Science.gov

Sample records for asms2004 session code

  1. A coding scheme for the evaluation of the relationship in music therapy sessions.

    PubMed

    Raglio, A; Traficante, D; Oasi, O

    2006-08-01

    This study presents a coding system for observation and monitoring of changes in the interactive behaviour between patient and therapist during music therapy sessions. The coding scheme was developed from a psychodynamic framework and mainly consists of four behavioural classes: Verbal Communication, Nonverbal Communication, Countenance, and Sonorous Musical Communication. The 15 minutes in the middle of each videotape concerning the first active music therapy session--based on the sonorous musical improvisation--were coded. Subjects were children (4 boys; 3 girls) ages 3 to 10 years (M age = 6.3), diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder, and seven therapists. The method for data collection was continuous recording, applied through The Observer Video-Pro 5.0. For the reliability indexes there was a substantial agreement between assessments by video raters. PMID:17037452

  2. A coding scheme for the evaluation of the relationship in music therapy sessions.

    PubMed

    Raglio, A; Traficante, D; Oasi, O

    2006-08-01

    This study presents a coding system for observation and monitoring of changes in the interactive behaviour between patient and therapist during music therapy sessions. The coding scheme was developed from a psychodynamic framework and mainly consists of four behavioural classes: Verbal Communication, Nonverbal Communication, Countenance, and Sonorous Musical Communication. The 15 minutes in the middle of each videotape concerning the first active music therapy session--based on the sonorous musical improvisation--were coded. Subjects were children (4 boys; 3 girls) ages 3 to 10 years (M age = 6.3), diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder, and seven therapists. The method for data collection was continuous recording, applied through The Observer Video-Pro 5.0. For the reliability indexes there was a substantial agreement between assessments by video raters.

  3. Code-switching across brainstorming sessions: implications for the revised hierarchical model of bilingual language processing.

    PubMed

    Blot, Kevin J; Zárate, Michael A; Paulus, Paul B

    2003-01-01

    The revised hierarchical model (RHM) of bilingual language processing posits independent word form representations for the dominant language (L1) and the nondominant language (L2), facilitated translation from L2 words to L1 words, access to common concepts for L1 and L2, and stronger activation of concepts for L1 than for L2. Spanish-English and English-Spanish bilinguals brainstormed for two sessions; half switched languages (L1-L2 or L2-L1) and half stayed in the same language (L1-L1 or L2-L2) across sessions. In both sessions, L1 brainstorming resulted in more efficient idea productivity than L2 brainstorming, supporting stronger concept activation for L1, consistent with the RHM. Switching languages from L2 to L1 resulted in the most efficient idea productivity in Session 2, suggesting that switching to L1 not only permits strong concept activation, but also the activation of concepts that are relatively different than those activated by L2, inconsistent with the RHM. Switching languages increased the proportion of Session 1 ideas repeated during Session 2, despite instructions not to repeat. This finding suggests that there is activation of concepts as well as word forms in same language brainstorming and that this dual activation aids in following instructions not to repeat, consistent with the RHM. It is suggested that the RHM be re-specified to accommodate the notion that L1 and L2 access relatively different concepts.

  4. The School Code of Illinois and Related Laws As Amended through 1993 Regular Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Association of School Boards, Springfield.

    A special publication compiled for the Illinois Association of School Boards (IASB) consists of the School Code, plus numerous other statutes selected by IASB for their relevance to public school governance and administration, as enacted as of January 1, 1994. In addition to the School Code, laws from other sections of the statutes are added to…

  5. Coding into the Great Unknown: Analyzing Instant Messaging Session Transcripts to Identify User Behaviors and Measure Quality of Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maximiek, Sarah; Rushton, Erin; Brown, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    After one year of providing virtual reference service through an instant messaging (IM) service, Binghamton University (BU) Libraries, under the purview of its Digital Reference Committee (DRC), undertook a study of collected session transcripts. The goals of this work were to determine who was using the IM service and why; if staffing for the…

  6. Selected Mississippi Library Laws: From the Mississippi Code of 1972 current through the 1995 Regular Session of the Mississippi Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Library Commission, Jackson.

    This document is a compilation of selected laws of the state of Mississippi that pertain to or impact libraries. Excerpts from the Mississippi state constitution, from the Mississippi Code of 1972, and from relevant amendments are all included. Coverage of the statutes extends to issues such as: (1) legal holidays; (2) liability; (3) zoning; (4)…

  7. Session introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfante, Antonello; Brook, Anna; D'Auria, Luca; Tizzani, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    Environmental processes cover spatial and temporal scales of different orders of magnitude. Quantitative and qualitative models, covering differentresearch fields, have provided important insights as to the interplay between processes acting in environmental systems at different scales, such asglobal geodynamics processes, volcanology, seismology, earth's critical zone, soil hydrology, landslide phenomena, etc. In this context, the proposed session will emphasize the multiscale nature of environmental issues, relevant for both natural and anthropic processes, and the need for knowledge sharing between different scientific communities. The session will be introduced by em.prof. Johan Bouma.

  8. Panel Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIS Mid-Year Meeting, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Lists the speakers and summarizes the issues addressed for 12 panel sessions on topics related to networking, including libraries and national networks, federal national resources and energy programs, multimedia issues, telecommuting, remote image serving, accessing the Internet, library automation, scientific information, applications of Z39.50,…

  9. Poster Session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Poster Session, the discussion focuses on the following topics: Development of correlative measures for the assessment of attention and memory; Biodynamical Responses of the Crewmember Head/Neck System During Emergence Ejection; Fecundation in the Sky, a Ten Years Old Experiment in Microgravity; A Modified Botex Incubator as a Transport System For Developing Crickets into Space; Chromosomal Aberrations in Peripheral Lymphocytes of Cosmonauts and Astronauts after Space Flights; Method for Establishing Long term Bone Marrow; Cultures Under Microgravity Conditions Reproduction Under Simulated Weightlessness --Mammalian in vivo Experiments Under Suspension; Towards Human Movement Analysis Without the Use of Markers; Habitability Requirements For a Cogent Mars Mission; The Saucer Concept for Space Habitats; New Way In Modeling the Growth of the Organism; The Fractionation of Hydrogen and Oxygen Stable Isotopes By Life Support Systems of Space Station "MIR"; and Effect of Space Flight on Neutrophil Function.

  10. Session Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliane Lessner, Co-Chair:

    2009-03-01

    A panel discussion session providing a worldwide assessment of the status and experiences of women in physics, paying attention to the different cultures and environments they work in and to how the age of the physicist affects their perspective. We will hear about women physicists in Korea in particular and Asia in general, in Egypt in particular and Africa in general, and in the Caribbean. Six invited speakers will present analyses of the progress being made in promoting women in physics from their personal experiences and as assessed from their participation in the Third International Conference on Women In Physics (ICWIP2008) convened in Seoul, Korea in October 2008. From Albania to Zimbabwe, with representation of all the continents, ICWIP2008 congregated 283 women and men physicists from 57 countries to share the participants' scientific accomplishments and evaluate international progress in improving the status of women in physics. This three-hour session is organized jointly by the Committee on the Status of Women in Physics of the APS (CSWP) and the Forum on International Physics of the APS (FIP). Audience participation in the panel discussion will be strongly encouraged.

  11. H.R. 959: A Bill to amend the Internal Code of 1986 to clarify the conservation expenditures by electric and gas utilities are deductible for the year in which paid or incurred. Introduced in the of House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This document contains H.R. 959, A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to clarify that conservation expenditures by electric and gas utilities are deductible for the year in which paid or incurred. This Bill was introduced in the House of Representatives, 104th Congress, First Session, February 15, 1995.

  12. H.R. 577: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide a tax credit for the production of oil and gas from existing marginal oil and gas wells and from new oil and gas wells. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This document contains H.R. 577, A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide a tax credit for the production of oil and gas from existing marginal oil and gas wells and from new oil and gas wells. This Bill was introduced in the House of Representatives, 104th Congress, First Session, January 19, 1995.

  13. H.R. 432: A Bill to amend chapter 601 of title 49, United States Code, to improve natural gas and hazardous liquid pipeline safety, in response to the natural gas pipeline accident in Edison, New Jersey, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This document contains H.R. 432, A Bill to amend chapter 601 of title 49, United States Code, to improve natural gas and hazardous liquid pipeline safety, in response to the natural gas pipeline accident in Edison, New Jersey, and for other purposes. This Bill was introduced in the House of Representatives, 104th Congress, First Session, January 5, 1995.

  14. Sessions and Session Types: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezani-Ciancaglini, Mariangiola; de'Liguoro, Ugo

    We illustrate the concepts of sessions and session types as they have been developed in the setting of the π-calculus. Motivated by the goal of obtaining a formalisation closer to existing standards and aiming at their enhancement and strengthening, several extensions of the original core system have been proposed, which we survey together with the embodying of sessions into functional and object-oriented languages, as well as some implementations.

  15. The "Session Libre".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, J. T.

    At the Institut Universitaire de Technologie in Nancy, France, most English language teaching has been organized on a mixed extensive/intensive pattern. As a result of certain negative effects of the established "session intensive," another methodology was tried, called "session libre." This session involved several techniques: first, the…

  16. The "Session Libre"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    Outlines a strategy attempted as an alternative to the traditional instruction in intensive sessions of English at the Institut Universitaitre de Technologie in Nancy, France. Included were six basic activities (films, TV, press, tape library, games, and language laboratory) in a minimally-structured three-day session. (MSE)

  17. The Public Poster Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine-Rasky, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    This note describes the use of a student poster session as an innovative approach to student learning. The local context for the assignment is provided, followed by a description of the course for which the poster was prepared, details about the assignment including its evaluation, and practical considerations for planning a poster session. The…

  18. A Radical Poster Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Paul A., Jr.; Camp, Cameron J.

    1987-01-01

    Presents the use of a poster session as an integral part of an experimental design course. Describes how the principles of experimental design are demonstrated when undergraduates design and conduct original experiments, using radishes as subjects, and present their results in a poster session. Discusses the benefits of using radishes as subjects.…

  19. An Act for the General Revisions of the Copyright Law, Title 17 of the United States Code, and for Other Purposes. Senate Bill 1361. Ninety-Third Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on the Judiciary.

    This text of Senate Bill 1361, placed before the 93rd session of the United States Congress, proposes a number of revisions in the federal copyright law. The bill defines the terminology of copyright and stipulates exclusive rights in copyrighted works, including print materials; sound recordings; pictoral, graphic, and scuptural works; and…

  20. Abstracts of SIG Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIS Annual Meeting, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presents abstracts of 36 special interest group (SIG) sessions. Highlights include the Chemistry Online Retrieval Experiment; organizing and retrieving images; intelligent information retrieval using natural language processing; interdisciplinarity; libraries as publishers; indexing hypermedia; cognitive aspects of classification; computer-aided…

  1. Physician's Breakout Session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, William

    2001-01-01

    Dr. William Barry, Manager, NASA Occupational Health Program, moderated this session. As in one of the opening sessions, he re-iterated that the overall theme for the next year will be facilitating and implementing NIAT-1 (NASA Integrated Action Team - Action 1). He presented a candidate list of topics for consideration and discussion: (1) NIAT-1; (2) Skin cancer detection and the NASA Solar Safe Program; (3) Weapons of mass destruction; (4) Quality assurance; (5) Audits; (6) Environment of care; (7) Infection control; (8) Medication management; and (9) Confidentiality of medical records.

  2. An Observing Session

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyle, Bob; Argyle, R. W.

    In this chapter I describe a typical observing session with the 8-in. (20-cm) Thorrowgood refractor at the Institute of Astronomy in Cambridge. The telescope belongs to the Royal Astronomical Society but is on permanent loan to the Cambridge University Astronomical Society and has been on its present site since 1930 (Fig. 24.1).

  3. Summary of Session 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, J.

    2004-11-01

    In Session 3, the speakers were dealing with the following topics: Automatization of Feynman Diagram Calculations (FDC), Event generators, Analytical approaches to FDC and various Mathematical innovations related to different physical problems. A more general, ` brainstorming', talk was given by J. Vermaseren as first talk.

  4. The outreach sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Trache, Livius

    2015-02-24

    These are moderator’s remarks about the outreach day in the middle of the CSSP14, and in particular about the afternoon outreach session in round table format with the announced theme: “CERN at 60 and the internationalization of science”.

  5. Abstracts of SIG Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIS Annual Meeting, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Presents abstracts of 15 special interest group (SIG) sessions. Topics include navigation and information utilization in the Internet, natural language processing, automatic indexing, image indexing, classification, users' models of database searching, online public access catalogs, education for information professions, information services,…

  6. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  7. Session: Offshore wind

    SciTech Connect

    Gaarde, Jette; Ram, Bonnie

    2004-09-01

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations. Due to time constraints, a discussion period was not possible. The session addressed the current state of offshore wind energy development. The first presentation ''Monitoring Program and Results: Horns Rev and Nysted'' by Jette Gaarde summarized selected environmental studies conducted to date at operating offshore wind turbine projects in Denmark and lessons from other offshore wind developments in Europe. Wildlife impacts studies from the Danish sites focused on birds, fish, and mammals. The second presentation ''What has the U.S. Wind Industry Learned from the European Example'' by Bonnie Ram provided an update on current permit applications for offshore wind developments in the U.S. as well as lessons that may be drawn from the European experience.

  8. Session: Reservoir Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Renner, Joel L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Horne, Roland N.; Shook, G. Michael

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five papers: ''Reservoir Technology'' by Joel L. Renner; ''LBL Research on the Geysers: Conceptual Models, Simulation and Monitoring Studies'' by Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson; ''Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI'' by Philip E. Wannamaker; ''Optimizing Reinjection Strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines Based on Chloride Data'' by Roland N. Horne; ''TETRAD Reservoir Simulation'' by G. Michael Shook

  9. Session: Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, David; LaSala, Raymond J.; Kukacka, Lawrence E.; Bliem, Carl J.; Premuzic, Eugene T.; Weare, John H.

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hydrothermal Energy Conversion Technology'' by David Robertson and Raymond J. LaSala; ''Materials for Geothermal Production'' by Lawrence E. Kukacka; ''Supersaturated Turbine Expansions for Binary Geothermal Power Plants'' by Carl J. Bliem; ''Geothermal Waster Treatment Biotechnology: Progress and Advantages to the Utilities'' by Eugen T. Premuzic; and ''Geothermal Brine Chemistry Modeling Program'' by John H. Weare.

  10. Session: Geopressured-Geothermal

    SciTech Connect

    Jelacic, Allan J.; Eaton, Ben A.; Shook, G. Michael; Birkinshaw, Kelly; Negus-de Wys, Jane

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Overview of Geopressured-Geothermal'' by Allan J. Jelacic; ''Geothermal Well Operations and Automation in a Competitive Market'' by Ben A. Eaton; ''Reservoir Modeling and Prediction at Pleasant Bayou Geopressured-Geothermal Reservoir'' by G. Michael Shook; ''Survey of California Geopressured-Geothermal'' by Kelly Birkinshaw; and ''Technology Transfer, Reaching the Market for Geopressured-Geothermal Resources'' by Jane Negus-de Wys.

  11. 98th LHCC meeting Agenda OPEN Session and CLOSED Session

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    OPEN Session on Wednesday, 8 July at 9h00-11h00 in Main Auditorium, Live webcast, followed by CLOSED Session, Conference room 160-1-009 11h20-17h00. CLOSED Session continued on Thursday, 9 July at 9h00-12h30

  12. The Hydro Models Session

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, J. A.

    2004-07-01

    Hydrodynamic models play a central role in our understanding of how planetary nebulae form and evolve. The hydro models session at this conference was particularly interesting for it included excellent talks ranging from the development of large scale structures in PNe, such as halos, to studies of collimated outflows and hypersonic bullets, the effects of stellar rotation on the nebular shell and warped toroids as a way to explain the origin of point-symmetry and poly-polarity. This diversity of topics exemplifies the current vigorous quest in the field for answers to topical problems in PN research. I present here a brief overview of these talks in the order they were scheduled during the conference.

  13. Nutrition Session Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen; Stein, T. P.

    1999-01-01

    Nutrition deficiencies affect multiple systems including muscle, bone, cardiovascular, renal, and gastrointestinal. Humans require many nutrients, ranging from the macronutrients (water, protein, energy sources) to micronutrients (minerals, vitamins). The ability to withstand shortfalls in intake of individual nutrients ranges from one or two days (e.g., water) to weeks (energy, protein, potassium) and months (some vitamins, minerals). In addition to putting humans at risk for nutrition deficiencies, space flight may also change the absorption, hence the pharmacodynamics, of several important medications. Papers given in this session dealt with all of these nutritional and pharmacological factors related to space flight: (1) Protein metabolism and muscle formation. (2) Pharmacodynamics. (3) Calcium metabolism and bone formation/resorption. and (4) Fluid and electrolytes.

  14. Three featured plenary sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-07-01

    The conference included three plenary sessions. The plenary on Governance, Security, Economy, and the Ecosystem of the Changing Arctic featured Vera Alexander, president, Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S.; Alan Thornhill, chief environmental officer, U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management; and Fran Ulmer, chair, U.S. Arctic Research Commission. A plenary on the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea featured Ambassador David Balton, deputy assistant secretary for oceans and fisheries, U.S. Department of State; and Rear Admiral Frederick Kenney Jr., judge advocate general and chief counsel, U.S. Coast Guard. The plenary on Science and the 21st Century featured Phil Keslin, chief technology officer, small lab within Google.

  15. 96th LHCC meeting Agenda OPEN Session and CLOSED Session

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    OPEN Session on Wednesday, 19 November 2008 at 9h00-11h00 in Main Auditorium, Live webcast. Followed by CLOSED Session , 6th floor Conference room and continued on Thursday, 20 November 2008 9h00-13h00

  16. Neurovestibular Session Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, Charles; Cohen, Malcolm

    1999-01-01

    . Three examples were presented at this meeting: 1) Transgenic animal experiments suggest that in addition to the light illumination cycle, vestibular inputs may also serve as an important input to the circadian system. 2) Radiation can cause important CNS effects in animals, including loss of spatial memory. 3) As described in our session, otolith inputs may contribute to cardiovascular regulation of orthostatic tolerance. Over the past three days, we've all enjoyed catching up with old friends, and making many new ones. On behalf of my colleagues, I want to thank Al Coats and the USRA DSLS staff for the great job they did in running this meeting. And keeping the emphasis on fun. And also my Co- Chair, Mal Cohen, who had more stamina than many of us, despite major surgery only three weeks ago. Mal and I have written a few lines describing each of the seventeen papers in our session, to give you a quick over-view, and as a guide to the full abstracts, We have grouped them under five themes: preflight and inflight countermeasurements, postlanding posture and locomotion deficits: assessment and prediction, adaptive processes, relationships among physical simuli, perceptions, and eye movements, vestibular contribution to human autonomic responses, and implications and recommendations.

  17. From In-Session Behaviors to Drinking Outcomes: A Causal Chain for Motivational Interviewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyers, Theresa B.; Martin, Tim; Houck, Jon M.; Christopher, Paulette J.; Tonigan, J. Scott

    2009-01-01

    Client speech in favor of change within motivational interviewing sessions has been linked to treatment outcomes, but a causal chain has not yet been demonstrated. Using a sequential behavioral coding system for client speech, the authors found that, at both the session and utterance levels, specific therapist behaviors predict client change talk.…

  18. Summary report of session VI

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou et al.

    2002-08-19

    This report gives a brief review of the presentations in Session VI of the Ecloud'02 Workshop and summarizes the major points during the discussions. Some points (e.g., the critical mass phenomenon) are not conclusive and even controversial. But it has been agreed that further investigations are warranted. The topic of Session VI in the Ecloud'02 workshop is ''Discussions of future studies, collaborations and possible solutions.'' Half of the session is devoted to presentations, another half to discussions. This report will focus on the latter. There are six presentations: (1) R. Macek, Possible cures to the e-cloud problem; (2) G. Rumolo, Driving the electron-cloud instability by an electron cooler; (3) U. Iriso Ariz, RF test benches for electron-cloud studies; (4) F. Caspers, Stealth clearing electrodes; (5) F. Ruggiero, Future electron-cloud studies at CERN; and (6) E. Perevedentsev, Beam-beam and transverse impedance model.

  19. Poster Session C

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    therapeutics to combat hRSV. A key to the pathogenicity of hRSV is its ability to suppress host antiviral responses, including innate immune pathways. Innate immune responses are initiated upon host cell detection of viral-specific molecular patterns, such as virus-specific RNA features. This detection system activates the production of immunomodulatory cytokines (induction), which in turn stimulate the production of antiviral protein effectors (signalling), some of which amplify the cytokine induction process. hRSV produces two small non-structural proteins (NS1 and NS2) which dampen the host cell innate immune system by targeting key players in both induction and signalling pathways. We are working on the hypothesis that it may be possible to identify avenues for vaccine and/or therapeutic developments to combat hRSV by gaining a better understanding of the interactions between hRSV NS1 and NS2 and host cell antiviral pathways. We have developed a comprehensive suite of proteomic approaches to identify specific targets of hRSV NS1 and NS2. This includes workflows based on in-solution protein IEF of cell lysates with downstream bottom-up mass spectrometric label free quantification of individual IEF fractions to discern differences between hRSV-infected and uninfected cells. Another workflow involves bottom-up analyses of digests of unfractionated whole cell lysates combined with label free quantification. Our infectious experiments include hRSV encoding the complete wild-type genome and genotypes lacking NS1 and/or NS2 coding capacities. As a consequence we have identified key pathways that are promoted and/or blocked in order to achieve survival of the infected host cell in a state conducive to hRSV propagation. Although some observations were common to both proteomic workflows, the in-solution IEF workflow uniquely enabled observation of some regulation at a global level due to selective enrichment of low abundance proteins. Furthermore, the in-solution IEF workflow

  20. Poster Session B

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    adipogenesis. Since multiple feedback loops with different timing and strengths can sharpen the decision process and control the number of cells which are differentiating, we wanted to gain a better understanding of how many other proteins could be involved in the decision process. Objective: The objective of this work is to search for feedback loops that could play a key role in the commitment decision. Methods: Using Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry combined with perturbations, we analyzed OP9 cells to detect peptides of TFs which can serve as probes. We validated these probes with isotopically coded internal peptide standards and established a SRM library of transcriptional key regulators. These probes were subsequently used to quantitatively profile different stages of adipogenesis to obtain time courses of different TFs. To achieve our major goal to elucidate the TF control network in more detail, we furthermore searched for hidden feedback loops in this differentiation system. To do so we chemically manipulated the activity level of PPARg and its potential feedback partners individually. If a protein was a component of one or several feedback loops and was experimentally manipulated, all the other components of feedback loops associated with this protein should display a relative change in abundance and vice versa. Results: We developed a SRM methodology to monitor the concentration changes of TFs during adipogenesis. Using this SRM methodology together the perturbation of PPARg, and single cell analysis we were able to validate known feedback loops (C/EBPa, C/EBPb) and to identify several new feedback Loops. Conclusions: PPARg is the master regulator of adipogenesis. To successfully differentiate preadipocytes into adipocytes, its activity needs to be tightly regulated by a network of feedback loops. Overall, the study provides a new SRM MS-based method to uncover novel feedback loops regulating TFs. Based on this method; we have identified 7 new

  1. Introduction to Session 1A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himmel, Michael E.

    Understanding and overcoming the natural resistance of plant cell walls to enzymatic hydrolysis remains one of the most active research areas in biofuels production (as indicated by the number of abstracts and papers submitted to this session). A number of the oral presentations given during the Enzyme Catalysis and Engineering session highlighted the use of new and innovative tools for advancing our understanding of plant cell wall deconstruction. The oral presentations and posters given for this session included applications of imaging tools and computational models to advance our understanding of biomass recalcitrance relative to enzymatic deconstruction. This session was opened with a presentation by Dr. Danny Akin, who outlined the structural and chemical barriers for the bioconversion of grasses to sugars. Lignocelluloses from grasses, such as switch grass, are resistant to bioconversion by various aromatic constituuents, which include both lignins and phenolic acid esters. However, Akin and coworkers demonstrated the use of selected white rot fungal enzymes, which lack cellulases that could be used to produce delignified lignocellulosic materials, resulting in improved bioconversion.

  2. Aeropropulsion 1987. Session 3: Internal Fluid Mechanics Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Internal fluid mechanics research at Lewis is directed toward an improved understanding of the important flow physics affecting aerospace propulsion systems, and applying this improved understanding to formulate accurate predictive codes. To this end, research is conducted involving detailed experimentation and analysis. The presentations in this session summarize ongoing work and indicated future emphasis in three major research thrusts: namely, inlets, ducts, and nozzles; turbomachinery; and chemical reacting flows.

  3. Introduction to Session 1B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sticklen, Mariam B.

    Topics presented in the "Plant Biotechnology and Genomics" session focused on technologies that highlight the important role of plant biotechnology and genomics in the development of future energy crops. Several excellent presentations demonstrated the latest advances in energy crop development through the use of plant cell wall regulation and by engineering new energy crops such as brown midrib sweet sorghum. Approaches included the control of cellulose production by increased expression of cellulase synthase genes and the selection of high-yield varieties of shrub willows. The potential of producing hydrolytic enzymes using transgenic plants as a cost-effective means for the large-scale production of these enzymes was also explored in the session, as was the role of posttranslational modifications on the activities of heterologous expressed cellulases in hosts such as Pichia pastoris.

  4. Session: Long Valley Exploratory Well

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Finger, John T.; Eichelberger, John C.; Hickox, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Long Valley Exploratory Well - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''The Long Valley Well - Phase II Operations'' by John T. Finger; ''Geologic results from the Long Valley Exploratory Well'' by John C. Eichelberger; and ''A Model for Large-Scale Thermal Convection in the Long Valley Geothermal Region'' by Charles E. Hickox.

  5. A Video Recall Study of In-session Changes in Sentiment Override.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lee N; Tambling, Rachel B; Anderson, Shayne R

    2015-09-01

    This study examines in-session changes in sentiment override over the first three sessions of couple therapy. Couples viewed a video recording of therapy sessions immediately after each of the first three sessions and continuously rated their level of sentiment override. Ninety-eight changes were randomly chosen for analysis. Three talk turns prior to each change was coded using the Family Relational Communication Control Coding System. Results show that changes in sentiment override occur frequently. Repeated incidents of communication control were related to negative change in sentiment override for females. Repeated incidents of being left out of the conversation were related to negative changes in sentiment override for females and positive changes for males.

  6. A Video Recall Study of In-session Changes in Sentiment Override.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lee N; Tambling, Rachel B; Anderson, Shayne R

    2015-09-01

    This study examines in-session changes in sentiment override over the first three sessions of couple therapy. Couples viewed a video recording of therapy sessions immediately after each of the first three sessions and continuously rated their level of sentiment override. Ninety-eight changes were randomly chosen for analysis. Three talk turns prior to each change was coded using the Family Relational Communication Control Coding System. Results show that changes in sentiment override occur frequently. Repeated incidents of communication control were related to negative change in sentiment override for females. Repeated incidents of being left out of the conversation were related to negative changes in sentiment override for females and positive changes for males. PMID:25521172

  7. Working session 3: Tubing integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Cueto-Felgueroso, C.; Strosnider, J.

    1997-02-01

    Twenty-three individuals representing nine countries (Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, France, Japan, the Slovak Republic, Spain, the UK, and the US) participated in the session on tube integrity. These individuals represented utilities, vendors, consultants and regulatory authorities. The major subjects discussed by the group included overall objectives of managing steam generator tube degradation, necessary elements of a steam generator degradation management program, the concept of degradation specific management, structural integrity evaluations, leakage evaluations, and specific degradation mechanisms. The group`s discussions on these subjects, including conclusions and recommendations, are summarized in this article.

  8. Institutional computing (IC) information session

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Kenneth R; Lally, Bryan R

    2011-01-19

    The LANL Institutional Computing Program (IC) will host an information session about the current state of unclassified Institutional Computing at Los Alamos, exciting plans for the future, and the current call for proposals for science and engineering projects requiring computing. Program representatives will give short presentations and field questions about the call for proposals and future planned machines, and discuss technical support available to existing and future projects. Los Alamos has started making a serious institutional investment in open computing available to our science projects, and that investment is expected to increase even more.

  9. Practical Session: Simple Linear Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausel, M.; Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    Two exercises are proposed to illustrate the simple linear regression. The first one is based on the famous Galton's data set on heredity. We use the lm R command and get coefficients estimates, standard error of the error, R2, residuals …In the second example, devoted to data related to the vapor tension of mercury, we fit a simple linear regression, predict values, and anticipate on multiple linear regression. This pratical session is an excerpt from practical exercises proposed by A. Dalalyan at EPNC (see Exercises 1 and 2 of http://certis.enpc.fr/~dalalyan/Download/TP_ENPC_4.pdf).

  10. Session Two Outcome of the Formula First Session Task in Problem- and Solution-Focused Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Karin; Quinn, William H.

    1994-01-01

    Evaluated treatment effects in single session process using problem-focused approach and solution-focused approach. Findings indicated significant difference between two approaches when dealing with client's perceived problem improvement, outcome expectancy, session depth, session smoothness, and session positivity. Found no significant…

  11. Working session 1: Tubing degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Kharshafdjian, G.; Turluer, G.

    1997-02-01

    A general introductory overview of the purpose of the group and the general subject area of SG tubing degradation was given by the facilitator. The purpose of the session was described as to {open_quotes}develop conclusions and proposals on regulatory and technical needs required to deal with the issues of SG tubing degradation.{close_quotes} Types, locations and characteristics of tubing degradation in steam generators were briefly reviewed. The well-known synergistic effects of materials, environment, and stress and strain/strain rate, subsequently referred to by the acronym {open_quotes}MESS{close_quotes} by some of the group members, were noted. The element of time (i.e., evolution of these variables with time) was emphasized. It was also suggested that the group might want to consider the related topics of inspection capabilities, operational variables, degradation remedies, and validity of test data, and some background information in these areas was provided. The presentation given by Peter Millet during the Plenary Session was reviewed; Specifically, the chemical aspects and the degradation from the secondary side of the steam generator were noted. The main issues discussed during the October 1995 EPRI meeting on secondary side corrosion were reported, and a listing of the potential SG tube degradations was provided and discussed.

  12. Session: Wind industry project development

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Tom; Enfield, Sam

    2004-09-01

    This first session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a question and answer period. The session was intended to provide a general overview of wind energy product development, from the industry's perspective. Tom Gray of AWEA presented a paper titled ''State of the Wind Energy Industry in 2004'', highlighting improved performance and lower cost, efforts to address avian impacts, a status of wind energy in comparison to other energy-producing sources, and ending on expectations for the near future. Sam Enfield of Atlantic Renewable Energy Corporation presented a paper titled ''Key Factors for Consideration in Wind Plant Siting'', highlighting factors that wind facility developers must consider when choosing a site to build wind turbines and associated structures. Factors covered include wind resources available, ownership and land use patterns, access to transmission lines, accessibility and environmental impacts. The question and answer sum mary included topics related to risk taking, research and development, regulatory requirements, and dealing with utilities.

  13. Uplink Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollara, Fabrizio; Hamkins, Jon; Dolinar, Sam; Andrews, Ken; Divsalar, Dariush

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews uplink coding. The purpose and goals of the briefing are (1) Show a plan for using uplink coding and describe benefits (2) Define possible solutions and their applicability to different types of uplink, including emergency uplink (3) Concur with our conclusions so we can embark on a plan to use proposed uplink system (4) Identify the need for the development of appropriate technology and infusion in the DSN (5) Gain advocacy to implement uplink coding in flight projects Action Item EMB04-1-14 -- Show a plan for using uplink coding, including showing where it is useful or not (include discussion of emergency uplink coding).

  14. Influence of Source Constellations on UT1 Derived from IVS INT1 Sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uunila, M.; Nothnagel, A.; Leek, J.

    2012-12-01

    We examined the influence of the spatial distribution of the observations on the quality of UT1 results derived from IVS INT1 sessions. The Kokee-Wettzell baseline midpoint is chosen as a reference point for the analysis. A Matlab code is written for classification of the topocentric source positions in different sections of the sky, as seen from the reference point. A combination of these key numbers is then used to classify the sessions with quality codes and compare them with their respective formal errors. Furthermore, we checked how many observations could not be used in the UT1 estimates, although they were included in the schedules.

  15. Emotion Episodes during Psychotherapy Sessions among Women Newly Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Virtue, Shannon Myers; Manne, Sharon L.; O’Neill, Kathleen; Heckman, Carolyn J.; Ozga, Melissa; Kissane, David; Rubin, Stephen; Rosenblum, Norman

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe emotion episodes during early and late psychotherapy sessions among women newly diagnosed with gynecological cancer and to examine whether the total number of emotional episodes during early and later sessions were associated with baseline psychological distress, dispositional emotion expressivity, and patient-rated therapeutic progress. Methods The study utilized data from an ongoing study examining the efficacy of two psychotherapy interventions, a coping and communication intervention (CCI) and a supportive counseling intervention (SC), for women diagnosed with gynecological cancer. Emotion episode coding was completed for the first and sixth psychotherapy session for each patient randomized to receive psychotherapy (N = 173). Patients completed baseline survey measures of psychological distress and dispositional emotional expressivity and post-session ratings of therapeutic progress. Results The average number of emotion episodes was 7.4 in the first session and 5.2 episodes in the sixth session. In both sessions, the majority of emotion episodes contained only negative emotions and focused on a cancer-related topic. A higher1number of emotion episodes in the first session was associated with higher psychological distress reported in the baseline survey (p = .02). A higher number of emotions episodes in the sixth session was associated with a higher number of emotion episodes in the first session (p < .001) and higher patient-rated progress as rated in the sixth session (p = .016). Conclusion The findings highlight the importance of expressed emotions, particularly negative emotions about cancer-related topics, in therapeutic progress during psychotherapy among women diagnosed with gynecological cancer. PMID:25521772

  16. Working session 2: Tubing inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Guerra, J.; Tapping, R.L.

    1997-02-01

    This session was attended by delegates from 10 countries, and four papers were presented. A wide range of issues was tabled for discussion. Realizing that there was limited time available for more detailed discussion, three topics were chosen for the more detailed discussion: circumferential cracking, performance demonstration (to focus on POD and sizing), and limits of methods. Two other subsessions were organized: one dealt with some challenges related to the robustness of current inspection methods, especially with respect to leaving cracked tubes in service, and the other with developing a chart of current NDE technology with recommendations for future development. These three areas are summarized in turn, along with conclusions and/or recommendations. During the discussions there were four presentations. There were two (Canada, Japan) on eddy current probe developments, both of which addressed multiarray probes that would detect a range of flaws, one (Spain) on circumferential crack detection, and one (JRC, Petten) on the recent PISC III results.

  17. Session: Discussion of Research Needs

    SciTech Connect

    anon.

    2004-09-01

    This final session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop was lead by a facilitator who asked participants for their overall reaction to the research that had been presented during the workshop. Questions addressed by workshop participants included: how do you develop trust and confidence in the research, what are some of the specific gaps in our understanding of wind energy's impact on birds and bats; how do we prioritize and proceed with closing the data/research gaps; how do we connect the dots and bring various research and mapping efforts together; given gaps in the data, what are the critical questions we need to answer to make project decisions now; and, how do we track/influence the policies that will shape wind energy development. Conclusions reached regarding these questions are included in summary form.

  18. Sharing code.

    PubMed

    Kubilius, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Sharing code is becoming increasingly important in the wake of Open Science. In this review I describe and compare two popular code-sharing utilities, GitHub and Open Science Framework (OSF). GitHub is a mature, industry-standard tool but lacks focus towards researchers. In comparison, OSF offers a one-stop solution for researchers but a lot of functionality is still under development. I conclude by listing alternative lesser-known tools for code and materials sharing.

  19. Early Adolescence: Experiment with Poster Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Michael J.; Shaw, Edward

    1983-01-01

    In a poster session, students explain an experiment with the help of a poster that outlines the experimental procedures followed. Suggestions for preparing posters and conducting poster sessions are provided. A sample poster on the strength of electromagnets is also provided. (JN)

  20. The International Mathematical Olympiad Training Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousseau, Cecil; Patruno, Gregg

    1985-01-01

    The Mathematical Olympiad Training Session is designed to give United States students a problem-oriented exposure to subject areas (algebra, geometry, number theory, combinatorics, and inequalities) through an intensive three-week course. Techniques used during the session, with three sample problems and their solutions, are presented. (JN)

  1. Undergraduate Researchers and the Poster Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Gail; Green, Raymond

    2007-01-01

    Undergraduates presented original research in classroom poster sessions open to students, faculty, and friends. We assessed the reaction of the students to the experience and their reported change in their interest in presenting at conferences. Students enjoyed the poster session experience and indicated they preferred this method over other…

  2. 48 CFR 9901.311 - Executive sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Executive sessions. During the course of a Board meeting, any Board Member may request that for any portion of the meeting, the Board meet in executive session. The Chairman shall thereupon order such a....311 Section 9901.311 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE...

  3. Effects of Post-Session Wheel Running on Within-Session Changes in Operant Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aoyama, Kenjiro

    2007-01-01

    This study tested the effects of post-session wheel running on within-session changes in operant responding. Lever-pressing by six rats was reinforced by a food pellet under a continuous reinforcement (CRF) schedule in 30-min sessions. Two different flavored food pellets were used as reinforcers. In the wheel conditions, 30-min operant-sessions…

  4. Argumentation and Participation Patterns in General Chemistry Peer-Led Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulatunga, Ushiri; Moog, Richard S.; Lewis, Jennifer E.

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the use of Toulmin's argumentation scheme to investigate the characteristics of student group argumentation in Peer-Led Guided Inquiry sessions for a General Chemistry I course. A coding scheme based on Toulmin's [Toulmin [1958] "The uses of argument." Cambridge: Cambridge University Press] argumentation…

  5. Poster session ELIPGRID-PC

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.R.

    1995-02-01

    ELIPGRID-PC, a new personal computer program, has been developed to provide easy access to Singer`s ELIPGRID algorithm for hot-spot detection probabilities. Three features of the program are the ability to determine: (1) the grid size required for specified conditions, (2) the smallest hot spot that can be sampled with a given probability, and (3) the approximate grid size resulting from specified conditions and sampling cost. ELIPGRID-PC also provides probability of detection versus cost data for graphing with spreadsheets or graphics software. The program has been successfully tested using Singer`s published ELIPGRID results. An apparent error in the published ELIPGRID code has been uncovered and an appropriate modification incorporated into the new program.

  6. Flexible session management in a distributed environment

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Zach; Bradley, Dan; Tannenbaum, Todd; Sfiligoi, Igor; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Many secure communication libraries used by distributed systems, such as SSL, TLS, and Kerberos, fail to make a clear distinction between the authentication, session, and communication layers. In this paper we introduce CEDAR, the secure communication library used by the Condor High Throughput Computing software, and present the advantages to a distributed computing system resulting from CEDAR's separation of these layers. Regardless of the authentication method used, CEDAR establishes a secure session key, which has the flexibility to be used for multiple capabilities. We demonstrate how a layered approach to security sessions can avoid round-trips and latency inherent in network authentication. The creation of a distinct session management layer allows for optimizations to improve scalability by way of delegating sessions to other components in the system. This session delegation creates a chain of trust that reduces the overhead of establishing secure connections and enables centralized enforcement of system-wide security policies. Additionally, secure channels based upon UDP datagrams are often overlooked by existing libraries; we show how CEDAR's structure accommodates this as well. As an example of the utility of this work, we show how the use of delegated security sessions and other techniques inherent in CEDAR's architecture enables US CMS to meet their scalability requirements in deploying Condor over large-scale, wide-area grid systems.

  7. Flexible session management in a distributed environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Zach; Bradley, Dan; Tannenbaum, Todd; Sfiligoi, Igor

    2010-04-01

    Many secure communication libraries used by distributed systems, such as SSL, TLS, and Kerberos, fail to make a clear distinction between the authentication, session, and communication layers. In this paper we introduce CEDAR, the secure communication library used by the Condor High Throughput Computing software, and present the advantages to a distributed computing system resulting from CEDAR's separation of these layers. Regardless of the authentication method used, CEDAR establishes a secure session key, which has the flexibility to be used for multiple capabilities. We demonstrate how a layered approach to security sessions can avoid round-trips and latency inherent in network authentication. The creation of a distinct session management layer allows for optimizations to improve scalability by way of delegating sessions to other components in the system. This session delegation creates a chain of trust that reduces the overhead of establishing secure connections and enables centralized enforcement of system-wide security policies. Additionally, secure channels based upon UDP datagrams are often overlooked by existing libraries; we show how CEDAR's structure accommodates this as well. As an example of the utility of this work, we show how the use of delegated security sessions and other techniques inherent in CEDAR's architecture enables US CMS to meet their scalability requirements in deploying Condor over large-scale, wide-area grid systems.

  8. Speech coding

    SciTech Connect

    Ravishankar, C., Hughes Network Systems, Germantown, MD

    1998-05-08

    Speech is the predominant means of communication between human beings and since the invention of the telephone by Alexander Graham Bell in 1876, speech services have remained to be the core service in almost all telecommunication systems. Original analog methods of telephony had the disadvantage of speech signal getting corrupted by noise, cross-talk and distortion Long haul transmissions which use repeaters to compensate for the loss in signal strength on transmission links also increase the associated noise and distortion. On the other hand digital transmission is relatively immune to noise, cross-talk and distortion primarily because of the capability to faithfully regenerate digital signal at each repeater purely based on a binary decision. Hence end-to-end performance of the digital link essentially becomes independent of the length and operating frequency bands of the link Hence from a transmission point of view digital transmission has been the preferred approach due to its higher immunity to noise. The need to carry digital speech became extremely important from a service provision point of view as well. Modem requirements have introduced the need for robust, flexible and secure services that can carry a multitude of signal types (such as voice, data and video) without a fundamental change in infrastructure. Such a requirement could not have been easily met without the advent of digital transmission systems, thereby requiring speech to be coded digitally. The term Speech Coding is often referred to techniques that represent or code speech signals either directly as a waveform or as a set of parameters by analyzing the speech signal. In either case, the codes are transmitted to the distant end where speech is reconstructed or synthesized using the received set of codes. A more generic term that is applicable to these techniques that is often interchangeably used with speech coding is the term voice coding. This term is more generic in the sense that the

  9. Plenary Session: Resolutions and Plans for Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Nutrition Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presented are two resolutions adopted by the participants at the plenary session of the National Conference on Nutrition Education. Agencies which will receive these recommendations are also identified. (SA)

  10. Einstein Session of the Pontifical Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science, 1980

    1980-01-01

    The texts of four speeches, given at the 1979 Einstein Session of the Pontifical Academy held in Rome, are presented. Each address relates to some aspect of the life and times of Albert Einstein. (SA)

  11. Report of the Stability and Dynamics Session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Iwan; Chato, David; Collicott, Steven; Dadzic, Nihad; Duval, Walter; Garoff, Steven; Grayson, Gary; Hochstein, John; Kassemi, Mo; Nelson, Emily

    2003-01-01

    The plan for session are: 1. Are issues in the draft document appropriate and complete? 2. Are the issues properly organized and prioritized? 3. Is the plan well defined and suitable? 4. Are the proposed facilities adequate?

  12. 78 FR 44922 - Notice of an Education Listening Session Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-25

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Notice of an Education Listening Session Meeting SUMMARY: The Education... an Education Listening Session stakeholder meeting for all interested agricultural education stakeholders. DATES: The Education Listening Session will be held August 1, 2013. The public may file...

