session as an integral part of an experimental design course. Describes how the principles of experimental design are demonstrated when undergraduates design and conduct original experiments, using radishes as subjects, and present their results in a poster session. Discusses the benefits of using radishes as subjects.…

  16. The outreach sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Livius

    2017-06-01

    These are moderator's remarks about the outreach sessions on the Saturday in the middle of the Carpathian Summer School of Physics 2016, on July 2nd, and in particular about the afternoon session in round table format with the subject: "JINR Dubna at 60 and the internationalization of science".

  17. The Public Poster Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine-Rasky, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    This note describes the use of a student poster session as an innovative approach to student learning. The local context for the assignment is provided, followed by a description of the course for which the poster was prepared, details about the assignment including its evaluation, and practical considerations for planning a poster session. The…

  18. The "Session Libre"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    Outlines a strategy attempted as an alternative to the traditional instruction in intensive sessions of English at the Institut Universitaitre de Technologie in Nancy, France. Included were six basic activities (films, TV, press, tape library, games, and language laboratory) in a minimally-structured three-day session. (MSE)

  19. Abstracts of SIG Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIS Annual Meeting, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Presents abstracts of SIG Sessions. Highlights include digital collections; information retrieval methods; public interest/fair use; classification and indexing; electronic publication; funding; globalization; information technology projects; interface design; networking in developing countries; metadata; multilingual databases; networked…

  20. CEC Council Sessions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Each year, the North American Ministers to the Commission for Environmental Cooperation meet at least once for the CEC Council Session to set the CEC’s overall direction, including budget, and activities pursued through the cooperative work plan.

  1. Summary: Hadron dynamics sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, A. S.; Londergan, J. T.

    Four sessions on Hadron Dynamics were organized at this workshop. The first topic, QCD Exclusive Reactions and Color Transparency, featured talks by Ralston, Heppelman, and Strikman; the second, QCD and Inclusive Reactions had talks by Garvey, Speth, and Kisslinger. The third dynamics session, Medium Modification of Elementary Interactions had contributions from Kopeliovich, Alves, and Gyulassy; the fourth session, Pre-QCD Dynamics and Scattering, had talks by Harris, Myhrer, and Brown. An additional joint Spectroscopy/Dynamics session featured talks by Zumbro, Johnson, and McClelland. These contributions are reviewed briefly in this summary. Two additional joint sessions between Dynamics and eta physics are reviewed by the organizers of the eta sessions. In such a brief review there is no way the authors can adequately summarize the details of the physics presented here. As a result, they concentrate only on brief impressionistic sketches of the physics topics discussed and their interrelations. They include no bibliography in this summary, but simply refer to the talks given in more detail in the workshop proceedings. They focus on topics which were common to several presentations in these sessions. First, nuclear and particle descriptions of phenomena are now clearly converging, in both a qualitative and quantitative sense; they show several examples of this convergence. Second, an important issue in hadron dynamics is the extent to which elementary interactions are modified in nuclei at high energies and/or densities, and they illustrate some of these medium effects. Finally, they focus on those dynamical issues where hadron facilities can make an important, or even a unique, contribution to the knowledge of particle and nuclear physics.

  2. S. 2424: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, April 5, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Bill S.2424 has been introduced in the Senate of the United States on April 5, 1990. The purpose of this bill is to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide for the imposition of certain excise taxes related to the enforcement of provisions of the Clean Air Act added by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Chapter 38 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (relating to environmental taxes) is amended by adding a new subchapter regarding taxes relating to the Clean Air Act requirements. Attention is focused on the following: tax on permits for air quality nonattainment areas; fees not collected by states; and taxes on certain products.

  3. Country breakout session highlights.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, Angelo; Filli, Linard; Solaro, Claudio; Mekies, Claude; Landete, Lamberto; Lycke, Jan

    2016-12-01

    At the 2016 MS Experts Summit, country-relevant aspects pertaining to the management of symptoms and disability in multiple sclerosis (MS), with emphasis on those associated with spasticity, were explored in interactive country breakout sessions chaired by selected MS experts. Attendees had the opportunity to review and discuss topics in their own native language. After feedback from each session leader, key messages were collated and presented in a Plenary Session by Summit chair, Professor Angelo Ghezzi. Topics at this year's Summit included: gait tracking (Germany/Switzerland); the Care Alliance against MS spasticity (Italy); MS spasticity and associated symptoms (France); improvement in MS symptoms and functionality and patients' independence (Spain); Swedish MS guidelines (Sweden/Rest of World).

  4. Physician's Breakout Session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, William

    2001-01-01

    Dr. William Barry, Manager, NASA Occupational Health Program, moderated this session. As in one of the opening sessions, he re-iterated that the overall theme for the next year will be facilitating and implementing NIAT-1 (NASA Integrated Action Team - Action 1). He presented a candidate list of topics for consideration and discussion: (1) NIAT-1; (2) Skin cancer detection and the NASA Solar Safe Program; (3) Weapons of mass destruction; (4) Quality assurance; (5) Audits; (6) Environment of care; (7) Infection control; (8) Medication management; and (9) Confidentiality of medical records.

  5. Physician's Breakout Session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, William

    2001-01-01

    Dr. William Barry, Manager, NASA Occupational Health Program, moderated this session. As in one of the opening sessions, he re-iterated that the overall theme for the next year will be facilitating and implementing NIAT-1 (NASA Integrated Action Team - Action 1). He presented a candidate list of topics for consideration and discussion: (1) NIAT-1; (2) Skin cancer detection and the NASA Solar Safe Program; (3) Weapons of mass destruction; (4) Quality assurance; (5) Audits; (6) Environment of care; (7) Infection control; (8) Medication management; and (9) Confidentiality of medical records.

  6. Honor Codes at the Service Academies. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Manpower and Personnel of the Committee on Armed Services. United States Senate. Ninety-fourth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Armed Services.

    Transcripts of the hearings on honor codes at the federal military academies in June and August of 1976 include the statements of the Secretary of the Army, Superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy, Commandant of Cadets at the Military Academy, Superintendent of the Naval Academy, the Officer Representative to the Brigade Honor Committee (Naval…

  7. A Bill to Amend Title 38, United States Code, to Provide Counseling for Certain Veterans; . . . and Utilization of Veterans Readjustment Assistance Programs. H.R. 2231. 95th Congress, 1st Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This U.S. House of Representatives bill (H.R. 2231), to be cited, if enacted, as the Comprehensive Veterans Readjustment Assistance Act of 1977, would amend title 38, United States Code, to provide counseling for certain veterans; to permit acceleration of monthly educational assistance payments to eligible veterans and dependents; to revise the…

  8. Summary of Session 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, J.

    2004-11-01

    In Session 3, the speakers were dealing with the following topics: Automatization of Feynman Diagram Calculations (FDC), Event generators, Analytical approaches to FDC and various Mathematical innovations related to different physical problems. A more general, ` brainstorming', talk was given by J. Vermaseren as first talk.

  9. Poster Session- Extended Abstracts

    Treesearch

    Jack D. Alexander III; Jean Findley; Brenda K. Kury; Jan L. Beyers; Douglas S. Cram; Terrell T. Baker; Jon C. Boren; Carl Edminster; Sue A. Ferguson; Steven McKay; David Nagel; Trent Piepho; Miriam Rorig; Casey Anderson; Jeanne Hoadley; Paulette L. Ford; Mark C. Andersen; Ed L. Fredrickson; Joe Truett; Gary W. Roemer; Brenda K. Kury; Jennifer Vollmer; Christine L. May; Danny C. Lee; James P. Menakis; Robert E. Keane; Zhi-Liang Zhu; Carol Miller; Brett Davis; Katharine Gray; Ken Mix; William P. Kuvlesky Jr.; D. Lynn Drawe; Marcia G. Narog; Roger D. Ottmar; Robert E. Vihnanek; Clinton S. Wright; Timothy E. Paysen; Burton K. Pendleton; Rosemary L. Pendleton; Carleton S. White; John Rogan; Doug Stow; Janet Franklin; Jennifer Miller; Lisa Levien; Chris Fischer; Emma Underwood; Robert Klinger; Peggy Moore; Clinton S. Wright

    2008-01-01

    Titles found within Poster Session-Extended Abstracts include:Assessment of emergency fire rehabilitation of four fires from the 2000 fire season on the Vale, Oregon, BLM district: review of the density sampling materials and methods: p. 329 Growth of regreen, seeded for erosion control, in the...

  10. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  11. Abstracts of SIG Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIS Annual Meeting, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Includes abstracts of 18 special interest group (SIG) sessions. Highlights include natural language processing, information science and terminology science, classification, knowledge-intensive information systems, information value and ownership issues, economics and theories of information science, information retrieval interfaces, fuzzy thinking…

  12. The outreach sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Trache, Livius

    2015-02-24

    These are moderator’s remarks about the outreach day in the middle of the CSSP14, and in particular about the afternoon outreach session in round table format with the announced theme: “CERN at 60 and the internationalization of science”.

  13. Summary of Session III

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    2002-06-19

    This is a summary of the talks presented in Session III ''Simulations of Electron-Cloud Build Up'' of the Mini-Workshop on Electron-Cloud Simulations for Proton and Positron Beams ECLOUD-02, held at CERN, 15-18 April 2002.

  14. Student Poster Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgartner, Erin

    2004-01-01

    Poster presentations are one way scientists present their latest research findings at professional meetings. This format also works well in the classroom and gives students the opportunity to communicate the results of their experiments (perhaps the most critical portion of their studies). In a performance-based task such as a poster session,…

  15. Abstracts of SIG Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIS Annual Meeting, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Presents abstracts of 15 special interest group (SIG) sessions. Topics include navigation and information utilization in the Internet, natural language processing, automatic indexing, image indexing, classification, users' models of database searching, online public access catalogs, education for information professions, information services,…

  16. SPHERES Zero Robotics Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-04

    ISS036-E-039685 (4 Sept. 2013) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, Expedition 36 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES.

  17. SPHERES Zero Robotics Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-04

    ISS036-E-039743 (4 Sept. 2013) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, Expedition 36 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES.

  18. SPHERES Zero Robotics Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-04

    ISS036-E-039697 (4 Sept. 2013) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, Expedition 36 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES.

  19. SPHERES Zero Robotics Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-13

    ISS036-E-032134 (13 Aug. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, Expedition 36 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES.

  20. SPHERES Zero Robotics Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-13

    ISS036-E-032138 (13 Aug. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, Expedition 36 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES.

  1. SPHERES Zero Robotics Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-13

    ISS036-E-032180 (13 Aug. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, Expedition 36 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES.

  2. Educational poster session

    Treesearch

    Deborah Chavez

    1995-01-01

    The educational poster session provided a way of increasing the ordinarily limited time available for discussion of papers, while simultaneously making it easier to communicate visual materials not well suited to oral presentations. Poster presenters were available for 2 hours to discuss their displays. Poster presentations were divided into five categories: user...

  3. Abstracts of SIG Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIS Annual Meeting, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Presents abstracts of 34 special interest group (SIG) sessions. Highlights include humanities scholars and electronic texts; information retrieval and indexing systems design; automated indexing; domain analysis; query expansion in document retrieval systems; thesauri; business intelligence; Americans with Disabilities Act; management;…

  4. Wakata during SPHERES session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-10

    ISS038-E-000078 (10 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 38 flight engineer, poses for a photo while conducting a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES.

  5. Abstracts of SIG Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIS Annual Meeting, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Presents abstracts of 15 special interest group (SIG) sessions. Topics include navigation and information utilization in the Internet, natural language processing, automatic indexing, image indexing, classification, users' models of database searching, online public access catalogs, education for information professions, information services,…

  6. Session: Offshore wind

    SciTech Connect

    Gaarde, Jette; Ram, Bonnie

    2004-09-01

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations. Due to time constraints, a discussion period was not possible. The session addressed the current state of offshore wind energy development. The first presentation ''Monitoring Program and Results: Horns Rev and Nysted'' by Jette Gaarde summarized selected environmental studies conducted to date at operating offshore wind turbine projects in Denmark and lessons from other offshore wind developments in Europe. Wildlife impacts studies from the Danish sites focused on birds, fish, and mammals. The second presentation ''What has the U.S. Wind Industry Learned from the European Example'' by Bonnie Ram provided an update on current permit applications for offshore wind developments in the U.S. as well as lessons that may be drawn from the European experience.

  7. Burbank conducts PACE Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-01

    ISS030-E-007417 (1 Dec. 2011) --- In the International Space Station?s Destiny laboratory, NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, conducts a session with the Preliminary Advanced Colloids Experiment (PACE) at the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) in the Fluids Integrated Rack / Fluids Combustion Facility (FIR/FCF). PACE is designed to investigate the capability of conducting high magnification colloid experiments with the LMM for determining the minimum size particles which can be resolved with it.

  8. Burbank conducts PACE Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-01

    ISS030-E-007419 (1 Dec. 2011) --- In the International Space Station’s Destiny laboratory, NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, conducts a session with the Preliminary Advanced Colloids Experiment (PACE) at the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) in the Fluids Integrated Rack / Fluids Combustion Facility (FIR/FCF). PACE is designed to investigate the capability of conducting high magnification colloid experiments with the LMM for determining the minimum size particles which can be resolved with it.

  9. Burbank conducts PACE Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-01

    ISS030-E-007418 (1 Dec. 2011) --- In the International Space Station’s Destiny laboratory, NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, conducts a session with the Preliminary Advanced Colloids Experiment (PACE) at the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) in the Fluids Integrated Rack / Fluids Combustion Facility (FIR/FCF). PACE is designed to investigate the capability of conducting high magnification colloid experiments with the LMM for determining the minimum size particles which can be resolved with it.

  10. Swanson conducts CFE session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-03

    ISS040-E-032825 (3 July 2014) --- NASA astronaut Steve Swanson, Expedition 40 commander, conducts a session with the Capillary Flow Experiment (CFE) in the Harmony node of the International Space Station. CFE is a suite of fluid physics experiments that investigate how fluids move up surfaces in microgravity. The results aim to improve current computer models that are used by designers of low gravity fluid systems and may improve fluid transfer systems for water on future spacecraft.

  11. Swanson conducts CFE session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-03

    ISS040-E-032820 (3 July 2014) --- NASA astronaut Steve Swanson, Expedition 40 commander, conducts a session with the Capillary Flow Experiment (CFE) in the Harmony node of the International Space Station. CFE is a suite of fluid physics experiments that investigate how fluids move up surfaces in microgravity. The results aim to improve current computer models that are used by designers of low gravity fluid systems and may improve fluid transfer systems for water on future spacecraft.

  12. Swanson conducts CFE session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-03

    ISS040-E-032827 (3 July 2014) --- NASA astronaut Steve Swanson, Expedition 40 commander, conducts a session with the Capillary Flow Experiment (CFE) in the Harmony node of the International Space Station. CFE is a suite of fluid physics experiments that investigate how fluids move up surfaces in microgravity. The results aim to improve current computer models that are used by designers of low gravity fluid systems and may improve fluid transfer systems for water on future spacecraft.

  13. Session: Reservoir Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Renner, Joel L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Horne, Roland N.; Shook, G. Michael

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five papers: ''Reservoir Technology'' by Joel L. Renner; ''LBL Research on the Geysers: Conceptual Models, Simulation and Monitoring Studies'' by Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson; ''Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI'' by Philip E. Wannamaker; ''Optimizing Reinjection Strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines Based on Chloride Data'' by Roland N. Horne; ''TETRAD Reservoir Simulation'' by G. Michael Shook

  14. Session: Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, David; LaSala, Raymond J.; Kukacka, Lawrence E.; Bliem, Carl J.; Premuzic, Eugene T.; Weare, John H.

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hydrothermal Energy Conversion Technology'' by David Robertson and Raymond J. LaSala; ''Materials for Geothermal Production'' by Lawrence E. Kukacka; ''Supersaturated Turbine Expansions for Binary Geothermal Power Plants'' by Carl J. Bliem; ''Geothermal Waster Treatment Biotechnology: Progress and Advantages to the Utilities'' by Eugen T. Premuzic; and ''Geothermal Brine Chemistry Modeling Program'' by John H. Weare.

  15. Dreaming about the session.

    PubMed

    Sirois, F

    1994-04-01

    Dreams about the analytic session in which the analyst appears undisguised but the setting is changed are reported by most analysands. Such dreams are studied here as indicators of sensitive moments in the analysis. They are counterproposals by the analysand to the analytic activity of the analyst. They occur when the analyst's activity needs to be denied because it is experienced traumatically. Two particular disruptions are explored: the challenging of a narcissistic resistance, and one countertransferentially inspired deep interpretation.

  16. 98th LHCC meeting Agenda OPEN Session and CLOSED Session

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    OPEN Session on Wednesday, 8 July at 9h00-11h00 in Main Auditorium, Live webcast, followed by CLOSED Session, Conference room 160-1-009 11h20-17h00. CLOSED Session continued on Thursday, 9 July at 9h00-12h30

  17. Nutrition Session Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen; Stein, T. P.

    1999-01-01

    Nutrition deficiencies affect multiple systems including muscle, bone, cardiovascular, renal, and gastrointestinal. Humans require many nutrients, ranging from the macronutrients (water, protein, energy sources) to micronutrients (minerals, vitamins). The ability to withstand shortfalls in intake of individual nutrients ranges from one or two days (e.g., water) to weeks (energy, protein, potassium) and months (some vitamins, minerals). In addition to putting humans at risk for nutrition deficiencies, space flight may also change the absorption, hence the pharmacodynamics, of several important medications. Papers given in this session dealt with all of these nutritional and pharmacological factors related to space flight: (1) Protein metabolism and muscle formation. (2) Pharmacodynamics. (3) Calcium metabolism and bone formation/resorption. and (4) Fluid and electrolytes.

  18. Three featured plenary sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-07-01

    The conference included three plenary sessions. The plenary on Governance, Security, Economy, and the Ecosystem of the Changing Arctic featured Vera Alexander, president, Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S.; Alan Thornhill, chief environmental officer, U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management; and Fran Ulmer, chair, U.S. Arctic Research Commission. A plenary on the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea featured Ambassador David Balton, deputy assistant secretary for oceans and fisheries, U.S. Department of State; and Rear Admiral Frederick Kenney Jr., judge advocate general and chief counsel, U.S. Coast Guard. The plenary on Science and the 21st Century featured Phil Keslin, chief technology officer, small lab within Google.

  19. The Hydro Models Session

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, J. A.

    2004-07-01

    Hydrodynamic models play a central role in our understanding of how planetary nebulae form and evolve. The hydro models session at this conference was particularly interesting for it included excellent talks ranging from the development of large scale structures in PNe, such as halos, to studies of collimated outflows and hypersonic bullets, the effects of stellar rotation on the nebular shell and warped toroids as a way to explain the origin of point-symmetry and poly-polarity. This diversity of topics exemplifies the current vigorous quest in the field for answers to topical problems in PN research. I present here a brief overview of these talks in the order they were scheduled during the conference.

  20. Nutrition Session Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen; Stein, T. P.

    1999-01-01

    Nutrition deficiencies affect multiple systems including muscle, bone, cardiovascular, renal, and gastrointestinal. Humans require many nutrients, ranging from the macronutrients (water, protein, energy sources) to micronutrients (minerals, vitamins). The ability to withstand shortfalls in intake of individual nutrients ranges from one or two days (e.g., water) to weeks (energy, protein, potassium) and months (some vitamins, minerals). In addition to putting humans at risk for nutrition deficiencies, space flight may also change the absorption, hence the pharmacodynamics, of several important medications. Papers given in this session dealt with all of these nutritional and pharmacological factors related to space flight: (1) Protein metabolism and muscle formation. (2) Pharmacodynamics. (3) Calcium metabolism and bone formation/resorption. and (4) Fluid and electrolytes.

  1. Land subsidence session

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, Thomas L.

    A session on land subsidence caused by withdrawal of groundwater was held December 10, 1985, in San Francisco, Calif., at the AGU Fall Meeting. The symposium was organized by William E. Strange (National Geodetic Survey, Rockville, Md.) and Thomas L. Holzer (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Menlo Park, Calif.) and was cosponsored by the AGU Geodesy and Hydrology sections. Nine papers were presented on topics that ranged from evaluations of the suitability of the new satellite-based Global Positioning System (GPS) to theoretical analyses of land subsidence.T. N. Narasimhan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, Berkeley, Calif.) introduced the general subject of subsidence with a review of relevant physical processes. Compaction, although conceptually simple, involves several complexities, including plastic deformation and translation of deep-seated deformation through the overburden. Sashi Mathur (Tarleton State University, Stephenville, Tex.), in a paper coauthored with M. Yavuz Corapcioglu (City College of New York, New York), analyzed deformation in the unsaturated zone above a falling water table. Their theoretical formulation was able to reproduce results from laboratory studies of sand columns.

  2. 96th LHCC meeting Agenda OPEN Session and CLOSED Session

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    OPEN Session on Wednesday, 19 November 2008 at 9h00-11h00 in Main Auditorium, Live webcast. Followed by CLOSED Session , 6th floor Conference room and continued on Thursday, 20 November 2008 9h00-13h00

  3. Neurovestibular Session Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, Charles; Cohen, Malcolm

    1999-01-01

    . Three examples were presented at this meeting: 1) Transgenic animal experiments suggest that in addition to the light illumination cycle, vestibular inputs may also serve as an important input to the circadian system. 2) Radiation can cause important CNS effects in animals, including loss of spatial memory. 3) As described in our session, otolith inputs may contribute to cardiovascular regulation of orthostatic tolerance. Over the past three days, we've all enjoyed catching up with old friends, and making many new ones. On behalf of my colleagues, I want to thank Al Coats and the USRA DSLS staff for the great job they did in running this meeting. And keeping the emphasis on fun. And also my Co- Chair, Mal Cohen, who had more stamina than many of us, despite major surgery only three weeks ago. Mal and I have written a few lines describing each of the seventeen papers in our session, to give you a quick over-view, and as a guide to the full abstracts, We have grouped them under five themes: preflight and inflight countermeasurements, postlanding posture and locomotion deficits: assessment and prediction, adaptive processes, relationships among physical simuli, perceptions, and eye movements, vestibular contribution to human autonomic responses, and implications and recommendations.

  4. Neurovestibular Session Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, Charles; Cohen, Malcolm

    1999-01-01

    . Three examples were presented at this meeting: 1) Transgenic animal experiments suggest that in addition to the light illumination cycle, vestibular inputs may also serve as an important input to the circadian system. 2) Radiation can cause important CNS effects in animals, including loss of spatial memory. 3) As described in our session, otolith inputs may contribute to cardiovascular regulation of orthostatic tolerance. Over the past three days, we've all enjoyed catching up with old friends, and making many new ones. On behalf of my colleagues, I want to thank Al Coats and the USRA DSLS staff for the great job they did in running this meeting. And keeping the emphasis on fun. And also my Co- Chair, Mal Cohen, who had more stamina than many of us, despite major surgery only three weeks ago. Mal and I have written a few lines describing each of the seventeen papers in our session, to give you a quick over-view, and as a guide to the full abstracts, We have grouped them under five themes: preflight and inflight countermeasurements, postlanding posture and locomotion deficits: assessment and prediction, adaptive processes, relationships among physical simuli, perceptions, and eye movements, vestibular contribution to human autonomic responses, and implications and recommendations.

  5. 77 FR 62211 - Board of Directors Executive Session Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ..., 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. 2. Open session, Tuesday, October 23, 2012, 10:45 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Lloyd O. Pierson, President & CEO, USADF. [FR Doc. 2012-25060 Filed 10-11-12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE P ...

  6. Clinical coding. Code breakers.

    PubMed

    Mathieson, Steve

    2005-02-24

    --The advent of payment by results has seen the role of the clinical coder pushed to the fore in England. --Examinations for a clinical coding qualification began in 1999. In 2004, approximately 200 people took the qualification. --Trusts are attracting people to the role by offering training from scratch or through modern apprenticeships.

  7. STS-129 food tasting session.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-05-04

    JSC2009-E-107050 (4 May 2009) --- Astronauts Leland Melvin (left), Robert Satcher and Randy Bresnik, all STS-129 mission specialists, participate in a food tasting session in the Habitability and Environmental Factors Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  8. STS-129 food tasting session.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-05-04

    JSC2009-E-107056 (4 May 2009) --- Astronauts Leland Melvin (left) and Robert Satcher, both STS-129 mission specialists, participate in a food tasting session in the Habitability and Environmental Factors Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  9. STS-129 food tasting session.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-05-04

    JSC2009-E-107054 (4 May 2009) --- Astronauts Charlie Hobaugh (left), STS-129 commander; Leland Melvin and Robert Satcher, both mission specialists, participate in a food tasting session in the Habitability and Environmental Factors Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  10. STS-129 food tasting session.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-05-04

    JSC2009-E-107048 (4 May 2009) --- Astronaut Randy Bresnik, STS-129 mission specialist, participates in a food tasting session in the Habitability and Environmental Factors Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  11. STS-129 food tasting session.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-05-04

    JSC2009-E-107051 (4 May 2009) --- Astronauts Barry Wilmore (left), STS-129 pilot; and Mike Foreman, mission specialist, participate in a food tasting session in the Habitability and Environmental Factors Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  12. STS-129 food tasting session.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-05-04

    JSC2009-E-107047 (4 May 2009) --- Astronaut Leland Melvin, STS-129 mission specialist, participates in a food tasting session in the Habitability and Environmental Factors Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  13. STS-129 food tasting session.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-05-04

    JSC2009-E-107052 (4 May 2009) --- Astronauts Leland Melvin (left), Robert Satcher and Randy Bresnik, all STS-129 mission specialists, participate in a food tasting session in the Habitability and Environmental Factors Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  14. STS-129 food tasting session.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-05-04

    JSC2009-E-107059 (4 May 2009) --- Astronauts Robert Satcher (left) and Randy Bresnik, both STS-129 mission specialists, participate in a food tasting session in the Habitability and Environmental Factors Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  15. Session 3 in ACAT05

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, J.

    2006-04-01

    Activities in Session 3 of AIHENP/ACAT series are reviewed. In the perturbative approaches in high energy physics, this session keeps a special position among several similar other workshops because it deals with the massive usage of computers and/or artificial intelligence, not only physics consequences. In this edition of the series there appear in addition two new topics on the lattice QCD and the quantum computation.

  16. Poster Session A

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    A.1 Labeling of Peptide Fragmented Mass Spectra in Proteomic Studies B. Gerrits1, C. Panse1, B. Bodenmiller2, and R. Schlapbach1 1UZH/ETH Functional Genomics Center, Zurich, Switzerland; 2IMSB/ETH, Zurich, Switzerland Due to the advent of accurate and fast sampling mass spectrometers, proteomic experiments often contain thousands of peptide fragmentation spectra. Although it is commonly accepted that no manual validation of individual spectra in such experiments is feasible, annotated spectra of the peptides assignments with their modifications are required for publication and reviewing purposes. Here we present an algorithm that greatly facilitates the visualisation of peptide fragmentation spectra and aides with the quality assessment of modification sites such as phosphorylation. The application has two inputs: 1) the Mascot dat-file including the Mascot modifications and 2) the assignment list containing the query number and peptide rank. In the first step using Perl, the application retrieves the peptide assignments and computes the theoretical fragments. These are then mapped to the peak list with the error margin specified during the initial search. During the second stage using R, two different heuristics can be chosen to calculate the appropriate text-labels and print the labelled spectra. To demonstrate the usefulness of the peakplot application we built a CGI based world wide web accessible userinterface. Also via this interface several data sets are available for testing. As datfile content based filtering aion score cut-off, peptide query hit selection, and a selection by peptide modification based on the mascot servermodification file are provided. As output on default four different colour schemes areprovided, as well as one multi panel plot, which provides additional graphics and statistics about the assigned peaklist. A.2 Exact Quantification of Complex Protein Mixtures Using MeCAT—Metal Coded Tagging R. Ahrends1, U. Bergmann1, S. Pieper1, B

  17. Directed educational training improves coding and billing skills for residents.

    PubMed

    Benke, James R; Lin, Sandra Y; Ishman, Stacey L

    2013-03-01

    To determine if coding and billing acumen improves after a single directed educational training session. Case-control series. Fourteen otolaryngology practitioners including trainees each completed two clinical scenarios before and after a directed educational session covering basic skills and common mistakes in otolaryngology billing and coding. Ten practitioners had never coded before; while, four regularly billed and coded in a clinical setting. Individuals with no previous billing experience had a mean score of 54% (median 55%) before the educational session which was significantly lower than that of the experienced billers who averaged 82% (median 83%, p=0.002). After the educational billing and coding session, the inexperienced billers mean score improved to 62% (median, 67%) which was still statistically lower than that of the experienced billers who averaged 76% (median 75%, p=0.039). The inexperienced billers demonstrated a significant improvement in their total score after the intervention (P=0.019); however, the change observed in experienced billers before and after the educational intervention was not significant (P=0.469). Billing and coding skill was improved after a single directed education session. Residents, who are not responsible for regular billing and coding, were found to have the greatest improvement in skill. However, providers who regularly bill and code had no significant improvement after this session. These data suggest that a single 90min billing and coding education session is effective in preparing those with limited experience to competently bill and code. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Summary report of session VI

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou et al.

    2002-08-19

    This report gives a brief review of the presentations in Session VI of the Ecloud'02 Workshop and summarizes the major points during the discussions. Some points (e.g., the critical mass phenomenon) are not conclusive and even controversial. But it has been agreed that further investigations are warranted. The topic of Session VI in the Ecloud'02 workshop is ''Discussions of future studies, collaborations and possible solutions.'' Half of the session is devoted to presentations, another half to discussions. This report will focus on the latter. There are six presentations: (1) R. Macek, Possible cures to the e-cloud problem; (2) G. Rumolo, Driving the electron-cloud instability by an electron cooler; (3) U. Iriso Ariz, RF test benches for electron-cloud studies; (4) F. Caspers, Stealth clearing electrodes; (5) F. Ruggiero, Future electron-cloud studies at CERN; and (6) E. Perevedentsev, Beam-beam and transverse impedance model.

  19. Poster Sessions. [Concurrent Poster Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains presentations from four poster sessions at a conference on human resource development (HRD). "Human Resource and Organization Development Program Brochures: What Prospective Students Want" (Rose Opengart, Mary Wilson Callahan) reports on a study of promotional materials of graduate programs in the field of human…

  20. IMC9 Edinburgh Nomenclature Sessions.

    PubMed

    Norvell, Lorelei L; Hawksworth, David L; Petersen, Ronald H; Redhead, Scott A

    2010-12-01

    The proceedings of the 3-5 August 2010, IMC9 Edinburgh Nomenclature Sessions are briefly summarized. The final resolution approved by the General Assembly endorses the recommendations by the Nomenclature Sessions regarding transfer of the governance of fungal nomenclature from botanical to mycological congresses, mandatory pre-publication deposit of nomenclatural information for valid publication of new fungal names, and the acceptability of English as an alternative to Latin in the valid publication of fungal names. Complete results from the IMC9 nomenclature questionnaire are also provided.

  1. Interactive TV on parliament session

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, J.; Nguyen, H.; Martinot, O.; Preda, M.; Preteux, F.; Zaharia, T.

    2007-09-01

    This paper introduces a new interactive mobile TV application related to parliament session. This application aims to provide additional information to mobile TV users by inserting automatically and in real-time interactive contents (complementary information, subject of the current session...) into original TV program, using MPEG-4 streaming video and extra real time information (news, events, databases... from RSS streams, Internet links...). Here, we propose an architecture based on plug-in multimedia analyzers to generate the contextual description of the media and on an interactive scene generator to dynamically create related interactive scenes. Description is implemented according to the MPEG-7 standard.

  2. STS-129 food tasting session.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-05-04

    JSC2009-E-107053 (4 May 2009) --- STS-129 crewmembers participate in a food tasting session in the Habitability and Environmental Factors Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Pictured from the left are astronauts Barry Wilmore, pilot; Mike Foreman, mission specialist; Charlie Hobaugh, commander; Leland Melvin, Robert Satcher and Randy Bresnik, all mission specialists.

  3. STS-129 food tasting session.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-05-04

    JSC2009-E-107057 (4 May 2009) --- Astronauts Charlie Hobaugh (right), STS-129 commander; Barry Wilmore (left), pilot; and Mike Foreman, mission specialist, participate in a food tasting session in the Habitability and Environmental Factors Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  4. STS-129 food tasting session.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-05-04

    JSC2009-E-107049 (4 May 2009) --- Astronauts Charlie Hobaugh (right), STS-129 commander; Mike Foreman (center), mission specialist; and Barry Wilmore, pilot, participate in a food tasting session in the Habitability and Environmental Factors Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  5. Summary of Educational Poster Session

    Treesearch

    1992-01-01

    The educational poster session provided a way of increasing the ordinarily limited time available for discussion of papers, while simultaneously making it easier to communicate visual materials not well suited to oral presentations. Poster presenters were available for 3 hours to discuss their displays. Poster presentations were divided into two categories: minority...

  6. Introduction to Session 1A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himmel, Michael E.

    Understanding and overcoming the natural resistance of plant cell walls to enzymatic hydrolysis remains one of the most active research areas in biofuels production (as indicated by the number of abstracts and papers submitted to this session). A number of the oral presentations given during the Enzyme Catalysis and Engineering session highlighted the use of new and innovative tools for advancing our understanding of plant cell wall deconstruction. The oral presentations and posters given for this session included applications of imaging tools and computational models to advance our understanding of biomass recalcitrance relative to enzymatic deconstruction. This session was opened with a presentation by Dr. Danny Akin, who outlined the structural and chemical barriers for the bioconversion of grasses to sugars. Lignocelluloses from grasses, such as switch grass, are resistant to bioconversion by various aromatic constituuents, which include both lignins and phenolic acid esters. However, Akin and coworkers demonstrated the use of selected white rot fungal enzymes, which lack cellulases that could be used to produce delignified lignocellulosic materials, resulting in improved bioconversion.

  7. Online Training Sessions: Suggested Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabonell, Martha; And Others

    1981-01-01

    These planning and evaluative guidelines for online trainers utilize a sliding scale--from minimal to suggested to optimal--for five types of training sessions: (1) Search Service--Beginning; (2) Search Service--Advanced; (3) Search Service--Subject; (4) Database Producer; and (5) Independent Introductory Workshop. (RAA)

  8. Aeropropulsion 1987. Session 3: Internal Fluid Mechanics Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Internal fluid mechanics research at Lewis is directed toward an improved understanding of the important flow physics affecting aerospace propulsion systems, and applying this improved understanding to formulate accurate predictive codes. To this end, research is conducted involving detailed experimentation and analysis. The presentations in this session summarize ongoing work and indicated future emphasis in three major research thrusts: namely, inlets, ducts, and nozzles; turbomachinery; and chemical reacting flows.

  9. Ethical coding.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Barry I

    2009-01-01

    It is ethical, legal, and proper for a dermatologist to maximize income through proper coding of patient encounters and procedures. The overzealous physician can misinterpret reimbursement requirements or receive bad advice from other physicians and cross the line from aggressive coding to coding fraud. Several of the more common problem areas are discussed.

  10. Introduction to Session 1B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sticklen, Mariam B.

    Topics presented in the "Plant Biotechnology and Genomics" session focused on technologies that highlight the important role of plant biotechnology and genomics in the development of future energy crops. Several excellent presentations demonstrated the latest advances in energy crop development through the use of plant cell wall regulation and by engineering new energy crops such as brown midrib sweet sorghum. Approaches included the control of cellulose production by increased expression of cellulase synthase genes and the selection of high-yield varieties of shrub willows. The potential of producing hydrolytic enzymes using transgenic plants as a cost-effective means for the large-scale production of these enzymes was also explored in the session, as was the role of posttranslational modifications on the activities of heterologous expressed cellulases in hosts such as Pichia pastoris.

  11. SIRA: TREC Session Track 2014

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    different approaches in three separate runs for their participation in the 2013 Session Track. Their first run involved a simple retrieval system, their...should be wrapped around said words. Specifically, our system extracted nouns , verbs, adverbs, and adjectives and finds the highest frequency...task, we decided to use just the general frame consisting of nouns , verbs, people, locations, and organizations recognized in the text. The system

  12. Session: Long Valley Exploratory Well

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Finger, John T.; Eichelberger, John C.; Hickox, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Long Valley Exploratory Well - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''The Long Valley Well - Phase II Operations'' by John T. Finger; ''Geologic results from the Long Valley Exploratory Well'' by John C. Eichelberger; and ''A Model for Large-Scale Thermal Convection in the Long Valley Geothermal Region'' by Charles E. Hickox.

  13. Uplink Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollara, Fabrizio; Hamkins, Jon; Dolinar, Sam; Andrews, Ken; Divsalar, Dariush

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews uplink coding. The purpose and goals of the briefing are (1) Show a plan for using uplink coding and describe benefits (2) Define possible solutions and their applicability to different types of uplink, including emergency uplink (3) Concur with our conclusions so we can embark on a plan to use proposed uplink system (4) Identify the need for the development of appropriate technology and infusion in the DSN (5) Gain advocacy to implement uplink coding in flight projects Action Item EMB04-1-14 -- Show a plan for using uplink coding, including showing where it is useful or not (include discussion of emergency uplink coding).

