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Sample records for aspartic proteinases fourier

  1. Specificity of a wheat gluten aspartic proteinase.

    PubMed

    Bleukx, W; Brijs, K; Torrekens, S; Van Leuven, F; Delcour, J A

    1998-09-08

    The substrate and peptide bond specificities of a purified wheat gluten aspartic proteinase (GlAP) are studied. GlAP shows maximum gluten hydrolysing activity at pH 3.0. At this pH, especially the wheat high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) and to a lesser extent the low molecular weight glutenin subunits and gliadins are hydrolysed. GlAP has no obvious effect on albumins and globulins. In its action on oxidised insulin B-chain, GlAP forms eight peptides and has high specificity for peptide bonds located between amino acid residues with large hydrophobic side chains (Leu, Phe, Tyr) but the peptide bond Glu13-Ala14 is also hydrolysed. Although structurally quite similar to a barley aspartic proteinase, the peptide bond specificity of GlAP towards oxidised insulin B-chain resembles slightly more that of a cardoon aspartic proteinase, cardosin B. HMW-GS 7, purified from cultivar Galahad-77, is rapidly hydrolysed by GlAP. N-Terminal amino acid sequence data show that GlAP cleaves at least one Met-Ile peptide bond at the end of the N-terminal domain and two Val-Leu peptide bonds in the repetitive domain of HMW-GS 7.

  2. Some aspects of structural studies on aspartic proteinases.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, N S

    1992-01-01

    This paper gives a brief overview over the differences and similarities in the structure of aspartic proteinases presently available. Comparison of the three-dimentional structure of different aspartic proteinases by a common intramolecular coordinate system have been performed. The intramolecular movable subdomains have been localized and the role of motion in substrate binding and zymogen activation is discussed.

  3. Aspartic proteinases from Mucor spp. in cheese manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Yegin, Sirma; Fernandez-Lahore, Marcelo; Jose Gama Salgado, Antonio; Guvenc, Ulgar; Goksungur, Yekta; Tari, Canan

    2011-02-01

    Filamentous fungi belonging to the order of Mucorales are well known as producers of aspartic proteinases depicting milk-clotting activity. The biosynthesis level, the biochemical characteristics, and the technological properties of the resulting proteinases are affected by the producer strain and the mode of cultivation. While the milk-clotting enzymes produced by the Rhizomucor spp. have been extensively studied in the past, much less is known on the properties and potential applications of the aspartic proteinases obtained for Mucor spp. Indeed, several Mucor spp. strains have been reported as a potential source of milk-clotting enzymes having unique technological properties. Both submerged fermentation and solid substrate cultivation are proven alternatives for the production of Mucor spp. aspartic proteinases. This review provides an overview on the bioprocessing routes to obtain large amounts of these enzymes, on their structural characteristics as related to their functional properties, and on their industrial applications with focus on cheese manufacturing.

  4. Isolation and characterization of recombinant Drosophila Copia aspartic proteinase

    PubMed Central

    Athauda, Senarath B. P.; Yoshioka, Katsuji; Shiba, Tadayoshi; Takahashi, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    The wild type Copia Gag precursor protein of Drosophila melanogaster expressed in Escherichia coli was shown to be processed autocatalytically to generate two daughter proteins with molecular masses of 33 and 23 kDa on SDS/PAGE. The active-site motif of aspartic proteinases, Asp-Ser-Gly, was present in the 23 kDa protein corresponding to the C-terminal half of the precursor protein. The coding region of this daughter protein (152 residues) in the copia gag gene was expressed in E. coli to produce the recombinant enzyme protein as inclusion bodies, which was then purified and refolded to create the active enzyme. Using the peptide substrate His-Gly-Ile-Ala-Phe-Met-Val-Lys-Glu-Val-Asn (cleavage site: Phe–Met) designed on the basis of the sequence of the cleavage-site region of the precursor protein, the enzymatic properties of the proteinase were investigated. The optimum pH and temperature of the proteinase toward the synthetic peptide were 4.0 and 70 °C respectively. The proteolytic activity was increased with increasing NaCl concentration in the reaction mixture, the optimum concentration being 2 M. Pepstatin A strongly inhibited the enzyme, with a Ki value of 15 nM at pH 4.0. On the other hand, the active-site residue mutant, in which the putative catalytic aspartic acid residue was mutated to an alanine residue, had no activity. These results show that the Copia proteinase belongs to the family of aspartic proteinases including HIV proteinase. The B-chain of oxidized bovine insulin was hydrolysed at the Leu15−–Tyr16 bond fairly selectively. Thus the recombinant Copia proteinase partially resembles HIV proteinase, but is significantly different from it in certain aspects. PMID:16813567

  5. Functional role of aspartic proteinase cathepsin D in insect metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Zhong Zheng; Lee, Kwang Sik; Kim, Bo Yeon; Choi, Yong Soo; Wei, Ya Dong; Choo, Young Moo; Kang, Pil Don; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Kim, Iksoo; Je, Yeon Ho; Seo, Sook Jae; Lee, Sang Mong; Guo, Xijie; Sohn, Hung Dae; Jin, Byung Rae

    2006-01-01

    Background Metamorphosis is a complex, highly conserved and strictly regulated development process that involves the programmed cell death of obsolete larval organs. Here we show a novel functional role for the aspartic proteinase cathepsin D during insect metamorphosis. Results Cathepsin D of the silkworm Bombyx mori (BmCatD) was ecdysone-induced, differentially and spatially expressed in the larval fat body of the final instar and in the larval gut of pupal stage, and its expression led to programmed cell death. Furthermore, BmCatD was highly induced in the fat body of baculovirus-infected B. mori larvae, suggesting that this gene is involved in the induction of metamorphosis of host insects infected with baculovirus. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated BmCatD knock-down inhibited programmed cell death of the larval fat body, resulting in the arrest of larval-pupal transformation. BmCatD RNAi also inhibited the programmed cell death of larval gut during pupal stage. Conclusion Based on these results, we concluded that BmCatD is critically involved in the programmed cell death of the larval fat body and larval gut in silkworm metamorphosis. PMID:17062167

  6. A pepstatin-insensitive aspartic proteinase from a thermophilic Bacillus sp.

    PubMed Central

    Toogood, H S; Prescott, M; Daniel, R M

    1995-01-01

    Bacillus sp. strain Wp22.A1 produced a cell-associated aspartic proteinase which was purified to homogeneity using phenyl-Sepharose (hydrophobic and affinity chromatography) and Mono Q. The proteinase has a molecular mass of 45 kDa by SDS/PAGE and a pI of 3.8. It is insensitive to pepstatin, but is sensitive to the other aspartic proteinase-specific inhibitors diazoacetyl-DL-norleucine methyl ester (DAN) and 1,2-epoxy-3-(p-nitrophenoxy)propane. Inactivation by DAN was only partial, suggesting that it had non-specifically modified an aspartate residue at a site other than the active site. The enzyme was not inhibited by any of the serine or cysteine proteinase inhibitors tested. Maximum proteolytic activity was observed at pH 3.5. The proteinase had a higher activity with haemoglobin, but was more specific (Vmax./Km) for cytochrome c. Substrate inhibition was observed with both these substrates. The cleavage of oxidized insulin B chain tended to occur at sites where the P1 amino acid was bulky and non-polar, and the P1' amino acid was bulky and polar, such as its primary cleavage site of Val2-Asn3. The proteinase was stable in the pH range 2.5-5.5. Thermostability was increased in the presence of Ca2+, although to a lesser extent at higher temperatures. The thermostabilities at 60, 70, 80 and 90 degrees C were 45 h, 102, 21 and 3 min respectively in the presence of Ca2+. Images Figure 1 PMID:7741709

  7. Kinetic analysis of a general model of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens.

    PubMed

    Varón, R; García-Moreno, M; Valera-Ruipérez, D; García-Molina, F; García-Cánovas, F; Ladrón-de Guevara, R G; Masiá-Pérez, J; Havsteen, B H

    2006-10-07

    Starting from a simple general reaction mechanism of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens involving an uni- and a bimolecular simultaneous route, the time course equation of the concentration of the zymogen and of the activated enzyme have been derived. From these equations, an analysis quantifying the relative contribution to the global process of the two routes has been carried out for the first time. This analysis suggests a way to predict the time course of the relative contribution as well as the effect of the initial zymogen and activating enzyme concentrations, on the relative weight. An experimental design and kinetic data analysis is suggested to estimate the kinetic parameters involved in the reaction mechanism proposed. Finally, we apply some of our results to experimental data obtained by other authors in experimental studies of the activation of some aspartic proteinase zymogens.

  8. Solution structure of the squash aspartic acid proteinase inhibitor (SQAPI) and mutational analysis of pepsin inhibition.

    PubMed

    Headey, Stephen J; Macaskill, Ursula K; Wright, Michele A; Claridge, Jolyon K; Edwards, Patrick J B; Farley, Peter C; Christeller, John T; Laing, William A; Pascal, Steven M

    2010-08-27

    The squash aspartic acid proteinase inhibitor (SQAPI), a proteinaceous proteinase inhibitor from squash, is an effective inhibitor of a range of aspartic proteinases. Proteinaceous aspartic proteinase inhibitors are rare in nature. The only other example in plants probably evolved from a precursor serine proteinase inhibitor. Earlier work based on sequence homology modeling suggested SQAPI evolved from an ancestral cystatin. In this work, we determined the solution structure of SQAPI using NMR and show that SQAPI shares the same fold as a plant cystatin. The structure is characterized by a four-strand anti-parallel beta-sheet gripping an alpha-helix in an analogous manner to fingers of a hand gripping a tennis racquet. Truncation and site-specific mutagenesis revealed that the unstructured N terminus and the loop connecting beta-strands 1 and 2 are important for pepsin inhibition, but the loop connecting strands 3 and 4 is not. Using ambiguous restraints based on the mutagenesis results, SQAPI was then docked computationally to pepsin. The resulting model places the N-terminal strand of SQAPI in the S' side of the substrate binding cleft, whereas the first SQAPI loop binds on the S side of the cleft. The backbone of SQAPI does not interact with the pepsin catalytic Asp(32)-Asp(215) diad, thus avoiding cleavage. The data show that SQAPI does share homologous structural elements with cystatin and appears to retain a similar protease inhibitory mechanism despite its different target. This strongly supports our hypothesis that SQAPI evolved from an ancestral cystatin.

  9. Solution Structure of the Squash Aspartic Acid Proteinase Inhibitor (SQAPI) and Mutational Analysis of Pepsin Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Headey, Stephen J.; MacAskill, Ursula K.; Wright, Michele A.; Claridge, Jolyon K.; Edwards, Patrick J. B.; Farley, Peter C.; Christeller, John T.; Laing, William A.; Pascal, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    The squash aspartic acid proteinase inhibitor (SQAPI), a proteinaceous proteinase inhibitor from squash, is an effective inhibitor of a range of aspartic proteinases. Proteinaceous aspartic proteinase inhibitors are rare in nature. The only other example in plants probably evolved from a precursor serine proteinase inhibitor. Earlier work based on sequence homology modeling suggested SQAPI evolved from an ancestral cystatin. In this work, we determined the solution structure of SQAPI using NMR and show that SQAPI shares the same fold as a plant cystatin. The structure is characterized by a four-strand anti-parallel β-sheet gripping an α-helix in an analogous manner to fingers of a hand gripping a tennis racquet. Truncation and site-specific mutagenesis revealed that the unstructured N terminus and the loop connecting β-strands 1 and 2 are important for pepsin inhibition, but the loop connecting strands 3 and 4 is not. Using ambiguous restraints based on the mutagenesis results, SQAPI was then docked computationally to pepsin. The resulting model places the N-terminal strand of SQAPI in the S′ side of the substrate binding cleft, whereas the first SQAPI loop binds on the S side of the cleft. The backbone of SQAPI does not interact with the pepsin catalytic Asp32–Asp215 diad, thus avoiding cleavage. The data show that SQAPI does share homologous structural elements with cystatin and appears to retain a similar protease inhibitory mechanism despite its different target. This strongly supports our hypothesis that SQAPI evolved from an ancestral cystatin. PMID:20538608

  10. Crystal quality and inhibitor binding by aspartic proteinases; preparation of high quality crystals of mouse renin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badasso, M.; Sibanda, B. L.; Cooper, J. B.; Dealwis, C. G.; Wood, S. P.

    1992-08-01

    Renin from mouse submandibular glands has been highly purified and co-crystallized with a synthetic nonapeptide fragment of rat angiotensionogen in which the scissile Leu-Leu bond has been modified as a hydroxyethylene mimic of the transition state. The strong diffraction from these crystals compared to the native form is discussed in relation to the behaviour of other members of the aspartic proteinase family in crystallisation.

  11. Substrate and inhibitor studies with human gastric aspartic proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, A; Campbell, C J; Grinham, C J; Keane, R M; Lawton, B C; Pendlebury, J E

    1990-01-01

    The separation of pepsin isoenzymes 1, 2, 3 and 5 (gastricsin) in human gastric juice was effected by chromatography on Mono Q ion-exchanger, and slow-moving proteinase was purified to homogeneity by using a modified procedure incorporating a novel affinity-chromatography step. The pH-activity profiles of these enzymes with mucus glycoprotein and basement-membrane substrates were determined; the profiles for pepsin 2 were noticeably different, and, in general, the pH optima for the hydrolysis of basement membrane were more acidic. Pepsin 1 expressed larger specificity constants (kcat./Km) than pepsin 3 with a series of synthetic peptide substrates, reflecting greater binding (smaller Km) by pepsin 1. Inhibitor studies at pH 1.7 and 4.5 with a series of P2-substituted lactoyl-pepstatins implied that valine at position P2 was optimal for inhibiting pepsins 1, 2 and 3 but detrimental for pepsin 5, whereas lysine at position P2 was tolerated well by pepsin 5 but not by pepsins 1, 2 and 3. The potency of lactoyl-pepstatin with lysine at position P2 did not increase as a function of pH. P2-substituted lactoyl-pepstatins failed to show any inhibitory selectivity among pepsins 1, 2 and 3. PMID:2111133

  12. Purification and characterization of a milk-clotting aspartic proteinase from globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.).

    PubMed

    Llorente, Berta E; Brutti, Cristina B; Caffini, Néstor O

    2004-12-29

    The study of proteinase expression in crude extracts from different organs of the globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) disclosed that enzymes with proteolytic and milk-clotting activity are mainly located in mature flowers. Maximum proteolytic activity was recorded at pH 5.0, and inhibition studies showed that only pepstatin, specific for aspartic proteinases, presented a significant inhibitory effect. Such properties, in addition to easy enzyme inactivation by moderate heating, make this crude protease extract potentially useful for cheese production. Adsorption with activated carbon, together with anion exchange and affinity chromatography, led to the isolation of a heterodimeric milk-clotting proteinase consisting of 30- and 15-kDa subunits. MALDI-TOF MS of the 15-kDa chain determined a 15.358-Da mass, and the terminal amino sequence presented 96% homology with the smaller cardosin A subunit. The amino terminal sequence of the 30-kDa chain proved to be identical to the larger cardosin A subunit. Electrophoresis evidenced proteinase self-processing that was confirmed by immunoblots presenting 62-, 30-, and 15-kDa bands.

  13. Mutational analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease suggests functional homology with aspartic proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, D D; Hutchison, C A; Edgell, M H; Farmerie, W G; Swanstrom, R

    1989-01-01

    Processing of the retroviral gag and pol gene products is mediated by a viral protease. Bacterial expression systems have been developed which permit genetic analysis of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease as measured by cleavage of the pol protein precursor. Deletion analysis of the pol reading frame locates the sequences required to encode a protein with appropriate proteolytic activity near the left end of the pol reading frame but largely outside the gag-pol overlap region, which is at the extreme left end of pol. Most missense mutations within an 11-amino-acid domain highly conserved among retroviral proteases and with sequence similarity to the active site of aspartic proteinases abolish appropriate processing, suggesting that the retrovirus proteases share a catalytic mechanism with aspartic proteinases. Substitution of the amino acids flanking the scissile bond at three of the processing sites encoded by pol demonstrates distinct sequence requirements for cleavage at these different sites. The inclusion of a charged amino acid at the processing site blocks cleavage. A subset of these substitutions also inhibits processing at the nonmutated sites. Images PMID:2642305

  14. Identification of the aspartic proteinases from human erythrocyte membranes and gastric mucosa (slow-moving proteinase) as catalytically equivalent to cathepsin E.

    PubMed Central

    Jupp, R A; Richards, A D; Kay, J; Dunn, B M; Wyckoff, J B; Samloff, I M; Yamamoto, K

    1988-01-01

    Three aspartic proteinases with similar Mr values (approx. 80,000) but from distinct sources (human gastric mucosa, human erythrocyte membranes and rat spleen) were shown to have immunological cross-reactivity and comparable mobilities when subjected to polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis under non-denaturing conditions. Kinetic parameters (kcat, Km and Ki) were determined for the interactions of the three enzymes with two synthetic chromogenic substrates and five inhibitors (naturally occurring and synthetic). On this basis it would appear that all of the enzymes should be considered equivalent to cathepsin E. pH-activity measurements indicated that the aspartic proteinase that originated from the erythrocyte membranes retained activity at a higher pH value than either of its readily soluble counterparts. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3058118

  15. Design of dimerization inhibitors of HIV-1 aspartic proteinase: A computer-based combinatorial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caflisch, Amedeo; Schramm, Hans J.; Karplus, Martin

    2000-02-01

    Inhibition of dimerization to the active form of the HIV-1 aspartic proteinase (HIV-1 PR) may be a way to decrease the probability of escape mutations for this viral protein. The Multiple Copy Simultaneous Search (MCSS) methodology was used to generate functionality maps for the dimerization interface of HIV-1 PR. The positions of the MCSS minima of 19 organic fragments, once postprocessed to take into account solvation effects, are in good agreement with experimental data on peptides that bind to the interface. The MCSS minima combined with an approach for computational combinatorial ligand design yielded a set of modified HIV-1 PR C-terminal peptides that are similar to known nanomolar inhibitors of HIV-1 PR dimerization. A number of N-substituted 2,5-diketopiperazines are predicted to be potential dimerization inhibitors of HIV-1 PR.

  16. Nepenthesin, a unique member of a novel subfamily of aspartic proteinases: enzymatic and structural characteristics.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kenji; Athauda, Senarath B P; Matsumoto, Koji; Rajapakshe, Sanath; Kuribayashi, Masayuki; Kojima, Masaki; Kubomura-Yoshida, Nobuko; Iwamatsu, Akihiro; Shibata, Chiaki; Inoue, Hideshi

    2005-12-01

    Carnivorous plants are known to secrete acid proteinases to digest prey, mainly insects, for nitrogen uptake. In our recent study, we have purified, for the first time, to homogeneity two acid proteinases, nepenthesin I (Nep I) and nepenthesin II (Nep II) from the pitcher fluid of Nepenthes distillatoria and investigated their enzymatic and structural characteristics. Both enzymes were optimally active at pH approx. 2.6 toward acid-denatured hemoglobin; the specificity of Nep I toward oxidized insulin B chain appears to be similar, but slightly wider than those of other aspartic proteinases (APs). At or below 50 degrees C both enzymes were remarkably stable; especially Nep I was extremely stable over a wide range of pH from 3 to 10 for over 30 days. This suggests an evolutionary adaptation of the enzymes to their specific habitat. We have also cloned the cDNAs and deduced the complete amino acid sequences of the precursors of Nep I and Nep II from the pitcher tissue of Nepenthes gracilis. Although the corresponding mature enzymes are homologous with ordinary pepsin-type APs, both enzymes had a high content of cysteine residues (12 residues per molecule), which are assumed to form six unique disulfide bonds as suggested by computer modeling and are thought to contribute toward the remarkable stability of Neps. Moreover, the amino acid sequence identity of Neps with ordinary APs, including plant vacuolar APs, are remarkably low (approx. 20%), and phylogenetic comparison shows that Neps are distantly related to them to form a novel subfamily of APs with a high content of cysteine residues and a characteristic insertion, named 'the Nep-type AP (NAP)-specific insertion', including a large number of novel, orthologous plant APs emerging in the gene/protein databases.

  17. Enzymic and structural characterization of nepenthesin, a unique member of a novel subfamily of aspartic proteinases.

    PubMed

    Athauda, Senarath B P; Matsumoto, Koji; Rajapakshe, Sanath; Kuribayashi, Masayuki; Kojima, Masaki; Kubomura-Yoshida, Nobuko; Iwamatsu, Akihiro; Shibata, Chiaki; Inoue, Hideshi; Takahashi, Kenji

    2004-07-01

    Carnivorous plants are known to secrete acid proteinases to digest prey, mainly insects, for nitrogen uptake. In the present study, we have purified, for the first time, to homogeneity two acid proteinases (nepenthesins I and II) from the pitcher fluid of Nepenthes distillatoria (a pitcher-plant known locally as badura) and investigated their enzymic and structural characteristics. Both enzymes were optimally active at pH approx. 2.6 towards acid-denatured haemoglobin; the specificity of nepenthesin I towards oxidized insulin B chain appears to be similar, but slightly wider than those of other APs (aspartic proteinases). Among the enzymic properties, however, the most notable is their unusual stability: both enzymes were remarkably stable at or below 50 degrees C, especially nepenthesin I was extremely stable over a wide range of pH from 3 to 10 for over 30 days. This suggests an evolutionary adaptation of the enzymes to their specific habitat. We have also cloned the cDNAs and deduced the complete amino acid sequences of the precursors of nepenthesins I and II (437 and 438 residues respectively) from the pitcher tissue of N. gracilis. Although the corresponding mature enzymes (each 359 residues) are homologous with ordinary pepsin-type APs, both enzymes had a high content of cysteine residues (12 residues/molecule), which are assumed to form six unique disulphide bonds as suggested by computer modelling and are supposed to contribute towards the remarkable stability of nepenthesins. Moreover, the amino acid sequence identity of nepenthesins with ordinary APs, including plant vacuolar APs, is remarkably low (approx. 20%), and phylogenetic comparison shows that nepenthesins are distantly related to them to form a novel subfamily of APs with a high content of cysteine residues and a characteristic insertion, named 'the nepenthesin-type AP-specific insertion', that includes a large number of novel, orthologous plant APs emerging in the gene/protein databases.

  18. Aspartic proteinases of Candida spp.: role in pathogenicity and antifungal resistance.

    PubMed

    Silva, Naiara C; Nery, Jéssica M; Dias, Amanda L T

    2014-01-01

    Fungal infections represent a serious health risk as they are particularly prevalent in immunocompromised individuals. Candida spp. pathogenicity depends on several factors and secreted aspartic proteinases (Sap) are considered one of the most critical factors as they are associated with adhesion, invasion and tissue damage. The production of proteinases is encoded by a family of 10 genes known as SAP, which are distributed differently among the species. The expression of these genes may be influenced by environmental conditions, which generally result in a higher fungal invasive potential. Non-pathogenic Candida spp. usually have fewer SAP genes, which are not necessarily expressed in the genome. Exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of antifungal agents promotes the development of resistant strains with an increased expression of SAP genes. In general, Candida spp. isolates that are resistant to antifungals show a higher secretion of Sap than the susceptible isolates. The relationship between Sap secretion and the susceptibility profile of the isolates is of great interest, although the role of SAPs in the development of resistance to antifungal agents remains still unclear. This review is the first one to address these issues.

  19. Free-energy analysis of enzyme-inhibitor binding: aspartic proteinase-pepstatin complexes.

    PubMed

    Kalra, P; Das, A; Jayaram, B

    2001-01-01

    Expeditious in silico determinations of the free energies of binding of a series of inhibitors to an enzyme are of immense practical value in structure-based drug design efforts. Some recent advances in the field of computational chemistry have rendered a rigorous thermodynamic treatment of biologic molecules feasible, starting from a molecular description of the biomolecule, solvent, and salt. Pursuing the goal of developing and making available a software for assessing binding affinities, we present here a computationally rapid, albeit elaborate, methodology to estimate and analyze the molecular thermodynamics of enzyme-inhibitor binding with crystal structures as the point of departure. The complexes of aspartic proteinases with seven inhibitors have been adopted for this study. The standard free energy of complexation is considered in terms of a thermodynamic cycle of six distinct steps decomposed into a total of 18 well-defined components. The model we employed involves explicit all-atom accounts of the energetics of electrostatic interactions, solvent screening effects, van der Waals components, and cavitation effects of solvation combined with a Debye-Huckel treatment of salt effects. The magnitudes and signs of the various components are estimated using the AMBER parm94 force field, generalized Born theory, and solvent accessibility measures. Estimates of translational and rotational entropy losses on complexation as well as corresponding changes in the vibrational and configurational entropy are also included. The calculated standard free energies of binding at this stage are within an order of magnitude of the observed inhibition constants and necessitate further improvements in the computational protocols to enable quantitative predictions. Some areas such as inclusion of structural adaptation effects, incorporation of site-dependent amino acid pKa shifts, consideration of the dynamics of the active site for fine-tuning the methodology are easily

  20. Differential expression of wheat aspartic proteinases, WAP1 and WAP2, in germinating and maturing seeds.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Tomoko; Terauchi, Kaede; Kiyosaki, Toshihiro; Asakura, Tomiko; Funaki, Junko; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko

    2007-04-01

    Two aspartic proteinase (AP) cDNA clones, WAP1 and WAP2, were obtained from wheat seeds. Proteins encoded by these clones shared 61% amino acid sequence identity. RNA blotting analysis showed that WAP1 and WAP2 were expressed in both germinating and maturing seeds. The level of WAP2 mRNA expression was clearly weaker than that of WAP1 in all tissues of seeds during germination and maturation. APs purified from germinating seeds were enzymatically active and digested the wheat storage protein, gluten. To elucidate the physiological functions of WAP1 and WAP2 in seeds, we investigated the localisation of WAP1 and WAP2 by in situ hybridisation. In germinating seeds investigated 24h after imbibition, both WAP1 and WAP2 were expressed in embryos, especially in radicles and shoots, scutellum, and the aleurone layer. In maturing seeds, WAP1 was expressed in the whole embryo, with slightly stronger expression in radicles and shoots. WAP1 was also expressed in the aleurone layer 3 weeks after flowering. Strong signals of WAP1 mRNA were detected in the whole embryo and aleurone layer 6 weeks after flowering. On the other hand, WAP2 was scarcely detected in seeds 3 weeks after flowering, and thereafter weak signals began to appear in the whole embryo. WAP1 and WAP2 were expressed widely in germinating and maturing seeds. Such diversity in site- and stage-specific expression of the two enzymes suggests their differential functions in wheat seeds.

  1. N-terminal extension of the yeast IA3 aspartic proteinase inhibitor relaxes the strict intrinsic selectivity.

    PubMed

    Winterburn, Tim J; Phylip, Lowri H; Bur, Daniel; Wyatt, David M; Berry, Colin; Kay, John

    2007-07-01

    Yeast IA(3) aspartic proteinase inhibitor operates through an unprecedented mechanism and exhibits a remarkable specificity for one target enzyme, saccharopepsin. Even aspartic proteinases that are very closely similar to saccharopepsin (e.g. the vacuolar enzyme from Pichia pastoris) are not susceptible to significant inhibition. The Pichia proteinase was selected as the target for initial attempts to engineer IA(3) to re-design the specificity. The IA(3) polypeptides from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces castellii differ considerably in sequence. Alterations made by deletion or exchange of the residues in the C-terminal segment of these polypeptides had only minor effects. By contrast, extension of each of these wild-type and chimaeric polypeptides at its N-terminus by an MK(H)(7)MQ sequence generated inhibitors that displayed subnanomolar potency towards the Pichia enzyme. This gain-in-function was completely reversed upon removal of the extension sequence by exopeptidase trimming. Capture of the potentially positively charged aromatic histidine residues of the extension by remote, negatively charged side-chains, which were identified in the Pichia enzyme by modelling, may increase the local IA(3) concentration and create an anchor that enables the N-terminal segment residues to be harboured in closer proximity to the enzyme active site, thus promoting their interaction. In saccharopepsin, some of the counterpart residues are different and, consistent with this, the N-terminal extension of each IA(3) polypeptide was without major effect on the potency of interaction with saccharopepsin. In this way, it is possible to convert IA(3) polypeptides that display little affinity for the Pichia enzyme into potent inhibitors of this proteinase and thus broaden the target selectivity of this remarkable small protein.

  2. Kinetic analysis of a general model of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens involving a reversible inhibitor. I. Kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-López, A; Sotos-Lomas, A; Arribas, E; Masia-Perez, J; Garcia-Molina, F; García-Moreno, M; Varon, R

    2007-04-01

    Starting from a simple general reaction mechanism of activation of aspartic proteinases zymogens involving a uni- and a bimolecular simultaneous activation route and a reversible inhibition step, the time course equation of the zymogen, inhibitor and activated enzyme concentrations have been derived. Likewise, expressions for the time required for any reaction progress and the corresponding mean activation rates as well as the half-life of the global zymogen activation have been derived. An experimental design and kinetic data analysis is suggested to estimate the kinetic parameters involved in the reaction mechanism proposed.

  3. The squash aspartic proteinase inhibitor SQAPI is widely present in the cucurbitales, comprises a small multigene family, and is a member of the phytocystatin family.

    PubMed

    Christeller, John T; Farley, Peter C; Marshall, Richelle K; Anandan, Ananda; Wright, Michele M; Newcomb, Richard D; Laing, William A

    2006-12-01

    The squash (Cucurbita maxima) phloem exudate-expressed aspartic proteinase inhibitor (SQAPI) is a novel aspartic acid proteinase inhibitor, constituting a fifth family of aspartic proteinase inhibitors. However, a comparison of the SQAPI sequence to the phytocystatin (a cysteine proteinase inhibitor) family sequences showed approximately 30% identity. Modeling SQAPI onto the structure of oryzacystatin gave an excellent fit; regions identified as proteinase binding loops in cystatin coincided with regions of SQAPI identified as hypervariable, and tryptophan fluorescence changes were also consistent with a cystatin structure. We show that SQAPI exists as a small gene family. Characterization of mRNA and clone walking of genomic DNA (gDNA) produced 10 different but highly homologous SQAPI genes from Cucurbita maxima and the small family size was confirmed by Southern blotting, where evidence for at least five loci was obtained. Using primers designed from squash sequences, PCR of gDNA showed the presence of SQAPI genes in other members of the Cucurbitaceae and in representative members of Coriariaceae, Corynocarpaceae, and Begoniaceae. Thus, at least four of seven families of the order Cucurbitales possess member species with SQAPI genes, covering approximately 99% of the species in this order. A phylogenetic analysis of these Cucurbitales SQAPI genes indicated not only that SQAPI was present in the Cucurbitales ancestor but also that gene duplication has occurred during evolution of the order. Phytocystatins are widespread throughout the plant kingdom, suggesting that SQAPI has evolved recently from a phytocystatin ancestor. This appears to be the first instance of a cystatin being recruited as a proteinase inhibitor of another proteinase family.

  4. Purification and molecular cloning of aspartic proteinases from the stomach of adult Japanese fire belly newts, Cynops pyrrhogaster.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Tatsuki; Sano, Kaori; Kawaguchi, Mari; Kobayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Yasumasu, Shigeki; Inokuchi, Tomofumi

    2016-04-01

    Six aspartic proteinase precursors, a pro-cathepsin E (ProCatE) and five pepsinogens (Pgs), were purified from the stomach of adult newts (Cynops pyrrhogaster). On sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the molecular weights of the Pgs and active enzymes were 37-38 kDa and 31-34 kDa, respectively. The purified ProCatE was a dimer whose subunits were connected by a disulphide bond. cDNA cloning by polymerase chain reaction and subsequent phylogenetic analysis revealed that three of the purified Pgs were classified as PgA and the remaining two were classified as PgBC belonging to C-type Pg. Our results suggest that PgBC is one of the major constituents of acid protease in the urodele stomach. We hypothesize that PgBC is an amphibian-specific Pg that diverged during its evolutional lineage. PgBC was purified and characterized for the first time. The purified urodele pepsin A was completely inhibited by equal molar units of pepstatin A. Conversely, the urodele pepsin BC had low sensitivity to pepstatin A. In acidic condition, the activation rates of newt pepsin A and BC were similar to those of mammalian pepsin A and C1, respectively. Our results suggest that the enzymological characters that distinguish A- and C-type pepsins appear to be conserved in mammals and amphibians.

  5. Ovarian steroids, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and/or aspartic proteinases cooperate to control endometrial remodeling by regulating gene expression in the stroma and glands.

    PubMed

    Gaide Chevronnay, Héloïse P; Lemoine, Pascale; Courtoy, Pierre J; Marbaix, Etienne; Henriet, Patrick

    2010-09-01

    Explants from nonmenstrual endometria cultured in the absence of ovarian hormones undergo tissue breakdown. Addition of estradiol and progesterone (EP) prevents proteolysis. Explants include stromal and epithelial compartments which play different but complementary roles in endometrial physiology, including tissue remodeling and hormonal response. In order to characterize the cell type-specific contribution to regulation of tissue breakdown, we characterized the transcriptomes of microdissected stromal and glandular areas from endometrial explants cultured with or without EP. The datasets were also compared to other published endometrial transcriptomes. Finally, the contribution of proteolysis, hypoxia, and MAPKs to the regulation of selected genes was further investigated in explant culture. This analysis identified distinct gene expression profiles in stroma and glands, with differential response to EP, but functional clustering underlined convergence in biological processes, further indicating that endometrial remodeling requires cooperation between the two compartments through expression of cell type-specific genes. Only partial overlaps were observed between lists of genes involved in different occurrences of endometrial breakdown, pointing to a limited number of potentially crucial regulators but also to the requirement for additional mechanisms controlling tissue remodeling. We identified a group of genes differentially regulated by EP in stroma and glands among which some were sensitive to MAPKs and/or aspartic proteinases and were not induced by hypoxia. In conclusion, MAPKs and/or aspartic proteinases likely act in concert with EP to locally and specifically control differential expression of genes between degrading and preserved areas of the human endometrium.

  6. Engineering the substrate specificity of rhizopuspepsin: the role of Asp 77 of fungal aspartic proteinases in facilitating the cleavage of oligopeptide substrates with lysine in P1.

    PubMed Central

    Lowther, W. T.; Majer, P.; Dunn, B. M.

    1995-01-01

    Rhizopuspepsin and other fungal aspartic proteinases are distinct from the mammalian enzymes in that they are able to cleave substrates with lysine in the P1 position. Sequence and structural comparisons suggest that two aspartic acid residues, Asp 30 and Asp 77 (pig pepsin numbering), may be responsible for generating this unique specificity. Asp 30 and Asp 77 were changed to the corresponding residues in porcine pepsin, Ile 30 and Thr 77, to create single and double mutants. The zymogen forms of the wild-type and mutant enzymes were overexpressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies. Following solubilization, denaturation, refolding, activation, and purification to homogeneity, structural and kinetic comparisons were made. The mutant enzymes exhibited a high degree of structural similarity to the wild-type recombinant protein and a native isozyme. The catalytic activities of the recombinant proteins were analyzed with chromogenic substrates containing lysine in the P1, P2, or P3 positions. Mutation of Asp 77 resulted in a loss of 7 kcal mol-1 of transition-state stabilization energy in the hydrolysis of the substrate containing lysine in P1. An inhibitor containing the positively charged P1-lysine side chain inhibited only the enzymes containing Asp 77. Inhibition of the Asp 77 mutants of rhizopuspepsin and several mammalian enzymes was restored upon acetylation of the lysine side chain. These results suggest that an exploitation of the specific electrostatic interaction of Asp 77 in the active site of fungal enzymes may lead to the design of compounds that preferentially inhibit a variety of related Candida proteinases in immunocompromised patients. PMID:7613467

  7. Structures of aspartic acid-96 in the L and N intermediates of bacteriorhodopsin: analysis by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, A.; Sasaki, J.; Shichida, Y.; Yoshizawa, T.; Chang, M.; Ni, B.; Needleman, R.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1992-01-01

    The light-induced difference Fourier transform infrared spectrum between the L or N intermediate minus light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin (BR) was measured in order to examine the protonated states and the changes in the interactions of carboxylic acids of Asp-96 and Asp-115 in these intermediates. Vibrational bands due to the protonated and unprotonated carboxylic acid were identified by isotope shift and band depletion upon substitution of Asp-96 or -115 by asparagine. While the signal due to the deprotonation of Asp-96 was clearly observed in the N intermediate, this residue remained protonated in L. Asp-115 was partially deprotonated in L. The C = O stretching vibration of protonated Asp-96 of L showed almost no shift upon 2H2O substitution, in contrast to the corresponding band of Asp-96 or Asp-115 of BR, which shifted by 9-12 cm-1 under the same conditions. In the model system of acetic acid in organic solvents, such an absence of the shift of the C = O stretching vibration of the protonated carboxylic acid upon 2H2O substitution was seen only when the O-H of acetic acid is hydrogen-bonded. The non-hydrogen-bonded monomer showed the 2H2O-dependent shift. Thus, the O-H bond of Asp-96 enters into hydrogen bonding upon conversion of BR to L. Its increased hydrogen bonding in L is consistent with the observed downshift of the O-H stretching vibration of the carboxylic acid of Asp-96.

  8. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  9. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  10. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... also called asparaginic acid. Aspartic acid helps every cell in the body work. It plays a role in: Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: Legumes such as ...

  11. Multiple forms of calcium-dependent proteinase in crustacean muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.; Skinner, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    Four calcium-dependent proteinase (CDP) activities in lobster muscles have been resolved by high performance liquid chromatography. These activities differ in molecular weight and net charge. Though optimum activity occurred at high (5 and 10 mM) calcium at pH 6.8, the enzymes differ in activation at lower calcium concentrations. Only one of the CDPs is active at 100 ..mu..M calcium; none are active at 10 ..mu..M and below. Although all four CDPs are inhibited by the cysteine proteinase inhibitors leupeptin, E-64, and iodoacetamide, they show a differential response to the aspartic proteinase inhibitor pepstatin and the serine proteinase inhibitor PMSF. In contrast to CDPs from vertebrate tissues, crustacean muscles contain multiple forms that require calcium at millimolar levels. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Compartmentalization of proteinases and amylases in Nauphoeta cinerea midgut.

    PubMed

    Elpidina, E N; Vinokurov, K S; Gromenko, V A; Rudenskaya, Y A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Zhuzhikov, D P

    2001-12-01

    Compartmentalization of proteinases, amylases, and pH in the midgut of Nauphoeta cinerea Oliv. (Blattoptera:Blaberidae) was studied in order to understand the organization of protein and starch digestion. Total proteolytic activity measured with azocasein was maximal at pH 11.5 both in anterior (AM) and posterior (PM) halves of the midgut, but the bulk of activity (67%) was found in PM. Total AM and PM preparations were fractionated on a Sephadex G-50 column and further analysed by means of activity electrophoresis and specific inhibitors and activators. The major activity in PM was classified as an unusual SH-dependent proteinase with M(r) 24,000 and pH optimum with synthetic substrate BApNA at 10.0. The enzyme was 43-fold activated in the presence of 1 mM DTT, insensitive to synthetic inhibitors of serine (PMSF, TLCK, TPCK) and cysteine (IAA, E-64) proteinases, strongly inhibited by STI, and displayed four active bands on zymograms. In PM, activities of trypsin-like, chymotrypsin-like, subtilisin-like, and cysteine proteinases were observed. Aspartic and metalloproteinases were not detected. In AM, activity of unusual SH-dependent proteinase also dominated and activity of chymotrypsin-like proteinase was observed, but their levels were much lower than in PM. Distribution of amylase activity, exhibiting an optimum at pH 6.0, was quite the opposite. The major part of it (67%) was located in AM. Treatment of amylase preparation with proteinases from AM and PM reduced amylase activity twofold. pH of the midgut contents was 6.0-7.2 in AM, 6.4-7.6 in the first and 8.8-9.3 in the second halves of PM. Thus, pH in AM is in good agreement with the optimal pH of amylase, located in this compartment, but the activity of proteinases, including the ability to degrade amylase, in such an environment is low. Active proteolysis takes place in the second half of PM, where pH of the gut is close to the optimal pH of proteinases.

  13. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying the peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  14. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  15. Effect of retroviral proteinase inhibitors on Mason-Pfizer monkey virus maturation and transmembrane glycoprotein cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Sommerfelt, M A; Petteway, S R; Dreyer, G B; Hunter, E

    1992-01-01

    Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) is the prototype type D retrovirus which preassembles immature intracytoplasmic type A particles within the infected cell cytoplasm. Intracytoplasmic type A particles are composed of uncleaved polyprotein precursors which upon release are cleaved by the viral proteinase to their constituent mature proteins. This results in a morphological change in the virion described as maturation. We have investigated the role of the viral proteinase in virus maturation and infectivity by inhibiting the function of the enzyme through mutagenesis of the proteinase gene and by using peptide inhibitors originally designed to block human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proteinase activity. Mutation of the active-site aspartic acid, Asp-26, to asparagine abrogated the activity of the M-PMV proteinase but did not affect the assembly of noninfectious, immature virus particles. In mutant virions, the transmembrane glycoprotein (TM) of M-PMV, initially synthesized as a cell-associated gp22, is not cleaved to gp20, as is observed with wild-type virions. This demonstrates that the viral proteinase is responsible for this cleavage event. Hydroxyethylene isostere human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proteinase inhibitors were shown to block M-PMV proteinase cleavage of the TM glycoprotein and Gag-containing precursors in a dose-dependent manner. The TM cleavage event was more sensitive than cleavage of the Gag precursors to inhibition. The infectivity of treated particles was reduced significantly, but experiments showed that inhibition of precursor and TM cleavage may be at least partially reversible. These results demonstrate that the M-PMV aspartyl proteinase is activated in released virions and that the hydroxyethylene isostere proteinase inhibitors used in this study exhibit a broad spectrum of antiretroviral activity. Images PMID:1602542

  16. [Biosynthesis of the Bacillus intermedius subtilisin-like serine proteinase by the recombinant Bacillus subtilis strain].

    PubMed

    Kirillova, Iu M; Mikhaĭlova, E O; Balaban, N P; Mardanova, A M; Kaiumov, A R; Rudenskaia, G N; Kostrov, S V; Sharipova, M R

    2006-01-01

    The effect of certain nutrients on the growth and production of the Bacillus intermedius subtilisin-like serine proteinase by the recombinant strain Bacillus subtilis AJ73(pCS9) was studied. Glucose was found to inhibit the synthesis of proteinase in the early (28 h of growth) but not in the late stationary phase (48 h of growth). The inhibitory effect of the other mono- and disaccharides studied was less pronounced. Casamino acids added to the medium at concentrations of 0.1-1% as an additional carbon and nitrogen source stimulated enzyme biosynthesis. Individual amino acids (cysteine, asparagine, glutamine, tryptophan, histidine, and glutamate) also stimulated enzyme biosynthesis in the early stationary phase by 25-30%, whereas other amino acids (valine, leucine, alanine, and aspartate) were ineffective or even slightly inhibitory to enzyme production. The stimulatory effect of the first group of amino acids on the synthesis of proteinase in the late stationary phase was negligible. In contrast, the bivalent ions Ca2+, Mg2+, and Mn2+ stimulated biosynthesis of proteinase in the late stationary phase (by 20-60%) and not in the early stationary phase. The data indicate that there are differences in the biosyntheses of proteinase by the recombinant B. subtilis strain during the early and late periods of the stationary phases.

  17. HIV proteinase inhibitors target the Ddi1-like protein of Leishmania parasites

    PubMed Central

    White, Rhian E.; Powell, David J.; Berry, Colin

    2011-01-01

    HIV proteinase inhibitors reduce the levels of Leishmania parasites in vivo and in vitro, but their biochemical target is unknown. We have identified an ortholog of the yeast Ddi1 protein as the only member of the aspartic proteinase family in Leishmania parasites, and in this study we investigate this protein as a potential target for the drugs. To date, no enzyme assay has been developed for the Ddi1 proteins, but Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking the DDI1 gene secrete high levels of protein into the medium. We developed an assay in which these knockout yeast were functionally complemented to low secretion by introduction of genes encoding Ddi1 orthologs from Leishmania major or humans. Plasmid alone controls gave no complementation. Treatment of the Ddi1 transformants with HIV proteinase inhibitors showed differential effects dependent on the origin of the Ddi1. Dose responses allowed calculation of IC50 values; e.g., for nelfinavir, of 3.4 μM (human Ddi1) and 0.44 μM (Leishmania Ddi1). IC50 values with Leishmania constructs mirror the potency of inhibitors against parasites. Our results show that Ddi1 proteins are targets of HIV proteinase inhibitors and indicates the Leishmania Ddi1 as the likely target for these drugs and a potential target for antiparasitic therapy.—White, R. E., Powell, D. J., Berry, C. HIV proteinase inhibitors target the Ddi1-Like protein of Leishmania parasites. PMID:21266539

  18. Manduca sexta hemolymph proteinase 21 activates prophenoloxidase-activating proteinase 3 in an insect innate immune response proteinase cascade.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Maureen J; Wang, Yang; Jiang, Haobo; Kanost, Michael R

    2007-04-20

    Melanization, an insect immune response, requires a set of hemolymph proteins including pathogen recognition proteins that initiate the response, a cascade of mostly unknown serine proteinases, and phenoloxidase. Until now, only initial and final proteinases in the pathways have been conclusively identified. Four such proteinases have been purified from the larval hemolymph of Manduca sexta: hemolymph proteinase 14 (HP14), which autoactivates in the presence of microbial surface components, and three prophenoloxidase-activating proteinases (PAP1-3). In this study, we have used two complementary approaches to identify a serine proteinase that activates proPAP3. Partial purification from hemolymph of an activator of proPAP3 resulted in an active fraction with two abundant polypeptides of approximately 32 and approximately 37 kDa. Labeling of these polypeptides with a serine proteinase inhibitor, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, indicated that they were active serine proteinases. N-terminal sequencing revealed that both were cleaved forms of the previously identified hemolymph serine proteinase, HP21. Surprisingly, cleavage of proHP21 had occurred not at the predicted activation site but more N-terminal to it. In vitro reactions carried out with purified HP14 (which activates proHP21), proHP21, proPAP3, and site-directed mutant forms of the latter two proteinases confirmed that HP21 activates proPAP3 by limited proteolysis. Like the HP21 products purified from hemolymph, HP21 that was activated by HP14 in the in vitro reactions was not cleaved at its predicted activation site.

  19. A Deficiency in Aspartate Biosynthesis in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C2 Causes Slow Milk Coagulation†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Yu, Weizhu; Coolbear, Tim; O’Sullivan, Dan; McKay, Larry L.

    1998-01-01

    A mutant of fast milk-coagulating (Fmc+) Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C2, designated L. lactis KB4, was identified. Although possessing the known components essential for utilizing casein as a nitrogen source, which include functional proteinase (PrtP) activity and oligopeptide, di- and tripeptide, and amino acid transport systems, KB4 exhibited a slow milk coagulation (Fmc−) phenotype. When the amino acid requirements of L. lactis C2 were compared with those of KB4 by use of a chemically defined medium, it was found that KB4 was unable to grow in the absence of aspartic acid. This aspartic acid requirement could also be met by aspartate-containing peptides. The addition of aspartic acid to milk restored the Fmc+ phenotype of KB4. KB4 was found to be defective in pyruvate carboxylase and thus was deficient in the ability to form oxaloacetate and hence aspartic acid from pyruvate and carbon dioxide. The results suggest that when lactococci are propagated in milk, aspartate derived from casein is unable to meet fully the nutritional demands of the lactococci, and they become dependent upon aspartate biosynthesis. PMID:9572935

  20. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    PubMed

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-03-15

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelain, fruit bromelain and ananain were shown to be immunologically distinct. Enzymic characterization revealed differences in both substrate-specificities and inhibition profiles. A study of the cysteine proteinase derived from the related bromeliad Bromelia pinguin (pinguinain) indicated that in many respects it was similar to fruit bromelain, although it was found to be immunologically distinct.

  1. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-01-01

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelain, fruit bromelain and ananain were shown to be immunologically distinct. Enzymic characterization revealed differences in both substrate-specificities and inhibition profiles. A study of the cysteine proteinase derived from the related bromeliad Bromelia pinguin (pinguinain) indicated that in many respects it was similar to fruit bromelain, although it was found to be immunologically distinct. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2327970

  2. Evolutionary mechanisms acting on proteinase inhibitor variability.

    PubMed

    Christeller, John T

    2005-11-01

    The interaction of proteinase inhibitors produced, in most cases, by host organisms and the invasive proteinases of pathogens or parasites or the dietary proteinases of predators, results in an evolutionary 'arms race' of rapid and ongoing change in both interacting proteins. The importance of these interactions in pathogenicity and predation is indicated by the high level and diversity of observable evolutionary activity that has been found. At the initial level of evolutionary change, recruitment of other functional protein-folding families has occurred, with the more recent evolution of one class of proteinase inhibitor from another, using the same mechanism and proteinase contact residues. The combination of different inhibitor domains into a single molecule is also observed. The basis from which variation is possible is shown by the high rate of retention of gene duplication events and by the associated process of inhibitory domain multiplication. At this level of reorganization, mutually exclusive splicing is also observed. Finally, the major mechanism by which variation is achieved rapidly is hypervariation of contact residues, an almost ubiquitous feature of proteinase inhibitors. The diversity of evolutionary mechanisms in a single class of proteins is unlikely to be common, because few systems are under similar pressure to create variation. Proteinase inhibitors are therefore a potential model system in which to study basic evolutionary process such as functional diversification.

  3. [Extracellular proteinases of filamentous fungi as potential markers of phytopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Dunaevskiĭ, Ia E; Gruban', T N; Beliakova, G A; Belozerskiĭ, M A

    2006-01-01

    The presence of proteins in the culture liquid of filamentous fungi under study was found to induce the secretion of proteinases. The inhibitory analysis of the major extracellular proteinases of the saprotrophic fungus Trichoderma harzianum and the phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria alternata showed that they both belong to the group of serine proteinases. The substrate specificity of these proteinases and their sensitivity to inhibitors suggest that the enzyme of T. harzianum is a subtilisin-like proteinase and the enzyme of A. alternata is a trypsin-like proteinase. This difference between the proteinases may reflect the physiological difference between their producers (saprotroph and phytopathogen).

  4. Is Aspartate an Excitatory Neurotransmitter?

    PubMed Central

    Herring, Bruce E.; Silm, Katlin

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has resurrected the idea that the amino acid aspartate, a selective NMDA receptor agonist, is a neurotransmitter. Using a mouse that lacks the glutamate-selective vesicular transporter VGLUT1, we find that glutamate alone fully accounts for the activation of NMDA receptors at excitatory synapses in the hippocampus. This excludes a role for aspartate and, by extension, a recently proposed role for the sialic acid transporter sialin in excitatory transmission. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT It has been proposed that the amino acid aspartate serves as a neurotransmitter. Although aspartate is a selective agonist for NMDA receptors, we find that glutamate alone fully accounts for neurotransmission at excitatory synapses in the hippocampus, excluding a role for aspartate. PMID:26180193

  5. Aspartate Biosynthesis Is Essential for the Growth of Streptococcus thermophilus in Milk, and Aspartate Availability Modulates the Level of Urease Activity▿

    PubMed Central

    Arioli, Stefania; Monnet, Christophe; Guglielmetti, Simone; Parini, Carlo; De Noni, Ivano; Hogenboom, Johannes; Halami, Prakash M.; Mora, Diego

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the carbon dioxide metabolism of Streptococcus thermophilus, evaluating the phenotype of a phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase-negative mutant obtained by replacement of a functional ppc gene with a deleted and inactive version, Δppc. The growth of the mutant was compared to that of the parent strain in a chemically defined medium and in milk, supplemented or not with l-aspartic acid, the final product of the metabolic pathway governed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. It was concluded that aspartate present in milk is not sufficient for the growth of S. thermophilus. As a consequence, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity was considered fundamental for the biosynthesis of l-aspartic acid in S. thermophilus metabolism. This enzymatic activity is therefore essential for growth of S. thermophilus in milk even if S. thermophilus was cultured in association with proteinase-positive Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. It was furthermore observed that the supplementation of milk with aspartate significantly affected the level of urease activity. Further experiments, carried out with a pureI-gusA recombinant strain, revealed that expression of the urease operon was sensitive to the aspartate concentration in milk and to the cell availability of glutamate, glutamine, and ammonium ions. PMID:17660309

  6. Extracellular alkaline proteinase of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    PubMed

    Dunaevsky, Ya E; Matveeva, A R; Beliakova, G A; Domash, V I; Belozersky, M A

    2007-03-01

    The main proteinase of the filamentous fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides causing anthracnoses and serious problems for production and storage of agricultural products has molecular mass of 57 kD and was purified more than 200-fold to homogeneity with the yield of 5%. Maximal activity of the proteinase is at pH 9.0-10.0, and the enzyme is stable at pH 6.0-11.5 (residual activity not less than 70%). The studied enzyme completely kept its activity to 55 degrees C, with a temperature optimum of 45 degrees C. The purified C. gloeosporioides proteinase is stable at alkaline pH values, but rapidly loses its activity at pH values lower than 5.0. Addition of bovine serum albumin stabilizes the enzyme under acidic conditions. Data on inhibitor analysis and substrate specificity of the enzyme allow its classification as a serine proteinase of subtilisin family. It is demonstrated that the extracellular proteinase of C. gloeosporioides specifically effects plant cell wall proteins. It is proposed that the studied proteinase--via hydrolysis of cell wall--provides for penetration of the fungus into the tissues of the host plant.

  7. The picornaviral 3C proteinases: cysteine nucleophiles in serine proteinase folds.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, B A

    1995-08-01

    The 3C proteinases are a novel group of cysteine proteinases with a serine proteinase-like fold that are responsible for the bulk of polyprotein processing in the Picornaviridae. Because members of this viral family are to blame for several ongoing global pandemic problems (rhinovirus, hepatitis A virus) as well as sporadic outbreaks of more serious pathologies (poliovirus), there has been continuing interest over the last two decades in the development of antiviral therapies. The recent determination of the structure of two of the 3C proteinases by X-ray crystallography opens the door for the application of the latest advances in computer-assisted identification and design of anti-proteinase therapeutic/chemoprophylactic agents.

  8. Purification and characterization of native and recombinant SaPIN2a, a plant sieve element-localized proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Yu; Ding, Ling-Wen; Ge, Zhi-Juan; Wang, Zhaoyu; Wang, Fanghai; Li, Ning; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2007-01-01

    SaPIN2a encodes a proteinase inhibitor in nightshade (Solanum americanum), which is specifically localized to the enucleate sieve elements. It has been proposed to play an important role in phloem development by regulating proteolysis in sieve elements. In this study, we purified and characterized native SaPIN2a from nightshade stems and recombinant SaPIN2a expressed in Escherichia coli. Purified native SaPIN2a was found as a charge isomer family of homodimers, and was weakly glycosylated. Native SaPIN2a significantly inhibited serine proteinases such as trypsin, chymotrypsin, and subtilisin, with the most potent inhibitory activity on subtilisin. It did not inhibit cysteine proteinase papain and aspartic proteinase cathepsin D. Recombinant SaPIN2a had a strong inhibitory effect on chymotrypsin, but its inhibitory activities toward trypsin and especially toward subtilisin were greatly reduced. In addition, native SaPIN2a can effectively inhibit midgut trypsin-like activities from Trichoplusia ni and Spodoptera litura larvae, suggesting a potential for the production of insect-resistant transgenic plants.

  9. Novel Aggregation Properties of Candida albicans Secreted Aspartyl Proteinase Sap6 Mediate Virulence in Oral Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rohitashw; Saraswat, Darpan; Tati, Swetha; Edgerton, Mira

    2015-07-01

    Candida albicans, a commensal fungus of the oral microbiome, causes oral candidiasis in humans with localized or systemic immune deficiencies. Secreted aspartic proteinases (Saps) are a family of 10 related proteases and are virulence factors due to their proteolytic activity, as well as their roles in adherence and colonization of host tissues. We found that mice infected sublingually with C. albicans cells overexpressing Sap6 (SAP6 OE and a Δsap8 strain) had thicker fungal plaques and more severe oral infection, while infection with the Δsap6 strain was attenuated. These hypervirulent strains had highly aggregative colony structure in vitro and higher secreted proteinase activity; however, the levels of proteinase activity of C. albicans Saps did not uniformly match their abilities to damage cultured oral epithelial cells (SCC-15 cells). Hyphal induction in cells overexpressing Sap6 (SAP6 OE and Δsap8 cells) resulted in formation of large cell-cell aggregates. These aggregates could be produced in germinated wild-type cells by addition of native or heat-inactivated Sap6. Sap6 bound only to germinated cells and increased C. albicans adhesion to oral epithelial cells. The adhesion properties of Sap6 were lost upon deletion of its integrin-binding motif (RGD) and could be inhibited by addition of RGD peptide or anti-integrin antibodies. Thus, Sap6 (but not Sap5) has an alternative novel function in cell-cell aggregation, independent of its proteinase activity, to promote infection and virulence in oral candidiasis.

  10. Novel Aggregation Properties of Candida albicans Secreted Aspartyl Proteinase Sap6 Mediate Virulence in Oral Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rohitashw; Saraswat, Darpan; Tati, Swetha

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans, a commensal fungus of the oral microbiome, causes oral candidiasis in humans with localized or systemic immune deficiencies. Secreted aspartic proteinases (Saps) are a family of 10 related proteases and are virulence factors due to their proteolytic activity, as well as their roles in adherence and colonization of host tissues. We found that mice infected sublingually with C. albicans cells overexpressing Sap6 (SAP6 OE and a Δsap8 strain) had thicker fungal plaques and more severe oral infection, while infection with the Δsap6 strain was attenuated. These hypervirulent strains had highly aggregative colony structure in vitro and higher secreted proteinase activity; however, the levels of proteinase activity of C. albicans Saps did not uniformly match their abilities to damage cultured oral epithelial cells (SCC-15 cells). Hyphal induction in cells overexpressing Sap6 (SAP6 OE and Δsap8 cells) resulted in formation of large cell-cell aggregates. These aggregates could be produced in germinated wild-type cells by addition of native or heat-inactivated Sap6. Sap6 bound only to germinated cells and increased C. albicans adhesion to oral epithelial cells. The adhesion properties of Sap6 were lost upon deletion of its integrin-binding motif (RGD) and could be inhibited by addition of RGD peptide or anti-integrin antibodies. Thus, Sap6 (but not Sap5) has an alternative novel function in cell-cell aggregation, independent of its proteinase activity, to promote infection and virulence in oral candidiasis. PMID:25870228

  11. Molecular dynamic and docking interaction study of Heterodera glycines serine proteinase with Vigna mungo proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Prasad, C V S Siva; Gupta, Saurabh; Gaponenko, Alex; Tiwari, Murlidhar

    2013-08-01

    Many plants do produce various defense proteins like proteinase inhibitors (PIs) to protect them against various pests. PIs function as pseudosubstrates of digestive proteinase, which inhibits proteolysis in pests and leads to amino acid deficiency-based mortality. This work reports the structural interaction studies of serine proteinase of Heterodera glycines (SPHG) with Vigna mungo proteinase inhibitor (VMPI). 3D protein structure modeling, validation of SPHG and VMPI, and their putative protein-protein binding sites were predicted. Protein-protein docking followed by molecular dynamic simulation was performed to find the reliable confirmation of SPHG-VMPI complex. Trajectory analysis of each successive conformation concludes better interaction of first loop in comparison with second loop. Lysine residues of first loop were actively participating in complex formation. Overall, this study discloses the structural aspects and interaction mechanisms of VMPI with SPHG, and it would be helpful in the development of pest-resistant genetically modified crops.

  12. Novel proteinase inhibitor promotes resistance to insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) and its protein are identified in response to insect feeding on B. vulgaris seedlings. BvSTI is cloned into an expression vector with constitutive promoter and transformed into Nicotiana benthamiana plants to assess BvSTI’s ability to ...

  13. Proteinase activity in human and murine saliva as a biomarker for proteinase inhibitor efficacy.

    PubMed

    Fingleton, Barbara; Menon, Ramkumar; Carter, Kathy J; Overstreet, P Dawn; Hachey, David L; Matrisian, Lynn M; McIntyre, J Oliver

    2004-12-01

    As molecularly targeted agents reach the clinic, there is a need for assays to detect their presence and effectiveness against target molecules in vivo. Proteinase inhibitors are one example of a class of therapeutic agent for which satisfactory methods of identifying successful target modulation in vivo are lacking. This is of particular importance while these drugs are in clinical trials because standard maximum-tolerated dose-finding studies often are not suitable due to lack of toxicity. Saliva represents a readily accessible bodily fluid that can be repeatedly sampled and used for assaying in vivo effects of systemic drugs. Here we show the development of a simple assay that can be used to measure proteinase activity in saliva and proteinase inhibition after systemic treatment with three different proteinase inhibitors. A variety of gelatinolytic activities present in human and murine saliva have been assayed with a fluorescent dye-labeled substrate and assigned to different proteinase categories by inclusion of specific classes of inhibitors. Treatment of mice with either matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors or a urokinase inhibitor for a period as short as 48 hours results in levels of the drugs that can be detected in saliva by mass spectrometry and concomitant decreases in salivary proteinase activity, thus demonstrating that these inhibitors successfully modulate their targets in vivo.

  14. Inhibition of a Plasmodium vinckei cysteine proteinase cures murine malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, P J; Lee, G K; Smith, R E

    1993-01-01

    Intraerythrocytic malaria parasites degrade hemoglobin as a principal source of amino acids for parasite protein synthesis. We have previously identified a Plasmodium falciparum trophozoite cysteine proteinase as a putative hemoglobinase and shown that specific inhibitors of this proteinase block the hydrolysis of globin and the development of cultured parasites. We now show that the murine malaria parasite Plasmodium vinckei has an analogous cysteine proteinase with similar biochemical properties to the P. falciparum proteinase, including an acid pH optimum, a preference for the peptide proteolytic substrate benzyloxycarbonyl (Z)-Phe-Arg-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, and nonomolar inhibition by seven peptide fluoromethyl ketone proteinase inhibitors. Thus, P. vinckei offers a model system for the in vivo testing of the antimalarial properties of cysteine proteinase inhibitors. One of the proteinase inhibitors studied, morpholine urea (Mu)-Phe-Homophenylalanine (HPhe)-CH2F strongly inhibited the P. vinckei cysteine proteinase in vitro and rapidly blocked parasite cysteine proteinase activity in vivo. When administered four times a day for 4 d to P. vinckei-infected mice, Mu-Phe-HPhe-CH2F elicited long-term cures in 80% of the treated animals. These results show that peptide proteinase inhibitors can be effective antimalarial compounds in vivo and suggest that the P. falciparum cysteine proteinase is a promising target for chemotherapy. Images PMID:8450035

  15. Insulin Aspart (rDNA Origin) Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... unless it is used in an external insulin pump. In patients with type 2 diabetes, insulin aspart ... also can be used with an external insulin pump. Before using insulin aspart in a pump system, ...

  16. Silk gland-specific proteinase inhibitor serpin16 from the Bombyx mori shows cysteine proteinase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Peng-Chao; Dong, Zhaoming; Xiao, Li; Li, Tao; Zhang, Yan; He, Huawei; Xia, Qingyou; Zhao, Ping

    2015-01-30

    Serpins (serine proteinase inhibitors) are widely distributed in different species and are well known for their inhibitory activities towards serine proteinases. Here, we report the functional characterization of Bombyx mori serpin16. Expression analysis showed that serpin16 was specifically expressed at high levels in the silk gland at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Moreover, homology modeling and multi-sequence alignment suggested that serpin16 had a canonical serpin fold, but it contained a unique reactive center loop, which was obviously shorter than that of typical serpins. Inhibitory activity analyses revealed that the target proteinase of serpin18 is a cysteine proteinase, rather than a serine proteinase. Furthermore, a Michaelis complex model of serpin16 with its target proteinase was constructed to explain the structural basis of how serpin16 recognizes the cysteine proteinase and its target specificity.

  17. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5017 Aspartic acid. (a) Product. Aspartic acid (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5017 Aspartic acid. (a) Product. Aspartic acid (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5017 Aspartic acid. (a) Product. Aspartic acid (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of...

  20. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5017 Aspartic acid. (a) Product. Aspartic acid (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of...

  1. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5017 Aspartic acid. (a) Product. Aspartic acid (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of...

  2. Inhibition of the 20S proteosome by a protein proteinase inhibitor: evidence that a natural serine proteinase inhibitor can inhibit a threonine proteinase.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Kimihiko; Koide, Takehiko

    2009-02-01

    The 20S proteasome (20S) is an intracellular threonine proteinase (Mr 750,000) that plays important roles in many cellular regulations. Several synthetic peptide inhibitors and bacteria-derived inhibitors such as lactacystin and epoxomicin have been identified as potent proteasome inhibitors. However, essentially no protein proteinase inhibitor has been characterized. By examining several small size protein proteinase inhibitors, we found that a well-known serine proteinase inhibitor from bovine pancreas, basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), inhibits the 20S in vitro and ex vivo. Inhibition of the 20S by BPTI was time- and concentration-dependent, and stoichiometric. To inhibit the 20S activity, BPTI needs to enter into the interior of the 20S molecule. The molar ratio of BPTI to the 20S in the complex was estimated as approximately six BPTI to one 20S, thereby two sets of three peptidase activities (trypsin-like, chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like) of the 20S were all inhibited. These results indicate that an entrance hole to the 20S formed by seven alpha-subunits is sufficiently large for BPTI to enter. This report is essentially the initial description of the inhibition of a threonine proteinase by a protein serine proteinase inhibitor, suggesting a common mechanism of inhibition between serine and threonine proteinases by a natural protein proteinase inhibitor.

  3. Predicting proteinase specificities from free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Mekonnen, Seble Merid; Olufsen, Magne; Smalås, Arne O; Brandsdal, Bjørn O

    2006-10-01

    The role of the primary binding residue (P1) in complexes between three different subtilases (subtilisin Carlsberg, thermitase and proteinase K) and their canonical protein inhibitor eglin c have been studied by free energy calculations. Based on the crystal structures of eglin c in complex with subtilisin Carlsberg and thermitase, and a homology model of the eglin c-proteinase K complex, a total of 57 mutants have been constructed and docked into their host proteins. The binding free energy was then calculated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with the linear interaction energy (LIE) method for all complexes differing only in the nature of the amino acid at the P1 position. LIE calculations for 19 different complexes for each subtilase were thus carried out excluding proline. The effects of substitutions at the P1 position on the binding free energies are found to be very large, and positively charged residues (Arg, Lys and His) are particularly deleterious for all three enzymes. The charged variants of the acidic side chains are found to bind more favorably as compared to their protonated states in all three subtilases. Furthermore, hydrophobic amino acids are accommodated most favorably at the S1-site in all three enzymes. Comparison of the three series of binding free energies shows only minor differences in the 19 computed relative binding free energies among these subtilases. This is further reflected in the correlation coefficient between the 23 relative binding free energies obtained, including the possible protonation states of ionizable side chains, but excluding the P1 Pro, for subtilisin Carlsberg versus thermitase (0.95), subtilisin versus proteinase K (0.94) and thermitase versus proteinase K (0.96).