  13. MCNP code

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, S.N.

    1984-01-01

    The MCNP code is the major Monte Carlo coupled neutron-photon transport research tool at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and it represents the most extensive Monte Carlo development program in the United States which is available in the public domain. The present code is the direct descendent of the original Monte Carlo work of Fermi, von Neumaum, and Ulam at Los Alamos in the 1940s. Development has continued uninterrupted since that time, and the current version of MCNP (or its predecessors) has always included state-of-the-art methods in the Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport, basic cross section data, geometry capability, variance reduction, and estimation procedures. The authors of the present code have oriented its development toward general user application. The documentation, though extensive, is presented in a clear and simple manner with many examples, illustrations, and sample problems. In addition to providing the desired results, the output listings give a a wealth of detailed information (some optional) concerning each state of the calculation. The code system is continually updated to take advantage of advances in computer hardware and software, including interactive modes of operation, diagnostic interrupts and restarts, and a variety of graphical and video aids.

  14. QR Codes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Hsin-Chih; Chang, Chun-Yen; Li, Wen-Shiane; Fan, Yu-Lin; Wu, Ying-Tien

    2013-01-01

    This study presents an m-learning method that incorporates Integrated Quick Response (QR) codes. This learning method not only achieves the objectives of outdoor education, but it also increases applications of Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning (CTML) (Mayer, 2001) in m-learning for practical use in a diverse range of outdoor locations. When…

  15. Temporal variation in facilitator and client behavior during group motivational interviewing sessions

    PubMed Central

    Houck, Jon M.; Hunter, Sarah B.; Benson, Jennifer G.; Cochrum, Linda L.; Rowell, Lauren N.; D’Amico, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable evidence for Motivational interviewing (MI) in changing problematic behaviors. Research on the causal chain for MI suggests influence of facilitator speech on client speech. This association has been examined using macro (session-level) and micro (utterance-level) measures; however, effects across sessions have largely been unexplored, particularly with groups. We evaluated a sample of 129 adolescent group MI sessions, using a behavioral coding system and timing information to generate information on facilitator and client speech (CT: change talk) within 5 successive segments (quintiles) of each group session. We hypothesized that facilitator speech (open-ended questions and reflections of CT) would be related to subsequent CT. Repeated measures analysis indicated significant quadratic and cubic trends for facilitator and client speech across quintiles. Across quintiles, cross-lagged panel analysis using a zero-inflated negative binomial model showed minimal evidence of facilitator speech on client CT, but did indicate several effects of client CT on facilitator speech, and of client CT on subsequent client CT. Results suggest that session-level effects of facilitator speech on client speech do not arise from long-duration effects of facilitator speech; instead, we detected effects of facilitator speech on client speech only at the beginning and end of sessions, when open questions respectively suppressed and enhanced client expressions of CT. Findings suggest that clinicians must remain vigilant to client CT throughout the group session, reinforcing it when it arises spontaneously and selectively employing open-ended questions to elicit it when it does not, particularly towards the end of the session. PMID:26415055

  16. Country break-out session highlights.

    PubMed

    Fazekas, Franz; Gehring, Klaus; Gallo, Paolo; Lebrun-Frénay, Christine; Moral, Ester; Myhr, Kjell-Morten

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) spasticity present a wide range of symptoms and disability levels that are frequently challenging to manage. At the MS Experts Summit 2015, five country breakout sessions were conducted in parallel, and mainly in the native language, to examine various aspects about the management of treatment-resistant MS spasticity. Topics covered included video documentation of MS spasticity management (Germany), use of cannabinoid medicines in daily practice (Italy), multidisciplinary approach to MS spasticity care (France), titration and adherence to treatments for MS spasticity (Spain) and management of MS symptoms (Norway/Rest of World). For the benefit of all attendees, session highlights were collated and presented in a Plenary Session which is summarized herein. PMID:26611270

  17. H. R. 1086: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue code of 1986 to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide by imposing a tax on certain fuels based on their carbon content, introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, February 21, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    A new subchapter would be added to the Internal Revenue Code entitled Carbon Tax on Primary Fossil Fuels. The tax is imposed on coal, petroleum, and natural gas, and is phased in over five years beginning in 1992. The tax on coal is $3.60 per ton in 1992 and climbs to $18.00 per ton in 1996. The tax on petroleum begins at $0.78 per barrel and climbs to $3.90 per barrel in 1996. Natural gas is taxed at $0.096 per MCF in 1992 and $0.48 per MCF in 1996. The bill also describes inflation adjustments.

  18. H. R. 804: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide by imposing a tax on certain fuels based on their carbon content. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, February 3, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    H.R. 804 proposes the imposition of a carbon tax on primary fossil fuels. In general, Chapter 38 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is to be amended by adding at the end thereof the following new subchapter: [open quotes]Subchapter E--Carbon Tax on Primary Fossil Fuels.[close quotes] Section 4691 will be concerned with the tax on coal; Section 4692 with the tax on petroleum; Section 4693 with the tax on natural gas; and Section 4694 will discuss inflation adjustments.

  19. Efficient Session Type Guided Distributed Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaramakrishnan, K. C.; Nagaraj, Karthik; Ziarek, Lukasz; Eugster, Patrick

    Recently, there has been much interest in multi-party session types (MPSTs) as a means of rigorously specifying protocols for interaction among multiple distributed participants. By capturing distributed interaction as series of typed interactions, MPSTs allow for the static verification of compliance of corresponding distributed object programs. We observe that explicit control flow information manifested by MPST opens intriguing avenues also for performance enhancements. In this paper, we present a session type assisted performance enhancement framework for distributed object interaction in Java. Experimental evaluation within our distributed runtime infrastructure illustrates the costs and benefits of our composable enhancement strategies.

  20. Poster Sessions in Marketing Education: An Empirical Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stegemann, Nicole; Sutton-Brady, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Poster sessions provide a creative and stimulating alternative to traditional assessment methods in marketing. Poster sessions, as a means of assessment, have long been used in science fields. This article presents the successful implementation of poster sessions as a means of assessment in a postgraduate unit of study. Poster sessions in…

  1. Legislative Update--104th Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Cindy

    1996-01-01

    Discusses major issues pending in the Second Session of the 104th Congress, noting the impact on language education and focusing on educational reform agendas, recissions, the budget process, appropriations, and English as the official U.S. government language. Individuals in related professional organizations are urged to take steps to influence…

  2. Posters. [Poster Session at AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    The first of the papers in this poster session, "Developing the Employment Brand: Targeting MBA Campus Hires" (Diane M. Bergeron), posits that employment branding benefits both individuals and organizations. It functions as a campus recruiting tool in a competitive labor market and communicates the organization's values and work environment to…

  3. 48 CFR 9901.311 - Executive sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Executive sessions. 9901.311 Section 9901.311 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET ADMINISTRATION RULES AND PROCEDURES...

  4. My Session With André.

    PubMed

    Eigen, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The author shares personal reminiscences of a therapy session with André Green, as well as impressions of professional meetings, readings, and clinical work. He describes personal help he received and aspects of Green's writings on dynamics of madness, as well as the latter's end-of-life discussion of therapeutic limits.

  5. Summary of the pion production sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Dytman, S. A.

    2015-05-15

    This is a short summary of the 10 talks given in the Pion Production Sessions at NUINT12. There were 2 very interesting themes that spanned talks - problems with data for single nucleons and pion absorption in the nuclear medium. In addition, a number of interesting new efforts were described.

  6. My Session With André.

    PubMed

    Eigen, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The author shares personal reminiscences of a therapy session with André Green, as well as impressions of professional meetings, readings, and clinical work. He describes personal help he received and aspects of Green's writings on dynamics of madness, as well as the latter's end-of-life discussion of therapeutic limits. PMID:26485484

  7. Students' Roles during Peer Response Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Sandra Sim Phek; Samuel, Moses

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the types of roles played by students during peer response sessions and investigated how the students' roles facilitated learning. This qualitative case study involved six Grade 10 mixed-proficiency level students from a secondary school in Malaysia. Data were collected through multiple sources. The findings indicated that the…

  8. OJJDP Family Listening Sessions. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 2013

    2013-01-01

    From March through July 2011, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), in collaboration with the Campaign for Youth Justice and the Education Development Center, convened four listening sessions with families and youth who had direct experiences with the juvenile justice system at the local and state levels. The…

  9. Aeropropulsion 1987. Session 2: Aeropropulsion Structures Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Aeropropulsion systems present unique problems to the structural engineer. The extremes in operating temperatures, rotational effects, and behaviors of advanced material systems combine into complexities that require advances in many scientific disciplines involved in structural analysis and design procedures. This session provides an overview of the complexities of aeropropulsion structures and the theoretical, computational, and experimental research conducted to achieve the needed advances.

  10. Organizing a Practice Session for Maximum Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGroot, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    According to Jason Paulk, director of choral activities at Eastern New Mexico University, progress is made during those in-between times and that progress magnifies with efficient time spent alone. Paulk is a firm believer in the importance of singers organizing their practice sessions, and he details some effective organization methods, including…

  11. Working session 4: Preventative and corrective measures

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.; Slama, G.

    1997-02-01

    The Preventive and Corrective Measures working session included 13 members from France, Germany, Japan, Spain, Slovenia, and the United States. Attendee experience included regulators, utilities, three steam generator vendors, consultants and researchers. Discussions centered on four principal topics: (1) alternate materials, (2) mechanical mitigation, (3) maintenance, and (4) water chemistry. New or replacement steam generators and original equipment steam generators were separately addressed. Four papers were presented to the session, to provide information and stimulate various discussion topics. Topics discussed and issues raised during the several meeting sessions are provided below, followed by summary conclusions and recommendations on which the group was able to reach a majority consensus. The working session was composed of individuals with diverse experience and varied areas of specialized expertise. The somewhat broad range of topics addressed by the group at times saw discussion participation by only a few individuals. As in any technical meeting where all are allowed the opportunity to speak their mind, straying from an Individual topic was not unusual. Where useful, these stray topics are also presented below within the context In which they occurred. The main categories of discussion were: minimize sludge; new steam generators; maintenance; mechanical mitigation; water chemistry.

  12. ASCO Plenary Sessions: impact, legacy, future.

    PubMed

    Vandross, Andrae; Prasad, Vinay; Mailankody, Sham

    2016-06-01

    The ASCO annual meeting draws a large crowd of physicians, cancer researchers, policy makers, and industry representatives. The crown jewel of the annual events is the Plenary session where impactful, influential and visible abstracts are selected for the largest audience. Plenary topics are frequently paired with concurrent New England Journal or Lancet publications.  Here, we review 9 years of ASCO plenary sessions.  Several themes emerge.  First, many of the topics selected have indeed been practice changing, such as the use of ALK inhibitors for ALK rearranged NSCLC, or checkpoint inhibitors in metastatic melanoma.  Second, although some plenary topics seemed destined to change practice, they ultimately falter, such as the use of Cetuximab in NSCLC, vaccine therapy for follicular lymphoma, and even Bevacizumab in metastatic renal cell cancer. Who could have forseen bevacizumab displaced by several VEGF TKIs?  Third, negative trials are rare among Plenary sessions, but when they are presented they are immensely important.  Examples include a seminal study using CA-125 levels to guide treatment of relapsed ovarian cancer, the use of lapatinib combined with traztuzumab in the adjuvant treatment of HER2 + disease, and studies showing no survival benefit to upfront bevacizumab in glioblastoma multiforme.   Fourth, we note a large industry presence among Plenary sessions, as the Industry in part sponsored 62% of Plenary abstracts.  Ultimately a review of 9 years of ASCO plenary reveals the plenary for what it is: a conservative selection of abstracts that, at the time, are thought to change the face of oncology.  Time, however, is the true arbiter, and some succeed in this quest, while others falter.  ASCO plenary sessions reveal the influence, legacy and future of cancer care.

  13. Overview of CODE V development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Thomas I.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is part of a session that is aimed at briefly describing some of today''s optical design software packages with emphasis on the program''s philosophy and technology. CODE V is the ongoing result of a development process that began in the 1960''s it is now the result of many people''s efforts. This paper summarizes the roots of the program some of its history dominant philosophies and technologies that have contributed to its usefulness and some that drive its continued development. ROOTS OF CODE V Conceived in the early 60''s This was at a time when there was skepticism that " automatic design" could design lenses equal or better than " hand" methods. The concepts underlying CODE V and its predecessors were based on ten years of experience and exposure to the problems of a group of lens designers in a design-for-manufacture environment. The basic challenge was to show that lens design could be done better easier and faster by high quality computer-assisted design tools. The earliest development was for our own use as an engineering services organization -an in-house tool for custom design. As a tool it had to make us efficient in providing lens design and engineering services as a self-sustaining business. PHILOSOPHY OF OVTIM!ZATION IN CODE V Error function formation Based on experience as a designer we felt very strongly that there should be a clear separation of

  14. Advancing methods for reliably assessing motivational interviewing fidelity using the motivational interviewing skills code.

    PubMed

    Lord, Sarah Peregrine; Can, Doğan; Yi, Michael; Marin, Rebeca; Dunn, Christopher W; Imel, Zac E; Georgiou, Panayiotis; Narayanan, Shrikanth; Steyvers, Mark; Atkins, David C

    2015-02-01

    The current paper presents novel methods for collecting MISC data and accurately assessing reliability of behavior codes at the level of the utterance. The MISC 2.1 was used to rate MI interviews from five randomized trials targeting alcohol and drug use. Sessions were coded at the utterance-level. Utterance-based coding reliability was estimated using three methods and compared to traditional reliability estimates of session tallies. Session-level reliability was generally higher compared to reliability using utterance-based codes, suggesting that typical methods for MISC reliability may be biased. These novel methods in MI fidelity data collection and reliability assessment provided rich data for therapist feedback and further analyses. Beyond implications for fidelity coding, utterance-level coding schemes may elucidate important elements in the counselor-client interaction that could inform theories of change and the practice of MI.

  15. Optimal Grouping and Matching for Network-Coded Cooperative Communications

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S; Shi, Y; Hou, Y T; Kompella, S; Midkiff, S F

    2011-11-01

    Network-coded cooperative communications (NC-CC) is a new advance in wireless networking that exploits network coding (NC) to improve the performance of cooperative communications (CC). However, there remains very limited understanding of this new hybrid technology, particularly at the link layer and above. This paper fills in this gap by studying a network optimization problem that requires joint optimization of session grouping, relay node grouping, and matching of session/relay groups. After showing that this problem is NP-hard, we present a polynomial time heuristic algorithm to this problem. Using simulation results, we show that our algorithm is highly competitive and can produce near-optimal results.

  16. Proceedings of the Third NRC/ASME Symposium on Valve and Pump Testing. Session 1A--Session 2C: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The 1994 Symposium on Valve and Pump Testing, jointly sponsored by the Board of Nuclear Codes and Standards of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, provides a forum for the discussion of current programs and methods for inservice testing and motor-operated valve testing at nuclear power plants. The symposium also provides an opportunity to discuss the need to improve that testing in order to help ensure the reliable performance of pumps and valves. The participation of industry representatives, regulators, and consultants results in the discussion of a broad spectrum of ideas and perspectives regarding the improvement of inservice testing of pumps and valves at nuclear power plants. This document, Volume 1, covers sessions 1A through session 2C. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  17. Scenario Crisis Cases in Distance Learning Sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, A.

    2013-04-01

    We discuss early results using student-lead role-play of crises and disaster scenarios to encourage engagement in distance learning sessions. The disadvantage of distance learning via web interface—the lack of face-to-face and the ease with which a student can remain quiet—is balanced by the wealth of Internet-accessible media reports of past mission disasters. Capitol College minimizes the lecture component to simply frame each session's open-ended crisis in our Mission Operations engineering course. The students are presented with a historical ‘disaster’ but not its resolution; they present their course of action, then the lecturer steps in to debrief. With a wealth of past cases available on the web, use of scenarios rather than lectures shows early signs of being viable model for encouraging discussion and interaction within distance learning for a variety of course topics.

  18. Expert system for scheduling simulation lab sessions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, Chet

    1990-01-01

    Implementation and results of an expert system used for scheduling session requests for the Systems Engineering Simulator (SES) laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) are discussed. Weekly session requests are received from astronaut crew trainers, procedures developers, engineering assessment personnel, software developers, and various others who wish to access the computers, scene generators, and other simulation equipment available to them in the SES lab. The expert system under discussion is comprised of a data acquisition portion - two Pascal programs run on a personal computer - and a CLIPS program installed on a minicomputer. A brief introduction to the SES lab and its scheduling background is given. A general overview of the system is provided, followed by a detailed description of the constraint-reduction process and of the scheduler itself. Results from a ten-week trial period using this approach are discussed. Finally, a summary of the expert system's strengths and shortcomings are provided.

  19. Buffered Communication Analysis in Distributed Multiparty Sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniélou, Pierre-Malo; Yoshida, Nobuko

    Many communication-centred systems today rely on asynchronous messaging among distributed peers to make efficient use of parallel execution and resource access. With such asynchrony, the communication buffers can happen to grow inconsiderately over time. This paper proposes a static verification methodology based on multiparty session types which can efficiently compute the upper bounds on buffer sizes. Our analysis relies on a uniform causality audit of the entire collaboration pattern - an examination that is not always possible from each end-point type. We extend this method to design algorithms that allocate communication channels in order to optimise the memory requirements of session executions. From these analyses, we propose two refinements methods which respect buffer bounds: a global protocol refinement that automatically inserts confirmation messages to guarantee stipulated buffer sizes and a local protocol refinement to optimise asynchronous messaging without buffer overflow. Finally our work is applied to overcome a buffer overflow problem of the multi-buffering algorithm.

  20. Ideas for Advancing Code Sharing: A Different Kind of Hack Day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teuben, P.; Allen, A.; Berriman, B.; DuPrie, K.; Hanisch, R. J.; Mink, J.; Nemiroff, R. J.; Shamir, L.; Shortridge, K.; Taylor, M. B.; Wallin, J. F.

    2014-05-01

    How do we as a community encourage the reuse of software for telescope operations, data processing, and ? How can we support making codes used in research available for others to examine? Continuing the discussion from last year Bring out your codes! BoF session, participants separated into groups to brainstorm ideas to mitigate factors which inhibit code sharing and nurture those which encourage code sharing. The BoF concluded with the sharing of ideas that arose from the brainstorming sessions and a brief summary by the moderator.

  1. 78 FR 53497 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Closed Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Closed Session AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation Advisory... closed session of the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC). The special...

  2. 77 FR 60373 - Board of Directors Executive Session Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ...; ] AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION Board of Directors Executive Session Meeting Meeting: African Development Foundation, Board of Directors Executive Session Meeting. Time: Thursday, October 11, 2012, 5 p.m. to 6:30...

  3. 77 FR 62211 - Board of Directors Executive Session Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ...; ] AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION Board of Directors Executive Session Meeting Meeting: African Development Foundation, Board of Directors Executive Session Meeting. Time: Tuesday, October 23, 2012, 8:30 a.m. to...

  4. 78 FR 61321 - Board of Directors Executive Session Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ...; ] AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION Board of Directors Executive Session Meeting Meeting: African Development Foundation, Board of Directors Executive Session Meeting Time: Tuesday, October 22, 2013 9:00 a.m. to 1:00...

  5. 78 FR 5164 - Board of Directors Executive Session Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-24

    ...; ] AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION Board of Directors Executive Session Meeting Meeting: African Development Foundation, Board of Directors Executive Session Meeting Time: Tuesday, February 5, 2013, 9:00 a.m. to 1:00...

  6. 78 FR 46312 - Board of Directors Executive Session Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ...; ] AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION Board of Directors Executive Session Meeting Meeting: African Development Foundation, Board of Directors Executive Session Meeting Time: Tuesday, August 6, 2013 8:30 a.m. to 1:00...

  7. 78 FR 45494 - Plant Breeding Listening Session meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Plant Breeding Listening Session meeting ACTION: Notice of a Plant Breeding... Agriculture (USDA) announces a Plant Breeding Listening Session stakeholder meeting for all interested plant breeding and cultivar development stakeholders. DATES: The Plant Breeding Listening Session will be...

  8. 46 CFR 4.09-17 - Sessions to be public.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sessions to be public. 4.09-17 Section 4.09-17 Shipping... INVESTIGATIONS Marine Board of Investigation § 4.09-17 Sessions to be public. (a) All sessions of a Marine Board of Investigation for the purpose of obtaining evidence shall normally be open to the public,...

  9. 46 CFR 4.09-17 - Sessions to be public.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sessions to be public. 4.09-17 Section 4.09-17 Shipping... INVESTIGATIONS Marine Board of Investigation § 4.09-17 Sessions to be public. (a) All sessions of a Marine Board of Investigation for the purpose of obtaining evidence shall normally be open to the public,...

  10. 46 CFR 4.09-17 - Sessions to be public.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sessions to be public. 4.09-17 Section 4.09-17 Shipping... INVESTIGATIONS Marine Board of Investigation § 4.09-17 Sessions to be public. (a) All sessions of a Marine Board of Investigation for the purpose of obtaining evidence shall normally be open to the public,...

  11. 46 CFR 4.09-17 - Sessions to be public.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sessions to be public. 4.09-17 Section 4.09-17 Shipping... INVESTIGATIONS Marine Board of Investigation § 4.09-17 Sessions to be public. (a) All sessions of a Marine Board of Investigation for the purpose of obtaining evidence shall normally be open to the public,...

  12. 46 CFR 4.09-17 - Sessions to be public.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sessions to be public. 4.09-17 Section 4.09-17 Shipping... INVESTIGATIONS Marine Board of Investigation § 4.09-17 Sessions to be public. (a) All sessions of a Marine Board of Investigation for the purpose of obtaining evidence shall normally be open to the public,...

  13. 101st LHCC Meeting AGENDA OPEN Sessions I and II

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    OPEN Sessions I and II on Wednesday, 5 May from 9h00 to 16h30 in MAIN AUDITORIUM, CERN staff and Users are welcome to attend Open Sessions -LIVE WEBCAST. CLOSED Sessions on Wednesday, 5 May at 16h30 and Thursday, 6 May 8h15 in Conference room 60-6-015

  14. Homological stabilizer codes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jonas T.

    2013-03-15

    In this paper we define homological stabilizer codes on qubits which encompass codes such as Kitaev's toric code and the topological color codes. These codes are defined solely by the graphs they reside on. This feature allows us to use properties of topological graph theory to determine the graphs which are suitable as homological stabilizer codes. We then show that all toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. We show that the topological color codes and toric codes correspond to two distinct classes of graphs. We define the notion of label set equivalencies and show that under a small set of constraints the only homological stabilizer codes without local logical operators are equivalent to Kitaev's toric code or to the topological color codes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that Kitaev's toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that toric codes and color codes correspond to homological stabilizer codes on distinct graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find and classify all 2D homological stabilizer codes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find optimal codes among the homological stabilizer codes.

  15. Summary of the electron accelerators session

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1988-10-01

    Since the last High Energy Physics Symposium, there has been considerable progress in the field of polarized electron accelerators. Projects well into construction include the SLC, HERA, and LEP. The status of polarized beams for these projects is discussed in this session. Semiclassical and quantum mechanical calculations of polarizing and depolarizing effects are discussed, for both linear colliders and for storage rings. Substantial progress is continuing in the understanding of depolarizing mechanisms for circular machines. Modelling of these machines is underway. Activities with polarized electron beams at Novosibirsk are described. 8 refs.

  16. Session: Pre-development project risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, Richard; Linehan, Andy

    2004-09-01

    This second session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The focus of the presentations was on the practices and methodologies used in the wind energy industry for assessing risk to birds and bats at candidate project sites. Presenters offered examples of pre-development siting evaluation requirements set by certain states. Presentation one was titled ''Practices and Methodologies and Initial Screening Tools'' by Richard Curry of Curry and Kerlinger, LLC. Presentation two was titled ''State of the Industry in the Pacific Northwest'' by Andy Linehan, CH2MHILL.

  17. Cerebral glucose utilization is reduced in second test session.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, J M; Morgan, M J; Liu, X; Yung, B C; Phillips, R L; Wong, D F; Shaya, E K; Dannals, R F; London, E D

    1997-06-01

    Cerebral glucose utilization was higher during the first positron emission tomography (PET) session than during the second session, as assayed using the PET [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose method in male human volunteers. This difference was due largely to data from subjects with low-trait anxiety, since subjects with high anxiety showed similar metabolism in both PET sessions. High-anxiety subjects showed greater right/ left ratios of cerebral metabolism than low-anxiety subjects, particularly during the second PET session. These findings suggest that the level of anxiety may be an important variable to consider in PET studies using multiple sessions. PMID:9236727

  18. Coding of Neuroinfectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Barkley, Gregory L

    2015-12-01

    Accurate coding is an important function of neurologic practice. This contribution to Continuum is part of an ongoing series that presents helpful coding information along with examples related to the issue topic. Tips for diagnosis coding, Evaluation and Management coding, procedure coding, or a combination are presented, depending on which is most applicable to the subject area of the issue. PMID:26633789

  19. Model Children's Code.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. American Indian Law Center.

    The Model Children's Code was developed to provide a legally correct model code that American Indian tribes can use to enact children's codes that fulfill their legal, cultural and economic needs. Code sections cover the court system, jurisdiction, juvenile offender procedures, minor-in-need-of-care, and termination. Almost every Code section is…

  20. Image Interpretation Session: Sunday, November 27, 2005.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Geoffrey D; Bradley, William G; Foley, W Dennis; Herold, Christian J; Jaramillo, Diego; Seeger, Leanne L

    2005-01-01

    The Sunday afternoon Image Interpretation Session has been a high point of the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America for over 65 years. A panel of five experts has been selected, representing the very best from the fields of neurologic, abdominal, thoracic, pediatric, and musculoskeletal radiology. Each panelist will dazzle us with an insightful analysis of two difficult cases in their area of expertise. The panelists are to be lauded for their bravery in subjecting their diagnostic acumen to the scrutiny of the thousands of radiologists in the audience. The cases, representing a diverse spectrum of diseases and disease manifestations, were selected from recent clinical imaging studies performed at the Stanford University Medical Center or the Lucille Salter Packard Children's Hospital. This session celebrates the skills of diagnostic radiologists worldwide, who are called on daily to amalgamate disparate clinical information with complex imaging data into focused differential diagnoses and effective treatment planning. We hope that these cases will serve to illustrate the central role that expert image interpretation plays in the care of patients. We welcome our audience of RSNA attendees, readers of RadioGraphics, and cyberspace denizens to join with our experts in solving these medical puzzles and to enjoy the excitement of unraveling the unknown. PMID:16163794

  1. Developing assessment: involving the sessional clinical teacher.

    PubMed

    Bateman, H; Thomason, J M; McCracken, G; Ellis, J

    2016-02-12

    Assessment development is a fundamental element of curriculum management and a requirement for providers of education to consistently demonstrate attainment of educational standards. Development of authentic, valid and reliable assessment is, however, both challenging and resource intensive. In the UK, dental education standards are regulated by the General Dental Council (GDC). The 'safe beginner' is the threshold determined by the GDC for the passing student - but how do we apply this? This article describes an approach the School of Dental Sciences at Newcastle University has adopted to address the challenges associated with developing assessments. Sessional clinical teachers contribute a significant proportion of the clinical supervision within the BDS programme and also have a good appreciation of both the standard and concept of the 'safe beginner'. By implementing a process of active timetable management, we have identified time where this group could contribute to assessment development. We believe that aspects, which could be enhanced by their involvement, include writing, validation, standard-setting and utilisation of assessment. To achieve this, we recognise a requirement for investment in careful manpower planning and training, but consider that it is realistic and beneficial to include sessional clinical teachers in this essential part of learning and teaching. PMID:26868802

  2. Aspen Global Change Institute Summer Science Sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Katzenberger, John; Kaye, Jack A

    2006-10-01

    The Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) successfully organized and convened six interdisciplinary meetings over the course of award NNG04GA21G. The topics of the meetings were consistent with a range of issues, goals and objectives as described within the NASA Earth Science Enterprise Strategic Plan and more broadly by the US Global Change Research Program/Our Changing Planet, the more recent Climate Change Program Strategic Plan and the NSF Pathways report. The meetings were chaired by two or more leaders from within the disciplinary focus of each session. 222 scholars for a total of 1097 participants-days were convened under the auspices of this award. The overall goal of each AGCI session is to further the understanding of Earth system science and global environmental change through interdisciplinary dialog. The format and structure of the meetings allows for presentation by each participant, in-depth discussion by the whole group, and smaller working group and synthesis activities. The size of the group is important in terms of the group dynamics and interaction, and the ability for each participant's work to be adequately presented and discussed within the duration of the meeting, while still allowing time for synthesis

  3. Implementing and evaluating reflective practice group sessions.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Deidre; Higgins, Agnes

    2006-05-01

    The rapidly changing and developing arenas of biological and medical technology, coupled with a myriad of social concerns and issues affecting individual, family and societal health, necessitates that nursing practitioners engage themselves fully with patients in the pursuit of health and healing. The above factors have not only served as catalysts in the development of educational curricula in general but also nursing curricula. Reflection in these curricula is often considered an appropriate vehicle for the analysis of nursing practice, fostering not only an understanding of nurse's work but also the development of critically thoughtful approaches essential for providing nursing care in complex environments [Duke, S., Appleton, J., 2000. The use of reflection in a palliative care programme: a qualitative study of the development of reflective skills over an academic year. J. Adv. Nurs. 32 (6), 1557-1568]. Consequently, nurse educators are being called upon to develop nurses who are reflective practitioners. The focus of this paper is on an exploration of issues that arose from the implementation of reflective sessions with a group of qualified nurses undertaking a diploma in nursing. This paper addresses the challenges experienced in the introduction of reflection as a teaching method. Recommendations for other lecturers when using this approach are also provided. It is anticipated this paper will provide practical advice and guidance for educators who wish to use reflective sessions to enhance the educational experience of their nursing students. PMID:19040874

  4. To Code or Not To Code?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkinson, Brian; Sandhu, Parveen; Lacorte, Manel; Gourlay, Lesley

    1998-01-01

    This article considers arguments for and against the use of coding systems in classroom-based language research and touches on some relevant considerations from ethnographic and conversational analysis approaches. The four authors each explain and elaborate on their practical decision to code or not to code events or utterances at a specific point…

  5. Bare Code Reader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clair, Jean J.

    1980-05-01

    The Bare code system will be used, in every market and supermarket. The code, which is normalised in US and Europe (code EAN) gives informations on price, storage, nature and allows in real time the gestion of theshop.

  6. Innovative Session 2. [Concurrent Innovative Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Two presentations are provided from Innovative Session 2 of the Academy of Human Resource Development (HRD) 2000 Conference proceedings. "Training Companies Speak Out on HRD Industry Changes: Symposium Introduction" (R. Wayne Pace) describes how this symposium explores the process of consolidation in the field, how the Internet is being used to…

  7. Working through: In-Session Processes that Promote Between-Session Thoughts and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Jesse; Quirk, Kelley; Hilsenroth, Mark J.; Rodolfa, Emil

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether clients' ratings of the working alliance as well as their perception of cognitive-behavioral (CB) and psychodynamic-interpersonal (PI) techniques (delivered by therapists who used both) were associated with clients' intersession processes (i.e., their thoughts about therapy and therapeutic activity between sessions).…

  8. Session: Program Review X Wrap-Up

    SciTech Connect

    1992-01-01

    This wrap-up session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of Closing Remarks by Roland R. Kessler and six NGA Industry Critique Panel presentations: ''Summary of Comments on DOE-Industry Cooperation by Geothermal Industry Panel'' by James B. Koenig, GeothermEx, Inc.; ''NGA Industry Critique of the Exploration Component'' by Joe L. Iovenitti, Weiss Associates; ''Critique of Drilling Research'' by Jerry Hamblin, UNOCAL Geothermal; ''Critique Panel Comments on Reservoir Engineering, DOE Geothermal Technology Development'' by Dennis Kaspereit, California Energy Company, Inc.; ''DOE Geothermal Program Review - Critique on Production'' by Douglas B. Jung, Two-Phase Engineering and Research; ''Comments on the DOE Hydrothermal Energy Conversion R&D Program'' by David L. Mendive, Geothermal Development Associates.

  9. Meeting report VLPNPV: Session 8: Vaccines I.

    PubMed

    Thiriot, David S

    2014-01-01

    In Session 8 of the recent conference "Virus-Like Particle and Nano-Particle Vaccines" held at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California (05 June 2014), four scientists described new virus-like particle (VLP) approaches, progress, and early-stage plans for vaccines against significant human pathogens including HPV, malaria, HIV, Dengue, and RSV. A unifying theme was that displaying epitopes in an array on a virus-like particle can be a powerful approach for achieving a strong immune response. VLP approaches described included display of epitopes on bacteriophage, display of epitopes as fusions with other protein multimerization domains, and self-assembly of recombinantly-expressed virus coat proteins. Another theme in some of the presentations was the targeting of neutralizing epitopes that are masked or only transiently accessible during natural infection. PMID:25483643

  10. AAS Special Session: Policy Making in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardelli, J. A.; Massa, D.

    1995-12-01

    The professional astronomical community today is more diverse than at any time in its history. Individuals participating in creative research programs can be found in a wide range of positions. This type of diversity, which mixes research, education, and service (e.g. contract) work, represents the strength of contemporary astronomy. While recognizing the unavoidable reductions in funding and restructuring of organizations like NASA, it is imperative that the significance of the current diversity be considered during these processes. Creative ideas are one of the cornerstones of quality research, and they can originate anywhere. Consequently, it is essential that adequate research resources remain available for free and open competition by all astronomers. Our goal in this session is to bring together officials from the AAS, NASA, and the NSF to discuss how the policy and decision making process operates and whether it should be changed to better serve the general needs of the professional astronomical community. Examples of the issues we believe are important include: In establishing new policy, how can the needs of the average research astronomer be better addressed? How could input from such astronomers be provided to those who craft NASA/NSF policy? How can/should the AAS serve as an interface between policy/decision making bodies and its membership? Should the AAS membership become more actively/effectively involved in the decision making process and, if so, how? More information on this session and related issues can be found at the Association of Research Astronomers Home Page: http://www.phy.vill.edu/astro/faculty/ara/ara_home.htm

  11. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  12. Responding changes systematically within sessions during conditioning procedures.

    PubMed

    McSweeney, F K; Roll, J M

    1993-11-01

    When the procedure is held constant within an experimental session, responding often changes systematically within that session. Many of these within-session changes in responding cannot be dismissed as learning curves or by-products of satiation. They have been observed in studies of positive reinforcement, avoidance, punishment, extinction, discrimination, delayed matching to sample, concept formation, maze and alley running, and laboratory analogues of foraging, as well as in the unconditioned substrates of conditioned behavior. When aversive stimuli are used, responding usually increases early in the session. When positive reinforcers are used, responding changes in a variety of ways, including increasing, decreasing, and bitonic functions. Both strong and minimal reinforcement procedures produce within-session decreases in positively reinforced behavior. Within-session changes in responding have substantial theoretical and methodological implications for research in conditioning. PMID:8283153

  13. Responding changes systematically within sessions during conditioning procedures.

    PubMed Central

    McSweeney, F K; Roll, J M

    1993-01-01

    When the procedure is held constant within an experimental session, responding often changes systematically within that session. Many of these within-session changes in responding cannot be dismissed as learning curves or by-products of satiation. They have been observed in studies of positive reinforcement, avoidance, punishment, extinction, discrimination, delayed matching to sample, concept formation, maze and alley running, and laboratory analogues of foraging, as well as in the unconditioned substrates of conditioned behavior. When aversive stimuli are used, responding usually increases early in the session. When positive reinforcers are used, responding changes in a variety of ways, including increasing, decreasing, and bitonic functions. Both strong and minimal reinforcement procedures produce within-session decreases in positively reinforced behavior. Within-session changes in responding have substantial theoretical and methodological implications for research in conditioning. PMID:8283153

  14. Discussion on LDPC Codes and Uplink Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Ken; Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Moision, Bruce; Hamkins, Jon; Pollara, Fabrizio

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the progress that the workgroup on Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) for space link coding. The workgroup is tasked with developing and recommending new error correcting codes for near-Earth, Lunar, and deep space applications. Included in the presentation is a summary of the technical progress of the workgroup. Charts that show the LDPC decoder sensitivity to symbol scaling errors are reviewed, as well as a chart showing the performance of several frame synchronizer algorithms compared to that of some good codes and LDPC decoder tests at ESTL. Also reviewed is a study on Coding, Modulation, and Link Protocol (CMLP), and the recommended codes. A design for the Pseudo-Randomizer with LDPC Decoder and CRC is also reviewed. A chart that summarizes the three proposed coding systems is also presented.

  15. Manually operated coded switch

    DOEpatents

    Barnette, Jon H.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a manually operated recodable coded switch in which a code may be inserted, tried and used to actuate a lever controlling an external device. After attempting a code, the switch's code wheels must be returned to their zero positions before another try is made.

  16. 100th LHCC meeting AGENDA OPEN and CLOSED Sessions

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    OPEN Sessions on Wednesday, 17 February at 8h30-13h00 and 18 February at 9h00-11h00 in MAIN AUDITORIUM, CERN staff and Users are welcome to attend Open Sessions - LIVE WEBCAST. CLOSED Sessions in Conference room 60-6-015 Wednesday 17 February at 14h00-19h00 and continued on Thursday, 18 February at 11h00-17h00.

  17. 100th LHCC meeting AGENDA OPEN and CLOSED Sessions

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-07

    OPEN Sessions on Wednesday, 17 February at 8h30-13h00 and 18 February at 9h00-11h00 in MAIN AUDITORIUM, CERN staff and Users are welcome to attend Open Sessions - LIVE WEBCAST. CLOSED Sessions in Conference room 60-6-015 Wednesday 17 February at 14h00-19h00 and continued on Thursday, 18 February at 11h00-17h00.

  18. Parafermion stabilizer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güngördü, Utkan; Nepal, Rabindra; Kovalev, Alexey A.

    2014-10-01

    We define and study parafermion stabilizer codes, which can be viewed as generalizations of Kitaev's one-dimensional (1D) model of unpaired Majorana fermions. Parafermion stabilizer codes can protect against low-weight errors acting on a small subset of parafermion modes in analogy to qudit stabilizer codes. Examples of several smallest parafermion stabilizer codes are given. A locality-preserving embedding of qudit operators into parafermion operators is established that allows one to map known qudit stabilizer codes to parafermion codes. We also present a local 2D parafermion construction that combines topological protection of Kitaev's toric code with additional protection relying on parity conservation.

  19. Effect of a yoga practice session and a yoga theory session on state anxiety.

    PubMed

    Telles, Shirley; Gaur, Vaishali; Balkrishna, Acharya

    2009-12-01

    Yoga techniques practiced for varying durations have been shown to reduce state anxiety. In this study, there were 300 naive-to-yoga persons of both sexes who were attending a yoga therapy center in north India for stress relief as day visitors and were not residing at the center. They were assigned to two groups, yoga practice and yoga theory, and their state anxiety was assessed before and after a 2-hr. yoga session. A significant reduction in scores on state anxiety was found in the yoga practice group (14.7% decrease), as well as in the yoga theory group (3.4% decrease). The difference in scores following the sessions was statistically significant. Hence, yoga practice as well as learning about theoretical aspects of yoga appear to reduce state anxiety, with a greater reduction following yoga practice.

  20. Linking Competency with Training Needs: Session Summary on Disaster Studies and Evaluation, Session BO-17.

    PubMed

    Ling, Kelvin W K; Daily, Elaine K

    2016-02-01

    This section of Prehospital and Disaster Medicine (PDM) presents reports and summaries of the 19th World Congress on Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WCDEM) held in Cape Town, South Africa in April of 2015. Abstracts of Congress oral and poster presentations were published in April 2015 as a supplement to PDM (Volume 30, Supplement 1). Reports and session summaries of the 19th World Congress on Disaster and Emergency Medicine. PMID:26842014

  1. ARA type protograph codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor); Abbasfar, Aliazam (Inventor); Jones, Christopher R. (Inventor); Dolinar, Samuel J. (Inventor); Thorpe, Jeremy C. (Inventor); Andrews, Kenneth S. (Inventor); Yao, Kung (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An apparatus and method for encoding low-density parity check codes. Together with a repeater, an interleaver and an accumulator, the apparatus comprises a precoder, thus forming accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA codes). Protographs representing various types of ARA codes, including AR3A, AR4A and ARJA codes, are described. High performance is obtained when compared to the performance of current repeat-accumulate (RA) or irregular-repeat-accumulate (IRA) codes.

  2. QR Codes 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crompton, Helen; LaFrance, Jason; van 't Hooft, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A QR (quick-response) code is a two-dimensional scannable code, similar in function to a traditional bar code that one might find on a product at the supermarket. The main difference between the two is that, while a traditional bar code can hold a maximum of only 20 digits, a QR code can hold up to 7,089 characters, so it can contain much more…

  3. A Comparison of Natural Language Processing Methods for Automated Coding of Motivational Interviewing.

    PubMed

    Tanana, Michael; Hallgren, Kevin A; Imel, Zac E; Atkins, David C; Srikumar, Vivek

    2016-06-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is an efficacious treatment for substance use disorders and other problem behaviors. Studies on MI fidelity and mechanisms of change typically use human raters to code therapy sessions, which requires considerable time, training, and financial costs. Natural language processing techniques have recently been utilized for coding MI sessions using machine learning techniques, rather than human coders, and preliminary results have suggested these methods hold promise. The current study extends this previous work by introducing two natural language processing models for automatically coding MI sessions via computer. The two models differ in the way they semantically represent session content, utilizing either 1) simple discrete sentence features (DSF model) and 2) more complex recursive neural networks (RNN model). Utterance- and session-level predictions from these models were compared to ratings provided by human coders using a large sample of MI sessions (N=341 sessions; 78,977 clinician and client talk turns) from 6 MI studies. Results show that the DSF model generally had slightly better performance compared to the RNN model. The DSF model had "good" or higher utterance-level agreement with human coders (Cohen's kappa>0.60) for open and closed questions, affirm, giving information, and follow/neutral (all therapist codes); considerably higher agreement was obtained for session-level indices, and many estimates were competitive with human-to-human agreement. However, there was poor agreement for client change talk, client sustain talk, and therapist MI-inconsistent behaviors. Natural language processing methods provide accurate representations of human derived behavioral codes and could offer substantial improvements to the efficiency and scale in which MI mechanisms of change research and fidelity monitoring are conducted.

  4. Culturally relevant family-based treatment for adolescent delinquency and substance abuse: understanding within-session processes.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Phillippe B; Foster, Sharon L; Warner, Sarah E

    2010-08-01

    Identifying psychotherapy processes that likely contribute to client outcome with ethnic minorities is a vital practice and research need, particularly within family-focused, evidence-based treatments (EBT) for youth with externalizing problems. Identifying process variables within a cross-cultural context may improve the efficacy of EBTs by informing psychotherapists how to modify their behavior when working with ethnically diverse clients. The authors described one approach to the development of culturally competent psychotherapy, using an observational coding system comprising Afrocentric codes to investigate culturally relevant therapist behaviors. Qualitative examples illustrated the quantitative findings relating to therapist in-session behavior that promote client engagement and positive responding during a midtreatment session of multisystemic therapy.