  14. Sharing code.

    PubMed

    Kubilius, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Sharing code is becoming increasingly important in the wake of Open Science. In this review I describe and compare two popular code-sharing utilities, GitHub and Open Science Framework (OSF). GitHub is a mature, industry-standard tool but lacks focus towards researchers. In comparison, OSF offers a one-stop solution for researchers but a lot of functionality is still under development. I conclude by listing alternative lesser-known tools for code and materials sharing.

  15. Practical Session: Simple Linear Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausel, M.; Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    Two exercises are proposed to illustrate the simple linear regression. The first one is based on the famous Galton's data set on heredity. We use the lm R command and get coefficients estimates, standard error of the error, R2, residuals …In the second example, devoted to data related to the vapor tension of mercury, we fit a simple linear regression, predict values, and anticipate on multiple linear regression. This pratical session is an excerpt from practical exercises proposed by A. Dalalyan at EPNC (see Exercises 1 and 2 of http://certis.enpc.fr/~dalalyan/Download/TP_ENPC_4.pdf).

  16. Institutional computing (IC) information session

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Kenneth R; Lally, Bryan R

    2011-01-19

    The LANL Institutional Computing Program (IC) will host an information session about the current state of unclassified Institutional Computing at Los Alamos, exciting plans for the future, and the current call for proposals for science and engineering projects requiring computing. Program representatives will give short presentations and field questions about the call for proposals and future planned machines, and discuss technical support available to existing and future projects. Los Alamos has started making a serious institutional investment in open computing available to our science projects, and that investment is expected to increase even more.

  17. Working session 3: Tubing integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Cueto-Felgueroso, C.; Strosnider, J.

    1997-02-01

    Twenty-three individuals representing nine countries (Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, France, Japan, the Slovak Republic, Spain, the UK, and the US) participated in the session on tube integrity. These individuals represented utilities, vendors, consultants and regulatory authorities. The major subjects discussed by the group included overall objectives of managing steam generator tube degradation, necessary elements of a steam generator degradation management program, the concept of degradation specific management, structural integrity evaluations, leakage evaluations, and specific degradation mechanisms. The group`s discussions on these subjects, including conclusions and recommendations, are summarized in this article.

  18. Summer Session Organizational Models at Canadian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kops, Bill

    2010-01-01

    The issue of summer session organizational models continues to be of interest to summer session deans/directors and university administrators. The University of Victoria surveyed Canadian universities on this issue in 1994. Based on a similar survey done in 2009, this paper updates the status of Canadian university summer session organizational…

  19. Working session 1: Tubing degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Kharshafdjian, G.; Turluer, G.

    1997-02-01

    A general introductory overview of the purpose of the group and the general subject area of SG tubing degradation was given by the facilitator. The purpose of the session was described as to {open_quotes}develop conclusions and proposals on regulatory and technical needs required to deal with the issues of SG tubing degradation.{close_quotes} Types, locations and characteristics of tubing degradation in steam generators were briefly reviewed. The well-known synergistic effects of materials, environment, and stress and strain/strain rate, subsequently referred to by the acronym {open_quotes}MESS{close_quotes} by some of the group members, were noted. The element of time (i.e., evolution of these variables with time) was emphasized. It was also suggested that the group might want to consider the related topics of inspection capabilities, operational variables, degradation remedies, and validity of test data, and some background information in these areas was provided. The presentation given by Peter Millet during the Plenary Session was reviewed; Specifically, the chemical aspects and the degradation from the secondary side of the steam generator were noted. The main issues discussed during the October 1995 EPRI meeting on secondary side corrosion were reported, and a listing of the potential SG tube degradations was provided and discussed.

  20. Session: Wind industry project development

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Tom; Enfield, Sam

    2004-09-01

    This first session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a question and answer period. The session was intended to provide a general overview of wind energy product development, from the industry's perspective. Tom Gray of AWEA presented a paper titled ''State of the Wind Energy Industry in 2004'', highlighting improved performance and lower cost, efforts to address avian impacts, a status of wind energy in comparison to other energy-producing sources, and ending on expectations for the near future. Sam Enfield of Atlantic Renewable Energy Corporation presented a paper titled ''Key Factors for Consideration in Wind Plant Siting'', highlighting factors that wind facility developers must consider when choosing a site to build wind turbines and associated structures. Factors covered include wind resources available, ownership and land use patterns, access to transmission lines, accessibility and environmental impacts. The question and answer sum mary included topics related to risk taking, research and development, regulatory requirements, and dealing with utilities.

  1. A Video Recall Study of In-session Changes in Sentiment Override.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lee N; Tambling, Rachel B; Anderson, Shayne R

    2015-09-01

    This study examines in-session changes in sentiment override over the first three sessions of couple therapy. Couples viewed a video recording of therapy sessions immediately after each of the first three sessions and continuously rated their level of sentiment override. Ninety-eight changes were randomly chosen for analysis. Three talk turns prior to each change was coded using the Family Relational Communication Control Coding System. Results show that changes in sentiment override occur frequently. Repeated incidents of communication control were related to negative change in sentiment override for females. Repeated incidents of being left out of the conversation were related to negative changes in sentiment override for females and positive changes for males.

  2. DNA codes

    SciTech Connect

    Torney, D. C.

    2001-01-01

    We have begun to characterize a variety of codes, motivated by potential implementation as (quaternary) DNA n-sequences, with letters denoted A, C The first codes we studied are the most reminiscent of conventional group codes. For these codes, Hamming similarity was generalized so that the score for matched letters takes more than one value, depending upon which letters are matched [2]. These codes consist of n-sequences satisfying an upper bound on the similarities, summed over the letter positions, of distinct codewords. We chose similarity 2 for matches of letters A and T and 3 for matches of the letters C and G, providing a rough approximation to double-strand bond energies in DNA. An inherent novelty of DNA codes is 'reverse complementation'. The latter may be defined, as follows, not only for alphabets of size four, but, more generally, for any even-size alphabet. All that is required is a matching of the letters of the alphabet: a partition into pairs. Then, the reverse complement of a codeword is obtained by reversing the order of its letters and replacing each letter by its match. For DNA, the matching is AT/CG because these are the Watson-Crick bonding pairs. Reversal arises because two DNA sequences form a double strand with opposite relative orientations. Thus, as will be described in detail, because in vitro decoding involves the formation of double-stranded DNA from two codewords, it is reasonable to assume - for universal applicability - that the reverse complement of any codeword is also a codeword. In particular, self-reverse complementary codewords are expressly forbidden in reverse-complement codes. Thus, an appropriate distance between all pairs of codewords must, when large, effectively prohibit binding between the respective codewords: to form a double strand. Only reverse-complement pairs of codewords should be able to bind. For most applications, a DNA code is to be bi-partitioned, such that the reverse-complementary pairs are separated

  3. Session Two Outcome of the Formula First Session Task in Problem- and Solution-Focused Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Karin; Quinn, William H.

    1994-01-01

    Evaluated treatment effects in single session process using problem-focused approach and solution-focused approach. Findings indicated significant difference between two approaches when dealing with client's perceived problem improvement, outcome expectancy, session depth, session smoothness, and session positivity. Found no significant…

  4. Session: Discussion of Research Needs

    SciTech Connect

    anon.

    2004-09-01

    This final session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop was lead by a facilitator who asked participants for their overall reaction to the research that had been presented during the workshop. Questions addressed by workshop participants included: how do you develop trust and confidence in the research, what are some of the specific gaps in our understanding of wind energy's impact on birds and bats; how do we prioritize and proceed with closing the data/research gaps; how do we connect the dots and bring various research and mapping efforts together; given gaps in the data, what are the critical questions we need to answer to make project decisions now; and, how do we track/influence the policies that will shape wind energy development. Conclusions reached regarding these questions are included in summary form.

  5. Working session 2: Tubing inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Guerra, J.; Tapping, R.L.

    1997-02-01

    This session was attended by delegates from 10 countries, and four papers were presented. A wide range of issues was tabled for discussion. Realizing that there was limited time available for more detailed discussion, three topics were chosen for the more detailed discussion: circumferential cracking, performance demonstration (to focus on POD and sizing), and limits of methods. Two other subsessions were organized: one dealt with some challenges related to the robustness of current inspection methods, especially with respect to leaving cracked tubes in service, and the other with developing a chart of current NDE technology with recommendations for future development. These three areas are summarized in turn, along with conclusions and/or recommendations. During the discussions there were four presentations. There were two (Canada, Japan) on eddy current probe developments, both of which addressed multiarray probes that would detect a range of flaws, one (Spain) on circumferential crack detection, and one (JRC, Petten) on the recent PISC III results.

  6. Dreams that mirror the session.

    PubMed

    Civitarese, Giuseppe

    2006-06-01

    Dreams in which the analyst appears undisguised almost always depict violations of the setting. Often experienced as special, epiphanic moments, they give a glimpse of an intense, emotional reaction to traumatogenic or otherwise significant events that have occurred during the session or in the most recent previous ones. Probably, the essential aspect of these dreams can be found in the 'form of their content'. This may be paralleled by the narrative technique of mise en abyme or mirror-text. The dream appears as a story within the main story and the scene of the analysis is reflected anti-illusionistically. The fictional structure of the setting is emphasized. Its theatrical self-consciousness quality is revealed at its best. The author postulates that the transformative therapeutic value of these dreams derives from denouncing the referential illusion of 'concrete reality' and of 'what really happened'. For the analysand, they are an effective (i.e. emotionally intense) opportunity to discover the spatial articulations and the staggering refractions of the inside/outside, the textual/extra-textual, the psychic reality/material reality. In the continual comings and goings from one term to another, the work of symbolization is reactivated and the subject is constructed. Dreams that mirror the session, from this point of view, provide a model for conceptualizing the analytic work, and their significance goes beyond the specific phenomena referred to. A clinical case is given, in which some of one patient's dreams are considered as they occurred over a short period. In one of them, the dream-within-a-dream phenomenon is present.

  7. Sharing code

    PubMed Central

    Kubilius, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Sharing code is becoming increasingly important in the wake of Open Science. In this review I describe and compare two popular code-sharing utilities, GitHub and Open Science Framework (OSF). GitHub is a mature, industry-standard tool but lacks focus towards researchers. In comparison, OSF offers a one-stop solution for researchers but a lot of functionality is still under development. I conclude by listing alternative lesser-known tools for code and materials sharing. PMID:25165519

  8. Therapist influence on client language during motivational interviewing sessions.

    PubMed

    Moyers, Theresa B; Martin, Tim

    2006-04-01

    Client language in favor of change is hypothesized to be a causal mechanism for motivational interviewing (MI), and specific therapist behaviors are prescribed to elicit such speech. This project examined 38 motivational enhancement therapy sessions from Project MATCH (Matching Alcoholism Treatments to Client Heterogeneity), using a sequential behavioral coding system to investigate the relationship between therapist behaviors and client speech. Conditional probabilities were calculated between MI-consistent (MICO) therapist behaviors, MI-inconsistent (MIIN) therapist behaviors, and immediately subsequent client speech. MICO behaviors were more likely to be followed by self-motivational statements, whereas MIIN behaviors were more likely to be followed by client resistance. These results lend support to the importance of therapist behaviors in shaping client speech during MI sessions.

  9. DREAMING THE ANALYTIC SESSION: A CLINICAL ESSAY.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Thomas H

    2017-01-01

    This is a clinical paper in which the author describes analytic work in which he dreams the analytic session with three of his patients. He begins with a brief discussion of aspects of analytic theory that make up a good deal of the context for his clinical work. Central among these concepts are (1) the idea that the role of the analyst is to help the patient dream his previously "undreamt" and "interrupted" dreams; and (2) dreaming the analytic session involves engaging in the experience of dreaming the session with the patient and, at the same time, unconsciously (and at times consciously) understanding the dream. The author offers no "technique" for dreaming the analytic session. Each analyst must find his or her own way of dreaming each session with each patient. Dreaming the session is not something one works at; rather, one tries not to get in its way. © 2017 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  10. Anchor-Less Secure Session Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zugenmaier, Alf; Laganier, Julien; Prasad, Anand; Slavov, Kristian

    Communication session mobility relates transferring one endpoint of a communication session including its state from one device to another. Current proposals to deal with this securely require an anchor. We propose an anchor-less solution that takes some ideas from the host identity protocol. We then show how the idea of transferring endpoints simultaneously can be tackled without introducing timeouts as the session initiation protocol currently does.

  11. Synchrony in Dyadic Psychotherapy Sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramseyer, Fabian; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    Synchrony is a multi-faceted concept used in diverse domains such as physics, biology, and the social sciences. This chapter reviews some of the evidence of nonverbal synchrony in human communication, with a main focus on the role of synchrony in the psychotherapeutic setting. Nonverbal synchrony describes coordinated behavior of patient and therapist. Its association with empathy, rapport and the therapeutic relationship has been pointed out repeatedly, yet close evaluation of empirical studies suggests that the evidence remains inconclusive. Particularly in naturalistic studies, research with quantitative measures of synchrony is still lacking. We introduce a new empirical approach for the study of synchrony in psychotherapies under field conditions: Motion Energy Analysis (MEA). This is a video-based algorithm that quantifies the amount of movement in freely definable regions of interest. Our statistical analysis detects synchrony on a global level, irrespective of the specific body parts moving. Synchrony thus defined can be considered as a general measure of movement coordination between interacting individuals. Data from a sequence of N = 21 therapy sessions taken from one psychotherapy dyad shows a high positive relationship between synchrony and the therapeutic bond. Nonverbal synchrony can thus be considered a promising concept for research on the therapeutic alliance. Further areas of application are discussed.

  12. Experience of a Reiki session.

    PubMed

    Engebretson, Joan; Wardell, Diane Wind

    2002-01-01

    Touch therapies, including Reiki, are increasingly popular complementary therapies. Previous studies of touch therapies have yielded equivocal findings. Exploring the experiences of Reiki recipients contributes to understanding the popularity of touch therapies and possibly elucidates variables for future studies. Descriptive study with quantitative and qualitative data. This report focuses on qualitative interview data. Thematic analysis was used to discern patterns in the experience. All Reiki treatments were given in a sound proof windowless room by one Reiki master. Audiotaped interviews were conducted immediately after the treatment in a quiet room adjoining the treatment room. Generally healthy volunteers (N=23) who were naive to Reiki. Standardized, 30-minute Reiki session. Interview data supported by quantitative data. Participants described a liminal state of awareness in which sensate and symbolic phenomena were experienced in a paradoxical way. Liminality was apparent in participants' orientation to time, place, environment, and self Paradox also was seen in participants' symbolic experiences of internal feelings, cognitive experience, and external experience of relationship to the Reiki master. Liminal states and paradoxical experiences that occur in ritual healing are related to the holistic nature and individual variation of the healing experience. These findings suggest that many linear models used in researching touch therapies are not complex enough to capture the experience of participants.

  13. Speech coding

    SciTech Connect

    Ravishankar, C., Hughes Network Systems, Germantown, MD

    1998-05-08

    Speech is the predominant means of communication between human beings and since the invention of the telephone by Alexander Graham Bell in 1876, speech services have remained to be the core service in almost all telecommunication systems. Original analog methods of telephony had the disadvantage of speech signal getting corrupted by noise, cross-talk and distortion Long haul transmissions which use repeaters to compensate for the loss in signal strength on transmission links also increase the associated noise and distortion. On the other hand digital transmission is relatively immune to noise, cross-talk and distortion primarily because of the capability to faithfully regenerate digital signal at each repeater purely based on a binary decision. Hence end-to-end performance of the digital link essentially becomes independent of the length and operating frequency bands of the link Hence from a transmission point of view digital transmission has been the preferred approach due to its higher immunity to noise. The need to carry digital speech became extremely important from a service provision point of view as well. Modem requirements have introduced the need for robust, flexible and secure services that can carry a multitude of signal types (such as voice, data and video) without a fundamental change in infrastructure. Such a requirement could not have been easily met without the advent of digital transmission systems, thereby requiring speech to be coded digitally. The term Speech Coding is often referred to techniques that represent or code speech signals either directly as a waveform or as a set of parameters by analyzing the speech signal. In either case, the codes are transmitted to the distant end where speech is reconstructed or synthesized using the received set of codes. A more generic term that is applicable to these techniques that is often interchangeably used with speech coding is the term voice coding. This term is more generic in the sense that the

  14. Emotion episodes during psychotherapy sessions among women newly diagnosed with gynecological cancers.

    PubMed

    Myers Virtue, Shannon; Manne, Sharon L; Darabos, Kathleen; Heckman, Carolyn J; Ozga, Melissa; Kissane, David; Rubin, Stephen; Rosenblum, Norman

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe emotion episodes during early and late psychotherapy sessions among women newly diagnosed with gynecological cancer and to examine whether the total number of emotion episodes during early and later sessions was associated with baseline psychological distress, dispositional emotion expressivity, and patient-rated therapeutic progress. The study utilized data from an ongoing study examining the efficacy of two psychotherapy interventions, a coping and communication intervention and a supportive counseling intervention, for women diagnosed with gynecological cancer. Emotion episode coding was completed for the first and sixth psychotherapy sessions for each patient randomized to receive psychotherapy (N = 173). Patients completed baseline survey measures of psychological distress and dispositional emotional expressivity and post-session ratings of therapeutic progress. The average number of emotion episodes was 7.4 in the first session and 5.2 episodes in the sixth session. In both sessions, the majority of emotion episodes contained only negative emotions and focused on a cancer-related topic. A higher number of emotion episodes in the first session was associated with higher psychological distress reported in the baseline survey (p = 0.02). A higher number of emotion episodes in the sixth session was associated with a higher number of emotion episodes in the first session (p < 0.001) and higher patient-rated progress as rated in the sixth session (p = 0.016). The findings highlight the importance of expressed emotions, particularly negative emotions about cancer-related topics, in therapeutic progress during psychotherapy among women diagnosed with gynecological cancer. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Emotion Episodes during Psychotherapy Sessions among Women Newly Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Virtue, Shannon Myers; Manne, Sharon L.; O’Neill, Kathleen; Heckman, Carolyn J.; Ozga, Melissa; Kissane, David; Rubin, Stephen; Rosenblum, Norman

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe emotion episodes during early and late psychotherapy sessions among women newly diagnosed with gynecological cancer and to examine whether the total number of emotional episodes during early and later sessions were associated with baseline psychological distress, dispositional emotion expressivity, and patient-rated therapeutic progress. Methods The study utilized data from an ongoing study examining the efficacy of two psychotherapy interventions, a coping and communication intervention (CCI) and a supportive counseling intervention (SC), for women diagnosed with gynecological cancer. Emotion episode coding was completed for the first and sixth psychotherapy session for each patient randomized to receive psychotherapy (N = 173). Patients completed baseline survey measures of psychological distress and dispositional emotional expressivity and post-session ratings of therapeutic progress. Results The average number of emotion episodes was 7.4 in the first session and 5.2 episodes in the sixth session. In both sessions, the majority of emotion episodes contained only negative emotions and focused on a cancer-related topic. A higher1number of emotion episodes in the first session was associated with higher psychological distress reported in the baseline survey (p = .02). A higher number of emotions episodes in the sixth session was associated with a higher number of emotion episodes in the first session (p < .001) and higher patient-rated progress as rated in the sixth session (p = .016). Conclusion The findings highlight the importance of expressed emotions, particularly negative emotions about cancer-related topics, in therapeutic progress during psychotherapy among women diagnosed with gynecological cancer. PMID:25521772

  16. Nature's Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Vanessa J.; Rowlands, Peter

    2008-10-01

    We propose that the mathematical structures related to the `universal rewrite system' define a universal process applicable to Nature, which we may describe as `Nature's code'. We draw attention here to such concepts as 4 basic units, 64- and 20-unit structures, symmetry-breaking and 5-fold symmetry, chirality, double 3-dimensionality, the double helix, the Van der Waals force and the harmonic oscillator mechanism, and our explanation of how they necessarily lead to self-aggregation, complexity and emergence in higher-order systems. Biological concepts, such as translation, transcription, replication, the genetic code and the grouping of amino acids appear to be driven by fundamental processes of this kind, and it would seem that the Platonic solids, pentagonal symmetry and Fibonacci numbers have significant roles in organizing `Nature's code'.

  17. Show Code.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    "Let's get one thing straight: there is no such thing as a show code," my attending asserted, pausing for effect. "You either try to resuscitate, or you don't. None of this halfway junk." He spoke so loudly that the two off-service consultants huddled at computers at the end of the unit looked up… We did four rounds of compressions and pushed epinephrine twice. It was not a long code. We did good, strong compressions and coded this man in earnest until the end. Toward the final round, though, as I stepped up to do compressions, my attending looked at me in a deep way. It was a look in between willing me as some object under his command and revealing to me everything that lay within his brash, confident surface but could not be spoken. © 2017 The Hastings Center.

  18. Session duration and the VI response function: Within-session prospective and retrospective effects

    PubMed Central

    Dougan, James D.; Kuh, J. Alfred; Vink, K. L.

    1993-01-01

    Two experiments examined the effects of session duration on responding during simple variable-interval schedules. In Experiment 1, rats were exposed to a series of simple variable-interval schedules differing in both session duration (10 min or 30 min) and scheduled reinforcement rate (7.5 s, 15 s, 30 s, and 480 s). The functions relating response rate to reinforcement rate were predominantly monotonic for the short (10-min) sessions but were predominantly bitonic for the long (30-min) sessions, when data from the entire session were considered. Examination of responding within sessions suggested that differences in the whole-session data were produced by a combination of prospective processes (i.e., processes based on events scheduled to occur later in the session) and retrospective processes (i.e., processes based on events that had already occurred in the session). In Experiment 2, rats were exposed to a modified discrimination procedure in which pellet flavor (standard or banana) predicted session duration (10 min or 30 min). All rats came to respond faster during the short (10-min) sessions than during the first 10 min of the long sessions. As in Experiment 1, the results seemed to reflect the simultaneous operation of both prospective and retrospective processes. The results shed light on the recent controversy over the form of the variable-interval response function by identifying one variable (session duration) and two types of processes (prospective and retrospective) that influence responding on these schedules. PMID:16812719

  19. Poster session ELIPGRID-PC

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.R.

    1995-02-01

    ELIPGRID-PC, a new personal computer program, has been developed to provide easy access to Singer`s ELIPGRID algorithm for hot-spot detection probabilities. Three features of the program are the ability to determine: (1) the grid size required for specified conditions, (2) the smallest hot spot that can be sampled with a given probability, and (3) the approximate grid size resulting from specified conditions and sampling cost. ELIPGRID-PC also provides probability of detection versus cost data for graphing with spreadsheets or graphics software. The program has been successfully tested using Singer`s published ELIPGRID results. An apparent error in the published ELIPGRID code has been uncovered and an appropriate modification incorporated into the new program.

  20. QR Codes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Hsin-Chih; Chang, Chun-Yen; Li, Wen-Shiane; Fan, Yu-Lin; Wu, Ying-Tien

    2013-01-01

    This study presents an m-learning method that incorporates Integrated Quick Response (QR) codes. This learning method not only achieves the objectives of outdoor education, but it also increases applications of Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning (CTML) (Mayer, 2001) in m-learning for practical use in a diverse range of outdoor locations. When…

  1. QR Codes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Hsin-Chih; Chang, Chun-Yen; Li, Wen-Shiane; Fan, Yu-Lin; Wu, Ying-Tien

    2013-01-01

    This study presents an m-learning method that incorporates Integrated Quick Response (QR) codes. This learning method not only achieves the objectives of outdoor education, but it also increases applications of Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning (CTML) (Mayer, 2001) in m-learning for practical use in a diverse range of outdoor locations. When…

  2. Uplink Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Ken; Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Moision, Bruce; Hamkins, Jon; Pollara, Fabrizio

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the objectives, meeting goals and overall NASA goals for the NASA Data Standards Working Group. The presentation includes information on the technical progress surrounding the objective, short LDPC codes, and the general results on the Pu-Pw tradeoff.

  3. Ann Arbor Session I: Breaking Ground.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Music Educators Journal, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Summarizes the first session of the National Symposium on the Applications of Psychology to the Teaching and Learning of Music held at Ann Arbor from October 30 to November 2, 1978. Sessions concerned auditory perception, motor learning, child development, memory and information processing, and affect and motivation. (SJL)

  4. Early Adolescence: Experiment with Poster Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Michael J.; Shaw, Edward

    1983-01-01

    In a poster session, students explain an experiment with the help of a poster that outlines the experimental procedures followed. Suggestions for preparing posters and conducting poster sessions are provided. A sample poster on the strength of electromagnets is also provided. (JN)

  5. Early Adolescence: Experiment with Poster Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Michael J.; Shaw, Edward

    1983-01-01

    In a poster session, students explain an experiment with the help of a poster that outlines the experimental procedures followed. Suggestions for preparing posters and conducting poster sessions are provided. A sample poster on the strength of electromagnets is also provided. (JN)

  6. Grants.gov Informational Session for Tribes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA partnered with Grants.gov to provide a Grants.gov Informational Session for Tribes that includes an overview of the registration process as well as how to use the Grants.gov web application. EPA held five consultation sessions.

  7. Summary of Round Table Session and Appendixes

    Treesearch

    1992-01-01

    The round table session was designed for interaction between the presenters and other round table participants. Twelve round tables, each capable of holding 10 participants were set up in one room. Presenters for the sessions were encouraged to lead discussions on one of many topics in these areas: a research idea that the presenter was just formulating; an unpublished...

  8. Undergraduate Researchers and the Poster Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Gail; Green, Raymond

    2007-01-01

    Undergraduates presented original research in classroom poster sessions open to students, faculty, and friends. We assessed the reaction of the students to the experience and their reported change in their interest in presenting at conferences. Students enjoyed the poster session experience and indicated they preferred this method over other…

  9. A Recipe for Successful Poster Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazard, Brenda L.

    2007-01-01

    Poster sessions are frequently on the menu at professional conferences and meetings. They offer an opportunity to share an idea, a solution, an experiment (successful or failed), or a discovery. Poster sessions tell a short visual story and include a frequently repeated, brief presentation (5-10 minutes), accompanying materials, and informal…

  10. H.R. 5299: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to phase out the tax subsidies for alcohol fuels involving alcohol produced from feedstocks eligible to receive Federal agricultural subsidies. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, November 29, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The report H.R. 5299 is a bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to phase out the tax subsidies of alcohol fuels involving alcohol produced from feedstocks eligible to receive Federal agriculture subsidies. The proposed legislative text is included.

  11. The Free Market Copyright Royalty Act of 1983. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Patents, Copyrights and Trademarks of the Committee on the Judiciary, United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session on S. 1270: A Bill to Amend Title 17, United States Code, Regarding the Copyright Royalty Tribunal. March 13, 1984. Serial No. J-98-100.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on the Judiciary.

    This document comprises a copy of a bill (S. 1270) and transcripts of hearings held in the U.S. Senate to amend Title 17, United States Code, regarding the Copyright Royalty Tribunal (CRT). An opening statement by Senator Dennis DeConcini of Arizona, the text of comments and materials submitted by R.E. Turner of the Turner Broadcasting System,…

  12. Session-RPE for quantifying the load of different youth basketball training sessions

    PubMed Central

    Tessitore, A; Gasperi, L; Gomez, MAR

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate youth basketball training, verifying the reliability of the session-RPE method in relation to session duration (< and ≥ 80 minutes) and workout typology (reduced and high warm-up, conditioning, technical, tactical, game portions within a single session) categories. Six male youth basketball players (age, 16.5±0.5 years; height, 195.5±6.75 cm; body mass, 93.9±10.9 kg; and body mass index, 23.6±2.8 kg.m-2) were monitored (HR, type and duration of workouts) during 15 (66 individual) training sessions (80±26 minutes). Edwards’ HR method was used as a reference measure of internal training load (ITL); the CR-10 RPE scale was administered 30 minutes after the end of each session. The results obtained showed that all comparisons between different session durations and workout portions revealed effects in term of Edwards’ ITLs except for warm-up portions. Moderate to strong relationships between Edwards’ and session- RPE methods emerged for all sessions (r = .85, P < .001), player’s sessions (r range = .79 - .95, P < .001), session durations (< 80 minutes: r = .67, P < .001; ≥ 80 minutes: r = .75, P < .001), and workout portions (r range = .78 - .89, P range = .002 - < .001). The findings indicated that coaches of youth basketball players can successfully use session-RPE to monitor the ITL, regardless of session durations and workout portions. PMID:28416891

  13. Effects of Post-Session Wheel Running on Within-Session Changes in Operant Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aoyama, Kenjiro

    2007-01-01

    This study tested the effects of post-session wheel running on within-session changes in operant responding. Lever-pressing by six rats was reinforced by a food pellet under a continuous reinforcement (CRF) schedule in 30-min sessions. Two different flavored food pellets were used as reinforcers. In the wheel conditions, 30-min operant-sessions…

  14. Effects of Post-Session Wheel Running on Within-Session Changes in Operant Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aoyama, Kenjiro

    2007-01-01

    This study tested the effects of post-session wheel running on within-session changes in operant responding. Lever-pressing by six rats was reinforced by a food pellet under a continuous reinforcement (CRF) schedule in 30-min sessions. Two different flavored food pellets were used as reinforcers. In the wheel conditions, 30-min operant-sessions…

  15. Argumentation and Participation Patterns in General Chemistry Peer-Led Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulatunga, Ushiri; Moog, Richard S.; Lewis, Jennifer E.

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the use of Toulmin's argumentation scheme to investigate the characteristics of student group argumentation in Peer-Led Guided Inquiry sessions for a General Chemistry I course. A coding scheme based on Toulmin's [Toulmin [1958] "The uses of argument." Cambridge: Cambridge University Press] argumentation…

  16. Argumentation and Participation Patterns in General Chemistry Peer-Led Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulatunga, Ushiri; Moog, Richard S.; Lewis, Jennifer E.

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the use of Toulmin's argumentation scheme to investigate the characteristics of student group argumentation in Peer-Led Guided Inquiry sessions for a General Chemistry I course. A coding scheme based on Toulmin's [Toulmin [1958] "The uses of argument." Cambridge: Cambridge University Press] argumentation…

  17. Flexible session management in a distributed environment

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Zach; Bradley, Dan; Tannenbaum, Todd; Sfiligoi, Igor; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Many secure communication libraries used by distributed systems, such as SSL, TLS, and Kerberos, fail to make a clear distinction between the authentication, session, and communication layers. In this paper we introduce CEDAR, the secure communication library used by the Condor High Throughput Computing software, and present the advantages to a distributed computing system resulting from CEDAR's separation of these layers. Regardless of the authentication method used, CEDAR establishes a secure session key, which has the flexibility to be used for multiple capabilities. We demonstrate how a layered approach to security sessions can avoid round-trips and latency inherent in network authentication. The creation of a distinct session management layer allows for optimizations to improve scalability by way of delegating sessions to other components in the system. This session delegation creates a chain of trust that reduces the overhead of establishing secure connections and enables centralized enforcement of system-wide security policies. Additionally, secure channels based upon UDP datagrams are often overlooked by existing libraries; we show how CEDAR's structure accommodates this as well. As an example of the utility of this work, we show how the use of delegated security sessions and other techniques inherent in CEDAR's architecture enables US CMS to meet their scalability requirements in deploying Condor over large-scale, wide-area grid systems.

  18. Flexible session management in a distributed environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Zach; Bradley, Dan; Tannenbaum, Todd; Sfiligoi, Igor

    2010-04-01

    Many secure communication libraries used by distributed systems, such as SSL, TLS, and Kerberos, fail to make a clear distinction between the authentication, session, and communication layers. In this paper we introduce CEDAR, the secure communication library used by the Condor High Throughput Computing software, and present the advantages to a distributed computing system resulting from CEDAR's separation of these layers. Regardless of the authentication method used, CEDAR establishes a secure session key, which has the flexibility to be used for multiple capabilities. We demonstrate how a layered approach to security sessions can avoid round-trips and latency inherent in network authentication. The creation of a distinct session management layer allows for optimizations to improve scalability by way of delegating sessions to other components in the system. This session delegation creates a chain of trust that reduces the overhead of establishing secure connections and enables centralized enforcement of system-wide security policies. Additionally, secure channels based upon UDP datagrams are often overlooked by existing libraries; we show how CEDAR's structure accommodates this as well. As an example of the utility of this work, we show how the use of delegated security sessions and other techniques inherent in CEDAR's architecture enables US CMS to meet their scalability requirements in deploying Condor over large-scale, wide-area grid systems.

  19. Endicott College at 2014 TREC Session Track

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    of a click graph to re-rank results for RL1, RL2, and RL3. The other two used relevance models computed over snippets from the session, and boosted...their RL3 run using click graph recommendations. In the absence of clicks (e.g., RL1 and clickless sessions in RL2 and RL3), two of the runs used pseudo...describe in Section 2. We then discuss our click graph re-ranking technique for the ECxCGxPRF run in Section 3 and the session relevance modeling

  20. Report of the Stability and Dynamics Session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Iwan; Chato, David; Collicott, Steven; Dadzic, Nihad; Duval, Walter; Garoff, Steven; Grayson, Gary; Hochstein, John; Kassemi, Mo; Nelson, Emily

    2003-01-01

    The plan for session are: 1. Are issues in the draft document appropriate and complete? 2. Are the issues properly organized and prioritized? 3. Is the plan well defined and suitable? 4. Are the proposed facilities adequate?

  1. Einstein Session of the Pontifical Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science, 1980

    1980-01-01

    The texts of four speeches, given at the 1979 Einstein Session of the Pontifical Academy held in Rome, are presented. Each address relates to some aspect of the life and times of Albert Einstein. (SA)

  2. Einstein Session of the Pontifical Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science, 1980

    1980-01-01

    The texts of four speeches, given at the 1979 Einstein Session of the Pontifical Academy held in Rome, are presented. Each address relates to some aspect of the life and times of Albert Einstein. (SA)

  3. Session title: Distributed and intelligent databases

    SciTech Connect

    Argos, P.; Mewes, H.W.; Frishman, D.

    1996-12-31

    This session focuses on the recent advances in the delivery of information to the biological community concerning genome sequencing and related information. New approaches include interconnecting existing databases, knowledge-based expert systems, interface languages and multiserver management.

  4. Session summary: Electronics, triggering and data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Rescia, S.

    1991-12-01

    The session focused on the requirements for calorimetry at the SSC/LHC. Results on new readout techniques, calibration, radiation hard electronics and semiconductor devices, analog and digital front and electronics, and trigger strategies are presented.

  5. Session on computation in biological pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Karp, P.D.; Riley, M.

    1996-12-31

    The papers in this session focus on the development of pathway databases and computational tools for pathway analysis. The discussion involves existing databases of sequenced genomes, as well as techniques for studying regulatory pathways.

  6. API Development for Persistent Data Sessions Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    for persistent sessions. This testing is conducted on a wired environment to reconnect the FTP, RTSP or Telnet respectively. If time permits, the...example of a low level interface used by application programmers is the Berkeley Sockets interface which UNIX systems support [5]. 19 Many...types of protocols involved for the session. Real Time Streaming Protocol ( RTSP ) and Real Time Protocol (RTP) . RTSP is used for video control

  7. 47 CFR 97.513 - VE session manager requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false VE session manager requirements. 97.513 Section... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.513 VE session manager requirements. (a) A VE session manager may be selected by the VE team for each examination session. The VE session...

  8. 76 FR 42112 - Specialty Crop Committee Stakeholder Listening Sessions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Office of the Secretary Specialty Crop Committee Stakeholder Listening Sessions AGENCY: Research, Education, and Economics, USDA. ACTION: Notice of stakeholder listening sessions... Department of Agriculture announces two stakeholder listening sessions of the Specialty Crop Committee,...

  9. Effect of patients' rights training sessions for nurses on perceptions of nurses and patients.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sanaa A; Hassan, Mona A; Hamouda, Seham Ibrahim; Abd Allah, Nama M

    2016-01-27

    Patients' rights are universal values that must be respected; however, it is not easy to put such values and principles into effect as approaches and attitudes differ from individual to individual, from society to society, and from country to country. If we want to reach a general conclusion about the status of patient rights in the world as whole, we should examine the situation in individual countries. To study the effect of training sessions for nurses about patients' rights on the perceptions of nurses and patients in two Egyptian hospitals. Quasi-experimental with pre- and posttest design was used in this study. Two groups of participants were included in the study: the first with 97 nurses and the second with 135 patients. A questionnaire sheet was used for nurses and patients to assess their perceptions about patients' rights before starting sessions. The training sessions were developed based on the baseline information gathered in the assessment phase and related literature. After the implementation of the sessions, a posttest was immediately conducted for nurses, while for patients the posttest was conducted 1 month after implementation to evaluate the effect of the nurses' training sessions on the patients' perceptions. The same tools were used in pretest and posttest. Written approval was sought and obtained from the administrators of the studied hospitals prior to conducting the study. Oral consent was obtained from nurses and patients willing to participate. Confidentiality and anonymity of the participants were strictly maintained through code numbers on the questionnaires. The improvement in nurses' knowledge and perceptions about patients' rights after implementation of the training sessions was remarkable. Moreover, an improvement in patients' perceptions regarding their rights was reported. Repetition of the training sessions is suggested to achieve continuous improvement. Provision of posters and booklets about a bill of patient rights within

  10. Attendance at NHS mandatory training sessions.

    PubMed

    Brand, Darren

    2015-02-17

    To identify factors that affect NHS healthcare professionals' attendance at mandatory training sessions. A quantitative approach was used, with a questionnaire sent to 400 randomly selected participants. A total of 122 responses were received, providing a mix of qualitative and quantitative data. Quantitative data were analysed using statistical methods. Open-ended responses were reviewed using thematic analysis. Clinical staff value mandatory training sessions highly. They are aware of the requirement to keep practice up-to-date and ensure patient safety remains a priority. However, changes to the delivery format of mandatory training sessions are required to enable staff to participate more easily, as staff are often unable to attend. The delivery of mandatory training should move from classroom-based sessions into the clinical area to maximise participation. Delivery should be assisted by local 'experts' who are able to customise course content to meet local requirements and the requirements of different staff groups. Improved arrangements to provide staff cover, for those attending training, would enable more staff to attend training sessions.