  4. Characterization of proteinases from the midgut of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus involved in the generation of antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hemoglobin is a rich source of biologically active peptides, some of which are potent antimicrobials (hemocidins). A few hemocidins have been purified from the midgut contents of ticks. Nonetheless, how antimicrobials are generated in the tick midgut and their role in immunity is still poorly understood. Here we report, for the first time, the contribution of two midgut proteinases to the generation of hemocidins. Results An aspartic proteinase, designated BmAP, was isolated from the midgut of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus using three chromatographic steps. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that BmAP is restricted to the midgut. The other enzyme is a previously characterized midgut cathepsin L-like cysteine proteinase designated BmCL1. Substrate specificities of native BmAP and recombinant BmCL1 were mapped using a synthetic combinatorial peptide library and bovine hemoglobin. BmCL1 preferred substrates containing non-polar residues at P2 subsite and polar residues at P1, whereas BmAP hydrolysed substrates containing non-polar amino acids at P1 and P1'. Conclusions BmAP and BmCL1 generate hemocidins from hemoglobin alpha and beta chains in vitro. We postulate that hemocidins may be important for the control of tick pathogens and midgut flora. PMID:20663211

  5. Molt cycle-associated changes in calcium-dependent proteinase activity that degrades actin and myosin in crustacean muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.; Skinner, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The role of calcium-dependent proteinase (CDP) in the proecdysial atrophy of crustacean claw muscle has been investigated. During atrophy the molar ratio of actin to myosin heavy chain decreased 31%, confirming earlier ultrastructural observations that the ratio of thin:thick myofilaments declined from 9:1 to 6:1 (D.L. Mykles and D.M. Skinner, 1981, J. Ultrastruct. Res. 75, 314 to 325). The release of TCA-soluble material in muscle homogenates at neutral pH was stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ and completely inhibited by EGTA. The specific degradation of the major myofibrillar proteins (actin, myosin heavy and light chains, paramyosin, tropomyosin, troponin-T, and troponin-I) was demonstrated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Proteolytic activity was more than twofold greater in proecdysial muscle homogenates. Degradation of myofibrillar proteins was inhibited by EGTA, and the two inhibitors of crysteine proteinases, leupeptin, and antipain, but not pepstatin, an inhibitor of aspartic proteinases. Unlike CDPs from vertebrate muscle, the CDP(s) in crab claw muscle degrades actin and myosin in addition to other myofibrillar proteins.

  6. Picornaviral 3C cysteine proteinases have a fold similar to the chymotrypsin-like serine proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Allaire,M.; Chernaia, M.; Malcolm, B.; James, M.

    1994-01-01

    The picornavirus family includes several pathogens such as poliovirus, rhinovirus (the major cause of the common cold), hepatitis A virus and the foot-and-mouth disease virus. Picornaviral proteins are expressed by direct translation of the genomic RNA into a single, large polyprotein precursor. Proteolysis of the viral polyprotein into the mature proteins is assured by the viral 3C enzymes, which are cysteine proteinases. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution of the 3C proteinase from hepatitis A virus (HAV-3C). The overall architecture of HAV-3C reveals a fold resembling that of the chymotrypsin family of serine proteinases, which is consistent with earlier predictions. Catalytic residues include Cys 172 as nucleophile and His 44 as general base. The 3C cleavage specificity for glutamine residues is defined primarily by His 191. The overall structure suggests that an inter-molecular (trans) cleavage releases 3C and that there is an active proteinase in the polyprotein.

  7. [Suppression of activity of Candida albicans proteinases by cobalt chloride].

    PubMed

    Kutyreva, M P; Mukhametzianova, A R; Ulakhovich, N A

    2012-01-01

    Influence of cobalt (II) chloride on the system of Candida albicans proteinase (SAP C. alb.) (both in solution and immobilized on a surface of nitrocellulose membranes) has been investigated. In solution cobalt chloride inactivated inducible but not constitute enzyme. In the heterogenous sytem proteolitical effect of the cobalt ion on inductible proteinase was also observed.

  8. Aspartate release from rat hippocampal synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Bradford, S E; Nadler, J V

    2004-01-01

    Certain excitatory pathways in the rat hippocampus can release aspartate along with glutamate. This study utilized rat hippocampal synaptosomes to characterize the mechanism of aspartate release and to compare it with glutamate release. Releases of aspartate and glutamate from the same tissue samples were quantitated simultaneously. Both amino acids were released by 25 mM K(+), 300 microM 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) and 0.5 and 1 microM ionomycin in a predominantly Ca(2+)-dependent manner. For a roughly equivalent quantity of glutamate released, aspartate release was significantly greater during exposure to elevated [K(+)] than to 4-AP and during exposure to 0.5 than to 1 microM ionomycin. Aspartate release was inefficiently coupled to P/Q-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels and was reduced by KB-R7943, an inhibitor of reversed Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange. In contrast, glutamate release depended primarily on Ca(2+) influx through P/Q-type channels and was not significantly affected by KB-R7943. Pretreatment of the synaptosomes with tetanus toxin and botulinum neurotoxins C and F reduced glutamate release, but not aspartate release. Aspartate release was also resistant to bafilomycin A(1), an inhibitor of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, whereas glutamate release was markedly reduced. (+/-) -Threo-3-methylglutamate, a non-transportable competitive inhibitor of excitatory amino acid transport, did not reduce aspartate release. Niflumic acid, a blocker of Ca(2+)-dependent anion channels, did not alter the release of either amino acid. Exogenous aspartate and aspartate recently synthesized from glutamate accessed the releasable pool of aspartate as readily as exogenous glutamate and glutamate recently synthesized from aspartate accessed the releasable glutamate pool. These results are compatible with release of aspartate from either a vesicular pool by a "non-classical" form of exocytosis or directly from the cytoplasm by an as-yet-undescribed Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism. In either case

  9. Overview of pepsin-like aspartic peptidases.

    PubMed

    Dunn, B M

    2001-11-01

    The aspartic peptidase family of enzymes has been implicated in a variety of disease states, from stomach ulcers, to breast cancer, and even Alzheimer's Disease. This unit describes the major characteristics of the aspartic peptidases, including mechanism of action, subcellular and tissue localization, and biological substrate specificity.

  10. Leukocyte cell surface proteinases: regulation of expression, functions, and mechanisms of surface localization.

    PubMed

    Owen, Caroline A

    2008-01-01

    A number of proteinases are expressed on the surface of leukocytes including members of the serine, metallo-, and cysteine proteinase superfamilies. Some proteinases are anchored to the plasma membrane of leukocytes by a transmembrane domain or a glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchor. Other proteinases bind with high affinity to classical receptors, or with lower affinity to integrins, proteoglycans, or other leukocyte surface molecules. Leukocyte surface levels of proteinases are regulated by: (1) cytokines, chemokines, bacterial products, and growth factors which stimulate synthesis and/or release of proteinases by cells; (2) the availability of surface binding sites for proteinases; and/or (3) internalization or shedding of surface-bound proteinases. The binding of proteinases to leukocyte surfaces serves many functions including: (1) concentrating the activity of proteinases to the immediate pericellular environment; (2) facilitating pro-enzyme activation; (3) increasing proteinase stability and retention in the extracellular space; (4) regulating leukocyte function by proteinases signaling through cell surface binding sites or other surface proteins; and (5) protecting proteinases from inhibition by extracellular proteinase inhibitors. There is strong evidence that membrane-associated proteinases on leukocytes play critical roles in wound healing, inflammation, extracellular matrix remodeling, fibrinolysis, and coagulation. This review will outline the biology of membrane-associated proteinases expressed by leukocytes and their roles in physiologic and pathologic processes.

  11. Fourier Series Operating Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnow, Milton L.

    1961-01-01

    This report presents a computer program for multiplying, adding, differentiating, integrating, "barring" and scalarly multiplying "literal" Fourier series as such, and for extracting the coefficients of specified terms.

  12. Peptide aldehyde inhibitors of hepatitis A virus 3C proteinase.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, B A; Lowe, C; Shechosky, S; McKay, R T; Yang, C C; Shah, V J; Simon, R J; Vederas, J C; Santi, D V

    1995-06-27

    Picornaviral 3C proteinases are a group of closely related thiol proteinases responsible for processing of the viral polyprotein into its component proteins. These proteinases adopt a chymotrypsin-like fold [Allaire et al. (1994) Nature 369, 72-77; Matthews et al. (1994) Cell 77, 761-771] and a display an active-site configuration like those of the serine proteinases. Peptide-aldehydes based on the preferred peptide substrates for hepatitis A virus (HAV) 3C proteinase were synthesized by reduction of a thioester precursor. Acetyl-Leu-Ala-Ala-(N,N'-dimethylglutaminal) was found to be a reversible, slow-binding inhibitor for HAV 3C with a Ki* of (4.2 +/- 0.8) x 10(-8) M. This inhibitor showed 50-fold less activity against the highly homologous human rhinovirus (strain 14) 3C proteinase, whose peptide substrate specificity is slightly different, suggesting a high degree of selectivity. NMR spectrometry of the adduct of the 13C-labeled inhibitor with the HAV-3C proteinase indicate that a thiohemiacetal is formed between the enzyme and the aldehyde carbon as previously noted for peptide-aldehyde inhibitors of papain [Lewis & Wolfenden (1977) Biochemistry 16,4890-4894; Gamcsik et al. (1983) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 105, 6324-6325]. The adduct can also be observed by electrospray mass spectrometry.

  13. Proteinases as virulence factors in Leishmania spp. infection in mammals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania parasites cause human tegumentary and visceral infections that are commonly referred to as leishmaniasis. Despite the high incidence and prevalence of cases, leishmaniasis has been a neglected disease because it mainly affects developing countries. The data obtained from the analysis of patients’ biological samples and from assays with animal models confirm the involvement of an array of the parasite’s components in its survival inside the mammalian host. These components are classified as virulence factors. In this review, we focus on studies that have explored the role of proteinases as virulence factors that promote parasite survival and immune modulation in the mammalian host. Additionally, the direct involvement of proteinases from the host in lesion evolution is analyzed. The gathered data shows that both parasite and host proteinases are involved in the clinical manifestation of leishmaniasis. It is interesting to note that although the majority of the classes of proteinases are present in Leishmania spp., only cysteine-proteinases, metalloproteinases and, to a lesser scale, serine-proteinases have been adequately studied. Members from these classes have been implicated in tissue invasion, survival in macrophages and immune modulation by parasites. This review reinforces the importance of the parasite proteinases, which are interesting candidates for new chemo or immunotherapies, in the clinical manifestations of leishmaniasis. PMID:22871236

  14. Characterization and pathogenetic role of proteinase from Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Na, B K; Kim, J C; Song, C Y

    2001-01-01

    A secreted proteinase was purified from the culture supernatant of Acanthamoeba castellanii with several chromatographic steps. The purified proteinase was a chymotrypsin-like serine proteinase. Its molecular weight was approximately 12 kDa on SDS-PAGE, and its native molecular weight was 12 kDa when determined by molecular sieve chromatography. It showed a broad temperature optimum ranging 30-55 degrees C with an optimal at 55 degrees C and an optimal pH of 8.5. It could degrade various protein substrates, such as collagen, fibronectin, laminin, secretory immunoglobulin A, immunoglobulin G, plasminogen, fibrinogen, haemoglobin and rabbit corneal proteins. It showed strong cytopathic effects in cultured cells, including HEp2 and HEK cells. The corneal lesions, induced by both the purified proteinase and A. castellanii, displayed similar clinical results for both cases, in which the stromal infiltration and opacity with the epithelial defect were revealed. These results suggest that the enzyme was highly associated with the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba. The fact that cytopathic effects and development of corneal lesions caused by the proteinase of Acanthamoeba were inhibited by the proteinase inhibitor suggest that the proteinase inhibitor might be useful as a therapeutic agent.

  15. Action of plant proteinase inhibitors on enzymes of physiopathological importance.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Maria Luiza V; Sampaio, Misako U

    2009-09-01

    Obtained from leguminous seeds, various plant proteins inhibit animal proteinases, including human, and can be considered for the development of compounds with biological activity. Inhibitors from the Bowman-Birk and plant Kunitz-type family have been characterized by proteinase specificity, primary structure and reactive site. Our group mostly studies the genus Bauhinia, mainly the species bauhinioides, rufa, ungulata and variegata. In some species, more than one inhibitor was characterized, exhibiting different properties. Although proteins from this group share high structural similarity, they present differences in proteinase inhibition, explored in studies using diverse biological models.

  16. Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.

    2003-03-01

    This paper gives a short account of some key elements in the life of Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier (1768-1830), specifically his relation to Napoleon Bonaparte. The mathematical approach to Fourier series and the original scepticism by French mathematicians are briefly illustrated.

  17. Fourier Series Optimization Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian

    2008-01-01

    This note discusses the introduction of Fourier series as an immediate application of optimization of a function of more than one variable. Specifically, it is shown how the study of Fourier series can be motivated to enrich a multivariable calculus class. This is done through discovery learning and use of technology wherein students build the…

  18. Identification of a vesicular aspartate transporter

    PubMed Central

    Miyaji, Takaaki; Echigo, Noriko; Hiasa, Miki; Senoh, Shigenori; Omote, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    Aspartate is an excitatory amino acid that is costored with glutamate in synaptic vesicles of hippocampal neurons and synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs) of pinealocytes and is exocytosed and stimulates neighboring cells by binding to specific cell receptors. Although evidence increasingly supports the occurrence of aspartergic neurotransmission, this process is still debated because the mechanism for the vesicular storage of aspartate is unknown. Here, we show that sialin, a lysosomal H+/sialic acid cotransporter, is present in hippocampal synaptic vesicles and pineal SLMVs. RNA interference of sialin expression decreased exocytosis of aspartate and glutamate in pinealocytes. Proteoliposomes containing purified sialin actively accumulated aspartate and glutamate to a similar extent when inside positive membrane potential is imposed as the driving force. Sialin carrying a mutation found in people suffering from Salla disease (R39C) was completely devoid of aspartate and glutamate transport activity, although it retained appreciable H+/sialic acid cotransport activity. These results strongly suggest that sialin possesses dual physiological functions and acts as a vesicular aspartate/glutamate transporter. It is possible that people with Salla disease lose aspartergic (and also the associated glutamatergic) neurotransmission, and this could provide an explanation for why Salla disease causes severe neurological defects. PMID:18695252

  19. A low molecular weight proteinase inhibitor produced by T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ganea, D; Teodorescu, M; Dray, S

    1986-01-01

    A low molecular weight (MW) proteinase inhibitor, between 6500 and 21,500 MW, appeared in the supernatant of rabbit spleen cells cultured at high density for 24 hr. The inhibitor inhibited the enzymatic activity of trypsin for both a high MW natural substrate, fibrinogen, and for a low MW artificial substrate, Chromozym TRY. The low MW proteinase inhibitor is protein in nature and is different, in terms of specificity for enzymes, MW and sensitivity to different physical or chemical treatments, from aprotinin, a low MW proteinase inhibitor (6500 MW) of bovine origin, and from the soybean trypsin inhibitor, a relatively high MW proteinase inhibitor (21,500 MW). The inhibitor was found in the supernatant of purified T cells but not B cells, and its production was increased in the presence of an optimal concentration of Con A. The possibility that this proteinase inhibitor has a role in the regulation of trypsin-like proteinases involved to the immune response remains to be investigated. Images Figure 4 PMID:2417942

  20. The induction of proteinases in corn and soybean by anoxia

    SciTech Connect

    VanToai, T.; Hwang, Shihying )

    1989-04-01

    This study characterized the anaerobic changes in proteinase activities in corn and soybean roots and to investigate the possibility that these changes might contribute to the differential anaerobiosis tolerance of the two species. After 24 h of anoxia, crude protein extracts from H60 corn and Keller soybean root tips (10cm) were assayed for proteinase activities at pH range from 4.5 to 9.5. Turnover of aberrant proteins was studied in seedlings labelled with {sup 3}H-leucine for 12 h under: (a) puromycin (0.64 mM) in air, (b) ethanol (1%) in air, (c) nitrogen and (d) air. After the treatment, the labelled proteins remaining in roots were determined every 2 h for 6 h. In both corn and soybean, activities of alkali proteinases increased, and activities of acid proteinases declined under anoxia. Neutral proteinases increase in anoxic corn roots, but decline in anoxic soybean roots. The protein turnover rate in corn treated with puromycin, ethanol and nitrogen was much higher than in control roots. The protein turnover rate in soybean roots treated with puromycin, ethanol was similar to the rate of the control. The results indicated that: (a) anoxic corn can degrade aberrant proteins, but anoxic soybean cannot, (b) the degradation of aberrant proteins in anoxic corn is accomplished by neutral proteinases, and (c) the accumulation of aberrant proteins in soybean might contribute to the susceptibility of this species to anoxia.

  1. The reaction of serpins with proteinases involves important enthalpy changes.

    PubMed

    Boudier, C; Bieth, J G

    2001-08-21

    When active serpins are proteolytically inactivated in a substrate-like reaction, they undergo an important structural transition with a resultant increase in their conformational stability. We have used microcalorimetry to show that this conformational alteration is accompanied by an important enthalpy change. For instance, the cleavage of alpha(1)-proteinase inhibitor by Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase, Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, or papain and that of antithrombin by leukocyte elastase are characterized by large enthalpy changes (DeltaH = -53 to -63 kcal mol(-1)). The former reaction also has a large and negative heat capacity (DeltaC(p)() = -566 cal K(-1) mol(-1)). In contrast, serpins release significantly less heat when they act as proteinase inhibitors. For example, the inhibition of pancreatic elastase, leukocyte elastase, and pancreatic chymotrypsin by alpha(1)-proteinase inhibitor and that of pancreatic trypsin and coagulation factor Xa by antithrombin are accompanied by a DeltaH of -20 to -31 kcal mol(-1). We observe no heat release upon proteolytic cleavage of inactive serpins or following inhibition of serine proteinases by canonical inhibitors or upon acylation of chymotrypsin by N-trans-cinnamoylimidazole. We suggest that part of the large enthalpy change that occurs during the structural transition of serpins is used to stabilize the proteinase in its inactive state.

  2. Fourier Modulus Image Construction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    Fourier Optics: the Encoding of Infor- mation by Complex Zeroes," Optica Acta 26, 1139-46 (1979). 13. Y.M. Bruck and L.(. Sodin, "On the Ambiguity of the...0002 UNCLASSIFIED RADC-TR-81-63 NL -- END LEVEL# " DC-TR-61143 Finul Technical Relort 0 FOURIER MODULUS IMAGE "N CONSTRUCTION C Environmental Research... FOURIER MODULUS IMAGE CONSTRUCTION 7Sep 9--3 Sep 8 _ N/A 7. AUTHOR(s) N . James E Fienup. 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  3. A Short Biography of Joseph Fourier and Historical Development of Fourier Series and Fourier Transforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with a brief biographical sketch of Joseph Fourier, his first celebrated work on analytical theory of heat, his first great discovery of Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Included is a historical development of Fourier series and Fourier transforms with their properties, importance and applications. Special emphasis is made…

  4. Steerable Discrete Fourier Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fracastoro, Giulia; Magli, Enrico

    2017-03-01

    Directional transforms have recently raised a lot of interest thanks to their numerous applications in signal compression and analysis. In this letter, we introduce a generalization of the discrete Fourier transform, called steerable DFT (SDFT). Since the DFT is used in numerous fields, it may be of interest in a wide range of applications. Moreover, we also show that the SDFT is highly related to other well-known transforms, such as the Fourier sine and cosine transforms and the Hilbert transforms.

  5. Fourier optics on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakil, Ashkan; Engheta, Nader

    2012-02-01

    Using numerical simulations, here, we demonstrate that a single sheet of graphene with properly designed inhomogeneous, nonuniform conductivity distributions can act as a convex lens for focusing and collimating the transverse-magnetic (TM) surface plasmon polariton (SPP) surface waves propagating along the graphene. Consequently, we show that the graphene can act as a platform for obtaining spatial Fourier transform of infrared (IR) SPP signals. This may lead to rebirth of the field of Fourier optics on a 1-atom-thick structure.

  6. Generalized fiber Fourier optics.

    PubMed

    Cincotti, Gabriella

    2011-06-15

    A twofold generalization of the optical schemes that perform the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is given: new passive planar architectures are presented where the 2 × 2 3 dB couplers are replaced by M × M hybrids, reducing the number of required connections and phase shifters. Furthermore, the planar implementation of the discrete fractional Fourier transform (DFrFT) is also described, with a waveguide grating router (WGR) configuration and a properly modified slab coupler.

  7. Proteinases in the joint: clinical relevance of proteinases in joint destruction

    PubMed Central

    Rengel, Yvonne; Ospelt, Caroline; Gay, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    Proteinases are involved in essential steps in cartilage and bone homeostasis. Consequently, efforts have been made to establish their potential role in the pathology of rheumatic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and spondyloarthritis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are sensitive markers of disease severity and response to treatment, and therefore they have potential in the assessment of rheumatic diseases. Despite disappointing early results with synthetic inhibitors of MMPs, there is still much scope for developing effective and safe MMPs inhibitors, and consequently to deliver new options to inhibit joint destruction. PMID:18001502

  8. Proteinases of the cornea and preocular tear film.

    PubMed

    Ollivier, F J; Gilger, B C; Barrie, K P; Kallberg, M E; Plummer, C E; O'Reilly, S; Gelatt, K N; Brooks, D E

    2007-01-01

    Maintenance and repair of corneal stromal extracellular matrix (ECM) requires a tightly coordinated balance of ECM synthesis, degradation and remodeling in which proteolytic enzymes (proteinases) perform important functions. There are natural proteinase inhibitors present in preocular tear film (PTF) and cornea simultaneously with proteinases that prevent excessive degradation of normal healthy tissue. Disorders occur when there is an imbalance between proteinases and proteinase inhibitors in favor of the proteinases, causing pathologic degradation of stromal collagen and proteoglycans in the cornea. Two matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-2 and MMP-9, are of major importance in terms of remodeling and degradation of the corneal stromal collagen. Immunohistochemical studies have shown different origins of MMP-2 and -9. MMP-2 is synthesized by corneal keratocytes and performs a surveillance function in the normal cornea, becoming locally activated to degrade collagen molecules that occasionally become damaged. Alternatively, MMP-9 may be produced by epithelial cells and polymorphonuclear neutrophils following corneal wounding. Because the cornea is in close contact with the preocular tear film (PTF), proteinases have been evaluated in the PTF. In damaged corneas, total proteolytic activity in the tear fluid was found to be significantly increased compared to normal eyes and contralateral eyes. Studies analyzing the proteolytic activity in serial PTF samples during corneal healing led to the following conclusions: ulcerative keratitis in animals is associated with initially high levels of tear film proteolytic activity, which decrease as ulcers heal; proteinase levels in melting ulcers remain elevated leading to rapid progression of the ulcers. The success of medical and surgical treatment of the corneal ulcers is reflected by the proteolytic activity in tears. In animals, successful treatment leads to a rapid reduction in tear film proteolytic activity that

  9. The hydrothermal reaction kinetics of aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Jenny S.; Seward, Terry M.

    2007-02-01

    Experimental data on the hydrothermal reaction kinetics of aspartic acid were acquired using a custom-built spectrophotometric reaction cell which permits in situ observation under hydrothermal conditions. The results of this study indicate that the reaction kinetics of dilute aspartic acid solutions are significantly different depending on the presence or absence of catalytic surfaces such as standard metal alloys. The spectroscopic data presented here represent the first direct observations, in situ and in real time, of an amino acid reacting in a hydrothermal solution. Quantitative kinetic information, including rate constants, concentration versus time profiles, and calculations of the individual component spectra, was obtained from the data using a chemometric approach based on factor analysis/principle component analysis which treats the rate expressions simultaneously as a system of differential algebraic equations (DAE) of index 1. Identification of the products was confirmed where possible by high pressure anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD). The reaction kinetics of aspartic acid under hydrothermal conditions was observed to be highly complex, in contrast to previous studies which indicated almost exclusively deamination. At lower temperatures (120-170 °C), several different reaction pathways were observed, including decarboxylation and polymerization, and the catalytic effects of reactor surfaces on the aspartic acid system were clearly demonstrated. At higher temperatures (above 170 °C), aspartic acid exhibited highly complex behaviour, with evidence indicating that it can simultaneously dimerize and cyclize, deaminate (by up to two pathways), and decarboxylate (by up to two pathways). These higher temperature kinetics were not fully resolvable in a quantitative manner due to the complexity of the system and the constraints of UV spectroscopy. The results of this study provide strong evidence that the reaction

  10. Caspase-1 (interleukin-1beta-converting enzyme) is inhibited by the human serpin analogue proteinase inhibitor 9.

    PubMed Central

    Annand, R R; Dahlen, J R; Sprecher, C A; De Dreu, P; Foster, D C; Mankovich, J A; Talanian, R V; Kisiel, W; Giegel, D A

    1999-01-01

    The regulation of caspases, cysteine proteinases that cleave their substrates after aspartic residues, is poorly understood, even though they are involved in tightly regulated cellular processes. The recently discovered serpin analogue proteinase inhibitor 9 (PI9) is unique among human serpin analogues in that it has an acidic residue in the putative specificity-determining position of the reactive-site loop. We measured the ability of PI9 to inhibit the amidolytic activity of several caspases. The hydrolysis of peptide substrates by caspase-1 (interleukin-1beta-converting enzyme), caspase-4 and caspase-8 is inhibited by PI9 in a time-dependent manner. The rate of reaction of caspase-1 with PI9, as well as the rate of substrate hydrolysis of the initial caspase-PI9 complex, shows a hyperbolic dependence on the concentration of PI9, indicative of a two-step kinetic mechanism for inhibition with an apparent second-order rate constant of 7x10(2) M(-1).s(-1). The hydrolysis of a tetrapeptide substrate by caspase-3 is not inhibited by PI9. The complexes of caspase-1 and caspase-4 with PI9 can be immunoprecipitated but no complex with caspase-3 can be detected. No complex can be immunoprecipitated if the active site of the caspase is blocked with a covalent inhibitor. These results show that PI9 is an inhibitor of caspase-1 and to a smaller extent caspase-4 and caspase-8, but not of the more distantly related caspase-3. PI9 is the first example of a human serpin analogue that inhibits members of this class of cysteine proteinases. PMID:10477277

  11. Aspartate-bond isomerization affects the major conformations of synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Szendrei, G I; Fabian, H; Mantsch, H H; Lovas, S; Nyéki, O; Schön, I; Otvos, L

    1994-12-15

    The aspartic acid bond changes to an beta-aspartate bond frequently as a side-reaction during peptide synthesis and often as a post-translational modification of proteins. The formation of beta-asparate bonds is reported to play a major role not only in protein metabolism, activation and deactivation, but also in pathological processes such as deposition of the neuritic plaques of Alzheimer's disease. Recently, we reported how conformational changes following the aspartic-acid-bond isomerization may help the selective aggregation and retention of the amyloid beta peptide in affected brains (Fabian et al., 1994). In the current study we used circular dichroism, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and molecular modeling to characterize the general effect of the beta-aspartate-bond formation on the conformation of five sets of synthetic model peptides. Each of the non-modified, parent peptides has one of the major secondary structures as the dominant spectroscopically determined conformation: a type I beta turn, a type II beta turn, short segments of alpha or 3(10) helices, or extended beta strands. We found that both types of turn structures are stabilized by the aspartic acid-bond isomerization. The isomerization at a terminal position did not affect the helix propensity, but placing it in mid-chain broke both the helix and the beta-pleated sheet with the formation of reverse turns. The alteration of the geometry of the lowest energy reverse turn was also supported by molecular dynamics calculations. The tendency of the aspartic acid-bond isomerization to stabilize turns is very similar to the effect of incorporating sugars into synthetic peptides and suggests a common feature of these post-translational modifications in defining the secondary structure of protein fragments.

  12. Systematic mutational analysis of the active-site threonine of HIV-1 proteinase: rethinking the "fireman's grip" hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Strisovsky, K.; Tessmer, U.; Langner, J.; Konvalinka, J.; Kräusslich, H. G.

    2000-01-01

    Aspartic proteinases share a conserved network of hydrogen bonds (termed "fireman's grip"), which involves the hydroxyl groups of two threonine residues in the active site Asp-Thr-Gly triplets (Thr26 in the case of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) PR). In the case of retroviral proteinases (PRs), which are active as symmetrical homodimers, these interactions occur at the dimer interface. For a systematic analysis of the "fireman's grip," Thr26 of HIV-1 PR was changed to either Ser, Cys, or Ala. The variant enzymes were tested for cleavage of HIV-1 derived peptide and polyprotein substrates. PR(T26S) and PR(T26C) showed similar or slightly reduced activity compared to wild-type HIV-1 PR, indicating that the sulfhydryl group of cysteine can substitute for the hydroxyl of the conserved threonine in this position. PR(T26A), which lacks the "fireman's grip" interaction, was virtually inactive and was monomeric in solution at conditions where wild-type PR exhibited a monomer-dimer equilibrium. All three mutations had little effect when introduced into only one chain of a linked dimer of HIV-1 PR. In this case, even changing both Thr residues to Ala yielded residual activity suggesting that the "fireman's grip" is not essential for activity but contributes significantly to dimer formation. Taken together, these results indicate that the "fireman's grip" is crucial for stabilization of the retroviral PR dimer and for overall stability of the enzyme. PMID:11045610

  13. Developing novel anthelmintics from plant cysteine proteinases

    PubMed Central

    Behnke, Jerzy M; Buttle, David J; Stepek, Gillian; Lowe, Ann; Duce, Ian R

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal helminth infections of livestock and humans are predominantly controlled by treatment with three classes of synthetic drugs, but some livestock nematodes have now developed resistance to all three classes and there are signs that human hookworms are becoming less responsive to the two classes (benzimidazoles and the nicotinic acetylcholine agonists) that are licensed for treatment of humans. New anthelmintics are urgently needed, and whilst development of new synthetic drugs is ongoing, it is slow and there are no signs yet that novel compounds operating through different modes of action, will be available on the market in the current decade. The development of naturally-occurring compounds as medicines for human use and for treatment of animals is fraught with problems. In this paper we review the current status of cysteine proteinases from fruits and protective plant latices as novel anthelmintics, we consider some of the problems inherent in taking laboratory findings and those derived from folk-medicine to the market and we suggest that there is a wealth of new compounds still to be discovered that could be harvested to benefit humans and livestock. PMID:18761736

  14. The amino acid sequence of the aspartate aminotransferase from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, V B; Maras, B; Barra, D; Doonan, S

    1991-01-01

    1. The single (cytosolic) aspartate aminotransferase was purified in high yield from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). 2. Amino-acid-sequence analysis was carried out by digestion of the protein with trypsin and with CNBr; some of the peptides produced were further subdigested with Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase or with pepsin. Peptides were sequenced by the dansyl-Edman method and/or by automated gas-phase methods. The amino acid sequence obtained was complete except for a probable gap of two residues as indicated by comparison with the structures of counterpart proteins in other species. 3. The N-terminus of the enzyme is blocked. Fast-atom-bombardment m.s. was used to identify the blocking group as an acetyl one. 4. Alignment of the sequence of the enzyme with those of vertebrate cytosolic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferases and with the enzyme from Escherichia coli showed that about 25% of residues are conserved between these distantly related forms. 5. Experimental details and confirmatory data for the results presented here are given in a Supplementary Publication (SUP 50164, 25 pages) that has been deposited at the British Library Document Supply Centre, Boston Spa. Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7 BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1991) 273, 5. PMID:1859361

  15. The serine proteinase chain of human complement component C1s. Cyanogen bromide cleavage and N-terminal sequences of the fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, P E; Dunbar, B; Fothergill, J E

    1983-01-01

    Human complement component C1s was purified from fresh blood by conventional methods of precipitation and chromatography. The single-chain zymogen form was activated by treatment with C1r. Reduction and carboxymethylation then allowed the light chain and heavy chain to be separated on DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B in 8 M-urea. Liquid-phase sequencing of the light chain determined 50 residues from the N-terminus. CNBr-cleavage fragments of the light chain were separated by high-pressure liquid chromatography on gel-permeation and reverse-phase columns. N-Terminal sequencing of these fragments determined the order of a further 138 residues, giving a total of 188 residues or about 75% of the light chain. Seven of these eight sequences could be readily aligned with the amino acid sequences of other serine proteinases. The typical serine proteinase active-site residues are clearly conserved in C1s, and the specificity-related side chain of the substrate-binding pocket is aspartic acid, as in trypsin, consistent with the proteolytic action of C1s on C4 at an arginine residue. Somewhat surprisingly, when the C1s sequence is compared with that of complement subcomponent C1r, the percentage difference (59%) is approximately the same as that found between the other mammalian serine proteinases (56-71%). PMID:6362661

  16. Secreted fungal aspartic proteases: A review.

    PubMed

    Mandujano-González, Virginia; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Angel; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia

    2016-01-01

    The aspartic proteases, also called aspartyl and aspartate proteases or acid proteases (E.C.3.4.23), belong to the endopeptidase family and are characterized by the conserved sequence Asp-Gly-Thr at the active site. These enzymes are found in a wide variety of microorganisms in which they perform important functions related to nutrition and pathogenesis. In addition, their high activity and stability at acid pH make them attractive for industrial application in the food industry; specifically, they are used as milk-coagulating agents in cheese production or serve to improve the taste of some foods. This review presents an analysis of the characteristics and properties of secreted microbial aspartic proteases and their potential for commercial application.

  17. A second hepatitis C virus-encoded proteinase.

    PubMed Central

    Grakoui, A; McCourt, D W; Wychowski, C; Feinstone, S M; Rice, C M

    1993-01-01

    Host and viral proteinases are believed to be required for the production of at least nine hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific polyprotein cleavage products. Although several cleavages appear to be catalyzed by host signal peptidase or the HCV NS3 serine proteinase, the enzyme responsible for cleavage at the 2/3 site has not been identified. In this report, we have defined the 2/3 cleavage site and obtained evidence which suggests that this cleavage is mediated by a second HCV-encoded proteinase, located between aa 827 and 1207. This region encompasses the C-terminal portion of the 23-kDa NS2 protein, the 2/3 cleavage site, and the serine proteinase domain of NS3. Efficient processing at the 2/3 site was observed in mammalian cells, Escherichia coli, and in plant or animal cell-free translation systems in the absence of microsomal membranes. Cleavage at the 2/3 site was abolished by alanine substitutions for NS2 residues His-952 or Cys-993 but was unaffected by several other substitution mutations, including those that inactivate NS3 serine proteinase function. Mutations abolishing cleavage at the 2/3 site did not block cleavage at other sites in the HCV polyprotein. Cotransfection experiments indicate that the 2/3 site can be cleaved in trans, which should facilitate purification and further characterization of this enzyme. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8248148

  18. Candida albicans Secreted Aspartyl Proteinases in Virulence and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Naglik, Julian R.; Challacombe, Stephen J.; Hube, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen of humans and has developed an extensive repertoire of putative virulence mechanisms that allows successful colonization and infection of the host under suitable predisposing conditions. Extracellular proteolytic activity plays a central role in Candida pathogenicity and is produced by a family of 10 secreted aspartyl proteinases (Sap proteins). Although the consequences of proteinase secretion during human infections is not precisely known, in vitro, animal, and human studies have implicated the proteinases in C. albicans virulence in one of the following seven ways: (i) correlation between Sap production in vitro and Candida virulence, (ii) degradation of human proteins and structural analysis in determining Sap substrate specificity, (iii) association of Sap production with other virulence processes of C. albicans, (iv) Sap protein production and Sap immune responses in animal and human infections, (v) SAP gene expression during Candida infections, (vi) modulation of C. albicans virulence by aspartyl proteinase inhibitors, and (vii) the use of SAP-disrupted mutants to analyze C. albicans virulence. Sap proteins fulfill a number of specialized functions during the infective process, which include the simple role of digesting molecules for nutrient acquisition, digesting or distorting host cell membranes to facilitate adhesion and tissue invasion, and digesting cells and molecules of the host immune system to avoid or resist antimicrobial attack by the host. We have critically discussed the data relevant to each of these seven criteria, with specific emphasis on how this proteinase family could contribute to Candida virulence and pathogenesis. PMID:12966142

  19. A serine proteinase inhibitor from frog eggs with bacteriostatic activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Yaoping; Yu, Haining; Yang, Xinbo; Rees, Huw H; Liu, Jingze; Lai, Ren

    2008-01-01

    By Sephadex G-50 gel filtration, Resource Q anionic exchange and C4 reversed phase liquid high performance liquid chromatography, a proteinase inhibitor protein (Ranaserpin) was identified and purified from the eggs of the odour frog, Rana grahami. The protein displayed a single band adjacent to the molecular weight marker of 14.4 kDa analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The inhibitor protein homogeneity and its molecular weight were confirmed again by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis. The MALDI-TOF mass spectrum analysis gave this inhibitor protein an m/z of 14422.26 that was matched well with the result from SDS-PAGE. This protein is a serine proteinase inhibitor targeting multiple proteinases including trypsin, elastase, and subtilisin. Ranaserpin inhibited the proteolytic activities of trypsin, elastase, and subtilisin. It has an inhibitory constant (K(i)) of 6.2 x 10(-8) M, 2.7 x 10(-7) M and 2.2 x 10(-8) M for trypsin, elastase, and subtilisin, respectively. This serine proteinase inhibitor exhibited bacteriostatic effect on Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633). It was suggested that ranaserpin might act as a defensive role in resistance to invasion of pests or pathogens. This is the first report of serine proteinase inhibitor and its direct defensive role from amphibian eggs.

  20. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Daniel Peralta, Luis Grave de; Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui; Bernussi, Ayrton A.

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  1. SufA--a novel subtilisin-like serine proteinase of Finegoldia magna.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Christofer; Andersson, Marie-Louise; Collin, Mattias; Schmidtchen, Artur; Björck, Lars; Frick, Inga-Maria

    2007-12-01

    Finegoldia magna is an anaerobic Gram-positive bacterium and commensal, which is also associated with clinically important conditions such as skin and soft tissue infections. This study describes a novel subtilisin-like extracellular serine proteinase of F. magna, denoted SufA (subtilase of Finegoldia magna), which is believed to be the first subtilase described among Gram-positive anaerobic cocci. SufA is associated with the bacterial cell surface, but is also released in substantial amounts during bacterial growth. Papain was used to release SufA from the surface of F. magna and the enzyme was purified by ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. A protein band on SDS-PAGE corresponding to the dominating proteolytic activity on gelatin zymography was analysed by MS/MS. Based on the peptide sequences obtained, the sufA gene was sequenced. The gene comprises 3466 bp corresponding to a preprotein of 127 kDa. Like other members of the subtilase family, SufA contains the catalytic triad of aspartic acid, histidine and serine with surrounding conserved residues. A SufA homologue was identified in 33 of 34 investigated isolates of F. magna, as revealed by PCR and immunoprinting. The enzyme forms dimers, which are more proteolytically active than the monomeric protein. SufA was found to efficiently cleave and inactivate the antibacterial peptide LL-37 and the CXC chemokine MIG/CXCL9, indicating that the enzyme promotes F. magna survival and colonization.

  2. Effects of leupeptin on proteinase and germination of castor beans

    SciTech Connect

    Alpi, A.; Beevers, H.

    1981-10-01

    Leupeptin, tripeptide inhibitor of some proteinases, was shown previously to maintain the stability of several enzymes (isocitrate lyase, fumarase, and catalase) in crude extracts of castor bean endosperm. This reagent is now shown to inhibit the breakdown of water-soluble and crystalloid-storage proteins of the protein bodies isolated from castor beans by the SH-proteinase and it also inhibits the endopeptidase from mung beans. When suitably introduced into the endosperm of dry castor beans it strongly inhibits germination and seedling development. Application of leupeptin to endosperm halves removed from the seed prevents the normal development of enzymes concerned with gluconeogenesis from fat and drastically curtails sugar production. The results suggest that the SH-proteinase is intimately involved in the mobilization of storage proteins.

  3. Production of proteinase on noncarbohydrate carbon sources by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Morihara, K

    1965-09-01

    Proteinase production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was studied in medium containing noncarbohydrate materials, especially various hydrocarbons, as the sole carbon source. On heavy oil, kerosene, n-paraffinic hydrocarbon of C(12), C(14), or C(16), and propylene glycol, the bacteria grew well and high protinase production was observed. However, production on paraffinic hydrocarbon differed remarkably with strains of varied origins. The elastase-positive strain, IFO 3455, showed abundant growth and high proteinase production on medium containing a paraffin of C(12), C(14), or C(16), whereas the elastase-negative strain, IFO 3080, showed little growth on the same medium. Neither elastase-positive nor elastase-negative strains, however, utilized n-paraffins of C(5) to C(10), or various aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and anthracene. The proteinases produced on the noncarbohydrate medium were identical with those produced in glucose medium.

  4. Introduction to Fourier Optics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2007-01-01

    Much like a physical prism, which displays the frequency components of a light wave, Fourier analysis can be thought of as a mathematical prism that can tell us what harmonics or frequency components are contained in a recording of a sound wave. We wrote the MacScope II program so that the user could not only see a plot of the harmonic amplitudes…

  5. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Michael L.; Rempel, Don L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of Fourier transform mass spectrometry and its unique combination of high mass resolution, high upper mass limit, and multichannel advantage. Examines its operation, capabilities and limitations, applications (ion storage, ion manipulation, ion chemistry), and future applications and developments. (JN)

  6. [Isolation of a specific inhibitor of microbial serine proteinase from kidney bean seeds].

    PubMed

    Mosolov, V V; Malova, E L; Cheban, A N

    1983-10-01

    A protein acting as a specific inhibitor of microbial serine proteinases was isolated from kidney bean seeds. The purification procedure included complex formation between the inhibitor and Aspergillus oryzae proteinase. The protein with a Mr approximately 10 000 inhibits subtilisin and Asp. oryzae proteinase but does not affect trypsin and chymotrypsin. The inhibitor molecule contains no half-cystine residues.

  7. Phase diagram of crystallization of Aspergillus niger acid proteinase A, a non-pepsin-type acid proteinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Norio; Ataka, Mitsuo; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Muramatsu, Tomonari; Katsura, Tatsuo; Tanokura, Masaru

    1996-10-01

    Proteinase A from Aspergillus niger var. macrosporus is a non-pepsin-type acid proteinase with an extremely low isoelectric point (pI 3.3). The protein is crystallized from ammonium sulfate solutions of pH lower than 4. The crystallization is affected by the presence of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). We have studied the phase diagram of the crystallization of proteinase A in the absence and presence of DMSO, to clarify crystallization at such an extremely low pH and to study the effects of DMSO. The results indicate that the logarithm of protein solubility is a rectilinear function of ammonium sulfate concentration in both the absence and presence of DMSO. DMSO definitely lowers the solubility at relatively low concentrations of ammonium sulfate, but had little effect on protein solubility at higher concentrations of ammonium sulfate.

  8. Gas-phase acidities of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and their amino acid amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong; Matus, Myrna H.; Velazquez, Hector Adam; Dixon, David A.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2007-09-01

    Gas-phase acidities (GA or [Delta]Gacid) for the two most acidic common amino acids, aspartic acid and glutamic acid, have been determined for the first time. Because of the amide linkage's importance in peptides and as an aid in studying side chain versus main chain deprotonation, aspartic acid amide and glutamic acid amide were also studied. Experimental GA values were measured by proton transfer reactions in an electrospray ionization/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Calculated GAs were obtained by density functional and molecular orbital theory approaches. The best agreement with experiment was found at the G3MP2 level; the MP2/CBS and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ results are 3-4 kcal/mol more acidic than the G3MP2 results. Experiment shows that aspartic acid is more acidic than glutamic acid by ca. 3 kcal/mol whereas the G3MP2 results show a smaller acidity difference of 0.2 kcal/mol. Similarly, aspartic acid amide is experimentally observed to be ca. 2 kcal/mol more acidic than glutamic acid amide whereas the G3MP2 results show a correspondingly smaller energy difference of 0.7 kcal/mol. The computational results clearly show that the anions are all ring-like structures with strong hydrogen bonds between the OH or NH2 groups and the CO2- group from which the proton is removed. The two amino acids are main-chain deprotonated. In addition, use of the COSMO model for the prediction of the free energy differences in aqueous solution gave values in excellent agreement with the most recent experimental values for pKa. Glutamic acid is predicted to be more acidic than aspartic acid in aqueous solution due to differential solvation effects.

  9. Studies on Proteinases from Some Blood-Sucking Insects,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ovinus, and Pediculus humanus, but not in those of Cimex lectularius or Rhodnius prolixus. The trypsin and chymotrypsin have been partially... Cimex and Rhodnius appear to have a high molecular weight proteinase with optimal activity at pH 5 in their midguts. (Author)

  10. Proteinase Inhibitor I Accumulation in Tomato Suspension Cultures 1

    PubMed Central

    Walker-Simmons, Mary; Ryan, Clarence A.

    1986-01-01

    Suspension-cultured cells of tomato accumulate proteinase Inhibitor I as the sucrose is depleted from 1% to less than 0.1% in the culture medium. Inhibitor I can be prematurely induced to accumulate in the cells by the addition to the medium of the proteinase inhibitor inducing factor, trigalacturonic acid, ethylene glycol chitin, or chitosan. In cultures grown in 0.6% initial sucrose with no inducers added, a uronic acid-rich extracellular polysaccharide appears in the medium during growth of the cells. This extracellular polysaccharide apparently contains an `endogenous inducer' of Inhibitor I synthesis. When the partially purified polysaccharide is added to the culture medium, Inhibitor I accumulation is induced. Proteinase inhibitors also accumulate in tobacco and alfalfa suspension-cultured cells as the cell cultures age. As with the tomato cultures, a uronic acid-rich component(s) appears in the media prior to inhibitor accumulation. These data suggest that an endogenous inducer may be activating proteinase inhibitor genes through a similar mechanism in all three types of cells. PMID:16664609

  11. Serine proteinases from barley malt may degrade beta-amylase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley seed proteinases are critically important to seed germination and malting in that they generate amino acids from seed N reserves, supporting embryo growth during germination and yeast fermentation during brewing. However, relatively little is known regarding the endogenous protein substrate ...

  12. Phospholipase and proteinase activities of Candida isolates from denture wearers.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Arias, Cristina; Eraso, Elena; Madariaga, Lucila; Aguirre, Jose Manuel; Quindós, Guillermo

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterise phospholipase and proteinase activities of oral Candida isolates from 100 denture wearers and to study the relationship of these activities with denture stomatitis. Of 100 patients studied, 44 suffered from denture stomatitis. Specimens were collected by swabbing the denture and underlying mucosa. Isolates were previously identified by conventional mycological and genotypic methods. The phospholipase and proteinase activities were evaluated by agar plate methods. A total of 152 isolates were recovered from denture and underlying mucosa, including 101 Candida albicans, 18 Candida tropicalis, 14 Candida glabrata, 11 Candida guilliermondii, four Candida parapsilosis, two Saccharomyces cerevisiae and one isolate each of Candida dubliniensis and Candida krusei. Most C. albicans (97%) showed phospholipase activity; furthermore, the unique C. dubliniensis isolate showed a moderate phospholipase activity. The isolation of C. albicans (chi-square test, P = 0.0016) and phospholipase production by Candida spp. (chi-square test, P = 0.0213) was found to be significantly associated with denture stomatitis. Proteinase production was observed in <30% of isolates, and it was not related to the presence of denture stomatitis (P = 0.7675). Candida albicans isolates may produce both virulence factors, although the proteinase production was only observed in <30% of the isolates. Phospholipase production was exclusive of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis.

  13. Digestive proteinases of yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor) larvae: purification and characterization of a trypsin-like proteinase.

    PubMed

    Tsybina, T A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Belozersky, M A; Zhuzhikov, D P; Oppert, B; Elpidina, E N

    2005-03-01

    A new trypsin-like proteinase was purified to homogeneity from the posterior midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-50 and gel filtration on Superdex-75. The isolated enzyme had molecular mass of 25.5 kD and pI 7.4. The enzyme was also characterized by temperature optimum at 55 degrees C, pH optimum at 8.5, and K(m) value of 0.04 mM (for hydrolysis of Bz-Arg-pNA). According to inhibitor analysis the enzyme is a trypsin-like serine proteinase stable within the pH range of 5.0-9.5. The enzyme hydrolyzes peptide bonds formed by Arg or Lys residues in the P1 position with a preference for relatively long peptide substrates. The N-terminal amino acid sequence, IVGGSSISISSVPXQIXLQY, shares 50-72% identity with other insect trypsin-like proteinases, and 44-50% identity to mammalian trypsins. The isolated enzyme is sensitive to inhibition by plant proteinase inhibitors and it can serve as a suitable target for control of digestion in this stored product pest.

  14. Similarities between cysteinesulphinate transaminase and aspartate aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Recasens, M; Mandel, P

    1979-01-01

    A method for the purification of two cysteinesulphinate transaminases, A and B (EC 2.6.1), is described. These enzymes catalyse the conversion of cysteinesulphinic acid to beta-sulphinyl pyruvate. The final preparations are homogeneous by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectrofocusing. The molecular weight of the subunits is 41 000 for cysteinesulphinate transaminase A and 43 400 for B. Both enzymes are unspecific, as L-asparate, L-glutamate and L-cysteic acid serve as substrates in addition to L-cysteinesulphinic acid. Cysteinesulphinate transaminase A has a Km of 9.8 mM for cysteinesulphinic acid and 0.25 mM for aspartic acid, whereas the B enzyme has a Km of 6.5 mM for cysteinesulphinic acid and 1.4 mM for aspartic acid. The Vmax values of the A and B enzymes are respectively 7.1 and 6.2 mmol h-1 mg-1 protein for aspartic acid and 45 and 9.3 mmol h-1 mg-1 protein for cysteinesulphinic acid. Both enzymes exhibit maximum activity at pH 8.6. A high specific activity is found in optimal conditions for these two transaminases, the pI values being 9.06 and 5.70 for cysteinesulphinate transaminase A and B respectively. These results have been compared with those already obtained for purified aspartate aminotransferase. Similarities in the pathways of taurine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism are discussed.

  15. Fourier multispectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jie; Ni, Chuan; Sarangan, Andrew; Hirakawa, Keigo

    2015-08-24

    Current multispectral imaging systems use narrowband filters to capture the spectral content of a scene, which necessitates different filters to be designed for each application. In this paper, we demonstrate the concept of Fourier multispectral imaging which uses filters with sinusoidally varying transmittance. We designed and built these filters employing a single-cavity resonance, and made spectral measurements with a multispectral LED array. The measurements show that spectral features such as transmission and absorption peaks are preserved with this technique, which makes it a versatile technique than narrowband filters for a wide range of multispectral imaging applications.

  16. Fourier Domain Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldkhun, Daniel (Inventor); Wagner, Kelvin H. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods and systems are disclosed of sensing an object. A first radiation is spatially modulated to generate a structured second radiation. The object is illuminated with the structured second radiation such that the object produces a third radiation in response. Apart from any spatially dependent delay, a time variation of the third radiation is spatially independent. With a single-element detector, a portion of the third radiation is detected from locations on the object simultaneously. At least one characteristic of a sinusoidal spatial Fourier-transform component of the object is estimated from a time-varying signal from the detected portion of the third radiation.

  17. Immunodetection of thiol proteinase levels in various populations of Artemia cysts and during development.

    PubMed

    Lu, J; Warner, A H

    1991-01-01

    An immunodetection assay on Western blots has been used to determine the thiol proteinase content and composition in cysts from 12 populations of the brine shrimp Artemia. Our results showed no differences in the subunit composition of the thiol proteinase among cysts from eight bisexual strains and four parthenogenic strains, and confirmed an earlier finding that the proteinase is composed of two subunits of 25.9 and 31.5 kilodaltons. In contrast, we found that Artemia cysts from parthenogenic strains contain 17.1 ng/cyst of the thiol proteinase, while cysts from bisexual strains contain 8.2 ng/cyst of the thiol proteinase. Also, there was a good linear correlation (r = 0.863; p less than 0.001) between the thiol proteinase content and cyst mass. Embryo fractionation experiments showed that 82% of the thiol proteinase was in the cytosol, while 14 and 4%, respectively, were in the nuclei/yolk platelets and mitochondria/lysosome fractions. Measurements of the thiol proteinase content of developing Artemia embryos showed that the proteinase content was relatively constant during early development, suggesting that the activity of the thiol proteinase gene(s) may be constitutive and not developmentally regulated in Artemia embryos.

  18. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Hermann, M.R.; Dane, C.B.; Tiszauer, D.H.

    1995-12-12

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 {micro}m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only about 1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power. 1 fig.

  19. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Hermann, Mark R.; Dane, C. Brent; Tiszauer, Detlev H.

    1995-01-01

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 .mu.m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only .about.1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power.

  20. Ozone inactivation of human alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.A.

    1980-06-01

    Ozone decreased the trypsin, chymotrypsin, and elastase inhibitory activities of human alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor both in plasma and in solutions of the pure inhibitor. The total loss of porcine elastase inhibitory activity required 18 mol of ozone/mol of pure alpha 1-PI and approximately 850 mol of ozone/mol of alpha 1-PI in plasma. A corresponding loss of the ability to inhibit human leukocyte elastase was observed. Inactivated alpha 1-PI contains four residues of methionine sulfoxide, in addition to oxidized tryosine and tryptophan. Electrophoretic analysis demonstrated that the ozone-inactivated alpha 1-PI did not form normal complexes with serine proteinases. These findings suggest that the inhalation of ozone could inactivate alpha 1-PI on the airspace side of the lung to create a localized alpha 1-PI deficiency, which might contribute to the development of emphysema.

  1. CP30, a Cysteine Proteinase Involved in Trichomonas vaginalis Cytoadherence

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-López, M. Remedios; Becerril-Garcia, Cecilia; Fattel-Facenda, Loriz V.; Avila-Gonzalez, Leticia; Ruíz-Tachiquín, Martha E.; Ortega-Lopez, Jaime; Arroyo, Rossana

    2000-01-01

    We describe here the participation of a Trichomonas vaginalis 30-kDa proteinase (CP30) with affinity to the HeLa cell surface in attachment of this parasite to host epithelial cells. The CP30 band is a cysteine proteinase because its activity was inhibited by E-64, a thiol proteinase inhibitor. In two-dimensional substrate gel electrophoresis of total extracts of the trichomonad isolate CNCD 147, three spots with proteolytic activity were detected in the 30-kDa region, in the pI range from 4.5 to 5.5. Two of the spots (pI 4.5 and 5.0) bound to the surfaces of fixed HeLa cells corresponding to the CP30 band. The immunoglobulin G fraction of the rabbit anti-CP30 antiserum that recognized a 30-kDa band by Western blotting and immunoprecipitated CP30 specifically inhibited trichomonal cytoadherence to HeLa cell monolayers in a concentration-dependent manner and reacted with CP30 at the parasite surface. CP30 degraded proteins found on the female urogenital tract, including fibronectin, collagen IV, and hemoglobin. Interestingly, CP30 digested fibronectin and collagen IV only at pH levels between 4.5 and 5.0. Moreover, trichomonosis patients whose diagnosis was confirmed by in vitro culture possessed antibody to CP30 in both sera and vaginal washes, and CP30 activity was found in vaginal washes. Our results suggest that surface CP30 is a cysteine proteinase necessary for trichomonal adherence to human epithelial cells. PMID:10948104

  2. Astronomical Fourier spectropolarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, F. F.; Fymat, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    Spectra of the Stokes polarization parameters of Venus (resolution 0.5 per cm) are presented. They were obtained at the Cassegrain focus of the 154-cm telescope of the National Mexican Observatory, Baja California, Mexico, July 12 and 13, 1972, with the Fourier Interferometer Polarimeter (FIP). A preliminary, limited analysis of four spectral features and of the CO2 rotational band structures at 6080 and 6200 per cm has demonstrated that spectral polarization is indeed present. These experimental results, confirmed by two series of observations, provide substantiation for this theoretically predicted phenomenon. They also tend to show that the FIP represents a novel astronomical tool for variable spectral resolution studies of both the intensity and the state of polarization of astronomical light sources.

  3. Fourier Transform Spectrometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) data acquisition system includes an FTS spectrometer that receives a spectral signal and a laser signal. The system further includes a wideband detector, which is in communication with the FTS spectrometer and receives the spectral signal and laser signal from the FTS spectrometer. The wideband detector produces a composite signal comprising the laser signal and the spectral signal. The system further comprises a converter in communication with the wideband detector to receive and digitize the composite signal. The system further includes a signal processing unit that receives the composite signal from the converter. The signal processing unit further filters the laser signal and the spectral signal from the composite signal and demodulates the laser signal, to produce velocity corrected spectral data.

  4. Rainbow Fourier Transform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel technique for remote sensing of cloud droplet size distributions. Polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135deg and 165deg exhibit a sharply defined rainbow structure, the shape of which is determined mostly by single scattering properties of cloud particles, and therefore, can be modeled using the Mie theory. Fitting the observed rainbow with such a model (computed for a parameterized family of particle size distributions) has been used for cloud droplet size retrievals. We discovered that the relationship between the rainbow structures and the corresponding particle size distributions is deeper than it had been commonly understood. In fact, the Mie theory-derived polarized reflectance as a function of reduced scattering angle (in the rainbow angular range) and the (monodisperse) particle radius appears to be a proxy to a kernel of an integral transform (similar to the sine Fourier transform on the positive semi-axis). This approach, called the rainbow Fourier transform (RFT), allows us to accurately retrieve the shape of the droplet size distribution by the application of the corresponding inverse transform to the observed polarized rainbow. While the basis functions of the proxy-transform are not exactly orthogonal in the finite angular range, this procedure needs to be complemented by a simple regression technique, which removes the retrieval artifacts. This non-parametric approach does not require any a priori knowledge of the droplet size distribution functional shape and is computationally fast (no look-up tables, no fitting, computations are the same as for the forward modeling).

  5. Dental Enamel Development: Proteinases and Their Enamel Matrix Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, John D.

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on recent discoveries and delves in detail about what is known about each of the proteins (amelogenin, ameloblastin, and enamelin) and proteinases (matrix metalloproteinase-20 and kallikrein-related peptidase-4) that are secreted into the enamel matrix. After an overview of enamel development, this review focuses on these enamel proteins by describing their nomenclature, tissue expression, functions, proteinase activation, and proteinase substrate specificity. These proteins and their respective null mice and human mutations are also evaluated to shed light on the mechanisms that cause nonsyndromic enamel malformations termed amelogenesis imperfecta. Pertinent controversies are addressed. For example, do any of these proteins have a critical function in addition to their role in enamel development? Does amelogenin initiate crystallite growth, does it inhibit crystallite growth in width and thickness, or does it do neither? Detailed examination of the null mouse literature provides unmistakable clues and/or answers to these questions, and this data is thoroughly analyzed. Striking conclusions from this analysis reveal that widely held paradigms of enamel formation are inadequate. The final section of this review weaves the recent data into a plausible new mechanism by which these enamel matrix proteins support and promote enamel development. PMID:24159389

  6. Biochemical characterization of Acacia schweinfurthii serine proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Odei-Addo, Frank; Frost, Carminita; Smith, Nanette; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Muramoto, Koji; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Gráf, László; Naude, Ryno

    2014-10-01

    One of the many control mechanisms of serine proteinases is their specific inhibition by protein proteinase inhibitors. An extract of Acacia schweinfurthii was screened for potential serine proteinase inhibition. It was successfully purified to homogeneity by precipitating with 80% (v/v) acetone and sequential chromatographic steps, including ion-exchange, affinity purification and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Reducing sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis conditions revealed an inhibitor (ASTI) consisting of two polypeptide chains A and B of approximate molecular weights of 16 and 10 kDa, respectively, and under non-reducing conditions, 26 kDa was observed. The inhibitor was shown to inhibit bovine trypsin (Ki of 3.45 nM) at an approximate molar ratio of inhibitor:trypsin (1:1). The A- and B-chains revealed complete sequences of 140 and 40 amino acid residues, respectively. Sequence similarity (70%) was reported between ASTI A-chain and ACTI A-chain (Acacia confusa) using ClustalW. The B-chain produced a 76% sequence similarity between ASTI and Leucaena leucocephala trypsin inhibitor.

  7. Ultrasonic Transducers for Fourier Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Describes an experiment that uses the ultrasonic transducer for demonstrating the Fourier components of waveshapes such as the square and triangular waves produced by laboratory function generators. (JRH)

  8. Intracellular localization and trafficking of serine proteinase AhSub and cysteine proteinase AhCP of Acanthamoeba healyi.

    PubMed

    Moon, E-K; Lee, S-T; Chung, D-I; Kong, H-H

    2006-01-01

    Proteinases have been proposed to play important roles in pathogenesis and various biologic actions in Acanthamoeba. Although genetic characteristics of several proteases of Acanthamoeba have been reported, the intracellular localization and trafficking of these enzymes has yet to be studied. In the present study, we analyzed the intracellular localization and trafficking of two proteinases, AhSub and AhCP, of Acanthamoeba healyi by transient transfection. Full-length AhSub-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusion protein was found in intracellular vesicle-like structures of transfected amoebae. Time-lapse photographs confirmed the secretion of the fluorescent material of the vesicle toward the extracellular space. The mutated AhSub, of which the pre or prepro region was deleted, was found to localize diffusely throughout the cytoplasm of the amoeba rather than concentrated in the secretory vesicle. Transfection of the construct containing the pre region only showed the same localization and trafficking of the full-length AhSub. A cysteine proteinase AhCP-EGFP fusion protein showed similar localization in the vesicle-like structure in the amoeba. However, using Lyso Tracker analysis, these vesicular structures of AhCP were confirmed to be lysosomes rather than secretory vesicles. The AhCP construct with a deletion of the prepro region showed a dispersed distribution of fluorescence in the cytoplasm of the cells. These results indicated that AhSub and AhCP would play different roles in Acanthameoba biology and that the pre region of AhSub and pro region of AhCP are important for proper intracellular localization and trafficking of each proteinase.

  9. Antiviral cytokines induce hepatic expression of the granzyme B inhibitors, proteinase inhibitor 9 and serine proteinase inhibitor 6.

    PubMed

    Barrie, Mahmoud B; Stout, Heather W; Abougergi, Marwan S; Miller, Bonnie C; Thiele, Dwain L

    2004-05-15

    Expression of the granzyme B inhibitors, human proteinase inhibitor 9 (PI-9), or the murine orthologue, serine proteinase inhibitor 6 (SPI-6), confers resistance to CTL or NK killing by perforin- and granzyme-dependent effector mechanisms. In light of prior studies indicating that virally infected hepatocytes are selectively resistant to this CTL effector mechanism, the present studies investigated PI-9 and SPI-6 expression in hepatocytes and hepatoma cells in response to adenoviral infection and to cytokines produced during antiviral immune responses. Neither PI-9 nor SPI-6 expression was detected by immunoblotting in uninfected murine or human hepatocytes. Similarly, human Huh-7 hepatoma cells were found to express only very low levels of PI-9 relative to levels detected in perforin- and granzyme-resistant CTL or lymphokine-activated killer cells. Following in vivo adenoviral infection or in vitro culture with IFN-alphabeta or IFN-gamma, SPI-6 expression was induced in murine hepatocytes. Similarly, after culture with IFN-alpha, induction of PI-9 mRNA and protein expression was observed in human hepatocytes and Huh-7 cells. IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha also induced 4- to 10-fold higher levels of PI-9 mRNA expression in Huh-7 cells, whereas levels of mRNA encoding a related serine proteinase inhibitor, proteinase inhibitor 8, were unaffected by culture of Huh-7 cells with IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma, or TNF-alpha. These findings indicate that cytokines that promote antiviral cytopathic responses also regulate expression of the cytoprotective molecules, PI-9 and SPI-6, in hepatocytes that are potential targets of CTL and NK effector mechanisms.

  10. Characterization of a novel Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Pariani, Sebastián; Contreras, Marisol; Rossi, Franco R; Sander, Valeria; Corigliano, Mariana G; Simón, Francisco; Busi, María V; Gomez-Casati, Diego F; Pieckenstain, Fernando L; Duschak, Vilma G; Clemente, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Many different types of serine proteinase inhibitors have been involved in several kinds of plant physiological processes, including defense mechanisms against phytopathogens. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors, which are included in the serine proteinase inhibitor family, are present in several organisms. These proteins play a regulatory role in processes that involve serine proteinases like trypsin, chymotrypsin, thrombin, elastase and/or subtilisin. In the present work, we characterized two putative Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors from Arabidopsis thaliana, which have a single putative Kazal-type domain. The expression of these inhibitors is transiently induced in response to leaf infection by Botrytis cinerea, suggesting that they play some role in defense against pathogens. We also evaluated the inhibitory specificity of one of the Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors, which resulted to be induced during the local response to B. cinerea infection. The recombinant Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor displayed high specificity for elastase and subtilisin, but low specificity for trypsin, suggesting differences in its selectivity. In addition, this inhibitor exhibited a strong antifungal activity inhibiting the germination rate of B. cinerea conidia in vitro. Due to the important role of proteinase inhibitors in plant protection against pathogens and pests, the information about Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors described in the present work could contribute to improving current methods for plant protection against pathogens.

  11. The effect of nitrogen and carbon sources on proteinase production by Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Fairbairn, D J; Law, B A

    1987-02-01

    Some factors influencing the production of an extracellular proteinase by Pseudomonas fluorescens NCDO 2085 were studied. Proteinase production was optimal at 20 degrees C and pH 6.9 in static culture when calcium was included in the medium. Proteinase was not detectable in basal medium but could be induced by organic nitrogen compounds. The proteinase was produced in the exponential phase of growth on protein substrates but not until early stationary phase during growth on amino acids. The organism did not utilize lactose, the most abundant carbohydrate in milk. Citrate was readily utilized as an energy source but had a strong repressive effect on proteinase production. A medium containing sodium caseinate and pyruvate supported good growth and enzyme production. All the amino acids utilized as a sole carbon source, with the exception of serine, could induce proteinase production. Asparagine was the most effective amino acid inducer. Particular combinations of amino acids could induce or repress proteinase production. The regulation of proteinase production by Ps. fluorescens NCDO 2085 appears to be based on a balance between induction by low concentrations of low molecular weight degradation products and sensitivity to end product catabolite repression. The results suggest that the function of the proteinase is to ensure a supply of carbon rather than amino acids for protein synthesis.

  12. Homoserine as an Aspartic Acid Precursor for Synthesis of Proteoglycan Glycopeptide Containing Aspartic Acid and a Sulfated Glycan Chain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weizhun; Ramadan, Sherif; Yang, Bo; Yoshida, Keisuke; Huang, Xuefei

    2016-12-02

    Among many hurdles in synthesizing proteoglycan glycopeptides, one challenge is the incorporation of aspartic acid in the peptide backbone and acid sensitive O-sulfated glycan chains. To overcome this, a new strategy was developed utilizing homoserine as an aspartic acid precursor. The conversion of homoserine to aspartic acid in the glycopeptide was successfully accomplished by late stage oxidation using (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO) and bis(acetoxy)iodobenzene (BAIB). This is the first time that a glycopeptide containing aspartic acid and an O-sulfated glycan was synthesized.

  13. [Conformation of aspartate aminotransferase in crystals].

    PubMed

    Borisov, V V; Borisova, S N; Sosfenov, N I; Dikson, Kh BF

    1983-01-01

    X-ray study of chicken cytosolic aspartate aminotransferase revealed conformational changes in the protein of two kinds: (1) a shift of the small domain adjacent to substrate-binding area due to interaction of the protein with two carboxyl groups of substrate and (2) a change in inclination of the coenzyme plane due to replacement of C = N bond of the coenzyme with Lys-258 by C = N bond with a substrate. An asymmetry in subunit behaviour is observed in both cases: the domain is shifted in one subunit and the coenzyme is rotated in other. Substrate-binding properties of each subunit are strictly dependent on the protein conformation in substrate-binding area.