  5. Increasing session-to-session transfer in a brain-computer interface with on-site background noise acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hohyun; Ahn, Minkyu; Kim, Kiwoong; Jun, Sung Chan

    2015-12-01

    Objective. A brain-computer interface (BCI) usually requires a time-consuming training phase during which data are collected and used to generate a classifier. Because brain signals vary dynamically over time (and even over sessions), this training phase may be necessary each time the BCI system is used, which is impractical. However, the variability in background noise, which is less dependent on a control signal, may dominate the dynamics of brain signals. Therefore, we hypothesized that an understanding of variations in background noise may allow existing data to be reused by incorporating the noise characteristics into the feature extraction framework; in this way, new session data are not required each time and this increases the feasibility of the BCI systems. Approach. In this work, we collected background noise during a single, brief on-site acquisition session (approximately 3 min) immediately before a new session, and we found that variations in background noise were predictable to some extent. Then we implemented this simple session-to-session transfer strategy with a regularized spatiotemporal filter (RSTF), and we tested it with a total of 20 cross-session datasets collected over multiple days from 12 subjects. We also proposed and tested a bias correction (BC) in the RSTF. Main results. We found that our proposed session-to-session strategies yielded a slightly less or comparable performance to the conventional paradigm (each session training phase is needed with an on-site training dataset). Furthermore, using an RSTF only and an RSTF with a BC outperformed existing approaches in session-to-session transfers. Significance. We inferred from our results that, with an on-site background noise suppression feature extractor and pre-existing training data, further training time may be unnecessary.

  6. A session-to-session examination of homework engagement in cognitive therapy for depression: Do patients experience immediate benefits?

    PubMed

    Conklin, Laren R; Strunk, Daniel R

    2015-09-01

    Homework is a key component of Cognitive Therapy (CT) for depression. Although previous research has found evidence for a positive relationship between homework compliance and treatment outcome, the methods used in previous studies have often not been optimal. In this study, we examine the relation of specific aspects of homework engagement and symptom change over successive session-to-session intervals. In a sample of 53 depressed adults participating in CT, we examined the relation of observer-rated homework engagement and session-to-session symptom change across the first five sessions. Within patient (and not between patient) variability in homework engagement was significantly related to greater session-to-session symptom improvements. These findings were similar when homework engagement was assessed through a measure of general engagement with homework assignments and a measure assessing engagement in specific assignments often used in CT. Secondary analyses suggested that observer ratings of the effort patients made on homework and the completion of cognitive homework were the numerically strongest predictors of depressive symptom improvements. Patient engagement with homework assignments appears to be an important predictor of early session-to-session symptom improvements. Future research is needed to identify what therapist behaviors promote homework engagement. PMID:26183022

  7. Proceedings of the 21st DOE/NRC nuclear air cleaning conference; Volume 2, Sessions 9--16

    SciTech Connect

    First, M.W.

    1991-02-01

    The 21st meeting of the Department of Energy/Nuclear Regulatory Commission (DOE/NRC) Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference was held in San Diego, CA on August 13--16, 1990. The proceedings have been published as a two volume set. Volume 2 contains sessions covering adsorbents, nuclear codes and standards, modelling, filters, safety, containment venting and a review of nuclear air cleaning programs around the world. Also included is the list of attendees and an index of authors and speakers. (MHB)

  8. Nonbinary Quantum Convolutional Codes Derived from Negacyclic Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianzhang; Li, Jianping; Yang, Fan; Huang, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, some families of nonbinary quantum convolutional codes are constructed by using negacyclic codes. These nonbinary quantum convolutional codes are different from quantum convolutional codes in the literature. Moreover, we construct a family of optimal quantum convolutional codes.

  9. Single session treatment for bleeding hemorrhoids

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, S.J.; Rypins, E.B.; Houck, J.; Thrower, S.

    1987-12-01

    Fifty consecutive outpatients with bleeding internal hemorrhoids were prospectively treated with a single application of rubber band ligation or infrared coagulation. Complete follow-up observation was obtained in 48 patients (23 underwent rubber band ligation and 25 underwent infrared coagulation). At one month after treatment, 22 patients who underwent rubber band ligation and 16 who underwent infrared coagulation, were symptomatically improved (p less than 0.05). At six months, 15 patients who had undergone rubber band ligation and ten who had infrared coagulation treatment, remained improved (p less than 0.05). There was no statistical difference in the discomfort experienced by either group during or after the procedure as determined by a self-assessment scale. Two patients who underwent rubber band ligation experienced complications--a thrombosed external hemorrhoid developed in one patient and another had delayed rectal bleeding. Although associated with occasional complications after treatment, rubber band ligation is more effective than in infrared coagulation for single session treatment of bleeding internal hemorrhoids.

  10. 49 CFR 845.3 - Sessions open to the public.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sessions open to the public. 845.3 Section 845.3... RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRANSPORTATION; ACCIDENT/INCIDENT HEARINGS AND REPORTS § 845.3 Sessions open to the public. (a) All hearings shall normally be open to the public (subject to the provision that any...

  11. 47 CFR 97.513 - VE session manager requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false VE session manager requirements. 97.513 Section 97.513 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.513 VE session manager requirements....

  12. 47 CFR 97.513 - VE session manager requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false VE session manager requirements. 97.513 Section 97.513 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.513 VE session manager requirements....

  13. 47 CFR 97.513 - VE session manager requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false VE session manager requirements. 97.513 Section 97.513 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.513 VE session manager requirements....

  14. 47 CFR 97.513 - VE session manager requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false VE session manager requirements. 97.513 Section 97.513 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.513 VE session manager requirements....

  15. 47 CFR 97.513 - VE session manager requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false VE session manager requirements. 97.513 Section 97.513 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.513 VE session manager requirements....

  16. Quality Assurance of Assessment and Moderation Discourses Involving Sessional Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grainger, Peter; Adie, Lenore; Weir, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Quality assurance is a major agenda in tertiary education. The casualisation of academic work, especially in teaching, is also a quality assurance issue. Casual or sessional staff members teach and assess more than 50% of all university courses in Australia, and yet the research in relation to the role sessional staff play in quality assurance of…

  17. Asymmetric quantum convolutional codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Guardia, Giuliano G.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we construct the first families of asymmetric quantum convolutional codes (AQCCs). These new AQCCs are constructed by means of the CSS-type construction applied to suitable families of classical convolutional codes, which are also constructed here. The new codes have non-catastrophic generator matrices, and they have great asymmetry. Since our constructions are performed algebraically, i.e. we develop general algebraic methods and properties to perform the constructions, it is possible to derive several families of such codes and not only codes with specific parameters. Additionally, several different types of such codes are obtained.

  18. Reactivity to nicotine cues over repeated cue reactivity sessions.

    PubMed

    LaRowe, Steven D; Saladin, Michael E; Carpenter, Matthew J; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P

    2007-12-01

    The present study investigated whether reactivity to nicotine-related cues would attenuate across four experimental sessions held 1 week apart. Participants were nineteen non-treatment seeking, nicotine-dependent males. Cue reactivity sessions were performed in an outpatient research center using in vivo cues consisting of standardized smoking-related paraphernalia (e.g., cigarettes) and neutral comparison paraphernalia (e.g., pencils). Craving ratings were collected before and after both cue presentations while physiological measures (heart rate, skin conductance) were collected before and during the cue presentations. Although craving levels decreased across sessions, smoking-related cues consistently evoked significantly greater increases in craving relative to neutral cues over all four experimental sessions. Skin conductance was higher in response to smoking cues, though this effect was not as robust as that observed for craving. Results suggest that, under the described experimental parameters, craving can be reliably elicited over repeated cue reactivity sessions.

  19. CodeSlinger: a case study in domain-driven interactive tool design for biomedical coding scheme exploration and use.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Natalie L

    2010-01-01

    CodeSlinger is a desktop application that was developed to aid medical professionals in the intertranslation, exploration, and use of biomedical coding schemes. The application was designed to provide a highly intuitive, easy-to-use interface that simplifies a complex business problem: a set of time-consuming, laborious tasks that were regularly performed by a group of medical professionals involving manually searching coding books, searching the Internet, and checking documentation references. A workplace observation session with a target user revealed the details of the current process and a clear understanding of the business goals of the target user group. These goals drove the design of the application's interface, which centers on searches for medical conditions and displays the codes found in the application's database that represent those conditions. The interface also allows the exploration of complex conceptual relationships across multiple coding schemes.

  20. Cellulases and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2001-02-20

    The present invention provides three fungal cellulases, their coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the cellulase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present cellulases are from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  1. Cellulases and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides three fungal cellulases, their coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the cellulase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present cellulases are from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  2. QR Code Mania!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shumack, Kellie A.; Reilly, Erin; Chamberlain, Nik

    2013-01-01

    space, has error-correction capacity, and can be read from any direction. These codes are used in manufacturing, shipping, and marketing, as well as in education. QR codes can be created to produce…

  3. EMF wire code research

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.

    1993-11-01

    This paper examines the results of previous wire code research to determines the relationship with childhood cancer, wire codes and electromagnetic fields. The paper suggests that, in the original Savitz study, biases toward producing a false positive association between high wire codes and childhood cancer were created by the selection procedure.

  4. Software Certification - Coding, Code, and Coders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus; Holzmann, Gerard J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a certification approach for software development that has been adopted at our organization. JPL develops robotic spacecraft for the exploration of the solar system. The flight software that controls these spacecraft is considered to be mission critical. We argue that the goal of a software certification process cannot be the development of "perfect" software, i.e., software that can be formally proven to be correct under all imaginable and unimaginable circumstances. More realistically, the goal is to guarantee a software development process that is conducted by knowledgeable engineers, who follow generally accepted procedures to control known risks, while meeting agreed upon standards of workmanship. We target three specific issues that must be addressed in such a certification procedure: the coding process, the code that is developed, and the skills of the coders. The coding process is driven by standards (e.g., a coding standard) and tools. The code is mechanically checked against the standard with the help of state-of-the-art static source code analyzers. The coders, finally, are certified in on-site training courses that include formal exams.

  5. Semi-Automated Discovery of Application Session Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kannan, J.; Jung, J.; Paxson, V.; Koksal, C.

    2006-09-07

    While the problem of analyzing network traffic at the granularity of individual connections has seen considerable previous work and tool development, understanding traffic at a higher level---the structure of user-initiated sessions comprised of groups of related connections---remains much less explored. Some types of session structure, such as the coupling between an FTP control connection and the data connections it spawns, have prespecified forms, though the specifications do not guarantee how the forms appear in practice. Other types of sessions, such as a user reading email with a browser, only manifest empirically. Still other sessions might exist without us even knowing of their presence, such as a botnet zombie receiving instructions from its master and proceeding in turn to carry them out. We present algorithms rooted in the statistics of Poisson processes that can mine a large corpus of network connection logs to extract the apparent structure of application sessions embedded in the connections. Our methods are semi-automated in that we aim to present an analyst with high-quality information (expressed as regular expressions) reflecting different possible abstractions of an application's session structure. We develop and test our methods using traces from a large Internet site, finding diversity in the number of applications that manifest, their different session structures, and the presence of abnormal behavior. Our work has applications to traffic characterization and monitoring, source models for synthesizing network traffic, and anomaly detection.

  6. Coding for Electronic Mail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. F.; Lee, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Scheme for coding facsimile messages promises to reduce data transmission requirements to one-tenth current level. Coding scheme paves way for true electronic mail in which handwritten, typed, or printed messages or diagrams sent virtually instantaneously - between buildings or between continents. Scheme, called Universal System for Efficient Electronic Mail (USEEM), uses unsupervised character recognition and adaptive noiseless coding of text. Image quality of resulting delivered messages improved over messages transmitted by conventional coding. Coding scheme compatible with direct-entry electronic mail as well as facsimile reproduction. Text transmitted in this scheme automatically translated to word-processor form.

  7. XSOR codes users manual

    SciTech Connect

    Jow, Hong-Nian; Murfin, W.B.; Johnson, J.D.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes the source term estimation codes, XSORs. The codes are written for three pressurized water reactors (Surry, Sequoyah, and Zion) and two boiling water reactors (Peach Bottom and Grand Gulf). The ensemble of codes has been named ``XSOR``. The purpose of XSOR codes is to estimate the source terms which would be released to the atmosphere in severe accidents. A source term includes the release fractions of several radionuclide groups, the timing and duration of releases, the rates of energy release, and the elevation of releases. The codes have been developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in support of the NUREG-1150 program. The XSOR codes are fast running parametric codes and are used as surrogates for detailed mechanistic codes. The XSOR codes also provide the capability to explore the phenomena and their uncertainty which are not currently modeled by the mechanistic codes. The uncertainty distributions of input parameters may be used by an. XSOR code to estimate the uncertainty of source terms.

  8. [The paradoxical effect of persuasive communication in health education sessions].

    PubMed

    Piperini, Marie-Christine

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the communication dynamics leading to the adoption of new attitudes and cognitions in health education sessions. We examined the verbal interactions at work in persuasive communication in 16 health education sessions. The study found that the medical expertise of the educator and the initial level of commitment of the participants had a positive effect on adherence to recommendations. However, persuasive communication in health education sessions appears to involve a paradoxical process in which criticism of the message can go hand in hand with the expression of an intention to implement new risk-reducing behaviors.

  9. DLLExternalCode

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Flach, Frank Smith

    2014-05-14

    DLLExternalCode is the a general dynamic-link library (DLL) interface for linking GoldSim (www.goldsim.com) with external codes. The overall concept is to use GoldSim as top level modeling software with interfaces to external codes for specific calculations. The DLLExternalCode DLL that performs the linking function is designed to take a list of code inputs from GoldSim, create an input file for the external application, run the external code, and return a list of outputs, read from files created by the external application, back to GoldSim. Instructions for creating the input file, running the external code, and reading the output are contained in an instructions file that is read and interpreted by the DLL.

  10. DLLExternalCode

    2014-05-14

    DLLExternalCode is the a general dynamic-link library (DLL) interface for linking GoldSim (www.goldsim.com) with external codes. The overall concept is to use GoldSim as top level modeling software with interfaces to external codes for specific calculations. The DLLExternalCode DLL that performs the linking function is designed to take a list of code inputs from GoldSim, create an input file for the external application, run the external code, and return a list of outputs, read frommore » files created by the external application, back to GoldSim. Instructions for creating the input file, running the external code, and reading the output are contained in an instructions file that is read and interpreted by the DLL.« less

  11. Parafermion stabilizer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gungordu, Utkan; Nepal, Rabindra; Kovalev, Alexey

    2015-03-01

    We define and study parafermion stabilizer codes [Phys. Rev. A 90, 042326 (2014)] which can be viewed as generalizations of Kitaev's one dimensional model of unpaired Majorana fermions. Parafermion stabilizer codes can protect against low-weight errors acting on a small subset of parafermion modes in analogy to qudit stabilizer codes. Examples of several smallest parafermion stabilizer codes are given. Our results show that parafermions can achieve a better encoding rate than Majorana fermions. A locality preserving embedding of qudit operators into parafermion operators is established which allows one to map known qudit stabilizer codes to parafermion codes. We also present a local 2D parafermion construction that combines topological protection of Kitaev's toric code with additional protection relying on parity conservation. This work was supported in part by the NSF under Grants No. Phy-1415600 and No. NSF-EPSCoR 1004094.

  12. Summary of session 3 on synchrotron radiation and beam dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Metral, E.; /CERN

    2010-12-01

    We summarize presentations, discussions and general conclusions of the Workshop session on 'Beam Dynamics Issues'. Major subjects include effects due to synchrotron radiation (SR), cryogenic loads, electron cloud, impedances, intra-beam scattering (IBS) and beam-beam interactions.

  13. 76 FR 41278 - Cargo Security Risk Reduction; Public Listening Sessions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... special assistance at either or both sessions, please contact LTJG William Gasperetti or LTJG Bradley... or LTJG Bradley Bergan, Domestic Ports Division (CG-5441) at 202-372-1149 or via e-mail at...

  14. Channelopathies: Summary of the hot topic keynotes session

    EPA Science Inventory

    The "Hot Topic Keynotes: Channelopathies" session of the 26th International Neurotoxicology Conference brought together toxicologists studying interactions of environmental toxicants with ion channels, to review the state of the science of channelopathies and to discuss the poten...

  15. Spring Meeting Preview: Joint Assembly Sessions Focus on Urbanization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-04-01

    The urban environment has grown to encompass not just the downtown area of a city but also the suburbs and rapidly growing exurban areas. This growth can affect a wide range of geological, physical, and biological processes. Several sessions at the 23-26 May 2006 Joint Assembly in Baltimore, Md., will explore this topic. Two union sessions on the ``Impact of Urbanization on Environmental Systems'' (U31A and U32A) will take place on Wednesday morning, 24 May, at 8:30 A.M. and 10:45 A.M. The sessions are designed to be a wide-ranging exploration of the different, multiple roles that urbanization, and the changes in the environment that accompany urbanization, have on biological and geophysical processes, said session co-convener Larry Band. Brand is Voit Gilmore distinguished professor and chair of the department of geography at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

  16. 76 FR 42112 - Specialty Crop Committee Stakeholder Listening Sessions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... Economics Advisory Board Office, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Room 3901, South Building, 1400...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Office of the Secretary Specialty Crop Committee Stakeholder Listening Sessions AGENCY: Research, Education, and Economics, USDA. ACTION: Notice of stakeholder listening...

  17. Videotaping Therapeutic Sessions and the Right of Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banja, John D.; Higgins, Patricia

    1989-01-01

    The article examines the usefulness of videotaping therapeutic sessions in rehabilitation settings and provides suggestions for rehabilitation professionals contemplating videotaping in light of the patient's legal and ethical right to privacy. (Author/DB)

  18. Astronauts Armstrong and Scott during photo session outside KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong (left), command pilot, and David R. Scott, pilot, the Gemini 8 prime crew, during a photo session outside the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Mission Control Center. They are standing in front of a radar dish.

  19. Session: Monitoring wind turbine project sites for avian impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Wally

    2004-09-01

    This third session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of one presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The focus of the session was on existing wind projects that are monitored for their impacts on birds and bats. The presentation given was titled ''Bird and Bat Fatality Monitoring Methods'' by Wally Erickson, West, Inc. Sections included protocol development and review, methodology, adjusting for scavenging rates, and adjusting for observer detection bias.

  20. Digital techniques in HV tests; Summary of 1989 panel session

    SciTech Connect

    McComb, T.R.; Fenimore, C.; Gockenbach, E.; Kuffel, J.; Malewski, R.; Schon, K.; Van der Sluis, L.; Ward, B.; Zhang, Y.X.

    1992-10-01

    A panel session on digital techniques in HV tests was held at the IEEE PES Summer Meeting in Long Beach, CA. This panel addressed the question of how signal processing can be used to enhance High Voltage Tests and extract more information for them. Part 1 dealt with the evaluation of digitizers and records and Part 2 dealt with the application of digitizers to industrial testing. This paper presents an outline of the Panel Session and lists pertinent reference material.

  1. Psychotherapy reflections: what I seek to accomplish in psychotherapy sessions.

    PubMed

    Tryon, Georgiana Shick

    2013-09-01

    I discuss the three things that I want to accomplish in each psychotherapy session from the theoretical orientation of a cognitive-behavioral psychotherapist. They are to establish collaboration, goal consensus, and engagement with the patient. I indicate my approach to these therapy elements in the beginning, middle, and end of sessions, and provide background information and theory, fabricated case examples, and research results for each element.

  2. Modern Vaccine Adjuvant/Formulation—Session 9: Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Dalençon, François

    2013-01-01

    The Session 9 of the Modern Vaccine Adjuvant/Formulation meeting pointed out the permanent need for vaccine improvement and for adjuvant development. Indeed, the increasing use of recombinant subunit vaccines for both parenteral and mucosal vaccination necessitates the development of improved adjuvants. This session dealt with strategies for the development of new vaccine adjuvants with respect to the availability of new molecules targeting specifically the receptors of the systemic or mucosal immune system. PMID:23938771

  3. H. R. 1476: A bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to clarify the application of the credit for producing fuel from a nonconventional source with respect to gas produced from a tight formation and to make such credit permanent with respect to such gas and gas produced from Devonian shale. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, March 16, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The determination of whether gas is produced from geopressured brines, Devonian shales, coal seams, or a tight formation is made from section 503 of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978. Permanent credit is for gas produced from a tight formation or Devonian shale only and applies to gas sold after July 1, 1987. The credit allowed for any taxable year shall not exceed the sum of the regular tax reduced by the sum of other credits allowable under other subsections of the Internal Revenue Code.

  4. Evidence of Online Performance Deterioration in User Sessions on Reddit

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Philipp; Ferrara, Emilio; Kooti, Farshad; Strohmaier, Markus; Lerman, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    This article presents evidence of performance deterioration in online user sessions quantified by studying a massive dataset containing over 55 million comments posted on Reddit in April 2015. After segmenting the sessions (i.e., periods of activity without a prolonged break) depending on their intensity (i.e., how many posts users produced during sessions), we observe a general decrease in the quality of comments produced by users over the course of sessions. We propose mixed-effects models that capture the impact of session intensity on comments, including their length, quality, and the responses they generate from the community. Our findings suggest performance deterioration: Sessions of increasing intensity are associated with the production of shorter, progressively less complex comments, which receive declining quality scores (as rated by other users), and are less and less engaging (i.e., they attract fewer responses). Our contribution evokes a connection between cognitive and attention dynamics and the usage of online social peer production platforms, specifically the effects of deterioration of user performance. PMID:27560185

  5. Within-session delay-of-reinforcement gradients.

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Mark P; Lattal, Kennon A

    2004-01-01

    Within-session delay-of-reinforcement gradients were generated with pigeons by progressively increasing delays to reinforcement within each session. In Experiment 1, the effects of imposing progressive delays on variable-interval and fixed-interval schedules were investigated while controlling for simultaneous decreases in reinforcer rate across the session via a within-subject yoked-control procedure. Rate of key pecking decreased as a negatively decelerated function of delay of reinforcement within a session. These rate decreases were greater than those during a yoked-interval session in which the rate of immediate reinforcement decreased at the same rate as it did under the progressive-delay procedure. In Experiment 2, delay-of-reinforcement gradients were shallower when the progressive delay intervals were signaled by a blackout than when they were unsignaled. The delay gradients obtained in each experiment were similar to those generated under conditions in which different delays of reinforcement are imposed across blocks of sessions. The present procedure offers a technique for rapidly generating delay-of-reinforcement gradients that might serve as baselines for assessing the effects of other behavioral and pharmacological variables. PMID:15484869

  6. A comparison of presession and within-session reinforcement choice.

    PubMed Central

    Graff, R B; Libby, M E

    1999-01-01

    Single- and concurrent-operants procedures were used to evaluate the effects of two reinforcement conditions on the free-operant responding of 3 individuals with developmental disabilities and 1 with attention deficit disorder. In the presession choice condition, prior to each session the participant chose one item from an array of three different highly preferred stimuli. This item was delivered by the experimenter on each reinforcer delivery during that session. In the within-session choice condition, each reinforcer delivery consisted of placing an array of three different highly preferred stimuli in front of the participant, who was allowed to select one. Only one of the two reinforcement conditions was in effect for any particular session in single-operant phases. Buttons associated with each reinforcement condition were present, and the participant could allocate responses to one or the other in concurrent-operants phases. Data showed substantially more responding to the button associated with within-session choice than presession choice during concurrent-operants phases. This effect was not as apparent during single-operant phases, suggesting that a concurrent-operants procedure provided the more sensitive evaluation of within-session and presession reinforcer choice effects. PMID:10396769

  7. Summary of low-energy aspects of QCD and medium-energy hadron parallel sessions

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    Two sessions were organized dealing with low energy aspects of QCD. The first dealt with the issue of QCD dibaryons. The second session centered on mostly low-energy tests of QCD. This report discusses experiments dealing with these sessions.

  8. Assessing play-based activities, child talk, and single session outcome in family therapy with young children.

    PubMed

    Willis, Amber B; Walters, Lynda H; Crane, D Russell

    2014-07-01

    This exploratory, observational study was designed to reveal descriptive information regarding therapists' actual practices with preschool- and school-aged children in a single session of family therapy and to investigate change mechanisms in family play therapy that have been proposed to make this approach effective. A purposive sample of 30 families receiving family therapy was recruited and video-taped during a family session where at least one child between the ages of 4 and 12 was present. Following the session, the therapist and parent(s) completed questionnaires while one of the children (aged 4-12) was interviewed. Session recordings were coded, minute-by-minute, for participant talk time, visual aids or props used, and therapy technique type (e.g., play-based/activity vs. talk-only techniques). Hierarchical regression and canonical correlational analyses revealed evidence supporting the theory that play-based techniques promote young children's participation, enhance the quality of the child-therapist relationship, and build positive emotional experiences in family therapy.

  9. Industrial Code Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Wilbur

    1991-01-01

    The industrial codes will consist of modules of 2-D and simplified 2-D or 1-D codes, intended for expeditious parametric studies, analysis, and design of a wide variety of seals. Integration into a unified system is accomplished by the industrial Knowledge Based System (KBS), which will also provide user friendly interaction, contact sensitive and hypertext help, design guidance, and an expandable database. The types of analysis to be included with the industrial codes are interfacial performance (leakage, load, stiffness, friction losses, etc.), thermoelastic distortions, and dynamic response to rotor excursions. The first three codes to be completed and which are presently being incorporated into the KBS are the incompressible cylindrical code, ICYL, and the compressible cylindrical code, GCYL.

  10. Updating the Read Codes

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, David; Comp, Dip; Schulz, Erich; Brown, Philip; Price, Colin

    1997-01-01

    Abstract The Read Codes are a hierarchically-arranged controlled clinical vocabulary introduced in the early 1980s and now consisting of three maintained versions of differing complexity. The code sets are dynamic, and are updated quarterly in response to requests from users including clinicians in both primary and secondary care, software suppliers, and advice from a network of specialist healthcare professionals. The codes' continual evolution of content, both across and within versions, highlights tensions between different users and uses of coded clinical data. Internal processes, external interactions and new structural features implemented by the NHS Centre for Coding and Classification (NHSCCC) for user interactive maintenance of the Read Codes are described, and over 2000 items of user feedback episodes received over a 15-month period are analysed. PMID:9391934

  11. Mechanical code comparator

    DOEpatents

    Peter, Frank J.; Dalton, Larry J.; Plummer, David W.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of mechanical code comparators is described which have broad potential for application in safety, surety, and security applications. These devices can be implemented as micro-scale electromechanical systems that isolate a secure or otherwise controlled device until an access code is entered. This access code is converted into a series of mechanical inputs to the mechanical code comparator, which compares the access code to a pre-input combination, entered previously into the mechanical code comparator by an operator at the system security control point. These devices provide extremely high levels of robust security. Being totally mechanical in operation, an access control system properly based on such devices cannot be circumvented by software attack alone.

  12. Generating code adapted for interlinking legacy scalar code and extended vector code

    DOEpatents

    Gschwind, Michael K

    2013-06-04

    Mechanisms for intermixing code are provided. Source code is received for compilation using an extended Application Binary Interface (ABI) that extends a legacy ABI and uses a different register configuration than the legacy ABI. First compiled code is generated based on the source code, the first compiled code comprising code for accommodating the difference in register configurations used by the extended ABI and the legacy ABI. The first compiled code and second compiled code are intermixed to generate intermixed code, the second compiled code being compiled code that uses the legacy ABI. The intermixed code comprises at least one call instruction that is one of a call from the first compiled code to the second compiled code or a call from the second compiled code to the first compiled code. The code for accommodating the difference in register configurations is associated with the at least one call instruction.

  13. Phonological coding during reading

    PubMed Central

    Leinenger, Mallorie

    2014-01-01

    The exact role that phonological coding (the recoding of written, orthographic information into a sound based code) plays during silent reading has been extensively studied for more than a century. Despite the large body of research surrounding the topic, varying theories as to the time course and function of this recoding still exist. The present review synthesizes this body of research, addressing the topics of time course and function in tandem. The varying theories surrounding the function of phonological coding (e.g., that phonological codes aid lexical access, that phonological codes aid comprehension and bolster short-term memory, or that phonological codes are largely epiphenomenal in skilled readers) are first outlined, and the time courses that each maps onto (e.g., that phonological codes come online early (pre-lexical) or that phonological codes come online late (post-lexical)) are discussed. Next the research relevant to each of these proposed functions is reviewed, discussing the varying methodologies that have been used to investigate phonological coding (e.g., response time methods, reading while eyetracking or recording EEG and MEG, concurrent articulation) and highlighting the advantages and limitations of each with respect to the study of phonological coding. In response to the view that phonological coding is largely epiphenomenal in skilled readers, research on the use of phonological codes in prelingually, profoundly deaf readers is reviewed. Finally, implications for current models of word identification (activation-verification model (Van Order, 1987), dual-route model (e.g., Coltheart, Rastle, Perry, Langdon, & Ziegler, 2001), parallel distributed processing model (Seidenberg & McClelland, 1989)) are discussed. PMID:25150679

  14. Industrial Computer Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Wilbur

    1996-01-01

    This is an overview of new and updated industrial codes for seal design and testing. GCYLT (gas cylindrical seals -- turbulent), SPIRALI (spiral-groove seals -- incompressible), KTK (knife to knife) Labyrinth Seal Code, and DYSEAL (dynamic seal analysis) are covered. CGYLT uses G-factors for Poiseuille and Couette turbulence coefficients. SPIRALI is updated to include turbulence and inertia, but maintains the narrow groove theory. KTK labyrinth seal code handles straight or stepped seals. And DYSEAL provides dynamics for the seal geometry.

  15. Doubled Color Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravyi, Sergey

    Combining protection from noise and computational universality is one of the biggest challenges in the fault-tolerant quantum computing. Topological stabilizer codes such as the 2D surface code can tolerate a high level of noise but implementing logical gates, especially non-Clifford ones, requires a prohibitively large overhead due to the need of state distillation. In this talk I will describe a new family of 2D quantum error correcting codes that enable a transversal implementation of all logical gates required for the universal quantum computing. Transversal logical gates (TLG) are encoded operations that can be realized by applying some single-qubit rotation to each physical qubit. TLG are highly desirable since they introduce no overhead and do not spread errors. It has been known before that a quantum code can have only a finite number of TLGs which rules out computational universality. Our scheme circumvents this no-go result by combining TLGs of two different quantum codes using the gauge-fixing method pioneered by Paetznick and Reichardt. The first code, closely related to the 2D color code, enables a transversal implementation of all single-qubit Clifford gates such as the Hadamard gate and the π / 2 phase shift. The second code that we call a doubled color code provides a transversal T-gate, where T is the π / 4 phase shift. The Clifford+T gate set is known to be computationally universal. The two codes can be laid out on the honeycomb lattice with two qubits per site such that the code conversion requires parity measurements for six-qubit Pauli operators supported on faces of the lattice. I will also describe numerical simulations of logical Clifford+T circuits encoded by the distance-3 doubled color code. Based on a joint work with Andrew Cross.

  16. FAA Smoke Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Domino, Stefan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay; Gallegos, Carlos

    2006-10-27

    FAA Smoke Transport Code, a physics-based Computational Fluid Dynamics tool, which couples heat, mass, and momentum transfer, has been developed to provide information on smoke transport in cargo compartments with various geometries and flight conditions. The software package contains a graphical user interface for specification of geometry and boundary conditions, analysis module for solving the governing equations, and a post-processing tool. The current code was produced by making substantial improvements and additions to a code obtained from a university. The original code was able to compute steady, uniform, isothermal turbulent pressurization. In addition, a preprocessor and postprocessor were added to arrive at the current software package.

  17. Bar Code Labels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    American Bar Codes, Inc. developed special bar code labels for inventory control of space shuttle parts and other space system components. ABC labels are made in a company-developed anodizing aluminum process and consecutively marketed with bar code symbology and human readable numbers. They offer extreme abrasion resistance and indefinite resistance to ultraviolet radiation, capable of withstanding 700 degree temperatures without deterioration and up to 1400 degrees with special designs. They offer high resistance to salt spray, cleaning fluids and mild acids. ABC is now producing these bar code labels commercially or industrial customers who also need labels to resist harsh environments.

  18. Tokamak Systems Code

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.L.; Barrett, R.J.; Brown, T.G.; Gorker, G.E.; Hooper, R.J.; Kalsi, S.S.; Metzler, D.H.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Roth, K.E.; Spampinato, P.T.

    1985-03-01

    The FEDC Tokamak Systems Code calculates tokamak performance, cost, and configuration as a function of plasma engineering parameters. This version of the code models experimental tokamaks. It does not currently consider tokamak configurations that generate electrical power or incorporate breeding blankets. The code has a modular (or subroutine) structure to allow independent modeling for each major tokamak component or system. A primary benefit of modularization is that a component module may be updated without disturbing the remainder of the systems code as long as the imput to or output from the module remains unchanged.

  19. MORSE Monte Carlo code

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, S.N.

    1984-01-01

    The MORSE code is a large general-use multigroup Monte Carlo code system. Although no claims can be made regarding its superiority in either theoretical details or Monte Carlo techniques, MORSE has been, since its inception at ORNL in the late 1960s, the most widely used Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The principal reason for this popularity is that MORSE is relatively easy to use, independent of any installation or distribution center, and it can be easily customized to fit almost any specific need. Features of the MORSE code are described.

  20. Session 70 - Panel: Consequence Management of a Radiological Dispersion Device

    SciTech Connect

    Demmer, Rick; Lenox, Dave; Wilson, Pete; Schumann, Jean; Honerlah, Hans; Chen, S.Y.; Gwiazdowski, Gene

    2006-07-01

    This was an unusual panel session in that the panelists did not give presentations but responded to a tabletop exercise where they postulated decisions necessary after radiological dispersal device detonation event (dirty bomb). Articles in the daily WM'06 newsletter sought to prepare the participants for a simulated exercise involving the sighting of a known terrorist and the theft of radiological materials. During the slide presentation (in the form of a developing television news broadcast) the audience played decision makers and their 'votes' were tallied for multiple choice decisions and questions. After that was completed, the expert panel was asked to give their best responses for those decisions. The audience was allowed to ask questions and to give opinions as the panel responded. During the exercise the session co-chairs alternated announcing the events as they unfolded in the exercise and polled the audience using multiple-choice options for decisions to be made during the event. The answers to those questions were recorded and compared to the panelists' answers. The event chronology and decisions (audience questions) are shown in this report. - An explosion was reported at the Tucson International Airport (9:35 am). 1. Who is in charge? - Witnesses report 10-20 fatalities, 50 injured and massive damage to the airport, no cause determined yet (9:55 am). 2. IC's Next Action Should Be? - KRAD (local television station) Investigative News Reporters interviewed witnesses that observed a 25 foot U-Haul truck pull up onto the departure ramp just moments before the explosion (10:02 am). Terrorism has not been ruled out. 3. When is the incident declared a potential crime scene? - City of Tucson IC has ordered an evacuation of the airport to a holding area at a nearby long term parking area (10:10 am). No information has been given as to why the evacuation took place. The explosion is suspected to contain chemical, biological or radiological agents. County and

  1. Research on universal combinatorial coding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Zhang, Zhuo; Mo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The conception of universal combinatorial coding is proposed. Relations exist more or less in many coding methods. It means that a kind of universal coding method is objectively existent. It can be a bridge connecting many coding methods. Universal combinatorial coding is lossless and it is based on the combinatorics theory. The combinational and exhaustive property make it closely related with the existing code methods. Universal combinatorial coding does not depend on the probability statistic characteristic of information source, and it has the characteristics across three coding branches. It has analyzed the relationship between the universal combinatorial coding and the variety of coding method and has researched many applications technologies of this coding method. In addition, the efficiency of universal combinatorial coding is analyzed theoretically. The multicharacteristic and multiapplication of universal combinatorial coding are unique in the existing coding methods. Universal combinatorial coding has theoretical research and practical application value.

  2. Research on universal combinatorial coding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Zhang, Zhuo; Mo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The conception of universal combinatorial coding is proposed. Relations exist more or less in many coding methods. It means that a kind of universal coding method is objectively existent. It can be a bridge connecting many coding methods. Universal combinatorial coding is lossless and it is based on the combinatorics theory. The combinational and exhaustive property make it closely related with the existing code methods. Universal combinatorial coding does not depend on the probability statistic characteristic of information source, and it has the characteristics across three coding branches. It has analyzed the relationship between the universal combinatorial coding and the variety of coding method and has researched many applications technologies of this coding method. In addition, the efficiency of universal combinatorial coding is analyzed theoretically. The multicharacteristic and multiapplication of universal combinatorial coding are unique in the existing coding methods. Universal combinatorial coding has theoretical research and practical application value. PMID:24772019

  3. Fast Coding Unit Encoding Mechanism for Low Complexity Video Coding

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yueying; Jia, Kebin; Gao, Guandong

    2016-01-01

    In high efficiency video coding (HEVC), coding tree contributes to excellent compression performance. However, coding tree brings extremely high computational complexity. Innovative works for improving coding tree to further reduce encoding time are stated in this paper. A novel low complexity coding tree mechanism is proposed for HEVC fast coding unit (CU) encoding. Firstly, this paper makes an in-depth study of the relationship among CU distribution, quantization parameter (QP) and content change (CC). Secondly, a CU coding tree probability model is proposed for modeling and predicting CU distribution. Eventually, a CU coding tree probability update is proposed, aiming to address probabilistic model distortion problems caused by CC. Experimental results show that the proposed low complexity CU coding tree mechanism significantly reduces encoding time by 27% for lossy coding and 42% for visually lossless coding and lossless coding. The proposed low complexity CU coding tree mechanism devotes to improving coding performance under various application conditions. PMID:26999741

  4. Code of Ethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Division for Early Childhood, Council for Exceptional Children, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Code of Ethics of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children is a public statement of principles and practice guidelines supported by the mission of DEC. The foundation of this Code is based on sound ethical reasoning related to professional practice with young children with disabilities and their families…

  5. Lichenase and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2000-08-15

    The present invention provides a fungal lichenase, i.e., an endo-1,3-1,4-.beta.-D-glucanohydrolase, its coding sequence, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the lichenase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present lichenase is from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  6. Legacy Code Modernization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hribar, Michelle R.; Frumkin, Michael; Jin, Haoqiang; Waheed, Abdul; Yan, Jerry; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Over the past decade, high performance computing has evolved rapidly; systems based on commodity microprocessors have been introduced in quick succession from at least seven vendors/families. Porting codes to every new architecture is a difficult problem; in particular, here at NASA, there are many large CFD applications that are very costly to port to new machines by hand. The LCM ("Legacy Code Modernization") Project is the development of an integrated parallelization environment (IPE) which performs the automated mapping of legacy CFD (Fortran) applications to state-of-the-art high performance computers. While most projects to port codes focus on the parallelization of the code, we consider porting to be an iterative process consisting of several steps: 1) code cleanup, 2) serial optimization,3) parallelization, 4) performance monitoring and visualization, 5) intelligent tools for automated tuning using performance prediction and 6) machine specific optimization. The approach for building this parallelization environment is to build the components for each of the steps simultaneously and then integrate them together. The demonstration will exhibit our latest research in building this environment: 1. Parallelizing tools and compiler evaluation. 2. Code cleanup and serial optimization using automated scripts 3. Development of a code generator for performance prediction 4. Automated partitioning 5. Automated insertion of directives. These demonstrations will exhibit the effectiveness of an automated approach for all the steps involved with porting and tuning a legacy code application for a new architecture.

  7. Synthesizing Certified Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Michael; Schumann, Johann; Fischer, Bernd

    2002-01-01

    Code certification is a lightweight approach to demonstrate software quality on a formal level. Its basic idea is to require producers to provide formal proofs that their code satisfies certain quality properties. These proofs serve as certificates which can be checked independently. Since code certification uses the same underlying technology as program verification, it also requires many detailed annotations (e.g., loop invariants) to make the proofs possible. However, manually adding theses annotations to the code is time-consuming and error-prone. We address this problem by combining code certification with automatic program synthesis. We propose an approach to generate simultaneously, from a high-level specification, code and all annotations required to certify generated code. Here, we describe a certification extension of AUTOBAYES, a synthesis tool which automatically generates complex data analysis programs from compact specifications. AUTOBAYES contains sufficient high-level domain knowledge to generate detailed annotations. This allows us to use a general-purpose verification condition generator to produce a set of proof obligations in first-order logic. The obligations are then discharged using the automated theorem E-SETHEO. We demonstrate our approach by certifying operator safety for a generated iterative data classification program without manual annotation of the code.

  8. Combustion chamber analysis code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przekwas, A. J.; Lai, Y. G.; Krishnan, A.; Avva, R. K.; Giridharan, M. G.

    1993-05-01

    A three-dimensional, time dependent, Favre averaged, finite volume Navier-Stokes code has been developed to model compressible and incompressible flows (with and without chemical reactions) in liquid rocket engines. The code has a non-staggered formulation with generalized body-fitted-coordinates (BFC) capability. Higher order differencing methodologies such as MUSCL and Osher-Chakravarthy schemes are available. Turbulent flows can be modeled using any of the five turbulent models present in the code. A two-phase, two-liquid, Lagrangian spray model has been incorporated into the code. Chemical equilibrium and finite rate reaction models are available to model chemically reacting flows. The discrete ordinate method is used to model effects of thermal radiation. The code has been validated extensively against benchmark experimental data and has been applied to model flows in several propulsion system components of the SSME and the STME.

  9. Combustion chamber analysis code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekwas, A. J.; Lai, Y. G.; Krishnan, A.; Avva, R. K.; Giridharan, M. G.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional, time dependent, Favre averaged, finite volume Navier-Stokes code has been developed to model compressible and incompressible flows (with and without chemical reactions) in liquid rocket engines. The code has a non-staggered formulation with generalized body-fitted-coordinates (BFC) capability. Higher order differencing methodologies such as MUSCL and Osher-Chakravarthy schemes are available. Turbulent flows can be modeled using any of the five turbulent models present in the code. A two-phase, two-liquid, Lagrangian spray model has been incorporated into the code. Chemical equilibrium and finite rate reaction models are available to model chemically reacting flows. The discrete ordinate method is used to model effects of thermal radiation. The code has been validated extensively against benchmark experimental data and has been applied to model flows in several propulsion system components of the SSME and the STME.

  10. Energy Conservation Code Decoded

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Pam C.; Taylor, Zachary T.

    2006-09-01

    Designing an energy-efficient, affordable, and comfortable home is a lot easier thanks to a slime, easier to read booklet, the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), published in March 2006. States, counties, and cities have begun reviewing the new code as a potential upgrade to their existing codes. Maintained under the public consensus process of the International Code Council, the IECC is designed to do just what its title says: promote the design and construction of energy-efficient homes and commercial buildings. Homes in this case means traditional single-family homes, duplexes, condominiums, and apartment buildings having three or fewer stories. The U.S. Department of Energy, which played a key role in proposing the changes that resulted in the new code, is offering a free training course that covers the residential provisions of the 2006 IECC.