  11. A Session Type System with Subject Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Keigo; Yuen, Shoji; Agusa, Kiyoshi

    Distributed applications and services have become pervasive in our society due to the widespread use of internet and mobile devices. There are urgent demands to efficiently ensure safety and correctness of such software. A session-type system is a framework to statically check whether communication descriptions conform to certain protocols. They are shown to be effective yet simple enough to fit in harmony with existing programming languages. In the original session type system, the subject reduction property does not hold. This paper establishes a conservative extension of the original session type system with the subject reduction property. Finally, it is also shown that our typing rule properly extends the set of typeable processes.

  12. Error-correction coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinds, Erold W. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the progress made towards the completion of a specific task on error-correcting coding. The proposed research consisted of investigating the use of modulation block codes as the inner code of a concatenated coding system in order to improve the overall space link communications performance. The study proposed to identify and analyze candidate codes that will complement the performance of the overall coding system which uses the interleaved RS (255,223) code as the outer code.

  13. Overview of CODE V development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Thomas I.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is part of a session that is aimed at briefly describing some of today''s optical design software packages with emphasis on the program''s philosophy and technology. CODE V is the ongoing result of a development process that began in the 1960''s it is now the result of many people''s efforts. This paper summarizes the roots of the program some of its history dominant philosophies and technologies that have contributed to its usefulness and some that drive its continued development. ROOTS OF CODE V Conceived in the early 60''s This was at a time when there was skepticism that " automatic design" could design lenses equal or better than " hand" methods. The concepts underlying CODE V and its predecessors were based on ten years of experience and exposure to the problems of a group of lens designers in a design-for-manufacture environment. The basic challenge was to show that lens design could be done better easier and faster by high quality computer-assisted design tools. The earliest development was for our own use as an engineering services organization -an in-house tool for custom design. As a tool it had to make us efficient in providing lens design and engineering services as a self-sustaining business. PHILOSOPHY OF OVTIM!ZATION IN CODE V Error function formation Based on experience as a designer we felt very strongly that there should be a clear separation of

  14. Temporal variation in facilitator and client behavior during group motivational interviewing sessions

    PubMed Central

    Houck, Jon M.; Hunter, Sarah B.; Benson, Jennifer G.; Cochrum, Linda L.; Rowell, Lauren N.; D’Amico, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable evidence for Motivational interviewing (MI) in changing problematic behaviors. Research on the causal chain for MI suggests influence of facilitator speech on client speech. This association has been examined using macro (session-level) and micro (utterance-level) measures; however, effects across sessions have largely been unexplored, particularly with groups. We evaluated a sample of 129 adolescent group MI sessions, using a behavioral coding system and timing information to generate information on facilitator and client speech (CT: change talk) within 5 successive segments (quintiles) of each group session. We hypothesized that facilitator speech (open-ended questions and reflections of CT) would be related to subsequent CT. Repeated measures analysis indicated significant quadratic and cubic trends for facilitator and client speech across quintiles. Across quintiles, cross-lagged panel analysis using a zero-inflated negative binomial model showed minimal evidence of facilitator speech on client CT, but did indicate several effects of client CT on facilitator speech, and of client CT on subsequent client CT. Results suggest that session-level effects of facilitator speech on client speech do not arise from long-duration effects of facilitator speech; instead, we detected effects of facilitator speech on client speech only at the beginning and end of sessions, when open questions respectively suppressed and enhanced client expressions of CT. Findings suggest that clinicians must remain vigilant to client CT throughout the group session, reinforcing it when it arises spontaneously and selectively employing open-ended questions to elicit it when it does not, particularly towards the end of the session. PMID:26415055

  15. Session-RPE for quantifying load of different youth taekwondo training sessions.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Corrado; Capranica, Laura; Cortis, Cristina; Guidotti, Flavia; Bianco, Antonino; Tessitore, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    The session rating of perceived exertion (session-RPE) proved to be a valuable method to quantify the internal training load (ITL) in taekwondo. However, no study validated this method in youth taekwondo athletes performing different training sessions. Thus this study aimed at evaluating the reliability of the session-RPE to monitor the ITL of prepubescent taekwondo athletes during pre-competitive (PC) and competitive (C) training sessions. Five female (age: 12.0±0.7 y; height: 1.54±0.08 m; body mass: 48.8±7.3 kg) and four male (age: 12.0±0.8 yrs; height: 1.55±0.07 m; body mass: 47.3±5.3 kg) taekwondo athletes were monitored during 100 individual sessions (PC: N.=33; C: N.=67). The Edwards' HR method was used as reference measure of ITL; the CR-10 RPE scale was administered at 1- and 30-minutes from the end of each session. No difference for gender emerged. The ITLs of C (Edwards: 228±40 arbitrary units, AU) resulted higher than that of PC (192±26 AU; P=0.04). Although all training typologies and data collections achieved significant correlations between Edwards' and session-RPE methods, a large relationship (r =0.71, P<0.001) emerged only for PC sessions evaluated at 30 minutes of the recovery phases. Findings support coaches of prepubescent taekwondo athletes to successfully use session-RPE to monitor the ITL of different training typologies. However, PC training evaluated at 30 minutes of the recovery phase represents the best condition for a highly reliable ITL perception.

  16. Aeropropulsion 1987. Session 2: Aeropropulsion Structures Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Aeropropulsion systems present unique problems to the structural engineer. The extremes in operating temperatures, rotational effects, and behaviors of advanced material systems combine into complexities that require advances in many scientific disciplines involved in structural analysis and design procedures. This session provides an overview of the complexities of aeropropulsion structures and the theoretical, computational, and experimental research conducted to achieve the needed advances.

  17. Students' Roles during Peer Response Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Sandra Sim Phek; Samuel, Moses

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the types of roles played by students during peer response sessions and investigated how the students' roles facilitated learning. This qualitative case study involved six Grade 10 mixed-proficiency level students from a secondary school in Malaysia. Data were collected through multiple sources. The findings indicated that the…

  18. Webis at the TREC 2010 Sessions Track

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    Webis at the TREC 2010 Sessions Track Matthias Hagen , Benno Stein, and Michael Völske Faculty of Media Bauhaus -Universität Weimar, Germany <first...AND ADDRESS(ES) Bauhaus -Universitat,Faculty of Media,Weimar, Germany, 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME

  19. Posters. [Poster Session at AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    The first of the papers in this poster session, "Developing the Employment Brand: Targeting MBA Campus Hires" (Diane M. Bergeron), posits that employment branding benefits both individuals and organizations. It functions as a campus recruiting tool in a competitive labor market and communicates the organization's values and work…

  20. 48 CFR 9901.311 - Executive sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Executive sessions. 9901.311 Section 9901.311 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET ADMINISTRATION RULES AND PROCEDURES...

  1. 45 CFR 702.6 - Executive session.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... appear at executive session, except as provided in § 702.11. (e) If such persons intend to submit sworn... them an opportunity to appear as voluntary witnesses or to file a sworn statement in their own behalf and to submit brief and pertinent sworn statements of others....

  2. Undergraduate Seminars: The Poster Session Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chute, Douglas L.; Bank, Barry

    1983-01-01

    A good alternative to the undergraduate psychology seminar is the poster session. During the course each student wrote a review paper. For use in his/her class presentation, the student provided the following information on poster paper: title, author, abstract, a few graphs or illustrations from the literature, conclusions, and references. (RM)

  3. Summary of Simulated Field Trip Session

    Treesearch

    1992-01-01

    The Simulated Field Trips offered resource managers an opportunity to "show" Symposium attendees their resource areas. The emphasis was on recreational activities in the wildland-urban interface and on management techniques for these areas. The six presentations were in the form of slide shows and videotapes. The session was moderated by Robert Laidlaw of the...

  4. ICTNET at Session Track TREC2014

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    document as VDM feature. 2.3 User’s Attention Time(UAT) User’s attention time is very important in judging if the document is relevant[2]. We know...expansion score of the document. SVD The score of the session visual document model. UAT The score of user attention time model. BM25QC The BM25

  5. Organizing a Practice Session for Maximum Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGroot, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    According to Jason Paulk, director of choral activities at Eastern New Mexico University, progress is made during those in-between times and that progress magnifies with efficient time spent alone. Paulk is a firm believer in the importance of singers organizing their practice sessions, and he details some effective organization methods, including…

  6. Summary of the pion production sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Dytman, S. A.

    2015-05-15

    This is a short summary of the 10 talks given in the Pion Production Sessions at NUINT12. There were 2 very interesting themes that spanned talks - problems with data for single nucleons and pion absorption in the nuclear medium. In addition, a number of interesting new efforts were described.

  7. Wakata and Mastracchio during SPHERES session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-10

    ISS038-E-000068 (10 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata (left) and NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, both Expedition 38 flight engineers, conduct a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES.

  8. OJJDP Family Listening Sessions. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 2013

    2013-01-01

    From March through July 2011, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), in collaboration with the Campaign for Youth Justice and the Education Development Center, convened four listening sessions with families and youth who had direct experiences with the juvenile justice system at the local and state levels. The…

  9. Grants.gov Information Session for Applicants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is partnering with Grants.gov program managers at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to provide Grants.gov Informational Sessions for applicants that include an overview of the registration process as well as how to use the

  10. Working session 4: Preventative and corrective measures

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.; Slama, G.

    1997-02-01

    The Preventive and Corrective Measures working session included 13 members from France, Germany, Japan, Spain, Slovenia, and the United States. Attendee experience included regulators, utilities, three steam generator vendors, consultants and researchers. Discussions centered on four principal topics: (1) alternate materials, (2) mechanical mitigation, (3) maintenance, and (4) water chemistry. New or replacement steam generators and original equipment steam generators were separately addressed. Four papers were presented to the session, to provide information and stimulate various discussion topics. Topics discussed and issues raised during the several meeting sessions are provided below, followed by summary conclusions and recommendations on which the group was able to reach a majority consensus. The working session was composed of individuals with diverse experience and varied areas of specialized expertise. The somewhat broad range of topics addressed by the group at times saw discussion participation by only a few individuals. As in any technical meeting where all are allowed the opportunity to speak their mind, straying from an Individual topic was not unusual. Where useful, these stray topics are also presented below within the context In which they occurred. The main categories of discussion were: minimize sludge; new steam generators; maintenance; mechanical mitigation; water chemistry.

  11. Do Sessions of Different Treatments Have Different Impacts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiles, William B.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Forty clients received eight psychodynamic treatment (exploratory) sessions and eight cognitive/behavioral treatment (prescriptive) sessions in crossover design. Counselors and external raters rated exploratory sessions as deeper and more powerful; counselors, external raters, and clients rated prescriptive sessions as smoother and easier.…

  12. Poster Sessions in Marketing Education: An Empirical Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stegemann, Nicole; Sutton-Brady, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Poster sessions provide a creative and stimulating alternative to traditional assessment methods in marketing. Poster sessions, as a means of assessment, have long been used in science fields. This article presents the successful implementation of poster sessions as a means of assessment in a postgraduate unit of study. Poster sessions in…

  13. Modeling Rich Interactions in Session Search - Georgetown University at TREC 2014 Session Track

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    iterations triggered by query reformulations to accomplish a complex search task. In our groups’ 2013 work [1], we model this interactive process of session...search as a MDP process. In our 2014 work [3][4], we model it as a POMDP process. TREC 2014 Session track Task 1 intends to test whether we can...Session Track 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT

  14. Homological stabilizer codes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jonas T.

    2013-03-15

    In this paper we define homological stabilizer codes on qubits which encompass codes such as Kitaev's toric code and the topological color codes. These codes are defined solely by the graphs they reside on. This feature allows us to use properties of topological graph theory to determine the graphs which are suitable as homological stabilizer codes. We then show that all toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. We show that the topological color codes and toric codes correspond to two distinct classes of graphs. We define the notion of label set equivalencies and show that under a small set of constraints the only homological stabilizer codes without local logical operators are equivalent to Kitaev's toric code or to the topological color codes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that Kitaev's toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that toric codes and color codes correspond to homological stabilizer codes on distinct graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find and classify all 2D homological stabilizer codes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find optimal codes among the homological stabilizer codes.

  15. Building emotional resilience over 14 sessions of emotion focused therapy: Micro-longitudinal analyses of productive emotional patterns.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Leone, A; Yeryomenko, N; Sawashima, T; Warwar, S

    2017-05-04

    Pascual-Leone and Greenberg's sequential model of emotional processing has been used to explore process in over 24 studies. This line of research shows emotional processing in good psychotherapy often follows a sequential order, supporting a saw-toothed pattern of change within individual sessions (progressing "2-steps-forward, 1-step-back"). However, one cannot assume that local in-session patterns are scalable across an entire course of therapy. Thus, the primary objective of this exploratory study was to consider how the sequential patterns identified by Pascual-Leone, may apply across entire courses of treatment. Intensive emotion coding in two separate single-case designs were submitted for quantitative analyses of longitudinal patterns. Comprehensive coding in these cases involved recording observations for every emotional event in an entire course of treatment (using the Classification of Affective-Meaning States), which were then treated as a 9-point ordinal scale. Applying multilevel modeling to each of the two cases showed significant patterns of change over a large number of sessions, and those patterns were either nested at the within-session level or observed at the broader session-by-session level of change. Examining successful treatment cases showed several theoretically coherent kinds of temporal patterns, although not always in the same case. Clinical or methodological significance of this article: This is the first paper to demonstrate systematic temporal patterns of emotion over the course of an entire treatment. (1) The study offers a proof of concept that longitudinal patterns in the micro-processes of emotion can be objectively derived and quantified. (2) It also shows that patterns in emotion may be identified on the within-session level, as well as the session-by-session level of analysis. (3) Finally, observed processes over time support the ordered pattern of emotional states hypothesized in Pascual-Leone and Greenberg's ( 2007 ) model of

  16. Advancing methods for reliably assessing motivational interviewing fidelity using the motivational interviewing skills code.

    PubMed

    Lord, Sarah Peregrine; Can, Doğan; Yi, Michael; Marin, Rebeca; Dunn, Christopher W; Imel, Zac E; Georgiou, Panayiotis; Narayanan, Shrikanth; Steyvers, Mark; Atkins, David C

    2015-02-01

    The current paper presents novel methods for collecting MISC data and accurately assessing reliability of behavior codes at the level of the utterance. The MISC 2.1 was used to rate MI interviews from five randomized trials targeting alcohol and drug use. Sessions were coded at the utterance-level. Utterance-based coding reliability was estimated using three methods and compared to traditional reliability estimates of session tallies. Session-level reliability was generally higher compared to reliability using utterance-based codes, suggesting that typical methods for MISC reliability may be biased. These novel methods in MI fidelity data collection and reliability assessment provided rich data for therapist feedback and further analyses. Beyond implications for fidelity coding, utterance-level coding schemes may elucidate important elements in the counselor-client interaction that could inform theories of change and the practice of MI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimal Grouping and Matching for Network-Coded Cooperative Communications

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S; Shi, Y; Hou, Y T; Kompella, S; Midkiff, S F

    2011-11-01

    Network-coded cooperative communications (NC-CC) is a new advance in wireless networking that exploits network coding (NC) to improve the performance of cooperative communications (CC). However, there remains very limited understanding of this new hybrid technology, particularly at the link layer and above. This paper fills in this gap by studying a network optimization problem that requires joint optimization of session grouping, relay node grouping, and matching of session/relay groups. After showing that this problem is NP-hard, we present a polynomial time heuristic algorithm to this problem. Using simulation results, we show that our algorithm is highly competitive and can produce near-optimal results.

  18. Model Children's Code.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. American Indian Law Center.

    The Model Children's Code was developed to provide a legally correct model code that American Indian tribes can use to enact children's codes that fulfill their legal, cultural and economic needs. Code sections cover the court system, jurisdiction, juvenile offender procedures, minor-in-need-of-care, and termination. Almost every Code section is…

  19. Coding of Neuroinfectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Barkley, Gregory L

    2015-12-01

    Accurate coding is an important function of neurologic practice. This contribution to Continuum is part of an ongoing series that presents helpful coding information along with examples related to the issue topic. Tips for diagnosis coding, Evaluation and Management coding, procedure coding, or a combination are presented, depending on which is most applicable to the subject area of the issue.

  20. Diagnostic Coding for Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Williams, Korwyn; Nuwer, Marc R; Buchhalter, Jeffrey R

    2016-02-01

    Accurate coding is an important function of neurologic practice. This contribution to Continuum is part of an ongoing series that presents helpful coding information along with examples related to the issue topic. Tips for diagnosis coding, Evaluation and Management coding, procedure coding, or a combination are presented, depending on which is most applicable to the subject area of the issue.

  1. Phylogeny of genetic codes and punctuation codes within genetic codes.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2015-03-01

    Punctuation codons (starts, stops) delimit genes, reflect translation apparatus properties. Most codon reassignments involve punctuation. Here two complementary approaches classify natural genetic codes: (A) properties of amino acids assigned to codons (classical phylogeny), coding stops as X (A1, antitermination/suppressor tRNAs insert unknown residues), or as gaps (A2, no translation, classical stop); and (B) considering only punctuation status (start, stop and other codons coded as -1, 0 and 1 (B1); 0, -1 and 1 (B2, reflects ribosomal translational dynamics); and 1, -1, and 0 (B3, starts/stops as opposites)). All methods separate most mitochondrial codes from most nuclear codes; Gracilibacteria consistently cluster with metazoan mitochondria; mitochondria co-hosted with chloroplasts cluster with nuclear codes. Method A1 clusters the euplotid nuclear code with metazoan mitochondria; A2 separates euplotids from mitochondria. Firmicute bacteria Mycoplasma/Spiroplasma and Protozoan (and lower metazoan) mitochondria share codon-amino acid assignments. A1 clusters them with mitochondria, they cluster with the standard genetic code under A2: constraints on amino acid ambiguity versus punctuation-signaling produced the mitochondrial versus bacterial versions of this genetic code. Punctuation analysis B2 converges best with classical phylogenetic analyses, stressing the need for a unified theory of genetic code punctuation accounting for ribosomal constraints.

  2. To Code or Not To Code?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkinson, Brian; Sandhu, Parveen; Lacorte, Manel; Gourlay, Lesley

    1998-01-01

    This article considers arguments for and against the use of coding systems in classroom-based language research and touches on some relevant considerations from ethnographic and conversational analysis approaches. The four authors each explain and elaborate on their practical decision to code or not to code events or utterances at a specific point…

  3. Highlights of the hotline sessions presented at the scientific sessions 2008 of the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Möllmann, Helge; Nef, Holger; Böhm, Michael; Laufs, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Summaries and commentaries on trials presented at the hotline sessions of the scientific sessions 2008 of the American Heart Association in New Orleans have been generated from the oral presentations and the webcasts of the American Heart Association. The following papers are discussed: APPROACH, ATLAS, BACH, BICC, HF-ACTION, I-PRESERVE, JPAD, JUPITER, Mass-DAC, Physicians' Health Study II, SEARCH, tailored clopidogrel loading to prevent stent thrombosis, and TIMACS.

  4. Expert system for scheduling simulation lab sessions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, Chet

    1990-01-01

    Implementation and results of an expert system used for scheduling session requests for the Systems Engineering Simulator (SES) laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) are discussed. Weekly session requests are received from astronaut crew trainers, procedures developers, engineering assessment personnel, software developers, and various others who wish to access the computers, scene generators, and other simulation equipment available to them in the SES lab. The expert system under discussion is comprised of a data acquisition portion - two Pascal programs run on a personal computer - and a CLIPS program installed on a minicomputer. A brief introduction to the SES lab and its scheduling background is given. A general overview of the system is provided, followed by a detailed description of the constraint-reduction process and of the scheduler itself. Results from a ten-week trial period using this approach are discussed. Finally, a summary of the expert system's strengths and shortcomings are provided.

  5. Overview of the TREC 2014 Session Track

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    present evaluation results and analysis. 2 Evaluation Tasks We use the word “session” to mean a sequence of reformulations along with any user interaction...query reformulations ). A single topic can have more than one session associated with it, since two different users could go about satisfying the same...collection consists of roughly 730 million English- language web pages, comprising approximately 5TB of compressed data. The dataset was crawled from the Web

  6. Physical Review X Q&A Session

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-03-01

    Physical Review X (PRX) is already being recognized as a top-quality journal in physics. What are its current standards and strengths? How will it grow and evolve in the coming years? Why is PRX a journal for you? PRX editors and the Editorial Board invite you to a Q & A session, where we will answer these questions and others you have about the journal. Bring your questions and learn more about PRX. Light refreshments will be provided.

  7. Bare Code Reader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clair, Jean J.

    1980-05-01

    The Bare code system will be used, in every market and supermarket. The code, which is normalised in US and Europe (code EAN) gives informations on price, storage, nature and allows in real time the gestion of theshop.

  8. Proceedings of the Third NRC/ASME Symposium on Valve and Pump Testing. Session 1A--Session 2C: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The 1994 Symposium on Valve and Pump Testing, jointly sponsored by the Board of Nuclear Codes and Standards of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, provides a forum for the discussion of current programs and methods for inservice testing and motor-operated valve testing at nuclear power plants. The symposium also provides an opportunity to discuss the need to improve that testing in order to help ensure the reliable performance of pumps and valves. The participation of industry representatives, regulators, and consultants results in the discussion of a broad spectrum of ideas and perspectives regarding the improvement of inservice testing of pumps and valves at nuclear power plants. This document, Volume 1, covers sessions 1A through session 2C. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  9. How Do Therapists Ally with Adolescents in Family Therapy? An Examination of Relational Control Communication in Early Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Pena, Cristina Muniz; Friedlander, Myrna L.; Escudero, Valentin; Heatherington, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Sequential analyses examined associations between the working alliance and therapist-adolescent communication patterns in 10 Spanish cases of brief conjoint family therapy. Early sessions with strong versus problematic alliances, rated by observers, were selected for coding of relational control communication patterns. No differences were found in…

  10. How Do Therapists Ally with Adolescents in Family Therapy? An Examination of Relational Control Communication in Early Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Pena, Cristina Muniz; Friedlander, Myrna L.; Escudero, Valentin; Heatherington, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Sequential analyses examined associations between the working alliance and therapist-adolescent communication patterns in 10 Spanish cases of brief conjoint family therapy. Early sessions with strong versus problematic alliances, rated by observers, were selected for coding of relational control communication patterns. No differences were found in…

  11. Generalized concatenated quantum codes

    SciTech Connect

    Grassl, Markus; Shor, Peter; Smith, Graeme; Smolin, John; Zeng Bei

    2009-05-15

    We discuss the concept of generalized concatenated quantum codes. This generalized concatenation method provides a systematical way for constructing good quantum codes, both stabilizer codes and nonadditive codes. Using this method, we construct families of single-error-correcting nonadditive quantum codes, in both binary and nonbinary cases, which not only outperform any stabilizer codes for finite block length but also asymptotically meet the quantum Hamming bound for large block length.

  12. Ideas for Advancing Code Sharing: A Different Kind of Hack Day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teuben, P.; Allen, A.; Berriman, B.; DuPrie, K.; Hanisch, R. J.; Mink, J.; Nemiroff, R. J.; Shamir, L.; Shortridge, K.; Taylor, M. B.; Wallin, J. F.

    2014-05-01

    How do we as a community encourage the reuse of software for telescope operations, data processing, and ? How can we support making codes used in research available for others to examine? Continuing the discussion from last year Bring out your codes! BoF session, participants separated into groups to brainstorm ideas to mitigate factors which inhibit code sharing and nurture those which encourage code sharing. The BoF concluded with the sharing of ideas that arose from the brainstorming sessions and a brief summary by the moderator.

  13. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  14. Coset Codes Viewed as Terminated Convolutional Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossorier, Marc P. C.; Lin, Shu

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, coset codes are considered as terminated convolutional codes. Based on this approach, three new general results are presented. First, it is shown that the iterative squaring construction can equivalently be defined from a convolutional code whose trellis terminates. This convolutional code determines a simple encoder for the coset code considered, and the state and branch labelings of the associated trellis diagram become straightforward. Also, from the generator matrix of the code in its convolutional code form, much information about the trade-off between the state connectivity and complexity at each section, and the parallel structure of the trellis, is directly available. Based on this generator matrix, it is shown that the parallel branches in the trellis diagram of the convolutional code represent the same coset code C(sub 1), of smaller dimension and shorter length. Utilizing this fact, a two-stage optimum trellis decoding method is devised. The first stage decodes C(sub 1), while the second stage decodes the associated convolutional code, using the branch metrics delivered by stage 1. Finally, a bidirectional decoding of each received block starting at both ends is presented. If about the same number of computations is required, this approach remains very attractive from a practical point of view as it roughly doubles the decoding speed. This fact is particularly interesting whenever the second half of the trellis is the mirror image of the first half, since the same decoder can be implemented for both parts.

  15. Concatenated Coding Using Trellis-Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Michael W.

    1997-01-01

    In the late seventies and early eighties a technique known as Trellis Coded Modulation (TCM) was developed for providing spectrally efficient error correction coding. Instead of adding redundant information in the form of parity bits, redundancy is added at the modulation stage thereby increasing bandwidth efficiency. A digital communications system can be designed to use bandwidth-efficient multilevel/phase modulation such as Amplitude Shift Keying (ASK), Phase Shift Keying (PSK), Differential Phase Shift Keying (DPSK) or Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM). Performance gain can be achieved by increasing the number of signals over the corresponding uncoded system to compensate for the redundancy introduced by the code. A considerable amount of research and development has been devoted toward developing good TCM codes for severely bandlimited applications. More recently, the use of TCM for satellite and deep space communications applications has received increased attention. This report describes the general approach of using a concatenated coding scheme that features TCM and RS coding. Results have indicated that substantial (6-10 dB) performance gains can be achieved with this approach with comparatively little bandwidth expansion. Since all of the bandwidth expansion is due to the RS code we see that TCM based concatenated coding results in roughly 10-50% bandwidth expansion compared to 70-150% expansion for similar concatenated scheme which use convolution code. We stress that combined coding and modulation optimization is important for achieving performance gains while maintaining spectral efficiency.

  16. Chapter II: Twenty Eighth General Assembly Business Sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Robert

    2015-08-01

    The President of the IAU, Prof. Robert Williams, welcomed the delegates and members to this first business session of the General Assembly. The President invited the General Secretary, Dr. Ian Corbett, to start the business session.

  17. 78 FR 53497 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Closed Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Closed Session AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation Advisory... closed session of the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC). The special...

  18. Discussion on LDPC Codes and Uplink Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Ken; Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Moision, Bruce; Hamkins, Jon; Pollara, Fabrizio

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the progress that the workgroup on Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) for space link coding. The workgroup is tasked with developing and recommending new error correcting codes for near-Earth, Lunar, and deep space applications. Included in the presentation is a summary of the technical progress of the workgroup. Charts that show the LDPC decoder sensitivity to symbol scaling errors are reviewed, as well as a chart showing the performance of several frame synchronizer algorithms compared to that of some good codes and LDPC decoder tests at ESTL. Also reviewed is a study on Coding, Modulation, and Link Protocol (CMLP), and the recommended codes. A design for the Pseudo-Randomizer with LDPC Decoder and CRC is also reviewed. A chart that summarizes the three proposed coding systems is also presented.

  19. Discussion on LDPC Codes and Uplink Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Ken; Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Moision, Bruce; Hamkins, Jon; Pollara, Fabrizio

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the progress that the workgroup on Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) for space link coding. The workgroup is tasked with developing and recommending new error correcting codes for near-Earth, Lunar, and deep space applications. Included in the presentation is a summary of the technical progress of the workgroup. Charts that show the LDPC decoder sensitivity to symbol scaling errors are reviewed, as well as a chart showing the performance of several frame synchronizer algorithms compared to that of some good codes and LDPC decoder tests at ESTL. Also reviewed is a study on Coding, Modulation, and Link Protocol (CMLP), and the recommended codes. A design for the Pseudo-Randomizer with LDPC Decoder and CRC is also reviewed. A chart that summarizes the three proposed coding systems is also presented.

  20. Session serves up smorgasbord of paleoclimatic research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ted

    At the Western Pacific Geophysics Meeting held in July 1996 in Brisbane, Australia, a session titled “Glacial/Interglacial Records of the PEP Transects” brought together scientists interested in applying their range of expertise to interdisciplinary endeavors. For example, where else could one learn of progress in quantifying paleo-precipitation by using magnetic climofunctions, or how to obtain paleo-temperature from racemization measurements on ancient emu eggshells, or how to determine changes in the volume of the oceans from U-series ages on fossil reefs?

  1. Summary of the electron accelerators session

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y. )

    1989-05-05

    Since the last High Energy Physics Symposium, there has been considerable progress in the field of polarized electron accelerators. Projects well into construction include the SLC, HERA, and LEP. The status of polarized beams for these projects is discussed in this session. Semiclassical and quantum mechanical calculations of polarizing and depolarizing effects are discussed, for both linear colliders and for storage rings. Substantial progress is continuing in the understanding of depolarizing mechanisms for circular machines. Modelling of these machines is underway. Activities with polarized electron beams at Novosibirsk are described.

  2. Summary of the electron accelerators session

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1988-10-01

    Since the last High Energy Physics Symposium, there has been considerable progress in the field of polarized electron accelerators. Projects well into construction include the SLC, HERA, and LEP. The status of polarized beams for these projects is discussed in this session. Semiclassical and quantum mechanical calculations of polarizing and depolarizing effects are discussed, for both linear colliders and for storage rings. Substantial progress is continuing in the understanding of depolarizing mechanisms for circular machines. Modelling of these machines is underway. Activities with polarized electron beams at Novosibirsk are described. 8 refs.

  3. Session: Pre-development project risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, Richard; Linehan, Andy

    2004-09-01

    This second session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The focus of the presentations was on the practices and methodologies used in the wind energy industry for assessing risk to birds and bats at candidate project sites. Presenters offered examples of pre-development siting evaluation requirements set by certain states. Presentation one was titled ''Practices and Methodologies and Initial Screening Tools'' by Richard Curry of Curry and Kerlinger, LLC. Presentation two was titled ''State of the Industry in the Pacific Northwest'' by Andy Linehan, CH2MHILL.

  4. Department of Energy PEIS scoping session

    SciTech Connect

    Badar, L

    1992-12-10

    This is the second programmatic environmental impact statement scoping session held in Durango, Colorado. The purpose was: to present the ground water program so as to build some familiarity and understanding about the issue involved; and to get Durango community's input. Scoping is the collection of information and getting everyone involved and really making a team out of coming up with a proposed action. This report contains the presentations made by the project manager for the Uranium Mill Tailings (UMTRA) program, site manager for the Durango UMTRA site, manager of ground water hydrology, and include comments made by local residents.

  5. DOD SPHERES-RINGS Test Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025915 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  6. Bar Codes for Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahn, Erwin

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the evolution of standards for bar codes (series of printed lines and spaces that represent numbers, symbols, and/or letters of alphabet) and describes the two types most frequently adopted by libraries--Code-A-Bar and CODE 39. Format of the codes is illustrated. Six references and definitions of terminology are appended. (EJS)

  7. Manually operated coded switch

    DOEpatents

    Barnette, Jon H.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a manually operated recodable coded switch in which a code may be inserted, tried and used to actuate a lever controlling an external device. After attempting a code, the switch's code wheels must be returned to their zero positions before another try is made.

  8. Bring out your codes! Bring out your codes! (Increasing Software Visibility and Re-use)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, A.; Berriman, B.; Brunner, R.; Burger, D.; DuPrie, K.; Hanisch, R. J.; Mann, R.; Mink, J.; Sandin, C.; Shortridge, K.; Teuben, P.

    2013-10-01

    Progress is being made in code discoverability and preservation, but as discussed at ADASS XXI, many codes still remain hidden from public view. With the Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) now indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS), the introduction of a new journal, Astronomy & Computing, focused on astrophysics software, and the increasing success of education efforts such as Software Carpentry and SciCoder, the community has the opportunity to set a higher standard for its science by encouraging the release of software for examination and possible reuse. We assembled representatives of the community to present issues inhibiting code release and sought suggestions for tackling these factors. The session began with brief statements by panelists; the floor was then opened for discussion and ideas. Comments covered a diverse range of related topics and points of view, with apparent support for the propositions that algorithms should be readily available, code used to produce published scientific results should be made available, and there should be discovery mechanisms to allow these to be found easily. With increased use of resources such as GitHub (for code availability), ASCL (for code discovery), and a stated strong preference from the new journal Astronomy & Computing for code release, we expect to see additional progress over the next few years.

  9. 101st LHCC Meeting AGENDA OPEN Sessions I and II

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    OPEN Sessions I and II on Wednesday, 5 May from 9h00 to 16h30 in MAIN AUDITORIUM, CERN staff and Users are welcome to attend Open Sessions -LIVE WEBCAST. CLOSED Sessions on Wednesday, 5 May at 16h30 and Thursday, 6 May 8h15 in Conference room 60-6-015

  10. 101st LHCC Meeting AGENDA OPEN Sessions I and II

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    OPEN Sessions I and II on Wednesday, 5 May from 9h00 to 16h30 in MAIN AUDITORIUM, CERN staff and Users are welcome to attend Open Sessions -LIVE WEBCAST. CLOSED Sessions on Wednesday, 5 May at 16h30 and Thursday, 6 May 8h15 in Conference room 60-6-015

  11. Summary of Session 2: Data analysis—algorithms and tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiesling, C.

    2006-04-01

    This report summarizes the Session 2 ("Data Analysis—Algorithms and Tools"), reviewing shortly the evolvement of this session during the series of ACAT workshops, emphasizing the highlights and recent developments of methods presented at this workshop, and presenting some thoughts as regards to the possible future development of the session within the ACAT workshop series.

  12. 78 FR 45494 - Plant Breeding Listening Session meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Plant Breeding Listening Session meeting ACTION: Notice of a Plant Breeding... Agriculture (USDA) announces a Plant Breeding Listening Session stakeholder meeting for all interested plant breeding and cultivar development stakeholders. DATES: The Plant Breeding Listening Session will be held...

  13. 7 CFR 900.24 - Pre-hearing information sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pre-hearing information sessions. 900.24 Section 900... and Marketing Orders § 900.24 Pre-hearing information sessions. A pre-hearing information session may... proposing an amendment to a Federal milk marketing agreement or order may request that a...

  14. 7 CFR 900.24 - Pre-hearing information sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pre-hearing information sessions. 900.24 Section 900... and Marketing Orders § 900.24 Pre-hearing information sessions. A pre-hearing information session may... proposing an amendment to a Federal milk marketing agreement or order may request that a...

  15. 7 CFR 900.24 - Pre-hearing information sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pre-hearing information sessions. 900.24 Section 900... and Marketing Orders § 900.24 Pre-hearing information sessions. A pre-hearing information session may... proposing an amendment to a Federal milk marketing agreement or order may request that a...

  16. 7 CFR 900.24 - Pre-hearing information sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pre-hearing information sessions. 900.24 Section 900... and Marketing Orders § 900.24 Pre-hearing information sessions. A pre-hearing information session may... proposing an amendment to a Federal milk marketing agreement or order may request that a...

  17. QR Codes 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crompton, Helen; LaFrance, Jason; van 't Hooft, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A QR (quick-response) code is a two-dimensional scannable code, similar in function to a traditional bar code that one might find on a product at the supermarket. The main difference between the two is that, while a traditional bar code can hold a maximum of only 20 digits, a QR code can hold up to 7,089 characters, so it can contain much more…

  18. ARA type protograph codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor); Abbasfar, Aliazam (Inventor); Jones, Christopher R. (Inventor); Dolinar, Samuel J. (Inventor); Thorpe, Jeremy C. (Inventor); Andrews, Kenneth S. (Inventor); Yao, Kung (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An apparatus and method for encoding low-density parity check codes. Together with a repeater, an interleaver and an accumulator, the apparatus comprises a precoder, thus forming accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA codes). Protographs representing various types of ARA codes, including AR3A, AR4A and ARJA codes, are described. High performance is obtained when compared to the performance of current repeat-accumulate (RA) or irregular-repeat-accumulate (IRA) codes.

