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Sample records for aso volcano japan

  1. Analysis of Fumarole Acoustics at Aso Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, K. F.; Yokoo, A.; Fee, D.; Huang, Y. C.; Yoshikawa, S.; Utsugi, M.; Minami, T.; Ohkura, T.

    2015-12-01

    The lowermost portion of large eruption columns is the momentum-driven, fluid flow portion known as a volcanic jet. The perturbation of the atmosphere from this region produces a sound known as jetting or jet noise. Recent work has shown that this volcanic jet noise produced by a volcano has similar characteristics as the sound from jet and rocket engines. The study of volcanic jet noise has gained much from laboratory jet engine studies; however, jet engines have been engineered to reduce noise thereby limiting their use as a comparison tool to the complex, ever-changing volcanic jet. Previous studies have noted that fumaroles produce jet noise without further detailed investigation. The goal of this work is to enhance our understanding of large-scale volcanic jets by studying an accessible, less hazardous fumarolic jet. We aim to characterize the acoustic signature of fumaroles and evaluate if fumarolic jets scale to that of large volcanic jets. To investigate this, we deployed a 6-element acoustic array at two different locations along the edge of the crater wall at Aso Volcano, Japan from early July through mid-August 2015. Approximately two months before this deployment, the pyroclastic cone within Aso's crater partially collapsed into the vent. The cone was constructed during both ash venting and strombolian-style explosive activity in the last year. After the deployment, on July 13 a new small vent opened on the southwest flank of the pyroclastic cone. The vent is several meters in diameter and has consistent gas jetting which produces audible jet noise. To better capture the acoustic signature of the gas jetting we moved the array to the southwestern edge of the crater. The array is 230 meters from the vent and is positioned 54 degrees from the vertical jet axis, a recording angle usually not feasible in volcanic environments. Preliminary investigations suggest directionality at the source and the influence of topography along the propagation path as

  2. Coseismic rupturing stopped by Aso volcano during the 2016 Mw 7.1 Kumamoto earthquake, Japan.

    PubMed

    Lin, A; Satsukawa, T; Wang, M; Mohammadi Asl, Z; Fueta, R; Nakajima, F

    2016-11-18

    Field investigations and seismic data show that the 16 April 2016 moment magnitude (Mw) 7.1 Kumamoto earthquake produced a ~40-kilometer-long surface rupture zone along the northeast-southwest-striking Hinagu-Futagawa strike-slip fault zone and newly identified faults on the western side of Aso caldera, Kyushu Island, Japan. The coseismic surface ruptures cut Aso caldera, including two volcanic cones inside it, but terminate therein. The data show that northeastward propagation of coseismic rupturing terminated in Aso caldera because of the presence of magma beneath the Aso volcanic cluster. The seismogenic faults of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake may require reassessment of the volcanic hazard in the vicinity of Aso volcano.

  3. Coseismic rupturing stopped by Aso volcano during the 2016 Mw 7.1 Kumamoto earthquake, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, A.; Satsukawa, T.; Wang, M.; Mohammadi Asl, Z.; Fueta, R.; Nakajima, F.

    2016-11-01

    Field investigations and seismic data show that the 16 April 2016 moment magnitude (Mw) 7.1 Kumamoto earthquake produced a ~40-kilometer-long surface rupture zone along the northeast-southwest-striking Hinagu-Futagawa strike-slip fault zone and newly identified faults on the western side of Aso caldera, Kyushu Island, Japan. The coseismic surface ruptures cut Aso caldera, including two volcanic cones inside it, but terminate therein. The data show that northeastward propagation of coseismic rupturing terminated in Aso caldera because of the presence of magma beneath the Aso volcanic cluster. The seismogenic faults of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake may require reassessment of the volcanic hazard in the vicinity of Aso volcano.

  4. Origin and mode of emplacement of lithic-rich breccias at Aso Volcano, Japan: Geological, paleomagnetic, and petrological reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Kuniyuki; Uno, Koji; Shinmura, Taro; Miyoshi, Masaya; Kanamaru, Tatsuo; Inokuchi, Hiroo

    2014-04-01

    Takajosan breccia rocks are distributed around the southwestern caldera rim of the Aso Volcano in Japan. They are characterized by coarse lithic breccias with a pumiceous matrix. The proximal coarse lithic breccias are divided into the lower massive unit and the upper stratified unit. The lower massive lithic breccias tend to transform laterally into tuff breccias and pumiceous lapilli tuffs. Paleomagnetic results showed that all of the deposits were deposited at high temperatures of 175-560 °C. This was also supported by geological characteristics such as spatter clasts, clasts with a bread-crust texture, and weakly welded parts. These features clearly show that the deposits originated from pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). The dense lithic-rich lithofacies, low vesicularity of pumice, lack of plinian fall deposits, and radial distribution indicate that the deposits were derived from boil-over PDCs rather than plinian column-collapse PDCs. The SiO2 contents of the matrix glasses of the proximal lower massive breccia showed a progressive decrease from the bottom toward the upper part. We interpret that this chemical variation corresponds to chemical zonation of the magma chamber. This indicates that the massive deposits aggraded progressively from the base upwards (progressive aggradation), rather than through en masse freezing. The vertical lithofacies changes of the proximal breccias from the lower massive to the upper stratified units indicate that a sustained current in a quasi-steady state switched to an unsteady current with the progression of the volcanic activity.

  5. Origin and deformation of high porosity bands in the Takanoobane Rhyolite lava of Aso volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, K.; Uno, K.

    2015-10-01

    In rhyolite lavas, the high porosity bands are often developed. They potentially act as pathways for gas movement to the lava surface. Since explosive activities of lavas are generally considered to be controlled by degassing system, understanding the origin and deformation process of the high porosity bands is important to assessing volcanic hazards. The Takanoobane rhyolite lava in the middle of Kyushu Island in SW Japan is effused at 51 ± 5 ka. The volume, flow length, and thickness are 0.14 km3, > 2 km, and about 90 m, respectively. The central crystalline part of the lava is characterized by the light-colored bands defined by the high porosity zone (HPZ). On the basis of geological and petrographical studies, we revealed that the HPZ was primary formed by ductile-brittle tearing of the lava (known as cavitation). According to the AMS results, the HPZs were subsequently stretched and flattened laterally during the concentric spreading of the lava. This deformation process could stretch the HPZ not only radially but also laterally. This effective stretching developed the HPZ into pervasive thin bands. Since the HPZs act as degassing pathways to the lava surface, the pervasive HPZ bands may play a role in providing volcanic gasses to void spaces created in surface fold hinges of rhyolite lavas. Thus, this degassing system may promote explosive activity of the lava surface.

  6. Fracturing during ductile-brittle transition and development of flow banding in the Takanoobane Rhyolite lava of Aso volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, K.; Uno, K.

    2014-12-01

    Flow banding, which is characterized by deformation of highly vesicular part, is ubiquitously observed in rhyolite lavas. To explore the origin of the highly vesicular part, we examined Takanoobane rhyolite lava (TR lava) in Aso caldera, Japan, which effused at 51+/-5 ka (Matsumoto et al., 1991). The highly vesicular parts characterized by ductile deformation are well developed in the central crystalline layer, at which the parts tend to be flattened with an increasing of distance from the source. The part develops into flow bands. The highly vesicular parts are also recognized around fractures that developed perpendicular to the flow direction, and adjacent to phenocrysts. The highly vesicular part is composed of cavities with mainly <100 μm in diameter. Microscopic observation and the SEM image show that the cavities have ragged walls characterized by the protrusion of groundmass crystals and phenocrysts. Smith et al. (2001) described such cavities in detail using three silicic lavas in Japan, and proposed that the cavities were formed by failure of the magma by flow during ductile-brittle transition. The authors described the fracturing mechanism as cavitation, and considered that groundmass adjacent to phenocryst also appears to act as a site of strong cavitation because of the steep strain gradient between deforming matrix and non-deforming phenocrysts. The similarity of the textures means that the highly vesicular part in TR lava was also formed by cavitation during ductile-brittle transition. The part would be deformed and flattened with progression of lava deformation. We analyzed the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) to estimate the deformation style of TR lava. The results show that the highly vesicular part was deformed by pure shear strain. We established the following model for the development of flow banding. In TR lava, the highly vesicular parts were formed by failure of the magma during ductile-brittle transition during and/or after lava

  7. Volcanic magma reservoir imaged as a low-density body beneath Aso volcano that terminated the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Ayumu; Sumita, Tatsuya; Okubo, Yasukuni; Okuwaki, Ryo; Otsubo, Makoto; Uesawa, Shimpei; Yagi, Yuji

    2016-12-01

    We resolve the density structure of a possible magma reservoir beneath Aso, an active volcano on Kyushu Island, Japan, by inverting gravity data. In the context of the resolved structure, we discuss the relationship between the fault rupture of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake and Aso volcano. Low-density bodies were resolved beneath central Aso volcano using a three-dimensional inversion with an assumed density contrast of ±0.3 g/cm3. The resultant location of the southern low-density body is consistent with a magma reservoir reported in previous studies. No Kumamoto aftershocks occur in the southern low-density body; this aseismic anomaly may indicate a ductile feature due to high temperatures and/or the presence of partial melt. Comparisons of the location of the southern low-density body with rupture models of the mainshock, obtained from teleseismic waveform and InSAR data, suggest that the rupture terminus overlaps the southern low-density body. The ductile features of a magma reservoir could have terminated rupture propagation. On the other hand, a northern low-density body is resolved in the Asodani area, where evidence of current volcanic activity is scarce and aftershock activity is high. The northern low-density body might, therefore, be derived from a thick caldera fill in the Asodani area, or correspond to mush magma or a high-crystallinity magma reservoir that could be the remnant of an ancient intrusion.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Magma plumbing system at the beginning of repeated caldera eruption: A case study on Aso-1 erupted about 270 ky ago from Aso caldera, SW Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, I.; Hoshizumi, H.; Miyabuchi, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In order to understand the commencement of magma plumbing system of a polygenetic caldera, we started petrological study on the earliest eruptive product of Aso caldera, SW Japan. Aso caldera is one of the active volcano in Japan which have produced four stages (Aso-1, -2, -3, -4) of large-scale pyroclastic flow deposits 270 to 90 ky. ago. A suite of samples were collected from the bottom of Aso-1 pyroclastic flow deposit and from the underlying tephra layer (Ono et al., 1979). The tephra comprises more than 10 pumice fall units inter-layered by dark gray volcanic ash. For whole rock chemistry, coarser pumice fragments were separated. For mineral and glass chemistry, phenocrysts and glass particles were handpicked from the sieved 500-1000 um fractions under a binocular microscope. This fraction consist of plagioclase, orthopyroxene, variably vesiculated volcanic glass fragments, and clinopyroxene phenocrysts. They were analyzed using an electron micro-probe. The suite of samples are similar and major temporal change is the chemical composition of orthopyroxenes; those from upper horizon are relatively Mg rich. Anorthite content of plagioclase phenocryst is bimodal 49-53 mol. % (major) and 57-70 mol. % (minor). Silica content of matrix glass fall in a narrow range 68-70 wt. %. Temperature and oxygen fugacity were estimated to be 865-905 deg-C and FMQ+2 log unit, respectively, using ILMAT (Lepage, 2003). Pressure and water content of the magma are estimated to be 5-7 kbar and 0.5-1 wt. % H2O, respectively, using rhyolite-MELTS (Gualda et al., 2012) on the most undifferentiated tholeiitic basalt of Aso 4KC-03 (Hunter, 1998) to reproduce the observed composition of matrix glass (68-70 wt. % SiO2) and plagioclase (An 49-53 mol. %). The calcic plagioclase (An 57-70 mol. %), however, suggest that the basalt was initially hydrous and require magma degassing before the differentiation. If we assume degassing by magma convection in a conduit (Kazahaya et al., 1994), the

  9. Nekodake stratovolcano formed at the edge of caldera before the huge pyroclastic eruptions of Aso, Japan: petrological constraints on magma supply system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Y.; Hasenaka, T.; Mori, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic activities prior to caldera-forming eruptions give important constraints on the magma supply system leading to catastrophic eruptions. Nekodake volcano located in the eastern end of Aso Caldera, Central Kyushu, Japan, was considered to have been active during the post-caldera period. However, the stratigraphic relations and radiometric ages suggest that the Nekodake volcano was active during the caldera forming periods, Aso-1, Aso-2, Aso-3 and Aso-4 pyroclastic flows. In the history of the activities of the Aso volcano, there are some parasitic eruptive activities between pyroclastic flows. However, the relationship between those activities and the pyroclastic flow eruptions is not clear. The purpose of this study is to clarify the petrological relation between magmas of the Nekodake volcano and those of Aso pyroclastic flows. We investigated geological features of the Nekodake volcano, and conducted whole rock chemical analysis and the petrographical description of the volcanic products of Nekodake. We classified the Nekodake volcanic products into four groups from phenocryst assemblage, and two groups from the chemical composition. We found a correlation between petrographical groups and compositional groups. For example, incompatible elements are abundant in olivine group (olivine + 2 pyroxene + plagioclases). Nekodake volcanic products and the caldera-forming products show contrasting differentiation trends on the Harker diagrams. MgO, Al2O3, and CaO contents are high and TiO2, P2O5, and Fe2O3 are low in Nekodake products compared with those in caldera-forming products. Incompatible elements of Nekodake volcanic products show characteristically lower values (K20:0. 6 wt.% - 1.5 wt.%, Rb: 14.2 - 50.0 ppm, Zr: 90.7 ppm -129.2 ppm) than those of caldera-forming products (K20: 1.2 wt.%- 5.0 wt.%, Rb: 21.2 - 165.0 ppm, Zr: 93.76 ppm -321.0 ppm). These data show that the magma reservoir of Nekodake volcano and that of the gigantic pyroclastic eruptions are

  10. Soil carbon stocks and carbon sequestration rates in seminatural grassland in Aso region, Kumamoto, Southern Japan.

    PubMed

    Toma, Yo; Clifton-Brown, John; Sugiyama, Shinji; Nakaboh, Makoto; Hatano, Ryusuke; Fernández, Fabián G; Ryan Stewart, J; Nishiwaki, Aya; Yamada, Toshihiko

    2013-06-01

    Global soil carbon (C) stocks account for approximately three times that found in the atmosphere. In the Aso mountain region of Southern Japan, seminatural grasslands have been maintained by annual harvests and/or burning for more than 1000 years. Quantification of soil C stocks and C sequestration rates in Aso mountain ecosystem is needed to make well-informed, land-use decisions to maximize C sinks while minimizing C emissions. Soil cores were collected from six sites within 200 km(2) (767-937 m asl.) from the surface down to the k-Ah layer established 7300 years ago by a volcanic eruption. The biological sources of the C stored in the Aso mountain ecosystem were investigated by combining C content at a number of sampling depths with age (using (14) C dating) and δ(13) C isotopic fractionation. Quantification of plant phytoliths at several depths was used to make basic reconstructions of past vegetation and was linked with C-sequestration rates. The mean total C stock of all six sites was 232 Mg C ha(-1) (28-417 Mg C ha(-1) ), which equates to a soil C sequestration rate of 32 kg C ha(-1)  yr(-1) over 7300 years. Mean soil C sequestration rates over 34, 50 and 100 years were estimated by an equation regressing soil C sequestration rate against soil C accumulation interval, which was modeled to be 618, 483 and 332 kg C ha(-1)  yr(-1) , respectively. Such data allows for a deeper understanding in how much C could be sequestered in Miscanthus grasslands at different time scales. In Aso, tribe Andropogoneae (especially Miscanthus and Schizoachyrium genera) and tribe Paniceae contributed between 64% and 100% of soil C based on δ(13) C abundance. We conclude that the seminatural, C4 -dominated grassland system serves as an important C sink, and worthy of future conservation.

  11. Seismic Attenuation beneath Tateyama Volcano, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, K.; Kawakata, H.; Doi, I.

    2014-12-01

    Subsurface structures beneath active volcanoes have frequently been investigated (e.g., Oikawa et al., 1994: Sudo et al., 1996), and seismic attenuation beneath some active volcanoes are reported to be strong. On the other hand, few local subsurface structures beneath volcanoes whose volcanic activities are low have been investigated in detail, though it is important to study them to understand the potential of volcanic activity of these volcanoes. Then, we analyzed the seismic attenuation beneath Tateyama volcano (Midagahara volcano) located in central Japan, whose volcanic activity is quite low. We used seismograms obtained by Hi-net deployed by NIED (National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention). Hi-net is one of the densest seismic station networks in the world, and the spatial interval of their seismographs is about 20 km, which is suitable for investigating local structure beneath an individual volcano. We estimated S-wave attenuation using seismograms at five stations near Tateyama volcano for nineteen small, local, shallow earthquakes (M 2.7-4.0) that occurred from January 2012 to December 2013. We divided these earthquakes into six groups according to their hypocenter locations. We used twofold spectral ratios around the first S-arrivals to investigate the S-wave attenuation when S-waves passed through the region beneath Tateyama volcano. We focused on station pairs located on opposite sides of Tateyama volcano to each other, and earthquake pairs whose epicenters were located almost along the line connecting Tateyama volcano and the two stations, so that the spectral ratios reflect a local structure beneath Tateyama volcano. Twofold spectral ratios of all seismograms for S waves having northwestern or southeastern sources show strong attenuation beneath Tateyama volcano. On the other hand, those of seismograms having northeastern or southwestern sources show much weaker attenuation, which suggested that the region of strong

  12. Mineral and chemical variations within an ash-flow sheet from Aso caldera, Southwestern Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.

    1967-01-01

    Although products of individual volcanic eruptions, especially voluminous ash-flow eruptions, have been considered among the best available samples of natural magmas, detailed petrographic and chemical study indicates that bulk compositions of unaltered Pleistocene ash-flow tuffs from Aso caldera, Japan, deviate significantly from original magmatic compositions. The last major ash-flow sheet from Aso caldera is as much as 150 meters thick and shows a general vertical compositional change from phenocryst-poor rhyodacite upward into phenocryst-rich trachyandesite; this change apparently reflects in inverse order a compositionally zoned magma chamber in which more silicic magma overlay more mafic magma. Details of these magmatic variations were obscured, however, by: (1) mixing of compositionally distinct batches of magma during upwelling in the vent, as indicated by layering and other heterogeneities within single pumice lumps; (2) mixing of particulate fragments-pumice lumps, ash, and phenocrysts-of varied compositions during emplacement, with the result that separate pumice lenses from a single small outcrop may have a compositional range nearly as great as the bulk-rook variation of the entire sheet; (3) density sorting of phenocrysts and ash during eruption and emplacement, resulting in systematic modal variations with distance from the caldera; (4) addition of xenocrysts, resulting in significant contamination and modification of proportions of crystals in the tuffs; and (5) ground-water leaching of glassy fractions during hydration after cooling. Similar complexities characterize ash-flow tuffs under study in southwestern Nevada and in the San Juan Mountains, Colorado, and probably are widespread in other ash-flow fields as well. Caution and careful planning are required in study of the magmatic chemistry and phenocryst mineralogy of these rocks. ?? 1967 Springer-Verlag.

  13. Unzipping of the volcano arc, Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, R.J.; Smoot, N.C.; Rubin, M.

    1984-01-01

    A working hypothesis for the recent evolution of the southern Volcano Arc, Japan, is presented which calls upon a northward-progressing sundering of the arc in response to a northward-propagating back-arc basin extensional regime. This model appears to explain several localized and recent changes in the tectonic and magrnatic evolution of the Volcano Arc. Most important among these changes is the unusual composition of Iwo Jima volcanic rocks. This contrasts with normal arc tholeiites typical of the rest of the Izu-Volcano-Mariana and other primitive arcs in having alkaline tendencies, high concentrations of light REE and other incompatible elements, and relatively high silica contents. In spite of such fractionated characteristics, these lavas appear to be very early manifestations of a new volcanic and tectonic cycle in the southern Volcano Arc. These alkaline characteristics and indications of strong regional uplift are consistent with the recent development of an early stage of inter-arc basin rifting in the southern Volcano Arc. New bathymetric data are presented in support of this model which indicate: 1. (1) structural elements of the Mariana Trough extend north to the southern Volcano Arc. 2. (2) both the Mariana Trough and frontal arc shoal rapidly northwards as the Volcano Arc is approached. 3. (3) rugged bathymetry associated with the rifted Mariana Trough is replaced just south of Iwo Jima by the development of a huge dome (50-75 km diameter) centered around Iwo Jima. Such uplifted domes are the immediate precursors of rifts in other environments, and it appears that a similar situation may now exist in the southern Volcano Arc. The present distribution of unrifted Volcano Arc to the north and rifted Mariana Arc to the south is interpreted not as a stable tectonic configuration but as representing a tectonic "snapshot" of an arc in the process of being rifted to form a back-arc basin. ?? 1984.

  14. Crustal deformation associated with the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake and its effect on the magma system of Aso volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Taku; Fujita, Eisuke; Ueda, Hideki

    2016-11-01

    An MJMA6.5 earthquake (foreshock) and MJMA7.3 earthquake (mainshock) struck Kumamoto Prefecture on April 14, 2016, and April 16, 2016. To evaluate the effect of crustal deformation due to the earthquake on the Aso magma system, we detected crustal deformation using InSAR and GNSS. From InSAR analysis, we detected large crustal deformations along the Hinagu Fault, the Futagawa Fault, and the northeast extension of the latter fault. It extended to more than 50 km, and the maximum slant-range change exceeded 1 m. Although the obtained crustal deformation was approximately explained by the right-lateral strike-slip on the fault, its details could not be explained by such simple faulting. Additionally, we found complex surface deformation west of the Aso caldera rim, suggesting that shallow fault slips occurred in many known and unknown faults associated with the earthquake. Most of the crustal deformation could be reasonably explained by four rectangle faults located along the Futagawa Fault, in the northeast extension of the Futagawa Fault, alongside the Hinagu Fault, and in the eastern part of the Futagawa Fault. The first three of faults have high dip angles and right-lateral slip. The other was a fault with a low dip angle that branched from the shallow depth of the fault along the Futagawa Fault. The normal-dip right-lateral slip was estimated for this segment. Based on the estimated fault model, we calculated the displacement and stress field around the Aso volcano by the finite-element method (FEM) to evaluate the effects on the Aso magma system. In this calculation, we assumed a spherical soft medium located at a 6-km depth beneath the area south of the Kusasenri region as the magma system and considered only static effects. The result shows complex distributions of displacements and stresses, but we can notice the following significant points. (1) The spherical magma system deformed to an ellipsoid, and the total volume was slightly increased, less than 1%. (2

  15. Volcano Monitoring and Eruption Response in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, S.; Morita, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Although the start of eruption was forecasted at Miyakejima in June 2000, its change since then was largely different from what we expected; the countermeasures always became one step behind. There was a sudden lateral intrusion of the enormous amount magma as far as 30 km away from the volcano. The failure in forecasting comes partly from insufficient consideration of the eruption history and simple analogy of recent, near-steady state eruption events. The 2000 eruption may be reappearance of that of 2.5 ka at Miyakejima. The national project of eruption prediction researches has focused on seismological and geomagnetic investigations to detect the temporal change in the subsurface structure for active volcanoes, together with repeated, multidiscipline intensive observation. These were considered important to understand magma storage and movement, to evaluate the eruption potential, and to forecast the future eruption. Although direct detection of the magma chamber was incomplete, the convex distribution of dense material beneath the summit became common throughout examined volcanoes. It became clear that the part consists of the dike swarms through the conduit drilling project at Unzen. Understanding of the velocity structure by the seismic experiments was very useful to determine the detail location of volcano earthquakes in those volcanoes. Furthermore, combination of seismic, geodetic, geomagnetic and petrological investigations provided us a better imaging of the subsurface structure of several volcanoes. New technology such as the cosmic-ray (muon) radiography, which made the volcano interior visible, will give us the important information on magma ascent in the shallowest part of volcano. Recently, seismological and geodetic monitoring at densely-located observation sites makes possible to image the magma’s ascent and accumulation under volcanoes from the middle to upper crust. This process, of course, needs knowledge on the subsurface structure (depth of

  16. Space Radar Image of Sakura-Jima Volcano, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The active volcano Sakura-Jima on the island of Kyushu, Japan is shown in the center of this radar image. The volcano occupies the peninsula in the center of Kagoshima Bay, which was formed by the explosion and collapse of an ancient predecessor of today's volcano. The volcano has been in near continuous eruption since 1955. Its explosions of ash and gas are closely monitored by local authorities due to the proximity of the city of Kagoshima across a narrow strait from the volcano's center, shown below and to the left of the central peninsula in this image. City residents have grown accustomed to clearing ash deposits from sidewalks, cars and buildings following Sakura-jima's eruptions. The volcano is one of 15 identified by scientists as potentially hazardous to local populations, as part of the international 'Decade Volcano' program. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 9, 1994. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and the United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The image is centered at 31.6 degrees North latitude and 130.6 degrees East longitude. North is toward the upper left. The area shown measures 37.5 kilometers by 46.5 kilometers (23.3 miles by 28.8 miles). The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; green is the average of L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received and C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; blue is C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received.

  17. Broadband seismic observation at Kusatsu-Shirane volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, T.; Aoyama, H.; Terada, A.; Nogami, K.

    2011-12-01

    Kusatsu-Shirane volcano, central part of Japan, has repeated phreatic explosions with an interval of several decades. More than 25 years have passed since the last eruption in 1983. Currently persistent seismic and fumarolic activities are observed. Recently, a long tremor was observed in May 2011, for the first time in the last 3 years. The high-frequency tremor lasted for about 7 minutes and were observed by borehole seismometers. It was accompanied by a notable crustal deformation which lasted for about 4 minutes and observed by borehole tiltmeters. The source of the crustal deformation was estimated about 0.5 km to the southeast of Yugama, the main crater lake of the volcano. The location is at the margin of the observation network, which makes it difficult to locate the source precisely. The seismic network of the volcano has consisted of short-period seismometers. Thus very low frequency seismic events, which have often been observed at volcanoes with broadband seismometers, have not been investigated. In order to constrain such pressure sources, to understand better the relationships between high frequency tremor and low frequency deformation, and to investigate very low frequency events, we deployed 3-component seimometers at 3 points, surrounding the deformation source area. Two broadband seismometers, CMG-40T (f0=0.033 Hz) by Güralp Systems were installed to the north and east of the deformation source. And a short-period seismometer, L-4C (f0=1 Hz) by Mark Products, was installed to the south. The seismic data are continuously recorded. One and a half month passed at the time of abstract submission. Neither tremor nor very low frequency event have occurred to date.

  18. Transpiration characteristics of forests and shrubland under land cover change within the large caldera of Mt. Aso, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Y.; Inoue, A.; Maruyama, A.

    2013-12-01

    Grassland within a caldera of Mt. Aso has been maintained for fertilizer production from grasses and cattle feeding. Due to the changes in the agricultural and social structure since 1950's, a large part of the grassland was converted to plantations or abandoned to shrublands. Because vegetations of different plant functional types differ in evapotranspiration; ET, a research project was launched to examine the effects of the ongoing land use change on the ET within the caldera, and consequently affect the surface and groundwater discharge of the region. As the part of the project, transpiration rate; E of the major 3 forest types were investigated using sap flow measurements. Based on the measured data, stomatal conductance; Gs was inversely calculated and its response to the environmental factors was modeled using Jarvis-type equation in order to estimate ET of a given part of the caldera based on the plant functional type and the weather data. The selected forests were conifer plantation, deciduous broadleaved plantation and shrubland, which were installed with sap flow sensors to calculate stand-level transpiration rate. Sap flux; Js did not show clear differences among sites despite the large differences in sapwood area. In early summer solar radiation was limited to low levels due to frequent rainfall events and therefore, Js was the function of solar radiation rather than other environmental factors, such as vapor pressure deficit and soil water content. Gs was well regressed with the vapor pressure deficit and solar radiation. The estimated E based on Gs model and the weather data was 0.3-1.2 mm day-1 for each site and was comparable to the E of grassland in other study sites. Results suggested that transpiration rate in growing was not different between vegetations but its annual value are thought to differ due to the different phenology.

  19. Characterizing long-term radon concentration changes in a geothermal area for correlation with volcanic earthquakes and reservoir temperatures: A case study from Mt. Aso, southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Katsuaki; Yoshinaga, Tohru; Asaue, Hisafumi

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize in detail the temporal changes in Rn (radon-222) concentration in soil gases near fumaroles and clarify its correlation with volcanic earthquakes and temperatures in two geothermal reservoirs. Mt. Aso crater in southwest Japan, which has two reservoirs on its western side estimated by magnetotelluric survey to be at about 2 km in depth, was selected for this study. For the long-term survey, the α scintillation counter method was used weekly for 12.5 years at the three hot springs within a 2-km range. Rn concentrations were calculated using the CRAS method, a calculation method that considers radioactive equilibrium or nonequilibrium state of the soil gas. Rn concentrations generally showed similar fluctuation patterns among the sites. CRAS was used as a new indicator for evaluating the age of the soil gas. This age corresponds to the elapsed time determined from the generation of Rn based on the measurement of the numbers of atoms of Rn and its daughter 218Po at the start of measurement. In comparing the Rn data with the history of earthquakes in the Aso caldera, volcanic seismicity was identified as a major controlling factor in the sudden increase and decrease in Rn concentration as a function of age. For more precise detections of change, Rn concentrations were measured continuously at one site by pumping soil gas from a borehole and using an ionization chamber over 2.5 years. Five chemical components (He, H2, N2, CH4, and CO2) were then measured by gas chromatography at 1-week intervals. Because Rn concentrations are affected strongly by atmospheric temperatures, the residual components were obtained by subtracting the trend of the components from the original data. Chemical component data were used to estimate the temperature and pressure in the reservoir at the site; temperatures ranged from 229 to 280 °C, (average 265 °C, average pressure 80 MPa). Residual Rn concentrations showed a clear correlation with

  20. Deep magma feeding system of Fuji volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, E.; Asano, K.; Nakajima, J.

    2012-12-01

    Fuji volcano is known for its perfect cone shape and it is the largest among Japanese Quaternary volcanoes. For the last 100kya, Fuji has erupted dominantly basalt magma (>>99 vol%), but its eruption style changed (from debris flow and tephra dominant Ko-Fuji or Older Fuji, to lava flow dominant Shin-Fuji or Younger Fuji) at ~15 kya BP. The incompatible trace element composition of the magma changed abruptly between Ko-Fuji and Shin-Fuji. The origin of the voluminous yet monotonous basalt production and the simultaneous changes in volcanic style and magma chemistry in Fuji volcano have been discussed but remain unanswered. Here we report the first high-pressure melting experimental results on Fuji Basalt (Hoei-IV, AD1707) and demonstrate that its main magma chamber is located at ca.25km depth (Asano et al, this conference). We also show seismic tomographic images of Fuji volcano for the first time, which reveal the existence of strong upwelling flow in the mantle and its connection to the voluminous lower crustal magma chamber (Fig.1). The chemistry of Fuji magma is buffered by a lower crustal AFC magma chamber located at 25-35km depth. Mantle derived primitive basalt (FeO/MgO~1.0, saturated with mantle peridotite assemblage, oliv+opx+cpx) changes to evolved basalt (FeO/MgO~2.0, saturated with lower crustal gabbroic assemblage, opx+cpx+pl) by the AFC process. Very frequent low frequency earthquakes just above the magma chamber (red circles in Fig.1) may be due to the injection of basalt magma and/or fluids (Ukawa, 2007). The total lack of silica-rich rocks (basaltic andesite and andesite) in Fuji volcano must be due to the special location of the volcano. As shown in Fig.1 (solid line), the plate boundary between the Eurasia plate and the subducting Phillipine sea plate is located just beneath Fuji volcano (~5 km depth). Large tectonic stress and deformation associated with the plate boundary inhibit the survival of a shallow level magma chamber, which would allow

  1. Lightning During the Eruptions at Sakurajima Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Behnke, S. A.; Edens, H. E.; Iguchi, M.; Miki, D.; McNutt, S. R.; Van Eaton, A. R.; Smith, C. M.; Cimarelli, C.; Cigala, V.

    2015-12-01

    In May 2015 our volcano-lightning team spent about 2 weeks at the Sakurajima volcano observing electrical activity during many explosive eruptions. The explosive eruptions sent ash into the atmosphere reaching between 2 and 5 km MSL. Most of the eruptions produced lightning and electrical activity. Our measurements included electric, photographic, seismic, and ascustic. The atmospheric-electricity instruments included a 10-station-LMA, slow antenna, fast antenna, and broad-band-RF. Inaddition to standard photography and video, we had infrared video, low-light video, and high-speed video. The slow antenna showed that typically the predominant charge was negative, but at times it was positive. The larger eruptions show the continual electrical discharges that begin coincident within tenths of a second as the explosion. We have sensed these small discharges in many other volcanic eruptions.

  2. Volcanoes!

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1997-01-01

    Volcanoes is an interdisciplinary set of materials for grades 4-8. Through the story of the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, students will answer fundamental questions about volcanoes: "What is a volcano?" "Where do volcanoes occur and why?" "What are the effects of volcanoes on the Earth system?" "What are the risks and the benefits of living near volcanoes?" "Can scientists forecast volcanic eruptions?"

  3. Scoria cone formation through a violent Strombolian eruption: Irao Volcano, SW Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyosugi, Koji; Horikawa, Yoshiyuki; Nagao, Takashi; Itaya, Tetsumaru; Connor, Charles B.; Tanaka, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Scoria cones are common volcanic features and are thought to most commonly develop through the deposition of ballistics produced by gentle Strombolian eruptions and the outward sliding of talus. However, some historic scoria cones have been observed to form with phases of more energetic violent Strombolian eruptions (e.g., the 1943-1952 eruption of Parícutin, central Mexico; the 1975 eruption of Tolbachik, Kamchatka), maintaining volcanic plumes several kilometers in height, sometimes simultaneous with active effusive lava flows. Geologic evidence shows that violent Strombolian eruptions during cone formation may be more common than is generally perceived, and therefore it is important to obtain additional insights about such eruptions to better assess volcanic hazards. We studied Irao Volcano, the largest basaltic monogenetic volcano in the Abu Monogenetic Volcano Group, SW Japan. The geologic features of this volcano are consistent with a violent Strombolian eruption, including voluminous ash and fine lapilli beds (on order of 10-1 km3 DRE) with simultaneous scoria cone formation and lava effusion from the base of the cone. The characteristics of the volcanic products suggest that the rate of magma ascent decreased gradually throughout the eruption and that less explosive Strombolian eruptions increased in frequency during the later stages of activity. During the eruption sequence, the chemical composition of the magma became more differentiated. A new K-Ar age determination for phlogopite crystallized within basalt dates the formation of Irao Volcano at 0.4 ± 0.05 Ma.

  4. Use of Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) in Response to the 2014 Eruption of Ontake Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Terada, A.; Shinohara, H.; Kazahaya, R.; Yoshimoto, M.; Tanaka, R.

    2015-12-01

    On Sept. 27, 2014, a phreatic eruption occurred at Ontake volcano (3067 m a.s.l.), central Japan. The eruption caused an unprecedented volcanic disaster in the last 70 years in Japan. Search and rescue operations started soon after the eruption until they were suspended due to snowfall in late October. Considering the potential hazards of further explosive events and the severe winter condition, an approach to the summit area after late October was very difficult. To reveal the condition of the volcanic activity and foresee the trend, we considered it important to carry out volcanic gas surveys for the dense plumes in the vicinity of the vents using an unmanned aircraft system (UAS). For the surveys at Ontake volcano, the UAS was expected to fly about 8 km roundtrip distance at an altitude of over 3000 m. A multicopter with 8 rotors was adopted and we targeted four types of plume monitoring using the UAS; in-plume monitoring of multiple gas concentrations, SO2 flux measurement with UV spectroscopy, thermography of the vents, and in-plume particle sampling. In order to meet the 1 kg payload of the multicopter, some of the instruments were slimmed down.The UAS campaigns at Ontake volcano were carried out on Nov. 20-21, 2014 and on Jun. 2, 2015 from the safety distance of 3-3.5 km away from the crater. With the UAS surveys, we revealed that the SO2/H2S ratios of volcanic gas were closer to the hydrothermal origin instead of direct magma degassing. The second survey also pointed out that the SO2 emission decreased down below 10 ton/day by June 2015, by taking an advantage of flying the vicinity of the vents before the plume was diluted. Our surveys showed decreasing activity of the volcano, together with the advantages of using UAS in volcano monitoring for inaccessible conditions.

  5. Risk-Free Volcano Observations Using an Unmanned Autonomous Helicopter: seismic observations near the active vent of Sakurajima volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohminato, T.; Kaneko, T.; Koyama, T.; Yasuda, A.; Watanabe, A.; Takeo, M.; Honda, Y.; Kajiwara, K.; Kanda, W.; Iguchi, M.; Yanagisawa, T.

    2010-12-01

    Observations in the vicinity of summit area of active volcanoes are important not only for understanding physical processes in the volcanic conduit but also for eruption prediction and volcanic hazards mitigation. It is, however, challenging to install observation sensors near active vents because of the danger of sudden eruptions. We need safe and efficient ways of installing sensors near the summit of active volcanoes. We have been developing an volcano observation system based on an unmanned autonomous vehicle (UAV) for risk-free volcano observations. Our UAV is an unmanned autonomous helicopter manufactured by Yamaha-Motor Co., Ltd. The UAV is 3.6m long and weighs 84kg with maximum payload of 10kg. The UAV can aviate autonomously along a previously programmed path within a meter accuracy using real-time kinematics differential GPS equipment. The maximum flight time and distance from the operator are 90 minutes and 5km, respectively. We have developed various types of volcano observation techniques adequate for the UAV, such as aeromagnetic survey, taking infrared and visible images from onboard high-resolution cameras, volcanic ash sampling in the vicinity of active vents. Recently, we have developed an earthquake observation module (EOM), which is exclusively designed for the UAV installation in the vicinity of active volcanic vent. In order to meet the various requirements for UAV installation, the EOM is very compact, light-weight (5-6kg), and is solar-powered. It is equipped with GPS for timing, a communication device using cellular-phone network, and triaxial accelerometers. Our first application of the EOM installation using the UAV is one of the most active volcanoes in Japan, Sakurajima volcano. Since 2006, explosive eruptions have been continuing at the reopened Showa crater at the eastern flank near the summit of Sakurajima. Entering the area within 2 km from the active craters is prohibited, and thus there were no observation station in the vicinity

  6. First attenuation study at Usu volcano (Hokkaido, Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudencio, Janire; Taira, Taka'aki; De Siena, Luca; Onizawa, Shin'ya; Ibañez, Jesús; Hellweg, Margaret; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Aoyama, Hiroshi; García-Yeguas, Araceli; Oshima, Hiromitsu; Díaz-Moreno, Alejandro

    2014-05-01

    2D and 3D attenuation structures of Usu volcano has been obtained with measurements of diffusion model and coda-normalization method, respectively, with the same data-set used to develop the 3D velocity tomography by Onizawa et al., (2007). We have obtained intrinsic and scattering 2D maps applying the diffusion model which is an approximation of the general energy transport theory developed by Wegler and Lühr (2001) and Wegler (2003). As a result of the theoretical curves with the energy envelopes of the seismograms, we have obtained intrinsic attenuation coefficient and diffusivity coefficient values in the frequency range of 4-16 Hz. Then, We have quantified the contribution of intrinsic and scattering attenuation by inverse quality factor because is more representative. Finally, with a new representation method based in the Gaussian probability function distribution, we have represented the inverse quality factors obtained into 2D contour maps. To obtain 3D attenuation tomography of Deception Island, we have used more than 2000 waveforms recorded at over 288 on land seismic stations. The rays were traced in a 3D velocity model. We have inverted the spectral ratios obtained with the coda normalization method to obtain total-Q values. We resolve 1 km cubic cells. Both results, 2D maps and 3D attenuation structure, have shown that there is likewise agreement with the velocity tomography: the low velocity zones being consistent with regions featuring high attenuation effects and the high velocity zones with regions featuring low attenuation effects. This new models will be a complement to the better understanding of velocity anomalies and will allow remove some grades of uncertainty of the other studies.

  7. Three-dimensional resistivity modeling of GREATEM survey data from Ontake Volcano, northwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Allah, Sabry; Mogi, Toru

    2016-05-01

    Ontake Volcano is located in central Japan, 200 km northwest of Tokyo and erupted on September 27, 2014. To study the structure of Ontake Volcano and discuss the process of its phreatic eruption, which can help in future eruptions mitigation, airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys using the grounded electrical-source airborne transient electromagnetic (GREATEM) system were conducted over Ontake Volcano. Field measurements and data analysis were done by OYO Company under the Sabo project managed by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism. Processed data and 1D resistivity models were provided by this project. We performed numerical forward modeling to generate a three-dimensional (3D) resistivity structure model that fits the GREATEM data where a composite of 1D resistivity models was used as the starting model. A 3D electromagnetic forward-modeling scheme based on a staggered-grid finite-difference method was modified and used to calculate the response of the 3D resistivity model along each survey line. We verified the model by examining the fit of magnetic-transient responses between the field data and 3D forward-model computed data. The preferred 3D resistivity models show that a moderately resistive structure (30-200 Ω m) is characteristic of most of the volcano, and were able to delineate a hydrothermal zone within the volcanic edifice. This hydrothermal zone may be caused by a previous large sector collapse.

  8. Volcanoes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunar, L. N. S.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the forces responsible for the eruptions of volcanoes and gives the physical and chemical parameters governing the type of eruption. Explains the structure of the earth in relation to volcanoes and explains the location of volcanic regions. (GS)

  9. Volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, R.W.; Decker, B.

    1989-01-01

    This book describes volcanoes although the authors say they are more to be experienced than described. This book poses more question than answers. The public has developed interest and awareness in volcanism since the first edition eight years ago, maybe because since the time 120 volcanoes have erupted. Of those, the more lethal eruptions were from volcanoes not included in the first edition's World's 101 Most Notorious Volcanoes.

  10. Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilling, Robert I.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, this booklet provides a non-technical introduction to the subject of volcanoes. Separate sections examine the nature and workings of volcanoes, types of volcanoes, volcanic geological structures such as plugs and maars, types of eruptions, volcanic-related activity such as geysers…

  11. Lithospheric Contributions to Arc Magmatism: Isotope Variations Along Strike in Volcanoes of Honshu, Japan

    PubMed

    Kersting; Arculus; Gust

    1996-06-07

    Major chemical exchange between the crust and mantle occurs in subduction zone environments, profoundly affecting the chemical evolution of Earth. The relative contributions of the subducting slab, mantle wedge, and arc lithosphere to the generation of island arc magmas, and ultimately new continental crust, are controversial. Isotopic data for lavas from a transect of volcanoes in a single arc segment of northern Honshu, Japan, have distinct variations coincident with changes in crustal lithology. These data imply that the relatively thin crustal lithosphere is an active geochemical filter for all traversing magmas and is responsible for significant modification of primary mantle melts.

  12. Sakura-jima volcano in Japan as seen from STS-66 Atlantis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    One of the world's most active volcanoes, Sakura-jima in southern-most Kyushu, Japan, erupts dozens of times a year. Volcanic eruptions are so much a part of of daily life in the city of Kagoshima (across the bay and west of Sakura-jima), that school children wear hard hats to school. This photo provides a nice clear view of Sakura-jima on a quiet day - only a plume of steam rises from the summit crater. The summit region is covered with gray ash from the frequent eruptions, and some of the rivers cutting down the mountain (especially the western drainages) appear to be filled with volcanic debris.

  13. Elastic models for the magma intrusion associated with the 2000 eruption of Usu Volcano, Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Mori, Hitoshi; Okada, Hiromu

    2003-07-01

    After 23 years of dormancy, Usu Volcano (Hokkaido, Japan) erupted on March 31, 2000. Many observations (seismicity, deformation rates, gravity data, groundwater level monitoring) show that the period of intense activity was short, starting abruptly, and continuing for ca. 5 months with a decreasing rate. Uplift was observed at two successive and separate locations at the time of the eruption. We obtained GPS and microgravity data at Usu Volcano for two intervals, the first from August 1996 to July 1998, once every 2-4 months, and the second in November 2000, 2 months after the end of the eruption. Between July 1998 and November 2000, the displacements and gravity variations are among the largest ever recorded on an active volcano in association with an eruption. We review three different elastic models commonly used in volcano-geodesy (sphere, fault system, fissure zone) and invert the high-quality data using each of these models. The combined inversion of GPS and microgravity data leads to the best solution in the least-squares sense. It is compatible with the intrusion of approximately 5×10 11 kg of new magma into the western part of Usu Volcano. This appears to have occurred in a subvertical fracture zone (about 2.4 km length, 0.1 km width) aligned in the east-west direction. The fracture zone is between 0.4 and 3.3 km depth with an extension of about 30 m. The fractures are likely to be filled with material having a density slightly higher than the density of old products of Mount Usu, i.e. about 2400 kg m -3. This model is consistent with the locations and magnitudes of the earthquakes recorded during the period of intense seismic activity in April and May 2000. These earthquakes correspond to the boundaries of the intruded magma body. The model suggests that the two locations of uplift are not independent.

  14. Elastic modelling of magma intrusions: example of the 2000 eruption of Usu Volcano, Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, P.; Mori, H.; Okada, H.

    2003-04-01

    After 23 years of dormancy, Usu Volcano (Hokkaido, Japan) erupted on 31st of March, 2000. Many observations (seismicity, deformation rates, gravity observations, groundwater level monitoring) show that the period of intense activity was short, starting abruptly, and continuing for ca. 5 months with a decreasing rate. Uplift was observed at two successive and separate locations at the time of the eruption. We obtained GPS and microgravity data at Usu Volcano for two intervals, first from August 1996 to July 1998, once every 2 to 4 months, and second in November 2000, 2 months after the end of the eruption. Between July 1998 and November 2000, the displacements and gravity variations are among the largest ever recorded on an active volcano in association with an eruption. We review three different elastic models commonly used in volcano-geodesy (sphere, fault system, fissure zone) and invert the high quality data using each of these models. The combined inversion of GPS and microgravity data leads to the best solution in the least-squares sense. It is compatible with the intrusion of approximately 5× 1011 kg of new magma into the western part of Usu Volcano. This appears to have occurred in a subvertical fracture zone (about 2.4 km length, 0.1 km width) aligned in the East-West direction. The fracture zone is between 0.4 and 3.3 km depth with an extension of about 30 m. The fractures are likely to be filled with material having a density slightly higher than the density of old products of Mount Usu, i.e., about 2400 kg m-3. This model is consistent with the locations and magnitudes of the earthquakes recorded during the period of the intense seismic activity in April and May 2000. These earthquakes correspond to the boundaries of the intruded magma body. The model suggests that the two locations of uplift are not independent.

  15. Geothermal activity and energy of the Yakedake volcano, Gifu-Nagano, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Iriyama, Jun

    1996-12-31

    The temperature of the most active solfatara in the summit crater of the Yakedake volcano (altitude 2,455 m Gifu-Nagano, Japan) was 92.2 and 129.4{degrees}C in September 1995 and in October 1994, respectively. The temperature of solfatara in the northern summit dome at an altitude of 2,240 to 2,270 m ranged from 68.2 to 92.5{degrees}C in September 1995. The water sample from a crater pond, Shoga-ike, located on the summit, showed a pH and electrical conductivity of 4.38 and 42.2 {mu}S/cm in October 1991, 4.35 and 42.4 {mu}S/cm in September 1992, 4.11 and 76.6 {mu}S/cm in October 1994, and 4.30 and 45.1 {mu}S/cm in September 1995, respectively. In 1960, the water sample from the same pond showed the pH and electrical conductivity of 3.7 and 80.8 {mu}S/cm, respectively. Although the values of pH and electrical conductivity in 1994 approached to the values at the volcano`s pre-eruption in 1960, the eruption in the summit dome did not occur in 1995. However, a large steam explosion occurred in the Nakanoyu area of the southeastern Mountainside of the volcano. The geothermal energy within the summit dome at an altitude of 2,050 to 2,455 m of the Yakedake volcano is calculated, using new data, to be about 4.8 x 10{sup 17} J, which represents a thermal power output of 5.1 x 10{sup 2} MW{sub th} averaged over 30 yrs.

  16. The October 16, 2013 rainfall-induced landslides and associated lahars at Izu Oshima Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyabuchi, Yasuo; Maeno, Fukashi; Nakada, Setsuya

    2015-09-01

    Intense rainfall related to the typhoon T1326 on October 15-16, 2013 (total 824 mm; maximum hourly rainfall 118.5 mm) triggered numerous landslides and associated lahars at Izu Oshima Volcano, the northernmost part of Izu Mariana volcanic arc, Japan. The landslides were concentrated mainly in a 2-km2 area located on the western slope of Izu Oshima Volcano. Most of the landslides were shallow soil slips (< 2 m thick) in unconsolidated fallout tephra layers overlying lava flows and pyroclastic rocks. The rupture surfaces of them were located near the base of Y1 tephra (AD 1777-1778) and/or the base of Y4 tephra (AD 1421). The Y1 and Y4 tephras differ from the underlying paleosols in permeability, grain size and degree of compaction. The saturated hydraulic conductivities of the paleosols were one to two orders of magnitude smaller than those of the overlying Y1 and Y4 tephras. Most landslides mobilized completely into lahars, traveling along stream channels or flat slopes and flooding at the foot of the volcano. The associated lahars severely damaged inhabited areas and caused thirty five fatalities. Although the lahars eroded slopes and transported boulders up to 1 m in diameter and a large amount of woody debris, they contained more than 90% of sand-to-silt-size particles, similar in composition to the original sliding materials. Sediment discharge volumes from three basins were estimated at 1.8-4.1 × 104 m3/km2, based on debris volumes trapped by sediment retention dams. The characteristics of rainfall-induced landslides and associated lahars at Izu Oshima Volcano in 2013 provide an important lesson about future non-eruption-related landslide and lahar hazards at tephra-rich volcanoes.

  17. Estimation of Seismic Attenuation beneath Tateyama Volcano, Central Japan by Using Peak Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, K.; Kawakata, H.; Hirano, S.; Doi, I.

    2015-12-01

    The Hida Mountain Range located in central Japan has a lot of active volcanoes. Katsumata et al. (1995, GJI) suggested the presence of regions with low-velocity and low-density as well as low Qanomaly at 5-15 km deep beneath the range. Tateyama volcano is located in the northern part of the range. Iwata et al. (2014, AGU Fall Meeting) quantitatively estimated strength of S-wave attenuation beneath Tateyama volcano using twofold spectral ratios and suggested that regions with high seismic attenuation exist in the south or the southeast of Tateyama volcano. However, it is difficult to estimate the contribution of scattering loss and intrinsic absorption to total attenuation on the basis of this method. In the present study, we focused on the peak delay (Takahashi et al., 2007, GJI) in seismic envelopes. We used seismograms observed at five NIED Hi-net stations near Tateyama volcano for 31 local earthquakes (MJMA2.5-4.0). We found seismograms recorded after passing below the southern part of the Hida Mountain Range show longer peak delay than those recorded before passing below the region, while there are no clear difference in peak delay for pairs of seismograms before and after passing below Tateyama volcano. It suggests that causes of the attenuation beneath Tateyama volcano and the southern part of the Hida Mountain Range are different. We used the peak delay values to evaluate the strength of intrinsic absorption. We assumed that the difference of whole peak delay between two seismograms for the same earthquake was caused by intrinsic absorption beneath the region between the two seismic stations. Wecalculated the change in amplitude and peak delay on the basis of a theory suggested by Azimi et al. (1966, Izvestia, Earth Physics). In case of the two envelopes are quite similar to each other, we conclude that intrinsic absorption is a major cause of total attenuation

  18. Characterization of fine volcanic ash from explosive eruption from Sakurajima volcano, South Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanayama, F.; Furukawa, R.; Ishizuka, Y.; Yamamoto, T.; Geshi, N.; Oishi, M.

    2013-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions can affect infrastructure and ecosystem by their dispersion of the volcanic particle. Characterization of volcanic particle expelled by explosive eruption is crucial for evaluating for quantitative hazard assessment by future volcanic eruption. Especially for fine volcanic ash less than 64 micron in diameter, it can disperse vast area from the source volcano and be easily remobilized by surface wind and precipitation after the deposition. As fine volcanic ash is not preserved well at the earth surface and in strata except for enormously large scale volcanic eruption. In order to quantify quantitative characteristics of fine volcanic ash particle, we sampled volcanic ash directly falling from the eruption cloud from Showa crater, the most active vent of Sakurajima volcano, just before landing on ground. We newly adopted high precision digital microscope and particle grain size analyzer to develop hazard evaluation method of fine volcanic ash particle. Field survey was performed 5 sequential days in January, 2013 to take tamper-proof volcanic ash samples directly obtained from the eruption cloud of the Sakurajima volcano using disposable paper dishes and plastic pails. Samples were taken twice a day with time-stamp in 40 localities from 2.5 km to 43 km distant from the volcano. Japan Meteorological Agency reported 16 explosive eruptions of vulcanian style occurred during our survey and we took 140 samples of volcanic ash. Grain size distribution of volcanic ash was measured by particle grain size analyzer (Mophologi G3S) detecting each grain with parameters of particle diameter (0.3 micron - 1 mm), perimeter, length, area, circularity, convexity, solidity, and intensity. Component of volcanic ash was analyzed by CCD optical microscope (VHX-2000) which can take high resolution optical image with magnifying power of 100-2500. We discriminated each volcanic ash particle by color, texture of surface, and internal structure. Grain size

  19. The “anomalous cedar trees” of Lake Ashi, Hakone Volcano, Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oki, Y.

    1984-01-01

    On the bottom of Lake Ashi at Hakone, Japan, there stand great trees that, since ancient times, have been widely known as the "Anomalous Cedar Trees" of Ashi. It is not known why these trees grow on the bottom of the lake, and it remains one of the mysteries of Hakone. It was formerly thought that, at the time Lake Ashi was born, a great forest of cedar trees which was growing in the caldera of the volcano sank into the water. From radioactive carbon dating techniques, it is known that a steam explosion in the Kami Mountains created the caldera approximately 3,000 years ago. The age of the "Anomalous Cedars" is placed at approximately. 

  20. Monitoring eruption activity from temporal stress changes at Mt. Ontake volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terakawa, T.; Kato, A.; Yamanaka, Y.; Maeda, Y.; Horikawa, S.; Matsuhiro, K.; Okuda, T.

    2015-12-01

    On 27 September 2014, Mt. Ontake in Japan produced a phreatic (steam type) eruption with a Volcanic Explosivity Index value of 2 after being dormant for seven years. The local stress field around volcanoes is the superposition of the regional stress field and stress perturbations related to volcanic activity. Temporal stress changes over periods of weeks to months are generally attributed to volcanic processes. Here we show that monitoring temporal changes in the local stress field beneath Mt. Ontake, using focal mechanism solutions of volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes, is an effective tool for assessing the state of volcanic activity. We estimated focal mechanism solutions of 157 VT earthquakes beneath Mt. Ontake from August 2014 to March 2015, assuming that the source was double-couple. Pre-eruption seismicity was dominated by normal faulting with east-west tension, whereas most post-eruption events were reverse faulting with east-west compression. The misfit angle between observed slip vectors and those derived theoretically from the regional (i.e., background) stress pattern is used to evaluate the deviation of the local stress field, or the stress perturbation related to volcanic activity. The moving average of misfit angles tended to exceed 90° before the eruption, and showed a marked decrease immediately after the eruption. This indicates that during the precursory period the local stress field beneath Mt. Ontake was rotated by stress perturbations caused by the inflation of magmatic/hydrothermal fluids. Post-eruption events of reverse faulting acted to shrink the volcanic edifice after expulsion of volcanic ejecta, controlled by the regional stress field. The misfit angle is a good indicator of the state of volcanic activity. The monitoring method by using this indicator is applicable to other volcanoes and may contribute to the mitigation of volcanic hazards.

  1. Volcanoes

    MedlinePlus

    ... hot gases and debris called pyroclastic flows. Some dangers from volcanoes can be predicted ahead of time ... for All Disasters Illnesses, injuries, carbon monoxide poisoning, animals & insects, food, water, cleanup, mold, environmental concerns, and ...

  2. Volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, Robert I.

    1998-01-01

    Volcanoes destroy and volcanoes create. The catastrophic eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980, made clear the awesome destructive power of a volcano. Yet, over a time span longer than human memory and record, volcanoes have played a key role in forming and modifying the planet upon which we live. More than 80 percent of the Earth's surface--above and below sea level--is of volcanic origin. Gaseous emissions from volcanic vents over hundreds of millions of years formed the Earth's earliest oceans and atmosphere, which supplied the ingredients vital to evolve and sustain life. Over geologic eons, countless volcanic eruptions have produced mountains, plateaus, and plains, which subsequent erosion and weathering have sculpted into majestic landscapes and formed fertile soils.

  3. Aeromagnetic Constraints on the Subsurface Structure of Usu Volcano, Hokkaido Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsuka, T.; Okuma, S.; Ishizuka, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Usu Volcano, Hokkaido, Japan consists mainly of dacitic volcanic rocks underlain by basaltic somma lava and Pliocene - Pleistocene andesitic volcanic rocks and has erupted every 20-30 years. Latest eruption in 2000 took place for the first time after the 1977-1978 eruption. A helicopter-borne high-resolution aeromagnetic survey was conducted to better understand the subsurface structure of the volcano almost three months after the start of the eruption. The survey with a stinger-mounted Cs magnetometer was flown at an altitude of 150 m above terrain along north-south survey lines and east-west tie lines, spaced 200 m and 1000 m apart, respectively. DGPS with an accuracy of 50cm was employed for flight-path recovery. Total magnetic intensity was observed every 0.1 second and anomaly was calculated as residual values after subtracting the IGRF-10 field. Magnetic anomalies on a smoothed observation surface were calculated by the reduction method, assuming equivalent anomalies below the actual observation surface (Nakatsuka and Okuma, 2006a). Preliminary 3-D imaging of magnetic anomalies over Usu Volcano was also conducted to constrain the subsurface structure. The 3-D magnetic model indicates that magnetization highs occupy the main edifice of Usu Volcano, suggesting the subsurface distribution of the Usu Somma Lava with a thickness of 1,000 m at the maximum. While, (negative) magnetization lows lie northwest of the Nishi-Yama Craters Area and on the Higashi-Maruyama Cryptodome, where Pliocene and Pleistocene volcanic rocks are distributed, respectively. Their reverse magnetization can be responsible for the magnetization lows. Although the survey was successful to better understand the surface and subsurface distribution of volcanic rocks which constitute the edifice and basement of Usu Volcano, some limitations exist. Any information about the magmas intruded during recent eruptions such as in 1977-1978 and 2000 has not been obtained by the high

  4. Magma Genesis of Sakurajima, the Quaternary post- Aira caldera volcano, southern Kyushu Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, T.; Suzuki, J.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Miki, D.; Takemura, K.

    2012-12-01

    Sakurajima volcano is the Quaternary post-caldera volcano of Aira caldera, which was caused by the eruption of huge amount of silicic pyroclastics, situated on Ryukyu arc, southern Kyushu Island, Japan. This volcano is quite active, so it can be considered that the preparation of next caldera-forming eruption with huge amount of silicic magma is proceeding. It is, therefore, expected that the investigation of magma genesis of Sakurajima volcano give us information for the mechanism generating huge amount of silicic magma, which cause the caldera formation. We analyzed major and trace elements with Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of volcanic rocks from Sakurajima volcano. We sampled (ol) - opx - cpx - pl andesite and dacite from almost all the volcanic units defined by Fukuyama and Ono (1981). In addition to Sakurajima samples, we also studied basaltic rocks erupted at pre-caldera stage of the Aira caldera to estimate the primary magma of Sakurajima volcano. Major and trace element variations generally show linear trends on the Harker diagrams, with the exception of P2O5 and TiO2. Based on the trend of P2O5 vs.SiO2, we divided studied samples low-P (P2O5 < 0.15 wt. %) and high-P (P2O5 > 0.15 wt. %) groups and these groups also display two distinct trends on TiO2-SiO2 diagram. The composition of trace elements shows typical island arc character as depletion of Nb and enrichments of Rb, K and Pb, suggesting addition of aqueous fluids to the mantle wedge. The Zr and Nb concentrations make a liner trend (Zr/Nb = 27) and this trend across from tend of MORB (Zr/Nb = 35) to that of crustal materials (Zr/Nb=17). The Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions broadly plot to on the mixing curve connecting MORB-type mantle and sediments of the Philippine Sea Plate, indicating that the primary magma was generated by partial melting of MORB-type mantle wedge, which was hydrated with fluids derived from the subducted Philippine Sea sediments. But we found that our data plot apart

  5. Crustal deformation of Miyakejima volcano, Japan since the eruption of 2000 using dense GPS campaign observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, M.; Matsushima, T.; Oikawa, J.; Watanabe, A.; Okuda, T.; Ozawa, T.; Kohno, Y.; Miyagi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Miyakejima is an active volcanic Island located about 175 km south of Tokyo, Japan. Miyakejima volcano erupted approximately every 20 years in the past 100 years. The latest eruptive activities since 2000 was different from those of the last 100 years, in that the activities included a caldera formation for the first time in 2500 years and gigantic volcanic gas emission that forced islander to evacuate over four and half years. In 2000, a dense GPS observation campaign had detected the magma intrusion in detail (e.g., Irwan et al., 2003; Murase et al., 2006). However, this campaign observation ceased from 2002 to 2010 because a large amount of volcanic gas prevented from entering to the island. Since 2011, we restarted the campaign observation by the dense GPS network, and examined the ongoing magma accumulation process beneath Miyakejima volcano to get insights about the future activity. In this analysis, we combined the data of our campaign observations, the data of the University Union in 2000, and the GEONET data. The observation data were analyzed by RTK-LIB (Takasu et al., 2007) using GPS precise ephemeris from IGS. We estimated the locations and volumes of the pressure sources beneth Miyakejima using an elevation-modified Mogi model (Fukui et al., 2003) and open crack model (Okada, 1992) during the two periods (2000 ~ 2012 and 2011 ~ 2012). We used the software of Magnetic and Geodetic data Computer Analysis Program for Volcano (MaGCAP-V) (Fukui et al., 2010), and estimated the source parameters by trial and error. During 2000 and 2012, a contracting spherical source and contracting dyke were estimated beneath the caldera and at the southwestern part of the island, respectively. In contrast, during 2011 and 2012, an spherical inflation source was estimated a few km beneath the caldera. This result suggest that Miyakejima is now storing new magma for the next eruption. Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI) (2011) suggested that the inflation started

  6. Character and origin of lithofacies in the conduit of Unzen volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Yoshihiko; Nakada, Setsuya; Kurokawa, Masaru; Shimano, Taketo; Sugimoto, Takeshi; Sakuma, Sumio; Hoshizumi, Hideo; Yoshimoto, Mitsuhiro; Uto, Kozo

    2008-07-01

    Unzen, western Kyushu, Japan, is an andesitic to dacitic, polygenetic volcano that reaches an elevation of 1486 m above sea level. A 1996-m-long hole has been drilled on a slanted trajectory passing beneath the volcano, penetrating the conduit zone of the volcano at 30-150 m below sea level. Spot drill cores, totalling 75 m in length, were recovered between lengths 1582 to 1996 m of the hole. The principal lithofacies of the cores are polymict volcanic breccia (74 vol.% of total drill cores), coherent dacite (13 vol.%), coherent andesite (6 vol.%), partly brecciated coherent dacite (5 vol.%), and volcaniclastic veins (2 vol.%). The polymict volcanic breccia is poorly sorted, non-graded and made up of various clasts of andesite/dacite composition, 1-120 cm across, in a matrix of andesite/dacite fragments, up to 5 mm across. The clasts are subangular to subrounded, non-vesicular to vesicular, and contain 62-66 wt.% SiO 2. This facies is interpreted as forming the subvertical body of a diatreme, and to have been produced by fragmentation of vent-conduit wall rocks by explosive eruptions and associated gravitational failure. The coherent dacite (SiO 2 = 66-67 wt.%) is uniform to flow-banded and commonly has chilled margins. The dacite is porphyritic containing phenocrysts of plagioclase, hornblende, biotite and minor quartz in a non-vesicular groundmass. This facies is interpreted as representing dykes that have intruded into the polymict volcanic breccia. The coherent andesite (SiO 2 = 59 wt.%) and partly brecciated coherent dacite (SiO 2 = 69 wt.%) are massive to fractured, vesicular and porphyritic. These facies are interpreted to be lavas extruded during the old stage (500-300 ka) of the evolution of the Unzen volcano. The volcaniclastic veins occur within all the lithofacies described and range from 0.1 to 250 mm wide. The veins consist of volcanic lithic and mineral fragments up to several millimetres across, and are inferred to have formed by injection of high

  7. Diffuse degassing survey at the Higashi Izu monogenetic volcano field, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notsu, Kenji; Pérez, Nemesio M.; Fujii, Naoyuki; Hernández, Pedro A.; Mori, Toshiya; Padrón, Eleazar; Melián, Gladys

    2016-04-01

    The Higashi-Izu monogenetic volcanic group, which consists of more than 60 volcanoes, overlies the polygenetic volcanoes in the eastern part of the Izu peninsula, Japan, which are distributed over the area of 350 km2. Some of the monogenetic volcanoes are located on northwest-southeast alignments, suggesting that they developed along fissures. Recent volcanic activity occurred offshore, e.g., at the Izu-Oshima volcano, which erupted in 1986 and a submarine eruption of the small new Teishi knoll off eastern Izu Peninsula in 1989 (Hasebe et al., 2001). This study was carried out to investigate the possible relationship of diffuse CO2 emission and the recent seismic activity recorded NE of Higashi Izu monogenetic volcanic field, to quantify the rate at which CO2 is diffusely degassed from the studied area including Omuroyama volcano and to identify the structures controlling the degassing process. Measurements were carried out over a three day period from 8-10 July 2013. Diffuse CO2 emission surveys were always carried out following the accumulation chamber method and spatial distribution maps were constructed following the sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) procedure. Soil gas samples were collected at 30-40 cm depth by withdrawal into 60 cc hypodermic syringes to characterize the chemical and isotopic composition of the soil gas. At Omurayama volcano, soil CO2 efflux values ranged from non-detectable to 97.5 g m-2 d-1, while at the seismic swarm zone ranged from 1.5 to 233.2 g m-2 d-1 and at the fault zone ranged from 5.7 to 101.2 g m-2 d-1. Probability-plot technique of all CO2 efflux data showed two different populations, background with a mean of 8.7 g m-2 d-1 and peak with a mean of 92.7 g m-2 d-1. In order to strength the deep seated contribution to the soil gases at the studied are, carbon isotopic analysis were performed in the CO2 gas. Soil gases (He, CO2 and N2) showed a clear mixing trend between air composition and a rich CO2 end member, suggesting the

  8. Multi-parametric Observation of Volcanic Lightning at Sakurajima Volcano, Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimarelli, C.; Alatorre-Ibarguengoitia, M.; Aizawa, K.; Yokoo, A.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Ash-rich volcanic plumes are very often associated with electrical discharges producing majestic display of lightning. Observation and understanding of this phenomenon can shed light on crucial properties of the plume such as mass eruption rate and content of fine particles, as recently demonstrated by laboratory investigation of volcanic lightning (Cimarelli et al., 2014). Despite the recent advances in experimental investigations and the increasing detailed observation by lightning monitoring arrays, many fundamental questions are yet unsolved. In particular, to which extent electrical discharges in volcanic plumes are comparable to thundercloud lightning? Is the presence of hydrometeors in the plume a necessary condition for the generation of volcanic lightning? Multiparametric observation of electrical activity at erupting volcanoes is key to answering these questions. Here we present the results of a campaign of measurements conducted at Sakurajima volcano (southern Japan) where, for the first time, we combined synchronized high-speed imaging with magnetotelluric (MT) and acoustic measurements of ash-rich plumes generating electrical discharges and compare our observations with maximum plume height measurement and atmospheric soundings. Results show that flashes concentrate within the plume and closer to the crater. Good correlation if found between cloud-to-ground versus intra-cloud events and the frequency and duration of recorded MT-signals, while measured currents at Sakurajima are 10 to 100 times smaller than those produced by thundercloud discharges. Finally, atmospheric soundings show that plumes producing flashes didn't cross isotherms relevant for ice formation thus discarding a relevant contribution of hydrometeors in the generation of the observed volcanic lightning. Cimarelli et al. 2014. Experimenal generation of volcanic lightning. Geology v. 42, no. 1 doi: 10.1130/G34802.1

  9. Observations of eruption clouds from Sakura-zima volcano, Kyushu, Japan from Skylab 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, J.D.; Heiken, G.; Randerson, D.; McKay, D.S.

    1976-01-01

    Hasselblad and Nikon stereographic photographs taken from Skylab between 9 June 1973 and 1 February 1974 give synoptic plan views of several entire eruption clouds emanating from Sakura-zima volcano in Kagoshima Bay, Kyushu, Japan. Analytical plots of these stereographic pairs, studied in combination with meteorological data, indicate that the eruption clouds did not penetrate the tropopause and thus did not create a stratospheric dust veil of long residence time. A horizontal eddy diffusivity of the order of 106 cm2 s-1 and a vertical eddy diffusivity of the order of 105 cm2 s-1 were calculated from the observed plume dimensions and from available meteorological data. These observations are the first, direct evidence that explosive eruption at an estimated energy level of about 1018 ergs per paroxysm may be too small under atmospheric conditions similar to those prevailing over Sakura-zima for volcanic effluents to penetrate low-level tropospheric temperature inversions and, consequently, the tropopause over northern middle latitudes. Maximum elevation of the volcanic clouds was determined to be 3.4 km. The cumulative thermal energy release in the rise of volcanic plumes for 385 observed explosive eruptions was estimated to be 1020 to 1021 ergs (1013 to 1014 J), but the entire thermal energy release associated with pyroclastic activity may be of the order of 2.5 ?? 1022 ergs (2.5 ?? 1015 J). Estimation of the kinetic energy component of explosive eruptions via satellite observation and meteorological consideration of eruption clouds is thus useful in volcanology as an alternative technique to confirm the kinetic energy estimates made by ground-based geological and geophysical methods, and to aid in construction of physical models of potential and historical tephra-fallout sectors with implications for volcano-hazard prediction. ?? 1976.

  10. Post-eruptive volcanic dome evolution as revealed by deformation and microgravity observations at Usu volcano (Hokkaido, Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Okada, Hiromu

    1999-04-01

    Usu volcano (Hokkaido, Japan) is a dacitic volcano, known for its high production rate of lava domes and crypto-domes. It is thus a good target to study processes of volcanic dome evolution (upheaval and/or relaxation). We carried out repeated GPS and microgravity surveys on the three most recent domes of Mt. Usu (1910: Meiji Shinzan; 1943-1945: Showa-Shinzan and 1977-1982: Usu-Shinzan). The repeat period was 1 to 2 months and extended from October 1996 to June 1997. We also compare new data with results from former studies. More than 20 years after the start of Usu-Shinzan dome growth, there is still subsidence at a maximum rate of about 7 to 8 cm/year. The reasons for this subsidence are discussed. Repeated gravity surveys revealed an increase of gravity on the domes (about 60±10 microgal/year for Usu-Shinzan, about 15 microgal at Showa-Shinzan and 10 to 20 microgal for Meiji-shinzan); this gravity increase exceeds that expected due to subsidence. We discuss and interpret the excess gravity change in terms of a density increase in the edifice, caused by a combination of processes (contraction of the edifice, water level change, devesiculisation, cooling and magma intrusion). Quantification of these processes at Usu volcano may help to understand the processes of evolution at domes on other volcanoes such as Merapi (Indonesia), Unzen (Japan) or Montserrat (West Indies).