  11. Evolving genetic code

    PubMed Central

    OHAMA, Takeshi; INAGAKI, Yuji; BESSHO, Yoshitaka; OSAWA, Syozo

    2008-01-01

    In 1985, we reported that a bacterium, Mycoplasma capricolum, used a deviant genetic code, namely UGA, a “universal” stop codon, was read as tryptophan. This finding, together with the deviant nuclear genetic codes in not a few organisms and a number of mitochondria, shows that the genetic code is not universal, and is in a state of evolution. To account for the changes in codon meanings, we proposed the codon capture theory stating that all the code changes are non-disruptive without accompanied changes of amino acid sequences of proteins. Supporting evidence for the theory is presented in this review. A possible evolutionary process from the ancient to the present-day genetic code is also discussed. PMID:18941287

  12. Introduction and Overview of the Industrial Interactive Panel Session

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, David

    2014-03-01

    A unique industrial panel covering the challenges and needs of various industries and how being innovative is important. The session involves two invited industry speakers (24 minutes each) who will set the stage for the interactive round table panel session. The Panel, led by moderator Mark Bernius (Morgan Advanced Materials), consists of the two invited speakers plus an additional five industry panelists. The first thirty minutes of the panel session has the five additional panelists introducing themselves and their work/company. These introductions could include what they or their company does, sharing one or two technical highlights, listing some challenges or needs for physicists, and what innovation breakthroughs are needed in their industries. The final hour of the session will be highly interactive with questions to the panel coming from the moderator, the audience, and the panelists themselves. Questions that might be addressed include: how physicists are or could be critical in advancing innovation; how can AIP/APS/FIAP help industry get the physics help they need to be innovative (knowledge, the right staff, etc.); what role can students and post docs play in advancing industry's mission; etc. We invite you to participate in this interactive session and ask our industry experts your own interesting and challenging questions. The invited speakers are George Thompson, Intel, and Rick Watkins, Nike. The panel members also include Jason Cleveland, Asylum Research; Robert Doering, Texas Instruments; William Gallagher, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center; James Hollenhorst, Agilent Technologies; and Martin Poitzsch, Schlumberger-Doll Research.

  13. Communicating Earth Science Applications through Virtual Poster Sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favors, J. E.; Childs-Gleason, L. M.; Ross, K. W.; Ruiz, M. L.; Rogers, L.

    2013-12-01

    The DEVELOP National Program addresses environmental and public policy issues through interdisciplinary research projects that apply the lens of NASA Earth observations to community concerns around the globe. Part of NASA's Applied Sciences' Capacity Building Program, DEVELOP bridges the gap between NASA Earth Science and society, building capacity in both participants and partner organizations to better prepare them to handle the challenges that face our society and future generations. Teams of DEVELOP participants partner with decision makers to conduct rapid feasibility projects that highlight fresh applications of NASA's suite of Earth observing sensors, cultivate advanced skills, and increase understanding of NASA Earth Science data and technology. Part of this process involves the creation of short introductory videos that demonstrate the environmental concerns, project methodologies and results, and an overview of how this work will impact decision makers. These videos are presented to the public three times a year in 'virtual poster sessions' (VPS) that provide an interactive way for individuals from around the globe to access the research, understand the capabilities and applications of NASA's Earth science datasets, and interact with the participants through blogging and dialogue sessions. Virtual poster sessions have allowed DEVELOP to introduce NASA's Earth science assets to thousands of viewers around the world. For instance, one fall VPS had over 5,000 visitors from 89 different countries during the two week session. This presentation will discuss lessons learned and statistics related to the series of nine virtual poster sessions that DEVELOP has conducted 2011-2013.

  14. Theory, practice, and history in critical GIS: Reports on an AAG panel session

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, M.W.; Poore, B.S.

    2009-01-01

    Extending a special session held at the 2008 annual meeting of the Association of American Geographers in Boston, this commentary collection highlights elements of the critical GIS research agenda that are particularly pressing. Responding to a Progress report on critical GIS written by David O'Sullivan in 2006, these six commentaries discuss how different interpretations of 'critical' are traced through critical GIS research. Participants in the panel session discussed the need for a continued discussion of a code of ethics in GIS use in the context of ongoing efforts to alter or remake the software and its associated practices, of neo-geographies and volunteered geographies. There were continued calls for hope and practical ways to actualize this hope, and a recognition that critical GIS needs to remain relevant to the technology. This 'relevance' can be variously defined, and in doing so, researchers should consider their positioning vis-??-vis the technology. Throughout the commentaries collected here, a question remains as to what kind of work disciplinary sub-fields such as critical GIS and GIScience perform. This is a question about language, specifically the distance that language can create among practitioners and theoreticians, both in the case of critical GIS and more broadly throughout GIScience.

  15. Quantum convolutional codes derived from constacyclic codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Tingsu; Huang, Xinmei; Tang, Yuansheng

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, three families of quantum convolutional codes are constructed. The first one and the second one can be regarded as a generalization of Theorems 3, 4, 7 and 8 [J. Chen, J. Li, F. Yang and Y. Huang, Int. J. Theor. Phys., doi:10.1007/s10773-014-2214-6 (2014)], in the sense that we drop the constraint q ≡ 1 (mod 4). Furthermore, the second one and the third one attain the quantum generalized Singleton bound.

  16. Radiation transport phenomena and modeling. Part A: Codes; Part B: Applications with examples

    SciTech Connect

    Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Beutler, D.E.

    1997-09-01

    This report contains the notes from the second session of the 1997 IEEE Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects Conference Short Course on Applying Computer Simulation Tools to Radiation Effects Problems. Part A discusses the physical phenomena modeled in radiation transport codes and various types of algorithmic implementations. Part B gives examples of how these codes can be used to design experiments whose results can be easily analyzed and describes how to calculate quantities of interest for electronic devices.

  17. Look at the Gato! Code-Switching in Speech to Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bail, Amelie; Morini, Giovanna; Newman, Rochelle S.

    2015-01-01

    We examined code-switching (CS) in the speech of twenty-four bilingual caregivers when speaking with their 18- to 24-month-old children. All parents CS at least once in a short play session, and some code-switched quite often (over 1/3 of utterances). This CS included both inter-sentential and intra-sentential switches, suggesting that at least…

  18. Pyramid image codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1990-01-01

    All vision systems, both human and machine, transform the spatial image into a coded representation. Particular codes may be optimized for efficiency or to extract useful image features. Researchers explored image codes based on primary visual cortex in man and other primates. Understanding these codes will advance the art in image coding, autonomous vision, and computational human factors. In cortex, imagery is coded by features that vary in size, orientation, and position. Researchers have devised a mathematical model of this transformation, called the Hexagonal oriented Orthogonal quadrature Pyramid (HOP). In a pyramid code, features are segregated by size into layers, with fewer features in the layers devoted to large features. Pyramid schemes provide scale invariance, and are useful for coarse-to-fine searching and for progressive transmission of images. The HOP Pyramid is novel in three respects: (1) it uses a hexagonal pixel lattice, (2) it uses oriented features, and (3) it accurately models most of the prominent aspects of primary visual cortex. The transform uses seven basic features (kernels), which may be regarded as three oriented edges, three oriented bars, and one non-oriented blob. Application of these kernels to non-overlapping seven-pixel neighborhoods yields six oriented, high-pass pyramid layers, and one low-pass (blob) layer.

  19. Report number codes

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.N.

    1985-05-01

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

  20. Special Panel Session: Driving Critical Initiatives in Motor Speech

    PubMed Central

    Weismer, Gary; Barlow, Steven; Smith, Anne; Caviness, John

    2008-01-01

    The following report is a summary of the Special Panel Session, entitled, “Driving Critical Initiatives in Motor Speech,” that was conducted at the Conference on Motor Speech, March 2008, in Monterey California. Don Finan (Program Chair for Speech Motor Control) and Julie Liss (Program Chair for Motor Speech Disorders) invited four distinguished scientists (Drs. Gary Weismer, Steven Barlow, Anne Smith, and John Caviness) to share, briefly, their opinions and views on selected topics. This was followed by an hour-long general discussion session with conference attendees. This report contains an introductory statement followed by the panel members' own summaries of the opinions and ideas expressed in their talks. We then summarize the major topics that were considered during the discussion session. This summary reflects the biases and opinions of the participants, and is meant to serve as a thought-piece for the readership of JMSLP, rather than as a scientific report. PMID:19421339

  1. Diagnostic reading session: temporal patterns and case-order effects.

    PubMed

    Good, W F; King, J L; Sumkin, J H; Miketic, L M; Gur, D

    1994-01-01

    The authors analyzed receiver-operating-characteristic studies to determine temporal patterns and performance as a function of the elapsed time in a reading session. Nineteen radiologists each read as many as 300 chest images with use of seven different display modalities, including conventional and laser-printed film and high-resolution soft display. With a computerized reporting system, the ratio of observers' interpretation rates (time to diagnosis) were recorded for the last five and 10 compared with the first five and 10 of 30-40 cases seen in sessions lasting 45-110 minutes. Observers tended to accelerate their interpretation as the sessions progressed by an average of 15% (P < .001). The acceleration was consistent for all readers (both fast and slow) with a variety of display modes under the nonrestricted time environment.

  2. COPA to sponsor two Union sessions at AGU Spring Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folger, Peter

    Members of AGU's Committee on Public Affairs (COPA) will convene two Union sessions designed to highlight the link between geophysical research and the broader societal concerns at the upcoming AGU Spring meeting in Boston. Session U05, titled “Contaminated Groundwater and Litigation: Lessons from the Woburn Case,” will focus on the union of geophysical science and the legal system, geophysical science and health effects, and geophysical science and public participation. The Woburn, Massachusetts, toxic tort case, made popular by Jonathan Harr's book A Civil Action, will be used to illustrate the role and interaction of geophysical science with public policy in these areas. COPA members Jim Mercer and Margo Kingston will convene the session Wednesday June 5, starting at 8:30 a.m. in room CC302.

  3. Leveraging user query sessions to improve searching of medical literature.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shiwen; Hristidis, Vagelis; Weiner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Published reports about searching medical literature do not refer to leveraging the query context, as expressed by previous queries in a session. We aimed to assess novel strategies for context-aware searching, hypothesizing that this would be better than baseline. Building upon methods using term frequency-inverse document frequency, we added extensions such as a function incorporating search results and terms of previous queries, with higher weights for more recent queries. Among 60 medical students generating queries against the TREC 9 benchmark dataset, we assessed recall and mean average precision. For difficult queries, we achieved improvement (27%) in average precision over baseline. Improvements in recall were also seen. Our methods outperformed baseline by 4% to 14% on average. Furthermore, the effectiveness of context-aware search was greater for longer query sessions, which are typically more challenging. In conclusion, leveraging the previous queries in a session improved overall search quality with this biomedical database.

  4. IFESS 2005 Special Session 5 Artifical Vision. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, James D.

    2005-07-05

    A special session on visual prostheses was held during the Annual Meeting of the International Functional Electrical Stimulation Society (IFESS), in Montreal, Canada, July 5-9, 2005. IFESS is a meeting that typically attracts researchers in implantable nerve stimulators, functional electrical stimulation, and rehabilitation. All of these areas have significant overlap with the retinal prosthesis, but these areas have decades of research behind them. The special session provided a forum for researchers with vast experience in nerve stimulation to interact with leading research in retinal and cortical visual prostheses. The grant paid for the travel and conference costs of the presenters in the session. The session was chaired by James Weiland (the PI on this grant). The session co-chair was Phil Troyk, Ph.D., from the Illinois Institute of Technology. The Department of Energy was acknowledged at the start of the session as the sponsor. The following talks were delivered: Clinical Trial of a Prototype Retinal Prosthesis James Weiland, Ph.D. Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, California The U.S. Department of Energy's Artificial Sight Program Elias Greenbaum, Ph.D. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee A 16-Channel stimulator ASIC for use in an intracortical visual prosthesis Phillip R. Troyk, Ph.D. Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois Two approaches to the Optic Nerve Visual Prosthesis Jean Delbeke, M.D. University Cath de Louvain, Louvain, Belgium Design and Implementation of High Power Efficiency Modules for a Cortical Visual Stimulator Mohammad Sawan, Ph.D. Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, Canada Remaining funds from the grant were used to support Dr. Weiland's travel to the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology in May 2006, with DOE approval, where several projects, supported by the DOE artificial retina program, were presented.

  5. Teacher in Space Participants testing space food in orientation session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Teacher in Space Participant Christa McAuliffe appears to be enjoying her first taste of space food during an orientation session in JSC's life sciences laboratory (39977); McAuliffe, left, appears to be deciding what she thinks of a piece of space food she tastes during an orientation session. Barbara R. Morgan, backup to McAuliffe, samples an apricot. Dr. C.T. Bourland, a dietician specialist, assists the two (39978); McAuliffe (left) chews on a morsel while Morgan reaches for a bite. Dr. Bourland looks on (39979).

  6. Summary of Session Activities: Coordination of Environmental Education Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeler, Michael; Mahootian, Farzad

    1995-01-01

    In this session, we address four fundamental questions related to environmental fields with emphasis on education. These are: What are the goals, objectives, and practical opportunities for coordinating our projects? How can we improve awareness of, interest in, access to, and support the products of our work? How can we build relationships between projects for scientific, educational, technical, and programmatic benefit? How can we evaluate the effectiveness of coordination efforts. In this working session, we produced answers to these questions and proposed a structure for future collaboration.

  7. Mini-conference and Related Sessions on Laboratory Plasma Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Hantao Ji

    2004-02-27

    This paper provides a summary of some major physics issues and future perspectives discussed in the Mini-Conference on Laboratory Plasma Astrophysics. This Mini-conference, sponsored by the Topical Group on Plasma Astrophysics, was held as part of the American Physical Society's Division of Plasma Physics 2003 Annual Meeting (October 27-31, 2003). Also included are brief summaries of selected talks on the same topic presented at two invited paper sessions (including a tutorial) and two contributed focus oral sessions, which were organized in coordination with the Mini-Conference by the same organizers.

  8. Highlights of session presentations. TSS / CST population IEC meeting.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    The great deal of documentation which was prepared for the recent TSS/CST Population IEC (information, education, and communication) meeting from research, field experiments, and action projects will be useful to TSS/CST advisors and individual countries undertaking IEC and population education work. This article summarizes the 12 sessions held during the open forum. To illustrate some of the latest trends in population and health communication, the "enter-educate" approach and use of the interactive computer software called SCOPE (Strategic Communication Planning and Evaluation) were discussed. Next, ways in which to apply research effectively in IEC and population education were considered. Examples were provided of 1) a workshop methodology used to help a multidisciplinary group design a problem-solving communication strategy in Malaysia and Dominica; 2) the counseling training evaluation technique based on the GATHER (greet, ask, tell, help, explain, and return for follow-up) model; and 3) four types of evaluation of population education in schools. The third session was concerned with the program approach used in IEC and population education. Session 4 dealt with the implication of UNFPA support to family planning (FP) IEC. Counseling skills training and interpersonal communication were next on the agenda, followed by a consideration of how knowledge and policies are applied in the area of youth. The seventh session concentrated on ways to involve men in FP and reproductive health and included a discussion of a case study on the attitude and behavior of men with regard to FP which had IEC implications. The next session described the need to reconceptualize population education and what such a reconceptualization would entail. Session 9 was devoted to a consideration of gender issues and the education of girls. The tenth session covered the use of participatory approaches and community involvement in population communication programs. Innovative methodologies

  9. The Second ICASE/LaRC Industry Roundtable: Session Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, Sharath

    1997-01-01

    The second ICASE/LaRC Industry Roundtable was held October 7-9, 1996 at the Williamsburg Hospitality House, Williamsburg, Virginia. Like the first roundtable in 1994, this meeting had two objectives: (1) to expose ICASE and LaRC scientists to industrial research agendas; and (2) to acquaint industry with the capabilities and technology available at ICASE, LaRC and academic partners of ICASE. Nineteen sessions were held in three parallel tracks. Of the 170 participants, over one third were affiliated with various industries. Proceedings from the different sessions are summarized in this report.

  10. Sessions on history of space and geophysics spark interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    Three sessions at international conferences were held in 1997 to discuss the history of space and geophysics and its different disciplines. The first session was held during the Assembly of the German Geophysical Society in March in Potsdam, Germany. Topics included the theory of relativity and gravitation in geophysics; work by Albert Abraham Michelson, Leon Foucault, and Ernst Mach; work by Hermann von Helmholtz; and the physical application and geophysical evidence of Werner Heisenberg's research. Also included were discussions relevant to the history of geophysics, aeronomy, meteor astronomy, and geodetical research, including developments in instrumentation during the last few decades.

  11. The first ICASE/LARC industry roundtable: Session proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, Sharath

    1995-01-01

    The first 'ICASE/LaRC Industry Roundtable' was held on October 3-4, 1994, in Williamsburg, Virginia. The main purpose of the roundtable was to draw attention of ICASE/LaRC scientists to industrial research agendas. The roundtable was attended by about 200 scientists, 30% from NASA Langley; 20% from universities; 17% NASA Langley contractors (including ICASE personnel); and the remainder from federal agencies other than NASA Langley. The technical areas covered reflected the major research programs in ICASE and closely associated NASA branches. About 80% of the speakers were from industry. This report is a compilation of the session summaries prepared by the session chairmen.

  12. ASIS '99 Knowledge: Creation, Organization and Use, Part III: Plenary Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIS Annual Meeting, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Describes the following sessions: "Knowledge Management: A Celebration of Humans Connected with Quality Information Objects (Plenary Session 1); "Intellectual Property Rights and the Emerging Information Infrastructure (Plenary Session 2); and "Knowledge: Creation, Organization and Use (Conference Wrap-up Session). (AEF)

  13. International code of nomenclature of prokaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Garrity, George M.; Parker, Charles T.; Tindall, Brian J.

    2015-11-20

    Here, this volume contains the edition of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes that was presented in draft form and available for comment at the Plenary Session of the Fourteenth International Congress of Bacteriology and Applied Microbiology (BAM), Montréal, 2014, together with updated lists of conserved and rejected bacterial names and of Opinions issued by the Judicial Commission. As in the past it brings together those changes accepted, published and documented by the ICSP and the Judicial Commission since the last revision was published. Several new appendices have been added to this edition. Appendix 11 addresses the appropriate application of the Candidatus concept, Appendix 12 contains the history of the van Niel Prize, and Appendix 13 contains the summaries of Congresses.

  14. International code of nomenclature of prokaryotes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Garrity, George M.; Parker, Charles T.; Tindall, Brian J.

    2015-11-20

    Here, this volume contains the edition of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes that was presented in draft form and available for comment at the Plenary Session of the Fourteenth International Congress of Bacteriology and Applied Microbiology (BAM), Montréal, 2014, together with updated lists of conserved and rejected bacterial names and of Opinions issued by the Judicial Commission. As in the past it brings together those changes accepted, published and documented by the ICSP and the Judicial Commission since the last revision was published. Several new appendices have been added to this edition. Appendix 11 addresses the appropriate applicationmore » of the Candidatus concept, Appendix 12 contains the history of the van Niel Prize, and Appendix 13 contains the summaries of Congresses.« less

  15. Compressible Astrophysics Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, L.; Singer, M.

    2007-07-18

    This is an astrophysics simulation code involving a radiation diffusion module developed at LLNL coupled to compressible hydrodynamics and adaptive mesh infrastructure developed at LBNL. One intended application is to neutrino diffusion in core collapse supernovae.

  16. EthoLog 2.2: a tool for the transcription and timing of behavior observation sessions.

    PubMed

    Ottoni, E B

    2000-08-01

    EthoLog is a tool that aids in the transcription and timing of behavior observation sessions--experimental or naturalistic, from video/audio tapes or registering real time. It was created with Visual Basic and runs on Windows (3.x/9x). The user types the key codes for the predefined behavioral categories, and EthoLog registers their sequence and timing and saves the resulting data in ASCII output files. A sequential analysis matrix can be generated from the sequential data. The output files may be edited, converted to plain text files for printing, or exported to a spreadsheet program, such as MS Excel, for further analyses.

  17. Functions of Arabic-English Code-Switching: Sociolinguistic Insights from a Study Abroad Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Masaeed, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    This sociolinguistic study examines the functions and motivations of code-switching, which is used here to mean the use of more than one language in the same conversation. The conversations studied here take place in a very particular context: one-on-one speaking sessions in a study abroad program in Morocco where English is the L1 and Arabic the…

  18. Differences between a single session and repeated sessions of 1 Hz TMS by double-cone coil prefrontal stimulation for the improvement of tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Vanneste, Sven; De Ridder, Dirk

    2013-03-01

    Tinnitus related distress is associated with increased activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). In a recent study, it was demonstrated that a single session of low frequency prefrontal TMS using a double-cone coil (DCC) modulating the ACC (AC/DC TMS, anterior cingulate cortex targeted modulation by Double-Cone coil) yields a transient improvement in subjects with chronic tinnitus. An increasing number of studies demonstrated that repeated sessions of low frequency TMS to the temporoparietal area can significantly improve tinnitus complaints. Our aim is to determine the extent to which repeated sessions of AC/DC TMS can modulate tinnitus in comparison to a single session. Seventy-three tinnitus patients received a single (N = 46) or repetitive (N = 27) session(s) of TMS using a DCC placed over the prefrontal cortex. Our results indicate that both single sessions as well as multiple sessions (i.e. 8 sessions) of AC/DC TMS suppress both tinnitus distress (respectively 7.60% vs. 26.19%) and tinnitus intensity (respectively 7.12% vs. 19.60%) transiently. It was further shown that multiple sessions of AC/DC TMS generate a higher suppression effect in comparison to a single session of AC/DC TMS and that more patients responded to repeated sessions of 1 Hz stimulation in comparison to a single session. Our findings give further support to the fact that non-auditory areas are involved in tinnitus intensity and tinnitus distress and that more patients respond to repeated sessions with a higher suppression effect in comparison to patients who received a single session, suggesting that the approach of daily TMS sessions is relevant.

  19. Seals Flow Code Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    In recognition of a deficiency in the current modeling capability for seals, an effort was established by NASA to develop verified computational fluid dynamic concepts, codes, and analyses for seals. The objectives were to develop advanced concepts for the design and analysis of seals, to effectively disseminate the information to potential users by way of annual workshops, and to provide experimental verification for the models and codes under a wide range of operating conditions.

  20. Robust Nonlinear Neural Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qianli; Pitkow, Xaq

    2015-03-01

    Most interesting natural sensory stimuli are encoded in the brain in a form that can only be decoded nonlinearly. But despite being a core function of the brain, nonlinear population codes are rarely studied and poorly understood. Interestingly, the few existing models of nonlinear codes are inconsistent with known architectural features of the brain. In particular, these codes have information content that scales with the size of the cortical population, even if that violates the data processing inequality by exceeding the amount of information entering the sensory system. Here we provide a valid theory of nonlinear population codes by generalizing recent work on information-limiting correlations in linear population codes. Although these generalized, nonlinear information-limiting correlations bound the performance of any decoder, they also make decoding more robust to suboptimal computation, allowing many suboptimal decoders to achieve nearly the same efficiency as an optimal decoder. Although these correlations are extremely difficult to measure directly, particularly for nonlinear codes, we provide a simple, practical test by which one can use choice-related activity in small populations of neurons to determine whether decoding is suboptimal or optimal and limited by correlated noise. We conclude by describing an example computation in the vestibular system where this theory applies. QY and XP was supported by a grant from the McNair foundation.

  1. KENO-V code

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, S.N.

    1984-01-01

    The KENO-V code is the current release of the Oak Ridge multigroup Monte Carlo criticality code development. The original KENO, with 16 group Hansen-Roach cross sections and P/sub 1/ scattering, was one ot the first multigroup Monte Carlo codes and it and its successors have always been a much-used research tool for criticality studies. KENO-V is able to accept large neutron cross section libraries (a 218 group set is distributed with the code) and has a general P/sub N/ scattering capability. A supergroup feature allows execution of large problems on small computers, but at the expense of increased calculation time and system input/output operations. This supergroup feature is activated automatically by the code in a manner which utilizes as much computer memory as is available. The primary purpose of KENO-V is to calculate the system k/sub eff/, from small bare critical assemblies to large reflected arrays of differing fissile and moderator elements. In this respect KENO-V neither has nor requires the many options and sophisticated biasing techniques of general Monte Carlo codes.

  2. Coded aperture compressive temporal imaging.

    PubMed

    Llull, Patrick; Liao, Xuejun; Yuan, Xin; Yang, Jianbo; Kittle, David; Carin, Lawrence; Sapiro, Guillermo; Brady, David J

    2013-05-01

    We use mechanical translation of a coded aperture for code division multiple access compression of video. We discuss the compressed video's temporal resolution and present experimental results for reconstructions of > 10 frames of temporal data per coded snapshot.

  3. American Association of Dental Schools Annual Session & Exposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    The planned program of the 77th annual meeting of the American Association of Dental Schools, "Strengthening Alliances, Expanding Horizons," comprises this special issue, which includes information on plenary session speakers, daily programs, TechnoFair clinics and workshops, section programs and meetings, faculty development workshops, exposition…

  4. Factors Influencing Consent to Having Videotaped Mental Health Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ko, Kenton; Goebert, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors critically reviewed the literature regarding factors influencing consent to having videotaped mental health sessions. Methods: The authors searched the literature in PubMed, PsycINFO, Google Scholar, and Web of Science from the mid-1950s through February 2009. Results: The authors identified 27 studies, of which 19 (73%)…

  5. Closed Conference Signalling Using the Session Initiation Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miladinovic, Igor; Stadler, Johannes

    2003-01-01

    Introduces an extension of the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) for closed multiparty conferences; the extension expands SIP for discovery of participant identities in a conference, and ensures that each participant is notified before a new participant joins. Verifies this extension by applying it to two SIP conference models. Concludes with an…

  6. Our Place in the Universe. Session 1; History of Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi

    2016-01-01

    This session includes a very broad overview of a couple of the major ideas of astronomy, along with demonstrations of Earth's motions that, give rise to the seasons, show us the "faces" of Venus (and the Moon), and result in retrograde motion of the outer planets.

  7. Setting the Standards for Sessional Staff: Quality Learning and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Across the Australian Higher Education sector a focus on quality is driving a new paradigm for learning and teaching: quality standards. One challenge is to engage all academics with this progress towards systematic quality enhancement and assurance. Sessional staff, who provide most of the face-to-face teaching in Australian universities, remain…

  8. Using Simulated Sessions to Enhance Clinical Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooradian, John K.

    2008-01-01

    This article evaluates a learning method that used theatre students as family clients in an advanced social work practice course. Data from 47 advanced graduate students showed that observing peers conduct simulated sessions can be an effective and valued learning experience. Quantitative findings indicated that simulations are perceived to be…

  9. The Facilitator's Edge: Group Sessions for Edge-ucators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handcock, Helen

    The Facilitator's Edge is a workshop series based on the life/work messages of The Edge magazine. The workshops are deigned to help educators, youth workers, and their career practitioners facilitate conscious career building. This manual consists of five group sessions, each focusing on a different career-building theme. "Megatrends and Making it…

  10. Attitudes of Healthcare Students on Gross Anatomy Laboratory Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawashiro, Yukiko; Anahara, Reiko; Kohno, Toshihiko; Mori, Chisato; Matsuno, Yoshiharu

    2009-01-01

    At Chiba University, gross anatomy laboratory sessions ("laboratories") are required for physical therapy students. Though most physical therapy schools require their students to participate in laboratories so that they will better understand the structure of the human body, few data exist on the value of these laboratories specifically for…

  11. Organizing and Conducting Farmer-Scientist Focus Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lev, Larry S.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Farmer-scientist focus sessions represent a means by which participants exchange ideas for action, identify researchable topics, and enhance long-term farmer-scientist team work. Three examples involving controlling weeds, disposal of cull onion, and food safety concerns are described that illustrate the types of issues treated, the format, and…

  12. Effects of Psychotherapy Training and Intervention Use on Session Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boswell, James F.; Castonguay, Louis G.; Wasserman, Rachel H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study was an investigation of the relationships among therapist training variables, psychotherapy process, and session outcome in a psychotherapy training clinic. The aims were to assess the relationship between "training as usual" and intervention use in individual psychotherapy, to investigate the relationship between therapist…

  13. Freshman Orientation Sessions Can Teach Incoming Students about Healthful Lifestyles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Marjorie R.; Waldrop, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This GEM describes the "Freshman 15 Jeopardy" workshop, a 30-minute nutrition education session aimed to expose incoming college freshmen to the college food environment, to increase their awareness of factors that cause weight gain, and to instruct them on lifestyle choices they could employ to prevent weight gain. This short workshop has not…

  14. Hypnosis and Smoking: A Five-Session Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Helen H.

    An active five-session, individualized treatment approach to the stopping of smoking is described. This approach emphasized the following: (a) the feedback, in and out of hypnosis, of the client's own reasons for quitting, (b) the visualization of both positive and negative smoking experiences meaningful to the client, (c) maintaining contact with…

  15. Dominance and Peer Tutoring Sessions with English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Diana Calhoun; Elledge, Sara Redington

    2008-01-01

    In order to better understand the complex dynamic that often occurs during writing center sessions between native English speaking (L1) tutors and English language learners (ELL), this study investigates linguistic dominance through time-at-talk, turn-taking, agenda-setting, and content analysis. We conclude that, in keeping with theory and…

  16. Anger and Violence Prevention: Enhancing Treatment Effects through Booster Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Alysha; McWhirter, Paula T.; McWhirter, J. Jeffries

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of booster sessions on the maintenance of intervention gains following an anger management prevention program: "Student Created Aggression Replacement Education Program" ("SCARE"). Participants who had completed the "SCARE" program a year earlier were randomly assigned into either a booster…

  17. Training Sessions Provide Working Knowledge of National Animal Identification System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaze, J. Benton, Jr.; Ahola, Jason K.

    2010-01-01

    One in-service and two train-the-trainer workshops were conducted by University of Idaho Extension faculty, Idaho State Department of Agriculture personnel, and allied industry representatives to increase Extension educators' knowledge and awareness of the National Animal Identification System (NAIS) and related topics. Training sessions included…

  18. STS 51-G simulate meal session on orbiter's middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Three members of the STS 51-G crew simulate a meal session on the orbiter's middeck during training in the crew compartment trainer at JSC's shuttle mockup and integration facility. Pictured (l.-r.) are Sultan Salman Abdelzize Al-Saud, John N. Fabian and Patrick Baudry. Fabian is a mission specialist and the other two men are payload specialists.

  19. 78 FR 33074 - Army Science Board Summer Study Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Session AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: 1. Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). 2. Date: Wednesday, July...

  20. Implementing Problem-Based Learning in the Counseling Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Kimberly R.

    This study examined the use of problem-based learning (PBL) in an actual counseling session and the effects on student assertiveness skills. A group of seventh-grade students, who were all victims of bullies, participated in the study. The students, two boys and one girls, were 13 and 14 years old. Teachers rated the level of assertiveness skills…

  1. Academic Aspirations amongst Sessional Tutors in a New Zealand University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Kathryn A.; Gilbert, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    In New Zealand, as in many other western societies, the higher education system has become an increasingly less secure place in which to work, and over 40 per cent of those teaching in New Zealand higher education are sessional staff of some kind. Our university in New Zealand has long relied on part-time paid tutors, many of whom are students…

  2. Clinical Teaching by Video-Enhanced Study Club Discussion Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Douglass B.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The Loma Linda University School of Dentistry's "study club" method of teaching operative dentistry involves a four-hour clinical operating session and an hour-long discussion immediately following. Videotape recordings of the operative procedures are used successfully in the discussion period to enhance observation and recall. (MSE)

  3. Client Good Moments: An Intensive Analysis of a Single Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalikas, Anastassios; Fitzpatrick, Marilyn

    1995-01-01

    An intensive analysis of a single counseling session conducted by Fritz Perls was carried out to examine relationships among client experiencing level, client strength of feeling, counselor interventions, and client good moments. The possibility that positive therapeutic outcome is related to the accretion of good moments is discussed. (JBJ)

  4. Discussant Remarks on Session: Statistical Aspects of Measuring the Internet

    SciTech Connect

    Cottrell, Les

    1999-04-02

    These remarks will briefly summarize what we learn from the talks in this session, and add some more areas in Internet Measurement that may provide challenges for statisticians. It will also point out some reasons why statisticians may be interested in working in this area.

  5. Summary of the Open Session at the IMC 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeeck, C.; Argo, M.; Brown, P.; Molau, S.; Rendtel, J.; Martínez Picar, A.

    2016-01-01

    The Open Session at the IMC 2016 took place on Friday, June 3rd 2016 evening (21:30-22:30) and was intended to accommodate beginners' questions about meteor astronomy. Megan Argo moderated a panel of experts, consisting of Peter Brown, Sirko Molau, Jürgen Rendtel, and Antonio Martínez Picar.

  6. 1979 Summer Session Survey. Research Study Number 79-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Ben K.

    A survey of 1,074 students and 77 faculty members at Los Angeles City College (LACC), as well as 5,710 students and 505 teachers districtwide, was conducted in classes meeting on July 10, 1979, to obtain reactions to the 1979 summer session "four-day" schedule, i.e., courses were scheduled only Monday through Thursday. The student questionnaire…

  7. Astronauts Armstrong and Scott during photo session outside KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong (left), command pilot, and David R. Scott, pilot, the Gemini 8 prime crew, during a photo session outside the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Mission Control Center. Both men are wearing full space suits and carring their helmets.

  8. Definitional Ceremonies: Integrating Community into Multicultural Counseling Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitter, James Robert; Robertson, Patricia E.; Roig, Grace; Disqueact, J. Graham

    2004-01-01

    Definitional Ceremonies are used as a forum for integrating members of diverse cultures into multicultural counseling sessions. The authors provide a philosophical foundation, implementation process, and excerpts from a typescript of a recent definitional ceremony involving a women and her mother, both recently in the United States from Panama.

  9. The Tenth Regular Session of UNEP's Governing Council: Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uniterra, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Highlights the tenth session of the United Nation's Governing Council. Indicates that a clearer course is needed for the United Nations Environment Programme and that additional funds are desirable. Includes an edited extract of Dr. Mustafa Tolba's (UNEP's Executive Director) closing address. (Author/JN)

  10. Session on coupled atmospheric/chemistry coupled models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne

    1993-01-01

    The session on coupled atmospheric/chemistry coupled models is reviewed. Current model limitations, current issues and critical unknowns, and modeling activity are addressed. Specific recommendations and experimental strategies on the following are given: multiscale surface layer - planetary boundary layer - chemical flux measurements; Eulerian budget study; and Langrangian experiment. Nonprecipitating cloud studies, organized convective systems, and aerosols - heterogenous chemistry are also discussed.

  11. Peer Assisted Study Sessions (PASS): Does Gender Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geerlings, Peter M.; Cole, Helen; Batt, Sharryn; Martin-Lynch, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Peer-learning is an effective way to assist students to acquire study skills and content knowledge, especially in university courses that students find difficult, and it is an effective adjunct to improve student retention. In 2014, Murdoch University in Perth, Western Australia, commenced Peer Assisted Study Sessions (PASS) in two first-year…

  12. Practical session assessments in human anatomy: Weightings and performance.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Aaron C; Chan, Siew-Pang; Schuijers, Johannes A

    2016-07-01

    Assessment weighting within a given module can be a motivating factor for students when deciding on their commitment level and time given to study a specific topic. In this study, an analysis of assessment performances of second year anatomy students was performed over four years to determine if (1) students performed better when a higher weighting was given to a set of practical session assessments and (2) whether an improved performance in the practical session assessments had a carry-over effect on other assessment tasks within that anatomy module and/or other anatomy modules that follow. Results showed that increasing the weighting of practical session assessments improved the average mark in that assessment and also improved the percentage of students passing that assessment. Further, it significantly improved performance in the written end-semester examination within the same module and had a carry-over effect on the anatomy module taught in the next teaching period, as students performed better in subsequent practical session assessments as well as subsequent end-semester examinations. It was concluded that the weighting of assessments had significant influences on a student's performance in that, and subsequent, assessments. It is postulated that practical session assessments, designed to develop deep learning skills in anatomy, improved efficacy in student performance in assessments undertaken in that and subsequent anatomy modules when the weighting of these assessments was greater. These deep learning skills were also transferable to other methods of assessing anatomy. Anat Sci Educ 9: 330-336. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  13. Single-Session Radiofrequency Ablation of Bilateral Lung Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Palussiere, Jean Gomez, Fernando; Cannella, Matthieu; Ferron, Stephane; Descat, Edouard; Fonck, Marianne; Brouste, Veronique; Avril, Antoine

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: This retrospective study examined the feasibility and efficacy of bilateral lung radiofrequency ablation (RFA) performed in a single session. Methods: From 2002-2009, patients with bilateral lung metastases were treated by RFA, where possible in a single session under general anesthesia with CT guidance. The second lung was punctured only if no complications occurred after treatment of the first lung. Five lung metastases maximum per patient were treated by RFA and prospectively followed. The primary endpoint was the evaluation of acute and delayed complications. Secondary endpoints were calculation of hospitalization duration, local efficacy, median survival, and median time to tumor progression. Local efficacy was evaluated on CT or positron emission tomography (PET) CT. Results: Sixty-seven patients were treated for bilateral lung metastases with RFA (mean age, 62 years). Single-session treatment was not possible in 40 due to severe pneumothoraces (n = 24), bilateral pleural contact (n = 14), and operational exclusions (n = 2). Twenty-seven (41%) received single-session RFA of lesions in both lungs for 66 metastases overall. Fourteen unilateral and four bilateral pneumothoraces occurred (18 overall, 66.7%). Unilateral (n = 13) and bilateral (n = 2) chest tube drainage was required. Median hospitalization was 3 (range, 2-8) days. Median survival was 26 months (95% confidence interval (CI), 19-33). Four recurrences on RFA sites were observed (4 patients). Median time to tumor progression was 9.5 months (95% CI, 4.2-23.5). Conclusions: Although performing single-session bilateral lung RFA is not always possible due to pneumothoraces after RFA of first lung, when it is performed, this technique is safe and effective.

  14. New residential construction compliance: Evaluation of the Washington State Energy Code program

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, W.M.; Lee, A.D.; Sandahl, L.J.; Durfee, D.L.; Richman, E.E.

    1993-07-01

    This report describes the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL`s) evaluation of the Washington State Energy Code Program (WSECP). In 1990, the Washington State Legislature passed a residential energy efficiency code to be effective July 1, 1992. Bonneville supported passage and implementation of the code to ensure that new residences in the State of Washington were as energy efficient as economically feasible. The Washington State Energy Office (WSEO) is conducting the WSECP for Bonneville to support code implementation. This support takes several forms, including providing training to code enforcement officials, technical support both in the field and through telephone ``hot lines,`` and computerized tools to review house plans for code compliance. WSEO began implementing the WSECP in 1992, prior to the effective date of the new code. This first phase of the WSECP was the subject of an earlier process evaluation conducted by PNL. From that evaluation PNL found that most new homes being built immediately after the code went into effect were ``grand-fathered`` under the old code. The training program for the new code was in place and sessions were being attended by the jurisdictions but it was too early to determine if the training was effective in improving code compliance and easing the transition to the new energy code. That is the subject of this evaluation.

  15. Prioritized LT Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Simon S.; Cheng, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    The original Luby Transform (LT) coding scheme is extended to account for data transmissions where some information symbols in a message block are more important than others. Prioritized LT codes provide unequal error protection (UEP) of data on an erasure channel by modifying the original LT encoder. The prioritized algorithm improves high-priority data protection without penalizing low-priority data recovery. Moreover, low-latency decoding is also obtained for high-priority data due to fast encoding. Prioritized LT codes only require a slight change in the original encoding algorithm, and no changes at all at the decoder. Hence, with a small complexity increase in the LT encoder, an improved UEP and low-decoding latency performance for high-priority data can be achieved. LT encoding partitions a data stream into fixed-sized message blocks each with a constant number of information symbols. To generate a code symbol from the information symbols in a message, the Robust-Soliton probability distribution is first applied in order to determine the number of information symbols to be used to compute the code symbol. Then, the specific information symbols are chosen uniform randomly from the message block. Finally, the selected information symbols are XORed to form the code symbol. The Prioritized LT code construction includes an additional restriction that code symbols formed by a relatively small number of XORed information symbols select some of these information symbols from the pool of high-priority data. Once high-priority data are fully covered, encoding continues with the conventional LT approach where code symbols are generated by selecting information symbols from the entire message block including all different priorities. Therefore, if code symbols derived from high-priority data experience an unusual high number of erasures, Prioritized LT codes can still reliably recover both high- and low-priority data. This hybrid approach decides not only "how to encode

  16. SUMMARY OF GENERAL WORKING GROUP A+B+D: CODES BENCHMARKING.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.; SHAPOSHNIKOVA, E.; ZIMMERMANN, F.; HOFMANN, I.

    2006-05-29

    Computer simulation is an indispensable tool in assisting the design, construction, and operation of accelerators. In particular, computer simulation complements analytical theories and experimental observations in understanding beam dynamics in accelerators. The ultimate function of computer simulation is to study mechanisms that limit the performance of frontier accelerators. There are four goals for the benchmarking of computer simulation codes, namely debugging, validation, comparison and verification: (1) Debugging--codes should calculate what they are supposed to calculate; (2) Validation--results generated by the codes should agree with established analytical results for specific cases; (3) Comparison--results from two sets of codes should agree with each other if the models used are the same; and (4) Verification--results from the codes should agree with experimental measurements. This is the summary of the joint session among working groups A, B, and D of the HI32006 Workshop on computer codes benchmarking.

  17. Induction technology optimization code

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.; Brooks, A.L.; Kirbie, H.C.

    1992-08-21

    A code has been developed to evaluate relative costs of induction accelerator driver systems for relativistic klystrons. The code incorporates beam generation, transport and pulsed power system constraints to provide an integrated design tool. The code generates an injector/accelerator combination which satisfies the top level requirements and all system constraints once a small number of design choices have been specified (rise time of the injector voltage and aspect ratio of the ferrite induction cores, for example). The code calculates dimensions of accelerator mechanical assemblies and values of all electrical components. Cost factors for machined parts, raw materials and components are applied to yield a total system cost. These costs are then plotted as a function of the two design choices to enable selection of an optimum design based on various criteria. The Induction Technology Optimization Study (ITOS) was undertaken to examine viable combinations of a linear induction accelerator and a relativistic klystron (RK) for high power microwave production. It is proposed, that microwaves from the RK will power a high-gradient accelerator structure for linear collider development. Previous work indicates that the RK will require a nominal 3-MeV, 3-kA electron beam with a 100-ns flat top. The proposed accelerator-RK combination will be a high average power system capable of sustained microwave output at a 300-Hz pulse repetition frequency. The ITOS code models many combinations of injector, accelerator, and pulse power designs that will supply an RK with the beam parameters described above.

  18. Coded source neutron imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, Philip R; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2011-01-01

    Coded aperture techniques have been applied to neutron radiography to address limitations in neutron flux and resolution of neutron detectors in a system labeled coded source imaging (CSI). By coding the neutron source, a magnified imaging system is designed with small spot size aperture holes (10 and 100 m) for improved resolution beyond the detector limits and with many holes in the aperture (50% open) to account for flux losses due to the small pinhole size. An introduction to neutron radiography and coded aperture imaging is presented. A system design is developed for a CSI system with a development of equations for limitations on the system based on the coded image requirements and the neutron source characteristics of size and divergence. Simulation has been applied to the design using McStas to provide qualitative measures of performance with simulations of pinhole array objects followed by a quantitative measure through simulation of a tilted edge and calculation of the modulation transfer function (MTF) from the line spread function. MTF results for both 100um and 10um aperture hole diameters show resolutions matching the hole diameters.