  19. Aspen Global Change Institute Summer Science Sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Katzenberger, John; Kaye, Jack A

    2006-10-01

    The Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) successfully organized and convened six interdisciplinary meetings over the course of award NNG04GA21G. The topics of the meetings were consistent with a range of issues, goals and objectives as described within the NASA Earth Science Enterprise Strategic Plan and more broadly by the US Global Change Research Program/Our Changing Planet, the more recent Climate Change Program Strategic Plan and the NSF Pathways report. The meetings were chaired by two or more leaders from within the disciplinary focus of each session. 222 scholars for a total of 1097 participants-days were convened under the auspices of this award. The overall goal of each AGCI session is to further the understanding of Earth system science and global environmental change through interdisciplinary dialog. The format and structure of the meetings allows for presentation by each participant, in-depth discussion by the whole group, and smaller working group and synthesis activities. The size of the group is important in terms of the group dynamics and interaction, and the ability for each participant's work to be adequately presented and discussed within the duration of the meeting, while still allowing time for synthesis

  20. Developing assessment: involving the sessional clinical teacher.

    PubMed

    Bateman, H; Thomason, J M; McCracken, G; Ellis, J

    2016-02-12

    Assessment development is a fundamental element of curriculum management and a requirement for providers of education to consistently demonstrate attainment of educational standards. Development of authentic, valid and reliable assessment is, however, both challenging and resource intensive. In the UK, dental education standards are regulated by the General Dental Council (GDC). The 'safe beginner' is the threshold determined by the GDC for the passing student - but how do we apply this? This article describes an approach the School of Dental Sciences at Newcastle University has adopted to address the challenges associated with developing assessments. Sessional clinical teachers contribute a significant proportion of the clinical supervision within the BDS programme and also have a good appreciation of both the standard and concept of the 'safe beginner'. By implementing a process of active timetable management, we have identified time where this group could contribute to assessment development. We believe that aspects, which could be enhanced by their involvement, include writing, validation, standard-setting and utilisation of assessment. To achieve this, we recognise a requirement for investment in careful manpower planning and training, but consider that it is realistic and beneficial to include sessional clinical teachers in this essential part of learning and teaching.

  1. Efficient entropy coding for scalable video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woong Il; Yang, Jungyoup; Jeon, Byeungwoo

    2005-10-01

    The standardization for the scalable extension of H.264 has called for additional functionality based on H.264 standard to support the combined spatio-temporal and SNR scalability. For the entropy coding of H.264 scalable extension, Context-based Adaptive Binary Arithmetic Coding (CABAC) scheme is considered so far. In this paper, we present a new context modeling scheme by using inter layer correlation between the syntax elements. As a result, it improves coding efficiency of entropy coding in H.264 scalable extension. In simulation results of applying the proposed scheme to encoding the syntax element mb_type, it is shown that improvement in coding efficiency of the proposed method is up to 16% in terms of bit saving due to estimation of more adequate probability model.

  2. Working through: In-Session Processes that Promote Between-Session Thoughts and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Jesse; Quirk, Kelley; Hilsenroth, Mark J.; Rodolfa, Emil

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether clients' ratings of the working alliance as well as their perception of cognitive-behavioral (CB) and psychodynamic-interpersonal (PI) techniques (delivered by therapists who used both) were associated with clients' intersession processes (i.e., their thoughts about therapy and therapeutic activity between sessions).…

  3. Session on modeling of radiative transfer processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flatau, Piotr

    1993-01-01

    The session on modeling of radiative transfer processes is reviewed. Six critical issues surfaced in the discussion concerning scale-interactive radiative processes relevent to the mesoscale convective systems (MCS's). These issues are the need to expand basic knowledge of how MCS's influence climate through extensive cloud shields and increased humidity in the upper troposphere; to improve radiation parameterizations used in mesoscale and General Circulation Model (GCM) models; to improve our basic understanding of the influence of radiation on MCS dynamics due to diabatic heating, production of condensate, and vertical and horizontal heat fluxes; to quantify our understanding of radiative impacts of MCS's on the surface and free atmosphere energy budgets; to quantify and identify radiative and microphysical processes important in the evolution of MCS's; and to improve the capability to remotely sense MCS radiative properties from space and ground-based systems.

  4. Session: Program Review X Wrap-Up

    SciTech Connect

    1992-01-01

    This wrap-up session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of Closing Remarks by Roland R. Kessler and six NGA Industry Critique Panel presentations: ''Summary of Comments on DOE-Industry Cooperation by Geothermal Industry Panel'' by James B. Koenig, GeothermEx, Inc.; ''NGA Industry Critique of the Exploration Component'' by Joe L. Iovenitti, Weiss Associates; ''Critique of Drilling Research'' by Jerry Hamblin, UNOCAL Geothermal; ''Critique Panel Comments on Reservoir Engineering, DOE Geothermal Technology Development'' by Dennis Kaspereit, California Energy Company, Inc.; ''DOE Geothermal Program Review - Critique on Production'' by Douglas B. Jung, Two-Phase Engineering and Research; ''Comments on the DOE Hydrothermal Energy Conversion R&D Program'' by David L. Mendive, Geothermal Development Associates.

  5. Meeting report VLPNPV: Session 3: Immune responses.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Trudy G

    2014-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) and nano-particles (NP) are increasingly considered for both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines for a wide variety of human and animal diseases. Indeed, 2 VLPs have already been licensed for use in humans, the human papilloma virus vaccine and the hepatitis B virus vaccine. (1) Reflecting this increased interest, a second international conference with a specific focus on VLPs and NP was held at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California, in June 2014. Approximately 100 attendees, hailing from many nations, came from academic institutions, research institutes, and biotech companies. A wide variety of topics were discussed, ranging from development and characterization of specific VLP and NP vaccine candidates to methods of production of these particles. Session three was focused on the general question of immune responses to VLPs.

  6. Partners' session spurs progress for Latin women.

    PubMed

    1982-02-18

    A workshop sponsored by Partners of the Americas with support from the US Agency for International Development's Women in Development Office held in Christiana, Jamaica, October 1981 was designed to expand the involvement of women in the development process by strengthening leadership capabilities of women in the Caribbean. Sessions were held on project planning, goal identification, and resource evaluation. By the end of the workshop women representing 11 US states and their partners in 17 Latin American and Caribbean countries had initiated several projects. Some projects are: 1) Colombia-Florida: developing literacy training aids about nutrition information, 2) Guatemala-Alabama: home gardening and nutrition education, and 3) Jamaica-western New York: skills training programs for young mothers.

  7. AAS Special Session: Policy Making in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardelli, J. A.; Massa, D.

    1995-12-01

    The professional astronomical community today is more diverse than at any time in its history. Individuals participating in creative research programs can be found in a wide range of positions. This type of diversity, which mixes research, education, and service (e.g. contract) work, represents the strength of contemporary astronomy. While recognizing the unavoidable reductions in funding and restructuring of organizations like NASA, it is imperative that the significance of the current diversity be considered during these processes. Creative ideas are one of the cornerstones of quality research, and they can originate anywhere. Consequently, it is essential that adequate research resources remain available for free and open competition by all astronomers. Our goal in this session is to bring together officials from the AAS, NASA, and the NSF to discuss how the policy and decision making process operates and whether it should be changed to better serve the general needs of the professional astronomical community. Examples of the issues we believe are important include: In establishing new policy, how can the needs of the average research astronomer be better addressed? How could input from such astronomers be provided to those who craft NASA/NSF policy? How can/should the AAS serve as an interface between policy/decision making bodies and its membership? Should the AAS membership become more actively/effectively involved in the decision making process and, if so, how? More information on this session and related issues can be found at the Association of Research Astronomers Home Page: http://www.phy.vill.edu/astro/faculty/ara/ara_home.htm

  8. What is Code Biology?

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Marcello

    2017-10-06

    Various independent discoveries have shown that many organic codes exist in living systems, and this implies that they came into being during the history of life and contributed to that history. The genetic code appeared in a population of primitive systems that has been referred to as the common ancestor, and it has been proposed that three distinct signal processing codes gave origin to the three primary kingdoms of Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya. After the genetic code and the signal processing codes, on the other hand, only the ancestors of the eukaryotes continued to explore the coding space and gave origin to splicing codes, histone code, tubulin code, compartment codes and many others. A first theoretical consequence of this historical fact is the idea that the Eukarya became increasingly more complex because they maintained the potential to bring new organic codes into existence. A second theoretical consequence comes from the fact that the evolution of the individual rules of a code can take an extremely long time, but the origin of a new organic code corresponds to the appearance of a complete set of rules and from a geological point of view this amounts to a sudden event. The great discontinuities of the history of life, in other words, can be explained as the result of the appearance of new codes. A third theoretical consequence comes from the fact that the organic codes have been highly conserved in evolution, which shows that they are the great invariants of life, the sole entities that have gone intact through billions of years while everything else has changed. This tells us that the organic codes are fundamental components of life and their study - the new research field of Code Biology - is destined to become an increasingly relevant part of the life sciences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Acceptance versus change interventions in behavioral couple therapy: impact on couples' in-session communication.

    PubMed

    Cordova, J V; Jacobson, N S; Christensen, A

    1998-10-01

    Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy (IBCT) attempts to improve Traditional Behavioral Couple Therapy (TBCT) by incorporating an emphasis on promoting acceptance into TBCT's emphasis on behavioral change. This study examined changes in couples' communication over the course of IBCT and TBCT. Early, middle, and late sessions were coded to measure couples' communication of acceptance. Results showed that IBCT couples expressed more nonblaming descriptions of problems and more soft emotions than TBCT couples during late stages of therapy. IBCT couples significantly increased their nonblaming description of problems and significantly decreased their expressions of hard emotions and their problematic communication over time. Results support the hypothesis that structural differences between the therapies affect initial levels of emotional expression in session. Increases in nonblaming descriptions of problems were significantly correlated with increases in marital satisfaction.

  10. DIANE multiparticle transport code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caillaud, M.; Lemaire, S.; Ménard, S.; Rathouit, P.; Ribes, J. C.; Riz, D.

    2014-06-01

    DIANE is the general Monte Carlo code developed at CEA-DAM. DIANE is a 3D multiparticle multigroup code. DIANE includes automated biasing techniques and is optimized for massive parallel calculations.

  11. QR Code Mania!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shumack, Kellie A.; Reilly, Erin; Chamberlain, Nik

    2013-01-01

    space, has error-correction capacity, and can be read from any direction. These codes are used in manufacturing, shipping, and marketing, as well as in education. QR codes can be created to produce…

  12. Honesty and Honor Codes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Donald; Trevino, Linda Klebe

    2002-01-01

    Explores the rise in student cheating and evidence that students cheat less often at schools with an honor code. Discusses effective use of such codes and creation of a peer culture that condemns dishonesty. (EV)

  13. Cellulases and coding sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides three fungal cellulases, their coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the cellulase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present cellulases are from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  14. Cellulases and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2001-02-20

    The present invention provides three fungal cellulases, their coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the cellulase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present cellulases are from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  15. QR Code Mania!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shumack, Kellie A.; Reilly, Erin; Chamberlain, Nik

    2013-01-01

    space, has error-correction capacity, and can be read from any direction. These codes are used in manufacturing, shipping, and marketing, as well as in education. QR codes can be created to produce…

  16. Practices in Code Discoverability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teuben, P.; Allen, A.; Nemiroff, R. J.; Shamir, L.

    2012-09-01

    Much of scientific progress now hinges on the reliability, falsifiability and reproducibility of computer source codes. Astrophysics in particular is a discipline that today leads other sciences in making useful scientific components freely available online, including data, abstracts, preprints, and fully published papers, yet even today many astrophysics source codes remain hidden from public view. We review the importance and history of source codes in astrophysics and previous efforts to develop ways in which information about astrophysics codes can be shared. We also discuss why some scientist coders resist sharing or publishing their codes, the reasons for and importance of overcoming this resistance, and alert the community to a reworking of one of the first attempts for sharing codes, the Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL). We discuss the implementation of the ASCL in an accompanying poster paper. We suggest that code could be given a similar level of referencing as data gets in repositories such as ADS.

  17. STEEP32 computer code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goerke, W. S.

    1972-01-01

    A manual is presented as an aid in using the STEEP32 code. The code is the EXEC 8 version of the STEEP code (STEEP is an acronym for shock two-dimensional Eulerian elastic plastic). The major steps in a STEEP32 run are illustrated in a sample problem. There is a detailed discussion of the internal organization of the code, including a description of each subroutine.

  18. Universal Noiseless Coding Subroutines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlutsmeyer, A. P.; Rice, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    Software package consists of FORTRAN subroutines that perform universal noiseless coding and decoding of integer and binary data strings. Purpose of this type of coding to achieve data compression in sense that coded data represents original data perfectly (noiselessly) while taking fewer bits to do so. Routines universal because they apply to virtually any "real-world" data source.

  19. Universal Noiseless Coding Subroutines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlutsmeyer, A. P.; Rice, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    Software package consists of FORTRAN subroutines that perform universal noiseless coding and decoding of integer and binary data strings. Purpose of this type of coding to achieve data compression in sense that coded data represents original data perfectly (noiselessly) while taking fewer bits to do so. Routines universal because they apply to virtually any "real-world" data source.

  20. Morse Code Activity Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clinton, Janeen S.

    This activity packet offers simple directions for setting up a Morse Code system appropriate to interfacing with any of several personal computer systems. Worksheets are also included to facilitate teaching Morse Code to persons with visual or other disabilities including blindness, as it is argued that the code is best learned auditorily. (PB)

  1. EMF wire code research

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.

    1993-11-01

    This paper examines the results of previous wire code research to determines the relationship with childhood cancer, wire codes and electromagnetic fields. The paper suggests that, in the original Savitz study, biases toward producing a false positive association between high wire codes and childhood cancer were created by the selection procedure.

  2. Mapping Local Codes to Read Codes.

    PubMed

    Bonney, Wilfred; Galloway, James; Hall, Christopher; Ghattas, Mikhail; Tramma, Leandro; Nind, Thomas; Donnelly, Louise; Jefferson, Emily; Doney, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Background & Objectives: Legacy laboratory test codes make it difficult to use clinical datasets for meaningful translational research, where populations are followed for disease risk and outcomes over many years. The Health Informatics Centre (HIC) at the University of Dundee hosts continuous biochemistry data from the clinical laboratories in Tayside and Fife dating back as far as 1987. However, the HIC-managed biochemistry dataset is coupled with incoherent sample types and unstandardised legacy local test codes, which increases the complexity of using the dataset for reasonable population health outcomes. The objective of this study was to map the legacy local test codes to the Scottish 5-byte Version 2 Read Codes using biochemistry data extracted from the repository of the Scottish Care Information (SCI) Store.

  3. Software Certification - Coding, Code, and Coders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus; Holzmann, Gerard J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a certification approach for software development that has been adopted at our organization. JPL develops robotic spacecraft for the exploration of the solar system. The flight software that controls these spacecraft is considered to be mission critical. We argue that the goal of a software certification process cannot be the development of "perfect" software, i.e., software that can be formally proven to be correct under all imaginable and unimaginable circumstances. More realistically, the goal is to guarantee a software development process that is conducted by knowledgeable engineers, who follow generally accepted procedures to control known risks, while meeting agreed upon standards of workmanship. We target three specific issues that must be addressed in such a certification procedure: the coding process, the code that is developed, and the skills of the coders. The coding process is driven by standards (e.g., a coding standard) and tools. The code is mechanically checked against the standard with the help of state-of-the-art static source code analyzers. The coders, finally, are certified in on-site training courses that include formal exams.

  4. Software Certification - Coding, Code, and Coders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus; Holzmann, Gerard J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a certification approach for software development that has been adopted at our organization. JPL develops robotic spacecraft for the exploration of the solar system. The flight software that controls these spacecraft is considered to be mission critical. We argue that the goal of a software certification process cannot be the development of "perfect" software, i.e., software that can be formally proven to be correct under all imaginable and unimaginable circumstances. More realistically, the goal is to guarantee a software development process that is conducted by knowledgeable engineers, who follow generally accepted procedures to control known risks, while meeting agreed upon standards of workmanship. We target three specific issues that must be addressed in such a certification procedure: the coding process, the code that is developed, and the skills of the coders. The coding process is driven by standards (e.g., a coding standard) and tools. The code is mechanically checked against the standard with the help of state-of-the-art static source code analyzers. The coders, finally, are certified in on-site training courses that include formal exams.

  5. Linking Competency with Training Needs: Session Summary on Disaster Studies and Evaluation, Session BO-17.

    PubMed

    Ling, Kelvin W K; Daily, Elaine K

    2016-02-01

    This section of Prehospital and Disaster Medicine (PDM) presents reports and summaries of the 19th World Congress on Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WCDEM) held in Cape Town, South Africa in April of 2015. Abstracts of Congress oral and poster presentations were published in April 2015 as a supplement to PDM (Volume 30, Supplement 1). Reports and session summaries of the 19th World Congress on Disaster and Emergency Medicine.

  6. Coding for Electronic Mail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. F.; Lee, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Scheme for coding facsimile messages promises to reduce data transmission requirements to one-tenth current level. Coding scheme paves way for true electronic mail in which handwritten, typed, or printed messages or diagrams sent virtually instantaneously - between buildings or between continents. Scheme, called Universal System for Efficient Electronic Mail (USEEM), uses unsupervised character recognition and adaptive noiseless coding of text. Image quality of resulting delivered messages improved over messages transmitted by conventional coding. Coding scheme compatible with direct-entry electronic mail as well as facsimile reproduction. Text transmitted in this scheme automatically translated to word-processor form.

  7. XSOR codes users manual

    SciTech Connect

    Jow, Hong-Nian; Murfin, W.B.; Johnson, J.D.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes the source term estimation codes, XSORs. The codes are written for three pressurized water reactors (Surry, Sequoyah, and Zion) and two boiling water reactors (Peach Bottom and Grand Gulf). The ensemble of codes has been named ``XSOR``. The purpose of XSOR codes is to estimate the source terms which would be released to the atmosphere in severe accidents. A source term includes the release fractions of several radionuclide groups, the timing and duration of releases, the rates of energy release, and the elevation of releases. The codes have been developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in support of the NUREG-1150 program. The XSOR codes are fast running parametric codes and are used as surrogates for detailed mechanistic codes. The XSOR codes also provide the capability to explore the phenomena and their uncertainty which are not currently modeled by the mechanistic codes. The uncertainty distributions of input parameters may be used by an. XSOR code to estimate the uncertainty of source terms.

  8. DLLExternalCode

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Flach, Frank Smith

    2014-05-14

    DLLExternalCode is the a general dynamic-link library (DLL) interface for linking GoldSim (www.goldsim.com) with external codes. The overall concept is to use GoldSim as top level modeling software with interfaces to external codes for specific calculations. The DLLExternalCode DLL that performs the linking function is designed to take a list of code inputs from GoldSim, create an input file for the external application, run the external code, and return a list of outputs, read from files created by the external application, back to GoldSim. Instructions for creating the input file, running the external code, and reading the output are contained in an instructions file that is read and interpreted by the DLL.

  9. Defeating the coding monsters.

    PubMed

    Colt, Ross

    2007-02-01

    Accuracy in coding is rapidly becoming a required skill for military health care providers. Clinic staffing, equipment purchase decisions, and even reimbursement will soon be based on the coding data that we provide. Learning the complicated myriad of rules to code accurately can seem overwhelming. However, the majority of clinic visits in a typical outpatient clinic generally fall into two major evaluation and management codes, 99213 and 99214. If health care providers can learn the rules required to code a 99214 visit, then this will provide a 90% solution that can enable them to accurately code the majority of their clinic visits. This article demonstrates a step-by-step method to code a 99214 visit, by viewing each of the three requirements as a monster to be defeated.

  10. 100th LHCC meeting AGENDA OPEN and CLOSED Sessions

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    OPEN Sessions on Wednesday, 17 February at 8h30-13h00 and 18 February at 9h00-11h00 in MAIN AUDITORIUM, CERN staff and Users are welcome to attend Open Sessions - LIVE WEBCAST. CLOSED Sessions in Conference room 60-6-015 Wednesday 17 February at 14h00-19h00 and continued on Thursday, 18 February at 11h00-17h00.

  11. E-MRS Spring Meeting - Nanophotonic Materials Session

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-27

    MEETING SYMPOSIUM A2 Thursday, May 27, 2004 Morning Joint Session Symposium A1, A2: Silicon -based nanophotonics Session chairs: P. Fauchet...EUROPEAN MATERIALS RESEARCH SOCIETY Strasbourg (France) E-MRS Spring Meeting 2004 May 24-28, 2004 SYMPOSIUM A2 Nanophotonic ...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655-04-1-5025 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE E-MRS Spring Meeting - Nanophotonic Materials Session 5c

  12. 100th LHCC meeting AGENDA OPEN and CLOSED Sessions

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-07

    OPEN Sessions on Wednesday, 17 February at 8h30-13h00 and 18 February at 9h00-11h00 in MAIN AUDITORIUM, CERN staff and Users are welcome to attend Open Sessions - LIVE WEBCAST. CLOSED Sessions in Conference room 60-6-015 Wednesday 17 February at 14h00-19h00 and continued on Thursday, 18 February at 11h00-17h00.

  13. Single-session laparoscopic cystectomy and nephroureterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chłosta, Piotr; Myślak, Marek; Herlinger, Grzegorz; Dobroński, Piotr; Kryst, Piotr; Drewa, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Patients with high grade and/or muscle invasive bladder cancer and with concomitant diseases of the upper urinary tract, e.g. urothelial tumors (transitional cell carcinoma – TCC) or afunctional hydronephrotic kidneys, may be candidates for simultaneous cystectomy and nephroureterectomy. Although the progress in laparoscopic techniques made these procedures feasible and safe, they are still technically demanding so only experienced surgeons can perform them. The aim of the study is to report our experience with laparoscopic simultaneous en bloc resection of the urinary bladder together with unilateral or bilateral nephroureterectomy in patients with TCC. Our material consists of three cases operated on in three centers between 2002 and 2011. After having completed bilateral (1 case) or unilateral (2 cases) nephroureterectomy, we performed radical cystectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection. All the specimens, including the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and reproductive organs in the female, were collected in endobags and were retrieved en bloc using hypogastric incision in the male patient and the vaginal route in the female patients. The demographic and perioperative information was collected and analyzed. All procedures were completed laparoscopically without the need of conversion to open surgery. No major intra- or postoperative complications were observed. Only 1 patient suffered from prolonged lymphatic leakage. From our experience we can conclude that single-session laparoscopic cystectomy and nephroureterectomy are technically feasible and safe, and may be offered for the treatment of selected cases of TCC of the urinary tract. PMID:23837100

  14. Single session treatment for bleeding hemorrhoids

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, S.J.; Rypins, E.B.; Houck, J.; Thrower, S.

    1987-12-01

    Fifty consecutive outpatients with bleeding internal hemorrhoids were prospectively treated with a single application of rubber band ligation or infrared coagulation. Complete follow-up observation was obtained in 48 patients (23 underwent rubber band ligation and 25 underwent infrared coagulation). At one month after treatment, 22 patients who underwent rubber band ligation and 16 who underwent infrared coagulation, were symptomatically improved (p less than 0.05). At six months, 15 patients who had undergone rubber band ligation and ten who had infrared coagulation treatment, remained improved (p less than 0.05). There was no statistical difference in the discomfort experienced by either group during or after the procedure as determined by a self-assessment scale. Two patients who underwent rubber band ligation experienced complications--a thrombosed external hemorrhoid developed in one patient and another had delayed rectal bleeding. Although associated with occasional complications after treatment, rubber band ligation is more effective than in infrared coagulation for single session treatment of bleeding internal hemorrhoids.

  15. Review of the heavy ion physics sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Jacak, B.V.

    1991-01-01

    The parallel sessions on Heavy Ion Physics covered several areas of recent progress in characterizing the nuclear equation of state and the search for deconfined quark matter. Studies of systems from 1 to several hundred GeV/nucleon have been made in order to map the behavior of nuclear matter over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. We have also considered results from proton-nucleus reactions in the heavy ion physics discussions. This should help untangle nuclear effects'' due to the presence of relatively undisturbed nuclear matter from observables arising in the hot, dense part of the system. Even though heavy ion physics covers a large range of bombarding energies, the same two basic questions must be answered. The first problem is to characterize the system that has been produced. We need to determine the energy density, lifetime, temperature and baryon density reached in the collision before expansion and particle production. Then we may address the second issue and look for evidence of new physics. At this meeting, we heard new results from experiments, and theoretical analyses which strive to explain all available data, including those from proton-nucleus collisions. We explored heavy quark production, which may indicate quark matter through color screening of c{bar c} pairs. We heard new results in strangeness production, which has been predicted to be enhanced if quark matter is formed. There were also discussions of jets and minijets, which may probe the hot, dense matter existing early in the collision.

  16. Session management for web-based healthcare applications.

    PubMed

    Wei, L; Sengupta, S

    1999-01-01

    In health care systems, users may access multiple applications during one session of interaction with the system. However, users must sign on to each application individually, and it is difficult to maintain a common context among these applications. We are developing a session management system for web-based applications using LDAP directory service, which will allow single sign-on to multiple web-based applications, and maintain a common context among those applications for the user. This paper discusses the motivations for building this system, the system architecture, and the challenges of our approach, such as the session objects management for the user, and session security.

  17. [Interests of advanced systematic evaluation of dialysis session].

    PubMed

    Galland, Roula; Hallonet, Patrick; Pachot, Monique; Combe, Corinne; Schoenfelder, Isabelle; Caillette Beaudoin, Agnès

    2013-07-01

    In order to rationalize the cost of care for dialysis patients in Centre, regulatory authorities urge establishments to favor the orientation of the patients in Medical Dialysis Unit where the medical presence is not permanent. This involves clinical skills for nurses in the conduct of the dialysis session. Faced with this changing work patterns, we present two security tools of the dialysis session. The first is a "check-list", simple, quick and easy to use, it enables secure connection phase of the patient. It was quickly integrated practice of all professionals. The second tool developed is a combination of indicators "DEAUP" for Pain, Purification, Blood access, Ultrafiltration and other Problems for assessing the quality of the course of the dialysis session. The aim is to reduce the occurrence of adverse events, the DEAUP rating certain criteria depending on the occurrence of incidents, from 0 to 2, 2 corresponding to the appearance of an incident having required the call of the doctor and constitute a precious tool of evaluation of the session for all the professionals. All nurses have joined the practice of evaluation, 98% of the realized sessions are informed and quoted; 8.4% of sessions required call nephrologists before or at the connection. The evaluation at the end of dialysis session found 15% of the sessions listed 2. Calls have resulted in an adjustment to the prescription of the sessions. Copyright © 2013 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Session management for web-based healthcare applications.

    PubMed Central

    Wei, L.; Sengupta, S.

    1999-01-01

    In health care systems, users may access multiple applications during one session of interaction with the system. However, users must sign on to each application individually, and it is difficult to maintain a common context among these applications. We are developing a session management system for web-based applications using LDAP directory service, which will allow single sign-on to multiple web-based applications, and maintain a common context among those applications for the user. This paper discusses the motivations for building this system, the system architecture, and the challenges of our approach, such as the session objects management for the user, and session security. PMID:10566511

  19. A Comparison of Natural Language Processing Methods for Automated Coding of Motivational Interviewing.

    PubMed

    Tanana, Michael; Hallgren, Kevin A; Imel, Zac E; Atkins, David C; Srikumar, Vivek

    2016-06-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is an efficacious treatment for substance use disorders and other problem behaviors. Studies on MI fidelity and mechanisms of change typically use human raters to code therapy sessions, which requires considerable time, training, and financial costs. Natural language processing techniques have recently been utilized for coding MI sessions using machine learning techniques, rather than human coders, and preliminary results have suggested these methods hold promise. The current study extends this previous work by introducing two natural language processing models for automatically coding MI sessions via computer. The two models differ in the way they semantically represent session content, utilizing either 1) simple discrete sentence features (DSF model) and 2) more complex recursive neural networks (RNN model). Utterance- and session-level predictions from these models were compared to ratings provided by human coders using a large sample of MI sessions (N=341 sessions; 78,977 clinician and client talk turns) from 6 MI studies. Results show that the DSF model generally had slightly better performance compared to the RNN model. The DSF model had "good" or higher utterance-level agreement with human coders (Cohen's kappa>0.60) for open and closed questions, affirm, giving information, and follow/neutral (all therapist codes); considerably higher agreement was obtained for session-level indices, and many estimates were competitive with human-to-human agreement. However, there was poor agreement for client change talk, client sustain talk, and therapist MI-inconsistent behaviors. Natural language processing methods provide accurate representations of human derived behavioral codes and could offer substantial improvements to the efficiency and scale in which MI mechanisms of change research and fidelity monitoring are conducted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Comparison of Natural Language Processing Methods for Automated Coding of Motivational Interviewing

    PubMed Central

    Hallgren, Kevin A.; Imel, Zac E.; Atkins, David C.; Srikumar, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an efficacious treatment for substance use disorders and other problem behaviors. Studies on MI fidelity and mechanisms of change typically use human raters to code therapy sessions, which requires considerable time, training, and financial costs. Natural language processing techniques have recently been utilized for coding MI sessions using machine learning techniques, rather than human coders, and preliminary results have suggested these methods hold promise. The current study extends this previous work by introducing two natural language processing models for automatically coding MI sessions via computer. The two models differ in the way they semantically represent session content, utilizing either 1) simple discrete sentence features (DSF model) and 2) more complex recursive neural networks (RNN model). Utterance- and session-level predictions from these models were compared to ratings provided by human coders using a large sample of MI sessions (N = 341 sessions; 78,977 clinician and client talk turns) from 6 MI studies. Results show that the DSF model generally had slightly better performance compared to the RNN model. The DSF model had “good” or higher utterance-level agreement with human coders (Cohen’s kappa > 0.60) for open and closed questions, affirm, giving information, and follow/neutral (all therapist codes); considerably higher agreement was obtained for session-level indices, and many estimates were competitive with human-to-human agreement. However, there was poor agreement for client change talk, client sustain talk, and therapist MI-inconsistent behaviors. Natural language processing methods provide accurate representations of human derived behavioral codes and could offer substantial improvements to the efficiency and scale in which MI mechanisms of change research and fidelity monitoring are conducted. PMID:26944234

  1. CodeSlinger: a case study in domain-driven interactive tool design for biomedical coding scheme exploration and use.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Natalie L

    2010-01-01

    CodeSlinger is a desktop application that was developed to aid medical professionals in the intertranslation, exploration, and use of biomedical coding schemes. The application was designed to provide a highly intuitive, easy-to-use interface that simplifies a complex business problem: a set of time-consuming, laborious tasks that were regularly performed by a group of medical professionals involving manually searching coding books, searching the Internet, and checking documentation references. A workplace observation session with a target user revealed the details of the current process and a clear understanding of the business goals of the target user group. These goals drove the design of the application's interface, which centers on searches for medical conditions and displays the codes found in the application's database that represent those conditions. The interface also allows the exploration of complex conceptual relationships across multiple coding schemes.

  2. Increasing session-to-session transfer in a brain-computer interface with on-site background noise acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hohyun; Ahn, Minkyu; Kim, Kiwoong; Jun, Sung Chan

    2015-12-01

    Objective. A brain-computer interface (BCI) usually requires a time-consuming training phase during which data are collected and used to generate a classifier. Because brain signals vary dynamically over time (and even over sessions), this training phase may be necessary each time the BCI system is used, which is impractical. However, the variability in background noise, which is less dependent on a control signal, may dominate the dynamics of brain signals. Therefore, we hypothesized that an understanding of variations in background noise may allow existing data to be reused by incorporating the noise characteristics into the feature extraction framework; in this way, new session data are not required each time and this increases the feasibility of the BCI systems. Approach. In this work, we collected background noise during a single, brief on-site acquisition session (approximately 3 min) immediately before a new session, and we found that variations in background noise were predictable to some extent. Then we implemented this simple session-to-session transfer strategy with a regularized spatiotemporal filter (RSTF), and we tested it with a total of 20 cross-session datasets collected over multiple days from 12 subjects. We also proposed and tested a bias correction (BC) in the RSTF. Main results. We found that our proposed session-to-session strategies yielded a slightly less or comparable performance to the conventional paradigm (each session training phase is needed with an on-site training dataset). Furthermore, using an RSTF only and an RSTF with a BC outperformed existing approaches in session-to-session transfers. Significance. We inferred from our results that, with an on-site background noise suppression feature extractor and pre-existing training data, further training time may be unnecessary.

  3. Napping Promotes Inter-Session Habituation to Emotional Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Pace-Schott, Edward F.; Shepherd, Elizabeth; Spencer, Rebecca M.C.; Marcello, Matthew; Tucker, Matthew; Propper, Ruth E.; Stickgold, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The effects of a daytime nap on inter-session habituation to aversive visual stimuli were investigated. Healthy young adult volunteers viewed repeated presentations of highly negative and emotionally neutral (but equally arousing) International Affective Picture System (IAPS) photographs during two afternoon sessions separated by 2.5 hrs. Half of the photographs were shown at both sessions (Repeated Sets) and half differed between sessions (Novel Sets). For each stimulus presentation, evoked skin conductance response (SCR), heart rate deceleration (HRD) and corrugator supercilii EMG response (EMG), were computed and range corrected using respective maximum session-1 responses. Following each presentation, subjects rated each photograph on dimensions of pleasantness and arousability. During the inter-session interval, Nap subjects had a 120-min polysomnographically monitored sleep opportunity, whereas Wake subjects watched a non-stimulating video. Nap and Wake subjects did not differ in their subjective ratings of photographs. However, for Repeated-Set photographs, Nap subjects demonstrated greater inter-session habituation in SCR and EMG but a trend toward lesser inter-session habituation in HRD. These group differences were absent for Novel-Set photographs. Group differences across all measures were greater for negative stimuli. Occurrence of SWS during the nap was associated with greater inter-session habituation of EMG whereas occurrence of REM was associated with lesser inter-session habituation of SCR to negative stimuli. Sleep may therefore promote emotional adjustment at the level of somatic responses. Physiological but not subjective inter-session habituation to aversive images was enhanced by a daytime nap. PMID:20969968

  4. Effect of an overground training session versus a treadmill training session on timed up and go in hemiparetic patients.

    PubMed

    Bonnyaud, Céline; Zory, Raphael; Robertson, Johanna; Bensmail, Djamel; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Roche, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Timed Up and Go (TUG) performance is reduced following stroke. Gait training improves gait-related activities in hemiparetic patients. However, no study has compared the impact of a single overground training session with a treadmill training session on gait-related activities (assessed by TUG). To compare the immediate effect of a single overground training session versus a single treadmill training session on TUG performance in hemiparetic patients. In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 56 hemiparetic patients were randomized to 1 or 2 distinct groups: a single gait training session overground (O group) or on a treadmill (T group). Time taken to perform the TUG (in seconds) was assessed before and immediately after the completion of each session. Time taken to perform the TUG decreased significantly, and to a similar extent, in both groups following the training session (O group, 5.9%; T group, 5.2%). An overground training session and a treadmill training session were equally effective in improving TUG performance in hemiparetic patients. Hemiparetic patients should be encouraged to walk regularly overground including turns for 20 minutes without stopping. This is an easy and inexpensive self-rehabilitation method to improve functional gait-related activities involved in the TUG test.

  5. A session-to-session examination of homework engagement in cognitive therapy for depression: Do patients experience immediate benefits?

    PubMed

    Conklin, Laren R; Strunk, Daniel R

    2015-09-01

    Homework is a key component of Cognitive Therapy (CT) for depression. Although previous research has found evidence for a positive relationship between homework compliance and treatment outcome, the methods used in previous studies have often not been optimal. In this study, we examine the relation of specific aspects of homework engagement and symptom change over successive session-to-session intervals. In a sample of 53 depressed adults participating in CT, we examined the relation of observer-rated homework engagement and session-to-session symptom change across the first five sessions. Within patient (and not between patient) variability in homework engagement was significantly related to greater session-to-session symptom improvements. These findings were similar when homework engagement was assessed through a measure of general engagement with homework assignments and a measure assessing engagement in specific assignments often used in CT. Secondary analyses suggested that observer ratings of the effort patients made on homework and the completion of cognitive homework were the numerically strongest predictors of depressive symptom improvements. Patient engagement with homework assignments appears to be an important predictor of early session-to-session symptom improvements. Future research is needed to identify what therapist behaviors promote homework engagement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Session-to-Session Examination of Homework Engagement in Cognitive Therapy for Depression: Do patients experience immediate benefits?