  11. Constraining tephra dispersion and deposition from three subplinian explosions in 2011 at Shinmoedake volcano, Kyushu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeno, Fukashi; Nagai, Masashi; Nakada, Setsuya; Burden, Rose E.; Engwell, Samantha; Suzuki, Yuki; Kaneko, Takayuki

    2014-06-01

    Constraining physical parameters of tephra dispersion and deposition from explosive volcanic eruptions is a significant challenge, because of both the complexity of the relationship between tephra distribution and distance from the vent and the difficulties associated with direct and comprehensive real-time observations. Three andesitic subplinian explosions in January 2011 at Shinmoedake volcano, Japan, are used as a case study to validate selected empirical and theoretical models using observations and field data. Tephra volumes are estimated using relationships between dispersal area and tephra thickness or mass/area. A new cubic B-spline interpolation method is also examined. Magma discharge rate is estimated using theoretical plume models incorporating the effect of wind. Results are consistent with observed plume heights (6.4-7.3 km above the vent) and eruption durations. Estimated tephra volumes were 15-34 × 106 m3 for explosions on the afternoon of 26 January and morning of 27 January, and 5.0-7.6 × 106 m3 for the afternoon of 27 January; magma discharge rates were in the range 1-2 × 106 kg/s for all three explosions. Clast dispersal models estimated plume height at 7.1 ± 1 km above the vent for each explosion. The three subplinian explosions occurred with approximately 12-h reposes and had similar mass discharge rates and plume heights but decreasing erupted magma volumes and durations.

  12. Observations at Kuchinoerabu-jima volcano, southern Kyushu, Japan, by using unmanned helicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohminato, T.; Kaneko, T.; Koyama, T.; Watanabe, A.; Kanda, W.; Tameguri, T.; Kazahaya, R.

    2015-12-01

    Kuchinoerabu-jima, volcano is a volcanic island located southern Kyushu, Japan. In 3 August, 2014, a small eruption at active summit crater, Shin-dake, destroyed all the observation stations near the summit. Since then, this volcano was only poorly monitored. After the eruption, entering within 2km from Shin-dake crater was strictly prohibited and thus it was impossible to fix summit stations on site. In April, 2015, we conducted seismic sensor installation by using unmanned helicopter (RMAX-G1 manufactured by Yamaha) so as to reestablish the seismic monitoring network near the summit area. We installed four seismic stations in the summit area. We also conducted various types of near-summit observations including an aero-magnetic measurement over the summit area, taking visual and infra-red images from low altitude, and volcanic gas sampling. We present preliminary results of the near summit observations using unmanned helicopter. The light-weight (5kg) and solar-powered seismic stations were designed exclusively for helicopter installation. They transmit seismic data every 10 minutes by using mobile data communication network. We could install them within 500m from the summit crater on 17, April. On 29 May, Shin-dake crater erupted again and the newly installed seismic stations were all destroyed by this eruption. The seismic stations could transmit data until just before the eruption. These data made us possible to evaluate the change in seismic activity leading up to the eruption. An aero-magnetic survey was conducted on 17 and 18 April. The flight altitude was between 100m and 150m above the ground (i.e a draped magnetic survey) . Path interval is 100m and the total flight path length is 80km. The magnetic intensity data were converted to magnetization of the edifice of Shin-dake. Comparison between the result this time with that obtained in 2001 shows demagnetization near the summit area. Temperature measurement over the summit area detected 368ºC at the

  13. ASTER-SRTM Perspective of Mount Oyama Volcano, Miyake-Jima Island, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Mount Oyama is a 820-meter-high (2,700 feet) volcano on the island of Miyake-Jima, Japan. In late June 2000, a series of earthquakes alerted scientists to possible volcanic activity. On June 27, authorities evacuated 2,600 people, and on July 8 the volcano began erupting and erupted five times over that week. The dark gray blanket covering green vegetation in the image is the ash deposited by prevailing northeasterly winds between July 8 and 17. This island is about 180 kilometers (110 miles) south of Tokyo and is part of the Izu chain of volcanic islands that runs south from the main Japanese island of Honshu. Miyake-Jima is home to 3,800 people. The previous major eruptions of Mount Oyama occurred in 1983 and 1962, when lava flows destroyed hundreds of houses. An earlier eruption in 1940 killed 11 people.

    This image is a perspective view created by combining image data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) aboard NASA's Terra satellite with an elevation model from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Vertical relief is exaggerated, and the image includes cosmetic adjustments to clouds and image color to enhance clarity of terrain features.

    The ASTER instrument is a cooperative project between NASA, JPL, and the Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the

  14. Characterizing Explosive Eruptions at Sakurajima Volcano, Japan, Using Seismic, Infrasound, Lightning and Video Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. M.; Behnke, S. A.; Thomas, R. J.; Edens, H. E.; Cimarelli, C.; Cigala, V.; Van Eaton, A. R.; Iguchi, M.; Miki, D.; McNutt, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to determine volcanic ash plume characteristics from seismic and/or infrasonic records would enable increased accuracy in volcanic monitoring during times of low visibility. During May-June 2015 a field deployment of 6 infrasound sensors, 2 seismometers, multiple cameras, and 10 Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) stations were deployed around Sakurajima Volcano in Japan. During one month of observations (13 May to 10 June) hundreds of explosive eruptions were observed with plume heights reaching 4.3 km above the vent. The plumes varied in duration, ash content, and physical form. The resulting explosions exhibited a variety of infrasound waveforms including the classic long-period N shape as well as events with a mixture of high and low frequencies. For a subset of larger events, peak pressures ranged from 16 to 741 Pa at a distance of 3.6 km from the vent. The seismic signals are long period and emergent with no clear P or S-waves, although high frequency ground-coupled airwaves are visible in conjunction with the infrasonic record of some of the explosive eruptions. Peak ground displacements on the vertical component ranged from 2.1 to 183 um for the same subset of events. Volcanic lightning was both visually observed and recorded on the LMA stations. One of the goals of this project to determine if there are intrinsic relationships between ash plume characteristics, such as initial velocity or acceleration, ash grain size, texture, and composition, seismic and infrasound waveforms, and the presence and type of volcanic lightning. The rich variety of observations provides a good opportunity to determine such relationships.

  15. Detection of Aeromagnetic Field Changes Using an Unmanned Autonomous Helicopter: Repeated Experiments at Tarumae Volcano (Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, T.; Koyama, T.; Yanagisawa, T.; Yoshimoto, M.; Ohminato, T.; Kaneko, T.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions often prohibit humans from approaching active craters. Meanwhile, it is important, especially at the initial stage of an eruption, to perform visual surveillance, geophysical/chemical measurements and material sampling in the vicinity of the craters. Besides scientific purposes, information from such surveys is helpful for the local government in deciding the response to volcanic unrest. We started airborne surveys using an unmanned helicopter on a trial basis in cooperation with the Hokkaido Regional Development Bureau. As a part of the project, we repeated aeromagnetic surveys over Mt. Tarumae (1,041m), one of the active volcanoes in northern Japan in 2011, 2012 and 2013. Owing to its high accuracy of positioning control in the autonomous flight with the aid of GPS navigation and the fairly small magnetic field gradient in the air, temporal changes up to 30 nT were successfully detected through a direct comparison between separate surveys. The field changes in the air were mostly consistent with those on the ground surface, which suggested remagnetization due to cooling beneath the summit lava dome. Through our three-year experiments, the unmanned helicopter was proved to be useful for aeromagnetic monitoring. Although the system still has some limitations in terms of maximum flight altitude and operational range from the base station, we emphasize the following three advantages of this technique. (1) Operation without exposing human to volcanic hazards. (2) Straightforward data processing procedure to obtain temporal magnetic field changes, which is especially important in an emergency response such as an ongoing unrest. (3) Great reduction of the cost to maintain ground-based monitoring stations for many years. Acknowledgments: We express sincere thanks to Muroran and Sapporo Development and Construction Departments of the HRDB for the cooperation in the field experiments using their unmanned helicopter.

  16. Application of terrestrial laser scanning for detection of ground surface deformation in small mud volcano (Murono, Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Yuichi S.; Kusumoto, Shigekazu; Matta, Nobuhisa

    2016-07-01

    We perform terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to detect changes in surface morphology of a mud volcano in Murono, north-central Japan. The study site underwent significant deformation by a strong earthquake in 2011, and the surface deformation has continued in the following years. The point cloud datasets were obtained by TLS at three different times in 2011, 2013 and 2014. Those point clouds were aligned by cloud-based registration, which minimizes the closest point distance of point clouds of unchanged ground features, and the TLS-based point cloud data appear to be suitable for detecting centimeter-order deformations in the central domain of the mud volcano, as well as for measurements of topographic features including cracks of paved ground surface. The spatial patterns and accumulative amount of the vertical deformation during 2011-2014 captured by TLS correspond well with those previously reported based on point-based leveling surveys, supporting the validity of TLS survey.

  17. Intensive hydration of the wedge mantle at the Kuril arc - NE Japan arc junction: implications from mafic lavas from Usu Volcano, northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuritani, T.; Tanaka, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Nakagawa, M.; Matsumoto, A.

    2015-12-01

    The southwestern part of Hokkaido, northern Japan, is located at the junction of the NE Japan arc and the Kuril arc. The subducting Pacific plate under this region shows a hinge-like shape due to the dip change of the subducting plate along the trench. Because of the interest in this unique tectonic setting, this arc-arc junction has been the focus of extensive geophysical studies (e.g. Kita et al., 2010, Morishige and van Keken, 2014; Wada et al., 2015). This region is also known as an area in which magmatism has been intense; there are many active volcanoes such as Usu, Tarumae, and Komagatake, and large calderas including Toya, Shikotsu, and Kuttara. In this region, the temporal and spatial evolution of the volcanism and the chemical compositions of the volcanic rocks are well characterized (e.g. Nakagawa, 1992). However, the generation conditions of magmas have not been estimated for these volcanoes, probably because of the scarcity of basaltic products. Therefore, a possible link between the tectonic setting and the intense magmatism is still unclear. In this study, we carried out a petrological and geochemical study on mafic lavas (49.6-51.3 wt.% SiO2) from Usu Volcano, and estimated the conditions under which the magmas were generated. By application of a plagioclase-melt hygrometer to the plagioclase and the host magma, the water content of ~6.5 wt.% was obtained for the basaltic magma. Using this information, as well as the olivine maximum fractionation model (Tatsumi et al., 1983), the composition of the primary magma is estimated to be 47.9 wt.% SiO2, 15.1 wt.% MgO, and 4.1 wt.% H2O. Analyses using the multi-component thermodynamics suggest that the primary magma was generated in the source mantle with 0.9 wt.% H2O at 1310ºC and at 1.6 GPa. The water content of 0.9 wt.% of the source mantle is significantly higher than the estimates for the source mantle in the main NE Japan arc (<0.7 wt.% H2O); this implies that the flux of slab-derived fluids is

  18. The effect of porosity and crystallinity on magma rheology at Unzen volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coats, Rebecca; Lavallée, Yan; Kendrick, Jackie E.; Wallace, Paul A.; Ashworth, James D.; Hornby, Adrian; Miwa, Takahiro

    2016-04-01

    Eruptions of lava domes are some of the most unpredictable and dangerous volcanic phenomena, and their frequent occurrence highlights the priority of improving our understanding of the mechanisms at play during magma ascent. For example, between 1991 and 1995 Mt. Unzen sustained an extensive period of dome growth. During this time approximately 2.1x108 m3 dense rock equivalent of magma was emplaced at effusion rates of 0.1-4x105 m3d-1. Repeated partial collapses of the dome generated frequent pyroclastic density currents which caused several fatalities and damage to populated areas near Shimabara City. One of the keys to grasping the switch between effusive to explosive behaviour, as well as the onset of a dome collapse event lies within understanding the rheological behaviour of upwelling magma. Although the conditions which lead to failure of magma are now increasingly studied, we lack an understanding of the influence of mechanisms at play during magma deformation. Strain rate and temperature play primary roles in the transition of silicate melts from viscous bodies to elastic solids; this regime change is known as the viscous-brittle transition and is bound by the glass transition of the interstitial melt, which signals the beginning of either fracture or flow. Crystals and pores present in the system can alter the position of the viscous-brittle transition. Laboratory experiments which aim to simulate realistic volcanic conditions permit the controlled study of volcanic processes, and help determine the behaviour of multi-phase magmatic suspensions. For magma with high crystal contents (>40%) rheology is strongly influenced by the crystalline phase and is strain rate dependent. Here we present the results of high-temperature deformation experiments on variably porous (9-33%), crystal-rich (>50%) dacite lavas from Unzen volcano, Japan. Uniaxial compression tests were carried out on dacitic samples from Unzen at room temperature (˜20° C) and high temperature

  19. Crustal deformation and volcanic earthquakes associated with the recent volcanic activity of Iwojima Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, H.; Fujita, E.; Tanada, T.

    2013-12-01

    Iwojima is an active volcanic island located within a 10 km wide submarine caldera about 1250 km to the south of Tokyo, Japan. The seismometer and GPS network of National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) in Iwojima has observed a repeating island wide uplift more than 1 m associated with large number of volcanic earthquakes every several years. During 2006-2012, we observed more than 20000 volcanic earthquakes and an uplift of about 3 m, and precursory volcanic earthquakes and rapid crustal deformation just before the small submarine eruption near the northern coast of Iwojima in April 2012. In a restless volcano such as Iwojima, it is important issue to distinguish whether rapid crustal deformation and intense earthquake activity lead to an eruption or not. According to a long period geodetic observation by Ukawa et al. (2006), the crustal deformation of Iwojima can be classify into 2 phases. The first is an island wide large uplift centering on Motoyama area (the eastern part of the island, the center of the caldera), and the second is contraction and subsidence at local area centering on Motoyama and uplift around that area. They are interpreted by superposition of crustal deformations by a shallow contraction source and a deep seated inflation source beneath Motoyama. The earthquake activity of Iwojima highly correlates with the island wide large uplift, suggesting the earthquakes are almost controlled by a magma accumulation into a deep seated magma chamber. In contrast to the activity, the precursory activity of the eruption in 2012 is deviated from the correlation. The rapid crustal deformation just before and after the eruption in 2012 can be interpreted by rapid inflation and deflation of a shallow sill source about 1km deep, respectively, suggesting that it was caused by a shallow hydrothermal activity. The result shows that we can probably distinguish an abnormal activity related with a volcanic eruption when we observe

  20. Physical properties of volcanic lightning: Constraints from magnetotelluric and video observations at Sakurajima volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Koki; Cimarelli, Corrado; Alatorre-Ibargüengoitia, Miguel A.; Yokoo, Akihiko; Dingwell, Donald B.; Iguchi, Masato

    2016-06-01

    The lightning generated by explosive volcanic eruptions is of interest not only as a promising technique for monitoring volcanic activity, but also for its broader implications and possible role in the origin of life on Earth, and its impact on the atmosphere and biosphere of the planet. However, at present the genetic mechanisms and physical properties of volcanic lightning remain poorly understood, as compared to our understanding of thundercloud lightning. Here, we present joint magnetotelluric (MT) data and video imagery that were used to investigate the physical properties of electrical discharges generated during explosive activity at Sakurajima volcano, Japan, and we compare these data with the characteristics of thundercloud lightning. Using two weeks of high-sensitivity, high-sample-rate MT data recorded in 2013, we detected weak electromagnetic signals radiated by volcanic lightning close to the crater. By carefully inspecting all MT waveforms that synchronized with visible flashes, and comparing with high-speed (3000 frame/s) and normal-speed (30 frame/s) videos, we identified two types of discharges. The first type consists of impulses (Type A) and is interpreted as cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning. The second type is characterized by weak electromagnetic variations with multiple peaks (Type B), and is interpreted as intra-cloud (IC) lightning. In addition, we observed a hybrid MT event wherein a continuous weak current accompanied Type A discharge. The observed features of volcanic lightning are similar to thunderstorm lightning, and the physical characteristics show that volcanic lightning can be treated as a miniature version of thunderstorm lightning in many respects. The overall duration, length, inter-stroke interval, peak current, and charge transfer all exhibit values 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller than those of thunderstorm lightning, thus suggesting a scaling relation between volcanic and thunderstorm lightning parameters that is independent of

  1. Distinct S wave reflector in the midcrust beneath Nikko-Shirane volcano in the northeastern Japan arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Akira

    1996-02-01

    Distinct S waves reflected from a midcrustal seismic velocity discontinuity are detected beneath Nikko-Shirane volcano in the southernmost part of the northeastern Japan arc. A detailed travel time analysis of the reflected S waves by using data acquired through a dense seismic network temporarily set up in this region shows that this unusual S wave reflector is distributed over an area of 15 × 15 km2 at depths ranging from 8 to 15 km. The reflector has a conical shape becoming shallow toward the summit of Nikko-Shirane volcano. Observed amplitude spectral ratios of reflected S waves to direct S waves show that the reflector body has a strong velocity contrast to the surrounding medium and its thickness is of the order of 100 m at most. The reflector body is approximated by two thin layers probably filled with partially molten materials. Cutoff depth for shallow seismicity in this area is 3-5 km above the reflector and becomes shallow toward Nikko-Shirane volcano, nearly parallel to the reflector. The depth to brittle-ductile transition zone seems to be prescribed by the existence of the reflector body, which is perhaps a thin magma body.

  2. Characterization of the luminance and shape of ash particles at Sakurajima volcano, Japan, using CCD camera images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Takahiro; Shimano, Taketo; Nishimura, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    We develop a new method for characterizing the properties of volcanic ash at the Sakurajima volcano, Japan, based on automatic processing of CCD camera images. Volcanic ash is studied in terms of both luminance and particle shape. A monochromatic CCD camera coupled with a stereomicroscope is used to acquire digital images through three filters that pass red, green, or blue light. On single ash particles, we measure the apparent luminance, corresponding to 256 tones for each color (red, green, and blue) for each pixel occupied by ash particles in the image, and the average and standard deviation of the luminance. The outline of each ash particle is captured from a digital image taken under transmitted light through a polarizing plate. Also, we define a new quasi-fractal dimension ( D qf ) to quantify the complexity of the ash particle outlines. We examine two ash samples, each including about 1000 particles, which were erupted from the Showa crater of the Sakurajima volcano, Japan, on February 09, 2009 and January 13, 2010. The apparent luminance of each ash particle shows a lognormal distribution. The average luminance of the ash particles erupted in 2009 is higher than that of those erupted in 2010, which is in good agreement with the results obtained from component analysis under a binocular microscope (i.e., the number fraction of dark juvenile particles is lower for the 2009 sample). The standard deviations of apparent luminance have two peaks in the histogram, and the quasi-fractal dimensions show different frequency distributions between the two samples. These features are not recognized in the results of conventional qualitative classification criteria or the sphericity of the particle outlines. Our method can characterize and distinguish ash samples, even for ash particles that have gradual property changes, and is complementary to component analysis. This method also enables the relatively fast and systematic analysis of ash samples that is required for

  3. Uplift revealed by LASER scanner surveys in Murono mud volcano, Niigata Prefecture, Japan, and estimation of its source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, A.; Fukuda, Y.; Kusumoto, S.

    2014-12-01

    Since mud volcanoes spew out pressurized material, such as natural gas, oil, mud including water from a deeper ground, the activities of the mud volcanoes are good indicators of the stress conditions/orientations as well as the tectonic controls. The Murono mud volcano area located in Tokamachi City, Niigata prefecture, Japan, is one of the active ground deforming areas associated with mud, natural gas, oil and water eruptions. This area is famous because rapid ground deformation events were recorded corresponding to neighboring large earthquakes. For instance, associated with Naganoken-Hokubu Earthquake (Mw. 6.7) which occurred in 2011, the area recorded a sudden large uplift of about 50 cm. In order to reveal the source mechanism of the mud volcano, Toyama University has been conducting successive leveling surveys at 61 benchmarks. They revealed that the same area of the rapid uplift of 2011 has been still uplifting, even the amount of the uplift is much smaller (20 mm/yr). However, the source of the uplift could not be well identified due to the low spatial resolutions. Therefore, in order to obtain a high resolution land deformation pattern, we have conducted laser scanning surveys two times in June and October 2013, using TOPCON Imaging Station IS-301, which can obtain 3D point cloud data by the automatic laser scanning mode without reflector. The surface deformations obtained by comparing the June and October datasets indicate clear uplifts where the sudden uplift occurred. Since the uplift area show a clear concentric pattern, we estimated the source of the uplift assuming a Mogi source model. The obtained source parameters are, depth=14[m], Volume=14[m3], assuming the Poisson's ratio of 0.25. Then the calculated uplift at the nearest benchmark also shows good agreement with the uplift obtained by the leveling survey. The current uplift is much smaller than the 2011 uplift. Nevertheless both sources could be the same, because the areas of the uplifts are

  4. Relationship between geomorphology and lithotypes of lahar deposit from Chokai volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Y.; Ohba, T.; Hayashi, S.; Kataoka, K.

    2013-12-01

    Chokai volcano, located in the northern Honshu arc in Japan, is an andesitic stratovolcano that collapsed partly at ca. 2500 years ago. A post collapse lahar deposit (Shirayukigawa lahar deposit) is distributed in the northern foot of the volcanic edifice. The deposit consists of 16 units of debris flow, hyperconcentrated flow and streamflow deposits. The Shirayukigawa lahar deposit has a total thickness of 30 m and overlies the 2.5-ka Kisakata debris avalanche deposit. Shirayukigawa lahar deposit forms volcanic fan and volcanic apron. The volcanic fan is subdivided into four areas on the basis of slope angles and of geomorphological features: 1) steeply sloped area, 2) moderately sloped area, 3) gently sloped area and 4) horizontal area. From sedimentary facies and structures, each unit of the Shirayukigawa lahar deposit is classified into one of four lithotypes: clast-supported debris flow deposit (Cc), matrix-supported debris flow deposit (Cm1), hyperconcentrated flow deposit (Cm2) and streamflow deposit (Sl). Each type has the following lithological characteristics. The lithotypes are well correlated with the geomorphology of the volcanic fan. The steeply-sloped and the moderately-sloped areas are dominated by Cc, Cm1, and Cm2, and The horizontal area are dominated by Sl. Debris flow deposit (Cc) is massive, very poorly sorted, partly graded, and clast-supported with polymictic clasts dominated by subrounded to rounded volcanic clasts. Matrix is sandy to muddy. Preferred clast orientation are present. Debris flow deposit (Cm1) is massive, very poorly sorted, and matrix-supported with polymictic clasts dominated by subrounded to rounded volcanic clasts. Matrix is sandy to muddy. Some layers exhibit coarse-tail normal/inverse grading. Most clasts are oriented. Hyperconcentrated flow deposit (Cm2) is massive to diffusely laminated, very poorly sorted and matrix-supported with polymictic clasts dominated by subrounded to rounded volcanic rocks. Matrix is sandy. The

  5. Pre-eruptive inflation caused by gas accumulation: Insight from detailed gas flux variation at Sakurajima volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazahaya, Ryunosuke; Shinohara, Hiroshi; Mori, Toshiya; Iguchi, Masato; Yokoo, Akihiko

    2016-11-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rate observations were made at Sakurajima volcano, Japan, to quantify the relationship between the SO2 emission rate and inflation prior to Vulcanian explosions. The explosions associated with precursory inflation events were preceded by decreases in SO2 emission rates by 10-60 min. The amounts of accumulated gas were calculated using time series of SO2 emission rate. The amounts of accumulated SO2 and increases in strain records before the explosions showed a positive correlation. The volume increase of a deformation source calculated using the strain records was of the comparable order of magnitude as the volume of the accumulated volcanic gas. The results suggest that the inflations before the explosions were caused by the gas accumulation.

  6. Results of SO222; Pore fluid chemistry of the Kumano Basin mud volcanoes, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryon, M. D.; Kopf, A.; Madison, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    The primary hypotheses driving the MeMo Project at the mud volcanoes of the Kumano Basin, arcward of the NanTroSEIZE IODP drilling transect, are: 1) Much, if not most, of the chemically bound water released from depths corresponding to the transition from aseismic to seismogenic behavior are being transported via the subduction factory's intermediate loop, i.e., upwards through the wedge via faults and the fractured upper plate, and 2), the Kumano Basin mud volcanoes tap these fluids and may provide insights on fluid genesis and pathways within the Nankai forearc. During RV Sonne cruise SO222 (Jun-Jul 2012) we collected 600+ pore fluid samples from 6 MeBo drill cores (up to 35 mbsf) and 39 gravity cores (up to 8 mbsf). With few exceptions, the cores from mud volcanoes indicate two trends of fluid freshening with depth; a shallow freshening trend and a deeper freshening trend. Our initial thoughts on this is that the large amount of shallow freshening in the gravity cores is due to gas hydrate dissociation during core recovery and processing, and the deeper freshening trend may be due to advection of fluids influence by mineral dehydration at great depth. At this point, the fluids have just arrived back at the lab and further analyses are about to begin. We will report here on the initial results and present preliminary thoughts on the genesis of the fluids being emitted at the mud volcanoes.

  7. Explosive eruptive activity and temporal magmatic changes at Yotei Volcano during the last 50,000 years, southwest Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesawa, Shimpei; Nakagawa, Mitsuhiro; Umetsu, Akane

    2016-10-01

    To understand the eruptive history, structure, and magmatic evolution of Yotei Volcano, southwest Hokkaido, Japan, we investigated the geology and petrology of tephras located around the base of the volcano. We identified 43 tephra units interbedded with soils (in descending stratigraphic order, tephras Y1-Y43), and four widespread regional tephras. Ten radiocarbon ages were obtained from soils beneath the Yotei tephras. On the basis of petrologic differences and, the stratigraphic positions of thick layers of volcanic ash soil, indicative of volcanic stratigraphic gaps, the Yotei tephras are divided into four groups (in ascending stratigraphic order): Yotei tephra groups I, II-1, II-2, and II-3. We calculated the age of each eruptive deposit based on the soil accumulation rate, and estimated the volume of each eruption using isopach maps or the correlation between eruption volume and the maximum thickness at ~ 10 km from the summit crater. The results regarding eruptive activity and the rate of explosive eruptions indicate four eruptive stages at Yotei Volcano over the last 50,000 years. Stage I eruptions produced Yotei tephra group I between ca. 54 cal. ka BP and up to at least ca. 46 cal. ka BP, at relatively high average eruption rates of 0.07 km3 dense-rock equivalent (DRE)/ky. After a pause in activity of ca. 8000 years, Stage II-1 to II-2 eruptions produced Yotei tephra groups II-1 and II-2 from ca. 38 to ca. 21 cal. ka BP at high average eruption rates (0.10 km3 DRE/ky), after a pause in activity of 2000-3000 years. Finally, after another pause in activity of 4000-5000 years, Stage II-3 eruptions produced Yotei tephra group II-3 from ca. 16.5 cal. ka BP until the present day, at low average eruption rates (0.009 km3 DRE/ky). Whole-rock geochemical compositions vary within each tephra group over the entire eruption history. For example, group I and II-3 tephras contain the lowest and highest abundances, respectively, of K2O, P2O5, and Zr. Group II-1 has the

  8. Multi-parametric observation of volcanic lightning produced by ash-rich plumes at Sakurajima volcano, Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimarelli, Corrado; Alatorre-Ibargüengoitia, Miguel; Aizawa, Koki; Scheu, Bettina; Yokoo, Akihiko; Mueller, Sebastian; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2014-05-01

    Ash-rich volcanic plumes are very often associated with electrical discharges producing a majestic display of volcanic lightning. While the direct threat posed by volcanic lightning is small in comparison to other hazards, observation and understanding of this phenomenon can shed light on important properties of the plume such as mass eruption rate and content of fine particles as recently demonstrated by laboratory investigation of volcanic lightning (Cimarelli et al., 2014). Electrical charging of ash particles within the plume can in addition play an important role in aggregation processes therefore influencing the dispersion and sedimentation of tephra. Despite the recent advances in the experimental investigations under controlled conditions and the increasing detailed observation by lightning monitoring arrays, many fundamental questions about electrical discharges in volcanic plume still remain unsolved. In particular, to which extent electrical discharges in volcanic plumes are comparable to thundercloud lightning? Is the presence of hydrometeors in the plume a necessary condition for the generation of volcanic lightning? Answering these questions is vital for the thorough understanding of the electrification process and in turn it is fundamental to fully decipher what volcanic lightning can tell us about the properties of volcanic plumes. The combination of multiparametric observation of electrical activity at erupting volcanoes can undoubtedly help us answering these questions. Here we present preliminary results from a campaign of measurements conducted at Sakurajima volcano in Japan where we combined high-speed imaging with magnetotelluric and acoustic measurements of ash-rich plumes generating electrical discharges and compare our observation with maximum plume height measurement and atmospheric soundings. We invite discussions on cross-correlation of relevant monitoring techniques and possible future developments of multi-parametric arrays. Cimarelli

  9. Magma generation process beneath volcanic front of Kyushu arc, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, T.; Hasenaka, T.; Wallace, P. J.; Yasuda, A.; Mori, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We presents data for major and volatile (H2O, CO2, S, Cl) elements in olivine-hosted melt inclusions from Quaternary volcanoes (Aso, Kuju, Kirishima and Kaimon) along volcanic front of Kyushu arc, southwest Japan. Melt inclusion data are corrected for post-entrapment modifications including diffusive Fe-loss, H2O loss and post-entrapment crystallization. The primitive magma compositions calculated from corrected melt inclusion data are used to estimate the degree of partial melting and compositions of slab-derived fluids beneath Kyushu volcanic front. The result show that magmatism of four volcanoes in Kyushu arc is divided into two groups (Group A and B). Group A indicates high K2O contents in primitive magmas and in fluids at Aso and Kuju volcanoes, northern Kyushu arc. Group B indicates low K2O contents in primitive magmas and in fluids at Kirishima and Kaimon volcanoes, southern Kyushu arc. K2O contents of Group A and B are impossible of explaining by degree of partial melting and the origin of hydrous mantle. High K2O content in fluids is attributed to dehydration of phengite-bearing slab at deep depth (about 140 km) in Group A compared with shallow depth (about 100 km) in Group B. Phengite is dehydrated from submerging plate beneath 110 km depth. This study suggests that compositions of primitive magmas beneath Kyushu arc are reflected by the depth of slab and the kind of dehydrating hydrous minerals.

  10. Separation of scattering and intrinsic attenuation at Asama volcano (Japan): Evidence of high volcanic structural contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudencio, Janire; Aoki, Yosuke; Takeo, Minoru; Ibáñez, Jesús M.; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Song, WenZhan

    2017-03-01

    In this study we show 2D intrinsic- and scattering-Q images of Asama volcano obtained by analyzing 2320 waveforms from active data. Observed energy envelopes were fitted to the diffusion model and separate intrinsic- and scattering-Q images were produced using a back-projection method based on a Gaussian-type weighting function. Synthetic tests indicate robustness and reliability of the results. Areas of high scattering attenuation coincide with the volcanic edifice and the summit at which recent eruptions took place. The intrinsic dissipation pattern shows a strong contrast between the east and west side of the volcanic structure with the low values observed in the west interpreted as solidified magma bodies. Our results demonstrate a strong relationship between structural heterogeneities and attenuation processes in volcanic areas and confirm the effectiveness of the present technique, which can be used as an imaging tool complementary to conventional techniques.

  11. Progressive enrichment of arc magmas caused by the subduction of seamounts under Nishinoshima volcano, Izu-Bonin Arc, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Takashi; Shirao, Motomaro; Tani, Kenichiro; Tsutsumi, Yukiyasu; Kiyokawa, Shoichi; Fujii, Toshitsugu

    2016-06-01

    The chemical composition of intraplate seamounts is distinct from normal seafloor material, meaning that the subduction of seamounts at a convergent margin can cause a change in the chemistry of the mantle wedge and associated arc magmas. Nishinoshima, a volcanic island in the Izu-Bonin Arc of Japan, has been erupting continuously over the past 2 years, providing an ideal opportunity to examine the effect of seamount subduction on the chemistry of arc magmas. Our research is based on the whole-rock geochemistry and the chemistry of minerals within lavas and air-fall scoria from Nishinoshima that were erupted before 1702, in 1973-1974, and in 2014. The mineral phases within the analyzed samples crystallized under hydrous conditions (H2O = 3-4 wt.%) at temperatures of 970 °C-990 °C in a shallow (3-6 km depth) magma chamber. Trace element data indicate that the recently erupted Nishinoshima volcanics are much less depleted in the high field strength elements (Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf) than other volcanics within the Izu-Bonin Arc. In addition, the level of enrichment in the Nishinoshima magmas has increased in recent years, probably due to the addition of material from HIMU-enriched (i.e., high Nb/Zr and Ta/Hf) seamounts on the Pacific Plate, which is being subducted westwards beneath the Philippine Sea Plate. This suggests that the chemistry of scoria from Nishinoshima volcano records the progressive addition of components derived from subducted seamounts.

  12. CO2 emission from lake-filled Katanuma crater, Narugo volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padron, E.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Mori, T.; Perez, N.

    2010-12-01

    Narugo volcano is composed by four dacitic Holocene age lava domes surrounding the 400 m wide lake-filled Katanuma crater. A large caldera, 5.5 x 7 km NW of the city of Sendai was formed by paroxysmal eruptions 45 ka ago and after this activity, lava flows and lava domes were formed in the inner part of the caldera. The only known eruption at Narugo in historical time occurred in 837 AD. Katanuma is known as one of the most acidic lakes in the world and boiling springs, water vapour and volcanic gases are discharged from the lake botton. As a result of this degassing, a relatively intense volcanic gas emission is observed along the lake surface in the form of gas bubbles. To compute the total CO2 degassing rate through Katanuma water lake surface, a CO2 emission survey was carried out on August 2010. CO2 efflux measurements were performed on the water surface by means of a portable NDIR sensor at 86 sampling sites, following a modified floating device of the accumulation chamber method.CO2 efflux values ranged between 16 and 14300 g m-2 d-1. CO2 efflux map was constructed using sequential Gaussian simulation. An important CO2 degassing structure was observed at the water surface, located on its west half part, with a N-S trending. An averaged map of 200 equiprobable simulations allowed us to compute 35.2 ± 4.1 t/d of CO2 released to the atmosphere through the water surface on a area of 0.14 km2. These results suggest clearly that monitoring CO2 emission rate from lake-filled Katanuma crater will contribute to improve the Narugo volcano surveillance program as well as our knowledge on the global CO2 emission from volcanic lakes, which is actually estimated about 136 Mt year-1 (Pérez et al., 2010). Reference: Pérez et al., 2010. CVL 7 Workshop Costa Rica, March 2010.

  13. Primary melt from Sannome-gata volcano, NE Japan arc: constraints on generation conditions of rear-arc magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuritani, T.; Yoshida, T.; Kimura, J.; Takahashi, T.; Hirahara, Y.; Miyazaki, T.; Senda, R.; Chang, Q.; Ito, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Material and energy transport in subduction zones has played an important role in Earth's evolution, and has been investigated extensively in petrological, geochemical, experimental, numerical, and geophysical studies. In these approaches, petrological and geochemical studies on arc basalts have remarkably contributed to the quantitative understanding of subduction-zone processes. However, a more rigorous understanding is limited by the fact that primary magmas generated in the mantle erupt only very occasionally without significant thermal and mechanical interaction with the crust. In this study, the conditions under which arc magma is generated are estimated using primary basalts from the Sannome-gata volcano, located in the rear of the NE Japan arc. The NE Japan arc has been investigated extensively, and is one of the best-documented volcanic arcs on Earth. Therefore, the reliable estimates of the magma generation conditions are expected to contribute to gaining a better understanding of subduction-zone processes. The Sannome-gata maar is located in the Oga Peninsula, NE Japan. The age of the volcanic activity is 20-24 ka (Kitamura 1990). We have examined the petrology and geochemistry of basaltic scoria samples that were collected from scoria fall deposits, outcropping around 500 m southwest of the Sannome-gata maar (Yoshinaga and Nakagawa 1999). The scoriae occur with abundant mantle and crustal xenoliths, suggesting that the magma ascended rapidly from the upper mantle. They show significant variations in their whole-rock compositions (7.9-11.1 wt.% in MgO). High-MgO scoriae (MgO > ~9.5 wt.%) have mostly homogeneous 87Sr/86Sr ratios (~0.70318), whereas low-MgO scoriae (MgO <~9 wt.%) have higher 87Sr/86Sr ratios (>0.70327); ratios tend to increase with decreasing MgO content. The high-MgO scoriae are aphyric, containing ~5 vol.% olivine microphenocrysts with Mg# of up to 90. In contrast, the low-MgO scoriae have crustal xenocrysts of plagioclase, alkali

  14. The Changing U.S.-Japan Alliance: Implications for U.S. Interests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-23

    current Prime Minister Taro Aso in September 2008. Aso, who served as Foreign Minister in the Abe Cabinet, is considered a defense hawk but has been...Minister Taro Aso had called for a discussion on developing nuclear weapons, but he and then-Prime Minister Abe later both reiterated that Japan had no

  15. Long-term thermal activity revealed by magnetic measurements at Kusatsu-Shirane volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kosuke; Fujii, Ikuko

    2014-09-01

    Repeated geomagnetic measurements commenced around the three summit crater lakes of Kusatsu-Shirane volcano (Yugama, Mizugama and Karegama lakes) in 1976 and continuous measurements commenced in 1990. We reviewed and analyzed these geomagnetic data acquired over the 34 years starting in 1978. Changes in the geomagnetic field related to eruptions during 1982-1983 were recorded in the repeated geomagnetic measurements from 1982 to 1985. A thermal-demagnetization source was estimated to be 400 m below Mizugama crater lake during this period. Although there were no eruptions from 1988 to 1991, there were numerous volcanic earthquakes. Thermomagnetic signals due to demagnetization of the material beneath the crater lakes were recorded by the repeated magnetic measurements during this period. The demagnetized body was estimated to be 600 m below Mizugama crater lake at this time. Previous seismological and geochemical studies attributed these demagnetization events to the ascent of hydrothermal water and volcanic gas. The difference between the depths of demagnetized bodies during these two periods of demagnetization may provide important information about the mechanism of the 1982-1983 eruptions. In contrast, magnetization associated with cooling of rocks beneath the crater lakes was recorded from 1996 to 2012. According to our thermomagnetic modeling of this period, the source of the magnetization was 400 to 700 m below an area immediately northeast of Yugama crater lake and the cooling migrated gradually to shallower depths during this period. Based on our modeling, seismological data, and geochemical monitoring of Yugama lake water, we consider that the flux of hydrothermal fluid from depth decreased after 1992 and rock magnetization due to cooling began in 1996.

  16. Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geiger, Rita; And Others

    The document offers practical and motivating techniques for studying Japan. Dedicated to promoting global awareness, separate sections discuss Japan's geography, history, culture, education, government, economics, energy, transportation, and communication. Each section presents a topical overview; suggested classroom activities; and easily…

  17. Fluidized landslides induced by extreme rainfall along basaltic caldera cliff of Mt. Aso in July 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Matsushi, Yuki; Furuya, Gen; Saito, Hitoshi

    2013-04-01

    In the end of the rainy season of 2012, a extreme rainfall affected western Japan in July and induced hundreds of fluidized landslides claiming casualties of more than 20. Measured trigger precipitation was recorded by the nearby ground-based station of the AMeDAS network (Automated Meteorological Data Acquisition System)as about 80 mm/h for consecutive 4 hours. Analysis of Radar-Raingauge Analyzed Precipitation-operated by the Japan Meteorological Agency showed landslide affected area almost coincided with the ones of heavier precipitation. Most of the landslides took place along the outer caldera rim and flank of the central cone of Mt. Aso, a basaltic active volcano. Most of the landslides slid on the boundary of strongly weathered soils, which used to be new volcanic accretion materials. Outstanding features of these landslides are: (1) This area had been affected by similar heavy rainfall decades ago, however, again a number of landslides took place in the nearby past scars; (2) Many of the soil slide bodies are shallow less than 5 meters deep and possibly immediately transformed into debris flows or mud flows and traveled long distance to reach the downslope communities; (3) Visual observation of the sources showed the high possibility that some of the slides were apparently induced by liquefaction. Similar cases were reported of past 2 landslide disasters in Japan. This strongly suggests that excessive rainfall can trigger numerous mud flows of unexpected reach. We conducted close field study at a typical soil slide - mud flow site. It originally initiated as debris or soil slide on a thin steep bedding plane of about 34 degrees consisting of coarser accretion materials. Needle penetration test showed comparatively weaker strength in the layer. It is underlain by a layer of finer materials. Such a higher permeability contrast could contribute to higher susceptibility of excess pore pressure generation. We took soil samples from the vicinity of sliding

  18. Petrological characteristics and volatile content of magma from the 2000 eruption of Miyakejima Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Genji; Uto, Kozo; Kazahaya, Kohei; Shinohara, Hiroshi; Kawanabe, Yoshihisa; Satoh, Hisao

    2005-03-01

    Among the series of eruptions at Miyakejima volcano in 2000, the largest summit explosion occurred on 18 August 2000. During this explosion, vesiculated bombs and lapilli having cauliflower-like shapes were ejected as essential products. Petrological observation and chemical analyses of the essential ejecta and melt inclusions were carried out in order to investigate magma ascent and eruption processes. SEM images indicate that the essential bombs and lapilli have similar textures, which have many tiny bubbles, crystal-rich and glass-poor groundmass and microphenocrysts of plagioclase, augite and olivine. Black ash particles, which compose 40% of the air-fall ash from the explosion, also have similar textures to the essential bombs. Whole-rock analyses show that the chemical composition of all essential ejecta is basaltic (SiO2=51 52 wt%). Chemical analyses of melt inclusions in plagioclase and olivine phenocrysts indicate that melt in the magma had 0.9 1.9 wt% H2O, <0.011 wt% CO2, 0.04 0.17 wt% S and 0.06 0.1 wt% Cl. The variation in volatile content suggests degassing of the magma during ascent up to a depth of about 1 km. The ratio of H2O and S content of melt inclusions is similar to that of volcanic gas, which has been intensely and continuously emitted from the summit since the end of August 2000, indicating that the 18 August magma is the source of the gas emission. Based on the volatile content of the melt inclusions and the volcanic gas composition, the initial bulk volatile content of the magma was estimated to be 1.6 1.9 wt% H2O, 0.08 0.1 wt% CO2, 0.11 0.17 wt% S and 0.06 0.07 wt% Cl. The basaltic magma ascended from a deeper chamber (˜10 km) due to decrease in magma density caused by volatile exsolution with pressure decrease. The highly vesiculated magma, which had at least 30 vol% bubbles, may have come into contact with ground water at sea level causing the large explosion of 18 August 2000.

  19. Relationship between eruptive style and vesicularity of juvenile clasts during eruptive episode A of Towada Volcano, Northeast Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroi, Yoshimi; Miyamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2016-10-01

    It has been reported that juvenile pumice lapilli found in plinian eruptions have high vesicularity, while those found in phreatoplinian eruptions have low vesicularity. However, juvenile glass shards from phreatoplinian eruptions consist of large, expanded bubbles such as bubble wall-type glass. These glass shards seem to possess high vesicularity, unlike the pumice lapilli. This study examines the factors causing this difference, especially focusing on the temporal variations in the vesicularity of the juvenile pyroclasts from eruptive episode A of Towada Volcano, Northeast Japan. This examination was conducted through four analyses: density measurements of pumice lapilli, thin section texture classification of pumice lapilli, classification of glass shards, and surface texture classification of pumice lapilli. Further, pumice lapilli from plinian eruptions have a low density, and those from phreatoplinian eruptions are characterized by high density. The density of the pumice lapilli depends on the eruption style and is hence determined after the eruption. A progressive increase in the amount of large bubbles is observed in glass shards ejected during an eruptive magmatic to phreatomagmatic sequence. Because it does not hinge on the eruptive style, it is assumed that the vesicularity of the glass shards is kept from the conduit before contact with water, especially on fragmentation by magma vesiculation in the conduit. The surfaces of the pumice lapilli show a similar increase in vesicularity with time as glass shards. However, this increase is not successive throughout, but decreases temporarily at the phreatomagmatic stage of the eruption, as in the case of density. This indicates that the successive bubble growth continues within the pumice, and additional vesiculation is superposed when the magmatic eruption comes into contact with water. Because of this, different juvenile clasts exhibit different vesicularities upon cooling. Interestingly, magma

  20. Estimation of total discharged mass from the phreatic eruption of Ontake Volcano, central Japan, on September 27, 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takarada, Shinji; Oikawa, Teruki; Furukawa, Ryuta; Hoshizumi, Hideo; Itoh, Jun'ichi; Geshi, Nobuo; Miyagi, Isoji

    2016-08-01

    The total mass discharged by the phreatic eruption of Ontake Volcano, central Japan, on September 27, 2014, was estimated using several methods. The estimated discharged mass was 1.2 × 106 t (segment integration method), 8.9 × 105 t (Pyle's exponential method), and varied from 8.6 × 103 to 2.5 × 106 t (Hayakawa's single isopach method). The segment integration and Pyle's exponential methods gave similar values. The single isopach method, however, gave a wide range of results depending on which contour was used. Therefore, the total discharged mass of the 2014 eruption is estimated at between 8.9 × 105 and 1.2 × 106 t. More than 90 % of the total mass accumulated within the proximal area. This shows how important it is to include a proximal area field survey for the total mass estimation of phreatic eruptions. A detailed isopleth mass distribution map was prepared covering as far as 85 km from the source. The main ash-fall dispersal was ENE in the proximal and medial areas and E in the distal area. The secondary distribution lobes also extended to the S and NW proximally, reflecting the effects of elutriation ash and surge deposits from pyroclastic density currents during the phreatic eruption. The total discharged mass of the 1979 phreatic eruption was also calculated for comparison. The resulting volume of 1.9 × 106 t (using the segment integration method) indicates that it was about 1.6-2.1 times larger than the 2014 eruption. The estimated average discharged mass flux rate of the 2014 eruption was 1.7 × 108 kg/h and for the 1979 eruption was 1.0 × 108 kg/h. One of the possible reasons for the higher flux rate of the 2014 eruption is the occurrence of pyroclastic density currents at the summit area.

  1. Frictional control on eruptive style at Mt. Unzen (Japan) and Santiaguito volcano (Guatemala)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornby, A. J.; Kendrick, J. E.; Hirose, T.; De Angelis, S.; Henton De Angelis, S.; Lavallee, Y.; Umakoshi, K.

    2013-12-01

    velocities led to increased melt productivity with a diminishing control on shear resistance at the slip zone. These relationships suggest a non-Newtonian rheology for frictional melt, which induces slip dynamics that do not abide to Byerlee's rule. We note that while the total slip required to undergo frictional melting diminishes with axial stress and slip velocity, Santiaguito dome samples required greater distances to achieve melting than Unzen samples (at the same conditions). Dome material from Santiaguito and Unzen show a remarkably similar mechanical response upon frictional melting. At shallow depths frictional melting may exert a viscous brake on slip, encouraging stick-slip behaviour at dome volcanoes. This study concludes that frictional melting changes the mechanical properties of rocks at a fault surface, and thus the rheology driving dome extrusion may not be derived directly from the relict dome material itself.

  2. Long-term geochemical surveillance of fumaroles at Showa-Shinzan dome, Usu volcano, Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, R.B.; Mizutani, Y.; Briggs, P.H.

    1996-01-01

    This study investigates 31 years of fumarole gas and condensate (trace elements) data from Showa-Shinzan, a dacitic dome-cryptodome complex that formed during the 1943-1945 eruption of Usu volcano. Forty-two gas samples were collected from the highest-temperature fumarole, named A-1, from 1954 (800??C) to 1985 (336??C), and from lower-temperature vents. Condensates were collected contemporaneously with the gas samples, and we reanalyzed ten of these samples, mostly from the A-1 vent, for 32 cations and three anions. Modeling using the thermochemical equilibrium program, SOLVGAS, shows that the gas samples are mild disequilibrium mixtures because they: (a) contain unequilibrated sedimentary CH4 and NH3; (b) have unequilibrated meteoric water; or (c) lost CO, either by air oxidation or by absorption by the sodium hydroxide sampling solution. SOLVGAS also enabled us to restore the samples by removing these disequilibrium effects, and to estimate their equilibrium oxygen fugacities and amounts of S2 and CH4. The restored compositions contain > 98% H2O with minor to trace amounts of CO2, H2, HCl, SO2, HF, H2S, CO, S2 and CH4. We used the restored gas and condensate data to test the hypotheses that these time-series compositional data from the dome's fumaroles provide: (1) sufficient major-gas data to analyze long-term degassing trends of the dome's magma-hydrothermal system without the influence of sampling or contamination effects; (2) independent oxygen fugacity-versus-temperature estimates of the Showa-Shinzan dacite; (3) the order of release of trace elements, especially metals, from magma; and (4) useful information for assessing volcanic hazards. The 1954-1985 restored A-1 gas compositions confirm the first hypothesis because they are sufficient to reveal three long-term degassing trends: (1) they became increasingly H2O-rich with time due to the progressive influx of meteoric water into the dome; (2) their C/S and S/Cl ratios decreased dramatically while their Cl

  3. Japan.

    PubMed

    1987-02-01

    Japan is composed of 4 main islands and more than 3900 smaller islands and has 317.7 persons/square kilometer. This makes it one of the most densely populated nations in the world. Religion is an important force in the life of the Japanese and most consider themselves Buddhists. Schooling is free through junior high but 90% of Japanese students complete high school. In fact, Japan enjoys one of the highest literacy rates in the world. There are over 178 newspapers and 3500 magazines published in Japan and the number of new book titles issued each year is greater than that in the US. Since WW1, Japan expanded its influence in Asia and its holdings in the Pacific. However, as a direct result of WW2, Japan lost all of its overseas possessions and was able to retain only its own islands. Since 1952, Japan has been ruled by conservative governments which cooperate closely with the West. Great economic growth has come since the post-treaty period. Japan as a constitutional monarchy operates within the framework of a constitution which became effective in May 1947. Executive power is vested in a cabinet which includes the prime minister and the ministers of state. Japan is one of the most politically stable of the postwar democracies and the Liberal Democratic Party is representative of Japanese moderate conservatism. The economy of Japan is strong and growing. With few resources, there is only 19% of Japanese land suitable for cultivation. Its exports earn only about 19% of the country's gross national product. More than 59 million workers comprise Japan's labor force, 40% of whom are women. Japan and the US are strongly linked trading partners and after Canada, Japan is the largest trading partner of the US. Foreign policy since 1952 has fostered close cooperation with the West and Japan is vitally interested in good relations with its neighbors. Relations with the Soviet Union are not close although Japan is attempting to improve the situation. US policy is based on

  4. Development of low noise cosmic ray muon detector for imaging density structure of Usu Volcano, Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusagaya, T.; Tanaka, H.; Taketa, A.; Oshima, H.; Maekawa, T.

    2012-12-01

    We are developing low noise cosmic ray muon detector to image a density structure of Usu Volcano, Hokkaido, Japan by muon radiography. Intensity of cosmic ray muon penetrating through the object is expressed as a function of the product of muon path length and density along muon path. And, the intensity of penetrating muon steeply decreases if muon path length becomes longer or density along muon path becomes larger. The detector that we are developing is called hodoscope that consists of multiple Position Sensitive Detectors (PSDs). A PSD has NxM grids consisting of N vertically aligned Scintillation Counters (SC: a plastic scintillator attached to a photo multiplier tube) and M horizontally aligned SCs. We can identify a muon path direction with two or more PSDs by connecting muon-detecting points in each PSD. But, Usu Volcano is so large that the intensity of penetrating muon becomes lower, and then noise rate becomes higher: the count of penetrating cosmic ray muon is estimated to be a few counts per month with the detector of which has the cross-section area of one square meter and the solid angle of 0.01 steradian. The noise is defined as a particle other than the muon penetrating the observed object such as electrons, photons, vertically arriving muons and so on. If noise rate becomes higher, the measured intensity of penetrating muon becomes higher than the theoretical intensity of that. Then we get a wrong result as if there were matter of lower density relative to real. So we need to develop a low noise detector. The ElectroMagnetic (EM) shower that consists of many electrons and photons is thought to be one of noise. When EM shower reaches the detector, each PSD detects arriving particles and detecting points are sometimes connected by a straight line. In that case, we cannot discriminate the penetrating muon from EM shower, and we count it as a muon event. This results noise. In order to discriminate the noise event, the use of more PSDs for our

  5. The effect of shear on permeability in a volcanic conduit: a case study at Unzen volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, James; Lavallée, Yan; Wallace, Paul; Lamur, Anthony; Kendrick, Jackie; Miwa, Takahiro

    2016-04-01

    The efficiency of outgassing at volcanoes is a function of permeability, and exerts a major influence on the type of eruptive behaviour exhibited. Understanding how shear affects the permeability profile across volcanic conduits is therefore a key part of understanding volcanic processes and the associated hazards. During the final months of the 1990-1995 eruption of Unzen volcano in southern Japan, extrusion of a dacite spine followed a period of endogenous dome growth. Many of the resulting formations are relatively accessible, allowing for the study of a variety of associated deformation phenomena. One of these formations, a ~6 m wide block, is a section of the extruded spine, that forms the basis for this study on shallow conduit processes. It displays a textural gradation from highly sheared rock to rock with negligible deformation, and is bounded at the high shear end by an agglutinated block of gouge that is thought to represent the conduit margin. A multi-faceted approach was taken to investigate the variation of permeability across the spine and its implications for processes occurring within the conduit. The permeability was measured at several points along the exposed surface of the spine transect using a field permeameter. Sample blocks from four of these locations were collected and tested in the lab using a hydrostatic pressure vessel water-flow permeameter and categorized as: gouge; highest shear; moderate shear; negligible shear. Each block was tested in three orthogonal axes: one perpendicular to observed shear; and two in the plane of shear. For each of these rocks, permeability and porosity measurements were made at a wide range of effective pressures (5 to 100 MPa), using a controlled upstream/downstream pore pressure gradient of 0.5 MPa (at an average pore pressure of 1.25 MPa). Thin sections of each sample were also taken prepared and analysed to describe the primary microstructures controlling the permeability of the rock. Textural analysis

  6. Petrogenesis of mafic magma and associated silicic magma for calk-alkaline rocks in the Shirataka volcano, NE Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirotani, S.; Ban, M.; Nakagawa, M.

    2009-12-01

    Eruptive products of Shirataka volcano (0.9-0.7 Ma) in NE Japan are calc-alkaline andesite-dacite (57-66% SiO2), and are divided into six petrologic groups (G1-6). Mafic inclusions (48-58% SiO2) are always observed in G1, G2, G5 and G6. The host rocks as well as inclusions are mixed rocks formed between mafic and silicic end-members judging from many petrologic aspects. Based on petrologic data of more than 30 mafic inclusion-host pairs in these groups, we revealed the petrologic features of the end-member magmas and examined their petrogenesis. The mixing trends defined by hosts and inclusions are divided into high- and low-Cr types. Both types coexist in G1, G2 and G5, while G6 lacks high-Cr type. In the same group, the mafic end-member for high-Cr type shows more primitive features (e.g. in G5; 1140-1160°C, 50% SiO2, Fo-rich olv + Mg-rich cpx + An-rich plg phenocrysts) than that for the low-Cr type (e.g. in G5; c. 1100°C, 51% SiO2, Mg-rich cpx + An-rich plg phenocrysts). The silicic end-members for the two types show similar mineral assemblage (e.g. in G5; hbl + qtz + Mg-poor px + An-poor plg phenocrysts) but are different in bulk compositions (e.g. in G5; high-Cr type, 67% SiO2; low-Cr type, 66% SiO2). Significantly, in a petrologic group, the high-Cr type mafic and corresponding silicic end-members have lower values in 87Sr/86Sr ratio than the low-Cr type ones. Further, the bulk compositions of each type end-members show slight variability among petrologic groups. For example, Sr isotopic ratios and SiO2 contents of high-Cr type mafic end-members are 0.7037 and 48% in G1, 0.7039 and 51% in G2, and 0.7042 and 50% in G5, respectively. The MELTS and geochemical model calculations have shown that the low-Cr type mafic end-member magma can be produced through c. 20% fractional crystallization (olv + plg) from the high-Cr type mafic end-member magma accompanied with the assimilation of basement plutonic rocks (r=0.02-0.05) in the case of G5. In terms of associated

  7. Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Savannah C.

    Materials for a secondary level, interdisciplinary social studies course on Japan are divided into introductory information, 14 classroom units, and study and evaluation materials. Introductory material includes lists of objectives and skills, an outline of Japanese history, and an explanation of Japan's name and flag. The units cover the…

  8. Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, John N.

    1986-01-01

    Analyzes the intergroup relations in Japanese society and Japan's educational system. Challenges the view that Japan is a homogeneous society by presenting the various forms of discrimination against Koreans, Ainu, and the burakumin. Suggests that despite ostracism and isolation, groups can affect public policy and achieve social advancement. (SA)

  9. Andesite Magmas are Produced along Oceanic Arcs where the Crust is Thin: Evidence from Nishinoshima Volcano, Ogasawara Arc, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.; Ishizuka, O.; Sato, T.; Nichols, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    The incentive for this study is the ongoing explosive eruption of Nishinoshima volcano, located about 1,000 km south of Tokyo along the Ogasawara (Bonin) Arc. The straightforward but unexpected relationship presented here relates crustal thickness and magma type in the Izu-Ogasawara Oceanic Arc. Volcanoes along the Ogasawara segment of the arc, which include Nishinoshima, are underlain by thin crust (16-21 km)—in contrast to those along the Izu segment, where the crust is ~35 km thick. Interestingly, andesite magmas are dominant products from the former volcanoes and mostly basaltic lavas erupt from the latter. Why and how do volcanoes on the thin crust erupt andesite magmas? An introductory petrology textbook might answer this question by suggesting that, under decreasing pressure and hydrous conditions, the liquidus field of forsterite expands relative to that of enstatite, with the result that, at some point, enstatite melts incongruently to produce primary andesite melt. According to the hypothesis presented here, however, rising mantle diapirs stall near the base of the oceanic arc crust at depths controlled by the thickness of the overlying crust. Where the crust is thin, as along the Ogasawara segment of the arc, pressures are relatively low, and magmas produced in the mantle wedge tend to be andesitic. Where the crust is thick, as along the Izu segment, pressures are greater, and only basaltic magmas tend to be produced. To examine this hypothesis, JAMSTEC cruise NT15-E02 on the R/V Natsushima took place from 11 June to 21 June 2015 to Nishinoshima. It's present island has an elevation of only ~150 m, but its submarine flanks extend to ocean depths of 2,000-3,000 m, so the great bulk of the volcano is submarine and yet-to-be explored. We present the new hypothesis and its evidence from Nishinoshima based on the primitive lavas collected from the submarine parts of the volcano.

  10. Combined use of repeated active shots and ambient noise to detect temporal changes in seismic velocity: application to Sakurajima volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Takashi; Nakahara, Hisashi; Nishimura, Takeshi

    2017-03-01

    Coda-wave interferometry is a technique to detect small seismic velocity changes using phase changes in similar waveforms from repeating natural or artificial sources. Seismic interferometry is another technique for detecting seismic velocity changes from cross-correlation functions of ambient seismic noise. We simultaneously use these two techniques to clarify seismic velocity changes at Sakurajima volcano, one of the most active volcanoes in Japan, examining the two methods. We apply coda-wave interferometry to the records of repeated active seismic experiments conducted once a year from 2011 to 2014, and seismic interferometry to the ambient seismic noise data. We directly compare seismic velocity changes from these two techniques. In coda-wave interferometry analyses, we detect significant seismic velocity increases between 2011 and 2013, and seismic velocity decreases between 2013 and 2014 at the northern and eastern flanks of the volcano. The absolute values are at a maximum 0.47 ± 0.06% for 2-4 Hz, 0.24 ± 0.03% for 4-8 Hz, and 0.15 ± 0.03% for 8-16 Hz, respectively. In seismic interferometry analyses, vertical-vertical cross-correlations in 1-2, 2-4, and 4-8 Hz bands indicate seismic velocity increases and decreases during 3 years of 2012-2014 with the maximum amplitudes of velocity change of ±0.3% for 1-2 Hz, ±0.4% for 2-4 Hz, and ±0.2% for 4-8 Hz, respectively. Relative velocity changes indicate the almost annual change. These periodical changes are well matched with volcano deformation detected by GNSS receivers deployed around the volcano. We compare the results from coda-wave interferometry with those from seismic interferometry on the shot days and find that most of them are consistent. This study illustrates that the combined use of coda-wave interferometry and seismic interferometry is useful to obtain accurate and continuous measurements of seismic velocity changes.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Simulation of pre-eruptive magma migration and accumulation based on hydrokinetic modeling of magma plumbing system beneath Sakurajima Volcano (Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, S.; Iguchi, M.; Mikada, H.; Goto, T.; Takekawa, J.

    2012-12-01

    We numerically simulated a transient magma accumulating process in the magma plumbing system beneath an active Showa crater of Sakurajima Volcano (Japan). Our objective is to find dominant geophysical parameters in the accumulating process before eruption. Geodetic observations showed that a periodic inflation and deflation event had lasted 30 hours before an explosive eruption. Our model consists of shallower gas and deeper magma reservoirs connected by a volcanic conduit as inferred from the past geophysical observations. A pressure difference between the two reservoirs forces the magma to move from the deeper up to the shallower reservoir. We assumed a constant rate of magma supply to the deeper reservoir as an input to the magma plumbing system. In a cylindrical volcanic conduit, a viscous multiphase magma flow is demonstrated by 1-dimentional transient flow simulations with the effects of the relative motion of gas in magma, the exsolution of volatiles in melt, the crystallization of microlites in groundmass, the change in height of magma head, etc. As a result, we found that the radius of the volcanic conduit, the magma supply rate and the compressibility of the deeper reservoir are key parameters to reproduce the observed volumetric variations before the eruption. These three parameters are estimated about 13 m, 3.5 m3/s and 10 GPa, respectively by means of a least squares method. Finally, the inflation and deflation event observed before the eruption are well reproduced. We would like to propose our numerical model as one of quantitative simulation methods that could be applied to the future eruptive events not only at Sakurajima Volcano but for the other volcanoes. Some of parameters of the magma plumbing system need to be fixed as in this study should be discussed in terms of the sensitivity in the analysis at the time of the application.

  12. Response of a hydrothermal system to magmatic heat inferred from temporal variations in the complex frequencies of long-period events at Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano, Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nakano, M.; Kumagai, H.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate temporal variations in the complex frequencies (frequency and quality factor Q) of long-period (LP) events that occurred at Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano, central Japan. We analyze LP waveforms observed at this volcano in the period between 1988 and 1995, which covers a seismically active period between 1989 and 1993. Systematic temporal variations in the complex frequencies are observed in October-November 1989, July-October 1991, and September 1992-January 1993. We use acoustic properties of a crack filled with hydrothermal fluids to interpret the observed temporal variations in the complex frequencies. The temporal variations in October-November 1989 can be divided into two periods, which are explained by a gradual decrease and increase of a gas-volume fraction in a water-steam mixture in a crack, respectively. The temporal variations in July-October 1991 can be also divided into two periods. These variations in the first and second periods are similar to those observed in November 1989 and in September-November 1992, respectively, and are interpreted as drying of a water-steam mixture and misty gas in a crack, respectively. The repeated nature of the temporal variations observed in similar seasons between July and November suggests the existence of seasonality in the occurrence of LP events. This may be caused by a seasonally variable meteoritic water supply to a hydrothermal system, which may have been heated by the flux of volcanic gases from magma beneath this volcano. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Stress-induced spatiotemporal variations in anisotropic structures beneath Hakone volcano, Japan, detected by S wave splitting: A tool for volcanic activity monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Ryou; Yukutake, Yohei; Yoshida, Akio; Harada, Masatake; Miyaoka, Kazuki; Satomura, Mikio

    2014-09-01

    Hakone volcano, located at the northern tip of the Izu-Mariana volcanic arc, Japan, has a large caldera structure containing numerous volcanic hot springs. Earthquake swarms have occurred repeatedly within the caldera. The largest seismic swarm since the commencement of modern seismic observations (in 1968) occurred in 2001. We investigated the anisotropic structure of Hakone volcano based on S wave splitting analysis and found spatiotemporal changes in the splitting parameters accompanying the seismic swarm activity. Depth-dependent anisotropic structures are clearly observed. A highly anisotropic layer with a thickness of ~1.5 km is located beneath the Koziri (KZR) and Kozukayama (KZY) stations. The anisotropic intensity in the region reaches a maximum of 6-7% at a depth of 1 km and decreases markedly to less than 1% at a depth of 2 km. The anisotropic intensity beneath Komagatake station (KOM) decreases gradually from a maximum of 6% at the surface to 0% at a depth of 5 km but is still greater than 2.5% at a depth of 3 km. At KZY, the anisotropic intensity along a travel path of which the back azimuth was the south decreased noticeably after the 2001 seismic swarm activity. During the swarm activity, tilt meters and GPS recorded the crustal deformation. The observed decrease in anisotropic intensity is presumed to be caused by the closing of microcracks by stress changes accompanying crustal deformation near the travel path.

  14. Is uplift of volcano clusters in the Tohoku Volcanic Arc, Japan, driven by magma accumulation in hot zones? A geodynamic modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Ophelia A.; Malservisi, Rocco; Govers, Rob; Connor, Charles B.; Connor, Laura J.

    2016-06-01

    In many volcanic arcs, the rate of tectonic uplift cannot be explained by lithospheric plate motion alone but may be associated with dynamic uplift. Buoyant forces associated with underplated magma bodies lift the upper crust and leads to relatively high rates of topographic change. One such region is northern Honshu, Japan, where Quaternary volcano clusters are spatially associated with uplifted crust and isostatic gravity anomalies. Axisymmetric inversion of Bouguer gravity data for the Sengan volcano cluster shows that these gravity anomalies can be modeled by 30 km radius bodies emplaced at ˜15 km depth. Axisymmetric, finite element models, generated using GTECTON, of a layered Earth representative of the Tohoku crust indicate that the deformation of these midcrustal intrusions produces elevated topography on the surface directly above the intrusion that is bounded by a shallow peripheral trough. The wavelengths of vertical deformation produced by these bodies are sensitive to the thickness of the models' elastic layer and relatively insensitive to the models' rheology. This suggests that the amplitude of the vertical deformation represents a trade-off between the size of the intrusion and the thickness of the elastic layer and is less strongly influenced by the rheology of the lithosphere into which the bodies are emplaced. Our results are consistent with hot zone and hot finger models for the arc and indicate that Tohoku Volcanic Arc features such as gravity anomalies and uplifted basement are related to crustal magma intrusions and hot zones rather than directly related to mantle processes.

  15. The Rise of the Democratic Party of Japan and Its Impact on Elements of Japanese Maritime Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    deployed MSDF assets arose. The LDP, as represented by Prime Minister Taro Aso at the time, argued “that the use of weapons against pirates, who are...104 Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet, “Statement by Prime Minister Taro Aso (Concerning the ‘Draft Law on the...Accessed August 30, 2010. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8230317.stm. 81 Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet. “Statement by Prime Minister Taro Aso

  16. Nature of low frequency earthquakes observed at Asama volcano, Japan: Time variation of wave parameters and hypocenter distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, J.; Ida, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Long period (LP) events called N-type earthquakes are typical phenomena observed at many active volcanoes, such as Kusatsu-Shirane, Asama, Tokachi-dake volcanoes. They are probably related to activities of magma, ground water or volcanic gas and many source mechanisms such as resonance of fluid cracks or spheres are proposed. In this study, we analyze the LP events observed at Asama volcano in Dec. 1-10, 1996, to reveal their source process with the high quality data obtained by the seismic network close to the summit crater of the volcano. We observed 112 N-type earthquakes during the period. The waveforms of these events seem to be a quasi-monochromatic oscillation with gradually decreasing amplitude. The spectrum has a dominant peak at 1.6-7.2 Hz, most of which make a group (Group 0) in which the dominant peak changes from 2.0 Hz to 1.6 Hz gradually, indicating that the scale or the physical properties of the LP source changes gradually if we accept the resonance model. Other groups appear in Dec. 3-6 (Group 1) and in Dec. 9-10 (Group 2) in which the dominant peak changes from 7.2 Hz to 1.4 Hz and 4.3 Hz to 1.6 Hz gradually, respectively. This indicates that two or more sources of the N-type earthquakes exist simultaneously. Attenuation factors have a positive but weak correlation with the frequency of dominant peaks. Hypocenters of the events determined by the travel time of the first motion are concentrated within a depth of 300 m underneath the summit crater and are distributed in the shallow part of the region where B-type earthquakes occur. The events of Group 0 are concentrated underneath the southwest side of the crater, and the events of Group 1 and 2 distribute in the east side of the crater.

  17. Continuous survey of color and glass composition of ash particles by automatic sampling system at Sakurajima volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimano, T.; Iguchi, M.; Miki, D.

    2013-12-01

    Activities at many subaerial volcanoes in subduction regions are characterized by ash emissions. Sakurajima volcano is also characterized by long-term successive ash emission such as vulcanian and strombolian eruptions that show many transitional features in eruption types, intensity of explosion or seismicity, amount and grain size of ash, height of plume, duration and interval of eruption, etc. In contrast, however, Plinian eruptions have occurred several times even in historical age, such as the 1914 eruption. In 2006, Showa crater of Sakurajima volcano became active since the 1946 eruption that similar ash emitting activity for several years evolved into effusion of large amount of lava. One of the aims of our study is to clarify how eruptions evolve into such larger eruptions from quiescent phase or moderate ash emission. We carried out continuous survey of ash particles of ash emitting eruptions, and here we report some results to reveal and understand transitional features of ash emitting activity. We started collection of ash at Sakurajima volcano in 2008 by establishing automatic sampling system. We developed mobile unmanned apparatus that enables continuous sampling of ash fall, and have been successful in daily collection of samples for five years at a locality 2.3 km from active vent, thus we have collected more than 1500 samples. The temporal change in daily amount of ash fall at this site was consistent with that estimated monthly by manned survey around this volcano. We found several types of ash particles in each of these samples where crystalline and glassy particles, in terms of groundmass crystallinity, are dominant types. We have carried out some analyses that characterize ash samples. Although petrological features are rather complex, chemical composition of matrix glass of particles and color of bulk ash sample in terms of photochrometry show systematic temporal changes in order of date that may be correlated with some geodetic observations

  18. PREFACE: Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths (ASOS9) Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths (ASOS9)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, Glenn M.; Wiese, Wolfgang L.; Beiersdorfer, Peter

    2009-05-01

    For the first time since its inaugural meeting in Lund in 1983, the triennial international conference on Atomic Spectroscopy and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas (ASOS) returned to Lund, Sweden. Lund has been a home to atomic spectroscopy since the time of Janne Rydberg, and included the pioneering work in laboratory and solar spectroscopy by Bengt Edlén, who presented the initial ASOS talk in 1983. The ninth ASOS was hosted by the Lund Observatory and Physics Department of Lund University, 7-10 August 2007, and was attended by 99 registrants. An encouraging sign for the field was the number of young researchers in attendance. This volume of Physica Scripta contains contributions from the invited presentations of the conference. For the first time, papers from the ASOS9 poster presentations have been made feely available online in a complementary volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. With these two volumes the character of ASOS9 is more evident, and together they serve as a review of the state of atomic spectroscopy for spectrum analysis and the determination of oscillator strengths and their applications. The goal of ASOS is to be a forum for atomic spectroscopy, where both the providers and the users of atomic data, which includes wavelengths, energy levels, lifetimes, oscillator strengths and line shape parameters, can meet to discuss recent advances in experimental and theoretical techniques and their application to understanding the physical processes that are responsible for producing observed spectra. The applications mainly originate from the fields of astrophysics and plasma physics, which includes fusion energy and lighting research. The oral presentations, all but one of which are presented in this volume, provided an extensive synopsis of techniques currently in use and those that are being planned. New to ASOS9 was the extent to which techniques such as cold, trapped atoms and molecules and frequency combs are

  19. Three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure of Bandai volcano in northeastern Japan inferred from active seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, Teruo; Tanaka, Satoru; Ueki, Sadato; Hamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakamichi, Haruhisa; Nishimura, Takeshi; Oikawa, Jun; Tsutsui, Tomoki; Nishi, Kiyoshi; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Sosuke; Miyamachi, Hiroki; Yamasato, Hitoshi; Hayashi, Yutaka

    2004-12-01

    The three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure of the Bandai volcano has been revealed by tomographic inversion using approximately 2200 travel-time data collected during an active seismic survey comprising 298 temporary seismic stations and eight artificial shots. The key result of this study is the delineation of a high-velocity anomaly (Vp>4.6 km/s at sea-level) immediately below the summit peak. This feature extends to depths of 1-2 km below sea-level. The near-surface horizontal position of the high-velocity anomaly coincides well with that of a positive Bouguer gravity anomaly. Geological data demonstrate that sector collapses have occurred in all directions from the summit and that the summit crater has been repeatedly refilled with magmatic material. These observations suggest that the high-velocity region revealed in this study is a manifestation of an almost-solidified magmatic plumbing system. We have also noted that a near-surface low-velocity region (Vp<3.0 km/s at sea-level) on the southern foot of the volcano corresponds to the position of volcanic sediments including ash and debris avalanche material. In addition, we have made use of the tomographic results to recompute the hypocenters of earthquake occurring during seismic swarms beneath the summit in 1988 and 2000. Relocating the earthquakes using the three-dimensional velocity model clearly indicates that they predominantly occurred on two steeply dipping planes. Low-frequency earthquakes observed during the swarms in 2000 occurred in the seismic gap between the two clusters. The hypocentral regions of the seismic swarms and the low-frequency earthquakes are close to the higher-velocity zone beneath the volcano's summit. These observations suggest that the recent seismic activity beneath the summit is likely associated with thermal energy being released within the solidifying magmatic plumbing system.