  14. The sodium effect of Bacillus subtilis growth on aspartate.

    PubMed

    Whiteman, P; Marks, C; Freese, E

    1980-08-01

    aspH mutants of Bacillus subtilis have a constitutive aspartase activity and grow well on aspartate as sole carbon source. aspH aspT mutants, which are deficient in high affinity aspartate transport as a result of the aspT mutation, grow as well as aspH mutants in medium containing high concentrations of aspartate and Na+. This Na+ effect is not due to an enhancement of aspartate transport but is the result of increased cellular metabolism. The ability to grow rapidly in sodium aspartate is induced by prior growth in the presence of Na+. In potassium aspartate, the addition of arginine, citrulline, ornithine, delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylase or proline instead of Na+ also allows rapid growth; but in a mutant deficient in ornithine--oxo-acid aminotransferase, only pyrroline-carboxylate or proline can replace Na+. The amino acid pool of cells growing slowly in potassium aspartate contains proline at a low concentration which increases upon addition of proline (but not Na+) to the medium. Thus, Na+ addition does not increase the synthesis of proline, but proline or pyrroline-carboxylate acts similarly to Na+ either in preventing some inhibitory effect (by aspartate or the accumulating NH4+) or in overcoming some deficiency (e.g. in further proline metabolism.

  15. The role of fungal proteinases in pathophysiology of Stachybotrys chartarum.

    PubMed

    Yike, Iwona; Rand, Thomas; Dearborn, Dorr G

    2007-10-01

    The adverse health effects of Stachybotrys chartarum have often been linked to exposure to the trichothecene mycotoxins. Recent studies have shown that in addition to mycotoxins this fungus is capable of producing and secreting in vivo proteins such as hemolysins and proteinases. Spore extracts obtained from a high trichothecene producing isolate JS 58-17 exhibited a significantly lower proteolytic activity compared to the low trichothecene producer, JS 58-06. Growing isolates on rice or potato dextrose agar results in higher proteolytic activity of the spores compared to those grown on drywall. Proteinases in the spore extracts can hydrolyze gelatin and collagen I and IV. Analysis of zymograms shows the presence of several proteins with proteolytic activity in the spores of S. chartarum. Human tracheal epithelial cells exposed to spore extracts produced significantly higher levels of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-alpha than control cells. This stimulation of cytokine production was completely abolished by Pefabloc, a serine protease inhibitor. Neutrophil numbers and proinflammatory cytokine (IL1-beta and TNF-alpha) concentrations were highly elevated in the lungs of 7 day old rat pups exposed intratracheally to 4 x 10(4) spores/gm body weight compared to control. No significant differences in those inflammatory indices in vivo were noted between the treatments with the high trichothecene producer, isolate JS 58-17 and JS 58-06, which does not produce macrocyclic trichothecenes. Immunohistochemistry revealed reduced collagen IV labeling in spore-induced lung granulomas in rat pups exposed to both isolates. These results suggest that proteinases from S. chartarum spores significantly contribute to lung inflammation and injury.

  16. Molecular orbital studies of enzyme activity: I: Charge relay system and tetrahedral intermediate in acylation of serine proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Scheiner, S; Kleier, D A; Lipscomb, W N

    1975-01-01

    The charge relay ststem and its role in the acylation of serine proteinases is studied using the partial retention of diatomic differential overlap (PRDDO) technique to perform approximate ab initio molecular orbital calculations on a model of the enzyme-substrate complex. The aspartate in the charge relay system is seen to act as the ultimate proton acceptor during the charging of the serine nucleophile. A projection of the potential energy surface is obtained in a subspace corresponding to this charge transfer and to the coupled motions of active site residues and the substrate. These results together with extended basis set results for cruder models suggest that a concerted transfer of protons from Ser-195 to His-57 and from His-57 to Asp-102 occurs with an energy barrier of 20-25 kcal/mole (84-105 kJ/mole). The subsequent nucleophilic attack on the scissile peptide linkage by the charged serine is then seen to proceed energetically downhill to the tetrahedral intermediate. The formation of the tetrahedral intermediate from the Michaelis complex is calculated to be nearly thermoneutral. PMID:1058476

  17. Fourier Analysis and Structure Determination: Part I: Fourier Transforms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesick, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Provides a brief introduction with some definitions and properties of Fourier transforms. Shows relations, ways of understanding the mathematics, and applications. Notes proofs are not included but references are given. First of three part series. (MVL)

  18. Purification and characterization of an alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitor from the mollusc Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed Central

    Thøgersen, I B; Salvesen, G; Brucato, F H; Pizzo, S V; Enghild, J J

    1992-01-01

    The cell-free haemolymph of the mollusc Octopus vulgaris inhibited the proteolytic activity of the thermolysin against the high-molecular-mass substrate hide powder azure. The purified inhibitor was a glycoprotein composed of two identical 180 kDa disulphide-linked subunits. In addition to the inhibition of the metalloproteinase thermolysin, the protein inhibited the serine proteinases human neutrophil elastase, pig pancreatic elastase, bovine chymotrypsin, bovine trypsin and the cysteine proteinase papain. A fraction of the proteinase-inhibitor complex resisted dissociation after denaturation indicating that some of the proteinase molecules became covalently bound. The nucleophile beta-aminopropionitrile decreased the covalent binding of proteinases to the Octopus vulgaris protein, suggesting that this interaction is mediated by an internal thiol ester; the reactivity and the amino acid sequence flanking the reactive residues of the putative thiol ester were consistent with this hypothesis. Bound trypsin remained active against the low-molecular-mass chromatogenic substrate H-D-Pro-Phe-Arg p-nitroanilide and was protected from inhibition by active-site-directed protein inhibitors of trypsin; however, the bound trypsin was readily inhibited by small synthetic inhibitors. This indicates that the inhibition of proteinases is accomplished by steric hindrance. The proteinase-inhibitory activity of this protein is characteristic of inhibition by mammalian alpha-macroglobulins and the presence of a putative thiol ester suggests that the Octopus vulgaris proteinase inhibitor is a homologue of human alpha 2-macroglobulin. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:1379044

  19. Autoantibodies against the multicatalytic proteinase in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus contain specific autoantibodies directed against different polypeptide components of the multicatalytic proteinase (also known as proteasome or prosome). These human autoantibodies, in contrast to polyclonal antibodies obtained in rabbits against the purified enzyme, recognize highly conserved epitopes of the multicatalytic proteinase polypeptides from yeast to human. PMID:1703207

  20. Antibody in sera of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis is to trichomonad proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Alderete, J F; Newton, E; Dennis, C; Neale, K A

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND--A recent report demonstrated the immunogenic character of the cysteine proteinases of Trichomonas vaginalis. It was of interest, therefore, to examine for the presence of serum anti-proteinase antibody among patients with trichomoniasis. METHODS--An immunoprecipitation assay was used involving protein A-bearing Staphylococcus aureus first coated with the IgG fraction of goat anti-human Ig and then mixed with individual sera of patients to bind human antibody. These antibody-coated bacteria were then added to detergent extracts of T vaginalis. Bound immune complexes on S aureus were washed and solubilised for electrophoretic analysis on acrylamide copolymerised with gelatin for detection of proteinase activity. RESULTS--Sera from patients (50/50), but none from sera of normal, uninfected women, possessed IgG to numerous trichomonad cysteine proteinases. The presence of this serum anti-proteinase antibody disappeared after drug treatment and cure of patients of the T vaginalis infection. CONCLUSIONS--The commonality of the anti-proteinase antibody in the sera of patients with trichomoniasis provided evidence for the expression of the same repertoire of parasite proteinases during infection. These observations have important implications for the in vivo relevance of the proteinases and indicate that strategies to use a specific serum antibody response for diagnosis of this infection may be possible. Images PMID:1916796

  1. Roles for proteinases in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Caroline A

    2008-01-01

    Since the early 1960s, a compelling body of evidence has accumulated to show that proteinases play critical roles in airspace enlargement in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, until recently the causative enzymes and their exact roles in pathologic processes in COPD have not been clear. Recent studies of gene-targeted mice in murine models of COPD have confirmed roles for proteinases not only in airspace enlargement, but also in airway pathologies in COPD. These studies have also shed light on the specific proteinases involved in COPD pathogenesis, and the mechanisms by which these proteinases injure the lung. They have also identified important interactions between different classes of proteinases, and between proteinases and other molecules that amplify lung inflammation and injury. This review will discuss the biology of proteinases and the mechanisms by which they contribute to the pathogenesis of COPD. In addition, I will discuss the potential of proteinase inhibitors and anti-inflammatory drugs as new treatment strategies for COPD patients. PMID:18686734

  2. Fourier phase in Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Uttam, Shikhar; Liu, Yang

    2015-12-01

    Phase of an electromagnetic wave propagating through a sample-of-interest is well understood in the context of quantitative phase imaging in transmission-mode microscopy. In the past decade, Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography has been used to extend quantitative phase imaging to the reflection-mode. Unlike transmission-mode electromagnetic phase, however, the origin and characteristics of reflection-mode Fourier phase are poorly understood, especially in samples with a slowly varying refractive index. In this paper, the general theory of Fourier phase from first principles is presented, and it is shown that Fourier phase is a joint estimate of subresolution offset and mean spatial frequency of the coherence-gated sample refractive index. It is also shown that both spectral-domain phase microscopy and depth-resolved spatial-domain low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy are special cases of this general theory. Analytical expressions are provided for both, and simulations are presented to explain and support the theoretical results. These results are further used to show how Fourier phase allows the estimation of an axial mean spatial frequency profile of the sample, along with depth-resolved characterization of localized optical density change and sample heterogeneity. Finally, a Fourier phase-based explanation of Doppler optical coherence tomography is also provided.

  3. Fourier phase in Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Uttam, Shikhar; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Phase of an electromagnetic wave propagating through a sample-of-interest is well understood in the context of quantitative phase imaging in transmission-mode microscopy. In the past decade, Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography has been used to extend quantitative phase imaging to the reflection-mode. Unlike transmission-mode electromagnetic phase, however, the origin and characteristics of reflection-mode Fourier phase are poorly understood, especially in samples with a slowly varying refractive index. In this paper, the general theory of Fourier phase from first principles is presented, and it is shown that Fourier phase is a joint estimate of subresolution offset and mean spatial frequency of the coherence-gated sample refractive index. It is also shown that both spectral-domain phase microscopy and depth-resolved spatial-domain low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy are special cases of this general theory. Analytical expressions are provided for both, and simulations are presented to explain and support the theoretical results. These results are further used to show how Fourier phase allows the estimation of an axial mean spatial frequency profile of the sample, along with depth-resolved characterization of localized optical density change and sample heterogeneity. Finally, a Fourier phase-based explanation of Doppler optical coherence tomography is also provided. PMID:26831383

  4. Sensitive method to identify and characterize proteinases in situ after SDS-PAGE.

    PubMed

    Williams, J; McGrath, W J; Mangel, W F

    2000-11-01

    Cells and body fluids contain numerous, different proteinases; to identify and characterize them are both important and difficult tasks. Especially difficult to identify and characterize are highly specific proteinases. Here, we present an extremely sensitive and quantitative method to characterize proteinases fractionated by SDS-PAGE that cleave specific rhodamine-based fluorogenic substrates. To test the sensitivity of the technique, we used trypsin as our model system. Filter paper impregnated with rhodamine-based fluorogenic substrates was placed on a gel, and bands of fluorescence originating from specific proteinases were visualized in real time. The method is very sensitive; picogram amounts of trypsin can be detected. The method should be very general, in that even proteinases whose substrates require amino acids C-terminal to the cleavage site may be identified and characterized. The results allow one to obtain not only information on the substrate specificity of a specific enzyme but also information about its molecular weight.

  5. Expression of virus-encoded proteinases: functional and structural similarities with cellular enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, W G; Semler, B L

    1993-01-01

    Many viruses express their genome, or part of their genome, initially as a polyprotein precursor that undergoes proteolytic processing. Molecular genetic analyses of viral gene expression have revealed that many of these processing events are mediated by virus-encoded proteinases. Biochemical activity studies and structural analyses of these viral enzymes reveal that they have remarkable similarities to cellular proteinases. However, the viral proteinases have evolved unique features that permit them to function in a cellular environment. In this article, the current status of plant and animal virus proteinases is described along with their role in the viral replication cycle. The reactions catalyzed by viral proteinases are not simple enzyme-substrate interactions; rather, the processing steps are highly regulated, are coordinated with other viral processes, and frequently involve the participation of other factors. Images PMID:8302216

  6. Activation of Proteinase 3 Contributes to Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Toonen, Erik JM; Mirea, Andreea-Manuela; Tack, Cees J; Stienstra, Rinke; Ballak, Dov B; van Diepen, Janna A; Hijmans, Anneke; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Dokter, Wim H; Pham, Christine TN; Netea, Mihai G; Dinarello, Charles A; Joosten, Leo AB

    2016-01-01

    Activation of inflammatory pathways is known to accompany development of obesity-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In addition to caspase-1, the neutrophil serine proteases proteinase 3, neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G are able to process the inactive proinflammatory mediators interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 to their bioactive forms, thereby regulating inflammatory responses. In this study, we investigated whether proteinase 3 is involved in obesity-induced development of insulin resistance and NAFLD. We investigated the development of NAFLD and insulin resistance in mice deficient for neutrophil elastase/proteinase 3 and neutrophil elastase/cathepsin G and in wild-type mice treated with the neutrophil serine proteinase inhibitor human α-1 antitrypsin. Expression profiling of metabolically relevant tissues obtained from insulin-resistant mice showed that expression of proteinase 3 was specifically upregulated in the liver, whereas neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G and caspase-1 were not. Neutrophil elastase/proteinase 3-deficient mice showed strongly reduced levels of lipids in the liver after being fed a high-fat diet. Moreover, these mice were resistant to high–fat–diet-induced weight gain, inflammation and insulin resistance. Injection of proteinase 3 exacerbated insulin resistance in caspase-1–/– mice, indicating that proteinase 3 acts independently of caspase-1. Treatment with α-1 antitrypsin during the last 10 d of a 16-wk high-fat diet reduced hepatic lipid content and decreased fasting glucose levels. We conclude that proteinase 3 is involved in NAFLD and insulin resistance and that inhibition of proteinase 3 may have therapeutic potential. PMID:27261776

  7. Activation of proteinase 3 contributes to Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Toonen, Erik J M; Mirea, Andreea-Manuela; Tack, Cees J; Stienstra, Rinke; Ballak, Dov B; van Diepen, Janna A; Hijmans, Anneke; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Dokter, Wim H; Pham, Christine T N; Netea, Mihai G; Dinarello, Charles A; Joosten, Leo A B

    2016-05-24

    Activation of inflammatory pathways is known to accompany development of obesity-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In addition to caspase-1, the neutrophil serine proteases proteinase 3, neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G are able to process the inactive pro-inflammatory mediators IL-1β and IL-18 to their bioactive forms, thereby regulating inflammatory responses. In the present study, we investigated whether proteinase 3 is involved in obesity-induced development of insulin resistance and NAFLD. We investigated the development of NAFLD and insulin resistance in mice deficient for neutrophil elastase/proteinase 3 and neutrophil elastase/cathepsin G and in wild-type mice treated with the neutrophil serine proteinase inhibitor human alpha-1 antitrypsin. Expression profiling of metabolically relevant tissues obtained from insulin resistant mice showed that expression of proteinase 3 was specifically upregulated in the liver, whereas neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G and caspase-1 were not. Neutrophil elastase/proteinase 3 deficient mice showed strongly reduced levels of lipids in the liver after fed a high fat diet. Moreover, these mice were resistant to high fat diet-induced weight gain, inflammation and insulin resistance. Injection of proteinase 3 exacerbated insulin resistance in caspase-1(-/-) mice, indicating that proteinase 3 acts independently of caspase-1. Treatment with alpha-1 antitrypsin during the last 10 days of a 16 week high fat diet reduced hepatic lipid content and decreased fasting glucose levels. We conclude that proteinase 3 is involved in NAFLD and insulin resistance and that inhibition of proteinase 3 may have therapeutic potential.

  8. Converging beam optical Fourier transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puang-ngern, Srisuda; Almeida, Silverio P.

    1985-08-01

    The classical, most often used, system for performing the optical Fourier transform is by using parallel coherent beam illumination. Lenses used in this method can become quite costly. In this paper we present results obtained using converging beam illumination which is suitable for many applications and is less expensive than the parallel beam method. The input objects for which the Fourier transforms were made are transparencies of snowflakes.

  9. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate labeling of sperm-associated proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Odem, R.R.; Willand, J.L.; Polakoski, K.L. )

    1990-02-01

    Proteinase inhibitors have been shown to be capable of preventing various aspects of fertilization. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) is an irreversible inhibitor of trypsin-like enzymes that is commercially available in a radiolabeled form. The experiments described herein were designed to determine if DFP would prevent sperm function in live, motile sperm and to identify the sperm proteins bound with DFP. DFP at 5 mM concentrations had no observable effect on sperm motility, but inhibited the penetration of zona-free hamster ova by human sperm (5.5%) compared to controls (33.5%). Acid extracts of motile sperm that had been incubated with radiolabeled DFP and collected by the swim-up procedure demonstrated the presence of radiolabeled DFP, and the autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gels of these extracts localized the uptake of radiolabeled DFP to proteins in the molecular weight region of the proacrosin-acrosin system. Acid-extracted proteinases from semen samples incubated with DFP demonstrated a concentration-dependent inhibition of both esterolytic hydrolysis of benzoyl-arginine ethyl ester on spectrophotometric analysis and proteolytic activity on gelatin SDS-PAGE zymography. DFP-labeled proteins were precipitated by highly specific antibodies to proacrosin. These results demonstrated that DFP is capable of inhibiting sperm function, and that it associates with the proacrosin-acrosin system in live motile sperm.

  10. Molecular alteration and carbonization of aspartic acid upon N + ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, F. Z.; Sun, S. Q.; Zhang, D. M.; Ma, Z. L.; Chen, G. Q.

    2000-06-01

    Structural changes of aspartic acid (Asp) irradiated by nitrogen ions of 30 keV were studied using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Significant decreases of the intensities of COO -, NH 3+, COOH and CH 2 vibrations in the FTIR spectra, compared with those of unirradiated Asp, were observed for the sample irradiated at the fluence of 1×10 16 ions/cm 2. The decrease rates of the intensities of COO -, NH 3+, COOH and CH 2 vibrations with respect to the increasing irradiation fluences up to 4×10 16 ions/cm 2 were different. The results were attributable to the nonstoichiometrical desorption of corresponding volatile species such as H 2, NH 3+ and CO 2. The radiolysis residue of Asp after irradiation at a high fluence of 1×10 17 ions/cm 2 was analyzed and fatty acid was detected.

  11. Effect of solvents and temperature on the conformation of poly(beta-benzyl-L-aspartate) brushes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Tsung; Wang, Yuli; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2010-05-10

    We report on the synthesis and characterization of end-tethering polypeptide monolayers based on poly(beta-benzyl-L-aspartate) (PBLA) homopolymer and PBLA-b-poly(gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate) block copolymer. The homopolypeptide and copolypeptide brushes were fabricated by the sequential, surface-initiated vapor deposition polymerization of the N-carboxyanhydride of beta-benzyl-L-aspartate or gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate, yielding 80-nm-thick, chemically grafted films after 30 min of reaction time. Both Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and circular dichroism showed that the polypeptide brushes could be reversibly and repeatedly switched between left-handed and right-handed alpha-helical structures in response to solvent vapor exposure or permanently converted to a beta-sheet structure when heated to 160 degrees C in air. The facile, in vacuo manufacturability and the robustness of the films of PBLA-based brushes could allow them to be incorporated as active components for biosensing and nanofabricated devices.

  12. A role of secreted proteinase of Candida albicans for the invasion of chick chorio-allantoic membrane.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, I; Kondoh, Y; Shimizu, K; Tanaka, K

    1989-01-01

    The invasion of Candida albicans strains into the chorio-allantoic membrane (CAM) of a developing chick was studied by light and electron microscopy. A proteinase-producing strain, NUM961, invaded into intact CAM, but proteinase-deficient strain NUM678 cells remained on the surface of the CAM with no evidence of damage to the host cells. However, NUM678 cells invaded into the ectoderm-damaged CAM, or proteinase-treated one. Electron microscopy revealed that treatment with purified Candida proteinase disorganized the ectoderm tissue by disrupting the intercellular junctions. These results suggest that Candida proteinase damages the CAM surface, which enables the invasion of the growing hyphae.

  13. Limited proteolysis by macrophage elastase inactivities human. cap alpha. /sub 1/-proteinase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Banda, M.J.; Clark, E.J.; Werb, Z.

    1980-12-01

    Ever since the initial description of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-proteinase inhibitor (..cap alpha../sub 1/PI), the role of this plasma glycoprotein and its allelic polymorphism in disease and in healthy physiology has been the subject of much investigation, ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI inactivates a number of serine proteinases, including granulocyte elastase, and thus affords protection from the connective tissue degradation mediated by this class of proteinases. Because an imbalance in the ratio between ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI and proteinase may contribute to the development of destructive lung diseases, proteinases have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema. Both macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes have been implicated in disruption of the ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI-proteinase balance. In this report, a new mechanism for alteration of the ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI-proteinase balance is demonstrated. It was found that the purified form of macrophage elastase catalytically degrades and inactivates ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI so that it no longer inhibits the elastinolytic activity of granulocyte elastase.

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proteinase is rapidly and efficiently inactivated in human plasma by alpha 2-macroglobulin.

    PubMed

    Kisselev, A F; von der Helm, K

    1994-10-01

    Human plasma impairs the activity of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) proteinase to cleave the HIV-1 gag-polyprotein precursor. The inhibition is due to the entrapment of the proteinase by plasma alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M). In methylamine-treated plasma, where alpha 2M is inactivated, HIV proteinase is not blocked. The interaction of alpha 2M and HIV-1 proteinase resulting in covalent complexes of proteinase and alpha 2M was demonstrated by immunoblotting with antiserum either to alpha 2M or to the HIV proteinase. We suggest if HIV-1 proteinase would be released in vivo from infected patients' cells, alpha 2M entrapment may prevent or minimize a conceivable cleavage of extracellular matrix or plasma proteins by the HIV-1 enzyme.

  15. A short biography of Joseph Fourier and historical development of Fourier series and Fourier transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2012-07-01

    The profound study of nature is the most fertile source of mathematical discoveries. Not only does this study, by offering a definite goal to research, have the advantage of excluding vague questions and futile calculations, but it is also a sure means of moulding analysis itself, and discerning those elements in it which it is still essential to know and which science ought to conserve. These fundamental elements are those which recur in all natural phenomena. Joseph Fourier pure mathematics enables us to discover the concepts and laws connecting them, which gives us the key to the understanding of the phenomena of nature. Albert Einstein This article deals with a brief biographical sketch of Joseph Fourier, his first celebrated work on analytical theory of heat, his first great discovery of Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Included is a historical development of Fourier series and Fourier transforms with their properties, importance and applications. Special emphasis is made to his splendid research contributions to mathematical physics, pure and applied mathematics and his unprecedented public service accomplishments in the history of France. This is followed by historical comments about the significant and major impact of Fourier analysis on mathematical physics, probability and mathematical statistics, mathematical economics and many areas of pure and applied mathematics including geometry, harmonic analysis, signal analysis, wave propagation and wavelet analysis. Special attention is also given to the Fourier integral formula, Brownian motion and stochastic processes and many examples of applications including isoparametric inequality, everywhere continuous but nowhere differentiable functions, Heisenberg uncertainty principle, Dirichlets' theorem on primes in

  16. [High molecular weight chitosan and sodium alginate effect on secretory acid proteinase of Candida albicans].

    PubMed

    Calamari, Silvia; Bojanich, Alejandra; Barembaum, Silvina; Azcurra, Ana; Virga, Carolina; Dorronsoro, Susana

    2004-12-01

    The effect of high molecular weight chitosan (HMWCh) and sodium alginate (NaAL) on acid proteinase secretion of Candida albicans (one of culture collection and five isolates) was evaluated. The secretion of acid proteinase was induced in the presence and the absence of these polymers in different concentrations and their enzymatic activity was determined. HMWCh and NaAL significantly diminished the enzymatic activity (>76% for the collection strains and > 89% for the isolates, p < 0.05). HMWCh did not modify protein concentrations, but NaAL did. It can be concluded that both polymers can inhibit the proteinase activity of Candida albicans.

  17. Structural and functional properties of kunitz proteinase inhibitors from leguminosae: a mini review.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Ferreira, Rodrigo da Silva; Ferreira, Joana Gasperazzo; de Paula, Cláudia Alessandra Andrade; Salas, Carlos E; Sampaio, Misako Uemura

    2011-08-01

    Seed proteins that inhibit proteinases are classified in families based on amino acid sequence similarity, nature of reactive site and mechanism of action, and are used as tools for investigating proteinases in physiological and pathological events. More recently, the plant Kunitz family of inhibitors with two disulphide bridges was enlarged with members containing variable number of cysteine residues, ranging from no cysteine at all to more than four residues. The characteristic of these proteins, as well the interactions with their target proteinases, are briefly discussed.

  18. Triacontanol negatively modulates the jasmonic acid-stimulated proteinase inhibitors in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    PubMed

    Ramanarayan, Krishnamurthy; Swamy, Gangadharamurthy Sivakumar

    2004-04-01

    Triacontanol (TRIA), a long chain aliphatic alcohol (C30H61OH) reverses the effect of jasmonic acid (JA) in inducing proteinase inhibitors (PIs) in tomato leaves. Porcine pancreas trypsin and Spodoptera litura gut proteinases were inhibited in the presence of leaf proteins treated with JA, and TRIA partially reverses this effect. Spodoptera litura larvae fed with tomato leaves treated with JA were reduced in body weight and TRIA is able to partially reverse this JA-induced effect. These results reflect the partial reversal effect of TRIA in down regulating the JA-induced production of proteinase inhibitors.

  19. Non-enzymic beta-decarboxylation of aspartic acid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doctor, V. M.; Oro, J.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the mechanism of nonenzymic beta-decarboxylation of aspartic acid in the presence of metal ions and pyridoxal. The results suggest that aspartic acid is first converted to oxalacetic acid by transamination with pyridoxal which in turn is converted to pyridoxamine. This is followed by decarboxylation of oxalacetic acid to form pyruvic acid which transaminates with pyridoxamine to form alanine. The possible significance of these results to prebiotic molecular evolution is briefly discussed.

  20. Fourier dimension of random images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekström, Fredrik

    2016-10-01

    Given a compact set of real numbers, a random C^{m + α}-diffeomorphism is constructed such that the image of any measure concentrated on the set and satisfying a certain condition involving a real number s, almost surely has Fourier dimension greater than or equal to s / (m + α). This is used to show that every Borel subset of the real numbers of Hausdorff dimension s is C^{m + α}-equivalent to a set of Fourier dimension greater than or equal to s / (m + α ). In particular every Borel set is diffeomorphic to a Salem set, and the Fourier dimension is not invariant under Cm-diffeomorphisms for any m.

  1. Homology models of main proteinase from coronavirus associated with SARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Lin, Jin-Chung; Ho, Yih; Chen, Chin-Wen

    2005-01-01

    In this study, two homology models of the main proteinase (M pro) from the novel coronavirus associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV) were constructed. These models reveal three distinct functional domains, in which an intervening loop connecting domains II and III as well as a catalytic cleft containing the substrate binding subsites S1 and S2 between domains I and II are observed. S2 exhibits structural variations more significantly than S1 during the 200 ps molecular dynamics simulations because it is located at the open mouth of the catalytic cleft and the amino acid residues lining up this subsite are least conserved. In addition, the higher structural variation of S2 makes it flexible enough to accommodate a bulky hydrophobic residue from the substrate.

  2. Novel distribution of the secretory leucocyte proteinase inhibitor in kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Ohlsson, S; Ljungkrantz, I; Ohlsson, K; Segelmark, M; Wieslander, J

    2001-01-01

    The secretory leucocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) is a low molecular weight, tissue-specific inhibitor of, for example, elastase and cathepsin G, which also have antimicrobial capacity. SLPI has been localised to the respiratory, gastrointestinal and genital tracts, but so far not to the kidney. The presence of SLPI in renal tubuli cells was demonstrated using immunohistochemistry and, by means of in situ hybridisation on human renal biopsies, we were able to demonstrate SLPI production. In various inflammatory conditions in the kidneys, the protease-antiprotease balance is disturbed. For this reason, as well as the possible role in the defence against ascending urinary tract infections, it is interesting to establish a source of SLPI in renal tubuli cells. PMID:11817677

  3. Fragmentation reactions of deprotonated peptides containing aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Alex G.; Young, Alex B.

    2006-09-01

    The fragmentation reactions of deprotonated peptides containing aspartic acid have been elucidated using MS2 and MS3 experiments and accurate mass measurements where necessary. The disposition of labile (N and O bonded) hydrogens in the fragmentation products has been studied by exchanging the labile hydrogens for deuterium whereby the [MD]- ion is formed on electrospray ionization. [alpha]-Aspartyl and [beta]-aspartyl dipeptides give very similar fragment ion spectra on collisional activation, involving for both species primarily formation of the y1 ion and loss of H2O from [MH]- followed by further fragmentation, thus precluding the distinction of the isomeric species by negative ion tandem mass spectrometry. Dipeptides of sequence HXxxAspOH give characteristic spectra different from the [alpha]- and [beta]-isomers. For larger peptides containing aspartic acid a common fragmentation reaction involves nominal cleavage of the NC bond N-terminal to the aspartic acid residue to form a c ion (deprotonated amino acid amide (c1) or peptide amide (cn)) and the complimentary product involving elimination of a neutral amino acid amide or peptide amide. When aspartic acid is in the C-terminal position this fragmentation reaction occurs from the [MH]- ion while when the aspartic acid is not in the C-terminal position the fragmentation reaction occurs mainly from the [MHH2O]- ion. The products of this NC bond cleavage reaction serve to identify the position of the aspartic acid residue in the peptide.

  4. Altered Expression of Brain Proteinase-Activated Receptor-2, Trypsin-2 and Serpin Proteinase Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Michael J; Durrenberger, Pascal F; Gentleman, Steve M; Walls, Andrew F; Dexter, David T

    2015-09-01

    Neuroinflammation is thought to contribute to cell death in neurodegenerative disorders, but the factors involved in the inflammatory process are not completely understood. Proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) expression in brain is increased in Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis, but the status of PAR2 in Parkinson's disease is unknown. This study examined expression of PAR2 and endogenous proteinase activators (trypsin-2, mast cell tryptase) and proteinase inhibitors (serpin-A5, serpin-A13) in areas vulnerable and resistant to neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease at different Braak α-synuclein stages of the disease in post-mortem brain. In normal aged brain, expression of PAR-2, trypsin-2, and serpin-A5 and serpin-A13 was found in neurons and microglia, and alterations in the amount of immunoreactivity for these proteins were found in some brain regions. Namely, there was a decrease in neurons positive for serpin-A5 in the dorsal motor nucleus, and serpin-A13 expression was reduced in the locus coeruleus and primary motor cortex, while expression of PAR2, trypsin-2 and both serpins was reduced in neurons within the substantia nigra. There was an increased number of microglia that expressed serpin-A5 in the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus and elevated numbers of microglia that expressed serpin-A13 in the substantia nigra of late Parkinson's disease cases. The number of microglia that expressed trypsin-2 increased in primary motor cortex of incidental Lewy body disease cases. Analysis of Parkinson's disease cases alone indicated that serpin-A5 and serpin-A13, and trypsin-2 expression in midbrain and cerebral cortex was different in cases with a high incidence of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia and psychosis compared to those with low levels of these treatment-induced side effects. This study showed that there was altered expression in brain of PAR2 and some proteins that can control its function in Parkinson's disease. Given the role of PAR2 in

  5. Synthetic Fourier transform light scattering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeoreh; Kim, Hyeon-Don; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Youngchan; Hillman, Timothy R; Min, Bumki; Park, Yongkeun

    2013-09-23

    We present synthetic Fourier transform light scattering, a method for measuring extended angle-resolved light scattering (ARLS) from individual microscopic samples. By measuring the light fields scattered from the sample plane and numerically synthesizing them in Fourier space, the angle range of the ARLS patterns is extended up to twice the numerical aperture of the imaging system with unprecedented sensitivity and precision. Extended ARLS patterns of individual microscopic polystyrene beads, healthy human red blood cells (RBCs), and Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized RBCs are presented.

  6. Effect of a Bowman-Birk proteinase inhibitor from Phaseolus coccineus on Hypothenemus hampei gut proteinases in vitro.

    PubMed

    de Azevedo Pereira, Railene; Valencia-Jiménez, Arnubio; Magalhães, Cláudio Picanço; Prates, Maura Vianna; Melo, Jorge Alex Taquita; de Lima, Liziane Maria; de Sales, Maurício Pereira; Tempel Nakasu, Erich Yukio; da Silva, Maria Cristina Mattar; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria Fátima

    2007-12-26

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari), is an important devastating coffee pest worldwide. Both trypsin and chymotrypsin enzyme activities from H. hampei larval midgut can be inactivated by proteinaceous enzyme-inhibitors. A serine proteinase inhibitor belonging to the Bowman-Birk class was purified from a wild accession of Phaseolus coccineus L. seeds. The inhibitor (PcBBI1) is a cysteine-rich protein that is heat-stable at alkaline pH. MALDI-TOF/MS analysis showed that PcBBI1 occurs in seeds as a monomer (8689 Da) or dimer (17,378 Da). Using in vitro inhibition assays, it was found that PcBBI1 has a high inhibitory activity against H. hampei trypsin-like enzymes, bovine pancreatic chymotrypsin, and trypsin. According to this, PcBBI1 could be a promising tool to make genetically modified coffee with resistance to coffee berry borer.

  7. Circular dichroism of stem bromelain: a third spectral class within the family of cysteine proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo-Reyna, A; Hernandez-Arana, A; Arreguin-Espinosa, R

    1994-01-01

    Two forms of stem bromelain (EC 3.4.22.4) were isolated from commercial, crude and chromatographically purified preparations of the enzyme by means of gel-filtration and cation-exchange liquid chromatography. These forms possess nearly identical secondary and tertiary structures, as judged from their circular dichroism (c.d.) spectra. The spectral characteristics of stem bromelain suggest that this enzyme belongs to the alpha + beta protein class, as other cysteine proteinases do. In agreement with these results, quantitative estimation of secondary structures yielded amounts similar to those for papain and proteinase omega. However, the bromelain c.d. curve is clearly distinguishable from those reported for papain and proteinase omega, on one hand, and that of chymopapain, on the other. Thus, it is apparent that there are at least three types of c.d. spectra associated with the family of cysteine proteinases. PMID:8198520

  8. Fourier Lucas-Kanade algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lucey, Simon; Navarathna, Rajitha; Ashraf, Ahmed Bilal; Sridharan, Sridha

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a framework for both gradient descent image and object alignment in the Fourier domain. Our method centers upon the classical Lucas & Kanade (LK) algorithm where we represent the source and template/model in the complex 2D Fourier domain rather than in the spatial 2D domain. We refer to our approach as the Fourier LK (FLK) algorithm. The FLK formulation is advantageous when one preprocesses the source image and template/model with a bank of filters (e.g., oriented edges, Gabor, etc.) as 1) it can handle substantial illumination variations, 2) the inefficient preprocessing filter bank step can be subsumed within the FLK algorithm as a sparse diagonal weighting matrix, 3) unlike traditional LK, the computational cost is invariant to the number of filters and as a result is far more efficient, and 4) this approach can be extended to the Inverse Compositional (IC) form of the LK algorithm where nearly all steps (including Fourier transform and filter bank preprocessing) can be precomputed, leading to an extremely efficient and robust approach to gradient descent image matching. Further, these computational savings translate to nonrigid object alignment tasks that are considered extensions of the LK algorithm, such as those found in Active Appearance Models (AAMs).

  9. Fourier Analysis of Musical Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    Use of a microphone attached to a computer to capture musical sounds and software to display their waveforms and harmonic spectra has become somewhat commonplace. A recent article in "The Physics Teacher" aptly demonstrated the use of MacScope in just such a manner as a way to teach Fourier analysis. A logical continuation of this project is to…

  10. Fourier Series and Elliptic Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2003-01-01

    Non-linear second-order differential equations whose solutions are the elliptic functions "sn"("t, k"), "cn"("t, k") and "dn"("t, k") are investigated. Using "Mathematica", high precision numerical solutions are generated. From these data, Fourier coefficients are determined yielding approximate formulas for these non-elementary functions that are…

  11. Fourier spectroscopy and planetary research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanel, R. A.; Kunde, V. G.

    1974-01-01

    The application of Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (FTS) to planetary research is reviewed. The survey includes FTS observations of the sun, all the planets except Uranus and Pluto, the Galilean satellites and Saturn's rings. Instrumentation and scientific results are considered and the prospects and limitations of FTS for planetary research in the forthcoming years are discussed.

  12. [Properties of Bacillus pumilus subtilisin like proteinase secreted from recombinant strain on different growth stages].

    PubMed

    Balaban, N P; Danilova, Iu V; Shamsutdinov, T R; Mardanova, A M; Cheremin, A M; Rudenskaia, G N; Sharipova, M R

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus pumilus 3-19 glutamylendopeptidase has been isolated from culture liquid of Bacillus subtilis recombinant strain on different growth stages: growth retardation (early enzyme) and stationary phase (late enzyme). The effect of purified proteinase of different growth stages on insulin beta-chain, protein and oligopeptide substrates has been studied. Comparative study of physicochemical properties of early and late proteinases was carried out. Two protein fractions were different in catalytic characteristics and demonstrated different sensitivity to the presence of metal cations.

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi: insights into naphthoquinone effects on growth and proteinase activity.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, Saulo C; Cavalcanti, Danielle F B; de Souza, Alessandra M T; Castro, Helena C; Rodrigues, Carlos R; Albuquerque, Magaly G; Santos, Dilvani O; da Silva, Gabriel Gomes; da Silva, Fernando C; Ferreira, Vitor F; de Pinho, Rosa T; Alves, Carlos R

    2011-01-01

    In this study we compared the effects of naphthoquinones (α-lapachone, β-lapachone, nor-β-lapachone and Epoxy-α-lap) on growth of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes forms, and on viability of VERO cells. In addition we also experimentally analyzed the most active compounds inhibitory profile against T. cruzi serine- and cysteine-proteinases activity and theoretically evaluated them against cruzain, the major T. cruzi cysteine proteinase by using a molecular docking approach. Our results confirmed β-lapachone and Epoxy-α-lap with a high trypanocidal activity in contrast to α-lapachone and nor-β-lapachone whereas Epoxy-α-lap presented the safest toxicity profile against VERO cells. Interestingly the evaluation of the active compounds effects against T. cruzi cysteine- and serine-proteinases activities revealed different targets for these molecules. β-Lapachone is able to inhibit the cysteine-proteinase activity of T. cruzi proteic whole extract and of cruzain, similar to E-64, a classical cysteine-proteinase inhibitor. Differently, Epoxy-α-lap inhibited the T. cruzi serine-proteinase activity, similar to PMSF, a classical serine-proteinase inhibitor. In agreement to these biological profiles in the enzymatic assays, our theoretical analysis showed that E-64 and β-lapachone interact with the cruzain specific S2 pocket and active site whereas Epoxy-α-lap showed no important interactions. Overall, our results infer that β-lapachone and Epoxy-α-lap compounds may inhibit T. cruzi epimastigotes growth by affecting T. cruzi different proteinases. Thus the present data shows the potential of these compounds as prototype of protease inhibitors on drug design studies for developing new antichagasic compounds.

  14. Effect of carbon and nitrogen sources on neutral proteinase production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Nigam, J N; Pillai, K R; Baruah, J N

    1981-01-01

    A strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from soil produced large quantities of extracellular neutral proteinase and could utilize several organic substances as carbon and nitrogen sources for enzyme production. The growth media required the presence of a high amount of phosphate when glucose was the carbon source. The intermediates of citric-acid cycle acids supported the proteinase production more than any other carbon sources. However, complex nitrogenous substances supported enzyme production more efficiently. Higher concentration of casamino acids suppressed the protinase synthesis.

  15. [Activity dynamics of proteinases and glycosidases of fish chymus with exposure in fresh and brackish water].

    PubMed

    Kuz'mina, V V; Shekhovtsova, N V; Bolobonina, V E

    2010-01-01

    Activity of proteinases of the content of intestines (chymus) of the benthos-eater Carassius carassius fed different diets during prolonged exposure to water is studied. In the process of exposure of the chymus to water, the activity of proteinases decreases. Activity of glycosidases may increase, maximally during the first three days of exposure. This phenomenon suggests the important role of enzymes of the enteral microflora in processes of destruction of proteinaceous and carbohydrate components of the suspension and especially of organic detritus.

  16. Fourier analysis for rotating-element ellipsometers.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong Jai; Chegal, Won; Cho, Hyun Mo

    2011-01-15

    We introduce a Fourier analysis of the waveform of periodic light-irradiance variation to capture Fourier coefficients for multichannel rotating-element ellipsometers. In this analysis, the Fourier coefficients for a sample are obtained using a discrete Fourier transform on the exposures. The analysis gives a generic function that encompasses the discrete Fourier transform or the Hadamard transform, depending on the specific conditions. Unlike the Hadamard transform, a well-known data acquisition method that is used only for conventional multichannel rotating-element ellipsometers with line arrays with specific readout-mode timing, this Fourier analysis is applicable to various line arrays with either nonoverlap or overlap readout-mode timing. To assess the effects of the novel Fourier analysis, the Fourier coefficients for a sample were measured with a custom-built rotating-polarizer ellipsometer, using this Fourier analysis with various numbers of scans, integration times, and rotational speeds of the polarizer.

  17. Bitter gourd proteinase inhibitors: potential growth inhibitors of Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera litura.

    PubMed

    Telang, Manasi; Srinivasan, Ajay; Patankar, Aparna; Harsulkar, Abhay; Joshi, Vijay; Damle, Archana; Deshpande, Vasanti; Sainani, Mohini; Ranjekar, Prabhakar; Gupta, Gorakh; Birah, Ajanta; Rani, Seema; Kachole, Manavendra; Giri, Ashok; Gupta, Vidya

    2003-07-01

    Proteinase inhibitors (PIs) from the seeds of bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L.) were identified as strong inhibitors of Helicoverpa armigera gut proteinases (HGP). Biochemical investigations showed that bitter gourd PIs (BGPIs) inhibited more than 80% HGP activity. Electrophoretic analysis revealed the presence of two major proteins (BGPI-1 and-2) and two minor proteins (BGPI-3 and-4) having inhibitory activity against both trypsin and HGP. The major isoforms BGPI-1 and BGPI-2 have molecular mass of 3.5 and 3.0 kDa, respectively. BGPIs inhibited HGP activity of larvae fed on different host plants, on artificial diet with or without added PIs and proteinases excreted in fecal matter. Degradation of BGPI-1 by HGP showed direct correlation with accumulation of BGPI-2-like peptide, which remained stable and active against high concentrations of HGP up to 3 h. Chemical inhibitors of serine proteinases offered partial protection to BGPI-1 from degradation by HGP, suggesting that trypsin and chymotrypsin like proteinases are involved in degradation of BGPI-1. In larval feeding studies, BGPIs were found to retard growth and development of two lepidopteran pests namely Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera litura. This is the first report showing that BGPIs mediated inhibition of insect gut proteinases directly affects fertility and fecundity of both H. armigera and S. litura. The results advocate use of BGPIs to introduce insect resistance in otherwise susceptible plants.

  18. A serine proteinase of an archaebacterium, Halobacterium mediterranei. A homologue of eubacterial subtilisins.

    PubMed Central

    Stepanov, V M; Rudenskaya, G N; Revina, L P; Gryaznova, Y B; Lysogorskaya, E N; Filippova IYu; Ivanova, I I

    1992-01-01

    A homogeneous serine proteinase secreted by the extreme halophilic bacterium Halobacterium mediterranei 1538 was isolated by affinity chromatography on bacitracin-Sepharose with a yield of 48% (260-fold purification). The enzyme reveals an optimum for pyroglutamyl-Ala-Ala-Leu p-nitroanilide hydrolysis at pH 8.0-8.5 (Km 0.14 mM; k(cat). 36.9 s-1). Its activity increases linearly with NaCl concentration over the range 2-5 M. The substrate specificity of the enzyme is comparable with that of secretory subtilisins, the extent of protein degradation approaching that attained with proteinase K. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 41 kDa and a pI of 7.5. The N-terminal sequence of H. mediterranei serine proteinase reveals a 50% identity with that of Thermoactinomyces vulgaris serine proteinases, indicating that the enzyme belongs to the subtilisin family. Hence the serine proteinase secreted by the halophilic bacterium should be considered as a functional analogue, and a structural homologue, of eubacterial serine proteinases (subtilisins). Images Fig. 3. PMID:1637313

  19. Involement of an acrosinlike proteinase in the sulfhydryl-induced degradation of rabbit sperm nuclear protamine

    PubMed Central

    Zirkin, BR; Chang, TSK; Heaps, J

    1980-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that proteolytic activity is associated with isolated rabbit sperm nuclei and is responsible for the degradation of nuclear protamine that occurs during thiol-induced in vitro decondensation of the nuclei (Zirkin and Chang, 1977; Chang and Zirkin, 1978). In this study, we present the results of experiments designed to characterize this proteolytic activity. Basic protein isolated from rabbit sperm nuclei incubated with 5 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) and 1 percent Triton X-100 for increasing periods of time exhibited progressively faster migrating bands on acid-urea polyacrylamide gels, reflection the progressive degradation of protamine. Ultimately, a specific and characteristic peptide banding pattern resulted. When sperm nuclei were treated with the esterase inhibitor nitrophenyl-p-guanidino benzoate (NPGB) to inhibit the nuclear-associated proteolytic activity and then incubated with one of several exogenous proteinases in addition to DTT and Triton X-100, characteristic peptide banding patterns were seen for each exogenous proteinase employed. For trypsin, chymotrypsin, pronase, and papain, the peptide banding patterns differed from one another and from the pattern characteristic of protamine degradation by the nuclear-associated proteinase. By contrast, when rabbit acrosin served as the exogenous proteinase, the peptide banding pattern seen was identical to the pattern characteristic of the nuclear-associated proteinase. These results demonstrate directly that the proteinase associated with rabbit sperm nuclei and involved in sperm nuclear decondensation in vitro is acrosinlike. PMID:6988441

  20. General up regulation of Spodoptera frugiperda trypsins and chymotrypsins allows its adaptation to soybean proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Brioschi, Daniela; Nadalini, Larissa D; Bengtson, Mario H; Sogayar, Mari Cleide; Moura, Daniel S; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2007-12-01

    The existence of a diverse serine proteinase gene family in lepidopteran insects suggests they play a significant role in the insect adaptation to plant proteinase inhibitors. These proteinases have been shown to be involved in the process of proteolytic digestion in insect larvae. We carried out a selective transcriptome study of midguts from Spodoptera frugiperda larvae fed on a diet supplemented with soybean proteinase inhibitor (SPI). Using subtracted cDNA libraries made of gut-expressed transcripts, a total of 2100 partial sequences were obtained, of those 38% were related to digestive process. Two large and diverse groups of chymotrypsins and trypsins were obtained, and some of these proteinase-encoding genes were further characterized by quantitative RT-PCR. The transcription analyses revealed two groups: one group of genes constitutively expressed in the control larvae that is up regulated by introducing SPI to the diet, and a second group that is absent in the control but is induced by the SPI-rich diet. This observation suggests that adaptation of S. frugiperda to SPI involves de novo synthesis and also up regulation of existing enzymes. Proteases from intestines of larvae reared on a diet with SPI showed insensitivity to the inhibitor. The proteases were also insensitive to a broad-spectrum potato proteinase inhibitor preparation. We propose that adaptation of S. frugiperda to SPI follows a "shotgun" approach, based on a general up regulation of a large set of endoproteinases.

  1. Purification and characterization of a subtilisin-like proteinases secreted in the stationary growth phase of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens H2.

    PubMed

    Balaban, N P; Malikova, L A; Mardanova, A M; Rudenskaya, G N; Sharipova, M R

    2007-04-01

    Proteinases secreted during the early and late stationary phases have been isolated from the culture liquid of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens H2 using CM-cellulose ion-exchange chromatography with subsequent FPLC on a Mono S column. Considering the character of hydrolysis of specific chromogenic substrates and the type of inhibition, these enzymes were identified as subtilisin-like proteinases. The molecular weight of both proteinases is 29 kD. The proteolytic activity of the proteinases secreted during the early and late stationary phases towards the synthetic substrate Z-Ala-Ala-Leu-pNA was maximal at pH 8.5 and 9.0, respectively. The maximal activity of both proteinases was observed at 37 degrees C, and the proteins were stable within the pH range of 7.2-9.5. The subtilisin-like proteinases from B. amyloliquefaciens were shown to catalyze synthesis of peptide bonds.

  2. Compact Microwave Fourier Spectrum Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2009-01-01

    A compact photonic microwave Fourier spectrum analyzer [a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer, (FTMWS)] with no moving parts has been proposed for use in remote sensing of weak, natural microwave emissions from the surfaces and atmospheres of planets to enable remote analysis and determination of chemical composition and abundances of critical molecular constituents in space. The instrument is based on a Bessel beam (light modes with non-zero angular momenta) fiber-optic elements. It features low power consumption, low mass, and high resolution, without a need for any cryogenics, beyond what is achievable by the current state-of-the-art in space instruments. The instrument can also be used in a wide-band scatterometer mode in active radar systems.

  3. Subharmonic Fourier domain mode locking.

    PubMed

    Eigenwillig, Christoph M; Wieser, Wolfgang; Biedermann, Benjamin R; Huber, Robert

    2009-03-15

    We demonstrate a subharmonically Fourier domain mode-locked wavelength-swept laser source with a substantially reduced cavity fiber length. In contrast to a standard Fourier domain mode-locked configuration, light is recirculated repetitively in the delay line with the optical bandpass filter used as switch. The laser has a fundamental optical round trip frequency of 285 kHz and can be operated at integer fractions thereof (subharmonics). Sweep ranges up to 95 nm full width centred at 1317 nm are achieved at the 1/5th subharmonic. A maximum sensitivity of 116 dB and an axial resolution of 12 microm in air are measured at an average sweep power of 12 mW. A sensitivity roll-off of 11 dB over 4 mm and 25 dB over 10 mm is observed and optical coherence tomography imaging is demonstrated. Besides the advantage of a reduced fiber length, subharmonic Fourier domain mode locking (shFDML) enables simple scaling of the sweep speed by extracting light from the delay part of the resonator. A sweep rate of 570 kHz is achieved. Characteristic features of shFDML operation, such as power leakage during fly-back and cw breakthrough, are investigated.

  4. From Fourier optics to integrative engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannson, Tomasz; Kostrzewski, Andrew

    2011-10-01

    In this paper we present technical evolution at Physical Optics Corporation (POC), from Fourier Optics, inspired by Professor Joseph Goodman's classic book: Introduction to Fourier Optics, to recent directions at POC, related to socalled "Integrative Engineering."

  5. Proteinase 3, Wegener's autoantigen: from gene to antigen.

    PubMed

    van der Geld, Y M; Limburg, P C; Kallenberg, C G

    2001-02-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) is one of four serine protease homologues in the azurophilic granules of neutrophils and granules of monocytes. It is of importance that anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) are mainly directed against PR3 only. Furthermore, PR3 is overexpressed in a variety of acute and chronic myeloid leukemia cells. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for a PR3-derived peptide have been shown to specifically lyse leukemia cells that overexpress PR3. This review will focus on PR3 and the characteristics of PR3 that might implicate this particular antigen in the pathogenesis of WG and as target for immunotherapy in myeloid leukemias. We will discuss the genetic localization and gene regulation of PR3, the processing, storage, and expression of the PR3 protein, and the physiological functions of PR3, and compare this with the three other neutrophil-derived serine proteases: human leukocyte elastase, cathepsin G, and azurocidin. Three main differences are described between PR3 and the other serine proteases. This makes PR3 a very intriguing protein with a large array of physiological functions, some of which may play a role in ANCA-associated vasculitidis and myeloid leukemia.

  6. Conformational Plasticity of the 2A Proteinase from Enterovirus 71

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qixu; Yameen, Muhammad; Liu, Weihua; Gao, Zhenting; Li, Yaozong; Peng, Xuanjia; Cai, Yaxian; Wu, Caiming; Zheng, Qian

    2013-01-01

    The 2A proteinase (2Apro) is an enterovirally encoded cysteine protease that plays essential roles in both the processing of viral precursor polyprotein and the hijacking of host cell translation and other processes in the virus life cycle. Crystallographic studies of 2Apro from enterovirus 71 (EV71) and its interaction with the substrate are reported here. EV71 2Apro was comprised of an N-terminal domain of a four-stranded antiparallel β sheet and a C-terminal domain of a six-stranded antiparallel β barrel with a tightly bound zinc atom. Unlike in other 2Apro structures, there is an open cleft across the surface of the protein in an open conformation. As demonstrated by the crystallographic studies and modeling of the complex structure, the open cleft could be fitted with the substrate. On comparison 2Apro of EV71 to those of the human rhinovirus 2 and coxsackievirus B4, the open conformation could be closed with a hinge motion in the bII2 and cII β strands. This was supported by molecular dynamic simulation. The structural variation among different 2Apro structures indicates a conformational flexibility in the substrate-binding cleft. The open structure provides an accessible framework for the design and development of therapeutics against the viral target. PMID:23616646

  7. Role of saliva proteinase 3 in dental caries

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Teng-Yu; Zhou, Wen-Jie; Du, Yue; Wu, Song-Tao; Yuan, Wen-Wen; Yu, Yu; Su, Lin; Luo, Yang; Zhang, Jie-Hua; Lu, Wan-Lu; Wang, Xiao-Qian; Chen, Jiao; Feng, Yun; Zhou, Xue-Dong; Zhang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Salivary analysis can be used to assess the severity of caries. Of the known salivary proteins, a paucity of information exists concerning the role of proteinase 3 (PR3), a serine protease of the chymotrypsin family, in dental caries. Whole, unstimulated saliva was collected from children with varying degrees of active caries and tested using a Human Protease Array Kit and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A significantly decreased concentration of salivary PR3 was noted with increasing severity of dental caries (P<0.01); a positive correlation (r=0.87; P<0.01; Pearson's correlation analysis) was also observed between salivary pH and PR3 concentration. In an antibacterial test, a PR3 concentration of 250 ng·mL−1 or higher significantly inhibited Streptococcus mutans UA159 growth after 12 h of incubation (P<0.05). These studies indicate that PR3 is a salivary factor associated with the severity of dental caries, as suggested by the negative relationship between salivary PR3 concentration and the severity of caries as well as the susceptibility of S. mutans to PR3. PMID:26756046

  8. Proteinase 3-ANCA Vasculitis versus Myeloperoxidase-ANCA Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Hilhorst, Marc; van Paassen, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    In patients with GN or vasculitis, ANCAs are directed against proteinase 3 (PR3) or myeloperoxidase (MPO). The differences between PR3-ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and MPO-AAV described in the past have been supplemented during the last decade. In this review, we discuss the differences between these two small-vessel vasculitides, focusing especially on possible etiologic and pathophysiologic differences. PR3-AAV is more common in northern parts of the world, whereas MPO-AAV is more common in southern regions of Europe, Asia, and the Pacific, with the exception of New Zealand and Australia. A genetic contribution has been extensively studied, and there is a high prevalence of the HLA-DPB1*04:01 allele in patients with PR3-AAV as opposed to patients with MPO-AAV and/or healthy controls. Histologically, MPO-AAV and PR3-AAV are similar but show qualitative differences when analyzed carefully. Clinically, both serotypes are difficult to distinguish, but quantitative differences are present. More organs are affected in PR3-AAV, whereas renal limited vasculitis occurs more often in patients with MPO-AAV. For future clinical trials, we advocate classifying patients by ANCA serotype as opposed to the traditional disease type classification. PMID:25956510

  9. Interference of Wegener's granulomatosis autoantibodies with neutrophil Proteinase 3 activity.

    PubMed Central

    van de Wiel, B A; Dolman, K M; van der Meer-Gerritsen, C H; Hack, C E; von dem Borne, A E; Goldschmeding, R

    1992-01-01

    Classic anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (C-ANCA) are disease-specific markers of Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). The possible pathogenetic role of these autoantibodies, which are directed against Proteinase 3 (PR3), is not yet clear. We studied the effect of C-ANCA on PR3 proteolytic activity and on the complexation of PR3 with alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT). C-ANCA IgG from eight patients with active WG significantly inhibited PR3 proteolytic activity, particularly towards elastin (median 84.2% inhibition). C-ANCA IgG significantly inhibited the complexation of PR3 with alpha 1AT (median 58.8% inhibition). Moreover, addition of purified PR3 to C-ANCA-positive sera from WG patients yielded less complexes with alpha 1AT (median 44.8%) compared with sera containing perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (P-ANCA) or ANCA-negative sera. These findings indicate the existence of a hitherto unknown property of C-ANCA, which may be of importance in the pathogenesis of WG. PMID:1458677

  10. Poliovirus polypeptide precursors: expression in vitro and processing by exogenous 3C and 2A proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Nicklin, M J; Kräusslich, H G; Toyoda, H; Dunn, J J; Wimmer, E

    1987-01-01

    Plasmids have been constructed to generate substrates for the study of proteinases 2A and 3C of poliovirus. They contain the P1 (capsomer precursor) region of the poliovirus genome or P1 and part of P2 (a nonstructural precursor), which can be transcribed and translated in vitro. A transcript containing the entire 5' nontranslated region and the P1 region of the viral RNA gave poor translation in a reticulocyte translation system. Truncation of the 5' nontranslated region to its 3'-most segment gave acceptably good yields of radiolabeled P1. P1 was specifically processed to yield capsomer proteins by enzymes supplied in a postmitochondrial supernatant from poliovirus-infected cells. Thus, proteinase 3C can be supplied exogenously (in trans) and effect processing. This system may be used to provide P1 for the assay of proteinase 3C. Precursors that lacked either the 1A or 1D regions were poor substrates for proteinase 3C--observations that demonstrated a stringent structural requirement in processing by 3C. The translation product of a transcript encoding P1 and part of P2 was rapidly cleaved at the P1-P2 site in the absence of infected-cell extract. A transcript that contained a mutated 2A region gave a stable P1-P2 precursor that could be processed specifically by exogenous proteinase from infected-cell fractions. Processing of P1 appeared to require cleavage of the P1-P2 bond. These results support our previous data that 2A is the second polioviral proteinase and also provides a means of assaying proteinase 2A in vitro. Images PMID:3035560

  11. New variation on a theme: structure and mechanism of action of hydrolytic antibody 7F11, an aspartate rich relation of catalytic antibodies 17E8 and 29G11.

    PubMed

    Cross, Simon S J; Brady, Kevin; Stevenson, James D; Sackin, Jenny R; Kenward, Nigel; Dietel, Anja; Thomas, Neil R

    2002-11-01

    A computer model, based on homology, of the catalytic antibody 7F11 that catalyses the decomposition of the benzoate ester of a dioxetane resulting in chemiluminescence is reported. Antibody 7F11 has 89% identity in the V(L) domain, and 72% identity in the V(H) domain with hydrolytic antibodies 17E8 and 29G11 previously reported by Scanlan et al. These were also raised against a phosphonate containing hapten. The antigen-binding site of antibody 7F11 whilst similar to that of 17E8 has aspartic acids at positions 33H and 35H, reminiscent in position of the catalytic residues found in aspartate proteinases such as pepsin. AutoDock 3.0 has been used to identify the best binding mode for the hapten. Molecular dynamic simulations have also been undertaken to examine any major conformational changes induced by hapten binding. A mechanism for benzoate ester hydrolysis involving the aspartic acid side-chains is proposed. Construction of a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) of 7F11 is also reported.

  12. Alkaline proteinase inhibitor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a mutational and molecular dynamics study of the role of N-terminal residues in the inhibition of Pseudomonas alkaline proteinase.

    PubMed

    Feltzer, Rhona E; Trent, John O; Gray, Robert D

    2003-07-11

    Alkaline proteinase inhibitor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a 11.5-kDa, high affinity inhibitor of the serralysin class of zinc-dependent proteinases secreted by several Gram-negative bacteria. X-ray crystallography of the proteinase-inhibitor complex reveals that five N-terminal inhibitor residues occupy the extended substrate binding site of the enzyme and that the catalytic zinc is chelated by the alpha-amino and carbonyl groups of the N-terminal residue of the inhibitor. In this study, we assessed the effect of alteration of inhibitor residues 2-5 on its affinity for Pseudomonas alkaline proteinase (APR) as derived from the ratio of the dissociation and associate rate constants for formation of the enzyme-inhibitor complex. The largest effect was observed at position Ser-2, which occupies the S1' pocket of the enzyme and donates a hydrogen bond to the carboxyl group of the catalytic Glu-177 of the proteinase. Substitution of Asp, Arg, or Trp at this position increased the dissociation constant KD by 35-, 180-, and 13-fold, respectively. Mutation at positions 3-5 of the trunk also resulted in a reduction in enzyme-inhibitor affinity, with the exception of an I4W mutant, which exhibited a 3-fold increase in affinity. Molecular dynamics simulation of the complex formation between the catalytic domain of APR and the S2D mutant showed that the carboxyl of Asp-2 interacts with the catalytic zinc, thereby partially neutralizing the negative charge that otherwise would clash with the carboxyl group of Glu-177 of APR. Simulation of the interaction between the alkaline proteinase and the I4W mutant revealed a major shift in the loop comprised of residues 189-200 of the enzyme that allowed formation of a stacking interaction between the aromatic rings of Ile-4 of the inhibitor and Tyr-158 of the proteinase. This new interaction could account for the observed increase in enzyme-inhibitor affinity.

  13. Kinetic analysis of a general model of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens involving a reversible inhibitor. II. Contribution of the uni- and bimolecular activation routes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-López, A; Sotos-Lomas, A; Arribas, E; Escribano, J; Masia-Perez, J; Muñoz-Muñoz, J L; Varon, R

    2007-04-01

    From the kinetic study carried out in part I of this series (preceding article) an analysis quantifying the relative contribution to the global process of the uni- and bimolecular routes has been carried out. This analysis suggests a way to predict the time course of the relative contribution as well as the effect on this relative weight of the initial zymogen, inhibitor and activating enzyme concentrations.

  14. A Simple Approach to Fourier Aliasing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foadi, James

    2007-01-01

    In the context of discrete Fourier transforms the idea of aliasing as due to approximation errors in the integral defining Fourier coefficients is introduced and explained. This has the positive pedagogical effect of getting to the heart of sampling and the discrete Fourier transform without having to delve into effective, but otherwise long and…

  15. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors in the midgut of Phlebotomus papatasi

    PubMed Central

    Sigle, Leah Theresa; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae) are important disease vectors of parasites of the genus Leishmania, as well as bacteria and viruses. Following studies of the midgut transcriptome of Phlebotomus papatasi, the principal vector of Leishmania major, two non-classical Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors were identified (PpKzl1 and PpKzl2). Analyses of expression profiles indicated that PpKzl1 and PpKzl2 transcripts are both regulated by blood-feeding in the midgut of P. papatasi and are also expressed in males, larva and pupa. We expressed a recombinant PpKzl2 in a mammalian expression system (CHO-S free style cells) that was applied to in vitro studies to assess serine proteinase inhibition. Recombinant PpKzl2 inhibited α-chymotrypsin to 9.4% residual activity and also inhibited α-thrombin and trypsin to 33.5% and 63.9% residual activity, suggesting that native PpKzl2 is an active serine proteinase inhibitor and likely involved in regulating digestive enzymes in the midgut. Early stages of Leishmania are susceptible to killing by digestive proteinases in the sandfly midgut. Thus, characterising serine proteinase inhibitors may provide new targets and strategies to prevent transmission of Leishmania. PMID:24037187

  16. Taraxalisin -- a serine proteinase from dandelion Taraxacum officinale Webb s.l.

    PubMed

    Rudenskaya, G N; Bogacheva, A M; Preusser, A; Kuznetsova, A V; Dunaevsky YaE; Golovkin, B N; Stepanov, V M

    1998-10-23

    Latex of dandelion roots contains a serine proteinase that hydrolyzes a chromogenic peptide substrate Glp-Ala-Ala-Leu-pNA optimally at pH 8.0. Maximal activity of the proteinase in the roots is attained in April, at the beginning of plant development after the winter period. The protease was isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation of the root extract followed by affinity chromatography on a Sepharose-Ala-Ala-Leu-mrp and gel filtration on Superose 6R performed in FPLC regime. Pure serine proteinase named taraxalisin was inactivated by specific inhibitors of serine proteinases, diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) and phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride (PMSF). Its molecular mass is 67 kDa and pI 4.5. pH stability range is 6-9 in the presence of 2 mM Ca2+, temperature optimum is at 40 degrees C; Km=0.37+/-0.06 mM. The substrate specificity of taraxalisin towards synthetic peptides and insulin B-chain is comparable with that of two other subtilisin-like serine proteinases, cucumisin and macluralisin. The taraxalisin N-terminal sequence traced for 15 residues revealed 40% coinciding residues when aligned with that of subtilisin Carlsberg.

  17. [Progresses in the structure and function of Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qing-Liang; Sheng, Qing; Zhang, Yao-Zhou

    2006-09-01

    Proteinase inhibitors are widely distributed in many living organisms and play crucial roles in many biological processes, particularly in regulating the proteinase activity spatially and temporally. However, The Kazal family of serine protease inhibitors is one of the most important and extensively studied protease inhibitor families. This type of protease inhibitor normally consists of one or several domains. Every domain has a highly conserved sequence structure and molecular conformation. It is found that contact residues are hyper variable, which are responsible for the interaction of inhibitors and proteinases. Most of them are in the solvent exposed loop. But P1 residue is the key active site of the interaction between inhibitor and enzyme. The types of the amino acid at P1 site likely play an important role in causing different inhibitory activity. The substitutions at the contact residues cause significant effects on the association constant. By using the Laskowski algorithm, the Ki values of a Kazal domain against six serine proteinases can be predicted from the domain' s sequence alone. At present there are many Kazal proteinase inhibitors found in the organisms, which show important biological functions. This article gives a comprehensive review of the newer developments in the characters and the interaction of the Kazal-type inhibitors.

  18. Purification and characterization of serine proteinase 2 from Bacillus intermedius 3-19.

    PubMed

    Balaban, N P; Mardanova, A M; Sharipova, M R; Gabdrakhmanova, L A; Sokolova, E A; Rudenskaya, G N; Leshchinskaya, I B

    2004-04-01

    A proteinase secreted in the late stationary phase was isolated from the culture fluid of Bacillus intermedius 3-19 by ion-exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose followed by FPLC on a Mono S column. The enzyme was completely inhibited by the serine proteinase inhibitors diisopropyl fluorophosphate and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride. The maximum proteolytic activity against the synthetic chromogenic substrate Z-Ala-Ala-Leu-pNA was observed at pH 9.0. The molecular weight of the enzyme is 28 kD and its isoelectric point is 9.2. We have also determined pH- and thermostability and Km and kcat of this proteinase. The enzyme has been classified as a thiol-dependent serine proteinase. N-Terminal amino acid sequence (10 residues) and amino acid composition of the protein were also determined. By the mode of hydrolysis of peptide bonds in the oxidized B-chain of insulin, this enzyme is similar to the thiol-dependent serine proteinase 1 from B. intermedius 3-19 secreted during vegetative growth.