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, Laren R.; Strunk, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Homework is a key component of Cognitive Therapy (CT) for depression. Although previous research has found evidence for a positive relationship between homework compliance and treatment outcome, the methods used in previous studies have often not been optimal. In this study, we examine the relation of specific aspects of homework engagement and symptom change over successive session-to-session intervals. In a sample of 53 depressed adults participating in CT, we examined the relation of observer-rated homework engagement and session-to-session symptom change across the first five sessions. Within patient (and not between patient) variability in homework engagement was significantly related to session-to-session symptom improvements. These findings were similar when homework engagement was assessed through a measure of general engagement with homework assignments and a measure assessing engagement in specific assignments often used in CT. Secondary analyses suggested that observer ratings of the effort patients made on homework and the completion of cognitive homework were the numerically strongest predictors of depressive symptom improvements. Patient engagement with homework assignments appears to be an important predictor of early session-to-session symptom improvements. Future research is needed to identify what therapist behaviors promote homework engagement. PMID:26183022

  7. Proceedings of the 21st DOE/NRC nuclear air cleaning conference; Volume 2, Sessions 9--16

    SciTech Connect

    First, M.W.

    1991-02-01

    The 21st meeting of the Department of Energy/Nuclear Regulatory Commission (DOE/NRC) Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference was held in San Diego, CA on August 13--16, 1990. The proceedings have been published as a two volume set. Volume 2 contains sessions covering adsorbents, nuclear codes and standards, modelling, filters, safety, containment venting and a review of nuclear air cleaning programs around the world. Also included is the list of attendees and an index of authors and speakers. (MHB)

  8. More box codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, G.

    1992-01-01

    A new investigation shows that, starting from the BCH (21,15;3) code represented as a 7 x 3 matrix and adding a row and column to add even parity, one obtains an 8 x 4 matrix (32,15;8) code. An additional dimension is obtained by specifying odd parity on the rows and even parity on the columns, i.e., adjoining to the 8 x 4 matrix, the matrix, which is zero except for the fourth column (of all ones). Furthermore, any seven rows and three columns will form the BCH (21,15;3) code. This box code has the same weight structure as the quadratic residue and BCH codes of the same dimensions. Whether there exists an algebraic isomorphism to either code is as yet unknown.

  9. Mechanical code comparator

    DOEpatents

    Peter, Frank J.; Dalton, Larry J.; Plummer, David W.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of mechanical code comparators is described which have broad potential for application in safety, surety, and security applications. These devices can be implemented as micro-scale electromechanical systems that isolate a secure or otherwise controlled device until an access code is entered. This access code is converted into a series of mechanical inputs to the mechanical code comparator, which compares the access code to a pre-input combination, entered previously into the mechanical code comparator by an operator at the system security control point. These devices provide extremely high levels of robust security. Being totally mechanical in operation, an access control system properly based on such devices cannot be circumvented by software attack alone.

  10. Rewriting the Genetic Code.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Takahito; Lajoie, Marc J; Englert, Markus; Söll, Dieter

    2017-09-08

    The genetic code-the language used by cells to translate their genomes into proteins that perform many cellular functions-is highly conserved throughout natural life. Rewriting the genetic code could lead to new biological functions such as expanding protein chemistries with noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) and genetically isolating synthetic organisms from natural organisms and viruses. It has long been possible to transiently produce proteins bearing ncAAs, but stabilizing an expanded genetic code for sustained function in vivo requires an integrated approach: creating recoded genomes and introducing new translation machinery that function together without compromising viability or clashing with endogenous pathways. In this review, we discuss design considerations and technologies for expanding the genetic code. The knowledge obtained by rewriting the genetic code will deepen our understanding of how genomes are designed and how the canonical genetic code evolved.

  11. Generating code adapted for interlinking legacy scalar code and extended vector code

    DOEpatents

    Gschwind, Michael K

    2013-06-04

    Mechanisms for intermixing code are provided. Source code is received for compilation using an extended Application Binary Interface (ABI) that extends a legacy ABI and uses a different register configuration than the legacy ABI. First compiled code is generated based on the source code, the first compiled code comprising code for accommodating the difference in register configurations used by the extended ABI and the legacy ABI. The first compiled code and second compiled code are intermixed to generate intermixed code, the second compiled code being compiled code that uses the legacy ABI. The intermixed code comprises at least one call instruction that is one of a call from the first compiled code to the second compiled code or a call from the second compiled code to the first compiled code. The code for accommodating the difference in register configurations is associated with the at least one call instruction.

  12. Breaking the Neural Code

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-21

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This seedling proposed to use advanced imaging techniques to break the neuronal code that links the firing of neurons in...Report: Breaking the Neural Code Report Title This seedling proposed to use advanced imaging techniques to break the neuronal code that links the...generating a closed-loop on-line experimental platform. We have completed all proposed tasks of the seedling and successfully completed preliminary

  13. Phonological coding during reading

    PubMed Central

    Leinenger, Mallorie

    2014-01-01

    The exact role that phonological coding (the recoding of written, orthographic information into a sound based code) plays during silent reading has been extensively studied for more than a century. Despite the large body of research surrounding the topic, varying theories as to the time course and function of this recoding still exist. The present review synthesizes this body of research, addressing the topics of time course and function in tandem. The varying theories surrounding the function of phonological coding (e.g., that phonological codes aid lexical access, that phonological codes aid comprehension and bolster short-term memory, or that phonological codes are largely epiphenomenal in skilled readers) are first outlined, and the time courses that each maps onto (e.g., that phonological codes come online early (pre-lexical) or that phonological codes come online late (post-lexical)) are discussed. Next the research relevant to each of these proposed functions is reviewed, discussing the varying methodologies that have been used to investigate phonological coding (e.g., response time methods, reading while eyetracking or recording EEG and MEG, concurrent articulation) and highlighting the advantages and limitations of each with respect to the study of phonological coding. In response to the view that phonological coding is largely epiphenomenal in skilled readers, research on the use of phonological codes in prelingually, profoundly deaf readers is reviewed. Finally, implications for current models of word identification (activation-verification model (Van Order, 1987), dual-route model (e.g., Coltheart, Rastle, Perry, Langdon, & Ziegler, 2001), parallel distributed processing model (Seidenberg & McClelland, 1989)) are discussed. PMID:25150679

  14. Industrial Computer Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Wilbur

    1996-01-01

    This is an overview of new and updated industrial codes for seal design and testing. GCYLT (gas cylindrical seals -- turbulent), SPIRALI (spiral-groove seals -- incompressible), KTK (knife to knife) Labyrinth Seal Code, and DYSEAL (dynamic seal analysis) are covered. CGYLT uses G-factors for Poiseuille and Couette turbulence coefficients. SPIRALI is updated to include turbulence and inertia, but maintains the narrow groove theory. KTK labyrinth seal code handles straight or stepped seals. And DYSEAL provides dynamics for the seal geometry.

  15. Ptolemy Coding Style

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-05

    Ptolemy Coding Style Christopher Brooks Edward A. Lee Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California at Berkeley Technical...COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ptolemy Coding Style 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...constraints, so such constraints are not new to the academic community. This document describes the coding style used in Ptolemy II, a package with

  16. Industrial Computer Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Wilbur

    1996-01-01

    This is an overview of new and updated industrial codes for seal design and testing. GCYLT (gas cylindrical seals -- turbulent), SPIRALI (spiral-groove seals -- incompressible), KTK (knife to knife) Labyrinth Seal Code, and DYSEAL (dynamic seal analysis) are covered. CGYLT uses G-factors for Poiseuille and Couette turbulence coefficients. SPIRALI is updated to include turbulence and inertia, but maintains the narrow groove theory. KTK labyrinth seal code handles straight or stepped seals. And DYSEAL provides dynamics for the seal geometry.

  17. Direct Observational Assessment during Test Sessions and Child Clinical Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConaughy, Stephanie H.

    2005-01-01

    Test sessions and child clinical interviews offer opportunities for direct observations of children's behavior in controlled settings. Moreover, standardized instruments for test session and interview observations offer more reliable and valid assessment methods than do anecdotal reports. This article reviews characteristics and psychometric…

  18. Quality Assurance of Assessment and Moderation Discourses Involving Sessional Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grainger, Peter; Adie, Lenore; Weir, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Quality assurance is a major agenda in tertiary education. The casualisation of academic work, especially in teaching, is also a quality assurance issue. Casual or sessional staff members teach and assess more than 50% of all university courses in Australia, and yet the research in relation to the role sessional staff play in quality assurance of…

  19. 47 CFR 97.519 - Coordinating examination sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coordinating examination sessions. 97.519 Section 97.519 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.519 Coordinating examination sessions...

  20. 47 CFR 97.513 - VE session manager requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false VE session manager requirements. 97.513 Section 97.513 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.513 VE session manager requirements. (a...

  1. 47 CFR 97.519 - Coordinating examination sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coordinating examination sessions. 97.519 Section 97.519 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.519 Coordinating examination sessions...

  2. 47 CFR 97.519 - Coordinating examination sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coordinating examination sessions. 97.519 Section 97.519 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.519 Coordinating examination sessions...

  3. 47 CFR 97.519 - Coordinating examination sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coordinating examination sessions. 97.519 Section 97.519 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.519 Coordinating examination sessions...

  4. 47 CFR 97.513 - VE session manager requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false VE session manager requirements. 97.513 Section 97.513 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.513 VE session manager requirements. (a...

  5. 47 CFR 97.519 - Coordinating examination sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coordinating examination sessions. 97.519 Section 97.519 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.519 Coordinating examination sessions...

  6. 47 CFR 97.513 - VE session manager requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false VE session manager requirements. 97.513 Section 97.513 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.513 VE session manager requirements. (a...

  7. 47 CFR 97.513 - VE session manager requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false VE session manager requirements. 97.513 Section 97.513 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.513 VE session manager requirements. (a...

  8. Professional development session for early career scientists at SITC 2012

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) 2012 Professional Development Session was held as part of the SITC 27th Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, on October 24, 2012. The session was designed as a new opportunity for early career investigators to learn about relevant career development topics in a didactic setting. PMID:25742323

  9. Quality Assurance of Assessment and Moderation Discourses Involving Sessional Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grainger, Peter; Adie, Lenore; Weir, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Quality assurance is a major agenda in tertiary education. The casualisation of academic work, especially in teaching, is also a quality assurance issue. Casual or sessional staff members teach and assess more than 50% of all university courses in Australia, and yet the research in relation to the role sessional staff play in quality assurance of…

  10. Session overview: climate and landscape change over time

    Treesearch

    Constance I. Millar

    2004-01-01

    In this chapter, we strive for something different. Whereas a goal of the other sessions at the Sierra Nevada Science Symposium was to present new research on familiar themes, our goal in the session "Climate and Landscape Change Over Time" was to introduce a topic that itself is likely unfamiliar to many resource scientists and managers. The limited...

  11. Couples Relapse Prevention Sessions as a Maintenance Strategy for Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutter, Henry S. G.; And Others

    This study evaluated whether alcoholics who receive relapse prevention (RP) sessions in the year after a short-term behavioral marital therapy (BMT) do better at long-term follow-up than do those not receiving the additional RP. Sixty couples with an alcoholic husband, after participating in 10 weekly BMT couples group sessions, were assigned…

  12. Five Decades of ALER Conference Session Presentations, 1960-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Still, Kristine Lynn; Gordon, Jaclyn Prizant

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a quantitative content analysis of the conference session programs from the Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers (ALER) annual meetings across five decades spanning from 1960 through 2010. The data cycled through an analysis during four separate phases. In total, 4,605 conference sessions were…

  13. Parmitano in Columbus module during Oxygen Uptake measurement session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-02

    ISS037-E-004950 (2 Oct. 2013) --- European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, Expedition 37 flight engineer, performs an oxygen uptake measurement session in the Columbus laboratory of the International Space Station. He is wearing a Pulmonary Function System (PFS) face mask during the session.

  14. Emerging POPs. A special session at "Dioxin 2008" in Birmingham.

    PubMed

    Rose, Martin; Falandysz, Jerzy

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the topics and ideas presented at the Special Session of the conference Dioxin 2008 (28th International Symposium on Halogenated Environmental Organic Pollutants and POPs) titled: "Emerging POPs". The session was devoted to emerging and re-emerging compounds or groups of compounds identified recently as environmental contaminants and classified as dioxin-like compounds or persistent organic pollutants.

  15. 7 CFR 900.38 - Pre-hearing information sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pre-hearing information sessions. 900.38 Section 900.38 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... Agreements and Marketing Orders § 900.38 Pre-hearing information sessions. A pre-hearing information...

  16. 7 CFR 900.38 - Pre-hearing information sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pre-hearing information sessions. 900.38 Section 900.38 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... Agreements and Marketing Orders § 900.38 Pre-hearing information sessions. A pre-hearing information...

  17. 7 CFR 900.38 - Pre-hearing information sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pre-hearing information sessions. 900.38 Section 900.38 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... Agreements and Marketing Orders § 900.38 Pre-hearing information sessions. A pre-hearing information...

  18. 7 CFR 900.38 - Pre-hearing information sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pre-hearing information sessions. 900.38 Section 900.38 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... Agreements and Marketing Orders § 900.38 Pre-hearing information sessions. A pre-hearing information...

  19. Training for Triggers: Helping Writing Center Consultants Navigate Emotional Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Labor performed by writing center consultants in sessions is inherently emotional. While writing center professionals can never alleviate fully the emotional demands placed on consultants during sessions, we can work to educate our staff about empathetic engagement with clients, and we can create structures and practices conducive to a supportive…

  20. Transonic airfoil codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garabedian, P. R.

    1979-01-01

    Computer codes for the design and analysis of transonic airfoils are considered. The design code relies on the method of complex characteristics in the hodograph plane to construct shockless airfoil. The analysis code uses artificial viscosity to calculate flows with weak shock waves at off-design conditions. Comparisons with experiments show that an excellent simulation of two dimensional wind tunnel tests is obtained. The codes have been widely adopted by the aircraft industry as a tool for the development of supercritical wing technology.

  1. FAA Smoke Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Domino, Stefan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay; Gallegos, Carlos

    2006-10-27

    FAA Smoke Transport Code, a physics-based Computational Fluid Dynamics tool, which couples heat, mass, and momentum transfer, has been developed to provide information on smoke transport in cargo compartments with various geometries and flight conditions. The software package contains a graphical user interface for specification of geometry and boundary conditions, analysis module for solving the governing equations, and a post-processing tool. The current code was produced by making substantial improvements and additions to a code obtained from a university. The original code was able to compute steady, uniform, isothermal turbulent pressurization. In addition, a preprocessor and postprocessor were added to arrive at the current software package.

  2. Tokamak Systems Code

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.L.; Barrett, R.J.; Brown, T.G.; Gorker, G.E.; Hooper, R.J.; Kalsi, S.S.; Metzler, D.H.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Roth, K.E.; Spampinato, P.T.

    1985-03-01

    The FEDC Tokamak Systems Code calculates tokamak performance, cost, and configuration as a function of plasma engineering parameters. This version of the code models experimental tokamaks. It does not currently consider tokamak configurations that generate electrical power or incorporate breeding blankets. The code has a modular (or subroutine) structure to allow independent modeling for each major tokamak component or system. A primary benefit of modularization is that a component module may be updated without disturbing the remainder of the systems code as long as the imput to or output from the module remains unchanged.

  3. Topological subsystem codes

    SciTech Connect

    Bombin, H.

    2010-03-15

    We introduce a family of two-dimensional (2D) topological subsystem quantum error-correcting codes. The gauge group is generated by two-local Pauli operators, so that two-local measurements are enough to recover the error syndrome. We study the computational power of code deformation in these codes and show that boundaries cannot be introduced in the usual way. In addition, we give a general mapping connecting suitable classical statistical mechanical models to optimal error correction in subsystem stabilizer codes that suffer from depolarizing noise.

  4. Reactivity to nicotine cues over repeated cue reactivity sessions

    PubMed Central

    LaRowe, Steven D.; Saladin, Michael E.; Carpenter, Matthew J.; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated whether reactivity to nicotine-related cues would attenuate across four experimental sessions held one week apart. Participants were nineteen non-treatment seeking, nicotine-dependent males. Cue reactivity sessions were performed in an outpatient research center using in vivo cues consisting of standardized smoking-related paraphernalia (e.g., cigarettes) and neutral comparison paraphernalia (e.g., pencils). Craving ratings were collected before and after both cue presentations while physiological measures (heart rate, skin conductance) were collected before and during the cue presentations. Although craving levels decreased across sessions, smoking-related cues consistently evoked significantly greater increases in craving relative to neutral cues over all four experimental sessions. Skin conductance was higher in response to smoking cues, though this effect was not as robust as that observed for craving. Results suggest that, under the described experimental parameters, craving can be reliably elicited over repeated cue reactivity sessions. PMID:17537583

  5. Reactivity to nicotine cues over repeated cue reactivity sessions.

    PubMed

    LaRowe, Steven D; Saladin, Michael E; Carpenter, Matthew J; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P

    2007-12-01

    The present study investigated whether reactivity to nicotine-related cues would attenuate across four experimental sessions held 1 week apart. Participants were nineteen non-treatment seeking, nicotine-dependent males. Cue reactivity sessions were performed in an outpatient research center using in vivo cues consisting of standardized smoking-related paraphernalia (e.g., cigarettes) and neutral comparison paraphernalia (e.g., pencils). Craving ratings were collected before and after both cue presentations while physiological measures (heart rate, skin conductance) were collected before and during the cue presentations. Although craving levels decreased across sessions, smoking-related cues consistently evoked significantly greater increases in craving relative to neutral cues over all four experimental sessions. Skin conductance was higher in response to smoking cues, though this effect was not as robust as that observed for craving. Results suggest that, under the described experimental parameters, craving can be reliably elicited over repeated cue reactivity sessions.

  6. A multidisciplinary approach to vascular surgery procedure coding improves coding accuracy, work relative value unit assignment, and reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Francesco A; Judelson, Dejah R; Messina, Louis M; Indes, Jeffrey; FitzGerald, Gordon; Doucet, Danielle R; Simons, Jessica P; Schanzer, Andres

    2016-08-01

    Vascular surgery procedural reimbursement depends on accurate procedural coding and documentation. Despite the critical importance of correct coding, there has been a paucity of research focused on the effect of direct physician involvement. We hypothesize that direct physician involvement in procedural coding will lead to improved coding accuracy, increased work relative value unit (wRVU) assignment, and increased physician reimbursement. This prospective observational cohort study evaluated procedural coding accuracy of fistulograms at an academic medical institution (January-June 2014). All fistulograms were coded by institutional coders (traditional coding) and by a single vascular surgeon whose codes were verified by two institution coders (multidisciplinary coding). The coding methods were compared, and differences were translated into revenue and wRVUs using the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule. Comparison between traditional and multidisciplinary coding was performed for three discrete study periods: baseline (period 1), after a coding education session for physicians and coders (period 2), and after a coding education session with implementation of an operative dictation template (period 3). The accuracy of surgeon operative dictations during each study period was also assessed. An external validation at a second academic institution was performed during period 1 to assess and compare coding accuracy. During period 1, traditional coding resulted in a 4.4% (P = .004) loss in reimbursement and a 5.4% (P = .01) loss in wRVUs compared with multidisciplinary coding. During period 2, no significant difference was found between traditional and multidisciplinary coding in reimbursement (1.3% loss; P = .24) or wRVUs (1.8% loss; P = .20). During period 3, traditional coding yielded a higher overall reimbursement (1.3% gain; P = .26) than multidisciplinary coding. This increase, however, was due to errors by institution coders, with six inappropriately used codes

  7. H. R. 1476: A bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to clarify the application of the credit for producing fuel from a nonconventional source with respect to gas produced from a tight formation and to make such credit permanent with respect to such gas and gas produced from Devonian shale. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, March 16, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The determination of whether gas is produced from geopressured brines, Devonian shales, coal seams, or a tight formation is made from section 503 of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978. Permanent credit is for gas produced from a tight formation or Devonian shale only and applies to gas sold after July 1, 1987. The credit allowed for any taxable year shall not exceed the sum of the regular tax reduced by the sum of other credits allowable under other subsections of the Internal Revenue Code.

  8. Fast Coding Unit Encoding Mechanism for Low Complexity Video Coding.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Liu, Pengyu; Wu, Yueying; Jia, Kebin; Gao, Guandong

    2016-01-01

    In high efficiency video coding (HEVC), coding tree contributes to excellent compression performance. However, coding tree brings extremely high computational complexity. Innovative works for improving coding tree to further reduce encoding time are stated in this paper. A novel low complexity coding tree mechanism is proposed for HEVC fast coding unit (CU) encoding. Firstly, this paper makes an in-depth study of the relationship among CU distribution, quantization parameter (QP) and content change (CC). Secondly, a CU coding tree probability model is proposed for modeling and predicting CU distribution. Eventually, a CU coding tree probability update is proposed, aiming to address probabilistic model distortion problems caused by CC. Experimental results show that the proposed low complexity CU coding tree mechanism significantly reduces encoding time by 27% for lossy coding and 42% for visually lossless coding and lossless coding. The proposed low complexity CU coding tree mechanism devotes to improving coding performance under various application conditions.

  9. Fast Coding Unit Encoding Mechanism for Low Complexity Video Coding

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yueying; Jia, Kebin; Gao, Guandong

    2016-01-01

    In high efficiency video coding (HEVC), coding tree contributes to excellent compression performance. However, coding tree brings extremely high computational complexity. Innovative works for improving coding tree to further reduce encoding time are stated in this paper. A novel low complexity coding tree mechanism is proposed for HEVC fast coding unit (CU) encoding. Firstly, this paper makes an in-depth study of the relationship among CU distribution, quantization parameter (QP) and content change (CC). Secondly, a CU coding tree probability model is proposed for modeling and predicting CU distribution. Eventually, a CU coding tree probability update is proposed, aiming to address probabilistic model distortion problems caused by CC. Experimental results show that the proposed low complexity CU coding tree mechanism significantly reduces encoding time by 27% for lossy coding and 42% for visually lossless coding and lossless coding. The proposed low complexity CU coding tree mechanism devotes to improving coding performance under various application conditions. PMID:26999741

  10. Insurance billing and coding.

    PubMed

    Napier, Rebecca H; Bruelheide, Lori S; Demann, Eric T K; Haug, Richard H

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to highlight the importance of understanding various numeric and alpha-numeric codes for accurately billing dental and medically related services to private pay or third-party insurance carriers. In the United States, common dental terminology (CDT) codes are most commonly used by dentists to submit claims, whereas current procedural terminology (CPT) and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD.9.CM) codes are more commonly used by physicians to bill for their services. The CPT and ICD.9.CM coding systems complement each other in that CPT codes provide the procedure and service information and ICD.9.CM codes provide the reason or rationale for a particular procedure or service. These codes are more commonly used for "medical necessity" determinations, and general dentists and specialists who routinely perform care, including trauma-related care, biopsies, and dental treatment as a result of or in anticipation of a cancer-related treatment, are likely to use these codes. Claim submissions for care provided can be completed electronically or by means of paper forms.

  11. Coding Acoustic Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Xie, Boyang; Tang, Kun; Cheng, Hua; Liu, Zhengyou; Chen, Shuqi; Tian, Jianguo

    2017-02-01

    Coding acoustic metasurfaces can combine simple logical bits to acquire sophisticated functions in wave control. The acoustic logical bits can achieve a phase difference of exactly π and a perfect match of the amplitudes for the transmitted waves. By programming the coding sequences, acoustic metasurfaces with various functions, including creating peculiar antenna patterns and waves focusing, have been demonstrated.

  12. Synthesizing Certified Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Michael; Schumann, Johann; Fischer, Bernd

    2002-01-01

    Code certification is a lightweight approach to demonstrate software quality on a formal level. Its basic idea is to require producers to provide formal proofs that their code satisfies certain quality properties. These proofs serve as certificates which can be checked independently. Since code certification uses the same underlying technology as program verification, it also requires many detailed annotations (e.g., loop invariants) to make the proofs possible. However, manually adding theses annotations to the code is time-consuming and error-prone. We address this problem by combining code certification with automatic program synthesis. We propose an approach to generate simultaneously, from a high-level specification, code and all annotations required to certify generated code. Here, we describe a certification extension of AUTOBAYES, a synthesis tool which automatically generates complex data analysis programs from compact specifications. AUTOBAYES contains sufficient high-level domain knowledge to generate detailed annotations. This allows us to use a general-purpose verification condition generator to produce a set of proof obligations in first-order logic. The obligations are then discharged using the automated theorem E-SETHEO. We demonstrate our approach by certifying operator safety for a generated iterative data classification program without manual annotation of the code.

  13. Dress Codes for Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Million, June

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses an e-mail survey of principals from across the country regarding whether or not their school had a formal staff dress code. The results indicate that most did not have a formal dress code, but agreed that professional dress for teachers was not only necessary, but showed respect for the school and had a…

  14. Pseudonoise code tracking loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laflame, D. T. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A delay-locked loop is presented for tracking a pseudonoise (PN) reference code in an incoming communication signal. The loop is less sensitive to gain imbalances, which can otherwise introduce timing errors in the PN reference code formed by the loop.

  15. Modified JPEG Huffman coding.

    PubMed

    Lakhani, Gopal

    2003-01-01

    It is a well observed characteristic that when a DCT block is traversed in the zigzag order, the AC coefficients generally decrease in size and the run-length of zero coefficients increase in number. This article presents a minor modification to the Huffman coding of the JPEG baseline compression algorithm to exploit this redundancy. For this purpose, DCT blocks are divided into bands so that each band can be coded using a separate code table. Three implementations are presented, which all move the end-of-block marker up in the middle of DCT block and use it to indicate the band boundaries. Experimental results are presented to compare reduction in the code size obtained by our methods with the JPEG sequential-mode Huffman coding and arithmetic coding methods. The average code reduction to the total image code size of one of our methods is 4%. Our methods can also be used for progressive image transmission and hence, experimental results are also given to compare them with two-, three-, and four-band implementations of the JPEG spectral selection method.

  16. Code of Ethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Division for Early Childhood, Council for Exceptional Children, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Code of Ethics of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children is a public statement of principles and practice guidelines supported by the mission of DEC. The foundation of this Code is based on sound ethical reasoning related to professional practice with young children with disabilities and their families…

  17. Dress Codes for Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Million, June

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses an e-mail survey of principals from across the country regarding whether or not their school had a formal staff dress code. The results indicate that most did not have a formal dress code, but agreed that professional dress for teachers was not only necessary, but showed respect for the school and had a…

  18. Lichenase and coding sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2000-08-15

    The present invention provides a fungal lichenase, i.e., an endo-1,3-1,4-.beta.-D-glucanohydrolase, its coding sequence, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the lichenase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present lichenase is from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  19. Legacy Code Modernization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hribar, Michelle R.; Frumkin, Michael; Jin, Haoqiang; Waheed, Abdul; Yan, Jerry; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Over the past decade, high performance computing has evolved rapidly; systems based on commodity microprocessors have been introduced in quick succession from at least seven vendors/families. Porting codes to every new architecture is a difficult problem; in particular, here at NASA, there are many large CFD applications that are very costly to port to new machines by hand. The LCM ("Legacy Code Modernization") Project is the development of an integrated parallelization environment (IPE) which performs the automated mapping of legacy CFD (Fortran) applications to state-of-the-art high performance computers. While most projects to port codes focus on the parallelization of the code, we consider porting to be an iterative process consisting of several steps: 1) code cleanup, 2) serial optimization,3) parallelization, 4) performance monitoring and visualization, 5) intelligent tools for automated tuning using performance prediction and 6) machine specific optimization. The approach for building this parallelization environment is to build the components for each of the steps simultaneously and then integrate them together. The demonstration will exhibit our latest research in building this environment: 1. Parallelizing tools and compiler evaluation. 2. Code cleanup and serial optimization using automated scripts 3. Development of a code generator for performance prediction 4. Automated partitioning 5. Automated insertion of directives. These demonstrations will exhibit the effectiveness of an automated approach for all the steps involved with porting and tuning a legacy code application for a new architecture.

  20. Computerized mega code recording.

    PubMed

    Burt, T W; Bock, H C

    1988-04-01

    A system has been developed to facilitate recording of advanced cardiac life support mega code testing scenarios. By scanning a paper "keyboard" using a bar code wand attached to a portable microcomputer, the person assigned to record the scenario can easily generate an accurate, complete, timed, and typewritten record of the given situations and the obtained responses.

  1. Legacy Code Modernization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hribar, Michelle R.; Frumkin, Michael; Jin, Haoqiang; Waheed, Abdul; Yan, Jerry; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Over the past decade, high performance computing has evolved rapidly; systems based on commodity microprocessors have been introduced in quick succession from at least seven vendors/families. Porting codes to every new architecture is a difficult problem; in particular, here at NASA, there are many large CFD applications that are very costly to port to new machines by hand. The LCM ("Legacy Code Modernization") Project is the development of an integrated parallelization environment (IPE) which performs the automated mapping of legacy CFD (Fortran) applications to state-of-the-art high performance computers. While most projects to port codes focus on the parallelization of the code, we consider porting to be an iterative process consisting of several steps: 1) code cleanup, 2) serial optimization,3) parallelization, 4) performance monitoring and visualization, 5) intelligent tools for automated tuning using performance prediction and 6) machine specific optimization. The approach for building this parallelization environment is to build the components for each of the steps simultaneously and then integrate them together. The demonstration will exhibit our latest research in building this environment: 1. Parallelizing tools and compiler evaluation. 2. Code cleanup and serial optimization using automated scripts 3. Development of a code generator for performance prediction 4. Automated partitioning 5. Automated insertion of directives. These demonstrations will exhibit the effectiveness of an automated approach for all the steps involved with porting and tuning a legacy code application for a new architecture.

  2. Current and Future Applications of Mechanical Fasteners for Light-Frame Wood Structures: Proceedings of Mechanical Fasteners Plenary Session at the Forest Products Research Society Annual Meeting

    Treesearch

    Leslie H. Groom; [Compiler

    1993-01-01

    The title of this publication-"Current and Future Applications of Mechanical Fasteners for Light-Frame Wood Structures" is the theme of this plenary session from the 1991 annual meeting of the Forest Products Research Society (FPRS). This theme was chosen to address current issues in the forest products industry: changing design codes, fastener performance,...

  3. Energy Conservation Code Decoded

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Pam C.; Taylor, Zachary T.

    2006-09-01

    Designing an energy-efficient, affordable, and comfortable home is a lot easier thanks to a slime, easier to read booklet, the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), published in March 2006. States, counties, and cities have begun reviewing the new code as a potential upgrade to their existing codes. Maintained under the public consensus process of the International Code Council, the IECC is designed to do just what its title says: promote the design and construction of energy-efficient homes and commercial buildings. Homes in this case means traditional single-family homes, duplexes, condominiums, and apartment buildings having three or fewer stories. The U.S. Department of Energy, which played a key role in proposing the changes that resulted in the new code, is offering a free training course that covers the residential provisions of the 2006 IECC.

  4. Combustion chamber analysis code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekwas, A. J.; Lai, Y. G.; Krishnan, A.; Avva, R. K.; Giridharan, M. G.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional, time dependent, Favre averaged, finite volume Navier-Stokes code has been developed to model compressible and incompressible flows (with and without chemical reactions) in liquid rocket engines. The code has a non-staggered formulation with generalized body-fitted-coordinates (BFC) capability. Higher order differencing methodologies such as MUSCL and Osher-Chakravarthy schemes are available. Turbulent flows can be modeled using any of the five turbulent models present in the code. A two-phase, two-liquid, Lagrangian spray model has been incorporated into the code. Chemical equilibrium and finite rate reaction models are available to model chemically reacting flows. The discrete ordinate method is used to model effects of thermal radiation. The code has been validated extensively against benchmark experimental data and has been applied to model flows in several propulsion system components of the SSME and the STME.

  5. Evolving genetic code

    PubMed Central

    OHAMA, Takeshi; INAGAKI, Yuji; BESSHO, Yoshitaka; OSAWA, Syozo

    2008-01-01

    In 1985, we reported that a bacterium, Mycoplasma capricolum, used a deviant genetic code, namely UGA, a “universal” stop codon, was read as tryptophan. This finding, together with the deviant nuclear genetic codes in not a few organisms and a number of mitochondria, shows that the genetic code is not universal, and is in a state of evolution. To account for the changes in codon meanings, we proposed the codon capture theory stating that all the code changes are non-disruptive without accompanied changes of amino acid sequences of proteins. Supporting evidence for the theory is presented in this review. A possible evolutionary process from the ancient to the present-day genetic code is also discussed. PMID:18941287

  6. Semi-Automated Discovery of Application Session Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kannan, J.; Jung, J.; Paxson, V.; Koksal, C.

    2006-09-07

    While the problem of analyzing network traffic at the granularity of individual connections has seen considerable previous work and tool development, understanding traffic at a higher level---the structure of user-initiated sessions comprised of groups of related connections---remains much less explored. Some types of session structure, such as the coupling between an FTP control connection and the data connections it spawns, have prespecified forms, though the specifications do not guarantee how the forms appear in practice. Other types of sessions, such as a user reading email with a browser, only manifest empirically. Still other sessions might exist without us even knowing of their presence, such as a botnet zombie receiving instructions from its master and proceeding in turn to carry them out. We present algorithms rooted in the statistics of Poisson processes that can mine a large corpus of network connection logs to extract the apparent structure of application sessions embedded in the connections. Our methods are semi-automated in that we aim to present an analyst with high-quality information (expressed as regular expressions) reflecting different possible abstractions of an application's session structure. We develop and test our methods using traces from a large Internet site, finding diversity in the number of applications that manifest, their different session structures, and the presence of abnormal behavior. Our work has applications to traffic characterization and monitoring, source models for synthesizing network traffic, and anomaly detection.

  7. Quantum convolutional codes derived from constacyclic codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Tingsu; Huang, Xinmei; Tang, Yuansheng

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, three families of quantum convolutional codes are constructed. The first one and the second one can be regarded as a generalization of Theorems 3, 4, 7 and 8 [J. Chen, J. Li, F. Yang and Y. Huang, Int. J. Theor. Phys., doi:10.1007/s10773-014-2214-6 (2014)], in the sense that we drop the constraint q ≡ 1 (mod 4). Furthermore, the second one and the third one attain the quantum generalized Singleton bound.

  8. [The paradoxical effect of persuasive communication in health education sessions].

    PubMed

    Piperini, Marie-Christine

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the communication dynamics leading to the adoption of new attitudes and cognitions in health education sessions. We examined the verbal interactions at work in persuasive communication in 16 health education sessions. The study found that the medical expertise of the educator and the initial level of commitment of the participants had a positive effect on adherence to recommendations. However, persuasive communication in health education sessions appears to involve a paradoxical process in which criticism of the message can go hand in hand with the expression of an intention to implement new risk-reducing behaviors.

  9. Pyramid image codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1990-01-01

    All vision systems, both human and machine, transform the spatial image into a coded representation. Particular codes may be optimized for efficiency or to extract useful image features. Researchers explored image codes based on primary visual cortex in man and other primates. Understanding these codes will advance the art in image coding, autonomous vision, and computational human factors. In cortex, imagery is coded by features that vary in size, orientation, and position. Researchers have devised a mathematical model of this transformation, called the Hexagonal oriented Orthogonal quadrature Pyramid (HOP). In a pyramid code, features are segregated by size into layers, with fewer features in the layers devoted to large features. Pyramid schemes provide scale invariance, and are useful for coarse-to-fine searching and for progressive transmission of images. The HOP Pyramid is novel in three respects: (1) it uses a hexagonal pixel lattice, (2) it uses oriented features, and (3) it accurately models most of the prominent aspects of primary visual cortex. The transform uses seven basic features (kernels), which may be regarded as three oriented edges, three oriented bars, and one non-oriented blob. Application of these kernels to non-overlapping seven-pixel neighborhoods yields six oriented, high-pass pyramid layers, and one low-pass (blob) layer.

  10. Embedded foveation image coding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Bovik, A C

    2001-01-01

    The human visual system (HVS) is highly space-variant in sampling, coding, processing, and understanding. The spatial resolution of the HVS is highest around the point of fixation (foveation point) and decreases rapidly with increasing eccentricity. By taking advantage of this fact, it is possible to remove considerable high-frequency information redundancy from the peripheral regions and still reconstruct a perceptually good quality image. Great success has been obtained previously by a class of embedded wavelet image coding algorithms, such as the embedded zerotree wavelet (EZW) and the set partitioning in hierarchical trees (SPIHT) algorithms. Embedded wavelet coding not only provides very good compression performance, but also has the property that the bitstream can be truncated at any point and still be decoded to recreate a reasonably good quality image. In this paper, we propose an embedded foveation image coding (EFIC) algorithm, which orders the encoded bitstream to optimize foveated visual quality at arbitrary bit-rates. A foveation-based image quality metric, namely, foveated wavelet image quality index (FWQI), plays an important role in the EFIC system. We also developed a modified SPIHT algorithm to improve the coding efficiency. Experiments show that EFIC integrates foveation filtering with foveated image coding and demonstrates very good coding performance and scalability in terms of foveated image quality measurement.

  11. Report number codes

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.N.