  20. The first discovery of cryptotephra of the catastrophic eruptions of the Baitoushan volcano in the tenth century A.D. in the shelf deposits of the Sea of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akulichev, V. A.; Astakhov, A. S.; Malakhov, M. I.; Aksentov, K. I.; Karabtsov, A. A.; Mar'yash, A. A.; Alatortsev, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    The interlayers of the cryptotephra of different episodes of the catastrophic eruption of the Baitoushan volcano (Paektu-san, Changbaishan-Tianchi) in the 10th century were discovered in the sedimentary cover of Amur Bay in the Sea of Japan by the geochemical and paleomagnetic characteristics. The petrochemistry of the volcanic glass indicates the possible occurrence of pyroclastic material in the B-Tm layer and more recent episodes that have not been identified before in the sediments of the Sea of Japan. The impact of the eruption on the bay environment is noted. It is shown that the medieval state of Balhae occupying vast areas and adjacent to the volcano no longer existed after the more earlier episodes of eruption.

  1. Explosion Energy of the 2004 Eruption of the Asama Volcano, Central Japan: Inference From Ionospheric Disturbances Observed by a Dense GPS Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heki, K.

    2006-12-01

    Ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) can be easily measured as the phase differences of the L1 and L2 band carrier waves from Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. Ionospheric disturbances measured as TEC changes have been contributing to not only solar-terrestrial studies but also solid earth geophysics, e.g. constraining the source process of the 2004 Sumatra Earthquake (Heki et al., JGR, 2006). Here I present a new application of GPS-TEC, i.e. estimation of the explosion energy of a volcanic eruption (Heki, GRL, 2006). The Asama Volcano, Central Japan, started eruptive activity at 11:02 UT on September 1, 2004, with a vulcanian explosion associated with strong airwaves. The Japanese dense GPS array GEONET recorded ionospheric disturbances as N-shaped changes in TEC approximately 12 minutes after the eruption. The disturbance had a period of 1.25 minutes and propagated as fast as about 1.1 km/s, suggesting its origin as the acoustic wave generated by the explosion. By comparing the disturbance amplitudes with those by a surface mine blast with a known energy (Calais et al., GJI, 1998), the overall Asama explosion energy is inferred to be equivalent to 1.2e14 Joule, about one third of the energy reported for the 1938 eruption (Minakami, BERI, 1942). Energy of the airwave can be estimated following Johnson (JVGR, 2003), assuming that the disturbance is a part of the spherical wave propagated from the volcano. We thus obtained the value 9.0e6 Joule, a typical value of airwave energies associated with volcanic eruptions. This new technique would complement past methods based on observations of mass deficits, near-field measurements of airwaves, etc, and may contribute to mitigation of volcanic hazards.

  2. Determination of temporal changes in seismic velocity caused by volcanic activity in and around Hakone volcano, central Japan, using ambient seismic noise records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukutake, Yohei; Ueno, Tomotake; Miyaoka, Kazuki

    2016-12-01

    Autocorrelation functions (ACFs) for ambient seismic noise are considered to be useful tools for estimating temporal changes in the subsurface structure. Velocity changes at Hakone volcano in central Japan, where remarkable swarm activity has often been observed, were investigated in this study. Significant velocity changes were detected during two seismic activities in 2011 and 2013. The 2011 activity began immediately after the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, suggesting remote triggering by the dynamic stress changes resulting from the earthquake. During the 2013 activity, which exhibited swarm-like features, crustal deformations were detected by Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) stations and tiltmeters, suggesting a pressure increment of a Mogi point source at a depth of 7 km and two shallow open cracks. Waveforms that were bandpass-filtered between 1 and 3 Hz were used to calculate ACFs using a one-bit correlation technique. Fluctuations in the velocity structure were obtained using the stretching method. A gradual decrease in the velocity structure was observed prior to the 2013 activity at the KOM station near the central cone of the caldera, which started after the onset of crustal expansion observed by the GNSS stations. Additionally, a sudden significant velocity decrease was observed at the OWD station near a fumarolic area just after the onset of the 2013 activity and the tilt changes. The changes in the stress and strain caused by the deformation sources were likely the main contributors to these decreases in velocity. The precursory velocity reduction at the KOM station likely resulted from the inflation of the deep Mogi source, whereas the sudden velocity decrease at the OWD station may reflect changes in the strain caused by the shallow open-crack source. Rapid velocity decreases were also detected at many stations in and around the volcano after the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake. The velocity changes may reflect the redistribution of hydrothermal

  3. A study of the Taisho lahar generated by the 1926 eruption of Tokachidake Volcano, central Hokkaido, Japan, and implications for the generation of cohesive lahars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesawa, Shimpei

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the generation mechanisms of lahars is important for improving volcanic hazard assessments. The Taisho lahar (TL) was generated during the 1926 eruption of Tokachidake Volcano, Japan, and was considered a typical snowmelt lahar caused by the runout of hot debris onto a snow-covered slope. A similar mechanism produced a huge mud flow during the 1985 eruption of Nevado del Ruiz, Colombia. However, the origin of water in such lahars remains a controversial topic because the calculated water mass is based on the assumption that all of the snow on the runout area of the TL was melted, although this is much less than the estimated water volume in the TL estimated by previous studies. I have re-examined proximal deposits of the TL and their paleomagnetic characteristics in order to better understand the eruption sequence and formation of the TL. The TL produced two debris avalanche deposits and a surge-like deposit that had relatively high emplacement temperature (~ 350 °C). The deposits are composed of hydrothermally altered andesitic gravel, sand and mud. The high clay content (3-5 wt.% clay in the < 2 mm fraction) and sedimentary characteristics indicate that the flow was a cohesive lahar, most likely induced by collapse of a hydrothermally altered pyroclastic cone (hypocenter). The presence of the surge deposit indicates that the TL was not caused by simple collapse of a cinder cone but by a phreatic explosion that resulted in sector collapse. This suggests that the hydrothermal system was related to the 1926 eruption. The present-day volcano has a large hydrothermal system (1 × 106 m3 water) beneath the active crater. This study indicates that hydrothermal system explosions can trigger cohesive lahars that contain both snow melt and hydrothermal pore water, and this indicates the need to monitor hydrothermal systems.

  4. Petrogenesis of mafic and associated silicic end-member magmas for calc-alkaline mixed rocks in the Shirataka volcano, NE Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirotani, Shiho; Ban, Masao; Nakagawa, Mitsuhiro

    2009-06-01

    Eruptive products of the Shirataka volcano (0.9-0.7 Ma) in NE Japan are calc-alkaline andesite-dacite, and are divisible into six petrologic groups (G1-G6). Shirataka rocks possess mafic inclusions—basalt-basaltic andesite, except for G3 and G4. All rocks show mixing and mingling of the mafic and silicic end-members, with trends defined by hosts and inclusions divided into high-Cr and low-Cr types; both types coexist in G1, G2, and G5. Estimated mafic end-members are high-Cr (1120-1170°C, 48-51% SiO2, olv ± cpx ± plg) and low-Cr type magmas (49-52% SiO2, cpx ± plg) except for the Sr isotopic composition. In contrast, the silicic end-members of both types have similar petrologic features (790-840°C, 64-70% SiO2, hbl ± qtz ± px + plg). High-Cr type mafic and corresponding silicic end-members have lower 87Sr/86Sr ratios than the low-Cr ones in each group. The trace element model calculations suggest that the low-Cr type mafic end-member magma is produced through ca. 20% fractional crystallization (olv ± cpx ± plg) from the high-Cr type one with assimilation of granitoids ( r = 0.02-0.05). The silicic magmas are producible through <30% partial remelting of previously emplaced basaltic magma with assimilation of crustal components. The compositional difference between the low-K and medium-K basalts in the Shirataka volcano is mainly attributed to the different degrees of the effect of subduction derived fluid by dehydration of phlogopite.

  5. Volcanic gas composition changes during the gradual decrease of the gigantic degassing activity of Miyakejima volcano, Japan, 2000-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Hiroshi; Geshi, Nobuo; Matsushima, Nobuo; Saito, Genji; Kazahaya, Ryunosuke

    2017-02-01

    The composition of volcanic gases discharged from Miyakejima volcano has been monitored during the intensive degassing activity that began after the eruption in 2000. During the 15 years from 2000 to 2015, Miyakejima volcano discharged 25.5 Mt of SO2, which required degassing of 3 km3 of basaltic magma. The SO2 emission rate peaked at 50 kt/day at the end of 2000 and quickly decreased to 5 kt/day by 2003. During the early degassing period, the volcanic gas composition was constant with the CO2/SO2 = 0.8 (mol ratio), H2O/SO2 = 35, HCl/SO2 = 0.08, and SO2/H2S = 15. The SO2 emission rate decreased gradually to 0.5 kt/day by 2012, and the gas composition also changed gradually to CO2/SO2 = 1.5, H2O/SO2 = 150, HCl/SO2 = 0.15, and SO2/H2S = 6. The compositional changes are not likely caused by changes in degassing pressure or volatile heterogeneity of a magma chamber but are likely attributed to an increase of hydrothermal scrubbing caused by large decrease of the volcanic gas emission rate, suggesting a supply of gases with constant composition during the 15 years. The intensive degassing was modeled based on degassing of a convecting magma conduit. The gradual SO2 emission rate that decrease without changes in volcanic gas composition is attributed to a reduction of diameter of the convecting magma conduit.

  6. Isolation of aquatic yeasts with the ability to neutralize acidic media, from an extremely acidic river near Japan's Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano.

    PubMed

    Mitsuya, Daisuke; Hayashi, Takuya; Wang, Yu; Tanaka, Mami; Okai, Masahiko; Ishida, Masami; Urano, Naoto

    2017-02-28

    The Yukawa River is an extremely acidic river whose waters on the east foot of the Kusatu-Shirane Volcano (in Gunma Prefecture, Japan) contain sulfate ions. Here we isolated many acid-tolerant yeasts from the Yukawa River, and some of them neutralized an acidic R2A medium containing casamino acid. Candida fluviatilis strain CeA16 had the strongest acid tolerance and neutralizing activity against the acidic medium. To clarify these phenomena, we performed neutralization tests with strain CeA16 using casamino acid, a mixture of amino acids, and 17 single amino acid solutions adjusted to pH 3.0, respectively. Strain CeA16 neutralized not only acidic casamino acid and the mixture of amino acids but also some of the acidic single amino acid solutions. Seven amino acids were strongly decomposed by strain CeA16 and simultaneously released ammonium ions. These results suggest strain CeA16 is a potential yeast as a new tool to neutralize acidic environments.

  7. Izu-Oshima volcano, Japan: nine years of geochemical monitoring by means of CO_{2} soil diffuse degassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Pedro A.; Mori, Toshiya; Notsu, Kenji; Morita, Masaaki; Padrón, Eleazar; Onizawa, Shin'ya; Melián, Gladys; Sumino, Hirochicka; Asensio-Ramos, María; Nogami, Kenji; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2016-04-01

    Izu-Oshima is a 15×9 km active volcanic island located around 100 km SSW of Tokyo. The centre of the island is occupied by a caldera complex with a diameter of 3 km. A large post-caldera cone known as Mt. Mihara is located at the south-western quadrant of the caldera. Izu-Oshima has erupted 74 times, consisting mainly in fissure eruptions, both inside and outside of the caldera. The last eruption of Izu-Oshima occurred in 1986. Since 2007, seven soil gas surveys have been carried out to investigate the spatial and temporal evolution of diffuse CO2 emission from this volcanic system and to identify those structures controlling the degassing process. Diffuse CO2 emission surveys were always carried out following the accumulation chamber method. Spatial distribution maps were constructed following the sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) procedure. The location of the CO2 anomalies has always shown a close relationship with the structural characteristics of the volcano, with most of the gas discharged from the rim of the summit crater. Temporal evolution of diffuse CO2 emission rate from Mt. Miharayama has shown a good temporal correlation with the seismicity recorded in and around Izu Oshima island during the period of study. The two peaks of seismic activity occur when highest CO2 diffuse emissions were computed, March 2007, August 2010 and July 2011, may be associated with fluid pressure fluctuations in the volcanic system due to the seismicity. In order to strength the contribution of deep seated gases to the diffuse emission, we performed carbon isotopic analysis of soil gas samples at selected sites during 2010, 2013 and 2015 surveys. At isotopic compositions lighter than ˜- 6‰ the soil CO2 effluxes were always low, while at heavier isotopic compositions an increasing number of points are characterized by relatively high soil CO efflux as a consequence of the addition of the hydrothermal CO2 source. Soil CO2 efflux peak values (xBackground) showed also a

  8. Tephrostratigraphy during 3000 years recorded in the sedimentary sequence of Beppu Bay, central Kyushu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, K.; Yamada, K.; Kuwae, M.; Yamamoto, M.; Danhara, T.

    2012-12-01

    The tephrostratigraphy around Beppu Bay, central Japan, is investigated using a 9m-long sedimentary core (KT09-3) collected in 2009 with a piston corer. Beppu Bay is located to the east of active volcanic region in Kyushu Island in southwest Japan. Eruptive history of their active volcanoes and widespread tephra records may be preserved in the sedimentary sequence in bay environment. A method to determine the down-hole content of volcanic glass was used in this study. This method consists of four steps: (1) continuous measurement of magnetic susceptibility with lithological observation of sediments, (2) systematic separation of the volcanic glass particles from samples taken at close intervals, and the determination of relative concentration; (3) mineral assemblages counted in the size of 63-125 micro meter fraction; (4) precise measurement of the refractive indices of the separated glass particles. A refractive index measuring system (RIMS) based on the thermal immersion method permitted quick and accurate measurement of the refractive index of a large number of samples. Core (KT09-3) is one of fourteen piston and gravity cores which were retrieved at the center of the basin. Correlation of cores was conducted using sand and silt seams related by events such as turbidite or flood or volcanic ash air fall, and the age-depth model was created by wiggle-matching of forty-two AMS radiocarbon dates from bivalve mollusk shells and excess Pb-210 and Cs-137 concentrations (Kuwae et al., 2012). The sedimentation rates were 230-300 cm/ky. Core is composed of massive diatomaceous clays with 18 event sediments of coarse fractions. Two distinct volcanic ash horizons and several cryptically deposited horizons are found within the sequence. Upper distinct volcanic ash of 509.2 cm depth is composed of many volcanic glasses and heavy minerals of Opx and Cpx with GHb and BHb. Most of volcanic glasses have characteristic high refractive index of about 1.559. This tephra is

  9. Multiple-pressure-source model for ground inflation during the period of high explosivity at Sakurajima volcano, Japan - Combination analysis of continuous GNSS, tilt and strain data -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, Kohei; Iguchi, Masato; Ohkura, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Keigo

    2016-01-01

    We herein propose a three-pressure-source model for ground inflation with highly eruptive activity at the Showa crater of Sakurajima volcano, Japan. We applied a model of stacked spherical sources to continuous combined geodetic data from a global navigation satellite system, tilt and strainmeters. The data were recorded during ground inflation throughout an eruptive episode that began in October 2011 and ended in March 2012. Using a genetic algorithm, we obtained the locations and volumes of three sources. A pressure source analysis of ground inflation during the period from October 2011 to March 2012 revealed inflation sources to be located at a depth of 9.6 km beneath Aira caldera (A-source) and 3.3 km beneath Kita-dake (K-source), and a shallow deflation source is located at a depth of 0.7 km beneath Minami-dake (M-source). The A-source corresponds to the main magma reservoir at a depth of 10 km beneath the Aira caldera inferred by previous geophysical studies. The K-source is a-reservoir of Sakurajima volcano, where magma intrudes from the main magma reservoir beneath the Aira caldera during the first stage of eruptive activity. The M-source is the uppermost part of a conduit from the K-source to the summit and the Showa crater. Magma injection into the A-source started in mid-November 2011, instantly triggering the migration of increased volumes of magma from the A-source to the K-source. Approximately one month later, in mid-December 2011, an increased volume of magma started migrating from the K-source to the M-source and finally erupted at the surface. The accumulation rate for the A-source is comparable to the magma supply rate for the past 100 years (0.8 to 1.6 × 107 m3). The three-pressure-source model was applied to inflation events before the 2011 event in order to reconstruct the magma migration process. Applying our source model to earlier activity phases, we found that injected magma from the A-source remained at the K-source and a small amount of

  10. A Mechanism For Production Of Calc-alkalic And Tholeiitic Magma Series In Zao Volcano, NE Japan (II) - Sr Isotope Micro-analysis Of Plagioclase Phenocrysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, T.; Hirahara, Y.; Tatsumi, Y.; Kimura, J.; Ban, M.

    2006-12-01

    It was discussed from the investigation of bulk rock chemical compositions and isotopes ratio that the origin magma or material of calc-alkalic series (CA) and tholeiitic series (TH) from Zao volacano, NE Japan was several necessity (Hirahara et al., 2006). Consequently, we paid attention to Sr isotope ratio of phenocrystic minerals in volcanic rocks, because it can be thought to recorded such magmatic processes, and proposed a mechanism for producing these two magma series based on data obtained by Sr isotopic micro-analyses of plagioclase in volcanic rocks from Zao Volcano. The Sr isotope micro-analyses were performed by two methods. One is the Laser Ablation Multicollector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. The ablate crater size is 0.2mm. Other one is combined method of microdrilling and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometey. The microdrilling is the sampling technique of drilling a sample mechanically with a small drill and collecting the sample powder milled. The diameter at the tip of the drills used for sampling is 0.1 and 0.27mm. The collected sample powder was dissolved with acid, and Sr was separated using micro-columns Sr selective resin. Sr isotope measurement was carried out on the Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer. Core part of plagioclases in CA has widely An% and Sr isotope ratio (52 ~ 93 and 0.7035 ~ 0.7045), and there are divided into several types by the isotopical and compositional characteristics. Especially, plagioclase of most high An% (90 ~ 93) type in CA shows the lowest Sr isotope ratio (0.7035 ~ 0.7037). On the other hand, plagioclase in TH possesses relatively narrow range of An% and Sr isotope ratio (85 ~ 95 and 0.7042 ~ 0.7045), and there is a tendency that Sr isotope ratio slightly increase with decreasing An%. Results of Sr isotope micro-analyses show that CA formed by magma mixing between isotopically depleted basalt magma and isotopically enriched felsic magma. On the other hand, it shows that the primary basalt magma

  11. The Lyman-α Solar Telescope (LST) for the ASO-S mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui

    The Lyman-α (Lyα) Solar Telescope (LST) is one of the payloads for the proposed Space-Borne Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO-S). LST consists of a Solar Disk Imager (SDI) with a field-of-view (FOV) of 1.2 R⊙ (R⊙ = solar radius), a Solar Corona Imager (SCI) with an FOV of 1.1 - 2.5 R⊙, and a full-disk White-light Solar Telescope (WST) with the same FOV as the SDI, which also serves as the guiding telescope. The SCI is designed to work in the Lyα (121.6 nm) waveband and white-light (for polarization brightness observation), while the SDI will work in the Lyα waveband only. The WST works in both visible (for guide) and ultraviolet (for science) broadband. The LST will observe the Sun from disk-center up to 2.5 R⊙ for both solar flares and coronal mass ejections with high tempo-spatial resolution

  12. The Lyman-alpha Solar Telescope for the ASO-S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui

    2015-08-01

    The Lyman-alpha Solar Telescope (LST) is one of the payloads for the proposed Space-Borne Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO-S). LST consists of a Solar Disk Imager (SDI) with a field-of-view (FOV) of 1.2 Rsun, a Solar Corona Imager (SCI) with an FOV of 1.1 - 2.5 Rsun, and a full-disk White-light Solar Telescope (WST) with an FOV of 1.2 Rsun, which also serves as the guiding telescope. The SCI is designed to work at the Lyman-alpha waveband and white-light, while the SDI will work at the Lyman-alpha waveband only. The WST works both in visible (for guide) and ultraviolet (for science) white-light. The LST will observe the Sun from disk-center up to 2.5 solar radii for both solar flares and coronal mass ejections. In this presentation, I will give an introduction to LST, including scientific objectives, science requirement, instrument design and current status.

  13. Comparison of eruptive and intrusive samples from Unzen Volcano, Japan: Effects of contrasting pressure temperature time paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almberg, L. D.; Larsen, J. F.; Eichelberger, J. C.; Vogel, T. A.; Patino, L. C.

    2008-07-01

    Core samples from the conduit of Unzen Volcano, obtained only 9 years after cessation of the 1991-1995 eruption, exhibit important differences in physical characteristics and mineralogy, and subtle differences in bulk chemistry from erupted samples. These differences in the conduit samples reflect emplacement under a confining pressure where about half of the original magmatic water was retained in the melt phase, maintenance at hypersolidus temperature for some unknown but significant time span, and subsequent subsolidus hydrothermal alteration. In contrast, magma that extruded as lava underwent decompression to 1 atm with nearly complete loss of magmatic water and cooling at a sufficiently rapid rate to produce glass. The resulting hypabyssal texture of the conduit samples, while clearly distinct from eruptive rocks, is also distinct from plutonic suites. Given the already low temperature of the conduit (less than 200 °C, [Nakada, S., Uto, K., Yoshimoto, M., Eichelberger, J.C., Shimizu, H., 2005. Scientific Results of Conduit Drilling in the Unzen Scientific Drilling Project (USDP), Sci. Drill., 1, 18-22]) when it was sampled by drilling, this texture must have developed within a decade, and perhaps within a much shorter time, after emplacement. The fact that all trace-element concentrations of the conduit and the last-emplaced lava of the spine, 1300 m above it, are identical to within analytical uncertainty provides strong evidence that both were produced during the same eruption sequence. Changes in conduit magma that occurred between emplacement and cooling to the solidus were collapse of vesicles from less than or equal to the equilibrium value of about 50 vol.% to about 0.1 vol.%; continued resorption of quartz and reaction of biotite phenocrysts due to heating of magma prior to ascent by intruding mafic magma; breakdown of hornblende; and micro-crystallization of rhyolitic melt to feldspar and quartz. Subsolidus changes were deposition of calcite and

  14. Mineralogical and Sulfur Isotopic Study on Volcanic Ash of the 2014 Eruption at Ontake Volcano, Central Honshu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, T.; Minami, Y.; Ohba, T.; Takahashi, R.; Imai, A.; Hayashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    Ontake volcano erupted on 27th September 2014. Components in fallout samples were analyzed with microscope, XRD, and SEM-EDS. Pyrophyllite, smectite, muscovite, kaoline group minerals, quartz, cristobalite, tridymite, pyrite, alunite, gypsum and anhydrite were identified from bulk samples. Coarse ash fraction (> 125 µm) consists mainly of siliceous fragments that are intensely altered and contain pyrite and rutile. Weakly-altered dark-gray volcanic rock fragments are also contained. Fine fraction is abundant in euhedral free crystals of alunite and gypsum and aggregates of silica minerals. The 34S/32S ratios of bulk ash samples were analyzed for sulfur leached by water (water-soluble sulfate), gastric (HCl-soluble sulfate), and HNO3 (sulfide). Gastric and HNO3 leaching methods were applied to coarse fraction too. The bulk δ34SCDT compositions of water-soluble sulfate, HCl-soluble sulfate and sulfide were +14.7 ‰, +15.7 ‰, and -4.7 ‰, respectively. Those of HCl-soluble sulfate and sulfide in coarse fraction were +9.1 ‰ and -4.3 ‰, respectively. Paragenesis of quartz and pyrophyllite in single grain implies hydrothermal alteration by hot (> 230 °C), acidic fluid in the sub-volcanic system. The sulfur isotope geothermometry (Ohmoto and Rye, 1979) applied to the pair of water-soluble sulfate and bulk sulfide resulted in 306 °C. Similar temperature (ca. 296 °C) was estimated for the pair of HCl-soluble sulfate and sulfide in bulk ash. The mineralogy and sulfur isotopic study indicate that the 2014 Ontake eruption was derived from an acidic high-temperature (ca. 300 °C) sub-volcanic hydrothermal fluid. However, the estimated temperature for the pair of HCl-soluble sulfate and sulfide from coarse fraction resulted in higher temperature (ca. 482 °C). The coarse fraction preserved the past temperature record of the hydrothermal fluid, because the coarse lithic fragments were derived from pre-existing altered rocks.

  15. Deformation and gravity changes at Izu islands, Japan, prior to, during, and after the 2000 caldera collapse at Miyake-jima volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, M.; Okubo, S.; Kimata, F.

    2006-12-01

    Eruptive and caldera-forming activity at Miyakejima volcano, Japan, was accompanied by more than 40 days of seismic swarms, including more than five M6 (or greater) earthquakes, and significant crustal deformation in nearby islands. Here we review ground deformation and gravity changes at Miyakejima and other nearby islands prior to, during, and after the 2000 caldera collapse episode at Miyakejima. While ground displacements observed at Izu-islands can be basically predicted from the Philippine Sea Plate motion in a global perspective, Miyakejima was undergoing inflation if examined locally within the island before the 2000 unrest. It is also known that a couple of leveling benchmarks inside the previous caldera were secularly subsiding [Miyazaki, 1990]. Using JERS1's InSAR data, Furuya~[2004] also confirmed this. Was the localized subsidence before 2000 a precursor for the caldera collapse? We will argue that this is probably not the case. After the beginning of the earthquake swarm on 26 June 2000, significant ground displacements were recorded at Miyakejima both in the permanent GPS stations [e.g., Nishimura et al. 2001] and tiltmeters by the NIED [Ukawa et al. 2001]. Using both FG5 absolute gravimeter and LaCoste-Romberg G-type gravimeters, high precision gravity survey has been repeatedly carried out by ERI, University of Tokyo. Furuya et al~[2003a] showed spatial-temporal gravity changes from the beginning stage to early 2001. Notably, they detected a gravity decrease of as much as 145 μgals (1 μgal=10^{-8} m/s2) at the summit area 2 days prior to the collapse, and interpreted as reflecting the formation of a large void beneath the volcano. Correcting for the effect of topography change due to the collapse, subsequent gravity change data suggested an effective density decrease until the middle August 2000, followed by a significant density increase toward at least November 2000. Those spatial and temporal gravity changes were associated with the explosive

  16. Field-based density measurements as tool to identify preeruption dome structure: set-up and first results from Unzen volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, Ulrich; Scheu, Bettina; Spieler, Oliver; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2005-03-01

    For an improvement in the quality of conduit flow and dome-related explosive eruption models, knowledge of the preeruption or precollapse density of the rocks involved is necessary. As close investigation is impossible during eruption, the best substitute comes from quantitative investigation of the eruption deposits. The porosity of volcanic rocks is of primary importance for the eruptive behaviour and, accordingly, a key-parameter for realistic models of dome stability and conduit flow. Fortunately, this physical property may be accurately determined via density measurements. We developed a robust, battery-powered device for rapid and reliable density measurements of dry rock samples in the field. The density of the samples (sealed in plastic bags at 250 mbar) is determined using the Archimedean principle. We have tested the device on the deposits of the 1990-1995 eruption of Unzen volcano, Japan. Short setup and operation times allow up to 60 measurements per day under fieldwork conditions. The rapid accumulation of correspondingly large data sets has allowed us to acquire the first statistically significant data set of clast density distribution in block-and-ash flow deposits. More than 1100 samples with a total weight of 2.2 tons were measured. The data set demonstrates that the deposits of the last eruptive episode at Unzen display a bimodal density distribution, with peaks at 2.0±0.1 and 2.3±0.1 g/cm 3, corresponding to open porosity values of 20 and 8 vol.%, respectively. We use this data set to link the results of laboratory-based fragmentation experiments to field studies at recently active lava domes.

  17. Source mechanism of long-period events at Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano, Japan, inferred from waveform inversion of the effective excitation functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nakano, M.; Kumagai, H.; Chouet, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the source mechanism of long-period (LP) events observed at Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano, Japan, based on waveform inversions of their effective excitation functions. The effective excitation function, which represents the apparent excitation observed at individual receivers, is estimated by applying an autoregressive filter to the LP waveform. Assuming a point source, we apply this method to seven LP events the waveforms of which are characterized by simple decaying and nearly monochromatic oscillations with frequency in the range 1-3 Hz. The results of the waveform inversions show dominant volumetric change components accompanied by single force components, common to all the events analyzed, and suggesting a repeated activation of a sub-horizontal crack located 300 m beneath the summit crater lakes. Based on these results, we propose a model of the source process of LP seismicity, in which a gradual buildup of steam pressure in a hydrothermal crack in response to magmatic heat causes repeated discharges of steam from the crack. The rapid discharge of fluid causes the collapse of the fluid-filled crack and excites acoustic oscillations of the crack, which produce the characteristic waveforms observed in the LP events. The presence of a single force synchronous with the collapse of the crack is interpreted as the release of gravitational energy that occurs as the slug of steam ejected from the crack ascends toward the surface and is replaced by cooler water flowing downward in a fluid-filled conduit linking the crack and the base of the crater lake. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Reconstruction of a phreatic eruption on 27 September 2014 at Ontake volcano, central Japan, based on proximal pyroclastic density current and fallout deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeno, Fukashi; Nakada, Setsuya; Oikawa, Teruki; Yoshimoto, Mitsuhiro; Komori, Jiro; Ishizuka, Yoshihiro; Takeshita, Yoshihiro; Shimano, Taketo; Kaneko, Takayuki; Nagai, Masashi

    2016-05-01

    The phreatic eruption at Ontake volcano on 27 September 2014, which caused the worst volcanic disaster in the past half-century in Japan, was reconstructed based on observations of the proximal pyroclastic density current (PDC) and fallout deposits. Witness observations were also used to clarify the eruption process. The deposits are divided into three major depositional units (Units A, B, and C) which are characterized by massive, extremely poorly sorted, and multimodal grain-size distribution with 30-50 wt% of fine ash (silt-clay component). The depositional condition was initially dry but eventually changed to wet. Unit A originated from gravity-driven turbulent PDCs in the relatively dry, vent-opening phase. Unit B was then produced mainly by fallout from a vigorous moist plume during vent development. Unit C was derived from wet ash fall in the declining stage. Ballistic ejecta continuously occurred during vent opening and development. As observed in the finest population of the grain-size distribution, aggregate particles were formed throughout the eruption, and the effect of water in the plume on the aggregation increased with time and distance. Based on the deposit thickness, duration, and grain-size data, and by applying a scaling analysis using a depth-averaged model of turbulent gravity currents, the particle concentration and initial flow speed of the PDC at the summit area were estimated as 2 × 10-4-2 × 10-3 and 24-28 m/s, respectively. The tephra thinning trend in the proximal area shows a steeper slope than in similar-sized magmatic eruptions, indicating a large tephra volume deposited over a short distance owing to the wet dispersal conditions. The Ontake eruption provided an opportunity to examine the deposits from a phreatic eruption with a complex eruption sequence that reflects the effect of external water on the eruption dynamics.

  19. Shaking up volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prejean, Stephanie G.; Haney, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    Most volcanic eruptions that occur shortly after a large distant earthquake do so by random chance. A few compelling cases for earthquake-triggered eruptions exist, particularly within 200 km of the earthquake, but this phenomenon is rare in part because volcanoes must be poised to erupt in order to be triggered by an earthquake (1). Large earthquakes often perturb volcanoes in more subtle ways by triggering small earthquakes and changes in spring discharge and groundwater levels (1, 2). On page 80 of this issue, Brenguier et al. (3) provide fresh insight into the interaction of large earthquakes and volcanoes by documenting a temporary change in seismic velocity beneath volcanoes in Honshu, Japan, after the devastating Tohoku-Oki earthquake in 2011.

  20. Nyiragonga Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image of the Nyiragonga volcano eruption in the Congo was acquired on January 28, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters about 50 to 300 feet ), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    Image: A river of molten rock poured from the Nyiragongo volcano in the Congo on January 18, 2002, a day after it erupted, killing dozens, swallowing buildings and forcing hundreds of thousands to flee the town of Goma. The flow continued into Lake Kivu. The lave flows are depicted in red on the image indicating they are still hot. Two of them flowed south form the volcano's summit and went through the town of Goma. Another flow can be seen at the top of the image, flowing towards the northwest. One of Africa's most notable volcanoes, Nyiragongo contained an active lava lake in its deep summit crater that drained catastrophically through its outer flanks in 1977. Extremely fluid, fast-moving lava flows draining from the summit lava lake in 1977 killed 50 to 100 people, and several villages were destroyed. The image covers an area of 21 x 24 km and combines a thermal band in red, and two infrared bands in green and blue.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the

  1. The Role of Philippine Sea Plate to the Genesis of Quaternary Magmas of Northern Kyushu Island, Japan, Inferred from Along-Arc Geochemical Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, T.; Yoshikawa, M.; Itoh, J.; Ujike, O.; Miyoshi, M.; Takemura, K.

    2013-12-01

    Quaternary volcanoes on Kyushu Island comprise volcanoes Himeshima, Futagoyama, Yufu-Tsurumi, Kuju, Aso, Kirishima and Sakurajima from north to south alongstrike the volcanic front. Adakitic lavas are observed from Yufu-Tsurumi and Kuju volcanoes in northern Kyushu (Kita et al., 2001; Sugimoto et al., 2007), whereas no Quaternary adakites were observed at Aso (e.g., Hunter, 1998) and the volcanoes south of Aso along the entire Ryukyu arc. Sugimoto et al. (2007) suggested that the trace element and Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions of adakitic magmas from Yufu-Tsurumi volcano indicate derivation of the magmas by partial melting of the subducting PSP. In contrast, Zellmer et al. (2012) suggested that these adakites may have formed by fractional crystallization of mantle-derived mafic magmas within the garnet stability field in the crust. The Honshu-Kyushu arc transition is a particular favorable setting to address these controversial models for the origin of the adakitic lavas, because of the potential relationship between the PSP materials and the alongstrike variation of the lava chemistry. The Palau-Kyushu ridge divides the oceanic crust of the PSP into northeastern and southwestern segments with ages of 26-15 (Shikoku Basin) and 60-40 Ma (West Philippine Basin), respectively (Mahony et al., 2011). Although there are no clear plate images beneath northern Kyushu, the northern extension of the Palau-Kyushu ridge potentially corresponds to the boundary between the SW Japan and Ryukyu arcs. If adakite genesis was related to the subducted slab rather than the overlying crust, then the spatial distribution of Quaternary adakites should correlate with the age of the subducted PSP. In order to test such correlation and elucidate the petrogenesis of the northern Kyushu adakites, we compiled major and trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope ratios from volcanoes along the arc front that includes the transition from adakitic to non-adakitic arc volcanism. Comprehensive

  2. Crustal magma pathway beneath Aso caldera inferred from three-dimensional electrical resistivity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Maki; Takakura, Shinichi; Matsushima, Nobuo; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Utsugi, Mitsuru

    2016-10-01

    At Naka-dake cone, Aso caldera, Japan, volcanic activity is raised cyclically, an example of which was a phreatomagmatic eruption in September 2015. Using a three-dimensional model of electrical resistivity, we identify a magma pathway from a series of northward dipping conductive anomalies in the upper crust beneath the caldera. Our resistivity model was created from magnetotelluric measurements conducted in November-December 2015; thus, it provides the latest information about magma reservoir geometry beneath the caldera. The center of the conductive anomalies shifts from the north of Naka-dake at depths >10 km toward Naka-dake, along with a decrease in anomaly depths. The melt fraction is estimated at 13-15% at 2 km depth. Moreover, these anomalies are spatially correlated with the locations of earthquake clusters, which are distributed within resistive blocks on the conductive anomalies in the northwest of Naka-dake but distributed at the resistive sides of resistivity boundaries in the northeast.

  3. The evaluation of ASOS for the Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yersavich, Ann; Wheeler, Mark; Taylor, Gregory; Schumann, Robin; Manobianco, John

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the Applied Meteorology Unit's (AMU) evaluation of the effectiveness and utility of the Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) in terms of spaceflight operations and user requirements. In particular, the evaluation determines which of the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) observation requirements can be satisfied by ASOS. This report also includes a summary of ASOS' background, current configuration and specifications, system performance, and the possible concepts of operations for use of ASOS at the SLF. This evaluation stems from a desire by the Air Force to determine if ASOS units could be used to reduce the cost of SLF meteorological observations.

  4. Iceland Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-23

    article title:  Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland, Volcano Ash Cloud     View larger ... Europe and captured this image of the Eyjafjallajökull Volcano ash cloud as it continued to drift over the continent. Unlike other ...

  5. Testing the Nuclear Will of Japan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    propel Japan into the nuclear weapons club, but together fuel current debates.2 However, other Japanese leaders do not agree with former Minister Aso and...in such organizations as the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). 2 The following five factors fuel current debates: (1) Japan now possesses the...civilian plutonium and new reprocessing facilities that could be used to support such efforts. In order to help understand what fuels the current debates

  6. Nicaraguan Volcanoes

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    article title:  Nicaraguan Volcanoes     View Larger Image Nicaraguan volcanoes, February 26, 2000 . The true-color image at left is a ... February 26, 2000 - Plumes from the San Cristobal and Masaya volcanoes. project:  MISR category:  gallery ...

  7. Melt inclusion record of CO2 and H2O evolution of magma from Kikai-Akahoya caldera-forming eruption of Satsuma-Iojima volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, G.; Morishita, Y.; Kawanabe, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Geological survey and chemical analyses of pyroclastic rocks and melt inclusions in the deposits of Kikai-Akahoya caldera-forming eruption (7.3 ka) of Satsuma-Iojima volcano, Japan, were carried out in order to investigate compositional variation and degassing process οf the magma. Three pyroclastic units were erupted by the eruption successively; Koya-Funakura air-fall pumice (KFA), densely welded Funakura pyroclastic flow deposit and nonwelded Takeshima pyroclastic flow deposit (TPF; Ono et al., 1982). The total mass of the tephra is estimated to be more than 100 km3 (Machida and Arai, 2003). The KFA is a layer of coarse-grained rhyolitic pumice deposit (SiO2=71-72 wt.%) with 2-3m thick. The TPF has a thickness of about 30m and can be divided into at least three units. The deposit mainly consists of rhyolitic pumice (SiO2=70-72 wt.%) and vitric ash with small amount of andesitic scoria (SiO2=58-60 wt.%) and banded pumice. The upper unit is more rich in andesitic scoria than the lower unit. Analyses of major elements and S of the melt inclusions (MIs) in plagioclases and pyroxenes in the pumice and scoria were made by EPMA, and H2O and CO2 by SIMS. Major element composition of MIs in the pumice and scoria is similar to that of groundmass of them, respectively, indicating the melt entrapment just before the eruption. The MIs in the KFA have volatile contents of 4-6 wt.% H2O, <0.007 wt.% CO2 and <0.01 wt.% S. Gas saturation pressure of the magma is calculated to be 100-260 MPa on the basis of the H2O and CO2 contents of the MIs. On the other hand, the MIs in the rhyolitic pumice in the lower TPF have similar H2O and S contents but higher CO2 content (0.01-0.03 wt.%) than those of the KFA. Gas saturation pressure of the magma is calculated to be 130-270 MPa. The MIs in the andesitic scoria in the upper TPF have higher S (0.05-0.12 wt.%), similar CO2 content and lower H2O (2-3 wt.%) contents than those of the lower unit. Gas saturation pressure of the magma is

  8. Magma Degassing and Evolution Processes of the 2000 Eruption of Miyakejima Volcano, Japan, Deduced From of Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusion Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, G.; Morishita, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Chemical analyses of melt inclusions in Mg-poor (Mg#68-73) and Mg-rich (Mg#76-84)"@olivines from a bomb and lapilli from the 18 August 2000 eruption of Miyakejima volcano, Japan, were carried out in order to investigate degassing and evolution process "Íf the magma. Analyses of major elements, S and Cl of the melt inclusions were made by EPMA, and H2O and CO2 by FTIR and SIMS (Miyagi et al., 1995; Hauri et al., 2002). Major element composition of Mg-poor olivine-hosted melt inclusions (Mg-poor Ol MIs) is similar to that of groundmass in the bomb, indicating the melt entrapment just before the eruption. The Mg-poor Ol MIs have volatile contents of 0.7-2.5 wt.% H2O, 0.005-0.02 wt.% CO2, 0.05-0.17 wt. % S, and 0.06-0.1 wt. % Cl, that are roughly similar to those of plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions (Saito et al., 2005). Gas saturation pressure of the magma is calculated to be 20-100 MPa on the basis of the H2O and CO2 contents of Mg-poor Ol MIs, corresponds to the depth of 1-4 km. On the other hand, the Mg-rich olivine-hosted melt inclusions (Mg-rich Ol MIs) have SiO2 and K2O-poor but Al2O3-rich composition than the whole rock composition of the bomb and lapilli. They have volatile contents of 1.9-3.5 wt.% H2O, 0.003-0.025 wt.% CO2, 0.06-0.21 wt.% S, and 0.04-0.07 wt.% Cl, that are a little higher H2O and S and lower Cl contents than those of Mg-rich Ol MIs. Gas saturation pressure of the magma is calculated to be 50-150 MPa on the basis of the H2O and CO2 contents of Mg-rich Ol MIs. Ratios of H2O and S contents of both the Mg-poor and Mg-rich Ol MIs are similar to that of volcanic gas emitted from the summit after the 2000 eruption, while their ratios of CO2 and H2O contents are lower than that of volcanic gas. Existence of the Al2O3-rich less-evolved melt with high H2O content is consistent with the petrological and experimental studies that low-MgO high-alumina basalt is derived from primary magma with high H2O content (Uto, 1986; Sisson and Grove, 1993). The

  9. Geomorphology and sedimentary features, and temporal component-change of lahar deposits at the northern foot of Chokai volcano, NE Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Y.; Ohba, T.; Kataoka, K.; Hayashi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Chokai volcano is an andesitic stratovolcano that collapsed to the north ca.2500 years ago. The post-collapse fan deposits are distributed in the northern foot of the volcano, and to reveal their depositional process in terms of modern sedimentology, we carried out the geological study includung digging survey, as well as geomorphological analysis, mineralogy, and 14C chronology. Consequently, the geological study revealed that the fan deposits consist of more than 16 units, which are debris flow, hyperconcentrated flow and streamflow deposits. We give hare general name lahar deposits for these deposits. The lahar deposits have a total thickness of 30 m, and overlie the 2.5-ka Kisakata debris avalanche deposit. The lahar deposits form a part of volcanic fan and volcaniclastic apron of Chokai volcano. In proximal areas (steep or moderate sloped areas), the lahar flowed down as debris flows, and in the distal area (horizontal area) the lahars transformed into hyperconcentrated flow or stream flows but partly arrived the area as debris flow. The hyperconcentrated flows or stream flows reached the horizontal area at least four times, supposed by AMS dating (the ages of some lahar deposits are 2200, 1500-1600, 1000-1200, and 100-200 yBP). The lahar deposits contain clasts of altered andesite, fresh andesite, mudstone and sandstone. Proportions of altered andesite clasts to total clasts decrease upwards in stratigraphic sequence. Matrices of the lower eight units are composed of grayish-blue clay, and are different from those of the upper eight units, composed of brownish yellow volcanic sand. The stratigraphic variation in matrix component is consistent with the change in matrix mineral assemblage, possibly reflecting changes in the source materials from Chokai volcano.

  10. Civil UAV Applications in Japan and Related Safety & Certification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Background and Development of Autonomous Helicopter Japan is famous for volcanoes and earthquakes. In 1990 - Unzen volcano erupted. In 1995 - the...Payload up to 100kg • Operational range < 250m • Operational altitude < 50m RPH 2-Agricultural Spraying • In Service for Volcano Observing by...Rotor Diameter 4.8m Applications of Autonomous YAMAHA Unmanned Helicopter Observation of Volcanoes April 2000 at Erupting Volcanoes Mt.Usu (The

  11. Japan-U.S. Relations: Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-03

    in Japan. Premier Taro Aso has clung to power while watching his approval ratings dip increasingly lower. When parliamentary elections are...foreign visit, followed by embattled Prime Minister Taro Aso’s reception as President Obama’s first foreign guest in the White House. Both Clinton

  12. Dante's Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This video contains two segments: one a 0:01:50 spot and the other a 0:08:21 feature. Dante 2, an eight-legged walking machine, is shown during field trials as it explores the inner depths of an active volcano at Mount Spurr, Alaska. A NASA sponsored team at Carnegie Mellon University built Dante to withstand earth's harshest conditions, to deliver a science payload to the interior of a volcano, and to report on its journey to the floor of a volcano. Remotely controlled from 80-miles away, the robot explored the inner depths of the volcano and information from onboard video cameras and sensors was relayed via satellite to scientists in Anchorage. There, using a computer generated image, controllers tracked the robot's movement. Ultimately the robot team hopes to apply the technology to future planetary missions.

  13. Volcano Infrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. B.; Fee, D.; Matoza, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    Open-vent volcanoes generate prodigious low frequency sound waves that tend to peak in the infrasound (<20 Hz) band. These long wavelength (> ~20 m) atmospheric pressure waves often propagate long distances with low intrinsic attenuation and can be well recorded with a variety of low frequency sensitive microphones. Infrasound records may be used to remotely monitor eruptions, identify active vents or track gravity-driven flows, and/or characterize source processes. Such studies provide information vital for both scientific study and volcano monitoring efforts. This presentation proposes to summarize and standardize some of the terminology used in the still young, yet rapidly growing field of volcano infrasound. Herein we suggest classification of typical infrasound waveform types, which include bimodal pulses, blast (or N-) waves, and a variety of infrasonic tremors (including broadband, harmonic, and monotonic signals). We summarize various metrics, including reduced pressure, intensity, power, and energy, in which infrasound excess pressures are often quantified. We also describe the spectrum of source types and radiation patterns, which are typically responsible for recorded infrasound. Finally we summarize the variety of propagation paths that are common for volcano infrasound radiating to local (<10 km), regional (out to several hundred kilometers), and global distances. The effort to establish common terminology requires community feedback, but is now timely as volcano infrasound studies proliferate and infrasound becomes a standard component of volcano monitoring.

  14. Motivations for muon radiography of active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedonio, G.; Martini, M.

    2010-02-01

    Muon radiography represents an innovative tool for investigating the interior of active volcanoes. This method integrates the conventional geophysical techniques and provides an independent way to estimate the density of the volcano structure and reveal the presence of magma conduits. The experience from the pioneer experiments performed at Mt. Asama, Mt. West Iwate, and Showa-Shinzan (Japan) are very encouraging. Muon radiography could be applied, in principle, at any stratovolcano. Here we focus our attention on Vesuvius and Stromboli (Italy).

  15. Mineralogical study on volcanic ash of the eruption on September 27, 2014 at Ontake volcano, central Japan: correlation with porphyry copper systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Yusuke; Imura, Takumi; Hayashi, Shintaro; Ohba, Tsukasa

    2016-04-01

    The volcanic ash of the eruption on September 27, 2014 at Ontake volcano consists mostly of altered rock fragments. The ash contains partly altered volcanic rock fragments consisting of primary igneous minerals (plagioclase, orthopyroxene, titanomagnetite, and feldspars) and volcanic glass accompanied by alteration minerals to some extents, and contains no juvenile fragments. These features indicate that the eruption was a non-juvenile hydrothermal eruption that was derived from the hydrothermal system developed under the crater. The major minerals derived from hydrothermal alteration zones are silica mineral, kaolin-group mineral, smectite, pyrophyllite, muscovite, alunite, anhydrite, gypsum, pyrite, K-feldspar, albite, and rutile. Minor chlorite, biotite, and garnet are accompanied. Five types of alteration mineral associations are identified from observations on individual ash particles: silica-pyrite, silica-pyrite ± alunite ± kaolin, silica-pyrophyllite-pyrite, silica-muscovite ± chlorite, and silica-K-feldspar ± albite ± garnet ± biotite. The associations indicate development of advanced argillic, sericite, and potassic alteration zones under the crater. Occurrence of anhydrite veinlet and the set of alteration zones indicate hydrothermal alteration zones similar to late-stage porphyry copper systems. Comparing the mineral associations with the geologic model of the late-stage porphyry copper systems, the source depths of mineral associations are estimated to range from near surface to >2 km. The depths of advanced argillic alteration, sericite, and potassic zones are 0 to ~2, ~1.5 to ~2, and >2 km, respectively.

  16. Temporal evolution of a hydrothermal system in Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano, Japan, inferred from the complex frequencies of long-period events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kumagai, H.; Chouet, B.A.; Nakano, M.

    2002-01-01

    We present a detailed description of temporal variations in the complex frequencies of long-period (LP) events observed at Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano. Using the Sompi method, we analyze 35 LP events that occurred during the period from August 1992 through January 1993. The observed temporal variations in the complex frequencies can be divided into three periods. During the first period the dominant frequency rapidly decreases from 5 to 1 Hz, and Q of the dominant spectral peak remains roughly constant with an average value near 100. During the second period the dominant frequency gradually increases up to 3 Hz, and Q gradually decreases from 160 to 30. During the third period the dominant frequency increases more rapidly from 3 to 5 Hz, and Q shows an abrupt increase at the beginning of this period and then remains roughly constant with an average value near 100. Such temporal variations can be consistently explained by the dynamic response of a hydrothermal crack to a magmatic heat pulse. During the first period, crack growth occurs in response to the overall pressure increase in the hydrothermal system caused by the heat pulse. Once crack formation is complete, heat gradually changes the fluid in the crack from a wet misty gas to a dry gas during the second period. As heating of the hydrothermal system gradually subsides, the overall pressure in this system starts to decrease, causing the collapse of the crack during the third period.

  17. Source spectrum and source time function of volcanic tremor determined with a dense seismic network near the summit crater of Izu-Oshima volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, Jun; Ida, Yoshiaki; Yamaoka, Koshun

    1994-05-01

    Digital seismic records of episodic volcanic tremor, obtained with a dense seismic network near the summit crater of Izu-Oshima volcano, were analyzed to determine source spectrum and source time function. Source spectrum and transfer function could be separated because the seismic records showed a systematic change with distance from the source. The source spectrum of velocity amplitude had a different frequency, f, dependence above and below a corner frequency of 8 to 10 Hz. At high ranges, the spectrum was proportional to f(exp -2), while at low ranges, it was proportional to f(exp 2). Inversion of this frequency-dependent source spectrum yields a source time function that can be represented by an impulse that attenuates in about 0.1 s. Repeated impulses could explain observed volcanic tremor that persists for many minutes or longer and that have complicated phase spectra. The source spectrum gives an energy release rate of about 5.2 x 10(exp 2) J/s, so that the total energy released is about 1.0 x 10(exp 5) J during a tremor episode of about 3 min at Izu-Oshima. Such energy release is comparable to the seismic energy released by an earthquake of magnitude 0.1.

  18. Crustal deformation model of the Beppu-Shimabara graben area, central Kyushu, Japan, based on inversion of three-component GNSS data in 2000-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Kazuma; Mitsui, Yuta

    2016-11-01

    The 2016 Kumamoto earthquakes, including an Mw-7 right-lateral earthquake on April 15 (UTC), occurred along faults within the Beppu-Shimabara graben in central Kyushu, Japan. Previous studies showed that the graben area was under heterogeneous stress conditions with north-south T-axes and spreading in a north-south direction. Here, we construct a detailed crustal deformation model using three-component Global Navigation Satellite System data in 2000-2010 and considering the distribution of geological fault traces in this area. Our inversion analysis suggests that the strain accumulation rate for the right-lateral seismic slip segment (corresponding to the Futagawa fault), where the largest of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquakes ruptured, was several times smaller than the other segments in the Beppu-Shimabara graben. Furthermore, we observe distinct subsidence along the Beppu-Shimabara graben. Our base model attributes the subsidence to deflation of magma reservoirs beneath volcanoes, but the observed vertical velocities are poorly fit. In order to improve the fitting results for the vertical deformation, we need more sophisticated volcano-deformation model (such as a sill-like deformation source for Mt. Aso) or graben model. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Syrian Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    23 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small volcano in the Syria Planum region of Mars. Today, the lava flows that compose this small volcano are nearly hidden by a mantle of rough-textured, perhaps somewhat cemented, dust. The light-toned streaks that cross the scene were formed by passing dust devils, a common occurrence in Syria.

    Location near: 13.0oS, 102.6oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Autumn

  20. Marine Geography of the Sea of Japan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1951-01-01

    coast line. In general, the volcanoes that still con be identified in Japan ore not older than the Pleistocene or Glacic; epoch (1 million years...Oe ee nuneros volcanoes and frequent ethquokes. Reoevences: RESTRICTED Many submarine canyons are present on the continental shelf, but due to the... volcanoes and frequent earthquakes. References: Balzak, S. S., V. F. Vasyutin, and Y. G. Feigin, "Economic Geography of the USSR," The Macmillion Company

  1. AgNa2Mo3O9AsO4

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Hamadi; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    The title compound, silver disodium trimolybdenum(VI) nonaoxide arsenate, AgNa2Mo3O9AsO4, was prepared by a solid-state reaction at 808 K. The structure consists of an infinite (Mo3AsO13)n ribbon, parallel to the c axis, composed of AsO4 tetra­hedra and MoO6 octa­hedra sharing edges and corners. The Na and Ag ions partially occupy several independent close positions, with various occupancies, in the inter-ribbon space delimited by the one-dimensional framework. The composition was refined to Ag1.06(1)Na1.94(1)Mo3O9AsO4. PMID:22219728

  2. Volcano Hazards Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Myers, Bobbie; Driedger, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    Diagram of common volcano hazards. The U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program (VHP) monitors unrest and eruptions at U.S. volcanoes, assesses potential hazards, responds to volcanic crises, and conducts research on how volcanoes work. When conditions change at a monitored volcano, the VHP issues public advisories and warnings to alert emergency-management authorities and the public. See http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/ to learn more about volcanoes and find out what's happening now.

  3. Chikurachki Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... southeast. The darker areas of the plume typically indicate volcanic ash, while the white portions of the plume indicate entrained water droplets and ice. According to the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruptions Response Team (KVERT), the temperature of the plume near the volcano ...

  4. Characteristics of the surface ruptures associated with the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake sequence, central Kyushu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirahama, Yoshiki; Yoshimi, Masayuki; Awata, Yasuo; Maruyama, Tadashi; Azuma, Takashi; Miyashita, Yukari; Mori, Hiroshi; Imanishi, Kazutoshi; Takeda, Naoto; Ochi, Tadafumi; Otsubo, Makoto; Asahina, Daisuke; Miyakawa, Ayumu

    2016-11-01

    The 2016 Kumamoto earthquake sequence started with a M J (Japan Meteorological Agency magnitude) 6.5 event on April 14, and culminated in a M J 7.3 event on April 16. Associated with the sequence, approximately 34-km-long surface ruptures appeared along the eastern part of the Futagawa fault zone and the northernmost part of the Hinagu fault zone. We carried out an urgent field investigation soon after the earthquake to map the extent and displacement of surface ruptures with the following results. (1) The rupture zone generally consisted of a series of left-stepping en echelon arrays of discontinuous fault traces of various lengths. (2) Slip exceeding 100 cm occurred on previously unrecognized fault traces in the alluvial lowland of the Kiyama plain and on the western rim of the Aso volcano caldera. (3) Large slip with maximum dextral slip of 220 cm was measured throughout the central section of the rupture zone along the Futagawa segment, and the slip gradually decreased bilaterally on the adjoining northeastern and southwestern sections. (4) The surface rupture mostly occurred along fault traces mapped in previous active fault investigations. (5) Most of the surface ruptures were produced by the mainshock, and significant postseismic slip occurred after the mainshock.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Magma mixing and degassing processes of 2011 eruption series of Kirishima volcano, Japan, based on chemical analyses of minerals and melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, G.

    2012-12-01

    Petrological studies of the essential products of phreato-magmatic, sub-Plinian, Vulcanian and minor ash eruptions in 2011 eruption series of Shinmoedake, Kirishima volcanic group, Japan, were carried out. Using the combined geological, petrological and gas emission observations from the 2011 eruptions, I investigated magma ascent and degassing processes of the eruptions. The bimodal plagioclase core composition, relatively small rims of olivines and pyroxenes, and diffusion profiles of the olivines indicate the mixing of mafic magma and felsic magma in several days before the sub-Plinian eruption. Melt inclusion analysis indicated that the end members of the magma mixing were basaltic andesite and dacite magmas and its mixing ratio was estimated to be 0.4 of the basaltic andesite. Magmas of the following Vulcanian and ash eruptions in February to June have similar mode composition, chemical compositions of phenocrysts, groundmass minerals and groundmass and zoning profiles of olivines of the eruptive products of to those of the sub-Plinian eruptions. These results indicate that magma mixing process proposed for the sub-Plinian eruptions also occurred in eruptions showing various styles. These results suggest that the mafic magma input to felsic magma intermittently occurred after the sub-Plinian eruptions to cause the minor eruptions in March to June. The amount of the degassed magma that was estimated based on sulfur content of melt inclusions of the end member magmas and SO2 flux observation was larger than that of eruptive products in 2011, indicating the degassing of the magma in the chamber due to convection of the magma in a conduit.

  6. Santorini Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Druitt, T.H.; Edwards, L.; Mellors, R.M.; Pyle, D.M.; Sparks, R.S.J.; Lanphere, M.; Davies, M.; Barreirio, B.

    1999-01-01

    Santorini is one of the most spectacular caldera volcanoes in the world. It has been the focus of significant scientific and scholastic interest because of the great Bronze Age explosive eruption that buried the Minoan town of Akrotiri. Santorini is still active. It has been dormant since 1950, but there have been several substantial historic eruptions. Because of this potential risk to life, both for the indigenous population and for the large number of tourists who visit it, Santorini has been designated one of five European Laboratory Volcanoes by the European Commission. Santorini has long fascinated geologists, with some important early work on volcanoes being conducted there. Since 1980, research groups at Cambridge University, and later at the University of Bristol and Blaise Pascal University in Clermont-Ferrand, have collected a large amount of data on the stratigraphy, geochemistry, geochronology and petrology of the volcanics. The volcanic field has been remapped at a scale of 1:10 000. A remarkable picture of cyclic volcanic activity and magmatic evolution has emerged from this work. Much of this work has remained unpublished until now. This Memoir synthesizes for the first time all the data from the Cambridge/Bristol/Clermont groups, and integrates published data from other research groups. It provides the latest interpretation of the tectonic and magmatic evolution of Santorini. It is accompanied by the new 1:10 000 full-colour geological map of the island.

  7. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Orr, Tim R.

    2008-01-01

    Lava from Kilauea volcano flowing through a forest in the Royal Gardens subdivision, Hawai'i, in February 2008. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) monitors the volcanoes of Hawai'i and is located within Hawaiian Volcanoes National Park. HVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Kilauea and HVO at http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov.

  8. Mud Volcanoes Formation And Occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guliyev, I. S.

    2007-12-01

    Mud volcanoes are natural phenomena, which occur throughout the globe. They are found at a greater or lesser scale in Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Georgia, on the Kerch and Taman peninsulas, on Sakhalin Island, in West Kuban, Italy, Romania, Iran, Pakistan, India, Burma, China, Japan, Indonesia, Malaysia, New Zealand, Mexico, Colombia, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela and Ecuador. Mud volcanoes are most well-developed in Eastern Azerbaijan, where more than 30% of all the volcanoes in the world are concentrated. More than 300 mud volcanoes have already been recognized here onshore or offshore, 220 of which lie within an area of 16,000 km2. Many of these mud volcanoes are particularly large (up to 400 m high). The volcanoes of the South Caspian form permanent or temporary islands, and numerous submarine banks. Many hypotheses have been developed regarding the origin of mud volcanoes. Some of those hypotheses will be examined in the present paper. Model of spontaneous excitation-decompaction (proposed by Ivanov and Guliev, 1988, 2002). It is supposed that one of major factors of the movement of sedimentary masses and formation of hydrocarbon deposits are phase transitions in sedimentary basin. At phase transitions there are abnormal changes of physical and chemical parameters of rocks. Abnormal (high and negative) pressure takes place. This process is called as excitation of the underground environment with periodicity from several tens to several hundreds, or thousand years. The relationship between mud volcanism and the generation of hydrocarbons, particularly methane, is considered to be a critical factor in mud volcano formation. At high flow rates the gas and sediment develops into a pseudo-liquid state and as flow increases the mass reaches the "so-called hover velocity" where mass transport begins. The mass of fluid moves as a quasi-uniform viscous mass through the sediment pile in a piston like manner until expelled from the surface as a "catastrophic eruption

  9. La variété β-NaMoO2(AsO4)

    PubMed Central

    Ben Hlila, Soumaya; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    The title compound, sodium dioxidomolybdenum(VI) arsenate(V), β-NaMoO2AsO4, was prepared by solid-state reaction at 953 K. In the crystal structure, the AsO4 tetra­hedra and MoO6 octa­hedra (both with m symmetry) share corner atoms to form a three-dimensional framework that delimits cavities parallel to [010] where disordered six-coordinated sodium cations (half-occupation) are located. Structural relationships between the different orthoarsenates of the AMoO2AsO4 series (A = Ag, Li, Na, K and Rb) are discussed. PMID:21581739

  10. 78 FR 18314 - Foreign-Trade Zone 169-Manatee County, Florida; Application for Production Authority; ASO, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 169--Manatee County, Florida; Application for Production Authority; ASO, LLC; Subzone 169A (Textile Fabric Adhesive Bandage Coating and Production); Sarasota... facility is used for the production of plastic and textile fabric adhesive bandages. ASO is also...

  11. Gaia17aso and Gaia17asp transients confirmed by Euler imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Roelens, M.; Semaan, T.; Palaversa, L.; Mowlavi, N.; Eyer, L.

    2017-03-01

    We report confirmation of Gaia Science Alerts transients Gaia17aso and Gaia17asp. Images were obtained through modified Gunn R band filter of the ECAM instrument installed on the Swiss 1.2m Euler telescope at La Silla, on 2017 March 21st - 22nd.

  12. K(MoO2)4O3(AsO4)

    PubMed Central

    Jouini, Raja; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    A new compound with a non-centrosymmetric structure, potassium tetra­kis­[dioxomolybdenum(IV)] arsenate trioxide, K(MoO2)4O3(AsO4), has been synthesized by a solid-state reaction. The [(MoO2)4O3(AsO4)]+ three-dimensional framework consists of single arsenate AsO4 tetra­hedra, MoO6 octa­hedra, MoO5 bipyramids and bi­octa­hedral units of edge-sharing Mo2O10 octa­hedra. The [Mo2O8]∞ octa­hedral chains running along the a-axis direction are connected through their corners to the AsO4 tetra­hedra, MoO6 octa­hedra and MoO5 bipyramids, so as to form large tunnels propagating along the a axis in which the K+ cations are located. This structure is compared with compounds containing M 2O10 (M = Mo, V, Fe) dimers and with those containing M 2O8 (M = V) chains. PMID:23794968

  13. Cladistic analysis applied to the classification of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hone, D. W. E.; Mahony, S. H.; Sparks, R. S. J.; Martin, K. T.

    2007-11-01

    Cladistics is a systematic method of classification that groups entities on the basis of sharing similar characteristics in the most parsimonious manner. Here cladistics is applied to the classification of volcanoes using a dataset of 59 Quaternary volcanoes and 129 volcanic edifices of the Tohoku region, Northeast Japan. Volcano and edifice characteristics recorded in the database include attributes of volcano size, chemical composition, dominant eruptive products, volcano morphology, dominant landforms, volcano age and eruptive history. Without characteristics related to time the volcanic edifices divide into two groups, with characters related to volcano size, dominant composition and edifice morphology being the most diagnostic. Analysis including time based characteristics yields four groups with a good correlation between these groups and the two groups from the analysis without time for 108 out of 129 volcanic edifices. Thus when characters are slightly changed the volcanoes still form similar groupings. Analysis of the volcanoes both with and without time yields three groups based on compositional, eruptive products and morphological characters. Spatial clusters of volcanic centres have been recognised in the Tohoku region by Tamura et al. ( Earth Planet Sci Lett 197:105 106, 2002). The groups identified by cladistic analysis are distributed unevenly between the clusters, indicating a tendency for individual clusters to form similar kinds of volcanoes with distinctive but coherent styles of volcanism. Uneven distribution of volcano types between clusters can be explained by variations in dominant magma compositions through time, which are reflected in eruption products and volcanic landforms. Cladistic analysis can be a useful tool for elucidating dynamic igneous processes that could be applied to other regions and globally. Our exploratory study indicates that cladistics has promise as a method for classifying volcanoes and potentially elucidating dynamic

  14. Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On the night of June 4, 2001, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) captured this thermal image of the erupting Shiveluch volcano. Located on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, Shiveluch rises to an altitude of 2,447 meters (8,028 feet). The active lava dome complex is seen as a bright (hot) area on the summit of the volcano. To the southwest, a second hot area is either a debris avalanche or hot ash deposit. Trailing to the west is a 25-kilometer (15-mile) ash plume, seen as a cold 'cloud' streaming from the summit. At least 60 large eruptions have occurred here during the last 10,000 years; the largest historical eruptions were in 1854 and 1964.

    Because Kamchatka is located along the major aircraft routes between North America/Europe and Asia, this area is constantly monitored for potential ash hazards to aircraft. The area is part of the 'Ring of Fire,' a string of volcanoes that encircles the Pacific Ocean.

    The lower image is the same as the upper, except it has been color-coded: red is hot, light greens to dark green are progressively colder, and gray/black are the coldest areas.

    The image is located at 56.7 degrees north latitude, 161.3 degrees east longitude.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched Dec. 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

  15. Chiliques volcano, Chile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A January 6, 2002 ASTER nighttime thermal infrared image of Chiliques volcano in Chile shows a hot spot in the summit crater and several others along the upper flanks of the edifice, indicating new volcanic activity. Examination of an earlier nighttime thermal infrared image from May 24,2000 showed no thermal anomaly. Chiliques volcano was previously thought to be dormant. Rising to an elevation of 5778 m, Chiliques is a simple stratovolcano with a 500-m-diameter circular summit crater. This mountain is one of the most important high altitude ceremonial centers of the Incas. It is rarely visited due to its difficult accessibility. Climbing to the summit along Inca trails, numerous ruins are encountered; at the summit there are a series of constructions used for rituals. There is a beautiful lagoon in the crater that is almost always frozen.

    The daytime image was acquired on November 19, 2000 and was created by displaying ASTER bands 1,2 and 3 in blue, green and red. The nighttime image was acquired January 6, 2002, and is a color-coded display of a single thermal infrared band. The hottest areas are white, and colder areas are darker shades of red. Both images cover an area of 7.5 x 7.5 km, and are centered at 23.6 degrees south latitude, 67.6 degrees west longitude.

    Both images cover an area of 7.5 x 7.5 km, and are centered at 23.6 degrees south latitude, 67.6 degrees west longitude.

    These images were acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A

  16. Geothermal resources of Kyushu, southwest Japan with special focus on the Kuju volcanic region

    SciTech Connect

    Ehara, S.

    1995-12-31

    Tectonic and geothermal backgrounds of Kyushu Island, are described to understand the thermal regime of Kuju volcano. A model for the geothermal system beneath Kuju volcano is presented based on thermal, isotopic and structural data. Based on the model, the geothermal resources beneath Kuju volcano are classified into five categories and are estimated by a volume method. The volcano energy stored beneath Kuju volcano is one of very promising potential resources in Japan. It would seem more reasonable to develop technologies to utilize volcano energy step by step.

  17. Focus: alien volcanos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Michael; Lopes, Rosaly

    2007-03-01

    Part 1: Volcanoes on Earth - blowing their top; Part 2: Volcanoes of the inner Solar System - dead or alive: the Moon, Mercury, Mars, Venus; Part 3: Volcanoes of the outer Solar System - fire and ice: Io, Europa, Ganymede and Miranda, Titan, Triton, Enceladus.

  18. A Scientific Excursion: Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olds, Henry, Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews an educationally valuable and reasonably well-designed simulation of volcanic activity in an imaginary land. VOLCANOES creates an excellent context for learning information about volcanoes and for developing skills and practicing methods needed to study behavior of volcanoes. (Author/JN)

  19. Geological background and geodynamic mechanism of Mt. Changbai volcanoes on the China-Korea border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia-qi; Chen, Shuang-shuang; Guo, Zheng-fu; Guo, Wen-feng; He, Huai-yu; You, Hai-tao; Kim, Hang-min; Sung, Gun-ho; Kim, Haenam

    2015-11-01

    The intense Cenozoic volcanism of Mt. Changbai provides a natural laboratory for investigating the characteristics of volcanism and the dynamical evolution of the Northeast Asian continental margin. Mt. Changbai volcanoes predominantly consist of Wangtian'e volcano in China, Tianchi volcano spanning China and DPR Korea, and Namphothe volcano in DPR Korea. Geochronology data and historical records of volcanism indicate that the three eruption centers were formed in the following sequence: Wangtian'e volcano to Namphothe and Tianchi volcano, advancing temporally and spatially from southwest to northeast. The three eruption centers of Mt. Changbai volcano are located close together, have similar magma evolution trends, bimodal volcanic rock distribution, and an enriched mantle source, etc. Although the Cenozoic volcanism in Mt. Changbai is thought to be somewhat related to the subduction of the Western Pacific Plate, the regularity of volcanic activity and petrography characteristics have continental rift affinity. We therefore conclude that the occurrence of synchronous and similar volcanic activity on both sides of the Japan Sea (i.e., the Japan Arc and Northeast China) likely respond to the rift expansion and the back-arc spreading of Japan Sea. From many perspectives, Mt. Changbai volcano is a giant active volcano with hidden potentially eruptive risks.

  20. ASTER Images Mt. Usu Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    On April 3, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra Satellite captured this image of the erupting Mt. Usu volcano in Hokkaido, Japan. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image the Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    This false color infrared image of Mt Usu volcano is dominated by Lake Toya, an ancient volcanic caldera. On the south shore is the active Usu volcano. On Friday, March 31, more than 11,000 people were evacuated by helicopter, truck and boat from the foot of Usu, that began erupting from the northwest flank, shooting debris and plumes of smoke streaked with blue lightning thousands of feet in the air. Although no lava gushed from the mountain, rocks and ash continued to fall after the eruption. The region was shaken by thousands of tremors before the eruption. People said they could taste grit from the ash that was spewed as high as 2,700 meters (8,850 ft) into the sky and fell to coat surrounding towns with ash. 'Mount Usu has had seven significant eruptions that we know of, and at no time has it ended quickly with only a small scale eruption,' said Yoshio Katsui, a professor at Hokkaido University. This was the seventh major eruption of Mount Usu in the past 300 years. Fifty people died when the volcano erupted in 1822, its worst known eruption.