  19. Pacifastin, a novel 155-kDa heterodimeric proteinase inhibitor containing a unique transferrin chain

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zicai; Sottrup-Jensen, Lars; Aspán, Anna; Hall, Martin; Söderhäll, Kenneth

    1997-01-01

    A 155-kDa proteinase inhibitor, pacifastin, from plasma of the freshwater crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus, was found to be composed of two covalently linked subunits. The two subunits are encoded by two different mRNAs, which were cloned and sequenced. The heavy chain of pacifastin (105 kDa) is related to transferrins, containing three transferrin lobes, two of which seem to be active for iron binding. The light chain of pacifastin (44 kDa) is the inhibitory subunit, and has nine cysteine-rich inhibitory domains that are homologous to each other and to low molecular weight proteinase inhibitors isolated from the grasshopper, Locusta migratoria. The nine light chain domains and the Locusta inhibitors share a characteristic cysteine array (Cys-Xaa9–12-Cys-Xaa2-Cys-Xaa-Cys-Xaa6–8-Cys-Xaa4-Cys) distinct from any described proteinase inhibitor family, suggesting that they constitute a new family of proteinase inhibitors. Pacifastin is the first known protein that has combined properties of a transferrin-like molecule and a proteinase inhibitor. PMID:9192625

  20. Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis: influence of successive in vitro cultivation on the expression of promastigote proteinases.

    PubMed

    Rebello, Karina Mastropasqua; Britto, Constança; Pereira, Bernardo Acácio Santini; Pita-Pereira, Daniela de; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Ferreira, Anna Beatriz Robottom; Cysne-Finkelstein, Léa; Otto, Thomas Dan; Côrtes, Luzia Monteiro de Castro; da-Silva, Gabriel Gomes; Alves, Carlos Roberto

    2010-12-01

    Cysteine proteinases are an important virulence factor in Leishmania parasites. In this study we analyzed the cysteine proteinase expression of infective Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis promastigotes, examining the expression induced by successive in vitro passages in culture. We observed that this parasite presents a decrease in its virulence over BALB/c macrophages, after successive passages in culture, but still they present proteinase activity, being capable of hydrolyzing the substrate pGlu-Phe-Leu-p Nitroanilide at pH 7.0. This proteinase activity also decreases in the course of the successive passages. Additionally, the decrease in the amount of CPB proteins following successive passages of promastigotes was verified by immunoblotting assays, using an anti-CPB antiserum. Real-time PCR assays were performed to assess the relative cpb expression when compared to a housekeeping gene in promastigote cDNA preparations from the first, fourth and seventh passages. Interestingly, the data indicate a relative increase in cpb gene transcripts as the promastigotes were maintained under in vitro culture: 2.2 times higher for fourth and 2.7 times higher for seventh passages when compared to the first passage. Thus, the information gathered here shows that the expression of cysteine proteinases is modified during in vitro cultivation of L. (V.) braziliensis promastigotes.

  1. Differential antibiosis against Helicoverpa armigera exerted by distinct inhibitory repeat domains of Capsicum annuum proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rakesh S; Gupta, Vidya S; Giri, Ashok P

    2014-05-01

    Plant defensive serine proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are known to have negative impact on digestive physiology of herbivore insects and thus have a crucial role in plant protection. Here, we have assessed the efficacy and specificity of three previously characterized inhibitory repeat domain (IRD) variants from Capsicum annuum PIs viz., IRD-7, -9 and -12 against gut proteinases from Helicoverpa armigera. Comparative study of in silico binding energy revealed that IRD-9 possesses higher affinity towards H. armigera serine proteinases as compared to IRD-7 and -12. H. armigera fed on artificial diet containing 5 TIU/g of recombinant IRD proteins exhibited differential effects on larval growth, survival rate and other nutritional parameters. Major digestive gut trypsin and chymotrypsin genes were down regulated in the IRD fed larvae, while few of them were up-regulated, this indicate alterations in insect digestive physiology. The results corroborated with proteinase activity assays and zymography. These findings suggest that the sequence variations among PIs reflect in their efficacy against proteinases in vitro and in vivo, which also could be used for developing tailor-made multi-domain inhibitor gene(s).

  2. Fourier-transform optical microsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, S. D.; Smith, R. L.; Gonzalez, C.; Stewart, K. P.; Hagopian, J. G.; Sirota, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and initial characterization of a miniature single-pass Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTS) that has an optical bench that measures 1 cm x 5 cm x 10 cm is presented. The FTS is predicated on the classic Michelson interferometer design with a moving mirror. Precision translation of the mirror is accomplished by microfabrication of dovetailed bearing surfaces along single-crystal planes in silicon. Although it is miniaturized, the FTS maintains a relatively high spectral resolution, 0.1 cm-1, with adequate optical throughput.

  3. Fourier Transform Methods. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Simon G.; Quijada, Manuel A.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS) for accurate spectrophotometry over a wide spectral range. After a brief exposition of the basic concepts of FTS operation, we discuss instrument designs and their advantages and disadvantages relative to dispersive spectrometers. We then examine how common sources of error in spectrophotometry manifest themselves when using an FTS and ways to reduce the magnitude of these errors. Examples are given of applications to both basic and derived spectrophotometric quantities. Finally, we give recommendations for choosing the right instrument for a specific application, and how to ensure the accuracy of the measurement results..

  4. Improved AWG Fourier optics model.

    PubMed

    Molina-Fernández, I; Wangüemert-Pérez, J

    2004-10-04

    In this paper we present an improved Fourier Optics model to calculate the transmission characteristics between any arbitrary pair of input/output ports (IOPs) of an Arrayed Waveguide Grating (AWG). In this model the input and output sections of the AWG are modeled using the same approximations, thus removing some reciprocity-related inconsistencies present in previously existing models. The expressions which summarize the model are compact and easily interpretable. Simple quasi-analytical expressions are also derived under the Gaussian approximation of the mode field profiles.

  5. Aperture scanning Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Xiaoze; Chung, Jaebum; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-01-01

    Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) is implemented through aperture scanning by an LCOS spatial light modulator at the back focal plane of the objective lens. This FPM configuration enables the capturing of the complex scattered field for a 3D sample both in the transmissive mode and the reflective mode. We further show that by combining with the compressive sensing theory, the reconstructed 2D complex scattered field can be used to recover the 3D sample scattering density. This implementation expands the scope of application for FPM and can be beneficial for areas such as tissue imaging and wafer inspection. PMID:27570705

  6. Neutrophil elastase and proteinase 3 trafficking routes in myelomonocytic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kaellquist, Linda; Rosen, Hanna; Nordenfelt, Pontus; Calafat, Jero; Janssen, Hans; Persson, Ann-Maj; Hansson, Markus; Olsson, Inge

    2010-11-15

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase 3 (PR3) differ in intracellular localization, which may reflect different trafficking mechanisms of the precursor forms when synthesized at immature stages of neutrophils. To shed further light on these mechanisms, we compared the trafficking of precursor NE (proNE) and precursor PR3 (proPR3). Like proNE [1], proPR3 interacted with CD63 upon heterologous co-expression in COS cells but endogenous interaction was not detected although cell surface proNE/proPR3/CD63 were co-endocytosed in myelomonocytic cells. Cell surface proNE/proPR3 turned over more rapidly than cell surface CD63 consistent with processing/degradation of the pro-proteases but recycling of CD63. Colocalization of proNE/proPR3/CD63 with clathrin and Rab 7 suggested trafficking through coated vesicles and late endosomes. Partial caveolar trafficking of proNE/CD63 but not proPR3 was suggested by colocalization with caveolin-1. Blocking the C-terminus of proNE/proPR3 by creating a fusion with FK506 binding protein inhibited endosomal re-uptake of proNE but not proPR3 indicating 'pro{sub C}'-peptide-dependent structural/conformational requirements for proNE but not for proPR3 endocytosis. The NE aminoacid residue Y199 of a proposed NE sorting motif that interacts with AP-3 [2] was not required for proNE processing, sorting or endocytosis in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells expressing heterologous Y199-deleted proNE; this suggests operation of another AP-3-link for proNE targeting. Our results show intracellular multi-step trafficking to be different between proNE and proPR3 consistent with their differential subcellular NE/PR3 localization in neutrophils.

  7. Pathway-selective antagonism of proteinase activated receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Suen, J Y; Cotterell, A; Lohman, R J; Lim, J; Han, A; Yau, M K; Liu, L; Cooper, M A; Vesey, D A; Fairlie, D P

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Proteinase activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is a GPCR associated with inflammation, metabolism and disease. Clues to understanding how to block PAR2 signalling associated with disease without inhibiting PAR2 activation in normal physiology could be provided by studies of biased signalling. Experimental Approach PAR2 ligand GB88 was profiled for PAR2 agonist and antagonist properties by several functional assays associated with intracellular G-protein-coupled signalling in vitro in three cell types and with PAR2-induced rat paw oedema in vivo. Key Results In HT29 cells, GB88 was a PAR2 antagonist in terms of Ca2+ mobilization and PKC phosphorylation, but a PAR2 agonist in attenuating forskolin-induced cAMP accumulation, increasing ERK1/2 phosphorylation, RhoA activation, myosin phosphatase phosphorylation and actin filament rearrangement. In CHO-hPAR2 cells, GB88 inhibited Ca2+ release, but activated Gi/o and increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In human kidney tubule cells, GB88 inhibited cytokine secretion (IL6, IL8, GM-CSF, TNF-α) mediated by PAR2. A rat paw oedema induced by PAR2 agonists was also inhibited by orally administered GB88 and compared with effects of locally administered inhibitors of G-protein coupled pathways. Conclusions and Implications GB88 is a biased antagonist of PAR2 that selectively inhibits PAR2/Gq/11/Ca2+/PKC signalling, leading to anti-inflammatory activity in vivo, while being an agonist in activating three other PAR2-activated pathways (cAMP, ERK, Rho) in human cells. These findings highlight opportunities to design drugs to block specific PAR2-linked signalling pathways in disease, without blocking beneficial PAR2 signalling in normal physiology, and to dissect PAR2-associated mechanisms of disease in vivo. PMID:24821440

  8. Synthesis of 6-phosphofructose aspartic acid and some related Amadori compounds.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Alexandar L; Behrman, Edward J

    2016-08-05

    We describe the synthesis and characterization of 6-phosphofructose-aspartic acid, an intermediate in the metabolism of fructose-asparagine by Salmonella. We also report improved syntheses of fructose-asparagine itself and of fructose-aspartic acid.

  9. Several properties of the partially purified proteinase inhibitor in eggplant exocarp.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, M; Ibuki, F; Yamada, M; Tashiro, M; Miyoshi, M

    1975-01-01

    A proteinase inhibitor was isolated and partially purified from the exocarp of eggplant, Solanum melongena L., by means of acetate buffer extraction, heat treatment, salting-out and column chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. This preparation showed inhibitory activities on various proteinases; trypsin [EC 3.4.4.4] and Pronase were strongly inhibited while alpha-chymotrypsin [EC 3.4.4.5] and Nagarse were weakly inhibited. The inhibitor was a protein substance, and, therefore, it was gradually inactivated by the long-time incubation with Pronase. The inhibition mode was non-competitive on trypsin and competitive on Pronase on the basis of Lineweaver-Burk plots. The investigations on the inhibition behavior in the co-existence of two kinds of proteinases suggested that the inhibitor was not of multi-headed type.

  10. Purification and Characterization of an Extracellular Proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174

    PubMed Central

    Rattray, F. P.; Bockelmann, W.; Fox, P. F.

    1995-01-01

    An extracellular serine proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 was purified to homogeneity. pH and temperature optima were 8.5 and 50(deg)C, respectively. The results for the molecular mass of the proteinase were 56 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 126 kDa by gel filtration, indicating that the native enzyme exists as a dimer. Mg(sup2+) and Ca(sup2+) activated the proteinase, as did NaCl; however, Hg(sup2+), Fe(sup2+), and Zn(sup2+) caused strong inhibition. The sequence of the first 20 N-terminal amino acids was NH(inf2)-Ala-Lys-Asn-Asp-Ala-Val-Gly-Gly-Met-Gly-Tyr-Leu-Ser-Met-Ile-Pro-Se r-Gln-Pro-Gly. PMID:16535130

  11. Characteristics of a Proteinase of a Trichosporon Species Isolated from Dungeness Crab Meat

    PubMed Central

    Groninger, Herman S.; Eklund, M. W.

    1966-01-01

    The proteinase of a Trichosporon species was partially purified by dialysis, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and Sephadex G-100 gel filtration. A 170-fold purification of the enzyme with a 1.4% recovery of the activity was achieved. The proteinase was separated into a major component and possibly two minor components by starch gel electrophoresis. The pH optimum of the enzyme was 5.8 to 6.2. It was active against casein, hemoglobin, and crab protein substrates, but inactive against bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, and benzoylarginine ethyl ester. It was slightly activated by 10 mm cysteine, 0.1 mm ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and 0.1 mm Co++. There was slight inhibition by 10 mm Co++ and 0.1 mm phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride, and total inhibition by 1 mmp-chloromercuribenzoate. The proteinase was completely inactivated by heating at 60 C for 10 min. PMID:5914489

  12. Purification and partial characterization of proteinase inhibitors of equine seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, André Belico; Santos, Alexandre Martins Costa; Oliveira, Jamil Silvano; Lagares, Monique de Albuquerque; Santoro, Marcelo Matos

    2009-07-01

    The aims of the study were: 1/ to isolate and identify equine seminal plasma proteinase inhibitors, 2/ to evaluate their inhibitory potential, and 3/ to test a correlation between protein concentration in seminal plasma supernatant (obtained after precipitation with 36% ammonium sulfate) and stallion sexual maturity. Seminal plasma proteins obtained from six stallions were chromatographed in a Superose 12 (FPLC system) column followed by C(18) HPLC reverse-phase. Inhibition of trypsin amidase activity was evaluated in the collected fractions. Active proteins with a molecular mass of 6.3-7.0 KDa were identified using mass spectrometry. The older stallions showed a reduction in total seminal plasma protein concentration, but had similar concentrations of proteinase inhibitors (0.28+/-0.10 mg/ml) in seminal plasma supernatant. Different proteinase inhibitor isoforms were found in semen of all stallions which suggests that the isoforms may be used as biomarkers of individual animals.

  13. Biological roles of cysteine proteinases in the pathogenesis of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Hilda M; Marcet, Ricardo; Sarracent, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Human trichomonosis, infection with Trichomonas vaginalis, is the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease in the world. The host-parasite interaction and pathophysiological processes of trichomonosis remain incompletely understood. This review focuses on the advancements reached in the area of the pathogenesis of T. vaginalis, especially in the role of the cysteine proteinases. It highlights various approaches made in this field and lists a group of trichomonad cysteine proteinases involved in diverse processes such as invasion of the mucous layer, cytoadherence, cytotoxicity, cytoskeleton disruption of red blood cells, hemolysis, and evasion of the host immune response. A better understanding of the biological roles of cysteine proteinases in the pathogenesis of this parasite could be used in the identification of new chemotherapeutic targets. An additional advantage could be the development of a vaccine in order to reduce transmission of T. vaginalis.

  14. Toll-like receptors recognize distinct proteinase-resistant glycoconjugates in Campylobacter jejuni and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Phongsisay, Vongsavanh; Hara, Hiromitsu; Fujimoto, Shuji

    2015-03-01

    Campylobacter jejuni causes gastroenteritis and autoimmune neuropathy Guillain-Barré syndrome. The mechanism by which C. jejuni infection results in such the hyperimmunity is not completely understood. Host immunity plays an important role in the disease pathogenesis; however, little is known how immune system recognizes this human pathogen. In this study, we report that Toll-like receptors recognize distinct proteinase K-resistant glycoconjugates in C. jejuni and Escherichia coli. Lipopolysaccharide is solely proteinase-resistant glycoconjugate in E. coli. In contrast, C. jejuni possesses at least five different components that are resistant to proteinase digestion and are capable of inducing NF-κB activation through TLR2 and TLR4. Possession of multiple activators of Toll-like receptors may be the unique strategy of C. jejuni to trigger hyperimmunity.

  15. Purification and Characterization of an Extracellular Proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174.

    PubMed

    Rattray, F P; Bockelmann, W; Fox, P F

    1995-09-01

    An extracellular serine proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 was purified to homogeneity. pH and temperature optima were 8.5 and 50(deg)C, respectively. The results for the molecular mass of the proteinase were 56 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 126 kDa by gel filtration, indicating that the native enzyme exists as a dimer. Mg(sup2+) and Ca(sup2+) activated the proteinase, as did NaCl; however, Hg(sup2+), Fe(sup2+), and Zn(sup2+) caused strong inhibition. The sequence of the first 20 N-terminal amino acids was NH(inf2)-Ala-Lys-Asn-Asp-Ala-Val-Gly-Gly-Met-Gly-Tyr-Leu-Ser-Met-Ile-Pro-Se r-Gln-Pro-Gly.

  16. Consequences of manganese replacement of copper for prion protein function and proteinase resistance

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David R.; Hafiz, Farida; Glasssmith, Leslie L.; Wong, Boon-Seng; Jones, Ian M.; Clive, Christine; Haswell, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP) binds copper and has antioxidant activity enhancing the survival of neurones in culture. The ability of the PrP to bind other cations was tested and it was found that only manganese could substitute for copper. Although initially manganese-loaded PrP exhibited similar structure and activity to copper-loaded PrP, after aging, manganese-loaded PrP became proteinase resistant and lost function. It was also found that manganese could be incorporated into PrP expressed by astrocytes and that this PrP was partially proteinase resistant. These results show that it is possible to generate proteinase-resistant PrP from cells and suggest a possible mechanism for the formation of the scrapie isoform of the PrP as generated in sporadic prion disease. PMID:10716918

  17. Molecular investigation on the interaction of spermine with proteinase K by multispectroscopic techniques and molecular simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Hosseini-Koupaei, Mansoore; Shareghi, Behzad; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Davar, Fateme

    2017-01-01

    The alteration in structure, function and stability of proteinase K in the presence of spermine was investigated using spectroscopic methods and simulation techniques. The stability and enzyme activity of proteinase K-spermine complex were significantly enhanced as compared to that of the pure enzyme. The increase in the value of Vmax and the catalytic efficiency of Proteinase K in presence of spermine confirmed that the polyamine could bring the enzyme hyperactivation. UV-vis spectroscopy, intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism methods demonstrated that the binding of spermine changed the microenvironment and structure of proteinase K. The fluorescence studies, showing that spermine quenched the intensity of proteinase K with static mechanism. Thermodynamic parameters analysis suggested that hydrogen bond and van der Waals forces play a key role in complex stability which is in agreement with modeling studies. The CD spectra represented the secondary structure alteration of proteinase K with an increase in α-helicity and a decrease in β-sheet of proteinase K upon spermine conjugation. The molecular simulation results proposed that spermine could interact with proteinase K spontaneously at single binding site, which is in agreement with spectroscopic results. This agreement between experimental and theoretical results may be a worth method for protein-ligand complex studies.

  18. The characterization of SaPIN2b, a plant trichome-localized proteinase inhibitor from Solanum americanum.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming; Ding, Ling-Wen; Ge, Zhi-Juan; Wang, Zhen-Yu; Hu, Bo-Lun; Yang, Xiao-Bei; Sun, Qiao-Yang; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2012-11-16

    Proteinase inhibitors play an important role in plant resistance of insects and pathogens. In this study, we characterized the serine proteinase inhibitor SaPIN2b, which is constitutively expressed in Solanum americanum trichomes and contains two conserved motifs of the proteinase inhibitor II (PIN2) family. The recombinant SaPIN2b (rSaPIN2b), which was expressed in Escherichia coli, was demonstrated to be a potent proteinase inhibitor against a panel of serine proteinases, including subtilisin A, chymotrypsin and trypsin. Moreover, rSaPIN2b also effectively inhibited the proteinase activities of midgut trypsin-like proteinases that were extracted from the devastating pest Helicoverpa armigera. Furthermore, the overexpression of SaPIN2b in transgenic tobacco plants resulted in enhanced resistance against H. armigera. Taken together, our results demonstrated that SaPIN2b is a potent serine proteinase inhibitor that may act as a protective protein in plant defense against insect attacks.

  19. Regulation of alpha 1 proteinase inhibitor function by rabbit alveolar macrophages. Evidence for proteolytic rather than oxidative inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Banda, M J; Clark, E J; Werb, Z

    1985-01-01

    Rabbit alveolar macrophages were cultured in an environment conducive to the secretion of both reactive oxygen and proteinases, so that the relative importance of proteolytic and oxidative inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by alveolar macrophages could be evaluated. The inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor was proportional to its proteolysis, and there was no detectable inactivation in the absence of proteolysis. Although the live macrophages were capable of secreting reactive oxygen, they did not inactivate alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by oxidation. The inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by proteolysis was proportional to the secretion of elastinolytic activity by the alveolar macrophages. The inability of the alveolar macrophages to oxidize alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor was attributed to the methionine in the macrophages, in secreted proteins, and in the culture medium competing for oxidants. The data suggest that proteolytic inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor may be important in vivo and that the methionine concentration in vivo may protect alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor from significant oxidative inactivation. Images PMID:2989330

  20. Immobilization of a proteinase from the extremely thermophilic organism Thermus Rt41A.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S A; Peek, K; Daniel, R M

    1994-02-05

    An extracellular proteinase from Thermus strain Rt41A was immobilized to controlled pore glass (CPG) beads. The properties of the free and CPG-immobilized enzymes were compared using both a large (azocasein) and a small (peptidase) substrate. The specific activity of the immobilized proteinase was 5284 azoU/mg with azocasein and 144 sucU/mg for SucAAPFpNA. The percentage recovery of enzyme activity was unaffected by pore size when it was immobilized at a fixed level of activity/g of beads, whereas it increased with increasing pore size when added at a fixed level/m(2) of support. Saturation of the CPG beads was observed at 540 azoU/m(2) of 105-nm beads. Lower levels (50 azoU/m(2) of 50-nm beads) were used in characterization experiments. The pH optimum of the immobilized Rt41A proteinase was 8.0 for azocasein and 9.5 for SucAAPFpNA, compared with the free proteinase which was 10.5 for both substrates. The immobilized enzyme retained 65% of its maximum activity against azocasein at pH 12, whereas the free proteinase retained less than 10% under the same conditions. Stability at 80 degrees C increased on immobilization at all pH values between 5 and 11, the greatest increase in half-life being approximately 12-fold at pH 7.0. Temperature-activity profiles for both the free and immobilized enzymes were similar for both substrates. The stability of the immobilized proteinase, however, was higher than that of the free enzyme in the absence and presence of CaCl(2). Overall, the results show that low levels of calcium (10 muM) protect against thermal denaturation, but that high calcium or immobilization are required to protect against autolysis. (c) 1994 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Serine proteinases of mast cell and leukocyte granules. A league of their own.

    PubMed

    Caughey, G H

    1994-12-01

    Serine proteinases are hydrolases that use serine's side chain hydroxyl group to attack and cleave internal peptide bonds in peptides and proteins. They reside in all mammalian tissues, including the lung and airway. As a group, they vary tremendously in form and target specificity and have a vast repertoire of functions, many of which are critical for life. A subset of these proteinases is expressed primarily in the cytosolic granules of leukocytes from bone marrow, including mast cells. Examples are elastase-related proteinases and cathepsin G of monocytes and neutrophils, the many "granzymes" of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells, and the tryptases and chymases of mast cells. The pace of discovery and characterization of these granule-associated serine proteinases, fueled by technical advances in molecular biology, has accelerated rapidly in the past few years. Progress has been made in assigning possible functions to individual proteinases. However, the burgeoning numbers of these enzymes; their cell, tissue and species-dependent differences in expression; and their variety of action in vitro (despite, in many cases, shared modes of activation and recent divergence in protein evolution) have vexed and challenged those of us who are anxious to establish their roles in mammalian biology. Certainly, much remains to be discovered and clarified. The purpose of this overview is to capture the state of the art in this field, stressing the similarities as well as the differences among individual granule-associated proteinases and focusing particularly on those enzymes likely to be important in the human lung and airways.

  2. Analysis of human immunoglobulin-degrading cysteine proteinases of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed Central

    Provenzano, D; Alderete, J F

    1995-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a protozoan parasite that causes a widely distributed sexually transmitted disease (STD). Since immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to specific trichomonad immunogens are found in serum and vaginal washes (VWs) from patients with trichomoniasis, a potential mechanism of immune evasion by this parasite might be the ability of T. vaginalis proteinases to degrade human immunoglobulins (Igs). Incubation of human IgG with lysates of T. vaginalis organisms resulted in time- and concentration-dependent degradation of the heavy chain. Secretory IgA was degraded similarly. Inhibitors of cysteine proteinases, when added to trichomonal lysates, abolished IgG and IgA degradation, while EDTA, a metalloproteinase inhibitor, did not. Substrate-gel electrophoresis with human IgG, IgM, or IgA copolymerized with acrylamide revealed several distinct cysteine proteinases in both lysates and culture supernatants from logarithmically growing parasites that degraded all classes of human antibodies. Trichomonal lysates and supernatants of numerous isolates tested all had Ig-degrading activity. Finally, proteolytic activity against IgG was detected in most (26 of 33; 78%) VWs from patients with trichomoniasis. In contrast, 18 of 28 (65%) VWs from women without trichomoniasis or from patients infected with other STDs had no detectable proteinases when tested in an identical manner. The other 10 of these 28 VWs (35%) had smaller amounts of detectable Ig-degrading proteinases. These differences in Ig-degrading proteinase activity between patients with and without trichomoniasis, regardless of coinfecting STDs, were statistically significant (P = 0.001). These results illustrate that T. vaginalis is capable of degrading human Igs. PMID:7642267

  3. Cloning and rational mutagenesis of kexstatin I, a potent proteinaceous inhibitor of Kex2 proteinase.

    PubMed Central

    Oda, K; Oyama, H; Ito, S; Fukiharu, M; Miyagawa, Y; Takahashi, S; Hirose, M; Kikuchi, N; Nakayama, T; Shibano, Y

    2001-01-01

    Kexstatin I is a potent proteinaceous inhibitor of Kex2 proteinase (EC 3.4.21.61). In the present study we show the molecular cloning, primary structure determination and expression of the gene encoding kexstatin I. We also demonstrate its enhanced activity and specificity for Kex2 proteinase inhibition by rational mutagenesis. The cloned kexstatin I gene encoded a protein of 145 amino acid residues, including the 35-residue signal sequence for secretion. The amino acid sequence showed 52% identity with those of the Streptomyces subtilisin inhibitors (SSIs). Thus kexstatin I is the first SSI-family member that can inhibit Kex2 proteinase. The reactive site of the inhibitor was determined to be -Thr(69)-Lys(70) downward arrowGlu(71)-, where downward arrow indicates the reactive site. Because Kex2 proteinase generally shows the highest affinity for substrates with basic amino acid residues at the P(1) and P(2) sites, conversion of the Thr(69)-Lys(70) segment of the inhibitor into dibasic motifs was expected to result in enhanced inhibitory activities. Thus we constructed kexstatin I mutants, in which the Thr(69)-Lys(70) sequence was replaced by the Thr(69)-Arg(70), Lys(69)-Lys(70) and Lys(69)-Arg(70) sequences using PCR-based mutagenesis, and analysed them kinetically. Among these mutants, the Lys(69)-Arg(70) mutant was the most potent inhibitor. The K(i) for Kex2 proteinase was 3.2x10(-10) M, which was 140-fold lower than that of the inhibitor with the Thr(69)-Lys(70) sequence. Although kexstatin I could also inhibit subtilisin, the enhancement of inhibitory activity upon such mutations was specific for Kex2 proteinase inhibition. PMID:11284720

  4. Changes in midgut endopeptidase activity of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) are responsible for adaptation to soybean proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Paulillo, L C; Lopes, A R; Cristofoletti, P T; Parra, J R; Terra, W R; Silva-Filho, M C

    2000-06-01

    The development of transgenic maize plants expressing soybean proteinase inhibitors could reduce the economic damage of one of the major maize pests in Brazil, the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith, 1797). We examined the influence of soybean proteinase inhibitors on digestive enzyme properties and development of S. frugiperda larvae. The inhibition of trypsin and chymotrypsin activities in vitro by soybean proteinase inhibitors suggested that either Kunitz (SBTI) or Bowman-Birk (SBBI) would have a potential antimetabolic effect when ingested by insect larvae. However, chronic ingestion of semipurified soybean inhibitors did not result in a significant reduction of growth and development of fall armyworm. Therefore, digestive serine proteinase activities (trypsin and chymotrypsin) of fall armyworm larvae were characterized. The results suggest that S. frugiperda was able to physiologically adapt to dietary proteinase inhibitors by altering the complement of proteolytic enzymes in the insect midguts.

  5. Understanding and targeting a novel plant viral proteinase/substrate interaction. Final report, July 1, 1989--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, W.

    1995-10-01

    The past 3 years of funding have focused our efforts on trying to understand the molecular basis of a unique substrate interaction displayed by a viral proteinase. We have made good progress and during this funding period we have made four contributions to the scientific literature and have developed the application of the proteinase in the expression and purification of recombinant fusion proteins. A comprehensive review of virus-encoded proteinases, written during the funding period, emphazing the tremendous similarity of viral proteinases with their cellular counterparts and at the same time detail the unique characteristics which permit them to function in a cellular environment. The focus of the research effort was the tobacco etch virus (TEV) 27kDa NIa proteinase.

  6. A practical total synthesis of the microbial alkaline proteinase inhibitor (MAPI).

    PubMed

    Haebich, Dieter; Hillisch, Alexander; El Sheikh, Sherif

    2009-12-01

    Diverse serine and cysteine proteases as well as alkaline proteinases and elastases play a crucial role in numerous biological processes. Natural peptide aldehydes such as the "microbial alkaline proteinase inhibitor" (MAPI, 1) are valuable tools to characterize novel enzymes and to study their function in nature. Within a drug discovery program we wanted to design and explore non-natural MAPI congeners with novel biological profiles. To that end we devised a simple, practical, and scalable synthesis of MAPI 1 from readily available amino acid building blocks. The modular nature of our approach allows convenient structural modification of the MAPI backbone.

  7. Effects of E-64, a cysteine proteinase inhibitor, on cowpea weevil growth, development, and fecundity

    SciTech Connect

    Murdock, L.L.; Shade, R.E.; Pomeroy, M.A.

    1988-06-01

    E-64, a specific inhibitor of cysteine proteinases, was incorporated into artificial seeds at low levels (0.01-0.25% by weight). It prolonged developmental time and increased mortality of the larval cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus (F.), in direct proportion to its concentration in the artificial seeds. The fecundity of females emerging from the artificial seeds was significantly decreased by E-64 concentrations of 0.06% and higher. These observations are compatible with the hypothesis that the midgut cysteine proteinase in C. maculatus is essential for normal growth and development.

  8. Identification of a novel proteinase (ameloprotease-I) responsible for the complete degradation of amelogenin during enamel maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Moradian-Oldak, J; Leung, W; Simmer, J P; Zeichner-David, M; Fincham, A G

    1996-01-01

    During enamel formation the proteins of the extracellular matrix, particularly amelogenins, are removed prior to maturation. In order to investigate this process and to improve our understanding of the function of proteinases during enamel maturation, proteinase fractions were isolated from developing pig enamel and assayed for proteolytic activity in vitro. A recombinant murine amelogenin, M179, was used as a substrate. Two major groups of enamel proteinases were defined as high-molecular-mass ['high-molecular-weight' in Moradian-Oldak, Simmer, Sarte, Zeichner-David and Fincham (1994) Arch. Oral Biol.39, 647-656] and low-molecular-mass proteinases. Here we report the characterization of one of the proteinases present in the low-molecular-mass group. We demonstrate that this proteinase is a serine proteinase capable of degradation of M179 following cleavage of the tyrosine-rich amelogenin polypeptide from the N-terminal region. A partial N-terminal sequence of the proteinase was obtained (LPHVPHRIPPGYGRPXTXNEEGXNPYFXFFXXHG). An anti-peptide antibody directed against a synthetic peptide corresponding to the first 14 amino acids of the above sequence was produced. The presence of the proteinase in the acetic acid extract was confirmed by Western blotting. Searching using the amino acid sequence determined in this study showed it to be also present in the 32 kDa and 89 kDa enamelin proteins reported by Fukae, Tanabe, Murakami and Tohi [(1996) Adv. Dent. Res., in the press]. We therefore identify the 32 kDa enamelin as an enamel proteinase ('ameloprotease-I') which is responsible for amelogenin degradation in maturing enamel. We propose that the 89 kDa enamelin is a precursor of ameloprotease-I, the first enamel protein for which a function has been defined. PMID:8836151

  9. Dual Comb Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsch, T. W.; Picqué, N.

    2010-06-01

    The advent of laser frequency combs a decade ago has already revolutionized optical frequency metrology and precision spectroscopy. Extensions of laser combs from the THz region to the extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray frequencies are now under exploration. Such laser combs have become enabling tools for a growing tree of applications, from optical atomic clocks to attosecond science. Recently, the millions of precisely controlled laser comb lines that can be produced with a train of ultrashort laser pulses have been harnessed for highly multiplexed molecular spectroscopy. Fourier multi-heterodyne spectroscopy, dual comb spectroscopy, or asynchronous optical sampling spectroscopy with frequency combs are emerging as powerful new spectroscopic tools. Even the first proof-of-principle experiments have demonstrated a very exciting potential for ultra-rapid and ultra-sensitive recording of complex molecular spectra. Compared to conventional Fourier transform spectroscopy, recording times could be shortened from seconds to microseconds, with intriguing prospects for spectroscopy of short lived transient species. Longer recording times allow high resolution spectroscopy of molecules with extreme precision, since the absolute frequency of each laser comb line can be known with the accuracy of an atomic clock. The spectral structure of sharp lines of a laser comb can be very useful even in the recording of broadband spectra without sharp features, as they are e.g. encountered for molecular gases or in the liquid phase. A second frequency comb of different line spacing permits the generation of a comb of radio frequency beat notes, which effectively map the optical spectrum into the radio frequency regime, so that it can be recorded with a single fast photodetector, followed by digital signal analysis. In the time domain, a pulse train of a mode-locked femtosecond laser excites some molecular medium at regular time intervals. A second pulse train of different repetition

  10. Development of poly(aspartic acid-co-malic acid) composites for calcium carbonate and sulphate scale inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mithil Kumar, N; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Jagadeesh, Dani; Kanny, K; Bux, F

    2015-01-01

    Polyaspartic acid (PSI) is suitable for the inhibition of inorganic scale deposition. To enhance its scale inhibition efficiency, PSI was modified by reacting aspartic acid with malic acid (MA) using thermal polycondensation polymerization. This reaction resulted in poly(aspartic acid-co-malic acid) (PSI-co-MA) dual polymer. The structural, chemical and thermal properties of the dual polymers were analysed by using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and gel permeation chromatography. The effectiveness of six different molar ratios of PSI-co-MA dual polymer for calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate scale inhibition at laboratory scale batch experiments was evaluated with synthetic brine solution at selected doses of polymer at 65-70°C by the static scale test method. The performance of PSI-co-MA dual polymer for the inhibition of calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate precipitation was compared with that of a PSI single polymer. The PSI-co-MA exhibited excellent ability to control inorganic minerals, with approximately 85.36% calcium carbonate inhibition and 100% calcium sulphate inhibition at a level of 10 mg/L PSI-co-MA, respectively. Therefore, it may be reasonably concluded that PSI-co-MA is a highly effective scale inhibitor for cooling water treatment applications.

  11. Quantum Fourier transform in computational basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S. S.; Loke, T.; Izaac, J. A.; Wang, J. B.

    2017-03-01

    The quantum Fourier transform, with exponential speed-up compared to the classical fast Fourier transform, has played an important role in quantum computation as a vital part of many quantum algorithms (most prominently, Shor's factoring algorithm). However, situations arise where it is not sufficient to encode the Fourier coefficients within the quantum amplitudes, for example in the implementation of control operations that depend on Fourier coefficients. In this paper, we detail a new quantum scheme to encode Fourier coefficients in the computational basis, with fidelity 1 - δ and digit accuracy ɛ for each Fourier coefficient. Its time complexity depends polynomially on log (N), where N is the problem size, and linearly on 1/δ and 1/ɛ . We also discuss an application of potential practical importance, namely the simulation of circulant Hamiltonians.

  12. The Fourier Transform on Quantum Euclidean Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulembier, Kevin

    2011-05-01

    We study Fourier theory on quantum Euclidean space. A modified version of the general definition of the Fourier transform on a quantum space is used and its inverse is constructed. The Fourier transforms can be defined by their Bochner's relations and a new type of q-Hankel transforms using the first and second q-Bessel functions. The behavior of the Fourier transforms with respect to partial derivatives and multiplication with variables is studied. The Fourier transform acts between the two representation spaces for the harmonic oscillator on quantum Euclidean space. By using this property it is possible to define a Fourier transform on the entire Hilbert space of the harmonic oscillator, which is its own inverse and satisfies the Parseval theorem.

  13. Fourier's law: insight from a simple derivation.

    PubMed

    Dubi, Y; Di Ventra, M

    2009-04-01

    The onset of Fourier's law in a one-dimensional quantum system is addressed via a simple model of weakly coupled quantum systems in contact with thermal baths at their edges. Using analytical arguments we show that the crossover from the ballistic (invalid Fourier's law) to diffusive (valid Fourier's law) regimes is characterized by a thermal length scale, which is directly related to the profile of the local temperature. In the same vein, dephasing is shown to give rise to classical Fourier's law, similarly to the onset of Ohm's law in mesoscopic conductors.

  14. Bioproduction of L-Aspartic Acid and Cinnamic Acid by L-Aspartate Ammonia Lyase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Patel, Arti T; Akhani, Rekha C; Patel, Manisha J; Dedania, Samir R; Patel, Darshan H

    2016-12-17

    Aspartase (L-aspartate ammonia lyase, EC 4.3.1.1) catalyses the reversible amination and deamination of L-aspartic acid to fumaric acid which can be used to produce important biochemical. In this study, we have explored the characteristics of aspartase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PA-AspA). To overproduce PA-AspA, the 1425-bp gene was introduced in Escherichia coli BL21 and purified. A 51.0-kDa protein was observed as a homogenous purified protein on SDS-PAGE. The enzyme was optimally active at pH 8.0 and 35 °C. PA-AspA has retained 56% activity after 7 days of incubation at 35 °C, which displays the hyperthermostablility characteristics of the enzyme. PA-AspA is activated in the presence of metal ions and Mg2+ is found to be most effective. Among the substrates tested for specificity of PA-AspA, L-phenylalanine (38.35 ± 2.68) showed the highest specific activity followed by L-aspartic acid (31.21 ± 3.31) and fumarate (5.42 ± 2.94). K m values for L-phenylalanine, L-aspartic acid and fumarate were 1.71 mM, 0.346 μM and 2 M, respectively. The catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m) for L-aspartic acid (14.18 s(-1) mM(-1)) was higher than that for L-phenylalanine (4.65 s(-1) mM(-1)). For bioconversion, from an initial concentration of 1000 mM of fumarate and 30 mM of L-phenylalanine, PA-AspA was found to convert 395.31 μM L-aspartic acid and 3.47 mM cinnamic acid, respectively.

  15. Microwave-assisted reaction of glycosylamine with aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Real-Fernández, Feliciana; Nuti, Francesca; Bonache, M Angeles; Boccalini, Marco; Chimichi, Stefano; Chelli, Mario; Papini, Anna Maria

    2010-07-01

    The synthesis of N-protected glycosyl amino acids from amines has been investigated and it was found that, under microwave conditions, glycosylamines could be hydrolyzed leading to new products containing a glycosyl ester linkage. The efficiency of the microwave-induced glycosylation of aspartic acid was studied comparing the microwave activity between amide and ester bond formation. Different sugar moieties have been employed to demonstrate the simple and reproducible coupling methodology. New glycosyl ester compounds were further characterized by NMR spectroscopy.

  16. Explosive enantiospecific decomposition of aspartic acid on Cu surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mhatre, B S; Dutta, S; Reinicker, A; Karagoz, B; Gellman, A J

    2016-12-01

    Aspartic acid adsorbed on Cu surfaces is doubly deprotonated. On chiral Cu(643)(R&S) its enantiomers undergo enantiospecific decomposition via an autocatalytic explosion. Once initiated, the decomposition mechanism proceeds via sequential cleavage of the C3-C4 and C1-C2 bonds each yielding CO2, followed by conversion of the remaining species into N[triple bond, length as m-dash]CCH3.

  17. On the solvation of L-aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, A. T.; Harper, J. B.

    2004-01-01

    We use molecular statics and dynamics to study the stability of L-aspartic acid both in vacuo and solvated by polar and non-polar molecules using density functional theory in the generalized gradient approximation. We find that structures stable in vacuo are unstable in aqueous solution and vice versa. From our simulations we are able to come to some conclusions about the mechanism of stabilisation of zwitterions by polar protic solvents, water and methanol.

  18. High-molecular-mass multicatalytic proteinase complexes produced by the nitrogen-fixing actinomycete Frankia strain BR.

    PubMed Central

    Benoist, P; Müller, A; Diem, H G; Schwencke, J

    1992-01-01

    A major-high-molecular mass proteinase and seven latent minor proteinases were found in cell extracts and in concentrates of culture medium from Frankia sp. strain BR after nondenaturing electrophoresis in mixed gelatin-polyacrylamide gels. All of these complexes showed multicatalytic properties. Their molecular masses and their sedimentation coefficients varied from 1,300 kDa (28S) to 270 kDa (12S). The electroeluted 1,300-kDa proteinase complex dissociated into 11 low-molecular-mass proteinases (40 to 19 kDa) after sodium dodecyl sulfate activation at 30 degrees C and electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. All of these electroeluted proteinases hydrolyzed N-carbobenzoxy-Pro-Ala-Gly-Pro-4-methoxy-beta- naphthylamide, D-Val-Leu-Arg-4-methoxy-beta-naphthylamide, and Boc-Val-Pro-Arg-4-methyl-7-coumarylamide, whereas Suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-4-methyl-7-coumarylamide was cleaved only by the six lower-molecular-mass proteinases (27.5 to 19 kDa). Examination by electron microscopy of uranyl acetate-stained, electroeluted 1,300- and 650-kDa intracellular and extracellular proteinase complexes showed ring-shaped and cylindrical particles (10 to 11 nm in diameter, 15 to 16 nm long) similar to those of eukaryotic prosomes and proteasomes. Polyclonal antibodies raised against rat skeletal muscle proteasomes cross-reacted with all of the high-molecular-mass proteinase complexes and, after denaturation of the electroeluted 1,300-kDa band, with polypeptides of 35 to 38, 65, and 90 kDa. Electrophoresis of the activated cell extracts under denaturing conditions revealed 11 to 17 gelatinases from 40 to 19 kDa, including the 11 proteinases of the 1,300-kDa proteinase complex. The inhibition pattern of these proteinases is complex. Thiol-reactive compounds and 1-10-phenanthroline strongly inhibited all of the proteinases, but inhibitors against serine-type proteinases were also effective for most of them. Images PMID:1537794

  19. Microbial aspartic proteases: current and potential applications in industry.

    PubMed

    Theron, Louwrens W; Divol, Benoit

    2014-11-01

    Aspartic proteases are a relatively small group of proteolytic enzymes that are active in acidic environments and are found across all forms of life. Certain microorganisms secrete such proteases as virulence agents and/or in order to break down proteins thereby liberating assimilable sources of nitrogen. Some of the earlier applications of these proteolytic enzymes are found in the manufacturing of cheese where they are used as milk-clotting agents. Over the last decade, they have received tremendous research interest because of their involvement in human diseases. Furthermore, there has also been a growing interest on these enzymes for their applications in several other industries. Recent research suggests in particular that they could be used in the wine industry to prevent the formation of protein haze while preserving the wines' organoleptic properties. In this mini-review, the properties and mechanisms of action of aspartic proteases are summarized. Thereafter, a brief overview of the industrial applications of this specific class of proteases is provided. The use of aspartic proteases as alternatives to clarifying agents in various beverage industries is mentioned, and the potential applications in the wine industry are thoroughly discussed.

  20. Age estimation based on aspartic acid racemization in human sclera.

    PubMed

    Klumb, Karolin; Matzenauer, Christian; Reckert, Alexandra; Lehmann, Klaus; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Age estimation based on racemization of aspartic acid residues (AAR) in permanent proteins has been established in forensic medicine for years. While dentine is the tissue of choice for this molecular method of age estimation, teeth are not always available which leads to the need to identify other suitable tissues. We examined the suitability of total tissue samples of human sclera for the estimation of age at death. Sixty-five samples of scleral tissue were analyzed. The samples were hydrolyzed and after derivatization, the extent of aspartic acid racemization was determined by gas chromatography. The degree of AAR increased with age. In samples from younger individuals, the correlation of age and D-aspartic acid content was closer than in samples from older individuals. The age-dependent racemization in total tissue samples proves that permanent or at least long-living proteins are present in scleral tissue. The correlation of AAR in human sclera and age at death is close enough to serve as basis for age estimation. However, the precision of age estimation by this method is lower than that of age estimation based on the analysis of dentine which is due to molecular inhomogeneities of total tissue samples of sclera. Nevertheless, the approach may serve as a valuable alternative or addition in exceptional cases.

  1. Isolation and characterization of a subtilisin-like proteinase of Bacillus intermedius secreted by the Bacillus subtilis recombinant strain AJ73 at different growth stages.

    PubMed

    Mikhailova, E O; Mardanova, A M; Balaban, N P; Rudenskaya, G N; Sharipova, M R

    2007-02-01

    Two subtilisin-like serine proteinases of Bacillus intermedius secreted by the Bacillus subtilis recombinant strain AJ73 (pCS9) on the 28th and 48th h of culture growth (early and late proteinase, respectively) have been isolated by ion-exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose and by FPLC. Molecular weights of both proteinases were determined. The N-terminal sequences of the recombinant protein and mature proteinases of the original strain were compared. Kinetic parameters and substrate specificities of the early and late proteinase were analyzed. Physicochemical properties of the enzymes were studied.

  2. Prevalence, susceptibility profile and proteinase production of yeasts causing vulvovaginitis in Turkish women.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Sema Keceli; Budak, Fatma; Yucesoy, Gulseren; Susever, Serdar; Willke, Ayse

    2006-02-01

    In this study the prevalence of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), antifungal susceptibility and proteinase production of isolated Candida species were investigated. Vaginal swabs were collected from symptomatic women with vulvovaginitis attending the Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic of Kocaeli University, Turkey. The relation between risk factors, such as pregnancy, diabetes mellitus, antibiotic and corticosteroid use, history of sexually transmitted diseases and contraceptive methods, was recorded. Candida spp. were identified by conventional methods, then evaluated for proteinase secretion in a medium containing casein. Antifungal susceptibility was determined according to the NCCLS microdilution method. The prevalence of women with vulvovaginitis was 35.7% (170/6080) and 16% (28/170) of them were diagnosed as VVC. Candida albicans was the dominant species: 21 (75%), followed by 4 C. glabrata (14%), 2 C. tropicalis (7%), and one C. krusei (3.5%). All isolates were susceptible to fluconazole, itraconazole and amphotericin B, except one C. krusei, one C. glabrata and one C. albicans that were resistant to fluconazole. Proteinase production was determined in 19 (90.5%) C. albicans and in all C. tropicalis isolates. Proteinase activity was not associated with antifungal resistance. No association was found between risk factors and VVC.

  3. Detergents modify proteinase K resistance of PrPSc in different transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs)

    PubMed Central

    Breyer, Johanna; Wemheuer, Wiebke M.; Wrede, Arne; Graham, Catherine; Benestad, Sylvie L.; Brenig, Bertram; Richt, Jürgen A.; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J.

    2012-01-01

    Prion diseases are diagnosed by the detection of their proteinase K-resistant prion protein fragment (PrPSc). Various biochemical protocols use different detergents for the tissue preparation. We found that the resistance of PrPSc against proteinase K may vary strongly with the detergent used. In our study, we investigated the influence of the most commonly used detergents on eight different TSE agents derived from different species and distinct prion disease forms. For a high throughput we used a membrane adsorbtion assay to detect small amounts of prion aggregates, as well as Western blotting. Tissue lysates were prepared using DOC, SLS, SDS or Triton X-100 in different concentrations and these were digested with various amounts of proteinase K. Detergents are able to enhance or diminish the detectability of PrPSc after proteinase K digestion. Depending on the kind of detergent, its concentration - but also on the host species that developed the TSE and the disease form or prion type - the detectability of PrPSc can be very different. The results obtained here may be helpful during the development or improvement of a PrPSc detection method and they point towards a detergent effect that can be additionally used for decontamination purposes. A plausible explanation for the detergent effects described in this article could be an interaction with the lipids associated with PrPSc that may stabilize the aggregates. PMID:22226540

  4. Subunit structure of karatasin, the proteinase isolated from Bromelia plumieri (karatas).

    PubMed

    Montes, C; Amador, M; Cuevas, D; Cordoba, F

    1990-01-01

    Close to 15% of the karatasin proteinase activity in the fruit juice of Bromelia plumieri (karatas) is present outside dialysis Visking tubing in 7 days in 0.2 M acetate buffer (pH) 3.5 or 6.5) containing phenyl mercuric acetate. The small proteinase(s), distinct from the 85% activity in juice due to nondialysable karatasin with a reported Mr of 24,868, separates across Spectrapore (13 kDa) membranes but not across Spectrapore with 3.5 kDa average pore diameter. The dialyzed proteinase is named karatasin-D (K-D). Purified non-Dialysable karatasin can be dissociated to what seems to be K-D by incubation in a buffer solution, containing SDS and 2-mercaptoethanol with phenyl mercuric acetate, in dialysis experiments for 8 days at room temperature using Spectrapore 13 kDa tubing. Thus, native karatasin in B. plumieri fruit juice seem to be the result of association of 2 small molecular mass K-D subunits, linked together by disulfide bonds and electrostatic forces, in equilibrium with small amounts of free K-D molecules. The amino acid composition and partial sequence of karatasin up to the 14th position from the amino terminus have discrete analogies with papain and with stem bromelain.

  5. Proteinase K and the structure of PrPse: the good, the bad, and the ugly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious proteins (prions) are, ironically, defined by their resistance to proteolytic digestion. A defining characteristic of the transmissible isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc) is its partial resistance to proteinase K (PK) digestion. Diagnosis of prion disease typically relies upon immunod...

  6. Insect and wound induced GUS gene expression from a Beta vulgaris proteinase inhibitor gene promoter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inducible gene promoters that are specifically activated by pathogen invasion or insect pest attack are needed for effective expression of resistance genes to control plant diseases. In the present study, a promoter from a serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) shown to be up-regulated in resist...

  7. Inactivation of key factors of the plasma proteinase cascade systems by Bacteroides gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, T; Carlsson, J; Sundqvist, G

    1985-01-01

    The effect of Bacteroides gingivalis W83 on various key components of the human plasma proteinase cascade systems was studied. When purified C1-inhibitor was incubated with the bacterium, the inhibitor was rapidly inactivated by limited proteolytic cleavage. In citrated whole plasma, C1-inhibitor, antithrombin, plasminogen, prekallikrein, prothrombinase complex, the clotting factor X, and most of the alpha 2-antiplasmin were functionally eliminated after 30 min of incubation with the bacterium. Fibrinogen disappeared from the plasma almost immediately upon mixing with the bacterial suspension. In contrast, there was no appreciable decrease in the bulk of other plasma proteins, such as various transport proteins (albumin, prealbumin, transferrin) and immunoglobulins, during 4 h of incubation with the bacterium. Most of the observed effects can be assigned to the proteolytic activity of the bacterium itself, since there was little evidence for generation of intrinsic plasma proteinase activity, despite the loss of proteinase inhibitory activities. B. gingivalis W83 thus seems to be equipped with proteolytic enzyme systems which selectively recognize and rapidly inactivate the most important proteinase inhibitors and proenzymes present in human plasma. This bacterium therefore seems to be able to efficiently paralyze the host's various defenses against invading microorganisms. Images PMID:3902645

  8. Detergents modify proteinase K resistance of PrP Sc in different transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs).

    PubMed

    Breyer, Johanna; Wemheuer, Wiebke M; Wrede, Arne; Graham, Catherine; Benestad, Sylvie L; Brenig, Bertram; Richt, Jürgen A; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J

    2012-05-25

    Prion diseases are diagnosed by the detection of their proteinase K-resistant prion protein fragment (PrP(Sc)). Various biochemical protocols use different detergents for the tissue preparation. We found that the resistance of PrP(Sc) against proteinase K may vary strongly with the detergent used. In our study, we investigated the influence of the most commonly used detergents on eight different TSE agents derived from different species and distinct prion disease forms. For a high throughput we used a membrane adsorption assay to detect small amounts of prion aggregates, as well as Western blotting. Tissue lysates were prepared using DOC, SLS, SDS or Triton X-100 in different concentrations and these were digested with various amounts of proteinase K. Detergents are able to enhance or diminish the detectability of PrP(Sc) after proteinase K digestion. Depending on the kind of detergent, its concentration - but also on the host species that developed the TSE and the disease form or prion type - the detectability of PrP(Sc) can be very different. The results obtained here may be helpful during the development or improvement of a PrP(Sc) detection method and they point towards a detergent effect that can be additionally used for decontamination purposes. A plausible explanation for the detergent effects described in this article could be an interaction with the lipids associated with PrP(Sc) that may stabilize the aggregates.

  9. A new subtilisin-like proteinase from roots of the dandelion Taraxacum officinale Webb S. L.

    PubMed

    Bogacheva, A M; Rudenskaya, G N; Preusser, A; Tchikileva, I O; Dunaevsky, Y E; Golovkin, B N; Stepanov, V M

    1999-09-01

    A serine proteinase from roots of Taraxacum officinale Webb S. L. was isolated by affinity chromatography and gel-filtration on Superose 6R using FPLC. The enzyme is a 67-kD glycoprotein containing 54% carbohydrate which we have named taraxalisin. The substrate specificity of taraxalisin toward synthetic peptides and oxidized insulin B-chain is comparable with that of cucumisin from Cucumis melo and the subtilisin-like serine proteinase macluralisin from Maclura pomifera. The proteinase is inactivated by DFP and PMSF. Taraxalisin exhibits maximal activity at pH 8.0. The pH range for stability of the enzyme is narrow--6.0-9.0. The temperature optimum for the subtilisin-like activity is 40 degrees C. The N-terminal sequence of taraxalisin has 40% of its residues identical to those of subtilisin Carlsberg. Thus, the serine proteinase from dandelion roots is a member of the subtilisin family, which is evidently widespread in the plant kingdom.

  10. Proteinase from germinating bean cotyledons. Evidence for involvement of a thiol group in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Csoma, C; Polgár, L

    1984-09-15

    To degrade storage proteins germinating seeds synthesize proteinases de novo that can be inhibited by thiol-blocking reagents [Baumgartner & Chrispeels (1977) Eur. J. Biochem. 77, 223-233]. We have elaborated a procedure for isolation of such a proteinase from the cotyledons of Phaseolus vulgaris. The purification procedure involved fractionation of the cotyledon homogenate with acetone and with (NH4)2SO4 and successive chromatographies on DEAE-cellulose, activated thiol-Sepharose Sepharose and Sephacryl S-200. The purified enzyme has an Mr of 23,400, proved to be highly specific for the asparagine side chain and blocking of its thiol group resulted in loss of the catalytic activity. The chemical properties of the thiol group of the bean enzyme were investigated by acylation with t-butyloxycarbonyl-L-asparagine p-nitro-phenyl ester and by alkylations with iodoacetamide and iodoacetate. Deviations from normal pH-rate profile were observed, which indicated that the thiol group is not a simple functional group, but constitutes a part of an interactive system at the active site. The pKa value for acylation and the magnitude of the rate constant for alkylation with iodoacetate revealed that the bean proteinase possesses some properties not shared by papain and the other cysteine proteinases studied to date.

  11. LEKTI domain 15 is a functional Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Vitzithum, Klaus; Lauber, Thomas; Kreutzmann, Peter; Schulz, Axel; Sommerhoff, Christian P; Rösch, Paul; Marx, Ute C

    2008-01-01

    The multidomain proteinase inhibitor LEKTI (lympho-epithelial Kazal-type related inhibitor) consists of 15 potential serine proteinase inhibitory domains. In various diseases such as the severe skin disorder Netherton syndrome as well as atopy, defects in the gene encoding LEKTI have been identified that generate premature termination codons of translation, suggesting a specific role of the COOH-terminal part of LEKTI in healthy individuals. We overexpressed and purified a sequence comprising the 15th domain of LEKTI for further characterisation. Here, we present a high yield expression system for recombinant production and efficient purification of LEKTI domain 15 as a highly soluble protein with a uniform disulfide pattern that is identical to that of other known Kazal-type inhibitors. Also, the expected P1P1' site was confirmed. LEKTI domain 15 is a well-structured protein as verified by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and a tight-binding and stable inhibitor of the serine proteinase trypsin. These findings confirm the designation of domain 15 as a proteinase inhibitor of the Kazal family.

  12. Insect resistance to sugar beet pests mediated by a Beta vulgaris proteinase inhibitor transgene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We transformed sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) hairy roots and Nicotiana benthamiana plants with a Beta vulgaris root gene (BvSTI) that codes for a serine proteinase inhibitor. BvSTI is a root gene cloned from the F1016 breeding line that has moderate levels of resistance to the sugar beet root maggot ...

  13. Applicability of Yeast Extracellular Proteinases in Brewing: Physiological and Biochemical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Bilinski, Carl A.; Russell, Inge; Stewart, Graham G.

    1987-01-01

    A general screening survey for expression of extracellular acid proteinase production was performed on over 100 cultures belonging to the genus Saccharomyces. Although two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed positive extracellular proteinase phenotypes in plate tests, it was not possible to demonstrate proteolytic activities in cell-free culture supernatants in assays performed at beer pH values. Of several yeasts from other genera examined, Saccharomycopsis fibuligera and Torulopsis magnoliae produced extracellular proteinases with desirable properties. Proteolytic activities were detected in assays performed at beer pH values and at lower temperature. Brewer's wort served as a highly inducing medium for extracellular proteinase production, with T. magnoliae yielding enzyme of highest specific activity. In fact, commencement of enzyme production was detected shortly after the onset of exponential growth in brewer's wort. Inclusion of crude enzyme preparations in brewer's wort inoculated simultaneously with brewer's yeast reduced final ethanol yields slightly and was found to be effective in reducing chill haze formation in bottled beer. PMID:16347298

  14. Nutritional Requirements and Nitrogen-Dependent Regulation of Proteinase Activity of Lactobacillus helveticus CRL 1062

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Elvira M.; Raya, Raul R.; De Giori, Graciela S.

    2000-01-01

    The nutritional requirements of Lactobacillus helveticus CRL 1062 were determined with a simplified chemically defined medium (SCDM) and compared with those of L. helveticus CRL 974 (ATCC 15009). Both strains were found to be prototrophic for alanine, glycine, asparagine, glutamine, and cysteine. In addition, CRL 1062 also showed prototrophy for lysine and serine. The microorganisms also required riboflavin, calcium pantothenate, pyridoxal, nicotinic acid, and uracil for growth in liquid SCDM. The growth rate and the synthesis of their cell membrane-bound serine proteinases, but not of their intracellular leucyl-aminopeptidases, were influenced by the peptide content of the medium. The highest proteinase levels were found during cell growth in basal SCDM, while the synthesis of this enzyme was inhibited in SCDM supplemented with Casitone, Casamino Acids, or β-casein. Low-molecular-mass peptides (<3,000 Da), extracted from Casitone, and the dipeptide leucylproline (final concentration, 5 mM) play important roles in the medium-dependent regulation of proteinase activity. The addition of the dipeptide leucylproline (5 mM) to SCDM reduced proteinase activity by 25%. PMID:11097908

  15. Proteinase inhibitors in severe inflammatory processes (septic shock and experimental endotoxaemia): biochemical, pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Fritz, H

    1979-01-01

    Plasma levels of antithrombin III, alpha 2-macroglobulin and inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor, as well as those of various clotting, complement and other plasma factors, were significantly decreased in 18 patients suffering from hyperdynamic septic shock. A similar statistically significant reduction of the concentrations of several plasma factors (prothrombin and antithrombin III, plasminogen and alpha 2-plasmin inhibitor, complement factor C3 and clotting factor XIII) was observed in experimental endotoxaemia. In this model the reduction in the plasma levels of these factors was considerably diminished by the intravenous injection of a granulocytic elastase--cathepsin G inhibitor of lower molecular weight from soybeans. The results of both studies indicate that consumption of plasma factors in the course of Gram-negative sepsis proceeds not only via the classical routes (by activation of the clotting, fibrinolytic and complement cascades by system-specific proteinases such as thrombokinase or the plasminogen activator) but also to an appreciable degree of unspecific degradation of plasma factors by neutral proteinases such as elastase and cathepsin G. The endotoxin-induced release of both sorts of proteinases, the system-specific ones and the unspecific lysosomal proteinases from leucocytes and other cells, is likely to be mainly responsible for the consumption of antithrombin III and alpha-2-macroglobulin via complex formation (followed by elimination of the complexes) and the increased turnover of the inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor as observed in the clinical study. The therapeutic use of an exogenous elastase--cathepsin G inhibitor in the experimental model was stimulated by the observation that human mucous secretions contain and acid-stable inhibitor of the neutral granulocytic proteinases, called HUSI-I or antileucoproteinase. This inhibitor protects mucous membranes and soluble proteins against proteolytic attack by leucocytic proteinases released in the

  16. Enzymatic response of the eucalypt defoliator Thyrinteina arnobia (Stoll) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) to a bis-benzamidine proteinase Inhibitor. i.

    PubMed

    Marinho-Prado, Jeanne Scardini; Lourenção, A L; Guedes, R N C; Pallini, A; Oliveira, J A; Oliveira, M G A

    2012-10-01

    Ingestion of proteinase inhibitors leads to hyperproduction of digestive proteinases, limiting the bioavailability of essential amino acids for protein synthesis, which affects insect growth and development. However, the effects of proteinase inhibitors on digestive enzymes can lead to an adaptive response by the insect. In here, we assessed the biochemical response of midgut proteinases from the eucalypt defoliator Thyrinteina arnobia (Stoll) to different concentrations of berenil, a bis-benzamidine proteinase inhibitor, on eucalyptus. Eucalyptus leaves were immersed in berenil solutions at different concentrations and fed to larvae of T. arnobia. Mortality was assessed daily. The proteolytic activity in the midgut of T. arnobia was assessed after feeding on plants sprayed with aqueous solutions of berenil, fed to fifth instars of T. arnobia for 48 h before midgut removal for enzymatic assays. Larvae of T. arnobia were able to overcome the effects of the lowest berenil concentrations by increasing their trypsin-like activity, but not as berenil concentration increased, despite the fact that the highest berenil concentration resulted in overproduction of trypsin-like proteinases. Berenil also prevented the increase of the cysteine proteinases activity in response to trypsin inhibition.

  17. Characterization of the Proteinase that Initiates the Degradation of the Trypsin Inhibitor in Germinating Mung Beans (Vigna radiata).

    PubMed

    Wilson, K A; Tan-Wilson, A L

    1987-05-01

    The proteinase (proteinase F) responsible for the initial proteolysis of the mung bean (Vigna radiata) trypsin inhibitor (MBTI) during germination has been purified 1400-fold from dry beans. The enzyme acts as an endopeptidase, cleaving the native inhibitor, MBTI-F, to produce the first modified inhibitor form, MBTI-E. The cleavage of the Asp76-Lys77 peptide bond of MBTI-F occurs at a pH optimum of 4.5, with the tetrapeptide Lys-Asp-Asp-Asp being released. Proteinase F exhibited no activity against the modified inhibitor forms MBTI-E and MBTI-C. Vicilin, the major storage protein of the mung bean, does not serve as a substrate for proteinase F between pH 4 and 7. Proteinase F is inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, chymostatin, p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, and p-chlorophenylsulfonate, but not by iodoacetate and CuCl(2). It is not activated by dithiothreitol, and is stable for extended periods of time (10 months, 4 degrees C, pH 4.0) in the absence of reducing agents. An apparent molecular weight of 65,000 was found for proteinase F by gel filtration. Subcellular fractionation in glycerol suggests that greater than 85% of the proteinase F activity is found in the protein bodies of the ungerminated mung bean. The same studies indicate that at least 56% of the MBTI of the seed is also localized in the protein bodies.

  18. Fourier analysis and synthesis tomography.

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Kelvin H.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Feldkuhn, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Most far-field optical imaging systems rely on a lens and spatially-resolved detection to probe distinct locations on the object. We describe and demonstrate a novel high-speed wide-field approach to imaging that instead measures the complex spatial Fourier transform of the object by detecting its spatially-integrated response to dynamic acousto-optically synthesized structured illumination. Tomographic filtered backprojection is applied to reconstruct the object in two or three dimensions. This technique decouples depth-of-field and working-distance from resolution, in contrast to conventional imaging, and can be used to image biological and synthetic structures in fluoresced or scattered light employing coherent or broadband illumination. We discuss the electronically programmable transfer function of the optical system and its implications for imaging dynamic processes. Finally, we present for the first time two-dimensional high-resolution image reconstructions demonstrating a three-orders-of-magnitude improvement in depth-of-field over conventional lens-based microscopy.

  19. Fourier smoothing of digital photographic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anupama, G. C.

    1990-03-01

    Fourier methods of smoothing one-dimensional data are discussed with particular reference to digital photographic spectra. Data smoothed using lowpass filters with different cut-off frequencies are intercompared. A method to scale densities in order to remove the dependence of grain noise on density is described. Optimal filtering technique which models signal and noise in Fourier domain is also explained.

  20. The multipliers of multiple trigonometric Fourier series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ydyrys, Aizhan; Sarybekova, Lyazzat; Tleukhanova, Nazerke

    2016-11-01

    We study the multipliers of multiple Fourier series for a regular system on anisotropic Lorentz spaces. In particular, the sufficient conditions for a sequence of complex numbers {λk}k∈Zn in order to make it a multiplier of multiple trigonometric Fourier series from Lp[0; 1]n to Lq[0; 1]n , p > q. These conditions include conditions Lizorkin theorem on multipliers.