    1985-05-01

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

  12. Superluminal Labview Code

    SciTech Connect

    Wheat, Robert; Marksteiner, Quinn; Quenzer, Jonathan; Higginson, Ian

    2012-03-26

    This labview code is used to set the phase and amplitudes on the 72 antenna of the superluminal machine, and to map out the radiation patter from the superluminal antenna.Each antenna radiates a modulated signal consisting of two separate frequencies, in the range of 2 GHz to 2.8 GHz. The phases and amplitudes from each antenna are controlled by a pair of AD8349 vector modulators (VMs). These VMs set the phase and amplitude of a high frequency signal using a set of four DC inputs, which are controlled by Linear Technologies LTC1990 digital to analog converters (DACs). The labview code controls these DACs through an 8051 microcontroller.This code also monitors the phases and amplitudes of the 72 channels. Near each antenna, there is a coupler that channels a portion of the power into a binary network. Through a labview controlled switching array, any of the 72 coupled signals can be channeled in to the Tektronix TDS 7404 digital oscilloscope. Then the labview code takes an FFT of the signal, and compares it to the FFT of a reference signal in the oscilloscope to determine the magnitude and phase of each sideband of the signal. The code compensates for phase and amplitude errors introduced by differences in cable lengths.The labview code sets each of the 72 elements to a user determined phase and amplitude. For each element, the code runs an iterative procedure, where it adjusts the DACs until the correct phases and amplitudes have been reached.

  13. Coding for surgical audit.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, R A; van Rij, A M

    1990-05-01

    A simple system of codes for operations, diagnoses and complications, developed specifically for computerized surgical audit, is described. This arose following a review of our established surgical audit in which problems in the retrieval of data from the database were identified. Evaluation of current methods of classification of surgical data highlighted the need for a dedicated coding system that was suitable for classifying surgical audit data, enabling rapid retrieval from large databases. After 2 years of use, the coding system has been found to fulfil the criteria of being sufficiently flexible and specific for computerized surgical audit, yet simple enough for medical staff to use.

  14. The Neuromuscular, Biochemical, and Endocrine Responses to a Single-Session Vs. Double-Session Training Day in Elite Athletes.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Michael J; Cook, Christian J; Drake, David; Costley, Lisa; Johnston, Julie P; Kilduff, Liam P

    2016-11-01

    Johnston, MJ, Cook, CJ, Drake, D, Costley, L, Johnston, JP, and Kilduff, LP. The neuromuscular, biochemical, and endocrine responses to a single-session vs. double-session training day in elite athletes. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3098-3106, 2016-The aim of this study was to compare the acute neuromuscular, biochemical, and endocrine responses of a training day consisting of a speed session only with performing a speed-and-weights training session on the same day. Fifteen men who were academy-level rugby players completed 2 protocols in a randomized order. The speed-only protocol involved performing 6 maximal effort repetitions of 50-m running sprints with 5 minutes of recovery between each sprint, whereas the speed-and-weights protocol involved the same sprinting session but was followed 2 hours later by a lower-body weights session consisting of 4 sets of 5 backsquats and Romanian deadlift at 85% one repetition maximum. Testosterone, cortisol, creatine kinase, lactate, and perceived muscle soreness were determined immediately before, immediately after, 2 hours after, and 24 hours after both the protocols. Peak power, relative peak power, jump height, and average rate of force development were determined from a countermovement jump (CMJ) at the same time points. After 24-hours, muscle soreness was significantly higher after the speed-and-weights protocol compared with the speed-only protocol (effect size η = 0.253, F = 4.750, p ≤ 0.05). There was no significant difference between any of the CMJ variables at any of the posttraining time points. Likewise, creatine kinase, testosterone, and cortisol were unaffected by the addition of a weight-training session. These data indicate that the addition of a weight-training session 2 hours after a speed session, whereas increasing the perception of fatigue the next day does not result in a difference in endocrine response or in neuromuscular capability.

  15. Therapist Use of Socratic Questioning Predicts Session-to-Session Symptom Change in Cognitive Therapy for Depression

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Justin D.; Strunk, Daniel R.; Sasso, Katherine E.; Cooper, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Socratic questioning is a key therapeutic strategy in cognitive therapy (CT) for depression. However, little is known regarding its relation to outcome. In this study, we examine therapist use of Socratic questioning as a predictor of session-to-session symptom change. Participants were 55 depressed adults who participated in a 16-week course of CT (see Adler, Strunk, & Fazio, 2015). Socratic questioning was assessed through observer ratings of the first three sessions. Socratic ratings were disaggregated into scores reflecting within-patient and between-patient variability to facilitate an examination of the relation of within-patient Socratic questioning and session-to-session symptom change. Because we examined within-patient variability in Socratic questioning, the identification of such a relation cannot be attributed to any stable patient characteristics that might otherwise introduce a spurious relation. Within-patient Socratic questioning significantly predicted session-to-session symptom change across the early sessions, with a one standard deviation increase in Socratic-Within predicting a 1.51-point decrease in BDI-II scores in the following session. Within-patient Socratic questioning continued to predict symptom change after controlling for within-patient ratings of the therapeutic alliance (i.e., Relationship and Agreement), suggesting that the relation of Socratic questioning and symptom change was not only independent of stable characteristics, but also within-patient variation in the alliance. Our results provide the first empirical support for a relation of therapist use of Socratic questioning and symptom change in CT for depression. PMID:25965026

  16. Recording and reenactment of collaborative diagnosis sessions using DICOM.

    PubMed

    von Wangenheim, Aldo; Prüsse, Martin; Maia, Rafael Simon; Abdala, Daniel Duarte; Regert, André Germano; Nobre, Luiz Felipe de Souza; Comunello, Eros

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a radiological collaborative tool capable of direct manipulation of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images on both sides, and also recording and reenacting of a recorded session. A special collaborative application protocol formerly developed was extended and used as basis for the development of collaborative session recording and playback processes. The protocol is used today for real-time radiological meetings through the Internet. This new standard for collaborative sessions makes possible other uses for the protocol, such as asynchronous collaborative sessions, decision regulation, auditing, and educational applications. Experimental results are given which compare this protocol with other popular collaborative approaches. Comparison of these results shows that the proposed protocol performs much better than other approaches when run under controlled conditions.

  17. Hadfield during Ham radio session in the SM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-05

    ISS034-E-023688 (5 Jan. 2013) --- Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield, Expedition 34 flight engineer, conducts a ham radio session in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station.

  18. Summary of the parallel session on hadron dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Corcoran, M.D.; Carroll, A.S.

    1994-12-31

    The hadron dynamics sessions focussed on A-dependent effects in hard interactions and heavy quark production, as well as color transparency effects. Other topics covered included exclusive processes and spin effects.

  19. STS-127 crew during their food tasting session.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-06-19

    JSC2008-E-047934 (19 June 2008) --- Astronaut Thomas H. Marshburn, STS-127 mission specialist, participates in a food tasting session in the Flight Projects Division Laboratory at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  20. STS-127 crew during their food tasting session.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-06-19

    JSC2008-E-047941 (19 June 2008) --- Astronaut David A. Wolf, STS-127 mission specialist, participates in a food tasting session in the Flight Projects Division Laboratory at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  1. An improved anti-leech mechanism based on session identifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianbiao; Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Han; Lin, Li

    2011-12-01

    With the rapid development of information technology and extensive requirement of network resource sharing, plenty of resource hotlinking phenomenons appear on the internet. The hotlinking problem not only harms the interests of legal websites but also leads to a great affection to fair internet environment. The anti-leech technique based on session identifier is highly secure, but the transmission of session identifier in plaintext form causes some security flaws. In this paper, a proxy hotlinking technique based on session identifier is introduced firstly to illustrate these security flaws; next, this paper proposes an improved anti-leech mechanism based on session identifier, the mechanism takes the random factor as the core and detects hotlinking request using a map table that contains random factor, user's information and time stamp; at last the paper analyzes the security of mechanism in theory. The result reveals that the improved mechanism has the merits of simple realization, high security and great flexibility.

  2. An improved anti-leech mechanism based on session identifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianbiao; Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Han; Lin, Li

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid development of information technology and extensive requirement of network resource sharing, plenty of resource hotlinking phenomenons appear on the internet. The hotlinking problem not only harms the interests of legal websites but also leads to a great affection to fair internet environment. The anti-leech technique based on session identifier is highly secure, but the transmission of session identifier in plaintext form causes some security flaws. In this paper, a proxy hotlinking technique based on session identifier is introduced firstly to illustrate these security flaws; next, this paper proposes an improved anti-leech mechanism based on session identifier, the mechanism takes the random factor as the core and detects hotlinking request using a map table that contains random factor, user's information and time stamp; at last the paper analyzes the security of mechanism in theory. The result reveals that the improved mechanism has the merits of simple realization, high security and great flexibility.

  3. Raymark Public Open House and General Information Session

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The USEPA, CTDEEP, CT DPH, & the Stratford Health Department will host an Open House & General Information Session for Stratford, CT residents to learn more about the Raymark Industries, Inc. Superfund Site, on Tuesday, May 23, 2017...

  4. Summary of session 3 on synchrotron radiation and beam dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Metral, E.; /CERN

    2010-12-01

    We summarize presentations, discussions and general conclusions of the Workshop session on 'Beam Dynamics Issues'. Major subjects include effects due to synchrotron radiation (SR), cryogenic loads, electron cloud, impedances, intra-beam scattering (IBS) and beam-beam interactions.

  5. Channelopathies: Summary of the hot topic keynotes session

    EPA Science Inventory

    The "Hot Topic Keynotes: Channelopathies" session of the 26th International Neurotoxicology Conference brought together toxicologists studying interactions of environmental toxicants with ion channels, to review the state of the science of channelopathies and to discuss the poten...

  6. Channelopathies: Summary of the hot topic keynotes session

    EPA Science Inventory

    The "Hot Topic Keynotes: Channelopathies" session of the 26th International Neurotoxicology Conference brought together toxicologists studying interactions of environmental toxicants with ion channels, to review the state of the science of channelopathies and to discuss the poten...

  7. Burbank during session with BCAT-6 Experiment in the JPM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-08

    ISS030-E-063957 (8 Feb. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, conducts a session with the Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-6 (BCAT-6) experiment in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  8. BCAT-C1 Session in the JPM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-08

    ISS032-E-014593 (6 Aug. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Joe Acaba, Expedition 32 flight engineer, conducts a session with the Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-6 (BCAT-6) experiment in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  9. Burbank during session with BCAT-6 Experiment in the JPM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-08

    ISS030-E-063961 (8 Feb. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, conducts a session with the Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-6 (BCAT-6) experiment in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  10. 77 FR 60373 - Board of Directors Executive Session Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ...; ] AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION Board of Directors Executive Session Meeting Meeting: African Development..., October 11, 2012, 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Lloyd O. Pierson, President & CEO, United States African Development...

  11. Comparing the Efficiency of an Eight-Session Versus Four-Session Memory Intervention for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Heather; McDougall, Graham J.; Douglas, Nora E.; Arheart, Kristopher L.

    2008-01-01

    Evidence that a reduced treatment achieves similar outcomes is beneficial because shorter interventions may be more cost-effective and more acceptable to participants. We examined the effects of shortening a memory intervention for elders from 8 sessions to 4 sessions. Shortening the intervention had little impact on either self-reported or performance measures of memory and daily living activities. Small to moderate effects were associated with positive change in both groups. When examining the cost-effectiveness, the 8-session intervention produced slightly greater gains in memory performance, but at a higher cost. Future studies should systematically vary key intervention components in more diverse samples. PMID:18346565

  12. SASSYS LMFBR systems code

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, F.E.; Prohammer, F.G.; Weber, D.P.

    1983-01-01

    The SASSYS LMFBR systems analysis code is being developed mainly to analyze the behavior of the shut-down heat-removal system and the consequences of failures in the system, although it is also capable of analyzing a wide range of transients, from mild operational transients through more severe transients leading to sodium boiling in the core and possible melting of clad and fuel. The code includes a detailed SAS4A multi-channel core treatment plus a general thermal-hydraulic treatment of the primary and intermediate heat-transport loops and the steam generators. The code can handle any LMFBR design, loop or pool, with an arbitrary arrangement of components. The code is fast running: usually faster than real time.

  13. Compressible Astrophysics Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, L.; Singer, M.

    2007-07-18

    This is an astrophysics simulation code involving a radiation diffusion module developed at LLNL coupled to compressible hydrodynamics and adaptive mesh infrastructure developed at LBNL. One intended application is to neutrino diffusion in core collapse supernovae.

  14. Code Disentanglement: Initial Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlbier, John Greaton; Kelley, Timothy M.; Rockefeller, Gabriel M.; Calef, Matthew Thomas

    2015-01-27

    The first step to making more ambitious changes in the EAP code base is to disentangle the code into a set of independent, levelized packages. We define a package as a collection of code, most often across a set of files, that provides a defined set of functionality; a package a) can be built and tested as an entity and b) fits within an overall levelization design. Each package contributes one or more libraries, or an application that uses the other libraries. A package set is levelized if the relationships between packages form a directed, acyclic graph and each package uses only packages at lower levels of the diagram (in Fortran this relationship is often describable by the use relationship between modules). Independent packages permit independent- and therefore parallel|development. The packages form separable units for the purposes of development and testing. This is a proven path for enabling finer-grained changes to a complex code.

  15. Critical Care Coding for Neurologists.

    PubMed

    Nuwer, Marc R; Vespa, Paul M

    2015-10-01

    Accurate coding is an important function of neurologic practice. This contribution to Continuum is part of an ongoing series that presents helpful coding information along with examples related to the issue topic. Tips for diagnosis coding, Evaluation and Management coding, procedure coding, or a combination are presented, depending on which is most applicable to the subject area of the issue.

  16. Surveying Requirements Meeting Management Sessions, 1-5 February 1982,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    Public Administrator , and we have a secretary. The three of us are full-time in this effort performing the function of a catalyst, and secretary...Army Corps of Engineers SURVEYING REQUIREMENTS MEETING MANAGEMENT SESSIONS 1-5 February 1982 ELC This publication ~ summarizes the management sessions... administration of Corps surveying and maping activities. These proceedings were compiled by Mr. E.J. East and M.K. Miles of the Office of the Chief of

  17. Session: Monitoring wind turbine project sites for avian impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Wally

    2004-09-01

    This third session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of one presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The focus of the session was on existing wind projects that are monitored for their impacts on birds and bats. The presentation given was titled ''Bird and Bat Fatality Monitoring Methods'' by Wally Erickson, West, Inc. Sections included protocol development and review, methodology, adjusting for scavenging rates, and adjusting for observer detection bias.

  18. Astronauts Parise and Jernigan check helmets prior to training session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Attired in training versions of the Shuttle partial-pressure launch and entry suits, payload specialist Dr. Ronald A Parise (left) and astronaut Tamara E. Jernigan, payload commander, check over their helmets prior to a training session. Holding the helmets is suit expert Alan M. Rochford, of NASA. The two were about to join their crew mates in a session of emergency bailout training at JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF).

  19. Panel Session on the Future of Few-Body Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Bernard L. G.; Carbonell, Jaume; Elster, Charlotte; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, Nasser; Richard, Jean-Marc

    2014-08-01

    During the 22nd European Few-Body Conference, a session was devoted to a panel discussion on the future of few-body physics. The panel members were Charlotte Elster, Jaume Carbonell, Evgeny Epelbaum, Nasser Kalantar-Nayestanaki, and Jean-Marc Richard. The session was chaired by Ben Bakker. After presentations by the panel members, several topics were discussed with the audience. The conclusions of this discussion are presented in this paper.

  20. The experience of sessional teachers in nursing: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Kathleen A; Cotton, Antoinette; Moroney, Robyn; Salamonson, Yenna

    2015-11-01

    Worldwide, there is a growing reliance on sessional teachers in universities. This trend is reflected in an undergraduate nursing program in a large Australian metropolitan university where a significant proportion of contact hours is staffed by sessional teachers, yet little is known about what type of support is needed for sessional teachers to optimise their capacity to contribute to the academic program. To describe the experiences of sessional teachers in a Bachelor of Nursing program in an Australian university. This is an exploratory qualitative study; fifteen sessional teachers were interviewed using semi-structured questions to explore their experiences of teaching. This study was conducted in a large metropolitan school of nursing located on three sites. A purposive sample of 15 sessional teachers was interviewed for this study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted face to face. Thematic analysis was used to identify major themes in the interview data and collaborative analysis was undertaken to ensure rigour. Findings revealed that sessional teachers enjoyed teaching, were committed to their role and viewed their clinical currency as a valuable asset for teaching. However, participants also spoke about wanting a sense of belonging to the School, with most feeling they were "outsiders". Areas identified for improvement included system and process issues, micro teaching and assessment skills, classroom management and timely access to resources. There is a need to improve sessional teachers' sense of belonging and to provide an inclusive structure and culture to optimise their capacity to contribute to the academic program. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The analyst at work: two sessions with Alba.

    PubMed

    Bolognini, Stefano

    2002-08-01

    In this paper, the author presents clinical material that relates to two sessions with a patient called Alba. This analytic work, being of a somewhat unusual character, lends itself to discussion, the author feels, since the technical choices made are undoubtedly very personal and he believes many colleagues might have done things differently. The author endeavours to enrich the account of the sessions with his concomitant thoughts, so as to supply colleagues with the elements, atmosphere and developments of his internal workshop.

  2. Seals Flow Code Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    In recognition of a deficiency in the current modeling capability for seals, an effort was established by NASA to develop verified computational fluid dynamic concepts, codes, and analyses for seals. The objectives were to develop advanced concepts for the design and analysis of seals, to effectively disseminate the information to potential users by way of annual workshops, and to provide experimental verification for the models and codes under a wide range of operating conditions.

  3. A comparison of presession and within-session reinforcement choice.

    PubMed Central

    Graff, R B; Libby, M E

    1999-01-01

    Single- and concurrent-operants procedures were used to evaluate the effects of two reinforcement conditions on the free-operant responding of 3 individuals with developmental disabilities and 1 with attention deficit disorder. In the presession choice condition, prior to each session the participant chose one item from an array of three different highly preferred stimuli. This item was delivered by the experimenter on each reinforcer delivery during that session. In the within-session choice condition, each reinforcer delivery consisted of placing an array of three different highly preferred stimuli in front of the participant, who was allowed to select one. Only one of the two reinforcement conditions was in effect for any particular session in single-operant phases. Buttons associated with each reinforcement condition were present, and the participant could allocate responses to one or the other in concurrent-operants phases. Data showed substantially more responding to the button associated with within-session choice than presession choice during concurrent-operants phases. This effect was not as apparent during single-operant phases, suggesting that a concurrent-operants procedure provided the more sensitive evaluation of within-session and presession reinforcer choice effects. PMID:10396769

  4. A Proposal of Secure Session Provider Service over NGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, Tadashi; Fujishiro, Takahiro; Susaki, Seiichi; Kawai, Eri; Hoshino, Kazuyoshi; Higashino, Teruo

    In these days, telecom operators in the world have been constructing Next Generation Network (NGN). NGN can provide QoS and security guaranteed communication to its users. However, the protection of communication is limited inside NGN. Therefore, when the interconnection between NGN and the Internet will be widely used in near future, it will become an important problem to solve how it protects the communications crossing over NGN and the Internet. This paper proposes a secure communication provider service that protects the confidentiality and integrity of communications crossing over NGN and the Internet by setting up and controlling the IPsec session in cooperation with NGN's call session control function (CSCF). In this service, the secure session control provider (sSCP) server and CSCF authenticate its user as Trusted Third Party on behalf of service providers. In addition, this service provides the ability of fast session establishment because sSCP distributes a security association for IPsec session between the user and service provider via the SIP session protected by NGN.

  5. Evidence of Online Performance Deterioration in User Sessions on Reddit

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Philipp; Ferrara, Emilio; Kooti, Farshad; Strohmaier, Markus; Lerman, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    This article presents evidence of performance deterioration in online user sessions quantified by studying a massive dataset containing over 55 million comments posted on Reddit in April 2015. After segmenting the sessions (i.e., periods of activity without a prolonged break) depending on their intensity (i.e., how many posts users produced during sessions), we observe a general decrease in the quality of comments produced by users over the course of sessions. We propose mixed-effects models that capture the impact of session intensity on comments, including their length, quality, and the responses they generate from the community. Our findings suggest performance deterioration: Sessions of increasing intensity are associated with the production of shorter, progressively less complex comments, which receive declining quality scores (as rated by other users), and are less and less engaging (i.e., they attract fewer responses). Our contribution evokes a connection between cognitive and attention dynamics and the usage of online social peer production platforms, specifically the effects of deterioration of user performance. PMID:27560185

  6. Robust Nonlinear Neural Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qianli; Pitkow, Xaq

    2015-03-01

    Most interesting natural sensory stimuli are encoded in the brain in a form that can only be decoded nonlinearly. But despite being a core function of the brain, nonlinear population codes are rarely studied and poorly understood. Interestingly, the few existing models of nonlinear codes are inconsistent with known architectural features of the brain. In particular, these codes have information content that scales with the size of the cortical population, even if that violates the data processing inequality by exceeding the amount of information entering the sensory system. Here we provide a valid theory of nonlinear population codes by generalizing recent work on information-limiting correlations in linear population codes. Although these generalized, nonlinear information-limiting correlations bound the performance of any decoder, they also make decoding more robust to suboptimal computation, allowing many suboptimal decoders to achieve nearly the same efficiency as an optimal decoder. Although these correlations are extremely difficult to measure directly, particularly for nonlinear codes, we provide a simple, practical test by which one can use choice-related activity in small populations of neurons to determine whether decoding is suboptimal or optimal and limited by correlated noise. We conclude by describing an example computation in the vestibular system where this theory applies. QY and XP was supported by a grant from the McNair foundation.

  7. Scalable motion vector coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarien, Joeri; Munteanu, Adrian; Verdicchio, Fabio; Andreopoulos, Yiannis; Cornelis, Jan P.; Schelkens, Peter

    2004-11-01

    Modern video coding applications require transmission of video data over variable-bandwidth channels to a variety of terminals with different screen resolutions and available computational power. Scalable video coding is needed to optimally support these applications. Recently proposed wavelet-based video codecs employing spatial domain motion compensated temporal filtering (SDMCTF) provide quality, resolution and frame-rate scalability while delivering compression performance comparable to that of the state-of-the-art non-scalable H.264-codec. These codecs require scalable coding of the motion vectors in order to support a large range of bit-rates with optimal compression efficiency. Scalable motion vector coding algorithms based on the integer wavelet transform followed by embedded coding of the wavelet coefficients were recently proposed. In this paper, a new and fundamentally different scalable motion vector codec (MVC) using median-based motion vector prediction is proposed. Extensive experimental results demonstrate that the proposed MVC systematically outperforms the wavelet-based state-of-the-art solutions. To be able to take advantage of the proposed scalable MVC, a rate allocation mechanism capable of optimally dividing the available rate among texture and motion information is required. Two rate allocation strategies are proposed and compared. The proposed MVC and rate allocation schemes are incorporated into an SDMCTF-based video codec and the benefits of scalable motion vector coding are experimentally demonstrated.

  8. Session 70 - Panel: Consequence Management of a Radiological Dispersion Device

    SciTech Connect

    Demmer, Rick; Lenox, Dave; Wilson, Pete; Schumann, Jean; Honerlah, Hans; Chen, S.Y.; Gwiazdowski, Gene

    2006-07-01

    This was an unusual panel session in that the panelists did not give presentations but responded to a tabletop exercise where they postulated decisions necessary after radiological dispersal device detonation event (dirty bomb). Articles in the daily WM'06 newsletter sought to prepare the participants for a simulated exercise involving the sighting of a known terrorist and the theft of radiological materials. During the slide presentation (in the form of a developing television news broadcast) the audience played decision makers and their 'votes' were tallied for multiple choice decisions and questions. After that was completed, the expert panel was asked to give their best responses for those decisions. The audience was allowed to ask questions and to give opinions as the panel responded. During the exercise the session co-chairs alternated announcing the events as they unfolded in the exercise and polled the audience using multiple-choice options for decisions to be made during the event. The answers to those questions were recorded and compared to the panelists' answers. The event chronology and decisions (audience questions) are shown in this report. - An explosion was reported at the Tucson International Airport (9:35 am). 1. Who is in charge? - Witnesses report 10-20 fatalities, 50 injured and massive damage to the airport, no cause determined yet (9:55 am). 2. IC's Next Action Should Be? - KRAD (local television station) Investigative News Reporters interviewed witnesses that observed a 25 foot U-Haul truck pull up onto the departure ramp just moments before the explosion (10:02 am). Terrorism has not been ruled out. 3. When is the incident declared a potential crime scene? - City of Tucson IC has ordered an evacuation of the airport to a holding area at a nearby long term parking area (10:10 am). No information has been given as to why the evacuation took place. The explosion is suspected to contain chemical, biological or radiological agents. County and

  9. What Happens in Session Doesn't Stay in Session: Changes within Exposures Predict Subsequent Improvement and Dropout

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Peter J.; Hayes-Skelton, Sarah A.; Klenck, Suzanne C.

    2011-01-01

    Previous exposure therapy research has suggested potential differences in emotional processing at different points in treatment (Hayes, Hope, & Heimberg, 2008). For example, indicators of emotional processing may be more related to outcome during the later exposure sessions than during the initial session. This is consistent with a growing body of psychotherapy research highlighting the importance of timing and change processes across therapy. The current study examined whether the learning-but-not-benefiting hypothesis is observed in a group based intervention for clients with a range of anxiety disorders. It was hypothesized that activation and within session habituation during later, but not the initial exposure session, would be related to outcome, whereas activation and within session habituation during the first session would be related to dropout status. Results revealed that lower activation and less habituation during the first exposure was associated with increased treatment discontinuation. Second, lower peak and, to a lesser extent greater activation and habituation, during exposures were generally associated with better treatment outcomes. These findings highlight the importance of examining the complexities and timing of the exposure process. PMID:21419597

  10. What happens in session does not stay in session: changes within exposures predict subsequent improvement and dropout.

    PubMed

    Norton, Peter J; Hayes-Skelton, Sarah A; Klenck, Suzanne C

    2011-06-01

    Previous exposure therapy research has suggested potential differences in emotional processing at different points in treatment (Hayes, Hope, & Heimberg, 2008). For example, indicators of emotional processing may be more related to outcome during the later exposure sessions than during the initial session. This is consistent with a growing body of psychotherapy research highlighting the importance of timing and change processes across therapy. The current study examined whether the learning-but-not-benefiting hypothesis is observed in a group based intervention for clients with a range of anxiety disorders. It was hypothesized that activation and within session habituation during later, but not the initial exposure session, would be related to outcome, whereas activation and within session habituation during the first session would be related to dropout status. Results revealed that lower activation and less habituation during the first exposure was associated with increased treatment discontinuation. Second, lower peak and, to a lesser extent greater activation and habituation, during exposures were generally associated with better treatment outcomes. These findings highlight the importance of examining the complexities and timing of the exposure process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessing play-based activities, child talk, and single session outcome in family therapy with young children.

    PubMed

    Willis, Amber B; Walters, Lynda H; Crane, D Russell

    2014-07-01

    This exploratory, observational study was designed to reveal descriptive information regarding therapists' actual practices with preschool- and school-aged children in a single session of family therapy and to investigate change mechanisms in family play therapy that have been proposed to make this approach effective. A purposive sample of 30 families receiving family therapy was recruited and video-taped during a family session where at least one child between the ages of 4 and 12 was present. Following the session, the therapist and parent(s) completed questionnaires while one of the children (aged 4-12) was interviewed. Session recordings were coded, minute-by-minute, for participant talk time, visual aids or props used, and therapy technique type (e.g., play-based/activity vs. talk-only techniques). Hierarchical regression and canonical correlational analyses revealed evidence supporting the theory that play-based techniques promote young children's participation, enhance the quality of the child-therapist relationship, and build positive emotional experiences in family therapy.

  12. Effects of caffeine on session ratings of perceived exertion.

    PubMed

    Killen, L G; Green, J M; O'Neal, E K; McIntosh, J R; Hornsby, J; Coates, T E

    2013-03-01

    This study examined effects of caffeine on session ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) following 30 min constant-load cycling. Individuals (n = 15) of varying aerobic fitness completed a [Formula: see text] max trial and two 30 min cycling bouts (double-blind, counterbalanced) following ingestion of 6 mL/kg of caffeine or matched placebo. RPE overall, legs and breathing were estimated every 5 min and session RPE was estimated 30 min post-exercise using the OMNI pictorial scale. Session RPE for caffeine and placebo trails were compared using paired t test. Between-trial comparisons of HR, RPE overall, RPE legs and RPE breathing were analyzed using an independent 2 (trial) × 6 (time point) repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) for each dependent variable. Caffeine resulted in a significantly lower session RPE (p < 0.05) for caffeine (6.1 ± 2.2) versus placebo (6.8 ± 2.1). Acute perceptual responses were significantly lower for caffeine for RPE overall (15, 20, 25, and 30 min), RPE breathing (15, 20, 25, and 30 min) and RPE legs (20 and 30 min). Survey responses post-exercise revealed greater feelings of nervousness, tremors, restlessness and stomach distress following caffeine versus placebo. Blunted acute RPE and survey responses suggest participants responded to caffeine ingestion. Caffeine decreased acute RPE during exercise which could partially account for lower session RPE responses. However, decreased session RPE could also reveal a latent analgesic affect of caffeine extending into recovery. Extending the understanding of session RPE could benefit coaches in avoiding overtraining when adjusting training programs.

  13. Prioritized LT Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Simon S.; Cheng, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    The original Luby Transform (LT) coding scheme is extended to account for data transmissions where some information symbols in a message block are more important than others. Prioritized LT codes provide unequal error protection (UEP) of data on an erasure channel by modifying the original LT encoder. The prioritized algorithm improves high-priority data protection without penalizing low-priority data recovery. Moreover, low-latency decoding is also obtained for high-priority data due to fast encoding. Prioritized LT codes only require a slight change in the original encoding algorithm, and no changes at all at the decoder. Hence, with a small complexity increase in the LT encoder, an improved UEP and low-decoding latency performance for high-priority data can be achieved. LT encoding partitions a data stream into fixed-sized message blocks each with a constant number of information symbols. To generate a code symbol from the information symbols in a message, the Robust-Soliton probability distribution is first applied in order to determine the number of information symbols to be used to compute the code symbol. Then, the specific information symbols are chosen uniform randomly from the message block. Finally, the selected information symbols are XORed to form the code symbol. The Prioritized LT code construction includes an additional restriction that code symbols formed by a relatively small number of XORed information symbols select some of these information symbols from the pool of high-priority data. Once high-priority data are fully covered, encoding continues with the conventional LT approach where code symbols are generated by selecting information symbols from the entire message block including all different priorities. Therefore, if code symbols derived from high-priority data experience an unusual high number of erasures, Prioritized LT codes can still reliably recover both high- and low-priority data. This hybrid approach decides not only "how to encode

  14. 75 FR 34418 - Notice of the Specialty Crop Committee's Stakeholder Listening Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Office of the Secretary Notice of the Specialty Crop Committee's Stakeholder Listening Session AGENCY: Research, Education, and Economics, USDA. ACTION: Notice of stakeholder listening session. SUMMARY: The notice announces the Specialty Crop Committee's Stakeholder Listening Session....

  15. Coded source neutron imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, Philip R; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2011-01-01

    Coded aperture techniques have been applied to neutron radiography to address limitations in neutron flux and resolution of neutron detectors in a system labeled coded source imaging (CSI). By coding the neutron source, a magnified imaging system is designed with small spot size aperture holes (10 and 100 m) for improved resolution beyond the detector limits and with many holes in the aperture (50% open) to account for flux losses due to the small pinhole size. An introduction to neutron radiography and coded aperture imaging is presented. A system design is developed for a CSI system with a development of equations for limitations on the system based on the coded image requirements and the neutron source characteristics of size and divergence. Simulation has been applied to the design using McStas to provide qualitative measures of performance with simulations of pinhole array objects followed by a quantitative measure through simulation of a tilted edge and calculation of the modulation transfer function (MTF) from the line spread function. MTF results for both 100um and 10um aperture hole diameters show resolutions matching the hole diameters.

  16. Error coding simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Viveca K.

    1993-01-01

    There are various elements such as radio frequency interference (RFI) which may induce errors in data being transmitted via a satellite communication link. When a transmission is affected by interference or other error-causing elements, the transmitted data becomes indecipherable. It becomes necessary to implement techniques to recover from these disturbances. The objective of this research is to develop software which simulates error control circuits and evaluate the performance of these modules in various bit error rate environments. The results of the evaluation provide the engineer with information which helps determine the optimal error control scheme. The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) recommends the use of Reed-Solomon (RS) and convolutional encoders and Viterbi and RS decoders for error correction. The use of forward error correction techniques greatly reduces the received signal to noise needed for a certain desired bit error rate. The use of concatenated coding, e.g. inner convolutional code and outer RS code, provides even greater coding gain. The 16-bit cyclic redundancy check (CRC) code is recommended by CCSDS for error detection.

  17. Induction technology optimization code

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.; Brooks, A.L.; Kirbie, H.C.

    1992-08-21

    A code has been developed to evaluate relative costs of induction accelerator driver systems for relativistic klystrons. The code incorporates beam generation, transport and pulsed power system constraints to provide an integrated design tool. The code generates an injector/accelerator combination which satisfies the top level requirements and all system constraints once a small number of design choices have been specified (rise time of the injector voltage and aspect ratio of the ferrite induction cores, for example). The code calculates dimensions of accelerator mechanical assemblies and values of all electrical components. Cost factors for machined parts, raw materials and components are applied to yield a total system cost. These costs are then plotted as a function of the two design choices to enable selection of an optimum design based on various criteria. The Induction Technology Optimization Study (ITOS) was undertaken to examine viable combinations of a linear induction accelerator and a relativistic klystron (RK) for high power microwave production. It is proposed, that microwaves from the RK will power a high-gradient accelerator structure for linear collider development. Previous work indicates that the RK will require a nominal 3-MeV, 3-kA electron beam with a 100-ns flat top. The proposed accelerator-RK combination will be a high average power system capable of sustained microwave output at a 300-Hz pulse repetition frequency. The ITOS code models many combinations of injector, accelerator, and pulse power designs that will supply an RK with the beam parameters described above.

  18. Coded source neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Philip; Santos-Villalobos, Hector; Tobin, Ken

    2011-03-01

    Coded aperture techniques have been applied to neutron radiography to address limitations in neutron flux and resolution of neutron detectors in a system labeled coded source imaging (CSI). By coding the neutron source, a magnified imaging system is designed with small spot size aperture holes (10 and 100μm) for improved resolution beyond the detector limits and with many holes in the aperture (50% open) to account for flux losses due to the small pinhole size. An introduction to neutron radiography and coded aperture imaging is presented. A system design is developed for a CSI system with a development of equations for limitations on the system based on the coded image requirements and the neutron source characteristics of size and divergence. Simulation has been applied to the design using McStas to provide qualitative measures of performance with simulations of pinhole array objects followed by a quantitative measure through simulation of a tilted edge and calculation of the modulation transfer function (MTF) from the line spread function. MTF results for both 100μm and 10μm aperture hole diameters show resolutions matching the hole diameters.

  19. International code of nomenclature of prokaryotes

    DOE PAGES

    Garrity, George M.; Parker, Charles T.; Tindall, Brian J.

    2015-11-20

    Here, this volume contains the edition of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes that was presented in draft form and available for comment at the Plenary Session of the Fourteenth International Congress of Bacteriology and Applied Microbiology (BAM), Montréal, 2014, together with updated lists of conserved and rejected bacterial names and of Opinions issued by the Judicial Commission. As in the past it brings together those changes accepted, published and documented by the ICSP and the Judicial Commission since the last revision was published. Several new appendices have been added to this edition. Appendix 11 addresses the appropriate applicationmore » of the Candidatus concept, Appendix 12 contains the history of the van Niel Prize, and Appendix 13 contains the summaries of Congresses.« less

  20. International code of nomenclature of prokaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Garrity, George M.; Parker, Charles T.; Tindall, Brian J.

    2015-11-20

    Here, this volume contains the edition of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes that was presented in draft form and available for comment at the Plenary Session of the Fourteenth International Congress of Bacteriology and Applied Microbiology (BAM), Montréal, 2014, together with updated lists of conserved and rejected bacterial names and of Opinions issued by the Judicial Commission. As in the past it brings together those changes accepted, published and documented by the ICSP and the Judicial Commission since the last revision was published. Several new appendices have been added to this edition. Appendix 11 addresses the appropriate application of the Candidatus concept, Appendix 12 contains the history of the van Niel Prize, and Appendix 13 contains the summaries of Congresses.