    In the image, most of the land is covered by snow. Vegetation, appearing red in the false color composite, can be seen in the agricultural fields, and forests in the mountains. Mt. Usu is crossed by three dark streaks. These are the paths of ash deposits that rained out from eruption plumes two days earlier. The prevailing wind was from the northwest, carrying the ash away from the main city of Date. Ash deposited can be traced on the image as far away as 10 kilometers (16

  1. Volcano Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouet, B.

    - A fundamental goal of volcano seismology is to understand active magmatic systems, to characterize the configuration of such systems, and to determine the extent and evolution of source regions of magmatic energy. Such understanding is critical to our assessment of eruptive behavior and its hazardous impacts. With the emergence of portable broadband seismic instrumentation, availability of digital networks with wide dynamic range, and development of new powerful analysis techniques, rapid progress is being made toward a synthesis of high-quality seismic data to develop a coherent model of eruption mechanics. Examples of recent advances are: (1) high-resolution tomography to image subsurface volcanic structures at scales of a few hundred meters; (2) use of small-aperture seismic antennas to map the spatio-temporal properties of long-period (LP) seismicity; (3) moment tensor inversions of very-long-period (VLP) data to derive the source geometry and mass-transport budget of magmatic fluids; (4) spectral analyses of LP events to determine the acoustic properties of magmatic and associated hydrothermal fluids; and (5) experimental modeling of the source dynamics of volcanic tremor. These promising advances provide new insights into the mechanical properties of volcanic fluids and subvolcanic mass-transport dynamics. As new seismic methods refine our understanding of seismic sources, and geochemical methods better constrain mass balance and magma behavior, we face new challenges in elucidating the physico-chemical processes that cause volcanic unrest and its seismic and gas-discharge manifestations. Much work remains to be done toward a synthesis of seismological, geochemical, and petrological observations into an integrated model of volcanic behavior. Future important goals must include: (1) interpreting the key types of magma movement, degassing and boiling events that produce characteristic seismic phenomena; (2) characterizing multiphase fluids in subvolcanic

  2. Volcano seismology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chouet, B.

    2003-01-01

    A fundamental goal of volcano seismology is to understand active magmatic systems, to characterize the configuration of such systems, and to determine the extent and evolution of source regions of magmatic energy. Such understanding is critical to our assessment of eruptive behavior and its hazardous impacts. With the emergence of portable broadband seismic instrumentation, availability of digital networks with wide dynamic range, and development of new powerful analysis techniques, rapid progress is being made toward a synthesis of high-quality seismic data to develop a coherent model of eruption mechanics. Examples of recent advances are: (1) high-resolution tomography to image subsurface volcanic structures at scales of a few hundred meters; (2) use of small-aperture seismic antennas to map the spatio-temporal properties of long-period (LP) seismicity; (3) moment tensor inversions of very-long-period (VLP) data to derive the source geometry and mass-transport budget of magmatic fluids; (4) spectral analyses of LP events to determine the acoustic properties of magmatic and associated hydrothermal fluids; and (5) experimental modeling of the source dynamics of volcanic tremor. These promising advances provide new insights into the mechanical properties of volcanic fluids and subvolcanic mass-transport dynamics. As new seismic methods refine our understanding of seismic sources, and geochemical methods better constrain mass balance and magma behavior, we face new challenges in elucidating the physico-chemical processes that cause volcanic unrest and its seismic and gas-discharge manifestations. Much work remains to be done toward a synthesis of seismological, geochemical, and petrological observations into an integrated model of volcanic behavior. Future important goals must include: (1) interpreting the key types of magma movement, degassing and boiling events that produce characteristic seismic phenomena; (2) characterizing multiphase fluids in subvolcanic

  3. Cascades Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Driedger, Carolyn; Pallister, John

    2008-01-01

    Washington's Mount St. Helens volcano reawakens explosively on October 1, 2004, after 18 years of quiescence. Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) study and observe Mount St. Helens and other volcanoes of the Cascade Range in Washington, Oregon, and northern California that hold potential for future eruptions. CVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Mount St. Helens and CVO at http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/.

  4. K2V2O2(AsO4)2

    PubMed Central

    Belkhiri, Sabrina; Mezaoui, Djillali; Roisnel, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    The vanadium oxide arsenate with formula K2V2O2(AsO4)2, dipotassium divanadium(IV) dioxide diarsenate, has been synthesized by solid-state reaction in an evacuated silica ampoule. Its structure is isotypic with K2V2O2(PO4)2. The framework is built up from corner-sharing VO6 octa­hedra and AsO4 tetra­hedra, creating an infinite [VAsO8]∞ chain running along the a- and c-axis directions. The K+ cations are located in hexa­gonal tunnels, which are delimited by the connection of the [VAsO8]∞ chains. PMID:22807696

  5. Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Murray, Tom; Read, Cyrus

    2008-01-01

    Steam plume from the 2006 eruption of Augustine volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Explosive ash-producing eruptions from Alaska's 40+ historically active volcanoes pose hazards to aviation, including commercial aircraft flying the busy North Pacific routes between North America and Asia. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors these volcanoes to provide forecasts of eruptive activity. AVO is a joint program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAFGI), and the State of Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (ADGGS). AVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Augustine volcano and AVO at http://www.avo.alaska.edu.

  6. Structural features of two novel alluaudite-like arsenates Cd1.16Zn2.34(AsO4)1.5(HAsO4)(H2AsO4)0.5 and Cd0.74Mg2.76(AsO4)1.5(HAsO4)(H2AsO4)0.5

    PubMed Central

    Stojanović, Jovica; Đorđević, Tamara; Karanović, Ljiljana

    2012-01-01

    Two new compounds, Cd1.16Zn2.34(AsO4)1.5(HAsO4)(H2AsO4)0.5 (1) and Cd0.74Mg2.76(AsO4)1.5(HAsO4)(H2AsO4)0.5 (2), have been prepared hydrothermally. Their crystal structures consist of chains of edge-sharing M1O4(OH0.5)2, M1aO4(OH0.5)2, M2O5(OH0.5), and M2aO5(OH0.5) octahedra (M1, M1a = Zn, Cd; M2, M2a = Zn for 1, and M1, M1a = Mg, Cd; M2, M2a = Mg for 2) that are stacked parallel to (1 0 1) and are connected by the [(AsO4)0.5(AsO3(OH))0.5]2.5− and [(AsO4)0.5(AsO2(OH)2)0.5]2− tetrahedra. These chains produce two types of channels parallel to the c-axis. Cd atoms are located in channels 2, while in channels 1 are situated hydrogen atoms of OH groups. The infrared spectra clearly show the presence of broad O—H stretching and bending vibrations centred at 3236, 2392 1575 and 1396 cm−1 in (1), and 3210, 2379 1602 and 1310 cm−1 in (2). The O—H stretching frequency is in good agreement with O⋯O distances. Furthermore, structural characteristics of compounds with similar alluaudite-like structures were discussed. PMID:23471556

  7. Structural features of two novel alluaudite-like arsenates Cd1.16Zn2.34(AsO4)1.5(HAsO4)(H2AsO4)0.5 and Cd0.74Mg2.76(AsO4)1.5(HAsO4)(H2AsO4)0.5.

    PubMed

    Stojanović, Jovica; Dorđević, Tamara; Karanović, Ljiljana

    2012-04-15

    Two new compounds, Cd1.16Zn2.34(AsO4)1.5(HAsO4)(H2AsO4)0.5 (1) and Cd0.74Mg2.76(AsO4)1.5(HAsO4)(H2AsO4)0.5 (2), have been prepared hydrothermally. Their crystal structures consist of chains of edge-sharing M1O4(OH0.5)2, M1aO4(OH0.5)2, M2O5(OH0.5), and M2aO5(OH0.5) octahedra (M1, M1a = Zn, Cd; M2, M2a = Zn for 1, and M1, M1a = Mg, Cd; M2, M2a = Mg for 2) that are stacked parallel to (1 0 1) and are connected by the [(AsO4)0.5(AsO3(OH))0.5](2.5-) and [(AsO4)0.5(AsO2(OH)2)0.5](2-) tetrahedra. These chains produce two types of channels parallel to the c-axis. Cd atoms are located in channels 2, while in channels 1 are situated hydrogen atoms of OH groups. The infrared spectra clearly show the presence of broad O-H stretching and bending vibrations centred at 3236, 2392 1575 and 1396 cm(-1) in (1), and 3210, 2379 1602 and 1310 cm(-1) in (2). The O-H stretching frequency is in good agreement with O⋯O distances. Furthermore, structural characteristics of compounds with similar alluaudite-like structures were discussed.

  8. K0.8Ag0.2Nb4O9AsO4

    PubMed Central

    Ben Amor, Rym; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    The title compound, potassium silver tetra­niobium nona­oxide arsenate, K0.8Ag0.2Nb4O9AsO4, was prepared by a solid-state reaction at 1183 K. The structure consists of infinite (Nb2AsO14)n chains parallel to the b axis and cross-linked by corner sharing via pairs of edge-sharing octa­hedra. Each pair links together four infinite chains to form a three-dimensional framework. The K+ and Ag+ ions partially occupy several independent close positions in the inter­connected cavities delimited by the framework. K0.8Ag0.2Nb4O9AsO4 is likely to exhibit fast alkali-ion mobility and ion-exchange properties. The Wyckoff symbols of special positions are as follows: one Nb 8e, one Nb 8g, As 4c, two K 8f, one Ag 8f, one Ag 4c, one O 8g, one O 4c. PMID:21202442

  9. NaAg2Mo3O9AsO4

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Hamadi; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    The title compound, sodium disilver arsenatotrimolybdate, Na0.93 (1)Ag2.07 (1)Mo3AsO13, was prepared by a solid-state reaction. In the crystal structure, isolated AsO4 tetra­hedra share corners with groups of three edge-sharing MoO6 octa­hedra. This arrangement leads to the formation of anionic 1 ∞[Mo3AsO13]n ribbons extending parallel to [100]. The three metal sites show occupational disorder by AgI and NaI cations, each with a different Ag:Na ratio. The metal cations are situated in the space between the ribbons and are surrounded by terminal O atoms of the ribbons in the form of distorted MO7 polyhedra (M = Ag, Na) for distances < 3.0 Å. The title compound shows weak ionic conductivity. Structural relationships between different compounds in the quaternary systems M–Sb–P–O, M–Nb–P–O and M–Mo–As–O (M is Ag or an alkali metal) are also discussed. PMID:21587345

  10. K0.78Na0.22MoO2AsO4

    PubMed Central

    Jouini, Raja; Bouzidi, Chahira; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    The title compound, potassium sodium dioxidomolybden­um(VI) arsenate, K0.78Na0.22MoO2AsO4, was synthesized by a solid-state reaction route. The structure is built up from corner-sharing MoO6 octa­hedra and AsO4 tetra­hedra, creating infinite [MoAsO8]∞ chains running along the b-axis direction. As, Mo and all but one O atom are on special positions (4c) with m symmetry and K (occupancy 0.78) is on a position (4a) of -1 in the tunnels. The possible motion of the alkali cations has been investigated by means of the bond-valance sum (BVS) model. The simulation shows that the Na+ motion appears to be easier mainly along the b-axis direction. Structural relationships between the different compounds of the AMoO2AsO4 (A = Ag, Li, Na, K, Rb) series and MXO8 (M = V; X = P, As) chains are discussed. PMID:24109253

  11. Distant Mt. Fuji, Island of Honshu Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This distant view of Mt. Fuji, on the main home island of Honshu, Japan (34.0N, 139.0E) was taken from about 450 miles to the south. Evan at that great distance, the majestic and inspiring Mt. Fuji is still plainly visible and easily recognized as a world renowned symbol of Japan. The snow capped extinct volcano lies just a few miles south of Tokyo.

  12. Volcanoes: Nature's Caldrons Challenge Geochemists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurer, Pamela S.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews various topics and research studies on the geology of volcanoes. Areas examined include volcanoes and weather, plate margins, origins of magma, magma evolution, United States Geological Survey (USGS) volcano hazards program, USGS volcano observatories, volcanic gases, potassium-argon dating activities, and volcano monitoring strategies.…

  13. Galactic Super Volcano Similar to Iceland Volcano

    NASA Video Gallery

    This composite image from NASAs Chandra X-ray Observatory with radio data from the Very Large Array shows a cosmic volcano being driven by a black hole in the center of the M87 galaxy. This eruptio...

  14. Volcanoes, Observations and Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Clifford; Prejean, Stephanie

    Volcanoes are critical geologic hazards that challenge our ability to make long-term forecasts of their eruptive behaviors. They also have direct and indirect impacts on human lives and society. As is the case with many geologic phenomena, the time scales over which volcanoes evolve greatly exceed that of a human lifetime. On the other hand, the time scale over which a volcano can move from inactivity to eruption can be rather short: months, weeks, days, and even hours. Thus, scientific study and monitoring of volcanoes is essential to mitigate risk. There are thousands of volcanoes on Earth, and it is impractical to study and implement ground-based monitoring at them all. Fortunately, there are other effective means for volcano monitoring, including increasing capabilities for satellite-based technologies.

  15. The Volcano Adventure Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, Fraser

    2005-05-01

    Adventure travels to volcanoes offer chance encounters with danger, excitement, and romance, plus opportunities to experience scientific enlightenment and culture. To witness a violently erupting volcano and its resulting impacts on landscape, climate, and humanity is a powerful personal encounter with gigantic planetary forces. To study volcano processes and products during eruptions is to walk in the footsteps of Pliny himself. To tour the splendors and horrors of 25 preeminent volcanoes might be the experience of a lifetime, for scientists and nonscientists alike. In The Volcano Adventure Guide, we now have the ultimate tourist volume to lead us safely to many of the world's famous volcanoes and to ensure that we will see the important sites at each one.

  16. Volcanoes: observations and impact

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurber, Clifford; Prejean, Stephanie G.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanoes are critical geologic hazards that challenge our ability to make long-term forecasts of their eruptive behaviors. They also have direct and indirect impacts on human lives and society. As is the case with many geologic phenomena, the time scales over which volcanoes evolve greatly exceed that of a human lifetime. On the other hand, the time scale over which a volcano can move from inactivity to eruption can be rather short: months, weeks, days, and even hours. Thus, scientific study and monitoring of volcanoes is essential to mitigate risk. There are thousands of volcanoes on Earth, and it is impractical to study and implement ground-based monitoring at them all. Fortunately, there are other effective means for volcano monitoring, including increasing capabilities for satellite-based technologies.

  17. Erupting Volcano Mount Etna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An Expedition Two crewmember aboard the International Space Station (ISS) captured this overhead look at the smoke and ash regurgitated from the erupting volcano Mt. Etna on the island of Sicily, Italy. At an elevation of 10,990 feet (3,350 m), the summit of the Mt. Etna volcano, one of the most active and most studied volcanoes in the world, has been active for a half-million years and has erupted hundreds of times in recorded history.

  18. Volcano hazards at Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Mastin, Larry G.; Scott, William E.; Schilling, Steven P.

    1997-01-01

    Newberry volcano is a broad shield volcano located in central Oregon. It has been built by thousands of eruptions, beginning about 600,000 years ago. At least 25 vents on the flanks and summit have been active during several eruptive episodes of the past 10,000 years. The most recent eruption 1,300 years ago produced the Big Obsidian Flow. Thus, the volcano's long history and recent activity indicate that Newberry will erupt in the future. The most-visited part of the volcano is Newberry Crater, a volcanic depression or caldera at the summit of the volcano. Seven campgrounds, two resorts, six summer homes, and two major lakes (East and Paulina Lakes) are nestled in the caldera. The caldera has been the focus of Newberry's volcanic activity for at least the past 10,000 years. Other eruptions during this time have occurred along a rift zone on the volcano's northwest flank and, to a lesser extent, the south flank. Many striking volcanic features lie in Newberry National Volcanic Monument, which is managed by the U.S. Forest Service. The monument includes the caldera and extends along the northwest rift zone to the Deschutes River. About 30 percent of the area within the monument is covered by volcanic products erupted during the past 10,000 years from Newberry volcano. Newberry volcano is presently quiet. Local earthquake activity (seismicity) has been trifling throughout historic time. Subterranean heat is still present, as indicated by hot springs in the caldera and high temperatures encountered during exploratory drilling for geothermal energy. This report describes the kinds of hazardous geologic events that might occur in the future at Newberry volcano. A hazard-zonation map is included to show the areas that will most likely be affected by renewed eruptions. In terms of our own lifetimes, volcanic events at Newberry are not of day-to-day concern because they occur so infrequently; however, the consequences of some types of eruptions can be severe. When Newberry

  19. Yellowstone Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Lowenstern, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Eruption of Yellowstone's Old Faithful Geyser. Yellowstone hosts the world's largest and most diverse collection of natural thermal features, which are the surface expression of magmatic heat at shallow depths in the crust. The Yellowstone system is monitored by the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO), a partnership among the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Yellowstone National Park, and the University of Utah. YVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Yellowstone and YVO at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo.

  20. Mud volcanoes on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komar, Paul D.

    1991-01-01

    The term mud volcano is applied to a variety of landforms having in common a formation by extrusion of mud from beneath the ground. Although mud is the principal solid material that issues from a mud volcano, there are many examples where clasts up to boulder size are found, sometimes thrown high into the air during an eruption. Other characteristics of mud volcanoes (on Earth) are discussed. The possible presence of mud volcanoes, which are common and widespread on Earth, on Mars is considered.

  1. Stress, strain rate and anisotropy in Kyushu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, M. K.; Aoki, Y.; Unglert, K.; Ohkura, T.; Umakoshi, K.; Shimizu, H.; Iguchi, M.; Tameguri, T.; Ohminato, T.; Mori, J.

    2016-04-01

    Seismic anisotropy, the directional dependence of wave speeds, may be caused by stress-oriented cracks or by strain-oriented minerals, yet few studies have quantitatively compared anisotropy to stress and strain over large regions. Here we compare crustal stress and strain rates on the Island of Kyushu, Japan, as measured from inversions of focal mechanisms, GPS and shear wave splitting. Over 85,000 shear wave splitting measurements from local and regional earthquakes are obtained from the NIED network between 2004 and 2012, and on Aso, Sakurajima, Kirishima and Unzen volcano networks. Strain rate measurements are made from the Japanese Geonet stations. JMA-determined S arrival times processed with the MFAST shear wave splitting code measure fast polarisations (Φ), related to the orientation of the anisotropic medium and time delays (dt), related to the path length and the percent anisotropy. We apply the TESSA 2-D delay time tomography and spatial averaging code to the highest quality events, which have nearly vertical incidence angles, separating the 3455 shallow (depth < 40 km) from the 4957 deep (> = 40 km) earthquakes. Using square grids with 30 km sides for all the inversions, the best correlations are observed between splitting from shallow earthquakes and stress. Axes of maximum horizontal stress (SHmax) and Φ correlate with a coefficient c of 0.56, significant at the 99% confidence level. Their mean difference is 31.9°. Axes of maximum compressional strain rate and SHmax are also well aligned, with an average difference of 28°, but they do not correlate with each other, meaning that where they differ, the difference is not systematic. Anisotropy strength is negatively correlated with the stress ratio parameter determined from focal mechanism inversion (c = - 0.64; significant at the 99% confidence level). The anisotropy and stress results are consistent with stress-aligned microcracks in the crust in a dominantly strike-slip regime. Eigenvalues of

  2. Alaska Volcano Observatory at 20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2008-12-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was established in 1988 in the wake of the 1986 Augustine eruption through a congressional earmark. Even within the volcanological community, there was skepticism about AVO. Populations directly at risk in Alaska were small compared to Cascadia, and the logistical costs of installing and maintaining monitoring equipment were much higher. Questions were raised concerning the technical feasibility of keeping seismic stations operating through the long, dark, stormy Alaska winters. Some argued that AVO should simply cover Augustine with instruments and wait for the next eruption there, expected in the mid 90s (but delayed until 2006), rather than stretching to instrument as many volcanoes as possible. No sooner was AVO in place than Redoubt erupted and a fully loaded passenger 747 strayed into the eruption cloud between Anchorage and Fairbanks, causing a powerless glide to within a minute of impact before the pilot could restart two engines and limp into Anchorage. This event forcefully made the case that volcano hazard mitigation is not just about people and infrastructure on the ground, and is particularly important in the heavily traveled North Pacific where options for flight diversion are few. In 1996, new funding became available through an FAA earmark to aggressively extend volcano monitoring far into the Aleutian Islands with both ground-based networks and round-the-clock satellite monitoring. Beyond the Aleutians, AVO developed a monitoring partnership with Russians volcanologists at the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. The need to work together internationally on subduction phenomena that span borders led to formation of the Japan-Kamchatka-Alaska Subduction Processes (JKASP) consortium. JKASP meets approximately biennially in Sapporo, Petropavlovsk, and Fairbanks. In turn, these meetings and support from NSF and the Russian Academy of Sciences led to new international education and

  3. Volcano infrasound: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey Bruce; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2011-09-01

    Exploding volcanoes, which produce intense infrasound, are reminiscent of the veritable explosion of volcano infrasound papers published during the last decade. Volcano infrasound is effective for tracking and quantifying eruptive phenomena because it corresponds to activity occurring near and around the volcanic vent, as opposed to seismic signals, which are generated by both surface and internal volcanic processes. As with seismology, infrasound can be recorded remotely, during inclement weather, or in the dark to provide a continuous record of a volcano's unrest. Moreover, it can also be exploited at regional or global distances, where seismic monitoring has limited efficacy. This paper provides a literature overview of the current state of the field and summarizes applications of infrasound as a tool for better understanding volcanic activity. Many infrasound studies have focused on integration with other geophysical data, including seismic, thermal, electromagnetic radiation, and gas spectroscopy and they have generally improved our understanding of eruption dynamics. Other work has incorporated infrasound into volcano surveillance to enhance capabilities for monitoring hazardous volcanoes and reducing risk. This paper aims to provide an overview of volcano airwave studies (from analog microbarometer to modern pressure transducer) and summarizes how infrasound is currently used to infer eruption dynamics. It also outlines the relative merits of local and regional infrasound surveillance, highlights differences between array and network sensor topologies, and concludes with mention of sensor technologies appropriate for volcano infrasound study.

  4. A Rapid Turn-around, Scalable Big Data Processing Capability for the JPL Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattmann, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    The JPL Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) is an integrated LIDAR and Spectrometer measuring snow depth and rate of snow melt in the Sierra Nevadas, specifically, the Tuolumne River Basin, Sierra Nevada, California above the O'Shaughnessy Dam of the Hetch Hetchy reservoir, and the Uncompahgre Basin, Colorado, amongst other sites. The ASO data was delivered to water resource managers from the California Department of Water Resources in under 24 hours from the time that the Twin Otter aircraft landed in Mammoth Lakes, CA to the time disks were plugged in to the ASO Mobile Compute System (MCS) deployed at the Sierra Nevada Aquatic Research Laboratory (SNARL) near the airport. ASO performed weekly flights and each flight took between 500GB to 1 Terabyte of raw data, which was then processed from level 0 data products all the way to full level 4 maps of Snow Water Equivalent, albedo mosaics, and snow depth from LIDAR. These data were produced by Interactive Data analysis Language (IDL) algorithms which were then unobtrusively and automatically integrated into an Apache OODT and Apache Tika based Big Data processing system. Data movement was both electronic and physical including novel uses of LaCie 1 and 2 TeraByte (TB) data bricks and deployment in rugged terrain. The MCS was controlled remotely from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology (JPL) in Pasadena, California on behalf of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Communication was aided through the use of novel Internet Relay Chat (IRC) command and control mechanisms and through the use of the Notifico open source communication tools. This talk will describe the high powered, and light-weight Big Data processing system that we developed for ASO and its implications more broadly for airborne missions at NASA and throughout the government. The lessons learned from ASO show the potential to have a large impact in the development of Big Data processing systems in the years

  5. The NASA Airborne Snow Observatory: Demonstration Mission-3 and the Path Forward to a Broader ASO Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO), an imaging spectrometer and imaging LiDAR system, to quantify snow water equivalent and snow albedo, provide unprecedented knowledge of snow properties, and provide complete, robust inputs to snowmelt runoff models, water management models, and systems of the future. This talk presents results from the third Demonstration Mission that occurred during the intense California drought of spring 2015, a snow year far worse than the previously worst snow year on record of 2014, and an overview of the various analyses that are finally available due to the uniqueness of the ASO data. In 2015, ASO provided complete basin coverage for the Tuolumne, Merced, Lakes, Rush Creek, and Middle+South Forks of Kings River Basins in the California Sierra Nevada and the Upper Rio Grande, Conejos, and Uncompahgre Basins in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. ASO performed its first wintertime acquisitions in the Tuolumne Basin in response to water managers' needs to quantify SWE volume in what was already realized as dire conditions. Analyses show that with ASO data, river flows and reservoir inflows from the ASO acquisition date to 1 July can be estimated with uncertainties of less than 2%. These results provide enormous value in management operational flexibility for the diversity of needs, and provide strong scientific constraints on the physical processes controlling snowmelt runoff. Snowmelt runoff models are markedly better constrained due to the now accurate knowledge of the distribution of snow water equivalent. With the ASO high-resolution spectrometer and lidar data for a snow-free acquisition, we can determine surface classifications, vegetation heights, and river networks. These data allow runoff models to be accurately and rapidly developed with unprecedented accuracy. These data are now being used to constrain models of varying complexity. Finally, we discuss the path forward on expanding ASO to cover the entire Sierra Nevada and the

  6. Reunion Island Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On January 16, 2002, lava that had begun flowing on January 5 from the Piton de la Fournaise volcano on the French island of Reunion abruptly decreased, marking the end of the volcano's most recent eruption. These false color MODIS images of Reunion, located off the southeastern coast of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean, were captured on the last day of the eruption (top) and two days later (bottom). The volcano itself is located on the southeast side of the island and is dark brown compared to the surrounding green vegetation. Beneath clouds (light blue) and smoke, MODIS detected the hot lava pouring down the volcano's flanks into the Indian Ocean. The heat, detected by MODIS at 2.1 um, has been colored red in the January 16 image, and is absent from the lower image, taken two days later on January 18, suggesting the lava had cooled considerably even in that short time. Earthquake activity on the northeast flank continued even after the eruption had stopped, but by January 21 had dropped to a sufficiently low enough level that the 24-hour surveillance by the local observatory was suspended. Reunion is essentially all volcano, with the northwest portion of the island built on the remains of an extinct volcano, and the southeast half built on the basaltic shield of 8,630-foot Piton de la Fournaise. A basaltic shield volcano is one with a broad, gentle slope built by the eruption of fluid basalt lava. Basalt lava flows easily across the ground remaining hot and fluid for long distances, and so they often result in enormous, low-angle cones. The Piton de la Fournaise is one of Earth's most active volcanoes, erupting over 150 times in the last few hundred years, and it has been the subject of NASA research because of its likeness to the volcanoes of Mars. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  7. Volcanoes. A planetary perspective.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, P.

    In this book, the author gives an account of the familiar violent aspects of volcanoes and the various forms that eruptions can take. He explores why volcanoes exist at all, why volcanoes occur where they do, and how examples of major historical eruptions can be interpreted in terms of physical processes. Throughout he attempts to place volcanism in a planetary perspective, exploring the pre-eminent role of submarine volcanism on Earth and the stunning range of volcanic phenomena revealed by spacecraft exploration of the solar system.

  8. Japan Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-03

    10503« JPRS-JAR-87-001 3 FEBRUARY 1987 Japan Report 19980629 058 FBIS FOREIGN BROADCAST INFORMATION SERVICE BTIO QUALITY INSPECTED 6... JAPAN REPORT CONTENTS POLITICAL AND SOCIOLOGICAL Impact of Miyazawa’s Appointment as Finance Minister (Kenzo Uchida, et al.; ZAIKAI TEMBO, Oct 86...Direct U.S. Investment Discussed (Akio Morita, et? al.; KEIDANREN GEPPO, Sep 86) 30 Japan -PRC Trade Expansion Council Officially Inaugurated

  9. Japan Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-30

    172068 JPRS-JAR-85-0 1 0 3 0 April 198 5 Japan Report 19980722 116 »TIC QUALITY SfSPECTED 3 FBIS FOREIGN BROADCAST INFORMATION SERVICE...85-010 30 April 19 85 JAPAN REPORT CONTENTS POLITICAL AND SOCIOLOGICAL Break Up of Tanaka-Nakasone Alliance Anticipated (Taro Maki; SEKAI, Jan 85...minister. It became "When I was prime minister, Japan was isolated in international society," and although at the U.S.- Japan summit talks President Reagan

  10. Japan Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    034079 JPRS-JAR-85-005 1 9 February 1 985 Japan Report A Appro-mi for pwMe \\ɘ!fc W [OTIC QUALITY IfSPIS CTED 9 FBIS FOREIGN...Virginia 22201. JPRS-JAR-85-005 19 February 1985 JAPAN REPORT CONTENTS POLITICAL AND SOCIOLOGICAL ’Crisis-Management Set-Up’ Critiqued (Koichiro...Output Jumps 11.2 Percent in 1984 (KYODO, 29 Jan 85) 43 Japan , U.S. Aircraft Makers To Cooperate (KYODO, 25 Jan 85) 45 Japan Seeks End to Auto

  11. Japan Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-09

    expenditure . He said that he hoped for greater effort on Japan’s part in regard to the defense of Japan itself and its periphery. This means he clearly set...Forces into real combat forces and their unification with U.S. Forces. They dealt with the mounting defense expenditure , which is also connected with...governments of Japan and the United States on "guidelines for Japan -U.S. cooperation on defense " in 1978. Throughout 1984, even Prime Minister Nakasone

  12. Theoretical and experimental study of the vibrational spectra of sarkinite Mn2(AsO4)(OH) and adamite Zn2(AsO4)(OH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makreski, Petre; Jovanovski, Stefan; Pejov, Ljupco; Kloess, Gert; Hoebler, Hans-Joachim; Jovanovski, Gligor

    2013-09-01

    The arsenate hydroxyl-bearing minerals sarkinite and adamite were studied with vibrational spectroscopic (IR and Raman) and quantum theoretical methods. The observed IR bands in the higher (1100-600 cm-1) and especially lower (600-450 cm-1) frequency region of AsO4 vibrations could clearly discriminate between the studied analogues. The differences between their crystal structures are much pronounced in both IR and Raman OH-stretching regions. Namely, a single strong band is found in the case of orthorhombic adamite compared to four weaker bands observed in corresponding IR and Raman spectral regions of monoclinic sarkinite. Essentially all bands in the experimental spectra, collected at both room and liquid nitrogen temperature, were tentatively assigned. To support the tentative assignment of bands in the vibrational spectra of the mentioned minerals, periodic pseudopotential plane wave density functional theory calculations were carried out. Geometry optimizations of the 3D periodic systems included both optimizations of the atomic positions within the unit cell and of the unit cell itself. In most cases, the assignments were either supported or implied by the obtained theoretical data. It is worth mentioning that this is the first experimental and theoretical study of the vibrational spectra of the very-rare sarkinite mineral.

  13. What Are Volcano Hazards?

    MedlinePlus

    ... large landslides have swept down the slopes of Mount Rainier, Washington, during the past 6,000 years. The ... communities downstream from glacier-clad volcanoes, such as Mount Rainier. To help protect lives and property, scientists of ...

  14. Update Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoopes, Aaron

    This book is a guide intended for persons planning on relocating to Japan. Following a chapter on background information, 13 additional chapters lead the reader step-by-step through the relocation process. These chapters include: before leaving, on arrival, language, culture, doing business in Japan, household pointers and everyday life, schools…

  15. 75 FR 59695 - Foreign-Trade Zone 169-Manatee County, Florida; Extension of Subzone; Aso LLC (Adhesive Bandage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... (Adhesive Bandage Manufacturing); Sarasota County, FL An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade... strips per year) was approved by the Board in 2000 for the manufacture of adhesive bandages under FTZ... has at times instead used various duty suspension provisions on adhesive tape. Aso is now...

  16. Stereo Image of Mt. Usu Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On April 3, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra Satellite captured this image of the erupting Mt. Usu volcano in Hokkaido, Japan. This anaglyph stereo image is of Mt Usu volcano. On Friday, March 31, more than 15,000 people were evacuated by helicopter, truck and boat from the foot of Usu, that began erupting from the northwest flank, shooting debris and plumes of smoke streaked with blue lightning thousands of feet in the air. Although no lava gushed from the mountain, rocks and ash continued to fall after the eruption. The region was shaken by thousands of tremors before the eruption. People said they could taste grit from the ash that was spewed as high as 2,700 meters (8,850 ft) into the sky and fell to coat surrounding towns with ash. A 3-D view can be obtained by looking through stereo glasses, with the blue film through your left eye and red film with your right eye at the same time. North is on your right hand side. For more information, see When Rivers of Rock Flow ASTER web page Image courtesy of MITI, ERSDAC, JAROS, and the U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

  17. Stabilin-1 and Stabilin-2 are specific receptors for the cellular internalization of phosphorothioate-modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Colton M.; Donner, Aaron J.; Blank, Emma E.; Egger, Andrew W.; Kellar, Brianna M.; Østergaard, Michael E.; Seth, Punit P.; Harris, Edward N.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorothioate (PS)-modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have been extensively investigated over the past three decades as pharmacological and therapeutic agents. One second generation ASO, Kynamro™, was recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia and over 35 second generation PS ASOs are at various stages of clinical development. In this report, we show that the Stabilin class of scavenger receptors, which were not previously thought to bind DNA, do bind and internalize PS ASOs. With the use of primary cells from mouse and rat livers and recombinant cell lines each expressing Stabilin-1 and each isoform of Stabilin-2 (315-HARE and 190-HARE), we have determined that PS ASOs bind with high affinity and these receptors are responsible for bulk, clathrin-mediated endocytosis within the cell. Binding is primarily dependent on salt-bridge formation and correct folding of the intact protein receptor. Increased internalization rates also enhanced ASO potency for reducing expression of the non-coding RNA Malat-1, in Stabilin-expressing cell lines. A more thorough understanding of mechanisms by which ASOs are internalized in cells and their intracellular trafficking pathways will aid in the design of next generation antisense agents with improved therapeutic properties. PMID:26908652

  18. The diversity of mud volcanoes in the landscape of Azerbaijan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidov, Tofig

    2014-05-01

    As the natural phenomenon the mud volcanism (mud volcanoes) of Azerbaijan are known from the ancient times. The historical records describing them are since V century. More detail study of this natural phenomenon had started in the second half of XIX century. The term "mud volcano" (or "mud hill") had been given by academician H.W. Abich (1863), more exactly defining this natural phenomenon. All the previous definitions did not give such clear and capacious explanation of it. In comparison with magmatic volcanoes, globally the mud ones are restricted in distribution; they mainly locate within the Alpine-Himalayan, Pacific and Central Asian mobile belts, in more than 30 countries (Columbia, Trinidad Island, Italy, Romania, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Iran, Pakistan, Indonesia, Burma, Malaysia, etc.). Besides it, the zones of mud volcanoes development are corresponded to zones of marine accretionary prisms' development. For example, the South-Caspian depression, Barbados Island, Cascadia (N.America), Costa-Rica, Panama, Japan trench. Onshore it is Indonesia, Japan, and Trinidad, Taiwan. The mud volcanism with non-accretionary conditions includes the areas of Black Sea, Alboran Sea, the Gulf of Mexico (Louisiana coast), Salton Sea. But new investigations reveal more new mud volcanoes and in places which were not considered earlier as the traditional places of mud volcanoes development (e.g. West Nile Rive delta). Azerbaijan is the classic region of mud volcanoes development. From over 800 world mud volcanoes there are about 400 onshore and within the South-Caspian basin, which includes the territory of East Azerbaijan (the regions of Shemakha-Gobustan and Low-Kura River, Absheron peninsula), adjacent water area of South Caspian (Baku and Absheron archipelagoes) and SW Turkmenistan and represents an area of great downwarping with thick (over 25 km) sedimentary series. Generally, in the modern relief the mud volcanoes represent more or less large uplifts

  19. Rearming Japan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    roughly ~’ Ibid., pp. 14-16, 27-30. 12 3.5 percent of their GDP towards defense while Japan spends slightly over 1 percent. Yet, when compared with...runs up huge trade surpluses in its commerce with the United States and Western Europe. Conversely, Japan spends just slightly over one percent of...its GNP on defense indicating to many in the U.S. and Western Europe that Japan is enjoying a free ride and waxing rich under American military

  20. Volcanoes: Coming Up from Under.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Provides specific information about the eruption of Mt. St. Helens in March 1980. Also discusses how volcanoes are formed and how they are monitored. Words associated with volcanoes are listed and defined. (CS)

  1. Evolution of the 120 ka caldera-forming eruption of Kutcharo volcano, eastern Hokkaido, Japan: Geologic and petrologic evidence for multiple vent systems and rapid generation of pyroclastic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Akiko; Nakagawa, Mitsuhiro

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the eruptive sequence and temporal evolution of juvenile materials during the 120 ka Kutcharo pumice flow IV (Kp IV) eruption, which was the most voluminous (175 km3: bulk volume) caldera-forming eruption of Kutcharo volcano. The eruptive deposits are divided into four units in ascending order. Unit 1 is widely dispersed and consists of silt-sized, cohesive ash. Unit 2 is a thin, moderately sorted pumice fall deposit with a restricted distribution and small volume (< 0.2 km3). Unit 3, consisting of widely distributed ignimbrite, is the most voluminous. Unit 4 is also composed of pyroclastic flow deposits, but its distribution is limited to the northwest side of the caldera. Juvenile materials consist mainly of rhyolite pumice (74%-78% SiO2) associated with a minor amount of scoria (52%-73% SiO2) that are found only northwest of the caldera in Unit 3 and Unit 4. These scoriae can be classified on the basis of the P2O5 contents of their matrix glass into low-P, medium-P, and high-P types, which are almost entirely restricted to the lower part of Unit 3, Unit 4, and the upper part of Unit 3, respectively. These three types display distinct mixing trends with the rhyolitic compositions in SiO2-P2O5 variation diagrams. This evidence indicates that three distinct mafic magmas were independently and intermittently injected into the main body of silicic magma to erupt from the northwestern part of the magma system. Mafic injections did not occur in the southern part of the magma system. This petrologic evidence implies that the northwestern and southeastern flows of Unit 3 are heterotopic, contemporaneous products derived from multiple vent systems. Although Unit 2 was derived from an eruptive column, its volume is very small compared to Plinian fall deposits of typical caldera-forming eruptions. In our interpretation, the activity of the Kp IV eruption reached its climax rapidly, depositing Unit 3, without first producing a stable Plinian column. The

  2. Erupting Volcano Mount Etna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Expedition Five crew members aboard the International Space Station (ISS) captured this overhead look at the smoke and ash regurgitated from the erupting volcano Mt. Etna on the island of Sicily, Italy in October 2002. Triggered by a series of earthquakes on October 27, 2002, this eruption was one of Etna's most vigorous in years. This image shows the ash plume curving out toward the horizon. The lighter-colored plumes down slope and north of the summit seen in this frame are produced by forest fires set by flowing lava. At an elevation of 10,990 feet (3,350 m), the summit of the Mt. Etna volcano, one of the most active and most studied volcanoes in the world, has been active for a half-million years and has erupted hundreds of times in recorded history.

  3. Organizational changes at Earthquakes & Volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, David W.

    1992-01-01

    Primary responsibility for the preparation of Earthquakes & Volcanoes within the Geological Survey has shifted from the Office of Scientific Publications to the Office of Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Engineering (OEVE). As a consequence of this reorganization, Henry Spall has stepepd down as Science Editor for Earthquakes & Volcanoes(E&V).

  4. Hawaii's volcanoes revealed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eakins, Barry W.; Robinson, Joel E.; Kanamatsu, Toshiya; Naka, Jiro; Smith, John R.; Takahashi, Eiichi; Clague, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Hawaiian volcanoes typically evolve in four stages as volcanism waxes and wanes: (1) early alkalic, when volcanism originates on the deep sea floor; (2) shield, when roughly 95 percent of a volcano's volume is emplaced; (3) post-shield alkalic, when small-volume eruptions build scattered cones that thinly cap the shield-stage lavas; and (4) rejuvenated, when lavas of distinct chemistry erupt following a lengthy period of erosion and volcanic quiescence. During the early alkalic and shield stages, two or more elongate rift zones may develop as flanks of the volcano separate. Mantle-derived magma rises through a vertical conduit and is temporarily stored in a shallow summit reservoir from which magma may erupt within the summit region or be injected laterally into the rift zones. The ongoing activity at Kilauea's Pu?u ?O?o cone that began in January 1983 is one such rift-zone eruption. The rift zones commonly extend deep underwater, producing submarine eruptions of bulbous pillow lava. Once a volcano has grown above sea level, subaerial eruptions produce lava flows of jagged, clinkery ?a?a or smooth, ropy pahoehoe. If the flows reach the ocean they are rapidly quenched by seawater and shatter, producing a steep blanket of unstable volcanic sediment that mantles the upper submarine slopes. Above sea level then, the volcanoes develop the classic shield profile of gentle lava-flow slopes, whereas below sea level slopes are substantially steeper. While the volcanoes grow rapidly during the shield stage, they may also collapse catastrophically, generating giant landslides and tsunami, or fail more gradually, forming slumps. Deformation and seismicity along Kilauea's south flank indicate that slumping is occurring there today. Loading of the underlying Pacific Plate by the growing volcanic edifices causes subsidence, forming deep basins at the base of the volcanoes. Once volcanism wanes and lava flows no longer reach the ocean, the volcano continues to submerge, while

  5. Volcano-electromagnetic effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, Malcolm J. S.

    2007-01-01

    Volcano-electromagnetic effects—electromagnetic (EM) signals generated by volcanic activity—derive from a variety of physical processes. These include piezomagnetic effects, electrokinetic effects, fluid vaporization, thermal demagnetization/remagnetization, resistivity changes, thermochemical effects, magnetohydrodynamic effects, and blast-excited traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). Identification of different physical processes and their interdependence is often possible with multiparameter monitoring, now common on volcanoes, since many of these processes occur with different timescales and some are simultaneously identified in other geophysical data (deformation, seismic, gas, ionospheric disturbances, etc.). EM monitoring plays an important part in understanding these processes.

  6. Using thermal remanent magnetisation (TRM) to distinguish block and ash flow and debris flow deposits, and to estimate their emplacement temperature: 1991-1995 lava dome eruption at Mt. Unzen Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, D.; Cas, R. A. F.; Folkes, C.; Takarada, S.; Oda, H.; Porreca, M.

    2015-09-01

    The 1991-1995 Mt. Unzen eruption (Kyushu, Japan) produced 13 lava domes, approximately 9400 block and ash pyroclastic flows (BAF) resulting from lava dome collapse events and syn- and post-dome collapse debris flow (DF) events. In the field, it can be very difficult to distinguish from field facies characteristics which deposits are primary hot BAF, cold BAF or rock avalanche, or secondary DF deposits. In this study we use a combination of field observations and thermal remanent magnetisation (TRM) analysis of juvenile, lava dome derived clasts from seven deposits of the 1991-1995 Mt. Unzen eruption in order to distinguish between primary BAF deposits and secondary DF deposits and to determine their emplacement temperature. Four major TRM patterns were identified: (1) Type I: clasts with a single magnetic component oriented parallel to the Earth's magnetic field at time and site of emplacement. This indicates that these deposits were deposited at very high temperature, between the Curie temperature of magnetite (~ 540 °C) and the glass transition temperature of the lava dome (~ 745 °C). These clasts are found in high temperature BAF deposits. (2) Type II: clasts with two magnetic components of magnetisation. The lower temperature magnetic components are parallel to the Earth's magnetic field at time of the Unzen eruption. Temperature estimations for these deposits can range from 80 to 540 °C. We found this paleomagnetic behaviour in moderate temperature BAF or warm DF deposits. (3) Type III: clasts with three magnetic components, with a lower temperature component oriented parallel to the Earth's magnetic field at Unzen. The individual clast temperatures estimated for this kind of deposit are usually less than 300 °C. We interpret this paleomagnetic behaviour as the effect of different thermal events during their emplacement history. There are several interpretations for this paleomagnetic behaviour including remobilisation of moderate temperature BAF, warm DF

  7. Santa Maria Volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The eruption of Santa Maria volcano in 1902 was one of the largest eruptions of the 20th century, forming a large crater on the mountain's southwest flank. Since 1922, a lava-dome complex, Santiaguito, has been forming in the 1902 crater. Growth of the dome has produced pyroclastic flows as recently as the 2001-they can be identified in this image. The city of Quezaltenango (approximately 90,000 people in 1989) sits below the 3772 m summit. The volcano is considered dangerous because of the possibility of a dome collapse such as one that occurred in 1929, which killed about 5000 people. A second hazard results from the flow of volcanic debris into rivers south of Santiaguito, which can lead to catastrophic flooding and mud flows. More information on this volcano can be found at web sites maintained by the Smithsonian Institution, Volcano World, and Michigan Tech University. ISS004-ESC-7999 was taken 17 February 2002 from the International Space Station using a digital camera. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Searching and viewing of additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts is available at the NASA-JSC Gateway to

  8. Nyamuragira Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nyamuragira volcano erupted on July 26, 2002, spewing lava high into the air along with a large plume of steam, ash, and sulfur dioxide. The 3,053-meter (10,013-foot) volcano is located in eastern Congo, very near that country's border with Rwanda. Nyamuragira is the smaller, more violent sibling of Nyiragongo volcano, which devastated the town of Goma with its massive eruption in January 2002. Nyamuragira is situated just 40 km (24 miles) northeast of Goma. This pair of images was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, on July 26. The image on the left shows the scene in true color. The small purple box in the upper righthand corner marks the location of Nyamuragira's hot summit. The false-color image on the right shows the plume from the volcano streaming southwestward. This image was made using MODIS' channels sensitive at wavelengths from 8.5 to 11 microns. Red pixels indicate high concentrations of sulphur dioxide. Image courtesy Liam Gumley, Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison

  9. Nyamuragira Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nyamuragira volcano erupted on July 26, 2002, spewing lava high into the air along with a large plume of steam, ash, and sulfur dioxide. The 3,053-meter (10,013-foot) volcano is located in eastern Congo, very near that country's border with Rwanda. Nyamuragira is the smaller, more violent sibling of Nyiragongo volcano, which devastated the town of Goma with its massive eruption in January 2002. Nyamuragira is situated just 40 km (24 miles) northeast of Goma. This true-color image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, on July 28, 2002. Nyamuragira is situated roughly in the center of this scene, roughly 100 km south of Lake Edward and just north of Lake Kivu (which is mostly obscured by the haze from the erupting volcano and the numerous fires burning in the surrounding countryside). Due south of Lake Kivu is the long, narrow Lake Tanganyika running south and off the bottom center of this scene.

  10. Geology of Kilauea volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.B. . Federal Center); Trusdell, F.A. . Hawaiian Volcano Observatory)

    1993-08-01

    This paper summarizes studies of the structure, stratigraphy, petrology, drill holes, eruption frequency, and volcanic and seismic hazards of Kilauea volcano. All the volcano is discussed, but the focus is on its lower east rift zone (LERZ) because active exploration for geothermal energy is concentrated in that area. Kilauea probably has several separate hydrothermal-convection systems that develop in response to the dynamic behavior of the volcano and the influx of abundant meteoric water. Important features of some of these hydrothermal-convection systems are known through studies of surface geology and drill holes. Observations of eruptions during the past two centuries, detailed geologic mapping, radiocarbon dating, and paleomagnetic secular-variation studies indicate that Kilauea has erupted frequently from its summit and two radial rift zones during Quaternary time. Petrologic studies have established that Kilauea erupts only tholeiitic basalt. Extensive ash deposits at Kilauea's summit and on its LERZ record locally violent, but temporary, disruptions of local hydrothermal-convection systems during the interaction of water or steam with magma. Recent drill holes on the LERZ provide data on the temperatures of the hydrothermal-convection systems, intensity of dike intrusion, porosity and permeability, and an increasing amount of hydrothermal alteration with depth. The prehistoric and historic record of volcanic and seismic activity indicates that magma will continue to be supplied to deep and shallow reservoirs beneath Kilauea's summit and rift zones and that the volcano will be affected by eruptions and earthquakes for many thousands of years. 71 refs., 2 figs.

  11. The Volcano Adventure Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Rosaly

    2005-02-01

    This guide contains vital information for anyone wishing to visit, explore, and photograph active volcanoes safely and enjoyably. Following an introduction that discusses eruption styles of different types of volcanoes and how to prepare for an exploratory trip that avoids volcanic dangers, the book presents guidelines to visiting 42 different volcanoes around the world. It is filled with practical information that includes tour itineraries, maps, transportation details, and warnings of possible non-volcanic dangers. Three appendices direct the reader to a wealth of further volcano resources in a volume that will fascinate amateur enthusiasts and professional volcanologists alike. Rosaly Lopes is a planetary geology and volcanology specialist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. In addition to her curatorial and research work, she has lectured extensively in England and Brazil and written numerous popular science articles. She received a Latinas in Science Award from the Comision Feminil Mexicana Nacional in 1991 and since 1992, has been a co-organizer of the United Nations/European Space Agency/The Planetary Society yearly conferences on Basic Science for the Benefit of Developing Countries.

  12. Geology of kilauea volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, R.B.; Trusdell, F.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes studies of the structure, stratigraphy, petrology, drill holes, eruption frequency, and volcanic and seismic hazards of Kilauea volcano. All the volcano is discussed, but the focus is on its lower cast rift zone (LERZ) because active exploration for geothermal energy is concentrated in that area. Kilauea probably has several separate hydrothermal-convection systems that develop in response to the dynamic behavior of the volcano and the influx of abundant meteoric water. Important features of some of these hydrothermal-convection systems are known through studies of surface geology and drill holes. Observations of eruptions during the past two centuries, detailed geologic mapping, radiocarbon dating, and paleomagnetic secular-variation studies indicate that Kilauea has erupted frequently from its summit and two radial rift zones during Quaternary time. Petrologic studies have established that Kilauea erupts only tholeiitic basalt. Extensive ash deposits at Kilauea's summit and on its LERZ record locally violent, but temporary, disruptions of local hydrothermal-convection systems during the interaction of water or steam with magma. Recent drill holes on the LERZ provide data on the temperatures of the hydrothermal-convection systems, intensity of dike intrusion, porosity and permeability, and an increasing amount of hydrothermal alteration with depth. The prehistoric and historic record of volcanic and seismic activity indicates that magma will continue to be supplied to deep and shallow reservoirs beneath Kilauea's summit and rift zones and that the volcano will be affected by eruptions and earthquakes for many thousands of years. ?? 1993.

  13. Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Gudmundsson, Magnus T.; Vogfjord, Kristin; Pagneux, Emmanuel; Oddsson, Bjorn; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2016-04-01

    The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes is a newly developed open-access web resource in English intended to serve as an official source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland GOSVÁ (commenced in 2012), as well as being part of the effort of FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016) on establishing an Icelandic volcano supersite. Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene (the time since the end of the last glaciation - approximately the last 11,500 years). In the last 50 years, over 20 eruptions have occurred in Iceland displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and the distribution lava and tephra. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in numerous scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU through the FP7 project FUTUREVOLC. The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes is a collaboration of the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Civil Protection Department of the National Commissioner of the Iceland Police, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The Catalogue is built up of chapters with texts and various

  14. Experimental and theoretical characterization of arsenite in water: insights into the coordination environment of As-O.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Solís, Alejandro; Mukopadhyay, Rita; Rosen, Barry P; Stemmler, Timothy L

    2004-05-03

    Long-term exposure to arsenic in drinking water has been linked to cancer of the bladder, lungs, skin, kidney, nasal passages, liver, and prostate in humans. It is therefore important to understand the structural aspects of arsenic in water, as hydrated arsenic is most likely the initial form of the metalloid absorbed by cells. We present a detailed experimental and theoretical characterization of the coordination environment of hydrated arsenite. XANES analysis confirms As(III) is a stable redox form of the metalloid in solution. EXAFS analysis indicate, at neutral pH, arsenite has a nearest-neighbor coordination geometry of approximately 3 As-O bonds at an average bond length of 1.77 A, while at basic pH the nearest-neighbor coordination geometry shifts to a single short As-O bond at 1.69 A and two longer As-O bonds at 1.82 A. Long-range ligand scattering is present in all EXAFS samples; however, these data could not be fit with any degree of certainty. There is no XAS detectable interaction between As and antimony, suggesting they are not imported into cells as a multinuclear complex. XAS results were compared to a structural database of arsenite compounds to confirm that a 3 coordinate As-O complex for hydrated arsenite is the predominate species in solution. Finally, quantum chemical studies indicate arsenite in solution is solvated by 3 water molecules. These results indicate As(OH)3 as the most stable structure existing in solution at neutral pH; thus, ionic As transport does not appear to be involved in the cellular uptake process.

  15. Tracking the movement of Hawaiian volcanoes; Global Positioning System (GPS) measurement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dvorak, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    At some well-studied volcanoes, surface movements of at least several centimeters take place out to distances of about 10 km from the summit of the volcano. Widespread deformation of this type is relatively easy to monitor, because the necessary survey stations can be placed at favorable sites some distance from the summit of the volcano. Examples of deformation of this type include Kilauea and Mauna Loa in Hawaii, Krafla in Iceland, Long Valley in California, Camp Flegrei in Italy, and Sakurajima in Japan. In contrast, surface movement at some other volcanoes, usually volcanoes with steep slopes, is restricted to places within about 1 km of their summits. Examples of this class of volcanoes include Mount St. Helens in Washington, Etna in Italy, and Tangkuban Parahu in Indonesia. Local movement on remote, rugged volcanoes of this type is difficult to observe using conventional methods of measuring ground movement, which generally require a clear line-of-sight between points of interest. However, a revolutionary new technique, called the Global Positional System (GPS), provides a very efficient, alternative method of making such measurements. GPS, which uses satellites and ground-based receivers to accurately record slight crustal movements, is rapidly becoming the method of choice to measure deformation at volcanoes

  16. Disposition and Pharmacology of a GalNAc3-conjugated ASO Targeting Human Lipoprotein (a) in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rosie Z; Graham, Mark J; Post, Noah; Riney, Stan; Zanardi, Thomas; Hall, Shannon; Burkey, Jennifer; Shemesh, Colby S; Prakash, Thazha P; Seth, Punit P; Swayze, Eric E; Geary, Richard S; Wang, Yanfeng; Henry, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Triantennary N-acetyl galactosamine (GalNAc3)-conjugated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have greatly improved potency via receptor-mediated uptake. In the present study, the in vivo pharmacology of a 2′-O-(2-methoxyethyl)-modified ASO conjugated with GalNAc3 (ISIS 681257) together with its unmodified congener (ISIS 494372) targeting human apolipoprotein (a) (apo(a)), were studied in human LPA transgenic mice. Further, the disposition kinetics of ISIS 681257 was studied in CD-1 mice. ISIS 681257 demonstrated over 20-fold improvement in potency over ISIS 494372 as measured by liver apo(a) mRNA and plasma apo(a) protein levels. Following subcutaneous (SC) dosing, ISIS 681257 cleared rapidly from plasma and distributed to tissues. Intact ISIS 681257 was the major full-length oligonucleotide species in plasma. In tissues, however, GalNAc sugar moiety was rapidly metabolized and unconjugated ISIS 681257 accounted > 97% of the total exposure, which was then cleared slowly from tissues with a half-life of 7–8 days, similar to the half-life in plasma. ISIS 681257 is highly bound to plasma proteins (> 94% bound), which limited its urinary excretion. This study confirmed dose-dependent exposure to the parent drug ISIS 681257 in plasma and rapid conversion to unconjugated ASO in tissues. Safety data and the extended half-life support its further development and weekly dosing in phase 1 clinical studies. PMID:27138177

  17. Geochemical fingerprint of the primary magma composition in the marine tephras originated from the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chungwan; Kim, Seonyoung; Lee, Changyeol

    2014-12-01

    The intraplate Baegdusan (Changbai) and Ulleung volcanoes located on the border of China, North Korea, and East/Japan Sea, respectively, have been explained by appeals to both hotspots and asthenospheric mantle upwelling (wet plume) caused by the stagnant Pacific plate. To understand the origin of the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanism, we performed geochemical analyses on the tephra deposits in the East/Japan Sea basins originating from the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanoes. The volcanic glass in the tephra from the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanoes ranged from alkaline trachyte to peralkaline rhyolite and from phonolite to trachyte, respectively. The tephra from the two intraplate volcanoes showed highly enriched incompatible elements, such as Tb, Nb, Hf, and Ta, distinct from those of the ordinary arc volcanoes of the Japanese islands. The straddle distribution of the Th/Yb and Ta/Yb ratios of the tephra deposits from the Baegdusan volcano may originate from the alkali basaltic magma resulting from mixing between the wet plume from the stagnant Pacific plate in the transition zone and the overlying shallow asthenospheric mantle. In contrast, the deposits from the Ulleung volcano show a minor contribution of the stagnant slab to the basaltic magma, implying either partial melting of a more enriched mantle, smaller degrees of partial melting of a garnet-bearing mantle source, or a combination of both processes as the magma genesis. Our study indicated that the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanoes have different magma sources and evolutionary histories.

  18. Japan Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    apprehensions of Europe and America that China would become closely related with Japan alone and that Japan might monopolize the Chinese market . As a...out of the 300 billion yen, 100 billion yen is supplier’s credit from concerted action by the Ex-Im Bank and the Open Market Bank, 130 billion yen is...to launch production in the U.S. in the belief that Japanese automakers will have to continue some form of export restraints for the American market

  19. Radar Image, Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The southeast part of the island of Hokkaido, Japan, is an area dominated by volcanoes and volcanic caldera. The active Usu Volcano is at the lower right edge of the circular Lake Toya-Ko and near the center of the image. The prominent cone above and to the left of the lake is Yotei Volcano with its summit crater. The city of Sapporo lies at the base of the mountains at the top of the image and the town of Yoichi -- the hometown of SRTM astronaut Mamoru Mohri -- is at the upper left edge. The bay of Uchiura-Wan takes up the lower center of the image. In this image, color represents elevation, from blue at the lowest elevations to white at the highest. The radar image has been overlaid to provide more details of the terrain. Due to a processing problem, an island in the center of this crater lake is missing and will be properly placed when further SRTM swaths are processed. The horizontal banding in this image is a processing artifact that will be removed when the navigation information collected by SRTM is fully calibrated. This image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC. Size: 100 by 150 kilometers

  20. Catalogue of Icelandic volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnus; Jonsson, Trausti; Oddsson, Björn; Reynisson, Vidir; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene. In the last 100 years, over 30 eruptions have occurred displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and their distribution. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland (commenced in 2012), and the EU FP7 project FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016), establishing an Icelandic volcano Supersite. The Catalogue is a collaborative effort between the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Icelandic Civil Protection, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The catalogue is scheduled for opening in the first half of 2015 and once completed, it will be an official publication intended to serve as an accurate and up to date source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue is an open web resource in English and is composed of individual chapters on each of the volcanic systems. The chapters include information on the geology and structure of the volcano; the eruption history, pattern and products; the known precursory signals

  1. Volcanic and geologic database projects of the Geological Survey of Japan (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takarada, S.; Nakano, S.; Hoshizumi, H.; Itoh, J.; Urai, M.; Nishiki, K.

    2009-12-01

    Geological Survey of Japan (GSJ) is presently implementing the GEO-DB project, which aims to integrate all kinds of geological information in GSJ. GSJ published more than 50 CD-ROM series and established more than 20 databases at the Research Information Database (RIO-DB) of the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST). Presently, four volcanic databases are open to the public: (1) Quaternary volcano database (RIO-DB), (2) Active volcano database (RIO-DB), and (3) ASTER satellite image database of major volcanoes. The Quaternary volcano database contains information such as volcanic type, history, age and pictures of more than 300 Quaternary volcanoes in Japan. More detailed volcanic information will be added to the database in the near future. The active volcano database contains information of active volcanoes in Japan such as the catalog of eruptive events during the last 10,000 years and geological maps of active volcanoes. The ASTER satellite image database provides sequential ASTER satellite image datasets of major volcanoes in the world. Collaboration between Quaternary and active volcano databases and the VOGRIPA project is the next important activity at the Geological Survey of Japan. The Geological Survey of Japan introduced the Integrated Geological Map Database (GeoMapDB) in 2006. The GeoMapDB is based on a WebGIS technology, which makes it possible to browse, overlay and search geological maps online. The database contains geological maps with scales ranging from 1:2 million to 1:25,000. Links to aforementioned volcanic database and active fault database in RIO-DB are also available. OneGeology is an international initiative of the geological surveys of the world and a flagship project of the ‘International Year of Planet Earth’. It aims to create dynamic geological map of the world available at the world wide web. Geological Surveys from 109 countries of the world are participating in this project. The Geological

  2. Volcano-hazard zonation for San Vicente volcano, El Salvador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, J.J.; Schilling, S.P.; Pullinger, C.R.; Escobar, C.D.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    San Vicente volcano, also known as Chichontepec, is one of many volcanoes along the volcanic arc in El Salvador. This composite volcano, located about 50 kilometers east of the capital city San Salvador, has a volume of about 130 cubic kilometers, rises to an altitude of about 2180 meters, and towers above major communities such as San Vicente, Tepetitan, Guadalupe, Zacatecoluca, and Tecoluca. In addition to the larger communities that surround the volcano, several smaller communities and coffee plantations are located on or around the flanks of the volcano, and major transportation routes are located near the lowermost southern and eastern flanks of the volcano. The population density and proximity around San Vicente volcano, as well as the proximity of major transportation routes, increase the risk that even small landslides or eruptions, likely to occur again, can have serious societal consequences. The eruptive history of San Vicente volcano is not well known, and there is no definitive record of historical eruptive activity. The last significant eruption occurred more than 1700 years ago, and perhaps long before permanent human habitation of the area. Nevertheless, this volcano has a very long history of repeated, and sometimes violent, eruptions, and at least once a large section of the volcano collapsed in a massive landslide. The oldest rocks associated with a volcanic center at San Vicente are more than 2 million years old. The volcano is composed of remnants of multiple eruptive centers that have migrated roughly eastward with time. Future eruptions of this volcano will pose substantial risk to surrounding communities.

  3. Development of volcano monitoring technique using repeating earthquakes observed by the Volcano Observation Network of NIED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Y.; Ueda, H.; Kimura, H.; Nagai, M.; Miyagi, Y.; Fujita, E.; Kozono, T.; Tanada, T.

    2012-12-01

    After the Grate East Japan Earthquake (M9.0) on March 11, 2011, the M6.4 earthquake occurred beneath Mt. Fuji on March 15, 2011. Although the hypocenter seemed to be very close to an assumed magma chamber of Fuji volcano, no anomalies in volcanic activity have been observed until August 2012. As an example, after the M6.1 earthquake occurred in 1998 at southwest of Iwate volcano, a change of seismic velocity structure (e.g. Nishimura et al., 2000) was observed as well as active seismicity and crustal deformation. It had affected waveforms of repeating earthquakes occurring at a plate subduction zone, that is, the waveform similarities were reduced just after the earthquake due to upwelling of magma. In this study, first we analyzed for Mt. Fuji where such changes are expected by the occurrence of the earthquake to try to develop a tool for monitoring active volcanoes using the Volcano Observation network (V-net) data. We used seismic waveform data of repeating earthquakes observed by short period seismometers of V-net and the High Sensitivity Seismograph Network Japan (Hi-net) stations near Fuji volcano after 2007. The seismic data were recorded with a sampling rate of 100 Hz, and we applied 4-8 Hz band pass filter to reduce noise. The repeating earthquakes occurred at the plate subduction zone and their catalog is compiled by Hi-net data (Kimura et al., 2006). We extracted repeating earthquake groups that include earthquakes before and after the M6.4 earthquake on March 15, 2011. A waveform of the first event of the group and waveforms of the other events are compared and calculated cross-correlation coefficients. We adjusted P wave arrivals of each event and calculate the coefficients and lag times of the latter part of the seismic waves with the time window of 1.25 s. We searched the best fit maximizing the cross-correlation coefficients with 0.1 s shift time at each time window. As a result we found three remarkable points at this time. [1] Comparing lag times

  4. Japan: Tsunami

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... tsunami triggered by the March 11, 2011, magnitude 8.9 earthquake centered off Japan's northeastern coast about 130 kilometers (82 ... inland from the eastern shoreline is visible in the post-earthquake image. The white sand beaches visible in the pre-earthquake view are ...

  5. The Alaska Volcano Observatory - Expanded Monitoring of Volcanoes Yields Results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brantley, Steven R.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent explosive eruptions at some of Alaska's 52 historically active volcanoes have significantly affected air traffic over the North Pacific, as well as Alaska's oil, power, and fishing industries and local communities. Since its founding in the late 1980s, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) has installed new monitoring networks and used satellite data to track activity at Alaska's volcanoes, providing timely warnings and monitoring of frequent eruptions to the aviation industry and the general public. To minimize impacts from future eruptions, scientists at AVO continue to assess volcano hazards and to expand monitoring networks.

  6. Researchers discuss Mt. Unzen, a decade volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Setsuya; Eichelberger, John; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    In November 1989, a swarm of earthquakes deep beneath Tachibana Bay, Kyushu Island, Japan, heralded the inexorable rise of magma toward the summit of Unzen Volcano, some 15 km upward and 15 km eastward, on the Shimabara Peninsula. When the “magma head” emerged in Jigokuato Crater on May 20, 1991, a beautiful but tragic drama began. It started peacefully as a budding flower unfolding lava petals (Figure 1). But by the time lava stopped flowing in February 1995, it had cost the city of Shimabara and the surrounding towns over $2 billion in damage and 44 human lives. At its height, the crisis required the prolonged evacuation of 11,000 residents. Amid this tragedy, however, volcanologists were able to make unprecedented visual and geophysical observations of processes of magma ascent, dome growth, and dome-fed pyroclastic flows.

  7. Small Syrian Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-498, 29 September 2003

    Today, 29 September 2003, is the first day of southern summer, and the first day of northern winter on Mars. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small volcano in Syria Planum near 12.9oS, 102.7oW. The volcano and surrounding terrain have been thickly mantled by dust; this dust has subsequently been eroded so that it appears textured rather than smooth. The thin, light streaks that crisscross the image are the tracks left by passing dust devils. Not all dust devils on Mars make streaks, and not all streaks are darker than their surroundings--those found in Syria Planum are invariably lighter in tone. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across; sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  8. Anatahan Volcano, Mariana Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    In the early hours of February 7, ASTER captured this nighttime thermal infrared image of an eruption of Anatahan Volcano in the central Mariana Islands. The summit of the volcano is bright indicating there is a very hot area there. Streaming to the west is an ash plume, visible by the red color indicating the presence of silicate-rich particles. Dark grey areas are clouds that appear colder than the ocean. Anatahan is a stratovolcano that started erupting in May 2003, forming a new crater.

    The image covers an area of 56.3 x 41.8 km, and is located 16 degrees north latitude and 145.6 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  9. Shiveluch and Klyuchevskaya Volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A distance of about 80 kilometers (50 miles) separates Shiveluch and Klyuchevskaya Volcanoes on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula. Despite this distance, however, the two acted in unison on April 26, 2007, when the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite caught them both erupting simultaneously. ASTER 'sees' a slightly different portion of the light spectrum than human eyes. Besides a portion of visible light, ASTER detects thermal energy, meaning it can detect volcanic activity invisible to human eyes. Inset in each image above is a thermal infrared picture of the volcano's summit. In these insets, dark red shows where temperatures are coolest, and yellowish-white shows where temperatures are hottest, heated by molten lava. Both insets show activity at the crater. In the case of Klyuchevskaya, some activity at the crater is also visible in the larger image. In the larger images, the landscapes around the volcanoes appear in varying shades of blue-gray. Dark areas on the snow surface are likely stains left over from previous eruptions of volcanic ash. Overhead, clouds dot the sky, casting their shadows on the snow, especially southeast of Shiveluch and northeast of Klyuchevskaya. To the northwest of Klyuchevskaya is a large bank of clouds, appearing as a brighter white than the snow surface. Shiveluch (sometimes spelled Sheveluch) and Klyuchevskaya (sometimes spelled Klyuchevskoy or Kliuchevskoi) are both stratovolcanoes composed of alternating layers of hardened lava, solidified ash, and rocks from earlier eruptions. Both volcanoes rank among Kamchatka's most active. Because Kamchatka is part of the Pacific 'Ring of Fire,' the peninsula experiences regular seismic activity as the Pacific Plate slides below other tectonic plates in the Earth's crust. Large-scale plate tectonic activity causing simultaneous volcanic eruptions in Kamchatka is not uncommon.

  10. 4D volcano gravimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Gottsmann, J.; Carbone, D.; Fernandez, J.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent gravimetric measurements can detect subsurface processes long before magma flow leads to earthquakes or other eruption precursors. The ability of gravity measurements to detect subsurface mass flow is greatly enhanced if gravity measurements are analyzed and modeled with ground-deformation data. Obtaining the maximum information from microgravity studies requires careful evaluation of the layout of network benchmarks, the gravity environmental signal, and the coupling between gravity changes and crustal deformation. When changes in the system under study are fast (hours to weeks), as in hydrothermal systems and restless volcanoes, continuous gravity observations at selected sites can help to capture many details of the dynamics of the intrusive sources. Despite the instrumental effects, mainly caused by atmospheric temperature, results from monitoring at Mt. Etna volcano show that continuous measurements are a powerful tool for monitoring and studying volcanoes.Several analytical and numerical mathematical models can beused to fit gravity and deformation data. Analytical models offer a closed-form description of the volcanic source. In principle, this allows one to readily infer the relative importance of the source parameters. In active volcanic sites such as Long Valley caldera (California, U.S.A.) and Campi Flegrei (Italy), careful use of analytical models and high-quality data sets has produced good results. However, the simplifications that make analytical models tractable might result in misleading volcanological inter-pretations, particularly when the real crust surrounding the source is far from the homogeneous/ isotropic assumption. Using numerical models allows consideration of more realistic descriptions of the sources and of the crust where they are located (e.g., vertical and lateral mechanical discontinuities, complex source geometries, and topography). Applications at Teide volcano (Tenerife) and Campi Flegrei demonstrate the

  11. Mechanical coupling between earthquakes, volcanos and landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigl, K. L.; Retina Team

    2003-04-01

    "The eruption began as a large earthquake that triggered a massive landslide that culminated in a violent lateral explosion" [Malone et al., USGS 1981]. The 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens taught a very powerful lesson -- that one natural hazard can trigger another. For example, earthquakes have triggered landslides in Papua New Guinea. Similarly, eruptions of Vesuvius are mechanically coupled to earthquakes in the Appenines, just as an inflating magma chamber can trigger earthquakes near Hengill volcano in SW Iceland and on the Izu Peninsula in Japan. The Luzon earthquake may have triggered the eruption of Mount Pinatubo. In many of these cases, the second triggered event caused more damage than the initial one. If we can better understand the mechanical coupling underlying the temporal and spatial correlation of such events, we will improve our assessments of the hazards they pose. The RETINA project has been funded by the European Commission's 5th Framework to study couplings between three classes of natural hazards: earthquakes, landslides, and volcanoes. These three phenomena are linked to and by the stress field in the crust. If the stress increases enough, the material will fail catastrophically. For example, magma injection beneath a volcano can trigger an earthquake by increasing stress on a fault. Increasing shear stress on unconsolidated materials on steep slopes can trigger landslides. Such stress change triggers may also be tectonic (from plate driving forces), hydrological (from heavy rain), or volcanic (magmatic injection). Any of these events can perturb the stress field enough to trigger another event. Indeed, stress changes as small as 0.1 bar (0.01 MPa) suffice to trigger an earthquake. If the medium is close to failure, this small change can increase the Coulomb stress beyond the yield threshold, breaking the material. This quantity is the primary means we will use for describing mechanical coupling. In this paper, we will review several case

  12. Volcanic Lightning in Eruptions of Sakurajima Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edens, Harald; Thomas, Ronald; Behnke, Sonja; McNutt, Stephen; Smith, Cassandra; Farrell, Alexandra; Van Eaton, Alexa; Cimarelli, Corrado; Cigala, Valeria; Eack, Ken; Aulich, Graydon; Michel, Christopher; Miki, Daisuke; Iguchi, Masato

    2016-04-01

    In May 2015 a field program was undertaken to study volcanic lightning at the Sakurajima volcano in southern Japan. One of the main goals of the study was to gain a better understanding of small electrical discharges in volcanic eruptions, expanding on our earlier studies of volcanic lightning at Augustine and Redoubt volcanoes in Alaska, USA, and Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland. In typical volcanic eruptions, electrical activity occurs at the onset of an eruption as a near-continual production of VHF emissions at or near to the volcanic vent. These emissions can occur at rates of up to tens of thousands of emissions per second, and are referred to as continuous RF. As the ash cloud expands, small-scale lightning flashes of several hundred meters length begin to occur while the continuous RF ceases. Later on during the eruption larger-scale lightning flashes may occur within the ash cloud that are reminiscent of regular atmospheric lightning. Whereas volcanic lightning flashes are readily observed and reasonably well understood, the nature and morphology of the events producing continuous RF are unknown. During the 2015 field program we deployed a comprehensive set of instrumentation, including a 10-station 3-D Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) that operated in 10 μs high time resolution mode, slow and fast ΔE antennas, a VHF flat-plate antenna operating in the 20-80 MHz band, log-RF waveforms within the 60-66 MHz band, an infra-red video camera, a high-sensitivity Watec video camera, two high-speed video cameras, and still cameras. We give an overview of the Sakurajima field program and present preliminary results using correlated LMA, waveforms, photographs and video recordings of volcanic lightning at Sakurajima volcano.