  19. Exploring the Affective Inner Experiences of Therapists in Training: The Qualitative Interaction between Session Experience and Session Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, John L.; Nofzinger-Collins, Dawn; Wynne, Martha E.; Susman, Marilyn

    2005-01-01

    Thirty-four 1st-year counseling students recorded their inner experiences following a simulated counseling session. Using a qualitative collective case study approach to extract emotion from a large pool of inner experience, 6 judges identified samples of affect through a triangulation process using intensity, extreme, and critical case sampling…

  20. IFLA General Conference, 1990. Official Opening and Plenary Session; Open Forum on IFLA's Core Programmes; Contributed Papers Session. Booklet 0.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    The 15 papers in this collection include opening remarks, reports on core programs of the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA), and papers from a contributed papers session. Contents are: (1) "Opening Speech of the IFLA General Conference: Stockholm 1990" (Hans-Peter Geh), in German, with an English translation; (2) "The IFLA…

  1. IFLA General Conference, 1992. Opening Session; Plenary Session; Core Programme for the Universal Availability of Publications (UAP). Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, London (England).

    Papers from the opening session of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) conference are presented. "New Beginnings" (Robert Wedgeworth) opens the conference and pays tribute to S. R. Ranganathan, in whose memory the conference was dedicated, and William Warner Bishop, also a past president of IFLA. "Library…

  2. IFLA General Conference, 1991. Official Opening and Plenary Session, Open Forum on IFLA's Professional Activities, Contributed Papers Session. Booklet 0.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    The nine papers in this booklet were presented at three sessions of the IFLA General Conference. The text of the first paper, "Presidential Address at the Opening of the IFLA Council and General Conference: Moscow 1991" (Hans-Peter Geh, President of IFLA), is provided in English, German, and Russian. The text of the second paper, "Libraries and…

  3. Early in-session predictors of response to trauma-focused cognitive therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Francesca; Warnock-Parkes, Emma; Barker, Chris; Ehlers, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Trauma-focused cognitive behaviour therapy is effective in treating posttraumatic stress disorder but non-response rates range between 25% and 50%. Results of previous research on patient characteristics predicting outcome are inconsistent and mainly focused on demographic and diagnostic variables. This study examined whether behavioural predictors of poor treatment response can be observed in early sessions. It was predicted that greater patient perseveration, lower expression of thoughts and feelings and weaker therapeutic alliance would be associated with poorer outcomes. We also explored the relationships of patient behaviours with therapeutic alliance and the efficiency and competence of treatment delivery. Audio or video recordings of the initial treatment sessions of 58 patients who had shown either good (n = 34) or poor response (n = 24) to cognitive therapy for PTSD (CT-PTSD, Ehlers & Clark, 2000) were blindly coded for patient perseveration, expression of thoughts and feelings, therapeutic alliance, efficiency and competency of treatment delivery and therapist competence. Poor responders showed more perseveration and less expression of thoughts and feelings in the initial session. Patient perseveration and low expression of thoughts and feelings were associated with poorer therapeutic alliance and compromised treatment delivery. Patients with these behavioural characteristics may benefit from additional treatment strategies. Limitations of the study and implications for clinical practice are discussed. PMID:26523887

  4. A qualitative process evaluation of electronic session-by-session outcome measurement in child and adolescent mental health services

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Regular monitoring of patient progress is important to assess the clinical effectiveness of an intervention. Recently, initiatives within UK child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) have advocated the use of session-by-session monitoring to continually evaluate the patient’s outcome throughout the course of the intervention. However, the feasibility and acceptability of such regular monitoring is unknown. Method Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with clinicians (n = 10), administrative staff (n = 8) and families (n = 15) who participated in a feasibility study of an electronic session-by-session outcome monitoring tool, (SxS), which is based on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). This study took place in three CAMHS clinics in Nottinghamshire. The interview transcripts were thematically analysed. Results We found clinicians accepted the need to complete outcome measures, particularly valuing those completed by the patient. However, there were some difficulties with engaging clinicians in this practice and in the training offered. Generally, patients were supportive of completing SxS in the waiting room prior to the clinic session and assistance with the process from administrative staff was seen to be a key factor. Clinicians and families found the feedback reports created from SxS to be helpful for tracking progress, facilitating communication and engagement, and as a point of reflection. The use of technology was considered positively, although some technological difficulties hindered the completion of SxS. Clinicians and families appreciated the brevity of SxS, but some were concerned that a short questionnaire could not adequately encapsulate the complexity of the patient’s issues. Conclusions The findings show the need for appropriate infrastructure, mandatory training, and support to enable an effective system of session-by-session monitoring. Our findings indicate that clinicians

  5. Code query by example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaucouleur, Sebastien

    2011-02-01

    We introduce code query by example for customisation of evolvable software products in general and of enterprise resource planning systems (ERPs) in particular. The concept is based on an initial empirical study on practices around ERP systems. We motivate our design choices based on those empirical results, and we show how the proposed solution helps with respect to the infamous upgrade problem: the conflict between the need for customisation and the need for upgrade of ERP systems. We further show how code query by example can be used as a form of lightweight static analysis, to detect automatically potential defects in large software products. Code query by example as a form of lightweight static analysis is particularly interesting in the context of ERP systems: it is often the case that programmers working in this field are not computer science specialists but more of domain experts. Hence, they require a simple language to express custom rules.

  6. Adaptation and visual coding

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Visual coding is a highly dynamic process and continuously adapting to the current viewing context. The perceptual changes that result from adaptation to recently viewed stimuli remain a powerful and popular tool for analyzing sensory mechanisms and plasticity. Over the last decade, the footprints of this adaptation have been tracked to both higher and lower levels of the visual pathway and over a wider range of timescales, revealing that visual processing is much more adaptable than previously thought. This work has also revealed that the pattern of aftereffects is similar across many stimulus dimensions, pointing to common coding principles in which adaptation plays a central role. However, why visual coding adapts has yet to be fully answered. PMID:21602298

  7. FAA Smoke Transport Code

    2006-10-27

    FAA Smoke Transport Code, a physics-based Computational Fluid Dynamics tool, which couples heat, mass, and momentum transfer, has been developed to provide information on smoke transport in cargo compartments with various geometries and flight conditions. The software package contains a graphical user interface for specification of geometry and boundary conditions, analysis module for solving the governing equations, and a post-processing tool. The current code was produced by making substantial improvements and additions to a codemore » obtained from a university. The original code was able to compute steady, uniform, isothermal turbulent pressurization. In addition, a preprocessor and postprocessor were added to arrive at the current software package.« less

  8. Seals Code Development Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C. (Compiler); Liang, Anita D. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    Seals Workshop of 1995 industrial code (INDSEAL) release include ICYL, GCYLT, IFACE, GFACE, SPIRALG, SPIRALI, DYSEAL, and KTK. The scientific code (SCISEAL) release includes conjugate heat transfer and multidomain with rotordynamic capability. Several seals and bearings codes (e.g., HYDROFLEX, HYDROTRAN, HYDROB3D, FLOWCON1, FLOWCON2) are presented and results compared. Current computational and experimental emphasis includes multiple connected cavity flows with goals of reducing parasitic losses and gas ingestion. Labyrinth seals continue to play a significant role in sealing with face, honeycomb, and new sealing concepts under investigation for advanced engine concepts in view of strict environmental constraints. The clean sheet approach to engine design is advocated with program directions and anticipated percentage SFC reductions cited. Future activities center on engine applications with coupled seal/power/secondary flow streams.

  9. Autocatalysis, information and coding.

    PubMed

    Wills, P R

    2001-01-01

    Autocatalytic self-construction in macromolecular systems requires the existence of a reflexive relationship between structural components and the functional operations they perform to synthesise themselves. The possibility of reflexivity depends on formal, semiotic features of the catalytic structure-function relationship, that is, the embedding of catalytic functions in the space of polymeric structures. Reflexivity is a semiotic property of some genetic sequences. Such sequences may serve as the basis for the evolution of coding as a result of autocatalytic self-organisation in a population of assignment catalysts. Autocatalytic selection is a mechanism whereby matter becomes differentiated in primitive biochemical systems. In the case of coding self-organisation, it corresponds to the creation of symbolic information. Prions are present-day entities whose replication through autocatalysis reflects aspects of biological semiotics less obvious than genetic coding.

  10. Code inspection instructional validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Kay; Stancil, Shirley

    1992-01-01

    The Shuttle Data Systems Branch (SDSB) of the Flight Data Systems Division (FDSD) at Johnson Space Center contracted with Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) to validate the effectiveness of an interactive video course on the code inspection process. The purpose of this project was to determine if this course could be effective for teaching NASA analysts the process of code inspection. In addition, NASA was interested in the effectiveness of this unique type of instruction (Digital Video Interactive), for providing training on software processes. This study found the Carnegie Mellon course, 'A Cure for the Common Code', effective for teaching the process of code inspection. In addition, analysts prefer learning with this method of instruction, or this method in combination with other methods. As is, the course is definitely better than no course at all; however, findings indicate changes are needed. Following are conclusions of this study. (1) The course is instructionally effective. (2) The simulation has a positive effect on student's confidence in his ability to apply new knowledge. (3) Analysts like the course and prefer this method of training, or this method in combination with current methods of training in code inspection, over the way training is currently being conducted. (4) Analysts responded favorably to information presented through scenarios incorporating full motion video. (5) Some course content needs to be changed. (6) Some content needs to be added to the course. SwRI believes this study indicates interactive video instruction combined with simulation is effective for teaching software processes. Based on the conclusions of this study, SwRI has outlined seven options for NASA to consider. SwRI recommends the option which involves creation of new source code and data files, but uses much of the existing content and design from the current course. Although this option involves a significant software development effort, SwRI believes this option

  11. Securing mobile code.

    SciTech Connect

    Link, Hamilton E.; Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Neumann, William Douglas; Campbell, Philip LaRoche; Beaver, Cheryl Lynn; Pierson, Lyndon George; Anderson, William Erik

    2004-10-01

    If software is designed so that the software can issue functions that will move that software from one computing platform to another, then the software is said to be 'mobile'. There are two general areas of security problems associated with mobile code. The 'secure host' problem involves protecting the host from malicious mobile code. The 'secure mobile code' problem, on the other hand, involves protecting the code from malicious hosts. This report focuses on the latter problem. We have found three distinct camps of opinions regarding how to secure mobile code. There are those who believe special distributed hardware is necessary, those who believe special distributed software is necessary, and those who believe neither is necessary. We examine all three camps, with a focus on the third. In the distributed software camp we examine some commonly proposed techniques including Java, D'Agents and Flask. For the specialized hardware camp, we propose a cryptographic technique for 'tamper-proofing' code over a large portion of the software/hardware life cycle by careful modification of current architectures. This method culminates by decrypting/authenticating each instruction within a physically protected CPU, thereby protecting against subversion by malicious code. Our main focus is on the camp that believes that neither specialized software nor hardware is necessary. We concentrate on methods of code obfuscation to render an entire program or a data segment on which a program depends incomprehensible. The hope is to prevent or at least slow down reverse engineering efforts and to prevent goal-oriented attacks on the software and execution. The field of obfuscation is still in a state of development with the central problem being the lack of a basis for evaluating the protection schemes. We give a brief introduction to some of the main ideas in the field, followed by an in depth analysis of a technique called 'white-boxing'. We put forth some new attacks and improvements

  12. Aeroacoustic Prediction Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P; Mani, R.; Shin, H.; Mitchell, B.; Ashford, G.; Salamah, S.; Connell, S.; Huff, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report describes work performed on Contract NAS3-27720AoI 13 as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonic Transport (AST) Noise Reduction Technology effort. Computer codes were developed to provide quantitative prediction, design, and analysis capability for several aircraft engine noise sources. The objective was to provide improved, physics-based tools for exploration of noise-reduction concepts and understanding of experimental results. Methods and codes focused on fan broadband and 'buzz saw' noise and on low-emissions combustor noise and compliment work done by other contractors under the NASA AST program to develop methods and codes for fan harmonic tone noise and jet noise. The methods and codes developed and reported herein employ a wide range of approaches, from the strictly empirical to the completely computational, with some being semiempirical analytical, and/or analytical/computational. Emphasis was on capturing the essential physics while still considering method or code utility as a practical design and analysis tool for everyday engineering use. Codes and prediction models were developed for: (1) an improved empirical correlation model for fan rotor exit flow mean and turbulence properties, for use in predicting broadband noise generated by rotor exit flow turbulence interaction with downstream stator vanes: (2) fan broadband noise models for rotor and stator/turbulence interaction sources including 3D effects, noncompact-source effects. directivity modeling, and extensions to the rotor supersonic tip-speed regime; (3) fan multiple-pure-tone in-duct sound pressure prediction methodology based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis; and (4) low-emissions combustor prediction methodology and computer code based on CFD and actuator disk theory. In addition. the relative importance of dipole and quadrupole source mechanisms was studied using direct CFD source computation for a simple cascadeigust interaction problem, and an empirical combustor

  13. Stimulus Coding Rules for Perceptual Learning

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Stanley A; Levi, Dennis M; Yu, Cong

    2008-01-01

    Perceptual learning of visual features occurs when multiple stimuli are presented in a fixed sequence (temporal patterning), but not when they are presented in random order (roving). This points to the need for proper stimulus coding in order for learning of multiple stimuli to occur. We examined the stimulus coding rules for learning with multiple stimuli. Our results demonstrate that: (1) stimulus rhythm is necessary for temporal patterning to take effect during practice; (2) learning consolidation is subject to disruption by roving up to 4 h after each practice session; (3) importantly, after completion of temporal-patterned learning, performance is undisrupted by extended roving training; (4) roving is ineffective if each stimulus is presented for five or more consecutive trials; and (5) roving is also ineffective if each stimulus has a distinct identity. We propose that for multi-stimulus learning to occur, the brain needs to conceptually “tag” each stimulus, in order to switch attention to the appropriate perceptual template. Stimulus temporal patterning assists in tagging stimuli and switching attention through its rhythmic stimulus sequence. PMID:18707195

  14. Codes with Monotonic Codeword Lengths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahams, Julia

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the minimum average codeword length coding under the constraint that the codewords are monotonically nondecreasing in length. Bounds on the average length of an optimal monotonic code are derived, and sufficient conditions are given such that algorithms for optimal alphabetic codes can be used to find the optimal monotonic code. (six…

  15. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  16. Genetically modified foods: hazard identification and risk assessment. Session summary.

    PubMed

    Ito, Nobuyuki

    2002-07-01

    During a Joint Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP)/International Federation of Societies of Toxicologic Pathologists (IFSTP) International Symposium, held between June 24 and 28, 2001, in Orlando, FL, USA, there was a session entitled as "Genetically Modified Foods: Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment". The purpose of this session was to present and discuss the current situations in the US, European Union and Japan for the public concerns, safety assessments and regulations on genetically modified (GM) products used as foods or food ingredients. Assuming the wide and fast growing of the usage of GM products, it is the duty for us as toxicologic pathologists, to supply reliable data on their safety and possible risks or hazards as a world-wide basis to not only governments or regulatory agencies but also general public of our countries.

  17. A sessional blind signature based on quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodambashi, Siavash; Zakerolhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a sessional blind signature protocol whose security is guaranteed by fundamental principles of quantum physics. It allows a message owner to get his message signed by an authorized signatory. However, the signatory is not capable of reading the message contents and everyone can verify authenticity of the message. For this purpose, we took advantage of a sessional signature as well as quantum entangled pairs which are generated with respect to it in our proposed protocol. We describe our proposed blind signature through an example and briefly discuss about its unconditional security. Due to the feasibility of the protocol, it can be widely employed for e-payment, e-government, e-business and etc.

  18. Summary of Sessions: Ionosphere - Thermosphere - Mesosphere Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F.; Bhattacharyya, A.

    2006-01-01

    The topics covered by the sessions under the working group on Ionosphere-Thermosphere-Mesosphere dealt with various aspects of the response of the ionosphere-thermosphere coupled system and the middle atmosphere to solar variability. There were four plenary talks related to the theme of this working group, thirteen oral presentations in three sessions and six poster presentations. A number of issues related to effects of solar variability on the ionosphere-thermosphere, observed using satellite and ground-based data including ground magnetometer observations, radio beacon studies of equatorial spread F, and modeling of some of these effects, were discussed. Radar observations of the mesosphere-lower thermosphere region and a future mission to study the coupling of thunderstorm processes to this region, the ionosphere, and magnetosphere were also presented.

  19. Aeropropulsion 1987. Session 6: High-Speed Propulsion Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    NASA is conducting aeronautical research over a broad range of Mach numbers. In addition to the advanced CTOL propulsion research described in a separate session, the Lewis Research Center has intensified its efforts towards propulsion technology for selected high-speed flight applications. In a companion program, the Langley Research Center has also accomplished excellent research in Supersonic Combustion Ramjet (SCRAM) propulsion. What is presented in this session is an unclassified review of some of the propulsion research results that are applicable for supersonic to hypersonic vehicles. Not only is a review provided for several key work areas, it also presents a viewpoint on future research directions by calling attention to cycles, components, and facilities involved in this rapidly expanding field of work.

  20. Session: Avoiding, minimizing, and mitigating avian and bat impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Thelander, Carl; Kerlinger, Paul

    2004-09-01

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question answer period. The session addressed a variety of questions related to avoiding, minimizing, and mitigating the avian and bat impacts of wind power development including: what has been learned from operating turbines and mitigating impacts where they are unavoidable, such as at Altamont Pass WRA, and should there be mitigation measures such as habitat creation or land conservation where impacts occur. Other impact minimization and mitigation approaches discussed included: location and siting evaluations; options for construction and operation of wind facilities; turbine lighting; and the physical alignment/orientation. Titles and authors of the presentations were: 'Bird Fatalities in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: A Case Study, Part II' by Carl Thelander and 'Prevention and Mitigation of Avian Impacts at Wind Power Facilities' by Paul Kerlinger.

  1. Electrical Circuit Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Wix, Steven D.; Waters, Arlon J.; Shirley, David

    2001-08-09

    Massively-Parallel Electrical Circuit Simulation Code. CHILESPICE is a massively-arallel distributed-memory electrical circuit simulation tool that contains many enhanced radiation, time-based, and thermal features and models. Large scale electronic circuit simulation. Shared memory, parallel processing, enhance convergence. Sandia specific device models.

  2. The revised genetic code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninio, Jacques

    1990-03-01

    Recent findings on the genetic code are reviewed, including selenocysteine usage, deviations in the assignments of sense and nonsense codons, RNA editing, natural ribosomal frameshifts and non-orthodox codon-anticodon pairings. A multi-stage codon reading process is presented.

  3. Dual Coding in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, John K.; Wildman, Terry M.

    The purpose of this study was to test the applicability of the dual coding hypothesis to children's recall performance. The hypothesis predicts that visual interference will have a small effect on the recall of visually presented words or pictures, but that acoustic interference will cause a decline in recall of visually presented words and…

  4. Dress Codes and Uniforms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumsden, Linda; Miller, Gabriel

    2002-01-01

    Students do not always make choices that adults agree with in their choice of school dress. Dress-code issues are explored in this Research Roundup, and guidance is offered to principals seeking to maintain a positive school climate. In "Do School Uniforms Fit?" Kerry White discusses arguments for and against school uniforms and summarizes the…

  5. Code of Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of College Unions-International, Bloomington, IN.

    The code of ethics for the college union and student activities professional is presented by the Association of College Unions-International. The preamble identifies the objectives of the college union as providing campus community centers and social programs that enhance the quality of life for members of the academic community. Ethics for…

  6. Odor Coding Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kenshi

    Odor is a one of important sensing parameters for human life. However, odor has not been quantified by a measuring instrument because of its vagueness. In this paper, a measuring of odor with odor coding, which are vector quantities of plural odor molecular information, and its applications are described.

  7. Sharing the Code.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Florence

    2003-01-01

    Colleges and universities are beginning to consider collaborating on open-source-code projects as a way to meet critical software and computing needs. Points out the attractive features of noncommercial open-source software and describes some examples in use now, especially for the creation of Web infrastructure. (SLD)

  8. Building Codes and Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, John L.

    The hazard of fire is of great concern to libraries due to combustible books and new plastics used in construction and interiors. Building codes and standards can offer architects and planners guidelines to follow but these standards should be closely monitored, updated, and researched for fire prevention. (DS)

  9. Code Optimization Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    MAGEE,GLEN I.

    2000-08-03

    Computers transfer data in a number of different ways. Whether through a serial port, a parallel port, over a modem, over an ethernet cable, or internally from a hard disk to memory, some data will be lost. To compensate for that loss, numerous error detection and correction algorithms have been developed. One of the most common error correction codes is the Reed-Solomon code, which is a special subset of BCH (Bose-Chaudhuri-Hocquenghem) linear cyclic block codes. In the AURA project, an unmanned aircraft sends the data it collects back to earth so it can be analyzed during flight and possible flight modifications made. To counter possible data corruption during transmission, the data is encoded using a multi-block Reed-Solomon implementation with a possibly shortened final block. In order to maximize the amount of data transmitted, it was necessary to reduce the computation time of a Reed-Solomon encoding to three percent of the processor's time. To achieve such a reduction, many code optimization techniques were employed. This paper outlines the steps taken to reduce the processing time of a Reed-Solomon encoding and the insight into modern optimization techniques gained from the experience.

  10. The Redox Code

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The redox code is a set of principles that defines the positioning of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD, NADP) and thiol/disulfide and other redox systems as well as the thiol redox proteome in space and time in biological systems. The code is richly elaborated in an oxygen-dependent life, where activation/deactivation cycles involving O2 and H2O2 contribute to spatiotemporal organization for differentiation, development, and adaptation to the environment. Disruption of this organizational structure during oxidative stress represents a fundamental mechanism in system failure and disease. Recent Advances: Methodology in assessing components of the redox code under physiological conditions has progressed, permitting insight into spatiotemporal organization and allowing for identification of redox partners in redox proteomics and redox metabolomics. Critical Issues: Complexity of redox networks and redox regulation is being revealed step by step, yet much still needs to be learned. Future Directions: Detailed knowledge of the molecular patterns generated from the principles of the redox code under defined physiological or pathological conditions in cells and organs will contribute to understanding the redox component in health and disease. Ultimately, there will be a scientific basis to a modern redox medicine. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 734–746. PMID:25891126

  11. Code of Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Sociological Association, Washington, DC.

    The American Sociological Association's code of ethics for sociologists is presented. For sociological research and practice, 10 requirements for ethical behavior are identified, including: maintaining objectivity and integrity; fully reporting findings and research methods, without omission of significant data; reporting fully all sources of…

  12. Congress ends session with a whimper, but EPA is roaring

    SciTech Connect

    Begley, R.

    1994-10-19

    The end of session for Congress (October 1994) marked a disturbing end for environmental concerns which did not see Congressional action. EPA`s agenda of worker protection, chemical monitoring and criminal enforcement will most likely resurface. Legislation that died included Superfund reform, Clean Water Act and Product liability. However, NAFTA got passed, as did a hazardous materials transportation reauthorization and risk assessment in an agricultural bill.

  13. Mobility Outcomes Following Five Training Sessions with a Powered Exoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Hartigan, Clare; Kandilakis, Casey; Dalley, Skyler; Clausen, Mike; Wilson, Edgar; Morrison, Scott; Etheridge, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Background: Loss of legged mobility due to spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with multiple physiological and psychological impacts. Powered exoskeletons offer the possibility of regained mobility and reversal or prevention of the secondary effects associated with immobility. Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate mobility outcomes for individuals with SCI after 5 gait-training sessions with a powered exoskeleton, with a primary goal of characterizing the ease of learning and usability of the system. Methods: Sixteen subjects with SCI were enrolled in a pilot clinical trial at Shepherd Center, Atlanta, Georgia, with injury levels ranging from C5 complete to L1 incomplete. An investigational Indego exoskeleton research kit was evaluated for ease of use and efficacy in providing legged mobility. Outcome measures of the study included the 10-meter walk test (10MWT) and the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) as well as measures of independence including donning and doffing times and the ability to walk on various surfaces. Results: At the end of 5 sessions (1.5 hours per session), average walking speed was 0.22 m/s for persons with C5-6 motor complete tetraplegia, 0.26 m/s for T1-8 motor complete paraplegia, and 0.45 m/s for T9-L1 paraplegia. Distances covered in 6 minutes averaged 64 meters for those with C5-6, 74 meters for T1-8, and 121 meters for T9-L1. Additionally, all participants were able to walk on both indoor and outdoor surfaces. Conclusions: Results after only 5 sessions suggest that persons with tetraplegia and paraplegia learn to use the Indego exoskeleton quickly and can manage a variety of surfaces. Walking speeds and distances achieved also indicate that some individuals with paraplegia can quickly become limited community ambulators using this system. PMID:26364278

  14. Determination of a behavioral transfer function: White-noise analysis of session-to-session response-ratio dynamics on concurrent VI VI schedules.

    PubMed

    Hunter, I; Davison, M

    1985-01-01

    Six pigeons were exposed to concurrent variable-interval schedules in which the programmed reinforcer ratios changed from session to session according to a pseudorandom binary sequence. This procedure corresponded to the stochastic identification paradigm ("white-noise experiment") of systems theory and enabled the relation between log response ratios in the current session and log reinforcer ratios in all previous sessions to be determined. Such dynamic relations are called linear transfer functions. Both nonparametric and parametric representations of these, in the form of "impulse-response functions," were determined for each bird. The session-to-session response ratios resulting from the session-to-session pseudorandom binary variations in reinforcer ratios were well predicted by the impulse-response functions identified for each pigeon. The impulse-response functions were well fitted by a second-order dynamic model involving only two parameters: a time constant and a gain. The mean time constant was 0.67 sessions, implying that the effects of abrupt changes in log reinforcer ratios should be 96% complete within about five sessions. The mean gain was 0.53, which was surprisingly low inasmuch as it should equal the sensitivity to reinforcement ratio observed under steady-state conditions. The same six pigeons were subjected to a similar experiment 10 months following the first. Despite individual differences in impulse-response functions between birds within each experiment, the impulse-response functions determined from the two experiments were essentially the same.

  15. Fungal Nomenclature at IMC10: Report of the Nomenclature Sessions.

    PubMed

    Redhead, Scott A; Demoulin, Vincent; Hawksworth, David L; Seifert, Keith A; Turland, Nicholas J

    2014-12-01

    Three Nomenclature Sessions were convened during the 10(th) International Mycological Congress (IMC10) in Bangkok on 3-8 August 2014. In addition a Questionnaire was given to all delegates. This Report reviews and summarizes the views expressed in the Sessions and in the responses to the Questionnaire. The issues covered related to aspects of: registration, protected names, forgotten names, pleomorphic fungi, lichenized fungi, typification, diagnoses, and governance. In addition, reports were received from working groups preparing lists of names to be proposed for protection, and controversial cases of competing names were discussed. The Congress was mandated to ratify decisions of the Nomenclature Committee for Fungi (NCF) on the appointment of repositories for the registration of new fungal names. After discussion in the Sessions on the decision of the NCF to appoint three such bodies, a Resolution to that effect was approved by the Congress. The Congress also adopted a Resolution asking that the opinions of mycologists on future directions for the nomenclature of fungi be taken into account in formulating changes in the rules for consideration at the International Botanical Congress in 2017.

  16. Design and evaluation of interprofessional cross-cultural communication sessions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Poirier, Therese; Butler, Lakesha; Comrie, Rhonda; Pailden, Junvie

    2015-01-01

    The 2013 National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) call for healthcare professionals to provide quality care and services that are responsive to diverse cultural health beliefs and practices. Accreditation organizations for health professional programs require their curriculum to adequately prepare future practitioners for serving culturally and linguistically diverse populations. Another common curricular need of health professional programs is interprofessional education (IPE). This study presents data that evaluates two IPE culturally competent communication sessions designed for pharmacy and nursing students. Teams of nursing and pharmacy students (n = 160) engaged in case studies focused on developing cross-cultural communication skills, using the LEARN model. Quantitative survey data collected pre-test and post-test measured cultural competency (including subscales of perceived skills, perceived knowledge, confidence in encounter, and attitude) and knowledge related to culturally competent communication. Univariate ANOVA results indicate that actual knowledge as measured by the test and all four Clinical Cultural Competency Questionnaire (CCCQ) subscales significantly increased after the IPE sessions. Pharmacy students scored higher than nursing students on the knowledge pre-test, and nursing students had a more positive attitude at pre-test. The IPE sessions effectively addressed all learning outcomes and will continue in future course offerings. Using cross-cultural communication as a thematic area for IPE program development resulted in educational benefits for the students. To further strengthen nursing and pharmacy students' interprofessional practice, additional IPE opportunities are to be explored. PMID:26652635

  17. Within-session spacing improves delayed recall in children.

    PubMed

    Zigterman, Jessica R; Simone, Patricia M; Bell, Matthew C

    2015-01-01

    Multiple retrievals of a memory over a spaced manner improve long-term memory performance in infants, children, younger and older adults; however, few studies have examined spacing effects with young school-age children. To expand the understanding of the spacing benefit in children, the current study presented weakly associated English word-pairs to children aged 7-11 and cued their recall two times immediately (massed), after a delay of 5 or 10 items (spaced) or not at all (control). After this encoding session with or without two retrievals, participants were tested two times for memory of all word-pairs: immediately and 30 minutes after the encoding session. Multiple retrievals significantly improved memory on the tests. However, words repeated in a spaced design were remembered at higher rates than those that were massed, while gap size between repetitions (5 or 10) did not differentially impact performance. The data show that a within-session spacing strategy can benefit children's ability to remember word-pairs after 30 minutes. Thus, asking students to recall what they have learned within a lesson is a technique that can be used in a classroom to improve long-term recall.

  18. Fungal Nomenclature at IMC10: Report of the Nomenclature Sessions.

    PubMed

    Redhead, Scott A; Demoulin, Vincent; Hawksworth, David L; Seifert, Keith A; Turland, Nicholas J

    2014-12-01

    Three Nomenclature Sessions were convened during the 10(th) International Mycological Congress (IMC10) in Bangkok on 3-8 August 2014. In addition a Questionnaire was given to all delegates. This Report reviews and summarizes the views expressed in the Sessions and in the responses to the Questionnaire. The issues covered related to aspects of: registration, protected names, forgotten names, pleomorphic fungi, lichenized fungi, typification, diagnoses, and governance. In addition, reports were received from working groups preparing lists of names to be proposed for protection, and controversial cases of competing names were discussed. The Congress was mandated to ratify decisions of the Nomenclature Committee for Fungi (NCF) on the appointment of repositories for the registration of new fungal names. After discussion in the Sessions on the decision of the NCF to appoint three such bodies, a Resolution to that effect was approved by the Congress. The Congress also adopted a Resolution asking that the opinions of mycologists on future directions for the nomenclature of fungi be taken into account in formulating changes in the rules for consideration at the International Botanical Congress in 2017. PMID:25734034

  19. 76 FR 12757 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Vendor Outreach Session Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... Information Management System ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor (DOL) is soliciting comments concerning the information collections contained in the Vendor Outreach Session Information Management System... small businesses. Accordingly, the Vendor Outreach Session Information Management System is needed...

  20. FISHERIES IN MOUNT HOPE BAY: NOTES ON A SPECIAL SYMPOSIUM FROM A SESSION MODERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This contribution represents a summary of talks presented during the afternoon session the Mount Hope Bay Syposium, focused directly on the issues surrounding observed winter flounder populations, as prepared by the session moderator.

  1. 75 FR 27536 - Notice of the Specialty Crop Committee's Stakeholder Listening Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...: Research, Education, and Economics, USDA. ACTION: Notice of stakeholder listening session. SUMMARY: In... Agriculture announces a stakeholder listening session of the Specialty Crop Committee, under the auspices...

  2. 78 FR 22225 - Meeting: African Development Foundation, Board of Directors Executive Session Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ...; ] AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION Board of Directors Executive Session Meeting Meeting: African Development Foundation, Board of Directors Executive Session Meeting Time: Tuesday, April 23, 2013 11:15 a.m. to 2:15...

  3. Psychophysiological Responses to Group Exercise Training Sessions: Does Exercise Intensity Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Vandoni, Matteo; Codrons, Erwan; Marin, Luca; Correale, Luca; Bigliassi, Marcelo; Buzzachera, Cosme Franklim

    2016-01-01

    Group exercise training programs were introduced as a strategy for improving health and fitness and potentially reducing dropout rates. This study examined the psychophysiological responses to group exercise training sessions. Twenty-seven adults completed two group exercise training sessions of moderate and vigorous exercise intensities in a random and counterbalanced order. The %HRR and the exertional and arousal responses to vigorous session were higher than those during the moderate session (p<0.05). Consequently, the affective responses to vigorous session were less pleasant than those during moderate session (p<0.05). These results suggest that the psychophysiological responses to group exercise training sessions are intensity-dependent. From an adherence perspective, interventionists are encouraged to emphasize group exercise training sessions at a moderate intensity to maximize affective responses and to minimize exertional responses, which in turn may positively affect future exercise behavior. PMID:27490493

  4. 78 FR 70093 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Closed Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Closed Session AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation Advisory... closed session of the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC). The special...

  5. Using session-by-session measurement to compare mechanisms of action for acceptance and commitment therapy and cognitive therapy.

    PubMed

    Forman, Evan M; Chapman, Jason E; Herbert, James D; Goetter, Elizabeth M; Yuen, Erica K; Moitra, Ethan

    2012-06-01

    Debate continues about the extent to which postulated mechanisms of action of cognitive behavior therapies (CBT), including standard CBT (i.e., Beckian cognitive therapy [CT]) and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) are supported by mediational analyses. Moreover, the distinctiveness of CT and ACT has been called into question. One contributor to ongoing uncertainty in this arena is the lack of time-varying process data. In this study, 174 patients presenting to a university clinic with anxiety or depression who had been randomly assigned to receive either ACT or CT completed an assessment of theorized mediators and outcomes before each session. Hierarchical linear modeling of session-by-session data revealed that increased utilization of cognitive and affective change strategies relative to utilization of psychological acceptance strategies mediated outcome for CT, whereas for ACT the mediation effect was in the opposite direction. Decreases in self-reported dysfunctional thinking, cognitive "defusion" (the ability to see one's thoughts as mental events rather than necessarily as representations of reality), and willingness to engage in behavioral activity despite unpleasant thoughts or emotions were equivalent mediators across treatments. These results have potential implications for the theoretical arguments behind, and distinctiveness of, CT and ACT.

  6. Binary coding for hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Chang, Chein-I.; Chang, Chein-Chi; Lin, Chinsu

    2004-10-01

    Binary coding is one of simplest ways to characterize spectral features. One commonly used method is a binary coding-based image software system, called Spectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) for remotely sensed imagery developed by Mazer et al. For a given spectral signature, the SPAM calculates its spectral mean and inter-band spectral difference and uses them as thresholds to generate a binary code word for this particular spectral signature. Such coding scheme is generally effective and also very simple to implement. This paper revisits the SPAM and further develops three new SPAM-based binary coding methods, called equal probability partition (EPP) binary coding, halfway partition (HP) binary coding and median partition (MP) binary coding. These three binary coding methods along with the SPAM well be evaluated for spectral discrimination and identification. In doing so, a new criterion, called a posteriori discrimination probability (APDP) is also introduced for performance measure.

  7. Finite Element Analysis Code

    2006-03-08

    MAPVAR-KD is designed to transfer solution results from one finite element mesh to another. MAPVAR-KD draws heavily from the structure and coding of MERLIN II, but it employs a new finite element data base, EXODUS II, and offers enhanced speed and new capabilities not available in MERLIN II. In keeping with the MERLIN II documentation, the computational algorithms used in MAPVAR-KD are described. User instructions are presented. Example problems are included to demonstrate the operationmore » of the code and the effects of various input options. MAPVAR-KD is a modification of MAPVAR in which the search algorithm was replaced by a kd-tree-based search for better performance on large problems.« less

  8. The NIMROD Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnack, D. D.; Glasser, A. H.

    1996-11-01

    NIMROD is a new code system that is being developed for the analysis of modern fusion experiments. It is being designed from the beginning to make the maximum use of massively parallel computer architectures and computer graphics. The NIMROD physics kernel solves the three-dimensional, time-dependent two-fluid equations with neo-classical effects in toroidal geometry of arbitrary poloidal cross section. The NIMROD system also includes a pre-processor, a grid generator, and a post processor. User interaction with NIMROD is facilitated by a modern graphical user interface (GUI). The NIMROD project is using Quality Function Deployment (QFD) team management techniques to minimize re-engineering and reduce code development time. This paper gives an overview of the NIMROD project. Operation of the GUI is demonstrated, and the first results from the physics kernel are given.

  9. Finite Element Analysis Code

    SciTech Connect

    Sjaardema, G.; Wellman, G.; Gartling, D.

    2006-03-08

    MAPVAR-KD is designed to transfer solution results from one finite element mesh to another. MAPVAR-KD draws heavily from the structure and coding of MERLIN II, but it employs a new finite element data base, EXODUS II, and offers enhanced speed and new capabilities not available in MERLIN II. In keeping with the MERLIN II documentation, the computational algorithms used in MAPVAR-KD are described. User instructions are presented. Example problems are included to demonstrate the operation of the code and the effects of various input options. MAPVAR-KD is a modification of MAPVAR in which the search algorithm was replaced by a kd-tree-based search for better performance on large problems.

  10. Confocal coded aperture imaging

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William; Thomas, Jr., Clarence E.

    2001-01-01

    A method for imaging a target volume comprises the steps of: radiating a small bandwidth of energy toward the target volume; focusing the small bandwidth of energy into a beam; moving the target volume through a plurality of positions within the focused beam; collecting a beam of energy scattered from the target volume with a non-diffractive confocal coded aperture; generating a shadow image of said aperture from every point source of radiation in the target volume; and, reconstructing the shadow image into a 3-dimensional image of the every point source by mathematically correlating the shadow image with a digital or analog version of the coded aperture. The method can comprise the step of collecting the beam of energy scattered from the target volume with a Fresnel zone plate.

  11. Sinusoidal transform coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaulay, Robert J.; Quatieri, Thomas F.

    1988-01-01

    It has been shown that an analysis/synthesis system based on a sinusoidal representation of speech leads to synthetic speech that is essentially perceptually indistinguishable from the original. Strategies for coding the amplitudes, frequencies and phases of the sine waves have been developed that have led to a multirate coder operating at rates from 2400 to 9600 bps. The encoded speech is highly intelligible at all rates with a uniformly improving quality as the data rate is increased. A real-time fixed-point implementation has been developed using two ADSP2100 DSP chips. The methods used for coding and quantizing the sine-wave parameters for operation at the various frame rates are described.

  12. Finite Element Analysis Code

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, C.; Smith, M.; Sjaardema, G.

    2005-06-26

    Exotxt is an analysis code that reads finite element results data stored in an exodusII file and generates a file in a structured text format. The text file can be edited or modified via a number of text formatting tools. Exotxt is used by analysis to translate data from the binary exodusII format into a structured text format which can then be edited or modified and then either translated back to exodusII format or to another format.

  13. Status of MARS Code

    SciTech Connect

    N.V. Mokhov

    2003-04-09

    Status and recent developments of the MARS 14 Monte Carlo code system for simulation of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades in shielding, accelerator and detector components in the energy range from a fraction of an electronvolt up to 100 TeV are described. these include physics models both in strong and electromagnetic interaction sectors, variance reduction techniques, residual dose, geometry, tracking, histograming. MAD-MARS Beam Line Build and Graphical-User Interface.

  14. Reeds computer code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjork, C.

    1981-01-01

    The REEDS (rocket exhaust effluent diffusion single layer) computer code is used for the estimation of certain rocket exhaust effluent concentrations and dosages and their distributions near the Earth's surface following a rocket launch event. Output from REEDS is used in producing near real time air quality and environmental assessments of the effects of certain potentially harmful effluents, namely HCl, Al2O3, CO, and NO.

  15. Bar coded retroreflective target

    SciTech Connect

    Vann, C.S.

    2000-01-25

    This small, inexpensive, non-contact laser sensor can detect the location of a retroreflective target in a relatively large volume and up to six degrees of position. The tracker's laser beam is formed into a plane of light which is swept across the space of interest. When the beam illuminates the retroreflector, some of the light returns to the tracker. The intensity, angle, and time of the return beam is measured to calculate the three dimensional location of the target. With three retroreflectors on the target, the locations of three points on the target are measured, enabling the calculation of all six degrees of target position. Until now, devices for three-dimensional tracking of objects in a large volume have been heavy, large, and very expensive. Because of the simplicity and unique characteristics of this tracker, it is capable of three-dimensional tracking of one to several objects in a large volume, yet it is compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. Alternatively, a tracker produces a diverging laser beam which is directed towards a fixed position, and senses when a retroreflective target enters the fixed field of view. An optically bar coded target can be read by the tracker to provide information about the target. The target can be formed of a ball lens with a bar code on one end. As the target moves through the field, the ball lens causes the laser beam to scan across the bar code.

  16. MELCOR computer code manuals

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, R.M.; Cole, R.K. Jr.; Smith, R.C.; Stuart, D.S.; Thompson, S.L.; Hodge, S.A.; Hyman, C.R.; Sanders, R.L.

    1995-03-01

    MELCOR is a fully integrated, engineering-level computer code that models the progression of severe accidents in light water reactor nuclear power plants. MELCOR is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission as a second-generation plant risk assessment tool and the successor to the Source Term Code Package. A broad spectrum of severe accident phenomena in both boiling and pressurized water reactors is treated in MELCOR in a unified framework. These include: thermal-hydraulic response in the reactor coolant system, reactor cavity, containment, and confinement buildings; core heatup, degradation, and relocation; core-concrete attack; hydrogen production, transport, and combustion; fission product release and transport; and the impact of engineered safety features on thermal-hydraulic and radionuclide behavior. Current uses of MELCOR include estimation of severe accident source terms and their sensitivities and uncertainties in a variety of applications. This publication of the MELCOR computer code manuals corresponds to MELCOR 1.8.3, released to users in August, 1994. Volume 1 contains a primer that describes MELCOR`s phenomenological scope, organization (by package), and documentation. The remainder of Volume 1 contains the MELCOR Users Guides, which provide the input instructions and guidelines for each package. Volume 2 contains the MELCOR Reference Manuals, which describe the phenomenological models that have been implemented in each package.

  17. Bar coded retroreflective target

    DOEpatents

    Vann, Charles S.

    2000-01-01

    This small, inexpensive, non-contact laser sensor can detect the location of a retroreflective target in a relatively large volume and up to six degrees of position. The tracker's laser beam is formed into a plane of light which is swept across the space of interest. When the beam illuminates the retroreflector, some of the light returns to the tracker. The intensity, angle, and time of the return beam is measured to calculate the three dimensional location of the target. With three retroreflectors on the target, the locations of three points on the target are measured, enabling the calculation of all six degrees of target position. Until now, devices for three-dimensional tracking of objects in a large volume have been heavy, large, and very expensive. Because of the simplicity and unique characteristics of this tracker, it is capable of three-dimensional tracking of one to several objects in a large volume, yet it is compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. Alternatively, a tracker produces a diverging laser beam which is directed towards a fixed position, and senses when a retroreflective target enters the fixed field of view. An optically bar coded target can be read by the tracker to provide information about the target. The target can be formed of a ball lens with a bar code on one end. As the target moves through the field, the ball lens causes the laser beam to scan across the bar code.