  1. Pest protection conferred by a Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene.

    PubMed

    Smigocki, Ann C; Ivic-Haymes, Snezana; Li, Haiyan; Savić, Jelena

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors provide a means of engineering plant resistance to insect pests. A Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) was fused to the constitutive CaMV35S promoter for over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana plants to study its effect on lepidopteran insect pests. Independently derived BvSTI transgenic tobacco T2 homozygous progeny were shown to have relatively high BvSTI gene transcript levels. BvSTI-specific polyclonal antibodies cross-reacted with the expected 30 kDA recombinant BvSTI protein on Western blots. In gel trypsin inhibitor activity assays revealed a major clear zone that corresponded to the BvSTI proteinase inhibitor that was not detected in the untransformed control plants. BvSTI-transgenic plants were bioassayed for resistance to five lepidopteran insect pests. Spodoptera frugiperda, S. exigua and Manduca sexta larvae fed BvSTI leaves had significant reductions in larval weights as compared to larvae fed on untransformed leaves. In contrast, larval weights increased relative to the controls when Heliothis virescens and Agrotis ipsilon larvae were fed on BvSTI leaves. As the larvae entered the pupal stage, pupal sizes reflected the overall larval weights. Some developmental abnormalities of the pupae and emerging moths were noted. These findings suggest that the sugar beet BvSTI gene may prove useful for effective control of several different lepidopteran insect pests in genetically modified tobacco and other plants. The sugar beet serine proteinase inhibitor may be more effective for insect control because sugar beet is cropped in restricted geographical areas thus limiting the exposure of the insects to sugar beet proteinase inhibitors and build up of non-sensitive midgut proteases.

  2. Activities of amylase, proteinase, and lipase enzymes from Lactococcus chungangensis and its application in dairy products.

    PubMed

    Konkit, Maytiya; Kim, Wonyong

    2016-07-01

    Several enzymes are involved in the process of converting milk to lactic acid and coagulated milk to curd and, therefore, are important in dairy fermented products. Amylase, proteinase, and lipase are enzymes that play an important role in degrading milk into monomeric molecules such as oligosaccharides, amino acids, and fatty acids, which are the main molecules responsible for flavors in cheese. In the current study, we determined the amylase, proteinase, and lipase activities of Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T), a bacterial strain of nondairy origin, and compared them with those of the reference strain, Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T), which is commonly used in the dairy industry. Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T) and L. lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T) were both found to have amylase, proteinase, and lipase activities in broth culture, cream cheese, and yogurt. Notably, the proteinase and lipase activities of L. chungangensis CAU 28(T) were higher than those of L. lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T), with proteinase activity of 10.50 U/mL in tryptic soy broth and 8.64 U/mL in cream cheese, and lipase activity of 100 U/mL of tryptic soy broth, and 100 U/mL of cream cheese. In contrast, the amylase activity was low, with 5.28 U/mL in tryptic soy broth and 8.86 U/mL in cream cheese. These enzyme activities in L. chungangensis CAU 28(T) suggest that this strain has potential to be used for manufacturing dairy fermented products, even though the strain is of nondairy origin.

  3. A chymotrypsin-like proteinase from the midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae.

    PubMed

    Elpidina, E N; Tsybina, T A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Belozersky, M A; Zhuzhikov, D P; Oppert, B

    2005-08-01

    A chymotrypsin-like proteinase was isolated from the posterior midgut of larvae of the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, by ion-exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The enzyme, TmC1, was purified to homogeneity as determined by SDS-PAGE and postelectrophoretic activity detection. TmC1 had a molecular mass of 23.0 kDa, pI of 8.4, a pH optimum of 9.5, and the optimal temperature for activity was 51 degrees C. The proteinase displayed high stability at temperatures below 43 degrees C and in the pH range 6.5-11.2, which is inclusive of the pH of the posterior and middle midgut. The enzyme hydrolyzed long chymotrypsin peptide substrates SucAAPFpNA, SucAAPLpNA and GlpAALpNA and did not hydrolyze short chymotrypsin substrates. Kinetic parameters of the enzymatic reaction demonstrated that the best substrate was SucAAPFpNA, with k(cat app) 36.5 s(-1) and K(m) 1.59 mM. However, the enzyme had a lower K(m) for SucAAPLpNA, 0.5 mM. Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) was an effective inhibitor of TmC1, and the proteinase was not inhibited by either tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) or N(alpha)-tosyl-l-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK). However, the activity of TmC1 was reduced with sulfhydryl reagents. Several plant and insect proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors were active against the purified enzyme, the most effective being Kunitz soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI). The N-terminal sequence of the enzyme was IISGSAASKGQFPWQ, which was up to 67% similar to other insect chymotrypsin-like proteinases and 47% similar to mammalian chymotrypsin A. The amino acid composition of TmC1 differed significantly from previously isolated T. molitor enzymes.

  4. Proteinases in Naegleria Fowleri (strain NF3), a pathogenic amoeba: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Mat Amin, Nakisah

    2004-12-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a free-living amoeba, known as a causative agent for a fatal disease of the central nervous system (CNS) in man such as Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Factors contributing to its pathogenicity and its distribution in the environment have been investigated by previous researchers. In case of its pathogenicity, several enzymes such as phospolipase A and sphingomyelinase, have been proposed to probably act as aggressors in promoting PAM but no study so far have been conducted to investigate the presence of proteinase enzyme in this amoeba although a 56kDa cystein proteinase enzyme has been identified in Entamoeba histolytica as an important contributing factor in the amoeba's virulence. In this preliminary study, a pathogenic amoeba, Naegleria fowleri (strain NF3) was examined for the presence of proteinases. Samples of enzymes in this amoeba were analysed by electrophoresis using SDS-PAGE-gelatin gels. The results showed that this amoeba possesses at least two high molecular weight proteinases on gelatin gels; their apparent molecular weights are approximately 128 kDa and approximately 170 kDa. Band of approximately 128 kDa enzyme is membrane-associated and its activity is higher at alkaline pH compared with lower pH; at lower pH, its activity is greatly stimulated by DTT. The approximately 170 kDa band enzyme appears to be inactivated at pH 8.0, at lower ph its activity is higher and DTT-dependance. The activity of this enzyme is partially inhibited by inhibitor E-64 but markedly inhibited to antipain suggesting it belongs to the cysteine proteinase group.

  5. Fractional Fourier processing of quantum light.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yifan; Tao, Ran; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-13

    We have extended Fourier transform of quantum light to a fractional Fourier processing, and demonstrated that a classical optical fractional Fourier processor can be used for the shaping of quantum correlations between two or more photons. Comparing the present method with that of Fourier processing, we find that fractional Fourier processing for quantum light possesses many advantages. Based on such a method, not only quantum correlations can be shaped more rich, but also the initial states can be easily identified. Moreover, the twisted phase information can be recovered and quantum states are easily controlled in performing quantum information experiments. Our findings open up new avenues for the manipulation of correlations between photons in optical quantum information processing.

  6. Class specific inhibition of house dust mite proteinases which cleave cell adhesion, induce cell death and which increase the permeability of lung epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Winton, Helen L; Wan, Hong; Cannell, Mark B; Thompson, Philip J; Garrod, David R; Stewart, Geoffrey A; Robinson, Clive

    1998-01-01

    House dust mite (HDM) allergens with cysteine and serine proteinase activity are risk factors for allergic sensitization and asthma. A simple method to fractionate proteinase activity from HDM faecal pellets into cysteine and serine class activity is described. Both proteinase fractions increased the permeability of epithelial cell monolayers. The effects of the serine proteinase fraction were inhibited by 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulphonyl fluoride hydrochloride (AEBSF) and soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI). The effects of the cysteine proteinase fraction could be inhibited by E-64. No reciprocity of action was found. Treatment of epithelial monolayers with either proteinase fraction caused breakdown of tight junctions (TJs). AEBSF inhibited TJ breakdown caused by the serine proteinase fraction, whereas E-64 inhibited the cysteine proteinase fraction. Agarose gel electrophoresis revealed that the proteinases induced DNA cleavage which was inhibited by the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor BB-250. Compound E-64 inhibited DNA fragmentation caused by the cysteine proteinase fraction, but was without effect on the serine proteinase fraction. Staining of proteinase-treated cells with annexin V (AV) and propidium iodide (PI) revealed a diversity of cellular responses. Some cells stained only with AV indicating early apoptosis, whilst others were dead and stained with both AV and PI. HDM proteinases exert profound effects on epithelial cells which will promote allergic sensitization; namely disruption of intercellular adhesion, increased paracellular permeability and initiation of cell death. Attenuation of these actions by proteinase inhibitors leads to the conclusion that compounds designed to be selective for the HDM enzymes may represent a novel therapy for asthma. PMID:9720772

  7. Induction of a heparin-stimulated serine proteinase in sex accessory gland tumors of the Lobund-Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael J; Lind, Jeremy; Sinha, Akhouri A

    2015-08-01

    Induction of new proteinase activities that may process growth factors, modify cell surface receptors, cleave extracellular matrix proteins, etc. is considered fundamental in carcinogenesis. The purpose of this study was to characterize a novel proteinase activity induced in sex accessory gland cancers (about 70% in seminal vesicles) of adult male Lobund-Wistar rats by a single injection of N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU; 25mg/kg) followed by implanted testosterone propionate (45mg in silastic tubing every 2months) treatment for 10-14months. A 28kDa proteinase activity was detected in tumor extracts using SDS-gelatin gel zymography with incubations done without CaCl2. Its activity was stimulated 15 fold by heparin (optimal activity 1.5-3.0μg/lane) added to the tissue extract-SDS sample buffer prior to electrophoresis. No 28kDa heparin-stimulated proteinase (H-SP) was found in the dorsal, lateral and anterior (coagulating gland) prostate lobes or seminal vesicles of untreated adult rats, but there was a 26-30kDa Ca(2+)-independent proteinase activity in the ventral prostate that showed limited heparin stimulation. The 28kDa H-SP was completely inhibited by 1.0mM 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzenesulfonylfluoride (AESBF) indicating that it was a serine-type proteinase. Other types of proteinase inhibitors were without effect, including serine proteinase inhibitors benzamidine, tranexamic acid and ε-aminocaproic acid. Proteinase activities of about 28kDa were found with casein, fibrinogen or carboxymethylated transferrin as substrate, however, these activities were not stimulated by heparin. Similar levels of activities of the 28kDa H-SP were found in primary tumors and their metastases, but little/no activity was detected in serum, even from rats with large tumor volume and metastases. These data demonstrate overexpression of a heparin-stimulated 28kDa serine proteinase in the primary tumors of sex accessory gland cancers and their metastases. This proteinase either does not

  8. PCR cloning and expression analysis of cDNAs encoding cysteine proteinases from germinating seeds of Vicia sativa L.

    PubMed

    Becker, C; Fischer, J; Nong, V H; Münitz, K

    1994-11-01

    cDNA clones encoding cysteine proteinases from cotyledons of germinated seeds of Vicia sativa L. have been obtained by means of PCR. Degenerate oligonucleotide primers were designed according to conserved amino acid regions of known cysteine proteinases. The deduced amino acid sequences of the cDNA clones encoding VSCYSPR1 and VSCYSPR2 display strong homology to cysteine proteinases of the so called papain superfamily. Northern analyses revealed developmentally regulated expression of both the mRNAs in germinating seeds. The transcripts were shown to be products of two distinct single genes, each exhibiting structural polymorphisms as exposed in few nucleotide substitutions.

  9. The Geostationary Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, Richard; Sander, Stanley; Eldering, Annmarie; Blavier, Jean-Francois; Bekker, Dmitriy; Manatt, Kenneth; Rider, David; Wu, Yen-Hung (James)

    2012-09-01

    The Geostationary Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GeoFTS) is an imaging spectrometer designed for a geostationary orbit (GEO) earth science mission to measure key atmospheric trace gases and process tracers related to climate change and human activity. GEO allows GeoFTS to continuously stare at a region of the earth for frequent sampling to capture the variability of biogenic fluxes and anthropogenic emissions from city to continental spatial scales and temporal scales from diurnal, synoptic, seasonal to interannual. The measurement strategy provides a process based understanding of the carbon cycle from contiguous maps of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), and chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) collected many times per day at high spatial resolution (~2.7km×2.7km at nadir). The CO2/CH4/CO/CF measurement suite in the near infrared spectral region provides the information needed to disentangle natural and anthropogenic contributions to atmospheric carbon concentrations and to minimize uncertainties in the flow of carbon between the atmosphere and surface. The half meter cube size GeoFTS instrument is based on a Michelson interferometer design that uses all high TRL components in a modular configuration to reduce complexity and cost. It is self-contained and as independent of the spacecraft as possible with simple spacecraft interfaces, making it ideal to be a "hosted" payload on a commercial communications satellite mission. The hosted payload approach for measuring the major carbon-containing gases in the atmosphere from the geostationary vantage point will affordably advance the scientific understating of carbon cycle processes and climate change.

  10. The Geostationary Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, Richard; Sander, Stanley; Eldering, Annmarie; Blavier, Jean-Francois; Bekker, Dmitriy; Manatt, Ken; Rider, David; Wu, Yen-Hung

    2012-01-01

    The Geostationary Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GeoFTS) is an imaging spectrometer designed for a geostationary orbit (GEO) earth science mission to measure key atmospheric trace gases and process tracers related to climate change and human activity. GEO allows GeoFTS to continuously stare at a region of the earth for frequent sampling to capture the variability of biogenic fluxes and anthropogenic emissions from city to continental spatial scales and temporal scales from diurnal, synoptic, seasonal to interannual. The measurement strategy provides a process based understanding of the carbon cycle from contiguous maps of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), and chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) collected many times per day at high spatial resolution (2.7kmx2.7km at nadir). The CO2/CH4/CO/CF measurement suite in the near infrared spectral region provides the information needed to disentangle natural and anthropogenic contributions to atmospheric carbon concentrations and to minimize uncertainties in the flow of carbon between the atmosphere and surface. The half meter cube size GeoFTS instrument is based on a Michelson interferometer design that uses all high TRL components in a modular configuration to reduce complexity and cost. It is self-contained and as independent of the spacecraft as possible with simple spacecraft interfaces, making it ideal to be a "hosted" payload on a commercial communications satellite mission. The hosted payload approach for measuring the major carbon-containing gases in the atmosphere from the geostationary vantage point will affordably advance the scientific understating of carbon cycle processes and climate change.

  11. The Geostationary Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, Richard; Sander, Stanley; Eldering, Annmarie; Miller, Charles; Frankenberg, Christian; Natra, Vijay; Rider, David; Blavier, Jean-Francois; Bekker, Dmitriy; Wu, Yen-Hung

    2012-01-01

    The Geostationary Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GeoFTS) is an imaging spectrometer designed for an earth science mission to measure key atmospheric trace gases and process tracers related to climate change and human activity. The GeoFTS instrument is a half meter cube size instrument designed to operate in geostationary orbit as a secondary "hosted" payload on a commercial geostationary satellite mission. The advantage of GEO is the ability to continuously stare at a region of the earth, enabling frequent sampling to capture the diurnal variability of biogenic fluxes and anthropogenic emissions from city to continental scales. The science goal is to obtain a process-based understanding of the carbon cycle from simultaneous high spatial resolution measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), and chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) many times per day in the near infrared spectral region to capture their spatial and temporal variations on diurnal, synoptic, seasonal and interannual time scales. The GeoFTS instrument is based on a Michelson interferometer design with a number of advanced features incorporated. Two of the most important advanced features are the focal plane arrays and the optical path difference mechanism. A breadboard GeoFTS instrument has demonstrated functionality for simultaneous measurements in the visible and IR in the laboratory and subsequently in the field at the California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (CLARS) observatory on Mt. Wilson overlooking the Los Angeles basin. A GeoFTS engineering model instrument is being developed which will make simultaneous visible and IR measurements under space flight like environmental conditions (thermal-vacuum at 180 K). This will demonstrate critical instrument capabilities such as optical alignment stability, interferometer modulation efficiency, and high throughput FPA signal processing. This will reduce flight instrument development risk and show that the Geo

  12. Origins of hydration differences in homochiral and racemic crystals of aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Thomas R; Korter, Timothy M

    2015-02-26

    The propensity for crystalline hydrates of organic molecules to form is related to the strength of the interactions between molecules, including the chiral composition of the molecular solids. Specifically, homochiral versus racemic crystalline samples can exhibit distinct differences in their ability to form energetically stable hydrates. The focus of the current study is a comparison of the crystal structures and intermolecular forces found in solid-state L-aspartic acid, DL-aspartic acid, and L-aspartic acid monohydrate. The absence of experimental evidence for the DL-aspartic acid monohydrate is considered here in terms of the enhanced thermodynamic stability of the DL-aspartic acid anhydrate crystal as compared to the L-aspartic acid anhydrate as revealed through solid-state density functional theory calculations and terahertz spectroscopic measurements. The results indicate that anhydrous DL-aspartic acid is the more stable solid, not due to intermolecular forces alone but also due to the improved conformations of the molecules within the racemic solid. Hemihydrated and monohydrated forms of DL-aspartic acid have been computationally evaluated, and in each case, the hydrates produce destabilized aspartic acid conformations that prevent DL-aspartic acid hydrate formation from occurring.

  13. Structure and mechanisms of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase.

    PubMed

    Lipscomb, William N; Kantrowitz, Evan R

    2012-03-20

    Enzymes catalyze a particular reaction in cells, but only a few control the rate of this reaction and the metabolic pathway that follows. One specific mechanism for such enzymatic control of a metabolic pathway involves molecular feedback, whereby a metabolite further down the pathway acts at a unique site on the control enzyme to alter its activity allosterically. This regulation may be positive or negative (or both), depending upon the particular system. Another method of enzymatic control involves the cooperative binding of the substrate, which allows a large change in enzyme activity to emanate from only a small change in substrate concentration. Allosteric regulation and homotropic cooperativity are often known to involve significant conformational changes in the structure of the protein. Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) is the textbook example of an enzyme that regulates a metabolic pathway, namely, pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis, by feedback control and by the cooperative binding of the substrate, L-aspartate. The catalytic and regulatory mechanisms of this enzyme have been extensively studied. A series of X-ray crystal structures of the enzyme in the presence and absence of substrates, products, and analogues have provided details, at the molecular level, of the conformational changes that the enzyme undergoes as it shifts between its low-activity, low-affinity form (T state) to its high-activity, high-affinity form (R state). These structural data provide insights into not only how this enzyme catalyzes the reaction between l-aspartate and carbamoyl phosphate to form N-carbamoyl-L-aspartate and inorganic phosphate, but also how the allosteric effectors modulate this activity. In this Account, we summarize studies on the structure of the enzyme and describe how these structural data provide insights into the catalytic and regulatory mechanisms of the enzyme. The ATCase-catalyzed reaction is regulated by nucleotide binding some 60

  14. Rotational-translational fourier imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Jonathan W. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    This invention has the ability to create Fourier-based images with only two grid pairs. The two grid pairs are manipulated in a manner that allows (1) a first grid pair to provide multiple real components of the Fourier-based image and (2) a second grid pair to provide multiple imaginary components of the Fourier-based image. The novelty of this invention resides in the use of only two grid pairs to provide the same imaging information that has been traditionally collected with multiple grid pairs.

  15. [Expression of Chinese sturgeon cystatin in yeast Pichia pastoris and its proteinase inhibitory activity analysis].

    PubMed

    Ma, Dong-Mei; Bai, Jun-Jie; Jian, Qing; Lao, Hai-Hua; Ye, Xing; Luo, Jian-Ren

    2003-09-01

    Cystatin, which widely distributed in both tissues and body fluids of animal and plant, was a superfamily of cysteine proteinase inhibitors. It could form activity-inhibitor complexes with cysteine proteinases to inhibit the hydrolytic activity of proteinases. Cystatin played important roles not only in the inhibition of the proteolytic degradation of fish muscle, but also in biological defense systems against invaders. To explore the functions of fish cystatin and the potential values in fish disease prevention and cure, as well as seafood processing, the recombinant yeast strains which could express Chinese sturgeon cystatin were constructed. First, the cystatin cDNA of Chinese sturgeon, which had been PCR modified, was subcloned into yeast integrated vector pPICZaA. After extracted and purified, the recombinant plasmids were linearized by Sac I. The yeast Pichia pastoris GS115 strain was transformed by use of the Lithium Chloride transformation method, and the recombinant cystatin yeast strains got. After 0.5% methanol induction, SDS-PAGE analysis of the culture supernatant indicated that the yield of recombinant cystatin was about 215mg x L(-1) with the percentage about 73.6%. The recombinant cystatin was purified through Q-Sepharose anion-exchange chromatography, and the purity reached about 94.2%. The inhibitory activity of recombinant cystatin was measured by inhibiting the proteinase activity of papain. The results showed that about 1 microg recombinant cystatin could inhibit the activity of 15 microg papain. Heat stability assay results showed that there was a decrease in inhibitory activity of cystatin with the increasing of temperature. When solution of recombinant cystatin was kept at 70 degrees C for 5min, the inhibitory activity reduced fast. While the recombinant cystatin was heated to 90 degrees C for 5min, the inhibitory activity of recombinant cystatin was undetected. The inhibitory activity for recombinant Chinese sturgeon cystatin was higher

  16. Crystal structure of viral serpin crmA provides insights into its mechanism of cysteine proteinase inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Simonovic, M.; Gettins PGW; Volz, K.

    2000-01-01

    CrmA is an unusual viral serpin that inhibits both cysteine and serine proteinases involved in the regulation of host inflammatory and apoptosis processes. It differs from other members of the serpin superfamily by having a reactive center loop that is one residue shorter, and by its apparent inability to form SDS-stable covalent complexes with cysteine proteinases. To obtain insight into the inhibitory mechanism of crmA, we determined the crystal structure of reactive center loop-cleaved crmA to 2.9 A resolution. The structure, which is the first of a viral serpin, suggests that crmA can inhibit cysteine proteinases by a mechanism analogous to that used by other serpins against serine proteinases. However, one striking difference from other serpins, which may be significant for in vivo function, is an additional highly charged antiparallel strand for b sheet A, whose sequence and length are unique to crmA. PMID:10975564

  17. Plastidic aspartate aminotransferases and the biosynthesis of essential amino acids in plants.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Fernando; Cañas, Rafael A; Pascual, M Belén; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2014-10-01

    In the chloroplasts and in non-green plastids of plants, aspartate is the precursor for the biosynthesis of different amino acids and derived metabolites that play distinct and important roles in plant growth, reproduction, development or defence. Aspartate biosynthesis is mediated by the enzyme aspartate aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.1), which catalyses the reversible transamination between glutamate and oxaloacetate to generate aspartate and 2-oxoglutarate. Plastids contain two aspartate aminotransferases: a eukaryotic-type and a prokaryotic-type bifunctional enzyme displaying aspartate and prephenate aminotransferase activities. A general overview of the biochemistry, regulation, functional significance, and phylogenetic origin of both enzymes is presented. The roles of these plastidic aminotransferases in the biosynthesis of essential amino acids are discussed.

  18. The substituted aspartate analogue L-beta-threo-benzyl-aspartate preferentially inhibits the neuronal excitatory amino acid transporter EAAT3.

    PubMed

    Esslinger, C Sean; Agarwal, Shailesh; Gerdes, John; Wilson, Paul A; Davis, Erin S; Awes, Alicia N; O'Brien, Erin; Mavencamp, Teri; Koch, Hans P; Poulsen, David J; Rhoderick, Joseph F; Chamberlin, A Richard; Kavanaugh, Michael P; Bridges, Richard J

    2005-11-01

    The excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) play key roles in the regulation of CNS L-glutamate, especially related to synthesis, signal termination, synaptic spillover, and excitotoxic protection. Inhibitors available to delineate EAAT pharmacology and function are essentially limited to those that non-selectively block all EAATs or those that exhibit a substantial preference for EAAT2. Thus, it is difficult to selectively study the other subtypes, particularly EAAT1 and EAAT3. Structure activity studies on a series of beta-substituted aspartate analogues identify L-beta-benzyl-aspartate (L-beta-BA) as among the first blockers that potently and preferentially inhibits the neuronal EAAT3 subtype. Kinetic analysis of D-[(3)H]aspartate uptake into C17.2 cells expressing the hEAATs demonstrate that L-beta-threo-BA is the more potent diastereomer, acts competitively, and exhibits a 10-fold preference for EAAT3 compared to EAAT1 and EAAT2. Electrophysiological recordings of EAAT-mediated currents in Xenopus oocytes identify L-beta-BA as a non-substrate inhibitor. Analyzing L-beta-threo-BA within the context of a novel EAAT2 pharmacophore model suggests: (1) a highly conserved positioning of the electrostatic carboxyl and amino groups; (2) nearby regions that accommodate select structural modifications (cyclopropyl rings, methyl groups, oxygen atoms); and (3) a unique region L-beta-threo-BA occupied by the benzyl moieties of L-TBOA, L-beta-threo-BA and related analogues. It is plausible that the preference of L-beta-threo-BA and L-TBOA for EAAT3 and EAAT2, respectively, could reside in the latter two pharmacophore regions.

  19. Increased expression of Candida albicans secretory proteinase, a putative virulence factor, in isolates from human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Ollert, M W; Wende, C; Görlich, M; McMullan-Vogel, C G; Borg-von Zepelin, M; Vogel, C W; Korting, H C

    1995-01-01

    The increased prevalence and the severity of oropharyngeal candidiasis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients are attributed exclusively to the virus-induced immune deficiency of the host. The present study was aimed at answering the question of whether Candida albicans secretory proteinase, a putative virulence factor of the opportunistic C. albicans yeast, has any potential influence on the clinical manifestation of oropharyngeal candidiasis in HIV-positive patients. We measured the secretory proteinase activities of clinical C. albicans isolates from the oropharynges of either HIV-positive individuals (n = 100) or a control group (n = 122). The mean secretory proteinase activity of C. albicans isolates from the HIV-positive group (4,255 +/- 2,372 U/liter) was significantly higher compared with that of isolates from the control group (2,324 +/- 1,487 U/liter) (P < 0.05). The higher level of secretory proteinase activity in the culture supernatants of individual C. albicans isolates correlated with the increased level of proteinase expression on the cell surface, as revealed by cytofluorometry, and with higher levels of secretion of the immunodetectable protein, as shown by Western blotting (immunoblotting). Proteinase activity within the population of C. albicans isolates from HIV-positive individuals was independent of the patient's clinical disease stage and the CD4+/CD8+ cell numbers. Furthermore, no correlation of the proteinase activities with the C. albicans serotype was found, although C. albicans serotype B was significantly more frequent in the HIV-positive group (40%) compared with that in the control group (12%). However, a positive correlation of proteinase activity to antifungal susceptibility was evident.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8567880

  20. Specificity of an extracellular proteinase from Conidiobolus coronatus and its inhibition by an inhibitor from insect hemolymph.

    PubMed

    Bania, Jacek; Samborski, Jaroslaw; Bogus, Mieczyslawa; Polanowski, Antoni

    2006-08-01

    The relatively little-investigated entomopathogen Conidiobolus coronatus secretes several proteinases into culture broth. Using a combination of ion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography, we purified to homogeneity a serine proteinase of Mr 30,000-32,000, as ascertained by SDS-PAGE. The purified enzyme showed subtilisin-like activity. It very effectively hydrolyzed N-Suc-Ala(2)-Pro-Phe-pNa with a Km-1.36 x 10(-4) M and Kcat-24 s(-1), and N-Suc-Ala(2)-Pro-Leu-pNa with Km-6.65 x 10(-4) M and Kcat-11 s(-1). The specificity index k(cat)/K(m) for the tested substrates was calculated to be 176,340 s(-1) M(-1) and 17,030 s(-1) M(-1), respectively. Using oxidized insulin B chain as a substrate, the purified proteinase exhibited specificity to aromatic and hydrophobic amino-acid residues, such as Phe, Leu, and Gly at the P1 position, splitting primarily the peptide bonds: Phe(1)-Val(2), Leu(15)-Tyr(16), and Gly(23)-Phe(24). The proteinase appeared to be sensitive to the specific synthetic inhibitors of the serine proteinases DFP (diisopropyl flourophosphate) and PMSF (phenyl-methylsulfonyl fluoride) as well as to some naturally occurring protein inhibitors of chymotrypsin. It is worth noting that the enzyme exhibited the highest sensitivity to inhibition by AMCI-1 (with an association constant of 3 x 10(10) M(-1)), an inhibitor of cathepsin G/chymotrypsin from the larval hemolymph of Apis mellifera, reinforcing the possibility of involvement of inhibitors from hemolymph in insect innate immunity. The substrate specificity and proteinase inhibitor effects indicate that the purified proteinase from the fermentation broth of Conidiobolus coronatus is a subtilisin-like serine proteinase.

  1. Interaction Between Some Monosaccharides and Aspartic Acid in Dilute Aqueous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kulikova, Galina A.

    2008-01-01

    Interaction between aspartic acid and d-glucose, d-galactose, and d-fructose has been studied by isothermal titration calorimetry, calorimetry of dissolution, and densimetry. It has been found that d-glucose and d-fructose form thermodynamically stable associates with aspartic acid, in contrast to d-galactose. The selectivity in the interaction of aspartic acid with monosaccharides is affected by their stereochemical structures. PMID:19669542

  2. The bioactive acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif peptide.

    PubMed

    Minamizaki, Tomoko; Yoshiko, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The organic component of the bone matrix comprises 40% dry weight of bone. The organic component is mostly composed of type I collagen and small amounts of non-collagenous proteins (NCPs) (10-15% of the total bone protein content). The small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoprotein (SIBLING) family, a NCP, is considered to play a key role in bone mineralization. SIBLING family of proteins share common structural features and includes the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif and acidic serine- and aspartic acid-rich motif (ASARM). Clinical manifestations of gene mutations and/or genetically modified mice indicate that SIBLINGs play diverse roles in bone and extraskeletal tissues. ASARM peptides might not be primary responsible for the functional diversity of SIBLINGs, but this motif is suggested to be a key domain of SIBLINGs. However, the exact function of ASARM peptides is poorly understood. In this article, we discuss the considerable progress made in understanding the role of ASARM as a bioactive peptide.

  3. Neuronal death enhanced by N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Stefovska, Vanya; Turski, Lechoslaw

    2000-01-01

    Glutamate promotes neuronal survival during brain development and destroys neurons after injuries in the mature brain. Glutamate antagonists are in human clinical trials aiming to demonstrate limitation of neuronal injury after head trauma, which consists of both rapid and slowly progressing neurodegeneration. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists are considered for neuroprotection in chronic neurodegenerative disorders with slowly progressing cell death only. Therefore, humans suffering from Huntington's disease, characterized by slowly progressing neurodegeneration of the basal ganglia, are subjected to trials with glutamate antagonists. Here we demonstrate that progressive neurodegeneration in the basal ganglia induced by the mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionate or in the hippocampus by traumatic brain injury is enhanced by N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists but ameliorated by α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonists. These observations reveal that N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists may increase neurodestruction in mature brain undergoing slowly progressing neurodegeneration, whereas blockade of the action of glutamate at α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptors may be neuroprotective. PMID:11058158

  4. Aspartic acid substitutions affect proton translocation by bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Mogi, T; Stern, L J; Marti, T; Chao, B H; Khorana, H G

    1988-01-01

    We have substituted each of the aspartic acid residues in bacteriorhodopsin to determine their possible role in proton translocation by this protein. The aspartic acid residues were replaced by asparagines; in addition, Asp-85, -96, -115, and -112 were changed to glutamic acid and Asp-212 was also replaced by alanine. The mutant bacteriorhodopsin genes were expressed in Escherichia coli and the proteins were purified. The mutant proteins all regenerated bacteriorhodopsin-like chromophores when treated with a detergent-phospholipid mixture and retinal. However, the rates of regeneration of the chromophores and their lambda max varied widely. No support was obtained for the external point charge model for the opsin shift. The Asp-85----Asn mutant showed not detectable proton pumping, the Asp-96----Asn and Asp-212----Glu mutants showed less than 10% and the Asp-115----Glu mutant showed approximately equal to 30% of the normal proton pumping. The implications of these findings for possible mechanisms of proton translocation by bacteriorhodopsin are discussed. PMID:3288985

  5. Aspartate and glutamate mimetic structures in biologically active compounds.

    PubMed

    Stefanic, Peter; Dolenc, Marija Sollner

    2004-04-01

    Glutamate and aspartate are frequently recognized as key structural elements for the biological activity of natural peptides and synthetic compounds. The acidic side-chain functionality of both the amino acids provides the basis for the ionic interaction and subsequent molecular recognition by specific receptor sites that results in the regulation of physiological or pathophysiological processes in the organism. In the development of new biologically active compounds that possess the ability to modulate these processes, compounds offering the same type of interactions are being designed. Thus, using a peptidomimetic design approach, glutamate and aspartate mimetics are incorporated into the structure of final biologically active compounds. This review covers different bioisosteric replacements of carboxylic acid alone, as well as mimetics of the whole amino acid structure. Amino acid analogs presented include those with different distances between anionic moieties, and analogs with additional functional groups that result in conformational restriction or alternative interaction sites. The article also provides an overview of different cyclic structures, including various cycloalkane, bicyclic and heterocyclic analogs, that lead to conformational restriction. Higher di- and tripeptide mimetics in which carboxylic acid functionality is incorporated into larger molecules are also reviewed. In addition to the mimetic structures presented, emphasis in this article is placed on their steric and electronic properties. These mimetics constitute a useful pool of fragments in the design of new biologically active compounds, particularly in the field of RGD mimetics and excitatory amino acid agonists and antagonists.

  6. A Short-Segment Fourier Transform Methodology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    defined sampling of the continuous-valued discrete-time Fourier transform, superresolution in the frequency domain and allowance of Dirac delta functions associated with pure sinusoidal input data components.

  7. Fourier-Bessel rotational invariant eigenimages.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhizhen; Singer, Amit

    2013-05-01

    We present an efficient and accurate algorithm for principal component analysis (PCA) of a large set of two-dimensional images and, for each image, the set of its uniform rotations in the plane and its reflection. The algorithm starts by expanding each image, originally given on a Cartesian grid, in the Fourier-Bessel basis for the disk. Because the images are essentially band limited in the Fourier domain, we use a sampling criterion to truncate the Fourier-Bessel expansion such that the maximum amount of information is preserved without the effect of aliasing. The constructed covariance matrix is invariant to rotation and reflection and has a special block diagonal structure. PCA is efficiently done for each block separately. This Fourier-Bessel-based PCA detects more meaningful eigenimages and has improved denoising capability compared to traditional PCA for a finite number of noisy images.

  8. Content adaptive illumination for Fourier ptychography.

    PubMed

    Bian, Liheng; Suo, Jinli; Situ, Guohai; Zheng, Guoan; Chen, Feng; Dai, Qionghai

    2014-12-01

    Fourier ptychography (FP) is a recently reported technique, for large field-of-view and high-resolution imaging. Specifically, FP captures a set of low-resolution images, under angularly varying illuminations, and stitches them together in the Fourier domain. One of FP's main disadvantages is its long capturing process, due to the requisite large number of incident illumination angles. In this Letter, utilizing the sparsity of natural images in the Fourier domain, we propose a highly efficient method, termed adaptive Fourier ptychography (AFP), which applies content adaptive illumination for FP, to capture the most informative parts of the scene's spatial spectrum. We validate the effectiveness and efficiency of the reported framework, with both simulated and real experiments. Results show that the proposed AFP could shorten the acquisition time of conventional FP, by around 30%-60%.

  9. A trypsin-like proteinase in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): purification, characterization, and host plant inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Mina; Zibaee, Arash; Sendi, Jalal Jalali

    2014-01-01

    A trypsin-like proteinase was purified and characterized in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae. A purification process that used Sepharyl G-100 and DEAE-cellulose fast flow chromatographies revealed a proteinase with specific activity of 66.7 μmol/min/mg protein, recovery of 27.04 and purification fold of 23.35. Molecular weight of the purified protein was found to be 35.8 kDa. Optimal pH and temperature were obtained 9 and 20°C for the purified trypsin proteinase, respectively. The purified enzyme was significantly inhibited by PMSF, TLCK, and SBTI as specific inhibitors of trypsins in which TLCK showed the highest inhibitory effect. Trypsin proteinase inhibitors were extracted from four varieties of pomegranate including Brait, Torsh-Sabz, May-Khosh, and Shirin by ion exchange chromatography. It was found that fractions 17-20 of Brait; fractions 18 and 21-26 of Torsh-Sabz; fractions 1-7, 11-17, and 19-21 of May-Khosh and fraction 8 for Shirin showed presence of trypsin inhibitor in these host. Comparison of their inhibitory effects on the purified trypsin proteinase of E. ceratoniae demonstrated that fractions from May-khosh variety had the highest effect on the enzyme among other extracted fractions. Characterization of serine proteinases of insects mainly trypsins is one of the promising methods to decrease population and damages via extracting their inhibitors and providing resistant varieties.

  10. Fourier Analysis on GL(n,R)

    PubMed Central

    Gelbart, Stephen S.

    1970-01-01

    Two problems of Fourier analysis on GL(n,R) are studied. The first concerns the decomposition of the additive Fourier operator in terms of the group representation theory of G. The second concerns the analytic continuation of certain zeta-functions defined on G. It is found that the generalized Gamma functions of Gelfand and Graev arise naturally in the solution of both these problems. PMID:16591814

  11. Growth and characterization of KDP crystals doped with L-aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, R; Rajasekaran, R; Samuel, Bincy Susan

    2013-03-01

    Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP) doped with L-aspartic acid has been grown by solvent slow evaporation technique from a mixture of aqueous solution of KDP and 0.7% of L-aspartic acid at room temperature. The grown crystals were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, UV-visible, FTIR analysis. The doping of aspartic acid was confirmed by FTIR spectrum. The Nonlinear optical property (SHG) of L-aspartic acid doped KDP has been confirmed. Microhardness studies were carried out on the grown crystal.

  12. Growth and characterization of KDP crystals doped with L-aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, R.; Rajasekaran, R.; Samuel, Bincy Susan

    2013-03-01

    Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP) doped with L-aspartic acid has been grown by solvent slow evaporation technique from a mixture of aqueous solution of KDP and 0.7% of L-aspartic acid at room temperature. The grown crystals were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, UV-visible, FTIR analysis. The doping of aspartic acid was confirmed by FTIR spectrum. The Nonlinear optical property (SHG) of L-aspartic acid doped KDP has been confirmed. Microhardness studies were carried out on the grown crystal.

  13. Bead-Fourier path integral molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Sergei D.; Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2003-06-01

    Molecular dynamics formulation of Bead-Fourier path integral method for simulation of quantum systems at finite temperatures is presented. Within this scheme, both the bead coordinates and Fourier coefficients, defining the path representing the quantum particle, are treated as generalized coordinates with corresponding generalized momenta and masses. Introduction of the Fourier harmonics together with the center-of-mass thermostating scheme is shown to remove the ergodicity problem, known to pose serious difficulties in standard path integral molecular dynamics simulations. The method is tested for quantum harmonic oscillator and hydrogen atom (Coulombic potential). The simulation results are compared with the exact analytical solutions available for both these systems. Convergence of the results with respect to the number of beads and Fourier harmonics is analyzed. It was shown that addition of a few Fourier harmonics already improves the simulation results substantially, even for a relatively small number of beads. The proposed Bead-Fourier path integral molecular dynamics is a reliable and efficient alternative to simulations of quantum systems.

  14. Molecular cloning of Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor of the shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Hee Jeong; Cho, Hyun Kook; Park, Eun-Mi; Hong, Gyeong-Eun; Kim, Young-Ok; Nam, Bo-Hye; Kim, Woo-Jin; Lee, Sang-Jun; Han, Hyon Sob; Jang, In-Kwon; Lee, Chang Hoon; Cheong, Jaehun; Choi, Tae-Jin

    2009-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors play important roles in host defence systems involving blood coagulation and pathogen digestion. We isolated and characterized a cDNA clone for a Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor (KPI) from a hemocyte cDNA library of the oriental white shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis. The KPI gene consists of three exons and two introns. KPI cDNA contains an open reading frame of 396 bp, a polyadenylation signal sequence AATAAA, and a poly (A) tail. KPI cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 131 amino acids with a putative signal peptide of 21 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of KPI contains two homologous Kazal domains, each with six conserved cysteine residues. The mRNA of KPI is expressed in the hemocytes of healthy shrimp, and the higher expression of KPI transcript is observed in shrimp infected with the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), suggesting a potential role for KPI in host defence mechanisms.

  15. Analysis of the autoproteolytic activity of the recombinant helper component proteinase from zucchini yellow mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Boonrod, Kajohn; Füllgrabe, Marc W; Krczal, Gabi; Wassenegger, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The multifunctional helper component proteinase (HC-Pro) of potyviruses contains an autoproteolytic function that, together with the protein 1 (P1) and NIa proteinase, processes the polyprotein into mature proteins. In this study, we analysed the autoproteolytic active domain of zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) HC-Pro. Several Escherichia coli-expressed MBP:HC-Pro:GFP mutants containing deletions or point mutations at either the N- or C-terminus of the HC-Pro protein were examined. Our results showed that amino acids essential for the proteolytic activity of ZYMV HC-Pro are distinct from those of the tobacco etch virus HC-Pro, although the amino acid sequences in the proteolytic active domain are conserved among potyviruses.

  16. Purification and Characterization of a Keratinolytic Serine Proteinase from Streptomyces albidoflavus

    PubMed Central

    Bressollier, Philippe; Letourneau, François; Urdaci, Maria; Verneuil, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    Streptomyces strain K1-02, which was identified as a strain of Streptomyces albidoflavus, secreted at least six extracellular proteases when it was cultured on feather meal-based medium. The major keratinolytic serine proteinase was purified to homogeneity by a two-step procedure. This enzyme had a molecular weight of 18,000 and was optimally active at pH values ranging from 6 to 9.5 and at temperatures ranging from 40 to 70°C. Its sensitivity to protease inhibitors, its specificity on synthetic substrates, and its remarkably high level of NH2-terminal sequence homology with Streptomyces griseus protease B (SGPB) showed that the new enzyme, designated SAKase, was homologous to SGPB. We tested the activity of SAKase with soluble and fibrous substrates (elastin, keratin, and type I collagen) and found that it was very specific for keratinous substrates compared to SGPB and proteinase K. PMID:10347045

  17. Purification and characterization of a keratinolytic serine proteinase from Streptomyces albidoflavus.

    PubMed

    Bressollier, P; Letourneau, F; Urdaci, M; Verneuil, B

    1999-06-01

    Streptomyces strain K1-02, which was identified as a strain of Streptomyces albidoflavus, secreted at least six extracellular proteases when it was cultured on feather meal-based medium. The major keratinolytic serine proteinase was purified to homogeneity by a two-step procedure. This enzyme had a molecular weight of 18,000 and was optimally active at pH values ranging from 6 to 9.5 and at temperatures ranging from 40 to 70 degrees C. Its sensitivity to protease inhibitors, its specificity on synthetic substrates, and its remarkably high level of NH2-terminal sequence homology with Streptomyces griseus protease B (SGPB) showed that the new enzyme, designated SAKase, was homologous to SGPB. We tested the activity of SAKase with soluble and fibrous substrates (elastin, keratin, and type I collagen) and found that it was very specific for keratinous substrates compared to SGPB and proteinase K.

  18. A Kunitz proteinase inhibitor from corms of Xanthosoma blandum with bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Lima, Thaís B; Silva, Osmar N; Migliolo, Ludovico; Souza-Filho, Carlos R; Gonçalves, Eduardo G; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Oliveira, José T A; Amaral, André C; Franco, Octávio L

    2011-05-27

    Bacterial infections directly affect the world's population, and this situation has been aggravated by indiscriminate use of antimicrobial agents, which can generate resistant microorganisms. In this report, an initial screening of proteins with antibacterial activity from corms of 15 species of the Xanthosoma genus was conducted. Since Xanthosoma blandum corms showed enhanced activity toward bacteria, a novel protein with bactericidal activity was isolated from this particular species. Edman degradation was used for protein N-termini determination; the primary structure showed similarities with Kunitz inhibitors, and this protein was named Xb-KTI. This protein was further challenged against serine proteinases from different sources, showing clear inhibitory activities. Otherwise, no hemolytic activity was observed for Xb-KTI. The results demonstrate the biotechnological potential of Xb-KTI, the first proteinase inhibitor with antimicrobial activity described in the Xanthosoma genus.

  19. On the modeling of snake venom serine proteinase interactions with benzamidine-based thrombin inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Elsa S.; Fonseca, Nelson; Ramos, Maria João

    2004-01-01

    Pit viper venoms contain a number of serine proteinases that exhibit one or more thrombin-like activities on fibrinogen and platelets, this being the case for the kinin-releasing and fibrinogen-clotting KN-BJ from the venom of Bothrops jararaca. A three-dimensional structural model of the KN-BJ2 serine proteinase was built by homology modeling using the snake venom plasminogen activator TSV-PA as a major template and porcine kallikrein as additional structural support. A set of intrinsic buried waters was included in the model and its behavior under dynamic conditions was molecular dynamics simulated, revealing a most interesting similarity pattern to kallikrein. The benzamidine-based thrombin inhibitors α-NAPAP, 3-TAPAP, and 4-TAPAP were docked into the refined model, allowing for a more insightful functional characterization of the enzyme and a better understanding of the reported comparatively low affinity of KN-BJ2 toward those inhibitors. PMID:15322279

  20. Inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by Cu(II) and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Kwon, N S; Chan, P C; Kesner, L

    1990-03-01

    When alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor was treated with 1-5 microM CuSO4 in the presence of H2O2 (250-1000 microM), its elastase inhibitory capacity was markedly decreased. Several other metal ions tested had either very little or no effect. The Cu(II)-catalyzed decreased in the inhibition of elastase activity can also be demonstrated in dialyzed plasma. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that in several pathological conditions in which extracellular copper levels are elevated, Cu(II)-catalyzed peroxidation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor may occur at sites of inflammation where H2O2 is secreted as a major product by activated phagocytes.

  1. The Role of Cysteine Proteinases and their Inhibitors in the Host-Pathogen Cross Talk

    PubMed Central

    Kopitar-Jerala, Nataša

    2012-01-01

    Proteinases and their inhibitors play essential functional roles in basic biological processes in both hosts and pathogens. Endo/lysosomal cathepsins participate in immune response in pathogen recognition and elimination. They are essential for both antigen processing and presentation (host adaptive immune response) and activation of endosomal Toll like receptors (innate immune response). Pathogens can produce proteases and also natural inhibitors to subvert the host immune response. Several pathogens are sensed through the intracellular pathogen recognition receptors, but only some of them use the host proteolytic system to escape into the cytosol. In this review, I provide an update on the most recent developments regarding the role of proteinases and their inhibitors in the initiation and regulation of immune responses. PMID:23305363

  2. Degradation of immunoglobulins, protease inhibitors, and interleukin-1 by a secretory proteinase of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Na, Byoung-Kuk; Cho, Jong-Hwa; Song, Chul-Yong; Kim, Tong-Soo

    2002-01-01

    The effect of a secretory proteinase from the pathogenic amoebae Acanthamoeba castellanii on host's defense-oriented or regulatory proteins such as immunoglobulins, interleukin-1, and protease inhibitors was investigated. The enzyme was found to degrade secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA), IgG, and IgM. It also degraded interleukin-1α (IL-1α) and IL-1β. Its activity was not inhibited by endogenous protease inhibitors, such as α2-macroglobulin, α1-trypsin inhibitor, and α2-antiplasmin. Furthermore, the enzyme rapidly degraded those endogenous protease inhibitors as well. The degradation of host's defense-oriented or regulatory proteins by the Acanthamoeba proteinase suggested that the enzyme might be an important virulence factor in the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba infection. PMID:12073735

  3. Identification of monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors in birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals, and purification and characterization of a monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitor from the American bullfrog Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, D S; Thøgersen, I B; Pizzo, S V; Enghild, J J

    1993-01-01

    The alpha-macroglobulins are classified as broad-spectrum inhibitors because of their ability to entrap proteinases of different specificities and catalytic class. Tetrameric and dimeric alpha-macroglobulins have been identified in a wide variety of organisms including those as primitive as the mollusc Octopus vulgaris; however, monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors have been previously identified only in rodents. The monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors are believed to be analogous to the evolutionary precursor of the multimeric members of this family exemplified by the tetrameric human alpha 2-macroglobulin. Until now, monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors have only been identified in rodents and have therefore been considered an evolutionary anomaly. However, in this report we have utilized several sensitive assays to screen various plasmas and sera for the presence of monomeric alpha-macroglobulins, and our results suggest that monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors are present in organisms belonging to the avian, reptilian, amphibian and mammalian classes of the chordate phylum. This indicates that these proteins are more widespread than previously recognized and that their presence in rodents is not an anomaly. To demonstrate further that the identified proteins were indeed monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors, we purified the monomeric alpha-macroglobulin from the American bullfrog Rana catesbeiana. We conclude that this protein is a monomer of 180 kDa on the basis of its behaviour on (i) pore-limit gel electrophoresis, (ii) non-reducing and reducing SDS/PAGE and (iii) gel-filtration chromatography. In addition, we demonstrate that this protein is an alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitor by virtue of (i) its ability to inhibit proteinases of different catalytic class, (ii) the presence of a putative internal beta-cysteinyl-gamma-glutamyl thioester and (iii) an inhibitory mechanism

  4. SARS CoV main proteinase: The monomer-dimer equilibrium dissociation constant.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Vito; McGrath, William J; Yang, Lin; Mangel, Walter F

    2006-12-12

    The SARS coronavirus main proteinase (SARS CoV main proteinase) is required for the replication of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS CoV), the virus that causes SARS. One function of the enzyme is to process viral polyproteins. The active form of the SARS CoV main proteinase is a homodimer. In the literature, estimates of the monomer-dimer equilibrium dissociation constant, KD, have varied more than 65,0000-fold, from <1 nM to more than 200 microM. Because of these discrepancies and because compounds that interfere with activation of the enzyme by dimerization may be potential antiviral agents, we investigated the monomer-dimer equilibrium by three different techniques: small-angle X-ray scattering, chemical cross-linking, and enzyme kinetics. Analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering data from a series of measurements at different SARS CoV main proteinase concentrations yielded KD values of 5.8 +/- 0.8 microM (obtained from the entire scattering curve), 6.5 +/- 2.2 microM (obtained from the radii of gyration), and 6.8 +/- 1.5 microM (obtained from the forward scattering). The KD from chemical cross-linking was 12.7 +/- 1.1 microM, and from enzyme kinetics, it was 5.2 +/- 0.4 microM. While each of these three techniques can present different, potential limitations, they all yielded similar KD values.

  5. A heat-stable serine proteinase from the extreme thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed

    Burlini, N; Magnani, P; Villa, A; Macchi, F; Tortora, P; Guerritore, A

    1992-08-21

    A proteinase was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from crude extracts of the thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus. Molecular mass values assessed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration were 54 and 118 kDa, respectively, which points to a dimeric structure of the molecule. An isoelectric point of 5.6 was also determined. The enzyme behaved as a chymotrypsin-like serine proteinase, as shown by the inhibitory effects exerted by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin, tosylphenylalaninechloromethyl ketone and chymostatin. Consistently with the inhibition pattern, the enzyme cleaved chromogenic substrates at the carboxyl side of aromatic or bulky aliphatic amino acids; however, it effectively attacked only a small number of such substrates, thus, displaying a specificity much narrower than and clearly different from that of chymotrypsin. This was confirmed by its inability to digest a set of natural substrate proteins, as well as insulin chains A and B; only after alkylation casein was degraded to some extent. Proteinase activity was significantly stimulated by Mn2+ which acted as a mixed-type nonessential activator. The enzyme also displayed a broad pH optimum in the range 6.5-8.0. Furthermore, it was completely stable up to 90 degrees C; above this temperature it underwent first-order thermal inactivation with half-lives ranging from 342 min (92 degrees C) to 7 min (101 degrees C). At 50 degrees C it could withstand 6 M urea and, to some extent, different organic solvents; however, at 95 degrees C it was extensively inactivated by all of these compounds. None of the chemical physical properties of the enzyme, including amino-acid analysis, provided evidence of a possible relation to other well-known microbial serine proteinases.

  6. Crystal structure of 2A proteinase from hand, foot and mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Mu, Zhixia; Wang, Bei; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Gao, Xiaopan; Qin, Bo; Zhao, Zhendong; Cui, Sheng

    2013-11-15

    EV71 is responsible for several epidemics worldwide; however, the effective antiviral drug is unavailable to date. The 2A proteinase (2A(pro)) of EV71 presents a promising drug target due to its multiple roles in virus replication, inhibition of host protein synthesis and evasion of innate immunity. We determined the crystal structure of EV71 2A(pro) at 1.85Å resolution, revealing that the proteinase maintains a chymotrypsin-like fold. The active site is composed of the catalytic triads C110A, H21 and D39 with the geometry similar to that in other picornaviral 2A(pro), 3C(pro) and serine proteinases. The cI-to-eI2 loop at the N-terminal domain of EV71 2A(pro) adopts a highly stable conformation and contributes to the hydrophilic surface property, which are strikingly different in HRV2 2A(pro) but are similar in CVB4 2A(pro). We identified a hydrophobic motif "LLWL" followed by an acidic motif "DEE" at the C-terminus of EV71 2A(pro). The "LLWL" motif is folded into the β-turn structure that is essential for the positioning of the acidic motif. Our structural and mutagenesis study demonstrated that both the negative charging and the correct positioning of the C-terminus are essential for EV71 replication. Deletion of the "LLWL" motif abrogated the proteolytic activity, indicating that the motif is critical for maintaining the active proteinase conformation. Our findings provide the structural and functional insights into EV71 2A(pro) and establish a framework for structure-based inhibitor design.

  7. SARS CoV Main Proteinase: The Monomer-Dimer Equilibrium Dissociation Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Graziano,V.; McGrath, W.; Yang, L.; Mangel, W.

    2006-01-01

    The SARS coronavirus main proteinase (SARS CoV main proteinase) is required for the replication of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS CoV), the virus that causes SARS. One function of the enzyme is to process viral polyproteins. The active form of the SARS CoV main proteinase is a homodimer. In the literature, estimates of the monomer-dimer equilibrium dissociation constant, K{sub D}, have varied more than 650000-fold, from <1 nM to more than 200 {mu}M. Because of these discrepancies and because compounds that interfere with activation of the enzyme by dimerization may be potential antiviral agents, we investigated the monomer-dimer equilibrium by three different techniques: small-angle X-ray scattering, chemical cross-linking, and enzyme kinetics. Analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering data from a series of measurements at different SARS CoV main proteinase concentrations yielded K{sub D} values of 5.8 {+-} 0.8 {mu}M (obtained from the entire scattering curve), 6.5 {+-} 2.2 {mu}M (obtained from the radii of gyration), and 6.8 {+-} 1.5 {mu}M (obtained from the forward scattering). The K{sub D} from chemical cross-linking was 12.7 {+-} 1.1 {mu}M, and from enzyme kinetics, it was 5.2 {+-} 0.4 {mu}M. While each of these three techniques can present different, potential limitations, they all yielded similar K{sub D} values.

  8. Effect of acute ozone exposure on the proteinase-antiproteinase balance in the rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, J.A.; Gregory, R.E.; Cole, D.J.; Hahn, F.F.; Henderson, R.F.

    1987-04-01

    Lung disease may result from a persisting proteinase excess or a depletion of antiproteinase in pulmonary parenchyma. We investigated the in vivo effect of a 48-hr exposure to ozone at 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 ppm on proteinase and antiproteinase activity of rat lungs. Elastase inhibitory capacities of serum, lung tissue, and airway washings were measured as indicators of antielastase activity. Trypsin inhibitory capacity was measured using an esterolytic procedure. Proteinase was measured as radioactive release from a /sup 14/C-globin substrate. The 48-hr exposures to O/sub 3/ at levels up to 1 ppm produced concentration-dependent decreases of 35-80% of antiproteinase activities in serum and in lung tissue. However, exposure to 1.5 ppm O/sub 3/ resulted in no decrease in antiproteinase activities. Acid proteinase activities (pH 4.2) were increased 65-120% by exposure to 1 or 1.5 ppm O/sub 3/, which correlated with inflammatory cells noted histologically. At 1.5 ppm O/sub 3/, pulmonary edema and hemorrhage were noted in histologic sections. These changes led to a flooding of the alveoli with up to 40 times normal protein levels and a greater than fivefold increase in airway antiproteinase. These data suggest that serum and soluble lung tissue antiproteinase activity decreased upon exposure to low levels of ozone. However, if O/sub 3/ exposure is high enough to produce pulmonary hemorrhage, antiproteinase may increase following serum exudation. These changes may be important in the development of ozone-induced lung diseases, especially emphysema.

  9. Isolation and characterization of two forms of an acidic bromelain stem proteinase.

    PubMed

    Harrach, T; Eckert, K; Maurer, H R; Machleidt, I; Machleidt, W; Nuck, R

    1998-05-01

    Two forms of an acidic bromelain proteinase isolated from crude bromelain, an extract from pineapple stem, were found by a two-step FPLC purification procedure. The basic main components were removed by cation exchange chromatography and the breakthrough fraction was further resolved by anion exchange chromatography into 15 protein fractions, only two of which, called SBA/a and SBA/b, were proteolytically active. These components were characterized by electrospray mass spectroscopy (ESMS), isoelectric focusing, N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis, monosaccharide analysis, and enzymatic parameters. The molecular masses of SBA/a and SBA/b were determined by ESMS to be 23,550 and 23,560, respectively. The isoelectric points (pI) of the two bands of SBA/a were 4.8 and 4.9; SBA/b focused as a single band at pI = 4.8. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequences (11 residues) were identical to SBA/a and SBA/b and identical with those of stem bromelain, the basic main proteinase of the pineapple stem, and fruit bromelain, the acidic main proteinase of the pineapple fruit. Both components are highly glycosylated; hydrolysis of SBA/a yielded about twofold more monosaccharide per protein than SBA/b. The comparison of the catalytic properties of SBA/a with those of SBA/b revealed no relevant differences in the hydrolysis of three peptidyl-NH-Mec substrates and in the inhibition profiles using chicken cystatin and E-64, indicating that these components can be considered as two forms of a single enzyme. Both forms are scarcely inhibited by chicken cystatin and slowly inactivated by E-64, hence are nontypical cysteine proteinases of the papain superfamily.

  10. Digestion of human immunoglobulin G by the major cysteine proteinase (cruzipain) from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Bontempi, E; Cazzulo, J J

    1990-08-01

    The major cysteine proteinase (cruzipain) from Trypanosoma cruzi was able to digest human IgG, as shown by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of SDS, and by gel filtration on a Superose 12 column, in a FPLC system. The Fab fragment of IgG was only slightly degraded, but Fc was extensively hydrolyzed to small peptides. The results suggest that cruzipain might be involved in the defense mechanisms of the parasite against the immune response of the host.

  11. Comparison of self-processing of foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus leader proteinase nsp1α.

    PubMed

    Steinberger, Jutta; Kontaxis, Georg; Rancan, Chiara; Skern, Tim

    2013-09-01

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase (Lb(pro)) cleaves itself off the nascent viral polyprotein. NMR studies on the monomeric variant Lb(pro) L200F provide structural evidence for intramolecular self-processing. (15)N-HSQC measurements of Lb(pro) L200F showed specifically shifted backbone signals in the active and substrate binding sites compared to the monomeric variant sLb(pro), lacking six C-terminal residues. This indicates transient intramolecular interactions between the C-terminal extension (CTE) of one molecule and its own active site. Contrastingly, the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) leader proteinase nsp1α, with a papain-like fold like Lb(pro), stably binds its own CTE. Parts of the β-sheet domains but none of the α-helical domains of Lb(pro) and nsp1α superimpose; consequently, the α-helical domain of nsp1α is oriented differently relative to its β-sheet domain. This provides a large interaction surface for the CTE with the globular domain, stabilising the intramolecular complex. Consequently, self-processing inactivates nsp1α but not Lb(pro).

  12. Proteinase K enhanced immunoreactivity of the prion protein-specific monoclonal antibody 2A11.

    PubMed

    Brun, Alejandro; Castilla, Joaquín; Ramírez, Miguel A; Prager, Kai; Parra, Beatriz; Salguero, Francisco J; Shiveral, Diane; Sánchez, Carmen; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José M; Douglas, Alastair; Torres, Juan M

    2004-01-01

    Here, we report the development and further characterisation of a novel PrP-specific monoclonal antibody: 2A11. By Western blot analysis, 2A11 reacts with PrPC from a variety of species including cow, sheep, pig, hamster, rabbit, cat, dog, deer and mouse but fails to react with human, chicken and turtle PrP. Reactivity to PrPC in Western blot was found to be dependent on the redox state of the protein since binding of mAb 2A11 to its epitope was more effective in reducing conditions. 2A11 binding site was mapped within a region comprised by residues 171-179 (six octarepeats bovine PrP notation; 163-171 for the ovine PrP notation). Interestingly, in immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis, immunoreactivity was greatly enhanced after proteinase K (PK) sample treatment, while little or no reaction was observed in non-PK-treated BSE samples and samples from healthy animals. Quantitative differences in reactivity to BSE prions after PK treatment were also observed, to a lesser extent, by Western blot analysis. Since definitive diagnosis of prion diseases rely on IHC assays of proteinase K-treated samples, the use of mAb 2A11 might contribute to reduce the occurrence of false positive detection due to incomplete proteinase K digestion.

  13. Roles of the Picornaviral 3C Proteinase in the Viral Life Cycle and Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Di; Chen, Shun; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu

    2016-01-01

    The Picornaviridae family comprises a large group of non-enveloped viruses that have a major impact on human and veterinary health. The viral genome contains one open reading frame encoding a single polyprotein that can be processed by viral proteinases. The crucial 3C proteinases (3Cpros) of picornaviruses share similar spatial structures and it is becoming apparent that 3Cpro plays a significant role in the viral life cycle and virus host interaction. Importantly, the proteinase and RNA-binding activity of 3Cpro are involved in viral polyprotein processing and the initiation of viral RNA synthesis. In addition, 3Cpro can induce the cleavage of certain cellular factors required for transcription, translation and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to modulate cell physiology for viral replication. Due to interactions between 3Cpro and these essential factors, 3Cpro is also involved in viral pathogenesis to support efficient infection. Furthermore, based on the structural conservation, the development of irreversible inhibitors and discovery of non-covalent inhibitors for 3Cpro are ongoing and a better understanding of the roles played by 3Cpro may provide insights into the development of potential antiviral treatments. In this review, the current knowledge regarding the structural features, multiple functions in the viral life cycle, pathogen host interaction, and development of antiviral compounds for 3Cpro is summarized. PMID:26999188

  14. Three low molecular weight cysteine proteinase inhibitors of human seminal fluid: purification and enzyme kinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vikash Kumar; Chhikara, Nirmal; Gill, Kamaldeep; Dey, Sharmistha; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2013-08-01

    The cystatins form a superfamily of structurally related proteins with highly conserved structural folds. They are all potent, reversible, competitive inhibitors of cysteine proteinases (CPs). Proteins from this group present differences in proteinase inhibition despite their high level of structural similarities. In this study, three cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CPIs) of low molecular weight were isolated from human seminal fluid (HSF) by affinity chromatography on carboxymethyl (CM)-papain-Sepharose column, purified using various chromatographic procedures and checked for purity on sodium-dodecyl PAGE (SDS-PAGE). Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization-time-of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) identified these proteins as cystatin 9, cystatin SN, and SAP-1 (an N-terminal truncated form of cystatin S). All three CPIs suppressed the activity of papain potentially and showed remarkable heat stability. Interestingly SAP-1 also inhibits the activity of trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin, and PSA (prostate specific antigen) and acts as a cross-class protease inhibitor in in vitro studies. Using Surface Plasmon Resonance, we have also observed that SAP-1 shows a significant binding with all these proteases. These studies suggest that SAP-1 is a cross-class inhibitor that may regulate activity of various classes of proteases within the reproductive systems. To our knowledge, this is the first report about purification of CPIs from HSF; the identification of such proteins could provide better insights into the physiological processes and offer intimation for further research.

  15. Neutrophil Elastase, Proteinase 3, and Cathepsin G as Therapeutic Targets in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, Marshall S.; Jenne, Dieter E.; Gauthier, Francis

    2010-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils are the first cells recruited to inflammatory sites and form the earliest line of defense against invading microorganisms. Neutrophil elastase, proteinase 3, and cathepsin G are three hematopoietic serine proteases stored in large quantities in neutrophil cytoplasmic azurophilic granules. They act in combination with reactive oxygen species to help degrade engulfed microorganisms inside phagolysosomes. These proteases are also externalized in an active form during neutrophil activation at inflammatory sites, thus contributing to the regulation of inflammatory and immune responses. As multifunctional proteases, they also play a regulatory role in noninfectious inflammatory diseases. Mutations in the ELA2/ELANE gene, encoding neutrophil elastase, are the cause of human congenital neutropenia. Neutrophil membrane-bound proteinase 3 serves as an autoantigen in Wegener granulomatosis, a systemic autoimmune vasculitis. All three proteases are affected by mutations of the gene (CTSC) encoding dipeptidyl peptidase I, a protease required for activation of their proform before storage in cytoplasmic granules. Mutations of CTSC cause Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome. Because of their roles in host defense and disease, elastase, proteinase 3, and cathepsin G are of interest as potential therapeutic targets. In this review, we describe the physicochemical functions of these proteases, toward a goal of better delineating their role in human diseases and identifying new therapeutic strategies based on the modulation of their bioavailability and activity. We also describe how nonhuman primate experimental models could assist with testing the efficacy of proposed therapeutic strategies. PMID:21079042

  16. Fibronectin-Degrading Activity of Trypanosoma cruzi Cysteine Proteinase Plays a Role in Host Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Fernando Yukio; Cortez, Cristian; Izidoro, Mario Augusto; Juliano, Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, binds to diverse extracellular matrix proteins. Such an ability prevails in the parasite forms that circulate in the bloodstream and contributes to host cell invasion. Whether this also applies to the insect-stage metacyclic trypomastigotes, the developmental forms that initiate infection in the mammalian host, is not clear. Using T. cruzi CL strain metacyclic forms, we investigated whether fibronectin bound to the parasites and affected target cell invasion. Fibronectin present in cell culture medium bound to metacyclic forms and was digested by cruzipain, the major T. cruzi cysteine proteinase. G strain, with negligible cruzipain activity, displayed a minimal fibronectin-degrading effect. Binding to fibronectin was mediated by gp82, the metacyclic stage-specific surface molecule implicated in parasite internalization. When exogenous fibronectin was present at concentrations higher than cruzipain can properly digest, or fibronectin expression was stimulated by treatment of epithelial HeLa cells with transforming growth factor beta, the parasite invasion was reduced. Treatment of HeLa cells with purified recombinant cruzipain increased parasite internalization, whereas the treatment of parasites with cysteine proteinase inhibitor had the opposite effect. Metacyclic trypomastigote entry into HeLa cells was not affected by anti-β1 integrin antibody but was inhibited by anti-fibronectin antibody. Overall, our results have indicated that the cysteine proteinase of T. cruzi metacyclic forms, through its fibronectin-degrading activity, is implicated in host cell invasion. PMID:25267835

  17. Roles of the Picornaviral 3C Proteinase in the Viral Life Cycle and Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Di; Chen, Shun; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu

    2016-03-17

    The Picornaviridae family comprises a large group of non-enveloped viruses that have a major impact on human and veterinary health. The viral genome contains one open reading frame encoding a single polyprotein that can be processed by viral proteinases. The crucial 3C proteinases (3C(pro)s) of picornaviruses share similar spatial structures and it is becoming apparent that 3C(pro) plays a significant role in the viral life cycle and virus host interaction. Importantly, the proteinase and RNA-binding activity of 3C(pro) are involved in viral polyprotein processing and the initiation of viral RNA synthesis. In addition, 3C(pro) can induce the cleavage of certain cellular factors required for transcription, translation and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to modulate cell physiology for viral replication. Due to interactions between 3C(pro) and these essential factors, 3C(pro) is also involved in viral pathogenesis to support efficient infection. Furthermore, based on the structural conservation, the development of irreversible inhibitors and discovery of non-covalent inhibitors for 3C(pro) are ongoing and a better understanding of the roles played by 3C(pro) may provide insights into the development of potential antiviral treatments. In this review, the current knowledge regarding the structural features, multiple functions in the viral life cycle, pathogen host interaction, and development of antiviral compounds for 3C(pro) is summarized.