  13. Volcanoes and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.

    1982-01-01

    The evidence that volcanic eruptions affect climate is reviewed. Single explosive volcanic eruptions cool the surface by about 0.3 C and warm the stratosphere by several degrees. Although these changes are of small magnitude, there have been several years in which these hemispheric average temperature changes were accompanied by severely abnormal weather. An example is 1816, the "year without summer" which followed the 1815 eruption of Tambora. In addition to statistical correlations between volcanoes and climate, a good theoretical understanding exists. The magnitude of the climatic changes anticipated following volcanic explosions agrees well with the observations. Volcanoes affect climate because volcanic particles in the atmosphere upset the balance between solar energy absorbed by the Earth and infrared energy emitted by the Earth. These interactions can be observed. The most important ejecta from volcanoes is not volcanic ash but sulfur dioxide which converts into sulfuric acid droplets in the stratosphere. For an eruption with its explosive magnitude, Mount St. Helens injected surprisingly little sulfur into the stratosphere. The amount of sulfuric acid formed is much smaller than that observed following significant eruptions and is too small to create major climatic shifts. However, the Mount St. Helens eruption has provided an opportunity to measure many properties of volcanic debris not previously measured and has therefore been of significant value in improving our knowledge of the relations between volcanic activity and climate.

  14. Multinational seismic investigation focuses on Rabaul volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, O.; Johnson, R. W.; Finlayson, D. M.; Nishimura, Y.; Shimamura, H.; Terashima, A.; Itikarai, I.; Thurber, C.

    An improved disaster-reduction strategy for civil authorities and communities on the Gazelle Peninsula in Papua New Guinea is anticipated as a result of a multinational seismic investigation now under way there. Data collection has been completed but interpretation is at a preliminary stage. Volcanic eruptions in 1994 devastated the town of Rabaul and other communities on the peninsula.The investigation, known as the Rabaul Earthquake Location and Caldera Structure (RELACS) program, is building a seismic tomography image of the Rabaul volcano that will improve the precision with which volcano-related earthquakes can be located in real time. This will enable the Rabaul Volcanological Observatory (RVO) to interpret seismicity patterns in detail and provide better advice to civil authorities. Among other things, the scientific analytical capacity of RVO will be upgraded by improving knowledge about the subsurface structure of the caldera. Conducting the work are scientists from the Australian Geological Survey Organisation (AGSO), the Australian National University (ANU), the University of Hokkaido in Japan, and the University of Wisconsin (UW) in the United States.

  15. Volcanic hazard map for Telica, Cerro Negro and El Hoyo volcanoes, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahina, T.; Navarro, M.; Strauch, W.

    2007-05-01

    A volcano hazard study was conducted for Telica, Cerro Negro and El Hoyo volcanoes, Nicaragua, based on geological and volcanological field investigations, air photo analyses, and numerical eruption simulation. These volcanoes are among the most active volcanoes of the country. This study was realized 2004-2006 through technical cooperation of Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) with INETER, upon the request of the Government of Nicaragua. The resulting volcanic hazard map on 1:50,000 scale displays the hazards of lava flow, pyroclastic flows, lahars, tephra fall, volcanic bombs for an area of 1,300 square kilometers. The map and corresponding GIS coverage was handed out to Central, Departmental and Municipal authorities for their use and is included in a National GIS on Georisks developed and maintained by INETER.

  16. Japan Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    for fear of dying from the cold. Temperatures in the region fell below zero at night. The rubber boat landed ashore near Terpeniya peninsula on the...Natsume will meet Defense Minister Zhang Aiping and senior officers of the People’s Liberation Army ( PLA ). He will also visit PLA units in Tianjin...Agency sources said. China, which wants to modernize PLA armament, may ask about buying advanced Japanese military technology. However, Japan cannot

  17. Japan Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Japan Socialist Party General Secretary Tsuruo Yamaguchi: "The Deceptiveness of Breaking Through the Defense - Spending Limit of 1 Percent of GNP...Agency Budget Proposal 22 Defense Facilities Administration Agency Budget Proposal 41 Breaking of Defense - Spending Limit Criticized (Tsuruo...such as the high yen and decline in the price of oil. (1) Total Amount Fiscal 1987 defense related expenditures are 3,517.4 billion yen, an

  18. Japan Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-18

    the government should reduce expenditures for military hardware if it is difficult to hold defense spending within 1 percent of the GNP. Noting... expenditure , as well as a greater contribution to Pacific defense . According to Prior, a conservative parliamentarian and former secretary of state for...Northern Ireland, with Britain’s experience in Asia, it should join with Japan to help the United States with its Asian defense . Japanese Chairman

  19. Eruption of Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On the night of June 4, 2001 ASTER captured this thermal image of the erupting Shiveluch volcano. Located on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, Shiveluch rises to an altitude of 8028'. The active lava dome complex is seen as a bright (hot) area on the summit of the volcano. To the southwest, a second hot area is either a debris avalanche or hot ash deposit. Trailing to the west is a 25 km ash plume, seen as a cold 'cloud' streaming from the summit. At least 60 large eruptions have occurred during the last 10,000 years; the largest historical eruptions were in 1854 and 1964. Because Kamchatka is located along the major aircraft routes between North America/Europe and the Far East, this area is constantly monitored for potential ash hazards to aircraft. The lower image is the same as the upper, except it has been color coded: red is hot, light greens to dark green are progressively colder, and gray/black are the coldest areas.

    The image is located at 56.7 degrees north latitude, 161.3 degrees east longitude.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in

  20. Volcano Hazards Assessment for Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Nathenson, Manuel; Champion, Duane E.; Ramsey, David W.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Ewert, John W.

    2007-01-01

    Medicine Lake volcano (MLV) is a very large shield-shaped volcano located in northern California where it forms part of the southern Cascade Range of volcanoes. It has erupted hundreds of times during its half-million-year history, including nine times during the past 5,200 years, most recently 950 years ago. This record represents one of the highest eruptive frequencies among Cascade volcanoes and includes a wide variety of different types of lava flows and at least two explosive eruptions that produced widespread fallout. Compared to those of a typical Cascade stratovolcano, eruptive vents at MLV are widely distributed, extending 55 km north-south and 40 km east-west. The total area covered by MLV lavas is >2,000 km2, about 10 times the area of Mount St. Helens, Washington. Judging from its long eruptive history and its frequent eruptions in recent geologic time, MLV will erupt again. Although the probability of an eruption is very small in the next year (one chance in 3,600), the consequences of some types of possible eruptions could be severe. Furthermore, the documented episodic behavior of the volcano indicates that once it becomes active, the volcano could continue to erupt for decades, or even erupt intermittently for centuries, and very likely from multiple vents scattered across the edifice. Owing to its frequent eruptions, explosive nature, and proximity to regional infrastructure, MLV has been designated a 'high threat volcano' by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Volcano Early Warning System assessment. Volcanic eruptions are typically preceded by seismic activity, but with only two seismometers located high on the volcano and no other USGS monitoring equipment in place, MLV is at present among the most poorly monitored Cascade volcanoes.

  1. Digital Data for Volcano Hazards at Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, S.P.; Doelger, S.; Sherrod, D.R.; Mastin, L.G.; Scott, W.E.

    2008-01-01

    Newberry volcano is a broad shield volcano located in central Oregon, the product of thousands of eruptions, beginning about 600,000 years ago. At least 25 vents on the flanks and summit have been active during the past 10,000 years. The most recent eruption 1,300 years ago produced the Big Obsidian Flow. Thus, the volcano's long history and recent activity indicate that Newberry will erupt in the future. Newberry Crater, a volcanic depression or caldera has been the focus of Newberry's volcanic activity for at least the past 10,000 years. Newberry National Volcanic Monument, which is managed by the U.S. Forest Service, includes the caldera and extends to the Deschutes River. Newberry volcano is quiet. Local earthquake activity (seismicity) has been trifling throughout historic time. Subterranean heat is still present, as indicated by hot springs in the caldera and high temperatures encountered during exploratory drilling for geothermal energy. The report USGS Open-File Report 97-513 (Sherrod and others, 1997) describes the kinds of hazardous geologic events that might occur in the future at Newberry volcano. A hazard-zonation map is included to show the areas that will most likely be affected by renewed eruptions. When Newberry volcano becomes restless, the eruptive scenarios described herein can inform planners, emergency response personnel, and citizens about the kinds and sizes of events to expect. The geographic information system (GIS) volcano hazard data layers used to produce the Newberry volcano hazard map in USGS Open-File Report 97-513 are included in this data set. Scientists at the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory created a GIS data layer to depict zones subject to the effects of an explosive pyroclastic eruption (tephra fallout, pyroclastic flows, and ballistics), lava flows, volcanic gasses, and lahars/floods in Paulina Creek. A separate GIS data layer depicts drill holes on the flanks of Newberry Volcano that were used to estimate the probability

  2. The evolution of young silicic lavas at Medicine Lake Volcano, California: Implications for the origin of compositional gaps in calc-alkaline series lavas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, T.L.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    gap). At Mt. Mazama and Mt. St. Helens, USA and Aso Caldera and Shikotsu, Japan the amphibole-bearing assemblage was important. At Krakatau, Indonesia and Katmai, USA, an augite+orthopyroxene-bearing assemblage was important. In addition to its role in the production of a compositional gap between intermediate and rhyolitic lavas, the crystallization process increases the H2O content of the residual liquid. This rapid increase in residual liquid volatile content which results from the precipitation of a large proportion of crystalline solids may be an important factor among several that lead to explosive silicic eruptions. ?? 1986 Springer-Verlag.

  3. Remote sensing of Italian volcanos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianchi, R.; Casacchia, R.; Coradini, A.; Duncan, A. M.; Guest, J. E.; Kahle, A.; Lanciano, P.; Pieri, D. C.; Poscolieri, M.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a July 1986 remote sensing campaign of Italian volcanoes are reviewed. The equipment and techniques used to acquire the data are described and the results obtained for Campi Flegrei and Mount Etna are reviewed and evaluated for their usefulness for the study of active and recently active volcanoes.

  4. Italian Volcano Supersites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, G.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are among the geohazards that may have a substantial economic and social impact, even at worldwide scale. Large populated regions are prone to volcanic hazards worldwide. Even local phenomena may affect largely populated areas and in some cases even megacities, producing severe economic losses. On a regional or global perspective, large volcanic eruptions may affect the climate for years with potentially huge economic impacts, but even relatively small eruptions may inject large amounts of volcanic ash in the atmosphere and severely affect air traffic over entire continents. One of main challenges of the volcanological community is to continuously monitor and understand the internal processes leading to an eruption, in order to give substantial contributions to the risk reduction. Italian active volcanoes constitute natural laboratories and ideal sites where to apply the cutting-edge volcano observation systems, implement new monitoring systems and to test and improve the most advanced models and methods for investigate the volcanic processes. That's because of the long tradition of volcanological studies resulting into long-term data sets, both in-situ and from satellite systems, among the most complete and accurate worldwide, and the large spectrum of the threatening volcanic phenomena producing high local/regional/continental risks. This contribution aims at presenting the compound monitoring systems operating on the Italian active volcanoes, the main improvements achieved during the recent studies direct toward volcanic hazard forecast and risk reductions and the guidelines for a wide coordinated project aimed at applying the ideas of the GEO Supersites Initiative at Mt. Etna and Campi Flegrei / Vesuvius areas.

  5. Ruiz Volcano: Preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Volcano, Colombia (4.88°N, 75.32°W). All times are local (= GMT -5 hours).An explosive eruption on November 13, 1985, melted ice and snow in the summit area, generating lahars that flowed tens of kilometers down flank river valleys, killing more than 20,000 people. This is history's fourth largest single-eruption death toll, behind only Tambora in 1815 (92,000), Krakatau in 1883 (36,000), and Mount Pelée in May 1902 (28,000). The following briefly summarizes the very preliminary and inevitably conflicting information that had been received by press time.

  6. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Great Sitkin Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Miller, Thomas P.; Nye, Christopher J.

    2003-01-01

    Great Sitkin Volcano is a composite andesitic stratovolcano on Great Sitkin Island (51°05’ N latitude, 176°25’ W longitude), a small (14 x 16 km), circular volcanic island in the western Aleutian Islands of Alaska. Great Sitkin Island is located about 35 kilometers northeast of the community of Adak on Adak Island and 130 kilometers west of the community of Atka on Atka Island. Great Sitkin Volcano is an active volcano and has erupted at least eight times in the past 250 years (Miller and others, 1998). The most recent eruption in 1974 caused minor ash fall on the flanks of the volcano and resulted in the emplacement of a lava dome in the summit crater. The summit of the composite cone of Great Sitkin Volcano is 1,740 meters above sea level. The active crater is somewhat lower than the summit, and the highest point along its rim is about 1,460 meters above sea level. The crater is about 1,000 meters in diameter and is almost entirely filled by a lava dome emplaced in 1974. An area of active fumaroles, hot springs, and bubbling hot mud is present on the south flank of the volcano at the head of Big Fox Creek (see the map), and smaller ephemeral fumaroles and steam vents are present in the crater and around the crater rim. The flanking slopes of the volcano are gradual to steep and consist of variously weathered and vegetated blocky lava flows that formed during Pleistocene and Holocene eruptions. The modern edifice occupies a caldera structure that truncates an older sequence of lava flows and minor pyroclastic rocks on the east side of the volcano. The eastern sector of the volcano includes the remains of an ancestral volcano that was partially destroyed by a northwest-directed flank collapse. In winter, Great Sitkin Volcano is typically completely snow covered. Should explosive pyroclastic eruptions occur at this time, the snow would be a source of water for volcanic mudflows or lahars. In summer, much of the snowpack melts, leaving only a patchy

  7. Crystal growth and crystal structures of six novel phases in the Mn/As/O/Cl(Br) system, as well as magnetic properties of α-Mn3(AsO4)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weil, Matthias; Kremer, Reinhard K.

    2017-01-01

    Chemical vapour transport reactions (900 °C → 820 °C, Cl2 or Br2 as transport agent) of in situ formed Mn3(AsO4)2 yielded the orthoarsenates(V) α-Mn3(AsO4)2 and β-Mn3(AsO4)2 as well as the oxoarsenate(V) halide compounds Mn7(AsO4)4Cl2, Mn11(AsO4)7Cl, Mn11(AsO4)7Br and Mn5(AsO4)3Cl. The crystal structures of all six phases were determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. The crystal structures of α-and β-Mn3(AsO4)2 are isotypic with the corresponding phosphate phases γ- and α-Mn3(PO4)2, respectively, and are reported here for the first time. A comparative discussion with other structures of general composition M3(AsO4)2 (М = Mg; divalent first-row transition metal) is given. The unique crystal structures of Mn7(AsO4)4Cl2 and that of the two isotypic Mn11(AsO4)7X (X = Cl, Br) structures are composed of two [MnO5] polyhedra, two [MnO4Cl2] polyhedra (one with site symmetry 1 bar), two AsO4 tetrahedra, and one [MnO5] polyhedron, three [MnO6] octahedra (one with site symmetry.m.), one [MnO4X], one [MnO5X] polyhedron and four AsO4 tetrahedra, respectively. The various polyhedra of the three arsenate(V) halides are condensed into three-dimensional framework structures by corner- and edge-sharing. Mn5(AsO4)3Cl adopts the chloroapatite structure. The magnetic and thermal properties of pure polycrystalline samples of a-Mn3(AsO4)2 were investigated in more detail. The magnetic susceptibility proves all Mn atoms to be in the oxidation state +2 yielding an effective magnetic moment per Mn atom of 5.9 μB. Long-range antiferromagnetic ordering is observed below 8.2 K consistent with the negative Curie-Weiss temperature of -50 K derived from the high temperature susceptibility data. Chemical vapour transport reactions of in situ formed Mn3(AsO4)2 using Cl2 or Br2 as transport agents led to crystal growth of six phases structurally determined for the first time: α-Mn3(AsO4)2, β-Mn3(AsO4)2, Mn7(AsO4)4Cl2, Mn11(AsO4)7Cl, Mn11(AsO4)7Br and Mn5(AsO4)3Cl.

  8. Japan Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Nakasone expressed Japan’s "understanding" of SDI or the so-called "Star Wars" project in a new year summit in Los Angeles with President Ronald Reagan... project and arms con- trol issues could, be discussed during the Bonn summit of seven industrialized countries in May. CSO: 4100/229 11 JPRS-JAR-85...are projected to fall 1.08 million tons to 5.3 million tons, and exports to Southeast Asia also be 740,000 tons to 16.9 million tons, the

  9. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Iliamna Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Miller, Thomas P.

    1999-01-01

    Iliamna Volcano is a 3,053-meter-high, ice- and snow-covered stratovolcano in the southwestern Cook Inlet region about 225 kilometers southwest of Anchorage and about 100 kilometers northwest of Homer. Historical eruptions of Iliamna Volcano have not been positively documented; however, the volcano regularly emits steam and gas, and small, shallow earthquakes are often detected beneath the summit area. The most recent eruptions of the volcano occurred about 300 years ago, and possibly as recently as 90-140 years ago. Prehistoric eruptions have generated plumes of volcanic ash, pyroclastic flows, and lahars that extended to the volcano flanks and beyond. Rock avalanches from the summit area have occurred numerous times in the past. These avalanches flowed several kilometers down the flanks and at least two large avalanches transformed to cohesive lahars. The number and distribution of known volcanic ash deposits from Iliamna Volcano indicate that volcanic ash clouds from prehistoric eruptions were significantly less voluminous and probably less common relative to ash clouds generated by eruptions of other Cook Inlet volcanoes. Plumes of volcanic ash from Iliamna Volcano would be a major hazard to jet aircraft using Anchorage International Airport and other local airports, and depending on wind direction, could drift at least as far as the Kenai Peninsula and beyond. Ashfall from future eruptions could disrupt oil and gas operations and shipping activities in Cook Inlet. Because Iliamna Volcano has not erupted for several hundred years, a future eruption could involve significant amounts of ice and snow that could lead to the formation of large lahars and downstream flooding. The greatest hazards in order of importance are described below and shown on plate 1.

  10. Monitoring Mount Baker Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malone, S.D.; Frank, D.

    1976-01-01

    Hisotrically active volcanoes in the conterminous United States are restricted to the Cascade Range and extend to the Cascade Range and extend from Mount Baker near the Canadian border to Lassen Peak in northern California. Since 1800 A.D, most eruptive activity has been on a relatively small scale and has not caused loss of life or significant property damage. However, future  volcanism predictably will have more serious effects because of greatly increased use of land near volcanoes during the present century. (See "Appraising Volcanic Hazards of the Cascade Range of the Northwestern United States," Earthquake Inf. Bull., Sept.-Oct. 1974.) The recognition an impending eruption is highly important in order to minimize the potential hazard to people and property. Thus, a substantial increase in hydrothermal activity at Mount Baker in March 1975 ( see "Mount Baker Heating Up," July-Aug. 1975 issue) was regarded as a possible first signal that an eruption might occur, and an intensive monitoring program was undertaken. 

  11. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Kanaga Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Miller, Thomas P.; Nye, Christopher J.

    2002-01-01

    Kanaga Volcano is a steep-sided, symmetrical, cone-shaped, 1307 meter high, andesitic stratovolcano on the north end of Kanaga Island (51°55’ N latitude, 177°10’ W longitude) in the western Aleutian Islands of Alaska. Kanaga Island is an elongated, low-relief (except for the volcano) island, located about 35 kilometers west of the community of Adak on Adak Island and is part of the Andreanof Islands Group of islands. Kanaga Volcano is one of the 41 historically active volcanoes in Alaska and has erupted numerous times in the past 11,000 years, including at least 10 eruptions in the past 250 years (Miller and others, 1998). The most recent eruption occurred in 1993-95 and caused minor ash fall on Adak Island and produced blocky aa lava flows that reached the sea on the northwest and west sides of the volcano (Neal and others, 1995). The summit of the volcano is characterized by a small, circular crater about 200 meters in diameter and 50-70 meters deep. Several active fumaroles are present in the crater and around the crater rim. The flanking slopes of the volcano are steep (20-30 degrees) and consist mainly of blocky, linear to spoonshaped lava flows that formed during eruptions of late Holocene age (about the past 3,000 years). The modern cone sits within a circular caldera structure that formed by large-scale collapse of a preexisting volcano. Evidence for eruptions of this preexisting volcano mainly consists of lava flows exposed along Kanaton Ridge, indicating that this former volcanic center was predominantly effusive in character. In winter (October-April), Kanaga Volcano may be covered by substantial amounts of snow that would be a source of water for lahars (volcanic mudflows). In summer, much of the snowpack melts, leaving only a patchy distribution of snow on the volcano. Glacier ice is not present on the volcano or on other parts of Kanaga Island. Kanaga Island is uninhabited and is part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, managed by

  12. Source Inversions of Volcano Infrasound: Mass Outflux and Force System for Transient Explosive Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Fee, D.; Lees, J. M.; Yokoo, A.; Ruiz, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Sources of volcano infrasound associated with explosive eruptions are typically modeled assuming an acoustic monopole and/or dipole. While the monopole represents the mass outflux of erupted materials, the dipole represents a force system acting in the source region during eruptions. Therefore, appropriate acoustic source inversions of volcano infrasound data can provide estimates of eruption parameters which are critical to understanding eruption dynamics. Reliability of the source parameters is dominantly controlled by the accuracy of the acoustic Green's functions between the source and receiver positions. Conventional source inversions of volcano infrasound, however, were typically performed using a simplified Green's function obtained in a free space or half space. This may result in intolerable errors in the source parameters, especially when the infrasound waveforms are significantly distorted by volcano topography and/or local atmospheric variability (i.e., layered velocity structure or wind). In this study we present a full waveform inversion technique for volcano infrasound using numerical Green's functions. A full 3-D Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method accelerated with GPU is used to compute accurate Green's functions taking into account volcano topography and local atmospheric conditions. The presented method is applied to data recorded at Sakurajima volcano (Japan) and Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador), which provide a large volume of high-quality data recorded by azimuthally well-distributed stations within 2 -- 6 km distance of the volcanoes. We analyze infrasound signals associated with explosive eruptions exhibiting 1) distinct explosion waveforms followed by gas discharges and 2) strong anisotropic radiation patterns, which can be caused by either source directivity or topographic barriers/reflections. Here the role of topography in controlling the infrasound radiation is investigated through numerical modeling, and then the observed

  13. Redetermination of eveite, Mn2AsO4(OH), based on single-crystal X-ray diffraction data

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongbo W.; Stevenson, Ryan A.; Siegel, Alesha M.; Downs, Gordon W.

    2011-01-01

    The crystal structure of eveite, ideally Mn2(AsO4)(OH) [dimanganese(II) arsenate(V) hydroxide], was refined from a single crystal selected from a co-type sample from Långban, Filipstad, Varmland, Sweden. Eveite, dimorphic with sarkinite, is structurally analogous with the important rock-forming mineral andalusite, Al2OSiO4, and belongs to the libethenite group. Its structure consists of chains of edge-sharing distorted [MnO4(OH)2] octa­hedra (..2 symmetry) extending parallel to [001]. These chains are cross-linked by isolated AsO4 tetra­hedra (..m symmetry) through corner-sharing, forming channels in which dimers of edge-sharing [MnO4(OH)] trigonal bipyramids (..m symmetry) are located. In contrast to the previous refinement from Weissenberg photographic data [Moore & Smyth (1968 ▶). Am. Mineral. 53, 1841–1845], all non-H atoms were refined with anisotropic displacement param­eters and the H atom was located. The distance of the donor and acceptor O atoms involved in hydrogen bonding is in agreement with Raman spectroscopic data. Examination of the Raman spectra for arsenate minerals in the libethenite group reveals that the position of the peak originating from the O—H stretching vibration shifts to lower wavenumbers from eveite, to adamite, zincolivenite, and olivenite. PMID:22199466

  14. Na3Co2(AsO4)(As2O7): a new sodium cobalt arsenate

    PubMed Central

    Guesmi, Abderrahmen; Driss, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    In the title compound, tris­odium dicobalt arsenate diarsenate, Na3Co2AsO4As2O7, the two Co atoms, one of the two As and three of the seven O atoms lie on special positions, with site symmetries 2 and m for the Co, m for the As, and 2 and twice m for the O atoms. The two Na atoms are disordered over two general and special positions [occupancies 0.72 (3):0.28 (3) and 0.940 (6):0.060 (6), respectively]. The main structural feature is the association of the CoO6 octa­hedra in the ab plane, forming Co4O20 units, which are corner- and edge-connected via AsO4 and As2O7 arsenate groups, giving rise to a complex polyhedral connectivity with small tunnels, such as those running along the b- and c-axis directions, in which the Na+ ions reside. The structural model is validated by both bond-valence-sum and charge-distribution methods, and the distortion of the coordination polyhedra is analyzed by means of the effective coordination number. PMID:22807699

  15. Wyllieite-type Ag1.09Mn3.46(AsO4)3

    PubMed Central

    Frigui, Wafa; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Single crystals of wyllieite-type silver(I) manganese(II) tris­orthoarsenate(V), Ag1.09Mn3.46(AsO4)3, were grown by a solid-state reaction. The three-dimensional framework is made up from four Mn2+/Mn3+ cations surrounded octa­hedrally by O atoms. The MnO6 octa­hedra are linked through edge- and corner-sharing. Three independent AsO4 tetra­hedra are linked to the framework through common corners, delimiting channels along [100] in which two partly occupied Ag+ sites reside, one on an inversion centre and with an occupancy of 0.631 (4), the other on a general site and with an occupancy of 0.774 (3), both within distorted tetra­hedral environments. One of the Mn sites is also located on an inversion centre and is partly occupied, with an occupancy of 0.916 (5). Related compounds with alluaudite-type or rosemaryite-type structures are compared and discussed. PMID:22719272

  16. Eruptive viscosity and volcano morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posin, Seth B.; Greeley, Ronald

    1988-01-01

    Terrestrial central volcanoes formed predominantly from lava flows were classified as shields, stratovolcanoes, and domes. Shield volcanoes tend to be large in areal extent, have convex slopes, and are characterized by their resemblance to inverted hellenic war shields. Stratovolcanoes have concave slopes, whereas domes are smaller and have gentle convex slopes near the vent that increase near the perimeter. In addition to these differences in morphology, several other variations were observed. The most important is composition: shield volcanoes tend to be basaltic, stratovolcanoes tend to be andesitic, and domes tend to be dacitic. However, important exceptions include Fuji, Pico, Mayon, Izalco, and Fuego which have stratovolcano morphologies but are composed of basaltic lavas. Similarly, Ribkwo is a Kenyan shield volcano composed of trachyte and Suswa and Kilombe are shields composed of phonolite. These exceptions indicate that eruptive conditions, rather than composition, may be the primary factors that determine volcano morphology. The objective of this study is to determine the relationships, if any, between eruptive conditions (viscosity, erupted volume, and effusion rate) and effusive volcano morphology. Moreover, it is the goal of this study to incorporate these relationships into a model to predict the eruptive conditions of extraterrestrial (Martian) volcanoes based on their morphology.

  17. Mount Rainier active cascade volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mount Rainier is one of about two dozen active or recently active volcanoes in the Cascade Range, an arc of volcanoes in the northwestern United States and Canada. The volcano is located about 35 kilometers southeast of the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, which has a population of more than 2.5 million. This metropolitan area is the high technology industrial center of the Pacific Northwest and one of the commercial aircraft manufacturing centers of the United States. The rivers draining the volcano empty into Puget Sound, which has two major shipping ports, and into the Columbia River, a major shipping lane and home to approximately a million people in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. Mount Rainier is an active volcano. It last erupted approximately 150 years ago, and numerous large floods and debris flows have been generated on its slopes during this century. More than 100,000 people live on the extensive mudflow deposits that have filled the rivers and valleys draining the volcano during the past 10,000 years. A major volcanic eruption or debris flow could kill thousands of residents and cripple the economy of the Pacific Northwest. Despite the potential for such danger, Mount Rainier has received little study. Most of the geologic work on Mount Rainier was done more than two decades ago. Fundamental topics such as the development, history, and stability of the volcano are poorly understood.

  18. Volcano spacing and plate rigidity

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, U. )

    1991-04-01

    In-plane stresses, which accompany the flexural deformation of the lithosphere under the load adjacent volcanoes, may govern the spacing of volcanoes in hotspot provinces. Specifically, compressive stresses in the vicinity of a volcano prevent new upwelling in this area, forcing a new volcano to develop at a minimum distance that is equal to the distance in which the radial stresses change from compressional to tensile (the inflection point). If a volcano is modeled as a point load on a thin elastic plate, then the distance to the inflection point is proportional to the thickness of the plate to the power of 3/4. Compilation of volcano spacing in seven volcanic groups in East Africa and seven volcanic groups of oceanic hotspots shows significant correlation with the elastic thickness of the plate and matches the calculated distance to the inflection point. In contrast, volcano spacing in island arcs and over subduction zones is fairly uniform and is much larger than predicted by the distance to the inflection point, reflecting differences in the geometry of the source and the upwelling areas.

  19. Coexistence of magnetic fluctuations and superconductivity in SmFe0.95Co0.05AsO seen in 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, G.; Demarco, M.; Chudyk, M.; Steiner, J.; Coffey, D.; Zeng, H.; Li, Y. K.; Cao, G. H.; Xu, Z. A.

    2011-08-01

    The Mössbauer spectra (MS) of powder samples of SmFe1-xCoxAsO (x = 0.0, 0.05, and 0.1) were measured in applied fields up to 9 T and at temperatures up to 298 K. SmFeAsO is magnetically ordered with TN = 137 K and has a hyperfine magnetic field of (4.98 ± 0.18) T at 4.2 K. In applied magnetic fields, the MS is consistent with a distribution of hyperfine magnetic fields of width Happlied+Hhyperfine. This arises because the angles between the direction of the ordered field in the crystallites making up the sample are randomly distributed about the direction of the applied field. The MS of the superconductors SmFe0.95Co0.05AsO (TC≃5 K) and SmFe0.9Co0.1AsO (TC≃17 K) are well described by a single peak from room temperature to 4.2 K indicating the absence of static magnetic order. However, the half width at half maximum, Γ, of the peak in SmFe0.95Co0.05AsO increases with decreasing temperature from its high temperature value, 0.13 mm/s at 25 K, to 0.25 mm/s at 10 K. No such temperature dependence is seen in SmFe0.9Co0.1AsO. We analyze this temperature dependence in terms of a fluctuating hyperfine magnetic field model whose frequency at 4.2 K is found to be ˜5-10 MHz, giving direct evidence of coexisting magnetic fluctuations and superconductivity at the interface in the phase diagram between the regions with magnetic and superconducting order. In a 5 T applied field, SmFe0.95Co0.05AsO is no longer superconducting; however, the temperature-dependent fluctuating magnetic field is still present and largely unchanged. The absence of fluctuations in superconducting SmFe0.9Co0.1AsO and their presence in superconducting SmFe0.95Co0.05AsO in zero applied field and in nonsuperconducting SmFe0.95Co0.05AsO at 5 T suggests that magnetic order is in competition with superconductivity in SmFe1-xCoxAsO.

  20. Groundwater at Mayon, Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albano, S. E.; Sandoval, T.; Toledo, R.

    2001-12-01

    Around Mayon Volcano, Philippines, anecdotal evidence and rainfall normalized spring discharge data suggest that the water table 8 km from the summit of the volcano drops prior to eruptions. Residents report that they had to deepen their shallow wells in 1993 (some before and others following the eruption). In some cases they had to dig as far as 5 meters deeper to reach the water table. Significant decreases in spring discharge were recorded prior to the 1999 phreatic explosions and explosive eruption in 2000. A lesser decrease in spring discharge was recorded prior to the 2001 explosive eruptions. The cause of the observed correlation is not yet understood. Mechanisms consider include decrease in rainfall and boiling away of groundwater due to magmatic intrusion. Dilatation of the volcano may cause an increase in pore pressure, opening of cracks, and inflation of the ground surface that would all result in lower water table levels and decreases in spring discharges. Lack of significant hydraulic precursors prior to the 2001 eruptions may be due to a sustained state of inflation following the eruption of 2000. To better understand the relationship between changes in the volcanic system and changes in the groundwater system surrounding Mayon, instruments were installed about eight kilometers from the summit immediately following the explosive eruption of 26 July 2001. Parameters monitored include rainfall data, water levels in four shallow wells, discharge in the main river basin, and spring discharge. The aquifers at eight kilometers are predominantly poorly sorted lahar flow deposits. Characterization of these highly permeable aquifers has been conducted. Preliminary data include porosity ranges, hydraulic conductivity estimates, and response to rainfall. Water samples have been collected that are intended for geo-chemical analysis to determine if the water is predominantly meteoric or magmatic in origin. Numerical modeling of the system using the above mentioned

  1. Counterfactual Volcano Hazard Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Gordon

    2013-04-01

    , if a major storm surge happens to arrive at a high astronomical tide, sea walls may be overtopped and flooding may ensue. In the domain of geological hazards, periods of volcanic unrest may generate precursory signals suggestive of imminent volcanic danger, but without leading to an actual eruption. Near-miss unrest periods provide vital evidence for assessing the dynamics of volcanoes close to eruption. Where the volcano catalogue has been diligently revised to include the maximum amount of information on the phenomenology of unrest periods, dynamic modelling and hazard assessment may be significantly refined. This is illustrated with some topical volcano hazard examples, including Montserrat and Santorini.

  2. The California Volcano Observatory: Monitoring the state's restless volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stovall, Wendy K.; Marcaida, Mae; Mangan, Margaret T.

    2014-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions happen in the State of California about as frequently as the largest earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault Zone. At least 10 eruptions have taken place in California in the past 1,000 years—most recently at Lassen Peak in Lassen Volcanic National Park (1914 to 1917) in the northern part of the State—and future volcanic eruptions are inevitable. The U.S. Geological Survey California Volcano Observatory monitors the State's potentially hazardous volcanoes.

  3. Remote triggering of seismicity at Japanese volcanoes following the 2016 M7.3 Kumamoto earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enescu, Bogdan; Shimojo, Kengo; Opris, Anca; Yagi, Yuji

    2016-10-01

    The MJMA7.3 Kumamoto earthquake occurred on April 16, 2016, in the western part of Kyushu, at a depth of 12 km, on an active strike-slip fault. Here, we report on a relatively widespread activation of small remote earthquakes, which occurred as far as Hokkaido, detected by analyzing the continuous waveform data recorded at seismic stations all over Japan. Such relatively widespread remote seismicity activation, following a large inland earthquake, has not been reported before for Japan. Our analysis demonstrates that the remote events were triggered dynamically, by the passage of the surface waves from the Kumamoto earthquake. Most of the remotely triggered events in the Tohoku and Hokkaido regions, as well as close to Izu Peninsula, occur at or close to volcanoes, which suggests that the excitation of crustal fluids, by the passage of Rayleigh waves, played an important triggering role. Nevertheless, remote activation in other regions, like Noto Peninsula, occurred away from volcanoes. The relatively large-amplitude Love waves, enhanced by a source directivity effect during the Kumamoto earthquake, may have triggered seismicity on local active faults. The dynamic stresses in the areas where remote activation has been observed range from several kPa to tens of kPa, the thresholds being lower than in previous dynamic triggering cases for Japan; this might relate to a change in the crustal conditions following the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake, in particular at volcanoes in NE Japan.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Living with volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Thomas L.; Pierson, Thomas C.

    1992-01-01

    The 1980 cataclysmic eruption of Mount St. Helens (Lipman and Mullineaux, 1981) in southwestern Washington ushered in a decade marked by more worldwide volcanic disasters and crises than any other in recorded history. Volcanoes killed more people (over 28,500) in the 1980's than during the 78 years following 1902 eruption of Mount Pelee (Martinique). Not surprisingly, volcanic phenomena and attendant hazards received attention from government authorities, the news media, and the general public. As part of this enhanced global awareness of volcanic hazards, the U.S. Geological Survey (Bailey and others, 1983) in response to the eruptions or volcanic unrest during the 1980's at Mount St. Helens and Redoubt are still erupting intermittently, and the caldera unrest at Long Valley also continues, albeit less energetically than during the early 1980's.

  5. Active submarine volcano sampled

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, B.

    1983-01-01

    On June 4, 1982, two full dredge hauls of fresh lava were recovered from the upper flanks of Kavachi submarine volcano, Solomon Islands, in the western Pacific Ocean, from the water depths of 1,200 and 2,700 feet. the shallower dredge site was within 0.5 mile of the active submarine vent shown at the surface by an area of slick water, probably caused by gas emissions. Kavachi is a composite stratovolcano that has been observed to erupt every year or two for at least the last 30 years (see photographs). An island formed in 1952, 1961, 1965, and 1978; but, in each case, it rapidly eroded below sea level. The latest eruption was observed by Solair pilots during the several weeks up to and including May 18, 1982. 

  6. Monitoring active volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, Robert I.

    1987-01-01

    One of the most spectacular, awesomely beautiful, and at times destructive displays of natural energy is an erupting volcano, belching fume and ash thousands of meters into the atmosphere and pouring out red-hot molten lava in fountains and streams. Countless eruptions in the geologic past have produced volcanic rocks that form much of the Earth's present surface. The gradual disintegration and weathering of these rocks have yielded some of the richest farmlands in the world, and these fertile soils play a significant role in sustaining our large and growing population. Were it not for volcanic activity, the Hawaiian Islands with their sugar cane and pineapple fields and magnificent landscapes and seascapes would not exist to support their residents and to charm their visitors. Yet, the actual eruptive processes are catastrophic and can claim life and property.

  7. Mt. Fuji, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image to view the movie

    The nearly perfectly conical profile of Fuji soars 3,776 meters (12,388 feet) above sea level on southern Honshu, near Tokyo. The highest mountain in Japan, Fuji is the country's most familiar symbol. The summit of this graceful, dormant volcano is broken by a crater 610 meters (2,000 feet) in diameter. The crater is ringed by eight jagged peaks. The five Fuji Lakes lie on the northern slopes of the mountain, all formed in the wake of lava flows. Mirrored in the still waters of Kawaguchi-ko, the most beautiful of the five lakes, is a reflection of Fuji. Part of Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park, Fuji last erupted for a two-month period starting in November 1707, covering Tokyo, some 100 kilometers (60 miles) away, with a layer of ash. According to legend, Fuji arose from the plain during a single night in 286 BC. Geologically, the mountain is much older than this.

    Considered sacred by many, Fuji is surrounded by temples and shrines. Thousands of pilgrims climb the mountain each year as part of their religious practice, hoping to reach the summit by dawn to watch the sunrise. This animated fly-by was created by draping visible and near infrared image data over a digital topography model, created from ASTER's stereo bands. The spatial resolution of both the image and topography is 15 m. The image is centered at 35.3 degrees north latitude, 138.7 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  8. Resistivity Changes of Sakurajima Volcano by Magnetotelluric Continuous Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, K.; Kanda, W.; Ogawa, Y.; Iguchi, M.; Yokoo, A.

    2009-12-01

    In order to predict volcano eruptions and to contribute to hazard mitigation, monitoring of subsurface magma movement is the most essential approach. Recent study of time change of seismic structure (4D tomography) in Etna volcano clearly imaged time change of Vp/Vs structure, [Patanè et al., 2006]. They showed that structure changes not only on the location of magma intrusion but widely around the intrusion. They attributed Vp/Vs change to subsurface magma movement and fluids migration from the intrusion zone. Another method using seismic noise records are proposed to monitor the subsurface seismic structure [Brenguier et al., 2008]. These seismic methods have a great potential to reliable prediction of volcano eruption, though the method need densely deployed seismometer network. Monitoring electric resistivity structure is also the promising tools for imaging the subsurface magma movement, because magma and degassed volatile is highly conductive. Indeed, by repeated DC electric measurement using active source field, significant resistivity change is detected before and after the 1986 eruption of Izu-Oshima volcano, and the subsurface magma movement is deduced [Yukutake et al., 1990; Utada, 2003]. In this study, we show the first results of the long term continuous magnetotellurics (MT) observation to monitor the resistivity structure. Because MT impedance is stable and high time resolution [Eisel and Egbert, 2001; Hanekop and Simpson, 2006], the continuous MT observation is suitable to detect subsurface resistivity changes. We conducted long-term MT continuous measurements since May, 2008 to July, 2009 at Sakurajima, which is the most active volcano in Japan. Two observation sites were set up at 3.3km east, and 3km WNW of the summit crater. The obtained MT impedance shows significant apparent resistivity changes, which continues 20~50 days, in the frequency range between 300-1 Hz at the both observation sites. This frequency range corresponds to the depth

  9. Mahukona: The missing Hawaiian volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.O.; Muenow, D.W. ); Kurz, M.D. )

    1990-11-01

    New bathymetric and geochemical data indicate that a seamount west of the island of Hawaii, Mahukona, is a Hawaiian shield volcano. Mahukona has weakly alkalic lavas that are geochemically distinct. They have high {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios (12-21 times atmosphere), and high H{sub 2}O and Cl contents, which are indicative of the early state of development of Hawaiian volcanoes. The He and Sr isotopic values for Mahukona lavas are intermediate between those for lavas from Loihi and Manuna Loa volcanoes and may be indicative of a temporal evolution of Hawaiian magmas. Mahukona volcano became extinct at about 500 ka, perhaps before reaching sea level. It fills the previously assumed gap in the parallel chains of volcanoes forming the southern segment of the Hawaiian hotspot chain. The paired sequence of volcanoes was probably caused by the bifurcation of the Hawaiian mantle plume during its ascent, creating two primary areas of melting 30 to 40 km apart that have persisted for at least the past 4 m.y.

  10. Mount St. Helens and Kilauea volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Barrat, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Mount St. Helens' eruption has taught geologists invaluable lessons about how volcanoes work. Such information will be crucial in saving lives and property when other dormant volcanoes in the northwestern United States--and around the world--reawaken, as geologists predict they someday will. Since 1912, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory have pioneered the study of volcanoes through work on Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. In Vancouver, Wash., scientists at the Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory are studying the after-effects of Mount St. Helens' catalysmic eruption as well as monitoring a number of other now-dormant volcanoes in the western United States. This paper briefly reviews the similarities and differences between the Hawaiian and Washington volcanoes and what these volcanoes are teaching the volcanologists.

  11. Multibeam Bathymetry of Haleakala Volcano, Maui

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakins, B. W.; Robinson, J.

    2002-12-01

    The submarine northeast flank of Haleakala Volcano, Maui was mapped in detail during the summers of 2001 and 2002 by a joint team from the Japan Marine Science and Technology Center (JAMSTEC), Tokyo Institute of Technology, University of Hawaii, and the U.S. Geological Survey. JAMSTEC instruments used included SeaBeam 2112 hull-mounted multibeam sonar (bathymetry and sidescan imagery), manned submersible Shinkai 6500 and ROV Kaiko (bottom video, photographs and sampling of Hana Ridge), gravimeter, magnetometer, and single-channel seismic system. Hana Ridge, Haleakala's submarine east rift zone, is capped by coral-reef terraces for much of its length, which are flexurally tilted towards the axis of the Hawaiian Ridge and delineate former shorelines. Its deeper, more distal portion exhibits a pair of parallel, linear crests, studded with volcanic cones, that suggest lateral migration of the rift zone during its growth. The northern face of the arcuate ridge terminus is a landslide scar in one of these crests, while its southwestern prong is a small, constructional ridge. The Hana slump, a series of basins and ridges analogous to the Laupahoehoe slump off Kohala Volcano, Hawaii, lies north of Hana Ridge and extends down to the Hawaiian moat. Northwest of this slump region a small, dual-crested ridge strikes toward the Hawaiian moat and is inferred to represent a fossil rift zone, perhaps of East Molokai Volcano. A sediment chute along its southern flank has built a large submarine fan with a staircase of contour-parallel folds on its surface that are probably derived from slow creep of sediments down into the moat. Sediments infill the basins of the Hana slump [Moore et al., 1989], whose lowermost layers have been variously back-tilted by block rotation during slumping and flexural loading of the Hawaiian Ridge; the ridges define the outer edges of those down-dropped blocks, which may have subsided several kilometers. An apron of volcaniclastic debris shed from

  12. Vertical Motions of Oceanic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Moore, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    Oceanic volcanoes offer abundant evidence of changes in their elevations through time. Their large-scale motions begin with a period of rapid subsidence lasting hundreds of thousands of years caused by isostatic compensation of the added mass of the volcano on the ocean lithosphere. The response is within thousands of years and lasts as long as the active volcano keeps adding mass on the ocean floor. Downward flexure caused by volcanic loading creates troughs around the growing volcanoes that eventually fill with sediment. Seismic surveys show that the overall depression of the old ocean floor beneath Hawaiian volcanoes such as Mauna Loa is about 10 km. This gross subsidence means that the drowned shorelines only record a small part of the total subsidence the islands experienced. In Hawaii, this history is recorded by long-term tide-gauge data, the depth in drill holes of subaerial lava flows and soil horizons, former shorelines presently located below sea level. Offshore Hawaii, a series of at least 7 drowned reefs and terraces record subsidence of about 1325 m during the last half million years. Older sequences of drowned reefs and terraces define the early rapid phase of subsidence of Maui, Molokai, Lanai, Oahu, Kauai, and Niihau. Volcanic islands, such as Maui, tip down toward the next younger volcano as it begins rapid growth and subsidence. Such tipping results in drowned reefs on Haleakala as deep as 2400 m where they are tipped towards Hawaii. Flat-topped volcanoes on submarine rift zones also record this tipping towards the next younger volcano. This early rapid subsidence phase is followed by a period of slow subsidence lasting for millions of years caused by thermal contraction of the aging ocean lithosphere beneath the volcano. The well-known evolution along the Hawaiian chain from high to low volcanic island, to coral island, and to guyot is due to this process. This history of rapid and then slow subsidence is interrupted by a period of minor uplift

  13. Coordination of Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO) Science Working Group (SWG) for the study of instrument accommodation and operational requirements on space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives are to coordinate the activities of the Science Working Group (SWG) of the Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO) for the study of instruments accommodation and operation requirements on board space station. In order to facilitate the progress of the objective, two conferences were organized, together with two small group discussions.

  14. Electronic properties of highly-active Ag3AsO4 photocatalyst and its band gap modulation: an insight from hybrid-density functional calculations.

    PubMed

    Reunchan, Pakpoom; Boonchun, Adisak; Umezawa, Naoto

    2016-08-17

    The electronic structures of highly active Ag-based oxide photocatalysts Ag3AsO4 and Ag3PO4 are studied by hybrid-density functional calculations. It is revealed that Ag3AsO4 and Ag3PO4 are indirect band gap semiconductors. The Hartree-Fock mixing parameters are fitted for experimental band gaps of Ag3AsO4 (1.88 eV) and Ag3PO4 (2.43 eV). The smaller electron effective mass and the lower valence band edge of Ag3AsO4 are likely to be responsible for the superior photocatalytic oxidation reaction to Ag3PO4. The comparable lattice constant and analogous crystal structure between the two materials allow the opportunities of fine-tuning the band gap of Ag3AsxP1-xO4 using a solid-solution approach. The development of Ag3AsxP1-xO4 should be promising for the discovery of novel visible-light sensitized photocatalysts.

  15. A Rearmed Japan: Implications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    Japan started its initial rearmament effort. Japan’s defense expenditures have fluctuated from near 3% of GNP to as low...Klein, Donald W. " Japan 1979: The Second Oil Crisis’ Asian Survey, January 1980. Lee, William T. "Soviet Defense Expenditures in an Era of SALT." United...relationship to the options Japan can take. In very general terms, Japan has two options: to solely rely on the D.S.-Japanese Mutual Defense Treaty for

  16. Satellite monitoring of African volcanoes by means of RSTVOLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pergola, Nicola; Coviello, Irina; Falconieri, Alfredo; Filizzola, Carolina; Lacava, Teodosio; Liuzzi, Mariangela; Marchese, Francesco; Paciello, Rossana; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2015-04-01

    RSTVOLC is an algorithm for volcanic hot spot detection from space based on the Robust Satellite Techniques (RST) multi-temporal approach. This algorithm was firstly tested on Mt. Etna area, analyzing a long-term time series of infrared Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite records, and was then implemented on data provided by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to study a number of volcanoes in different geographic areas, including Asamayama (Japan) and Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland). Recently, RSTVOLC has been exported on data provided by geostationary sensors such as the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI), onboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites, allowing for the timely detection and real time monitoring of thermal volcanic phenomena. In this work, recent results achieved studying some important African volcanoes by means of polar and geostationary satellite data are presented. Outcomes and results achieved by RSTVOLC studying some past Ol Donyo Lengai (Tanzania) eruptions and the recent Nyamuragira (Congo) activity are reported and discussed, also for comparison with other independent hot spot detection techniques. This study confirms that RSTVOLC may be successfully used to monitor volcanoes at a global scale and to detect low level thermal activities, thanks to its intrinsic self-adaptivity to different observational/environmental conditions as well as to its high sensitivity to sublte hot spots, contributing to volcanic risk mitigation.

  17. El Misti Volcano and the City of Arequipa, Peru

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This three-dimensional perspective view was created from an Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Digital Elevation Model combined with a simulated natural color ASTER image, acquired July 13, 2001. It shows El Misti volcano towering 5822 meters high above the second city of Peru, Arequipa, with a population of more than one million. Geologic studies indicate that El Misti has had five minor eruptions this century, and a major eruption in the 15th century when residents were forced to flee the city. Despite the obvious hazard, civil defense authorities see it as a remote danger, and city planners are not avoiding development on the volcano side of the city. This view shows human development extending up the flanks of the volcano along gullies which would form natural channels for flows of lava, superheated ash and gas, or melted ice, snow, and mud from the summit snowfield in the event of an eruption. Image by Mike Abrams, NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

  18. Li3Al(MoO2)2O2(AsO4)2

    PubMed Central

    Hajji, Mounir; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    Single crystals of trilithium(I) aluminium(III) bis­[dioxidomolybdenum(VI)] dioxide bis­[arsenate(V)], Li3AlMo2As2O14, have been prepared by solid-state reaction at 788 K. The structure consists of AsO4 tetra­hedra, AlO6 octa­hedra and Mo2O10 groups sharing corners to form a three-dimensional framework containing channels running respectively along the [100] and [010] directions, where the Li+ ions are located. This structure is compared with compounds having (MX 2O12)n chains (M = Mo, Al and X = P, As) and others containing M 2O10 (M = Mo, Fe) dimers. PMID:21582037

  19. K0.12Na0.54Ag0.34Nb4O9AsO4

    PubMed Central

    Chérif, Saïda Fatma; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Potassium sodium silver tetra­niobium nona­oxide arsenate, K0.12Na0.54Ag0.34Nb4AsO13, synthesized by solid-state reaction at 1123 K, adopts a three-dimensional framework delimiting tunnels running along [001] in which occupationally disordered sodium, silver, and potassium ions are located. Of the 11 atoms in the asymmetric unit (two Nb, one As, one Ag, one K, one Na and fiveO), nine are located on special positions: one Nb and the K, Ag, Na and two O atoms are situated on mirror planes, the other Nb is on a twofold rotation axis, and the As atom and one O atom are on sites of m2m symmetry. PMID:21522808

  20. The mixed anion mineral parnauite Cu 9[(OH) 10|SO 4|(AsO 4) 2]·7H 2O—A Raman spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Keeffe, Eloise C.

    2011-10-01

    The mixed anion mineral parnauite Cu 9[(OH) 10|SO 4|(AsO 4) 2]·7H 2O from two localities namely Cap Garonne Mine, Le Pradet, France and Majuba Hill mine, Pershing County, Nevada, USA has been studied by Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectrum of the French sample is dominated by an intense band at 975 cm -1 assigned to the ν1 (SO 4) 2- symmetric stretching mode and Raman bands at 1077 and 1097 cm -1 may be attributed to the ν3 (SO 4) 2- antisymmetric stretching mode. Two Raman bands 1107 and 1126 cm -1 are assigned to carbonate CO 32- symmetric stretching bands and confirms the presence of carbonate in the structure of parnauite. The comparatively sharp band for the Pershing County mineral at 976 cm -1 is assigned to the ν1 (SO 4) 2- symmetric stretching mode and a broad spectral profile centered upon 1097 cm -1 is attributed to the ν3 (SO 4) 2- antisymmetric stretching mode. Two intense bands for the Pershing County mineral at 851 and 810 cm -1 are assigned to the ν1 (AsO 4) 3- symmetric stretching and ν3 (AsO 4) 3- antisymmetric stretching modes. Two Raman bands for the French mineral observed at 725 and 777 cm -1 are attributed to the ν3 (AsO 4) 3- antisymmetric stretching mode. For the French mineral, a low intensity Raman band is observed at 869 cm -1 and is assigned to the ν1 (AsO 4) 3- symmetric stretching vibration. Chemical composition of parnauite remains open and the question may be raised is parnauite a solid solution of two or more minerals such as a copper hydroxy-arsenate and a copper hydroxy sulphate.

  1. Thermal surveillance of volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A systematic aircraft program to monitor changes in the thermal emission from volcanoes of the Cascade Range has been initiated and is being carried out in conjunction with ERTS-1 thermal surveillance experiments. Night overflights by aircraft equipped with thermal infrared scanners sensitive to terrestrial emission in the 4-5.5 and 8-14 micron bands are currently being carried out at intervals of a few months. Preliminary results confirm that Mount Rainier, Mount Baker, Mount Saint Helens, Mount Shasta, and the Lassen area continue to be thermally active, although with the exception of Lassen which erupted between 1914 and 1917, and Mount Saint Helens which had a series of eruptions between 1831 and 1834, there has been no recent eruptive activity. Excellent quality infrared images recorded over Mount Rainier, as recently as April, 1972, show similar thermal patterns to those reported in 1964-1966. Infrared images of Mount Baker recorded in November 1970 and again in April 1972 revealed a distinct array of anomalies 1000 feet below the crater rim and associated with fumaroles or structures permitting convective heat transfer to the surface.

  2. Sand Volcano Following Earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Sand boil or sand volcano measuring 2 m (6.6 ft.) in length erupted in median of Interstate Highway 80 west of the Bay Bridge toll plaza when ground shaking transformed loose water-saturated deposit of subsurface sand into a sand-water slurry (liquefaction) in the October 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake. Vented sand contains marine-shell fragments. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: J.C. Tinsley, U.S. Geological Survey)

  3. Lifespans of Cascade Arc volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    Compiled argon ages reveal inception, eruptive episodes, ages, and durations of Cascade stratovolcanoes and their ancestral predecessors. Geologic mapping and geochronology show that most Cascade volcanoes grew episodically on multiple scales with periods of elevated behavior lasting hundreds of years to ca. 100 kyr. Notable examples include the paleomag-constrained, few-hundred-year-long building of the entire 15-20 km3 Shastina edifice at Mt. Shasta, the 100 kyr-long episode that produced half of Mt. Rainier's output, and the 30 kyr-long episode responsible for all of South and Middle Sister. Despite significant differences in timing and rates of construction, total durations of active and ancestral volcanoes at discrete central-vent locations are similar. Glacier Peak, Mt. Rainier, Mt. Adams, Mt. Hood, and Mt. Mazama all have inception ages of 400-600 ka. Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Jefferson, Newberry Volcano, Mt. Shasta and Lassen Domefield have more recent inception ages of 200-300 ka. Only the Sisters cluster and Mt. Baker have established eruptive histories spanning less than 50 kyr. Ancestral volcanoes centered 5-20 km from active stratocones appear to have similar total durations (200-600 kyr), but are less well exposed and dated. The underlying mechanisms governing volcano lifecycles are cryptic, presumably involving tectonic and plumbing changes and perhaps circulation cycles in the mantle wedge, but are remarkably consistent along the arc.

  4. Seismic signals from Lascar Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, M.

    1999-03-01

    Lascar, the most active volcano in northern Chile, lies near the center of the region studied during the Proyecto de Investigación Sismológica de la Cordillera Occidental 94 (PISCO '94). Its largest historical eruption occurred on 19 April 1993. By the time of the PISCO '94 deployment, its activity consisted mainly of a plume of water vapor and SO 2. In April and May 1994, three short-period, three-component seismometers were placed on the flanks of the volcano, augmenting the broadband seismometer located on the NW flank of the volcano during the entire deployment. In addition to the usual seismic signals recorded at volcanoes, Lascar produced two unique tremor types: Rapid-fire tremor and harmonic tremor. Rapid-fire tremor appears to be a sequence of very similar, but independent, "impulsive" events with a large range of amplitudes. Harmonic tremor, on the other hand, is a continuous, cyclic signal lasting several hours. It is characterized by a spectrum with peaks at a fundamental frequency and its integer multiples. Both types of tremor seem to be generated by movement of fluids in the volcano, most probably water, steam or gas.

  5. Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Eyjafjallajökull Volcano Plume Heights     View ... and stereo plume   Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull volcano produced its second major ash plume of 2010 beginning on May 7. Unlike ...

  6. Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Eyjafjallajökull Volcano Ash Plume Particle Properties     ... satellite flew over Iceland's erupting Eyjafjallajökull volcano on April 19, 2010, its Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) ...

  7. Earthquakes & Volcanoes, Volume 23, Number 6, 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Gordon, David W.

    1993-01-01

    Earthquakes and Volcanoes is published bimonthly by the U.S. Geological Survey to provide current information on earthquakes and seismology, volcanoes, and related natural hazards of interest to both generalized and specialized readers.

  8. Revisiting Jorullo volcano (Mexico): monogenetic or polygenetic volcano?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado Granados, H.; Roberge, J.; Farraz Montes, I. A.; Victoria Morales, A.; Pérez Bustamante, J. C.; Correa Olan, J. C.; Gutiérrez Jiménez, A. J.; Adán González, N.; Bravo Cardona, E. F.

    2007-05-01

    Jorullo volcano is located near the volcanic front of the westernmost part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, which is related to the subduction of the Cocos plate beneath the North American plate. This part of the TMVB is known as the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field, a region where widespread monogenetic volcanism is present although polygenetic volcanism is also recognized (i. e. Tancítaro volcano; Ownby et al., 2006). Jorullo volcano was born in the middle of crop fields. During its birth several lava flows were emitted and several cones were constructed. The main cone is the Jorullo proper, but there is a smaller cone on the north (Volcán del Norte), and three smaller cones aligned N-S on the south (Unnamed cone, UC; Volcán de Enmedio, VE; and Volcán del Sur, VS). The cone of Jorullo volcano is made up of tephra and lava flows erupted from the crater. The three southern cones show very interesting histories not described previously. VE erupted highly vesiculated tephras including xenoliths from the granitic basement. VS is made of spatter and bombs. A very well preserved hummocky morphology reveals that VE and VS collapsed towards the west. After the collapses, phreatomagmatic activity took place at the UC blanketing VE, VS and the southern flank of the Jorullo cone with sticky surge deposits. The excellent study by Luhr and Carmichael (1985) indicates that during the course of the eruption, lavas evolved from primitive basalt to basaltic andesite, although explosive products show a reverse evolution pattern (Johnson et al., 2006). We mapped lava flows not described by the observers in the 18th century nor considered in previous geologic reports as part of the Jorullo lavas. These lavas are older, distributed to the west and south, and some of them resemble the lava flows from La Pilita volcano, a cone older than Jorullo (Luhr and Carmichael, 1985). These lava flows were not considered before because they were not extruded during the 1759

  9. Seismic activity of Erebus volcano, antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminuma, Katsutada

    1987-11-01

    Mount Erebus is presently the only Antarctic volcano with sustained eruptive activity in the past few years. It is located on Ross Island and a convecting anorthoclase phonolite lava lake has occupied the summit crater of Mount Erebus from January 1973 to September 1984. A program to monitor the seismic activity of Mount Erebus named IMESS was started in December 1980 as an international cooperative program among Japan, the United States and New Zealand. A new volcanic episode began on 13 September, 1984 and continued until December. Our main observations from the seismic activity from 1982 1985 are as follows: (1) The average numbers of earthquakes which occurred around Mount Erebus in 1982, 1983 and January August 1984 were 64, 134 and 146 events per day, respectively. Several earthquake swarms occurred each year. (2) The averag number of earthquakes in 1985 is 23 events per day, with only one earthquake swarm. (3) A remarkable decrease of the background seismicity is recognized before and after the September 1984 activity. (4) Only a few earthquakes were located in the area surrounding Erebus mountain after the September 1984 activity. A magma reservoir is estimated to be located in the southwest area beneath the Erebus summit, based on the hypocenter distributions of earthquakes.

  10. Deep structure and origin of active volcanoes in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D.

    2010-12-01

    Recent geophysical studies have provided important constraints on the deep structure and origin of the active intraplate volcanoes in Mainland China. Magmatism in the western Pacific arc and back-arc areas is caused by the corner flow in the mantle wedge and dehydration of the subducting slab (e.g., Zhao et al., 2009a), while the intraplate magmatism in China has different origins. The active volcanoes in Northeast China (such as the Changbai and Wudalianchi) are caused by hot upwelling in the big mantle wedge (BMW) above the stagnant slab in the mantle transition zone and deep slab dehydration as well (Zhao et al., 2009b). The Tengchong volcano in Southwest China is caused by a similar process in the BMW above the subducting Burma microplate (or Indian plate) (Lei et al., 2009a). The Hainan volcano in southernmost China is a hotspot fed by a lower-mantle plume which may be associated with the Pacific and Philippine Sea slabs' deep subduction in the east and Indian slab's deep subduction in the west down to the lower mantle (Lei et al., 2009b; Zhao, 2009). The stagnant slab finally collapses down to the bottom of the mantle, which can trigger the upwelling of hot mantle materials from the lower mantle to the shallow mantle beneath the subducting slabs and may cause the slab-plume interactions (Zhao, 2009). References Lei, J., D. Zhao, Y. Su, 2009a. Insight into the origin of the Tengchong intraplate volcano and seismotectonics in southwest China from local and teleseismic data. J. Geophys. Res. 114, B05302. Lei, J., D. Zhao, B. Steinberger et al., 2009b. New seismic constraints on the upper mantle structure of the Hainan plume. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 173, 33-50. Zhao, D., 2009. Multiscale seismic tomography and mantle dynamics. Gondwana Res. 15, 297-323. Zhao, D., Z. Wang, N. Umino, A. Hasegawa, 2009a. Mapping the mantle wedge and interplate thrust zone of the northeast Japan arc. Tectonophysics 467, 89-106. Zhao, D., Y. Tian, J. Lei, L. Liu, 2009b. Seismic

  11. Global Volcano Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, R. S. J.; Loughlin, S. C.; Cottrell, E.; Valentine, G.; Newhall, C.; Jolly, G.; Papale, P.; Takarada, S.; Crosweller, S.; Nayembil, M.; Arora, B.; Lowndes, J.; Connor, C.; Eichelberger, J.; Nadim, F.; Smolka, A.; Michel, G.; Muir-Wood, R.; Horwell, C.

    2012-04-01

    Over 600 million people live close enough to active volcanoes to be affected when they erupt. Volcanic eruptions cause loss of life, significant economic losses and severe disruption to people's lives, as highlighted by the recent eruption of Mount Merapi in Indonesia. The eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland in 2010 illustrated the potential of even small eruptions to have major impact on the modern world through disruption of complex critical infrastructure and business. The effects in the developing world on economic growth and development can be severe. There is evidence that large eruptions can cause a change in the earth's climate for several years afterwards. Aside from meteor impact and possibly an extreme solar event, very large magnitude explosive volcanic eruptions may be the only natural hazard that could cause a global catastrophe. GVM is a growing international collaboration that aims to create a sustainable, accessible information platform on volcanic hazard and risk. We are designing and developing an integrated database system of volcanic hazards, vulnerability and exposure with internationally agreed metadata standards. GVM will establish methodologies for analysis of the data (eg vulnerability indices) to inform risk assessment, develop complementary hazards models and create relevant hazards and risk assessment tools. GVM will develop the capability to anticipate future volcanism and its consequences. NERC is funding the start-up of this initiative for three years from November 2011. GVM builds directly on the VOGRIPA project started as part of the GRIP (Global Risk Identification Programme) in 2004 under the auspices of the World Bank and UN. Major international initiatives and partners such as the Smithsonian Institution - Global Volcanism Program, State University of New York at Buffalo - VHub, Earth Observatory of Singapore - WOVOdat and many others underpin GVM.

  12. Volcanoes and global catastrophes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simkin, Tom

    1988-01-01

    The search for a single explanation for global mass extinctions has let to polarization and the controversies that are often fueled by widespread media attention. The historic record shows a roughly linear log-log relation between the frequency of explosive volcanic eruptions and the volume of their products. Eruptions such as Mt. St. Helens 1980 produce on the order of 1 cu km of tephra, destroying life over areas in the 10 to 100 sq km range, and take place, on the average, once or twice a decade. Eruptions producing 10 cu km take place several times a century and, like Krakatau 1883, destroy life over 100 to 1000 sq km areas while producing clear global atmospheric effects. Eruptions producting 10,000 cu km are known from the Quaternary record, and extrapolation from the historic record suggests that they occur perhaps once in 20,000 years, but none has occurred in historic time and little is known of their biologic effects. Even larger eruptions must also exist in the geologic record, but documentation of their volume becomes increasingly difficult as their age increases. The conclusion is inescapable that prehistoric eruptions have produced catastrophes on a global scale: only the magnitude of the associated mortality is in question. Differentiation of large magma chambers is on a time scale of thousands to millions of years, and explosive volcanoes are clearly concentrated in narrow belts near converging plate margins. Volcanism cannot be dismissed as a producer of global catastrophes. Its role in major extinctions is likely to be at least contributory and may well be large. More attention should be paid to global effects of the many huge eruptions in the geologic record that dwarf those known in historic time.

  13. Volcano Hazards - A National Threat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2006-01-01

    When the violent energy of a volcano is unleashed, the results are often catastrophic. The risks to life, property, and infrastructure from volcanoes are escalating as more and more people live, work, play, and travel in volcanic regions. Since 1980, 45 eruptions and 15 cases of notable volcanic unrest have occurred at 33 U.S. volcanoes. Lava flows, debris avalanches, and explosive blasts have invaded communities, swept people to their deaths, choked major riverways, destroyed bridges, and devastated huge tracts of forest. Noxious volcanic gas emissions have caused widespread lung problems. Airborne ash clouds have disrupted the health, lives, and businesses of hundreds of thousands of people; caused millions of dollars of aircraft damage; and nearly brought down passenger flights.

  14. High Rate GPS on Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattia, M.

    2005-12-01

    The high rate GPS data processing can be considered as the "new deal" in geodetic monitoring of active volcanoes. Before an eruption, infact, transient episodes of ground displacements related to the dynamics of magmatic fluids can be revealed through a careful analysis of high rate GPS data. In the very first phases of an eruption the real time processing of high rate GPS data can be used by the authorities of Civil Protection to follow the opening of fractures field on the slopes of the volcanoes. During an eruption large explosions, opening of vents, migration of fractures fields, landslides and other dangerous phenomena can be followed and their potential of damage estimated by authorities. Examples from the recent eruption of Stromboli volcano and from the current activities of high rate GPS monitoring on Mt. Etna are reported, with the aim to show the great potential and the perspectives of this technique.

  15. Remote sensing of volcanos and volcanic terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Francis, Peter W.; Wilson, Lionel; Pieri, David C.; Self, Stephen; Rose, William I.; Wood, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of using remote sensing to monitor potentially dangerous volcanoes is discussed. Thermal studies of active volcanoes are considered along with using weather satellites to track eruption plumes and radar measurements to study lava flow morphology and topography. The planned use of orbiting platforms to study emissions from volcanoes and the rate of change of volcanic landforms is considered.

  16. Multiphase modelling of mud volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Simone; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Clarke, Amanda B.

    2015-04-01

    Mud volcanism is a worldwide phenomenon, classically considered as the surface expression of piercement structures rooted in deep-seated over-pressured sediments in compressional tectonic settings. The release of fluids at mud volcanoes during repeated explosive episodes has been documented at numerous sites and the outflows resemble the eruption of basaltic magma. As magma, the material erupted from a mud volcano becomes more fluid and degasses while rising and decompressing. The release of those gases from mud volcanism is estimated to be a significant contributor both to fluid flux from the lithosphere to the hydrosphere, and to the atmospheric budget of some greenhouse gases, particularly methane. For these reasons, we simulated the fluid dynamics of mud volcanoes using a newly-developed compressible multiphase and multidimensional transient solver in the OpenFOAM framework, taking into account the multicomponent nature (CH4, CO2, H2O) of the fluid mixture, the gas exsolution during the ascent and the associated changes in the constitutive properties of the phases. The numerical model has been tested with conditions representative of the LUSI, a mud volcano that has been erupting since May 2006 in the densely populated Sidoarjo regency (East Java, Indonesia), forcing the evacuation of 40,000 people and destroying industry, farmland, and over 10,000 homes. The activity of LUSI mud volcano has been well documented (Vanderkluysen et al., 2014) and here we present a comparison of observed gas fluxes and mud extrusion rates with the outcomes of numerical simulations. Vanderkluysen, L.; Burton, M. R.; Clarke, A. B.; Hartnett, H. E. & Smekens, J.-F. Composition and flux of explosive gas release at LUSI mud volcano (East Java, Indonesia) Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., Wiley-Blackwell, 2014, 15, 2932-2946

  17. Of Rings and Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    show it. The bright spot close to the equator is the remnant of a giant storm in Saturn's extended atmosphere that has lasted more than 5 years. The present photo provides what is possibly the sharpest view of the ring system ever achieved from a ground-based observatory . Many structures are visible, the most obvious being the main ring sections, the inner C-region (here comparatively dark), the middle B-region (here relatively bright) and the outer A-region, and also the obvious dark "divisions", including the well-known, broad Cassini division between the A- and B-regions, as well as the Encke division close to the external edge of the A-region and the Colombo division in the C-region. Moreover, many narrow rings can be seen at this high image resolution , in particular within the C-region - they may be compared with those seen by the Voyager spacecraft during the flybys, cf. the weblinks below. This image demonstrates the capability of NAOS-CONICA to observe also extended objects with excellent spatial resolution. It is a composite of four short-exposure images taken through the near-infrared H (wavelength 1.6 µm) and K (2.2 µm) filters. This observation was particularly difficult because of the motion of Saturn during the exposure. To provide the best possible images, the Adaptive Optics system of NAOS was pointed towards the Saturnian moon Tethys , while the image of Saturn was kept at a fixed position on the CONICA detector by means of "differential tracking" (compensating for the different motions in the sky of Saturn and Tethys). This is also why the (faint) image of Tethys - visible south of Saturn (i.e., below the planet in PR Photo 04a/02 ) - appears slightly trailed. Io - volcanoes and sulphur ESO PR Photo 04b/02 ESO PR Photo 04b/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 478 pix - 39k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 955 pix - 112k] ESO PR Photo 04c/02 ESO PR Photo 04c/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 469 pix - 58k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 937 pix - 368k] Caption : PR Photo 04b/02 shows

  18. Alaska volcanoes guidebook for teachers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adleman, Jennifer N.

    2011-01-01

    Alaska’s volcanoes, like its abundant glaciers, charismatic wildlife, and wild expanses inspire and ignite scientific curiosity and generate an ever-growing source of questions for students in Alaska and throughout the world. Alaska is home to more than 140 volcanoes, which have been active over the last 2 million years. About 90 of these volcanoes have been active within the last 10,000 years and more than 50 of these have been active since about 1700. The volcanoes in Alaska make up well over three-quarters of volcanoes in the United States that have erupted in the last 200 years. In fact, Alaska’s volcanoes erupt so frequently that it is almost guaranteed that an Alaskan will experience a volcanic eruption in his or her lifetime, and it is likely they will experience more than one. It is hard to imagine a better place for students to explore active volcanism and to understand volcanic hazards, phenomena, and global impacts. Previously developed teachers’ guidebooks with an emphasis on the volcanoes in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Mattox, 1994) and Mount Rainier National Park in the Cascade Range (Driedger and others, 2005) provide place-based resources and activities for use in other volcanic regions in the United States. Along the lines of this tradition, this guidebook serves to provide locally relevant and useful resources and activities for the exploration of numerous and truly unique volcanic landscapes in Alaska. This guidebook provides supplemental teaching materials to be used by Alaskan students who will be inspired to become educated and prepared for inevitable future volcanic activity in Alaska. The lessons and activities in this guidebook are meant to supplement and enhance existing science content already being taught in grade levels 6–12. Correlations with Alaska State Science Standards and Grade Level Expectations adopted by the Alaska State Department of Education and Early Development (2006) for grades six through eleven are listed at

  19. Large landslides from oceanic volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holcomb, R.T.; Searle, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    Large landslides are ubiquitous around the submarine flanks of Hawaiian volcanoes, and GLORIA has also revealed large landslides offshore from Tristan da Cunha and El Hierro. On both of the latter islands, steep flanks formerly attributed to tilting or marine erosion have been reinterpreted as landslide headwalls mantled by younger lava flows. These landslides occur in a wide range of settings and probably represent only a small sample from a large population. They may explain the large volumes of archipelagic aprons and the stellate shapes of many oceanic volcanoes. Large landslides and associated tsunamis pose hazards to many islands. -from Authors

  20. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Waitt, Richard B.