  18. Orthopedics coding and funding.

    PubMed

    Baron, S; Duclos, C; Thoreux, P

    2014-02-01

    The French tarification à l'activité (T2A) prospective payment system is a financial system in which a health-care institution's resources are based on performed activity. Activity is described via the PMSI medical information system (programme de médicalisation du système d'information). The PMSI classifies hospital cases by clinical and economic categories known as diagnosis-related groups (DRG), each with an associated price tag. Coding a hospital case involves giving as realistic a description as possible so as to categorize it in the right DRG and thus ensure appropriate payment. For this, it is essential to understand what determines the pricing of inpatient stay: namely, the code for the surgical procedure, the patient's principal diagnosis (reason for admission), codes for comorbidities (everything that adds to management burden), and the management of the length of inpatient stay. The PMSI is used to analyze the institution's activity and dynamism: change on previous year, relation to target, and comparison with competing institutions based on indicators such as the mean length of stay performance indicator (MLS PI). The T2A system improves overall care efficiency. Quality of care, however, is not presently taken account of in the payment made to the institution, as there are no indicators for this; work needs to be done on this topic.

  19. Structural coding versus free-energy predictive coding.

    PubMed

    van der Helm, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    Focusing on visual perceptual organization, this article contrasts the free-energy (FE) version of predictive coding (a recent Bayesian approach) to structural coding (a long-standing representational approach). Both use free-energy minimization as metaphor for processing in the brain, but their formal elaborations of this metaphor are fundamentally different. FE predictive coding formalizes it by minimization of prediction errors, whereas structural coding formalizes it by minimization of the descriptive complexity of predictions. Here, both sides are evaluated. A conclusion regarding competence is that FE predictive coding uses a powerful modeling technique, but that structural coding has more explanatory power. A conclusion regarding performance is that FE predictive coding-though more detailed in its account of neurophysiological data-provides a less compelling cognitive architecture than that of structural coding, which, for instance, supplies formal support for the computationally powerful role it attributes to neuronal synchronization.

  20. Computer-Based Coding of Occupation Codes for Epidemiological Analyses.

    PubMed

    Russ, Daniel E; Ho, Kwan-Yuet; Johnson, Calvin A; Friesen, Melissa C

    2014-05-01

    Mapping job titles to standardized occupation classification (SOC) codes is an important step in evaluating changes in health risks over time as measured in inspection databases. However, manual SOC coding is cost prohibitive for very large studies. Computer based SOC coding systems can improve the efficiency of incorporating occupational risk factors into large-scale epidemiological studies. We present a novel method of mapping verbatim job titles to SOC codes using a large table of prior knowledge available in the public domain that included detailed description of the tasks and activities and their synonyms relevant to each SOC code. Job titles are compared to our knowledge base to find the closest matching SOC code. A soft Jaccard index is used to measure the similarity between a previously unseen job title and the knowledge base. Additional information such as standardized industrial codes can be incorporated to improve the SOC code determination by providing additional context to break ties in matches. PMID:25221787

  1. Preliminary Assessment of Turbomachinery Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, Quamrul H.

    2007-01-01

    This report assesses different CFD codes developed and currently being used at Glenn Research Center to predict turbomachinery fluid flow and heat transfer behavior. This report will consider the following codes: APNASA, TURBO, GlennHT, H3D, and SWIFT. Each code will be described separately in the following section with their current modeling capabilities, level of validation, pre/post processing, and future development and validation requirements. This report addresses only previously published and validations of the codes. However, the codes have been further developed to extend the capabilities of the codes.

  2. Proceedings of the conference on computer codes and the linear accelerator community

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.K.

    1990-07-01

    The conference whose proceedings you are reading was envisioned as the second in a series, the first having been held in San Diego in January 1988. The intended participants were those people who are actively involved in writing and applying computer codes for the solution of problems related to the design and construction of linear accelerators. The first conference reviewed many of the codes both extant and under development. This second conference provided an opportunity to update the status of those codes, and to provide a forum in which emerging new 3D codes could be described and discussed. The afternoon poster session on the second day of the conference provided an opportunity for extended discussion. All in all, this conference was felt to be quite a useful interchange of ideas and developments in the field of 3D calculations, parallel computation, higher-order optics calculations, and code documentation and maintenance for the linear accelerator community. A third conference is planned.

  3. 45 CFR 702.16 - Attendance of news media at public sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Attendance of news media at public sessions. 702... Attendance of news media at public sessions. Reasonable access for coverage of public sessions shall be provided to the various communications media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, newsreels,...

  4. 45 CFR 702.16 - Attendance of news media at public sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Attendance of news media at public sessions. 702... Attendance of news media at public sessions. Reasonable access for coverage of public sessions shall be provided to the various communications media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, newsreels,...

  5. 45 CFR 702.16 - Attendance of news media at public sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Attendance of news media at public sessions. 702... Attendance of news media at public sessions. Reasonable access for coverage of public sessions shall be provided to the various communications media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, newsreels,...

  6. 45 CFR 702.16 - Attendance of news media at public sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Attendance of news media at public sessions. 702... Attendance of news media at public sessions. Reasonable access for coverage of public sessions shall be provided to the various communications media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, newsreels,...

  7. 45 CFR 702.16 - Attendance of news media at public sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Attendance of news media at public sessions. 702... Attendance of news media at public sessions. Reasonable access for coverage of public sessions shall be provided to the various communications media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, newsreels,...

  8. 77 FR 43106 - Tribal Consultation Sessions-Department of the Interior Information Technology Infrastructure...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... Office of the Secretary Tribal Consultation Sessions--Department of the Interior Information Technology... sessions. The purpose of the sessions is to obtain tribal input on the 2012 Information Technology transformation realignment proposal as well as on how Information Technology transformation should be...

  9. Comparison of Dream Interpretation, Event Interpretation, and Unstructured Sessions in Brief Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diemer, Roberta A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Twenty-five distressed adult clients received 2 sessions each of dream and event interpretation using the Hill model during 12 sessions of successful therapy. No differences were found in depth, insight, and working alliance among dream interpretation, event interpretation, and unstructured sessions, suggesting that dream interpretation is as…

  10. A Model for Linking Organizational Culture and Performance. Innovative Session 6. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Cathy Bolton

    An innovative session was conducted to introduce session participants to a concept and researched model for linking organizational culture and performance. The session goals were as follows: (1) give participants a working knowledge of the link between business culture and key business performance indicators; (2) give participants a hands-on…

  11. New quantum MDS-convolutional codes derived from constacyclic codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fengwei; Yue, Qin

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we utilize a family of Hermitian dual-containing constacyclic codes to construct classical and quantum MDS convolutional codes. Our classical and quantum convolutional codes are optimal in the sense that they attain the classical (quantum) generalized Singleton bound.

  12. An experiment to assess the cost-benefits of code inspections in large scale software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, A.; Siy, H.; Toman, C. A.; Votta, L. G.

    1994-01-01

    This experiment (currently in progress) is designed to measure costs and benefits of different code inspection methods. It is being performed with a real development team writing software for a commercial product. The dependent variables for each code unit's inspection are the elapsed time and the number of defects detected. We manipulate the method of inspection by randomly assigning reviewers, varying the number of reviewers and the number of teams, and, when using more than one team, randomly assigning author repair and non-repair of detected defects between code inspections. After collecting and analyzing the first 17 percent of the data, we have discovered several interesting facts about reviewers, about the defects recorded during reviewer preparation and during the inspection collection meeting, and about the repairs that are eventually made. (1) Only 17 percent of the defects that reviewers record in their preparations are true defects that are later repaired. (2) Defects recorded at the inspection meetings fall into three categories: 18 percent false positives requiring no author repair, 57 percent soft maintenance where the author makes changes only for readability or code standard enforcement, and 25 percent true defects requiring repair. (3) The median elapsed calendar time for code inspections is 10 working days - 8 working days before the collection meeting and 2 after. (4) In the collection meetings, 31 percent of the defects discovered by reviewers during preparation are suppressed. (5) Finally, 33 percent of the true defects recorded are discovered at the collection meetings and not during any reviewer's preparation. The results to date suggest that inspections with two sessions (two different teams) of two reviewers per session (2sX2p) are the most effective. These two-session inspections may be performed with author repair or with no author repair between the two sessions. We are finding that the two-session, two-person with repair (2sX2p

  13. Improving Residents' Code Status Discussion Skills: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Kathy J.; Sharma, Rashmi K.; Cohen, Elaine R.; McGaghie, William C.; Wayne, Diane B.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Inpatient Code Status Discussions (CSDs) are commonly facilitated by resident physicians, despite inadequate training. We studied the efficacy of a CSD communication skills training intervention for internal medicine residents. Methods This was a prospective, randomized controlled trial of a multimodality communication skills educational intervention for postgraduate year (PGY) 1 residents. Intervention group residents completed a 2 hour teaching session with deliberate practice of communication skills, online modules, self-reflection, and a booster training session in addition to assigned clinical rotations. Control group residents completed clinical rotations alone. CSD skills of residents in both groups were assessed 2 months after the intervention using an 18 item behavioral checklist during a standardized patient encounter. Average scores for intervention and control group residents were calculated and between-group differences on the CSD skills assessment were evaluated using two-tailed independent sample t tests. Results Intervention group residents displayed higher overall scores on the simulated CSD (75.1% versus 53.2%, p<0.0001) than control group residents. The intervention group also displayed a greater number of key CSD communication behaviors and facilitated significantly longer conversations. The training, evaluation, and feedback sessions were rated highly. Conclusion A focused, multimodality curriculum can improve resident performance of simulated CSDs. Skill improvement lasted for at least 2 months after the intervention. Further studies are needed to assess skill retention and to set minimum performance standards. PMID:22690890

  14. Biometrics based authentication scheme for session initiation protocol.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qi; Tang, Zhixiong

    2016-01-01

    Many two-factor challenge-response based session initiation protocol (SIP) has been proposed, but most of them are vulnerable to smart card stolen attacks and password guessing attacks. In this paper, we propose a novel three-factor SIP authentication scheme using biometrics, password and smart card, and utilize the pi calculus-based formal verification tool ProVerif to prove that the proposed protocol achieves security and authentication. Furthermore, our protocol is highly efficient when compared to other related protocols.

  15. Summary of long-baseline systematics session at CETUP*2014

    SciTech Connect

    Cherdack, Daniel; Worcester, Elizabeth

    2015-10-15

    A session studying systematics in long-baseline neutrino oscillation physics was held July 14-18, 2014 as part of CETUP* 2014. Systematic effects from flux normalization and modeling, modeling of cross sections and nuclear interactions, and far detector effects were addressed. Experts presented the capabilities of existing and planned tools. A program of study to determine estimates of and requirements for the size of these effects was designed. This document summarizes the results of the CETUP* systematics workshop and the current status of systematic uncertainty studies in long-baseline neutrino oscillation measurements.

  16. Security of a sessional blind signature based on quantum cryptograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tian-Yin; Cai, Xiao-Qiu; Zhang, Rui-Ling

    2014-08-01

    We analyze the security of a sessional blind signature protocol based on quantum cryptograph and show that there are two security leaks in this protocol. One is that the legal user Alice can change the signed message after she gets a valid blind signature from the signatory Bob, and the other is that an external opponent Eve also can forge a valid blind message by a special attack, which are not permitted for blind signature. Therefore, this protocol is not secure in the sense that it does not satisfy the non-forgeability of blind signatures. We also discuss the methods to prevent the attack strategies in the end.

  17. Biometrics based authentication scheme for session initiation protocol.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qi; Tang, Zhixiong

    2016-01-01

    Many two-factor challenge-response based session initiation protocol (SIP) has been proposed, but most of them are vulnerable to smart card stolen attacks and password guessing attacks. In this paper, we propose a novel three-factor SIP authentication scheme using biometrics, password and smart card, and utilize the pi calculus-based formal verification tool ProVerif to prove that the proposed protocol achieves security and authentication. Furthermore, our protocol is highly efficient when compared to other related protocols. PMID:27462493

  18. “The Whole Family Suffered, so the Whole Family Needs to Recover”: Thematic Analysis of Substance-Abusing Mothers’ Family Therapy Sessions

    PubMed Central

    Brakenhoff, Brittany; Slesnick, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    Substance abusing mothers and their children are more likely to experience a range of social, behavioral, and psychological difficulties. Despite the significant challenges faced by these families, little is known about their experiences in treatment. The current study analyzed 12 sessions of family therapy using thematic analysis to identify common themes that arose during substance abusing mothers and their children’s discussion during family therapy. Mothers’ ages ranged from 28 to 35 years and the children’s ages ranged from 12 to 14 years. Four therapy sessions from three families were coded for a total of 12 therapy sessions. An ecological framework was used to classify themes, in which themes related to each level of the families’ ecological systems were identified. Thematic analysis of the therapy sessions indicated that mothers and their children primarily discussed topics related to their relational and emotional needs. The findings indicated that substance use disordered mothers and their children have unique treatment needs that should be addressed when the mother seeks treatment. More research is needed to further clarify and confirm the observations in this study. In particular, future research should include a larger sample and quantitative methodology. PMID:25729116

  19. Effects of health facilitator performance and attendance at training sessions on the acquisition of tobacco refusal skills among multi-ethnic, high-risk adolescents.

    PubMed

    Elder, J P; Woodruff, S I; Sallis, J F; de Moor, C; Edwards, C; Wildey, M B

    1994-06-01

    The study examined the effectiveness of a psycho-social tobacco use prevention intervention with a refusal skills training component on the refusal skills of high-risk adolescents, and investigated skill acquisition as related to subject demographics, performance of health facilitators and attendance at skills training sessions. Tobacco refusal skills were assessed for a group (n = 389) of high-risk, seventh-grade students participating as intervention and control subjects in Project SHOUT, a large tobacco use prevention program in the San Diego area. In addition, subject demographics, ratings of health facilitator performance and information about subjects' attendance at skills training sessions were collected. Subjects' responses to audiotaped peer offers of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco were coded for content and quality. Greater tobacco refusal skills among intervention subjects was hypothesized. Further health facilitator performance, attendance at training sessions and subject demographics were thought to be related to skill acquisition. High-risk intervention subjects gave significantly higher quality tobacco-refusal responses than did controls, although the differences between means were small. Results suggested that Hispanic adolescents were particularly receptive to the refusal skills training. The association between health facilitator performance and skill acquisition varied by subject ethnicity, as did the relationship between attendance at training sessions and skill acquisition. PMID:10150446

  20. 7 years of MacGyver sessions at EGU and AGU: what happened?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hut, Rolf; Selker, John; Weijs, Steven; Luxemburg, Wim; Wickert, Andy; Blume, Theresa; Bamburger, Jan; Stoof, Cathelijne; Tauro, Flavia

    2016-04-01

    The session that this poster is in, the: "Self-made sensors and unintended use of measurement equipment", also known as the "MacGyver-session" has had 7 years of scientists contributing their self made devices, hacks and solutions with the hydrological community. In 2009, the first session was held at the AGU fall meeting and since 2011 a session is also organised at the EGU General Assembly. On this poster, and in the accompanying review paper, we will present an overview of the work presented in the last 7 years, cataloging the work of the inventive scientists who have contributed to these successful, and above all: fun, sessions.

  1. Authorship Attribution of Source Code

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennyson, Matthew F.

    2013-01-01

    Authorship attribution of source code is the task of deciding who wrote a program, given its source code. Applications include software forensics, plagiarism detection, and determining software ownership. A number of methods for the authorship attribution of source code have been presented in the past. A review of those existing methods is…

  2. Energy Codes and Standards: Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, Rosemarie; Halverson, Mark A.; Shankle, Diana L.

    2007-01-01

    Energy codes and standards play a vital role in the marketplace by setting minimum requirements for energy-efficient design and construction. They outline uniform requirements for new buildings as well as additions and renovations. This article covers basic knowledge of codes and standards; development processes of each; adoption, implementation, and enforcement of energy codes and standards; and voluntary energy efficiency programs.

  3. Coding Issues in Grounded Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moghaddam, Alireza

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses grounded theory as one of the qualitative research designs. It describes how grounded theory generates from data. Three phases of grounded theory--open coding, axial coding, and selective coding--are discussed, along with some of the issues which are the source of debate among grounded theorists, especially between its…

  4. The Therapy Process Observational Coding System-Alliance Scale: Measure Characteristics and Prediction of Outcome in Usual Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Bryce D.; Weisz, John R.

    2005-01-01

    The authors describe psychometric characteristics of the new Therapy Process Observational Coding System-Alliance scale (TPOCS-A; B. D. McLeod, 2001) and illustrate its use in the study of treatment as usual. The TPOCS-A uses session observation to assess child-therapist and parent-therapist alliance. Both child and parent forms showed acceptable…

  5. Finite Element Analysis Code

    2005-06-26

    Exotxt is an analysis code that reads finite element results data stored in an exodusII file and generates a file in a structured text format. The text file can be edited or modified via a number of text formatting tools. Exotxt is used by analysis to translate data from the binary exodusII format into a structured text format which can then be edited or modified and then either translated back to exodusII format or tomore » another format.« less

  6. Finite Element Analysis Code

    SciTech Connect

    Sjaardema, G.; Forsythe, C.

    2005-05-07

    CONEX is a code for joining sequentially in time multiple exodusll database files which all represent the same base mesh topology and geometry. It is used to create a single results or restart file from multiple results or restart files which typically arise as the result of multiple restarted analyses. CONEX is used to postprocess the results from a series of finite element analyses. It can join sequentially the data from multiple results databases into a single database which makes it easier to postprocess the results data.

  7. Finite Element Analysis Code

    2005-05-07

    CONEX is a code for joining sequentially in time multiple exodusll database files which all represent the same base mesh topology and geometry. It is used to create a single results or restart file from multiple results or restart files which typically arise as the result of multiple restarted analyses. CONEX is used to postprocess the results from a series of finite element analyses. It can join sequentially the data from multiple results databases intomore » a single database which makes it easier to postprocess the results data.« less

  8. New quantum codes constructed from quaternary BCH codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gen; Li, Ruihu; Guo, Luobin; Ma, Yuena

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we firstly study construction of new quantum error-correcting codes (QECCs) from three classes of quaternary imprimitive BCH codes. As a result, the improved maximal designed distance of these narrow-sense imprimitive Hermitian dual-containing quaternary BCH codes are determined to be much larger than the result given according to Aly et al. (IEEE Trans Inf Theory 53:1183-1188, 2007) for each different code length. Thus, families of new QECCs are newly obtained, and the constructed QECCs have larger distance than those in the previous literature. Secondly, we apply a combinatorial construction to the imprimitive BCH codes with their corresponding primitive counterpart and construct many new linear quantum codes with good parameters, some of which have parameters exceeding the finite Gilbert-Varshamov bound for linear quantum codes.

  9. Low Density Parity Check Codes: Bandwidth Efficient Channel Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Wai; Lin, Shu; Maki, Gary; Yeh, Pen-Shu

    2003-01-01

    Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) Codes provide near-Shannon Capacity performance for NASA Missions. These codes have high coding rates R=0.82 and 0.875 with moderate code lengths, n=4096 and 8176. Their decoders have inherently parallel structures which allows for high-speed implementation. Two codes based on Euclidean Geometry (EG) were selected for flight ASIC implementation. These codes are cyclic and quasi-cyclic in nature and therefore have a simple encoder structure. This results in power and size benefits. These codes also have a large minimum distance as much as d,,, = 65 giving them powerful error correcting capabilities and error floors less than lo- BER. This paper will present development of the LDPC flight encoder and decoder, its applications and status.

  10. New quantum codes constructed from quaternary BCH codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gen; Li, Ruihu; Guo, Luobin; Ma, Yuena

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we firstly study construction of new quantum error-correcting codes (QECCs) from three classes of quaternary imprimitive BCH codes. As a result, the improved maximal designed distance of these narrow-sense imprimitive Hermitian dual-containing quaternary BCH codes are determined to be much larger than the result given according to Aly et al. (IEEE Trans Inf Theory 53:1183-1188, 2007) for each different code length. Thus, families of new QECCs are newly obtained, and the constructed QECCs have larger distance than those in the previous literature. Secondly, we apply a combinatorial construction to the imprimitive BCH codes with their corresponding primitive counterpart and construct many new linear quantum codes with good parameters, some of which have parameters exceeding the finite Gilbert-Varshamov bound for linear quantum codes.

  11. Report of the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2013, Dallas.

    PubMed

    Ishimori, Naoki; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Yamada, Satoshi; Yokoshiki, Hisashi; Mitsuyama, Hirofumi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions were held in Dallas on November 16-20, 2013. The meeting is one of the most leading conferences of cardiology in the world, with over 18,000 professional attendees from more than 105 countries. There were 315 invited sessions and 443 abstract sessions, comprising more than 5,000 presentations. The sessions were expanded to 26 program tracks, which included and integrated basic, translational, clinical, and population science. In the series of late-breaking sessions, updates of results from 20 clinical trials were disclosed. Japanese scientists submitted the second most abstracts to the Scientific Sessions in 2013. We appreciate the significant contribution to the sessions by Japanese cardiologists as well as the Japanese Circulation Society.

  12. Discourse analytic study of counseling sessions in stroke physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Talvitie, Ulla; Pyöriä, Outi

    2006-01-01

    Studies on the interaction between physiotherapists and patients during treatment sessions have found low levels of communicative participation by patients and lack of direct influence by patients on the content of their treatment. This article reports the results of 7 counseling sessions in which physiotherapists and patients with stroke and their caregivers discussed the patients' postural control and balance, which had been tested and videotaped at different stages of the rehabilitation process. The physiotherapists' discourses relating to the videotaped test performances were either brief comments on the patient's performance or critical appraisals with references to difficulties encountered during performance. Performances of the easier tasks were treated by the physiotherapists with rhetorical questions. The second type of discourse consisted of the physiotherapists directing the patients' attention to their problems, and of the patients' and caregivers' initiatives leading to conversation about the patients' problems. The patients understood the significance of the test performance for their life at home in varying ways. The results of this study showed that successful counseling calls for physiotherapists to develop dialogic communication skills to help patients in coconstructing their home exercise together with their social network.

  13. Indoor air contamination during a waterpipe (narghile) smoking session.

    PubMed

    Fromme, Hermann; Dietrich, Silvio; Heitmann, Dieter; Dressel, Holger; Diemer, Jürgen; Schulz, Thomas; Jörres, Rudolf A; Berlin, Knut; Völkel, Wolfgang

    2009-07-01

    The smoke of waterpipe contains numerous substances of health concern, but people mistakenly believe that this smoking method is less harmful and addictive than cigarettes. An experiment was performed in a 57 m3 room on two dates with no smoking on the first date and waterpipe smoking for 4h on the second date. We measured volatile organic compounds (VOC), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), metals, carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (e.g. NO), as well as particle mass (PM), particle number concentration (PNC) and particle surface area in indoor air. High concentrations were observed for the target analytes during the 4-h smoking event. The median (90th percentile) values of PM(2.5), PNC, CO and NO were 393 (737 microg/m(3)), 289,000 (550,000 particles/cm(3)), 51 (65 ppm) and 0.11 (0.13 ppm), respectively. The particle size distribution has a maximum of particles relating to a diameter of 17 nm. The seven carcinogenic PAH were found to be a factor 2.6 higher during the smoking session compared to the control day. In conclusion, the observed indoor air contamination of different harmful substances during a WP session is high, and exposure may pose a health risk for smokers but in particular for non-smokers who are exposed to ETS.

  14. Finding unconscious phantasy in the session: Recognizing form.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, Catalina

    2015-08-01

    The concept of unconscious phantasy has played - and still does play - a central role in psychoanalytic thinking. The author discusses the various forms by which unconscious phantasies manifest themselves in the analytic session as they are lived out and enacted in the transference relationship. This paper also aims at expanding the kleinian theory of symbol formation by exploring the impact that emotional aspects connected to early "raw', "pre-symbolic' phantasies have in the analysis and how their corporeal elements interlock with the signifying process. The author follows the expressive forms of primitive unconscious phantasies as they appear in a psychoanalytic session and proposes that the emotional effect that can be experienced in the communication between patient and analyst depends in great measure on "semiotic' aspects linked to primitive phantasies that are felt and lived out in embodied ways. Rather than a move from unconscious phantasies that typify symbolic equations to those showing proper symbolization, these can coexist and simultaneously find their way to what is communicated to the analyst. As early phantasies bear an intimate connection to the body and to unprocessed emotions when they are projected into the analyst they can produce a powerful resonance, sometimes also experienced in a physical way and forming an integral part of the analyst's counter-transference.

  15. Indoor air contamination during a waterpipe (narghile) smoking session.

    PubMed

    Fromme, Hermann; Dietrich, Silvio; Heitmann, Dieter; Dressel, Holger; Diemer, Jürgen; Schulz, Thomas; Jörres, Rudolf A; Berlin, Knut; Völkel, Wolfgang

    2009-07-01

    The smoke of waterpipe contains numerous substances of health concern, but people mistakenly believe that this smoking method is less harmful and addictive than cigarettes. An experiment was performed in a 57 m3 room on two dates with no smoking on the first date and waterpipe smoking for 4h on the second date. We measured volatile organic compounds (VOC), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), metals, carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (e.g. NO), as well as particle mass (PM), particle number concentration (PNC) and particle surface area in indoor air. High concentrations were observed for the target analytes during the 4-h smoking event. The median (90th percentile) values of PM(2.5), PNC, CO and NO were 393 (737 microg/m(3)), 289,000 (550,000 particles/cm(3)), 51 (65 ppm) and 0.11 (0.13 ppm), respectively. The particle size distribution has a maximum of particles relating to a diameter of 17 nm. The seven carcinogenic PAH were found to be a factor 2.6 higher during the smoking session compared to the control day. In conclusion, the observed indoor air contamination of different harmful substances during a WP session is high, and exposure may pose a health risk for smokers but in particular for non-smokers who are exposed to ETS. PMID:19394392

  16. Measuring Resistance to Change at the Within-Session Level

    PubMed Central

    Tonneau, François; Ríos, Américo; Cabrera, Felipe

    2006-01-01

    Resistance to change is often studied by measuring response rate in various components of a multiple schedule. Response rate in each component is normalized (that is, divided by its baseline level) and then log-transformed. Differential resistance to change is demonstrated if the normalized, log-transformed response rate in one component decreases more slowly than in another component. A problem with normalization, however, is that it can produce artifactual results if the relation between baseline level and disruption is not multiplicative. One way to address this issue is to fit specific models of disruption to untransformed response rates and evaluate whether or not a multiplicative model accounts for the data. Here we present such a test of resistance to change, using within-session response patterns in rats as a data base for fitting models of disruption. By analyzing response rate at a within-session level, we were able to confirm a central prediction of the resistance-to-change framework while discarding normalization artifacts as a plausible explanation of our results. PMID:16903495

  17. Effectiveness of an Electronic Booster Session Delivered to Mandated Students.

    PubMed

    Linowski, Sally A; DiFulvio, Gloria T; Fedorchak, Diane; Puleo, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    College student drinking continues to be a problem in the United States. Students who have violated campus alcohol policy are at particularly high risk for dangerous drinking. While Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS) has been found to be an effective strategy in reducing high-risk drinking and associated consequences, questions remain about ways to further reduce risk or sustain changes associated with a face-to face intervention. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a computer-delivered personalized feedback (electronic booster) delivered to policy violators who completed a mandated BASICS program. At 3-month post-intervention, 346 participants (60.4% male and 39.6% female) were randomized to one of two conditions: assessment only (n = 171) or electronic booster feedback (n = 175). Follow-up assessments were given to all participants at 3, 6, and 12-month post-initial intervention. Both groups showed reductions in drinking after the in-person BASICS intervention, but no additional reductions were seen with the addition of an electronic booster session. Findings suggest that although brief motivational interventions delivered in person to mandated students have been shown to be effective with mandated students, there is no additional benefit from an electronic booster session delivered 3-month post-intervention for this population.

  18. Prospects for UT1 Measurements from VLBI Intensive Sessions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, Johannes; Nilsson, Tobias; Schuh, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Intensives are one-hour single baseline sessions to provide Universal Time (UT1) in near real-time up to a delay of three days if a site is not e-transferring the observational data. Due to the importance of UT1 estimates for the prediction of Earth orientation parameters, as well as any kind of navigation on Earth or in space, there is not only the need to improve the timeliness of the results but also their accuracy. We identify the asymmetry of the tropospheric delays as the major error source, and we provide two strategies to improve the results, in particular of those Intensives which include the station Tsukuba in Japan with its large tropospheric variation. We find an improvement when (1) using ray-traced delays from a numerical weather model, and (2) when estimating tropospheric gradients within the analysis of Intensive sessions. The improvement is shown in terms of reduction of rms of length-of-day estimates w.r.t. those derived from Global Positioning System observations

  19. Finding unconscious phantasy in the session: Recognizing form.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, Catalina

    2015-08-01

    The concept of unconscious phantasy has played - and still does play - a central role in psychoanalytic thinking. The author discusses the various forms by which unconscious phantasies manifest themselves in the analytic session as they are lived out and enacted in the transference relationship. This paper also aims at expanding the kleinian theory of symbol formation by exploring the impact that emotional aspects connected to early "raw', "pre-symbolic' phantasies have in the analysis and how their corporeal elements interlock with the signifying process. The author follows the expressive forms of primitive unconscious phantasies as they appear in a psychoanalytic session and proposes that the emotional effect that can be experienced in the communication between patient and analyst depends in great measure on "semiotic' aspects linked to primitive phantasies that are felt and lived out in embodied ways. Rather than a move from unconscious phantasies that typify symbolic equations to those showing proper symbolization, these can coexist and simultaneously find their way to what is communicated to the analyst. As early phantasies bear an intimate connection to the body and to unprocessed emotions when they are projected into the analyst they can produce a powerful resonance, sometimes also experienced in a physical way and forming an integral part of the analyst's counter-transference. PMID:25990491

  20. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Special Session: Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Special Session: Mars Missions" contained the following reports:Initial Results from the MER Athena Science Investigation at Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum; Geomorphology of the Mars Exploration Rover (MER-A) Landing Site from Observations by the Spirit Rover; Geology of Meridiani Planum as Inferred from Mars Exploration Rover: Observations;Preliminary Mineralogy and Geochemistry Results at the MER-A Landing Site in Gusev; A First Look at the Mineralogy and Geochemistry of the MER-B Landing Site in Meridiani Planum; Mini-TES Observations of the Gusev and Meridiani Landing Sites; Preliminary Results of the Magnetic Properties Experiments on the Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity; Pancam Imaging of the Mars Exploration Rover Landing Sites in Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum; Atmospheric Science with the Mars Exploration Rovers: Things are Looking Up; The Mars Express Mission:Initial Scientific Results from Orbit; The HRSC Experiment in Mars Orbit: First Results; The OMEGA/Mars Express First Results; and SPICAM on Mars Express: First Results and First Observations of Water Ice at South.

  1. NCTM workshop splinter session, IR thermal measurement instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Herbert

    1989-01-01

    The splinter session dealing with commercial industrial thermal measurement state-of-the-hardware had a total attendance of 15. Two papers were presented in the splinter session as follows: (1) Development of an Infrared Imaging System for the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment, Alexander D. Pline, NASA LeRC; (2) A Space-qualified PtSi Thermal Imaging System, Robert W. Astheimer, Barnes Engineering Div., EDO Corp. In addition a brief description of SPRITE detector technology was presented by Richard F. Leftwich of Magnovox. As anticipated, the discussions were concerned mainly with thermal imaging figures of merit rather than those for point measurement instruments. The need for uniform guidelines whereby infrared thermal imaging instruments could be specified and evaluated was identified as most important, particularly where temperature measurements are required. Presently there are differences in the way different manufacturers present significant performance parameters in their instrument data sheets. Furthermore, the prospective user has difficulty relating these parameters to actual measurement needs, and procedures by which performance can be verified are poorly defined. The current availability of powerful thermal imaging diagnostic software was discussed.

  2. Session: What can we learn from developed wind resource areas

    SciTech Connect

    Thelander, Carl; Erickson, Wally

    2004-09-01

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop was composed of two parts intended to examine what existing science tells us about wind turbine impacts at existing wind project sites. Part one dealt with the Altamont Wind Resource area, one of the older wind projects in the US, with a paper presented by Carl Thelander titled ''Bird Fatalities in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: A Case Study, Part 1''. Questions addressed by the presenter included: how is avian habitat affected at Altamont and do birds avoid turbine sites; are birds being attracted to turbine strings; what factors contribute to direct impacts on birds by wind turbines at Altamont; how do use, behavior, avoidance and other factors affect risk to avian species, and particularly impacts those species listed as threatened, endangered, or of conservation concern, and other state listed species. The second part dealt with direct impacts to birds at new generation wind plants outside of California, examining such is sues as mortality, avoidance, direct habitat impacts from terrestrial wind projects, species and numbers killed per turbine rates/MW generated, impacts to listed threatened and endangered species, to USFWS Birds of Conservation Concern, and to state listed species. This session focused on newer wind project sites with a paper titled ''Bird Fatality and Risk at New Generation Wind Projects'' by Wally Erickson. Each paper was followed by a discussion/question and answer period.

  3. Multi-session statistics on beamformed MEG data☆

    PubMed Central

    Luckhoo, Henry T.; Brookes, Matthew J.; Woolrich, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Beamforming has been widely adopted as a source reconstruction technique in the analysis of magnetoencephalography data. Most beamforming implementations incorporate a spatially-varying rescaling (which we term weights normalisation) to correct for the inherent depth bias in raw beamformer estimates. Here, we demonstrate that such rescaling can cause critical problems whenever analyses are performed over multiple sessions of separately beamformed data, for example when comparing effect sizes between different populations. Importantly, we show that the weights-normalised beamformer estimates of neural activity can even lead to a reversal in the inferred sign of the effect being measured. We instead recommend that no weights normalisation be carried out; any depth bias is instead accounted for in the calculation of multi-session (e.g. group) statistics. We demonstrate the severity of the weights normalisation confound with a 2-D simulation, and in real MEG data by performing a group statistical analysis to detect differences in alpha power in eyes-closed rest compared with continuous visual stimulation. PMID:24412400

  4. Measuring resistance to change at the within-session level.

    PubMed

    Tonneau, François; Ríos, Américo; Cabrera, Felipe

    2006-07-01

    Resistance to change is often studied by measuring response rate in various components of a multiple schedule. Response rate in each component is normalized (that is, divided by its baseline level) and then log-transformed. Differential resistance to change is demonstrated if the normalized, log-transformed response rate in one component decreases more slowly than in another component. A problem with normalization, however, is that it can produce artifactual results if the relation between baseline level and disruption is not multiplicative. One way to address this issue is to fit specific models of disruption to untransformed response rates and evaluate whether or not a multiplicative model accounts for the data. Here we present such a test of resistance to change, using within-session response patterns in rats as a data base for fitting models of disruption. By analyzing response rate at a within-session level, we were able to confirm a central prediction of the resistance-to-change framework while discarding normalization artifacts as a plausible explanation of our results. PMID:16903495

  5. SmartWeld working session for the GTS4

    SciTech Connect

    Kleban, S.; Hicken, K.; Ng, R.; Fricke, B.

    1997-08-01

    Results from SmartWeld`s first working session involving in-progress designs is presented. The Welding Advisor component of SmartWeld was thoroughly exercised, evaluated all eleven welds of the selected part. The Welding Advisor is an expert system implemented with object-oriented techniques for knowledge representation. With two welding engineers in attendance, the recommendations of the Welding Advisor were thoroughly examined and critiqued for accuracy and for areas of improvement throughout the working session. The Weld Schedule Database component of SmartWeld was also exercised. It is a historical archive of proven, successful weld schedules that can be intelligently searched using the current context of SmartWeld`s problem solving state. On all eleven welds, the experts agreed that Welding Advisor recommended the most risk free options. As a result of the Advisor`s recommendation, six welds agreed completely with the experts, two welds had their joint geometry modified for production, and three welds were not modified but extra care was exercised during welding. 25 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Effectiveness of an Electronic Booster Session Delivered to Mandated Students.

    PubMed

    Linowski, Sally A; DiFulvio, Gloria T; Fedorchak, Diane; Puleo, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    College student drinking continues to be a problem in the United States. Students who have violated campus alcohol policy are at particularly high risk for dangerous drinking. While Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS) has been found to be an effective strategy in reducing high-risk drinking and associated consequences, questions remain about ways to further reduce risk or sustain changes associated with a face-to face intervention. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a computer-delivered personalized feedback (electronic booster) delivered to policy violators who completed a mandated BASICS program. At 3-month post-intervention, 346 participants (60.4% male and 39.6% female) were randomized to one of two conditions: assessment only (n = 171) or electronic booster feedback (n = 175). Follow-up assessments were given to all participants at 3, 6, and 12-month post-initial intervention. Both groups showed reductions in drinking after the in-person BASICS intervention, but no additional reductions were seen with the addition of an electronic booster session. Findings suggest that although brief motivational interventions delivered in person to mandated students have been shown to be effective with mandated students, there is no additional benefit from an electronic booster session delivered 3-month post-intervention for this population. PMID:26857563

  7. Working session 5: Operational aspects and risk analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cizelj, L.; Donoghue, J.

    1997-02-01

    A general observation is that both operational aspects and risk analysis cannot be adequately discussed without information presented in other sessions. Some overlap of conclusions and recommendations is therefore to be expected. Further, it was assumed that recommendations concerning improvements in some related topics were generated by other sessions and are not repeated here. These include: (1) Knowledge on degradation mechanisms (initiation, progression, and failure). (2) Modeling of degradation (initiation, progression, and failure). (3) Capabilities of NDE methods. (4) Preventive maintenance and repair. One should note here, however, that all of these directly affect both operational and risk aspects of affected plants. A list of conclusions and recommendations is based on available presentations and discussions addressing risk and operational experience. The authors aimed at reaching as broad a consensus as possible. It should be noted here that there is no strict delineation between operational and safety aspects of degradation of steam generator tubes. This is caused by different risk perceptions in different countries/societies. The conclusions and recommendations were divided into four broad groups: human reliability; leakage monitoring; risk impact; and consequence assessment.

  8. Measuring Diagnoses: ICD Code Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    O'Malley, Kimberly J; Cook, Karon F; Price, Matt D; Wildes, Kimberly Raiford; Hurdle, John F; Ashton, Carol M

    2005-01-01

    Objective To examine potential sources of errors at each step of the described inpatient International Classification of Diseases (ICD) coding process. Data Sources/Study Setting The use of disease codes from the ICD has expanded from classifying morbidity and mortality information for statistical purposes to diverse sets of applications in research, health care policy, and health care finance. By describing a brief history of ICD coding, detailing the process for assigning codes, identifying where errors can be introduced into the process, and reviewing methods for examining code accuracy, we help code users more systematically evaluate code accuracy for their particular applications. Study Design/Methods We summarize the inpatient ICD diagnostic coding process from patient admission to diagnostic code assignment. We examine potential sources of errors at each step and offer code users a tool for systematically evaluating code accuracy. Principle Findings Main error sources along the “patient trajectory” include amount and quality of information at admission, communication among patients and providers, the clinician's knowledge and experience with the illness, and the clinician's attention to detail. Main error sources along the “paper trail” include variance in the electronic and written records, coder training and experience, facility quality-control efforts, and unintentional and intentional coder errors, such as misspecification, unbundling, and upcoding. Conclusions By clearly specifying the code assignment process and heightening their awareness of potential error sources, code users can better evaluate the applicability and limitations of codes for their particular situations. ICD codes can then be used in the most appropriate ways. PMID:16178999

  9. Two-terminal video coding.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Stanković, Vladimir; Xiong, Zixiang; Zhao, Wei

    2009-03-01

    Following recent works on the rate region of the quadratic Gaussian two-terminal source coding problem and limit-approaching code designs, this paper examines multiterminal source coding of two correlated, i.e., stereo, video sequences to save the sum rate over independent coding of both sequences. Two multiterminal video coding schemes are proposed. In the first scheme, the left sequence of the stereo pair is coded by H.264/AVC and used at the joint decoder to facilitate Wyner-Ziv coding of the right video sequence. The first I-frame of the right sequence is successively coded by H.264/AVC Intracoding and Wyner-Ziv coding. An efficient stereo matching algorithm based on loopy belief propagation is then adopted at the decoder to produce pixel-level disparity maps between the corresponding frames of the two decoded video sequences on the fly. Based on the disparity maps, side information for both motion vectors and motion-compensated residual frames of the right sequence are generated at the decoder before Wyner-Ziv encoding. In the second scheme, source splitting is employed on top of classic and Wyner-Ziv coding for compression of both I-frames to allow flexible rate allocation between the two sequences. Experiments with both schemes on stereo video sequences using H.264/AVC, LDPC codes for Slepian-Wolf coding of the motion vectors, and scalar quantization in conjunction with LDPC codes for Wyner-Ziv coding of the residual coefficients give a slightly lower sum rate than separate H.264/AVC coding of both sequences at the same video quality.

  10. Genetic code for sine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Alyasa Gan; Wah, Yap Bee

    2015-02-01

    The computation of the approximate values of the trigonometric sines was discovered by Bhaskara I (c. 600-c.680), a seventh century Indian mathematician and is known as the Bjaskara's I's sine approximation formula. The formula is given in his treatise titled Mahabhaskariya. In the 14th century, Madhava of Sangamagrama, a Kerala mathematician astronomer constructed the table of trigonometric sines of various angles. Madhava's table gives the measure of angles in arcminutes, arcseconds and sixtieths of an arcsecond. The search for more accurate formulas led to the discovery of the power series expansion by Madhava of Sangamagrama (c.1350-c. 1425), the founder of the Kerala school of astronomy and mathematics. In 1715, the Taylor series was introduced by Brook Taylor an English mathematician. If the Taylor series is centered at zero, it is called a Maclaurin series, named after the Scottish mathematician Colin Maclaurin. Some of the important Maclaurin series expansions include trigonometric functions. This paper introduces the genetic code of the sine of an angle without using power series expansion. The genetic code using square root approach reveals the pattern in the signs (plus, minus) and sequence of numbers in the sine of an angle. The square root approach complements the Pythagoras method, provides a better understanding of calculating an angle and will be useful for teaching the concepts of angles in trigonometry.

  11. FAST GYROSYNCHROTRON CODES

    SciTech Connect

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Kuznetsov, Alexey A.

    2010-10-01

    Radiation produced by charged particles gyrating in a magnetic field is highly significant in the astrophysics context. Persistently increasing resolution of astrophysical observations calls for corresponding three-dimensional modeling of the radiation. However, available exact equations are prohibitively slow in computing a comprehensive table of high-resolution models required for many practical applications. To remedy this situation, we develop approximate gyrosynchrotron (GS) codes capable of quickly calculating the GS emission (in non-quantum regime) from both isotropic and anisotropic electron distributions in non-relativistic, mildly relativistic, and ultrarelativistic energy domains applicable throughout a broad range of source parameters including dense or tenuous plasmas and weak or strong magnetic fields. The computation time is reduced by several orders of magnitude compared with the exact GS algorithm. The new algorithm performance can gradually be adjusted to the user's needs depending on whether precision or computation speed is to be optimized for a given model. The codes are made available for users as a supplement to this paper.