  18. Structurally unique recombinant Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor retains activity when terminally extended and glycosylated.

    PubMed

    Kludkiewicz, Barbara; Kodrík, Dalibor; Grzelak, Krystyna; Nirmala, Xavier; Sehnal, Frantisek

    2005-10-01

    Recombinant derivatives of the Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor GmSPI2 (36 amino acid residues), which is a component of insect silk, were prepared in the expression vector Pichia pastoris. The rhSPI2 had a C-terminal hexahistidine tag attached to the GmSPI2 sequence, rtSPI2 was extended with GluAlaAla at the N-terminus, and rfSPI2 included this N-terminal extension and a C-terminal tail of 22 residues (myc epitope and hexahistidine). A portion of the secreted rfSI2 was O-glycosylated with a trimannosyl or hexamannosyl. The native inhibitor was active slightly on trypsin and highly on subtilisin and proteinase K. The extended C-terminus in rhSPI2 and rfSPI2 enhanced activity on the two latter enzymes and rendered rfSPI2 active on elastase and pronase, but abolished the inhibition of trypsin. The glycosylation of rfSPI2 reduced its inhibitory activity to a level comparable with the native inhibitor. The rtSPI2 with tripeptide extension at the N-terminus and no C-terminal modification was clearly less active than the native inhibitor. None of the tested compounds inhibited alpha-chymotrypsin and the non-serine proteinases.

  19. Characterization of the mature cell surface proteinase of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Josefina M; Brown, Lucía; Savoy de Giori, Graciela; Hebert, Elvira M

    2015-05-01

    The cell envelope-associated proteinase (CEP) of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581 (PrtL) has an essential role in bacterial growth, contributes to the flavor and texture development of fermented products, and can release bioactive health-beneficial peptides during milk fermentation. The genome of L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581 possesses only one gene that encodes PrtL, which consists of 1924 amino acids and is a multidomain protein anchored to the cell via its W domain. PrtL was extracted from the cell under high ionic strength conditions using NaCl, suggesting an electrostatic interaction between the proteinase and the cell envelope. The released PrtL was purified and biochemically characterized; its activity was maximal at temperatures between 37 and 40 °C and at pH between 7 and 8. Under optimal conditions, PrtL exhibited higher affinity for succinyl-alanyl-alanyl-prolyl-phenylalanine-p-nitroanilide than for succinyl-alanyl-glutamyl-prolyl-phenylalanine-p-nitroanilide, while methoxy-succinyl-arginyl-prolyl-tyrosyl-p-nitroanilide was not degraded. A similar α- and β-casein degradation pattern was observed with the purified and the cell envelope-bound proteinase. Finally, on the basis of its specificity towards caseins and the unique combination of amino acids at residues thought to be involved in substrate specificity, PrtL can be classified as a representative of a new group of CEP.

  20. Inhibition of serine proteinases from human blood clotting system by squash inhibitor mutants.

    PubMed

    Grzesiak, A; Buczek, O; Petry, I; Szewczuk, Z; Otlewski, J

    2000-05-23

    A series of six CMTI I variants mutated in the P(2)-P(4)' region of the canonical binding loop were used to probe the role of single amino acid substitutions on binding to the following human proteinases involved in blood clotting: plasmin, plasma kallikrein, factors X(a) and XII(a). The mutants were expressed as fusion proteins with the LE1413 hydrophobic polypeptide in Escherichia coli, purified from inclusion bodies, followed by cyanobromide cleavage and refolding. The mutants inhibited the proteinases with the association constants in the range 10(3)-10(9) M(-1). Inhibition of plasma kallikrein and factors X(a) and XII(a) could be improved up to 30-fold by single mutations. In contrast, neither of the introduced mutations increased inhibitory properties of CMTI I against plasmin. Additionally, using two inhibitors of natural origin, CMTI I (P(1) Arg) and CPTI II (P(1) Lys), we determined the effect of Lys-->Arg on binding to four proteinases. With the exception of plasmin (no effect), P(1) Arg resulted in up to 30-fold stronger binding than P(1) Lys.

  1. Activation of intracellular serine proteinase in Bacillus subtilis cells during sporulation.

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, T J; Shankweiler, G W; Hageman, J H

    1986-01-01

    Cells of Bacillus subtilis 168 (trpC2) growing and sporulating in a single chemically defined medium carried out intracellular protein degradation and increased their levels of intracellular serine protease-1 in a manner very similar to what had previously been reported for cells sporulating in nutrient broth. The results were interpreted to mean that these processes are intrinsic to sporulation rather than medium dependent. To determine the cause of these increases in specific activity of proteinases, we purified the protease, prepared rabbit immunoglobulins directed against it, and monitored changes in protease antigen levels by performing rocket immunoelectrophoresis. In cells sporulating in nutrient broth, the protease antigen levels increased about 7-fold, whereas the specific activity increased about 150-fold, for an activation of about 20-fold. In cells sporulating in the single chemically defined sporulation medium, the protease antigen increased about 10-fold, whereas the specific activity increased at least 400-fold, for an activation of about 40-fold. These results were interpreted to mean that a posttranslational event activated the protease in vivo; a previously described endogenous proteinase inhibitor was confirmed to be present in the strain used. Chloramphenicol added to the cultures inhibited both the increases in antigen levels and in the specific activity of the proteinase. PMID:3079745

  2. Proteolytic activity and fatal gram-negative sepsis in burned mice: effect of exogenous proteinase inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Neely, A N; Miller, R G; Holder, I A

    1994-01-01

    Circulating proteolytic activity (PA) increases following burn or surgical trauma. Challenging traumatized mice with the yeast Candida albicans further increases PA. Once a PA threshold has been passed, mortality increases as PA increases. The purposes of this study were to determine (i) if gram-negative bacterial challenge affects circulating PA and mortality as Candida challenge does and (ii) if proteinase inhibitor treatment with aprotinin, antithrombin III, and alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor decreases circulating PA and increases the survival of burned mice infected with a bacterium. For all bacteria tested (Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae), burn plus challenge significantly elevated PA and mortality above levels in mice that were only burned or only challenged. Quantitative culture counts indicated that the mice died of sepsis. Proteinase inhibitor treatment of mice burned and challenged with K. pneumoniae significantly decreased circulating PA, decreased the hepatic microbial load, and increased survival. Hence, in traumatized mice challenged with either C. albicans or gram-negative bacteria, a relationship exists between proteolytic load and subsequent septic death. Parallels between these animal studies and human studies are discussed. PMID:8188336

  3. [Conditions of the biosynthesis of an extracellular subtilisin-like proteinase by Bacillus pumilus KMM 62].

    PubMed

    Malikova, L A; Mardanova, A M; Sokolova, O V; Balaban, N P; Rudenskaia, G N; Sharipova, M R

    2007-01-01

    The influence of the cultivation conditions on Bacillus pumilus KMM 62 growth and effectiveness of the production of a subtilisin-like serine proteinase were investigated. Enzyme accumulation in the culture fluid reached the maximum value after 32 and 46-48 h of growth; it depends on the composition of the nutrient medium. The ratio of the concentrations of two main components of the medium, peptone and inorganic phosphate, which was optimal for enzyme biosynthesis was determined by multifactor experiments. Ammonium salts, when introduced as an additional nitrogen source, had different effects on the proteinase biosynthesis at different growth stages: they suppress enzyme production at the early stationary growth phase and stimulate the biosynthesis of the enzyme after 46-48 h of growth. Complex organic substrates (albumin, casein, hemoglobin, and gelatin) have a repressive effect on the biosynthesis of the enzyme. The effect of amino acids on culture growth and enzyme biosynthesis during the early and late stationary growth phase is different. Hydrophilic amino acids, glutamine, and glutamic acid exhibit the most pronounced repressive action on biosynthesis. The activity of different regulatory mechanisms for the synthesis of this proteinase is assumed at the early and late stationary stages of growth.

  4. Proteinase A, a storage-globulin-degrading endopeptidase of vetch (Vicia sativa L.) seeds, is not involved in early steps of storage-protein mobilization.

    PubMed

    Becker, C; Senyuk, V I; Shutov, A D; Nong, V H; Fischer, J; Horstmann, C; Müntz, K

    1997-09-01

    Proteinase A is a papain-like cysteine endopeptidase of vetch (Vicia sativa L.) which was assumed to initiate storage-globulin breakdown just after the onset of seed germination. This enzyme was purified from cotyledons of vetch seedlings. On gelatin-containg SDS gels, active proteinase A migrated with an apparent molecular mass of 21 kDa, whereas after heat denaturation its molecular size on SDS/PAGE was 29 kDa. Although proteinase A is capable of hydrolyzing storage globulins in vitro it could not be localized in the protein-body fraction of cotyledons from germinating seeds. cDNA clones encoding proteinase A precursor have been obtained by PCR. The precursor is composed of an N-terminal signal sequence followed by a propeptide, the region encoding mature proteinase A, and a C-terminal KDEL sequence. Mature proteinase A with a derived molecular mass of 25,244 Da does not have the KDEL sequence. The derived amino acid sequence of the proteinase A precursor is 78.2% identical to sulfhydryl-endopeptidase (SH-EP), a cysteine endopeptidase from germinating Vigna mungo seedlings. Northern blot analysis indicated that proteinase A mRNA appears de novo in cotyledons of 1-day-germinated vetch seeds, where its amount increases up to day 6. No proteinase A mRNA was detected in other vetch organs, not even in the embryo axis, which contains stored globulins. By means of antibodies raised against the purified and against recombinantly produced proteinase A, the 29-kDa bands of mature proteinase A were detected in cotyledon extracts of 6-day-germinated seeds when globulin degradation has already far proceeded. The reported data do not agree with the proposed triggering role of proteinase A in storage-globulin breakdown during germination.

  5. Injectable dopamine-modified poly(α,β-aspartic acid) nanocomposite hydrogel as bioadhesive drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chu; Lu, Caicai; Li, Bingqiang; Shan, Meng; Wu, Guolin

    2017-04-01

    Hydrogel systems based on cross-linked polymeric materials with adhesive properties in wet environments have been considered as promising candidates for tissue adhesives. The 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) is believed to be responsible for the water-resistant adhesive characteristics of mussel adhesive proteins. Under the inspiration of DOPA containing adhesive proteins, a dopamine-modified poly(α,β-aspartic acid) derivative (PDAEA) was successfully synthesized by successive ring-opening reactions of polysuccinimide (PSI) with dopamine and ethanolamine, and an injectable bioadhesive hydrogel was prepared via simply mixing PDAEA and FeCl3 solutions. The formation mechanism of the hydrogel was investigated by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopic, Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic, visual colorimetric measurements and EDTA immersion methods. The study demonstrated that the PDAEA-Fe(3+) hydrogel is a dual cross-linking system composed of covalent and coordination crosslinks. The PDAEA-Fe(3+) hydrogel is suitable to serve as a bioadhesive agent according to the rheological behaviors and the observed significant shear adhesive strength. The slow and sustained release of the model drug curcumin from the hydrogel in vitro demonstrated the hydrogel could also be potentially used for drug delivery. Moreover, the cytotoxicity tests in vitro suggested the prepared polymer and hydrogel possessed excellent cytocompatibility. All the results indicated that the dopamine modified poly(α,β-aspartic acid) derivative based hydrogel was a promising candidate for bioadhesive drug delivery system. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1000-1008, 2017.

  6. Allostery and cooperativity in Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase.

    PubMed

    Kantrowitz, Evan R

    2012-03-15

    The allosteric enzyme aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) from Escherichia coli has been the subject of investigations for approximately 50 years. This enzyme controls the rate of pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis by feedback inhibition, and helps to balance the pyrimidine and purine pools by competitive allosteric activation by ATP. The catalytic and regulatory components of the dodecameric enzyme can be separated and studied independently. Many of the properties of the enzyme follow the Monod, Wyman Changeux model of allosteric control thus E. coli ATCase has become the textbook example. This review will highlight kinetic, biophysical, and structural studies which have provided a molecular level understanding of how the allosteric nature of this enzyme regulates pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis.

  7. Pleiotropic aspartate taxis and serine taxis mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Reader, R W; Tso, W W; Springer, M S; Goy, M F; Adler, J

    1979-04-01

    Mutants that at one time were thought to be specifically defective in taxis toward aspartate and related amino acids (tar mutants) or specifically defective in taxis toward serine and related amino acids (tar mutants) are now shown to be pleiotropic in their defects. The tar mutants also lack taxis toward maltose and away from Co2+ and Ni2+. The tsr mutants are altered in their response to a variety of repellents. Double mutants (tar tsr) fail in nearly all chemotactic responses. The tar and tsr mutants provide evidence for two complementary, converging pathways of information flow: certain chemoreceptors feed information into the tar pathway and others into the tsr pathway. The tar and tsr products have been shown to be two different sets of methylated proteins.

  8. A Potent, Versatile Disulfide-Reducing Agent from Aspartic Acid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dithiothreitol (DTT) is the standard reagent for reducing disulfide bonds between and within biological molecules. At neutral pH, however, >99% of DTT thiol groups are protonated and thus unreactive. Herein, we report on (2S)-2-amino-1,4-dimercaptobutane (dithiobutylamine or DTBA), a dithiol that can be synthesized from l-aspartic acid in a few high-yielding steps that are amenable to a large-scale process. DTBA has thiol pKa values that are ∼1 unit lower than those of DTT and forms a disulfide with a similar E°′ value. DTBA reduces disulfide bonds in both small molecules and proteins faster than does DTT. The amino group of DTBA enables its isolation by cation-exchange and facilitates its conjugation. These attributes indicate that DTBA is a superior reagent for reducing disulfide bonds in aqueous solution. PMID:22353145

  9. Analysis of the aspartic acid metabolic pathway using mutant genes.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, R A

    2002-01-01

    Amino acid metabolism is a fundamental process for plant growth and development. Although a considerable amount of information is available, little is known about the genetic control of enzymatic steps or regulation of several pathways. Much of the information about biochemical pathways has arisen from the use of mutants lacking key enzymes. Although mutants were largely used already in the 60's, by bacterial and fungal geneticists, it took plant research a long time to catch up. The advance in this area was rapid in the 80's, which was followed in the 90's by the development of techniques of plant transformation. In this review we present an overview of the aspartic acid metabolic pathway, the key regulatory enzymes and the mutants and transgenic plants produced for lysine and threonine metabolism. We also discuss and propose a new study of high-lysine mutants.

  10. AGC1/2, the mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate carriers.

    PubMed

    Amoedo, N D; Punzi, G; Obre, E; Lacombe, D; De Grassi, A; Pierri, C L; Rossignol, R

    2016-10-01

    In this review we discuss the structure and functions of the aspartate/glutamate carriers (AGC1-aralar and AGC2-citrin). Those proteins supply the aspartate synthesized within mitochondrial matrix to the cytosol in exchange for glutamate and a proton. A structure of an AGC carrier is not available yet but comparative 3D models were proposed. Moreover, transport assays performed by using the recombinant AGC1 and AGC2, reconstituted into liposome vesicles, allowed to explore the kinetics of those carriers and to reveal their specific transport properties. AGCs participate to a wide range of cellular functions, as the control of mitochondrial respiration, calcium signaling and antioxydant defenses. AGC1 might also play peculiar tissue-specific functions, as it was found to participate to cell-to-cell metabolic symbiosis in the retina. On the other hand, AGC1 is involved in the glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity in neurons and AGC gene or protein alterations were discovered in rare human diseases. Accordingly, a mice model of AGC1 gene knock-out presented with growth delay and generalized tremor, with myelinisation defects. More recently, AGC was proposed to play a crucial role in tumor metabolism as observed from metabolomic studies showing that the asparate exported from the mitochondrion by AGC1 is employed in the regeneration of cytosolic glutathione. Therefore, given the central role of AGCs in cell metabolism and human pathology, drug screening are now being developed to identify pharmacological modulators of those carriers. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou.

  11. Masked object registration in the Fourier domain.

    PubMed

    Padfield, Dirk

    2012-05-01

    Registration is one of the most common tasks of image analysis and computer vision applications. The requirements of most registration algorithms include large capture range and fast computation so that the algorithms are robust to different scenarios and can be computed in a reasonable amount of time. For these purposes, registration in the Fourier domain using normalized cross-correlation is well suited and has been extensively studied in the literature. Another common requirement is masking, which is necessary for applications where certain regions of the image that would adversely affect the registration result should be ignored. To address these requirements, we have derived a mathematical model that describes an exact form for embedding the masking step fully into the Fourier domain so that all steps of translation registration can be computed efficiently using Fast Fourier Transforms. We provide algorithms and implementation details that demonstrate the correctness of our derivations. We also demonstrate how this masked FFT registration approach can be applied to improve the Fourier-Mellin algorithm that calculates translation, rotation, and scale in the Fourier domain. We demonstrate the computational efficiency, advantages, and correctness of our algorithm on a number of images from real-world applications. Our framework enables fast, global, parameter-free registration of images with masked regions.

  12. Interaction of aspartate and aspartate-derived antimetabolites with the enzymes of the threonine biosynthetic pathway of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shames, S L; Ash, D E; Wedler, F C; Villafranca, J J

    1984-12-25

    The five enzymes responsible for the conversion of L-aspartate to L-threonine in Escherichia coli were purified to homogeneity and subsequently reconstituted in vitro in ratios approximating those found in vivo. 31P NMR was used to conveniently monitor the rates of consumption of the substrates ATP and NADPH, the accumulation of the intermediates beta-aspartyl phosphate and homoserine phosphate, and the formation of the products ADP, NADP+, and Pi in a single experiment. By this method, the flux of aspartic acid through the enzymes of the pathway was monitored in the absence and in the presence of several alternative substrates and inhibitors. Several known antimetabolites were found to be alternative substrates that ultimately became inhibitors of pathway flux. L-threo-3-Hydroxyaspartic acid was converted to 3-hydroxyhomoserine phosphate by the first four enzymes of the pathway. The antimetabolite L-threo-3-hydroxyhomoserine was found to bind to and inhibit aspartokinase-homoserine dehydrogenase I in a cooperative fashion (I 0.5 = 3 mM, nH = 2.5), similar to the action of the allosteric end product inhibitor L-threonine (I 0.5 = 0.36 mM, nH = 2.4). In the presence of the remaining enzymes of the pathway, however, L-threo-3-hydroxyhomoserine was phosphorylated to the apparent ultimate antimetabolite L-threo-3-hydroxyhomoserine phosphate that was a potent inhibitor of threonine synthase and consequently of L-threonine biosynthesis. When aspartic acid alone was examined as a substrate of the enzymes of the pathway, no accumulation of the beta-aspartyl phosphate and homoserine phosphate intermediates was observed. However, in the presence of either 5 mM L-threo-3-hydroxyhomoserine or 5 mM L-threo-3-hydroxyhomoserine phosphate, homoserine phosphate was found to accumulate. In contrast to the homoserine phosphate and 3-hydroxyhomoserine phosphate intermediates, both of which were very stable, the acylphosphate intermediates beta-aspartyl phosphate and beta-3

  13. Properties of Copolymers of Aspartic Acid and Aliphatic Dicarboxylic Acids Prepared by Reactive Extrusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspartic acid may be prepared chemically or by the fermentation of carbohydrates. Currently, low molecular weight polyaspartic acids are prepared commercially by heating aspartic acid at high temperatures (greater than 220 degrees C) for several hours in the solid state. In an effort to develop a ...

  14. Citrin and aralar1 are Ca2+-stimulated aspartate/glutamate transporters in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, L.; Pardo, B.; Lasorsa, F.M.; del Arco, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Iijima, M.; Runswick, M.J.; Walker, J.E.; Saheki, T.; Satrústegui, J.; Palmieri, F.

    2001-01-01

    The mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier catalyzes an important step in both the urea cycle and the aspartate/malate NADH shuttle. Citrin and aralar1 are homologous proteins belonging to the mitochondrial carrier family with EF-hand Ca2+-binding motifs in their N-terminal domains. Both proteins and their C-terminal domains were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, reconstituted into liposomes and shown to catalyze the electrogenic exchange of aspartate for glutamate and a H+. Overexpression of the carriers in transfected human cells increased the activity of the malate/aspartate NADH shuttle. These results demonstrate that citrin and aralar1 are isoforms of the hitherto unidentified aspartate/glutamate carrier and explain why mutations in citrin cause type II citrullinemia in humans. The activity of citrin and aralar1 as aspartate/glutamate exchangers was stimulated by Ca2+ on the external side of the inner mitochondrial membrane, where the Ca2+-binding domains of these proteins are localized. These results show that the aspartate/glutamate carrier is regulated by Ca2+ through a mechanism independent of Ca2+ entry into mitochondria, and suggest a novel mechanism of Ca2+ regulation of the aspartate/malate shuttle. PMID:11566871

  15. Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor from disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus): molecular characterization and transcriptional response upon immune stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wickramaarachchi, W D Niroshana; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Whang, Ilson; Wan, Qiang; Lee, Jehee

    2013-09-01

    Proteinases and proteinase inhibitors are involved in several biological and physiological processes in all multicellular organisms. Proteinase inhibitors play a key role in regulating the activity of the respective proteinases. Among serine proteinase inhibitors, kazal-type proteinase inhibitors (KPIs) are widely found in mammals, avians, and a variety of invertebrates. In this study, we describe the identification of a kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor (Ab-KPI) from the disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus, which is presumably involved in innate immunity. The full-length cDNA of Ab-KPI includes 600 bp nucleotides with an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polypeptide of 143 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of Ab-KPI contains a putative 17-amino acid signal peptide and two tandem kazal domains with high similarity to other kazal-type SPIs. Each kazal domain consists of reactive site (P1) residue containing a leucine (L), and a threonine (T) located in the second amino acid position after the second conserved cysteine of each domain. Temporal expression of Ab-KPI was assessed by real time quantitative PCR in hemocytes and mantle tissue following bacterial and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) challenge, and tissue injury. At 6 h post-bacterial and -VHSV challenge, Ab-KPI expression in hemocytes was increased 14-fold and 4-fold, respectively, compared to control samples. The highest up-regulations upon tissue injury were shown at 9 h and 12 h in hemocytes and mantle, respectively. The transcriptional modulation of Ab-KPI following bacterial and viral challenges and tissue injury indicates that it might be involved in immune defense as well as wound healing process in abalone.

  16. Phospholipase and Aspartyl Proteinase Activities of Candida Species Causing Vulvovaginal Candidiasis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bassyouni, Rasha H; Wegdan, Ahmed Ashraf; Abdelmoneim, Abdelsamie; Said, Wessam; AboElnaga, Fatma

    2015-10-01

    Few research had investigated the secretion of phospholipase and aspartyl proteinase from Candida spp. causing infection in females with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This research aimed to investigate the prevalence of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) in diabetic versus non-diabetic women and compare the ability of identified Candida isolates to secrete phospholipases and aspartyl proteinases with characterization of their genetic profile. The study included 80 females with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 100 non-diabetic females within the child-bearing period. Candida strains were isolated and identified by conventional microbiological methods and by API Candida. The isolates were screened for their extracellular phospholipase and proteinase activities by culturing them on egg yolk and bovine serum albumin media, respectively. Detection of aspartyl proteinase genes (SAP1 to SAP8) and phospholipase genes (PLB1, PLB2) were performed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Our results indicated that vaginal candidiasis was significantly higher among the diabetic group versus nondiabetic group (50% versus 20%, respectively) (p = 0.004). C. albicans was the most prevalent species followed by C. glabrata in both groups. No significant association between diabetes mellitus and phospholipase activities was detected (p = 0.262), whereas high significant proteinase activities exhibited by Candida isolated from diabetic females were found (82.5%) (p = 0.000). Non-significant associations between any of the tested proteinase or phospholipase genes and diabetes mellitus were detected (p > 0.05). In conclusion, it is noticed that the incidence of C. glabrata causing VVC is increased. The higher prevalence of vaginal candidiasis among diabetics could be related to the increased aspartyl proteinase production in this group of patients.

  17. Purification and characterization of a 39,000-Da serine proteinase from the hemolymph of a solitary ascidian, Halocynthia roretzi.

    PubMed

    Shishikura, F; Abe, T; Ohtake, S; Tanaka, K

    1997-09-01

    A new endogenous serine proteinase from the cell-free hemolymph of a solitary ascidian, Halocythia roretzi, was purified by a combination of ammonium sulfate fractionation, hydrophobic interaction chromatography on TSKgel Toyopearl HW 65 F, ion exchange chromatography on TSKgel DEAE-Toyopearl 650 M, affinity chromatography on Arginine-Sepharose 4B, gel filtration on TSKgel Toyopearl HW 65F and hydroxyapatite chromatography on Bio-Gel HT. The serine proteinase is a single polypeptide chain whose molecular weight and isoelectric point are 39 kDa and about 7.6 pI, respectively. The most susceptible substrate was Boc-Leu-Gly-Arg-4-methyl-coumaryl-7-amide (MCA), and activity was optimal at pH 8. The enzyme was relatively stable at high temperatures; about 50% activity was retained even at 60 degrees C for 30 min in 50 mM Tris-HCl, pH 8.0, containing 0.5 M NaCl, and 0.05% Brij-35. The enzyme was characterized by the inhibitory effects of synthetic or natural inhibitors, substrate specificity toward 26 peptidyl-MCAs, proteinase activity toward natural proteins and complex formation with a serine proteinase inhibitor (58 kDa) previously found in H. roretzi hemolymph, indicating that the enzyme was a member of serine proteinases and strongly inhibited by the 58 kDa serine proteinase inhibitor as well as human antithrombin III. We also demonstrated the clotting enzyme activity of the purified serine proteinase toward bovine fibrinogen and Limulus coagulogen, a fibrinogen-like clottable protein of horseshoe crabs.

  18. L-aspartate-evoked inhibition of melatonin production in rat pineal glands.

    PubMed

    Yamada, H; Yamaguchi, A; Moriyama, Y

    1997-06-06

    Our previous studies in rat indicated that pinealocytes secrete L-glutamate through microvesicle-mediated exocytosis to regulate negatively melatonin production. Recently, we further found that pinealocytes secrete L-aspartate through microvesicle-mediated exocytosis. In the present study, we investigated the role of L-aspartate in the melatonin production in isolated rat pineal glands. It was found that L-aspartate inhibits norepinephrine-stimulated melatonin production as well as serotonin N-acetyltransferase activity reversibly and dose-dependently, the concentrations required for 50% inhibition being 150 and 175 microM, respectively. L-Asparagine and oxaloacetate, metabolites of L-aspartate, had no effect on the melatonin production. These results suggest that pinealocytes use L-aspartate, as well as L-glutamate, as a negative regulator for melatonin production.

  19. Photosynthetic metabolism of malate and aspartate in Flaveria trinervia a C/sub 4/ dicot

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    C/sub 4/ species are known to vary in their apparent relative use of malate and aspartate to mediate carbon flux through the C/sub 4/ cycle. These studies investigate some of the adjustments in photosynthetic carbon metabolism that occur during a dark to light transition and during expansion of leaves of Flaveria trinervia, a C/sub 4/ dicot. Enzyme localization studies with isolated leaf mesophyll and bundle sheath protoplasts, indicated that both C/sub 4/ acids are formed in the mesophyll chloroplast, and that aspartate is metabolized to malate in the bundle sheath chloroplast prior to decaroxylation there. During photosynthetic induction, the partitioning of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ between malate and aspartate showed a single oscillation of increased aspartate labelling after 5 min of illumination. Turnover of (4-14C) (malate plus aspartate) was slow initially during illumination, prior to establishment of active pools of C/sub 4/ cycle metabolites.

  20. Fermentation of L-aspartate by a saccharolytic strain of Bacteroides melaninogenicus.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, J C; Dyer, J K; Tribble, J L

    1977-01-01

    Resting cells of Bacteroides melaninogenicus fermented L-[14C]aspartate as a single substrate. The 14C-labeled products included succinate, acetate, CO2, oxaloacetate, formate, malate, glycine, alanine, and fumarate in the relative percentages 68, 15, 9.9, 2.7, 1.8, 1.0, 0.7, 0.5, and 0.06, respectively, based on the total counts per minute of the L-[14C]aspartate fermented. Ammonia was produced in high amounts, indicating that 96% of the L-aspartate fermented was deaminated. These data suggest that L-aspartate is mainly being reduced through a number of intermediate reactions involving enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle to succinate. L-[14C]asparagine was also fermented by resting cells of B. melaninogenicus to form L-aspartate, which was subsequently, but less actively, fermented. PMID:13713

  1. A resource-efficient adaptive Fourier analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdu, C. F.; Zamantzas, C.; Dabóczi, T.

    2016-10-01

    We present a resource-efficient frequency adaptation method to complement the Fourier analyzer proposed by Péceli. The novel frequency adaptation scheme is based on the adaptive Fourier analyzer suggested by Nagy. The frequency adaptation method was elaborated with a view to realizing a detector connectivity check on an FPGA in a new beam loss monitoring (BLM) system, currently being developed for beam setup and machine protection of the particle accelerators at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN). The paper summarizes the Fourier analyzer to the extent relevant to this work and the basic principle of the related frequency adaptation methods. It then outlines the suggested new scheme, presents practical considerations for implementing it and underpins it with an example and the corresponding operational experience.

  2. Exchange of aspartate and alanine. Mechanism for development of a proton-motive force in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Hayashi, H; Maloney, P C; Malone, P C

    1996-02-09

    We examined the idea that aspartate metabolism by Lactobacillus subsp. M3 is organized as a proton-motive metabolic cycle by using reconstitution to monitor the activity of the carrier, termed AspT, expected to carry out the electrogenic exchange of precursor (aspartate) and product (alanine). Membranes of Lactobacillus subsp. M3 were extracted with 1.25% octyl glucoside in the presence of 0. 4% Escherichia coli phospholipid and 20% glycerol. The extracts were then used to prepare proteoliposomes loaded with either aspartate or alanine. Aspartate-loaded proteoliposomes accumulated external [3H]aspartate by exchange with internal substrate; this homologous self-exchange (Kt = 0.4 mm) was insensitive to potassium or proton ionophores and was unaffected by the presence or absence of Na+, K+, or Mg2+. Alanine-loaded proteoliposomes also took up [3H]aspartate in a heterologous antiport reaction that was stimulated or inhibited by an inside-positive or inside-negative membrane potential, respectively. Several lines of evidence suggest that these homologous and heterologous exchange reactions were catalyzed by the same functional unit. Thus, [3H]aspartate taken up by AspT during self-exchange was released by a delayed addition of alanine. In addition, the spontaneous loss of AspT activity that occurs when a detergent extract is held at 37 degrees C prior to reconstitution was prevented by the presence of either aspartate (KD(aspartate) = 0.3 mm) or alanine (KD(alanine) > or = 10 mm), indicating that both substrates interact directly with AspT. These findings are consistent with operation of a proton-motive metabolic cycle during aspartate metabolism by Lactobacillus subsp. M3.

  3. Quantum transport efficiency and Fourier's law.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Daniel; Tiersch, Markus; Asadian, Ali; Briegel, Hans J

    2012-12-01

    We analyze the steady-state energy transfer in a chain of coupled two-level systems connecting two thermal reservoirs. Through an analytic treatment we find that the energy current is independent of the system size, hence violating Fourier's law of heat conduction. The classical diffusive behavior in Fourier's law of heat conduction can be recovered by introducing decoherence to the quantum systems constituting the chain. We relate these results to recent discussions of energy transport in biological light-harvesting systems, and discuss the role of quantum coherence and entanglement.

  4. Electro-optic imaging Fourier transform spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Znod, Hanying (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An Electro-Optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (EOIFTS) for Hyperspectral Imaging is described. The EOIFTS includes an input polarizer, an output polarizer, and a plurality of birefringent phase elements. The relative orientations of the polarizers and birefringent phase elements can be changed mechanically or via a controller, using ferroelectric liquid crystals, to substantially measure the spectral Fourier components of light propagating through the EIOFTS. When achromatic switches are used as an integral part of the birefringent phase elements, the EIOFTS becomes suitable for broadband applications, with over 1 micron infrared bandwidth.

  5. Structured illumination fluorescence Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiu, Peng; Chen, Youhua; Kuang, Cuifang; Fang, Yue; Wang, Yifan; Fan, Jiannan; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2016-12-01

    We apply a Fourier ptychographic algorithm for fluorescent samples using structured illumination. The samples are illuminated with structured light patterns and the raw imaging data using traditional structured illumination fluorescence microscopy (SIM) are acquired. We then extract equivalent oblique illuminated images of fluorescent samples from the SIM images. An optimized Fourier ptychography algorithm is proposed, which ensures the fidelity of the reconstructed the super-resolution results. This method can break the diffraction limit to a resolution of λ/4, and has a better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than SIM, especially when the background noise is high.

  6. Convergence of Fourier series in classical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galoyan, L. N.; Grigoryan, M. G.; Kobelyan, A. Kh

    2015-07-01

    The following results are proved:there exists an integrable function such that any subsequence of the Cesàro means of negative order of the Fourier series of this function diverges almost everywhere; the values of an arbitrary integrable function can be changed on a set (independent of this function) of arbitrarily small measure so that the Fourier series with respect to both the Franklin system and the Haar system of the 'modified' function will be absolutely convergent almost everywhere on [ 0,1 ] there exists a continuous function which features an unremovable absolute divergence. Bibliography: 47 titles.

  7. A Fourier approach to cloud motion estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arking, A.; Lo, R. C.; Rosenfield, A.

    1977-01-01

    A Fourier technique is described for estimating cloud motion from pairs of pictures using the phase of the cross spectral density. The method allows motion estimates to be made for individual spatial frequencies, which are related to cloud pattern dimensions. Results obtained are presented and compared with the results of a Fourier domain cross correlation scheme. Using both artificial and real cloud data show that the technique is relatively sensitive to the presence of mixtures of motions, changes in cloud shape, and edge effects.

  8. Fourier filtering grows much better with age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, H. John

    2011-10-01

    Since VanderLugt's famous 1964 paper showing that complex valued filters for optical matched filters could be made, an extremely large number of papers have been written - some by me and some by Professor Goodman, and many more by others. Yet optical Fourier transform filtering is almost never used for anything but university research. The reasons are fairly well known but seldom stated. We have found one new approach to pattern recognition that solves most of the problems and introduces a totally new and very useful thing that can be done with Fourier filtering.

  9. Illustrative EDOF topics in Fourier optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Nicholas; Chen, Xi; Chi, Wanli

    2011-10-01

    In this talk we present a series of illustrative topics in Fourier Optics that are proving valuable in the design of EDOF camera systems. They are at the level of final examination problems that have been made solvable by a student or professoi having studied from one of Joseph W. Goodman's books---our tribute for his 75fr year. As time permits, four illustrative topics are l) Electromagnetic waves and Fourier optics;2) The perfect lens; 3) Connection between phase delay and radially varying focal length in an asphere and 4) tailored EDOF designs.

  10. Implementation of quantum and classical discrete fractional Fourier transforms.

    PubMed

    Weimann, Steffen; Perez-Leija, Armando; Lebugle, Maxime; Keil, Robert; Tichy, Malte; Gräfe, Markus; Heilmann, René; Nolte, Stefan; Moya-Cessa, Hector; Weihs, Gregor; Christodoulides, Demetrios N; Szameit, Alexander

    2016-03-23

    Fourier transforms, integer and fractional, are ubiquitous mathematical tools in basic and applied science. Certainly, since the ordinary Fourier transform is merely a particular case of a continuous set of fractional Fourier domains, every property and application of the ordinary Fourier transform becomes a special case of the fractional Fourier transform. Despite the great practical importance of the discrete Fourier transform, implementation of fractional orders of the corresponding discrete operation has been elusive. Here we report classical and quantum optical realizations of the discrete fractional Fourier transform. In the context of classical optics, we implement discrete fractional Fourier transforms of exemplary wave functions and experimentally demonstrate the shift theorem. Moreover, we apply this approach in the quantum realm to Fourier transform separable and path-entangled biphoton wave functions. The proposed approach is versatile and could find applications in various fields where Fourier transforms are essential tools.

  11. Implementation of quantum and classical discrete fractional Fourier transforms

    PubMed Central

    Weimann, Steffen; Perez-Leija, Armando; Lebugle, Maxime; Keil, Robert; Tichy, Malte; Gräfe, Markus; Heilmann, René; Nolte, Stefan; Moya-Cessa, Hector; Weihs, Gregor; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Szameit, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Fourier transforms, integer and fractional, are ubiquitous mathematical tools in basic and applied science. Certainly, since the ordinary Fourier transform is merely a particular case of a continuous set of fractional Fourier domains, every property and application of the ordinary Fourier transform becomes a special case of the fractional Fourier transform. Despite the great practical importance of the discrete Fourier transform, implementation of fractional orders of the corresponding discrete operation has been elusive. Here we report classical and quantum optical realizations of the discrete fractional Fourier transform. In the context of classical optics, we implement discrete fractional Fourier transforms of exemplary wave functions and experimentally demonstrate the shift theorem. Moreover, we apply this approach in the quantum realm to Fourier transform separable and path-entangled biphoton wave functions. The proposed approach is versatile and could find applications in various fields where Fourier transforms are essential tools. PMID:27006089

  12. An essential role of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in cell proliferation is to enable aspartate synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Birsoy, Kıvanç; Wang, Tim; Chen, Walter; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Abu-Remaileh, Monther; Sabatini, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) enables many metabolic processes, but why its inhibition suppresses cell proliferation is unclear. It is also not well understood why pyruvate supplementation allows cells lacking ETC function to proliferate. We used a CRISPR-based genetic screen to identify genes whose loss sensitizes human cells to phenformin, a complex I inhibitor. The screen yielded GOT1, the cytosolic aspartate aminotransferase, loss of which kills cells upon ETC inhibition. GOT1 normally consumes aspartate to transfer electrons into mitochondria, but, upon ETC inhibition, it reverses to generate aspartate in the cytosol, which partially compensates for the loss of mitochondrial aspartate synthesis. Pyruvate stimulates aspartate synthesis in a GOT1-dependent fashion, which is required for pyruvate to rescue proliferation of cells with ETC dysfunction. Aspartate supplementation or overexpression of an aspartate transporter allows cells without ETC activity to proliferate. Thus, enabling aspartate synthesis is an essential role of the ETC in cell proliferation. PMID:26232224

  13. In vitro and ex vivo inhibition of hepatitis A virus 3C proteinase by a peptidyl monofluoromethyl ketone.

    PubMed

    Morris, T S; Frormann, S; Shechosky, S; Lowe, C; Lall, M S; Gauss-Müller, V; Purcell, R H; Emerson, S U; Vederas, J C; Malcolm, B A

    1997-05-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) 3C proteinase is the enzyme responsible for the processing of the viral polyprotein. Although a cysteine proteinase, it displays an active site configuration like those of the mammalian serine proteinases (Malcolm, B. A. Protein Science 1995, 4, 1439). A peptidyl monofluoromethyl ketone (peptidyl-FMK) based on the preferred peptide substrates for HAV 3C proteinase was generated by first coupling the precursor, N,N-dimethylglutamine fluoromethylalcohol, to the tripeptide, Ac-Leu-Ala-Ala-OH, and then oxidizing the product to the corresponding peptidyl-FMK (Ac-LAAQ'-FMK). This molecule was found to be an irreversible inactivator of HAV 3C with a second-order rate constant of 3.3 x 10(2) M-1 s-1. 19F NMR spectroscopy indicates the displacement of fluoride on inactivation of the enzyme by the fluoromethyl ketone. NMR spectroscopy of the complex between the 13C-labeled inhibitor and the HAV 3C proteinase indicates that an (alkylthio)methyl ketone is formed. Studies of polyprotein processing, using various substrates generated by in vitro transcription/translation, demonstrated efficient blocking of even the most rapid proteolytic events such as cleavage of the 2A-2B and 2C-3A junctions. Subsequent ex vivo studies, to test for antiviral activity, show a 25-fold reduction in progeny virus production as the result of treatment with 5 microM inhibitor 24 h post-infection.

  14. In vitro molecular genetics as a tool for determining the differential cleavage specificities of the poliovirus 3C proteinase.

    PubMed Central

    Ypma-Wong, M F; Semler, B L

    1987-01-01

    We describe a completely in vitro system for generating defined poliovirus proteinase mutations and subsequently assaying the phenotypic expression of such mutations. A complete cDNA copy of the entire poliovirus genome has been inserted into a bacteriophage T7 transcription vector. We have introduced proteinase and/or cleavage site mutations into this cDNA. Mutant RNA is transcribed from the altered cDNA template and is subsequently translated in vitro. Employing such a system, we provide direct evidence for the bimolecular cleavage events carried out by the 3C proteinase. We show that specific genetically-altered precursor polypeptides containing authentic Q-G cleavage sites will not act as substrates for 3C either in cis or in trans. We also provide evidence that almost the entire P3 region is required to generate 3C proteinase activity capable of cleaving the P1 precursor to capsid proteins. However, only the 3C portion of P3 is required to generate 3C proteinase activity capable of cleaving P2 and its processing products. Images PMID:3031587

  15. [Growth conditions and production of the Bacillus intermedius subtilisin-like serine proteinase by the recombinant Bacillus subtilis strain].

    PubMed

    Kirillova, Iu M; Mikhaĭlova, E O; Balaban, N P; Mardanova, A M; Rudenskaia, G N; Kostrov, S V; Sharipova, M R

    2006-01-01

    The effect of the components of the nutrient medium on growth and production of the Bacillus intermedius subtilisin-like serine proteinase by the recombinant strain Bacillus subtilis AJ73(pCS9) was studied. The production of proteinase was found to be dependent on the composition of the nutrient medium and showed two peaks, at the 28th and 48th h of growth. The concentrations of the main components of the nutrient medium (peptone and inorganic phosphate) optimal for the biosynthesis of subtilisin-like serine proteinase at the 28th and 48th h of growth were determined in factorial experiments. Complex organic substances, casein at concentrations of 0.5-1%, gelatin at concentrations of 0.5-1%, and yeast extract at a concentration of 0.5%, stimulated the production of subtilisin-like serine proteinase by the recombinant strain. The study of the sporulation dynamics in this strain showed that the proteinase peaks at the 28th and 48th h of growth correspond, respectively, to the initial stage of sporulation and to the terminal stages of endospore formation (V-VII stages of sporulation).

  16. Protein digestion in cereal aphids (Sitobion avenae) as a target for plant defence by endogenous proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pyati, Prashant; Bandani, Ali R; Fitches, Elaine; Gatehouse, John A

    2011-07-01

    Gut extracts from cereal aphids (Sitobion avenae) showed significant levels of proteolytic activity, which was inhibited by reagents specific for cysteine proteases and chymotrypsin-like proteases. Gut tissue contained cDNAs encoding cathepsin B-like cysteine proteinases, similar to those identified in the closely related pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum). Analysis of honeydew (liquid excreta) from cereal aphids fed on diet containing ovalbumin showed that digestion of ingested proteins occurred in vivo. Protein could partially substitute for free amino acids in diet, although it could not support complete development. Recombinant wheat proteinase inhibitors (PIs) fed in diet were antimetabolic to cereal aphids, even when normal levels of free amino acids were present. PIs inhibited proteolysis by aphid gut extracts in vitro, and digestion of protein fed to aphids in vivo. Wheat subtilisin/chymotrypsin inhibitor, which was found to inhibit serine and cysteine proteinases, was more effective in both inhibitory and antimetabolic activity than wheat cystatin, which inhibited cysteine proteases only. Digestion of ingested protein is unlikely to contribute significantly to nutritional requirements when aphids are feeding on phloem, and the antimetabolic activity of dietary proteinase inhibitors is suggested to result from effects on proteinases involved in degradation of endogenous proteins.

  17. Preoviposition activation of cathepsin-like proteinases in degenerating ovarian follicles of the mosquito Culex pipiens pallens.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Ohmori, D; Ueno, T; Nishizuka, M; Eshita, Y; Fukunaga, A; Kominami, E

    2001-09-01

    Within developing ovaries of many insects, some developing follicles or oocytes usually degenerate (follicular atresia or oosorption), while the others may continue to grow to maturity, thus maintaining the balance between the number of eggs and reproductive circumstances such as available nutrients. To help clarify the phenomenon of follicular atresia during ovarian development, we examined cysteine proteinases stored in mosquito Culex pipiens pallens ovaries. First, analysis using synthesized substrates showed that cathepsin B- and L-like proteinases gradually accumulated in the developing ovaries after a blood meal, which required more than 10 min of preincubation under acidic conditions to reach their maximum activities. However, homogenates of degenerating follicles 3 days after feeding showed proteolytic activities without acid treatment, suggesting that the proteinases had already been activated, while the extract of normally developing follicles collected from the same ovaries required more than 10 min of acid preincubation to reach the optimum activities, suggesting that the enzymes remained as inactive forms. Chemical and immunohistochemical analyses showed that more proteinases are located in the cytoplasm, rather than being associated with yolk granules. Ovarian proteinases, which are believed to become activated at the onset of embryogenesis, should also be activated during oogenesis, presumably to enhance oosorption.

  18. Comparison of self-processing of foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus leader proteinase nsp1α

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberger, Jutta; Rancan, Chiara; Skern, Tim

    2013-09-01

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase (Lb{sup pro}) cleaves itself off the nascent viral polyprotein. NMR studies on the monomeric variant Lb{sup pro} L200F provide structural evidence for intramolecular self-processing. {sup 15}N-HSQC measurements of Lb{sup pro} L200F showed specifically shifted backbone signals in the active and substrate binding sites compared to the monomeric variant sLb{sup pro}, lacking six C-terminal residues. This indicates transient intramolecular interactions between the C-terminal extension (CTE) of one molecule and its own active site. Contrastingly, the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) leader proteinase nsp1α, with a papain-like fold like Lb{sup pro}, stably binds its own CTE. Parts of the β-sheet domains but none of the α-helical domains of Lb{sup pro} and nsp1α superimpose; consequently, the α-helical domain of nsp1α is oriented differently relative to its β-sheet domain. This provides a large interaction surface for the CTE with the globular domain, stabilising the intramolecular complex. Consequently, self-processing inactivates nsp1α but not Lb{sup pro}. - Highlights: • We examine self-processing of the leader protease of foot-and-mouth disease virus. • NMR analysis strongly supports intramolecular self-processing. • Self-processing is a dynamic process with no stable complex. • Structural comparison with nsp1α of PRRSV which forms stable intramolecular complex. • Subdomain orientation explains differences in stability of intramolecular complexes.

  19. Fourier Analysis Of Vibrations Of Round Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Gary A.

    1990-01-01

    Fourier-series representation developed for analysis of vibrations in complicated, round structures like turbopump impellers. Method eliminates guesswork involved in characterization of shapes of vibrational modes. Easy way to characterize complicated modes, leading to determination of responsiveness of given mode to various forcing functions. Used in conjunction with finite-element numerical simulation of vibrational modes of structure.

  20. Fourier technique for studying ammonoid sutures

    SciTech Connect

    Gildner, R.F.; Ackerly, S.C.

    1985-01-01

    Suture patterns have long been recognized as being of primary importance in the study of ammonoids. The authors have developed a technique to use Fourier analysis to study these structures by using a simple transformation: x-y data of a digitized suture are transformed to angle of slope versus position along the suture's length. A Fast Fourier Transform applied to the data produces a power spectrum (amplitude versus wave number) providing a precise and accurate measure of suture shape. The authors have applied this technique to the analysis of ontogenetic change in suture morphology. In goniatitic, ceratitic and preadult ammonitic patterns most of the change is exhibited in the amplitudes of the lowest ten wave numbers. Their Fourier coefficients clearly show trends not readily apparent by visual inspection. The more complex ammonitic patterns are reflected in increased amplitudes of higher wave numbers (a broader peak of the power spectrum) and their analysis is necessarily more complex. The Fourier approach presents the opportunity to quantitatively measure and describe the tempo and mode of evolution in the Ammonoidea. Potential applications of the new technique, as well as limitations, are discussed with special attention to investigations of ammonoid ontogeny and phylogeny.

  1. Fourier transform infrared spectrometery: an undergraduate experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, L.

    2016-11-01

    Simple apparatus is developed, providing undergraduate students with a solid understanding of Fourier transform (FT) infrared (IR) spectroscopy in a hands on experiment. Apart from its application to measuring the mid-IR spectra of organic molecules, the experiment introduces several techniques with wide applicability in physics, including interferometry, the FT, digital data analysis, and control theory.

  2. Decay of (p,q)-Fourier coefficients.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, David E; Gurka, Petr; Lang, Jan

    2014-10-08

    We show that essentially the speed of decay of the Fourier sine coefficients of a function in a Lebesgue space is comparable to that of the corresponding coefficients with respect to the basis formed by the generalized sine functions sin p,q .

  3. Linear and nonlinear generalized Fourier transforms.

    PubMed

    Pelloni, Beatrice

    2006-12-15

    This article presents an overview of a transform method for solving linear and integrable nonlinear partial differential equations. This new transform method, proposed by Fokas, yields a generalization and unification of various fundamental mathematical techniques and, in particular, it yields an extension of the Fourier transform method.

  4. Geometric Representations for Discrete Fourier Transforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambell, C. W.

    1986-01-01

    Simple geometric representations show symmetry and periodicity of discrete Fourier transforms (DFT's). Help in visualizing requirements for storing and manipulating transform value in computations. Representations useful in any number of dimensions, but particularly in one-, two-, and three-dimensional cases often encountered in practice.

  5. Fourier Transform Spectroscopy, Eleventh International Conference. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    de Haseth, J.A.

    1998-05-01

    These proceedings represent the papers presented at the Eleventh International Conference on Fourier Transform Spectroscopy held in August, 1997 in Athens, Georgia, USA. The Conference provided an atmosphere for people of diverse backgrounds to congregate and exchange information. The topics discussed included applications of Fourier transform spectroscopy to surface science, biological systems, atmospheric science, forensics and textiles, etc. Biochemical and biomedical studies utilizing Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy formed a large section of the Conference Applications to semiconductor industry, namely monitoring of CVD processes and photoresists were also discussed. Most of the applications were in the near and mid infrared, with a few extending to the far infrared and visible regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. In the Keynote Address, Fourier Transform Ion Cyloctron Resonance Spectroscopy was reviewed by Professor Alan G. Marshall of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Florida. Altogether 152 papers were presented at the Conference and out of these, 15 have been abstracted for the Energy, Science and Technology database. (AIP)

  6. Effect of irreversibility on the thermodynamic characterization of the thermal denaturation of Aspergillus saitoi acid proteinase.

    PubMed Central

    Tello-Solis, S R; Hernandez-Arana, A

    1995-01-01

    The thermal denaturation of the acid proteinase from Aspergillus saitoi was studied by CD and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). This process seemed to be completely irreversible, as protein samples that were heated to temperatures at which the transition had been completed and then cooled at 25 degrees C did not show any reversal of the change in the CD signal. Similar results were obtained with DSC. Nevertheless, we were able to detect the presence of reversibly unfolded species in experiments in which the enzyme solution was heated to a temperature within the transition region, followed by rapid cooling at 25 degrees C. Accordingly, the denaturation of behaviour of the acid proteinase seems to be consistent with the existence of one (or more) reversible unfolding transition followed by an irreversible step. The van't Hoff enthalpy, delta HvH, which corresponds to the reversible transition was calculated from extrapolation to infinite heating rate as 310 kJ.mol-1. This parameter was also determined from direct estimation of the equilibrium constant at several temperatures (delta HvH = 176 kJ.mol-1). Comparison of the average delta HvH with the calorimetric enthalpy (delta Hcal. = 770 kJ.mol-1) gave a value of 3.2 for the delta Hcal./delta HvH ratio, indicating that the molecular structure of the enzyme is probably formed by three or four cooperative regions, a number similar to that of the acid proteinase, pepsin. It should be noted that a completely different conclusion would be obtained from a straightforward analysis of the calorimetric curves, disregarding the effect of irreversibility on the denaturation process. PMID:7487958

  7. Proteinase and Growth Factor Alterations Revealed by Gene Microarray Analysis of Human Diabetic Corneas

    PubMed Central

    Saghizadeh, Mehrnoosh; Kramerov, Andrei A.; Tajbakhsh, Jian; Aoki, Annette M.; Wang, Charles; Chai, Ning-Ning; Ljubimova, Julia Y.; Sasaki, Takako; Sosne, Gabriel; Carlson, Marc R. J.; Nelson, Stanley F.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE. To identify proteinases and growth factors abnormally expressed in human corneas of donors with diabetic retinopathy (DR), additional to previously described matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-10 and -3 and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I. METHODS. RNA was isolated from 35 normal, diabetic, and DR autopsy human corneas ex vivo or after organ culture. Amplified cRNA was analyzed using 22,000-gene microarrays (Agi-lent Technologies, Palo Alto, CA). Gene expression in each diabetic corneal cRNA was assessed against pooled cRNA from 7 to 9 normal corneas. Select differentially expressed genes were validated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (QPCR) and immunohistochemistry. Organ cultures were treated with a cathepsin inhibitor, cystatin C, or MMP-10. RESULTS. More than 100 genes were upregulated and 2200 were downregulated in DR corneas. Expression of cathepsin F and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) genes was increased in ex vivo and organ-cultured DR corneas compared with normal corneas. HGF receptor c-met, fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-3, its receptor FGFR3, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-4, laminin α4 chain, and thymosin β4 genes were down-regulated. The data were corroborated by QPCR and immuno-histochemistry analyses; main changes of these components occurred in corneal epithelium. In organ-cultured DR corneas, cystatin C increased laminin-10 and integrin α3β1, whereas in normal corneas MMP-10 decreased laminin-10 and integrin α3β1 expression. CONCLUSIONS. Elevated cathepsin F and the ability of its inhibitor to produce a more normal phenotype in diabetic corneas suggest increased proteolysis in these corneas. Proteinase changes may result from abnormalities of growth factors, such as HGF and FGF-3, in DR corneas. Specific modulation of proteinases and growth factors could reduce diabetic corneal epitheliopathy. PMID:16186340

  8. Effects of pH on the association between the inhibitor cystatin and the proteinase chymopapain.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Espinosa, Francisco; Arroyo-Reyna, Alfonso; Garcia-Gutierrez, Ponciano; Serratos, Iris N; Zubillaga, Rafael A

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine proteinases are involved in many aspects of physiological regulation. In humans, some cathepsins have shown another function in addition to their role as lysosomal proteases in intracellular protein degradation; they have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several heart and blood vessel diseases and in cancer development. In this work, we present a fluorometric and computational study of the binding of one representative plant cysteine proteinase, chymopapain, to one of the most studied inhibitors of these proteinases: chicken cystatin. The binding equilibrium constant, Kb, was determined in the pH range between 3.5 and 10.0, revealing a maximum in the affinity at pH 9.0. We constructed an atomic model for the chymopapain-cystatin dimer by docking the individual 3D protein structures; subsequently, the model was refined using a 100 ns NPT molecular dynamics simulation in explicit water. Upon scrutiny of this model, we identified 14 ionizing residues at the interface of the complex using a cutoff distance of 5.0 Å. Using the pKa values predicted with PROPKA and a modified proton-linkage model, we performed a regression analysis on our data to obtain the composite pKavalues for three isoacidic residues. We also calculated the electrostatic component of the binding energy (ΔGb,elec) at different pH values using an implicit solvent model and APBS software. The pH profile of this calculated energy compares well with the experimentally obtained binding energy, ΔGb. We propose that the residues that form an interchain ionic pair, Lys139A from chymopapain and Glu19B from cystatin, as well as Tyr61A and Tyr67A from chymopapain are the main residues responsible for the observed pH dependence in the chymopapain- cystatin affinity.

  9. A Compact Viral Processing Proteinase/Ubiquitin Hydrolase from the OTU Family

    PubMed Central

    Chenon, Mélanie; Andreani, Jessica; Guerois, Raphaël; Jupin, Isabelle; Bressanelli, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) - a member of the alphavirus-like supergroup of viruses - serves as a model system for positive-stranded RNA virus membrane-bound replication. TYMV encodes a precursor replication polyprotein that is processed by the endoproteolytic activity of its internal cysteine proteinase domain (PRO). We recently reported that PRO is actually a multifunctional enzyme with a specific ubiquitin hydrolase (DUB) activity that contributes to viral infectivity. Here, we report the crystal structure of the 150-residue PRO. Strikingly, PRO displays no homology to other processing proteinases from positive-stranded RNA viruses, including that of alphaviruses. Instead, the closest structural homologs of PRO are DUBs from the Ovarian tumor (OTU) family. In the crystal, one molecule's C-terminus inserts into the catalytic cleft of the next, providing a view of the N-terminal product complex in replication polyprotein processing. This allows us to locate the specificity determinants of PRO for its proteinase substrates. In addition to the catalytic cleft, at the exit of which the active site is unusually pared down and solvent-exposed, a key element in molecular recognition by PRO is a lobe N-terminal to the catalytic domain. Docking models and the activities of PRO and PRO mutants in a deubiquitylating assay suggest that this N-terminal lobe is also likely involved in PRO's DUB function. Our data thus establish that DUBs can evolve to specifically hydrolyze both iso- and endopeptide bonds with different sequences. This is achieved by the use of multiple specificity determinants, as recognition of substrate patches distant from the cleavage sites allows a relaxed specificity of PRO at the sites themselves. Our results thus shed light on how such a compact protein achieves a diversity of key functions in viral genome replication and host-pathogen interaction. PMID:23966860

  10. A compact viral processing proteinase/ubiquitin hydrolase from the OTU family.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Charlotte; Ayach, Maya; Beaurepaire, Lionel; Chenon, Mélanie; Andreani, Jessica; Guerois, Raphaël; Jupin, Isabelle; Bressanelli, Stéphane

    2013-08-01

    Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV)--a member of the alphavirus-like supergroup of viruses--serves as a model system for positive-stranded RNA virus membrane-bound replication. TYMV encodes a precursor replication polyprotein that is processed by the endoproteolytic activity of its internal cysteine proteinase domain (PRO). We recently reported that PRO is actually a multifunctional enzyme with a specific ubiquitin hydrolase (DUB) activity that contributes to viral infectivity. Here, we report the crystal structure of the 150-residue PRO. Strikingly, PRO displays no homology to other processing proteinases from positive-stranded RNA viruses, including that of alphaviruses. Instead, the closest structural homologs of PRO are DUBs from the Ovarian tumor (OTU) family. In the crystal, one molecule's C-terminus inserts into the catalytic cleft of the next, providing a view of the N-terminal product complex in replication polyprotein processing. This allows us to locate the specificity determinants of PRO for its proteinase substrates. In addition to the catalytic cleft, at the exit of which the active site is unusually pared down and solvent-exposed, a key element in molecular recognition by PRO is a lobe N-terminal to the catalytic domain. Docking models and the activities of PRO and PRO mutants in a deubiquitylating assay suggest that this N-terminal lobe is also likely involved in PRO's DUB function. Our data thus establish that DUBs can evolve to specifically hydrolyze both iso- and endopeptide bonds with different sequences. This is achieved by the use of multiple specificity determinants, as recognition of substrate patches distant from the cleavage sites allows a relaxed specificity of PRO at the sites themselves. Our results thus shed light on how such a compact protein achieves a diversity of key functions in viral genome replication and host-pathogen interaction.

  11. Proteinase and phospholipase activities and development at different temperatures of yeasts isolated from bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Melville, Priscilla A; Benites, Nilson R; Ruz-Peres, Monica; Yokoya, Eugenio

    2011-11-01

    The presence of yeasts in milk may cause physical and chemical changes limiting the durability and compromising the quality of the product. Moreover, milk and dairy products contaminated by yeasts may be a potential means of transmission of these microorganisms to man and animals causing several kinds of infections. This study aimed to determine whether different species of yeasts isolated from bovine raw milk had the ability to develop at 37°C and/or under refrigeration temperature. Proteinase and phospholipase activities resulting from these yeasts were also monitored at different temperatures. Five genera of yeasts (Aureobasidium sp., Candida spp., Geotrichum spp., Trichosporon spp. and Rhodotorula spp.) isolated from bovine raw milk samples were evaluated. All strains showed one or a combination of characteristics: growth at 37°C (99·09% of the strains), psychrotrophic behaviour (50·9%), proteinase production (16·81% of the strains at 37°C and 4·09% under refrigeration) and phospholipase production (36·36% of the isolates at 37°C and 10·9% under refrigeration), and all these factors may compromise the quality of the product. Proteinase production was similar for strains incubated at 37°C (16·81% of the isolates) and room temperature (17·27%) but there was less amount of phospholipase-producing strains at room temperature (15·45% of the isolates were positive) when compared with incubation at 37°C (36·36%). Enzymes production at 37°C by yeasts isolated from milk confirmed their pathogenic potential. The refrigeration temperature was found to be most efficient to inhibit enzymes production and consequently ensure better quality of milk. The viability of yeasts and the activity of their enzymes at different temperatures are worrying because this can compromise the quality of dairy products at all stages of production and/or storage, and represent a risk to the consumer.

  12. Influence of immunoprotection on genetic variability of cysteine proteinases from Haemonchus contortus adult worms.

    PubMed

    Martín, S; Molina, J M; Hernández, Y I; Ferrer, O; Muñoz, Ma C; López, A; Ortega, L; Ruiz, A

    2015-11-01

    The limitations associated with the use of anthelmintic drugs in the control of gastrotintestinal nematodosis, such as the emergence of anthelmintic resistance, have stimulated the study of the immunological control of many parasites. In the case of Haemonchus contortus, several vaccination trials using native and recombinant antigens have been conducted. A group of antigens with demonstrated immunoprotective value are cathepsin B - like proteolytic enzymes of the cysteine proteinase type. These enzymes, which have been observed in both excretory-secretory products and somatic extracts of H. contortus, may vary among different geographic isolates and on strains isolated from different hosts, or even from the same host, as has been demonstrated in some comparative studies of genetic variability. In the present study, we evaluated the genetic variability of the worms that fully developed their endogenous cycle in immunised sheep and goat in order to identify the alleles of most immunoprotective value. To address these objectives, groups of sheep and goats were immunised with PBS soluble fractions enriched for cysteine proteinases from adult worms of H. contortus from either a strain of H. contortus isolated from goats of Gran Canaria Island (SP) or a strain isolated from sheep of North America (NA). The results confirmed the immunoprophylactic value of this type of enzyme against haemonchosis in both sheep and goats in association with increased levels of specific IgG. The genetic analysis demonstrated that the immunisation had a genetic selection on proteinase-encoding genes. In all the immunised animals, allelic frequencies were statistically different from those observed in non-immunised control animals in the four analysed genes. The reduction in the allelic frequencies suggests that parasites expressing these proteases are selectively targeted by the vaccine, and hence they should be considered in any subunit vaccine approach to control haemonchosis in small

  13. Exposure to tobacco-derived materials induces overproduction of secreted proteinases in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Small-Howard, Andrea; Turner, Helen . E-mail: hturner@queens.org

    2005-04-15

    Mast cells reside at interfaces with the environment, including the mucosa of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. This localization exposes mast cells to inhaled, or ingested, environmental challenges. In the airways of smokers, resident immune cells will be in contact with the condensed components of cigarette smoke. Mast cells are of particular interest due to their ability to promote airway remodeling and mucus hypersecretion. Clinical data show increased levels of mast cell-secreted tryptase and increased numbers of degranulated mast cells in the lavage and bronchial tissue of smokers. Since mast cell-secreted proteinases (MCPTs), including tryptases, contribute to pathological airway remodeling, we investigated the relationship between mast cell proteinases and smoke exposure. We exposed a mast cell line to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). We show that CSC exposure increases MCPT levels in mast cells using an assay for tryptase-type MCPT activity. We hypothesized that this increase in MCPT activity reflects a CSC-induced increase in the cytosolic pool of proteinase molecules, via stimulation of MCPT transcription. Transcript array data suggested that mRNA changes in response to CSC were limited in number and peaked after 3 h of CSC exposure. However, we noted marked transcriptional regulation of several MCPT genes. CSC-induced changes in the mRNA levels for MCPTs were confirmed using quantitative RT-PCR. Taken together, our data suggest that chronic exposure to cigarette smoke up-regulates MCPT levels in mast cells at both the protein and the mRNA level. We suggest that the pathological airway remodeling that has been described in clinical studies of smoke inhalation may be attributable to MCPT overproduction in vivo.

  14. Nonlinear Fourier analysis with cnoidal waves

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    Fourier analysis is one of the most useful tools to the ocean engineer. The approach allows one to analyze wave data and thereby to describe a dynamical motion in terms of a linear superposition of ordinary sine waves. Furthermore, the Fourier technique allows one to compute the response function of a fixed or floating structure: each sine wave in the wave or force spectrum yields a sine wave in the response spectrum. The counting of fatigue cycles is another area where the predictable oscillations of sine waves yield procedures for the estimation of the fatigue life of structures. The ocean environment, however, is a source of a number of nonlinear effects which must also be included in structure design. Nonlinearities in ocean waves deform the sinusoidal shapes into other kinds of waves such as the Stokes wave, cnoidal wave or solitary wave. A key question is: Does there exist a generalization of linear Fourier analysis which uses nonlinear basis functions rather than the familiar sine waves? Herein addresses the dynamics of nonlinear wave motion in shallow water where the basis functions are cnoidal waves and discuss nonlinear Fourier analysis in terms of a linear superposition of cnoidal waves plus their mutual nonlinear interactions. He gives a number of simple examples of nonlinear Fourier wave motion and then analyzes an actual surface-wave time series obtained on an offshore platform in the Adriatic Sea. Finally, he briefly discusses application of the cnoidal wave spectral approach to the computation of the frequency response function of a floating vessel. The results given herein will prove useful in future engineering studies for the design of fixed, floating and complaint offshore structures.

  15. Infected Aortic Aneurysm Mimicking Anti-proteinase 3-Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Hachiya, Kenta; Wakami, Kazuaki; Yoshida, Atsuhiro; Suda, Hisao; Ohte, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    We herein report an unusual case of an infected descending aortic pseudoaneurysm with luminal pathognomonic oscillating vegetation with serological findings and clinical features mimicking anti-proteinase 3-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis. The positive blood cultures and imaging findings, including a pseudoaneurysm and vegetations in the aorta, suggested the presence of an infected aortic aneurysm. The patient was successfully treated with antibiotics and endovascular aortic repair. A precise diagnosis is crucial in order to avoid inappropriate therapy such as immunosuppressive treatment, which could result in life-threatening consequences in a patient with an infected aortic aneurysm. PMID:27904110

  16. Two distinct phases of apoptosis in mammary gland involution: proteinase-independent and -dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Leif R; Romer, John; Thomasset, Nicole; Solberg, Helene; Pyke, Charles; Bissell, Mina J; Dano, Keld; Werb, Zena

    1996-01-01

    Postlactational involution of the mammary gland is characterized by two distinct physiological events: apoptosis of the secretory, epithelial cells undergoing programmed cell death, and proteolytic degradation of the mammary gland basement membrane. We examined the spatial and temporal patterns of apoptotic cells in relation to those of proteinases during involution of the BALB/c mouse mammary gland. Apoptosis was almost absent during lactation but became evident at day 2 of involution, when {beta}-casein gene expression was still high. Apoptotic cells were then seen at least up to day 8 of involution, when {beta}-casein gene expression was being extinguished. Expression of sulfated glycoprotein-2 (SGP-2), interleukin-1{beta} converting enzyme (ICE) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 was upregulated at day 2, when apoptotic cells were seen initially. Expression of the matrix metalloproteinases gelatinase A and stromelysin-1 and the serine proteinase urokinase-type plasminogen activator, which was low during lactation, was strongly upregulated in parallel starting at day 4 after weaning, coinciding with start of the collapse of the lobulo-alveolar structures and the intensive tissue remodeling in involution. The major sites of mRNA synthesis for these proteinases were fibroblast-like cells in the periductal stroma and stromal cells surrounding the collapsed alveoli, suggesting that the degradative phase of involution is due to a specialized mesenchymal-epithelial interaction. To elucidate the functional role of these proteinases during involution, at the onset of weaning we treated mice systemically with the glucocorticoid hydrocortisone, which is known to inhibit mammary gland involution. Although the initial wave of apoptotic cells appeared in the lumina of the gland, the dramatic regression and tissue remodeling usually evident by day 5 was substantially inhibited by systemic treatment with hydrocortisone. mRNA and protein for gelatinase A, stromelysin

  17. Investigation of Serine-Proteinase-Catalyzed Peptide Splicing in Analogues of Sunflower Trypsin Inhibitor 1 (SFTI-1).