    1998-01-01

    Augustine Volcano is a 1250-meter high stratovolcano in southwestern Cook Inlet about 280 kilometers southwest of Anchorage and within about 300 kilometers of more than half of the population of Alaska. Explosive eruptions have occurred six times since the early 1800s (1812, 1883, 1935, 1964-65, 1976, and 1986). The 1976 and 1986 eruptions began with an initial series of vent-clearing explosions and high vertical plumes of volcanic ash followed by pyroclastic flows, surges, and lahars on the volcano flanks. Unlike some prehistoric eruptions, a summit edifice collapse and debris avalanche did not occur in 1812, 1935, 1964-65, 1976, or 1986. However, early in the 1883 eruption, a portion of the volcano summit broke loose forming a debris avalanche that flowed to the sea. The avalanche initiated a small tsunami reported on the Kenai Peninsula at English Bay, 90 kilometers east of the volcano. Plumes of volcanic ash are a major hazard to jet aircraft using Anchorage International and other local airports. Ashfall from future eruptions could disrupt oil and gas operations and shipping activities in Cook Inlet. Eruptions similar to the historical and prehistoric eruptions are likely in Augustine's future.

  1. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Mount Spurr Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Nye, Christopher J.

    2001-01-01

    Mount Spurr volcano is an ice- and snow-covered stratovolcano complex located in the north-central Cook Inlet region about 100 kilometers west of Anchorage, Alaska. Mount Spurr volcano consists of a breached stratovolcano, a lava dome at the summit of Mount Spurr, and Crater Peak vent, a small stratocone on the south flank of Mount Spurr volcano. Historical eruptions of Crater Peak occurred in 1953 and 1992. These eruptions were relatively small but explosive, and they dispersed volcanic ash over areas of interior, south-central, and southeastern Alaska. Individual ash clouds produced by the 1992 eruption drifted east, north, and south. Within a few days of the eruption, the south-moving ash cloud was detected over the North Atlantic. Pyroclastic flows that descended the south flank of Crater Peak during both historical eruptions initiated volcanic-debris flows or lahars that formed temporary debris dams across the Chakachatna River, the principal drainage south of Crater Peak. Prehistoric eruptions of Crater Peak and Mount Spurr generated clouds of volcanic ash, pyroclastic flows, and lahars that extended to the volcano flanks and beyond. A flank collapse on the southeast side of Mount Spurr generated a large debris avalanche that flowed about 20 kilometers beyond the volcano into the Chakachatna River valley. The debris-avalanche deposit probably formed a large, temporary debris dam across the Chakachatna River. The distribution and thickness of volcanic-ash deposits from Mount Spurr volcano in the Cook Inlet region indicate that volcanic-ash clouds from most prehistoric eruptions were as voluminous as those produced by the 1953 and 1992 eruptions. Clouds of volcanic ash emitted from the active vent, Crater Peak, would be a major hazard to all aircraft using Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport and other local airports and, depending on wind direction, could drift a considerable distance beyond the volcano. Ash fall from future eruptions could disrupt many

  2. Academic Libraries in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Rowena; Nagata, Haruki

    2008-01-01

    Academic libraries in Japan are well resourced by international standards, and support Japan's internationally recognized research capability well, but there are also ways in which they reflect Japan's strong bureaucratic culture. Recent changes to the status of national university libraries have seen a new interest in customer service, and…

  3. Io Volcano Observer (IVO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, A. S.; Keszthelyi, L.; Spencer, J.; Thomas, N.; Johnson, T.; Christensen, P.; Wurz, P.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Shinohara, C.; Girard, T.

    2009-04-01

    In early FY2008, NASA solicited study concepts for Discovery/Scout-class missions that would be enabled by use of 2 Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators (ASRGs). We proposed an Io Volcano Observer (IVO) study concept, because the ASRGs enable pointing flexibility and a high data rate from a low-cost mission in Jupiter orbit. Io presents a rich array of inter-connected orbital, geophysical, atmospheric, and plasma phenomena and is the only place in the Solar System (including Earth) where we can watch very large-scale silicate volcanic processes in action. Io is the best place to study tidal heating, which greatly expands the habitable zones of planetary systems. The coupled orbital-tidal evolution of Io and Europa is key to understanding the histories of both worlds. IVO utilizes an elliptical orbit inclined > 45° to Jupiter's orbital plane with repeated fast flybys of Io. Io will have nearly constant illumination at each flyby, which facilitates monitoring of changes over time. The view of Io on approach and departure will be nearly polar, enabling unique measurement and monitoring of polar heat flow (key to tidal heating models), equatorial plumes, and magnetospheric interactions. We expect to collect and return 20 Gbits per flyby via 34-m DSN stations, >1000 times the Io data return of Galileo. The minimal payload we considered included (1) a narrow-angle camera, (2) a thermal mapper, (3) an ion and neutral mass spectrometer, and (4) a pair of fluxgate magnetometers. The camera will acquire global km-scale monitoring and sampling down to 10 m/pixel or better. One key objective is to acquire nearly simultaneous (<0.1 s) multispectral measurements to determine the peak lava temperatures, which in turn constrains the temperature and rheology of Io's mantle and whether or not the heat flow is in equilibrium with tidal heating. The thermal mapper will be similar to THEMIS on Mars Odyssey, but with bandpasses designed to monitor volcanic activity, measure heat

  4. Laboratory volcano geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Færøvik Johannessen, Rikke; Galland, Olivier; Mair, Karen

    2014-05-01

    intrusion can be excavated and photographed from several angles to compute its 3D shape with the same photogrammetry method. Then, the surface deformation pattern can be directly compared with the shape of underlying intrusion. This quantitative dataset is essential to quantitatively test and validate classical volcano geodetic models.

  5. Mount Rainier, a decade volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, S.C.; Hooper, P.R. . Dept. of Geology); Eggers, A.E. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Mount Rainier, recently designated as a decade volcano, is a 14,410 foot landmark which towers over the heavily populated southern Puget Sound Lowland of Washington State. It last erupted in the mid-1800's and is an obvious threat to this area, yet Rainier has received little detailed study. Previous work has divided Rainier into two distinct pre-glacial eruptive episodes and one post-glacial eruptive episode. In a pilot project, the authors analyzed 253 well-located samples from the volcano for 27 major and trace elements. Their objective is to test the value of chemical compositions as a tool in mapping the stratigraphy and understanding the eruptive history of the volcano which they regard as prerequisite to determining the petrogenesis and potential hazard of the volcano. The preliminary data demonstrates that variation between flows is significantly greater than intra-flow variation -- a necessary condition for stratigraphic use. Numerous flows or groups of flows can be distinguished chemically. It is also apparent from the small variation in Zr abundances and considerable variation in such ratios as Ba/Nb that fractional crystallization plays a subordinate role to some form of mixing process in the origin of the Mount Rainier lavas.

  6. Infrared surveys of Hawaiian volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, W. A.; Moxham, R.M.; Polcyn, F.; Landis, G.H.

    1964-01-01

    Aerial infrared-sensor surveys of Kilauea volcano have depicted the areal extent and the relative intensity of abnormal thermal features in the caldera area of the volcano and along its associated rift zones. Many of these anomalies show correlation with visible steaming and reflect convective transfer of heat to the surface from subterranean sources. Structural details of the volcano, some not evident from surface observation, are also delineated by their thermal abnormalities. Several changes were observed in the patterns of infrared emission during the period of study; two such changes show correlation in location with subsequent eruptions, but the cause-and-effect relationship is uncertain.Thermal anomalies were also observed on the southwest flank of Mauna Loa; images of other volcanoes on the island of Hawaii, and of Haleakala on the island of Maui, revealed no thermal abnormalities.Approximately 25 large springs issuing into the ocean around the periphery of Hawaii have been detected.Infrared emission varies widely with surface texture and composition, suggesting that similar observations may have value for estimating surface conditions on the moon or planets.

  7. What Happened to Our Volcano?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangiante, Elaine Silva

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author presents an investigative approach to "understanding Earth changes." The author states that students were familiar with earthquakes and volcanoes in other regions of the world but never considered how the land beneath their feet had experienced changes over time. Here, their geology unit helped them understand…

  8. Ceboruco Volcano Gravimetric Analysis, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Cordoba, J.; Espindola, J. M.; Gutierrez, Q. J.; Garcia Serrano, A.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Pinzon, J. I.; Nuñez-Cornu, F. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Ceboruco is a late Quaternary dacitic-andesitic stratovolcano, is located in the Tepic-Zacoalco graben in the western part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) near to Ahuacatlan and Jala towns in Mexico. There have been at least eight eruptions from this volcano in the last thousand years, and for this reason Ceboruco must be considered an active volcano whit the possibility of erupting again in the future. This work aims to contribute with a regional density contrasts model from gravity measurements of volcano area. 163 observations were measured every 500 meters with a Scintrex CG-5 gravimeter. We corrected data were measured in the area to filter information dependent of external gravitational fields or outside to object of study. Post-filtering of data, we obtained gravity anomalies distribution and with other supporting data (aeromagnetic and geological data) we made 8 profiles around Ceboruco to build an approximate model of density changes in the lithological units under the volcano.

  9. Augustine Volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska (January 31, 2006)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Since last spring, the U.S. Geological Survey's Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) has detected increasing volcanic unrest at Augustine Volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska near Anchorage. Based on all available monitoring data, AVO regards that an eruption similar to 1976 and 1986 is the most probable outcome. During January, activity has been episodic, and characterized by emission of steam and ash plumes, rising to altitudes in excess of 9,000 m (30,000 ft), and posing hazards to aircraft in the vicinity. In the last week, volcanic flows have been seen on the volcano's flanks. An ASTER thermal image was acquired at night at 22:50 AST on January 31, 2006, during an eruptive phase of Augustine. The image shows three volcanic flows down the north flank of Augustine as white (hot) areas. The eruption plume spreads out to the east in a cone shape: it appears dark blue over the summit because it is cold and water ice dominates the composition; further downwind a change to orange color indicates that the plume is thinning and the signal is dominated by the presence of ash.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at

  10. Growth of superconducting NdFe0.88Co0.12AsO films by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition and post arsenic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrales-Mendoza, I.; Bartolo-Pèrez, P.; Sánchez-Reséndiz, V. M.; Gallardo-Hernández, S.; Conde-Gallardo, A.

    2015-01-01

    Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and post-deposition arsenic diffusion processes were successfully employed to grow superconducting NdFe0.88Co0.12AsO thin films. First, by employing iron, cobalt and neodymium metal-organic precursors, a precursor film is grown by MOCVD on (001)-oriented LaAlO3 substrates. Subsequently, the arsenic is incorporated during an annealing of these precursor films in the presence of a NdFe0.9Co0.1AsO pellet. The chemical composition and crystallographic results indicate the formation of the cobalt-doped NdFeAsO polycrystalline phase. The secondary ion mass spectroscopy indicates a homogeneous arsenic diffusion process. The resistance and magnetization measurements as a function of temperature indicate a superconducting transition ˜15 \\text{K} .

  11. Iridium emissions from Hawaiian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnegan, D. L.; Zoller, W. H.; Miller, T. M.

    1988-01-01

    Particle and gas samples were collected at Mauna Loa volcano during and after its eruption in March and April, 1984 and at Kilauea volcano in 1983, 1984, and 1985 during various phases of its ongoing activity. In the last two Kilauea sampling missions, samples were collected during eruptive activity. The samples were collected using a filterpack system consisting of a Teflon particle filter followed by a series of 4 base-treated Whatman filters. The samples were analyzed by INAA for over 40 elements. As previously reported in the literature, Ir was first detected on particle filters at the Mauna Loa Observatory and later from non-erupting high temperature vents at Kilauea. Since that time Ir was found in samples collected at Kilauea and Mauna Loa during fountaining activity as well as after eruptive activity. Enrichment factors for Ir in the volcanic fumes range from 10,000 to 100,000 relative to BHVO. Charcoal impregnated filters following a particle filter were collected to see if a significant amount of the Ir was in the gas phase during sample collection. Iridium was found on charcoal filters collected close to the vent, no Ir was found on the charcoal filters. This indicates that all of the Ir is in particulate form very soon after its release. Ratios of Ir to F and Cl were calculated for the samples from Mauna Loa and Kilauea collected during fountaining activity. The implications for the KT Ir anomaly are still unclear though as Ir was not found at volcanoes other than those at Hawaii. Further investigations are needed at other volcanoes to ascertain if basaltic volcanoes other than hot spots have Ir enrichments in their fumes.

  12. A new method for As(V) removal from waters by precipitation of mimetite Pb5(AsO4)3Cl on Pb-activated zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manecki, Maciej; Buszkiewicz, Urszula

    2016-04-01

    A new method for removal of arsenate AsO43- ions from aqueous solutions is proposed. The principle of the method stems from precipitation of very insoluble crystalline lead arsenate apatite (mimetite Pb5(AsO4)3Cl) induced by bringing in contact Pb-activated zeolite and As-contaminated water in the presence of Cl-. Zeolite is activated by sorption of Pb2+ followed by washing with water to remove the excess of Pb and to desorbe weakly adsorbed ions. Lead adsorbed on zeolite is bound strong enough to prevent desorption by water but weak enough to undergo desorption induced by heterogeneous precipitation of mimetite nanocrystals on the surface of zeolite. The experiment consisted of two steps. In the first step, aliquots of 0.5 g of natural clinoptilolite zeolite (from Zeocem a.s., Bystré, Slovak Republic) were reacted with 40 mL of solutions containing 20, 100, 500, and 2000 mg Pb/L (pH =4.5; reaction for 30 minutes followed by centrifugation). The amount of Pb sorbed was calculated from the drop of Pb concentration in solution. Centrifuged zeolite was washed three times by mixing with 10 mL of DDI water, followed by centrifugation. No Pb was detected in the water after second washing. Wet pulp resulting from this stage was exposed to solutions containing 70 mg/L Cl- and various concentrations of AsO43- (2 and 100 mg As/L; pH=4). Complete removal of As was observed for 2 mg As/L solutions mixed with zeolite-20 and zeolite-100. The precipitation of mimetite Pb5(AsO4)3Cl in the form of hexagonal crystals ca. 0.25 μm in size was observed using SEM/EDS. This work is partially funded by AGH research grant no 11.11.140.319.

  13. Raman spectroscopy of the multi-anion mineral schlossmacherite (H 3O,Ca)Al 3(AsO 4,PO 4,SO 4) 2(OH) 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Palmer, Sara J.; Xi, Yunfei

    2012-02-01

    The mineral schlossmacherite (H 3O,Ca)Al 3(AsO 4,PO 4,SO 4) 2(OH) 6, a multi-cation-multi-anion mineral of the beudantite mineral subgroup has been characterised by Raman spectroscopy. The mineral and related minerals functions as a heavy metal collector and is often amorphous or poorly crystalline, such that XRD identification is difficult. The Raman spectra are dominated by an intense band at 864 cm -1, assigned to the symmetric stretching mode of the AsO 43- anion. Raman bands at 809 and 819 cm -1 are assigned to the antisymmetric stretching mode of AsO 43-. The sulphate anion is characterised by bands at 1000 cm -1 ( ν1), and at 1031, 1082 and 1139 cm -1 ( ν3). Two sets of bands in the OH stretching region are observed: firstly between 2800 and 3000 cm -1 with bands observed at 2850, 2868, 2918 cm -1 and secondly between 3300 and 3600 with bands observed at 3363, 3382, 3410, 3449 and 3537 cm -1. These bands enabled the calculation of hydrogen bond distances and show a wide range of H-bond distances.

  14. In silico and in vitro evaluation of exonic and intronic off-target effects form a critical element of therapeutic ASO gapmer optimization

    PubMed Central

    Kamola, Piotr J.; Kitson, Jeremy D. A.; Turner, Gemma; Maratou, Klio; Eriksson, Sofie; Panjwani, Aliza; Warnock, Linda C.; Douillard Guilloux, Gaelle A.; Moores, Kitty; Koppe, Emma L.; Wixted, William E.; Wilson, Paul A.; Gooderham, Nigel J.; Gant, Timothy W.; Clark, Kenneth L.; Hughes, Stephen A.; Edbrooke, Mark R.; Parry, Joel D.

    2015-01-01

    With many safety and technical limitations partly mitigated through chemical modifications, antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are gaining recognition as therapeutic entities. The increase in potency realized by ‘third generation chemistries’ may, however, simultaneously increase affinity to unintended targets with partial sequence complementarity. However, putative hybridization-dependent off-target effects (OTEs), a risk historically regarded as low, are not being adequately investigated. Here we show an unexpectedly high OTEs confirmation rate during screening of fully phosphorothioated (PS)-LNA gapmer ASOs designed against the BACH1 transcript. We demonstrate in vitro mRNA and protein knockdown of off-targets with a wide range of mismatch (MM) and gap patterns. Furthermore, with RNase H1 activity residing within the nucleus, hybridization predicted against intronic regions of pre-mRNAs was tested and confirmed. This dramatically increased ASO-binding landscape together with relatively high potency of such interactions translates into a considerable safety concern. We show here that with base pairing-driven target recognition it is possible to predict the putative off-targets and address the liability during lead design and optimization phases. Moreover, in silico analysis performed against both primary as well as spliced transcripts will be invaluable in elucidating the mechanism behind the hepatoxicity observed with some LNA-modified gapmers. PMID:26338776

  15. Redetermination of the cubic struvite analogue Cs[Mg(OH2)6](AsO4)

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    In contrast to the previous refinement from photographic data [Ferrari et al. (1955 ▶). Gazz. Chim. Ital. 84, 169–174], the present redetermination of the title compound, caesium hexa­aqua­magnesium arsenate(V), revealed the Cs atom to be on Wyckoff position 4d instead of Wyckoff position 4b of space group F 3m. The structure can be derived from the halite structure. The centres of the complex [Mg(OH2)6] octa­hedra and the AsO4 tetra­hedra (both with 3m symmetry) are on the respective Na and Cl positions. The building units are connected to each other by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The Cs+ cations (3m symmetry) are located in the voids of this arrangement and exhibit a regular cubocta­hedral 12-coordination to the O atoms of the water mol­ecules. The O atom bonded to As has 2mm site symmetry (Wyckoff position 24f) and the water-mol­ecule O atom has m site symmetry (Wyckoff position 48h). PMID:21581464

  16. Eruptions on A Virtual Globe: The Aster Volcano Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieri, D. C.; Abrams, M. J.; Tan, H. L.

    2007-12-01

    The systematic study of the world's most frequent volcanic activity is a compelling and productive arena for orbital remote sensing techniques, informing a range of investigations from basic volcanology to societal risk assessments. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection radiometer (ASTER--a joint project of Japan and the United States), with its high spatial resolution (15, 30, 90m/pixel), multispectral character (0.52- 0.86μm; 1.6-2.4μm; 8.1-11.6μm), and stereophotogrammetric capability is in many ways an ideal imaging instrument for this task. Since launch in December 1999, an ASTER volcano target list of over 1500 volcanoes has yielded a (still growing) inventory of over 140,000 volcano views on over 70,000 individual ASTER day and night images. A significant emerging challenge for ASTER is how to effectively access a burgeoning data archive in a way that allows the survey, extraction, and distribution of important information in a timely way. This issue is particularly acute in general for ASTER, which has produced a multi-spectral, high spatial resolution, feature-specific targeted global data base of over 1 million image data granules worldwide. To promptly and efficiently access and manage voluminous volcano data within a large ASTER image library, and to house other ancillary correlative volcanological data from MISR, MODIS, EO-1 data sets, SRTM, and related in situ data, we have created a specialty domain called the JPL ASTER Volcano Archive (AVA: http://ava.jpl.nasa.gov). We will discuss and illustrate the myriad challenges and scientific opportunities that this unprecedentedly large, but accessible, global volcanological remote sensing data set represents in terms of data mining, data analysis, and data distribution to the scientific community, to disaster responders, the general public, and to educators, and will conduct a live AVA demonstration. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory-California Institute of

  17. Genotypic diversity of Theileria orientalis detected from cattle grazing in Kumamoto and Okinawa prefectures of Japan.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Naoaki; Ueno, Akio; Mizuno, Daisuke; Kuboki, Noritaka; Khukhuu, Altangerel; Igarashi, Ikuo; Miyahara, Tokuji; Shiraishi, Takashi; Kudo, Ryuta; Oshiro, Mamoru; Zakimi, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Matsumoto, Kotaro; Inokuma, Hisashi

    2011-03-01

    Theileria orientalis is a benign protozoan species that is widely distributed in Japan, yet sometimes causes serious economic losses in the livestock industry. In this study, we conducted a molecular survey based on genes encoding the major piroplasm surface protein (MPSP) and p23 for T. orientalis detected in cattle grazing in southern areas of Japan, consisting of 2 farms in Kumamoto prefecture (Aso and Kuma districts) and 3 farms in Okinawa prefecture (Ishigaki, Iriomote, and Yonaguni Islands). High prevalence rates of T. orientalis infection were shown in all the cattle populations using the diagnostic MPSP- and p23-PCR assays. Phylogenetic analyses revealed 4 MPSP genotypes and 3 p23 genotypes. Furthermore, MPSP genotype-specific PCR methods were developed in this study and wide distributions of 5-district genotypes of T. orientalis were observed for the examined farms. Our results indicate that at least 5 types of T. orientalis exist in Kumamoto and Okinawa prefectures of Japan and that genotype-specific PCR assays are highly applicable for the quarantine of transported cattle and for epidemiological surveys of bovine theileriosis in Japan.

  18. Preliminary Volcano-Hazard Assessment for Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Dorava, Joseph M.; Miller, Thomas P.; Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    Redoubt Volcano is a stratovolcano located within a few hundred kilometers of more than half of the population of Alaska. This volcano has erupted explosively at least six times since historical observations began in 1778. The most recent eruption occurred in 1989-90 and similar eruptions can be expected in the future. The early part of the 1989-90 eruption was characterized by explosive emission of substantial volumes of volcanic ash to altitudes greater than 12 kilometers above sea level and widespread flooding of the Drift River valley. Later, the eruption became less violent, as developing lava domes collapsed, forming short-lived pyroclastic flows associated with low-level ash emission. Clouds of volcanic ash had significant effects on air travel as they drifted across Alaska, over Canada, and over parts of the conterminous United States causing damage to jet aircraft. Economic hardships were encountered by the people of south-central Alaska as a result of ash fallout. Based on new information gained from studies of the 1989-90 eruption, an updated assessment of the principal volcanic hazards is now possible. Volcanic hazards from a future eruption of Redoubt Volcano require public awareness and planning so that risks to life and property are reduced as much as possible.

  19. Laboratory simulation of volcano seismicity.

    PubMed

    Benson, Philip M; Vinciguerra, Sergio; Meredith, Philip G; Young, R Paul

    2008-10-10

    The physical processes generating seismicity within volcanic edifices are highly complex and not fully understood. We report results from a laboratory experiment in which basalt from Mount Etna volcano (Italy) was deformed and fractured. The experiment was monitored with an array of transducers around the sample to permit full-waveform capture, location, and analysis of microseismic events. Rapid post-failure decompression of the water-filled pore volume and damage zone triggered many low-frequency events, analogous to volcanic long-period seismicity. The low frequencies were associated with pore fluid decompression and were located in the damage zone in the fractured sample; these events exhibited a weak component of shear (double-couple) slip, consistent with fluid-driven events occurring beneath active volcanoes.

  20. Venus - Volcano With Massive Landslides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This Magellan full-resolution mosaic which covers an area 143 by 146 kilometers (89 by 91 miles) is centered at 55 degrees north latitude, 266 degrees east longitude. The bright feature, slightly south of center is interpreted to be a volcano, 15-20 kilometers (9.3 to 12.4 miles) in diameter with a large apron of blocky debris to its right and some smaller aprons to its left. A preferred explanation is that several massive catastrophic landslides dropped down steep slopes and were carried by their momentum out into the smooth, dark lava plains. At the base of the east-facing or largest scallop on the volcano is what appears to be a large block of coherent rock, 8 to 10 kilometers (5 to 6 miles) in length. The similar margin of both the scallop and block and the shape in general is typical of terrestrial slumped blocks (masses of rock which slide and rotate down a slope instead of breaking apart and tumbling). The bright lobe to the south of the volcano may either be a lava flow or finer debris from other landslides. This volcanic feature, characterized by its scalloped flanks is part of a class of volcanoes called scalloped or collapsed domes of which there are more than 80 on Venus. Based on the chute-like shapes of the scallops and the existence of a spectrum of intermediate to well defined examples, it is hypothesized that all of the scallops are remnants of landslides even though the landslide debris is often not visible. Possible explanations for the missing debris are that it may have been covered by lava flows, the debris may have weathered or that the radar may not be recognizing it because the individual blocks are too small

  1. Glaciation of Haleakala volcano, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.G.; Mark, R. ); Porter, S.C. . Quaternary Research Center)

    1993-04-01

    Early debates regarding the large (5 [times] 10 km) summit crater'' of Haleakala volcano (3,055 m altitude) on the island of Maui attributed its origin to renting, rifting, caldera collapse, or erosion. It now is commonly assumed to have resulted from headward expansion of giant canyons by stream erosion (Stearns, 1942). Slope maps and shaded relief images based on new USGS digital elevation data point to the apparent overfit of the canyons that drain the summit depression. Studies of drowned coral reefs and terraces on the offshore east rift of Haleakala indicate that this part of the volcano has undergone submergence of about 2 km, as well as tilting, since 850 ka ago. Such subsidence indicates that the summit altitude at the end of the shield-building phase reached ca. 5,000 m, well above both the present and full-glacial snowlines. A comparison with the radiometrically dated glacial record of Mauna Kea and its reconstructed snowline history suggests that Haleakala experienced 10 or more glaciations, the most extensive during marine isotope stages 20, 18, and 16. By isotope stage 10, the summit had subsided below the full-glacial snowline. Diamictons on the south slope of the volcano, previously described as mudflows, contain lava clasts with superchilled margins, identical to margins of subglacially erupted lavas on Mauna Kea. Glacier ice that mantled the upper slopes of the volcano continuously for several hundred thousand years and intermittently thereafter, is inferred to have carved Haleakala crater and the upper reaches of large canyons radiating from it.

  2. Volcano Monitoring Using Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, J. E.; Dehn, J.; Webley, P.; Skoog, R.

    2006-12-01

    At the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), Google Earth is being used as a visualization tool for operational satellite monitoring of the region's volcanoes. Through the abilities of the Keyhole Markup Language (KML) utilized by Google Earth, different datasets have been integrated into this virtual globe browser. Examples include the ability to browse thermal satellite image overlays with dynamic control, to look for signs of volcanic activity. Webcams can also be viewed interactively through the Google Earth interface to confirm current activity. Other applications include monitoring the location and status of instrumentation; near real-time plotting of earthquake hypocenters; mapping of new volcanic deposits; and animated models of ash plumes within Google Earth, created by a combination of ash dispersion modeling and 3D visualization packages. The globe also provides an ideal interface for displaying near real-time information on detected thermal anomalies or "hotspot"; pixels in satellite images with elevated brightness temperatures relative to the background temperature. The Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska collects AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) through its own receiving station. The automated processing that follows includes application of algorithms that search for hotspots close to volcano location, flagging those that meet certain criteria. Further automated routines generate folders of KML placemarkers, which are linked to Google Earth through the network link function. Downloadable KML files have been created to provide links to various data products for different volcanoes and past eruptions, and to demonstrate examples of the monitoring tools developed. These KML files will be made accessible through a new website that will become publicly available in December 2006.

  3. Nagoya, Ise Bay, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This view of Nagoya, Ise Bay and nearby Kyoto, on the main island of Honshu, Japan (35.0N, 137.0E) combines in a single photo both the political, cultural and educational centers of early Japan as well as one of the main educational and business centers of modern Japan. Besides being a business, cultural and educational center, Nagoya is near the geographic center of the Japanese home islands.

  4. 2. PARKING LOT AT JAGGAR MUSEUM, VOLCANO OBSERVATORY. VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. PARKING LOT AT JAGGAR MUSEUM, VOLCANO OBSERVATORY. VIEW OF MEDIAN. NOTE VOLCANIC STONE CURBING (EDGING) TYPICAL OF MOST PARKING AREAS; TRIANGLING AT END NOT TYPICAL. MAUNA LOA VOLCANO IN BACK. - Crater Rim Drive, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  5. Active Deformation of Etna Volcano Combing IFSAR and GPS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The surface deformation of an active volcano is an important indicator of its eruptive state and its hazard potential. Mount Etna volcano in Sicily is a very active volcano with well documented eruption episodes.

  6. Why did we lose the 59 climbers in 2014 Ontake Volcano Eruption?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, F.

    2015-12-01

    The first historical eruption at Ontake volcano, central Japan was in 1979, and it was a phreatic eruption. Until then, most Japanese volcanologists understood that Ontake is a dormant or an extinct volcano. Re-examination of active volcanoes was done after the eruption.After the first historical eruption in 1979, two small eruptions are repeated in 1991 and 2007. Through the three eruptions, nobody has got injured. The last eruption on September 27, 2014, we lost 65 people included missing. Because it was fine weekend and there were many climbers on the summit. The eruption was almost at lunchtime. Clearly, casualties by tsunamis are inhabitants along the coastlines, and casualties by eruption are visitors not inhabitants around the volcano. Basically, visitors have small information of Ontake volcano. After the accident, one mountain guide tells us that we never have long broken such as lunch around the summit, because an active creator is close, and they are afraid of the volcano gas accidents. All casualties by eruption were lost their lives in the area of 1.0 km distance from the 2014 creators. In 2004 Sumatra Earthquake Tsunami, we could not recognize the tsunami inspiration between the habitants in Banda Aceh, Sumatra. They have no idea of tsunami, and they called "Rising Sea" never"Tsunami". As the result, they lost many habitants close to the coast. In 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Tsunami, when habitants felt strong shaking close to coast, they understood the tsunami coming. 0ver 50 % habitants decide to evacuate from the coast. However, 20-30 % habitants believe in themselves no tsunami attacking for them. As a result we lost many habitants. Additionally, the tsunami height was higher than broadcasting one by JMA. According to the results of the questionnaire survey in climbers or bereaved families of the eruption day on Ontake volcano (Shinano Mainich Newspaper, 2015), 39 % of them were climbing no understand of "Ontake active volcano". Moreover, only 10

  7. Thematic mapper studies of Andean volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, P. W.

    1986-01-01

    The primary objective was to identify all the active volcanoes in the Andean region of Bolivia. Morphological features of the Tata Sabaya volcano, Bolivia, were studied with the thematic mapper. Details include marginal levees on lava and pyroclastic flows, and summit crater structure. Valley glacier moraine deposits, not easily identified on the multispectral band scanner, were also unambiguous, and provide useful marker horizons on large volcanic edifices which were built up in preglacial times but which were active subsequently. With such high resolution imagery, it is not only possible to identify potentially active volcanoes, but also to use standard photogeological interpretation to outline the history of individual volcanoes.

  8. Seismicity controlled by resistivity structure: the 2016 Kumamoto earthquakes, Kyushu Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Koki; Asaue, Hisafumi; Koike, Katsuaki; Takakura, Shinichi; Utsugi, Mitsuru; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Yoshimura, Ryokei; Yamazaki, Ken'ichi; Komatsu, Shintaro; Uyeshima, Makoto; Koyama, Takao; Kanda, Wataru; Shiotani, Taro; Matsushima, Nobuo; Hata, Maki; Yoshinaga, Tohru; Uchida, Kazunari; Tsukashima, Yuko; Shito, Azusa; Fujita, Shiori; Wakabayashi, Asuma; Tsukamoto, Kaori; Matsushima, Takeshi; Miyazaki, Masahiro; Kondo, Kentaro; Takashima, Kanade; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Tamura, Makoto; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Yamashita, Yusuke; Nakamoto, Manami; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The M JMA 7.3 Kumamoto earthquake that occurred at 1:25 JST on April 16, 2016, not only triggered aftershocks in the vicinity of the epicenter, but also triggered earthquakes that were 50-100 km away from the epicenter of the main shock. The active seismicity can be divided into three regions: (1) the vicinity of the main faults, (2) the northern region of Aso volcano (50 km northeast of the mainshock epicenter), and (3) the regions around three volcanoes, Yufu, Tsurumi, and Garan (100 km northeast of the mainshock epicenter). Notably, the zones between these regions are distinctively seismically inactive. The electric resistivity structure estimated from one-dimensional analysis of the 247 broadband (0.005-3000 s) magnetotelluric and telluric observation sites clearly shows that the earthquakes occurred in resistive regions adjacent to conductive zones or resistive-conductive transition zones. In contrast, seismicity is quite low in electrically conductive zones, which are interpreted as regions of connected fluids. We suggest that the series of the earthquakes was induced by a local accumulated stress and/or fluid supply from conductive zones. Because the relationship between the earthquakes and the resistivity structure is consistent with previous studies, seismic hazard assessment generally can be improved by taking into account the resistivity structure. Following on from the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake series, we suggest that there are two zones that have a relatively high potential of earthquake generation along the western extension of the MTL. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Automatic readout for nuclear emulsions in muon radiography of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, A.; Bozza, C.; Consiglio, L.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Marco, N.; Kose, U.; Lauria, A.; Medinaceli, E.; Miyamoto, S.; Montesi, C.; Pupilli, F.; Rescigno, R.; Russo, A.; Sirignano, C.; Stellacci, S. M.; Strolin, P.; Tioukov, V.

    2012-04-01

    Nuclear emulsions are an effective choice in many scenarios of volcano radiography by cosmic-ray muons. They are cheap and emulsion-based detectors require no on-site power supply. Nuclear emulsion films provide sub-micrometric tracking precision and intrinsic angular accuracy better than 1 mrad. Imaging the inner structure of a volcano requires that the cosmic-ray absorption map be measured on wide angular range. High-absorption directions can be probed by allowing for large statistics, which implies a large overall flux, i.e. wide surface for the detector. A total area of the order of a few m2 is nowadays typical, thanks to the automatic readout tools originally developed for high-energy physics experiments such as CHORUS, PEANUT, OPERA. The European Scanning System is now being used to read out nuclear emulsion films exposed to cosmic rays on the side of volcanoes. The structure of the system is described in detail with respect to both hardware and software. Its present scanning speed of 20 cm2/h/side/microscope is suitable to fulfil the needs of the current exposures of nuclear emulsion films for muon radiograph, but it is worth to notice that applications in volcano imaging are among the driving forces pushing to increase the performances of the system. Preliminary results for the Unzen volcano of a joint effort by research groups in Italy and Japan show that the current system is already able to provide signal/background ratio in the range 100÷10000:1, depending on the quality cuts set in the off-line data analysis. The size of the smallest detectable structures in that experimental setup is constrained by the available statistics in the region of highest absorption to about 50 mrad, or 22 m under the top of the mountain. Another exposure is currently taking data at the Stromboli volcano. Readout of the exposed films is expected to begin in March 2012, and preliminary results will be available soon after. An effort by several universities and INFN has

  10. Smithsonian Volcano Data on Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venzke, E.; Siebert, L.; Luhr, J. F.

    2006-12-01

    Interactive global satellite imagery datasets such as hosted by Google Earth provide a dynamic platform for educational outreach in the Earth Sciences. Users with widely varied backgrounds can easily view geologic features on a global-to-local scale, giving access to educational background on individual geologic features or events such as volcanoes and earthquakes. The Smithsonian Institution's Global Volcanism Program (GVP) volcano data became available as a Google Earth layer on 11 June 2006. Locations for about 1550 volcanoes with known or possible Holocene activity are shown as red triangles with associated volcano names that appear when zooming in to a regional-scale view. Clicking on a triangle opens an informational balloon that displays a photo, geographic data, and a brief paragraph summarizing the volcano's geologic history. The balloon contains links to a larger version of the photo with credits and a caption and to more detailed information on the volcano, including eruption chronologies, from the GVP website. Links to USGS and international volcano observatories or other websites focusing on regional volcanoes are also provided, giving the user ready access to a broad spectrum of volcano data. Updates to the GVP volcano layer will be provided to Google Earth. A downloadable file with the volcanoes organized regionally is also available directly from the GVP website (www.volcano.si.edu) and provides the most current volcano data set. Limitations of the implied accuracy of spacially plotted data at high zoom levels are also apparent using platforms such as Google Earth. Real and apparent mismatches between plotted locations and the summits of some volcanoes seen in Google Earth satellite imagery occur for reasons including data precision (deg/min vs. deg/min/sec) and the GVP convention of plotting the center-point of large volcanic fields, which often do not correspond to specific volcanic vents. A more fundamental problem originates from the fact that

  11. Volcanic hazards at Atitlan volcano, Guatemala

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haapala, J.M.; Escobar Wolf, R.; Vallance, James W.; Rose, William I.; Griswold, J.P.; Schilling, S.P.; Ewert, J.W.; Mota, M.

    2006-01-01

    Atitlan Volcano is in the Guatemalan Highlands, along a west-northwest trending chain of volcanoes parallel to the mid-American trench. The volcano perches on the southern rim of the Atitlan caldera, which contains Lake Atitlan. Since the major caldera-forming eruption 85 thousand years ago (ka), three stratovolcanoes--San Pedro, Toliman, and Atitlan--have formed in and around the caldera. Atitlan is the youngest and most active of the three volcanoes. Atitlan Volcano is a composite volcano, with a steep-sided, symmetrical cone comprising alternating layers of lava flows, volcanic ash, cinders, blocks, and bombs. Eruptions of Atitlan began more than 10 ka [1] and, since the arrival of the Spanish in the mid-1400's, eruptions have occurred in six eruptive clusters (1469, 1505, 1579, 1663, 1717, 1826-1856). Owing to its distance from population centers and the limited written record from 200 to 500 years ago, only an incomplete sample of the volcano's behavior is documented prior to the 1800's. The geologic record provides a more complete sample of the volcano's behavior since the 19th century. Geologic and historical data suggest that the intensity and pattern of activity at Atitlan Volcano is similar to that of Fuego Volcano, 44 km to the east, where active eruptions have been observed throughout the historical period. Because of Atitlan's moderately explosive nature and frequency of eruptions, there is a need for local and regional hazard planning and mitigation efforts. Tourism has flourished in the area; economic pressure has pushed agricultural activity higher up the slopes of Atitlan and closer to the source of possible future volcanic activity. This report summarizes the hazards posed by Atitlan Volcano in the event of renewed activity but does not imply that an eruption is imminent. However, the recognition of potential activity will facilitate hazard and emergency preparedness.

  12. Active Volcanoes of the Kurile Islands: A Reference Guide for Aviation Users

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Rybin, Alexander; Chibisova, Marina; Miller, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The many volcanoes of the remote and mostly uninhabited Kurile Island arc (fig. 1; table 1) pose a serious hazard for air traffic in the North Pacific. Ash clouds from Kurile eruptions can impact some of the busiest air travel routes in the world and drift quickly into airspace managed by three countries: Russia, Japan, and the United States. Prevailing westerly winds throughout the region will most commonly send ash from any Kurile eruption directly across the parallel North Pacific airways between North America and Asia (Kristine A. Nelson, National Weather Service, oral commun., 2006; fig. 1). This report presents maps showing locations of the 36 most active Kurile volcanoes plotted on Operational Navigational Charts published by the Defense Mapping Agency (map sheets ONC F-10, F-11, and E-10; figs. 1, 2, 3, 4). These maps are intended to assist aviation and other users in the identification of restless Kurile volcanoes. A regional map is followed by three subsections of the Kurile volcanic arc (North, Central, South). Volcanoes and selected primary geographic features are labeled. All maps contain schematic versions of the principal air routes and selected air navigational fixes in this region.

  13. Island of Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The island of Okinawa, (26.5N, 128.0E) largest of the Ryukyu Islands, Japan. The Ryukyu island group lies south of the main home islands of Japan in an arc towards the Chinese island Republic of Taiwan. As is typical throughout the Japanese home islands, intense urban development can be observed all over the island in this near vertical view.

  14. Japan's High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohlen, Thomas P.

    The author, an anthropologist, spent 14 months (1974-75) in the industrial port city of Kobe (Japan) observing a cross section of urban high schools, including Japan's most elite private school and a night vocational school plagued by absenteeism and delinquency. He reports on the character of the institutions and of the experience via…

  15. Rehabilitation in Japan, 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Japanese Society for Rehabilitation of the Disabled, Tokyo.

    The scope of Japan's rehabilitation services for persons with disabilities is reviewed and discussed from the perspective of social and demographic change in that country. An introductory chapter on the current situation in Japan looks at characteristics of the land, the people, the government, industry and the economy, and the culture. The second…

  16. Water in Aleutian Arc Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, T.; Zimmer, M. M.; Hauri, E. H.

    2011-12-01

    In the past decade, baseline data have been obtained on pre-eruptive water contents for several volcanic arcs worldwide. One surprising observation is that parental magmas contain ~ 4 wt% H2O on average at each arc worldwide [1]. Within each arc, the variation from volcano to volcano is from 2 to 6 w% H2O, with few exceptions. The similar averages at different arcs are unexpected given the order of magnitude variations in the concentration of other slab tracers. H2O is clearly different from other tracers, however, being both a major driver of melting in the mantle and a major control of buoyancy and viscosity in the crust. Some process, such as mantle melting or crustal storage, apparently modulates the water content of mafic magmas at arcs. Mantle melting may deliver a fairly uniform product to the Moho, if the wet melt process includes a negative feedback. On the other hand, magmas with variable water content may be generated in the mantle, but a crustal filter may lead to magma degassing up to a common mid-to-upper crustal storage region. Testing between these two end-member scenarios is critical to our understanding of subduction dehydration, global water budgets, magmatic plumbing systems, melt generation and eruptive potential. The Alaska-Aleutian arc is a prime location to explore this fundamental problem in the subduction water cycle, because active volcanoes vary more than elsewhere in the world in parental H2O contents (based on least-degassed, mafic melt inclusions hosted primarily in olivine). For example, Shishaldin volcano taps magma with among the lowest H2O contents globally (~ 2 wt%) and records low pressure crystal fractionation [2], consistent with a shallow magma system (< 1 km bsl). At the other extreme, Augustine volcano is fed by a mafic parent that contains among the highest H2O globally (~ 7 wt%), and has evolved by deep crystal fractionation [2], consistent with a deep magma system (~ 14 km bsl). Do these magmas stall at different depths

  17. Clinical significance of miR-155 expression in breast cancer and effects of miR-155 ASO on cell viability and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shu-Rong; Guo, Gui-Long; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Guan-Li; Hu, Xiao-Qu; Zhu, Jin; Huang, Qi-Di; You, Jie; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2012-04-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that mircroRNAs (miRNAs) play a vital role in tumorigenesis. miR-155 is one of the most multifunctional miRNAs whose overexpression has been found to be associated with different types of cancer including breast cancer. To further determine the potential involvement of miR-155 in breast cancer, we evaluated the expression levels of miR-155 by real-time PCR and correlated the results with clinicopathological features. Matched non-tumor and tumor tissues of 42 infiltrating ductal carcinomas and 3 infiltrating lobular carcinomas were analyzed for miR-155 expression by real-time PCR. Further, we used an antisense technique to inhibit miR-155 expression in vitro. WST-8 test was performed to evaluate cell viability and apoptosis assay was used to investigate the effect of the miR-155 antisense oligonucleotide (miR-155 ASO) on HS578T cell death. The expression levels of miR-155 were significantly higher in tumor tissues than the levels in matched non-tumor tissues (P<0.001). Up-regulated miR-155 expression was associated with lymph node positivity (P=0.034), higher proliferation index (Ki-67 >10%) (P=0.019) and advanced breast cancer TNM clinical stage (P=0.002). Interestingly, we next found that miR-155 expression levels had close relations with ER status (P=0.041) and PR status (P=0.029). Transfection efficiency detected by flow cytometry was higher than 70%, the WST-8 test showed that viability of HS578T cells was greatly reduced after transfection with miR-155 ASO compared with the scramble (SCR) group or the liposome group. The Annexin V-FITC/PI assay also indicated that transfection with miR-155 ASO promoted apoptosis.

  18. Io's Volcanoes: Possible Influence on Spin Axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddard, P. R.; Jurdy, D. M.

    2002-03-01

    Massive outpourings of lava in short intervals could cause an instability in Io's rotation and a reorientation of its spin axis. The volcanos and mountains exhibit a complementary distribution, with the maximum principal inertia axis for volcanos close to the position of the rotation axis.

  19. Geoflicks Reviewed--Films about Hawaiian Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bykerk-Kauffman, Ann

    1994-01-01

    Reviews 11 films on volcanic eruptions in the United States. Films are given a one- to five-star rating and the film's year, length, source and price are listed. Top films include "Inside Hawaiian Volcanoes" and "Kilauea: Close up of an Active Volcano." (AIM)

  20. Monitoring eruption activity using temporal stress changes at Mount Ontake volcano

    PubMed Central

    Terakawa, Toshiko; Kato, Aitaro; Yamanaka, Yoshiko; Maeda, Yuta; Horikawa, Shinichiro; Matsuhiro, Kenjiro; Okuda, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Volcanic activity is often accompanied by many small earthquakes. Earthquake focal mechanisms represent the fault orientation and slip direction, which are influenced by the stress field. Focal mechanisms of volcano-tectonic earthquakes provide information on the state of volcanoes via stresses. Here we demonstrate that quantitative evaluation of temporal stress changes beneath Mt. Ontake, Japan, using the misfit angles of focal mechanism solutions to the regional stress field, is effective for eruption monitoring. The moving average of misfit angles indicates that during the precursory period the local stress field beneath Mt. Ontake was deviated from the regional stress field, presumably by stress perturbations caused by the inflation of magmatic/hydrothermal fluids, which was removed immediately after the expulsion of volcanic ejecta. The deviation of the local stress field can be an indicator of increases in volcanic activity. The proposed method may contribute to the mitigation of volcanic hazards. PMID:26892716

  1. Monitoring eruption activity using temporal stress changes at Mount Ontake volcano.

    PubMed

    Terakawa, Toshiko; Kato, Aitaro; Yamanaka, Yoshiko; Maeda, Yuta; Horikawa, Shinichiro; Matsuhiro, Kenjiro; Okuda, Takashi

    2016-02-19

    Volcanic activity is often accompanied by many small earthquakes. Earthquake focal mechanisms represent the fault orientation and slip direction, which are influenced by the stress field. Focal mechanisms of volcano-tectonic earthquakes provide information on the state of volcanoes via stresses. Here we demonstrate that quantitative evaluation of temporal stress changes beneath Mt. Ontake, Japan, using the misfit angles of focal mechanism solutions to the regional stress field, is effective for eruption monitoring. The moving average of misfit angles indicates that during the precursory period the local stress field beneath Mt. Ontake was deviated from the regional stress field, presumably by stress perturbations caused by the inflation of magmatic/hydrothermal fluids, which was removed immediately after the expulsion of volcanic ejecta. The deviation of the local stress field can be an indicator of increases in volcanic activity. The proposed method may contribute to the mitigation of volcanic hazards.

  2. Analytical volcano deformation source models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lisowski, Michael; Dzurisin, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Primary volcanic landforms are created by the ascent and eruption of magma. The ascending magma displaces and interacts with surrounding rock and fluids as it creates new pathways, flows through cracks or conduits, vesiculates, and accumulates in underground reservoirs. The formation of new pathways and pressure changes within existing conduits and reservoirs stress and deform the surrounding rock. Eruption products load the crust. The pattern and rate of surface deformation around volcanoes reflect the tectonic and volcanic processes transmitted to the surface through the mechanical properties of the crust.

  3. Infrasound Studies of Alaskan Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, S. R.; Arnoult, K.; Szuberla, C.; Olson, J. V.; Wilson, C. R.

    2010-12-01

    Infrasound has been used to study a number of Alaskan volcanic eruptions over the last 15 years. Arrays include the I53US array of 8 sensors in Fairbanks installed in 2002 under the CTBT umbrella; an array of 4 sensors installed at Okmok Volcano in summer 2010 by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO); and a 6-sensor array installed in Dillingham in September 2010 by the UAF Infrasound Group. Individual sensors have been installed by AVO at Pavlof (1996), Shishaldin (1997), Augustine (2006), Fourpeaked (2006), and Redoubt (2009) volcanoes. These have been especially valuable because they provide precise source timing and signal strength that allow the correct identification of atmospheric paths. Small volcanic explosions have been recorded at local stations only for Pavlof, Shishaldin and Fourpeaked volcanoes. The more interesting large explosive eruptions have been recorded on both local stations and arrays from eruptions at Augustine in 2006 (13 events), Fourpeaked in 2006 (2 events), Cleveland in 2007 (1 event), Okmok in 2008 (1 sustained event), Kasatochi in 2008 (5 events), and Redoubt in 2009 (over 30 events). Pressures up to 6 Pa have been recorded for the largest Redoubt event at a distance of 547 km from the array, and 1.2 Pa for the largest Kasatochi event at a distance of 2104 km. We determined reduced pressures (equivalent pressure at 1 km assuming 1/r decay) and find that Kasatochi exceeds 2500 Pa and Redoubt 1600 Pa. The smaller explosive eruptions at Augustine yield reduced pressures of 40 to 300 Pa. There is reasonable correlation between measured pressures and signal durations and the ash cloud heights and tephra volumes, hence the infrasound data are useful for hazard assessment. However, the long travel times (3 sec per km) suggest that infrasound array data arrive too late for primary detection but are good for estimating other attributes such as size. Infrasound data may also be combined with seismic data to determine the partitioning of energy

  4. Costa Rica's Chain of laterally collapsed volcanoes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, E.; Fernandez, E.

    2007-05-01

    From the NW extreme to the SW end of Costa Rica's volcanic backbone, a number of laterally collapsed volcanoes can be observed. Due to several factors, attention has been given to active volcanoes disregarding the importance of collapsed features in terms of assessing volcanic hazards for future generations around inhabited volcanoes. In several cases the typical horseshoe shape amphitheater-like depression can be easily observed. In other cases due to erosion, vegetation, topography, seismic activity or drastic weather such characteristics are not easily recognized. In the order mentioned above appear: Orosi-Cacao, Miravalles, Platanar, Congo, Von Frantzius, Cacho Negro and Turrialba volcanoes. Due to limited studies on these structures it is unknown if sector collapse occurred in one or several phases. Furthermore, in the few studied cases no evidence has been found to relate collapses to actual eruptive episodes. Detailed studies on the deposits and materials composing dome-like shapes will shed light on unsolved questions about petrological and chemical composition. Volume, form and distance traveled by deposits are part of the questions surrounding most of these collapsed volcanoes. Although most of these mentioned structures are extinct, at least Irazú volcano (active volcano) has faced partial lateral collapses recently. It did presented strombolian activity in the early 60s. Collapse scars show on the NW flank show important mass removal in historic and prehistoric times. Moreover, in 1994 a minor hydrothermal explosion provoked the weakening of a deeply altered wall that holds a crater lake (150m diameter, 2.6x106 ). A poster will depict images of the collapsed volcanoes named above with mayor descriptive characteristics. It will also focus on the importance of deeper studies to assess the collapse potential of Irazú volcano with related consequences. Finally, this initiative will invite researchers interested in such topic to join future studies in

  5. Submarine geology of Hana Ridge and Haleakala Volcano's northeast flank, Maui

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eakins, Barry W.; Robinson, Joel E.

    2006-01-01

    We present a morphostructural analysis of the submarine portions of Haleakala Volcano and environs, based upon a 4-year program of geophysical surveys and submersible explorations of the underwater flanks of Hawaiian volcanoes that was conducted by numerous academic and governmental research organizations in Japan and the U.S. and funded primarily by the Japan Agency for Marine–Earth Science and Technology. A resulting reconnaissance geologic map features the 135-km-long Hana Ridge, the 3000 km2 Hana slump on the volcano's northeast flank, and island-surrounding terraces that are the submerged parts of volcanic shields. Hana Ridge below 2000 m water depth exhibits the lobate morphology typical of the subaqueously erupted parts of Hawaiian rift zones, with some important distinctions: namely, subparallel crestlines, which we propose result from the down-rift migration of offsets in the dike intrusion zone, and an amphitheater at its distal toe, where a submarine landslide has embayed the ridge tip. Deformation of Haleakala's northeast flank is limited to that part identified as the Hana slump, which lies downslope from the volcano's submerged shield, indicating that flank mobility is also limited in plan, inconsistent with hypothesized volcanic spreading driven by rift-zone dilation. The leading edge of the slump has transverse basins and ridges that resemble the thrust ramps of accretionary prisms, and we present a model to describe the slump's development that emphasizes the role of coastally generated fragmental basalt on gravitational instability of Haleakala's northeast flank and that may be broadly applicable to other ocean-island slumps.

  6. Groundwater contamination in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tase, Norio

    1992-07-01

    Problems on groundwater contamination in Japan are briefly summarized in this paper. Although normal physical conditions in Japan restrict the possibilities of groundwater contamination, human activities are threatening groundwater resources. A survey by the Environment Agency of Japan showed nationwide spreading of organic substances, such as trichloroethylene as well as nitrogen compounds. Synthetic detergents have also been detected even in rural areas and in deep confined aquifers, although their concentrations are not as high. Public awareness of agrichemical or pesticides abuse, especially from golf courses, is apparent. Other problems such as nitrate-nitrogen, leachate from landfills, and the leaking of underground storage tanks are also discussed.

  7. Microelectronics in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulton, William R.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this JTEC study is to evaluate Japan's electronic manufacturing and packaging capabilities within the context of global economic competition. To carry out this study, the JTEC panel evaluated the framework of the Japanese consumer electronics industry and various technological and organizational factors that are likely to determine who will win and lose in the marketplace. This study begins with a brief overview of the electronics industry, especially as it operates in Japan today. Succeeding chapters examine the electronics infrastructure in Japan and take an in-depth look at the central issues of product development in order to identify those parameters that will determine future directions for electronic packaging technologies.

  8. Newberry Volcano's youngest lava flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Joel E.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Jensen, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The central caldera is visible in the lower right corner of the center map, outlined by the black dashed line. The caldera collapsed about 75,000 years ago when massive explosions sent volcanic ash as far as the San Francisco Bay area and created a 3,000-ft-deep hole in the center of the volcano. The caldera is now partly refilled by Paulina and East Lakes, and the byproducts from younger eruptions, including Newberry Volcano’s youngest rhyolitic lavas, shown in red and orange. The majority of Newberry Volcano’s many lava flows and cinder cones are blanketed by as much as 5 feet of volcanic ash from the catastrophic eruption of Mount Mazama that created Crater Lake caldera approximately 7,700 years ago. This ash supports abundant tree growth and obscures the youthful appearance of Newberry Volcano. Only the youngest volcanic vents and lava flows are well exposed and unmantled by volcanic ash. More than one hundred of these young volcanic vents and lava flows erupted 7,000 years ago during Newberry Volcano’s northwest rift zone eruption.

  9. Volcano geodesy: The search for magma reservoirs and the formation of eruptive vents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dvorak, J.J.; Dzurisin, D.

    1997-01-01

    Routine geodetic measurements are made at only a few dozen of the world's 600 or so active volcanoes, even though these measurements have proven to be a reliable precursor of eruptions. The pattern and rate of surface displacement reveal the depth and rate of pressure increase within shallow magma reservoirs. This process has been demonstrated clearly at Kilauea and Mauna Loa, Hawaii; Long Valley caldera, California; Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy; Rabaul caldera, Papua New Guinea; and Aira caldera and nearby Sakurajima, Japan. Slower and lesser amounts of surface displacement at Yellowstone caldera, Wyoming, are attributed to changes in a hydrothermal system that overlies a crustal magma body. The vertical and horizontal dimensions of eruptive fissures, as well as the amount of widening, have been determined at Kilauea, Hawaii; Etna, Italy; Tolbachik, Kamchatka; Krafla, Iceland; and Asal-Ghoubbet, Djibouti, the last a segment of the East Africa Rift Zone. Continuously recording instruments, such as tiltmeters, extensometers, and dilatometers, have recorded horizontal and upward growth of eruptive fissures, which grew at rates of hundreds of meters per hour, at Kilauea; Izu-Oshima, Japan; Teishi Knoll seamount, Japan; and Piton de la Fournaise, Re??union Island. In addition, such instruments have recorded the hour or less of slight ground movement that preceded small explosive eruptions at Sakurajima and presumed sudden gas emissions at Galeras, Colombia. The use of satellite geodesy, in particular the Global Positioning System, offers the possibility of revealing changes in surface strain both local to a volcano and over a broad region that includes the volcano.

  10. Borehole Strain Measurements on Volcanoes: Insights from Montserrat and Hekla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, A. T.; Sacks, S. I.

    2010-12-01

    In Fall 2000 we reported that data from Sacks-Evertson borehole strainmeters allowed a short term (~20 minutes) warning of an eruption of Hekla, Iceland, in 2000 and showed clear changes before an eruption of Izu-Oshima, Japan, in 1986. In 2002-2003 (CALIPSO program) we installed a small net of strainmeters near Montserrat’s Soufriere Hills Volcano, an active andesitic dome building volcano. We have sites in Long Valley and Hawaii (with USGS); at Vesuvius, Campi Flegrei area, Stromboli and (planned) Etna (with Italian colleagues). Gladwin strainmeters have been installed at Yellowstone and Mt. St. Helens (PBO). Our recent volcano research efforts have been on Montserrat and Hekla. Analyses of a very large dome collapse (Montserrat) in July 2003 (Voight et al, 2006) and an explosion in March 2004 (Linde et al., 2010) reveal a reservoir at about 5 km with a NW-SE trending dike extending from the reservoir to about 1.5 km from the surface. A number of explosions require only a narrow conduit (15 m radius) that extends from the top of the dike to the surface (Voight et al. 2010); others have a different strain signature and require deeper sources. A 1 month long clear strain excursion required an additional contribution from a reservoir at about 11 km (Hautmann et al. in prep). Many small signals with similar strain change patterns take place over much shorter time scales (2 - 20 mins) are presumably due to gas transfer. We now realize, from the 2000 eruption of Hekla, that the magma geometry is quite different from that in all earlier models. The reservoir is about 11 km deep but the dike that breaks the surface in Hekla's characteristic fissure eruption does not extend to the reservoir as had been thought; but to no more than about 1 km. Although undetectable by any available surface measurements, there must be a conduit to connect the reservoir to the dike. In Sturkell et al. (in prep) we propose that this conduit is now sufficiently large in diameter to remain

  11. Recording Tilt with Broadband Seismic Sensors at Erupting Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, B. E.; Lees, J. M.; Lyons, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    The horizontal components of broadband seismometers are known to be susceptible to gravitational acceleration due to slow tilting, and this has been successfully exploited to assess ground deformation at many volcanoes, including Anatahan (Mariana Islands), Meakan-dake (Japan), Santiaguito (Guatemala) and Stromboli (Italy). Tilt can be estimated from seismic velocity by differentiating, scaling to remove gravity, and applying an instrument correction. The fundamental assumption in estimating tilt from broadband data is that the signal recorded is the result of tilt and not translation, thus analysis of tilt require filtering below corner frequencies of seismic instruments, where the response to tilt should be flat. However, processing techniques for deriving tilt are not uniform among researchers. Filter type and passband allowance for the processing of data sets differs from case to case, and the dominant periods of tilt signals may vary from tens to hundreds of seconds. For instance, data from Santiaguito was filtered in the 600-30s passband, while at Anatahan filters spanned 13 hours to 8 minutes. In our study, we investigate tilt from seismic data sets at Karymsky (Kamchatka, Russia), Fuego (Guatemala), Yasur (Vanuatu), and Tungurahua (Ecuador) to understand implementation and limitations of this tool. We examine the importance of filter-type distortion related to filtering on the seismic signal. For example, a comparison of time domain versus frequency domain implementation is explored using a variety of lowpass and bandpass filters. We also investigate the advantages and drawbacks of causal versus acausal filters. In a few cases tiltmeters have been co-located with broadband seismic sensors for direct comparison. Signals at Mt. St. Helens, Stromboli, Sakurajima, and Semeru show a correlation of tilt and seismic records, although records at Karymsky volcano suggest that no tilt is recorded on either instrument. We speculate that strong vent explosions exhibit

  12. 2014 JAPAN Critical Limb Ischemia Database (JCLIMB) Annual Report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Since 2013, the Japanese Society for Vascular Surgery (JSVS) has started the project of nationwide registration and a tracking database for patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) who are treated by vascular surgeons. The purpose of this project is to clarify the current status of the medical practice for patients with CLI to contribute to the improvement of the quality of medical care. This database, called JAPAN Critical Limb Ischemia Database (JCLIMB), is created on the National Clinical Database (NCD) and collects data of patients’ background, therapeutic measures, early results, and long-term prognosis as long as 5 years after the initial treatment. The limbs managed conservatively are also registered in JCLIMB, together with those treated by surgery and/or endovascular treatment (EVT). In 2014, 1347 CLI limbs (male 936 limbs: 69%) were registered by 95 facilities. Arteriosclerosis obliterans (ASO) has accounted for 97% of the pathogenesis of these limbs. In this manuscript, the background data and the early prognosis of the registered limbs are reported. (This is a translation of Jpn J Vasc Surg 2016;25:293–310.) PMID:28018516

  13. 2013 JAPAN Critical Limb Ischemia Database (JCLIMB) Annual Report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Since 2013, the Japanese Society for Vascular Surgery (JSVS) has started the project of nationwide registration and a tracking database for patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) who are treated by vascular surgeons. The purpose of this project is to clarify the current status of the medical practice for patients with CLI to contribute to the improvement of the quality of medical care. This database, called JAPAN Critical Limb Ischemia Database (JCLIMB), is created on the National Clinical Database (NCD) and collects data of patients’ background, therapeutic measures, early results, and long term prognosis as long as five years after the initial treatment. The limbs managed conservatively are also registered in JCLIMB, together with those treated by surgery and/or EVT. In 2013, 1207 CLI limbs (male 874 limbs: 72%) were registered by 87 facilities. ASO has accounted for 98% of the pathogenesis of these limbs. In this manuscript, the background data and the early prognosis of the registered limbs are reported. (This is a translation of Jpn J Vasc Surg 2016; 25: 215–232.) PMID:28018515

  14. ASO: Antistreptolysin O titer

    MedlinePlus

    ... or glomerulonephritis , a form of kidney disease Caused rheumatic fever in a person with signs and symptoms The ... and/or go untreated, however, complications ( sequelae ), namely rheumatic fever and glomerulonephritis, can develop in some people, especially ...

  15. Exploring Geology on the World-Wide Web--Volcanoes and Volcanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schimmrich, Steven Henry; Gore, Pamela J. W.

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on sites on the World Wide Web that offer information about volcanoes. Web sites are classified into areas of Global Volcano Information, Volcanoes in Hawaii, Volcanoes in Alaska, Volcanoes in the Cascades, European and Icelandic Volcanoes, Extraterrestrial Volcanism, Volcanic Ash and Weather, and Volcano Resource Directories. Suggestions…

  16. Instant snapshot of the internal structure of Unzen lava dome, Japan with airborne muography

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki K. M.

    2016-01-01

    An emerging elementary particle imaging technique called muography has increasingly been used to resolve the internal structures of volcanoes with a spatial resolution of less than 100 m. However, land-based muography requires several days at least to acquire satisfactory image contrast and thus, it has not been a practical tool to diagnose the erupting volcano in a real time manner. To address this issue, airborne muography was implemented for the first time, targeting Heisei-Shinzan lava dome of Unzen volcano, Japan. Obtained in 2.5 hours, the resultant image clearly showed the density contrast inside the dome, which is essential information to predict the magnitude of the dome collapse. Since airborne muography is not restricted by topographic conditions for apparatus placements, we anticipate that the technique is applicable to creating images of this type of lava dome evolution from various angles in real time. PMID:28008978

  17. Instant snapshot of the internal structure of Unzen lava dome, Japan with airborne muography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki K. M.

    2016-12-01

    An emerging elementary particle imaging technique called muography has increasingly been used to resolve the internal structures of volcanoes with a spatial resolution of less than 100 m. However, land-based muography requires several days at least to acquire satisfactory image contrast and thus, it has not been a practical tool to diagnose the erupting volcano in a real time manner. To address this issue, airborne muography was implemented for the first time, targeting Heisei-Shinzan lava dome of Unzen volcano, Japan. Obtained in 2.5 hours, the resultant image clearly showed the density contrast inside the dome, which is essential information to predict the magnitude of the dome collapse. Since airborne muography is not restricted by topographic conditions for apparatus placements, we anticipate that the technique is applicable to creating images of this type of lava dome evolution from various angles in real time.

  18. Mud Volcanoes - Analogs to Martian Cones and Domes (by the Thousands!)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Oehler, Dorothy

    2010-01-01

    laboratory analyses of surface samples collected from mud volcanoes in Azerbaijan, Taiwan and Japan. X-ray diffraction, visible / near infrared reflectance spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy show that the samples are dominated by mixed-layer smectite clays, along with quartz, calcite and pyrite. Thin section analysis by optical and scanning electron microscopy confirms the mineral identifications. These samples also contain chemical and morphological biosignatures, including common microfossils, with evidence of partial replacement by pyrite. The bulk samples contain approximately 1 wt% total organic carbon and 0.4 mg / gm volatile hydrocarbons. The thousands of features in Acidalia Planitia cited as analogous to terrestrial mud volcanoes clearly represent an important element in the sedimentary record of Mars. Their location, in the distal depocenter for massive Hesperian-age floods, suggests that they contain fine-grained sediments from a large catchment area in the martian highlands. We have proposed these features as a new class of exploration target that can provide access to minimally-altered material from significant depth. By analogy to terrestrial mud volcanoes, these features may also be excellent sites for the sampling martian organics and subsurface microbial life, if such exist or ever existed.

  19. Mud Volcanoes - Analogs to Martian Cones and Domes (by the thousands !)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, C.; Oehler, D.

    2010-12-01

    laboratory analyses of surface samples collected from mud volcanoes in Azerbaijan, Taiwan and Japan. X-ray diffraction, visible / near infrared reflectance spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy show that the samples are dominated by mixed-layer smectite clays, along with quartz, calcite and pyrite. Thin section analysis by optical and scanning electron microscopy confirms the mineral identifications. These samples also contain chemical and morphological biosignatures, including common microfossils, with evidence of partial replacement by pyrite. The bulk samples contain approximately 1 wt% total organic carbon and 0.4 mg / gm volatile hydrocarbons. The thousands of features in Acidalia Planitia cited as analogous to terrestrial mud volcanoes clearly represent an important element in the sedimentary record of Mars. Their location, in the distal depocenter for massive Hesperian-age floods, suggests that they contain fine-grained sediments from a large catchment area in the martian highlands. We have proposed these features as a new class of exploration target that can provide access to minimally-altered material from significant depth. By analogy to terrestrial mud volcanoes, these features may also be excellent sites for the sampling martian organics and subsurface microbial life, if such exist or ever existed.

  20. Instrumentation Recommendations for Volcano Monitoring at U.S. Volcanoes Under the National Volcano Early Warning System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, Seth C.; Freymueller, Jeff T.; LaHusen, Richard G.; McGee, Kenneth A.; Poland, Michael P.; Power, John A.; Schmidt, David A.; Schneider, David J.; Stephens, George; Werner, Cynthia A.; White, Randall A.

    2008-01-01

    As magma moves toward the surface, it interacts with anything in its path: hydrothermal systems, cooling magma bodies from previous eruptions, and (or) the surrounding 'country rock'. Magma also undergoes significant changes in its physical properties as pressure and temperature conditions change along its path. These interactions and changes lead to a range of geophysical and geochemical phenomena. The goal of volcano monitoring is to detect and correctly interpret such phenomena in order to provide early and accurate warnings of impending eruptions. Given the well-documented hazards posed by volcanoes to both ground-based populations (for example, Blong, 1984; Scott, 1989) and aviation (for example, Neal and others, 1997; Miller and Casadevall, 2000), volcano monitoring is critical for public safety and hazard mitigation. Only with adequate monitoring systems in place can volcano observatories provide accurate and timely forecasts and alerts of possible eruptive activity. At most U.S. volcanoes, observatories traditionally have employed a two-component approach to volcano monitoring: (1) install instrumentation sufficient to detect unrest at volcanic systems likely to erupt in the not-too-distant future; and (2) once unrest is detected, install any instrumentation needed for eruption prediction and monitoring. This reactive approach is problematic, however, for two reasons. 1. At many volcanoes, rapid installation of new ground-1. based instruments is difficult or impossible. Factors that complicate rapid response include (a) eruptions that are preceded by short (hours to days) precursory sequences of geophysical and (or) geochemical activity, as occurred at Mount Redoubt (Alaska) in 1989 (24 hours), Anatahan (Mariana Islands) in 2003 (6 hours), and Mount St. Helens (Washington) in 1980 and 2004 (7 and 8 days, respectively); (b) inclement weather conditions, which may prohibit installation of new equipment for days, weeks, or even months, particularly at

  1. A Raman spectroscopic study of the arsenate mineral chenevixite Cu2Fe23+(AsO4)2(OH)4ṡH2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo; Lana, Cristiano; Xi, Yunfei

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the mineral chenevixite from Manto Cuba Mine, San Pedro de Cachiyuyo District, Inca de Oro, Chañaral Province, Atacama Region, Chile, using a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and vibrational spectroscopy. Qualitative chemical analysis shows a homogeneous composition, with predominance of As, Fe, Al, Cu, Fe and Cu. Minor amounts of Si were also observed. Raman spectroscopy complimented with infrared spectroscopy has been used to assess the molecular structure of the arsenate minerals chenevixite. Characteristic Raman and infrared bands of the (AsO4)3- stretching and bending vibrations are identified and described. The observation of multiple bands in the (AsO4)3- bending region offers support for the loss of symmetry of the arsenate anion in the structure of chenevixite. Raman bands attributable to the OH stretching vibrations of water and hydroxyl units were analysed. Estimates of the hydrogen bond distances were made based upon the OH stretching wavenumbers.

  2. Synthesis, crystal structure, electrical properties, and sodium transport pathways of the new arsenate Na4Co7(AsO4)6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Smida, Youssef; Marzouki, Riadh; Georges, Samuel; Kutteh, Ramzi; Avdeev, Maxim; Guesmi, Abderrahmen; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi

    2016-07-01

    A new sodium cobalt (II) arsenate Na4Co7(AsO4)6 has been synthesized by a solid-state reaction and its crystal structure determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. It crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group C2/m, with a=10.7098(9) Å, b=14.7837(9) Å, c=6.6845(7) Å, and β=105.545(9)°. The structure is described as a three-dimensional framework built up of corner-edge sharing CoO6, CoO4 and AsO4 polyhedra, with interconnecting channels along [100] in which the Na+ cations are located. The densest ceramics with relative density of 94% was obtained by ball milling and optimization of sintering temperature, and its microstructure characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The electrical properties of the ceramics were studied over a temperature interval from 280 °C to 560 °C using the complex impedance spectroscopy over the range of 13 MHz-5 Hz. The ionic bulk conductivity value of the sample at 360 °C is 2.51 10-5 S cm-1 and the measured activation energy is Ea=1 eV. The sodium migration pathways in the crystal structure were investigated computationally using the bond valence site energy (BVSE) model and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations.