  12. The Role of Session Zero in Successful Completion of Chronic Disease Self-Management Program Workshops

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Luohua; Smith, Matthew Lee; Chen, Shuai; Ahn, SangNam; Kulinski, Kristie P.; Lorig, Kate; Ory, Marcia G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) has been widely disseminated among various racial and ethnic populations. In addition to the six required CDSMP workshop sessions, the delivery sites have the option to offer a Session Zero (or zero class), an information session offered prior to Session One as a marketing tool. Despite assumptions that a zero class is helpful, little is known about the prevalence of these additional sessions or their impact on retaining participants in CDSMP workshops. This study aims to describe the proportion of CDSMP workshops that offered Session Zero and examine the association between Session Zero and workshop completion rates. Methods: Data were analyzed from 80,987 middle-aged and older adults collected during a two-year national dissemination of CDSMP. Generalized estimating equation regression analyses were conducted to assess the association between Session Zero and successful workshop completion (attending four or more of the six workshop sessions). Results: On average, 21.04% of the participants attended workshops that offered Session Zero, and 75.33% successfully completed the CDSMP workshop. The participants of the workshops that offered Session Zero had significantly higher odds of completing CDSMP workshops than those who were not offered Session Zero (OR = 1.099, P = <0.001) after controlling for participants’ demographic characteristics, race, ethnicity, living status, household income, number of chronic conditions, and workshop delivery type. Conclusion: As one of the first studies reporting the importance of an orientation session for participant retention in chronic disease management intervention projects, our findings suggest offering an orientation session may increase participant retention in similar translational efforts. PMID:25964918

  13. New optimal quantum convolutional codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shixin; Wang, Liqi; Kai, Xiaoshan

    2015-04-01

    One of the most challenges to prove the feasibility of quantum computers is to protect the quantum nature of information. Quantum convolutional codes are aimed at protecting a stream of quantum information in a long distance communication, which are the correct generalization to the quantum domain of their classical analogs. In this paper, we construct some classes of quantum convolutional codes by employing classical constacyclic codes. These codes are optimal in the sense that they attain the Singleton bound for pure convolutional stabilizer codes.

  14. Circular codes, symmetries and transformations.

    PubMed

    Fimmel, Elena; Giannerini, Simone; Gonzalez, Diego Luis; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2015-06-01

    Circular codes, putative remnants of primeval comma-free codes, have gained considerable attention in the last years. In fact they represent a second kind of genetic code potentially involved in detecting and maintaining the normal reading frame in protein coding sequences. The discovering of an universal code across species suggested many theoretical and experimental questions. However, there is a key aspect that relates circular codes to symmetries and transformations that remains to a large extent unexplored. In this article we aim at addressing the issue by studying the symmetries and transformations that connect different circular codes. The main result is that the class of 216 C3 maximal self-complementary codes can be partitioned into 27 equivalence classes defined by a particular set of transformations. We show that such transformations can be put in a group theoretic framework with an intuitive geometric interpretation. More general mathematical results about symmetry transformations which are valid for any kind of circular codes are also presented. Our results pave the way to the study of the biological consequences of the mathematical structure behind circular codes and contribute to shed light on the evolutionary steps that led to the observed symmetries of present codes. PMID:25008961

  15. Making your code citable with the Astrophysics Source Code Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Alice; DuPrie, Kimberly; Schmidt, Judy; Berriman, G. Bruce; Hanisch, Robert J.; Mink, Jessica D.; Nemiroff, Robert J.; Shamir, Lior; Shortridge, Keith; Taylor, Mark B.; Teuben, Peter J.; Wallin, John F.

    2016-01-01

    The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL, ascl.net) is a free online registry of codes used in astronomy research. With nearly 1,200 codes, it is the largest indexed resource for astronomy codes in existence. Established in 1999, it offers software authors a path to citation of their research codes even without publication of a paper describing the software, and offers scientists a way to find codes used in refereed publications, thus improving the transparency of the research. It also provides a method to quantify the impact of source codes in a fashion similar to the science metrics of journal articles. Citations using ASCL IDs are accepted by major astronomy journals and if formatted properly are tracked by ADS and other indexing services. The number of citations to ASCL entries increased sharply from 110 citations in January 2014 to 456 citations in September 2015. The percentage of code entries in ASCL that were cited at least once rose from 7.5% in January 2014 to 17.4% in September 2015. The ASCL's mid-2014 infrastructure upgrade added an easy entry submission form, more flexible browsing, search capabilities, and an RSS feeder for updates. A Changes/Additions form added this past fall lets authors submit links for papers that use their codes for addition to the ASCL entry even if those papers don't formally cite the codes, thus increasing the transparency of that research and capturing the value of their software to the community.

  16. Practices in Code Discoverability: Astrophysics Source Code Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, A.; Teuben, P.; Nemiroff, R. J.; Shamir, L.

    2012-09-01

    Here we describe the Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL), which takes an active approach to sharing astrophysics source code. ASCL's editor seeks out both new and old peer-reviewed papers that describe methods or experiments that involve the development or use of source code, and adds entries for the found codes to the library. This approach ensures that source codes are added without requiring authors to actively submit them, resulting in a comprehensive listing that covers a significant number of the astrophysics source codes used in peer-reviewed studies. The ASCL now has over 340 codes in it and continues to grow. In 2011, the ASCL has on average added 19 codes per month. An advisory committee has been established to provide input and guide the development and expansion of the new site, and a marketing plan has been developed and is being executed. All ASCL source codes have been used to generate results published in or submitted to a refereed journal and are freely available either via a download site or from an identified source. This paper provides the history and description of the ASCL. It lists the requirements for including codes, examines the advantages of the ASCL, and outlines some of its future plans.

  17. Rotational Seismology: AGU Session, Working Group, and Website

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, William H.K.; Igel, Heiner; Todorovska, Maria I.; Evans, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Although effects of rotational motions due to earthquakes have long been observed (e. g., Mallet, 1862), nevertheless Richter (1958, p. 213) stated that: 'Perfectly general motion would also involve rotations about three perpendicular axes, and three more instruments for these. Theory indicates, and observation confirms, that such rotations are negligible.' However, Richter provided no references for this claim. Seismology is based primarily on the observation and modeling of three-component translational ground motions. Nevertheless, theoretical seismologists (e.g., Aki and Richards, 1980, 2002) have argued for decades that the rotational part of ground motions should also be recorded. It is well known that standard seismometers are quite sensitive to rotations and therefore subject to rotation-induced errors. The paucity of observations of rotational motions is mainly the result of a lack, until recently, of affordable rotational sensors of sufficient resolution. Nevertheless, in the past decade, a number of authors have reported direct observations of rotational motions and rotations inferred from rigid-body rotations in short baseline accelerometer arrays, creating a burgeoning library of rotational data. For example, ring laser gyros in Germany and New Zealand have led to the first significant and consistent observations of rotational motions from distant earthquakes (Igel et al., 2005, 2007). A monograph on Earthquake Source Asymmetry, Structural Media and Rotation Effects was published recently as well by Teisseyre et al. (2006). Measurement of rotational motions has implications for: (1) recovering the complete ground-displacement history from seismometer recordings; (2) further constraining earthquake rupture properties; (3) extracting information about subsurface properties; and (4) providing additional ground motion information to earthquake engineers for seismic design. A special session on Rotational Motions in Seismology was convened by H

  18. Peripheral coding of taste

    PubMed Central

    Liman, Emily R.; Zhang, Yali V.; Montell, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Five canonical tastes, bitter, sweet, umami (amino acid), salty and sour (acid) are detected by animals as diverse as fruit flies and humans, consistent with a near universal drive to consume fundamental nutrients and to avoid toxins or other harmful compounds. Surprisingly, despite this strong conservation of basic taste qualities between vertebrates and invertebrates, the receptors and signaling mechanisms that mediate taste in each are highly divergent. The identification over the last two decades of receptors and other molecules that mediate taste has led to stunning advances in our understanding of the basic mechanisms of transduction and coding of information by the gustatory systems of vertebrates and invertebrates. In this review, we discuss recent advances in taste research, mainly from the fly and mammalian systems, and we highlight principles that are common across species, despite stark differences in receptor types. PMID:24607224

  19. Electromagnetic particle simulation codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    Electromagnetic particle simulations solve the full set of Maxwell's equations. They thus include the effects of self-consistent electric and magnetic fields, magnetic induction, and electromagnetic radiation. The algorithms for an electromagnetic code which works directly with the electric and magnetic fields are described. The fields and current are separated into transverse and longitudinal components. The transverse E and B fields are integrated in time using a leapfrog scheme applied to the Fourier components. The particle pushing is performed via the relativistic Lorentz force equation for the particle momentum. As an example, simulation results are presented for the electron cyclotron maser instability which illustrate the importance of relativistic effects on the wave-particle resonance condition and on wave dispersion.

  20. Surface acoustic wave coding for orthogonal frequency coded devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malocha, Donald (Inventor); Kozlovski, Nikolai (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Methods and systems for coding SAW OFC devices to mitigate code collisions in a wireless multi-tag system. Each device producing plural stepped frequencies as an OFC signal with a chip offset delay to increase code diversity. A method for assigning a different OCF to each device includes using a matrix based on the number of OFCs needed and the number chips per code, populating each matrix cell with OFC chip, and assigning the codes from the matrix to the devices. The asynchronous passive multi-tag system includes plural surface acoustic wave devices each producing a different OFC signal having the same number of chips and including a chip offset time delay, an algorithm for assigning OFCs to each device, and a transceiver to transmit an interrogation signal and receive OFC signals in response with minimal code collisions during transmission.

  1. Transionospheric Propagation Code (TIPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.; Kelley, T.A.

    1990-10-01

    The Transionospheric Propagation Code is a computer program developed at Los Alamos National Lab to perform certain tasks related to the detection of vhf signals following propagation through the ionosphere. The code is written in Fortran 77, runs interactively and was designed to be as machine independent as possible. A menu format in which the user is prompted to supply appropriate parameters for a given task has been adopted for the input while the output is primarily in the form of graphics. The user has the option of selecting from five basic tasks, namely transionospheric propagation, signal filtering, signal processing, DTOA study, and DTOA uncertainty study. For the first task a specified signal is convolved against the impulse response function of the ionosphere to obtain the transionospheric signal. The user is given a choice of four analytic forms for the input pulse or of supplying a tabular form. The option of adding Gaussian-distributed white noise of spectral noise to the input signal is also provided. The deterministic ionosphere is characterized to first order in terms of a total electron content (TEC) along the propagation path. In addition, a scattering model parameterized in terms of a frequency coherence bandwidth is also available. In the second task, detection is simulated by convolving a given filter response against the transionospheric signal. The user is given a choice of a wideband filter or a narrowband Gaussian filter. It is also possible to input a filter response. The third task provides for quadrature detection, envelope detection, and three different techniques for time-tagging the arrival of the transionospheric signal at specified receivers. The latter algorithms can be used to determine a TEC and thus take out the effects of the ionosphere to first order. Task four allows the user to construct a table of delta-times-of-arrival (DTOAs) vs TECs for a specified pair of receivers.

  2. Some easily analyzable convolutional codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceliece, R.; Dolinar, S.; Pollara, F.; Vantilborg, H.

    1989-01-01

    Convolutional codes have played and will play a key role in the downlink telemetry systems on many NASA deep-space probes, including Voyager, Magellan, and Galileo. One of the chief difficulties associated with the use of convolutional codes, however, is the notorious difficulty of analyzing them. Given a convolutional code as specified, say, by its generator polynomials, it is no easy matter to say how well that code will perform on a given noisy channel. The usual first step in such an analysis is to computer the code's free distance; this can be done with an algorithm whose complexity is exponential in the code's constraint length. The second step is often to calculate the transfer function in one, two, or three variables, or at least a few terms in its power series expansion. This step is quite hard, and for many codes of relatively short constraint lengths, it can be intractable. However, a large class of convolutional codes were discovered for which the free distance can be computed by inspection, and for which there is a closed-form expression for the three-variable transfer function. Although for large constraint lengths, these codes have relatively low rates, they are nevertheless interesting and potentially useful. Furthermore, the ideas developed here to analyze these specialized codes may well extend to a much larger class.

  3. Interframe vector wavelet coding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wus, John P.; Li, Weiping

    1997-01-01

    Wavelet coding is often used to divide an image into multi- resolution wavelet coefficients which are quantized and coded. By 'vectorizing' scalar wavelet coding and combining this with vector quantization (VQ), vector wavelet coding (VWC) can be implemented. Using a finite number of states, finite-state vector quantization (FSVQ) takes advantage of the similarity between frames by incorporating memory into the video coding system. Lattice VQ eliminates the potential mismatch that could occur using pre-trained VQ codebooks. It also eliminates the need for codebook storage in the VQ process, thereby creating a more robust coding system. Therefore, by using the VWC coding method in conjunction with the FSVQ system and lattice VQ, the formulation of a high quality very low bit rate coding systems is proposed. A coding system using a simple FSVQ system where the current state is determined by the previous channel symbol only is developed. To achieve a higher degree of compression, a tree-like FSVQ system is implemented. The groupings are done in this tree-like structure from the lower subbands to the higher subbands in order to exploit the nature of subband analysis in terms of the parent-child relationship. Class A and Class B video sequences from the MPEG-IV testing evaluations are used in the evaluation of this coding method.

  4. What's on the therapist's mind? A grounded theory analysis of family therapist reflections during individual therapy sessions.

    PubMed

    Rober, Peter; Elliott, Robert; Buysse, Ann; Loots, Gerrit; De Corte, Kim

    2008-01-01

    The authors used a videotape-assisted recall procedure to study the content of family therapists' inner conversations during individual sessions with a standardized client. Grounded theory was used to analyze therapists' reflections, resulting in a taxonomy of 282 different codes in a hierarchical tree structure of six levels, organized into four general domains: attending to client process; processing the client's story; focusing on therapists' own experience; and managing the therapeutic process. In addition to providing a descriptive model of therapists' inner conversation, this research led to an appreciation of the wealth of therapists' inner conversation. In particular, the authors found that therapists work hard to create an intersubjective space within which to talk by trying to be in tune with their clients and by using clients as a guide.

  5. Is Anticoagulation Discontinuation Achievable with Citrate Dialysate during HDF Sessions?

    PubMed Central

    Oger, Emmanuel; Hamel, Didier; Lombart, Marie-Laure; Hermès, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Citrate dialysate has been developed for few years to replace acetate and HCl concentrates. In Online Postdilution Hemodiafiltration (OL-POST-HDF), several issues are remaining concerning the possibility of stopping anticoagulation during sessions and the side effects of citrate solutions on calcium metabolism. This 1-year monocentric retrospective study included all patients exposed to citrate in OL-POST-HDF with nadroparin decrease for more than one month. Clotting events, serum calcium, PTH, hemoglobin, CRP, depuration parameters, and treatments administrated were recorded for analysis. 27 patients experienced nadroparin decrease and 5 did not receive nadroparin at the end of the study. Nadroparin decrease and withdrawal were both associated with more clotting events whereas the use of vitamin K antagonists was protective. No significant metabolic side effects were observed. Citrate dialysate does not allow anticoagulation discontinuation or decrease but has no significant side effects on mineral bone metabolism or erythropoiesis. PMID:27803814

  6. Quantum key distribution session with 16-dimensional photonic states.

    PubMed

    Etcheverry, S; Cañas, G; Gómez, E S; Nogueira, W A T; Saavedra, C; Xavier, G B; Lima, G

    2013-01-01

    The secure transfer of information is an important problem in modern telecommunications. Quantum key distribution (QKD) provides a solution to this problem by using individual quantum systems to generate correlated bits between remote parties, that can be used to extract a secret key. QKD with D-dimensional quantum channels provides security advantages that grow with increasing D. However, the vast majority of QKD implementations has been restricted to two dimensions. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using higher dimensions for real-world quantum cryptography by performing, for the first time, a fully automated QKD session based on the BB84 protocol with 16-dimensional quantum states. Information is encoded in the single-photon transverse momentum and the required states are dynamically generated with programmable spatial light modulators. Our setup paves the way for future developments in the field of experimental high-dimensional QKD.

  7. Quantum key distribution session with 16-dimensional photonic states.

    PubMed

    Etcheverry, S; Cañas, G; Gómez, E S; Nogueira, W A T; Saavedra, C; Xavier, G B; Lima, G

    2013-01-01

    The secure transfer of information is an important problem in modern telecommunications. Quantum key distribution (QKD) provides a solution to this problem by using individual quantum systems to generate correlated bits between remote parties, that can be used to extract a secret key. QKD with D-dimensional quantum channels provides security advantages that grow with increasing D. However, the vast majority of QKD implementations has been restricted to two dimensions. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using higher dimensions for real-world quantum cryptography by performing, for the first time, a fully automated QKD session based on the BB84 protocol with 16-dimensional quantum states. Information is encoded in the single-photon transverse momentum and the required states are dynamically generated with programmable spatial light modulators. Our setup paves the way for future developments in the field of experimental high-dimensional QKD. PMID:23897033

  8. Review of Session 7: non-cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Held, Kathryn D.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts in space and cancer patients being treated with ion beam radiotherapy can be exposed to charged particle radiations including energetic protons and heavy ions. These charged particles may be more effective than photons in inducing cancer as well as in causing non-cancer effects. The latter include acute damage from large solar particle events to the blood-forming organs and skin, acute and (from heavier ions) late damage to the central nervous system, and late degenerative damage to the lens of the eye and the cardiovascular, circulatory and respiratory systems. The presentations in this session discussed a number of non-cancer effects of protons and heavier charged particles including acute hematopoietic alterations, potentially detrimental cardiovascular and circulatory effects, and lifespan shortening.

  9. The Schrödinger Sessions: Science for Science Fiction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzel, Chad; Edwards, Emily; Rolston, Steven

    In July 2015, we held a workshop for 17 science fiction writers working in a variety of media at the Joint Quantum Institute at the University of Maryland, College Park. ''The Schrödinger Sessions,'' funded by an outreach grant from APS, provided a three-day ''crash course'' on quantum physics and technology, including lectures from JQI scientists and tours of JQI labs. The goal was to better inform and inspire stories making use of quantum physics, as a means of outreach to inspire a broad audience of future scientists. We will report on the contents of the workshop, reactions from the attendees and presenters, and future plans. Funded by an Outreach Mini-Grant from the APS.

  10. Quantum key distribution session with 16-dimensional photonic states

    PubMed Central

    Etcheverry, S.; Cañas, G.; Gómez, E. S.; Nogueira, W. A. T.; Saavedra, C.; Xavier, G. B.; Lima, G.

    2013-01-01

    The secure transfer of information is an important problem in modern telecommunications. Quantum key distribution (QKD) provides a solution to this problem by using individual quantum systems to generate correlated bits between remote parties, that can be used to extract a secret key. QKD with D-dimensional quantum channels provides security advantages that grow with increasing D. However, the vast majority of QKD implementations has been restricted to two dimensions. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using higher dimensions for real-world quantum cryptography by performing, for the first time, a fully automated QKD session based on the BB84 protocol with 16-dimensional quantum states. Information is encoded in the single-photon transverse momentum and the required states are dynamically generated with programmable spatial light modulators. Our setup paves the way for future developments in the field of experimental high-dimensional QKD. PMID:23897033

  11. Mathematics Intensive Summer Session (MISS). Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    This final technical report appears in two parts: the report for the 1995 summer MISS program and the report for the 1996 summer MISS program. Copies of the US Department of Energy Pre-Freshman Enrichment Program 1995 Entry Form and 1996 Entry Form completed by all participants were sent to the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education in the fall of 1995 and 1996 respectively. Those forms are on file should they be needed. Attached also is a copy of the Summary of ideas for panel discussions, problem-solving sessions, or small group discussions presented at the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Pre-Freshman Enrichment Program Project Directors Meeting held in San Antonio, TX, November 12--14, 1995.

  12. A crowd watches practice sessions for the FIRST competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Visitors to Kennedy Space Center, team members and their families fill the stands during practice sessions of the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 at the KSC Visitor Complex. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at KSC, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  13. Session: What do we know about cumulative or population impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Kerlinger, Paul; Manville, Al; Kendall, Bill

    2004-09-01

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of a panel discussion followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The panelists were Paul Kerlinger, Curry and Kerlinger, LLC, Al Manville, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Bill Kendall, US Geological Service. The panel addressed the potential cumulative impacts of wind turbines on bird and bat populations over time. Panel members gave brief presentations that touched on what is currently known, what laws apply, and the usefulness of population modeling. Topics addressed included which sources of modeling should be included in cumulative impacts, comparison of impacts from different modes of energy generation, as well as what research is still needed regarding cumulative impacts of wind energy development on bird and bat populations.

  14. Achieving intersubjective understanding: examples from an occupational therapy treatment session.

    PubMed

    Crepeau, E B

    1991-11-01

    Occupational therapists, like other health care professionals, must balance their application of treatment techniques with an understanding of their patients' life experiences. This paper reviews the literature from interpretive and medical sociology regarding the interplay between professional power and the achievement of an understanding of another person. It analyzes how an occupational therapist, during a single treatment session, enters into her patient's life-world and simultaneously controls and manages the treatment process. The concepts of knowledge schemata (the expectations and beliefs people bring to a situation) and footings (the shifts in alignment, or focus, that occur during interaction) are central to this analysis. The process of achieving a balance between professional power and an understanding of the patient's experience may be fostered in education and in clinical supervision through increased emphasis on the importance of understanding the values and beliefs of patients and on the development and refinement of interactive skills.

  15. Strategies for Managing Difficult Clinical Situations in Between Sessions

    PubMed Central

    Karakurt, Gunnur; Anderson, Amber; Badford, Alyssa; Dial, Shannon; Korkow, Hannah; Rable, Frank; Doslovich, Serife Fulya

    2014-01-01

    Therapists often have to deal with situations that make them uneasy to leave their clients on their own. They can go home and wonder what their clients are doing, whether they are safe, have a place to stay, even whether or not they are fighting. These thoughts can be overwhelming for the therapist. They may think about their clients' safety, they may also be worried about their own professional way of dealing with these situations, and its implications for them as clinician. The aim of this paper is to assist therapists to manage their own anxiety and to help them help their clients in between sessions in difficult situations such as suicidality, child abuse and neglect, intimate partner violence, crisis and stress management. PMID:25294951

  16. Introduction to the internal fluid mechanics research session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Brent A.; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1990-01-01

    Internal fluid mechanics research at LeRC is directed toward an improved understanding of the important flow physics affecting aerospace propulsion systems, and applying this improved understanding to formulate accurate predictive codes. To this end, research is conducted involving detailed experimentation and analysis. The following three papers summarize ongoing work and indicate future emphasis in three major research thrusts: inlets, ducts, and nozzles; turbomachinery; and chemical reacting flows. The underlying goal of the research in each of these areas is to bring internal computational fluid mechanic to a state of practical application for aerospace propulsion systems. Achievement of this goal requires that carefully planned and executed experiments be conducted in order to develop and validate useful codes. It is critical that numerical code development work and experimental work be closely coupled. The insights gained are represented by mathematical models that form the basis for code development. The resultant codes are then tested by comparing them with appropriate experiments in order to ensure their validity and determine their applicable range. The ultimate user community must be a part of this process to assure relevancy of the work and to hasten its practical application. Propulsion systems are characterized by highly complex and dynamic internal flows. Many complex, 3-D flow phenomena may be present, including unsteadiness, shocks, and chemical reactions. By focusing on specific portions of a propulsion system, it is often possible to identify the dominant phenomena that must be understood and modeled for obtaining accurate predictive capability. The three major research thrusts serve as a focus leading to greater understanding of the relevant physics and to an improvement in analytic tools. This in turn will hasten continued advancements in propulsion system performance and capability.

  17. Continuous detection of the self-initiated walking pre-movement state from EEG correlates without session-to-session recalibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioana Sburlea, Andreea; Montesano, Luis; Minguez, Javier

    2015-06-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) as a rehabilitation tool have been used to restore functions in patients with motor impairments by actively involving the central nervous system and triggering prosthetic devices according to the detected pre-movement state. However, since EEG signals are highly variable between subjects and recording sessions, typically a BCI is calibrated at the beginning of each session. This process is inconvenient especially for patients suffering locomotor disabilities in maintaining a bipedal position for a longer time. This paper presents a continuous EEG decoder of a pre-movement state in self-initiated walking and the usage of this decoder from session to session without recalibrating. Approach. Ten healthy subjects performed a self-initiated walking task during three sessions, with an intersession interval of one week. The implementation of our continuous decoder is based on the combination of movement-related cortical potential (MRCP) and event-related desynchronization (ERD) features with sparse classification models. Main results. During intrasession our technique detects the pre-movement state with 70% accuracy. Moreover this decoder can be applied from session to session without recalibration, with a decrease in performance of about 4% on a one- or two-week intersession interval. Significance. Our detection model operates in a continuous manner, which makes it a straightforward asset for rehabilitation scenarios. By using both temporal and spectral information we attained higher detection rates than the ones obtained with the MRCP and ERD detection models, both during the intrasession and intersession conditions.

  18. Nonlinear, nonbinary cyclic group codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, G.

    1992-01-01

    New cyclic group codes of length 2(exp m) - 1 over (m - j)-bit symbols are introduced. These codes can be systematically encoded and decoded algebraically. The code rates are very close to Reed-Solomon (RS) codes and are much better than Bose-Chaudhuri-Hocquenghem (BCH) codes (a former alternative). The binary (m - j)-tuples are identified with a subgroup of the binary m-tuples which represents the field GF(2 exp m). Encoding is systematic and involves a two-stage procedure consisting of the usual linear feedback register (using the division or check polynomial) and a small table lookup. For low rates, a second shift-register encoding operation may be invoked. Decoding uses the RS error-correcting procedures for the m-tuple codes for m = 4, 5, and 6.

  19. Explosive Formulation Code Naming SOP

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H. E.

    2014-09-19

    The purpose of this SOP is to provide a procedure for giving individual HME formulations code names. A code name for an individual HME formulation consists of an explosive family code, given by the classified guide, followed by a dash, -, and a number. If the formulation requires preparation such as packing or aging, these add additional groups of symbols to the X-ray specimen name.

  20. Variable Coded Modulation software simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sielicki, Thomas A.; Hamkins, Jon; Thorsen, Denise

    This paper reports on the design and performance of a new Variable Coded Modulation (VCM) system. This VCM system comprises eight of NASA's recommended codes from the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) standards, including four turbo and four AR4JA/C2 low-density parity-check codes, together with six modulations types (BPSK, QPSK, 8-PSK, 16-APSK, 32-APSK, 64-APSK). The signaling protocol for the transmission mode is based on a CCSDS recommendation. The coded modulation may be dynamically chosen, block to block, to optimize throughput.

  1. Astrophysics Source Code Library Enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanisch, R. J.; Allen, A.; Berriman, G. B.; DuPrie, K.; Mink, J.; Nemiroff, R. J.; Schmidt, J.; Shamir, L.; Shortridge, K.; Taylor, M.; Teuben, P. J.; Wallin, J.

    2015-09-01

    The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL)1 is a free online registry of codes used in astronomy research; it currently contains over 900 codes and is indexed by ADS. The ASCL has recently moved a new infrastructure into production. The new site provides a true database for the code entries and integrates the WordPress news and information pages and the discussion forum into one site. Previous capabilities are retained and permalinks to ascl.net continue to work. This improvement offers more functionality and flexibility than the previous site, is easier to maintain, and offers new possibilities for collaboration. This paper covers these recent changes to the ASCL.

  2. Implementation issues in source coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayood, Khalid; Chen, Yun-Chung; Hadenfeldt, A. C.

    1989-01-01

    An edge preserving image coding scheme which can be operated in both a lossy and a lossless manner was developed. The technique is an extension of the lossless encoding algorithm developed for the Mars observer spectral data. It can also be viewed as a modification of the DPCM algorithm. A packet video simulator was also developed from an existing modified packet network simulator. The coding scheme for this system is a modification of the mixture block coding (MBC) scheme described in the last report. Coding algorithms for packet video were also investigated.

  3. The FLUKA Code: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, F.; Battistoni, G.; Campanella, M.; Carboni, M.; Cerutti, F.; Empl, A.; Fasso, A.; Ferrari, A.; Gadioli, E.; Garzelli, M. V.; Lantz, M.; Liotta, M.; Mairani, A.; Mostacci, A.; Muraro, S.; Ottolenghi, A.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinsky, L.; Ranft, J.; Roesler, S.; Sala, P. R.; Scannicchio, D.; Trovati, S.; Villari, R.; Wilson, T.

    2006-01-01

    FLUKA is a multipurpose Monte Carlo code which can transport a variety of particles over a wide energy range in complex geometries. The code is a joint project of INFN and CERN: part of its development is also supported by the University of Houston and NASA. FLUKA is successfully applied in several fields, including but not only, particle physics, cosmic ray physics, dosimetry, radioprotection, hadron therapy, space radiation, accelerator design and neutronics. The code is the standard tool used at CERN for dosimetry, radioprotection and beam-machine interaction studies. Here we give a glimpse into the code physics models with a particular emphasis to the hadronic and nuclear sector.

  4. High Order Modulation Protograph Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Thuy V. (Inventor); Nosratinia, Aria (Inventor); Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Digital communication coding methods for designing protograph-based bit-interleaved code modulation that is general and applies to any modulation. The general coding framework can support not only multiple rates but also adaptive modulation. The method is a two stage lifting approach. In the first stage, an original protograph is lifted to a slightly larger intermediate protograph. The intermediate protograph is then lifted via a circulant matrix to the expected codeword length to form a protograph-based low-density parity-check code.

  5. The FLUKA Code: an Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Ballarini, F.; Battistoni, G.; Campanella, M.; Carboni, M.; Cerutti, F.; Empl, A.; Fasso, A.; Ferrari, A.; Gadioli, E.; Garzelli, M.V.; Lantz, M.; Liotta, M.; Mairani, A.; Mostacci, A.; Muraro, S.; Ottolenghi, A.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinsky, L.; Ranft, J.; Roesler, S.; Sala, P.R.; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /CERN /Siegen U. /Houston U. /SLAC /Frascati /NASA, Houston /ENEA, Frascati

    2005-11-09

    FLUKA is a multipurpose Monte Carlo code which can transport a variety of particles over a wide energy range in complex geometries. The code is a joint project of INFN and CERN: part of its development is also supported by the University of Houston and NASA. FLUKA is successfully applied in several fields, including but not only, particle physics, cosmic ray physics, dosimetry, radioprotection, hadron therapy, space radiation, accelerator design and neutronics. The code is the standard tool used at CERN for dosimetry, radioprotection and beam-machine interaction studies. Here we give a glimpse into the code physics models with a particular emphasis to the hadronic and nuclear sector.

  6. Psychometric properties of the system for coding couples' interactions in therapy--alcohol.

    PubMed

    Owens, Mandy D; McCrady, Barbara S; Borders, Adrienne Z; Brovko, Julie M; Pearson, Matthew R

    2014-12-01

    Few systems are available for coding in-session behaviors for couples in therapy. Alcohol Behavioral Couple Therapy (ABCT) is an empirically supported treatment, but little is known about its mechanisms of behavior change. In the current study, an adapted version of the Motivational Interviewing for Significant Others coding system was developed into the System for Coding Couples' Interactions in Therapy-Alcohol (SCCIT-A), which was used to code couples' interactions and behaviors during ABCT. Results showed good interrater reliability of the SCCIT-A and provided evidence that the SCCIT-A may be a promising measure for understanding couples in therapy. A 3-factor model of the SCCIT-A (Positive, Negative, and Change Talk/Counter-Change Talk) was examined using a confirmatory factor analysis, but model fit was poor. Because model fit was poor, ratios were computed for Positive/Negative ratings and for Change Talk/Counter-Change Talk codes based on previous research in the couples and Motivational Interviewing literature. Post hoc analyses examined correlations between specific SCCIT-A codes and baseline characteristics, and indicated some concurrent validity. Correlations were run between ratios and baseline characteristics; ratios may be an alternative to using the factors from the SCCIT-A. Reliability and validity analyses suggest that the SCCIT-A has the potential to be a useful measure for coding in-session behaviors of both partners in couples therapy and could be used to identify mechanisms of behavior change for ABCT. Additional research is needed to improve the reliability of some codes and to further develop the SCCIT-A and other measures of couples' interactions in therapy.

  7. The KIDTALK Behavior and Language Code: Manual and Coding Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaney, Elizabeth M.; Ezell, Sara S.; Solomon, Ned A.; Hancock, Terry B.; Kaiser, Ann P.

    Developed as part of the Milieu Language Teaching Project at the John F. Kennedy Center at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, this KIDTALK Behavior-Language Coding Protocol and manual measures behavior occurring during adult-child interactions. The manual is divided into 5 distinct sections: (1) the adult behavior codes describe…

  8. Telescope Adaptive Optics Code

    2005-07-28

    The Telescope AO Code has general adaptive optics capabilities plus specialized models for three telescopes with either adaptive optics or active optics systems. It has the capability to generate either single-layer or distributed Kolmogorov turbulence phase screens using the FFT. Missing low order spatial frequencies are added using the Karhunen-Loeve expansion. The phase structure curve is extremely dose to the theoreUcal. Secondly, it has the capability to simulate an adaptive optics control systems. The defaultmore » parameters are those of the Keck II adaptive optics system. Thirdly, it has a general wave optics capability to model the science camera halo due to scintillation from atmospheric turbulence and the telescope optics. Although this capability was implemented for the Gemini telescopes, the only default parameter specific to the Gemini telescopes is the primary mirror diameter. Finally, it has a model for the LSST active optics alignment strategy. This last model is highly specific to the LSST« less

  9. Patched Conic Trajectory Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Brooke Anderson; Wright, Henry

    2012-01-01

    PatCon code was developed to help mission designers run trade studies on launch and arrival times for any given planet. Initially developed in Fortran, the required inputs included launch date, arrival date, and other orbital parameters of the launch planet and arrival planets at the given dates. These parameters include the position of the planets, the eccentricity, semi-major axes, argument of periapsis, ascending node, and inclination of the planets. With these inputs, a patched conic approximation is used to determine the trajectory. The patched conic approximation divides the planetary mission into three parts: (1) the departure phase, in which the two relevant bodies are Earth and the spacecraft, and where the trajectory is a departure hyperbola with Earth at the focus; (2) the cruise phase, in which the two bodies are the Sun and the spacecraft, and where the trajectory is a transfer ellipse with the Sun at the focus; and (3) the arrival phase, in which the two bodies are the target planet and the spacecraft, where the trajectory is an arrival hyperbola with the planet as the focus.

  10. Within- and between-session variety effects in a food-seeking habituation paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Bouton, Mark E.; Todd, Travis P.; Miles, Olivia W.; León, Samuel P.; Epstein, Leonard H.

    2013-01-01

    Appetitive behavior is stronger when organisms are given a variety of foods than when they are repeatedly given the same food (the variety effect). Two experiments examined the variety effect in an operant food-seeking task. In both experiments, rats received a 45-mg food pellet for every 4th lever press over a series of daily 30-min sessions. The rats responded at a high rate early in the session, but the rate declined systematically over time within the session. In Experiment 1, alternating unpredictably between grain and sucrose pellets caused a higher level of responding, and a slower within-session decline in responding, than presenting either type of pellet consistently. In groups receiving one pellet consistently, a switch to the alternate pellet caused lawful changes in response rate that reflected both habituation and incentive contrast processes. In Experiment 2, an experimental group received grain only and sucrose only in daily alternating sessions. In sucrose sessions, they responded more than controls that always received either sucrose or grain (a type of variety effect); in grain sessions, they responded less than the controls. The results indicated a within-session variety effect that was controlled by habituation processes and a between-session variety effect that was controlled by incentive contrast. Both types of processes can come into play when organisms are exposed to food variety. PMID:23434973

  11. Rational emotive therapy-a study of initial therapy sessions of Albert Ellis.

    PubMed

    Becker, I M; Rosenfeld, J G

    1976-10-01

    Because psychotherapy is what a therapist does, and not necessarily what he says he does, it is important to observe the activity of leaders in the field during their sessions. Twenty taped initial psychotherapy sessions by Albert Ellis were selected randomly from 70 recently recorded ones. Typescripts of each session were made, and two raters naive to the purposes were trained to place each of Ellis' statements into 1 of 17 categories. Each category consisted of a therapeutic technique. Some of these were ones that Ellis did during the 20 sessions examined was related very closely to what he has claimed to do, but that he did vary considerably from client to client.

  12. 75 FR 26973 - Notice of Public Comment on Tribal Consultation Sessions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ... leadership and the leadership of Tribal Governments operating Head Start (including Early Head Start... (including Early Head Start) programs to participate in a formal Consultation Session with OHS...

  13. Error coding simulations in C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Viveca K.

    1994-01-01

    When data is transmitted through a noisy channel, errors are produced within the data rendering it indecipherable. Through the use of error control coding techniques, the bit error rate can be reduced to any desired level without sacrificing the transmission data rate. The Astrionics Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center has decided to use a modular, end-to-end telemetry data simulator to simulate the transmission of data from flight to ground and various methods of error control. The simulator includes modules for random data generation, data compression, Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) transfer frame formation, error correction/detection, error generation and error statistics. The simulator utilizes a concatenated coding scheme which includes CCSDS standard (255,223) Reed-Solomon (RS) code over GF(2(exp 8)) with interleave depth of 5 as the outermost code, (7, 1/2) convolutional code as an inner code and CCSDS recommended (n, n-16) cyclic redundancy check (CRC) code as the innermost code, where n is the number of information bits plus 16 parity bits. The received signal-to-noise for a desired bit error rate is greatly reduced through the use of forward error correction techniques. Even greater coding gain is provided through the use of a concatenated coding scheme. Interleaving/deinterleaving is necessary to randomize burst errors which may appear at the input of the RS decoder. The burst correction capability length is increased in proportion to the interleave depth. The modular nature of the simulator allows for inclusion or exclusion of modules as needed. This paper describes the development and operation of the simulator, the verification of a C-language Reed-Solomon code, and the possibility of using Comdisco SPW(tm) as a tool for determining optimal error control schemes.

  14. Error coding simulations in C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Viveca K.

    1994-10-01

    When data is transmitted through a noisy channel, errors are produced within the data rendering it indecipherable. Through the use of error control coding techniques, the bit error rate can be reduced to any desired level without sacrificing the transmission data rate. The Astrionics Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center has decided to use a modular, end-to-end telemetry data simulator to simulate the transmission of data from flight to ground and various methods of error control. The simulator includes modules for random data generation, data compression, Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) transfer frame formation, error correction/detection, error generation and error statistics. The simulator utilizes a concatenated coding scheme which includes CCSDS standard (255,223) Reed-Solomon (RS) code over GF(2(exp 8)) with interleave depth of 5 as the outermost code, (7, 1/2) convolutional code as an inner code and CCSDS recommended (n, n-16) cyclic redundancy check (CRC) code as the innermost code, where n is the number of information bits plus 16 parity bits. The received signal-to-noise for a desired bit error rate is greatly reduced through the use of forward error correction techniques. Even greater coding gain is provided through the use of a concatenated coding scheme. Interleaving/deinterleaving is necessary to randomize burst errors which may appear at the input of the RS decoder. The burst correction capability length is increased in proportion to the interleave depth. The modular nature of the simulator allows for inclusion or exclusion of modules as needed. This paper describes the development and operation of the simulator, the verification of a C-language Reed-Solomon code, and the possibility of using Comdisco SPW(tm) as a tool for determining optimal error control schemes.

  15. The effectiveness of one session of therapy using a single-session therapy approach for children and adolescents with mental health problems.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Ruth

    2006-06-01

    This study applied a solution-focused single session therapy (SST) approach to all clients presenting to an urban child and adolescent mental health clinic over 14 months. The effectiveness of a single 2-hour assessment and treatment session in treating mental health problems was investigated using parent, teacher and clinician outcome measures. Teachers reported low levels of psychopathology at intake with no significant change 1 month after treatment. However, using parent and clinician measures, clinical levels of psychopathology were found at intake, with significant improvement 1 month after a single session of treatment. The effect sizes for these improvements measured medium to large, demonstrating observable improvement of clinical significance from the 1 session of SST treatment. Respondents reported 95% satisfaction with service. The study adds weight to the argument that a solution-focused SST approach can be effective for the treatment of children and adolescents with mental health problems. It recommends SST as the initial choice of treatment for these clients.

  16. Coding in pigeons: Multiple-coding versus single-code/default strategies.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Carlos; Machado, Armando

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the coding strategies that pigeons may use in a temporal discrimination tasks, pigeons were trained on a matching-to-sample procedure with three sample durations (2s, 6s and 18s) and two comparisons (red and green hues). One comparison was correct following 2-s samples and the other was correct following both 6-s and 18-s samples. Tests were then run to contrast the predictions of two hypotheses concerning the pigeons' coding strategies, the multiple-coding and the single-code/default. According to the multiple-coding hypothesis, three response rules are acquired, one for each sample. According to the single-code/default hypothesis, only two response rules are acquired, one for the 2-s sample and a "default" rule for any other duration. In retention interval tests, pigeons preferred the "default" key, a result predicted by the single-code/default hypothesis. In no-sample tests, pigeons preferred the key associated with the 2-s sample, a result predicted by multiple-coding. Finally, in generalization tests, when the sample duration equaled 3.5s, the geometric mean of 2s and 6s, pigeons preferred the key associated with the 6-s and 18-s samples, a result predicted by the single-code/default hypothesis. The pattern of results suggests the need for models that take into account multiple sources of stimulus control.

  17. Indices for Testing Neural Codes

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Jonathan D.; Nirenberg, Sheila

    2009-01-01

    One of the most critical challenges in systems neuroscience is determining the neural code. A principled framework for addressing this can be found in information theory. With this approach, one can determine whether a proposed code can account for the stimulus-response relationship. Specifically, one can compare the transmitted information between the stimulus and the hypothesized neural code with the transmitted information between the stimulus and the behavioral response. If the former is smaller than the latter (i.e., if the code cannot account for the behavior), the code can be ruled out. The information-theoretic index most widely used in this context is Shannon’s mutual information. The Shannon test, however, is not ideal for this purpose: while the codes it will rule out are truly nonviable, there will be some nonviable codes that it will fail to rule out. Here we describe a wide range of alternative indices that can be used for ruling codes out. The range includes a continuum from Shannon information to measures of the performance of a Bayesian decoder. We analyze the relationship of these indices to each other and their complementary strengths and weaknesses for addressing this problem. PMID:18533812

  18. Video coding with dynamic background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Manoranjan; Lin, Weisi; Lau, Chiew Tong; Lee, Bu-Sung

    2013-12-01

    Motion estimation (ME) and motion compensation (MC) using variable block size, sub-pixel search, and multiple reference frames (MRFs) are the major reasons for improved coding performance of the H.264 video coding standard over other contemporary coding standards. The concept of MRFs is suitable for repetitive motion, uncovered background, non-integer pixel displacement, lighting change, etc. The requirement of index codes of the reference frames, computational time in ME & MC, and memory buffer for coded frames limits the number of reference frames used in practical applications. In typical video sequences, the previous frame is used as a reference frame with 68-92% of cases. In this article, we propose a new video coding method using a reference frame [i.e., the most common frame in scene (McFIS)] generated by dynamic background modeling. McFIS is more effective in terms of rate-distortion and computational time performance compared to the MRFs techniques. It has also inherent capability of scene change detection (SCD) for adaptive group of picture (GOP) size determination. As a result, we integrate SCD (for GOP determination) with reference frame generation. The experimental results show that the proposed coding scheme outperforms the H.264 video coding with five reference frames and the two relevant state-of-the-art algorithms by 0.5-2.0 dB with less computational time.

  19. ACCELERATION PHYSICS CODE WEB REPOSITORY.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.

    2006-06-26

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic accelerator-physics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  20. Computer algorithm for coding gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodd, E. E.

    1974-01-01

    Development of a computer algorithm for coding gain for use in an automated communications link design system. Using an empirical formula which defines coding gain as used in space communications engineering, an algorithm is constructed on the basis of available performance data for nonsystematic convolutional encoding with soft-decision (eight-level) Viterbi decoding.