    PubMed

    Karna, Natalia; Łęgowska, Anna; Malicki, Stanisław; Dębowski, Dawid; Golik, Przemysław; Gitlin, Agata; Grudnik, Przemysław; Wladyka, Benedykt; Brzozowski, Krzysztof; Dubin, Grzegorz; Rolka, Krzysztof

    2015-09-21

    Serine-proteinase-catalyzed peptide splicing was demonstrated in analogues of the trypsin inhibitor SFTI-1: both single peptides and two-peptide chains (C- and N-terminal peptide chains linked by a disulfide bridge). In the second series, peptide splicing with catalytic amount of proteinase was observed only when formation of acyl-enzyme intermediate was preceded by hydrolysis of the substrate Lys-Ser peptide bond. Here we demonstrate that with an equimolar amount of the proteinase, splicing occurs in all the two-peptide-chain analogues. This conclusion was supported by high resolution crystal structures of selected analogues in complex with trypsin. We showed that the process followed a direct transpeptidation mechanism. Thus, the acyl-enzyme intermediate was formed and was immediately used for a new peptide bond formation; products associated with the hydrolysis of the acyl-enzyme were not observed. The peptide splicing was sequence- not structure-specific.

  18. [Activity of cytoplasmic proteinases from rat liver in Heren's carcinoma during tumor growth and treatment with medicinal herbs].

    PubMed

    Marchenko, M M; Kopyl'chuk, H P; Hrygor'ieva, O V

    2000-01-01

    The dynamics of the acid and neutral proteinases general enzymes activity change in the hepatocytes postnuclear fraction in the rats suffering from the Heren's carcinoma was investigated. It was determined that in the tumor development of the enzyme activity level of both the acid and neutral proteinases increased 2,6-fold. The natural preparation of the herbs (Calendula officinalis L., Echinacea purpurea L., Scorzonera humilis L., Aconitum moldavicum Hacq.) normalizes both the activity of the investigated enzymes and coefficients of the liver weights of the sick animals. The chemical medicinal preparation 5,6-benzcumarine-5-uracil normalizes the activity of the neutral cytoplasmatic proteinases and reduces the level of the proteolytic activity of the acid enzymes in comparison with the control group of the animals as well as increases of the liver weight coefficients.

  19. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of a Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Dipak N.; Preeti; Chaudhry, Anshul; Sharma, Ashwani K.; Tomar, ­Shailly; Kumar, Pravindra

    2009-01-01

    A Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor has been purified from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds. SDS–PAGE analysis of a purified sample showed a homogeneous band corresponding to a molecular weight of 21 kDa. The protein was identified as a Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor based on N-terminal amino-acid sequence analysis. It was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method using PEG 6000. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 37.2, b = 77.1, c = 129.1 Å. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.7 Å. Preliminary crystallographic analysis indicated the presence of one proteinase inhibitor molecule in the asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of 44%. PMID:19574654

  20. Cloning eleven midgut trypsin cDNAs and evaluating the interaction of proteinase inhibitors with Cry1Ac against the tobacco budworm Heliothis virescens (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Midgut trypsins are associated with Bt protoxin activation and toxin degradation. Proteinase inhibitors have potential insecticidal toxicity against a wide range of insect species. Proactive action to examine trypsin gene profiles and proteinase inhibitors for interaction with Bt toxin is necessary ...

  1. Potential Use of Proteinase Inhibitors, Avidin, and Other Bio-reagents for Synergizing Bt Performance and Delaying Resistance Development to Bt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    After being ingested by target insects, the insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) need to go through a proteolytic process by insect midgut proteinases to become activated. At the same time, Bt can be hydrolyzed and degraded by midgut proteinases to become non-toxic to target insect...

  2. Synthesis and Properties of pH-, Thermo-, and Salt-Sensitive Modified Poly(aspartic acid)/Poly(vinyl alcohol) IPN Hydrogel and Its Drug Controlled Release

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jingqiong; Li, Yinhui; Hu, Deng; Chen, Xiaoling; Liu, Yongmei; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yansheng

    2015-01-01

    Modified poly(aspartic acid)/poly(vinyl alcohol) interpenetrating polymer network (KPAsp/PVA IPN) hydrogel for drug controlled release was synthesized by a simple one-step method in aqueous system using poly(aspartic acid) grafting 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (KH-550) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as materials. The hydrogel surface morphology and composition were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The thermal stability was analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The swelling properties and pH, temperature, and salt sensitivities of KPAsp, KPAsp/PVA semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN), and KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogels were also investigated. All of the three hydrogels showed ampholytic pH-responsive properties, and swelling behavior was also extremely sensitive to the temperature, ionic strength, and cationic species. Finally, the drug controlled release properties of the three hydrogels were evaluated and results indicated that three hydrogels could control drug release by external surroundings stimuli. The drug controlled release properties of KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogel are the most outstanding, and the correlative measured release profiles of salicylic acid at 37°C were 32.6 wt% at pH = 1.2 (simulated gastric fluid) and 62.5 wt% at pH = 7.4 (simulated intestinal fluid), respectively. These results indicated that KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogels are a promising carrier system for controlled drug delivery. PMID:26351630

  3. Nanoparticle carriers based on copolymers of poly( l-aspartic acid co- l-lactide)-1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Siyuan; Wang, Huan; Liang, Xingjie; Hu, Liming; Li, Min; Wu, Yan

    2011-09-01

    A novel poly( l-aspartic) derivative (PAL-DPPE) containing polylactide and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE) segments has been successfully synthesized. The chemical structures of the copolymers were confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), NMR (1H NMR, 13C NMR, 31P NMR), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed the formation of micelles of the PAL-DPPE copolymers. In order to estimate the feasibility as novel drug carriers, an anti-tumor model drug doxorubicin (DOX) was incorporated into polymeric micelles by double emulsion and nanoprecipitation method. The DOX-loaded micelle size, size distribution, and encapsulation efficiency (EE) were influenced by the feed weight ratio of the copolymer to DOX. In addition, in vitro release experiments of the DOX-loaded PAL-DPPE micelles exhibited that faster release in pH 5.0 than their release in pH 7.4 buffer. The poly( l-aspartic) derivative copolymer was proved to be an available carrier for the preparation of micelles for anti-tumor drug delivery.

  4. Intentional overdose with insulin glargine and insulin aspart.

    PubMed

    Tofade, Toyin S; Liles, E Allen

    2004-10-01

    Reports of intentional massive overdoses of insulin are infrequent. A review of the literature revealed no reports of overdose attempts with either insulin glargine or insulin aspart. We report the case of a 33-year-old woman without diabetes mellitus who intentionally injected herself with an overdose of both products, which belonged to her husband. She arrived at the emergency department 15 hours after her suicide attempt, which took place the night before. Her husband had checked her blood glucose level throughout the night and had given her high-carbohydrate drinks and foods. The patient had a history of obsessive-compulsive disorder, major depression, and numerous suicide attempts. She recovered from the resulting hypoglycemia after 40 hours of dextrose infusion and was transferred to a mental health facility. The main danger associated with insulin overdose is the resultant hypoglycemia and its effects on the central nervous system; hypokalemia, hypophosphatemia, and hypomagnesemia also can develop with excess insulin administration. Dextrose infusion, with liberal oral intake when possible, and monitoring for electrolyte changes, making adjustments as needed, are recommended for the treatment of intentional insulin overdose.

  5. New paradigm for allosteric regulation of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase.

    PubMed

    Cockrell, Gregory M; Zheng, Yunan; Guo, Wenyue; Peterson, Alexis W; Truong, Jennifer K; Kantrowitz, Evan R

    2013-11-12

    For nearly 60 years, the ATP activation and the CTP inhibition of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) has been the textbook example of allosteric regulation. We present kinetic data and five X-ray structures determined in the absence and presence of a Mg(2+) concentration within the physiological range. In the presence of 2 mM divalent cations (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+)), CTP does not significantly inhibit the enzyme, while the allosteric activation by ATP is enhanced. The data suggest that the actual allosteric inhibitor of ATCase in vivo is the combination of CTP, UTP, and a divalent cation, and the actual allosteric activator is a divalent cation with ATP or ATP and GTP. The structural data reveals that two NTPs can bind to each allosteric site with a divalent cation acting as a bridge between the triphosphates. Thus, the regulation of ATCase is far more complex than previously believed and calls many previous studies into question. The X-ray structures reveal that the catalytic chains undergo essentially no alternations; however, several regions of the regulatory chains undergo significant structural changes. Most significant is that the N-terminal region of the regulatory chains exists in different conformations in the allosterically activated and inhibited forms of the enzyme. Here, a new model of allosteric regulation is proposed.

  6. Adsorption of Aspartic Acid onto Rutile: Implications for Biochirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, C. F.; Jonsson, C. M.; Jonsson, C. L.; Sverjensky, D. A.; Hazen, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Mineral surfaces may have facilitated the concentration and polymerization of simple biomolecules into macromolecules while promoting the development of biochirality. In this study, rutile and aspartic acid (Asp) were investigated as a possible system in this scenario. Batch adsorption experiments were performed to examine the adsorption of Asp as a function of total concentration and pH. A constant background electrolyte of 0.1 M NaCl was applied to the system, and all solutions were purged with argon gas to eliminate carbon dioxide contamination. Asp adsorbs onto rutile to the highest extent over the pH range 3-5.5 suggesting that an acidic environment is required for the adsorption between Asp and rutile to occur in significant amounts. This pH range of maximum adsorption is constrained between the isoelectric point of Asp and the point of zero charge of rutile, which indicates that electrostatic effects are influencing Asp adsorption. Both the L- and D- enantiomers of Asp were individually adsorbed onto the rutile surface to determine the potential of the system for chiral selection. Preliminary results indicate that D-Asp may possibly adsorb in greater amounts than L-Asp at higher Asp total concentrations. This trend is unexpected as the growth planes dominating the rutile are achiral, and a more thorough study is required to validate this difference in adsorption. Nevertheless, this result may provide insight on the emergence of chiral selection in macromolecules within what might be a predominantly achiral prebiotic system.

  7. Supermacroporous chemically cross-linked poly(aspartic acid) hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Gyarmati, Benjámin; Mészár, E Zsuzsanna; Kiss, Lóránd; Deli, Mária A; László, Krisztina; Szilágyi, András

    2015-08-01

    Chemically cross-linked poly(aspartic acid) (PASP) gels were prepared by a solid-liquid phase separation technique, cryogelation, to achieve a supermacroporous interconnected pore structure. The precursor polymer of PASP, polysuccinimide (PSI) was cross-linked below the freezing point of the solvent and the forming crystals acted as templates for the pores. Dimethyl sulfoxide was chosen as solvent instead of the more commonly used water. Thus larger temperatures could be utilized for the preparation and the drawback of increase in specific volume of water upon freezing could be eliminated. The morphology of the hydrogels was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and interconnectivity of the pores was proven by the small flow resistance of the gels. Compression tests also confirmed the interconnected porous structure and the complete re-swelling and shape recovery of the supermacroporous PASP hydrogels. The prepared hydrogels are of interest for several biomedical applications as scaffolding materials because of their cytocompatibility, controllable morphology and pH-responsive character.

  8. Asynchronous reformation of individual kallikrein-related secretory proteinases in rat submandibular glands following degranulation by cyclocytidine.

    PubMed

    Proctor, G B; Shori, D K; Chan, K M; Garrett, J R

    1993-10-01

    Time scales for the reformation of the secretory granules in granular tubules and their constituent proteinases were assessed after inducing a massive degranulation by intraperitoneal injection of cyclocytidine in conscious animals. The minimum working dose of cyclocytidine to produce the maximum degranulation and depletion of proteinase activity, at 3 h after injection, was 75 mg/kg. Histologically, although most granular tubule cells then appeared to be extensively degranulated, isolated individual cells showing little or no degranulation always persisted. Acinar cells also showed some depletion of secretory material. At 15 h after injecting cyclocytidine the formation of new granules had begun in the granular tubule cells, but it was not extensive or uniform in adjacent cells; however, the acinar cells already appeared to be regranulated. The pattern of granule reformation in granular tubule cells progressed gradually, so that 7-10 days after cyclocytidine-induced degranulation the cells were mostly packed with granules and showed similar appearances to those of normal resting control glands. Individual proteinases in extracts of the glands were assayed specifically using fluorogenic oligopeptide amidase substrates, with and without appropriate inhibitors. This revealed a 95% reduction in total proteinase activity 3 h after cyclocytidine (75 mg/kg). In the same extracts, acinar peroxidase was reduced by 28%. Peroxidase levels recovered to control values within 15 h after cyclocytidine but recovery of proteinases progressed more gradually and did not occur uniformly for the different constituent proteinases. Tissue kallikrein (rK1) showed the most rapid recovery and had reached levels approaching normal within 3 days.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. The proteolytic system of Lactobacillus sanfrancisco CB1: purification and characterization of a proteinase, a dipeptidase, and an aminopeptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Gobbetti, M; Smacchi, E; Corsetti, A

    1996-01-01

    A cell envelope 57-kDa proteinase, a cytoplasmic 65-kDa dipeptidase, and a 75-kDa aminopeptidase were purified from Lactobacillus sanfrancisco CB1 sourdough lactic acid bacterium by sequential fast protein liquid chromatography steps. All of the enzymes are monomers. The proteinase was most active at pH 7.0 and 40 degrees C, while aminopeptidase and dipeptidase had optima at pH 7.5 and 30 to 35 degrees C. Relatively high activities were observed at the pH and temperature of the sourdough fermentation. The proteinase is a serine enzyme. Urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of digest of alpha s1- and beta-caseins showed differences in the pattern of peptides released by the purified proteinase and those produced by crude preparations of the cell envelope proteinases of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus B397 and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis SK11. Reversed-phase fast protein liquid chromatography of gliadin digests showed a more-complex peptide pattern produced by the proteinase of Lactobacillus sanfrancisco CB1. The dipeptidase is a metalloenzyme with high affinity for dipeptides containing hydrophobic amino acids but had no activity on tripeptides or larger peptides. The aminopeptidase was also inhibited by metal-chelating agents, and showed a broad N-terminal hydrolytic activity including di- and tripeptides. Km values of 0.70 and 0.44 mM were determined for the dipeptidase on Leu-Leu and the aminopeptidase on Leu-p-nitroanilide, respectively. PMID:8795211

  10. Adsorption of L-glutamic acid and L-aspartic acid to γ-Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Edward; Kumar, Kartik; Sumit, Madhuresh; Giuffre, Anthony; Zhao, Weilong; Pedersen, Joel; Sahai, Nita

    2014-05-01

    The interactions of amino acids with mineral surfaces have potential relevance for processes ranging from pre-biotic chemistry to biomineralization to protein adsorption on biomedical implants in vivo. Here, we report the results of experiments investigating the adsorption of L-glutamic (Glu) and L-aspartic (Asp) acids to γ-Al2O3. We examined the extent of Glu and Asp coverage as a function of pH and solution concentration (pH edges and isotherms) in solution-depletion experiments and used in situ Attenuated Total Refkectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy to estimate the molecular conformations of the adsorbed molecules. Glu and Asp exhibited similar adsorption behavior on γ-Al2O3 with respect to pH and solution concentration. In general, adsorption decreased as pH increased. At low and high amino acid concentrations, the isotherms exhibited two apparent saturation coverages, which could be interpreted as 1:4 or 1:2 ratios of adsorbed molecule/surface Al sites. Tetradentate tetranuclear and bidentate binuclear species were the dominant conformations inferred independently from FTIR spectra. In these conformations, both carboxylate groups are involved in bonding to either four or to two Al surface atoms, through direct covalent bonds or via H-bonds. An outer sphere species, in which one carboxylate group interacts with a surface Al atom, could not be ruled out based on the FTIR spectra.

  11. Aspartic acid-based modified PLGA-PEG nanoparticles for bone targeting: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yin-Chih; Fu, Tzu-Fun; Wang, Hung-Jen; Lin, Che-Wei; Lee, Gang-Hui; Wu, Shun-Cheng; Wang, Chih-Kuang

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) that target bone tissue were developed using PLGA-PEG (poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylene glycol) diblock copolymers and bone-targeting moieties based on aspartic acid, (Asp)(n(1,3)). These NP are expected to enable the transport of hydrophobic drugs. The molecular structures were examined by (1)H NMR or identified using mass spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra. The NP were prepared using the water miscible solvent displacement method, and their size characteristics were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering. The bone targeting potential of the NP was evaluated in vitro using hydroxyapatite affinity assays and in vivo using fluorescent imaging in zebrafish and rats. It was confirmed that the average particle size of the NP was <200 nm and that the dendritic Asp3 moiety of the PLGA-PEG-Asp3 NP exhibited the best apatite mineral binding ability. Preliminary findings in vivo bone affinity assays in zebrafish and rats indicated that the PLGA-PEG-ASP3 NP may display increased bone-targeting efficiency compared with other PLGA-PEG-based NP that lack a dendritic Asp3 moiety. These NP may act as a delivery system for hydrophobic drugs, warranting further evaluation of the treatment of bone disease.

  12. Automatic Fourier transform and self-Fourier beams due to parabolic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yiqi; Liu, Xing; Belić, Milivoj R.; Zhong, Weiping; Petrović, Milan S.; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-12-15

    We investigate the propagation of light beams including Hermite–Gauss, Bessel–Gauss and finite energy Airy beams in a linear medium with parabolic potential. Expectedly, the beams undergo oscillation during propagation, but quite unexpectedly they also perform automatic Fourier transform, that is, periodic change from the beam to its Fourier transform and back. In addition to oscillation, the finite-energy Airy beams exhibit periodic inversion during propagation. The oscillating period of parity-asymmetric beams is twice that of the parity-symmetric beams. Based on the propagation in parabolic potential, we introduce a class of optically-interesting beams that are self-Fourier beams—that is, the beams whose Fourier transforms are the beams themselves.

  13. Use of recombinant Entamoeba histolytica cysteine proteinase 1 to identify a potent inhibitor of amebic invasion in a human colonic model.

    PubMed

    Meléndez-López, Samuel G; Herdman, Scott; Hirata, Ken; Choi, Min-Ho; Choe, Youngchool; Craik, Charles; Caffrey, Conor R; Hansell, Elisabeth; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Chen, Yen Ting; Roush, William R; McKerrow, James; Eckmann, Lars; Guo, Jianhua; Stanley, Samuel L; Reed, Sharon L

    2007-07-01

    Cysteine proteinases are key virulence factors of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We have shown that cysteine proteinases play a central role in tissue invasion and disruption of host defenses by digesting components of the extracellular matrix, immunoglobulins, complement, and cytokines. Analysis of the E. histolytica genome project has revealed more than 40 genes encoding cysteine proteinases. We have focused on E. histolytica cysteine proteinase 1 (EhCP1) because it is one of two cysteine proteinases unique to invasive E. histolytica and is highly expressed and released. Recombinant EhCP1 was expressed in Escherichia coli and refolded to an active enzyme with a pH optimum of 6.0. We used positional-scanning synthetic tetrapeptide combinatorial libraries to map the specificity of the P1 to P4 subsites of the active site cleft. Arginine was strongly preferred at P2, an unusual specificity among clan CA proteinases. A new vinyl sulfone inhibitor, WRR483, was synthesized based on this specificity to target EhCP1. Recombinant EhCP1 cleaved key components of the host immune system, C3, immunoglobulin G, and pro-interleukin-18, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. EhCP1 localized to large cytoplasmic vesicles, distinct from the sites of other proteinases. To gain insight into the role of secreted cysteine proteinases in amebic invasion, we tested the effect of the vinyl sulfone cysteine proteinase inhibitors K11777 and WRR483 on invasion of human colonic xenografts. The resultant dramatic inhibition of invasion by both inhibitors in this human colonic model of amebiasis strongly suggests a significant role of secreted amebic proteinases, such as EhCP1, in the pathogenesis of amebiasis.

  14. Cloning and molecular characterization of a human intracellular serine proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, P; Sun, J; Cerruti, L; Salem, H H; Bird, P

    1993-01-01

    We describe a cDNA encoding a serine proteinase inhibitor present in placental tissue and the cytosolic fraction of K562 cells. On the basis of its interaction with thrombin, through which it was discovered, the inhibitor has been operationally named the placental thrombin inhibitor (PTI). Amino acid sequence comparisons suggest that its reactive center is located at Arg-341 and Cys-342, that it lacks a classical N-terminal signal sequence, and that it has the highest degree of similarity to intracellular serine proteinase inhibitors (serpins), such as the human monocyte/neutrophil elastase inhibitor and the equine leukocyte elastase inhibitor. PTI also resembles these inhibitors in that it contains oxidation-sensitive residues adjacent to the reactive site. The PTI cDNA was expressed in rabbit reticulocyte lysate and in COS-7 cells and a 42-kDa protein was produced. Recombinant PTI formed a 67-kDa complex when incubated with thrombin. The ability of native PTI to bind thrombin was destroyed by incubation with iodoacetamide. Analysis of human tissue mRNA indicated that PTI is expressed widely with the highest levels in cardiac and skeletal muscle and placenta. We conclude that PTI is a member of an emerging class of intracellular serpins. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8415716

  15. Proteinases, their receptors and inflammatory signalling: the Oxford South Parks Road connection*

    PubMed Central

    Hollenberg, M D

    2015-01-01

    In keeping with the aim of the Paton Memorial Lecture to ‘facilitate the historical study of pharmacology’, this overview, which is my distinct honour to write, represents a ‘Janus-like’ personal perspective looking both backwards and forwards at the birth and growth of ‘receptor molecular pharmacology’ with special relevance to inflammatory diseases. The overview begins in the Oxford Department of Pharmacology in the mid-1960s and then goes on to provide a current perspective of signalling by proteinases. Looking backwards, the synopsis describes the fruitful Oxford Pharmacology Department infrastructure that Bill Paton generated in keeping with the blueprint begun by his predecessor, J H Burn. Looking forwards, the overview illustrates the legacy of that environment in generating some of the first receptor ligand-binding data and providing the inspiration and vision for those like me who were training in the department at the same time. With apologies, I mention only in passing a number of individuals who benefitted from the ‘South Parks Road connection’ using myself as one of the ‘outcome study’ examples. It is also by looking forward that I can meet the complementary aim of summarizing the lecture presented at a ‘BPS 2014 Focused Meeting on Cell Signalling’ to provide an overview of the role of proteinases and their signalling mechanisms in the setting of inflammation. PMID:25521749

  16. Purification and characterization of a proteinase inhibitor from field bean, Dolichos lablab perpureus L.

    PubMed

    Devaraj, V R; Manjunatha, N H

    1999-01-01

    A proteinase inhibitor resembling Bowman-Birk family inhibitors has been purified from the seeds of cultivar HA-3 of Dolichos lablab perpureus L. The protein was apparently homogeneous as judged by SDS-PAGE, PAGE, IEF, and immunodiffusion. The inhibitor had 12 mole% 1/2-cystine and a few aromatic amino acids, and lacks tryptophan. Field bean proteinase inhibitor (FBPI) exhibited a pI of 4.3 and an Mr of 18,500 Da. CD spectral studies showed random coiled secondary structure. Conformational changes were detected in the FBPI-trypsin/chymotrypsin complexes by difference spectral studies. Apparent Ka values of complexes of inhibitor with trypsin and chymotrypsin were 2.1x10(7) M(-1) and 3.1x10(7) M(-1), respectively. The binary and ternary complexes of FBPI with trypsin and chymotrypsin have been isolated indicating 1:1 stoichiometry with independent sites for cognate enzymes. Amino acid modification studies showed lysine and tyrosine at the reactive sites of FBPI for trypsin and chymotrypsin, respectively.

  17. A recombinant cysteine proteinase from Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi suitable for serodiagnosis of American visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    de Souza Dias, Suzana; da Costa Pinheiro, Paulo Henrique; Katz, Simone; dos Santos, Márcia Regina Machado; Barbiéri, Clara Lúcia

    2005-02-01

    A recombinant protein, rLdccys1, which was produced by expression of the gene encoding a 30 kDa cysteine proteinase from Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi, was used for detection of antibodies in sera from patients with active visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence of rLdccys1 showed that it contains all the characteristics of a cysteine proteinase. The ability of the protein to react with sera from humans with VL was also shown by Western blotting. The sensitivity for detection of specific antibodies to L. (L.) chagasi bodies using rLdccys1, L. (L.) chagasi promastigote lysates, and amastigote lysates was 80%, 98%, and 99%, respectively. No cross-reactivity between rLdccys1 and Chagas disease was observed, and there was little positive reactivity with sera from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis and tuberculosis, compared with promastigote and amastigote extracts. Our findings indicate that rLdccys1 from L. (L.) chagasi constitutes a potential tool for the diagnosis of American VL.

  18. Primary structure and reactive site of a novel wheat proteinase inhibitor of subtilisin and chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Poerio, Elia; Di Gennaro, Simone; Di Maro, Antimo; Farisei, Francesca; Ferranti, Pasquale; Parente, Augusto

    2003-02-01

    The proteinase inhibitor WSCI, active in inhibiting bacterial subtilisin and a number of animal chymotrypsins, was purified from endosperm of exaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum, c.v. San Pastore) by ion exchange chromatography and its complete amino acid sequence was established by automated Edman degradation. WSCI consists of a single polypeptide chain of 72 amino acid residues, has a molecular mass of 8126.3 Da and a pl of 5.8. The inhibition constants (Ki) for Bacillus licheniformis subtilisin and bovine pancreatic alpha-chymotrypsin are 3.92 x 10(-9) M and 7.24 x 10(-9) M, respectively. The inhibitor contains one methionine and of tryptophan residue and has a high content of essential amino acids (41 over a total of 72 residues), but no cysteines. The primary structure of WSCI shows high similarity with barley subtilisin-chymotrypsin isoinhibitors of the Cl-2 type and with maize subtilisinchymotrypsin inhibitor MPI. Significant degrees of similarity were also found between sequences of WSCI and of other members of the potato inhibitor I family of the serine proteinase inhibitors. The wheat inhibitor WSCI has a single reactive site (the peptide bond between methionyl-48 and glutamyl-49 residues) as identified by affinity chromatography and sequence analysis.

  19. Suppression of collagen-induced arthritis with a serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) derived from myxoma virus.

    PubMed

    Brahn, Ernest; Lee, Sarah; Lucas, Alexandra; McFadden, Grant; Macaulay, Colin

    2014-08-01

    Many viruses encode virulence factors to facilitate their own survival by modulating a host's inflammatory response. One of these factors, secreted from cells infected with myxoma virus, is the serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) Serp-1. Because Serp-1 had demonstrated anti-inflammatory properties in arterial injury models and viral infections, it was cloned and evaluated for therapeutic efficacy in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Clinical severity was significantly lower in the Serp-1 protocols (p<0.0001) and blinded radiographs indicated that the Serp-1 group had significantly less erosions than the controls (p<0.01). Delayed-type hypersensitivity was lower in the Serp-1 group but antibody titers to type II collagen were not significantly altered. Recipients had minimal histopathologic synovial changes and did not develop neutralizing antibodies to Serp-1. These results indicate that Serp-1 impedes the pathogenesis of CIA and suggests that the therapeutic potential of serine proteinase inhibitors in inflammatory joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, should be investigated further.

  20. Bio-physical evaluation and in vivo delivery of plant proteinase inhibitor immobilized on silica nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Neha; Doke, Dhananjay S; Khandare, Jayant J; Jawale, Priyanka V; Biradar, Ankush V; Giri, Ashok P

    2015-06-01

    Recombinant expression of Capsicum annuum proteinase inhibitors (CanPI-13) and its application via synthetic carrier for the crop protection is the prime objective of our study. Herein, we explored proteinase inhibitor peptide immobilization on silica based nanospheres and rods followed by its pH mediated release in vitro and in vivo. Initial studies suggested silica nanospheres to be a suitable candidate for peptide immobilization. Furthermore, the interactions were characterized biophysically to ascertain their conformational stability and biological activity. Interestingly, bioactive peptide loading at acidic pH on nanospheres was found to be 62% and showed 56% of peptide release at pH 10, simulating gut milieu of the target pest Helicoverpa armigera. Additionally, in vivo study demonstrated significant reduction in insect body mass (158 mg) as compared to the control insects (265 mg) on 8th day after feeding with CanPI-13 based silica nanospheres. The study confirms that peptide immobilized silica nanosphere is capable of affecting overall growth and development of the feeding insects, which is known to hamper fecundity and fertility of the insects. Our study illustrates the utility and development of peptide-nanocarrier based platform in delivering diverse biologically active complexes specific to gut pH of H. armigera.

  1. Identification and characterization of alpha-I-proteinase inhibitor from common carp sarcoplasmic proteins.

    PubMed

    Siriangkanakun, Siriphon; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y; Yongsawadigul, Jirawat

    2016-02-01

    Purification of proteinase inhibitor from common carp (Cyprinus carpio) sarcoplasmic proteins resulted in 2.8% yield with purification fold of 111. Two inhibitors, namely inhibitor I and II, exhibited molecular mass of 47 and 52 kDa, respectively, based on non-reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Both inhibitors I and II were identified to be alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI) based on LC-MS/MS. They were glycoproteins and molecular mass after peptide-N-glycosidase F treatment was 38 and 45 kDa, respectively. The N-glycosylation sites of both inhibitors were determined to be at N214 and N226. The inhibitors specifically inhibited trypsin. The common carp α1-PI showed high thermal stability with denaturation temperatures of 65.43 and 73.31 °C, which were slightly less than those of ovomucoid. High stability toward NaCl was also evident up to 3M. The common carp α1-PI effectively reduced autolytic degradation of bigeye snapper surimi at the concentration as low as 0.025%.

  2. Specificity of an extracellular proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 on bovine alpha s1-casein.

    PubMed Central

    Rattray, F P; Fox, P F; Healy, A

    1996-01-01

    The specificity of the extracellular proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 on bovine alpha s1-casein was studied. Hydrolysis was monitored over time by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and urea-PAGE. The major pH 4.6-soluble peptides were isolated by high-performance liquid chromatography and identified by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry. The time course of peptide formation indicated that His-8-Gln-9, Ser-161-Gly-162, and either Gln-172-Tyr-173 or Phe-23-Phe-24 were the first, second, and third bonds cleaved, respectively. Other cleavage sites included Asn-19-Leu-20, Phe-32-Gly-33, Tyr-104-Lys-105, Leu-142-Ala-143, Phe-150-Arg-151, Gln-152-Phe-153, Leu-169-Gly-170, and Thr-171-Gln-172. The proteinase had a broad specificity for the amino acid residues at the P1 and P'1 positions but showed a preference for hydrophobic residues at the P2, P3, P4, P'2, P'3, and P'4 positions. PMID:8593051

  3. Specificity of an extracellular proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 on bovine beta-casein.

    PubMed Central

    Rattray, F P; Fox, P F; Healy, A

    1997-01-01

    The specificity of the extracellular proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 on bovine beta-casein was studied. Hydrolysis was monitored over time by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and urea-PAGE. The major pH 4.6-soluble peptides were isolated by high-performance liquid chromatography and identified by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry. The major sites of hydrolysis were Ser-18-Ser-19, Glu-20-Glu-21, Gln-56-Ser-57, Gln-72-Asn-73, Leu-77-Thr-78, Ala-101-Met-102, Phe-119-Thr-120, Leu-139-Leu-140, Ser-142-Trp-143, His-145-Gln-146, Gln-167-Ser-168, Gln-175-Lys-176, Tyr-180-Pro-181, and Phe-190-Leu-191. The proteinase had a broad specificity for the amino acid residues present at the P1 and P'1 positions but showed a preference for hydrophobic residues at the P2, P3, P4, P'2, P'3, and P'4 positions. PMID:9172371

  4. Wound-Inducible Proteinase Inhibitors in Pepper. Differential Regulation upon Wounding, Systemin, and Methyl Jasmonate1

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Daniel S.; Ryan, Clarence A.

    2001-01-01

    Seven small (approximately 6,000 D) wound-inducible proteinase inhibitor proteins were isolated from leaves of pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants that are members of the potato inhibitor II family. N-terminal sequences obtained indicated that the pepper leaf proteinase inhibitors (PLPIs) exhibit homology to two GenBank accessions that code for preproteins containing three isoinhibitors domains each that, when post-translationally processed, can account for the mixture of isoinhibitors that are reported herein from pepper leaves. A constitutive level of PLPI proteins was found in pepper leaves, and these levels increased up to 2.6-fold upon wounding of the lower leaves. Exposing intact plants to methyl jasmonate vapors induced the accumulation of PLPIs. Supplying excised young pepper plants with water through the cut stems induced PLPI proteins to levels higher than those found in intact plants, but with high variability. Supplying the excised plants with systemin did not result in an increase of PLPI levels that were statistically higher than levels found in excised plants. Gel-blot analyses of PLPI induction revealed the presence of two mRNA bands, having slightly different mobilities in agarose gels. Only the low Mr mRNA is present in untreated control plants, and it appears to be responsible for the constitutive levels of PLPI found in leaves. Both mRNA species are wound- and methyl jasmonate-inducible. Only the low- Mr species is weakly induced by systemin, indicating a differential expression of the two PLPI species. PMID:11351092

  5. [Prions and proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors: structural analogs and their consequences. II. Dynamics of prion diseases].

    PubMed

    Verevka, S V

    2000-01-01

    The assumption about pathogenic prions as the proteins supplying the extracellular proteinases transport into intracellular space permits to bring the pathogenesis of prion diseases to order of the known and partially proved process regarding the case of prion diseases. We present the mathematical model of the dynamics of prion pathogenesis explaining the existence of the minimal infectious dose and small influence of its exceeding on the duration of long-term latent period of the disease. According to the model proposed the transformation of the neuronal cell into PrPSc breeder is the result of proteolytic damage of shaperoning system caused by accumulation in the cell of some crucial amount of proteinase-transporting prions. Such an accumulation is considered as the result of successive and centripheral lay-by-lay transformation of compact cellular locus from higher affinity to prions to normal one. The formation in the moveable frontier lays of the wave with high prion consisting and its closing into the locus center leads to dramatic splash of prion concentration even at moderate difference between higher and normal affinity levels. The final concentration of prions depends mainly on the correlation between these affinities whilst on exceeding of some value the dimension of the locus is of no importance.

  6. Structure of the SARS coronavirus main proteinase as an active C{sub 2} crystallographic dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ting; Ooi, Amy; Lee, Hooi Chen; Wilmouth, Rupert; Liu, Ding Xiang; Lescar, Julien

    2005-11-01

    An orthorhombic crystal form of the SARS CoV main proteinase diffracting to a resolution of 1.9 Å is reported. The conformation of residues in the catalytic site indicates an active enzyme. The 34 kDa main proteinase (M{sup pro}) from the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) plays an important role in the virus life cycle through the specific processing of viral polyproteins. As such, SARS-CoV M{sup pro} is a key target for the identification of specific inhibitors directed against the SARS virus. With a view to facilitating the development of such compounds, crystals were obtained of the enzyme at pH 6.5 in the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 that diffract to a resolution of 1.9 Å. These crystals contain one monomer per asymmetric unit and the biologically active dimer is generated via the crystallographic twofold axis. The conformation of the catalytic site indicates that the enzyme is active in the crystalline form and thus suitable for structure-based inhibition studies.

  7. Effect of the Solvent Temperatures on Dynamics of Serine Protease Proteinase K

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Peng; Yang, Qiong; Du, Xing; Yang, Nan; Yang, Li-Quan; Ji, Xing-Lai; Fu, Yun-Xin; Meng, Zhao-Hui; Liu, Shu-Qun

    2016-01-01

    To obtain detailed information about the effect of the solvent temperatures on protein dynamics, multiple long molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of serine protease proteinase K with the solute and solvent coupled to different temperatures (either 300 or 180 K) have been performed. Comparative analyses demonstrate that the internal flexibility and mobility of proteinase K are strongly dependent on the solvent temperatures but weakly on the protein temperatures. The constructed free energy landscapes (FELs) at the high solvent temperatures exhibit a more rugged surface, broader spanning range, and higher minimum free energy level than do those at the low solvent temperatures. Comparison between the dynamic hydrogen bond (HB) numbers reveals that the high solvent temperatures intensify the competitive HB interactions between water molecules and protein surface atoms, and this in turn exacerbates the competitive HB interactions between protein internal atoms, thus enhancing the conformational flexibility and facilitating the collective motions of the protein. A refined FEL model was proposed to explain the role of the solvent mobility in facilitating the cascade amplification of microscopic motions of atoms and atomic groups into the global collective motions of the protein. PMID:26907253

  8. Proteinases involved in the degradation of trypsin inhibitor in germinating mung beans.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K A; Tan-Wilson, A L

    1983-01-01

    The mung bean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) trypsin inhibitor (MBTI) is rapidly modified by limited proteolysis during the early stages of seedling growth. Using an electrophoretic assay that separates the unmodified inhibitor (MBTI-F) and the first two modified species (MBTI-E and -C), a pH optimum of approximately 4 was found for the modification reaction. The inhibitor modifying activity is initially low in ungerminated seeds, with the reaction F leads to E being the primary reaction catalyzed. Activity catalyzing the production of MBTI-C appears on the first day of germination. This activity (F leads to E leads to C) increases up to 6 days after inhibition, at which time the cotyledons begin to abscise. The activity converting MBTI-F and -E to MBTI-C was strongly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (3.3 mM) but only weakly by iodoacetate (9 mM) and not at all by pepstatin A (9 microM), leupeptin (18 microM), or EDTA (5 mM). These results suggest the involvement of proteinases other than the major endopeptidase of the germinating seed, vicilin peptidohydrolase. This conclusion is further supported by gel filtration of the extracts of cotyledons on Sephacryl S-200. At least three proteinases are present in germinated cotyledons capable of modifying MBTI-F to MBTI-C and/or -E. All are distinguishable from vicilin peptidohydrolase on the basis of their molecular weight and inhibition by low molecular weight organic reagents.

  9. Functional Characterization of Cucumis metuliferus Proteinase Inhibitor Gene (CmSPI) in Potyviruses Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Wei; Su, Mei-Hsiu; Lin, Yu-Tsung; Chung, Chien-Hung; Ku, Hsin-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors are ubiquitous proteins that block the active center or interact allosterically with proteinases and are involved in plant physiological processes and defense responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The CmSPI gene identified from Cucumis metuliferus encodes a serine type PI (8 kDa) that belongs to potato I type family. To evaluate the effect of silencing CmSPI gene on Papaya ringspot virus resistance, RNA interference (RNAi) with an inter-space hairpin RNA (ihpRNA) construct was introduced into a PRSV-resistant C. metuliferus line. CmSPI was down-regulated in CmSPI RNAi transgenic lines in which synchronously PRSV symptoms were evident at 21 day post inoculation. Alternatively, heterogeneous expression of CmSPI in Nicotiana benthamiana was also conducted and showed that CmSPI can provide resistance to Potato virus Y, another member of Potyvirus, in transgenic N. benthamiana lines. This study demonstrated that CmSPI plays an important role in resistant function against potyviruses in C. metuliferus and N. benthamiana. PMID:26184285

  10. Specificity of an extracellular proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 on bovine beta-casein.

    PubMed

    Rattray, F P; Fox, P F; Healy, A

    1997-06-01

    The specificity of the extracellular proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 on bovine beta-casein was studied. Hydrolysis was monitored over time by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and urea-PAGE. The major pH 4.6-soluble peptides were isolated by high-performance liquid chromatography and identified by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry. The major sites of hydrolysis were Ser-18-Ser-19, Glu-20-Glu-21, Gln-56-Ser-57, Gln-72-Asn-73, Leu-77-Thr-78, Ala-101-Met-102, Phe-119-Thr-120, Leu-139-Leu-140, Ser-142-Trp-143, His-145-Gln-146, Gln-167-Ser-168, Gln-175-Lys-176, Tyr-180-Pro-181, and Phe-190-Leu-191. The proteinase had a broad specificity for the amino acid residues present at the P1 and P'1 positions but showed a preference for hydrophobic residues at the P2, P3, P4, P'2, P'3, and P'4 positions.

  11. Specificity of an extracellular proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 on bovine alpha s1-casein.

    PubMed

    Rattray, F P; Fox, P F; Healy, A

    1996-02-01

    The specificity of the extracellular proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 on bovine alpha s1-casein was studied. Hydrolysis was monitored over time by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and urea-PAGE. The major pH 4.6-soluble peptides were isolated by high-performance liquid chromatography and identified by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry. The time course of peptide formation indicated that His-8-Gln-9, Ser-161-Gly-162, and either Gln-172-Tyr-173 or Phe-23-Phe-24 were the first, second, and third bonds cleaved, respectively. Other cleavage sites included Asn-19-Leu-20, Phe-32-Gly-33, Tyr-104-Lys-105, Leu-142-Ala-143, Phe-150-Arg-151, Gln-152-Phe-153, Leu-169-Gly-170, and Thr-171-Gln-172. The proteinase had a broad specificity for the amino acid residues at the P1 and P'1 positions but showed a preference for hydrophobic residues at the P2, P3, P4, P'2, P'3, and P'4 positions.

  12. Candida tropicalis Biofilms: Biomass, Metabolic Activity and Secreted Aspartyl Proteinase Production.

    PubMed

    Negri, Melyssa; Silva, Sónia; Capoci, Isis Regina Grenier; Azeredo, Joana; Henriques, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    According to epidemiological data, Candida tropicalis has been related to urinary tract infections and haematological malignancy. Several virulence factors seem to be responsible for C. tropicalis infections, for example: their ability to adhere and to form biofilms onto different indwelling medical devices; their capacity to adhere, invade and damage host human tissues due to enzymes production such as proteinases. The main aim of this work was to study the behaviour of C. tropicalis biofilms of different ages (24-120 h) formed in artificial urine (AU) and their ability to express aspartyl proteinase (SAPT) genes. The reference strain C. tropicalis ATCC 750 and two C. tropicalis isolates from urine were used. Biofilms were evaluated in terms of culturable cells by colony-forming units enumeration; total biofilm biomass was evaluated using the crystal violet staining method; metabolic activity was evaluated by XTT assay; and SAPT gene expression was determined by real-time PCR. All strains of C. tropicalis were able to form biofilms in AU, although with differences between strains. Candida tropicalis biofilms showed a decrease in terms of the number of culturable cells from 48 to 72 h. Generally, SAPT3 was highly expressed. C. tropicalis strains assayed were able to form biofilms in the presence of AU although in a strain- and time-dependent way, and SAPT genes are expressed during C. tropicalis biofilm formation.

  13. Fourier analysis: from cloaking to imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kedi; Cheng, Qiluan; Wang, Guo Ping

    2016-04-01

    Regarding invisibility cloaks as an optical imaging system, we present a Fourier approach to analytically unify both Pendry cloaks and complementary media-based invisibility cloaks into one kind of cloak. By synthesizing different transfer functions, we can construct different devices to realize a series of interesting functions such as hiding objects (events), creating illusions, and performing perfect imaging. In this article, we give a brief review on recent works of applying Fourier approach to analysis invisibility cloaks and optical imaging through scattering layers. We show that, to construct devices to conceal an object, no constructive materials with extreme properties are required, making most, if not all, of the above functions realizable by using naturally occurring materials. As instances, we experimentally verify a method of directionally hiding distant objects and create illusions by using all-dielectric materials, and further demonstrate a non-invasive method of imaging objects completely hidden by scattering layers.

  14. Fourier series expansion for nonlinear Hamiltonian oscillators.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Vicenç; Sans, Cristina; Campos, Daniel; Llopis, Isaac

    2010-06-01

    The problem of nonlinear Hamiltonian oscillators is one of the classical questions in physics. When an analytic solution is not possible, one can resort to obtaining a numerical solution or using perturbation theory around the linear problem. We apply the Fourier series expansion to find approximate solutions to the oscillator position as a function of time as well as the period-amplitude relationship. We compare our results with other recent approaches such as variational methods or heuristic approximations, in particular the Ren-He's method. Based on its application to the Duffing oscillator, the nonlinear pendulum and the eardrum equation, it is shown that the Fourier series expansion method is the most accurate.

  15. Saturated pattern-illuminated Fourier ptychography microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yue; Chen, Youhua; Kuang, Cuifang; Xiu, Peng; Liu, Qiulan; Ge, Baoliang; Liu, Xu

    2017-01-01

    We report a series of simulation studies which extends pattern-illuminated Fourier ptychography microscopy by integrating with the nonlinearity arising from saturation of the fluorophore excited state for super-resolution fluorescence imaging. This extended technique, termed Saturated pattern-illuminated Fourier ptychography (SpiFP) microscopy, could achieve a resolution four times that of wide field when the illuminating light intensity approaches the saturation threshold in simulations. Increasing light intensity leads to further resolution enhancement. In order to demonstrate the performance of SpiFP, we make a comparison between SpiFP and saturated structure illumination microscopy in simulations, and prove that the SpiFP exhibits superior robustness to noise, aberration correcting ability, and pattern’s flexibility. Introducing the saturation of the fluorescent emission brings in notable improvements in imaging performance, implying its potential in nanoscale-sized biological observations by wide-field microscopy.

  16. Electro-optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2005-01-01

    JPL is developing an innovative compact, low mass, Electro-Optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (E-0IFTS) for hyperspectral imaging applications. The spectral region of this spectrometer will be 1 - 2.5 pm (1000 -4000 cm-') to allow high-resolution, high-speed hyperspectral imaging applications [l-51. One application will be theremote sensing of the measurement of a large number of different atmospheric gases simultaneously in the sameairmass. Due to the use of a combination of birefiingent phase retarders and multiple achromatic phase switches toachieve phase delay, this spectrometer is capable of hyperspectral measurements similar to that of the conventionalFourier transform spectrometer but without any moving parts. In this paper, the principle of operations, systemarchitecture and recent experimental progress will be presen.

  17. Electro-optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2005-01-01

    JPL is developing an innovative compact, low mass, Electro-Optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (E-O IFTS) for hyperspectral imaging applications. The spectral region of this spectrometer will be 1 - 2.5 micron (1000-4000/cm) to allow high-resolution, high-speed hyperspectral imaging applications. One application will be the remote sensing of the measurement of a large number of different atmospheric gases simultaneously in the same airmass. Due to the use of a combination of birefringent phase retarders and multiple achromatic phase switches to achieve phase delay, this spectrometer is capable of hyperspectral measurements similar to that of the conventional Fourier transform spectrometer but without any moving parts. In this paper, the principle of operations, system architecture and recent experimental progress will be presented.

  18. Fourier Transform Fabry-Perot Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, Hilary E.; Hays, Paul B.

    1992-01-01

    We are developing a compact, rugged, high-resolution remote sensing instrument with wide spectral scanning capabilities. This relatively new type of instrument, which we have chosen to call the Fourier-Transform Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FT-FPI), is accomplished by mechanically scanning the etalon plates of a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) through a large optical distance while examining the concomitant signal with a Fourier-transform analysis technique similar to that employed by the Michelson interferometer. The FT-FPI will be used initially as a ground-based instrument to study near-infrared atmospheric absorption lines of trace gases using the techniques of solar absorption spectroscopy. Future plans include modifications to allow for measurements of trace gases in the stratosphere using spectral lines at terahertz frequencies.

  19. Dispersive Fourier transformation femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobner, Sven; Fallnich, Carsten

    2016-11-01

    We present the first proof-of-principle spectroscopic measurements with purely passive dispersive Fourier transformation femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering. In femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering, the full Raman scattering spectrum is efficiently obtained, as all Raman transitions are coherently excited with the combination of a narrow-bandwidth and a broad-bandwidth (femtosecond) pulse at once. Currently, the detection speed of the spectra is limited by the read-out time of classical, comparably slow CCD-based spectrometers. We show a reduction in the acquisition time of Raman signatures by applying the dispersive Fourier transformation, a method employing wavelength-to-time transformation, in order to record the spectral composition of a single pulse with a single fast photodiode. This arrangement leads to an acquisition time of Raman signatures, scaling inversely with the repetition frequency of the applied laser system, which in our case corresponds to the order of microseconds.

  20. Computing Fourier integral operators with caustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caday, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Fourier integral operators (FIOs) have widespread applications in imaging, inverse problems, and PDEs. An implementation of a generic algorithm for computing FIOs associated with canonical graphs is presented, based on a recent paper of de Hoop et al. Given the canonical transformation and principal symbol of the operator, a preprocessing step reduces application of an FIO approximately to multiplications, pushforwards and forward and inverse discrete Fourier transforms, which can be computed in O({N}n+(n-1)/2{log}N) time for an n-dimensional FIO. The same preprocessed data also allows computation of the inverse and transpose of the FIO, with identical runtime. Examples demonstrate the algorithm’s output, and easily extendible MATLAB/C++ source code is available from the author.

  1. Quality time with the fractious Fourier family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Harrison H.

    2001-07-01

    The Fourier family comprises a wide variety of mathematical transforms, some of them well established in the image-science community, some lesser known but deserving of more recognition. The goal of this paper is to survey the genealogy of this family and to show some possibly non-obvious applications of each member. Three central premises run through the discussion: (1) There can be no science of imaging without a scientific approach to the evaluation of image quality; (2) Image quality must be defined in terms of the information that is desired from the image and the method of extracting that information; (3) Digital images are discrete data obtained from a continuous object. These considerations will lead us to rely on rather different members of the Fourier family than the ones most often encountered in polite imaging society.

  2. N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Activation May Contribute to Glufosinate Neurotoxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate Receptor Activation May Contribute to Glufosinate Neurotoxicity Glufosinate (GLF) at high levels in mammals causes convulsions through a mechanism that is not completely understood. The structural similarity of GLF to glutamate (GLU) implicates the glutamate...

  3. Purification and characterization of aspartic protease derived from Sf9 insect cells.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Takeshi; Ono, Hiroki; Kikuchi, Ken-Ichi; Nirasawa, Satoru; Takahashi, Saori

    2010-01-01

    An aspartic protease that is significantly produced by baculovirus-infected Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 insect cells was purified to homogeneity from a growth medium. To monitor aspartic protease activity, an internally quenched fluoresce (IQF) substrate specific to cathepsin D was used. The purified aspartic protease showed a single protein band on SDS-PAGE with an apparent molecular mass of 40 kDa. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the enzyme had a high homology to a Bombyx mori aspartic protease. The enzyme showed greatest affinity for the IQF substrate at pH 3.0 with a K(m) of 0.85 µM. The k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) values were 13 s(-1) and 15 s(-1) µM(-1) respectively. Pepstatin A proved to be a potent competitive inhibitor with inhibitor constant, K(i), of 25 pM.

  4. New evidence for the antiquity of man in North America deduced from aspartic acid racemization.

    PubMed

    Bada, J L; Schroeder, R A; Carter, G F

    1974-05-17

    Ages of several Californzia Paleo-Indlian skeletons have been deduced from the extent of aspartic acid racemization. These dates suggest that man was present in North America at least 50,000 years before the present.

  5. Atomic resolution crystal structure of Sapp2p, a secreted aspartic protease from Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Dostál, Jiří; Pecina, Adam; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Marečková, Lucie; Pichová, Iva; Řezáčová, Pavlina; Lepšík, Martin; Brynda, Jiří

    2015-12-01

    The virulence of the Candida pathogens is enhanced by the production of secreted aspartic proteases, which therefore represent possible targets for drug design. Here, the crystal structure of the secreted aspartic protease Sapp2p from Candida parapsilosis was determined. Sapp2p was isolated from its natural source and crystallized in complex with pepstatin A, a classical aspartic protease inhibitor. The atomic resolution of 0.83 Å allowed the protonation states of the active-site residues to be inferred. A detailed comparison of the structure of Sapp2p with the structure of Sapp1p, the most abundant C. parapsilosis secreted aspartic protease, was performed. The analysis, which included advanced quantum-chemical interaction-energy calculations, uncovered molecular details that allowed the experimentally observed equipotent inhibition of both isoenzymes by pepstatin A to be rationalized.

  6. Supporting Aspartate Biosynthesis Is an Essential Function of Respiration in Proliferating Cells.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Lucas B; Gui, Dan Y; Hosios, Aaron M; Bush, Lauren N; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Vander Heiden, Matthew G

    2015-07-30

    Mitochondrial respiration is important for cell proliferation; however, the specific metabolic requirements fulfilled by respiration to support proliferation have not been defined. Here, we show that a major role of respiration in proliferating cells is to provide electron acceptors for aspartate synthesis. This finding is consistent with the observation that cells lacking a functional respiratory chain are auxotrophic for pyruvate, which serves as an exogenous electron acceptor. Further, the pyruvate requirement can be fulfilled with an alternative electron acceptor, alpha-ketobutyrate, which provides cells neither carbon nor ATP. Alpha-ketobutyrate restores proliferation when respiration is inhibited, suggesting that an alternative electron acceptor can substitute for respiration to support proliferation. We find that electron acceptors are limiting for producing aspartate, and supplying aspartate enables proliferation of respiration deficient cells in the absence of exogenous electron acceptors. Together, these data argue a major function of respiration in proliferating cells is to support aspartate synthesis.

  7. Chiral Asymmetric Structures in Aspartic Acid and Valine Crystals Assessed by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Teschke, Omar; Soares, David Mendez

    2016-03-29

    Structures of crystallized deposits formed by the molecular self-assembly of aspartic acid and valine on silicon substrates were imaged by atomic force microscopy. Images of d- and l-aspartic acid crystal surfaces showing extended molecularly flat sheets or regions separated by single molecule thick steps are presented. Distinct orientation surfaces were imaged, which, combined with the single molecule step size, defines the geometry of the crystal. However, single molecule step growth also reveals the crystal chirality, i.e., growth orientations. The imaged ordered lattice of aspartic acid (asp) and valine (val) mostly revealed periodicities corresponding to bulk terminations, but a previously unreported molecular hexagonal lattice configuration was observed for both l-asp and l-val but not for d-asp or d-val. Atomic force microscopy can then be used to identify the different chiral forms of aspartic acid and valine crystals.

  8. Aspartic Acid Racemization and Age-Depth Relationships for Organic Carbon in Siberian Permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinton, Karen L. F.; Tsapin, Alexandre I.; Gilichinsky, David; McDonald, Gene D.

    2002-03-01

    We have analyzed the degree of racemization of aspartic acid in permafrost samples from Northern Siberia, an area from which microorganisms of apparent ages up to a few million years have previously been isolated and cultured. We find that the extent of aspartic acid racemization in permafrost cores increases very slowly up to an age of ~25,000 years (around 5 m in depth). The apparent temperature of racemization over the age range of 0-25,000 years, determined using measured aspartic acid racemization rate constants, is -19°C. This apparent racemization temperature is significantly lower than the measured environmental temperature (-11 to -13°C) and suggests active recycling of D-aspartic acid in Siberian permafrost up to an age of around 25,000 years. This indicates that permafrost organisms are capable of repairing some molecular damage incurred while in a "dormant" state over geologic time.

  9. Fourier analysis on the Heisenberg group

    PubMed Central

    Geller, Daryl

    1977-01-01

    We obtain a usable characterization of the (group) Fourier transform of 𝒮(Hn) (Schwartz space on the Heisenberg group). The characterization involves writing elements of [Formula: see text] as asymptotic series in Planck's constant. In the process, we derive a new “discrete” version of spherical harmonics, and elucidate the theory of group contractions. We give an application to Hardy space theory. PMID:16578749

  10. Exponential Approximations Using Fourier Series Partial Sums

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, Nana S.; Geer, James F.

    1997-01-01

    The problem of accurately reconstructing a piece-wise smooth, 2(pi)-periodic function f and its first few derivatives, given only a truncated Fourier series representation of f, is studied and solved. The reconstruction process is divided into two steps. In the first step, the first 2N + 1 Fourier coefficients of f are used to approximate the locations and magnitudes of the discontinuities in f and its first M derivatives. This is accomplished by first finding initial estimates of these quantities based on certain properties of Gibbs phenomenon, and then refining these estimates by fitting the asymptotic form of the Fourier coefficients to the given coefficients using a least-squares approach. It is conjectured that the locations of the singularities are approximated to within O(N(sup -M-2), and the associated jump of the k(sup th) derivative of f is approximated to within O(N(sup -M-l+k), as N approaches infinity, and the method is robust. These estimates are then used with a class of singular basis functions, which have certain 'built-in' singularities, to construct a new sequence of approximations to f. Each of these new approximations is the sum of a piecewise smooth function and a new Fourier series partial sum. When N is proportional to M, it is shown that these new approximations, and their derivatives, converge exponentially in the maximum norm to f, and its corresponding derivatives, except in the union of a finite number of small open intervals containing the points of singularity of f. The total measure of these intervals decreases exponentially to zero as M approaches infinity. The technique is illustrated with several examples.

  11. Fourier analysis of the SOR iteration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveque, R. J.; Trefethen, L. N.

    1986-01-01

    The SOR iteration for solving linear systems of equations depends upon an overrelaxation factor omega. It is shown that for the standard model problem of Poisson's equation on a rectangle, the optimal omega and corresponding convergence rate can be rigorously obtained by Fourier analysis. The trick is to tilt the space-time grid so that the SOR stencil becomes symmetrical. The tilted grid also gives insight into the relation between convergence rates of several variants.

  12. ISAR Imaging Using Fourier and Wavelet Transforms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    5 B. SCATTERING FROM A SPHERE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 C. IMAGING FROM WEAK-SCATTERER FAR-FIELD DATA USING FOURIER ANALYSIS ...independent of weather conditions, in day or night. With the advent of powerful digital signal processing algorithms, multidimensional signal analysis ...a very long antenna by signal analysis [Ref. 2]. The ability to view or capture a scene improves with a larger aperture (in a binocular or camera), a

  13. Development of an Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    13. Smith, Warren J. Modern Optical Engineering . McGraw Hill Book Company, New York, 1966. 14. Sanderson, R. B. "Fourier Spectroscopy." Molecular...DOWNGRADIP,.G SCHEDU.E 4 PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBERIS) AEDC-TR-86-17 6a. NAME OF PERFORMING ORGANIZATION ~ h Arnold Engineering L...PREFACE The work reported herein was conducted by the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC), Air Force Systems Command (AFSC), from October

  14. Aspartate oxidase plays an important role in Arabidopsis stomatal immunity.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Boutrot, Freddy; Rathjen, John P; Zipfel, Cyril

    2012-08-01

    Perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as bacterial flagellin (or the peptide flg22), by surface-localized receptors activates defense responses and subsequent immunity. In a previous forward-genetic screen aimed at the identification of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) flagellin-insensitive (fin) mutants, we isolated fin4, which is severely affected in flg22-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) bursts. Here, we report that FIN4 encodes the chloroplastic enzyme ASPARTATE OXIDASE (AO), which catalyzes the first irreversible step in the de novo biosynthesis of NAD. Genetic studies on the role of NAD have been hindered so far by the lethality of null mutants in NAD biosynthetic enzymes. Using newly identified knockdown fin alleles, we found that AO is required for the ROS burst mediated by the NADPH oxidase RBOHD triggered by the perception of several unrelated PAMPs. AO is also required for RBOHD-dependent stomatal closure. However, full AO activity is not required for flg22-induced responses that are RBOHD independent. Interestingly, although the fin4 mutation dramatically affects RBOHD function, it does not affect functions carried out by other members of the RBOH family, such as RBOHC and RBOHF. Finally, we determined that AO is required for stomatal immunity against the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae. Altogether, our work reveals a novel specific requirement for AO activity in PAMP-triggered RBOHD-dependent ROS burst and stomatal immunity. In addition, the availability of viable mutants for the chloroplastic enzyme AO will enable future detailed studies on the role of NAD metabolism in different cellular processes, including immunity, in Arabidopsis.

  15. Pharmacology of Triheteromeric N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Cheriyan, John; Balsara, Rashna D.; Hansen, Kasper B.; Castellino, Francis J.

    2016-01-01

    The N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors (NMDARs) are heteromeric cation channels involved in learning, memory, and synaptic plasticity, and their dysregulation leads to various neurodegenerative disorders. Recent evidence has shown that apart from the GluN1/GluN2A and GluN1/GluN2B diheteromeric ion channels, the NMDAR also exists as a GluN1/GluN2A/GluN2B triheteromeric channel that occupies the majority of the synaptic space. These GluN1/GluN2A/GluN2B triheteromers exhibit pharmacological and electrophysiological properties that are distinct from the GluN1/GluN2A and GluN1/GluN2B diheteromeric subtypes. However, these receptors have not been characterized with regards to their inhibition by conantokins, as well as their allosteric modulation by polyamines and extracellular protons. Here, we show that the GluN1/GluN2A/GluN2B triheteromeric channels showed less sensitivity to GluN2B-specific conantokin (con)-G and con-RlB, and subunit non-specific con-T, compared to the GluN2A-specific inhibitor TCN-201. Also, spermine modulation of GluN1/GluN2A/GluN2B triheteromers switched its nature from potentiation to inhibition in a pH dependent manner, and was 2.5-fold slower compared to the GluN1/GluN2B diheteromeric channels. Unraveling the distinctive functional attributes of the GluN1/GluN2A/GluN2B triheteromers is physiologically relevant since they form an integral part of the synapse, which will aid in understanding spermine/pH-dependent potentiation of these receptors in pathological settings. PMID:26917100

  16. Motor axon synapses on renshaw cells contain higher levels of aspartate than glutamate.

    PubMed

    Richards, Dannette S; Griffith, Ronald W; Romer, Shannon H; Alvarez, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    Motoneuron synapses on spinal cord interneurons known as Renshaw cells activate nicotinic, AMPA and NMDA receptors consistent with co-release of acetylcholine and excitatory amino acids (EAA). However, whether these synapses express vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) capable of accumulating glutamate into synaptic vesicles is controversial. An alternative possibility is that these synapses release other EAAs, like aspartate, not dependent on VGLUTs. To clarify the exact EAA concentrated at motor axon synapses we performed a quantitative postembedding colloidal gold immunoelectron analysis for aspartate and glutamate on motor axon synapses (identified by immunoreactivity to the vesicular acetylcholine transporter; VAChT) contacting calbindin-immunoreactive (-IR) Renshaw cell dendrites. The results show that 71% to 80% of motor axon synaptic boutons on Renshaw cells contained aspartate immunolabeling two standard deviations above average neuropil labeling. Moreover, VAChT-IR synapses on Renshaw cells contained, on average, aspartate immunolabeling at 2.5 to 2.8 times above the average neuropil level. In contrast, glutamate enrichment was lower; 21% to 44% of VAChT-IR synapses showed glutamate-IR two standard deviations above average neuropil labeling and average glutamate immunogold density was 1.7 to 2.0 times the neuropil level. The results were not influenced by antibody affinities because glutamate antibodies detected glutamate-enriched brain homogenates more efficiently than aspartate antibodies detecting aspartate-enriched brain homogenates. Furthermore, synaptic boutons with ultrastructural features of Type I excitatory synapses were always labeled by glutamate antibodies at higher density than motor axon synapses. We conclude that motor axon synapses co-express aspartate and glutamate, but aspartate is concentrated at higher levels than glutamate.

  17. Aspartic peptidases of human pathogenic trypanosomatids: perspectives and trends for chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Santos, L O; Garcia-Gomes, A S; Catanho, M; Sodre, C L; Santos, A L S; Branquinha, M H; d'Avila-Levy, C M

    2013-01-01

    Aspartic peptidases are proteolytic enzymes present in many organisms like vertebrates, plants, fungi, protozoa and in some retroviruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). These enzymes are involved in important metabolic processes in microorganisms/virus and play major roles in infectious diseases. Although few studies have been performed in order to identify and characterize aspartic peptidase in trypanosomatids, which include the etiologic agents of leishmaniasis, Chagas' disease and sleeping sickness, some beneficial properties of aspartic peptidase inhibitors have been described on fundamental biological events of these pathogenic agents. In this context, aspartic peptidase inhibitors (PIs) used in the current chemotherapy against HIV (e.g., amprenavir, indinavir, lopinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir and saquinavir) were able to inhibit the aspartic peptidase activity produced by different species of Leishmania. Moreover, the treatment of Leishmania promastigotes with HIV PIs induced several perturbations on the parasite homeostasis, including loss of the motility and arrest of proliferation/growth. The HIV PIs also induced an increase in the level of reactive oxygen species and the appearance of irreversible morphological alterations, triggering parasite death pathways such as programed cell death (apoptosis) and uncontrolled autophagy. The blockage of physiological parasite events as well as the induction of death pathways culminated in its incapacity to adhere, survive and escape of phagocytic cells. Collectively, these results support the data showing that parasites treated with HIV PIs have a significant reduction in the ability to cause in vivo infection. Similarly, the treatment of Trypanosoma cruzi cells with pepstatin A showed a significant inhibition on both aspartic peptidase activity and growth as well as promoted several and irreversible morphological changes. These studies indicate that aspartic peptidases can be promising targets in

  18. Aspartic Peptidases of Human Pathogenic Trypanosomatids: Perspectives and Trends for Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Santos, L.O.; Garcia-Gomes, A.S.; Catanho, M.; Sodré, C.L.; Santos, A.L.S.; Branquinha, M.H.; d’Avila-Levy, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Aspartic peptidases are proteolytic enzymes present in many organisms like vertebrates, plants, fungi, protozoa and in some retroviruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). These enzymes are involved in important metabolic processes in microorganisms/virus and play major roles in infectious diseases. Although few studies have been performed in order to identify and characterize aspartic peptidase in trypanosomatids, which include the etiologic agents of leishmaniasis, Chagas’ disease and sleeping sickness, some beneficial properties of aspartic peptidase inhibitors have been described on fundamental biological events of these pathogenic agents. In this context, aspartic peptidase inhibitors (PIs) used in the current chemotherapy against HIV (e.g., amprenavir, indinavir, lopinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir and saquinavir) were able to inhibit the aspartic peptidase activity produced by different species of Leishmania. Moreover, the treatment of Leishmania promastigotes with HIV PIs induced several perturbations on the parasite homeostasis, including loss of the motility and arrest of proliferation/growth. The HIV PIs also induced an increase in the level of reactive oxygen species and the appearance of irreversible morphological alterations, triggering parasite death pathways such as programed cell death (apoptosis) and uncontrolled autophagy. The blockage of physiological parasite events as well as the induction of death pathways culminated in its incapacity to adhere, survive and escape of phagocytic cells. Collectively, these results support the data showing that parasites treated with HIV PIs have a significant reduction in the ability to cause in vivo infection. Similarly, the treatment of Trypanosoma cruzi cells with pepstatin A showed a significant inhibition on both aspartic peptidase activity and growth as well as promoted several and irreversible morphological changes. These studies indicate that aspartic peptidases can be promising targets in

  19. The standard enthalpies of formation of crystalline N-(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid and its aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernyavskaya, N. V.; Volkov, A. V.; Nikol'Skii, V. M.