  3. A scale for ranking volcanoes by risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandone, Roberto; Bartolini, Stefania; Martí, Joan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple volcanic risk coefficient (VRC) useful for comparing the degree of risk arising from different volcanoes, which may be used by civil protection agencies and volcano observatories to rapidly allocate limited resources even without a detailed knowledge of each volcano. Volcanic risk coefficient is given by the sum of the volcanic explosivity index (VEI) of the maximum expected eruption from the volcano, the logarithm of the eruption rate, and the logarithm of the population that may be affected by the maximum expected eruption. We show how to apply the method to rank the risk using as examples the volcanoes of Italy and in the Canary Islands. Moreover, we demonstrate that the maximum theoretical volcanic risk coefficient is 17 and pertains to the large caldera-forming volcanoes like Toba or Yellowstone that may affect the life of the entire planet. We develop also a simple plugin for a dedicated Quantum Geographic Information System (QGIS) software to graphically display the VRC of different volcanoes in a region.

  4. GPM Arrives in Japan

    NASA Video Gallery

    An international satellite that will set a new standard for global precipitation measurements from space has completed a 7,300-mile journey from the United States to Japan, where it now will underg...

  5. Volcanoes

    MedlinePlus

    ... there are no guarantees of safety during a volcanic eruption, you can take actions to protect yourself. You should have a disaster plan. Being prepared can help reduce fear, anxiety, and ... help in finding ways to cope. Federal Emergency Management Agency

  6. Volcanoes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergencies Biological Threats Chemical Threats Cyber Incident Drought Earthquakes Extreme Heat Explosions Floods Hazardous Materials Incidents Home ... Emergencies Biological Threats Chemical Threats Cyber Incident Drought Earthquakes Extreme Heat Explosions Floods Hazardous Materials Incidents Home ...

  7. Linking space observations to volcano observatories in Latin America: Results from the CEOS DRM Volcano Pilot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, F.; Pritchard, M. E.; Biggs, J.; Arnold, D. W. D.; Poland, M. P.; Ebmeier, S. K.; Wauthier, C.; Wnuk, K.; Parker, A. L.; Amelug, F.; Sansosti, E.; Mothes, P. A.; Macedo, O.; Lara, L.; Zoffoli, S.; Aguilar, V.

    2015-12-01

    Within Latin American, about 315 volcanoes that have been active in the Holocene, but according to the United Nations Global Assessment of Risk 2015 report (GAR15) 202 of these volcanoes have no seismic, deformation or gas monitoring. Following the 2012 Santorini Report on satellite Earth Observation and Geohazards, the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) has developed a 3-year pilot project to demonstrate how satellite observations can be used to monitor large numbers of volcanoes cost-effectively, particularly in areas with scarce instrumentation and/or difficult access. The pilot aims to improve disaster risk management (DRM) by working directly with the volcano observatories that are governmentally responsible for volcano monitoring, and the project is possible thanks to data provided at no cost by international space agencies (ESA, CSA, ASI, DLR, JAXA, NASA, CNES). Here we highlight several examples of how satellite observations have been used by volcano observatories during the last 18 months to monitor volcanoes and respond to crises -- for example the 2013-2014 unrest episode at Cerro Negro/Chiles (Ecuador-Colombia border); the 2015 eruptions of Villarrica and Calbuco volcanoes, Chile; the 2013-present unrest and eruptions at Sabancaya and Ubinas volcanoes, Peru; the 2015 unrest at Guallatiri volcano, Chile; and the 2012-present rapid uplift at Cordon Caulle, Chile. Our primary tool is measurements of ground deformation made by Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) but thermal and outgassing data have been used in a few cases. InSAR data have helped to determine the alert level at these volcanoes, served as an independent check on ground sensors, guided the deployment of ground instruments, and aided situational awareness. We will describe several lessons learned about the type of data products and information that are most needed by the volcano observatories in different countries.

  8. Water content in arc basaltic magma in the Northeast Japan and Izu arcs: an estimate from Ca/Na partitioning between plagioclase and melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushioda, Masashi; Takahashi, Eiichi; Hamada, Morihisa; Suzuki, Toshihiro

    2014-12-01

    The variation in water content of arc basaltic magmas in the Northeast Japan arc and the Izu arc was estimated using a simple plagioclase phenocryst hygrometer. In order to construct a plagioclase phenocryst hygrometer optimized for arc basalt magmas, we have conducted high-pressure melting experiments of relatively primitive basalt from the Miyakejima volcano, a frontal-arc volcano in the Izu arc. As a result of the experiments, we found that the Ca/Na partition coefficient between plagioclase and hydrous basaltic melt increases linearly with an increase in H2O content in the melts. We then selected from literature geochemical data sets of relatively primitive basaltic rocks with no evidence of magma mixing and the most frequent Ca-rich plagioclase phenocrysts from 15 basaltic arc volcanoes including both frontal-arc and rear-arc volcanoes. In the 15 volcanoes studied, plagioclase phenocrysts of high anorthite content (An > 90) were commonly observed, whereas plagioclase phenocrysts in rear arc volcanoes usually had a lower anorthite content (90 > An > 80). In all volcanoes studied, the estimated H2O content of basaltic magma was at least 3 wt.% H2O or higher. The magmas of volcanoes located on the volcanic front have about 5 wt.% H2O in magma whereas those from the rear-arc side are slightly lower in H2O content.

  9. Small Volcano in Terra Cimmeria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 26 June 2002) The Science This positive relief feature (see MOLA context) in the ancient highlands of Mars appears to be a heavily eroded volcanic center. The top of this feature appears to be under attack by the erosive forces of the martian wind. Light-toned streaks are visible, trending northeast to southwest, and may be caused by scouring of the terrain, or they may be dune forms moving sand. The northeast portion of the caldera area looks as though a layer of material is being removed to expose a slightly lighter-toned surface underneath. The flanks of this feature are slightly less cratered than the surrounding terrain, which could be explained in two ways: 1) this feature may be younger than the surrounding area, and has had less time to accumulate meteorite impacts, or 2) the slopes that are observed today may be so heavily eroded that the original, cratered surfaces are now gone, exposing relatively uncratered rocks. Although most of Terra Cimmeria has low albedo, some eastern portions, such as shown in this image, demonstrate an overall lack of contrast that attests to the presence of a layer of dust mantling the surface. This dust, in part, is responsible for the muted appearance and infill of many of the craters at the northern and southern ends of this image The Story This flat-topped volcano pops out from the surface, the swirls of its ancient lava flows running down onto the ancient highlands of Mars. Its smooth top appears to be under attack by the erosive forces of the martian wind. How can you tell? Click on the image above for a close-up look. You'll see some light-toned streaks that run in a northeast-southwest direction. They are caused either by the scouring of the terrain or dunes of moving sand. Either way, the wind likely plays upon the volcano's surface. Look also for the subtle, nearly crescent shaped feature at the northeast portion of the volcano's cap. It looks as if a layer of material has been removed by the wind, exposing

  10. Hydrothermal systems and volcano geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.

    2007-01-01

    The upward intrusion of magma from deeper to shallower levels beneath volcanoes obviously plays an important role in their surface deformation. This chapter will examine less obvious roles that hydrothermal processes might play in volcanic deformation. Emphasis will be placed on the effect that the transition from brittle to plastic behavior of rocks is likely to have on magma degassing and hydrothermal processes, and on the likely chemical variations in brine and gas compositions that occur as a result of movement of aqueous-rich fluids from plastic into brittle rock at different depths. To a great extent, the model of hydrothermal processes in sub-volcanic systems that is presented here is inferential, based in part on information obtained from deep drilling for geothermal resources, and in part on the study of ore deposits that are thought to have formed in volcanic and shallow plutonic environments.

  11. Volcanoes can muddle the greenhouse

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    As scientists and politicians anxiously eye signs of global greenhouse warming, climatologists are finding the best evidence yet that a massive volcanic eruption can temporarily bring the temperature down a notch or two. Such a cooling could be enough to set the current global warming back more than a decade, confusing any efforts to link it to the greenhouse effect. By effectively eliminating some nonvolcanic climate changes from the record of the past 100 years, researchers have detected drops in global temperature of several tenths of a degree within 1 to 2 years of volcanic eruptions. Apparently, the debris spewed into the stratosphere blocked sunlight and caused the temperature drops. For all their potential social significance, the climate effects of volcanoes have been hard to detect. The problem has been in identifying a volcanic cooling among the nearly continuous climate warmings and coolings of a similar size that fill the record. The paper reviews how this was done.

  12. Relationship between Kamen Volcano and the Klyuchevskaya group of volcanoes (Kamchatka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churikova, Tatiana G.; Gordeychik, Boris N.; Ivanov, Boris V.; Wörner, Gerhard

    2013-08-01

    Data on the geology, petrography, mineralogy, and geochemistry of rocks from Kamen Volcano (Central Kamchatka Depression) are presented and compared with rocks from the neighbouring active volcanoes. The rocks from Kamen and Ploskie Sopky volcanoes differ systematically in major elemental and mineral compositions and could not have been produced from the same primary melts. The compositional trends of Kamen stratovolcano lavas and dikes are clearly distinct from those of Klyuchevskoy lavas in all major and trace element diagrams as well as in mineral composition. However, lavas of the monogenetic cones on the southwestern slope of Kamen Volcano are similar to the moderately high-Mg basalts from Klyuchevskoy and may have been derived from the same primary melts. This means that the monogenetic cones of Kamen Volcano represent the feeding magma for Klyuchevskoy Volcano. Rocks from Kamen stratovolcano and Bezymianny form a common trend on all major element diagrams, indicating their genetic proximity. This suggests that Bezymianny Volcano inherited the feeding magma system of extinct Kamen Volcano. The observed geochemical diversity of rocks from the Klyuchevskaya group of volcanoes can be explained as the result of both gradual depletion over time of the mantle N-MORB-type source due to the intense previous magmatic events in this area, and the addition of distinct fluids to this mantle source.

  13. Volcano Monitoring Using Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, W.; Dehn, J.; Bailey, J. E.; Webley, P.

    2009-12-01

    At the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), remote sensing is an important component of its daily monitoring of volcanoes. AVO’s remote sensing group (AVORS) primarily utilizes three satellite datasets; Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data, from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Polar Orbiting Satellites (POES), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Terra and Aqua satellites, and NOAA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) data. AVHRR and MODIS data are collected by receiving stations operated by the Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at the University of Alaska’s Geophysical Institute. An additional AVHRR data feed is supplied by NOAA’s Gilmore Creek satellite tracking station. GOES data are provided by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Monterey Bay. The ability to visualize these images and their derived products is critical for the timely analysis of the data. To this end, AVORS has developed javascript web interfaces that allow the user to view images and metadata. These work well for internal analysts to quickly access a given dataset, but they do not provide an integrated view of all the data. To do this AVORS has integrated its datasets with Keyhole Markup Language (KML) allowing them to be viewed by a number of virtual globes or other geobrowsers that support this code. Examples of AVORS’ use of KML include the ability to browse thermal satellite image overlays to look for signs of volcanic activity. Webcams can also be viewed interactively through KML to confirm current activity. Other applications include monitoring the location and status of instrumentation; near real-time plotting of earthquake hypocenters; mapping of new volcanic deposits using polygons; and animated models of ash plumes, created by a combination of ash dispersion modeling and 3D visualization packages.

  14. The hydrogeology of Kilauea volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Scholl, M.A. )

    1993-08-01

    The hydrogeology of Kilauea volcano and adjacent areas has been studied since the turn of this century. However, most studies to date have focused on the relatively shallow, low-salinity parts of the ground-water system, and the deeper hydrothermal system remains poorly understood. The rift zones of adjacent Mauna Loa volcano bound the regional ground-water flow system that includes Kilauea, and the area bounded by the rift zones of Kilauea and the ocean may comprise a partly isolated subsystem. Rates of ground-water recharge vary greatly over the area, and discharge is difficult to measure, because streams are ephemeral and most ground-water discharges diffusely at or below sea level. Hydrothermal systems exist at depth in Kilauea's east and southwest rift zone, as evidenced by thermal springs at the coast and wells in the lower east-rift zone. Available data suggest that dike-impounded, heated ground water occurs at relatively high elevations in the upper east- and southwest-rift zones of Kilauea, and that permeability at depth in the rift zones. Available data suggest that dike-impounded, heated ground water occurs at relatively high elevations in the upper east- and southwest-rift zones of Kilauea, and that permeability at depth in the rift zones (probably [le]10[sup [minus]15] m[sup 2]) is much lower than that of unaltered basalt flows closer to the surface ([ge]10[sup [minus]10] m[sup 2]). Substantial variations in permeability and the presence of magmatic heat sources influence that structure of the fresh water-salt water interface, so the Ghyben-Herzberg model will often fail to predict its position. Numerical modeling studies have considered only subsets of the hydrothermal system, because no existing computer code solves the coupled fluid-flow, heat- and solute-transport problem over the temperature and salinity range encountered at Kilauea. 73 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. A field guide to Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenson, Robert A.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; McKay, Daniele

    2009-01-01

    Newberry Volcano is located in central Oregon at the intersection of the Cascade Range and the High Lava Plains. Its lavas range in age from ca. 0.5 Ma to late Holocene. Erupted products range in composition from basalt through rhyolite and cover ~3000 km2. The most recent caldera-forming eruption occurred ~80,000 years ago. This trip will highlight a revised understanding of the volcano's history based on new detailed geologic work. Stops will also focus on evidence for ice and flooding on the volcano, as well as new studies of Holocene mafic eruptions. Newberry is one of the most accessible U.S. volcanoes, and this trip will visit a range of lava types and compositions including tholeiitic and calc-alkaline basalt flows, cinder cones, and rhyolitic domes and tuffs. Stops will include early distal basalts as well as the youngest intracaldera obsidian flow.

  16. Eruption of Alaska volcano breaks historic pattern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, Jessica; Neal, Christina A.; Webley, Peter; Freymueller, Jeff; Haney, Matthew; McNutt, Stephen; Schneider, David; Prejean, Stephanie; Schaefer, Janet; Wessels, Rick L.

    2009-01-01

    In the late morning of 12 July 2008, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) received an unexpected call from the U.S. Coast Guard, reporting an explosive volcanic eruption in the central Aleutians in the vicinity of Okmok volcano, a relatively young (~2000-year-old) caldera. The Coast Guard had received an emergency call requesting assistance from a family living at a cattle ranch on the flanks of the volcano, who reported loud "thunder," lightning, and noontime darkness due to ashfall. AVO staff immediately confirmed the report by observing a strong eruption signal recorded on the Okmok seismic network and the presence of a large dark ash cloud above Okmok in satellite imagery. Within 5 minutes of the call, AVO declared the volcano at aviation code red, signifying that a highly explosive, ash-rich eruption was under way.

  17. Lahar hazards at Agua volcano, Guatemala

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, S.P.; Vallance, J.W.; Matías, O.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    At 3760 m, Agua volcano towers more than 3500 m above the Pacific coastal plain to the south and 2000 m above the Guatemalan highlands to the north. The volcano is within 5 to 10 kilometers (km) of Antigua, Guatemala and several other large towns situated on its northern apron. These towns have a combined population of nearly 100,000. It is within about 20 km of Escuintla (population, ca. 100,000) to the south. Though the volcano has not been active in historical time, or about the last 500 years, it has the potential to produce debris flows (watery flows of mud, rock, and debris—also known as lahars when they occur on a volcano) that could inundate these nearby populated areas.

  18. Radial anisotropy ambient noise tomography of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Rivet, Diane; Shapiro, Nikolai; Jaxybulatov, Kairly; Landès, Matthieu; Koulakov, Ivan; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The use of ambient seismic noise allows us to perform surface-wave tomography of targets which could hardly be imaged by other means. The frequencies involved (~ 0.5 - 20 s), somewhere in between active seismic and regular teleseismic frequency band, make possible the high resolution imaging of intermediate-size targets like volcanic edifices. Moreover, the joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves dispersion curves extracted from noise correlations allows us to invert for crustal radial anisotropy. We present here the two first studies of radial anisotropy on volcanoes by showing results from Lake Toba Caldera, a super-volcano in Indonesia, and from Piton de la Fournaise volcano, a hot-spot effusive volcano on the Réunion Island (Indian Ocean). We will see how radial anisotropy can be used to infer the main fabric within a magmatic system and, consequently, its dominant type of intrusion.

  19. Investigation of prototype volcano-surveillance network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, J. P. (Principal Investigator); Ward, P. L.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The equipment installed in the volcano surveillance network continues to work quite reliably and earthquakes are being recorded at all sites. A summary of platform receptions per day has been prepared.

  20. Influence of an ocean on the propagation of magmas within an oceanic basaltic shield volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corvec, Nicolas; McGovern, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Basaltic shield volcanoes are a common feature on Earth and mostly occur within oceans, forming volcanic islands (e.g. Hawaii (USA), Galapagos (Ecuador), and recently Niijima (Japan)). As the volcano grows it will reach and emerge from the water surface and continue to grow above it. The deformation affecting the volcanic edifice may be influenced by the presence of the water level. We investigate how the presence of an ocean affects the state of stress within a volcanic edifice and thus magma propagation and fault formation. Using COMSOL Multiphysics, axisymmetric elastic models of a volcanic edifice overlying an elastic lithosphere were created. The volcanic edifice (height of ~6000 m and radius of ~ 60 km) was built either instantaneously or iteratively by adding new layers of equivalent volume on top of each other. In the later process, the resulting stress and geometry from the one step is transferred to the next as initial conditions. Thus each new layer overlies a deformed and stressed model. The water load was modeled with a boundary condition at the surface of the model. In the case of an instantaneous volcano different water level were studied, for an iteratively growing volcano the water level was set up to 4000 m. We compared the deformation of the volcanic edifice and lithosphere and the stress orientation and magnitude in half-space and flexural models with the presence or not of an ocean. The preliminary results show 1- major differences in the resulting state of stress between an instantaneous and an iteratively built volcanic edifice, similar to the results of Galgana et al. (2011) and McGovern and Solomon (1993), respectively; 2- the presence of an ocean decreases the amount of flexural response, which decreases the magnitude of differential stress within the models; and 3- stress orientation within the volcano and lithosphere in also influence of an ocean. Those results provide new insights on the state of stress and deformation of oceanic

  1. Observations of electrical discharges during eruptions of Sakurajima volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edens, H. E.; Thomas, R. J.; Behnke, S. A.; McNutt, S. R.; Smith, C. M.; Farrell, A. K.; Van Eaton, A. R.; Cimarelli, C.; Cigala, V.; Michel, C. W.; Miki, D.; Iguchi, M.

    2015-12-01

    In May 2015 a field program was undertaken to study volcanic lightning at the Sakurajima volcano in southern Japan. One of the main goals of the study was to gain a better understanding of small electrical discharges in volcanic eruptions. Prior studies of volcanic lightning have shown that there are several types of electrical discharges that can occur in volcanic eruption clouds. One of these is referred to as continuous RF, which manifests itself as a continual production of VHF emissions that typically last several seconds to a minute during the initial, active phase of an eruption. Its nature and origins are not well understood. Another type of discharge are small, discrete lightning flashes, which start occurring later on within the eruption cloud and are similar to atmospheric lightning. During the 2015 field program we studied the characteristics of continuous RF and discrete flashes during volcanic eruptions of Sakurajima volcano using a comprehensive set of instrumentation. This included a 10-station 3-D Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) that operated in 10 μs high time resolution mode, slow and fast ΔE antennas, a VHF flat-plate antenna operating in the 20-80 MHz band, log-RF waveforms within the 60-66 MHz band, an infra-red video camera, a high-sensitivity Watec video camera, two high-speed video cameras, and still cameras. We present correlated LMA, waveform, photographs and video recordings of continuous RF and discrete volcanic lightning flashes. We discuss the nature of continuous RF and its possible origins, and how it compares to VHF emissions from regular, discrete flashes. We also discuss the polarity of leaders of discrete flashes and the general time evolution of the charge structure in eruption clouds.

  2. TRANSIENT SOUNDING INVESTIGATION OF NEWBERRY VOLCANO, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitterman, David V.; Neev, Deborah K.

    1985-01-01

    Transient electromagnetic soundings were used to map the geoelectrical structure of Newberry Volcano in central Oregon. An extensive conductor was found to underlie the volcano and to have resistivities from 20 OMEGA m to 72 OMEGA m. The depth to the conductor ranges from 410 m to 870 m. Inside the caldera, low basement resistivities are the result of hot fluids. The cause of the conductor outside the caldera is not known; however, we speculate that it is due to the water table.

  3. Geology and petrology of Mahukona Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Moore, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    The submarine Mahukona Volcano, west of the island of Hawaii, is located on the Loa loci line between Kahoolawe and Hualalai Volcanoes. The west rift zone ridge of the volcano extends across a drowned coral reef at about-1150 m and a major slope break at about-1340 m, both of which represent former shoreines. The summit of the volcano apparently reached to about 250 m above sea level (now at-1100 m depth) did was surmounted by a roughly circular caldera. A econd rift zone probably extended toward the east or sutheast, but is completely covered by younger lavas from the adjacent subaerial volcanoes. Samples were vecovered from nine dredges and four submersible lives. Using subsidence rates and the compositions of flows which drape the dated shoreline terraces, we infer that the voluminous phase of tholeiitic shield growth ended about 470 ka, but tholeiitic eruptions continued until at least 435 ka. Basalt, transitional between tholeiitic and alkalic basalt, erupted at the end of tholeiitic volcanism, but no postshield-alkalic stage volcanism occurred. The summit of the volcano apparently subcided below sea level between 435 and 365 ka. The tholeiitic lavas recovered are compositionally diverse. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Ambient Noise Tomography at Bezymianny Volcano, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuler, A. E.; Ekström, G.; West, M.; Senyukov, S.

    2008-12-01

    Bezymianny Volcano is an active stratovolcano located in the Kluychevskoy volcanic group on the Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia. Since its dramatic sector collapse eruption in 1956, the volcano's activity has been characterized by nearly twice annual plinian eruptions accompanying ongoing lava-dome growth. Its frequent eruptions and similarity to Mt. St. Helens have made it the target of a multifaceted geologic and geophysical project supported by the NSF Partners in Research and Education (PIRE) program. Since mid- 2006, the volcano has been monitored by a broadband seismic array that is currently composed of 8 stations within 10 kilometers of the active dome. In this project, we use continuous data from these stations to investigate the static and dynamic structure of the volcano. Using methods similar to those used by Brenguier et al. (2007, 2008), we estimate the Green's function for each pair of stations by cross-correlating day-long time series of ambient noise. Paths with high signal-to-noise ratios can be used to estimate group velocity dispersion curves. From these measurements, we work towards constructing the first velocity model of this volcano. Furthermore, we begin to test whether measurements of ambient noise can be used to monitor changes inside the volcano prior to eruptive activity. These problems will continue to be addressed as more data becomes available in future field seasons.

  5. Evolution of large shield volcanoes on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrick, Robert R.; Dufek, Josef; McGovern, Patrick J.

    2005-01-01

    We studied the geologic history, topographic expression, and gravity signature of 29 large Venusian shield volcanoes with similar morphologies in Magellan synthetic aperture radar imagery. While they appear similar in imagery, 16 have a domical topographic expression and 13 have a central depression. Typical dimensions for the central depression are 150 km wide and 500 m deep. The central depressions are probably not calderas resulting from collapse of a shallow magma chamber but instead are the result of a corona-like sagging of a previously domical volcano. The depressions all have some later volcanic filling. All but one of the central depression volcanoes have been post-dated by geologic features unrelated to the volcano, while most of the domical volcanoes are at the top of the stratigraphic column. Analysis of the gravity signatures in the spatial and spectral domains shows a strong correlation between the absence of post-dating features and the presence of dynamic support by an underlying plume. We infer that the formation of the central depressions occurred as a result of cessation of dynamic support. However, there are some domical volcanoes whose geologic histories and gravity signatures also indicate that they are extinct, so sagging of the central region apparently does not always occur when dynamic support is removed. We suggest that the thickness of the elastic lithosphere may be a factor in determining whether a central depression forms when dynamic support is removed, but the gravity data are of insufficient resolution to test this hypothesis with admittance methods.

  6. Lahar-hazard zonation for San Miguel volcano, El Salvador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, J.J.; Schilling, S.P.; Pullinger, C.R.; Escobar, C.D.; Chesner, C.A.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    San Miguel volcano, also known as Chaparrastique, is one of many volcanoes along the volcanic arc in El Salvador. The volcano, located in the eastern part of the country, rises to an altitude of about 2130 meters and towers above the communities of San Miguel, El Transito, San Rafael Oriente, and San Jorge. In addition to the larger communities that surround the volcano, several smaller communities and coffee plantations are located on or around the flanks of the volcano, and the PanAmerican and coastal highways cross the lowermost northern and southern flanks of the volcano. The population density around San Miguel volcano coupled with the proximity of major transportation routes increases the risk that even small volcano-related events, like landslides or eruptions, may have significant impact on people and infrastructure. San Miguel volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in El Salvador; it has erupted at least 29 times since 1699. Historical eruptions of the volcano consisted mainly of relatively quiescent emplacement of lava flows or minor explosions that generated modest tephra falls (erupted fragments of microscopic ash to meter sized blocks that are dispersed into the atmosphere and fall to the ground). Little is known, however, about prehistoric eruptions of the volcano. Chemical analyses of prehistoric lava flows and thin tephra falls from San Miguel volcano indicate that the volcano is composed dominantly of basalt (rock having silica content

  7. Monoclinic structure of hydroxylpyromorphite Pb10(PO4)6(OH)2 - hydroxylmimetite Pb10(AsO4)6(OH)2 solid solution series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giera, Alicja; Manecki, Maciej; Borkiewicz, Olaf; Zelek, Sylwia; Rakovan, John; Bajda, Tomasz; Marchlewski, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    Seven samples of hydroxyl analogues of pyromorphite-mimetite solid solutions series were synthesized from aqueous solutions at 80° C in a computer-controlled chemistate: 200 mL aqueous solutions of 0.05M Pb(NO3)2 and 0.03M KH2AsO4 and/or KH2PO4 were dosed with a 0.25 mL/min rate to a glass beaker, which initially contained 100 mL of distilled water. Constant pH of 8 was maintained using 2M KOH. The syntheses yielded homogeneous fine-grained white precipitates composition of which was close to theoretical Pb10[(PO4)6-x(AsO4)x](OH)2, where x = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. High-resolution powder X-ray diffraction data were obtained in transmission geometry at the beamline 11-BM at the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois, USA). The structure Rietveld refinements based on starting parameters of either hexagonal hydroxylpyromorphite or monoclinic mimetite-M were performed using GSAS+EXPGUI software. Apatite usually crystallizes in the hexagonal crystal system with the space group P63/m. For the first time, however, the lowering of the hexagonal to monoclinic crystal symmetry was observed in the hydroxyl variety of pyromorphite-mimetite solid solution series. This is indicated by better fitting of the modeled monoclinic structure to the experimental data. The same is not the case for analogous calcium hydroxylapatite series Ca5(PO4)3OH - Ca5(AsO4)3OH (Lee et al. 2009). Systematical linear increase of unit cell parameters is observed with As substitution from a=9.88, b=19.75, and c=7.43 for Pb10(PO4)6(OH)2 to a=10.23, b=20.32, and c=7.51 for Pb10(AsO4)6(OH)2. A strong pseudohexagonal character (γ ≈ 120° and b ≈ 2a) of the analyzed monoclinic phases was established. This work is partially funded by AGH research grant no 11.11.140.319 and partially by Polish NCN grant No 2011/01/M/ST10/06999. Lee Y.J., Stephens P.W., Tang Y., Li W., Philips B.L., Parise J.B., Reeder R.J., 2009. Arsenate substitution in hydroxylapatite: Structural characterization

  8. Space robotics in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, William; Lowrie, James W.; McCain, Harry; Bejczy, Antal; Sheridan, Tom; Kanade, Takeo; Allen, Peter

    1994-03-01

    Japan has been one of the most successful countries in the world in the realm of terrestrial robot applications. The panel found that Japan has in place a broad base of robotics research and development, ranging from components to working systems for manufacturing, construction, and human service industries. From this base, Japan looks to the use of robotics in space applications and has funded work in space robotics since the mid-1980's. The Japanese are focusing on a clear image of what they hope to achieve through three objectives for the 1990's: developing long-reach manipulation for tending experiments on Space Station Freedom, capturing satellites using a free-flying manipulator, and surveying part of the moon with a mobile robot. This focus and a sound robotics infrastructure is enabling the young Japanese space program to develop relevant systems for extraterrestrial robotics applications.

  9. Psychology in Japan.

    PubMed

    Imada, Hiroshi; Tanaka-Matsumi, Junko

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide information about Japan and its psychology in advance of the 31st International Congress of Psychology (ICP), to be held in Yokohama, Japan, in 2016. The article begins with the introduction of the Japanese Psychological Association (JPA), the hosting organization of the ICP 2016, and the Japanese Union of Psychological Associations consisting of 51 associations/societies, of which the JPA is a member. This is followed by a brief description of a history of psychology of Japan, with emphasis on the variation in our approach to psychology in three different periods, that is, the pre- and post-Pacific War periods, and the post-1960 period. Next, the international contributions of Japanese psychology/psychologists are discussed from the point of view of their visibility. Education and training in psychology in Japanese universities is discussed with a final positive remark about the long-awaited enactment of the Accredited Psychologist Law in September, 2015.

  10. Space robotics in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittaker, William; Lowrie, James W.; Mccain, Harry; Bejczy, Antal; Sheridan, Tom; Kanade, Takeo; Allen, Peter

    1994-01-01

    Japan has been one of the most successful countries in the world in the realm of terrestrial robot applications. The panel found that Japan has in place a broad base of robotics research and development, ranging from components to working systems for manufacturing, construction, and human service industries. From this base, Japan looks to the use of robotics in space applications and has funded work in space robotics since the mid-1980's. The Japanese are focusing on a clear image of what they hope to achieve through three objectives for the 1990's: developing long-reach manipulation for tending experiments on Space Station Freedom, capturing satellites using a free-flying manipulator, and surveying part of the moon with a mobile robot. This focus and a sound robotics infrastructure is enabling the young Japanese space program to develop relevant systems for extraterrestrial robotics applications.

  11. Cultural Astronomy in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renshaw, Steven L.

    While Japan is known more for its contributions to modern astronomy than its archaeoastronomical sites, there is still much about the culture's heritage that is of interest in the study of cultural astronomy. This case study provides an overview of historical considerations necessary to understand the place of astronomy in Japanese society as well as methodological considerations that highlight traditional approaches that have at times been a barrier to interdisciplinary research. Some specific areas of study in the cultural astronomy of Japan are discussed including examples of contemporary research based on interdisciplinary approaches. Japan provides a fascinating background for scholars who are willing to go beyond their curiosity for sites of alignment and approach the culture with a desire to place astronomical iconography in social context.

  12. Redoubt Volcano: 2009 Eruption Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, K. F.

    2009-12-01

    Redoubt Volcano is a 3110-m glaciated stratovolcano located 170 km SW of Anchorage, Alaska, on the W side of Cook Inlet. The edifice comprises a <1500-m-thick sequence of mid-Pleistocene to recent, basaltic to dacitic pyroclastic-, block-and-ash- and lava-flow deposits built on Jurassic tonalite. Magma-ice contact features are common. A dissected earlier cone underlies the E flank of Redoubt. Alunite-bearing debris flows to the SE, E and N suggest multiple flank collapses over Redoubt's history. Most recent eruptions occurred in 1966-68, and 1989-90. In March 2009, Redoubt erupted to produce pyroclastic flows, voluminous lahars, and tephra that fell over large portions of south-central Alaska. Regional and local air traffic was significantly disrupted, Anchorage airport was closed for over 12 hours, and oil production in Cook Inlet was halted for nearly five months. Unrest began in August, 2008 with reports of H2S odor. In late September, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)’s seismic network recorded periods of volcanic tremor. Throughout the fall, AVO noted increased fumarolic emissions and accompanying ice- and snow-melt on and around the 1990 dome, and gas measurements showed elevated H2S and CO2 emissions. On January 23, seismometers recorded 48 hrs of intermittent tremor and discrete, low-frequency to hybrid events. Over the next 6 weeks, seismicity waxed and waned, an estimated 5-6 million m3 of ice were lost due to melting, volcanic gas emissions increased, and debris flows emerged repeatedly from recently formed ice holes near the 1990 dome, located on the crater’s N (“Drift”) side. On March 15, a phreatic explosion deposited non-juvenile ash from a new vent in the summit ice cap just S of the 1990 dome. Ash from the explosion rose to ~4500 m above sea level (asl). The plume was accompanied by weak seismicity. The first magmatic explosion occurred on March 22. Over the next two weeks, more than 19 explosions destroyed at least two lava domes and

  13. An Admittance Survey of Large Volcanoes on Venus: Implications for Volcano Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brian, A. W.; Smrekar, S. E.; Stofan, E. R.

    2004-01-01

    Estimates of the thickness of the venusian crust and elastic lithosphere are important in determining the rheological and thermal properties of Venus. These estimates offer insights into what conditions are needed for certain features, such as large volcanoes and coronae, to form. Lithospheric properties for much of the large volcano population on Venus are not well known. Previous studies of elastic thickness (Te) have concentrated on individual or small groups of edifices, or have used volcano models and fixed values of Te to match with observations of volcano morphologies. In addition, previous studies use different methods to estimate lithospheric parameters meaning it is difficult to compare their results. Following recent global studies of the admittance signatures exhibited by the venusian corona population, we performed a similar survey into large volcanoes in an effort to determine the range of lithospheric parameters shown by these features. This survey of the entire large volcano population used the same method throughout so that all estimates could be directly compared. By analysing a large number of edifices and comparing our results to observations of their morphology and models of volcano formation, we can help determine the controlling parameters that govern volcano growth on Venus.

  14. Spreading and collapse of big basaltic volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe; Bonforte, Alessandro; Guglielmino, Francesco; Peltier, Aline; Poland, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Among the different types of volcanoes, basaltic ones usually form the most voluminous edifices. Because volcanoes are growing on a pre-existing landscape, the geologic and structural framework of the basement (and earlier volcanic landforms) influences the stress regime, seismicity, and volcanic activity. Conversely, the masses of these volcanoes introduce a morphological anomaly that affects neighboring areas. Growth of a volcano disturbs the tectonic framework of the region, clamps and unclamps existing faults (some of which may be reactivated by the new stress field), and deforms the substratum. A volcano's weight on its basement can trigger edifice spreading and collapse that can affect populated areas even at significant distance. Volcano instability can also be driven by slow tectonic deformation and magmatic intrusion. The manifestations of instability span a range of temporal and spatial scales, ranging from slow creep on individual faults to large earthquakes affecting a broad area. In the frame of MED-SVU project, our work aims to investigate the relation between basement setting and volcanic activity and stability at three Supersite volcanoes: Etna (Sicily, Italy), Kilauea (Island of Hawaii, USA) and Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island, France). These volcanoes host frequent eruptive activity (effusive and explosive) and share common features indicating lateral spreading and collapse, yet they are characterized by different morphologies, dimensions, and tectonic frameworks. For instance, the basaltic ocean island volcanoes of Kilauea and Piton de la Fournaise are near the active ends of long hotspot chains while Mt. Etna has developed at junction along a convergent margin between the African and Eurasian plates and a passive margin separating the oceanic Ionian crust from the African continental crust. Magma supply and plate velocity also differ in the three settings, as to the sizes of the edifices and the extents of their rift zones. These

  15. Nyiragongo Volcano before the Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nyiragongo is an active stratovolcano situated on the Eastern African Rift; it is part of Africa's Virunga Volcanic Chain. In a massive eruption that occurred on January 17, 2002, Nyiragongo sent a vast plume of smoke and ash skyward, and three swifly-moving rivers of lava streaming down its western and eastern flanks. Previous lava flows from Nyiragongo have been observed moving at speeds of up to 40 miles per hour (60 kph). The lava flows from the January 17 eruption destroyed more than 14 villages in the surrounding countryside, forcing tens of thousands to flee into the neighboring country of Rwanda. Within one day the lava ran to the city of Goma, situated on the northern shore of Lake Kivu about 12 miles (19 km) south of Nyiragongo. The lava cut a 200 foot (60 meter) wide swath right through Goma, setting off many fires, as it ran into Lake Kivu. Goma, the most heavily populated city in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, is home to about 400,000 people. Most of these citizens were forced to flee, while many have begun to return to their homes only to find their homes destroyed. This true-color scene was captured by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), flying aboard the Landsat 7 satellite, on December 11, 2001, just over a month before the most recent eruption. Nyiragongo's large crater is clearly visible in the image. As recently as June 1994, there was a large lava lake in the volcano's crater which had since solidified. The larger Nyamuragira Volcano is located roughly 13 miles (21 km) to the north of Nyiragongo. Nyamuragira last erupted in February and March 2001. That eruption was also marked by columns of erupted ash and long fluid lava flows, some of which are apparent in the image as dark greyish swaths radiating away from Nyamuragira. Both peaks are also notorious for releasing large amounts of sulfur dioxide, which presents another health hazard to people and animals living in close proximity. Image by Robert Simmon, based on data supplied

  16. 4-D noise-based seismology at volcanoes: Ongoing efforts and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenguier, Florent; Rivet, Diane; Obermann, Anne; Nakata, Nori; Boué, Pierre; Lecocq, Thomas; Campillo, Michel; Shapiro, Nikolai

    2016-07-01

    Monitoring magma pressure buildup at depth and transport to surface is a key point for improving volcanic eruption prediction. Seismic waves, through their velocity dependence to stress perturbations, can provide crucial information on the temporal evolution of the mechanical properties of volcanic edifices. In this article, we review past and ongoing efforts for extracting accurate information of temporal changes of seismic velocities at volcanoes continuously in time using records of ambient seismic noise. We will first introduce the general methodology for retrieving accurate seismic velocity changes from seismic noise records and discuss the origin of seismic velocity temporal changes in rocks. We will then discuss in a second part how noise-based monitoring can improve our knowledge about magmatic activity at a long (years) to a short (days) time scale taking example from Piton de la Fournaise volcano (La Réunion). We will also mention ongoing efforts for operational noise-based seismic monitoring on volcanoes. Further, we will discuss perspectives for improving the spatial localization of detected velocity changes at depth with a special focus on the use of dense seismic arrays. In the last part, we will finally explore the complex response of volcanic regions to seismic shaking with an example from Japan and show how imaging seismic velocity susceptibility allows characterizing the state of pressurized fluids in volcanic regions.

  17. Eruption cyclicity at silicic volcanoes potentially caused by magmatic gas waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaut, Chloé; Ricard, Yanick; Bercovici, David; Sparks, R. Steve J.

    2013-10-01

    Eruptions at active silicic volcanoes are often cyclical. For example, at the Soufrière Hills volcano in Montserrat, Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines, and Sakurajima in Japan, episodes of intense activity alternate with repose intervals over periods between several hours and a day. Abrupt changes in eruption rates have been explained with the motion of a plug of magma that alternatively sticks or slides along the wall of the volcanic conduit. However, it is unclear how the static friction that prevents the plug from sliding is periodically overcome. Here we use two-phase flow equations to model a gas-rich, viscous magma ascending through a volcanic conduit. Our analyses indicate that magma compaction yields ascending waves comprised of low- and high-porosity bands. However, magma ascent to lower pressures also causes gas expansion. We find that the competition between magma compaction and gas expansion naturally selects pressurized gas waves with specific periods. At the surface, these waves can induce cyclical eruptive behaviour with periods between 1 and 100 hours, which compares well to the observations from Soufrière Hills, Mount Pinatubo and Sakurajima. We find that the period is insensitive to volcano structure, but increases weakly with magma viscosity. We conclude that observations of a shift to a longer eruption cycle imply an increase in magma viscosity and thereby enhanced volcanic hazard.

  18. [The arsenate Na3Fe2(AsO4) 3: structural study at low temperature and simulation of conduction properties of alkaline cations].

    PubMed

    Ouerfelli, Najoua; Guesmi, Abderrahmen; Mazza, Daniele; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2008-05-01

    The crystal structure of the low-temperature garnet-like form of trisodium diiron(III) triarsenate, Na(3)Fe(2)(AsO(4))(3), exhibits a three-dimensional framework with small tunnels running along the [111] direction, in which the Na(+) cations are located. This study demonstrates the structural origins of the different ionic conductivities of the low- and high-temperature forms. Sodium conduction properties are simulated by means of the bond-valence-sum (BVS) model; the correlations between the low- and high-temperature crystal structures are discussed. The As, Fe and Na atoms lie on special positions (Wyckoff symbols 24d, 16a and 24c, respectively).

  19. Effect of glycine substitution on the ferroelectric phase of betaine arsenate [(CH 3) 3NCH 2COO·H 3AsO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekola, T.; Ribeiro, J. L.; Klöpperpieper, A.

    2011-09-01

    The present work reports an experimental investigation on the influence of glycine (NH 2CH 2COOH) substitution in the polar properties and the critical dynamics of the molecular ferroelectric betaine arsenate, (CH 3) 3NCH 2COO·H 3AsO 4. The dielectric dispersion (20 Hz<ν<3 MHz) and the thermally induced displacement currents are investigated in detail over the extended Curie region of the system (130 K< T<100 K). The results obtained for a single crystal with nominal glycine content of 20% are analyzed, compared with those obtained for pure betaine arsenate and discussed within the scope of a phenomenological Landau model previously used to describe a system with competing ferroelectric and structural instabilities.

  20. Three-dimensional resistivity structure of Asama Volcano revealed by data-space magnetotelluric inversion using unstructured tetrahedral elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, Yoshiya; Ogawa, Yasuo; Aizawa, Koki; Kanda, Wataru; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Koyama, Takao; Yamaya, Yusuke; Kagiyama, Tsuneomi

    2017-03-01

    Asama Volcano is an andesitic composite volcano and one of the most active volcanoes in Japan. In order to reveal electrical resistivity structure beneath the volcano accurately, we performed a 3-D inversion of dense magnetotelluric survey data. In order to prevent misinterpretation of the subsurface resistivity due to the steep topography around Asama Volcano, we used an unstructured tetrahedral mesh to represent the topography. Furthermore, we reduced the calculation time by transforming the inverse problem from the model space into the data space. Comparison of the new data-space method to the original model-space method showed that the calculation time required to update the model parameters was reduced as a result of the transformation, whereas the resistivity structure obtained remained unchanged. In the subsurface resistivity structure around Asama Volcano that was estimated from the inversion, resistive bodies were discovered to be located under the old eruption centres. In particular, under the 24 ka collapse caldera to the west of the presently active crater, a spherical resistive body was found to exist in isolation. In addition, there was a widespread conductive layer below the resistive surface layer. By comparison with previous hydrological and geochemical studies, the conductive layer was interpreted as being a high-water-content layer and an overlying layer rich in altered clay minerals. Because the western part of the volcanic conduit was considered to be the resistive area, which is inferred to consist of unfractured rocks with lower permeability than their surroundings, it would appear that the area obstructs the westward flow of the hydrothermal fluid beneath the summit, thereby contributing to higher concentrations of SO42- and Cl- in the spring water at the northern and eastern feet as well as the uneven location of a diffuse CO2 anomaly.

  1. Growth History of Kaena Volcano, the Isolated, Dominantly Submarine, Precursor Volcano to Oahu, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinton, J. M.; Eason, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    The construction of O'ahu began with the recently recognized, ~3.5-4.9 Ma Ka'ena Volcano, as an isolated edifice in the Kaua'i Channel. Ka'ena remained submarine until, near the end of its lifetime as magma supply waned and the volcano transitioned to a late-shield stage of activity, it emerged to reach a maximum elevation of ~1000 m above sea level. We estimate that Ka'ena was emergent only for the last 15-25% of its lifespan, and that subaerial lavas make up < 5% of the total volume (20-27 x 103 km3). O'ahu's other volcanoes, Wai'anae (~3.9-2.85 Ma) and Ko'olau (~3.0-1.9 Ma), were built at least partly on the flanks of earlier edifices and both were active subaerial volcanoes for at least 1 Ma. The constructional history of Ka'ena contrasts with that of Wai'anae, Ko'olau, and many other Hawaiian volcanoes, which likely emerge within a few hundred kyr after inception, and with subaerial lavas comprising up to 35 volume % of the volcano. These relations suggest that volcano growth history and morphology are critically dependent on whether volcanic initiation and growth occur in the deep ocean floor (isolated), or on the flanks of pre-existing edifices. Two other volcanoes that likely formed in isolation are West Moloka'i and Kohala, both of which have long submarine rift zones, and neither attained great heights above sea level despite having substantial volume. The partitioning of volcanism between submarine and subaerial volcanism depends on the distance between volcanic centers, whether new volcanoes initiate on the flanks of earlier ones, and the time over which neighboring volcanoes are concurrently active. Ka'ena might represent an end-member in this spectrum, having initiated far from its next oldest neighbor and completed much of its evolution in isolation.

  2. 21 CFR 186.1555 - Japan wax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Japan wax. 186.1555 Section 186.1555 Food and....1555 Japan wax. (a) Japan wax (CAS Reg. No. 8001-39-6), also known as Japan tallow or sumac wax, is a... succedanea (Japan, Taiwan, and Indo-China), R. vernicifera (Japan), and R. trichocarpa (China,...

  3. Globalization and Education in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohkura, Kentaro; Shibata, Masako

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the authors contend that globalization in Japan is the gradual process in which Japan's positioning of "self" within international relations, which had formerly been dominated by the West, has changed. Accordingly, Japan's relationships with the West and the rest of the world, for example, Asia, have also been reviewed and…

  4. Advanced composites in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diefendorf, R. Judd; Hillig, William G.; Grisaffe, Salvatore J.; Pipes, R. Byron; Perepezko, John H.; Sheehan, James E.

    1994-01-01

    The JTEC Panel on Advanced Composites surveyed the status and future directions of Japanese high-performance ceramic and carbon fibers and their composites in metal, intermetallic, ceramic, and carbon matrices. Because of a strong carbon and fiber industry, Japan is the leader in carbon fiber technology. Japan has initiated an oxidation-resistant carbon/carbon composite program. With its outstanding technical base in carbon technology, Japan should be able to match present technology in the U.S. and introduce lower-cost manufacturing methods. However, the panel did not see any innovative approaches to oxidation protection. Ceramic and especially intermetallic matrix composites were not yet receiving much attention at the time of the panel's visit. There was a high level of monolithic ceramic research and development activity. High temperature monolithic intermetallic research was just starting, but notable products in titanium aluminides had already appeared. Matrixless ceramic composites was one novel approach noted. Technologies for high temperature composites fabrication existed, but large numbers of panels or parts had not been produced. The Japanese have selected aerospace as an important future industry. Because materials are an enabling technology for a strong aerospace industry, Japan initiated an ambitious long-term program to develop high temperature composites. Although just starting, its progress should be closely monitored in the U.S.

  5. Sapovirus in water, Japan.

    PubMed

    Hansman, Grant S; Sano, Daisuke; Ueki, You; Imai, Takahiro; Oka, Tomoichiro; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Naokazu; Omura, Tatsuo

    2007-01-01

    Sapoviruses are etiologic agents of human gastroenteritis. We detected sapovirus in untreated wastewater, treated wastewater, and a river in Japan. A total of 7 of 69 water samples were positive by reverse transcription-PCR. Phylogenetic analysis of the viral capsid gene grouped these strains into 4 genetic clusters.

  6. Political Corruption in Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Steven R.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Provides an overview of political corruption and its place in Japanese culture and society. Discusses recent scandals and efforts at political reform. These efforts are moving Japan from a "boss-patronage" system to a "civic-culture." Includes a table of post-war Japanese prime ministers and corruption scandals. (MJP)

  7. Japan's builders study platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, R.G.

    1984-07-05

    This paper discusses the developing role of Japan as a major supplier of offshore drilling and production equipment. Different firms are discussed along with their capacity. The marketing areas, work experience, and plans for designs are also included. There is special attention payed on the potential for developing Arctic platforms.

  8. Nuclear Power in Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, John W.

    1983-01-01

    Energy consumption in Japan has grown at a faster rate than in any other major industrial country. To maintain continued prosperity, the government has embarked on a crash program for nuclear power. Current progress and issues/reactions to the plan are discussed. (JN)

  9. Teaching Unit: Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Dina

    The cultural diversity of Japan can provide a rewarding learning experience for children of all grade levels. This teaching unit includes resources and ideas for the study of Japanese society, art, folklore, and poetry. Included among the instructional objectives are: (1) children will compare U.S. lifestyles with Japanese lifestyles by reading…

  10. The Graying of Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Linda G.

    1989-01-01

    Japan's rapidly aging population has become a top policy issue, especially as the increasing costs of pensions and medical care are debated. With the highest life expectancy on earth, the Japanese potentially face long periods of retirement, as well as the possibility of long periods of disability. Although family support of the elderly is thought…

  11. Japan's electronic packaging technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tummala, Rao R.; Pecht, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The JTEC panel found Japan to have significant leadership over the United States in the strategic area of electronic packaging. Many technologies and products once considered the 'heart and soul' of U.S. industry have been lost over the past decades to Japan and other Asian countries. The loss of consumer electronics technologies and products is the most notable of these losses, because electronics is the United States' largest employment sector and is critical for growth businesses in consumer products, computers, automobiles, aerospace, and telecommunications. In the past there was a distinction between consumer and industrial product technologies. While Japan concentrated on the consumer market, the United States dominated the industrial sector. No such distinction is anticipated in the future; the consumer-oriented technologies Japan has dominated are expected to characterize both domains. The future of U.S. competitiveness will, therefore, depend on the ability of the United States to rebuild its technological capabilities in the area of portable electronic packaging.

  12. Japan's electronic packaging technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tummala, Rao R.; Pecht, Michael

    1995-02-01

    The JTEC panel found Japan to have significant leadership over the United States in the strategic area of electronic packaging. Many technologies and products once considered the 'heart and soul' of U.S. industry have been lost over the past decades to Japan and other Asian countries. The loss of consumer electronics technologies and products is the most notable of these losses, because electronics is the United States' largest employment sector and is critical for growth businesses in consumer products, computers, automobiles, aerospace, and telecommunications. In the past there was a distinction between consumer and industrial product technologies. While Japan concentrated on the consumer market, the United States dominated the industrial sector. No such distinction is anticipated in the future; the consumer-oriented technologies Japan has dominated are expected to characterize both domains. The future of U.S. competitiveness will, therefore, depend on the ability of the United States to rebuild its technological capabilities in the area of portable electronic packaging.

  13. Photovoltaics in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, K.

    1985-01-01

    Report surveys status of research and development on photovoltaics in Japan. Report based on literature searches, private communications, and visits by author to Japanese facilities. Included in survey are Sunshine Project, national program to develop energy sources; industrial development at private firms; and work at academic institutions.

  14. Teacher Education in Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimahara, Nobuo

    A discussion is presented on the education of Japanese teachers, their roles in the schools, and proposed reforms in their education. In describing the pre-World War II background of teacher education in Japan, three ideological forces are discussed: Western thought that impacted upon early Meiji reforms, Confucianism, and nationalism. Western…

  15. Effects of Volcanoes on the Natural Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.

    2005-01-01

    The primary focus of this project has been on the development of techniques to study the thermal and gas output of volcanoes, and to explore our options for the collection of vegetation and soil data to enable us to assess the impact of this volcanic activity on the environment. We originally selected several volcanoes that have persistent gas emissions and/or magma production. The investigation took an integrated look at the environmental effects of a volcano. Through their persistent activity, basaltic volcanoes such as Kilauea (Hawaii) and Masaya (Nicaragua) contribute significant amounts of sulfur dioxide and other gases to the lower atmosphere. Although primarily local rather than regional in its impact, the continuous nature of these eruptions means that they can have a major impact on the troposphere for years to decades. Since mid-1986, Kilauea has emitted about 2,000 tonnes of sulfur dioxide per day, while between 1995 and 2000 Masaya has emotted about 1,000 to 1,500 tonnes per day (Duffel1 et al., 2001; Delmelle et al., 2002; Sutton and Elias, 2002). These emissions have a significant effect on the local environment. The volcanic smog ("vog" ) that is produced affects the health of local residents, impacts the local ecology via acid rain deposition and the generation of acidic soils, and is a concern to local air traffic due to reduced visibility. Much of the work that was conducted under this NASA project was focused on the development of field validation techniques of volcano degassing and thermal output that could then be correlated with satellite observations. In this way, we strove to develop methods by which not only our study volcanoes, but also volcanoes in general worldwide (Wright and Flynn, 2004; Wright et al., 2004). Thus volcanoes could be routinely monitored for their effects on the environment. The selected volcanoes were: Kilauea (Hawaii; 19.425 N, 155.292 W); Masaya (Nicaragua; 11.984 N, 86.161 W); and Pods (Costa Rica; 10.2OoN, 84.233 W).

  16. Spreading And Collapse Of Big Basaltic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, G.; Bonforte, A.; Guglielmino, F.; Peltier, A.; Poland, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    Among the different types of volcanoes, basaltic ones usually form the most voluminous edifices. Because volcanoes are growing on a pre-existing landscape, the geologic and structural framework of the basement (and earlier volcanic landforms) influences the stress regime, seismicity, and volcanic activity. Conversely, the masses of these volcanoes introduce a morphological anomaly that affects neighboring areas. Growth of a volcano disturbs the tectonic framework of the region, clamps and unclamps existing faults (some of which may be reactivated by the new stress field), and deforms the substratum. A volcano's weight on its basement can trigger edifice spreading and collapse that can affect populated areas even at significant distance. Volcano instability can also be driven by slow tectonic deformation and magmatic intrusion. The manifestations of instability span a range of temporal and spatial scales, ranging from slow creep on individual faults to large earthquakes affecting a broad area. Our work aims to investigate the relation between basement setting and volcanic activity and stability at Etna (Sicily, Italy), Kilauea (Island of Hawaii, USA) and Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island, France). These volcanoes host frequent eruptive activity (effusive and explosive) and share common features indicating lateral spreading and collapse, yet they are characterized by different morphologies, dimensions, and tectonic frameworks. For instance, the basaltic ocean island volcanoes of Kilauea and Piton de la Fournaise are near the active ends of long hotspot chains while Mt. Etna has developed at junction along a convergent margin between the African and Eurasian plates and a passive margin separating the oceanic Ionian crust from the African continental crust. Magma supply and plate velocity also differ in the three settings, as to the sizes of the edifices and the extents of their rift zones. These volcanoes, due to their similarities and differences, coupled with

  17. Seismic unrest at Katla Volcano- southern Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    jeddi, zeinab; Tryggvason, Ari; Gudmundsson, Olafur; Bödvarsson, Reynir; SIL Seismology Group

    2014-05-01

    Katla volcano is located on the propagating Eastern Volcanic Zone (EVZ) in South Iceland. It is located beneath Mýrdalsjökull ice-cap which covers an area of almost 600 km2, comprising the summit caldera and the eruption vents. 20 eruptions between 930 and 1918 with intervals of 13-95 years are documented at Katla which is one of the most active subglacial volcanoes in Iceland. Eruptions at Katla are mainly explosive due to the subglacial mode of extrusion and produce high eruption columns and catastrophic melt water floods (jökulhlaups). The present long Volcanic repose (almost 96 years) at Katla, the general unrest since 1955, and the 2010 eruption of the neighbouring Eyjafjallajökull volcano has prompted concerns among geoscientists about an imminent eruption. Thus, the volcano has been densely monitored by seismologists and volcanologists. The seismology group of Uppsala University as a partner in the Volcano Anatomy (VA) project in collaboration with the University of Iceland and the Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) installed 9 temporary seismic stations on and around the Mýrdalsjökull glacier in 2011. Another 10 permanent seismic stations are operated by IMO around Katla. The project's data collection is now finished and temporary stations were pulled down in August 2013. According to seismicity maps of the whole recording period, thousands of microearthquakes have occurred within the caldera region. At least three different source areas are active in Katla: the caldera region, the western Godaland region and a small cluster at the southern rim of Mýrdalsjökull near the glacial stream of Hafursarjökull. Seismicity in the southern flank has basically started after June 2011. The caldera events are mainly volcano-tectonic, while western and southern events are mostly long period (lp) and can be related to glacial or magmatic movement. One motivation of the VA Katla project is to better understand the physical mechanism of these lp events. Changes

  18. Partners in International Research and Education: Student Contributions to the Collaborative Investigation of Bezymianny, Shiveluch, and Karymsky Volcanoes, Kamchatka, Russia and Mount St. Helens, WA, USA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipman, J. S.; Kayzar, T. M.; Team, P.

    2008-12-01

    Undergraduate and graduate students as well as senior researchers from the U.S., Russia, and Japan are investigating volcanism as participants of the National Science Foundation initiative Partners in International Research and Education (PIRE). The goal of this study is to use the benefits of global comparisons to increase our understanding of explosive volcanism while at the same time developing international collaboration between scientists in the U.S., Russia, and Japan. International collaboration is established through field work in Kamchatka, Russia investigating the active systems of Bezymianny, Shiveluch, and Karymsky volcanoes with a specific focus on historic collapse-blast type eruptions. The Kamchatka volcanic arc provides unique access to multiple active volcanic systems that can be compared and contrasted to the well-studied behavior at Mount St. Helens, WA., USA. Conversely, Mount St. Helens also provides a field setting for Russian and Japanese students to be incorporated in U.S. research. Student participants employ their respective techniques in geochemistry, geophysics, petrology, and remote sensing to study the eruption response of Bezymianny and Shiveluch volcanoes, which have experienced edifice collapse. During the 2008 field season, the increased activity at Bezymianny volcano shortened a planned field expedition. In order to preserve the integrity of the program and provide a safer environment for researchers, alternative field studies began at Karymsky volcano. In July, an anonymously large eruption at Karymsky volcano permitted the collection of unique real-time data of the eruptive event. Here we present student research from three field seasons in the Kamchatka volcanic arc and associated workshops at Mount St. Helens, WA. Results include estimates of magma storage depth, gas emissions measurements, evidence for dynamic thermal regime changes in fresh volcanic deposits, and data constraining magma inputs and sources at each volcano. By

  19. Monitoring volcanoes using seismic noise correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenguier, Florent; Clarke, Daniel; Aoki, Yosuke; Shapiro, Nikolai M.; Campillo, Michel; Ferrazzini, Valérie

    2011-09-01

    In this article, we summarize some recent results of measurements of temporal changes of active volcanoes using seismic noise cross-correlations. We first present a novel approach to estimate volcano interior temporal seismic velocity changes. The proposed method allows to measure very small velocity changes (≈ 0.1%) with a time resolution as small as one day. The application of that method to Piton de la Fournaise Volcano (La Réunion Island) shows velocity decreases preceding eruptions. Moreover, velocity changes from noise cross-correlations over 10 years allow to detect transient velocity changes that could be due to long-lasting intrusions of magma without eruptive activity or to pressure buildup associated to the replenishing of the magma reservoir. We also present preliminary results of noise cross-correlation waveform perturbation associated with the occurrence of dike injection and volcanic eruption. We show that such an analysis leads us to locate the areas of dike injection and eruptive fissures at Piton de la Fournaise Volcano. These recent results suggest that monitoring volcanoes using seismic noise correlations should improve our ability to forecast eruptions, their intensity and thus potential environmental impact.

  20. Volcanoes and volcanic provinces - Martian western hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The recognition of some Martian landforms as volcanoes is based on their morphology and geologic setting. Other structures, however, may exhibit classic identifying features to a varying or a less degree; these may be only considered provisionally as having a volcanic origin. Regional geologic mapping of the western hemisphere of Mars from Viking images has revealed many more probable volcanoes and volcanotectonic features than were recognized on Mariner 9 pictures. These abundant volcanoes have been assigned to several distinct provinces on the basis of their areal distribution. Although the Olympus-Tharsis region remains as the principle center of volcanism on Mars, four other important provinces are now also recognized: the lowland plains, Tempe Terra plateau, southern highlands (in the Phaethontis and Thaumasia quadrangles), and a probable ignimbrite province, situated along the highland-lowland boundary in Amazonis Planitia. Volcanoes in any one province vary in morphlogy, size, and age, but volcanoes in each province tend to have common characteristics that distinguish that particular group.

  1. Gravity model studies of Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gettings, M.E.; Griscom, A.

    1988-01-01

    Newberry Volcano, a large Quaternary volcano located about 60 km east of the axis of the High Cascades volcanoes in central Oregon, has a coincident positive residual gravity anomaly of about 12 mGals. Model calculations of the gravity anomaly field suggest that the volcano is underlain by an intrusive complex of mafic composition of about 20-km diameter and 2-km thickness, at depths above 4 km below sea level. However, uplifted basement in a northwest trending ridge may form part of the underlying excess mass, thus reducing the volume of the subvolcanic intrusive. A ring dike of mafic composition is inferred to intrude to near-surface levels along the caldera ring fractures, and low-density fill of the caldera floor probably has a thickness of 0.7-0.9 km. The gravity anomaly attributable to the volcano is reduced to the east across a north-northwest trending gravity anomaly gradient through Newberry caldera and suggests that normal, perhaps extensional, faulting has occurred subsequent to caldera formation and may have controlled the location of some late-stage basaltic and rhyolitic eruptions. Significant amounts of felsic intrusive material may exist above the mafic intrusive zone but cannot be resolved by the gravity data. -Authors

  2. Gravity model studies of Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Gettings, M.E.; Griscom, A.

    1988-09-10

    Newberry, Volcano, a large Quaternary volcano located about 60 km east of the axis of the High Cascades volcanoes in central Oregon, has a coincident positive residual gravity anomaly of about 12 mGals. Model calculations of the gravity anomaly field suggest that the volcano is underlain by an intrusive complex of mafic composition of about 20-km diameter and 2-km thickness, at depths above 4 km below sea level. However, uplifted basement in a northwest trending ridge may form part of the underlying excess mass, thus reducing the volume of the subvolcanic intrusive. A ring dike of mafic composition is inferred to intrude to near-surface levels along the caldera ring fractures, and low-density fill of the caldera floor probably has a thickness of 0.7--0.9 km. The gravity anomaly attributable to the volcano is reduced to the east across a north-northwest trending gravity anomaly gradient through Newberry caldera and suggests that normal, perhaps extensional, faulting has occurred subsequent to caldera formation and may have controlled the location of some late-stage basaltic and rhyolitic eruptions. Significant amounts of felsic intrusive material may exist above the mafic intrusive zone but cannot be resolved by the gravity data.

  3. Volcanoes in the Classroom--an Explosive Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Susan A.; Thompson, Keith S.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a unit on volcanoes for third- and fourth-grade students. Includes demonstrations; video presentations; building a volcano model; and inviting a scientist, preferably a vulcanologist, to share his or her expertise with students. (JRH)

  4. Volcanostratigraphic Approach for Evaluation of Geothermal Potential in Galunggung Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadhan, Q. S.; Sianipar, J. Y.; Pratopo, A. K.

    2016-09-01

    he geothermal systems in Indonesia are primarily associated with volcanoes. There are over 100 volcanoes located on Sumatra, Java, and in the eastern part of Indonesia. Volcanostratigraphy is one of the methods that is used in the early stage for the exploration of volcanic geothermal system to identify the characteristics of the volcano. The stratigraphy of Galunggung Volcano is identified based on 1:100.000 scale topographic map of Tasikmalaya sheet, 1:50.000 scale topographic map and also geological map. The schematic flowchart for evaluation of geothermal exploration is used to interpret and evaluate geothermal potential in volcanic regions. Volcanostratigraphy study has been done on Galunggung Volcano and Talaga Bodas Volcano, West Java, Indonesia. Based on the interpretation of topographic map and analysis of the dimension, rock composition, age and stress regime, we conclude that both Galunggung Volcano and Talaga Bodas Volcano have a geothermal resource potential that deserve further investigation.

  5. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture radar studies of Alaska volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Wicks, Charles W.; Dzurisin, Daniel; Power, John A.; Thatcher, Wayne R.; Masterlark, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    In this article, we summarize our recent InSAR studies of 13 Alaska volcanoes, including New Trident, Okmok, Akutan, Kiska, Augustine, Westdahl, Peulik, Makushin, Seguam, Shishaldin, Pavlof, Cleveland, and Korovin volcanoes.

  6. Japan Report, Science and Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Commuter Market (AEROSPACE JAPAN-WEEKLY, 3 Nov 86) MHI Fostering MU-300 Sales to ASDF for FC-X (AEROSPACE JAPAN-WEEKLY, 3 Nov 86) Next Japan Air...Available (AEROSPACE JAPAN-WEEKLY, 10 Nov 86) 22 Briefs GD Implies Twin-Engined F-16 for FS-X 23 ASDF To Modernize C-l Transport 23 SH-60J To Be...the National Land Agency. /13046 CSO: 4307/008 AEROSPACE SCIENCES MHI FOSTERING MU-300 SALES TO ASDF FOR FC-X Tokyo AEROSPACE JAPAN

  7. Full-wave Ambient Noise Tomography of Mt Rainier volcano, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flinders, Ashton; Shen, Yang

    2015-04-01

    Mount Rainier towers over the landscape of western Washington (USA), ranking with Fuji-yama in Japan, Mt Pinatubo in the Philippines, and Mt Vesuvius in Italy, as one of the great stratovolcanoes of the world. Notwithstanding its picturesque stature, Mt Rainier is potentially the most devastating stratovolcano in North America, with more than 3.5 million people living beneath is shadow in the Seattle-Tacoma area. The primary hazard posed by the volcano is in the form of highly destructive debris flows (lahars). These lahars form when water and/or melted ice erode away and entrain preexisting volcanic sediment. At Mt Rainier these flows are often initiated by sector collapse of the volcano's hydrothermally rotten flanks and compounded by Mt Rainier's extensive snow and glacial ice coverage. It is therefore imperative to ascertain the extent of the volcano's summit hydrothermal alteration, and determine areas prone to collapse. Despite being one of the sixteen volcanoes globally designated by the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior as warranting detailed and focused study, Mt Rainier remains enigmatic both in terms of the shallow internal structure and the degree of summit hydrothermal alteration. We image this shallow internal structure and areas of possible summit alteration using ambient noise tomography. Our full waveform forward modeling includes high-resolution topography allowing us to accuratly account for the effects of topography on the propagation of short-period Rayleigh waves. Empirical Green's functions were extracted from 80 stations within 200 km of Mt Rainier, and compared with synthetic greens functions over multiple frequency bands from 2-28 seconds.

  8. Nyiragongo volcano, Congo, Perspective View with Lava SRTM / ASTER / Landsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Nyiragongo volcano in the Congo erupted on January 17, 2002, and subsequently sent streams of lava into the city of Goma on the north shore of Lake Kivu. More than 100 people were killed, more than 12,000 homes were destroyed, and hundreds of thousands were forced to flee the broader community of nearly half a million people. This computer-generated visualization combines a Landsat satellite image and an elevation model from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) to provide a view of both the volcano and the city of Goma, looking slightly east of north. Additionally, image data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite were used to supply a partial map of the recent lava flows (red), including a complete mapping of their intrusion into Goma as of January 28, 2002. Lava is also apparent within the volcanic crater and at a few other locations. Thick (but broken) cloud cover during the ASTER image acquisition prevented a complete mapping of the lava distribution, but future image acquisitions should complete the mapping.

    Nyiragongo is the steep volcano on the right, Lake Kivu is in the foreground, and the city of Goma has a light pink speckled appearance along the shoreline. Nyiragongo peaks at about 3,470 meters (11,380 feet) elevation and reaches almost exactly 2,000 meters (6,560 feet) above Lake Kivu. The shorter but broader Nyamuragira volcano appears in the left background. Topographic expression has been exaggerated vertically by a factor of 1.5 for this visualization.

    Goma, Lake Kivu, Nyiragongo, Nyamuragira and other nearby volcanoes sit within the East African Rift Valley, a zone where tectonic processes are cracking, stretching, and lowering the Earth's crust. Volcanic activity is common here, and older but geologically recent lava flows (magenta in this depiction) are particularly apparent on the flanks of the Nyamuragira volcano.

    The Landsat image used here was acquired

  9. Nyiragongo volcano, Congo, Perspective View with Lava SRTM / ASTER / Landsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Nyiragongo volcano in the Congo erupted on January 17, 2002, and subsequently sent streams of lava into the city of Goma on the north shore of Lake Kivu. More than 100 people were killed, more than 12,000 homes were destroyed, and hundreds of thousands were forced to flee the broader community of nearly half a million people. This computer-generated visualization combines a Landsat satellite image and an elevation model from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) to provide a view of both the volcano and the city of Goma, looking slightly east of north. Additionally, image data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite were used to supply a partial map of the recent lava flows (red), including a complete mapping of their intrusion into Goma as of January 28, 2002. Lava is also apparent within the volcanic crater and at a few other locations. Thick (but broken) cloud cover during the ASTER image acquisition prevented a complete mapping of the lava distribution, but future image acquisitions should complete the mapping.

    Nyiragongo is the steep volcano on the right, Lake Kivu is in the foreground, and the city of Goma has a light pink speckled appearance along the shoreline. Nyiragongo peaks at about 3,470 meters (11,380 feet) elevation and reaches almost exactly 2,000 meters (6,560 feet) above Lake Kivu. The shorter but broader Nyamuragira volcano appears in the left background. Topographic expression has been exaggerated vertically by a factor of 1.5 for this visualization.

    Goma, Lake Kivu, Nyiragongo, Nyamuragira and other nearby volcanoes sit within the East African Rift Valley, a zone where tectonic processes are cracking, stretching, and lowering the Earth's crust. Volcanic activity is common here, and older but geologically recent lava flows (magenta in this depiction) are particularly apparent on the flanks of the Nyamuragira volcano.

    The Landsat image used here was acquired

  10. Water content in arc basaltic magma in the Northeast Japan and Izu arcs: an estimate from Ca/Na partitioning between plagioclase and melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushioda, M.; Takahashi, E.; Hamada, M.; Suzuki, T.

    2015-12-01

    The variation in water content of arc basaltic magmas in the Northeast Japan arc and the Izu arc was estimatedusing a simple plagioclase phenocryst hygrometer. In order to construct a plagioclase phenocryst hygrometeroptimized for arc basalt magmas, we have conducted hydrous melting experiments of relatively primitive basaltfrom the Miyakejima volcano, a frontal-arc volcano in the Izu arc. As a result of the experiments, we found that theCa/Na partition coefficient between plagioclase and hydrous basaltic melt increases linearly with an increase in H2Ocontent in the melts. We then compiled published geochemical data sets of relatively primitive basaltic rocks with no evidence of magma mixing and the most frequent Ca-rich plagioclase phenocrysts from 15 basaltic arc volcanoesincluding both frontal-arc and rear-arc volcanoes. In the 15 volcanoes studied, plagioclase phenocrysts of high anorthitecontent (An > 90) were commonly observed, whereas plagioclase phenocrysts in rear arc volcanoes usually had a loweranorthite content (90 > An > 80). In all volcanoes studied, the estimated H2O content of basaltic magma was at least3 wt.% H2O or higher. The magmas of volcanoes located on the volcanic front have about 5 wt.% H2O in magmawhereas those from the rear-arc side are slightly lower in H2O content.