  1. Seals Code Development Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C. (Compiler); Liang, Anita D. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    Seals Workshop of 1995 industrial code (INDSEAL) release include ICYL, GCYLT, IFACE, GFACE, SPIRALG, SPIRALI, DYSEAL, and KTK. The scientific code (SCISEAL) release includes conjugate heat transfer and multidomain with rotordynamic capability. Several seals and bearings codes (e.g., HYDROFLEX, HYDROTRAN, HYDROB3D, FLOWCON1, FLOWCON2) are presented and results compared. Current computational and experimental emphasis includes multiple connected cavity flows with goals of reducing parasitic losses and gas ingestion. Labyrinth seals continue to play a significant role in sealing with face, honeycomb, and new sealing concepts under investigation for advanced engine concepts in view of strict environmental constraints. The clean sheet approach to engine design is advocated with program directions and anticipated percentage SFC reductions cited. Future activities center on engine applications with coupled seal/power/secondary flow streams.

  2. SAC: Sheffield Advanced Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Mike; Fedun, Viktor; Mumford, Stuart; Gent, Frederick

    2013-06-01

    The Sheffield Advanced Code (SAC) is a fully non-linear MHD code designed for simulations of linear and non-linear wave propagation in gravitationally strongly stratified magnetized plasma. It was developed primarily for the forward modelling of helioseismological processes and for the coupling processes in the solar interior, photosphere, and corona; it is built on the well-known VAC platform that allows robust simulation of the macroscopic processes in gravitationally stratified (non-)magnetized plasmas. The code has no limitations of simulation length in time imposed by complications originating from the upper boundary, nor does it require implementation of special procedures to treat the upper boundaries. SAC inherited its modular structure from VAC, thereby allowing modification to easily add new physics.

  3. Code query by example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaucouleur, Sebastien

    2011-02-01

    We introduce code query by example for customisation of evolvable software products in general and of enterprise resource planning systems (ERPs) in particular. The concept is based on an initial empirical study on practices around ERP systems. We motivate our design choices based on those empirical results, and we show how the proposed solution helps with respect to the infamous upgrade problem: the conflict between the need for customisation and the need for upgrade of ERP systems. We further show how code query by example can be used as a form of lightweight static analysis, to detect automatically potential defects in large software products. Code query by example as a form of lightweight static analysis is particularly interesting in the context of ERP systems: it is often the case that programmers working in this field are not computer science specialists but more of domain experts. Hence, they require a simple language to express custom rules.

  4. Autocatalysis, information and coding.

    PubMed

    Wills, P R

    2001-01-01

    Autocatalytic self-construction in macromolecular systems requires the existence of a reflexive relationship between structural components and the functional operations they perform to synthesise themselves. The possibility of reflexivity depends on formal, semiotic features of the catalytic structure-function relationship, that is, the embedding of catalytic functions in the space of polymeric structures. Reflexivity is a semiotic property of some genetic sequences. Such sequences may serve as the basis for the evolution of coding as a result of autocatalytic self-organisation in a population of assignment catalysts. Autocatalytic selection is a mechanism whereby matter becomes differentiated in primitive biochemical systems. In the case of coding self-organisation, it corresponds to the creation of symbolic information. Prions are present-day entities whose replication through autocatalysis reflects aspects of biological semiotics less obvious than genetic coding.

  5. Code inspection instructional validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Kay; Stancil, Shirley

    1992-01-01

    The Shuttle Data Systems Branch (SDSB) of the Flight Data Systems Division (FDSD) at Johnson Space Center contracted with Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) to validate the effectiveness of an interactive video course on the code inspection process. The purpose of this project was to determine if this course could be effective for teaching NASA analysts the process of code inspection. In addition, NASA was interested in the effectiveness of this unique type of instruction (Digital Video Interactive), for providing training on software processes. This study found the Carnegie Mellon course, 'A Cure for the Common Code', effective for teaching the process of code inspection. In addition, analysts prefer learning with this method of instruction, or this method in combination with other methods. As is, the course is definitely better than no course at all; however, findings indicate changes are needed. Following are conclusions of this study. (1) The course is instructionally effective. (2) The simulation has a positive effect on student's confidence in his ability to apply new knowledge. (3) Analysts like the course and prefer this method of training, or this method in combination with current methods of training in code inspection, over the way training is currently being conducted. (4) Analysts responded favorably to information presented through scenarios incorporating full motion video. (5) Some course content needs to be changed. (6) Some content needs to be added to the course. SwRI believes this study indicates interactive video instruction combined with simulation is effective for teaching software processes. Based on the conclusions of this study, SwRI has outlined seven options for NASA to consider. SwRI recommends the option which involves creation of new source code and data files, but uses much of the existing content and design from the current course. Although this option involves a significant software development effort, SwRI believes this option

  6. Introduction and Overview of the Industrial Interactive Panel Session

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, David

    2014-03-01

    A unique industrial panel covering the challenges and needs of various industries and how being innovative is important. The session involves two invited industry speakers (24 minutes each) who will set the stage for the interactive round table panel session. The Panel, led by moderator Mark Bernius (Morgan Advanced Materials), consists of the two invited speakers plus an additional five industry panelists. The first thirty minutes of the panel session has the five additional panelists introducing themselves and their work/company. These introductions could include what they or their company does, sharing one or two technical highlights, listing some challenges or needs for physicists, and what innovation breakthroughs are needed in their industries. The final hour of the session will be highly interactive with questions to the panel coming from the moderator, the audience, and the panelists themselves. Questions that might be addressed include: how physicists are or could be critical in advancing innovation; how can AIP/APS/FIAP help industry get the physics help they need to be innovative (knowledge, the right staff, etc.); what role can students and post docs play in advancing industry's mission; etc. We invite you to participate in this interactive session and ask our industry experts your own interesting and challenging questions. The invited speakers are George Thompson, Intel, and Rick Watkins, Nike. The panel members also include Jason Cleveland, Asylum Research; Robert Doering, Texas Instruments; William Gallagher, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center; James Hollenhorst, Agilent Technologies; and Martin Poitzsch, Schlumberger-Doll Research.

  7. Communicating Earth Science Applications through Virtual Poster Sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favors, J. E.; Childs-Gleason, L. M.; Ross, K. W.; Ruiz, M. L.; Rogers, L.

    2013-12-01

    The DEVELOP National Program addresses environmental and public policy issues through interdisciplinary research projects that apply the lens of NASA Earth observations to community concerns around the globe. Part of NASA's Applied Sciences' Capacity Building Program, DEVELOP bridges the gap between NASA Earth Science and society, building capacity in both participants and partner organizations to better prepare them to handle the challenges that face our society and future generations. Teams of DEVELOP participants partner with decision makers to conduct rapid feasibility projects that highlight fresh applications of NASA's suite of Earth observing sensors, cultivate advanced skills, and increase understanding of NASA Earth Science data and technology. Part of this process involves the creation of short introductory videos that demonstrate the environmental concerns, project methodologies and results, and an overview of how this work will impact decision makers. These videos are presented to the public three times a year in 'virtual poster sessions' (VPS) that provide an interactive way for individuals from around the globe to access the research, understand the capabilities and applications of NASA's Earth science datasets, and interact with the participants through blogging and dialogue sessions. Virtual poster sessions have allowed DEVELOP to introduce NASA's Earth science assets to thousands of viewers around the world. For instance, one fall VPS had over 5,000 visitors from 89 different countries during the two week session. This presentation will discuss lessons learned and statistics related to the series of nine virtual poster sessions that DEVELOP has conducted 2011-2013.

  8. Look at the Gato! Code-Switching in Speech to Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bail, Amelie; Morini, Giovanna; Newman, Rochelle S.

    2015-01-01

    We examined code-switching (CS) in the speech of twenty-four bilingual caregivers when speaking with their 18- to 24-month-old children. All parents CS at least once in a short play session, and some code-switched quite often (over 1/3 of utterances). This CS included both inter-sentential and intra-sentential switches, suggesting that at least…

  9. Radiation transport phenomena and modeling. Part A: Codes; Part B: Applications with examples

    SciTech Connect

    Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Beutler, D.E.

    1997-09-01

    This report contains the notes from the second session of the 1997 IEEE Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects Conference Short Course on Applying Computer Simulation Tools to Radiation Effects Problems. Part A discusses the physical phenomena modeled in radiation transport codes and various types of algorithmic implementations. Part B gives examples of how these codes can be used to design experiments whose results can be easily analyzed and describes how to calculate quantities of interest for electronic devices.

  10. Look at the Gato! Code-Switching in Speech to Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bail, Amelie; Morini, Giovanna; Newman, Rochelle S.

    2015-01-01

    We examined code-switching (CS) in the speech of twenty-four bilingual caregivers when speaking with their 18- to 24-month-old children. All parents CS at least once in a short play session, and some code-switched quite often (over 1/3 of utterances). This CS included both inter-sentential and intra-sentential switches, suggesting that at least…

  11. Securing mobile code.

    SciTech Connect

    Link, Hamilton E.; Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Neumann, William Douglas; Campbell, Philip LaRoche; Beaver, Cheryl Lynn; Pierson, Lyndon George; Anderson, William Erik

    2004-10-01

    If software is designed so that the software can issue functions that will move that software from one computing platform to another, then the software is said to be 'mobile'. There are two general areas of security problems associated with mobile code. The 'secure host' problem involves protecting the host from malicious mobile code. The 'secure mobile code' problem, on the other hand, involves protecting the code from malicious hosts. This report focuses on the latter problem. We have found three distinct camps of opinions regarding how to secure mobile code. There are those who believe special distributed hardware is necessary, those who believe special distributed software is necessary, and those who believe neither is necessary. We examine all three camps, with a focus on the third. In the distributed software camp we examine some commonly proposed techniques including Java, D'Agents and Flask. For the specialized hardware camp, we propose a cryptographic technique for 'tamper-proofing' code over a large portion of the software/hardware life cycle by careful modification of current architectures. This method culminates by decrypting/authenticating each instruction within a physically protected CPU, thereby protecting against subversion by malicious code. Our main focus is on the camp that believes that neither specialized software nor hardware is necessary. We concentrate on methods of code obfuscation to render an entire program or a data segment on which a program depends incomprehensible. The hope is to prevent or at least slow down reverse engineering efforts and to prevent goal-oriented attacks on the software and execution. The field of obfuscation is still in a state of development with the central problem being the lack of a basis for evaluating the protection schemes. We give a brief introduction to some of the main ideas in the field, followed by an in depth analysis of a technique called 'white-boxing'. We put forth some new attacks and improvements

  12. Aeroacoustic Prediction Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P; Mani, R.; Shin, H.; Mitchell, B.; Ashford, G.; Salamah, S.; Connell, S.; Huff, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report describes work performed on Contract NAS3-27720AoI 13 as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonic Transport (AST) Noise Reduction Technology effort. Computer codes were developed to provide quantitative prediction, design, and analysis capability for several aircraft engine noise sources. The objective was to provide improved, physics-based tools for exploration of noise-reduction concepts and understanding of experimental results. Methods and codes focused on fan broadband and 'buzz saw' noise and on low-emissions combustor noise and compliment work done by other contractors under the NASA AST program to develop methods and codes for fan harmonic tone noise and jet noise. The methods and codes developed and reported herein employ a wide range of approaches, from the strictly empirical to the completely computational, with some being semiempirical analytical, and/or analytical/computational. Emphasis was on capturing the essential physics while still considering method or code utility as a practical design and analysis tool for everyday engineering use. Codes and prediction models were developed for: (1) an improved empirical correlation model for fan rotor exit flow mean and turbulence properties, for use in predicting broadband noise generated by rotor exit flow turbulence interaction with downstream stator vanes: (2) fan broadband noise models for rotor and stator/turbulence interaction sources including 3D effects, noncompact-source effects. directivity modeling, and extensions to the rotor supersonic tip-speed regime; (3) fan multiple-pure-tone in-duct sound pressure prediction methodology based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis; and (4) low-emissions combustor prediction methodology and computer code based on CFD and actuator disk theory. In addition. the relative importance of dipole and quadrupole source mechanisms was studied using direct CFD source computation for a simple cascadeigust interaction problem, and an empirical combustor

  13. Polar Code Validation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-30

    Unclassified 2a SECURITY CLASSiF-ICATiON AUTHORIT’Y 3 DIStRIBUTION AVAILABILITY OF REPORT N,A Approved for public release; 2o DECLASSIFICAIiON DOWNGRADING SCH DI...SUMMARY OF POLAR ACHIEVEMENTS ..... .......... 3 3 . POLAR CODE PHYSICAL MODELS ..... ............. 5 3.1 PL-ASMA Su ^"ru5 I1LS SH A...11 Structure of the Bipolar Plasma Sheath Generated by SPEAR I ... ...... 1 3 The POLAR Code Wake Model: Comparison with in Situ Observations . . 23

  14. Theory, practice, and history in critical GIS: Reports on an AAG panel session

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, M.W.; Poore, B.S.

    2009-01-01

    Extending a special session held at the 2008 annual meeting of the Association of American Geographers in Boston, this commentary collection highlights elements of the critical GIS research agenda that are particularly pressing. Responding to a Progress report on critical GIS written by David O'Sullivan in 2006, these six commentaries discuss how different interpretations of 'critical' are traced through critical GIS research. Participants in the panel session discussed the need for a continued discussion of a code of ethics in GIS use in the context of ongoing efforts to alter or remake the software and its associated practices, of neo-geographies and volunteered geographies. There were continued calls for hope and practical ways to actualize this hope, and a recognition that critical GIS needs to remain relevant to the technology. This 'relevance' can be variously defined, and in doing so, researchers should consider their positioning vis-??-vis the technology. Throughout the commentaries collected here, a question remains as to what kind of work disciplinary sub-fields such as critical GIS and GIScience perform. This is a question about language, specifically the distance that language can create among practitioners and theoreticians, both in the case of critical GIS and more broadly throughout GIScience.

  15. Is it the unexpected experience that keeps them coming back? Group climate and session attendance examined between groups, between members, and between sessions.

    PubMed

    Kivlighan, Dennis M; Paquin, Jill Denise; Hsu, Yu-Kuang Kevin

    2014-07-01

    Attending group therapy sessions is necessary for a group member to have a chance at receiving benefit from the intervention. Group members' perceptions of their group's climate has been linked with important group member outcomes, including session attendance. On the basis of the writings of Curran and Bauer (2011), the current study examined group members' longitudinal ratings of session engagement and decomposed them into between-groups, between-members, and between-sessions components. These components were then used to examine the relationship between group members' ratings of an engaged group climate in the previous session and their attendance the following session. Session attendance in 573 group sessions for 91 group members in 14 Taiwanese counseling groups was modeled in a 3-level hierarchical model (sessions within group members, within groups). Contrary to our hypotheses, between-groups, between-members, and between-sessions components of engagement were not related to session attendance. However, there was a significant interaction between the between-members and between-sessions components of session engagement and group size in predicting session attendance. The likelihood of attendance increased when group members who, on average, rated sessions as being low in engagement uncharacteristically rated a previous session as high in engagement. The likelihood of attendance also increased when group members who, on average, rated sessions as high in engagement uncharacteristically rated the previous session as low in engagement. Larger group sizes amplified these effects. Expectancy (dis)confirmation theory is used to explain these results. Theoretical, research, and clinical implications are discussed.

  16. Unconference session at the IAU General Assembly 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, Tibisay Sankatsing; Venugopal, Ramasamy; Verdolini, Silvia

    2016-10-01

    The Astronomy For Development Focus Meeting 20 at the IAU General Assembly encompassed an `Unconference' session as part of the proceedings. Unstructured conferences, with their potential to unleash innovative ideas, are gaining traction in various conferences and symposia. Astronomy For Development is a field that is applicable to the entire Astronomy community (and even beyond) and hence an unconference inviting ideas and fostering frank dialogue is very pertinent. Officially one of the final sessions of the the 2015 General Assembly, the unconference session was intended to provide a balanced platform for a diverse set of participants and act as an informal setting to promote open discussion on topics of relevance to Astronomy for Development.

  17. Special Panel Session: Driving Critical Initiatives in Motor Speech

    PubMed Central

    Weismer, Gary; Barlow, Steven; Smith, Anne; Caviness, John

    2008-01-01

    The following report is a summary of the Special Panel Session, entitled, “Driving Critical Initiatives in Motor Speech,” that was conducted at the Conference on Motor Speech, March 2008, in Monterey California. Don Finan (Program Chair for Speech Motor Control) and Julie Liss (Program Chair for Motor Speech Disorders) invited four distinguished scientists (Drs. Gary Weismer, Steven Barlow, Anne Smith, and John Caviness) to share, briefly, their opinions and views on selected topics. This was followed by an hour-long general discussion session with conference attendees. This report contains an introductory statement followed by the panel members' own summaries of the opinions and ideas expressed in their talks. We then summarize the major topics that were considered during the discussion session. This summary reflects the biases and opinions of the participants, and is meant to serve as a thought-piece for the readership of JMSLP, rather than as a scientific report. PMID:19421339

  18. COPA to sponsor two Union sessions at AGU Spring Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folger, Peter

    Members of AGU's Committee on Public Affairs (COPA) will convene two Union sessions designed to highlight the link between geophysical research and the broader societal concerns at the upcoming AGU Spring meeting in Boston. Session U05, titled “Contaminated Groundwater and Litigation: Lessons from the Woburn Case,” will focus on the union of geophysical science and the legal system, geophysical science and health effects, and geophysical science and public participation. The Woburn, Massachusetts, toxic tort case, made popular by Jonathan Harr's book A Civil Action, will be used to illustrate the role and interaction of geophysical science with public policy in these areas. COPA members Jim Mercer and Margo Kingston will convene the session Wednesday June 5, starting at 8:30 a.m. in room CC302.

  19. Slicing it thin: new methods for brief sampling analysis using RIAS-coded medical dialogue.

    PubMed

    Roter, Debra L; Hall, Judith A; Blanch-Hartigan, Danielle; Larson, Susan; Frankel, Richard M

    2011-03-01

    To explore the relationship between one-minute slices and full-session interaction and the predictive validity of the slices to ratings of affect and rapport. Third-year medical students (n=253) were videotaped during an OSCE. All interaction was coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS) and samples were drawn at minutes 1, 5, and 9 and extracted from the coded database. The slices were related in multivariate analysis to full-session interaction, corrected for slice content, and correlated with affect ratings of participants and independently rated judgments of rapport. One-minute slices explained 33% of full-session variance in student interaction and 30% of variance in standardized patient interaction. Slices were significantly correlated with affective ratings of participants and independent judgments of rapport in a similar pattern as full-session interaction analysis. One-minute slices of interaction can provide a meaningful degree of insight into OSCE session communication with both concurrent and predictive validity to ratings of session affect and rapport. Evidence of concurrent and predictive validity further supports use of this approach as a research tool that provides an efficient means of analyzing processes of care, examining variation in communication throughout a visit and predicting visit outcomes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Organizing conceptual knowledge in humans with a gridlike code.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Alexandra O; O'Reilly, Jill X; Behrens, Timothy E J

    2016-06-17

    It has been hypothesized that the brain organizes concepts into a mental map, allowing conceptual relationships to be navigated in a manner similar to that of space. Grid cells use a hexagonally symmetric code to organize spatial representations and are the likely source of a precise hexagonal symmetry in the functional magnetic resonance imaging signal. Humans navigating conceptual two-dimensional knowledge showed the same hexagonal signal in a set of brain regions markedly similar to those activated during spatial navigation. This gridlike signal is consistent across sessions acquired within an hour and more than a week apart. Our findings suggest that global relational codes may be used to organize nonspatial conceptual representations and that these codes may have a hexagonal gridlike pattern when conceptual knowledge is laid out in two continuous dimensions.

  1. Coding for reliable satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S.

    1984-01-01

    Several error control coding techniques for reliable satellite communications were investigated to find algorithms for fast decoding of Reed-Solomon codes in terms of dual basis. The decoding of the (255,223) Reed-Solomon code, which is used as the outer code in the concatenated TDRSS decoder, was of particular concern.

  2. In-session processes of brief motivational interventions in two trials with mandated college students.

    PubMed

    Borsari, Brian; Apodaca, Timothy R; Jackson, Kristina M; Mastroleo, Nadine R; Magill, Molly; Barnett, Nancy P; Carey, Kate B

    2015-02-01

    Each year, thousands of college students receive mandated intervention as a sanction for alcohol use or alcohol-related behavior. For these mandated students, brief motivational interventions (BMIs) are currently the most efficacious individual intervention. However, little is known about how the technical (therapist behaviors) and relational (e.g., global ratings of therapist empathy) components of BMIs influence client language as well as subsequent change in alcohol use and consequences. This study used the Motivational Interviewing Skills Code (MISC 2.0; Miller, Moyers, Ernst, & Amrhein, 2003) to code BMI sessions from 2 randomized clinical trials that facilitated significant reductions in alcohol use (Study 1, n = 91) and alcohol-related consequences (Study 2, n = 158) in mandated students. There were significant relationships among therapist behaviors, global scores, and client language both for and against change, yet there were no links between in-session client language and subsequent changes in alcohol use or problems. In contrast, relational aspects of motivational interviewing (MI; global ratings of therapist MI Spirit and client self-exploration) were most predictive of postsession alcohol use. Mediation models incorporating both technical and relational components revealed that higher levels of client self-exploration mediated the relationship between higher therapist ratings of MI Spirit and reduced drinking at follow-up. Findings highlight the importance of considering how both technical and relational components of MI may influence alcohol use in mandated college students and also suggest more exact analyses to better understand this complex relationship. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Prediction of Affective Responses in Aerobic Exercise Sessions.

    PubMed

    Ramalho Oliveira, Bruno Ribeiro; Viana, Bruno Ferreira; Pires, Flávio Oliveira; Júnior Oliveira, Mário; Santos, Tony Meireles

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to verify which physiological (percentage of maximum oxygen consumption--%VO2 or percentage of maximum heart rate--%HR) or psychological (ratings of perceived exertion--RPE) variable is the best predictor of affective responses during continuous (CT) and interval (HIT) exercise sessions. Fourteen men underwent 3 exercise sessions on the treadmill. In the first session, a graded exercise test was performed to determine the maximum HR, peak VO2, and the respiratory compensation point (RCP). Then, participants performed the CT and HIT exercise in a counterbalanced order. The HIT session consisted of 2 min stimuli with an intensity of 100% of peak VO2 interspersed with periods of passive recovery. The average intensities of both exercise sessions were equalized at 85% of RCP. Linear regression analyses of both exercise sessions showed higher prediction values of RPE (CT--R2=.54, p <.01; HIT--R2=.68, p<.01) compared to %VO2 (CT--R2=.04, p=.08; HIT--R2=0.3, p=.12) and %HR (CT--R2=.07, p=.02; HIT--R2=.05, p=.05). Additionally, the results of the linear regression analysis between the Feeling Scale and physiological variables were not significant, indicating that the slope of the regression analysis was not different from zero. These results may be explained by the conscious mental processing required for the manifestation of both the RPE and the affective responses. In conclusion, the affective responses seem to be modulated not only by the intensity of exercise but also mostly by how the individual perceives this intensity.

  4. IFESS 2005 Special Session 5 Artifical Vision. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, James D.

    2005-07-05

    A special session on visual prostheses was held during the Annual Meeting of the International Functional Electrical Stimulation Society (IFESS), in Montreal, Canada, July 5-9, 2005. IFESS is a meeting that typically attracts researchers in implantable nerve stimulators, functional electrical stimulation, and rehabilitation. All of these areas have significant overlap with the retinal prosthesis, but these areas have decades of research behind them. The special session provided a forum for researchers with vast experience in nerve stimulation to interact with leading research in retinal and cortical visual prostheses. The grant paid for the travel and conference costs of the presenters in the session. The session was chaired by James Weiland (the PI on this grant). The session co-chair was Phil Troyk, Ph.D., from the Illinois Institute of Technology. The Department of Energy was acknowledged at the start of the session as the sponsor. The following talks were delivered: Clinical Trial of a Prototype Retinal Prosthesis James Weiland, Ph.D. Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, California The U.S. Department of Energy's Artificial Sight Program Elias Greenbaum, Ph.D. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee A 16-Channel stimulator ASIC for use in an intracortical visual prosthesis Phillip R. Troyk, Ph.D. Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois Two approaches to the Optic Nerve Visual Prosthesis Jean Delbeke, M.D. University Cath de Louvain, Louvain, Belgium Design and Implementation of High Power Efficiency Modules for a Cortical Visual Stimulator Mohammad Sawan, Ph.D. Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, Canada Remaining funds from the grant were used to support Dr. Weiland's travel to the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology in May 2006, with DOE approval, where several projects, supported by the DOE artificial retina program, were presented.

  5. Clarifying perspectives: Ethics case reflection sessions in childhood cancer care.

    PubMed

    Bartholdson, Cecilia; Lützén, Kim; Blomgren, Klas; Pergert, Pernilla

    2016-06-01

    Childhood cancer care involves many ethical concerns. Deciding on treatment levels and providing care that infringes on the child's growing autonomy are known ethical concerns that involve the whole professional team around the child's care. The purpose of this study was to explore healthcare professionals' experiences of participating in ethics case reflection sessions in childhood cancer care. Data collection by observations, individual interviews, and individual encounters. Data analysis were conducted following grounded theory methodology. Healthcare professionals working at a publicly funded children's hospital in Sweden participated in ethics case reflection sessions in which ethical issues concerning clinical cases were reflected on. The children's and their parents' integrity was preserved through measures taken to protect patient identity during ethics case reflection sessions. The study was approved by a regional ethical review board. Consolidating care by clarifying perspectives emerged. Consolidating care entails striving for common care goals and creating a shared view of care and the ethical concern in the specific case. The inter-professional perspectives on the ethical aspects of care are clarified by the participants' articulated views on the case. Different approaches for deliberating ethics are used during the sessions including raising values and making sense, leading to unifying interactions. The findings indicate that ethical concerns could be eased by implementing ethics case reflection sessions. Conflicting perspectives can be turned into unifying interactions in the healthcare professional team with the common aim to achieve good pediatric care. Ethics case reflection sessions is valuable as it permits the discussion of values in healthcare-related issues in childhood cancer care. Clarifying perspectives, on the ethical concerns, enables healthcare professionals to reflect on the most reasonable and ethically defensible care for the child

  6. Multiple trellis coded modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Marvin K. (Inventor); Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A technique for designing trellis codes to minimize bit error performance for a fading channel. The invention provides a criteria which may be used in the design of such codes which is significantly different from that used for average white Gaussian noise channels. The method of multiple trellis coded modulation of the present invention comprises the steps of: (a) coding b bits of input data into s intermediate outputs; (b) grouping said s intermediate outputs into k groups of s.sub.i intermediate outputs each where the summation of all s.sub.i,s is equal to s and k is equal to at least 2; (c) mapping each of said k groups of intermediate outputs into one of a plurality of symbols in accordance with a plurality of modulation schemes, one for each group such that the first group is mapped in accordance with a first modulation scheme and the second group is mapped in accordance with a second modulation scheme; and (d) outputting each of said symbols to provide k output symbols for each b bits of input data.

  7. Electrical Circuit Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Wix, Steven D.; Waters, Arlon J.; Shirley, David

    2001-08-09

    Massively-Parallel Electrical Circuit Simulation Code. CHILESPICE is a massively-arallel distributed-memory electrical circuit simulation tool that contains many enhanced radiation, time-based, and thermal features and models. Large scale electronic circuit simulation. Shared memory, parallel processing, enhance convergence. Sandia specific device models.

  8. Code Optimization Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    MAGEE,GLEN I.

    2000-08-03

    Computers transfer data in a number of different ways. Whether through a serial port, a parallel port, over a modem, over an ethernet cable, or internally from a hard disk to memory, some data will be lost. To compensate for that loss, numerous error detection and correction algorithms have been developed. One of the most common error correction codes is the Reed-Solomon code, which is a special subset of BCH (Bose-Chaudhuri-Hocquenghem) linear cyclic block codes. In the AURA project, an unmanned aircraft sends the data it collects back to earth so it can be analyzed during flight and possible flight modifications made. To counter possible data corruption during transmission, the data is encoded using a multi-block Reed-Solomon implementation with a possibly shortened final block. In order to maximize the amount of data transmitted, it was necessary to reduce the computation time of a Reed-Solomon encoding to three percent of the processor's time. To achieve such a reduction, many code optimization techniques were employed. This paper outlines the steps taken to reduce the processing time of a Reed-Solomon encoding and the insight into modern optimization techniques gained from the experience.

  9. Dress Codes. Legal Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2000-01-01

    As illustrated by two recent decisions, the courts in the past decade have demarcated wide boundaries for school officials considering dress codes, whether in the form of selective prohibitions or required uniforms. Administrators must warn the community, provide legitimate justification and reasonable clarity, and comply with state law. (MLH)

  10. Code of Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Sociological Association, Washington, DC.

    The American Sociological Association's code of ethics for sociologists is presented. For sociological research and practice, 10 requirements for ethical behavior are identified, including: maintaining objectivity and integrity; fully reporting findings and research methods, without omission of significant data; reporting fully all sources of…

  11. Dress Codes. Legal Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2000-01-01

    As illustrated by two recent decisions, the courts in the past decade have demarcated wide boundaries for school officials considering dress codes, whether in the form of selective prohibitions or required uniforms. Administrators must warn the community, provide legitimate justification and reasonable clarity, and comply with state law. (MLH)

  12. Dress Codes and Uniforms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumsden, Linda; Miller, Gabriel

    2002-01-01

    Students do not always make choices that adults agree with in their choice of school dress. Dress-code issues are explored in this Research Roundup, and guidance is offered to principals seeking to maintain a positive school climate. In "Do School Uniforms Fit?" Kerry White discusses arguments for and against school uniforms and summarizes the…

  13. Student Dress Codes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uerling, Donald F.

    School officials see a need for regulations that prohibit disruptive and inappropriate forms of expression and attire; students see these regulations as unwanted restrictions on their freedom. This paper reviews court litigation involving constitutional limitations on school authority, dress and hair codes, state law constraints, and school…

  14. Video Coding for ESL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kevin

    1992-01-01

    Coding tasks, a valuable technique for teaching English as a Second Language, are presented that enable students to look at patterns and structures of marital communication as well as objectively evaluate the degree of happiness or distress in the marriage. (seven references) (JL)

  15. Building Codes and Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, John L.

    The hazard of fire is of great concern to libraries due to combustible books and new plastics used in construction and interiors. Building codes and standards can offer architects and planners guidelines to follow but these standards should be closely monitored, updated, and researched for fire prevention. (DS)

  16. Dual Coding in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, John K.; Wildman, Terry M.

    The purpose of this study was to test the applicability of the dual coding hypothesis to children's recall performance. The hypothesis predicts that visual interference will have a small effect on the recall of visually presented words or pictures, but that acoustic interference will cause a decline in recall of visually presented words and…

  17. Within-session sensitization and between-session habituation: a robust physiological response to repetitive painful heat stimulation.

    PubMed

    May, A; Rodriguez-Raecke, R; Schulte, A; Ihle, K; Breimhorst, M; Birklein, F; Jürgens, T P

    2012-03-01

    Habituation and sensitization are important behavioural responses to repeated exposure of painful stimuli. Whereas within-session response dynamics to nociceptive stimuli is well characterized, little is known about long-term behaviour due to repetitive nociceptive stimulation. We used a standardized longitudinal heat pain paradigm in 66 healthy participants, 21 patients with chronic low back pain and 22 patients with depression who received daily sessions of 60 suprathreshold heat stimuli (48 °C each) for eight consecutive days. All three groups showed the same response: Repeated painful stimulation over several days resulted in substantially decreased pain ratings to identical painful stimuli. The decreased perception of pain over time was associated with a very robust increase in pain ratings in each single pain session, i.e., all participants sensitized within sessions and habituated between sessions. This uniform pattern was equally present in all examined groups. Chronic pain and depression do not seem to interfere with short-term sensitization and long-term habituation in this model of repetitive phasic heat pain.

  18. Comparison of multiple session 99% ethanol and single session OK-432 sclerotherapy for the treatment of simple renal cysts.

    PubMed

    Ham, Won Sik; Lee, Joo Hyoung; Kim, Won Tae; Yu, Ho Song; Choi, Young Deuk

    2008-12-01

    We compared the efficacy and safety of multiple session 99% ethanol sclerotherapy to single session OK-432 sclerotherapy for the treatment of simple renal cysts. Between September 2004 and November 2006, 41 patients (50 cysts, group 1) underwent sclerotherapy with 99% ethanol at least twice and 48 (61 cysts, group 2) underwent a single session of OK-432 sclerotherapy. Followup was performed with ultrasound or computerized tomography every 3 months for 1 year. Complete regression of the renal cyst or more than 70% reduction with no symptoms was considered successful treatment. There was no significant difference in the mean size of renal cysts between the 2 treatment groups. The overall success rate was 84.0% in group 1 and 98.4% in group 2. For cysts smaller than 500 ml there was a similar complete regression rate between the 2 groups whereas in cysts 500 ml or larger the complete regression ratio of group 2 was higher than group 1. The symptom relief rate of group 2 was higher than group 1. In group 1 there were 2 patients with a recurrent cyst but in group 2 there was no enlargement of the aspirated cysts. For cysts smaller than 200 ml neither treatment group had complications whereas in cysts 200 ml or larger the frequency of complications was higher in group 1. Single session OK-432 sclerotherapy is simpler, safer and more effective than multiple session 99% ethanol sclerotherapy for the treatment of simple renal cysts, especially large cysts.

  19. Coding for urologic office procedures.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Robert A; Painter, Mark

    2013-11-01

    This article summarizes current best practices for documenting, coding, and billing common office-based urologic procedures. Topics covered include general principles, basic and advanced urologic coding, creation of medical records that support compliant coding practices, bundled codes and unbundling, global periods, modifiers for procedure codes, when to bill for evaluation and management services during the same visit, coding for supplies, and laboratory and radiology procedures pertinent to urology practice. Detailed information is included for the most common urology office procedures, and suggested resources and references are provided. This information is of value to physicians, office managers, and their coding staff.

  20. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  1. The Second ICASE/LaRC Industry Roundtable: Session Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, Sharath

    1997-01-01

    The second ICASE/LaRC Industry Roundtable was held October 7-9, 1996 at the Williamsburg Hospitality House, Williamsburg, Virginia. Like the first roundtable in 1994, this meeting had two objectives: (1) to expose ICASE and LaRC scientists to industrial research agendas; and (2) to acquaint industry with the capabilities and technology available at ICASE, LaRC and academic partners of ICASE. Nineteen sessions were held in three parallel tracks. Of the 170 participants, over one third were affiliated with various industries. Proceedings from the different sessions are summarized in this report.

  2. Summary of Session Activities: Coordination of Environmental Education Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeler, Michael; Mahootian, Farzad

    1995-01-01

    In this session, we address four fundamental questions related to environmental fields with emphasis on education. These are: What are the goals, objectives, and practical opportunities for coordinating our projects? How can we improve awareness of, interest in, access to, and support the products of our work? How can we build relationships between projects for scientific, educational, technical, and programmatic benefit? How can we evaluate the effectiveness of coordination efforts. In this working session, we produced answers to these questions and proposed a structure for future collaboration.

  3. Mini-conference and Related Sessions on Laboratory Plasma Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Hantao Ji

    2004-02-27

    This paper provides a summary of some major physics issues and future perspectives discussed in the Mini-Conference on Laboratory Plasma Astrophysics. This Mini-conference, sponsored by the Topical Group on Plasma Astrophysics, was held as part of the American Physical Society's Division of Plasma Physics 2003 Annual Meeting (October 27-31, 2003). Also included are brief summaries of selected talks on the same topic presented at two invited paper sessions (including a tutorial) and two contributed focus oral sessions, which were organized in coordination with the Mini-Conference by the same organizers.

  4. Highlights of session presentations. TSS / CST population IEC meeting.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    The great deal of documentation which was prepared for the recent TSS/CST Population IEC (information, education, and communication) meeting from research, field experiments, and action projects will be useful to TSS/CST advisors and individual countries undertaking IEC and population education work. This article summarizes the 12 sessions held during the open forum. To illustrate some of the latest trends in population and health communication, the "enter-educate" approach and use of the interactive computer software called SCOPE (Strategic Communication Planning and Evaluation) were discussed. Next, ways in which to apply research effectively in IEC and population education were considered. Examples were provided of 1) a workshop methodology used to help a multidisciplinary group design a problem-solving communication strategy in Malaysia and Dominica; 2) the counseling training evaluation technique based on the GATHER (greet, ask, tell, help, explain, and return for follow-up) model; and 3) four types of evaluation of population education in schools. The third session was concerned with the program approach used in IEC and population education. Session 4 dealt with the implication of UNFPA support to family planning (FP) IEC. Counseling skills training and interpersonal communication were next on the agenda, followed by a consideration of how knowledge and policies are applied in the area of youth. The seventh session concentrated on ways to involve men in FP and reproductive health and included a discussion of a case study on the attitude and behavior of men with regard to FP which had IEC implications. The next session described the need to reconceptualize population education and what such a reconceptualization would entail. Session 9 was devoted to a consideration of gender issues and the education of girls. The tenth session covered the use of participatory approaches and community involvement in population communication programs. Innovative methodologies

  5. Teacher in Space Participants testing space food in orientation session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Teacher in Space Participant Christa McAuliffe appears to be enjoying her first taste of space food during an orientation session in JSC's life sciences laboratory (39977); McAuliffe, left, appears to be deciding what she thinks of a piece of space food she tastes during an orientation session. Barbara R. Morgan, backup to McAuliffe, samples an apricot. Dr. C.T. Bourland, a dietician specialist, assists the two (39978); McAuliffe (left) chews on a morsel while Morgan reaches for a bite. Dr. Bourland looks on (39979).