    2007-07-01

    The energy of combustion of N-(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid (CMAA) was determined by bomb calorimetry in oxygen. The standard enthalpies of combustion and formation of crystalline N-(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid were calculated. The heat effects of solution of crystalline CMAA in water and a solution of sodium hydroxide were measured at 298.15 K by direct calorimetry. The standard enthalpies of formation of CMAA and its dissociation products in aqueous solution were determined.

  20. Infrared and Raman spectra of DL-aspartic acid nitrate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajkumar, B. J. M.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Rajaram, R. K.

    1998-09-01

    Infrared and Raman spectral studies of DL-aspartic acid nitrate monohydrate help to determine the influence of extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the aspartic acid crystal. The presence of the carbonyl rather than the carboxylic group indicates that the molecule is ionic. The shifting of several group frequencies in the molecule confirms extensive hydrogen bonding. The anion fundamentals however continue to be degenerate. This indicates that its symmetry is unaffected in the molecule.

  1. Coordinate expression of the Porphyromonas gingivalis lysine-specific gingipain proteinase, Kgp, arginine-specific gingipain proteinase, RgpA, and the heme/hemoglobin receptor, HmuR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyan; Sroka, Aneta; Potempa, Jan; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2004-11-01

    Heme utilization in Porphyromonas gingivalis requires the participation of an outer membrane hemin/hemoglobin receptor, HmuR, the lysine-specific gingipain proteinase (Kgp) and arginine-specific gingipain proteinase (Rgp). In this study, the expression of hmuR , kgp and rgpA genes in response to growth with different heme sources was examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunoassay. Coordinate regulation of hmuR , kgp and rgpA gene expression was evaluated through utilization of P. gingivalis hmuR and kgp mutants or by selective inactivation of proteinases with Kgp- and Rgp-specific inhibitors. We observed that expression of the kgp and rgpA genes was not tightly regulated by heme, but rather by the growth phase. In contrast, expression of the hmuR gene was negatively regulated by heme, while growth of P. gingivalis with human serum resulted in increased hmuR expression. A P. gingivalis kgp isogenic mutant demonstrated significantly increased hmuR gene expression, and inactivation of Kgp and Rgp activity by specific inhibitors up-regulated hmuR gene transcription. Moreover, inactivation of Kgp up-regulated rgpA transcription. Finally, a P. gingivalis hmuR mutant exhibited repressed kgp gene expression and lysine-specific proteinase activity. Collectively, these results indicate that kgp , rgpA and hmuR gene transcription is coordinately regulated and may facilitate greater efficiency of heme utilization in P. gingivalis .

  2. Human cytomegalovirus maturational proteinase: expression in Escherichia coli, purification, and enzymatic characterization by using peptide substrate mimics of natural cleavage sites.

    PubMed Central

    Burck, P J; Berg, D H; Luk, T P; Sassmannshausen, L M; Wakulchik, M; Smith, D P; Hsiung, H M; Becker, G W; Gibson, W; Villarreal, E C

    1994-01-01

    The proteolytic processing of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) assembly protein, resulting in truncation of its C terminus, is an essential step in virion maturation. The proteinase responsible for this cleavage is the amino-terminal half of the protein encoded by the UL80a open reading fame. We have obtained high expression levels of this 256-amino-acid HCMV proteinase, assemblin, in Escherichia coli. In addition to the 28-kDa proteinase, a 15-kDa protein comprising the first 143 amino acids and a 13-kDa protein comprising the last 113 amino acids of the 28-kDa HCMV proteinase were present. Both the 28-kDa proteinase and the 15-kDa protein were purified by a two-step chromatographic procedure utilizing anion exchange in urea and dithiothreitol and size exclusion in NaSCN and dithiothreitol. Activation of the purified 28-kDa proteinase required denaturation in urea as well as complete reduction of all five cysteine residues in the molecule. Removal of the urea by dialysis with retention of the reducing agent yielded an active proteinase. Addition of glycerol to 50% enhanced the activity. The HCMV proteinase cleaved the peptides RGVVNASSRLAK and SYVKASVSPE, which are mimics of the maturational (M)- and release (R)-site sequences, respectively, in the UL80a-encoded protein. The cleavage site in the peptides was at the same Ala-Ser scissile bond as observed in the UL80a protein. The Km value for the cleavage of RGVVNASSRLAK (M-site mimic) by the proteinase was similar to that for SYVKASVSPE (R-site mimic), but the turnover (kcat) of the M-site peptide mimic substrate by the proteinase was six to eight times faster. The peptide homologs of the herpes simplex virus type 1 M- and R-site sequences in the UL26-encoded protein were also cleaved by the HCMV proteinase, although at rates slower than those for the HCMV substrates. The HCMV proteinase was inhibited by Zn2+ and by alkylating agents, but only at very high inhibitor concentrations. The purified 15-kDa protein

  3. The derivative-free Fourier shell identity for photoacoustics.

    PubMed

    Baddour, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    In X-ray tomography, the Fourier slice theorem provides a relationship between the Fourier components of the object being imaged and the measured projection data. The Fourier slice theorem is the basis for X-ray Fourier-based tomographic inversion techniques. A similar relationship, referred to as the 'Fourier shell identity' has been previously derived for photoacoustic applications. However, this identity relates the pressure wavefield data function and its normal derivative measured on an arbitrary enclosing aperture to the three-dimensional Fourier transform of the enclosed object evaluated on a sphere. Since the normal derivative of pressure is not normally measured, the applicability of the formulation is limited in this form. In this paper, alternative derivations of the Fourier shell identity in 1D, 2D polar and 3D spherical polar coordinates are presented. The presented formulations do not require the normal derivative of pressure, thereby lending the formulas directly adaptable for Fourier based absorber reconstructions.

  4. Lowered circulating aspartate is a metabolic feature of human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guoxiang; Zhou, Bingsen; Zhao, Aihua; Qiu, Yunping; Zhao, Xueqing; Garmire, Lana; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Yu, Herbert; Yen, Yun; Jia, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Distinct metabolic transformation is essential for cancer cells to sustain a high rate of proliferation and resist cell death signals. Such a metabolic transformation results in unique cellular metabolic phenotypes that are often reflected by distinct metabolite signatures in tumor tissues as well as circulating blood. Using a metabolomics platform, we find that breast cancer is associated with significantly (p = 6.27E-13) lowered plasma aspartate levels in a training group comprising 35 breast cancer patients and 35 controls. The result was validated with 103 plasma samples and 183 serum samples of two groups of primary breast cancer patients. Such a lowered aspartate level is specific to breast cancer as it has shown 0% sensitivity in serum from gastric (n = 114) and colorectal (n = 101) cancer patients. There was a significantly higher level of aspartate in breast cancer tissues (n = 20) than in adjacent non-tumor tissues, and in MCF-7 breast cancer cell line than in MCF-10A cell lines, suggesting that the depleted level of aspartate in blood of breast cancer patients is due to increased tumor aspartate utilization. Together, these findings suggest that lowed circulating aspartate is a key metabolic feature of human breast cancer. PMID:26452258

  5. Hydrolysis of aspartic acid phosphoramidate nucleotides: a comparative quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Michielssens, Servaas; Tien Trung, Nguyen; Froeyen, Matheus; Herdewijn, Piet; Tho Nguyen, Minh; Ceulemans, Arnout

    2009-09-07

    L-Aspartic acid has recently been found to be a good leaving group during HIV reverse transcriptase catalyzed incorporation of deoxyadenosine monophosphate (dAMP) in DNA. This showed that L-Asp is a good mimic for the pyrophosphate moiety of deoxyadenosine triphosphate. The present work explores the thermochemistry and mechanism for hydrolysis of several models for L-aspartic-dAMP using B3LYP/DGDZVP, MP2/6-311++G** and G3MP2 level of theory. The effect of the new compound is gradually investigated: starting from a simple methyl amine leaving group up to the aspartic acid leaving group. The enzymatic environment was mimicked by involving two Mg(2+) ions and some important active site residues in the reaction. All reactions are compared to the corresponding O-coupled leaving group, which is methanol for methyl amine and malic acid for aspartic acid. With methyl amine as a leaving group a tautomeric associative or tautomeric dissociative mechanism is preferred and the barrier is lower than the comparable mechanism with methanol as a leaving group. The calculations on the aspartic acid in the enzymatic environment show that qualitatively the mechanism is the same as for triphosphate but the barrier for hydrolysis by the associative mechanism is higher for L-aspartic-dAMP than for L-malic-dAMP and pyrophosphate.

  6. Ontogeny of malate-aspartate shuttle capacity and gene expression in cardiac mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Scholz, T D; Koppenhafer, S L; tenEyck, C J; Schutte, B C

    1998-03-01

    Developmental downregulation of the malate-aspartate shuttle has been observed in cardiac mitochondria. The goals of this study were to determine the time course of the postnatal decline and to identify potential regulatory sites by measuring steady-state myocardial mRNA and protein levels of the mitochondrial proteins involved in the shuttle. By use of isolated porcine cardiac mitochondria incubated with saturating concentrations of the cytosolic components of the malate-aspartate shuttle, shuttle capacity was found to decline by approximately 50% during the first 5 wk of life (from 921 +/- 48 to 531 +/- 53 nmol.min-1.mg protein-1). Mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase mRNA levels were greater in adult than in newborn myocardium. mRNA levels of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase in adult cardiac tissue were 224% of levels in newborn tissue, whereas protein levels were 54% greater in adult myocardium. Aspartate/glutamate carrier protein levels were also greater in adult than in newborn tissue. mRNA and protein levels of the oxoglutarate/malate carrier were increased in newborn myocardium. It was concluded that 1) myocardial malate-aspartate shuttle capacity declines rapidly after birth, 2) divergence of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase mRNA and protein levels during development suggests posttranscriptional regulation of this protein, and 3) the developmental decline in malate-aspartate shuttle capacity is regulated by decreased oxoglutarate/malate carrier gene expression.

  7. Hyperbolic cross truncations for stochastic Fourier cosine series.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihua

    2014-01-01

    Based on our decomposition of stochastic processes and our asymptotic representations of Fourier cosine coefficients, we deduce an asymptotic formula of approximation errors of hyperbolic cross truncations for bivariate stochastic Fourier cosine series. Moreover we propose a kind of Fourier cosine expansions with polynomials factors such that the corresponding Fourier cosine coefficients decay very fast. Although our research is in the setting of stochastic processes, our results are also new for deterministic functions.

  8. Fourier removal of stripe artifacts in IRAS images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Buren, Dave

    1987-01-01

    By working in the Fourier plane, approximate removal of stripe artifacts in IRAS images can be effected. The image of interest is smoothed and subtracted from the original, giving the high-spatial-frequency part. This 'filtered' image is then clipped to remove point sources and then Fourier transformed. Subtracting the Fourier components contributing to the stripes in this image from the Fourier transform of the original and transforming back to the image plane yields substantial removal of the stripes.

  9. Fourier Transforms Simplified: Computing an Infrared Spectrum from an Interferogram

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanley, Quentin S.

    2012-01-01

    Fourier transforms are used widely in chemistry and allied sciences. Examples include infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectroscopies. A thorough understanding of Fourier methods assists the understanding of microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and diffraction gratings. The theory of Fourier transforms has been presented in this "Journal",…

  10. Some Applications of Fourier's Great Discovery for Beginners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2012-01-01

    Nearly two centuries ago, Fourier discovered that any periodic function of period T can be presented as a sum of sine waveforms of frequencies equal to an integer times the fundamental frequency [omega] = 2[pi]/T (Fourier's series). It is impossible to overestimate the importance of Fourier's discovery, and all physics or engineering students…

  11. On-line textile quality control using optical Fourier transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellini, C.; Francini, F.; Longobardi, G.; Tiribilli, B.; Sansoni, P.

    Fourier transformation and spatial filtering offer the possibility of detecting structural defects in a fabric. In this paper a method based on an optical Fourier transform technique during the weaving process is described. Significant variations in the Fourier pattern occurring in the presence of defective fabric are recognised with a CCD sensor joined to an electronic hardware system performing a simple algorithm.

  12. Effects of cysteine proteinase inhibitors scN and E-64 on southern corn rootworm larval development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The southern corn rootworm (SCRW) can be a serious pest of peanut pods. A laboratory bioassay was developed to test feeding cysteine proteinase inhibitors soyacystatin N (scN) and E-64 against southern corn rootworm reared on artificial diet to determine the effects on larvae development and mortal...

  13. Granzyme M is a regulatory protease that inactivates proteinase inhibitor 9, an endogenous inhibitor of granzyme B.

    PubMed

    Mahrus, Sami; Kisiel, Walter; Craik, Charles S

    2004-12-24

    Granzyme M is a trypsin-fold serine protease that is specifically found in the granules of natural killer cells. This enzyme has been implicated recently in the induction of target cell death by cytotoxic lymphocytes, but unlike granzymes A and B, the molecular mechanism of action of granzyme M is unknown. We have characterized the extended substrate specificity of human granzyme M by using purified recombinant enzyme, several positional scanning libraries of coumarin substrates, and a panel of individual p-nitroanilide and coumarin substrates. In contrast to previous studies conducted using thiobenzyl ester substrates (Smyth, M. J., O'Connor, M. D., Trapani, J. A., Kershaw, M. H., and Brinkworth, R. I. (1996) J. Immunol. 156, 4174-4181), a strong preference for leucine at P1 over methionine was demonstrated. The extended substrate specificity was determined to be lysine = norleucine at P4, broad at P3, proline > alanine at P2, and leucine > norleucine > methionine at P1. The enzyme activity was found to be highly dependent on the length and sequence of substrates, indicative of a regulatory function for human granzyme M. Finally, the interaction between granzyme M and the serpins alpha(1)-antichymotrypsin, alpha(1)-proteinase inhibitor, and proteinase inhibitor 9 was characterized by using a candidate-based approach to identify potential endogenous inhibitors. Proteinase inhibitor 9 was effectively hydrolyzed and inactivated by human granzyme M, raising the possibility that this orphan granzyme bypasses proteinase inhibitor 9 inhibition of granzyme B.

  14. Highly conserved salt bridge stabilizes a proteinase K subfamily enzyme, Aqualysin I, from Thermus aquaticus YT-1.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Osaku, Kanae; Maejima, Susumu; Ohno, Nao; Sugahara, Yasusato; Oyama, Fumitaka; Kawakita, Masao

    2014-01-01

    The proteinase K subfamily enzymes, thermophilic Aqualysin I (AQN) from Thermus aquaticus YT-1 and psychrophilic serine protease (VPR) from Vibrio sp. PA-44, have six and seven salt bridges, respectively. To understand the possible significance of salt bridges in the thermal stability of AQN, we prepared mutant proteins in which amino acid residues participating in salt bridges common to proteinase K subfamily members and intrinsic to AQN were replaced to disrupt the bridges one at a time. Disruption of a salt bridge common to proteinase K subfamily enzymes in the D183N mutant resulted in a significant reduction in thermal stability, and a massive change in the content of the secondary structure was observed, even at 70°C, in the circular dichroism (CD) analysis. These results indicate that the common salt bridge Asp183-Arg12 is important in maintaining the conformation of proteinase K subfamily enzymes and suggest the importance of proximity between the regions around Asp183 and the N-terminal region around Arg12. Of the three mutants that lack an AQN intrinsic salt bridge, D212N was more prone to unfolding at 80°C than the wild-type enzyme. Similarly, D17N and E237Q were less thermostable than the wild-type enzyme, although this may be partially due to increased autolysis. The AQN intrinsic salt bridges appear to confer additional thermal stability to this enzyme. These findings will further our understanding of the factors involved in stabilizing protein structure.

  15. DNase I and proteinase K impair Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation and induce dispersal of pre-existing biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Uyen T; Burrows, Lori L

    2014-09-18

    Current sanitation methods in the food industry are not always sufficient for prevention or dispersal of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms. Here, we determined if prevention of adherence or dispersal of existing biofilms could occur if biofilm matrix components were disrupted enzymatically. Addition of DNase during biofilm formation reduced attachment (<50% of control) to polystyrene. Treatment of established 72h biofilms with 100μg/ml of DNase for 24h induced incomplete biofilm dispersal, with <25% biofilm remaining compared to control. In contrast, addition of proteinase K completely inhibited biofilm formation, and 72h biofilms-including those grown under stimulatory conditions-were completely dispersed with 100μg/ml proteinase K. Generally-regarded-as-safe proteases bromelain and papain were less effective dispersants than proteinase K. In a time course assay, complete dispersal of L. monocytogenes biofilms from both polystyrene and type 304H food-grade stainless steel occurred within 5min at proteinase K concentrations above 25μg/ml. These data confirm that both DNA and proteins are required for L. monocytogenes biofilm development and maintenance, and that these components of the biofilm matrix can be targeted for effective prevention and removal of biofilms.

  16. Alpha-2-macroglobulin functions as an inhibitor of fibrinolytic, clotting, and neutrophilic proteinases in sepsis: studies using a baboon model.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J P; Creasey, A A; Chang, A; Abbink, J J; Roem, D; Eerenberg, A J; Hack, C E; Taylor, F B

    1993-12-01

    Alpha-2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) may function as a proteinase inhibitor in vivo. Levels of this protein are decreased in sepsis, but the reason these levels are low is unknown. Therefore, we analyzed the behavior of alpha 2M in a baboon model for sepsis. Upon challenge with a lethal (4 baboons) or a sublethal (10 baboons) dose of Escherichia coli, levels of inactivated alpha 2M (i alpha 2M) steadily increased, the changes being more pronounced in the animals that received the lethal dose. The rise in i alpha 2M significantly correlated with the increase of thrombin-antithrombin III, plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin, and, to a lesser extent, with that of elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin complexes, raising the question of involvement of fibrinolytic, clotting, and neutrophilic proteinases in the inactivation of alpha 2M. Experiments with chromogenic substrates confirmed that thrombin, plasmin, elastase, and cathepsin G indeed had formed complexes with alpha 2M. Changes in alpha 2M similar to those observed in the animals that received E. coli occurred in baboons challenged with Staphylococcus aureus, indicating that alpha 2M formed complexes with the proteinases just mentioned in gram-positive sepsis as well. We conclude that alpha 2M in this baboon model for sepsis is inactivated by formation of complexes with proteinases, derived from activated neutrophils and from fibrinolytic and coagulation cascades. We suggest that similar mechanisms may account for the decreased alpha 2M levels in clinical sepsis.

  17. Microplate fluorescence protease assays test the inhibition of select North American snake venoms' activities with an anti-proteinase library.

    PubMed

    Price, Joseph A

    2015-09-01

    Snake envenomation is a relatively neglected significant world health problem, designated an orphan disease by the WHO. While often effective, antivenins are insufficient. Could another approach greatly aid inhibition of the venom toxins? New fluorescent substrates for measuring protease activity in microplate assays suitable for high throughput screening were tested and found reproducible with snake venom. Representative North American venoms showed relatively strong proteinase and collagenase, but weaker elastase activities. Caseinolytic activity is inhibited by the nonspecific proteinase inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline and by EDTA, as is collagenase activity, consistent with the action of metalloproteinases. Both general protease and collagenase assays CV average 3%, and Km measured were above normal working conditions. Using a library of anti -proteinase compounds with multiple venoms revealed high inhibitor activity by three agents with known multiple metalloproteinase inhibitor activity (Actinonin, GM6001, and NNGH), which incidentally supports the concept that much of the degradative activity of certain venoms is due to metalloproteinases with collagenase activity. These results together support the use of microplate proteinase assays, particularly this collagenase assay, in future drug repurposing studies leading to the development of new treatments for those envenomations that have a major proteolytic component in their pathophysiology.

  18. Divalent metals stabilize cellular prion proteins and alter the rate of proteinase-K dependent limited proteolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The key biochemical event in the pathogenesis of prion diseases is the conversion of normal cellular prion proteins (PrP**c) to the proteinase K (PK) resistant, abnormal form (PrP**sc); however, the cellular mechanisms underlying the conversion remain enigmatic. Binding of divalent ca...

  19. Temperature dependence of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channels and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor excitatory postsynaptic currents.

    PubMed

    Korinek, M; Sedlacek, M; Cais, O; Dittert, I; Vyklicky, L

    2010-02-03

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (NMDARs) are highly expressed in the CNS and mediate the slow component of excitatory transmission. The present study was aimed at characterizing the temperature dependence of the kinetic properties of native NMDARs, with special emphasis on the deactivation of synaptic NMDARs. We used patch-clamp recordings to study synaptic NMDARs at layer II/III pyramidal neurons of the rat cortex, recombinant GluN1/GluN2B receptors expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells, and NMDARs in cultured hippocampal neurons. We found that time constants characterizing the deactivation of NMDAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were similar to those of the deactivation of responses to a brief application of glutamate recorded under conditions of low NMDAR desensitization (whole-cell recording from cultured hippocampal neurons). In contrast, the deactivation of NMDAR-mediated responses exhibiting a high degree of desensitization (outside-out recording) was substantially faster than that of synaptic NMDA receptors. The time constants characterizing the deactivation of synaptic NMDARs and native NMDARs activated by exogenous glutamate application were only weakly temperature sensitive (Q(10)=1.7-2.2), in contrast to those of recombinant GluN1/GluN2B receptors, which are highly temperature sensitive (Q(10)=2.7-3.7). Ifenprodil reduced the amplitude of NMDAR-mediated EPSCs by approximately 50% but had no effect on the time course of deactivation. Analysis of GluN1/GluN2B responses indicated that the double exponential time course of deactivation reflects mainly agonist dissociation and receptor desensitization. We conclude that the temperature dependences of native and recombinant NMDAR are different; in addition, we contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanism that controls the time course of NMDAR-mediated EPSCs.

  20. Expression of the maize proteinase inhibitor (mpi) gene in rice plants enhances resistance against the striped stem borer (Chilo suppressalis): effects on larval growth and insect gut proteinases.

    PubMed

    Vila, Laura; Quilis, Jordi; Meynard, Donaldo; Breitler, Jean Christophe; Marfà, Victoria; Murillo, Isabel; Vassal, Jean Michel; Messeguer, Joaquima; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; San Segundo, Blanca

    2005-03-01

    The maize proteinase inhibitor (mpi) gene was introduced into two elite japonica rice varieties. Both constitutive expression of the mpi gene driven by the maize ubiquitin 1 promoter and wound-inducible expression of the mpi gene driven by its own promoter resulted in the accumulation of MPI protein in the transgenic plants. No effect on plant phenotype was observed in mpi-expressing lines. The stability of transgene expression through successive generations of mpi rice lines (up to the T(4) generation) and the production of functional MPI protein were confirmed. Expression of the mpi gene in rice enhanced resistance to the striped stem borer (Chilo suppressalis), one of the most important pests of rice. In addition, transgenic mpi plants were evaluated in terms of their effects on the growth of C. suppressalis larvae and the insect digestive proteolytic system. An important dose-dependent reduction of larval weight of C. suppressalis larvae fed on mpi rice, compared with larvae fed on untransformed rice plants, was observed. Analysis of the digestive proteolytic activity from the gut of C. suppressalis demonstrated that larvae adapted to mpi transgene expression by increasing the complement of digestive proteolytic activity: the serine and cysteine endoproteinases as well as the exopeptidases leucine aminopeptidase and carboxypeptidases A and B. However, the induction of such proteolytic activity did not prevent the deleterious effects of MPI on larval growth. The introduction of the mpi gene into rice plants can thus be considered as a promising strategy to protect rice plants against striped stem borer.

  1. A role for trigger factor and an rgg-like regulator in the transcription, secretion and processing of the cysteine proteinase of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, W R; Gibson, C M; Caparon, M G

    1998-01-01

    The ability of numerous microorganisms to cause disease relies upon the highly regulated expression of secreted proteinases. In this study, mutagenesis with a novel derivative of Tn4001 was used to identify genes required for the expression of the secreted cysteine proteinase (SCP) of the pathogenic Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes. Designated as Rop loci (regulation of proteinase), ropB is a rgg-like transcriptional activator required for transcription of the gene which encodes the proteinase. In contrast, ropA contributes post-transcriptionally to the secretion and processing of SCP and encodes a homologue of Trigger Factor, a peptidyl-prolyl isomerase and putative chaparone which is highly conserved in most bacterial species, but of unknown function. Analysis of additional ropA mutants demonstrated that RopA acts both to assist in targeting SCP to the secretory pathway and to promote the ability of the proprotein to establish an active conformation upon secretion. This latter function was dependent upon the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase domain of RopA and mutants that lacked this domain exhibited a bipartite deficiency manifested as a kinetic defect in autologous processing of the proprotein to the mature proteinase, and as a catalytic defect in the mature proteinase. These results provide insight into the function of Trigger Factor, the regulation of proteinase activity and the mechanism of secretion in Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:9799235

  2. Distortion of the catalytic domain of tissue-type plasminogen activator by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 coincides with the formation of stable serpin-proteinase complexes.

    PubMed

    Perron, Michel J; Blouse, Grant E; Shore, Joseph D

    2003-11-28

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a typical member of the serpin family that kinetically traps its target proteinase as a covalent complex by distortion of the proteinase domain. Incorporation of the fluorescently silent 4-fluorotryptophan analog into PAI-1 permitted us to observe changes in the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of two-chain tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and the proteinase domain of tPA during the inhibition reaction. We demonstrated three distinct conformational changes of the proteinase that occur during complex formation and distortion. A conformational change occurred during the initial formation of the non-covalent Michaelis complex followed by a large conformational change associated with the distortion of the proteinase catalytic domain that occurs concurrently with the formation of stable proteinase-inhibitor complexes. Following distortion, a very slow structural change occurs that may be involved in the stabilization or regulation of the trapped complex. Furthermore, by comparing the inhibition rates of two-chain tPA and the proteinase domain of tPA by PAI-1, we demonstrate that the accessory domains of tPA play a prominent role in the initial formation of the non-covalent Michaelis complex.

  3. L-aspartic acid transport by cat erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.W.; Preston, R.L.

    1986-03-01

    Cat and dog red cells are unusual in that they have no Na/K ATPase and contain low K and high Na intracellularly. They also show significant Na dependent L-aspartate (L-asp) transport. The authors have characterized this system in cat RBCs. The influx of /sup 3/H-L-asp (typically 2..mu..M) was measured in washed RBCs incubated for 60 s at 37/sup 0/C in medium containing 140 mM NaCl, 5 mM Kcl, 2 mM CaCl/sub 2/, 15 mM MOPS pH 7.4, 5 mM glucose, and /sup 14/C-PEG as a space marker. The cells were washed 3 times in the medium immediately before incubation which was terminated by centrifuging the RBCs through a layer of dibutylphthalate. Over an L-asp concentration range of 0.5-1000..mu..M, influx obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a small added linear diffusion component. The Kt and Jmax of the saturable component were 5.40 +/- 0.34 ..mu..M and 148.8 +/- 7.2 ..mu..mol 1. cell/sup -1/h/sup -1/ respectively. Replacement of Na with Li, K, Rb, Cs or choline reduce influx to diffusion. With the addition of asp analogues (4/sup +/M L-asp, 40/sup +/M inhibitor), the following sequence of inhibition was observed (range 80% to 40% inhib.): L-glutamate > L-cysteine sulfonate > D-asp > L-cysteic acid > D-glutamate. Other amino acids such as L-alanine, L-proline, L-lysine, L-cysteine, and taurine showed no inhibition (<5%). These data suggest that cat red cells contain a high-affinity Na dependent transport system for L-asp, glutamate, and closely related analogues which resembles that found in the RBCs of other carnivores and in neural tissues.

  4. A snake-like serine proteinase (PmSnake) activates prophenoloxidase-activating system in black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Monwan, Warunthorn; Amparyup, Piti; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2017-02-01

    Clip domain serine proteinases (ClipSPs) play critical roles in the activation of proteolytic cascade in invertebrate immune systems including the prophenoloxidase (proPO) activating system. In this study, we characterized a snake-like serine protease, namely PmSnake, from the shrimp Penaeus monodon which has previously been identified based on the subtractive cDNA library of proPO double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-treated hemocytes. An open reading frame of PmSnake contains 1068 bp encoding a predicted protein of 355 amino acid residues with a putative signal peptide of 22 amino acids and two conserved domains (N-terminal clip domain and C-terminal trypsin-like serine proteinase domain). Sequence analysis revealed that PmSnake was closest to the AeSnake from ant Acromyrmex echinatior (53% similarity), but was quite relatively distant from other shrimp PmclipSPs. PmSnake transcript was mainly expressed in shrimp hemocytes and up-regulated after systemic Vibrio harveyi infection indicating that it is an immune-responsive gene. Suppression of PmSnake expression by dsRNA interference reduced both transcript and protein levels leading to a reduction of the hemolymph phenoloxidase (PO) activity (36%), compared to the control, suggesting that the PmSnake functions as a clip-SP in shrimp proPO system. Western blot analysis using anti-PmSnake showed that the PmSnake was detected in hemocytes but not in cell-free plasma. In vitro PO activity and serine proteinase activity assays showed that adding rPmSnake into the shrimp hemolymph could increase PO activity as well as serine proteinase activity suggesting that the rPmSnake activates the proPO system via serine proteinase cascade.

  5. Substrate Specificity of the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in Reconstituted Liposomes*

    PubMed Central

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-01-01

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of l-aspartate1− with l-alanine0. Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, l-aspartate1−:l-alanine0 antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His6-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (Km = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for l-aspartate, Km = 0.098 ± 0 mm for d-aspartate, Km = 26 ± 2 mm for l-alanine, Km = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for d-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of l-aspartate or l-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that l-cysteine selectively inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited l-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, l-serine selectively inhibited l-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs l-cysteine sulfinic acid, l-cysteic acid, and d-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange compared with l-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT. PMID:21719707

  6. Substrate specificity of the aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in reconstituted liposomes.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-08-19

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of L-aspartate(1-) with L-alanine(0). Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, L-aspartate(1-):L-alanine(0) antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of L-aspartate and L-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His(6)-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (K(m) = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for L-aspartate, K(m) = 0.098 ± 0 mm for D-aspartate, K(m) = 26 ± 2 mm for L-alanine, K(m) = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for D-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of L-aspartate or L-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that L-cysteine selectively inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited L-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, L-serine selectively inhibited L-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs L-cysteine sulfinic acid, L-cysteic acid, and D-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange compared with L-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of L-aspartate and L-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT.

  7. Elliptic Fourier analysis of mandibular shape.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Guazzi, M; Serrao, G

    1996-01-01

    Craniofacial growth and development involve both size and shape variations. Shape variations can be assessed independently from size using mathematical methods such as the elliptic Fourier analysis, which allows a global evaluation of the shape of organs identified by their outlines independently from size, spatial orientation, and relation to reference planes. The mandibular outlines were digitized from the tracings of the Bolton standards (lateral view) from 1 to 18 years of age, and the age differences in shape independently from size were quantified using the elliptic Fourier series. A "morphologic distance" MD (i.e., a measurement of differences in shape) between each younger mandible and the oldest one was computed using the relevant Fourier coefficients like the cartesian coordinates in standard metric measurements. MD equals 0 when the profiles are identical. MD (Y) between the Bolton standard at 18 years of age and all the other Bolton tracings were significantly correlated (correlation coefficient r = 0.987, P < or = 0.001) with age (X) (semi-logarithmic interpolation Y = -3.87.log(e) X + 13.593). Differences between the size-independent shape of the Bolton standard at 18 years and the relevant plot at 1 year were located at the chin, gonion, coronoid process, anterior border of the ramus. Size differences were measured from the areas enclosed by the mandibular outlines. Mandibular area (Y) increased about 2.58 times from 1 to 18 years of age (X) (Y = -0.071.X2 + 4.917.X + 35.904, r = 0.997, P < or = 0.001). The shape effect was largely overwhelmed by the very evident size increments, and it could be measured only using the proper mathematical methods. The method developed could also be applied to the comparison between healthy and diseased individuals.

  8. Characterization of Yeast Aspartic Protease 3 (A novel basic-residue specific prohormone processing enzyme)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-05-16

    proteinases with naturallyw occurring inhibitors from aclinomycetes and ascaris lumbricoides . 1. Enzyme Inhibition, 1985. 1 : p. 77-82. 11 8...evident surrounding the periphery of the yeast cell (Fig.8.A and C). This staining pattern, described as a doughnut shaped pattern is characteristic ...number of peptide hormone substrates. it was necessary to develop a purification procedure in order to be able to verify some of these characteristics

  9. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of deuterated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcano O., A.; Markushin, Y.; Melikechi, N.; Connolly, D.

    2008-08-01

    We report on Fourier transform spectra of deuterated proteins: Bovine Serum Albumin, Leptin, Insulin-like Growth Factor II, monoclonal antibody to ovarian cancer antigen CA125 and Osteopontin. The spectra exhibit changes in the relative amplitude and spectral width of certain peaks. New peaks not present in the non-deuterated sample are also observed. Ways for improving the deuteration of proteins by varying the temperature and dilution time are discussed. We propose the use of deuterated proteins to increase the sensitivity of immunoassays aimed for early diagnostic of diseases most notably cancer.

  10. Phase amplitude conformal symmetry in Fourier transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, S.

    2015-04-01

    For the Fourier transform ℑ : L2(R) → L2(R) of a complex-valued even or odd function ψ, it is found that the amplitude invariance |ℑψ| = |ψ| leads to a phase invariance or inversion as arg(ℑψ) = ±argψ + θ (θ = constant). The converse holds unless arg ψ = constant. The condition |ψ| = |ℑψ| is required in dealing with, for example, the minimum uncertainty relation between position and momentum. Without the evenness or oddness of ψ, |ℑψ| = |ψ| does not necessarily imply arg(ℑψ) = ±argψ + θ, nor is the converse.

  11. Time-of-flight Fourier UCN spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulin, G. V.; Frank, A. I.; Goryunov, S. V.; Kustov, D. V.; Geltenbort, P.; Jentschel, M.; Lauss, B.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a new time-of-flight Fourier spectrometer for investigation of UCN diffraction by a moving grating. The device operates in the regime of a discrete set of modulation frequencies. The results of the first experiments show that the spectrometer may be used for obtaining UCN energy spectra in the energy range of 60 - 200 neV with a resolution of about 5 neV. The accuracy of determination of the line position was estimated to be several units of 10-10 eV.

  12. Analysis method for Fourier transform spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    A fast Fourier transform technique is given for the simulation of those distortion effects in the instrument line shape of the interferometric spectrum that are due to errors in the measured interferogram. The technique is applied to analyses of atmospheric absorption spectra and laboratory spectra. It is shown that the nonlinear least squares method can retrieve the correct information from the distorted spectrum. Analyses of HF absorption spectra obtained in a laboratory and solar CO absorption spectra gathered by a balloon-borne interferometer indicate that the retrieved amount of absorbing gas is less than the correct value in most cases, if the interferogram distortion effects are not included in the analysis.

  13. Optical Planar Discrete Fourier and Wavelet Transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cincotti, Gabriella; Moreolo, Michela Svaluto; Neri, Alessandro

    2007-10-01

    We present all-optical architectures to perform discrete wavelet transform (DWT), wavelet packet (WP) decomposition and discrete Fourier transform (DFT) using planar lightwave circuits (PLC) technology. Any compact-support wavelet filter can be implemented as an optical planar two-port lattice-form device, and different subband filtering schemes are possible to denoise, or multiplex optical signals. We consider both parallel and serial input cases. We design a multiport decoder/decoder that is able to generate/process optical codes simultaneously and a flexible logarithmic wavelength multiplexer, with flat top profile and reduced crosstalk.

  14. Biochemical properties of Bacillus intermedius subtilisin-like proteinase secreted by a Bacillus subtilis recombinant strain in its stationary phase of growth.

    PubMed

    Mikhailova, E O; Mardanova, A M; Balaban, N P; Rudenskaya, G N; Ilyinskaya, O N; Sharipova, M R

    2009-03-01

    Biochemical properties of Bacillus intermedius subtilisin-like proteinase (AprBi) secreted by a B. subtilis recombinant strain in the early and late stationary phases of growth have been determined. Protein structure was analyzed and its stability estimated. It was noted that the enzyme corresponding to different phases of bacterial growth retains activity in the presence of reducing and oxidizing agents (C2H5OH and H2O2). Different effects of bivalent metal ions on activity of two proteinase fractions were found. Calcium ions more efficiently activate proteinase secreted in the late stationary phase. Unlike the first enzyme fraction, the second forms catalytically active dimers.

  15. Caffeine alters glutamate-aspartate transporter function and expression in rat retina.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Adriana Pinto; Ferreira, Danielle Dias Pinto; Fernandes, Arlete; Martins, Robertta Silva; Borges-Martins, Vladimir Pedro Peralva; Sathler, Matheus Figueiredo; Dos-Santos-Pereira, Maurício; Paes-de-Carvalho, Roberto; Giestal-de-Araujo, Elizabeth; de Melo Reis, Ricardo Augusto; Kubrusly, Regina Celia Cussa

    2016-11-19

    l-Glutamate and l-aspartate are the main excitatory amino acids (EAAs) in the Central Nervous System (CNS) and their uptake regulation is critical for the maintenance of the excitatory balance. Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) are widely distributed among central neurons and glial cells. GLAST and GLT1 are expressed in glial cells, whereas excitatory amino acid transporter 3/excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAT3/EAAC1) is neuronal. Different signaling pathways regulate glutamate uptake by modifying the activity and expression of EAATs. In the present work we show that immature postnatal day 3 (PN3) rat retinas challenged by l-glutamate release [(3)H]-d-Aspartate linked to the reverse transport, with participation of NMDA, but not of non-NMDA receptors. The amount of [(3)H]-d-Aspartate released by l-glutamate is reduced during retinal development. Moreover, immature retinae at PN3 and PN7, but not PN14, exposed to a single dose of 200 or 500μM caffeine or the selective A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonist 100nM ZM241385 decreased [(3)H]-d-Aspartate uptake. Caffeine also selectively increased total expression of EAAT3 at PN7 and its expression in membrane fractions. However, both EAAT1 and EAAT2 were reduced after caffeine treatment in P2 fraction. Addition of 100nM DPCPX, an A1 receptor (A1R) antagonist, had no effect on the [(3)H]-d-Aspartate uptake. [(3)H]-d-Aspartate release was dependent on both extracellular sodium and Dl-TBOA, but not calcium, implying a transporter-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that in the developing rat retina caffeine modulates [(3)H]-d-Aspartate uptake by blocking adenosine A2AR.

  16. Itraconazole-resistant Candida auris with phospholipase, proteinase and hemolysin activity from a case of vulvovaginitis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dharmendra; Banerjee, Tuhina; Pratap, Chandra Bhan; Tilak, Ragini

    2015-04-15

    Since the emergence of pathogenic non-albicans Candida species, a number of new isolates have been added to the list. One such unusual species is Candida auris (C. auris), recently isolated and studied in few reports. In this study, a case of vulvovaginitis caused by Candida auris incidentally identified by molecular methods using internal transcribed spacer polymerase chain reaction (ITS PCR) is described. Antifungal susceptibility testing revealed the isolate to be resistant to itraconazole (MIC ≥ 2 µg/ml) and expressed important virulence factors including phospholipase, proteinase and hemolysin activity. The patient was successfully treated with oral fluconazole and did not have any invasive fungemia. Very few cases of this emerging pathogen have been reported. However, its isolation from clinical specimens reveals the significance of non-albicans candida species over C. albicans and the diversity of Candida spp causing infections.

  17. Inhibitors of acrosin and granulocyte proteinases from human genital tract secretions.

    PubMed

    Schiessler, H; Arnhold, M; Ohlsson, K; Fritz, H

    1976-09-01

    Human seminal plasma contains two acid-stable proteinase inhibitors, HUSI-II (Mr approximately 6500) and HUSI-I, (Mr approximately 11 000) with different inhibition specificities. The inhibitory activity of HUSI-II is strongly limited to trypsin and acrosin; both enzyme-inhibitor complexes are very stable (e.g. bovine trypsin-HUSI-II complex: Ki = 1 x 10(-10)M; human acrosin-HUSI-II complex: Ki = 2.7 x 10(-10)M). The inhibitor from human seminal plasma HUSI-II may therefore be seen as the natural antagonist of the sperm protease acrosin. In addition to pancreatic trypsin and alpha-chymotrypsin, HUSI-I forms strong complexes with neutral proteases of the lysosome-like granules from human granulocytes, for example, the elastase (Ki = 2.5 x 10(-9)M) and cathepsin G, the chymotrypsin like protease (Ki = 7 x 10(-8)M).

  18. Cystein proteinase inhibitor stefin A as an indicator of efficiency of tumor treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Korolenko, T A; Poteryaeva, O N; Falameeva, O V; Levina, O A

    2003-07-01

    The concentration of stefin A (cystatin A in mice) was measured in animals with experimental tumors (LS lymphosarcoma, HA-1-hepatoma, and Lewis lung carcinoma) during effective antitumor therapy. In mice with these tumors serum concentrations of stefin A increased, while the concentration of cystatin C (extracellular cystein proteinase inhibitor) decreased. The concentration of stefin A in tumor tissue in Lewis lung carcinoma was higher than in LS lymphosarcoma and HA-1-hepatoma ascitic cells, which can be explained by the degree of their malignancy. The content of stefin A in tumor tissue was similar to that in the liver and spleen of tumor-bearing animals, while its concentration in the liver and spleen of tumor-bearing animals was lower than in intact mice. The level of stefin A is an important marker of malignancy and an indicator of the efficiency of antitumor therapy.

  19. The insect immune protein scolexin is a novel serine proteinase homolog.

    PubMed Central

    Finnerty, C. M.; Karplus, P. A.; Granados, R. R.

    1999-01-01

    Scolexin is a coagulation-provoking plasma protein induced in response to bacterial or viral infection of larval Manduca sexta, a large lepidopterous insect. Here we report the isolation and sequencing of two cDNA clones that code for scolexin isoforms sharing 80% sequence identity. The scolexin sequences have low but recognizable sequence similarity to members of the chymotrypsin family and represent a new subfamily of chymotrypsin-like serine proteinases. Comparison with known structures reveals the conservation of key catalytic residues and a possible specificity for small nonpolar residues. Most remarkable is the absence of a canonical activation peptide cleavage site. This suggests that the regulation of scolexin activity will involve a novel activation mechanism. PMID:10210202

  20. Targeting a Proteinase-Activated Receptor 4 (PAR4) Carboxyl Terminal Motif to Regulate Platelet Function.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Rithwik; Mihara, Koichiro; Thibeault, Pierre; Vanderboor, Christina M; Petri, Björn; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Bouvier, Michel; Hollenberg, Morley D

    2017-04-01

    Thrombin initiates human platelet aggregation by coordinately activating proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) 1 and 4. However, targeting PAR1 with an orthosteric-tethered ligand binding-site antagonist results in bleeding, possibly owing to the important role of PAR1 activation on cells other than platelets. Because of its more restricted tissue expression profile, we have therefore turned to PAR4 as an antiplatelet target. We have identified an intracellular PAR4 C-terminal motif that regulates calcium signaling and β-arrestin interactions. By disrupting this PAR4 calcium/β-arrestin signaling process with a novel cell-penetrating peptide, we were able to inhibit both thrombin-triggered platelet aggregation in vitro and clot consolidation in vivo. We suggest that targeting PAR4 represents an attractive alternative to blocking PAR1 for antiplatelet therapy in humans.

  1. Proteinase 3-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive ulcerative colitis presenting with abducens neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kirito, Yuki; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    A 72-year-old man with ulcerative colitis (UC) presented with complete left abducens nerve palsy. Although MRI showed no significant changes, cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed pleocytosis and elevated protein and interleukin (IL)-6 levels. His serum proteinase 3-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (PR3-ANCA) level was also elevated to 31.1 U/mL, but granulomatosis with polyangiitis was not observed. On the basis of the diagnosis of autoimmune cranial neuropathy, he was treated with steroid therapy. While tapering steroid therapy, his serum PR3-ANCA levels; cerebrospinal fluid findings, including IL-6 levels; and symptoms improved. Serum PR3-ANCA could be a useful parameter of neurological disorders associated with ANCA-positive UC. PMID:28069788

  2. [Effect of proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors from potato tubers on the growth and development of phytopathogenic microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Revina, T A; Gerasimova, N G; Kladnitskaia, G V; Chalenko, G I; Valueva, T A

    2008-01-01

    We studied the effect of two proteins, PSPI-21 and PKSI, on the growth and development of phytopathogenic microorganisms (Phytophthora infestans oomycete and Fusarium culmorum fungus). Both proteins were isolated from potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L., cv. Istrinskii) and served as inhibitors of serine proteinases. These proteins differed in the ability to inhibit growth of Phytophthora infestans oomycete and Fusarium culmorum fungus. PSPI-21 was the most potent in modulating the growth of oomycete mycelium. PKSI primarily affected the growth of the fungal mycelium. The proteins under study induced complete destruction of oomycete zoospores and partial destruction of fungal macroconidia. Our results suggest that these proteins are involved in the protection of potato plants from phytopathogenic microorganisms.

  3. Role of calcium-dependent proteinase in molt-induced claw muscle atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.; Skinner, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    The claw closer muscle of the Bermuda land crab Gecarcinus lateralis undergoes a sequential atrophy and restoration during each intermolt cycle. Muscle protein decreases 40% during proecdysis and is restored following ecdysis. Amino acid incorporation into protein of postecdysial muscle is five times greater than that in anecdysial muscle. Since the rates of protein synthesis in anecdysial and proecdysial muscle are the same it appears that proecdysial muscle atrophy is caused primarily by an increase in protein degradation. A calcium-dependent proteinase (CDP) active at neutral pH has been implicated in the nonlysosomal hydrolysis of myofibrillar proteins. We have examined the role of a CDP in atrophy of the claw closer muscle. The many similarities between crustacean and vertebrate CDPs have established this crustacean system as a simple and convenient model for the role of Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent proteolysis in myofibrillar protein turnover and its manifestation in the structure of the sarcomere. 16 references, 8 figures. (ACR)

  4. Atomic resolution structure of serine protease proteinase K at ambient temperature

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Mamoru; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Song, Changyong; Nakane, Takanori; Nango, Eriko; Tanaka, Rie; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Mikami, Bunzo; Nureki, Osamu; Numata, Keiji; Iwata, So; Sugahara, Michihiro

    2017-01-01

    Atomic resolution structures (beyond 1.20 Å) at ambient temperature, which is usually hampered by the radiation damage in synchrotron X-ray crystallography (SRX), will add to our understanding of the structure-function relationships of enzymes. Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) has attracted surging interest by providing a route to bypass such challenges. Yet the progress on atomic resolution analysis with SFX has been rather slow. In this report, we describe the 1.20 Å resolution structure of proteinase K using 13 keV photon energy. Hydrogen atoms, water molecules, and a number of alternative side-chain conformations have been resolved. The increase in the value of B-factor in SFX suggests that the residues and water molecules adjacent to active sites were flexible and exhibited dynamic motions at specific substrate-recognition sites. PMID:28361898

  5. Roles of platelets and proteinase-activated receptors in gastric ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Perini, Rafael; Wallace, John L; Ma, Li

    2005-10-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are expressed on the surface of many cells, but those on the platelet have been among the most thoroughly characterized. PARs act as key receptors mediating the proaggregatory and pro-secretory effects of thrombin. In addition to contributing to hemostasis, platelets are increasingly being viewed as important contributors to healing and to tumor growth. This is attributable to the many pro- and anti-angiogenic factors that are stored within platelets, which can be released at the sites of injury and new vessel growth. In this paper, we review the importance of the platelet in gastric ulcer healing, the contribution of platelet-contained angiogenic factors to the healing of gastric ulcers, and the role of PARs in regulating the release of angiogenic factors from platelets. Taken together, our results suggest that PARs, including those expressed on platelets, are a rational therapeutic target for modulating healing processes and tumor growth.

  6. High cell density cultivation of Brevibacterium linens and formation of proteinases and lipase.

    PubMed

    Adamitsch, Bernhard F; Karner, Ferdinand; Hampel, Werner A

    2003-05-01

    Brevibacterium linens forms hydrolytic enzymes which can be used to accelerate the ripening of cheese without causing bitterness. B. linens ATCC 9172 was grown to a high cell density (50 g dry wt l-1 after 60 h) in a mineral medium containing lactic acid, soy-peptone and ammonium sulphate by applying a continuous feed of nutrients. The maximal activities of L-leucine aminopeptidase and cell-associated proteinase were 286 U l-1 and 202 U l-1, respectively. The cell-associated lipolytic activity exhibited a strong and sudden increase at 46 h, resulting in a maximum of 9.5 U g-1 dry wt; thus the volumetric productivity of proteolytic and lipolytic activity was 4220 U l-1 h-1 and 7.3 U l-1 h-1, respectively.

  7. The anthelmintic efficacy of natural plant cysteine proteinases against the equine tapeworm, Anoplocephala perfoliata in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mansur, F; Luoga, W; Buttle, D J; Duce, I R; Lowe, A E; Behnke, J M

    2016-09-01

    Papaya latex has been demonstrated to be an efficacious anthelmintic against murine, porcine, ovine and canine nematode parasites, and even those infecting poultry, and it has some efficacy against rodent cestodes. The active ingredients of papaya latex are known to be cysteine proteinases (CPs). The experiments described in this paper indicate that CPs in papaya latex, and also those in pineapples, are highly efficacious against the equine cestode Anoplocephala perfoliata in vitro, by causing a significant reduction in motility leading to death of the worms. The susceptibility of A. perfoliata to damage by CPs was considerably greater than that of the rodent cestodes Hymenolepis diminuta and H. microstoma. Our results are the first to report anthelmintic efficacy of CPs against an economically important equine helminth. Moreover, they provide further evidence that the spectrum of activity of CPs is not restricted to nematodes and support the idea that these plant-derived enzymes can be developed into useful broad-spectrum anthelmintics.

  8. Atomic resolution structure of serine protease proteinase K at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Mamoru; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Song, Changyong; Nakane, Takanori; Nango, Eriko; Tanaka, Rie; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Mikami, Bunzo; Nureki, Osamu; Numata, Keiji; Iwata, So; Sugahara, Michihiro

    2017-03-31

    Atomic resolution structures (beyond 1.20 Å) at ambient temperature, which is usually hampered by the radiation damage in synchrotron X-ray crystallography (SRX), will add to our understanding of the structure-function relationships of enzymes. Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) has attracted surging interest by providing a route to bypass such challenges. Yet the progress on atomic resolution analysis with SFX has been rather slow. In this report, we describe the 1.20 Å resolution structure of proteinase K using 13 keV photon energy. Hydrogen atoms, water molecules, and a number of alternative side-chain conformations have been resolved. The increase in the value of B-factor in SFX suggests that the residues and water molecules adjacent to active sites were flexible and exhibited dynamic motions at specific substrate-recognition sites.

  9. Molecular orbital studies of enzyme activity: catalytic mechanism of serine proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Scheiner, S; Lipscomb, W N

    1976-01-01

    The catalytic activity of the serine proteinases is studied using molecular orbital methods on a model of the enzyme-substrate complex. A mechanism is employed in which Ser-195, upon donating a proton to the His-57-Asp-102 dyad, attacks the substrate to form the tetrahedral intermediate. As His-57 then donates a proton to the leaving group, the intermediate decomposes to the acyl enzyme. An analogous process takes place during deacylation, as a water molecule takes the place of Ser-195 as the nucleophile. The motility of the histidine is found to be an important factor in both steps. An attempt is made to include the effects of those atoms not explicitly included in the calculations and to compare the reaction rate of the proposed mechanism with that of the uncatalyzed hydrolysis. This mechanism is found to be in good agreement with structural and kinetic data. PMID:1061145

  10. Protein degradation in Euglena gracilis: Purification and characterization of the major proteinase

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Y.J.

    1988-01-01

    Protolysis in a crude extract of Euglena gracilis was characterized by autolysis and the hydrolysis of {sup 125}I-labeled bovine serum albumin ({sup 125}I-BSA). Both procedures showed similar properties: stimulation by dithiothreitol, inhibition by leupeptin, and the same pH optima. Hydrolysis of {sup 125}I-BSA increased with growth stage and with the depletion of nutrient in the medium. The major proteolytic enzyme was purified to near homogeneity from extracts of dark-grown, stationary-phase Euglena gracilis by acid treatment, and by chromatography on CM-cellulose, DEAE-cellulose, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxyapatite using {sup 125}I-BSA as substrate. The molecular weight of the proteinase was 30,000 when determined by gel filtration on Sephadex G-75 and 15,000 when estimated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The enzyme therefore appears to be composed of two subunits.

  11. Cleavage of Grb2-Associated Binding Protein 2 by Viral Proteinase 2A during Coxsackievirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Haoyu; Fung, Gabriel; Qiu, Ye; Wang, Chen; Zhang, Jingchun; Jin, Zheng-Gen; Luo, Honglin

    2017-01-01

    Coxsackievirus type B3 (CV-B3), an enterovirus associated with the pathogenesis of several human diseases, subverts, or employs the host intracellular signaling pathways to support effective viral infection. We have previously demonstrated that Grb2-associated binding protein 1 (GAB1), a signaling adaptor protein that serves as a platform for intracellular signaling assembly and transduction, is cleaved upon CV-B3 infection, resulting in a gain-of-pro-viral-function via the modification of GAB1-mediated ERK1/2 pathway. GAB2 is a mammalian homolog of GAB1. In this study, we aim to address whether GAB2 plays a synergistic role with GAB1 in the regulation of CV-B3 replication. Here, we reported that GAB2 is also a target of CV-B3-encoded viral proteinase. We showed that GAB2 is cleaved at G238 during CV-B3 infection by viral proteinase 2A, generating two cleaved fragments of GAB2-N1−237 and GAB2-C238−676. Moreover, knockdown of GAB2 significantly inhibits the synthesis of viral protein and subsequent viral progeny production, accompanied by reduced levels of phosphorylated p38, suggesting a pro-viral function for GAB2 linked to p38 activation. Finally, we examined whether the cleavage of GAB2 can promote viral replication as observed for GAB1 cleavage. We showed that expression of neither GAB2-N1−237 nor GAB2-C238−676 results in enhanced viral infectivity, indicating a loss-of-function, rather than a gain-of-function of GAB2 cleavage in mediating virus replication. Taken together, our findings in this study suggest a novel host defense machinery through which CV-B3 infection is limited by the cleavage of a pro-viral protein. PMID:28361043

  12. A feedback regulatory pathway between LDL and alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor in chronic inflammation and infection.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Cynthia L; Modarresi, Rozbeh; Babayeva, Mariya A; LaBrunda, Michelle; Mukhtarzad, Roya; Trucy, Maylis; Franklin, Aaron; Reeves, Rudy E R; Long, Allegra; Mullen, Michael P; Cortes, Jose; Winston, Ronald

    2013-11-01

    Dietary lipids are transported via lymph to the liver and transformed to lipoproteins which bind to members of the low density lipoprotein receptor family (LDL-RFMs). Certain LDL-RFMs, e.g., very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), are also bound by inactivated proteinase inhibitors, the most abundant being α1proteinase inhibitor (α1PI, α1antitrypsin). Inflammation/infection, including HIV-1 infection, is accompanied by low levels of CD4+ T cells and active α1PI and high levels of inactivated α1PI. By inducing LDL-RFMs-mediated cellular locomotion, active α1PI regulates the number of CD4+ T cells. We sought to investigate whether CD4+ T cells and α1PI directly impact lipoprotein levels. At the cellular level, we show that active α1PI is required for VLDLR-mediated uptake of receptor-associated cargo, specifically CD4-bound HIV-1. We show that active α1PI levels linearly correlate with LDL levels in HIV-1 infected individuals (P<0.001) and that therapeutic, weekly infusions of active α1PI elevate the number of CD4+ T cells and HDL levels while lowering LDL levels in patients on antiretroviral therapy with controlled HIV-1. Based on the unusual combination of lipodystrophy and low levels of α1PI and CD4+ T cells in HIV-1 disease, we reveal that LDL and α1PI participate in a feedback regulatory pathway. We demonstrate integral roles for sequentially acting active and inactive α1PI in the uptake and recycling of receptors and cargo aggregated with VLDLR including CD4 and chemokine receptors. Evidence supports a role for α1PI as a primary sentinel to deploy the immune system as a consequence of its role in lipoprotein transport.

  13. Unmasking of complements using proteinase-K in formalin fixed paraffin embedded renal biopsies.

    PubMed

    Nada, R; Kumar, A; Kumar, V G; Gupta, K L; Joshi, K

    2016-01-01

    Renal biopsy interpretation requires histopathology, direct immunofluorescence (DIF) and electron microscopy. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPE) sent for light microscopy can be used for DIF after antigen retrieval. However, complement staining has not been satisfactory. We standardized DIF using proteinase-K for antigen retrieval in FFPE renal biopsies. A pilot study was conducted on known cases of membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN), membranoproliferative type-1 (MPGN-1), immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN), and anti-glomerular basement disease (anti-GBM). Immunofluorescence panel included fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) conjugated IgG, IgA, IgM, complements (C3 and C1q), light chains (kappa, lambda) and fibrinogen antibodies. After standardization of the technique, 75 renal biopsies and 43 autopsies cases were stained. Out of 43 autopsy cases, immune-complex mediated glomerulonephritis (GN) was confirmed in 18 cases (Lupus nephritis-11, IgAN-6, MGN-1), complement-mediated dense deposit disease (DDD-1) and monoclonal diseases in 4 cases (amyloidosis-3, cast nephropathy-1). Immune-mediated injury was excluded in 17 cases (focal segmental glomerulosclerosis -3, crescentic GN-6 [pauci-immune-3, anti-GBM-3], thrombotic microangiopathy-5, atherosclerosis-3). Renal biopsies (n-75) where inadequate or no frozen sample was available; this technique classified 52 mesangiocapillary pattern as MPGN type-1-46, DDD-2 and (C3GN-4). Others were diagnosed as IgAN-3, lupus nephritis-2, MGN-4, diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (DPGN)-1, Non-IC crescentic GN-1, monoclonal diseases-3. In nine cases, DIF on FFPE tissue could not help in making diagnosis. Proteinase-K enzymatic digestion of FFPE renal biopsies can unmask complements (both C3 and C1q) in immune-complexes mediated and complement-mediated diseases. This method showed good results on autopsy tissues archived for as long as 15 years.

  14. Application of Asian pumpkin (Cucurbita ficifolia) serine proteinase for production of biologically active peptides from casein.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowska, Anna; Szołtysik, Marek; Babij, Konrad; Pokora, Marta; Zambrowicz, Aleksandra; Chrzanowska, Józefa

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine potential application of a serine proteinase derived from Asian pumpkin for obtaining biologically active peptides from casein. The course of casein hydrolysis by three doses of the enzyme (50, 150, 300 U/mg of protein) was monitored for 24 hours by the determinations of: hydrolysis degree DH (%), free amino group content (μmole Gly/g), RP HPLC peptide profiles and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In all hydrolyzates analyzed antioxidant activities were determined using three tests: the ability to reduce iron ions in FRAP test, the ability to scavenge free radicals in DPPH test, and Fe(2+) chelating activity. The antimicrobial activity of obtained peptide fractions was determined as the ability to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas fluorescens in a diffusion plate test. The deepest degradation, expressed as the DH [%] and the free amino group content (67% and 7528 µmole Gly/mg, respectively), was noted in samples hydrolyzed with 300 U/ml of enzyme for 24 hours, while in other samples the determined values were about three and two times lower. The results were in agreement with the peptide profiles obtained by RP HPLC. The highest antioxidative activities determined in all tests were seen for the casein hydrolysate obtained with 300 U/mg protein of serine proteinase after 24 h of reaction (2.15 µM Trolox/mg, 96.15 µg Fe(3+)/mg, 814.97 µg Fe(2+)/mg). Antimicrobial activity was presented in three preparations. In other samples no antimicrobial activity was detected.

  15. Affinity purification and biochemical characterization of histolysin, the major cysteine proteinase of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Luaces, A L; Barrett, A J

    1988-01-01

    We report a one-step method for the purification to homogeneity of a cysteine proteinase of Entamoeba histolytica (histolysin) by affinity chromatography of the soluble extract of the parasite on immobilized phenylalanyl(2-phenyl)aminoacetaldehyde semicarbazone. The enzyme has an apparent Mr of 26,000 by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and 29,000 by gel chromatography. Its pH optimum varies widely, from 5.5 with azocasein to approx. 7 with other protein substrates and benzyloxycarbonylphenylalanyl-L-citrullylaminomethylcourmarin++ + (Z-Phe-Cit-NHMec), and to 9.5 with benzyloxycarbonylphenylalanylarginylaminomethylcoumarin (Z-Phe-Arg-NHMec) and benzyloxycarbonylarginylarginylaminomethylcourmarin (Z-Arg-Arg-NHMec). Values of Km, kcat. and kcat/Km are 1.5 microM, 130 s-1 and 87 X 10(6) M-1.s-1 for Z-Arg-Arg-NHMec, and 32 microM, 0.4 s-1 and 0.012 x 10(6) M-1.s-1 for Z-Phe-Arg-NHMec, respectively, at pH 7.5 and 37 degrees C. The enzyme is inhibited by leupeptin and such inhibitors of cysteine proteinases as L-transepoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-4-(guanidino)butane, peptidyldiazomethanes, iodoacetic acid and chicken cystatin. The tentative N-terminal amino acid sequence of the enzyme closely resembles that of papain. Histolysin does not degrade type I collagen or elastin, but it is active against cartilage proteoglycan and kidney glomerular basement-membrane collagen. It also detaches cells from their substratum in vitro, and could well play a role in tissue invasion. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:2898937

  16. On localization for double Fourier series.

    PubMed

    Goffman, C; Waterman, D

    1978-02-01

    The localization theorems for Fourier series of functions of a single variable are classical and easy to prove. The situation is different for Fourier series of functions of several variables, even if one restricts consideration to rectangular, in particular square, partial sums. We show that the answer to the problem can be obtained by considering the notion of generalized bounded variation, which we introduced. Given a nondecreasing sequence {lambda(n)} of positive numbers such that Sigma 1/lambda(n) diverges, a function g defined on an interval I of R(1) is said to be of Lambda-bounded variation (LambdaBV) if Sigma|g(a(n)) - g(b(n))|/lambda(n) converges for every sequence of nonoverlapping intervals (a(n), b(n)) [unk]I. If lambda(n) = n, we say that g is of harmonic bounded variation (HBV). The definition suitably modified can be extended to functions of several variables. We show that in the case of two variables the localization principle holds for rectangular partial sums if LambdaBV = HBV, and that if LambdaBV is not contained in HBV, then the localization principle does not hold for LambdaBV even in the case of square partial sums.

  17. Fourier transform methods in local gravity modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, J. C.; Dickinson, M.

    1989-01-01

    New algorithms were derived for computing terrain corrections, all components of the attraction of the topography at the topographic surface and the gradients of these attractions. These algoriithms utilize fast Fourier transforms, but, in contrast to methods currently in use, all divergences of the integrals are removed during the analysis. Sequential methods employing a smooth intermediate reference surface were developed to avoid the very large transforms necessary when making computations at high resolution over a wide area. A new method for the numerical solution of Molodensky's problem was developed to mitigate the convergence difficulties that occur at short wavelengths with methods based on a Taylor series expansion. A trial field on a level surface is continued analytically to the topographic surface, and compared with that predicted from gravity observations. The difference is used to compute a correction to the trial field and the process iterated. Special techniques are employed to speed convergence and prevent oscillations. Three different spectral methods for fitting a point-mass set to a gravity field given on a regular grid at constant elevation are described. Two of the methods differ in the way that the spectrum of the point-mass set, which extends to infinite wave number, is matched to that of the gravity field which is band-limited. The third method is essentially a space-domain technique in which Fourier methods are used to solve a set of simultaneous equations.

  18. Computing spatial information from Fourier coefficient distributions.

    PubMed

    Heinz, William F; Werbin, Jeffrey L; Lattman, Eaton; Hoh, Jan H

    2011-05-01

    The spatial relationships between molecules can be quantified in terms of information. In the case of membranes, the spatial organization of molecules in a bilayer is closely related to biophysically and biologically important properties. Here, we present an approach to computing spatial information based on Fourier coefficient distributions. The Fourier transform (FT) of an image contains a complete description of the image, and the values of the FT coefficients are uniquely associated with that image. For an image where the distribution of pixels is uncorrelated, the FT coefficients are normally distributed and uncorrelated. Further, the probability distribution for the FT coefficients of such an image can readily be obtained by Parseval's theorem. We take advantage of these properties to compute the spatial information in an image by determining the probability of each coefficient (both real and imaginary parts) in the FT, then using the Shannon formalism to calculate information. By using the probability distribution obtained from Parseval's theorem, an effective distance from the uncorrelated or most uncertain case is obtained. The resulting quantity is an information computed in k-space (kSI). This approach provides a robust, facile and highly flexible framework for quantifying spatial information in images and other types of data (of arbitrary dimensions). The kSI metric is tested on a 2D Ising model, frequently used as a model for lipid bilayer; and the temperature-dependent phase transition is accurately determined from the spatial information in configurations of the system.

  19. Fourier-Space Crystallography as Group Cohomology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabson, David; Fisher, Benji

    2001-03-01

    David Mermin has argued persuasively that the theoretical significance of quasicrystals lies not so much in relaxing the requirement of periodicity as in replacing exact identity of a density function (e.g., electronic or mass) under symmetry operations with indistinguishability of correlation functions, as expressed in Fourier space.(N.D. Mermin, Phys. Stat. Sol. (a) 151), 275 (1995) and references. After reviewing the formalism of Fourier-space crystallography (phase functions and gauge transformations), we present a new formulation in the language of cohomology of groups. First we reexpress the classification of space groups in terms of a first cohomology group; we then show how recent work by König and Mermin(A. König and N.D. Mermin, Am. J. Phys. 68), 525 (2000). on band sticking in nonsymmorphic crystals derives naturally from a first homology group and discuss its connection to a second cohomology group. The new language lets us prove generally several theorems previously known only in special cases. Finally, we let the listener decide whether we're just ``speaking prose.''(N.D. Mermin, Rev. Mod. Phys. 64), 3 (1992).

  20. The PROSAIC Laplace and Fourier Transform

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.A.

    1994-11-01

    Integral Transform methods play an extremely important role in many branches of science and engineering. The ease with which many problems may be solved using these techniques is well known. In Electrical Engineering especially, Laplace and Fourier Transforms have been used for a long time as a way to change the solution of differential equations into trivial algebraic manipulations or to provide alternate representations of signals and data. These techniques, while seemingly overshadowed by today`s emphasis on digital analysis, still form an invaluable basis in the understanding of systems and circuits. A firm grasp of the practical aspects of these subjects provides valuable conceptual tools. This tutorial paper is a review of Laplace and Fourier Transforms from an applied perspective with an emphasis on engineering applications. The interrelationship of the time and frequency domains will be stressed, in an attempt to comfort those who, after living so much of their lives in the time domain, find thinking in the frequency domain disquieting.