  1. QPhiX Code Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Balint

    2014-09-16

    A simple code-generator to generate the low level code kernels used by the QPhiX Library for Lattice QCD. Generates Kernels for Wilson-Dslash, and Wilson-Clover kernels. Can be reused to write other optimized kernels for Intel Xeon Phi(tm), Intel Xeon(tm) and potentially other architectures.

  2. Accelerator Physics Code Web Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, F.; Basset, R.; Bellodi, G.; Benedetto, E.; Dorda, U.; Giovannozzi, M.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pieloni, T.; Ruggiero, F.; Rumolo, G.; Schmidt, F.; Todesco, E.; Zotter, B.W.; Payet, J.; Bartolini, R.; Farvacque, L.; Sen, T.; Chin, Y.H.; Ohmi, K.; Oide, K.; Furman, M.; /LBL, Berkeley /Oak Ridge /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /SLAC /TRIUMF /Tech-X, Boulder /UC, San Diego /Darmstadt, GSI /Rutherford /Brookhaven

    2006-10-24

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic accelerator-physics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  3. LFSC - Linac Feedback Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Valentin; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    The computer program LFSC (Code>) is a numerical tool for simulation beam based feedback in high performance linacs. The code LFSC is based on the earlier version developed by a collective of authors at SLAC (L.Hendrickson, R. McEwen, T. Himel, H. Shoaee, S. Shah, P. Emma, P. Schultz) during 1990-2005. That code was successively used in simulation of SLC, TESLA, CLIC and NLC projects. It can simulate as pulse-to-pulse feedback on timescale corresponding to 5-100 Hz, as slower feedbacks, operating in the 0.1-1 Hz range in the Main Linac and Beam Delivery System. The code LFSC is running under Matlab for MS Windows operating system. It contains about 30,000 lines of source code in more than 260 subroutines. The code uses the LIAR ('Linear Accelerator Research code') for particle tracking under ground motion and technical noise perturbations. It uses the Guinea Pig code to simulate the luminosity performance. A set of input files includes the lattice description (XSIF format), and plane text files with numerical parameters, wake fields, ground motion data etc. The Matlab environment provides a flexible system for graphical output.

  4. South Carolina TEC Student Code.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, C. A., Ed.; Kiser, J. A., Ed.

    This student code has statewide application to South Carolina Technical Colleges and Technical Education Centers (TEC). Provisions are divided into eight articles: (1) General Provisions, including the purpose of a student code, the precept of internal solution of problems, and definitions; (2) Student Rights, including Bill of Rights protections;…

  5. Cracking the bioelectric code

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, AiSun; Levin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Patterns of resting potential in non-excitable cells of living tissue are now known to be instructive signals for pattern formation during embryogenesis, regeneration and cancer suppression. The development of molecular-level techniques for tracking ion flows and functionally manipulating the activity of ion channels and pumps has begun to reveal the mechanisms by which voltage gradients regulate cell behaviors and the assembly of complex large-scale structures. A recent paper demonstrated that a specific voltage range is necessary for demarcation of eye fields in the frog embryo. Remarkably, artificially setting other somatic cells to the eye-specific voltage range resulted in formation of eyes in aberrant locations, including tissues that are not in the normal anterior ectoderm lineage: eyes could be formed in the gut, on the tail, or in the lateral plate mesoderm. These data challenge the existing models of eye fate restriction and tissue competence maps, and suggest the presence of a bioelectric code—a mapping of physiological properties to anatomical outcomes. This Addendum summarizes the current state of knowledge in developmental bioelectricity, proposes three possible interpretations of the bioelectric code that functionally maps physiological states to anatomical outcomes, and highlights the biggest open questions in this field. We also suggest a speculative hypothesis at the intersection of cognitive science and developmental biology: that bioelectrical signaling among non-excitable cells coupled by gap junctions simulates neural network-like dynamics, and underlies the information processing functions required by complex pattern formation in vivo. Understanding and learning to control the information stored in physiological networks will have transformative implications for developmental biology, regenerative medicine and synthetic bioengineering. PMID:23802040

  6. PARAVT: Parallel Voronoi tessellation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, R. E.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we present a new open source code for massive parallel computation of Voronoi tessellations (VT hereafter) in large data sets. The code is focused for astrophysical purposes where VT densities and neighbors are widely used. There are several serial Voronoi tessellation codes, however no open source and parallel implementations are available to handle the large number of particles/galaxies in current N-body simulations and sky surveys. Parallelization is implemented under MPI and VT using Qhull library. Domain decomposition takes into account consistent boundary computation between tasks, and includes periodic conditions. In addition, the code computes neighbors list, Voronoi density, Voronoi cell volume, density gradient for each particle, and densities on a regular grid. Code implementation and user guide are publicly available at https://github.com/regonzar/paravt.

  7. Tristan code and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.

    Since TRISTAN: The 3-D Electromagnetic Particle Code was introduced in 1990, it has been used for many applications including the simulations of global solar windmagnetosphere interaction. The most essential ingridients of this code have been published in the ISSS-4 book. In this abstract we describe some of issues and an application of this code for the study of global solar wind-magnetosphere interaction including a substorm study. The basic code (tristan.f) for the global simulation and a local simulation of reconnection with a Harris model (issrec2.f) are available at http:/www.physics.rutger.edu/˜kenichi. For beginners the code (isssrc2.f) with simpler boundary conditions is suitable to start to run simulations. The future of global particle simulations for a global geospace general circulation (GGCM) model with predictive capability (for Space Weather Program) is discussed.

  8. Best practices for code release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berriman, G. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    In this talk, I want to describe what I think are the best practices for releasing code and having it adopted by end users. Make sure your code is licensed, so users will know how the software can be used and modified, and place your code in a public repository that (and make sure that you follow institutional policies in doing this). Yet licensing and releasing code are not enough: the code must be organized and documented so users can understand what it does, what its limitations are, and how to build and use it. I will describe what I think are best practices in developing the content to support release, including tutorials, design documents, specifications of interfaces and so on. Much of what I have learned on based on ten years of experience in supporting releases of the Montage Image Mosaic Engine.

  9. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Special Session: Mars Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Mars Climate Change" contained the following reports:Geological Evidence for Climate Change on Mars; A New Astronomical Solution for the Long Term Evolution of the Insolation Quantities of Mars; Interpreting Martian Paleoclimate with a Mars General Circulation Model; History and Progress of GCM Simulations on Recent Mars Climate Change; Northern and Southern Permafrost Regions on Mars with High Content of Water Ice: Similarities and Differences; Periods of Active Permafrost Layer Formation in the Recent Geological History of Mars; Microclimate Zones in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica: Implications for Landscape; Evolution and Climate Change on Mars; Geomorphic Evidence for Martian Ground Ice and Climate Change; Explaining the Mid-Latitude Ice Deposits with a General Circulation Model; Tharsis Montes Cold-based Glaciers: Observations and Constraints for Modeling and Preliminary Results; Ice Sheet Modeling: Terrestrial Background and Application to Arsia Mons Lobate Deposit, Mars; Enhanced Water-Equivalent Hydrogen on the Western Flanks of the Tharsis Montes and Olympus Mons: Remnant Subsurface Ice or Hydrate Minerals?; and New Age Mars.

  10. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Special Session: Mars Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Mars Climate Change" included the following topics:Geological Evidence for Climate Change on Mars; A New Astronomical Solution for the Long Term Evolution of the Insolation Quantities of Mars; Interpreting Martian Paleoclimate with a Mars General Circulation Model; History and Progress of GCM Simulations on Recent Mars Climate Change; Northern and Southern Permafrost Regions on Mars with High Content of Water Ice: Similarities and Differences; Periods of Active Permafrost Layer Formation in the Recent Geological History of Mars; Microclimate Zones in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica: Implications for Landscape Evolution and Climate Change on Mars; Geomorphic Evidence for Martian Ground Ice and Climate Change; Explaining the Mid-Latitude Ice Deposits with a General Circulation Model; Tharsis Montes Cold-based Glaciers: Observations and Constraints for Modeling and Preliminary Results; Ice Sheet Modeling: Terrestrial Background and Application to Arsia Mons Lobate Deposit, Mars; Enhanced Water-Equivalent Hydrogen on the Western Flanks of the Tharsis Montes and Olympus Mons: Remnant Subsurface Ice or Hydrate Minerals?; and New Age Mars.

  11. Spiritual Exploration in the Prenatal Genetic Counseling Session.

    PubMed

    Sagaser, Katelynn G; Shahrukh Hashmi, S; Carter, Rebecca D; Lemons, Jennifer; Mendez-Figueroa, Hector; Nassef, Salma; Peery, Brent; Singletary, Claire N

    2016-10-01

    Religion and spirituality (R/S) are important components of many individuals' lives, and spirituality is often employed by women coping with pregnancy complications. To characterize how prenatal genetic counselors might address spiritual issues with patients, 283 English and Spanish speaking women receiving prenatal genetic counseling in Houston, Texas were surveyed post-counseling using both the Brief RCope and questions regarding interest in spiritual exploration. Genetic counselors were concurrently surveyed to identify religious/spiritual language used within sessions and perceived importance of R/S. Genetic counselors were significantly more likely to identify R/S as important to a patient when patients used religious/spiritual language (p < 0.001). Conversely, when no religious/spiritual terms were present, the counselor felt uncertain about the importance of R/S 63 % of the time. However, 67 % of patients reported that they felt comfortable sharing their faith as it relates to their pregnancy, and 93 % reported using positive religious coping. Less than 25 % reported a desire for overt religious actions such as prayer or scripture exploration. Therefore, most patients' desires for spiritual exploration center in the decision making and coping processes that are in line with the genetic counseling scope of practice. Thus, counselors should feel empowered to incorporate spiritual exploration into their patient conversations.

  12. Big push for tort reform this legislative session.

    PubMed

    Howell, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    These are just a few of the things we'll see this year, but it doesn't come close to being an exhaustive list. We anticipate having our yearly discussions over the worthiness of state's motorcycle helmet law. We'll find ourselves advocating for stricter texting-while-operating laws and seat belt enforcement. The insurance companies will probably get an earful over narrow networks and prior authorization. Telemedicine will likely come up; as will the pharmaceutical industry and their numerous endeavors. We'll have to watch some public health groups who will attempt to offer solutions to their own issues for their select set of patients. We're the only state without a Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP), so that will be in play Plus, the chiropractors, optometrists, midwives, etc., never seem to go away And on and on and on... Be sure to read MSMA's weekly Legislative Report during the 2015 session. It will keep you in the loop on all the above and then some. And don't forget to volunteer as the MSMA Physician of the Day at the Capitol. It's not difficult, and the legislators love seeing one their physicians from back home. Look for a sign-up sheet on the MSMA website soon. If you have any questions about our advocacy efforts on your behalf, feel free to give me a call anytime at 573-636-5151, or email jhowell@msma.org. PMID:25665223

  13. Focus group sessions on formats of nutrition labels.

    PubMed

    Lewis, C J; Yetley, E A

    1992-01-01

    Four consumer focus group sessions, with a total of 40 participants, were conducted to gather information on the utility and appropriateness of selected components of nutrition label formats. The formats reviewed were bar graphs, pie charts, numeric listings, and adjectival descriptors such as high and low. Participants were asked to compare food labels using various format types and to discuss the utility and interpretability of the formats. The outcomes suggested that these consumers did not find pie charts useful. They considered bar graphs confusing or unnecessary when numeric values were provided. Participants expressed concern that adjectival descriptors could be misleading. The numeric listing format they considered the most useful consisted of two columns of numbers: one listing the amounts of food components present in a serving of the food, and a second listing either the percentage of the label reference value (eg, the US Recommended Daily Allowance) or the quantity established as the label reference value. Participants repeatedly stressed their interest in a simple label. The results form one component of the Food and Drug Administration's efforts to evaluate nutrition label formats and will be used in conjunction with ongoing experimental and quantitative research studies.

  14. Special Session 2: Cosmic Evolution of Groups and Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtilek, J. M.; David, L. P.

    2015-03-01

    During the past decade observations across the electromagnetic spectrum have led to broad progress in the understanding of galaxy clusters and their far more abundant smaller siblings, groups. From the X-rays, where Chandra and XMM have illuminated old phenomena such as cooling cores and discovered new ones such as shocks, cold fronts, bubbles and cavities, through rich collections of optical data (including vast and growing arrays of redshifts), to the imaging of AGN outbursts of various ages through radio observations, our access to cluster and group measurements has leaped forward, while parallel advances in theory and modeling have kept pace. This Special Session offered a survey of progress to this point, an assessment of outstanding problems, and a multiwavelength overview of the uses of the next generation of observatories. Holding the symposium in conjuction with the XXVIIIth General Assembly provided the significant advantage of involving not only a specialist audience, but also interacting with a broad cross-section of the world astronomical community.

  15. Evaluating a Pre-Session Homework Exercise in a Standalone Information Literacy Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Joseph E.; Barber, Catherine R.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, researchers evaluate a homework exercise assigned before a standalone information literacy session. Students in a Master of Education program completed a worksheet using the ERIC database thesaurus. The researchers conducted pre- and posttests within a single library session to assess student learning, using a control group for…

  16. Good Moments in Gestalt Therapy: A Descriptive Analysis of Two Perls Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulet, Donald; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Analyzed two Gestalt therapy sessions conducted by Fritz Perls using category system for identifying in-session client behaviors valued by Gestalt therapists. Four judges independently rated 210 client statements. Found common pattern of therapeutic movement: initial phase dominated by building block good moments and second phase characterized by…

  17. Effects of Preference and Reinforcer Variation on Within-Session Patterns of Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyl-Austin, Alice A.; Samaha, Andrew L.; Bloom, Sarah E.; Boyle, Megan A.

    2012-01-01

    We examined correspondence between preference assessment outcome and within-session patterns of responding in one subject with autism. Responding maintained by a single highly preferred item resulted in a greater total number of responses, a slower decline in within-session response rates, and a greater proportion of short interresponse times…

  18. One-Session Treatment of Specific Phobias: A Detailed Description and Review of Treatment Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zlomke, Kimberly; Davis, Thompson E., III

    2008-01-01

    One-Session Treatment (OST) is a form of massed exposure therapy for the treatment of specific phobias. OST combines exposure, participant modeling, cognitive challenges, and reinforcement in a single session, maximized to three hours. Clients are gradually exposed to steps of their fear hierarchy using therapist-directed behavioral experiments.…

  19. Correspondence of Motivational Interviewing Adherence and Competence Ratings in Real and Role-Played Client Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Suzanne E.; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Nich, Charla; Canning-Ball, Monica; Martino, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Treatment integrity ratings (adherence and competence) are frequently used as outcome measures in clinician training studies, drawn from recorded real client or role-played client sessions. However, it is unknown whether clinician adherence and competence are similar in real client and role-played sessions or whether real and role-play clients…

  20. Counselor Ethnicity, Counselor Nonverbal Behavior, and Session Outcome with Asian American Clients: Initial Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Bryan S. K.; Liang, Christopher T. H.; Li, Lisa C.

    2003-01-01

    Examination of counselor nonverbal behaviors revealed that European American counselors displayed significantly greater frequency of adaptors, postural shifts, and smiles than did Asian American counselors. The frequency of smiles was significantly positively correlated with client-rated session positivity and session arousal, and the frequency of…

  1. The Interactions between Breastfeeding Mothers and Their Babies during the Breastfeeding Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Karen

    1993-01-01

    Videotaped 12 breastfeeding mothers and their babies during breastfeeding sessions to investigate maternal-infant interactions occurring during breastfeeding sessions. Presents four case studies to examine differences in breastfeeding interactions, as well as benefits and disadvantages that breastfeeding provided different mother-child pairs. (MM)

  2. Improving Session Attendance in Mental Health and Substance Abuse Settings: A Review of Controlled Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefforge, Noelle L.; Donohue, Brad; Strada, Marilyn J.

    2007-01-01

    Patient nonattendance to scheduled sessions results in excessive costs to mental health and substance abuse providers and compromises the care of clients. This paper presents a comprehensive review of interventions that have been shown to increase session attendance rates in these settings. Unique to other review papers, reliability estimates were…

  3. 77 FR 19666 - Stakeholder Listening Session in Preparation for the 65th World Health Assembly

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Stakeholder Listening Session in Preparation for the 65th World Health Assembly Time and... the 65th World Health Assembly-- will hold an informal Stakeholder Listening Session on Monday April... for the World Health Assembly by taking full advantage of the knowledge, ideas, feedback,...

  4. A Comparative Evaluation of Minimal Therapist Contact and 15-Session Treatment for Female Orgasmic Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morokoff, Patricia J.; LoPiccolo, Joseph

    1986-01-01

    Compared a four-session minimal therapist contact (MTC) program for treatment of lifelong global orgasmic dysfunction in women to a 15-session full therapist contact (FTC) program. Both programs were effective in producing female orgasm and in improving satisfaction with the sexual relationship and, for women in MTC treatment, happiness in…

  5. Rethinking Design Process: Using 3D Digital Models as an Interface in Collaborative Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Suining

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a pilot study for an alternative design process by integrating a designer-user collaborative session with digital models. The collaborative session took place in a 3D AutoCAD class for a real world project. The 3D models served as an interface for designer-user collaboration during the design process. Students not only learned…

  6. An Evaluation of Consultation Sessions for Foster Carers and Adoptive Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Cara; Alfano, Julia

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine whether consultation sessions provided by educational psychologists (EPs) offer a useful way of supporting foster and adoptive parents. Feedback was collected from 101 EPs and 78 foster and adoptive parents through the use of a short questionnaire at the end of each session. As might be expected, educational…

  7. Managing Culture in the E-Workplace: The Practitioners' Perspectives. Innovative Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleezer, Catherine Marie; McCullough, Cathy Bolton; Cude, Roger L.

    A group of human resource development (HRD) practitioners participated in an innovative session on managing culture in the e-workplace. The session objectives were as follows: (1) bring cultural patterns of the e-workplace to the forefront; (2) discuss the impact of culture on performance improvement in the e-workplace; and (3) share resources for…

  8. 77 FR 26743 - The Manufacturing Council: Work Session of the Manufacturing Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... International Trade Administration The Manufacturing Council: Work Session of the Manufacturing Council AGENCY...: This notice sets forth the schedule and agenda for an open work session of the Manufacturing Council... Freescale Austin Technology and Manufacturing Center, 3501 Ed Bluestein Boulevard, Austin, Texas. All...

  9. Improving Initial Session Attendance of Substance Abusing and Conduct Disordered Adolescents: A Controlled Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohue, Brad; Azrin, Nathan H.; Lawson, Heather; Friedlander, Josh; Teichner, Gordon; Rindsberg, Jeff

    1998-01-01

    Demonstrates a method of improving first session attendance in a population of conduct-disordered and substance-abusing adolescents. Results indicate that an intensive intervention involving the youth and parent was more effective in improving session attendance than a less intensive intervention that excluded the youth's involvement. Discusses…

  10. How Was Your Session at the Writing Center? Pre- and Post-Grade Student Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Julie Bauer; Nadeau, Jean-Paul

    2003-01-01

    Uses follow-up telephone calls to writing center visitors to determine whether their level of satisfaction with writing center services had remained the same over time. Indicates that when students learned of their grades, they altered their previous perceptions of their writing sessions. Suggests a seemingly positive tutoring session can result…

  11. The Effects of Session Length on Demand Functions Generated Using FR Schedules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, T. Mary; Kinloch, Jennifer; Poling, Alan

    2011-01-01

    In comparing open and closed economies, researchers often arrange shorter sessions under the former condition than under the latter. Several studies indicate that session length per se can affect performance and there are some data that indicate that this variable can influence demand functions. To provide further data, the present study exposed…

  12. Effects of Methylphenidate and Morphine on Delay-Discount Functions Obtained within Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitts, Raymond C.; McKinney, A. Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Four rats responded under a "self-control" procedure designed to obtain delay- discount functions within sessions. Each session consisted of seven blocks, with seven trials within each block. Each block consisted of two initial forced- choice trials followed by five free-choice trials. On choice trials, the rats could press either of two…

  13. 78 FR 37553 - Maternal Health Town Hall Listening Session; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... national strategy to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality, and improve the quality and safety of... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Maternal Health Town Hall Listening Session; Notice of Meeting Name: Maternal Health Town Hall Listening Session. Date and Time: August 27, 2013,...

  14. Performance on Multiple Levels: Seeing the Forest "and" the Trees. Innovative Session 1. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Susan Reynolds; Short, Darren; Sleezer, Catherine M.

    A team of three organizers and a panel of five experts representing scholars and practitioners from multiple disciplines participated in an innovative session that explored performance at multiple levels in organizations. The session objectives were as follows: (1) raise participants' awareness of multilevel approaches to the study of…

  15. Correspondence of Motivational Interviewing Adherence and Competence Ratings in Real and Role-Played Client Sessions

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Suzanne E.; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Nich, Charla; Canning-Ball, Monica; Martino, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Treatment integrity ratings (adherence and competence) are frequently used as outcome measures in clinician training studies, drawn from recorded real client or role-played client sessions. However, it is unknown whether clinician adherence and competence are similar in real client and role-played sessions or whether real and role-play clients provide similar opportunities for skill demonstration. This study examined the correspondence of treatment adherence and competence ratings obtained in real client and role-played sessions for 91 clinicians trained in Motivational Interviewing (MI), using data from a multi-site trial examining three methods of clinician training (Martino et al., 2011). Results indicated overall poor integrity rating correspondence across the two session types, as indicated by weak correlations (r = .05–.27). Clinicians were rated significantly more MI adherent overall and specifically used more advanced MI strategies in role-played than real client sessions at several assessment time points (d = 0.36, 0.42). Real clients, in comparison to the role-play actor, demonstrated greater motivation at the beginning of the session (d = 1.09), discussion of unrelated topics (d = 0.70), and alliance with the clinician (d = 0.72). These findings suggest that MI integrity rating data obtained from real client and role-played sessions may not be interchangeable. More research is needed to improve the procedures and psychometric strength of treatment integrity assessment based on role-played sessions. PMID:23205626

  16. 14th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells& Modules: Materials and Processes; Summary of Discussion Sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Tan, T.; Sinton, R.; Swanson, D.

    2004-10-01

    The 14th Workshop discussion sessions addressed funding needs for Si research and for R&D to enhance U.S. PV manufacturing. The wrap-up session specifically addressed topics for the new university silicon program. The theme of the workshop, Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Leapfrogging the Barriers, was selected to reflect the astounding progress in Si PV technology during last three decades, despite a host of barriers and bottlenecks. A combination of oral, poster, and discussion sessions addressed recent advances in crystal growth technology, new cell structures and doping methods, silicon feedstock issues, hydrogen passivation and fire through metallization, and module issues/reliability. The following oral/discussion sessions were conducted: (1) Technology Update; (2) Defects and Impurities in Si/Discussion; (3) Rump Session; (4) Module Issues and Reliability/Discussion; (5) Silicon Feedstock/Discussion; (6) Novel Doping, Cells, and Hetero-Structure Designs/Discussion; (7) Metallization/Silicon Nitride Processing/Discussion; (8) Hydrogen Passivation/Discussion; (9) Characterization/Discussion; and (10) Wrap-Up. This year's workshop lasted three and a half days and, for the first time, included a session on Si modules. A rump session was held on the evening of August 8, which addressed efficiency expectations and challenges of c Si solar cells/modules. Richard King of DOE and Daren Dance of Wright Williams& Kelly (formerly of Sematech) spoke at two of the luncheon sessions. Eleven students received Graduate Student Awards from funds contributed by the PV industry.

  17. Illinois Board of Education Closed Sessions: Does the Superintendent Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banicki, Guy; Pacha, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Holding closed sessions in school board meetings to reach major policy decisions is generally discouraged; but, school boards occasionally use this tactic if conflict and tension arise. Therefore, the questions of "how often does a Board of Education encounter conflict and tension" and "how is the decision made to schedule a closed session to…

  18. Reflections on Focus Group Sessions Regarding Inclusive Education: Reconsidering Focus Group Research Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nel, Norma M.; Romm, Norma R. A.; Tlale, L. D. N.

    2015-01-01

    In this article we deliberate upon our way of facilitating focus group sessions with teachers concerning their views on inclusive education, by referring also to feedback that we received from the participants when they commented upon their experiences of the sessions. (The teacher participants were from three separate primary schools in South…

  19. Novice Designers' Myths about Usability Sessions: Guidelines To Implementing User-Centered Design Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugar, William A.

    1999-01-01

    Details myths that illustrate novice instructional designers' perspectives on usability sessions and their users. Then offers suggestions for integrating creativity and developing enhanced perspective-taking. Two tables list the myths and guidelines, and potential effects of usability-session guidelines on novice designers' myths are charted. (AEF)

  20. Cognitive Changes, Critical Sessions, and Sudden Gains in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Tony Z.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Beberman, Rachel; Pham, Thu

    2005-01-01

    Using an independent cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) data set, the authors replicated T. Z. Tang and R. J. DeRubeis' (1999) discovery of sudden gains--sudden and large decreases in depression severity in a single between-session interval. By incorporating therapy session transcripts, the authors of this study improved the reliability of the…

  1. Better versus Worse Family Therapy Sessions as Reflected in Clients' Alliance-Related Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Myrna L.; Bernardi, Shaina; Lee, Hsin-Hua

    2010-01-01

    To be responsive to clients' evaluations of the unfolding therapy process, therapists must first accurately "read" client behavior, a particularly challenging task in conjoint family therapy. In this study, the authors compared client behavior in 28 sessions that one family member and the therapist concurred, on the Session Evaluation…

  2. Calcineurin inhibition blocks within-, but not between-session fear extinction in mice.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Corrêa, Suellen; Moulin, Thiago C; Carneiro, Clarissa F D; Gonçalves, Marina M C; Junqueira, Lara S; Amaral, Olavo B

    2015-03-01

    Memory extinction involves the formation of a new associative memory that inhibits a previously conditioned association. Nonetheless, it could also depend on weakening of the original memory trace if extinction is assumed to have multiple components. The phosphatase calcineurin (CaN) has been described as being involved in extinction but not in the initial consolidation of fear learning. With this in mind, we set to study whether CaN could have different roles in distinct components of extinction. Systemic treatment with the CaN inhibitors cyclosporin A (CsA) or FK-506, as well as i.c.v. administration of CsA, blocked within-session, but not between-session extinction or initial learning of contextual fear conditioning. Similar effects were found in multiple-session extinction of contextual fear conditioning and in auditory fear conditioning, indicating that CaN is involved in different types of short-term extinction. Meanwhile, inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide (CHX) treatment did not affect within-session extinction, but disrupted fear acquisition and slightly impaired between-session extinction. Our results point to a dissociation of within- and between-session extinction of fear conditioning, with the former being more dependent on CaN activity and the latter on protein synthesis. Moreover, the modulation of within-session extinction did not affect between-session extinction, suggesting that these components are at least partially independent.

  3. Within-Session Transitions in Choice: A Structural and Quantitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banna, Kelly M.; Newland, M. Christopher

    2009-01-01

    The present study used within-session transitions between two concurrent schedules to evaluate choice in transition. Eight female Long-Evans rats were trained to respond under concurrent schedules of reinforcement during experimental sessions that lasted 22 hr. The generalized matching equation was used to model steady-state behavior at the end of…

  4. 76 FR 4412 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Closed Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Closed Session AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... 102-3.160, notice is hereby given of a special closed session of the Commercial Space...

  5. A Descriptive Analysis of Test Session Observation Checklist Ratings from the Woodcock Johnson III Standardization Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisby, Craig L.; Osterlind, Steven J.

    2006-01-01

    Modern scale construction techniques have been used to develop scales measuring examiner ratings of examinees' test session behavior (TSB) on Wechsler and Stanford-Binet intelligence tests. This study analyzes data from the Test Session Observation Checklist (TSOC), a measure developed by post hoc rational analysis, from a portion of the Woodcock…

  6. Clinical Problem Solving: The Case of John, Part II--Excerpts from Sessions 2-7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drell, Martin J.; Josephson, Allan; Pleak, Richard; Riggs, Paula; Rosenfeld, Alvin

    2006-01-01

    This article is part two of the three part series of articles entitled "Clinical Problem Solving: The Case of John," with excerpts from Sessions 2-7. In this article, the authors give their responses to sessions 2-7. One author talks about psychodynamic issues and developmental issues, as well as family interaction and intrapsychic problems in…

  7. ETR/ITER systems code

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, W.L.; Bathke, C.G.; Brooks, J.N.; Bulmer, R.H.; Busigin, A.; DuBois, P.F.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Fink, J.; Finn, P.A.; Galambos, J.D.; Gohar, Y.; Gorker, G.E.; Haines, J.R.; Hassanein, A.M.; Hicks, D.R.; Ho, S.K.; Kalsi, S.S.; Kalyanam, K.M.; Kerns, J.A.; Lee, J.D.; Miller, J.R.; Miller, R.L.; Myall, J.O.; Peng, Y-K.M.; Perkins, L.J.; Spampinato, P.T.; Strickler, D.J.; Thomson, S.L.; Wagner, C.E.; Willms, R.S.; Reid, R.L.

    1988-04-01

    A tokamak systems code capable of modeling experimental test reactors has been developed and is described in this document. The code, named TETRA (for Tokamak Engineering Test Reactor Analysis), consists of a series of modules, each describing a tokamak system or component, controlled by an optimizer/driver. This code development was a national effort in that the modules were contributed by members of the fusion community and integrated into a code by the Fusion Engineering Design Center. The code has been checked out on the Cray computers at the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computing Center and has satisfactorily simulated the Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor II (TIBER) design. A feature of this code is the ability to perform optimization studies through the use of a numerical software package, which iterates prescribed variables to satisfy a set of prescribed equations or constraints. This code will be used to perform sensitivity studies for the proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). 22 figs., 29 tabs.

  8. Coding design for error correcting output codes based on perceptron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jin-Deng; Wang, Xiao-Dan; Zhou, Hong-Jian; Cui, Yong-Hua; Jing, Sun

    2012-05-01

    It is known that error-correcting output codes (ECOC) is a common way to model multiclass classification problems, in which the research of encoding based on data is attracting more and more attention. We propose a method for learning ECOC with the help of a single-layered perception neural network. To achieve this goal, the code elements of ECOC are mapped to the weights of network for the given decoding strategy, and an object function with the constrained weights is used as a cost function of network. After the training, we can obtain a coding matrix including lots of subgroups of class. Experimental results on artificial data and University of California Irvine with logistic linear classifier and support vector machine as the binary learner show that our scheme provides better performance of classification with shorter length of coding matrix than other state-of-the-art encoding strategies.

  9. Does the Timing of Measurement Alter Session-RPE in Boxers?

    PubMed

    Uchida, Marco C; Teixeira, Luis F M; Godoi, Vladmir J; Marchetti, Paulo H; Conte, Marcelo; Coutts, Aaron J; Bacurau, Reury F P

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the influence of measuring the overall session rating of perceived exertion (session-RPE) at 10 vs. 30 minutes following exercise. Eight boxers completed three different standardized training sessions of different intensities (easy, moderate and hard) in a matchedpairs, randomized research design. Exercise intensity was assessed during each bout by measuring heart rate, blood lactate concentration and session-RPE. To assess the effect of measurement timing on session-RPE, RPE data were collected either 10 or 30 minutes post-exercise. There was no significant effect of measurement time on session-RPE values following easy (10 minutes: session-RPE = 1.3 ± 1.0 Arbitrary Unit (AU), %Heart Rate Reserve (HRR) = 49.5 ± 11.1, and ∆Blood lactate = -2.3 ± 16.3%; 30 minutes: session-RPE = 1.7 ± 1.0 AU, %HRR = 51.3 ± 10.8, and ∆Blood lactate = 0.7 ± 25.2%), moderate (10 minutes: session-RPE = 2.7 ± 1.6 AU, %HRR = 67.2 ± 10.8, and ∆Blood lactate = 2.2 ± 19%; 30 minutes: session-RPE = 2.5 ± 0.9 AU, %HRR = 67.2 ± 5.9, and ∆Blood lactate = 24.5 ± 17.1%) and hard (10 minutes: session-RPE = 5.7 ± 1.0 AU, %HRR = 88.1 ± 6.3, and ∆Blood lactate = 146.3 ± 87.9%; 30 minutes: session-RPE = 5.8 ± 1.9 AU, %HRR> = 83.3 ± 8.0, and ∆Blood lactate = 91.6 ± 39%) sessions. In conclusion, our findings suggest that session-RPE can be used in boxing training routines across a range of intensities and accurate measurements can be determined as early as 10 minutes after exercise. Key PointsIt is difficult to quantify and monitoring the external training load in martial arts (e.g. Aikido, Kung Fu, Judo) and physical combat sports (e.g. Boxing, Muay Thai), session RPE method appears to be a reliable method to quantifying training load in those sports.For many athletes it is impractical to wait 30 minutes after training session to provide a session-RPE. The present findings show that collecting ses-sion-RPE measures at 10 min

  10. Does the Timing of Measurement Alter Session-RPE in Boxers?

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Marco C.; Teixeira, Luis F. M.; Godoi, Vladmir J.; Marchetti, Paulo H.; Conte, Marcelo; Coutts, Aaron J.; Bacurau, Reury F. P.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the influence of measuring the overall session rating of perceived exertion (session-RPE) at 10 vs. 30 minutes following exercise. Eight boxers completed three different standardized training sessions of different intensities (easy, moderate and hard) in a matchedpairs, randomized research design. Exercise intensity was assessed during each bout by measuring heart rate, blood lactate concentration and session-RPE. To assess the effect of measurement timing on session-RPE, RPE data were collected either 10 or 30 minutes post-exercise. There was no significant effect of measurement time on session-RPE values following easy (10 minutes: session-RPE = 1.3 ± 1.0 Arbitrary Unit (AU), %Heart Rate Reserve (HRR) = 49.5 ± 11.1, and ∆Blood lactate = -2.3 ± 16.3%; 30 minutes: session-RPE = 1.7 ± 1.0 AU, %HRR = 51.3 ± 10.8, and ∆Blood lactate = 0.7 ± 25.2%), moderate (10 minutes: session-RPE = 2.7 ± 1.6 AU, %HRR = 67.2 ± 10.8, and ∆Blood lactate = 2.2 ± 19%; 30 minutes: session-RPE = 2.5 ± 0.9 AU, %HRR = 67.2 ± 5.9, and ∆Blood lactate = 24.5 ± 17.1%) and hard (10 minutes: session-RPE = 5.7 ± 1.0 AU, %HRR = 88.1 ± 6.3, and ∆Blood lactate = 146.3 ± 87.9%; 30 minutes: session-RPE = 5.8 ± 1.9 AU, %HRR> = 83.3 ± 8.0, and ∆Blood lactate = 91.6 ± 39%) sessions. In conclusion, our findings suggest that session-RPE can be used in boxing training routines across a range of intensities and accurate measurements can be determined as early as 10 minutes after exercise. Key Points It is difficult to quantify and monitoring the external training load in martial arts (e.g. Aikido, Kung Fu, Judo) and physical combat sports (e.g. Boxing, Muay Thai), session RPE method appears to be a reliable method to quantifying training load in those sports. For many athletes it is impractical to wait 30 minutes after training session to provide a session-RPE. The present findings show that collecting ses-sion-RPE measures at 10 min

  11. Implementation of Motor Imagery during Specific Aerobic Training Session in Young Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    Guillot, Aymeric; Di Rienzo, Franck; Pialoux, Vincent; Simon, Germain; Skinner, Sarah; Rogowski, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of implementing motor imagery (MI) during specific tennis high intensity intermittent training (HIIT) sessions on groundstroke performance in young elite tennis players. Stroke accuracy and ball velocity of forehand and backhand drives were evaluated in ten young tennis players, immediately before and after having randomly performed two HIIT sessions. One session included MI exercises during the recovery phases, while the other included verbal encouragements for physical efforts and served as control condition. Results revealed that similar cardiac demand was observed during both sessions, while implementing MI maintained groundstroke accuracy. Embedding MI during HIIT enabled the development of physical fitness and the preservation of stroke performance. These findings bring new insight to tennis and conditioning coaches in order to fulfil the benefits of specific playing HIIT sessions, and therefore to optimise the training time. PMID:26580804

  12. Training and Support of Sessional Staff to Improve Quality of Teaching and Learning at Universities

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Linda; Heslop, Ian; Glass, Beverley D.

    2015-01-01

    Sessional staff is increasingly involved in teaching at universities, playing a pivotal role in bridging the gap between theory and practice for students, especially in the health professions, including pharmacy. Although sessional staff numbers have increased substantially in recent years, limited attention has been paid to the quality of teaching and learning provided by this group. This review will discuss the training and support of sessional staff, with a focus on Australian universities, including the reasons for and potential benefits of training, and structure and content of training programs. Although sessional staff views these programs as valuable, there is a lack of in-depth evaluations of the outcomes of the programs for sessional staff, students and the university. Quality assurance of such programs is only guaranteed, however, if these evaluations extend to the impact of this training and support on student learning. PMID:26396280

  13. Training and Support of Sessional Staff to Improve Quality of Teaching and Learning at Universities.

    PubMed

    Knott, Gillian; Crane, Linda; Heslop, Ian; Glass, Beverley D

    2015-06-25

    Sessional staff is increasingly involved in teaching at universities, playing a pivotal role in bridging the gap between theory and practice for students, especially in the health professions, including pharmacy. Although sessional staff numbers have increased substantially in recent years, limited attention has been paid to the quality of teaching and learning provided by this group. This review will discuss the training and support of sessional staff, with a focus on Australian universities, including the reasons for and potential benefits of training, and structure and content of training programs. Although sessional staff views these programs as valuable, there is a lack of in-depth evaluations of the outcomes of the programs for sessional staff, students and the university. Quality assurance of such programs is only guaranteed, however, if these evaluations extend to the impact of this training and support on student learning.

  14. Implementation of Motor Imagery during Specific Aerobic Training Session in Young Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    Guillot, Aymeric; Di Rienzo, Franck; Pialoux, Vincent; Simon, Germain; Skinner, Sarah; Rogowski, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of implementing motor imagery (MI) during specific tennis high intensity intermittent training (HIIT) sessions on groundstroke performance in young elite tennis players. Stroke accuracy and ball velocity of forehand and backhand drives were evaluated in ten young tennis players, immediately before and after having randomly performed two HIIT sessions. One session included MI exercises during the recovery phases, while the other included verbal encouragements for physical efforts and served as control condition. Results revealed that similar cardiac demand was observed during both sessions, while implementing MI maintained groundstroke accuracy. Embedding MI during HIIT enabled the development of physical fitness and the preservation of stroke performance. These findings bring new insight to tennis and conditioning coaches in order to fulfil the benefits of specific playing HIIT sessions, and therefore to optimise the training time.

  15. Implementation of Motor Imagery during Specific Aerobic Training Session in Young Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Guillot, Aymeric; Di Rienzo, Franck; Pialoux, Vincent; Simon, Germain; Skinner, Sarah; Rogowski, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of implementing motor imagery (MI) during specific tennis high intensity intermittent training (HIIT) sessions on groundstroke performance in young elite tennis players. Stroke accuracy and ball velocity of forehand and backhand drives were evaluated in ten young tennis players, immediately before and after having randomly performed two HIIT sessions. One session included MI exercises during the recovery phases, while the other included verbal encouragements for physical efforts and served as control condition. Results revealed that similar cardiac demand was observed during both sessions, while implementing MI maintained groundstroke accuracy. Embedding MI during HIIT enabled the development of physical fitness and the preservation of stroke performance. These findings bring new insight to tennis and conditioning coaches in order to fulfil the benefits of specific playing HIIT sessions, and therefore to optimise the training time. PMID:26580804

  16. Body weight changes and voluntary fluid intakes during training and competition sessions in team sports.

    PubMed

    Broad, E M; Burke, L M; Cox, G R; Heeley, P; Riley, M

    1996-09-01

    Fluid losses (measured by body weight changes) and voluntary fluid intakes were measured in elite basketball, netball, and soccer teams during typical summer and winter exercise sessions to determine fluid requirements and the degree of fluid replacement. Each subject was weighed in minimal clothing before and immediately after training, weights, and competition sessions; fluid intake, duration of exercise, temperature and humidity, and opportunity to drink were recorded. Sweat rates were greatest during competition sessions and significantly lower during weights sessions for all sports. Seasonal variation in dehydration (%DH) was not as great as may have been expected, particularly in sports played indoors. Factors influencing fluid replacement during exercise included provision of an individual water bottle, proximity to water bottles during sessions, encouragement to drink, rules of the game, duration and number of breaks or substitutions, and awareness of personal sweat rates. Guidelines for optimizing fluid intakes in these three sports are provided.

  17. State building energy codes status

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This document contains the State Building Energy Codes Status prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-76RL01830 and dated September 1996. The U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Codes and Standards has developed this document to provide an information resource for individuals interested in energy efficiency of buildings and the relevant building energy codes in each state and U.S. territory. This is considered to be an evolving document and will be updated twice a year. In addition, special state updates will be issued as warranted.

  18. Understanding the Code: upholding dignity.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The Nursing and Midwifery Council, the statutory professional regulator for registered district nurses, has introduced a revised code of standards that came into effect on 31 March 2015. The Code makes clear that while district nurses can interpret the values and principles for use in community settings, the standards are not negotiable or discretionary. They must be applied, otherwise the district nurse's fitness to practice will be called into question. In the second of a series of articles analysing the legal implications of the Code on district nurse practice, the author considers the first standard, which requires district nurses to treat people as individuals and to uphold their dignity.

  19. Adaptations to Short, Frequent Sessions of Endurance and Strength Training Are Similar to Longer, Less Frequent Exercise Sessions When the Total Volume Is the Same.

    PubMed

    Kilen, Anders; Hjelvang, Line B; Dall, Niels; Kruse, Nanna L; Nordsborg, Nikolai B

    2015-11-01

    The hypothesis that the distribution of weekly training across several short sessions, as opposed to fewer longer sessions, enhances maximal strength gain without compromising maximal oxygen uptake was evaluated. Twenty-nine subjects completed an 8-week controlled parallel-group training intervention. One group ("micro training" [MI]: n = 21) performed nine 15-minute training sessions weekly, whereas a second group ("classical training" [CL]: n = 8) completed exactly the same training on a weekly basis but as three 45-minute sessions. For each group, each session comprised exclusively strength, high-intensity cardiovascular training or muscle endurance training. Both groups increased shuttle run performance (MI: 1,373 ± 133 m vs. 1,498 ± 126 m, p ≤ 0.05; CL: 1,074 ± 213 m vs. 1,451 ± 202 m, p < 0.001). In contrast to CL, MI increased peak oxygen uptake (3,744 ± 615 mL·min⁻¹ vs. 3,963 ± 753 mL·min⁻¹, p ≤ 0.05), maximal voluntary isometric (MVC) force of the knee extensors (646 ± 135 N vs. 659 ± 209 N, p < 0.001), MVC of the finger flexors (408 ± 109 N vs. 441 ± 131 N, p ≤ 0.05), and number of lunges performed in 2 minutes (65 ± 3 vs. 73 ± 2, p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences between MI and CL on any measured parameters before or after the training intervention. In conclusion, similar training adaptations can be obtained with short, frequent exercise sessions or longer, less frequent sessions where the total volume of weekly training performed is the same.

  20. Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox, use for interactive teaching sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosmorduc, V.; Benveniste, J.; Niejmeier, S.; Picot, N.

    2009-04-01

    Altimetry Toolbox in such interactive teaching sessions.