  6. The first ICASE/LARC industry roundtable: Session proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, Sharath

    1995-01-01

    The first 'ICASE/LaRC Industry Roundtable' was held on October 3-4, 1994, in Williamsburg, Virginia. The main purpose of the roundtable was to draw attention of ICASE/LaRC scientists to industrial research agendas. The roundtable was attended by about 200 scientists, 30% from NASA Langley; 20% from universities; 17% NASA Langley contractors (including ICASE personnel); and the remainder from federal agencies other than NASA Langley. The technical areas covered reflected the major research programs in ICASE and closely associated NASA branches. About 80% of the speakers were from industry. This report is a compilation of the session summaries prepared by the session chairmen.

  7. Sessions on history of space and geophysics spark interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    Three sessions at international conferences were held in 1997 to discuss the history of space and geophysics and its different disciplines. The first session was held during the Assembly of the German Geophysical Society in March in Potsdam, Germany. Topics included the theory of relativity and gravitation in geophysics; work by Albert Abraham Michelson, Leon Foucault, and Ernst Mach; work by Hermann von Helmholtz; and the physical application and geophysical evidence of Werner Heisenberg's research. Also included were discussions relevant to the history of geophysics, aeronomy, meteor astronomy, and geodetical research, including developments in instrumentation during the last few decades.

  8. Teacher in Space Participants testing space food in orientation session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Teacher in Space Participant Christa McAuliffe appears to be enjoying her first taste of space food during an orientation session in JSC's life sciences laboratory (39977); McAuliffe, left, appears to be deciding what she thinks of a piece of space food she tastes during an orientation session. Barbara R. Morgan, backup to McAuliffe, samples an apricot. Dr. C.T. Bourland, a dietician specialist, assists the two (39978); McAuliffe (left) chews on a morsel while Morgan reaches for a bite. Dr. Bourland looks on (39979).

  9. Summary of session B3 at GR20/Amaldi10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfinkle, David

    2014-05-01

    A wide variety of results was presented in session B3, the "non-astrophysical" numerical relativity parallel session. some results included improved numerical methods for such things as asymptotically flat spacetimes, generation of initial data, and characterization of binary black hole systems. Others included the propagation of various types of matter fields in the presence of black holes, naked singularities, and wormholes. There were also several simulations of spacetimes asymptotic to anti-de Sitter space. These simulations are of interest both for general relativity and (through the AdS/CFT correspondence) for the behavior of quantum field theories.

  10. Summary of Session Activities: Coordination of Environmental Education Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeler, Michael; Mahootian, Farzad

    1995-01-01

    In this session, we address four fundamental questions related to environmental fields with emphasis on education. These are: What are the goals, objectives, and practical opportunities for coordinating our projects? How can we improve awareness of, interest in, access to, and support the products of our work? How can we build relationships between projects for scientific, educational, technical, and programmatic benefit? How can we evaluate the effectiveness of coordination efforts. In this working session, we produced answers to these questions and proposed a structure for future collaboration.

  11. Coding Theory and Projective Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberstein, Natalia

    2008-05-01

    The projective space of order n over a finite field F_q is a set of all subspaces of the vector space F_q^{n}. In this work, we consider error-correcting codes in the projective space, focusing mainly on constant dimension codes. We start with the different representations of subspaces in the projective space. These representations involve matrices in reduced row echelon form, associated binary vectors, and Ferrers diagrams. Based on these representations, we provide a new formula for the computation of the distance between any two subspaces in the projective space. We examine lifted maximum rank distance (MRD) codes, which are nearly optimal constant dimension codes. We prove that a lifted MRD code can be represented in such a way that it forms a block design known as a transversal design. The incidence matrix of the transversal design derived from a lifted MRD code can be viewed as a parity-check matrix of a linear code in the Hamming space. We find the properties of these codes which can be viewed also as LDPC codes. We present new bounds and constructions for constant dimension codes. First, we present a multilevel construction for constant dimension codes, which can be viewed as a generalization of a lifted MRD codes construction. This construction is based on a new type of rank-metric codes, called Ferrers diagram rank-metric codes. Then we derive upper bounds on the size of constant dimension codes which contain the lifted MRD code, and provide a construction for two families of codes, that attain these upper bounds. We generalize the well-known concept of a punctured code for a code in the projective space to obtain large codes which are not constant dimension. We present efficient enumerative encoding and decoding techniques for the Grassmannian. Finally we describe a search method for constant dimension lexicodes.

  12. Fundamentals of coding and reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Price, Paula

    2002-01-01

    After completing this introduction to radiology coding and reimbursement, readers will: Understand how health care reimbursement evolved over the past 50 years. Know the importance of documenting the patient's history. Have an overall picture of the standardized numerical coding system. Understand how accurate coding affects reimbursement. Understand coding functions as they pertain to regulatory compliance in the radiology department. Be familiar with the U.S. Justice Department's use of coding in tracking health care fraud.

  13. High Dimensional Trellis Coded Modulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    popular recently for the decoding of turbo codes (or parallel concatenated codes ) which require an iteration between two permuted code sequences. The...nonsystematic constituent codes ) Published descriptions of the implementation of turbo decoders refer to the permuted “common” or “extrinsic” information...invented based on that condition. With the recent development of turbo codes [4] and the requirement of short frame transmission [5] [6], trellis

  14. New residential construction compliance: Evaluation of the Washington State Energy Code program

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, W.M.; Lee, A.D.; Sandahl, L.J.; Durfee, D.L.; Richman, E.E.

    1993-07-01

    This report describes the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL`s) evaluation of the Washington State Energy Code Program (WSECP). In 1990, the Washington State Legislature passed a residential energy efficiency code to be effective July 1, 1992. Bonneville supported passage and implementation of the code to ensure that new residences in the State of Washington were as energy efficient as economically feasible. The Washington State Energy Office (WSEO) is conducting the WSECP for Bonneville to support code implementation. This support takes several forms, including providing training to code enforcement officials, technical support both in the field and through telephone ``hot lines,`` and computerized tools to review house plans for code compliance. WSEO began implementing the WSECP in 1992, prior to the effective date of the new code. This first phase of the WSECP was the subject of an earlier process evaluation conducted by PNL. From that evaluation PNL found that most new homes being built immediately after the code went into effect were ``grand-fathered`` under the old code. The training program for the new code was in place and sessions were being attended by the jurisdictions but it was too early to determine if the training was effective in improving code compliance and easing the transition to the new energy code. That is the subject of this evaluation.

  15. The Modification of Mnemonic Code by the Construction of Formal Operational Schemes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arlin, Patricia Kennedy

    1977-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that coding used for recall is a dynamic process that changes in accordance with operational structures. Fifty male and female university students participated in two task sessions: (1) Formal operations and recall and (2) recall one month later. Significant correlations supported the basic…

  16. Functions of Arabic-English Code-Switching: Sociolinguistic Insights from a Study Abroad Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Masaeed, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    This sociolinguistic study examines the functions and motivations of code-switching, which is used here to mean the use of more than one language in the same conversation. The conversations studied here take place in a very particular context: one-on-one speaking sessions in a study abroad program in Morocco where English is the L1 and Arabic the…

  17. Functions of Arabic-English Code-Switching: Sociolinguistic Insights from a Study Abroad Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Masaeed, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    This sociolinguistic study examines the functions and motivations of code-switching, which is used here to mean the use of more than one language in the same conversation. The conversations studied here take place in a very particular context: one-on-one speaking sessions in a study abroad program in Morocco where English is the L1 and Arabic the…

  18. Managing Widely Disparate Code Bases Through Automation of Continuous Integration and Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, B. D.; Joshi, T.

    2013-12-01

    NASA EOSDIS tools, services, and service endpoints are widely dispersed across different sub-agencies and sub-organizations. Each of these entities has a different set of skills and widely varying codebases. Some produce sophisticated, well-tested, stable and deployable code, while others are struggling to meet stringent requirements with limited resources. This disparity makes the process of partnering with and deploying code onto the Earthdata platform (https://earthdata.nasa.gov) difficult, even at times impossible. The Earthdata Code Collaborative (ECC) is a project repository and code hosting facility that addresses this problem directly through a three-tiered approach: 1. Provide a standardized set of testing and automation tools for all hosted projects. 2. Regularly report on bugs and features as well as testing coverage and success through Web-based tools. 3. Directly pipeline projects from the ECC into the Earthdata production environment. This session will explain the architecture behind the ECC, including the custom software and 3rd party tools used. It will also detail the process by which decisions were and are being made to arrive at a fully-automated suite of tools and tests that allow any code base to quickly improve its quality and become a candidate for Earthdata inclusion. The session is oriented towards developers, managers, and team members involved in the process of developing, testing, deploying, and ensuring the quality of a code base, whether that code base be tens of millions of lines of code or simply hundreds.

  19. SUMMARY OF GENERAL WORKING GROUP A+B+D: CODES BENCHMARKING.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.; SHAPOSHNIKOVA, E.; ZIMMERMANN, F.; HOFMANN, I.

    2006-05-29

    Computer simulation is an indispensable tool in assisting the design, construction, and operation of accelerators. In particular, computer simulation complements analytical theories and experimental observations in understanding beam dynamics in accelerators. The ultimate function of computer simulation is to study mechanisms that limit the performance of frontier accelerators. There are four goals for the benchmarking of computer simulation codes, namely debugging, validation, comparison and verification: (1) Debugging--codes should calculate what they are supposed to calculate; (2) Validation--results generated by the codes should agree with established analytical results for specific cases; (3) Comparison--results from two sets of codes should agree with each other if the models used are the same; and (4) Verification--results from the codes should agree with experimental measurements. This is the summary of the joint session among working groups A, B, and D of the HI32006 Workshop on computer codes benchmarking.

  20. EthoLog 2.2: a tool for the transcription and timing of behavior observation sessions.

    PubMed

    Ottoni, E B

    2000-08-01

    EthoLog is a tool that aids in the transcription and timing of behavior observation sessions--experimental or naturalistic, from video/audio tapes or registering real time. It was created with Visual Basic and runs on Windows (3.x/9x). The user types the key codes for the predefined behavioral categories, and EthoLog registers their sequence and timing and saves the resulting data in ASCII output files. A sequential analysis matrix can be generated from the sequential data. The output files may be edited, converted to plain text files for printing, or exported to a spreadsheet program, such as MS Excel, for further analyses.

  1. Quantum codes from linear codes over finite chain rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiusheng; Liu, Hualu

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we provide two methods of constructing quantum codes from linear codes over finite chain rings. The first one is derived from the Calderbank-Shor-Steane (CSS) construction applied to self-dual codes over finite chain rings. The second construction is derived from the CSS construction applied to Gray images of the linear codes over finite chain ring F_{p^{2m}}+u{F}_{p^{2m}}. The good parameters of quantum codes from cyclic codes over finite chain rings are obtained.

  2. Factors Influencing Consent to Having Videotaped Mental Health Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ko, Kenton; Goebert, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors critically reviewed the literature regarding factors influencing consent to having videotaped mental health sessions. Methods: The authors searched the literature in PubMed, PsycINFO, Google Scholar, and Web of Science from the mid-1950s through February 2009. Results: The authors identified 27 studies, of which 19 (73%)…

  3. Peer Assisted Study Sessions (PASS): Does Gender Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geerlings, Peter M.; Cole, Helen; Batt, Sharryn; Martin-Lynch, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Peer-learning is an effective way to assist students to acquire study skills and content knowledge, especially in university courses that students find difficult, and it is an effective adjunct to improve student retention. In 2014, Murdoch University in Perth, Western Australia, commenced Peer Assisted Study Sessions (PASS) in two first-year…

  4. Session I: Secondary and primary stars. Discussion summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuermann, K.

    2002-01-01

    This is a summary of the discussion following the four invited talks in the Session I on the secondary and primary stars in CVs by Isabelle Baraffe, Andrew Collier Cameron, Paula Szkody, and Lars Bildsten. It also covers the short contribution by Travis Barman et al. on irradiated atmospheres.

  5. Client Good Moments: An Intensive Analysis of a Single Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalikas, Anastassios; Fitzpatrick, Marilyn

    1995-01-01

    An intensive analysis of a single counseling session conducted by Fritz Perls was carried out to examine relationships among client experiencing level, client strength of feeling, counselor interventions, and client good moments. The possibility that positive therapeutic outcome is related to the accretion of good moments is discussed. (JBJ)

  6. Anger and Violence Prevention: Enhancing Treatment Effects through Booster Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Alysha; McWhirter, Paula T.; McWhirter, J. Jeffries

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of booster sessions on the maintenance of intervention gains following an anger management prevention program: "Student Created Aggression Replacement Education Program" ("SCARE"). Participants who had completed the "SCARE" program a year earlier were randomly…

  7. Freshman Orientation Sessions Can Teach Incoming Students about Healthful Lifestyles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Marjorie R.; Waldrop, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This GEM describes the "Freshman 15 Jeopardy" workshop, a 30-minute nutrition education session aimed to expose incoming college freshmen to the college food environment, to increase their awareness of factors that cause weight gain, and to instruct them on lifestyle choices they could employ to prevent weight gain. This short workshop has not…

  8. Legislative Summary of the 104th Congress First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baime, David; And Others

    Providing a summary of legislative activity in the First Session of the 104th Congress, this report describes the current status of legislation and appropriations of key interest to community colleges and the American Association of Community Colleges' (AACC's) position on these issues. Summaries are provided of 1995 Congressional activity in the…

  9. Legislative Summary of the 105th Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, David

    Providing a summary of legislative activity in the First Session of the 105th Congress, this report describes the current status of legislation and appropriations of key interest to community colleges and presents the American Association of Community Colleges' (AACC's) position on these issues. Summaries are provided of 1997 Congressional…

  10. Ford and Marshburn conducts a session of the SPHERES ZR

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-11

    ISS034-E-028342 (11 Jan. 2013) --- NASA astronauts Kevin Ford (left), Expedition 34 commander; and Tom Marshburn, flight engineer, conduct a session of the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites Zero Robotics (SPHERES ZR) program in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  11. Ford and Marshburn conducts a session of the SPHERES ZR

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-11

    ISS034-E-028409 (11 Jan. 2013) --- With their feet anchored in floor restraints, NASA astronauts Kevin Ford (left), Expedition 34 commander; and Tom Marshburn, flight engineer, conduct a session of the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites Zero Robotics (SPHERES ZR) program in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  12. Implementing Problem-Based Learning in the Counseling Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Kimberly R.

    This study examined the use of problem-based learning (PBL) in an actual counseling session and the effects on student assertiveness skills. A group of seventh-grade students, who were all victims of bullies, participated in the study. The students, two boys and one girls, were 13 and 14 years old. Teachers rated the level of assertiveness skills…

  13. Nespoli conducts ham radio session in the SM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-08

    ISS026-E-016991 (8 Jan. 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 26 flight engineer, conducts a ham radio session from the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station with students at Universit? degli studi di Bari ?Cittadella Mediterranea della Scienza,? Bari, Italy.

  14. Fifth session of the Commission on Sustainable Development.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    The fifth session of the Commission on Sustainable Development was held at the UN Headquarters on April 7-25, 1997, to review the implementation of Agenda 21, the program of action adopted by the UN Conference on Environment and Development in 1992. The fifth session began with a 3-day high level segment that focused on two reports: the Commission's Ad Hoc Open-ended Inter-sessional Working Group, and the Open-ended Ad Hoc Intergovernmental Panel on Forests. Moreover, dialogue sessions were held with major representatives of children and youth, the scientific and technological community, women's groups, workers and trade union, indigenous peoples, nongovernmental organizations, local authorities, farmers, and business and industry organizations. Among the challenges and recommendations of the dialogue on global action for women towards sustainable and equitable development are: identification of successful instruments in combating harmful advertising; identification of industrial hot spots and preparation of a plan to clean these areas; and strengthening the women's role in efforts to implement Agenda 21.

  15. Organizing and Conducting Farmer-Scientist Focus Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lev, Larry S.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Farmer-scientist focus sessions represent a means by which participants exchange ideas for action, identify researchable topics, and enhance long-term farmer-scientist team work. Three examples involving controlling weeds, disposal of cull onion, and food safety concerns are described that illustrate the types of issues treated, the format, and…

  16. Webis at TREC 2014: Web, Session, and Contextual Suggestion Tracks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    Webis at TREC 2014: Web, Session, and Contextual Suggestion Tracks Matthias Hagen Steve Göring Maximilian Michel Georg Müller Benno Stein Bauhaus ...ES) Bauhaus -Universit??t Weimar,99421 Weimar, Germany, 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS

  17. Single-session Coil Embolization of Multiple Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Keun

    2013-01-01

    Objective There is no clear treatment strategy for the management of multiple intracranial aneurysms because of variable anatomical distribution, difficult identification of the aneurysm ruptured, and poor overall outcomes. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of single-session coil embolization for multiple intracranial aneurysms. Methods Between September 2008 and December 2012, 209 aneurysms in 117 patients were treated at our institute. Twenty eight among the 117 patients had multiple aneurysms with a total of 71, and 60 of the 71 aneurysms underwent coil embolization in a single-session. Results A total of 60 aneurysms were treated with a single-session coil embolization, of which the most frequent locations were in the posterior communicating artery, followed by the middle cerebral artery. Immediate post-embolization angiographies showed total occlusion in 49 (81.7%) aneurysms, remnant neck in 6 (10%), and body-filling in 5 (8.3%). Procedure-related complications had developed in 2 (3.3%) of the 60 embolized aneurysms: an asymptomatic thromboembolic event, and a partial coil protrusion without a subsequent thromboembolic complication. Conclusion With careful evaluation of individual aneurysm characteristics and configuration, multiple intracranial aneurysms previously thought to require multimodality therapy can be safely treated in a single-session coil embolization. PMID:24167798

  18. The Facilitator's Edge: Group Sessions for Edge-ucators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handcock, Helen

    The Facilitator's Edge is a workshop series based on the life/work messages of The Edge magazine. The workshops are deigned to help educators, youth workers, and their career practitioners facilitate conscious career building. This manual consists of five group sessions, each focusing on a different career-building theme. "Megatrends and…

  19. STS-127 crew during their food tasting session.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-06-19

    JSC2008-E-047939 (19 June 2008) --- NASA astronaut Christopher J. Cassidy and Canadian Space Agency astronaut Julie Payette, both STS-127 mission specialists, participate in a food tasting session in the Flight Projects Division Laboratory at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  20. "Where Are We Going? Mini Sessions on Maxi Concerns."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastern Association for Physical Education of College Women, Albany, NY.

    The proceedings of the fall conference of the Eastern Association for Physical Education of College Women includes articles and overviews of mini-sessions. In "Journey Proud," Celeste Ulrich provides observations about human interaction, teaching/learning environments, techniques and methods, and administrative patterns and scholarship. In…

  1. IFLA General Conference, 1986. Pre-Session Seminar, Kanasawa. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    The two papers in this document were presented at a pre-session held before the IFLA general conference in 1986. In "Problems of Document Delivery in the Science and Technology Information Environment--An African View," Lucilda Hunter (Sierra Leone) discusses typical difficulties encountered in the process of information retrieval in…

  2. Hypnosis and Smoking: A Five-Session Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Helen H.

    An active five-session, individualized treatment approach to the stopping of smoking is described. This approach emphasized the following: (a) the feedback, in and out of hypnosis, of the client's own reasons for quitting, (b) the visualization of both positive and negative smoking experiences meaningful to the client, (c) maintaining contact with…

  3. Report: Task Force on Safety Policies for Division Meeting Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Ron

    1987-01-01

    Expresses concern over the dangers in presenting chemical demonstrations at regional and national conventions. Lists the interim minimum guidelines for chemical demonstrations to be required for future meeting sessions of the Division of Chemical Education of the American Chemical Society. (TW)

  4. Our Place in the Universe. Session 1; History of Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi

    2016-01-01

    This session includes a very broad overview of a couple of the major ideas of astronomy, along with demonstrations of Earth's motions that, give rise to the seasons, show us the "faces" of Venus (and the Moon), and result in retrograde motion of the outer planets.

  5. Attitudes of Healthcare Students on Gross Anatomy Laboratory Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawashiro, Yukiko; Anahara, Reiko; Kohno, Toshihiko; Mori, Chisato; Matsuno, Yoshiharu

    2009-01-01

    At Chiba University, gross anatomy laboratory sessions ("laboratories") are required for physical therapy students. Though most physical therapy schools require their students to participate in laboratories so that they will better understand the structure of the human body, few data exist on the value of these laboratories specifically…

  6. Summary of Session E: Electron Cloud and Ion Desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Y.; Kraemer, A.

    2005-06-08

    Electron cloud and ion desorption are currently intensity limit of several hadron machines in operation, and possibly of concern for several accelerators in construction and planning. In this summary, the background, the progress, and the working session discussion of this aspect are reported.

  7. Training Sessions Provide Working Knowledge of National Animal Identification System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaze, J. Benton, Jr.; Ahola, Jason K.

    2010-01-01

    One in-service and two train-the-trainer workshops were conducted by University of Idaho Extension faculty, Idaho State Department of Agriculture personnel, and allied industry representatives to increase Extension educators' knowledge and awareness of the National Animal Identification System (NAIS) and related topics. Training sessions included…

  8. Summary of the Open Session at the IMC 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeeck, C.; Argo, M.; Brown, P.; Molau, S.; Rendtel, J.; Martínez Picar, A.

    2016-01-01

    The Open Session at the IMC 2016 took place on Friday, June 3rd 2016 evening (21:30-22:30) and was intended to accommodate beginners' questions about meteor astronomy. Megan Argo moderated a panel of experts, consisting of Peter Brown, Sirko Molau, Jürgen Rendtel, and Antonio Martínez Picar.

  9. Intergovernmental Copyright Committee (Eleventh Session, Geneva, November 1971). Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intergovernmental Copyright Committee, Paris (France).

    The eleventh session of the Intergovernmental Copyright Committee was held from November 3-5, 1971. This document reports on the agenda of that meeting which included the following topics: (1) report from the Conference for Revision of the Universal Copyright Convention (July 5-24, 1971); (2) photocopying of copyright works; (3) problems arising…

  10. Freshman Orientation Sessions Can Teach Incoming Students about Healthful Lifestyles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Marjorie R.; Waldrop, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This GEM describes the "Freshman 15 Jeopardy" workshop, a 30-minute nutrition education session aimed to expose incoming college freshmen to the college food environment, to increase their awareness of factors that cause weight gain, and to instruct them on lifestyle choices they could employ to prevent weight gain. This short workshop has not…

  11. Critical Thinking in Reflective Sessions and in Online Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celani, Maria Antonieta Alba; Collins, Heloisa

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on online educational sessions of a continuing teacher education programme. The aim of this programme is to give a contribution to the continuing education of teachers of English as critical professionals, aware of discursive classroom practices, able to analyze them in the light of objectives to be reached and knowledge to be…

  12. Closed Conference Signalling Using the Session Initiation Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miladinovic, Igor; Stadler, Johannes

    2003-01-01

    Introduces an extension of the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) for closed multiparty conferences; the extension expands SIP for discovery of participant identities in a conference, and ensures that each participant is notified before a new participant joins. Verifies this extension by applying it to two SIP conference models. Concludes with an…

  13. Attitudes of Healthcare Students on Gross Anatomy Laboratory Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawashiro, Yukiko; Anahara, Reiko; Kohno, Toshihiko; Mori, Chisato; Matsuno, Yoshiharu

    2009-01-01

    At Chiba University, gross anatomy laboratory sessions ("laboratories") are required for physical therapy students. Though most physical therapy schools require their students to participate in laboratories so that they will better understand the structure of the human body, few data exist on the value of these laboratories specifically…

  14. 76 FR 41278 - Cargo Security Risk Reduction; Public Listening Sessions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... progress and development of a CDC Security National Strategy to reduce risks associated with the transport, transfer, and storage of Certain Dangerous Cargo (CDC) in bulk within the U.S. Marine Transportation System... CONTACT: To submit questions and comments or to RSVP for the sessions, send e-mails to...

  15. Astronaut Mary Ellen Weber during training session in WETF

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-05-01

    Attired in a training version of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), Astronaut Mary Ellen Weber participates in a training session at JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF). Training as a mission specialist for the STS-70 mission, Weber was about to rehearse a contingency space walk. One of several SCUBA-equipped divers waits to assist in the rehearsal in the water.

  16. Organizing and Conducting Farmer-Scientist Focus Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lev, Larry S.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Farmer-scientist focus sessions represent a means by which participants exchange ideas for action, identify researchable topics, and enhance long-term farmer-scientist team work. Three examples involving controlling weeds, disposal of cull onion, and food safety concerns are described that illustrate the types of issues treated, the format, and…

  17. Setting the Standards for Sessional Staff: Quality Learning and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Across the Australian Higher Education sector a focus on quality is driving a new paradigm for learning and teaching: quality standards. One challenge is to engage all academics with this progress towards systematic quality enhancement and assurance. Sessional staff, who provide most of the face-to-face teaching in Australian universities, remain…

  18. NASA Exhibit at the NBA All-Star Jam Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-02-18

    JSC2006-E-04816 (18 Feb. 2006) --- Astronauts Joan Higginbotham and Robert L. Satcher Jr. autograph portraits for an attendee at the NBA All-Star Jam Session in Houston's central business district. The autograph table was part of NASA's exhibit at the event.

  19. The Facilitator's Edge: Group Sessions for Edge-ucators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handcock, Helen

    The Facilitator's Edge is a workshop series based on the life/work messages of The Edge magazine. The workshops are deigned to help educators, youth workers, and their career practitioners facilitate conscious career building. This manual consists of five group sessions, each focusing on a different career-building theme. "Megatrends and…

  20. "Where Are We Going? Mini Sessions on Maxi Concerns."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastern Association for Physical Education of College Women, Albany, NY.

    The proceedings of the fall conference of the Eastern Association for Physical Education of College Women includes articles and overviews of mini-sessions. In "Journey Proud," Celeste Ulrich provides observations about human interaction, teaching/learning environments, techniques and methods, and administrative patterns and scholarship. In…

  1. Factors Influencing Consent to Having Videotaped Mental Health Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ko, Kenton; Goebert, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors critically reviewed the literature regarding factors influencing consent to having videotaped mental health sessions. Methods: The authors searched the literature in PubMed, PsycINFO, Google Scholar, and Web of Science from the mid-1950s through February 2009. Results: The authors identified 27 studies, of which 19 (73%)…

  2. Anger and Violence Prevention: Enhancing Treatment Effects through Booster Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Alysha; McWhirter, Paula T.; McWhirter, J. Jeffries

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of booster sessions on the maintenance of intervention gains following an anger management prevention program: "Student Created Aggression Replacement Education Program" ("SCARE"). Participants who had completed the "SCARE" program a year earlier were randomly…

  3. Kuipers during second orbital NEUROSPAT Session in the Columbus Module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-14

    ISS030-E-116907 (13 Feb. 2012) --- Wearing an Electroencephalogram (EEG) electrode cap, European Space Agency astronaut Andre Kuipers, Expedition 30 flight engineer, performs a NeuroSpat science session in the Columbus laboratory of the International Space Station. NeuroSpat investigates the ways in which crew members’ three-dimensional visual & space perception is affected by long-duration stays in weightlessness.

  4. Kuipers during second orbital NEUROSPAT Session in the Columbus Module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-14

    ISS030-E-116908 (13 Feb. 2012) --- Wearing an Electroencephalogram (EEG) electrode cap, European Space Agency astronaut Andre Kuipers, Expedition 30 flight engineer, performs a NeuroSpat science session in the Columbus laboratory of the International Space Station. NeuroSpat investigates the ways in which crew members’ three-dimensional visual & space perception is affected by long-duration stays in weightlessness.

  5. Effects of Psychotherapy Training and Intervention Use on Session Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boswell, James F.; Castonguay, Louis G.; Wasserman, Rachel H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study was an investigation of the relationships among therapist training variables, psychotherapy process, and session outcome in a psychotherapy training clinic. The aims were to assess the relationship between "training as usual" and intervention use in individual psychotherapy, to investigate the relationship between therapist…

  6. Astronaut Mary Ellen Weber during training session in WETF

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-05-01

    Attired in a training version of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), astronaut Mary Ellen Weber gets help with the final touches of suit donning during a training session at JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF). Training as a mission specialist for the STS-70 mission, Weber was about to rehearse a contingency space walk.

  7. Strategic HRD. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on strategic human resource development (HRD). "The GEICO Challenge Session: A Model for Integrating Human Resource Development and Strategic Planning" (Clyde T. Conine, Jr., Bill P. Criswell) reports on a study that delineated the nature of the integration of HRD into the strategic…

  8. Training Sessions Provide Working Knowledge of National Animal Identification System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaze, J. Benton, Jr.; Ahola, Jason K.

    2010-01-01

    One in-service and two train-the-trainer workshops were conducted by University of Idaho Extension faculty, Idaho State Department of Agriculture personnel, and allied industry representatives to increase Extension educators' knowledge and awareness of the National Animal Identification System (NAIS) and related topics. Training sessions included…

  9. Task 3(a)R, Requirements Planning Session Outline.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-12

    outline is presented in a manner that can be readily applied to any topic area; however, it is assumed that the topic area will be Maintenance Production ... Management which will build on the results of one of the two topic areas from the Needs Planning Session in July. It is expected that this outline may

  10. Dominance and Peer Tutoring Sessions with English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Diana Calhoun; Elledge, Sara Redington

    2008-01-01

    In order to better understand the complex dynamic that often occurs during writing center sessions between native English speaking (L1) tutors and English language learners (ELL), this study investigates linguistic dominance through time-at-talk, turn-taking, agenda-setting, and content analysis. We conclude that, in keeping with theory and…

  11. Session on coupled atmospheric/chemistry coupled models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne

    1993-01-01

    The session on coupled atmospheric/chemistry coupled models is reviewed. Current model limitations, current issues and critical unknowns, and modeling activity are addressed. Specific recommendations and experimental strategies on the following are given: multiscale surface layer - planetary boundary layer - chemical flux measurements; Eulerian budget study; and Langrangian experiment. Nonprecipitating cloud studies, organized convective systems, and aerosols - heterogenous chemistry are also discussed.

  12. Binary coding for hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Chang, Chein-I.; Chang, Chein-Chi; Lin, Chinsu

    2004-10-01

    Binary coding is one of simplest ways to characterize spectral features. One commonly used method is a binary coding-based image software system, called Spectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) for remotely sensed imagery developed by Mazer et al. For a given spectral signature, the SPAM calculates its spectral mean and inter-band spectral difference and uses them as thresholds to generate a binary code word for this particular spectral signature. Such coding scheme is generally effective and also very simple to implement. This paper revisits the SPAM and further develops three new SPAM-based binary coding methods, called equal probability partition (EPP) binary coding, halfway partition (HP) binary coding and median partition (MP) binary coding. These three binary coding methods along with the SPAM well be evaluated for spectral discrimination and identification. In doing so, a new criterion, called a posteriori discrimination probability (APDP) is also introduced for performance measure.

  13. Epetra developers coding guidelines.

    SciTech Connect

    Heroux, Michael Allen; Sexton, Paul Michael

    2003-12-01

    Epetra is a package of classes for the construction and use of serial and distributed parallel linear algebra objects. It is one of the base packages in Trilinos. This document describes guidelines for Epetra coding style. The issues discussed here go beyond correct C++ syntax to address issues that make code more readable and self-consistent. The guidelines presented here are intended to aid current and future development of Epetra specifically. They reflect design decisions that were made in the early development stages of Epetra. Some of the guidelines are contrary to more commonly used conventions, but we choose to continue these practices for the purposes of self-consistency. These guidelines are intended to be complimentary to policies established in the Trilinos Developers Guide.

  14. CTI Correction Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard; Stoughton, Chris; Leauthaud, Alexie; Rhodes, Jason; Koekemoer, Anton; Ellis, Richard; Shaghoulian, Edgar

    2013-07-01

    Charge Transfer Inefficiency (CTI) due to radiation damage above the Earth's atmosphere creates spurious trailing in images from Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) imaging detectors. Radiation damage also creates unrelated warm pixels, which can be used to measure CTI. This code provides pixel-based correction for CTI and has proven effective in Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys raw images, successfully reducing the CTI trails by a factor of ~30 everywhere in the CCD and at all flux levels. The core is written in java for speed, and a front-end user interface is provided in IDL. The code operates on raw data by returning individual electrons to pixels from which they were unintentionally dragged during readout. Correction takes about 25 minutes per ACS exposure, but is trivially parallelisable to multiple processors.

  15. The NIMROD Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnack, D. D.; Glasser, A. H.

    1996-11-01

    NIMROD is a new code system that is being developed for the analysis of modern fusion experiments. It is being designed from the beginning to make the maximum use of massively parallel computer architectures and computer graphics. The NIMROD physics kernel solves the three-dimensional, time-dependent two-fluid equations with neo-classical effects in toroidal geometry of arbitrary poloidal cross section. The NIMROD system also includes a pre-processor, a grid generator, and a post processor. User interaction with NIMROD is facilitated by a modern graphical user interface (GUI). The NIMROD project is using Quality Function Deployment (QFD) team management techniques to minimize re-engineering and reduce code development time. This paper gives an overview of the NIMROD project. Operation of the GUI is demonstrated, and the first results from the physics kernel are given.

  16. WHPA Code available

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Wellhead Protection Area code is now available for distribution by the International Ground Water Modeling Center in Indianapolis, Ind. The WHPA code is a modular, semianalytical, groundwater flow model developed for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water Protection, designed to assist state and local technical staff with the task of Wellhead Protection Area (WHPA) delineation. A complete news item appeared in Eos, May 1, 1990, p. 690.The model consists of four independent, semianalytical modules that may be used to identify the areal extent of groundwater contribution to one or multiple pumping wells. One module is a general particle tracking program that may be used as a post-processor for two-dimensional, numerical models of groundwater flow. One module incorporates a Monte Carlo approach to investigate the effects of uncertain input parameters on capture zones. Multiple pumping and injection wells may be present and barrier or stream boundary conditions may be investigated.

  17. WHPA Code available

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Wellhead Protection Area (WHPA) code is now available for distribution by the International Ground Water Modeling Center in Indianapolis, Ind. The WHPA code is a modular, semi-analytical, groundwater flow model developed for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water Protection. It is designed to assist state and local technical staff with the task of WHPA delineation.The model consists of four independent, semi-analytical modules that may be used to identify the areal extent of groundwater contribution to one or multiple pumping wells. One module is a general particle tracking program that may be used as a post-processor for two-dimensional, numerical models of groundwater flow. One module incorporates a Monte Carlo approach to investigate the effects of uncertain input parameters on capture zones. Multiple pumping and injection wells may be present and barrier or stream boundary conditions may be investigated.

  18. Sinusoidal transform coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaulay, Robert J.; Quatieri, Thomas F.

    1988-01-01

    It has been shown that an analysis/synthesis system based on a sinusoidal representation of speech leads to synthetic speech that is essentially perceptually indistinguishable from the original. Strategies for coding the amplitudes, frequencies and phases of the sine waves have been developed that have led to a multirate coder operating at rates from 2400 to 9600 bps. The encoded speech is highly intelligible at all rates with a uniformly improving quality as the data rate is increased. A real-time fixed-point implementation has been developed using two ADSP2100 DSP chips. The methods used for coding and quantizing the sine-wave parameters for operation at the various frame rates are described.

  19. Efficient convolutional sparse coding

    DOEpatents

    Wohlberg, Brendt

    2017-06-20

    Computationally efficient algorithms may be applied for fast dictionary learning solving the convolutional sparse coding problem in the Fourier domain. More specifically, efficient convolutional sparse coding may be derived within an alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) framework that utilizes fast Fourier transforms (FFT) to solve the main linear system in the frequency domain. Such algorithms may enable a significant reduction in computational cost over conventional approaches by implementing a linear solver for the most critical and computationally expensive component of the conventional iterative algorithm. The theoretical computational cost of the algorithm may be reduced from O(M.sup.3N) to O(MN log N), where N is the dimensionality of the data and M is the number of elements in the dictionary. This significant improvement in efficiency may greatly increase the range of problems that can practically be addressed via convolutional sparse representations.

  20. Confocal coded aperture imaging

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William; Thomas, Jr., Clarence E.

    2001-01-01

    A method for imaging a target volume comprises the steps of: radiating a small bandwidth of energy toward the target volume; focusing the small bandwidth of energy into a beam; moving the target volume through a plurality of positions within the focused beam; collecting a beam of energy scattered from the target volume with a non-diffractive confocal coded aperture; generating a shadow image of said aperture from every point source of radiation in the target volume; and, reconstructing the shadow image into a 3-dimensional image of the every point source by mathematically correlating the shadow image with a digital or analog version of the coded aperture. The method can comprise the step of collecting the beam of energy scattered from the target volume with a Fresnel zone plate.