  11. Mg6.75(OH)3(H0.166AsO4)3(HAsO4), a member of the M 1- xM′6(OH)3(H2x/3AsO4)3(HAsO4) family (M,M′ = Co; Ni)

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    In the structure of the title compound, magnesium hydroxide hydrogenarsenate (6.75/3/4), two different Mg2+ ions, one located on a site with symmetry 3m. (occupancy 3/4) and one on a general position, as well as two different AsO3(OH) tetra­hedra (symmetry .m. with partial occupancy for the H atom for one, and symmetry 3m. with full occupancy for the H atom for the other) and one OH− ion (site symmetry .m.) are present. Both Mg2+ ions are octa­hedrally surrounded by O atoms. The MgO6 octa­hedra belonging to the partially occupied Mg2+ sites share faces, forming chains along [001]. The other type of MgO6 octa­hedra share corners and faces under formation of strands parallel to [001] whereby individual strands are linked through common corner atoms. The two types of AsO3(OH) tetra­hedra inter­link the strands and the chains, building up a three-dimensional framework resembling that of the mineral dumortierite. The OH groups were assigned on basis of bond-valence calculations and crystal chemical considerations. PMID:23723752

  12. Augustine Volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska (January 12, 2006)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Since last spring, the U.S. Geological Survey's Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) has detected increasing volcanic unrest at Augustine Volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska near Anchorage. Based on all available monitoring data, AVO regards that an eruption similar to 1976 and 1986 is the most probable outcome. During January, activity has been episodic, and characterized by emission of steam and ash plumes, rising to altitudes in excess of 9,000 m (30,000 ft), and posing hazards to aircraft in the vicinity. An ASTER image was acquired at 12:42 AST on January 12, 2006, during an eruptive phase of Augustine. The perspective rendition shows the eruption plume derived from the ASTER image data. ASTER's stereo viewing capability was used to calculate the 3-dimensional topography of the eruption cloud as it was blown to the south by prevailing winds. From a maximum height of 3060 m (9950 ft), the plume cooled and its top descended to 1900 m (6175 ft). The perspective view shows the ASTER data draped over the plume top topography, combined with a base image acquired in 2000 by the Landsat satellite, that is itself draped over ground elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The topographic relief has been increased 1.5 times for this illustration. Comparison of the ASTER plume topography data with ash dispersal models and weather radar data will allow the National Weather Service to validate and improve such models. These models are used to forecast volcanic ash plume trajectories and provide hazard alerts and warnings to aircraft in the Alaska region.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous

  13. Landslides induced by heavy rainfall in July 2012 in Northern Kyushu District, Japan and the influence of long term rainfall increase comparing with the slope destabilization due to strong seismic shaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Tetsuya; Shinohara, Yoshinori; Aditian, Aril

    2013-04-01

    soil strength reduction by seismic shaking. The target areas are located in northern Kyushu district, western Japan where they often have severe landslide disasters. The geology in research areas consists of Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks (mainly schist, slate) and Quaternary volcanic sediment such as Aso volcano body. The vegetation consists of mainly Japanese cypress, cedar or bamboo. 3. Result and consideration Consequently, the long term rainfall increase in the region such as increment of approximately 20 mm/hr for rain intensity Ri in 36 years is confirmed statistically using Kendall's rank correlation, and it is found that its impact on slope stability is considerable and critical in other cases. In the sample landslide slopes, even the increase in rain of duration for only 10 years has impact to a certain extent on their stabilities in terms of Fs. The Fs calculated with rains in previous decade is higher than 1.0 that corresponds to stable state, whereas the Fs with present rains is lower than 1.0 such as 0.99 which means unstable state. Extremely heavy rainfall with this impact is generally cause extreme ground water pressure in the slope. It is also obvious that the extreme ground water content rendered even small landslides liquefied to be source of destructive debris flows. In this disaster, especially in the Aso volcanic region, tremendous number of debris flow occurred and even the talus cone slopes which are usually stable collapsed to flow down. However, the influence of the long term rainfall increase on the slopes (such as 1% decrease in Fs) is not relatively small compared with the destabilization of the slopes due to the reduction of soil strength by seismic shaking (8~9 % reduction in Fs after seismic shaking of even 490gal). 4. Conclusion In the disaster in July 2012, many landslides and debris flows originated from landslides induced by concentrated underground water supplied by the heavy rainfall occurred. The increase of rainfall due to climate

  14. Book Review: Dangerous Neighbors: Volcanoes and Cities

    SciTech Connect

    Caporuscio, Florie Andre

    2013-01-01

    Here, Grant Heiken, a world-renowned volcanologist, has written a book based on his long history investigating volcanic hazards that is absolutely riveting. Eight of the ten chapters focus on the interplay between major metropolises and destructive volcanoes. The introductory chapter sets the stage for the remainder of the book. This chapter touches on various types of volcanic events; from Nyiragongo lava flows that disrupted the city of Goma, DRC, to debris flows from Nevado del Ruiz that killed 23,000 residents in Armero, Columbia, to the Eyjafjallajokull volcano in Iceland which spewed an ash column into the jet stream and disrupted air travel to 32 European countries for 6 days. Other issues weaved into the introduction are the social and political fallout when a predicted eruption does not occur (Soufriere de Guadeloupe), how hazard evaluation processes change, and why do major populations reside near high risk volcanoes.

  15. Kilauea volcano eruption seen from orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The STS-51 crew had a clear view of the erupting Kilauea volcano during the early morning pass over the Hawaiian islands. Kilauea, on the southwest side of the island of Hawaii, has been erupting almost continuously since January, 1983. Kilauea's summit caldera, with the smaller Halemaumau crater nestled within, is highlighted in the early morning sun (just above the center of the picture). The lava flows which covered roads and subdivisions in 1983-90 can be seen as dark flows to the east (toward the upper right) of the steam plumes on this photo. The summit crater and lava flows of Mauna Loa volcano make up the left side of the photo. Features like the Volcano House and Kilauea Visitor Center on the edge of the caldera, the small subdivisions east of the summit, Ola's Rain Forest north of the summit, and agricultural land along the coast are easily identified.

  16. Book Review: Dangerous Neighbors: Volcanoes and Cities

    DOE PAGES

    Caporuscio, Florie Andre

    2013-01-01

    Here, Grant Heiken, a world-renowned volcanologist, has written a book based on his long history investigating volcanic hazards that is absolutely riveting. Eight of the ten chapters focus on the interplay between major metropolises and destructive volcanoes. The introductory chapter sets the stage for the remainder of the book. This chapter touches on various types of volcanic events; from Nyiragongo lava flows that disrupted the city of Goma, DRC, to debris flows from Nevado del Ruiz that killed 23,000 residents in Armero, Columbia, to the Eyjafjallajokull volcano in Iceland which spewed an ash column into the jet stream and disruptedmore » air travel to 32 European countries for 6 days. Other issues weaved into the introduction are the social and political fallout when a predicted eruption does not occur (Soufriere de Guadeloupe), how hazard evaluation processes change, and why do major populations reside near high risk volcanoes.« less

  17. Renewed unrest at Mount Spurr Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Power, John A.

    2004-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO),a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has detected unrest at Mount Spurr volcano, located about 125 km west of Anchorage, Alaska, at the northeast end of the Aleutian volcanic arc.This activity consists of increased seismicity melting of the summit ice cap, and substantial rates of C02 and H2S emission.The current unrest is centered beneath the volcano's 3374-m-high summit, whose last known eruption was 5000–6000 years ago. Since then, Crater Peak, 2309 m in elevation and 4 km to the south, has been the active vent. Recent eruptions occurred in 1953 and 1992.

  18. How Do Volcanoes Affect Human Life? Integrated Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dayton, Rebecca; Edwards, Carrie; Sisler, Michelle

    This packet contains a unit on teaching about volcanoes. The following question is addressed: How do volcanoes affect human life? The unit covers approximately three weeks of instruction and strives to present volcanoes in an holistic form. The five subject areas of art, language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies are integrated into…

  19. Mount st. Helens volcano: recent and future behavior.

    PubMed

    Crandell, D R; Mullineaux, D R; Rubin, M

    1975-02-07

    Mount St. Helens volcano in southern Washington has erupted many times during the last 4000 years, usually after brief dormant periods. This behavior pattern. suggests that the volcano, last active in 1857, will erupt again-perhaps within the next few decades. Potential volcanic hazards of several kinds should be considered in planning for land use near the volcano.

  20. Living with Volcanoes: Year Eleven Teaching Resource Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Heron, Kiri; Andrews, Jill; Hooks, Stacey; Larnder, Michele; Le Heron, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Presents a unit on volcanoes and experiences with volcanoes that helps students develop geography skills. Focuses on four volcanoes: (1) Rangitoto Island; (2) Lake Pupuke; (3) Mount Smart; and (4) One Tree Hill. Includes an answer sheet and resources to use with the unit. (CMK)

  1. Predicting the Timing and Location of the next Hawaiian Volcano

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Joseph; Mattox, Stephen; Kildau, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    The wealth of geologic data on Hawaiian volcanoes makes them ideal for study by middle school students. In this paper the authors use existing data on the age and location of Hawaiian volcanoes to predict the location of the next Hawaiian volcano and when it will begin to grow on the floor of the Pacific Ocean. An inquiry-based lesson is also…

  2. Enhancement of primary productivity in the western North Pacific caused by the eruption of the Miyake-jima Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uematsu, Mitsuo; Toratani, Mitsuhiro; Kajino, Mizuo; Narita, Yasushi; Senga, Yasuhiro; Kimoto, Takashi

    2004-03-01

    The eruption of the Miyake-jima Volcano (34.08°N, 139.53°E) in the Izu Islands, Japan, 180 km SSW of Tokyo, began on 8 July 2000. A substantial amount of NH3 gas was found to be emitted from the Miyake-jima Volcano together with SO2 gas and that geochemically significant quantities of aerosol particles composed of ammonium sulfate form in the plume. Through the use of satellite images, the additional atmospheric deposition of ammonium sulfate caused an increase of phyto-plankton in the nutrient-deficient region south of the Kuroshio. The emission of volcanic gases from the Miyake-jima has likely been modifying the marine air quality as well as the open ocean ecosystem over parts of the western North Pacific for the past several years.

  3. Seismicity of the Earth 1900-2007, Japan and Vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhea, Susan; Tarr, Arthur C.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Villaseñor, Antonio; Benz, Harley

    2010-01-01

    This map shows details of Japan and vicinity not visible in an earlier publication, U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Map 3064. Japan and its island possessions lie across four major tectonic plates: Pacific plate, North America plate; Eurasia plate; and Philippine Sea plate. The Pacific plate is subducted into the mantle, beneath Hokkaido and northern Honshu, along the eastern margin of the Okhotsk microplate, a proposed subdivision of the North America plate (Bird, 2003). Farther south, the pacific plate is subducted beneath volcanic islands along the eastern margin of the Philippine Sea plate. This 2,200 km-long zone of subduction of the Pacific plate is responsible for the creation of the deep offshore Ogasawara and Japan trenches as well as parallel chains of islands and volcanoes, typical of the Circumpacific island arcs. Similarly, the Philippine Sea plate is itself subducting under the Eurasia plate along a zone, extending from Taiwan to southern Honshu, that comprises the Ryuku Islands and the Nansei-Shonto trench.

  4. GlobVolcano: Earth Observation Services for global monitoring of active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tampellini, L.; Ratti, R.; Borgström, S.; Seifert, F. M.; Solaro, G.

    2009-04-01

    The GlobVolcano project is part of the Data User Element (DUE) programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). The objective of the project is to demonstrate EO-based (Earth Observation) services able to support the Volcanological Observatories and other mandate users (Civil Protection, scientific communities of volcanoes) in their monitoring activities. The information service is assessed in close cooperation with the user organizations for different types of active volcano, from various geographical areas in various climatic zones. Users are directly and actively involved in the validation of the Earth Observation products, by comparing them with ground data available at each site. The following EO-based information services have been defined, harmonising the user requirements provided by a worldwide selection of user organizations. - Deformation Mapping - Surface Thermal Anomalies - Volcanic Gas Emission (SO2) - Volcanic Ash Tracking During the first phase of the project (completed in June 2008) a pre-operational information system has been designed, implemented and validated, involving a limited number of test areas and respective user organizations (i.e. Piton de la Fournaise in La Reunion Island, Karthala in Comore Islands, Stromboli, Volcano and Etna in Italy, Soufrière Hills in Montserrat Island, Colima in Mexico, Merapi in Indonesia). The second phase of the project (currently on-going) concerns the service provision on pre-operational basis. Fifteen volcanic sites located in four continents are regularly monitored and as many user organizations are involved and cooperating with the project team. Based on user requirements, the GlobVolcano Information System has been developed following system engineering rules and criteria, besides most recent interoperability standards for geospatial data. The GlobVolcano Information System includes two main elements: 1. The GlobVolcano Data Processing System, which consists of seven of EO data processing subsystems

  5. Applications of geophysical methods to volcano monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, Jeff; Dzurisin, Daniel; Finn, Carol A.; Kauahikaua, James P.; Lahusen, Richard G.

    2006-01-01

    The array of geophysical technologies used in volcano hazards studies - some developed originally only for volcano monitoring - ranges from satellite remote sensing including InSAR to leveling and EDM surveys, campaign and telemetered GPS networks, electronic tiltmeters and strainmeters, airborne magnetic and electromagnetic surveys, short-period and broadband seismic monitoring, even microphones tuned for infrasound. They include virtually every method used in resource exploration except large-scale seismic reflection. By “geophysical ” we include both active and passive methods as well as geodetic technologies. Volcano monitoring incorporates telemetry to handle high-bandwith cameras and broadband seismometers. Critical geophysical targets include the flux of magma in shallow reservoir and lava-tube systems, changes in active hydrothermal systems, volcanic edifice stability, and lahars. Since the eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington State in 1980, and the eruption at Pu’u O’o in Hawai’i beginning in 1983 and still continuing, dramatic advances have occurred in monitoring technology such as “crisis GIS” and lahar modeling, InSAR interferograms, as well as gas emission geochemistry sampling, and hazards mapping and eruption predictions. The on-going eruption of Mount St. Helens has led to new monitoring technologies, including advances in broadband Wi-Fi and satellite telemetry as well as new instrumentation. Assessment of the gap between adequate monitoring and threat at the 169 potentially dangerous Holocene volcanoes shows where populations are dangerously exposed to volcanic catastrophes in the United States and its territories . This paper focuses primarily on Hawai’ian volcanoes and the northern Pacific and Cascades volcanoes. The US Geological Survey, the US National Park System, and the University of Utah cooperate in a program to monitor the huge Yellowstone volcanic system, and a separate observatory monitors the restive Long Valley

  6. Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of Adakitic magma from the Wakurayama Dacite in San-in district, SW Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, D.; Shibata, T.; Matsumoto, I.

    2011-12-01

    The Wakuraya Dacite, San-in district, SW Japan was described as Adakite (Defant and Drummond, 1990, Nature) by Sato et al. (2011, JGS). Adakitic rocks are characterized by higher Al2O3 and Sr, and lower MgO, K2O, Y and Yb. Many Quaternary silicate volcanoes in Southwest Japan are considered to be adakitic magmas that have been generated by partial melting of the subducted Philippine Sea plate (e.g. the Daisen volcano; Morris, 1995, Geology). The Wakurayama Dacite is distributed within a 5 km radius in Shimane prefecture, Southwest Japan. The Wakurayama Dacite was erupted in the Late Miocene to Pliocene (ca. 5 Ma; Morris et al., 1990, JSAES), the activity in advance of the Daisen volcano. We present major and trace elements and isotopic compositions (Sr, Nd and Pb) to discuss the origin of the end-members that are related to magma genesis of the Wakurayama Dacite. The chemical characteristics of these rocks, which have higher Al2O3 (17.6-19.7 wt.%) and Sr (552-799 ppm), and lower MgO (0.28-2.14 wt.%), K2O (1.26-1.48 wt.%), Y (5-15 ppm) and Yb (0.4-0.7 ppm) contents, are similar to typical adakite. The isotopic compositions of the Wakurayama Dacite show similar to those of the Daisen volcano (Tamura et al., 2003, J. Petrol.). According to Defant and Drummond (1990), adakites are characterized by similar low 87Sr/86Sr ratios (usually < 0.7040) to those of MORB, but the Wakurayama Dacite and the Daisen volcano have higher 87Sr/86Sr ratio (ca. 0.7046 to 0.7052). Kimura et al. (2005) proposed that the origin of Daisen adakitic magmas have been primarily created by mixing between subducted oceanic crust and its associated sediments from the Philippine Sea plate. The isotopic compositions (Sr, Nd and Pb) of the Wakurayama Dacite are shown the two component-mixing curve between oceanic crust (Shikoku basin basalt; Hicky-Vargas, 1991, EPSL) and sediments (the Nankai Trough terrigenous sediments; Shimoda et al., 1998, EPSL). Above results suggest that the partial melting of

  7. In Brief: Russian volcano warnings reinstated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2007-04-01

    The Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) is again issuing warnings for aviation during periods of activity by Kamchatkan volcanoes. KVERT had stopped issuing warnings on 1 March due to a loss of funding by the Federal Unitary Enterprise State Air Traffic Management Corporation of Russia (see Eos 88(12), 2007). The funding for this work has now resumed. KVERT is a collaborative project of scientists from the Russian Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, the Kamchatka Experimental and Methodical Seismological Department, and the Alaska Volcano Observatory.

  8. In search of ancestral Kilauea volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Sisson, T.W.; Ui, T.; Naka, J.

    2000-01-01

    Submersible observations and samples show that the lower south flank of Hawaii, offshore from Kilauea volcano and the active Hilina slump system, consists entirely of compositionally diverse volcaniclastic rocks; pillow lavas are confined to shallow slopes. Submarine-erupted basalt clasts have strongly variable alkalic and transitional basalt compositions (to 41% SiO2, 10.8% alkalies), contrasting with present-day Kilauea tholeiites. The volcaniclastic rocks provide a unique record of ancestral alkalic growth of an archetypal hotspot volcano, including transition to its tholeiitic shield stage, and associated slope-failure events.

  9. The origin of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorak, John

    2011-05-15

    I first stepped through the doorway of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in 1976, and I was impressed by what I saw: A dozen people working out of a stone-and-metal building perched at the edge of a high cliff with a spectacular view of a vast volcanic plain. Their primary purpose was to monitor the island's two active volcanoes, Kilauea and Mauna Loa. I joined them, working for six weeks as a volunteer and then, years later, as a staff scientist. That gave me several chances to ask how the observatory had started.

  10. Venus small volcano classification and description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubele, J. C.

    1993-03-01

    The high resolution and global coverage of the Magellan radar image data set allows detailed study of the smallest volcanoes on the planet. A modified classification scheme for volcanoes less than 20 km in diameter is shown and described. It is based on observations of all members of the 556 significant clusters or fields of small volcanoes located and described by this author during data collection for the Magellan Volcanic and Magmatic Feature Catalog. This global study of approximately 10 exp 4 volcanoes provides new information for refining small volcano classification based on individual characteristics. Total number of these volcanoes was estimated to be 10 exp 5 to 10 exp 6 planetwide based on pre-Magellan analysis of Venera 15/16, and during preparation of the global catalog, small volcanoes were identified individually or in clusters in every C1-MIDR mosaic of the Magellan data set. Basal diameter (based on 1000 measured edifices) generally ranges from 2 to 12 km with a mode of 34 km, and follows an exponential distribution similar to the size frequency distribution of seamounts as measured from GLORIA sonar images. This is a typical distribution for most size-limited natural phenomena unlike impact craters which follow a power law distribution and continue to infinitely increase in number with decreasing size. Using an exponential distribution calculated from measured small volcanoes selected globally at random, we can calculate total number possible given a minimum size. The paucity of edifice diameters less than 2 km may be due to inability to identify very small volcanic edifices in this data set; however, summit pits are recognizable at smaller diameters, and 2 km may represent a significant minimum diameter related to style of volcanic eruption. Guest, et al, discussed four general types of small volcanic edifices on Venus: (1) small lava shields; (2) small volcanic cones; (3) small volcanic domes; and (4) scalloped margin domes ('ticks'). Steep

  11. Mantle fault zone beneath Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Cecily J; Okubo, Paul G; Shearer, Peter M

    2003-04-18

    Relocations and focal mechanism analyses of deep earthquakes (>/=13 kilometers) at Kilauea volcano demonstrate that seismicity is focused on an active fault zone at 30-kilometer depth, with seaward slip on a low-angle plane, and other smaller, distinct fault zones. The earthquakes we have analyzed predominantly reflect tectonic faulting in the brittle lithosphere rather than magma movement associated with volcanic activity. The tectonic earthquakes may be induced on preexisting faults by stresses of magmatic origin, although background stresses from volcano loading and lithospheric flexure may also contribute.

  12. Seismic Structure Beneath Taal Volcano, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, S. H.; Gung, Y.; Konstantinou, K. I.; Lin, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The very active Taal Volcano is situated 60 km south of Metro Manila in the southern part of Luzon Island. Based on its frequent explosive eruptions and high potential hazards to nearby population of several million, Taal Volcano is chosen as one of the 15 most dangerous "Decade Volcanoes" in the world. We deployed a temporary seismic network consisting of 8 stations since March 2008. The temporal network was operated from late March 2008 to mid March 2010 and recorded over 2270 local earthquakes. In the early data processing stages, unexpected linear drifting of clock time was clearly identified from ambient noise cross-correlation functions for a number of stations. The drifting rates of all problematic stations were determined as references to correct timing errors prior to further processing. Initial locations of earthquakes were determined from manually picking P- and S-phases arrivals with a general velocity model based on AK135. We used travel times of 305 well-located local events to derive a minimum 1-D model using VELEST. Two major earthquake groups were noticed from refined locations. One was underneath the western shore of Taal Lake with a linear feature, and the other spread at shallower depths showing a less compact feature around the eastern flank of Taal Volcano Island. We performed seismic tomography to image the 3D structure beneath Taal Volcano using a well-established algorithm, LOTOS. Some interesting features are noted in the tomographic results, such as a probable solidified past magma conduit below the northwestern corner of Taal Volcano Island, characterized by high Vp, Vs, and low Vp/Vs ratio, and a potential large hydrothermal reservoir beneath the central of Taal Volcano Island, characterized by low Vs and high Vp/Vs ratio. Combining the results of seismicity and tomographic images, we also suggest the potential existence of a magma chamber beneath the southwestern Taal Lake, and a magma conduit or fault extending from there to the

  13. Venus small volcano classification and description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubele, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    The high resolution and global coverage of the Magellan radar image data set allows detailed study of the smallest volcanoes on the planet. A modified classification scheme for volcanoes less than 20 km in diameter is shown and described. It is based on observations of all members of the 556 significant clusters or fields of small volcanoes located and described by this author during data collection for the Magellan Volcanic and Magmatic Feature Catalog. This global study of approximately 10 exp 4 volcanoes provides new information for refining small volcano classification based on individual characteristics. Total number of these volcanoes was estimated to be 10 exp 5 to 10 exp 6 planetwide based on pre-Magellan analysis of Venera 15/16, and during preparation of the global catalog, small volcanoes were identified individually or in clusters in every C1-MIDR mosaic of the Magellan data set. Basal diameter (based on 1000 measured edifices) generally ranges from 2 to 12 km with a mode of 34 km, and follows an exponential distribution similar to the size frequency distribution of seamounts as measured from GLORIA sonar images. This is a typical distribution for most size-limited natural phenomena unlike impact craters which follow a power law distribution and continue to infinitely increase in number with decreasing size. Using an exponential distribution calculated from measured small volcanoes selected globally at random, we can calculate total number possible given a minimum size. The paucity of edifice diameters less than 2 km may be due to inability to identify very small volcanic edifices in this data set; however, summit pits are recognizable at smaller diameters, and 2 km may represent a significant minimum diameter related to style of volcanic eruption. Guest, et al, discussed four general types of small volcanic edifices on Venus: (1) small lava shields; (2) small volcanic cones; (3) small volcanic domes; and (4) scalloped margin domes ('ticks'). Steep

  14. Monitoring Anak Krakatau Volcano in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann-Rothe, Arne; Ibs-von Seht, Malte; Knieβ, Rudolf; Faber, Eckhard; Klinge, Klaus; Reichert, Christian; Atje Purbawinata, Mas; Patria, Cahya

    2006-12-01

    Krakatau volcano, in Indonesia, showed its destructive vigor when it exploded in 1883 [Self and Rampino, 1981]. The eruption and subsequent tsunami caused more than 35,000 casualties along the coasts of the Sunda Strait. In 1928, the `child' of Krakatau, Anak Krakatau, emerged from the sea at the same location as its predecessor and has since grown to a height of 315 meters. The volcano exhibits frequent activity-on average one large eruption every four years-yet again posing risk for the coastal population of Java and Sumatra and for the economically important shipping routes through the Sunda Strait.

  15. Temporal Changes of Seismic Structure Around Iwate Volcano as Inferred From Waveform Correlation Analysis of Multiplet Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, T.; Nishimura, T.; Hamaguchi, H.

    2004-12-01

    Temporal change of crustal structure around Iwate volcano, northeastern Japan, for the period from 1995 to 2002 is investigated by examining waveform similarity in P- and S-waves of multiplet earthquakes occurring at the subducting Pacific Plate boundary. We analyze seventy-three groups of multiplets consisting of 2 to 20 events whose epicentral distances range from 80 to 260 km and magnitudes from 2.1 to 4.5. These multiplets are recorded at 30 stations within approximately 80 km from the summit of Iwate volcano. We calculate cross-correlation coefficients of P- and S-waves for each pair of multiplets belonging to the same group. Totally, 1142 pairs are analyzed. We first band-pass filter each waveform from 4 to 8 Hz and align them at P-wave onset. The cross-correlation coefficients of P- and S-waves are calculated for 5-second time window starting at onset time of each phase. The spatial distribution of the coefficient is examined by averaging the cross-correlation coefficients at each station. At most stations far from Iwate volcano, the averaged coefficients of S-waves are estimated to be from 0.95 to 0.97. On the other hand, two stations, IKG and GNB, located close to the west of the volcano show smaller average of 0.85 and 0.91, respectively. These stations are located close to active volcanic pressure sources detected by geodetic measurements. We further examine temporal changes in S-wave by aligning the cross-correlation coefficients for multiplet pairs with an occurrence interval of 6 to 18 months. The results show that no significant temporal change is observed at most of stations located far from the volcano. However, it is found that the coefficients at IKG and GNB remarkably decreased from 1998 during which significant volcanic activity was observed and an M6.1 earthquake took place at the southwest of the volcano. As the volcanic activity slowly subsided from 2000, the coefficients gradually become large. These changes are well correlated in time with

  16. DPAL activities in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masamori; Wani, Fumio

    2015-02-01

    Activities on diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL) in Japan is reviewed. We have started alkali laser works in 2011, and currently, we are the only players in Japan. Our interests are application oriented, and it is not only defense but also industrial. DPAL is a good candidate as a source of remote laser machining, thanks to its scalability and extremely good beam quality. We are studying on scientific and engineering problems of Cs DPAL with a small-scale apparatus. A commercial diode laser with volume Bragg grating outcoupler is used to pump the gain cell longitudinally. A 6.5 W continuous-wave output with optical to optical efficiency of 56% (based on the absorbed power) has been achieved. Numerical simulation codes are developed to understand the physics of DPAL and to help future developments.

  17. Water reuse in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ogoshi, M; Suzuki, Y; Asano, T

    2001-01-01

    Even though Japan has mean annual precipitation of 1,714 mm and hundreds of dams and reservoirs constructed, frequent and severe droughts have occurred in wide regions of the country. Because of rapid economic growth and concentrations of population in urban areas, water demands in large cities have stressed reliability of water supply systems and necessitated the development of new water resources with considerable economic and environmental costs. To alleviate these situations, wastewater reclamation and reuse have been implemented widely in major cities. This paper summarizes the current status of water reuse in Japan and discusses dominant uses of reclaimed water, emphasizing non-potable urban applications such as toilet flushing, industrial reuse, and environmental water.

  18. Scientific ballooning in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Fumiyoshi

    Activities in scientific ballooning in Japan during 1998-1999 are reported. The total number of scientific balloons flown in Japan in 1998 and 1999 was sixteen, eight flights in each year. The scientific objectives were observations of high energy cosmic electrons, air samplings at various altitudes, monitoring of atmospheric ozone density, Galactic infrared observations, and test flights of new type balloons. Balloon expeditions were conducted in Antarctica by the National Institute of Polar Research, in Russia, in Canada and in India in collaboration with foreign countries' institutes to investigate cosmic rays, Galactic infrared radiation, and Earth's atmosphere. There were three flights in Antarctica, four flights in Russia, three flights in Canada and two flights in India. Four test balloons were flown for balloon technology, which included pumpkin-type super-pressure balloon and a balloon made with ultra-thin polyethylene film of 3.4 μm thickness.

  19. The New USGS Volcano Hazards Program Web Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venezky, D. Y.; Graham, S. E.; Parker, T. J.; Snedigar, S. F.

    2008-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Volcano Hazard Program (VHP) has launched a revised web site that uses a map-based interface to display hazards information for U.S. volcanoes. The web site is focused on better communication of hazards and background volcano information to our varied user groups by reorganizing content based on user needs and improving data display. The Home Page provides a synoptic view of the activity level of all volcanoes for which updates are written using a custom Google® Map. Updates are accessible by clicking on one of the map icons or clicking on the volcano of interest in the adjacent color-coded list of updates. The new navigation provides rapid access to volcanic activity information, background volcano information, images and publications, volcanic hazards, information about VHP, and the USGS volcano observatories. The Volcanic Activity section was tailored for emergency managers but provides information for all our user groups. It includes a Google® Map of the volcanoes we monitor, an Elevated Activity Page, a general status page, information about our Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes, monitoring information, and links to monitoring data from VHP's volcano observatories: Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO), Long Valley Observatory (LVO), Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), and Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO). The YVO web site was the first to move to the new navigation system and we are working on integrating the Long Valley Observatory web site next. We are excited to continue to implement new geospatial technologies to better display our hazards and supporting volcano information.

  20. Japan Report, No. 184.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-10

    Iraw war escalated further. Speaking at a press conference, Tokio Nagayama, president of Petroleum As- sociation of Japan and also president of...figures were 41.0 percent and 31.8 percent respectively. This tendency is stronger among blue -collar 31 workers than white-collar workers. It would...respectively.) Furthermore, in a great majority of the workshop groups, whether it be blue collar or white collar jobs, a large number of

  1. Volcano shapes, entropies, and eruption probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, Agust; Mohajeri, Nahid

    2014-05-01

    We propose that the shapes of polygenetic volcanic edifices reflect the shapes of the associated probability distributions of eruptions. In this view, the peak of a given volcanic edifice coincides roughly with the peak of the probability (or frequency) distribution of its eruptions. The broadness and slopes of the edifices vary widely, however. The shapes of volcanic edifices can be approximated by various distributions, either discrete (binning or histogram approximation) or continuous. For a volcano shape (profile) approximated by a normal curve, for example, the broadness would be reflected in its standard deviation (spread). Entropy (S) of a discrete probability distribution is a measure of the absolute uncertainty as to the next outcome/message: in this case, the uncertainty as to time and place of the next eruption. A uniform discrete distribution (all bins of equal height), representing a flat volcanic field or zone, has the largest entropy or uncertainty. For continuous distributions, we use differential entropy, which is a measure of relative uncertainty, or uncertainty change, rather than absolute uncertainty. Volcano shapes can be approximated by various distributions, from which the entropies and thus the uncertainties as regards future eruptions can be calculated. We use the Gibbs-Shannon formula for the discrete entropies and the analogues general formula for the differential entropies and compare their usefulness for assessing the probabilities of eruptions in volcanoes. We relate the entropies to the work done by the volcano during an eruption using the Helmholtz free energy. Many factors other than the frequency of eruptions determine the shape of a volcano. These include erosion, landslides, and the properties of the erupted materials (including their angle of repose). The exact functional relation between the volcano shape and the eruption probability distribution must be explored for individual volcanoes but, once established, can be used to

  2. The Submarine Flanks of Anatahan Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, W. W.; Embley, R. W.; Johnson, P. D.; Merle, S. G.; Ristau, S.

    2003-12-01

    The submarine flanks of Anatahan volcano were surveyed with EM300 multibeam sonar and the MR1 sidescan sonar from the R/V Thomas G. Thompson in February 2003. This was part of a larger survey of over 50 submarine volcanoes within the Marianas volcanic arc between 13° 10'N and 23° 10'N (see Embley et al. and Baker et al. abstracts, this meeting). This work was part of a multi-year study of seafloor volcanism in diverse tectonic settings, funded by NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration. (see: http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/explorations/03fire/). The island of Anatahan has a maximum elevation of 798 m, but its submarine flanks descend to depths of 2000-2600 m, so most of the volcano lies below sea level. The submarine part of the volcano is elongated in the east-west direction, like the island. Conspicuous in the bathymetry are numerous small parasitic cones and hummocky ridges on the southwest and east submarine flanks of the island that radiate outward (downslope) from the island. These features appear as areas of high reflectivity in the MR1 sidescan sonar and some have distinctly lobate outlines, suggesting that they are areas of relatively young lava flows. Some of these lava flows extend up to 15 km from the coastline of the island and to depths below 2000 m. The upslope sources of these lavas are often ambiguous, but we interpret that they were erupted underwater (as opposed to erupted on land and then flowing into the ocean) because they are associated with cones and ridges that may be vent areas. The other flanks of the island appear to be draped in volcaniclastic material that has been transported downslope from the shoreline, in some cases as distinct flows that radiate outward in braided channels that have slightly higher reflectivity than surrounding areas in the sidescan imagery. These fragmental flows also extend to depths below 2000 m, especially on the west and south flanks of the island. The most prominent feature in the bathymetry around Anatahan is a

  3. Terrorism in Japan.

    PubMed

    Asai, Yasufumi; Arnold, Jeffrey L

    2003-01-01

    Although the 1995 Tokyo subway sarin attack probably was the most widely reported terrorist event in Japan to date (5,500 injured, 12 dead), the country has suffered numerous other large terrorism-related events in recent decades, including bombings of the headquarters of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries in Tokyo in 1974 (207 injured, 8 dead), the Hokkaido Prefectural Government office building in Sapporo in 1976 (80 injured, 2 dead), and the Yosakoi-Soran Festival in Sapporo in 2000 (10 injured, none dead). Japan also has experienced two other mass-casualty terrorist events involving chemical releases, including the 1994 Matsumoto sarin attack (600 injured, 7 dead) and the 1998 Wakayama arsenic incident (67 injured, 4 dead). Until 1995, emergency management in Japan focused on planning and preparedness at the local level for the frequent disasters caused by natural events. Since that time, substantial progress has been made in advancing emergency planning and preparedness for terrorism-related events, including the designation of disaster centers in each prefecture, the implementation of several education and training programs for nuclear, biological, and chemical terrorism, and the establishment of a national Anti terrorism Office within the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare.

  4. Special issue: The changing shapes of active volcanoes: Recent results and advances in volcano geodesy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.; Newman, Andrew V.

    2006-01-01

    The 18 papers herein report on new geodetic data that offer valuable insights into eruptive activity and magma transport; they present new models and modeling strategies that have the potential to greatly increase understanding of magmatic, hydrothermal, and volcano-tectonic processes; and they describe innovative techniques for collecting geodetic measurements from remote, poorly accessible, or hazardous volcanoes. To provide a proper context for these studies, we offer a short review of the evolution of volcano geodesy, as well as a case study that highlights recent advances in the field by comparing the geodetic response to recent eruptive episodes at Mount St. Helens. Finally, we point out a few areas that continue to challenge the volcano geodesy community, some of which are addressed by the papers that follow and which undoubtedly will be the focus of future research for years to come.

  5. Mobile Response Team Saves Lives in Volcano Crises

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ewert, John W.; Miller, C. Dan; Hendley, James W.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    1997-01-01

    The world's only volcano crisis response team, organized and operated by the USGS, can be quickly mobilized to assess and monitor hazards at volcanoes threatening to erupt. Since 1986, the team has responded to more than a dozen volcano crises as part of the Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP), a cooperative effort with the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance of the U.S. Agency for International Development. The work of USGS scientists with VDAP has helped save countless lives, and the valuable lessons learned are being used to reduce risks from volcano hazards in the United States.

  6. Hilarionite, Fe{2/3+}(SO4)(AsO4)(OH) · 6H2O, a new supergene mineral from Lavrion, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekov, I. V.; Chukanov, N. V.; Yapaskurt, V. O.; Rusakov, V. S.; Belakovsky, D. I.; Turchkova, A. G.; Voudouris, P.; Magganas, A.; Katerinopoulos, A.

    2014-12-01

    A new mineral, hilarionite, ideally Fe{2/3+} (SO4)(AsO4)(OH) · 6H2O, has been found in the Hilarion Mine, Agios Konstantinos, Kamariza, Lavrion district, Attiki Prefecture, Greece. It was formed in the oxidation zone of a sulfide-rich orebody in association with goethite, gypsum, bukovskyite, jarosite, melanterite, chalcanthite, allophane, and azurite. Hilarionite occurs as light green (typically with an olive or grayish tint) to light yellowish green spherulites (up to 1 mm in size) and bunches of prismatic to acicular "individuals" up to 0.5 mm long that are in fact near-parallel or divergent aggregates of very thin, curved fibers up to 0.3 mm long and usually lesser than 2 μm thick. The luster is silky to vitreous. The Mohs' hardness is ca. 2. Hilarionite is ductile, its "individuals" are flexible and inelastic; fracture is uneven or splintery. D(meas) = 2.40(5), D(calc) = 2.486 g/cm3. IR spectrum shows the presence of arsenate and sulfate groups and H2O molecules in significant amounts. The Mössbauer spectrum indicates the presence of Fe3+ at two six-fold coordinated sites and the absence of Fe2+. Hilarionite is optically biaxial (+), α = 1.575(2), γ = 1.64(2), 2 V is large. The chemical composition (electron microprobe, average of 7 point analyses; H2O determined by modified Penfield method) is as follows, wt %: 0.03 MnO, 0.18 CuO, 0.17 ZnO, 33.83 Fe2O3, 0.22 P2O5, 18.92 As2O5, 22.19 SO3, 26.3 H2O, total is 101.82%. The empirical formula calculated on the basis of 15 O is: (Fe{1.90/3+}Cu0.01Zn0.01)Σ1.92[(SO4)1.24(AsO4)0.74(PO4)0.01]Σ1.99(OH)1.01 · 6.03H2O. The X-ray powder diffraction data show close structural relationship of hilarionite and kaňkite, Fe{2/3+}(AsO4)2 · 7H2O. Hilarionite is monoclinic, space group C2/ m, Cm or C2, a = 18.53(4), b = 17.43(3), c = 7.56(1) Å, β = 94.06(15)°, V = 2436(3) Å3, Z = 8. The strongest reflections in the X-ray powder diffraction pattern ( d, Å- I[ hkl]) are: 12.66-100[110], , 5.00-10[22l], , 4

  7. The changing shapes of active volcanoes: History, evolution, and future challenges for volcano geodesy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.; Hamburger, Michael W.; Newman, Andrew V.

    2006-01-01

    At the very heart of volcanology lies the search for the 'plumbing systems' that form the inner workings of Earth’s active volcanoes. By their very nature, however, the magmatic reservoirs and conduits that underlie these active volcanic systems are elusive; mostly they are observable only through circumstantial evidence, using indirect, and often ambiguous, surficial measurements. Of course, we can infer much about these systems from geologic investigation of materials brought to the surface by eruptions and of the exposed roots of ancient volcanoes. But how can we study the magmatic processes that are occurring beneath Earth’s active volcanoes? What are the geometry, scale, physical, and chemical characteristics of magma reservoirs? Can we infer the dynamics of magma transport? Can we use this information to better forecast the future behavior of volcanoes? These questions comprise some of the most fundamental, recurring themes of modern research in volcanology. The field of volcano geodesy is uniquely situated to provide critical observational constraints on these problems. For the past decade, armed with a new array of technological innovations, equipped with powerful computers, and prepared with new analytical tools, volcano geodesists have been poised to make significant advances in our fundamental understanding of the behavior of active volcanic systems. The purpose of this volume is to highlight some of these recent advances, particularly in the collection and interpretation of geodetic data from actively deforming volcanoes. The 18 papers that follow report on new geodetic data that offer valuable insights into eruptive activity and magma transport; they present new models and modeling strategies that have the potential to greatly increase understanding of magmatic, hydrothermal, and volcano-tectonic processes; and they describe innovative techniques for collecting geodetic measurements from remote, poorly accessible, or hazardous volcanoes. To provide

  8. Digital data set of volcano hazards for active Cascade Volcanos, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, Steve P.

    1996-01-01

    Scientists at the Cascade Volcano Observatory have completed hazard assessments for the five active volcanos in Washington. The five studies included Mount Adams (Scott and others, 1995), Mount Baker (Gardner and others, 1995), Glacier Peak (Waitt and others, 1995), Mount Rainier (Hoblitt and others, 1995) and Mount St. Helens (Wolfe and Pierson, 1995). Twenty Geographic Information System (GIS) data sets have been created that represent the hazard information from the assessments. The twenty data sets have individual Open File part numbers and titles

  9. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Akutan Volcano east-central Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Power, John A.; Richter, Donlad H.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    Akutan Volcano is a 1100-meter-high stratovolcano on Akutan Island in the east-central Aleutian Islands of southwestern Alaska. The volcano is located about 1238 kilometers southwest of Anchorage and about 56 kilometers east of Dutch Harbor/Unalaska. Eruptive activity has occurred at least 27 times since historical observations were recorded beginning in the late 1700?s. Recent eruptions produced only small amounts of fine volcanic ash that fell primarily on the upper flanks of the volcano. Small amounts of ash fell on the Akutan Harbor area during eruptions in 1911, 1948, 1987, and 1989. Plumes of volcanic ash are the primary hazard associated with eruptions of Akutan Volcano and are a major hazard to all aircraft using the airfield at Dutch Harbor or approaching Akutan Island. Eruptions similar to historical Akutan eruptions should be anticipated in the future. Although unlikely, eruptions larger than those of historical time could generate significant amounts of volcanic ash, fallout, pyroclastic flows, and lahars that would be hazardous to life and property on all sectors of the volcano and other parts of the island, but especially in the major valleys that head on the volcano flanks. During a large eruption an ash cloud could be produced that may be hazardous to aircraft using the airfield at Cold Bay and the airspace downwind from the volcano. In the event of a large eruption, volcanic ash fallout could be relatively thick over parts of Akutan Island and volcanic bombs could strike areas more than 10 kilometers from the volcano.

  10. Results of repeated leveling surveys at Newberry Volcano, Oregon, and near Lassen Peak Volcano, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, D.

    1999-01-01

    Personnel from the U.S. Geological Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory conducted first-order, class-II leveling surveys near Lassen Peak, California, in 1991 and at Newberry Volcano, Oregon, in 1985, 1986, and 1994. Near Lassen Peak no significant vertical displacements had occurred along either of two traverses, 33 and 44 km long, since second-order surveys in 1932 and 1934. At Newberry, however, the 1994 survey suggests that the volcano's summit area had risen as much as 97??22 mm with respect to a third-order survey in 1931. The 1931 and 1994 surveys measured a 37-km-long, east-west traverse across the entire volcano. The 1985 and 1986 surveys, on the other hand, measured only a 9-km-long traverse across the summit caldera with only one benchmark in common with the 1931 survey. Comparison of the 1985, 1986, and 1994 surveys revealed no significant differential displacements inside the caldera. A possible mechanism for uplift during 1931-1994 is injection of approximately 0.06 km3 of magma at a depth of approximately 10 km beneath the volcano's summit. The average magma supply rate of approximately 1 x 10-3 km3/year would be generally consistent with the volcano's growth rate averaged over its 600,000-year history (0.7-1.7 x 10-3 km3/year).

  11. Biological Studies on a Live Volcano.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zipko, Stephen J.

    1992-01-01

    Describes scientific research on an Earthwatch expedition to study Arenal, one of the world's most active volcanoes, in north central Costa Rica. The purpose of the two-week project was to monitor and understand the past and ongoing development of a small, geologically young, highly active stratovolcano in a tropical, high-rainfall environment.…

  12. Different types of small volcanos on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slyuta, E. N.; Shalimov, I. V.; Nikishin, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    One of the studies of volcanic activity on Venus is the comparison of that with the analogous volcanic activity on Earth. The preliminary report of such a comparison and description of a small cluster of small venusian volcanos is represented in detail in this paper.

  13. Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... 1 Right: Figure 2   After a brief pause in eruptions that occurred in late March 2010, the Eyjafjallajökull Volcano in ... travelers around the world. The particles contained in volcanic ash clouds can cause significant damage to jet engines and the outside ...

  14. Mapping tremor at Kīlauea volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wech, A.; Thelen, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    Mapping the magma pathway geometry beneath active volcanoes is vital to providing an understanding of how each system works, what drives its dynamics and what eventually controls the surface expression of volcanism. Seismicity can provide clues about the subsurface plumbing, but the seismic catalog is often incomplete. The broad spectrum of seismic phenomena at volcanoes, from discrete earthquakes to the continuous hum of tremor, hampers event identification, and there are no standard seismological tools to resolve this problem. Even at Kīlauea, one of the best-instrumented and most studied volcanoes in the world, a detailed source geometry remains elusive. Here we present the first map of a volcano's deep plumbing system by taking a new approach to seismic monitoring. Using envelope cross-correlation, we systematically scan through 2.5 years of continuous seismic data to identify and locate thousands of undocumented volcanic sources, which we interpret to map the path of magma ascent from the deep mantle, offshore south of the Big Island, to the lava lake in Kīlauea's crater. The results offer a fundamental insight into the source of Kīlauea volcanism and generate a baseline understanding that increases our ability to interpret pre- and co-eruptive observations.

  15. Bathymetry of southern Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, William W.; Moore, James G.; Garcia, Michael O.; Fox, Christopher G.

    1993-01-01

    Manua Loa, the largest volcano on Earth, lies largely beneath the sea, and until recently only generalized bathymetry of this giant volcano was available. However, within the last two decades, the development of multibeam sonar and the improvement of satellite systems (Global Positioning System) have increased the availability of precise bathymetric mapping. This map combines topography of the subaerial southern part of the volcano with modern multibeam bathymetric data from the south submarine flank. The map includes the summit caldera of Mauna Loa Volcano and the entire length of the 100-km-long southwest rift zone that is marked by a much more pronounced ridge below sea level than above. The 60-km-long segment of the rift zone abruptly changes trend from southwest to south 30 km from the summit. It extends from this bend out to sea at the south cape of the island (Kalae) to 4 to 4.5 km depth where it impinges on the elongate west ridge of Apuupuu Seamount. The west submarine flank of the rift-zone ridge connects with the Kahuku fault on land and both are part of the ampitheater head of a major submarine landslide (Lipman and others, 1990; Moore and Clague, 1992). Two pre-Hawaiian volcanic seamounts in the map area, Apuupuu and Dana Seamounts, are apparently Cretaceous in age and are somewhat younger than the Cretaceous oceanic crust on which they are built.

  16. Preliminary radon measurements at Villarrica volcano, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigolini, C.; Laiolo, M.; Coppola, D.; Ulivieri, G.

    2013-10-01

    We report data from a radon survey conducted at Villarrica volcano. Measurements have been obtained at selected sites by E-PERM® electrets and two automatic stations utilizing DOSEman detectors (SARAD Gmbh). Mean values for Villarrica are 1600 (±1150) Bq/m3 are similar to values recorded at Cerro Negro and Arenal in Central America. Moderately higher emissions, at measurement sites, were recorded on the NNW sector of the volcano and the summit, ranging from 1800 to 2400 Bq/m3. These measurements indicate that this area could potentially be a zone of flank weakness. In addition, the highest radon activities, up to 4600 Bq/m3, were measured at a station located near the intersection of the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone with the Gastre Fault Zone. To date, the Villarrica radon measurements reported here are, together with those collected at Galeras (Colombia), the sole radon data reported from South American volcanoes. This research may contribute to improving future geochemical monitoring and volcano surveillance.

  17. Volcano hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, Guatemala

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallance, J.W.; Schilling, S.P.; Matías, O.; Rose, William I.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    The Fuego-Acatenango massif comprises a string of five or more volcanic vents along a north-south trend that is perpendicular to that of the Central American arc in Guatemala. From north to south known centers of volcanism are Ancient Acatenango, Yepocapa, Pico Mayor de Acatenango, Meseta, and Fuego. Volcanism along the trend stretches back more than 200,000 years. Although many of the centers have been active contemporaneously, there is a general sequence of younger volcanism, from north to south along the trend. This massive volcano complex towers more than 3500 meters (m) above the Pacific coastal plain to the south and 2000 m above the Guatemalan Highlands to the north. The volcano complex comprises remnants of multiple eruptive centers, which periodically have collapsed to form huge debris avalanches. The largest of these avalanches extended more than 50 kilometers (km) from its source and covered more than 300 square km. The volcano has potential to produce huge debris avalanches that could inundate large areas of the Pacific coastal plain. In areas around the volcanoes and downslope toward the coastal plain, more than 100,000 people are potentially at risk from these and other flowage phenomena.

  18. New volcanoes discovered in southeast Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-07-01

    Scientists have discovered three new active volcanoes in the Newer Volcanics Province (NVP) in southeast Australia. Researchers from Monash University in Melbourne describe in the Australian Journal of Earth Sciences how they used a combination of satellite photographs, detailed topography models from NASA, the distribution of magnetic minerals in the rocks, and site visits to analyze the region.

  19. Nyiragongo Volcano, Congo, Map View with Lava, Landsat / ASTER / SRTM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Nyiragongo volcano in the Congo erupted on January 17, 2002, and subsequently sent streams of lava into the city of Goma on the north shore of Lake Kivu. More than 100 people were killed, more than 12,000 homes were destroyed, and hundreds of thousands were forced to flee the broader community of nearly half a million people. This Landsat satellite image shows the volcano (right of center), the city of Goma, and surrounding terrain. Image data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite were used to supply a partial map of the recent lava flows (red overlay), including a complete mapping of their intrusion into Goma as of January 28, 2002. Lava is also apparent within the volcanic crater and at a few other locations. Thick (but broken) cloud cover during the ASTER image acquisition prevented a complete mapping of the lava distribution, but future image acquisitions should complete the mapping.

    Goma has a light pink speckled appearance along the shore of Lake Kivu. The city airport parallels, and is just right (east) of, the larger lava flow. Nyiragongo peaks at about 3,470 meters (11,380 feet) elevation and reaches almost exactly 2,000 meters (6,560 feet) above Lake Kivu. The shorter but much broader Nyamuragira volcano appears in the upper left.

    Goma, Lake Kivu, Nyiragongo, Nyamuragira and other nearby volcanoes sit within the East African Rift Valley, a zone where tectonic processes are cracking, stretching, and lowering the Earth's crust. Volcanic activity is common here, and older but geologically recent lava flows (magenta in this depiction) are particularly apparent on the flanks of the Nyamuragira volcano.

    The Landsat image used here was acquired on December 11, 2001, about a month before the eruption, and shows an unusually cloud-free view of this tropical terrain. Minor clouds and their shadows were digitally removed to clarify the view and topographic shading derived from the SRTM

  20. Nyiragongo Volcano, Congo, Map View with Lava, Landsat / ASTER / SRTM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Nyiragongo volcano in the Congo erupted on January 17, 2002, and subsequently sent streams of lava into the city of Goma on the north shore of Lake Kivu. More than 100 people were killed, more than 12,000 homes were destroyed, and hundreds of thousands were forced to flee the broader community of nearly half a million people. This Landsat satellite image shows the volcano (right of center), the city of Goma, and surrounding terrain. Image data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite were used to supply a partial map of the recent lava flows (red overlay), including a complete mapping of their intrusion into Goma as of January 28, 2002. Lava is also apparent within the volcanic crater and at a few other locations. Thick (but broken) cloud cover during the ASTER image acquisition prevented a complete mapping of the lava distribution, but future image acquisitions should complete the mapping.

    Goma has a light pink speckled appearance along the shore of Lake Kivu. The city airport parallels, and is just right (east) of, the larger lava flow. Nyiragongo peaks at about 3,470 meters (11,380 feet) elevation and reaches almost exactly 2,000 meters (6,560 feet) above Lake Kivu. The shorter but much broader Nyamuragira volcano appears in the upper left.

    Goma, Lake Kivu, Nyiragongo, Nyamuragira and other nearby volcanoes sit within the East African Rift Valley, a zone where tectonic processes are cracking, stretching, and lowering the Earth's crust. Volcanic activity is common here, and older but geologically recent lava flows (magenta in this depiction) are particularly apparent on the flanks of the Nyamuragira volcano.

    The Landsat image used here was acquired on December 11, 2001, about a month before the eruption, and shows an unusually cloud-free view of this tropical terrain. Minor clouds and their shadows were digitally removed to clarify the view and topographic shading derived from the SRTM

  1. Volcano deformation and gravity workshop synopsis and outcomes: the 2008 volcano deformation and temporal gravity change workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Lu, Zhong

    2009-01-01

    A volcano workshop was held in Washington State, near the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cascades Volcano Observatory. The workshop, hosted by the USGS Volcano Hazards Program (VHP), included more than 40 participants from the United States, the European Union, and Canada. Goals were to promote (1) collaboration among scientists working on active volcanoes and (2) development of new tools for studying volcano deformation. The workshop focused on conventional and emerging techniques, including the Global Positioning System (GPS), borehole strain, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), gravity, and electromagnetic imaging, and on the roles of aqueous and magmatic fluids.

  2. Hazard maps of Colima volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero Ayala, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Colima volcano, also known as Volcan de Fuego (19° 30.696 N, 103° 37.026 W), is located on the border between the states of Jalisco and Colima and is the most active volcano in Mexico. Began its current eruptive process in February 1991, in February 10, 1999 the biggest explosion since 1913 occurred at the summit dome. The activity during the 2001-2005 period was the most intense, but did not exceed VEI 3. The activity resulted in the formation of domes and their destruction after explosive events. The explosions originated eruptive columns, reaching attitudes between 4,500 and 9,000 m.a.s.l., further pyroclastic flows reaching distances up to 3.5 km from the crater. During the explosive events ash emissions were generated in all directions reaching distances up to 100 km, slightly affected nearby villages as Tuxpan, Tonila, Zapotlán, Cuauhtemoc, Comala, Zapotitlan de Vadillo and Toliman. During the 2005 this volcano has had an intense effusive-explosive activity, similar to the one that took place during the period of 1890 through 1900. Intense pre-plinian eruption in January 20, 1913, generated little economic losses in the lower parts of the volcano due to low population density and low socio-economic activities at the time. Shows the updating of the volcanic hazard maps published in 2001, where we identify whit SPOT satellite imagery and Google Earth, change in the land use on the slope of volcano, the expansion of the agricultural frontier on the east and southeast sides of the Colima volcano, the population inhabiting the area is approximately 517,000 people, and growing at an annual rate of 4.77%, also the region that has shown an increased in the vulnerability for the development of economic activities, supported by the construction of highways, natural gas pipelines and electrical infrastructure that connect to the Port of Manzanillo to Guadalajara city. The update the hazard maps are: a) Exclusion areas and moderate hazard for explosive events

  3. The Anatahan volcano-monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marso, J. N.; Lockhart, A. B.; White, R. A.; Koyanagi, S. K.; Trusdell, F. A.; Camacho, J. T.; Chong, R.

    2003-12-01

    A real-time 24/7 Anatahan volcano-monitoring and eruption detection system is now operational. There had been no real-time seismic monitoring on Anatahan during the May 10, 2003 eruption because the single telemetered seismic station on Anatahan Island had failed. On May 25, staff from the Emergency Management Office (EMO) of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) established a replacement telemetered seismic station on Anatahan whose data were recorded on a drum recorder at the EMO on Saipan, 130 km to the south by June 5. In late June EMO and USGS staff installed a Glowworm seismic data acquisition system (Marso et al, 2003) at EMO and hardened the Anatahan telemetry links. The Glowworm system collects the telemetered seismic data from Anatahan and Saipan, places graphical display products on a webpage, and exports the seismic waveform data in real time to Glowworm systems at Hawaii Volcano Observatory and Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO). In early July, a back-up telemetered seismic station was placed on Sarigan Island 40 km north of Anatahan, transmitting directly to the EMO on Saipan. Because there is currently no population on the island, at this time the principal hazard presented by Anatahan volcano would be air traffic disruption caused by possible erupted ash. The aircraft/ash hazard requires a monitoring program that focuses on eruption detection. The USGS currently provides 24/7 monitoring of Anatahan with a rotational seismic duty officer who carries a Pocket PC-cell phone combination that receives SMS text messages from the CVO Glowworm system when it detects large seismic signals. Upon receiving an SMS text message notification from the CVO Glowworm, the seismic duty officer can use the Pocket PC - cell phone to view a graphic of the seismic traces on the EMO Glowworm's webpage to determine if the seismic signal is eruption related. There have been no further eruptions since the monitoring system was

  4. 21 CFR 186.1555 - Japan wax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Japan wax. 186.1555 Section 186.1555 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1555 Japan wax. (a) Japan wax (CAS Reg. No. 8001-39-6), also known as Japan... fruits of the oriental sumac, Rhus succedanea (Japan, Taiwan, and Indo-China), R. vernicifera...

  5. 21 CFR 186.1555 - Japan wax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Japan wax. 186.1555 Section 186.1555 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1555 Japan wax. (a) Japan wax (CAS Reg. No. 8001-39-6), also known as Japan... fruits of the oriental sumac, Rhus succedanea (Japan, Taiwan, and Indo-China), R. vernicifera...

  6. 21 CFR 186.1555 - Japan wax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Japan wax. 186.1555 Section 186.1555 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1555 Japan wax. (a) Japan wax (CAS Reg. No. 8001-39-6), also known as Japan... fruits of the oriental sumac, Rhus succedanea (Japan, Taiwan, and Indo-China), R. vernicifera...

  7. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on the superconducting transition temperature and superfluid density of SmFeAsO0.85 and PrFe0.925Co0.075AsO superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X. L.; Lu, W.; Yang, J.; Yi, W.; Li, Z. C.; Zhang, C.; Ren, Z. A.; Che, G. C.; Sun, L. L.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, X. J.; Zhao, Z. X.

    2010-12-01

    We have measured magnetic susceptibility of iron pnictide superconductors SmFeAsO0.85 and PrFe0.925Co0.075AsO under hydrostatic pressure up to 1.15 GPa. The superconducting transition temperature (TC) deceases linearly and the Meissner signal size also decreases with increasing pressure for SmFeAsO0.85 . In contrast, the TC of PrFe0.925Co0.075AsO initially increases with pressure then saturates above ˜0.8GPa . Meanwhile its Meissner signal exhibits the similar pressure dependence. Our results indicate that the pressure dependences of TC and superfluid density in both systems are positively correlated which suggests that these quaternary iron-based superconductors are not conventional BCS ones.

  8. Space radar image of Galeras Volcano, Colombia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This radar image of the area surrounding the Galeras volcano in southern Colombia shows the ability of a multi-frequency radar to map volcanic structures that can be dangerous to study on the ground. Galeras has erupted more than 20 times since the area was first visited by European explorers in the 1500s. Volcanic activity levels have been high in the last five years, including an eruption in January 1993 that killed nine people on a scientific expedition to the volcano summit. Galeras is the light green area near the center of the image. The active cone, with a small summit pit, is the red feature nestled against the lower right edge of the caldera (crater) wall. The city of Pasto, with a population of 300,000, is shown in orange near the bottom of the image, just 8 kilometers (5 miles) from the volcano. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/ X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 96th orbit on April 15, 1994. North is toward the upper right. The area shown is 49.1 by 36.0 kilometers (30.5 by 22.3 miles), centered at 1.2 degrees north latitude and 77.4 degrees west longitude. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The false colors in this image were created using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received). Galeras is one of 15 volcanoes worldwide that are being monitored by the scientific community as an 'International Decade Volcano' because of the hazard that it represents to the local population.

  9. Japan-Russia Pediatric Society.

    PubMed

    Nihei, K; Thunemathu, Y; Kobayashi, N

    1993-12-01

    In March 1990, medical interchange between Japan and the Soviet Union began with a letter from the local health bureau of Khabarovsk. We visited Khabarovsk three times and Kamchatka once, and saw many hospitals and patients. Russian doctors of pediatrics visited Japan. Medical information was exchanged and discussed. The Japan-Russia Pediatric Society was established to perform interchange of medical information, technology and staff such as doctors, nurses and technicians between Japan and Russia, especially the Far East district of Russia. The Society meeting has been held three times: Tokyo (1991), Khabarovsk (1992) and Niigata (1993). It is necessary to continue the interchange between the two countries.

  10. Infrared and Raman spectroscopic characterizations on new Fe sulphoarsenate hilarionite (Fe2((III))(SO4)(AsO4)(OH)·6H2O): Implications for arsenic mineralogy in supergene environment of mine area.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; He, LiLe; Dong, Faqin; Frost, Ray L

    2017-01-05

    Hilarionite (Fe2 (SO4)(AsO4)(OH)·6H2O) is a new Fe sulphoarsenates mineral, which recently is found in the famous Lavrion ore district, Atliki Prefecture, Greece. The spectroscopic study of hilarionite enriches the data of arsenic mineralogy in supergene environment of a mine area. The infrared and Raman means are used to characterize the molecular structure of this mineral. The IR bands at 875 and 905cm(-1) are assigned to the antisymmetric stretching vibrations of AsO4(3-). The IR bands at 1021, 1086 and 1136cm(-1) correspond to the possible antisymmetric and symmetric stretching vibrations of SO4(2-). The Raman bands at 807, 843 and 875cm(-1) clearly show that arsenate components in the mineral structure, which are assigned to the symmetric stretching vibrations (ν1) of AsO4(3-) (807 and 843cm(-1)) and the antisymmetric vibration (ν3) (875cm(-1)). IR bands provide more sulfate information than Raman, which can be used as the basis to distinguish hilarionite from kaňkite. The powder XRD data shows that hilarionite has obvious differences with the mineral structure of kaňkite. The thermoanalysis and SEM-EDX results show that hilarionite has more sulfate than arsenate.

  11. Infrared and Raman spectroscopic characterizations on new Fe sulphoarsenate hilarionite (Fe2(III)(SO4)(AsO4)(OH)·6H2O): Implications for arsenic mineralogy in supergene environment of mine area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; He, LiLe; Dong, Faqin; Frost, Ray L.

    2017-01-01

    Hilarionite (Fe2 (SO4)(AsO4)(OH)·6H2O) is a new Fe sulphoarsenates mineral, which recently is found in the famous Lavrion ore district, Atliki Prefecture, Greece. The spectroscopic study of hilarionite enriches the data of arsenic mineralogy in supergene environment of a mine area. The infrared and Raman means are used to characterize the molecular structure of this mineral. The IR bands at 875 and 905 cm- 1 are assigned to the antisymmetric stretching vibrations of AsO43 -. The IR bands at 1021, 1086 and 1136 cm- 1 correspond to the possible antisymmetric and symmetric stretching vibrations of SO42 -. The Raman bands at 807, 843 and 875 cm- 1 clearly show that arsenate components in the mineral structure, which are assigned to the symmetric stretching vibrations (ν1) of AsO43 - (807 and 843 cm- 1) and the antisymmetric vibration (ν3) (875 cm- 1). IR bands provide more sulfate information than Raman, which can be used as the basis to distinguish hilarionite from kaňkite. The powder XRD data shows that hilarionite has obvious differences with the mineral structure of kaňkite. The thermoanalysis and SEM-EDX results show that hilarionite has more sulfate than arsenate.

  12. Deuteron NMR study of dynamics and of coexistence of paraelectric and ferroelectric phases in Rb0.90(ND4)0.10D2AsO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Nicholas J.; Howell, Francis L.; Schmidt, V. Hugo

    1993-09-01

    The deuteron glass Rb1-x(ND4)xD2AsO4 (DRADA) is a mixed crystal of RbD2AsO4 (DRDA) and ND4D2AsO4 (DADA). Deuteron nuclear magnetic resonance has been performed on the acid and ammonium deuterons. The crystal studied has an ammonium concentration (x=0.10) that puts it in the coexistence region of the phase diagram. Line-shape measurements of the ammonium deuterons show the coexistence of the ferroelectric (FE) and paraelectric (PE) phases as the temperature is lowered below the ferroelectric-phase-transition temperature Tc. The acid deuteron line shape on the other hand is found to broaden as the temperature is reduced but is unaffected by the ferroelectric transition. Spin-lattice-relaxation measurements have been performed and the activation energies for the relaxation processes have been computed. The relaxation-rate anomaly for acid deuterons in the ferroelectric-transition range indicates a short correlation length for the FE phase in the coexistence region of the phase diagram.

  13. Astrogeodetic geoid of Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganeko, Y.

    1976-01-01

    Three kinds of astrogeodetic geoid maps for Japan are presented: one referred to the global (18, 18) geoid of the 1973 Smithsonian Standard Earth (III) (SE III), referred to the best-fitting ellipsoid of SE III, and one referred to the reference ellipsoid of the Tokyo datum. Interpolations of the deflection of the vertical are carried out by a least squares estimation method. The geoid height differences obtained are compared with solutions of satellite-derived station positions. Good agreement is found in a comparison with Doppler tracking stations.

  14. Flux Pinning Properties and Magnetic Relaxation of Superconducting SmFe0.9Co0.1AsO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, J. C.; Sun, Y.; Ding, Y.; Yuan, F. F.; Liu, J. T.; Shi, Z. X.; Li, X. W.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic Co ion doped SmFeAsO polycrystal was synthesized via solid-state reaction. Resistivity, SEM and magnetic hysteresis loops (MHLs) were measured to investigate magnetic properties of the sample. Critical current densities as well as the flux pinning forces densities were estimated from MHLs. This paper reports for the first time the research of superconducting MHLs as well as magnetic relaxation properties of SmFe0.9Co0.1AsO. Results suggest that: (i) A tail effect in the resistivity measurement together with the rapid decrease in critical current densities at low fields shows the evidence for granularity of the sample; (ii) The asymmetry of the MHLs may be caused by the Bean-Livingstone (BL) surface pinning or granular nature, and none of theoretical models are suitable to the scaling behaviors of flux pinning forces densities; (iii) The anomalous tendency of the temperature dependence of magnetic relaxation rate as well as the effective pinning energy were observed, which may be attributed to the competition between the bulk pinning and the BL surface pinning.

  15. Uzon-Geysernaya volcano-tectonic depression: geodynamics phenomena last years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugaenko, Yulia

    2010-05-01

    (swarm) type. - The majority of earthquakes are connected with areas of hydrothermal activity in western slop of Kikhpinych volcanic massif. - Seismicity is located in part of caldera displacement, discovered by INSAR data. - By our mind, the seismicity and Uzon caldera inflation (as a result of activation of magma chamber or hydrothermal system) effected and destructed the caldera slop by activation of fissures and by change of pore-fracture configuration. Summarizing data about the tectonics, the raising of east slope of depression, the landsliding and local seismicity, we can suppose that all these phenomena are connected with the deep processes under Uzon-Geysernaya depression and Kikhpinuch volcano are the reason of all these events. It is the indication of the renewal of the dynamics within eastern part of the calderas. References: Belousov, V. I., E. N. Grib, and V. L. Leonov (1984), The geological setting of the hydrothermal systems in the Geysers Valley and Uzon caldera, Volcanol. Seismol., 5, 67-81. Kugaenko, Yu. (2008), Geodynamic processes as the risk factor of June 3, 2007 landslide in the Valley of the Geysers (Kamchatka, Russia), Proceedings of the First World Landslide Forum. 18-21 November 2008, Tokio, Japan, 333-336. Leonov, V. L., E. N. Grib, G. A. Karpov, V. M. Sugrobov, N. G. Sugrobova, and Z. I. Zubin (1991). Uzon caldera and Valley of Geysers, in Active Volcanoes of Kamchatka, edited by S. A. Fedotov and Y. P. Masurenkov, Nauka, Moscow, 92- 141. Leonov, V.L. (2007) Valley of the Geysers struck by large destructive landslide and related flood. Bulletin of the Global Volcanism Network (BGVN 32:07). 07/2007. Lundgren, P., Lu, Zh. (2006) Inflation model of Uzon caldera, Kamchatka, constrained by satellite radar interferometry observations. Geophysical Research Letters. 33, L06301, doi:10.1029/2005GL025181

  16. Influence of an ocean on the propagation of magmas within an oceanic basaltic shield volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corvec, N.; McGovern, P. J., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Basaltic shield volcanoes are a common feature on Earth and mostly occur within oceans, forming volcanic islands (e.g. Hawaii (USA), Galapagos (Ecuador), and recently Niijima (Japan)). As the volcano grows it will reach and emerge from the water surface and continue to grow above it. The deformation affecting the volcanic edifice may be influenced by the presence of the water level. We investigate how the presence of an ocean affects the state of stress within a volcanic edifice and thus magma propagation and fault formation. Using COMSOL Multiphysics, axisymmetric elastic models of a volcanic edifice overlying an elastic lithosphere were created. The volcanic edifice (height of ~6000 m and radius of ~ 60 km) was built either instantaneously or iteratively by adding new layers of equivalent volume on top of each other. In the later process, the resulting stress and geometry from the one step is transferred to the next as initial conditions. Thus each new layer overlies a deformed and stressed model. The water load was modeled with a boundary condition at the surface of the model. In the case of an instantaneous volcano different water level were studied, for an iteratively growing volcano the water level was set up to 4000 m. We compared the deformation of the volcanic edifice and lithosphere and the stress orientation and magnitude in half-space and flexural models with the presence or not of an ocean. The preliminary results show 1- major differences in the resulting state of stress between an instantaneous and an iteratively built volcanic edifice, similar to the results of [Galgana et al., 2011] and [McGovern and Solomon, 1993], respectively; 2- the presence of an ocean decreases the amount of flexural response, which decreases the magnitude of differential stress within the models; and 3- stress orientation within the volcano and lithosphere in also influence of an ocean. Those results provide new insights on the state of stress and deformation of oceanic

  17. 69 FR 61403 - Polychloroprene Rubber From Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2004-10-18

    ... COMMISSION Polychloroprene Rubber From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION... on polychloroprene rubber from Japan. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it will...)) to determine whether revocation of the antidumping finding on polychloroprene rubber from Japan...

  18. Space Radar Image of Colombian Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a radar image of a little known volcano in northern Colombia. The image was acquired on orbit 80 of space shuttle Endeavour on April 14, 1994, by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). The volcano near the center of the image is located at 5.6 degrees north latitude, 75.0 degrees west longitude, about 100 kilometers (65 miles) southeast of Medellin, Colombia. The conspicuous dark spot is a lake at the bottom of an approximately 3-kilometer-wide (1.9-mile) volcanic collapse depression or caldera. A cone-shaped peak on the bottom left (northeast rim) of the caldera appears to have been the source for a flow of material into the caldera. This is the northern-most known volcano in South America and because of its youthful appearance, should be considered dormant rather than extinct. The volcano's existence confirms a fracture zone proposed in 1985 as the northern boundary of volcanism in the Andes. The SIR-C/X-SAR image reveals another, older caldera further south in Colombia, along another proposed fracture zone. Although relatively conspicuous, these volcanoes have escaped widespread recognition because of frequent cloud cover that hinders remote sensing imaging in visible wavelengths. Four separate volcanoes in the Northern Andes nations ofColombia and Ecuador have been active during the last 10 years, killing more than 25,000 people, including scientists who were monitoring the volcanic activity. Detection and monitoring of volcanoes from space provides a safe way to investigate volcanism. The recognition of previously unknown volcanoes is important for hazard evaluations because a number of major eruptions this century have occurred at mountains that were not previously recognized as volcanoes. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of

  19. Common processes at unique volcanoes - a volcanological conundrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, Katharine; Biggs, Juliet

    2014-11-01

    An emerging challenge in modern volcanology is the apparent contradiction between the perception that every volcano is unique, and classification systems based on commonalities among volcano morphology and eruptive style. On the one hand, detailed studies of individual volcanoes show that a single volcano often exhibits similar patterns of behaviour over multiple eruptive episodes; this observation has led to the idea that each volcano has its own distinctive pattern of behaviour (or “personality”). In contrast, volcano classification schemes define eruption “styles” referenced to “type” volcanoes (e.g. Plinian, Strombolian, Vulcanian); this approach implicitly assumes that common processes underpin volcanic activity and can be used to predict the nature, extent and ensuing hazards of individual volcanoes. Actual volcanic eruptions, however, often include multiple styles, and type volcanoes may experience atypical eruptions (e.g., violent explosive eruptions of Kilauea, Hawaii1). The volcanological community is thus left with a fundamental conundrum that pits the uniqueness of individual volcanic systems against generalization of common processes. Addressing this challenge represents a major challenge to volcano research.

  20. Precursory Slope Deformation around Landslide Area Detected by Insar Throughout Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, T.; Wada, K.; Yamanaka, M.; Kamiya, I.; Nakajima, H.

    2016-06-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technique is able to detect a slope deformation around landslide (e.g., Singhroy et al., 2004; Une et al., 2008; Riedel and Walther, 2008; Sato et al., 2014). Geospatial Information Authority (GSI) of Japan has been performing the InSAR analysis regularly by using ALOS/PALSAR data and ALOS-2/PALSAR-2 data throughout Japan. There are a lot of small phase change sites except for crustal deformation with earthquake or volcano activity in the InSAR imagery. Most of the phase change sites are located in landslide area. We conducted field survey at the 10 sites of those phase change sites. As a result, we identified deformation of artificial structures or linear depressions caused by mass movement at the 9 sites. This result indicates that InSAR technique can detect on the continual deformation of landslide block for several years. GSI of Japan will continue to perform the InSAR analysis throughout Japan. Therefore, we will be able to observe and monitor precursory slope deformation around landslide areas throughout Japan.